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W H AT ’ S I N S I D E

Cherokee Life January/February 2014  Volume 9, Issue 1

features

E D I T O R I A L S TA F F

12 LONGTIME LOVE Up close with one of Cherokee’s longest married couples

DIRECTOR OF MAGAZINES

Mark Wallace Maguire LAYOUT AND DESIGN

Stacey L. Evans, Mark Wallace Maguire

17 BEST OF CHEROKEE From burgers to best spas, meet this year’s Best Of winners

CONTRIBUTORS

12

32 RAMBLIN TO ROSEMARY Florida gem offers a great getaway in winter

Carla Barnes, Jennifer Carter, Chris Collett, Rebecca Johnston, Joan Durbin, Stacey L. Evans, Therra C. Gwyn, Meredith Pruden PHOTOGRAPHER

in every issue

Sam Bennett PHOTOGRAPHY

FROM THE DIRECTOR 05

HIGHLIGHTS

36

Jennifer Carter

FEEDBACK

SCENE

38

PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT

REFLECTIONS

42

06

NEWS & NOTEWORTHY 06 REFLECTIONS

Marti Sacks PROOFREADER

Whitney Betts

16

A D V E R T I S I N G S TA F F

ON THE COVER

ADVERTISING MANAGER

One of the sumptuous offerings from Canyon’s, voted best burger in Cherokee

Kim Fowler ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

17

Tara Guest, Candace Hallford Paula Milton, Becky Opitz, Liz Ridley GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS Afterglow Spa Aqua Guard Basements Atlanta Lyric Theatre Autumn Joy Salon Bedoe's Bar & Grille Canton Main Street Program Canton Tire and Wheel Cherokee Arts Center Cherokee Bank Cherokee Charter Academy Cherokee County Farm Bureau Comprehensive Neurology of North Georgia, PC Darby Funeral Home Decorating Den Interiors Edward Jones 19 Falany Performing Arts Center at Reinhardt University Fowler Electric Free Home Traditions Fresh n Fit Frosty Frog Creamery & Café Guardian Angels Home Care Heritage of Brookstone Hot Stuff Jyl Craven Hair Design Main Street Canton Mid City Pharmacy

20 39 40 31 28 28 11 37 30 36 8 6 38 21

34 37 10 25 24 6 14 30 11 31 31

North Atlanta Fencing Center 15 North Cobb Spine & Nerve 9 Northside Cherokee Orthopedics & Sports Medicine 35 Northside Hospital Cherokee 43 Northside Hospital Sleep Disorders Center 7 Path & Post 18 Pinnacle Orthopaedics 3 Plastic Surgery Center of The South 16 Practically Perfect Day Spa & Salon 31 Salon • Spa Venéssa 15 Sosebee Funeral Home 44 Studio 121 31 Superior Plumbing 41 The Funk Hereitage Center of Reinhardt University 5 The Repair Barn 20 Three Sisters Gifts & Home Accents 24 Victoria Lee Photography 31 Wellstar 2 Woodstock Funeral Home 10 Woodstock Market 8 Yawn's Publishing 31

Beth Poirier, Jennifer Hall PRODUCTION CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Leigh Hall CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

Dave Gossett EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER

Otis Brumby III GENERAL MANAGER

Lee B. Garrett V.P. ADVERTISING Wade Stephens ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Jay Whorton I N F O R M AT I O N

Cherokee Life magazine is published six times a year by the Cherokee Tribune and distributed to more than 20,000 homes. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES

To request a copy or to subscribe to Cherokee Life, contact 770.795.5001 ADVERTISING

To advertise, contact Kim Fowler at 770.795.3068 SUBMISSIONS

Please send all editorial correspondence to mmaguire@cherokeelifemagazine.com Follow us on facebook


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F R O M T H E D I R E C TO R

BEST OF CHEROKEE STAFF PICKS Each year we present our

Best Of Cherokee voted on by you – our readers.

And, in what is becoming an annual tradition, we present some of our staff’s favorite Best Of picks. Longtime Cherokee Life columnist Carla Barnes faves include the Red Velvet Royale frozen yogurt at the new Menchie's in Canton, best hometown rock band The Thrillhammers and Learning Express in Towne Lake as best toy store. She also touted Dr. Robert A. Mills at Pathway Internal Medicine as best primary care physician and best customer service at the Lancome counter at the Belk in Canton. Staff writer and designer Stacey L. Evans said the best sushi is at Izumi in Woodstock. “I appreciate that they have inventive and yummy rolls for vegetarians, not just your standard avocado or cucumber roll. All their vegetarian rolls are outstanding— I have a difficult time choosing which ones I want.” She noted Blankets Creek as the best place to bike. For best group of volunteers and people making a difference she said Iron Hearts, a nonprofit therapeutic horsemanship program dedicated to empowering children and adults with special needs through equine-assisted activities, located in Canton. “It’s an awesome group of people who really make an impact.” Our food writer Joan Durbin said her favorite old timey Cherokee landmark is The Cherokee Market at Cumming Highway and Union Hill Road. “It would look right at home in any movie about the days of yesteryear. In addition to its funky appearance, depending on the time of year, the market sells everything from fresh produce to

Christmas trees and yard art. I’m told a developer has the market and the surrounding land in his sights, but losing this irreplaceable little gem would be a shame,” she said. She said the best sandwich few people know about is The Doner (pronounced dough-ner). The doner is made up of seasoned beef, lettuce, tomato, onions and a special yogurt sauce on thick pita bread. Although on first glance it looks like a Greek gyro, the seasoning in the meat and sauce is different, making the first bite a palatepleasing surprise. It will keep you coming back for more. This German specialty is proudly served at Frankfurt Doner and Meats in Ball Ground. She said her favorite New Yorkstyle pizza is Taste of Italy on Highway 92 in Woodstock. “It can’t be beat for pies that any denizen of the Big Apple would instantly recognize and appreciate. Top notch ingredients and respect for tradition puts this pizza on top in my book.” One of our photographers, Woodstock’s Jennifer Carter, said her favorite place for meeting authors is Foxtale Book Shoppe in Woodstock. “I don't know how the owners at Foxtale do it, but they are miracle workers when it comes to attracting the really big

authors to our little southern hamlet. It is not uncommon to see New York Times bestselling writers in the mix on their monthly calendar, and Foxtale ladies always have a knack for turning book signing events into a huge party for book lovers.” She said the Magnolia Thomas Restaurant in Woodstock is the best place to have a mimosa brunch. For favorite place to walk, she noted the wildflower fields at Gibbs Gardens in Ball Ground. “The Wildflower Garden at Gibbs doesn't always receive as much exposure as the extravagant Daffodil or Japanese Gardens. But it has my vote for a serene walk in a natural setting to gather one's thoughts. For an added treat, I take the ‘road less travelled by,’ at the trail's crossroads where you have the choice to go up the hill or not. I always choose the hill. From the top, there is a majestic mountain view over an ocean of wildflowers, and I usually have it completely to myself up there.” What about you? Have you got a favorite or Best Of Cherokee you want to share with us? Just email us at mmaguire@ cherokeelifemagazine.com. Best, Mark Wallace Maguire

The Funk Heritage Center of Reinhardt University Georgia’s Official Frontier and Southeastern Indian Interpretive Center • Hall of the Ancients and artifacts • Huge collection of historic hand tools • Native American art • Visit historic 1840’s log cabins 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Waleska, GA 30183 • 770.720.5970 www.reinhardt.edu/funkheritage Tues. - Fri. 9am-4pm Sat. 10am-5pm • Sun. 1pm-5pm January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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meet some of our contributors For almost 10 years Carla Barnes told Cherokee’s story for the Cherokee Tribune newspaper. Unknowingly she discovered her own story through its people and places, and built her life within its rolling landscape. When she is not writing, or thinking about writing, she is an avid reader, unapologetic anglophile and fashion devotee. She works in marketing for Kennesaw State University and is a proud honorary member of the Service League of Cherokee County. She loves to laugh and works at perfecting her “Yoda” voice which she occasionally shares with friends, particularly those under the age of eight.

Jennifer Carter is a photographer who recognizes roads on a map as “primary-colored possibilities” and odometer miles as “little victories.” She lives to travel, and her favorite thing in the world is waking up on a Saturday morning with a full tank of gas in her car and a fully-charged battery in her Canon 7D. Equally well, she loves putting down roots in her home county of Cherokee with her husband Benjamin, son Xavier, and her true blue hound dog Sadie Sue-Belle. Her photography has been published by the Marietta Daily Journal, the Cherokee Tribune, Cherokee Life Magazine, Cobb Life Magazine, Woodstock Patch and the city of Woodstock’s tourism brochure.

Rebecca Johnston is managing editor of the Cherokee Tribune and a lifelong Cherokee County resident. She has worked in the local media for 25 years in newspaper, radio and cable television. She has been honored with a number of awards for her columns and her work on radio, including Best Serious Column from the Georgia Press Association, most recently first place in 2011 and several GABBY awards from the Georgia Association of Broadcasters. Rebecca loves Cherokee County history and traces her roots in the county back to the time it was chartered in 1831. She wrote a comprehensive look at the county’s past, “Cherokee County: A History,” for the Cherokee County Historical Society. The book was published in 2011 and all proceeds benefit the Historical Society. In her spare time Rebecca loves to volunteer and is a member of the Cherokee County Historical Society and the Boys and Girls Club boards of directors, as well as a member of the Canton Downtown Development Authority. She is married to her childhood sweetheart and husband of 37 years, Harry Johnston, and they have two adult children. They live near downtown Canton.

Chris Collett is a life-long resident of Cherokee County. After spending 15 years with the Sheriff's Office, he is now the Chief Marshal and Director of 9-1-1. This includes Code Enforcement, Animal Control, 9-1-1, the Animal Shelter, and the Recycling Center. In his "spare time", he finds solitude at Canton Golf Club! Born and raised in Atlanta, Sam Bennett started photography in high school and continued at the University of South Carolina where he majored in Visual Communications. His work has previously appeared in several publications including the Marietta Daily Journal, Dawg Post, Score Atlanta and Johns Creek Herald. He also owns Cutting Edge Images that specializes in youth and high school sports photography. Sam has a passion for sports. He has served as a coach and umpire, acquired a black belt in Taekwondo and possesses a deep passion when rooting on his USC Gamecocks.

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[correction]

[feedback] Your article was an excellent snapshot of the evening

We incorrectly identified Cherokee resident Billy Hayes and his wife Brittany in the SCENE section of the November/December issue of Cherokee Life. The correct photo of the couple is above.

Dear Cherokee Life: I just received my copy of Cherokee Life in the mail today, and was excited to see the article on Les Marmitons of Atlanta beginning on page 26. I had been out of town for a few days, and several friends had called to say they saw my name mentioned in an article about Les Marmitons, but I hadn’t seen it yet. I was afraid I had missed it, but today my fears were put to rest! Your staff did an excellent job of this, truly! During the event, they were courteous, clearly interested in what we were doing, and very professional in their approach to understanding and covering what we do. The resulting article was, in my view, excellent! It captured all the essential elements of a fine evening of cooking, but more than that, it captured the essence of the club, which is enjoying cooking and good fellowship. Thank you, again, for a fine editorial project! In warm Les Marmitons friendship, Ron Seiberling Les Marmitons of Atlanta Woodstock

January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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[style] Working out style goes mainstream

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Cherokee Life January/February 2014

So long, dingy sweatpants. Workout clothes for women, once relegated to the back of the closet, are moving to the front of the fashion scene. Yoga pants are the new jeans, neon sports bras have become the "it" accessory and long athletic socks are hipper than high heels. "I've actually had more excitement buying workout gear than normal jeans and dresses," says Amanda Kleinhenz, 27, who wears workout gear both in and outside of the gym in Cleveland. "I want to look good." Blame it on the push by many Americans toward a more active lifestyle. Or call it an extension of the nation's fascination with fashion. Either way, these days jogging suits are just as likely to be seen on a runway in New York as a treadmill in Texas. In fact, sales of workout gear are growing faster than sales of everyday clothing — by a lot. Spending on workout clothes jumped 7 percent to $31.6 billion during the 12-month period that ended in August from the same period a year ago. That compares with a 1 percent rise in spending for other clothing to about $169.2 billion. But these aren't cheap cotton T-shirts and spandex jumpsuits. Top designers like Calvin Klein, Stella McCartney and Alexander Wang all rolled out fitness chic clothing lines, with everything from $50 leggings to $125 zip-front hoodies and $225 long john sweatpants. And big nationwide retailers like Gap, Forever 21, Victoria Secret and Macy's have fitness lines, too. "Active has become an important part of what customers are wearing," says Karen Hoguet, chief financial officer at Macy's, which is expanding its active wear label to 400 stores from 160. "Sometimes it's for athletic endeavors. Sometimes it's just to run errands." This is the latest evolution in fitness fashion. Sweatpants and tees were the hallmark of athletic clothing for decades. That changed with the invention of spandex in 1959, then again with the aerobics craze of the 1980s when tights, leotards, legwarmers and nylon track suits became popular. Athletic gear giants like Nike, Reebok and Adidas were popular for years as synthetic material like Gore Tex and Lyrcra gained popularity because of their performance qualities. Then, in the late 1990s, it became cool to wear workout clothes everywhere after the Lululemon athletic chain opened and gained a loyal following of fitness enthusiasts willing to shell out $100 for yoga pants. Annie Georgia Greenberg, a New York editor for style blog Refinery, 29, says she noticed the trend at the New York Fashion Week in September as more people were choosing shoes like the neon Nike Free Flyknit over designer pumps.


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Finally, You Can Sleep, Work, And Play Without Pain Again! How To Get Rid Of Neck Pain And Disc Herniations Without Surgery If you're suffering from neck pain, arm pain, or numbness in the hands, this may be the most important article you ever read about your health. This is, quite frankly, a vital message regarding your future health. It's about what is perhaps the most revolutionary treatment ever used for neck and arm pain. Even pinched nerves and disc herniation's can be successfully treated with this amazing therapy. You can recover. Joyful, pain-free living should be yours. My name is Dr. Amy Valente & I understand what it feels like to live in pain, because I see it every day. I've seen hundreds of people with neck problems and headaches leave the office pain free. When cushions in your neck joint, called discs, get injured or wear out, they begin to degenerate and cause pain. Bulging and herniation's begin to form, pressing on the nerve roots. The most common invasive treatment for disc herniation is surgery. Even with health insurance the patient is left with their own portion of the bill, in excess of $10,000-$15,000, and sometimes more. In addition, the recovery time and missed work can be anywhere from 3 to 6 months, not to mention the obvious severe risks associated with all surgeries. Before You Go Under The Knife And Opt For Spinal Surgery… You should seriously consider a less invasive approach called spinal decompression. Non-surgical spinal decompression is a new technology that has been proven to help disc herniation. It creates a vacuum effect on the disc, which pulls the disc back into its normal position and brings in a fresh blood supply to promote healing. The conditions this amazing treatment can help with are: • Serious neck pain • Shooting pains in the arms • Numbness and tingling • Migraine headaches • Bulging Cervical Discs

Just Listen to What our Patients Have To Say: When I began treatment at North Cobb Spine and Nerve I had agonizing pain in my neck and I could not feel my right arm. This had been going for so long that I thought my case was hopeless. Since I have started care movement in my arm and hand have been restored. I know longer have numbness in my arm and I can turn my head from side to side without pain. My energy has been restored and I can now play with my kids! I am so amazed after 30 years of pain I feel 100% better! Thank you, Colleen S. I sought out care at North Cobb Spine and Nerve for the pain and stiffness in my neck. The pain had been bothering me for about 4 months. I was unable to turn my head from side to side, which made driving difficult. Before seeking treatment I had tried multiple muscle relaxants and anti-inflammatory medications.Since starting my care I have improved 100%.The pain in my neck is gone and I am now able to turn my head with no pain. What surprised me most was that I have also had fewer headaches. The staff here has treated me great and always show genuine concern about my well -being. Thank you, Diana T. Until February 28, you can get everything for only $20. It's time for you to find out if spinal decompression will be your neck, arm and headache pain solution. For 2 months only, I'm running a very special offer where you can find out if you are a candidate for spinal decompression therapy.

And the best part about it is... No Dangerous Drugs, No Invasive Procedures, And No Painful Exercises. Spinal decompression treatments are very gentle. In fact, every once and a while I even catch a patient sleeping during sessions. The normal price for this type of evaluation,including x-rays,is $250 so you're saving a considerable amount by taking me up on this offer. Call today and we can get you scheduled for your consultation, exam and x-rays as soon as there's an opening. Our office is located just off the loop near Wal-Mart, just a few minutes from you. When you call, tell the receptionist you'd like to come in for the Decompression Evaluation so she can give you proper credit for this special offer. Sincerely, Dr. Amy Valente

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Hyundai prepares to mass market hydrogen car this year

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For years, the joke in the auto industry was that a mass-produced car that runs on hydrogen was always a decade away. That will change next year when Hyundai starts selling a Tucson SUV powered by a hydrogen fuel cell. It will be the first mass-market vehicle of its type to be sold or leased in the U.S. "These things are now ready for prime time," John Krafcik, Hyundai's North American CEO, said. Even as the industry focused on battery-powered and hybrid cars, automakers such as Hyundai, Honda and Toyota kept up research on fuel cells. Now they appear to have conquered obstacles such as high costs, safety concerns and a lack of filling stations. These vehicles could help the companies meet stricter future fuel-economy standards. Automakers have been dabbling in hydrogen-powered cars since the 1960s. General Motors announced a test fleet of hydrogen-powered Chevy Equinoxes in the mid-2000s, and Honda leased about two-dozen FCX Clarity models for $600 per month starting in 2005.


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President George W. Bush allocated $1.2 billion for hydrogen research and said in his 2003 State of the Union address: "The first car driven by a child born today could be powered by hydrogen and pollution free." But the program was largely scrapped by the Obama administration, which focused more on battery-powered vehicles. Hyundai now is making Bush's forecast come true, beating other auto companies to the mass market with Tucsons that have electric motors powered by a stack of hydrogen fuel cells. Hyundai plans to start selling the vehicles in Southern California and eventually spread to other areas as filling stations are built. Hyundai says it has overcome safety and storage issues with a rear-mounted tank that has passed numerous crash tests without incident. As for filling stations, the California Air Resources Board says there currently are nine open to the public in the state. Legislators recently allocated about $200 million per year for 100 more, to be built by 2023. Honda Motor Co. is scheduled to show off a fuel-cell concept vehicle, which it says hints at the aerodynamic

design of the next generation fuel-cell vehicle to be launched in 2015. Further details weren't available. General Motors continues work on its fuel-cell vehicles. The largest U.S. automaker, which has spent a lot of time and resources on battery-powered cars such as the Chevrolet Volt, has no fuel-cell vehicles currently in its new product pipeline, spokesman Dan Flores said. He said more work needs to be done on cost and infrastructure to make the cars viable. Hydrogen cars likely will help automakers meet new goals from eight key states to put more zero-emissions cars on the road. The states, including California and New York, pledged late last month to work together to put 3.3 million battery-powered cars, plug-in hybrids and other clean-burning vehicles on the roads in those states by 2025. That's more than 15 times as many zero-emission vehicles projected to be in use in the entire U.S. by 2015. The other states in the pact are Massachusetts, Maryland, Oregon, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Vermont. The eight states together represent about 23 percent of the U.S. auto market.

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January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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Love

& marriage



By Rebecca Johnston/Photography by Sam Bennett



After 55 years of marriage, Mary and Bill Johnston of Woodstock still have plenty to celebrate on Valentine’s Day. Love is not something they remember just once a year, but the underlying component of a marriage that has flourished since they first met and got married more than five decades ago.


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Mary Beavers, as she was then, grew up in the Macedonia community in east Cherokee County. The two were married on June 20, 1959, in a ceremony at Macedonia Baptist Church. They were introduced by friends Tom and Shirley Fowler in 1957 after Bill, a Woodstock native, returned from his time serving in the U.S. Air Force. For Bill, at least, it was love at first sight. “I knew right away that she was the one,” Bill said as he sat in the living room of his family home in downtown Woodstock 56 years after he first met Mary in December 1957. Mary glanced lovingly at her husband with that unspoken communication that close couples have as she admits it took her a little longer to come around, but once she did, the rest is history. The couple dated for a year, and on Christmas Eve 1958 Bill asked Mary to be his wife. “I liked her and I liked her family,” Bill said. “She is a solid, ambitious, smart person.” Bill and Mary Johnston of Woodstock.

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“You have to work hard, it is a give and take. It is not about how glamorous you are, you have to be a helpmate. It is about honesty.” — Mary Johnston

Mary points to similar traits when she explains what caused her to say yes to Bill’s proposal and why the marriage has lasted for 55 years. “He is hard working and honest, he helps me with everything, he is just a good person to have around,” Mary said. Bill agrees that the foundation of a longlasting relationship is mutual respect and common goals. “She has always helped me and we have always worked together,” Bill said. And he says it doesn’t hurt a bit that she is a great cook. “It’s my biscuits that have kept him around,” she responds with a laugh. But on a serious note, Mary points to the importance of commitment and the willingness to listen and compromise. “You have to work hard, it is a give and take. It is not about how glamorous you are, you have to be a helpmate,” Mary said. “It is about honesty.”

January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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REFLECTIONS

By Chris Collett

Real resolutions, real solutions It’s a new year and many will have made resolutions that will fail, with only a few being successful at keeping their promises to themselves. Some will plan on regular trips to the gym. Some will make a resolution to quit smoking or some other unhealthy vice. Come to think of it, most resolutions involve improving health. And that is a good thing. But few have the true desire to succeed. So as a fellow Cherokee resident, let’s make some resolutions together that can only improve the quality of life for each of us. Let’s make a resolution to not say anything about other people unless it is something good. This resolution would include not making personal attacks against public servants. In other words, our political comments should be about the issues and not a personal attack against the candidates. This will be tough for some because they aren’t smart enough to understand the

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Cherokee Life January/February 2014

issues. So personally attacking candidates is all they can do politically. I am one of those that aren’t smart enough to always understand the issues. But then again, I know it and I’m not out bashing our leaders. Another good resolution for us to adopt as a community would be to remember those that are less fortunate than us year around as opposed to only around the holidays. Those same people that are in need at Christmas are usually in need at all times during the year. This can be accomplished in many ways. Choose your own path. An important resolution for us to make is to make sure that we are important in the life of some child whether the child has our DNA or someone else’s. Many clamor to develop relationships with the rich and famous thinking that it will make their own lives seem more important. But most reasonable people would agree that if you want to really make Cherokee a better place, make the life of a child better. This would include our actions in front of children. They might appear as if they aren’t watching and listening, but they are. If we were to simply follow these three resolutions, Cherokee County would be a better place for all of us to live. But following these three make going to the gym and quitting smoking seem like child’s play. Because following these three is more about our character than our health. I wish all of you the best whether you made a resolution or not. Cherokee County is blessed with many blessings. But her greatest asset is the people she calls citizens. If we can keep that in mind, 2014 will be better than we can imagine. Happy New Year!


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BY JENNIFER CARTER, JOAN DURBIN, STACEY L. EVANS, MARK WALLACE MAGUIRE, MEREDITH PRUDEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM BENNETT AND JENNIFER CARTER

BEST OF CHEROKEE

>>2014


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Best Of CHEROKEE

BEST VOLUNTEER >>Melissa Whatley Canton resident Melissa Whatley works diligently every day as an executive administrative assistant to the superintendent of the school district, but it’s what she chooses to do in her spare time that has garnered public admiration from Cherokee Life readers. Voted “Best Volunteer,” Whatley is currently serving her eighth year as a member of the Service League of Cherokee County. Whatley is performing the duty of Caseworker this year, but her previous roles have included Treasurer, Riverfest Chair and others. When asked what motivates her volunteerism, she doesn’t hesitate to emphasize the instrumental role the Service League plays in helping the children of Cherokee County. “The opportunity to help our community’s most at-risk children is what motivates me and the other 90 women of the League to volunteer. As Caseworker, I hear from school counselors about the needs of these children, and I feel truly blessed to be a part of the group who strives to meet those needs,” said Whatley. “Through referrals from local schools and community organizations, the Service League is able to provide assistance with basic needs such as eyeglasses, clothing, dental or medical care, or with a family’s rent or utility bill.” In addition to its regular casework, the League also strives to touch the lives of children through its annual Christmas Children program providing not only toys, but also often basic necessities like a bed for a child, a warm blanket for a baby and sneakers for a student athlete. “It is an incredible honor to be recognized by my peers and to have the opportunity to serve through the Service League,” said Whatley of being awarded the title “Best Volunteer.” “I cannot say enough great things about the League and its mission. I hope that this recognition will lead others in our community to support the League as a sponsor, a patron or a member... you will make a difference in the life of a child.”

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Linda and Coy Adair of Canton.

BEST MEAT AND THREE >>Keithsburg Cafe 2452 Ball Ground Hwy, Canton 678.880.1714

One of the nicest things about Cherokee County is that wonderful little places like Keithsburg Café do not only survive, but thrive. It’s not much to look at from the outside. Looking like a former service station or old country store (it once was both), the building almost fades into the background and is easy to pass by. Coy Adair, who owns the café with his wife Linda, said he’s had several first-time customers tell him they’ve driven by the place scores of times but had just decided to stop in one day. Once they try the Adairs’ homestyle cooking, they’re hooked. You can get a terrific breakfast here, complete with some dynamite homemade biscuits, but it’s lunch that really puts the café’s country roots in the spotlight. Plates of one of the meats and two veggies, as well as a biscuit, piece of cornbread or roll, run just $6.95 and are sure to please. There are always staples like country fried steak and ham on the menu, but Adair also has a few daily specials. On a recent afternoon, there was what was billed as roast beef, but actually was tender, tasty, pot roaststyle beef with luxurious brown gravy. And even though usually I’m not a big fan of ham, Adair won me over completely with his succulent slice. Among the many choices for sides are fried yellow squash, mashed potatoes, spinach, green beans and crowder peas. This is not the place to expect overly salty or highly seasoned food, so if more pep is desirable, there is a handy bottle of hot sauce on each table.

Bret Bond Canton, Riverstone Pkwy 770-720-7835

Ned Castleberry, CFP®, AAMS® Downtown Canton 770-720-6245

Kelly Geiken, CFP®, AAMS® Hickory Flat 678-297-0154

Rob Means, Jr. Woodstock 770-926-0909

Charles Simon BridgeMill 678-493-9520

Steve Tuck Woodstock 770-926-5503

Tawanna Wesson Prominence Point/Canton 770-479-4758

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BEST BARTENDER >>Kevin Hoffman, PURE 405 Chambers Street, Woodstock, GA 770.952.7873 http://puretaqueria.com/woodstock woodstock@puretaqueria.com

Bartender Kevin Hoffman has all the makings of a great bartender: he has worked his way up through the ranks from a busboy position during his three years at PURE, was trained in-house to finally land himself behind the bar, is especially attentive to his customers, and perhaps most importantly, he can make an extremely tasty peach mojito. What’s more, he’s not afraid to get creative. “I like to formulate new cocktails that are inspired by the season and are exclusive to PURE,” Hoffman explains. His favorite drink to mix is what he calls the “reposadorita,” which is a tasty concoction of the signature PURE margarita mix combined with Patron Citronage and the juice of three limes. Jessica Laudermill, general manager of PURE, believes that Cherokee Life readers love the atmosphere and bartenders so much because they prove that you don’t have to go to Buckhead to have a good time. “PURE is a fun, loud, upbeat restaurant where employees and guests go to have a good time,” said Laudermill. “Our staff is like a big family so we want to make sure our guests feel like part of the family, too.”

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BEST FINE DINING >>Goin’ Coastal 125 West Main Street, Canton 770.479.3737 www.goincoastalseafood.com https://www.facebook.com/ GoinCoastalSeafood In landlocked north Georgia, reliably fresh and well-prepared seafood served in an atmosphere that’s both comfortable and stylish qualifies as one of the best kinds of fine dining experiences. That’s what diners can look forward to at Goin’ Coastal. Chef and owner Zach Kell is a graduate of Johnson & Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island. He opened the original Goin’ Coastal in Canton five years ago and a second one in Virginia Highlands in 2010. “The restaurant’s mission is to provide our guests with the highest quality product and service in a relaxed, unpretentious atmosphere,” Kell said. Seafood is the star of the menu, with as many as eight different fish available each day. “We source our sustainable seafood from a number of purveyors who deliver to the restaurant daily to ensure freshness. All of our fresh fish is listed on our chalk boards and when the fish is sold out we erase it from our boards,” Kell said. On a recent night choices included mahi mahi, grouper, swordfish, Scottish salmon, yellowfin tuna and snow crab. Signature dishes include an appetizer of fresh domestic jumbo lump crab cakes with Dijon lemon butter and an entrée of fresh dry pack New Bedford sea scallops served over white truffle risotto.

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Best Of CHEROKEE ucked away in the unassuming Hickory Flat Village Shopping Center, Frosty Frog Creamery & Café is one of those coveted places where in-the-know locals go when their sweet tooth is craving a fix. Whether you’re seeking a slice of pie and coffee for your breakfast, an after-school ice cream treat with your children or a Saturday night dessert-date with your partner, Frosty Frog offers something to suit everyone’s taste. Owners Frank and Glenda Cole, residents of the Hickory Flat community, take pride in their made-fromscratch selections and hired in-house baker Sharon Murphy seven years ago to carry on this tradition of excellence. Murphy continually tries to surprise customers with new recipes, and her latest creation is the pecan praline cake. Already a winner in the customers’ eyes (and mouths), the café is having a hard time keeping it in the case, according to Glenda. The cake’s layers of crunchy pecans and gooey praline give way to a creamy filling and a spice cake, all for the perfect balance of both sweet and savory. Served with a dab of whipped cream and a caramel sauce, the cake is a perfect ending to a meal or superb all by itself. Other worthy recommendations include their coconut cream pie, banana split, or a family favorite, “S’moresFor-Four.” Whole pies and cakes can also be specially ordered for special occasions.

T

BEST DESSERT >> Frosty Frog Creamery & Café 6205 Hickory Flat Highway, Canton 770.704.9333 www.frostyfrogcreamery.com info@frostyfrogcreamery.com

BEST OLD THING >>Canton Courthouse 100 North Street, Canton 770.345.3288 http://rockbarn.org/facilityCourthouse.php The building is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and visitors are welcome. The Historic Courthouse Jail is open for tours by appointment.

Voted Cherokee’s “Best Old Thing,” the Corinthiancolumned, historic courthouse that towers over Canton’s downtown square still has a few tales to tell. On the same steps where you now see schoolchildren on field trips, you once would have run into busy judges, deputies and occasional fleeing prisoners who liked to shimmy down the marble walls with tied bedsheets.

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The courthouse was built in 1927 by the architect A. Ten Eyck Brown, and marble slabs were carried in from nearby Tate for the construction of its Neo-Classical Revival design. According to an article posted on the Cherokee County Historical Society website, the cells that line the front of the courthouse building and overlook the rear of the marble eagles led to a popular Cherokee County euphemism for incarceration: a prisoner was not "in jail," but "behind the eagles."


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Best Of CHEROKEE

BEST BBQ >>Scott Boys BBQ 4864 Cumming Highway, Canton 404.217.2365 www.scottboysbbq.com www.facebook.com/pages/ Scott-Boys-BBQ Even if readers hadn’t voted Scott Boys the best barbecue in Cherokee, driving by the food truck at Union Hill Road and Cumming Highway I would never have been able to resist the tantalizing smoke wafting from their two wood-burning cookers. Couple that amazing aroma with the down home eye appeal of the funky food truck, the cars and trucks parked two deep and several customers patiently awaiting their orders, and it was clear that this was ‘cue worth stopping for. One bite of the moist, tender pulled pork revealed the secret. This meat had some serious smoke in it, just the way I like it. That same bold smokiness permeated the baby back ribs and chicken. Maybe it’s because Russ Scott burns a variety of woods, including peach and pecan, for his ‘cue. Maybe it’s due to his excellent and efficient “cookers,” built by BBQ pitmasters and award-winning competition cooks Scott Smith and Tim Thomas in Acworth. Or perhaps it’s because Russ has been barbecuing for at least 30 years and has developed the golden touch. He and his wife, Ann, live in East Cobb and are

the ones who actually run the business, but his brother Paul, a certified barbecue judge who still lives down in Crawford County, also occasionally contributes some time and expertise. Other than the smokiness, for me, what really sets the ribs apart is the unique preparation. Coated with a dry rub that includes cumin, garlic, raw sugar, chocolate, ancho chile and finely ground coffee, smoked at 200 degrees for one hour and 250 degrees for the second hour, the ribs are then plopped into a pan a doused with a concoction of apple jelly, butter and pineapple juice. “The salty and smoky rub is offset by the apple,” Russ explained. The meat is then finished off at 300 degrees and the ribs are done in around three hours because Russ says he prefers “hot and fast” to “low and slow.” The texture of the finished product is flavorful and just tender enough for a good chew. The mustard-based Hog Tonic, Scott Boys’ proprietary sauce, has a hint of sweetness but with pleasing tang. Other sauces include a Carolina vinegar and a sweet smoky red. For sides, Ann makes a dynamite cole slaw with apple and mango and a loaded baked potato salad.

BEST NEW THING >>Cherokee Aquatic Center 4864 Cumming Highway, Canton 1200 Gresham Mill Pkwy, Holly Springs 678.880.4760 http://www.crpa.net

Russ Scott, longtime pickmaster, slices up a batch of ribs.


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BEST FRIED CHICKEN >>Downtown Kitchen 140 E. Marietta St., Canton 770.479.1616 www.thedowntownkitchen.com

For 10 years, the folks at Downtown Kitchen have been putting out great food in one of Canton’s older buildings just off the main drag in the historic part of town. The restaurant has a cool vibe and bills itself as a “new American steakhouse,” but other items such as game meats and seafood also grace the menu. One of the most popular items on the bill of fare, the DT Kitchen Fried Chicken, is a standout. It is one of the most frequently mentioned items when diners go online to praise the restaurant. “The fried chicken is a fresh local chicken breast that is flash fried and served with a bacon and fresh thyme gravy,” said Chef Zach Kell, who owns the restaurant with partner Corey Shupert. “The chicken is so good because of the gravy and the freshness of the product. Plus, it is cooked to order.”

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ooking for an upscale yet comfortable salon experience without the headache of driving downtown? Well, look no further than Intercoiffure America/Canada member Jyl Craven Hair Design. Since 1999, Jyl and >> Jason Craven and their 7970 Knox Bridge Hwy., Canton staff have been providing a pleasantly hip salon 770.345.9411 experience to tons of www.jylcraven.com happy customers at the couple’s eponymous Canton salon. “Our main focus was to bring something outside the Perimeter that you previously could only go into Atlanta to get,”Jyl said. Widely recognized for cutting-edge color techniques and innovative treatments for fine, thinning hair, such as Evolve and Kerastase, the team also is Vidal Sassoon trained cutters with an overall focus on hair and education. “We pride ourselves on education,” Jyl said. “We have a full time education director, and we all travel for education here and abroad, so the team is constantly learning the latest and greatest trends and going back to basics as well.” It’s that kind of dedication to the craft combined with a whole lot of talent, skill and creativity that has earned Jyl Craven Hair Design numerous industry accolades, including the Salon Today Magazine 2012 Salon of Distinction award and a win at the L’Oreal Professional 2012 nationwide INOA Hair Color contest. Today, they can add one more to their trophy case — Best Salon in Cherokee!

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CHEROKEE

BEST SALON Jyl Craven Hair Design

Jyl Craven, owner

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Best Of CHEROKEE

BEST GIFT SHOP >>What a Girl Wants 1455 Riverstone Pkwy., Ste. 120, Canton, GA 30114 770.720.2040 www.shopwhatagirlwants.com

Sisters Jessie Cheshire, and Janice Perkins, both of Canton.

Where can you go for a shopping experience that’s never quite the same on any two visits? At Canton boutique and gift shop What a Girl Wants, owners Janice Perkins, Jessie Cheshire and Lisa Castleberry pride themselves on weekly updates to their quirkily cute retail store. “We order from different companies and replenish weekly,” Perkins said. “So, you’re always going to find something new when you come in.” In business for three years, the motherdaughters trio and long-time Canton residents said they love fashion and had always wanted to work together—even during their previous lives as student, teacher and stay-at-home mom, respectively. “We loved the idea of building a business together,” Cheshire said. “And, we grew up in this community, so, it’s nice to see familiar faces in the store.” Today, What a Girl Wants is a specialty boutique that exemplifies the distinct yet complementary personalities of its three owner-partners as a virtual treasure trove of clothing, accessories and gifts for girls and women of all ages. Housing everything from Behind the Glass jewelry, Caren Original bath goodies and collegiate paraphernalia to Mudpie chalkboard wine charms, trendy chevron patterned leggings and Mogo bracelets for the kids, What a Girl Wants more than earns its Best Of spot as a one-stop-shop for fashionistas.

BEST GOLF COURSE >>BridgeMill Athletic Club 1190 BridgeMill Avenue, Canton 770.345.5500 http://bridgemillathleticclub.com/golf Nestled into the rolling hills of the affluent BridgeMill neighborhood of Canton, this 18-hole championship golf course has become revered by golfers not only in its home county of Cherokee, but throughout the metroAtlanta region. With its par-72 layout, this well-maintained course was designed by golf greats Desmond Muirhead, designer of Mission Hills of the LPGA Nabisco Championship, and Georgia’s Larry Mize, the 1987 Masters Champion. Its sixteenth hole, featuring a true island green, is a particular club favorite. Members also appreciate BridgeMill’s comprehensive

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practice facilities, their separate short game practice area, and a hearty meal at Featherstone’s Grille after a game. To check rates and book a tee time, visit http://bridgemillathleticclub.com/book-a-tee-time/.


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BEST BIKE SHOP >>Outspokin’ 8594 Main St., Woodstock, GA 30188 678.483.0200 www.outspokinbikes.com For Outspokin’ owner Kevin Poske, opening a fullservice bike shop in downtown Woodstock was the culmination of a lifetime love affair with the sport. “I’d been cycling for 35 years and wanted to do something I was passionate about,” Poske said. “I picked this area because I grew up in a railroad town, and there weren’t any [bike] shops around here.” Now, a decade later, he and his team of bicycle enthusiasts have built a thriving business from a strong foundation of quality products, unmatched expertise and impeccable customer service. And, they’ve done so in one of the most bustling cities in Cherokee County. “I didn’t know Woodstock was going to expand like it has,” Poske said. “But one of my favorite things about having the store here is the relationships we’ve built with customers, riders and the community.” At Outspokin’, riders of all ages and skill levels can get everything they could ever possibly need to hit the road (or the trails) on two wheels. And, they can always trust that the shop’s wide variety of bikes, accessories and services will be vetted by avid riders. “Most of us ride just about every day,” Poske said. “We ride the product that’s in our shop, and if we don’t like it, we don’t sell it.” With a philosophy like that, it’s no wonder they’ve been voted Best Bike Shop!

BEST MUSICIAN >>Thomas Fountain www.thomasfountain.com www.youtube.com/user/tefountain

Country music artist Thomas Fountain sings pretty close to home. Though his Ball Ground residence is only about 15 minutes from where he grew up in Jasper, he also draws down deep and belts out a tune whose notes ring so true that even the rowdiest of crowds are forced to pause and listen. If you’ve ever wanted to see a country star right before he makes it big, now’s your chance. Fountain, who was named as a finalist for Georgia Male Country Artist of the Year in 2013, just returned from his first tour and is busy recording in Nashville. He’s also been performing gigs throughout Atlanta, with many scheduled in Cherokee County venues like Jump Kitchen & Sports Saloon in Woodstock and The Painted Pig in Canton.

Fountain, who attended Kennesaw State University for a degree in Health and Physical Education and had begun coaching for local schools, admits that it was one of the toughest decisions of his life to give up what he’d been educated to do to pursue a career in music. Coaching had always been a passion for him, he said, but in the end, he just had to follow his dream to be a musician. “I can always come back [to coaching], but music for an artist is different,” said Fountain. “So it's now or never for me as an artist.” And fans have responded well to this career move. Fountain has been drawing crowds with his traditional country style, playing old favorites as well songs he’s written himself. The recognition and fan support that he’s received is what he says spurs him on to do what he loves. “As a songwriter, you’re wearing your heart on your sleeve and then you’re putting your story out there to people who ‘know you,’ but might not know these things about you,” said Fountain. “That made me a little nervous, but the response has been overwhelming. The support from the community has been more that I could ever imagine. It just fuels me to do a little more.”


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BEST PLACE TO CELEBRATE >>The Painted Pig Tavern 190 East Main Street, Canton 678.880.1714 www.paintedpigtavern.com Voted “Best Place to Celebrate” by Cherokee Life readers, the Painted Pig Tavern will be doing a little celebrating of its own Jan. 24 which marks the upscale pub’s first anniversary. Co-owners Nick Vecchio and Joseph Guynup plan to revel in the occasion with a Hawaiian Luau and a pig roast for its loyal customers. And although it has only been in downtown Canton for a short time, the Painted Pig has quickly established a county-wide reputation for its lively gatherings and the owners’ penchant for nightly entertainment. “The Painted Pig is the best place to celebrate because not only do we offer an outstanding selection of pub fare, craft beer and whiskey but it is also the only place around where you can find the variety of entertainment that we offer,” said Vecchio. “Whether you'd like to see a live band, watch stand up comedy, play team trivia, sing karaoke, play pool, darts or ping pong, we've got it all and more.”

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Best Of CHEROKEE

The Autumn Hill Nursery, a Cherokee County favorite since 1992, is not just a place to find unique plants, although the selection there is extraordinary. With locations in both Woodstock and Canton, co-owners Kari and Eric Hill also carry everything their customers need to create dynamic outdoor showplaces for their properties, including fountains, pottery, wind chimes, statuary, bird feeders, arbors and other garden accents. Setting them apart from other nurseries, Autumn Hill loves to create elaborate displays to help inspire their customers with unique landscaping possibilities. “We show them ideas they can incor-

BEST GARDEN ACCESSORIES >>Autumn Hill Nursery Woodstock Location: 4256 Earney Road, 770.442.3901 Canton Location: 100 Pea Ridge Road, 770.345.5252 www.autumnhillnursery.com porate into their own yards,” said Eric. “Whether it is creating a cozy little sitting area in the corner of their back yard, decorating their patio, or creating an entry that welcomes

guests.” For a list of upcoming events and helpful gardening demonstrations, be sure to visit their website and sign up for their newsletter.

BEST PLACE TO SEE A PLAY >>Elm Street Cultural Arts Village 8534 Main St, Woodstock 678.494.4251 www.elmstreetarts.org The performing arts world has begun to take heed of Cherokee County’s wealth of talent thanks to the theatrical gems now being produced on Woodstock’s Elm Street stage. The Elm Street Cultural Arts Village, with the help of Artistic Director G. Lora Grooms, a devoted staff and generous donations from patrons, is becoming a thriving arts mecca, offering performances, instruction and exhibits year round. You’ll find live plays and musi-

cals, camps and classes in drama, art and music as well as concerts, recitals, pageants, art exhibits, the iThink Improv

Troupe and much more. Elm Street currently holds their performances at City Center Auditorium and Offices, 8534 Main Street (the old Woodstock Community Church). Exciting new developments, however, are in progress on their four-acre property where plans are underway for community gardens, restoration of a one hundred year old farmhouse into art gallery and studio space, historic preservation programming and in the future final phase – a state-of-the-art performing arts center.


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BEST ARTIST >>Elly Hobgood

CHEROKEE

www.ellyhobgood.com

Although Elly Hobgood always walked through the world with an artist’s hand, she did not immediately respond to its insistent calling. In fact, after a brief oil painting-stint in her twenties, the talented Canton painter put down her brush and palette to pursue a career in nursing that would span almost 30 years. It wasn’t until returning to Emory University for a Masters degree and taking on even more responsibility that she decided to relieve some job stress by taking a few classes in watercolor. “When I retired, I immersed myself in watercolor. Before long, people would say my paintings ‘made them happy,’” said Hobgood. “I was hooked.” Hobgood began to be accepted in regional and national exhibitions. She has also earned her Lifetime Signature Status with the Georgia Watercolor Society.

BEST FESTIVAL >>Canton Festival of the Arts http://cherokeearts.org/festival 770.704.6244 (Cherokee Arts Center)

OVER 3,000 SQUARE FEET FROM STORAGE AUCTIONS TUESDAY IS SENIOR DAY - 20% OFF 9539 Highway 92 • Woodstock, GA 30188 • 678-346-0891 Open Monday - Saturday 9am-8pm • Sunday 10am-6pm Across from Goodwill in the Shopping Center with Folks and Waffle House

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Every May, Brown Park in downtown Canton is completely transformed into a vibrant, two-day juried arts and crafts show that includes a fine art marketplace, a literary festival and children’s hands-on art experiences. Presented by Cherokee Arts Center, the Canton Festival of the Arts is gearing up for its eleventh year in 2014 and is scheduled for May 17 to 18 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Last year’s event attracted over 60 exhibitors from nine states, panels and book signings with authors from all over the Southeast, and featured food concessions including a wine and beer garden. Children were also entertained by lessons in mural painting, photography, drawing, dance and drama.


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The Canton Main Street Program invites you to

MidCity Pharmacy 196 E. Main Street

GA 770-479-5533 Canton, Billy Cagle, Pharmacy Owner

Family Owned • Diabetic Shoes and Supplies Compression Stockings and Fitting Flu, Shingles, Pneumonia and B12 Injections Durable Medical Equipment (walkers, wheelchairs and ostomy supplies)

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escape to Rosemar y Beach by Stacey L. Evans | photos courtesy of Rosemary Beach and Stacey L. Evans


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With swooping trees, vast green spaces and stunning coastal-inspired homes, Rosemary Beach is in a word, idyllic. Located between Panama City and Destin, Florida, this unique vacation destination revives the classic allAmerican small town. There are rental cottages, condos, a hotel and one inn, but many houses are residences or vacation homes. That strengthens the sense of community in the charming little town. Neighbors greet each other with genuine smiles. Couples laugh as they zoom by on bicycles. Children play games in wideopen parks. Homeowners watering their plants ask about your day as you pass. Restaurant owners talk excitedly about

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their endeavors. It’s a friendly neighborhood that just so happens to have a beautiful beach at its doorstep, top-notch dining and quaint shops. As a vacationer, you feel welcomed into the Rosemary Beach community right from the start. On day one you’re likely thinking ‘this place is great, we should go ahead and book it again for next year,’ but by day three you’re heading over to Rosemary Beach Realty to peruse the homes on the market because, well, wouldn’t this be a great life? The community was actually planned with that goal in mind, to represent the “New Urbanism.” The concept is a blend of intimate neighbor-

hoods and public spaces that’s pedestrian (and bicycle) friendly—it’s sort of anti-what the typical beach town has turned into, congested with cars, fastfood and tacky souvenir shops. At Rosemary Beach, everything you need is just a beautiful, serene stroll away. Enchanting footpaths, boardwalks and secret passages provide a beautiful pathway for leisurely walks to admire the grand homes and gardens. Walking from your cottage to any of the four pools, the gym (which has yoga, pilates and water aerobics classes), the spa, tennis courts, quaint shops, dining, and of course, the beach, is no more than a five minute stroll, and there are very few cars on the roads. January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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Rosemary Beach is named for the herb that grows wild in the area, and it’s a fitting name as preserving the environment was an important part of planning the community. The plants and flora outside of walls and fences are native to the area, while interior gardens within closed courtyards feature plants that require protected sanctuaries. Oh yeah, and the beach. The gulf’s azure waters are typcially tranquil, complementing the soft, white sand. The beach is bordered by protected dunes, which adds a nice aesthetic to the 2,500 feet of beachfront. What to do Start off with an invigorating and soul soothing yoga class. Grab a smoothie at Amavida Coffee or if you’ve worked up an appetite, head over to Cowgirl Unforgettable sunsets Kitchen for a Soft sand that caresses hearty breakyour feet fast before hitting the beach. Azure gulf waters In an adventurous Butterfly dances mood? Sea Oats rents Crisp Miami-style pools kayaks, Hobie Cats and padGenuine greetings with a warm smile dleboards, or rent a bike The kick of a Moscow from Bamboo Mule at Havana Bar Bicycle Company for a Bike rides on boardtrek down the walks surrounded by scenic 30A lush gardens and with that leads to overhanging trees Deer Lake State Park. The charm of a town bell that rings the numThere’s no ber of the hour reason why any one would Reading rooms with want to vensailboat chandeliers ture out, but if you’re up for Luxurious cottages it, Eden Gardens State Award winning archiPark is a short tecture and homes drive away worthy of a tour and features Moonlit strolls underthe 1897 hisneath a cascade of stars toric Greek Revival home showcasing a collection of Louis XVI furniture that is the second largest in the United States. The home is on breathtaking grounds overflowing with lush live oaks and magnolia trees, camellias and azaleas,

Rosemary Beach is…

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overlooking the Tucker Bayou. Bookworm or a rainy day? You will fall in love with Hidden Lantern, the quaint bookstore with cozy couches underneath a sailboat chandelier, a knowledgeable staff and an art gallery attached. From antiques and interior design shops to beach concessions and souvenirs, the downtown shops offer a diversity of shopping opportunities. Where to eat For a place so small and quaint, Rosemary Beach is abundant in excellent dining. This isn’t your average lazy beach town fare. I was impressed at not only the quality of dining, but the creativity of menus and atmosphere inside each restaurant. You really can’t go wrong with any of the dining options. Some standouts: For more casual fare, Cowgirl Kitchen has a fun atmosphere and unique breakfast items. Try one of their specialties, migas, which is an egg scramble with tortilla chips, onions, tomatoes and

Eden Gardens State Park. jalapenos, topped with queso and fresh chives and served over grits and bacon with two flour tortillas. For a special occasion or date night, pop over to the elegant Paradis for an exceptional meal paired with recommended wine. End the night with a round of drinks at Havana’s bar, or if you want something more low-key, Wild Olives often has live music on weekends.

INFORMATION: Rosemary Beach Cottage Rental Company 866/348-8952 (toll-free) www.rosemarybeach.com rentals@rosemarybeach.com For Rosemary Beach Realty 850/278-2000 (phone) Note: Vacation packages and last-minute specials can be searched online at www.rosemarybeach.com, under the heading “vacation rentals.”

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JULIA BULLOCK, SOPRANO>>> Start the year with a song and a rare chance to see an operatic star on the rise. Soprano Julia Bullock, fresh off performing the title role in Henry Purcell’s semi-opera The Indian Queen in Spain and Russia, is appearing in concert at the Falany Performing Arts Center. The young singer has been collecting awards and accolades for a few years now, including a nod from New York Arts magazine which noted her “vivid presence” and “full, very beautiful voice…and real charisma.” When and where: Jan. 12 at 3 p.m. Falany Performing Arts Center on the Reinhardt University campus, Waleska. Tickets: $25 for adults; $20 for seniors (55 years and older) and students; $10 for children 12 and younger. More information: 770.720.9167 or boxoffice@reinhardt.edu Online: http://www.reinhardt.edu/ Events/2014/julia-bullock,-soprano.html SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD>>> Woodstock’s residential (and by their own definition “semiprofessional”) theater company, Academy Theatre at Compass, presents a musical that spans the centuries, taking the viewer on a trip with characters who are all struggling to get somewhere in life. Locales vary from a 1492 Spanish sailing ship to contemporary New York City, 57 stories above Fifth Ave. A multi-ethnic cast tackles a score that runs the gamut of current popular music.

A closer look at events and activities throughout Cherokee this season When and where: Jan. 16, 17 at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 18 at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Cherokee Arts Center, 94 North St. Canton. More information: 678.697.8959. Online: http://www.atcwoodstock.com/our-season TOM SAWYER>>>Mark Twain’s classic 1876 novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer proved just as enduring once it was adapted for the stage, spawning a myriad of productions and showing no sign of slowing anytime soon. Presented here by Elm Street Arts Tom Sawyer chronicles the adventures of Sawyer, friends Joe Harper and Huckleberry Finn and other familiar characters including the winsome Becky Thatcher, stern Aunt Polly and mysterious Injun Joe. A portion of proceeds from the play will benefit teen programs at Families of Cherokee United in Service. When and where: January 17 & 24 at 7:30 p.m., January 18, 19, 25, 26 at 2 p.m. City Center Auditorium, 8534 Main St., Woodstock. Tickets: $10 in advance online (ages 2 and up) $12 at the door. More information: 678.494.4251 Box office hours: Monday through Friday 1 – 6 p.m., and 30 minutes prior to show times. Online: http://www.elmstreetarts.org/performingarts/current-season/


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DOC SEVERINSEN AND THE SAN MIGUEL 5>> Grammy-award winning trumpeteer and band leader, Carl “Doc” Severinsen’s career has spanned more than six decades, produced 30 albums and included stints with Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman, plus famously playing musical sidekick to Johnny Carson for 30 years on “The Tonight Show.” After moving to Mexico in 2006 he formed the San Miguel 5 with guitarist Gil Guitierrez, violinist Charlie Bisharat, percussionist Jimmy Branly and bass player Kevin Thomas. At 85years old Severinsen is still blowing strong. His witty banter and wild wardrobe continue unabated as well. Note: This show will sell out. When and where: Jan. 30, 7:30 p.m. Falany Performing Arts Center at Reinhardt University, Waleska. Tickets: $35 - $50 for adults; $30 - $45 for seniors (55 years and older) and students; $20 - $35 for children 12 and younger. More information: 770.720.9167 or boxoffice@reinhardt.edu Online: http://www.reinhardt.edu/Events/2014/doc-severinsenand-the-san-miguel-5.html THE HANDSOME DEVILS PRESENT SQUIRM BURPEE>> Vaudeville re-energized and reinvented for a new family audience, Colorado’s Handsome Devils Productions bring The Squirm Burpee Circus to town. Expect an eye-catching show from skilled circus acts like The Human Cannon and The Ladder of Love and don’t forget - there’s always that old stand-by crowdpleaser, chainsaw juggling. Dancing and classic Vaudeville routines round out a theatrical circus that is appropriate for ages 4 and up. When and where: Feb. 21, 7:30 p.m. Falany Performing Arts Center at Reinhardt University, Waleska. Tickets: $35 adults; $30 for seniors (55 years and older) and students; $20 for children 12 and younger. More information: 770.720.9167 or boxoffice@reinhardt.edu Online: http://www.reinhardt.edu/Events/2014/squirm-burpeeby-the-handsome-little-devils-2-21-14.html

Worth The Gas To Go: THE ATLANTA JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL>> Founded in 2000, the AJFF is now the largest film festival in Atlanta (and the second largest Jewish film fest in the United States), attracting more than 30,000 attendees in 2012. Twenty-two days of films that you often can’t see anywhere else in the region, this cinematic event focuses on Jewish culture, history and personalities, presenting a wide range of movies from comedies to documentaries. When and where: Jan. 29 through Feb. 20 at various venues in metro Atlanta More information: Box office reps can be reached at 866.214.2072 Online: http://www.ajff.org/

LIVE IN THE THEATER!

Songs For a New World January 16th & 17th at 7:30pm • January 18th at 3 pm & 7:30pm Presented by Academy Theatre at Compass

The audience is transported from the deck of a 1492 Spanish sailing ship to a ledge 57 stories above Fifth Avenue to meet a startling array of characters. With a small powerhouse, multi-ethnic cast and a driving, exquisitely crafted score running the gamut of today’s popular music, SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD is a great way to bring the next generation into the theatre.

DAILY BREAD PERFORMANCE: February 8th The theatre will host the talents of The Daily Bread, a trio who sings southern gospel in a breathtaking family three part harmony. See website for details.

January Classes: Kim Bates "Basic Digital Photography"

Compiled by Therra C. Gwyn Got an item, just email WhatsHappeningGA @gmail.com

Upcoming Workshops:

Kathryn Collins RYT 200 "Svaroopa® Yoga" Patty Cure "Acrylic Painting" Trisha Gotte’s "Drama" Elly Hobgood’s "Paint Group" John Horne’s "Drawing Classes" Heather Lyon’s "Creative Movement & Dance"

THE FIDDLEHEADS>> Home-grown Georgia talent, this group of bluegrass-and-more musicians from Dahlonega pleased audiences on America’s Got Talent in 2011, have played at the Grand Ole Opry and keep picking up new fans at every live show. When and where: Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m. Falany Performing Arts Center at Reinhardt University, Waleska. Tickets: $25 adults; $20 for seniors (55 years and older) and students; $10 for children 12 and younger. More information: 770.720.9167 or boxoffice@reinhardt.edu Online: tp://www.reinhardt.edu/Events/2014/ the-fiddleheads-2-27-14.html RESIDENTIAL

Linda Maphet’s "Oil and Acrylic Painting"

JANUARY 25, 2014: 1-3pm Social Media – Let’s take the leap to online, Entrepreneur! Presented by Camille Ronay MARCH 15, 2014: 1-3pm Social Media – The Next Step for the Entrepreneur Presented by Camille Ronay

To sign up for classes call 770-704-6244 or e-mail info@cherokeearts.org. Include name and phone number. Check our website for dates, times and fees. 94 North Street | Canton, GA 30114

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Experienced • Clean • Courteous • Drug-Free • Guaranteed Work January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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BridgeMill golf

The Golf Fore Charity Tournament took place at BridgeMill Athletic Club in mid-October. All proceeds go to The BridgeMill Sixes Service League which helps the needy in Cherokee County. 1. From left, Tracy Angle of Canton, Christina Carpenter of Woodstock, Jeanna Tlumak of Canton, and Terry Johnston of Canton. 2. Darryl Fulton of Canton, David Capalbo of Acworth, and Jeff Hall of Cartersville. 3. Suzanne Taylor, Jay Patouillet, and Marlyn Patouillet, all of Canton. 4. Susan Staudt, Kaitlin Gavin, and Elaine Casey, all of Canton. 5. Kathleen Atkins and John Cochran, both of Canton.

1 PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER CARTER

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6. Terry Groulx of Canton, Tom Eckstrom of Kennesaw, and Eric Sandler of Marietta. 7. Sarah Golemi and Terri Zahorodny, both of Canton. 8. Hank Dunlap and Steve Gillenwater, both of Canton. 9. Kathy Fulton and Ruth Clark, both of Canton.

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Goshen Valley Golf

The Goshen Valley Classic took place in October at the Cherokee Country Club. Funds raised from the event benefit the Goshen Valley Boys Ranch. 1. From left, Sharon Woods of Kennesaw, Katie Lopez of Atlanta, and Kim Paris of East Cobb. 2. Brian Venable of Canton, Jason Butcher of Canton, and Charles Venable of Big Canoe. 3. Reynold Jennings of Marietta, Kim Menefee of Marietta, and Joe Brywczynski of Acworth. 4. Sabrina Southern of Acworth and Beth Elder of Marietta. 5. Jack Snyder of Suwannee and Don McDonnell of Roswell.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER CARTER

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6. Bill Durell of Woodstock and Dianne Depuy of Kennesaw. 7. Mary Pat and Jim Ferreira of Kennesaw. 8. Mike Pollitt of Roswell and Keevy Hood of Marietta. 9. Brandon Reese of Atlanta and Christian Stevens of Canton.

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REFLECTIONS

To thy selfie be true The word, selfie (or selfy) is now A picture does tell a lot, but I wonder if included in Oxford Dictionaries. If you in our efforts to record our most glamdon’t know, a selfie is the picture you orous selfs we are missing those fleeting take of yourself to post on social media moments that make for the best stories. channels. According to the website, the A perfect example of this came while I first documented selfie was posted after was watching Robin Thicke perform his a person had a little too much to drink popular song “Blurred Lines” to the and fell down with the result being delight of a room full of screaming women their teeth protruding through their botduring a recent music awards show. tom lip. Walking along the aisles of the venue, Thankfully I have seen thousands of microphone in hand, he sought out a fan to attractive selfies versus those that give some special attention to. Instead of might require a waste basket nearby. arms outstretched to pull this hunky croonAccording to Oxford Dictionaries, er closer, there she was typing frantically “occasional selfies are acceptable, but on her iPhone clearly unable to look into posting a new picture of yourself his eyes and take in this once of lifetime everyday isn’t necessary.” brush with celebrity. It was over in secBY CARLA BARNES I took my first selfie this summer onds and I suspect a blurry picture is all when I was sitting poolside and feeling that she has left. particularly goddess-like. To clarify, it was only a headshot My husband, Doug, who has heard at least 95 percent of – enough to show my large black sunglasses and smiling all my editorial comments (at least five percent are about lips. I did end up cropping out my furrowed brow that I him and thus he would not hear those) got to hear my comcould blame on the sun, but I suspect I am inadvertently mentary about this particular moment in history. “The holding my face that way too often these days. world has officially gone crazy,” I started in. “Instead of My second selfie was taken on a football Saturday. I living out one heck of a moment and handing off her phone was wearing my blinged-out University of Georgia T-shirt to her friend she missed it.” and the perfect shade of red lipstick. A quick click and One of my favorite editorial cartoons in “The New there I was looking at Yorker” magazine by Liam least 50 pounds thinner Francis Walsh shows a man all thanks to the perfect wearing the cone of shame camera angle. The mesand telling his date, “It sages came soon after. keeps me from looking at Have I been working my phone every two secout? What diet was I on? onds.” It became my profile I am sure there are stats picture. I will never on how many times we change it ... ever. look at those tiny screens. I In People StyleWatch don’t even want to know magazine this month how many times I look at there are quick tips on mine. I am thankful though taking the perfect selfie. that I still keep it on silent This is something we most days and stow it away should all be well versed on because there are exin my purse during most occasions. boyfriends and girlfriends “creeping” everywhere on social One such event was a chamber breakfast where former media. UGA athletic director and coach Vince Dooley was the A friend, who will remain nameless, deliberately takes guest speaker. He and I have met at least a dozen of times regular selfies of herself not to post on social media, but to over the past 20 years, but I still get butterflies when he do what she calls a “fat check,” because you never really enters a room. I reached my hand out in greeting and know what you look like. Most of us still carry the mental instead of shaking it he bent his head down and kissed it. picture of ourselves when we were 18 years old and at the I swooned and while there is no photographic evidence top of our game. My grandmother said she would always of this particular moment there was a fellow Dawg fan ask the question, “Who is that old lady?” when she looked close by who captured the scarlet cheeks and giggles of in the mirror. this Southern girl caught up in the moment.

In People StyleWatch magazine this month there are quick tips on taking the perfect selfie. This is something we should all be well versed on because there are exboyfriends and girlfriends “creeping” everywhere on social media.

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W H AT ’ S I N S I D E

Cherokee Life January/February 2014  Volume 9, Issue 1

features

E D I T O R I A L S TA F F

12 LONGTIME LOVE Up close with one of Cherokee’s longest married couples

DIRECTOR OF MAGAZINES

Mark Wallace Maguire LAYOUT AND DESIGN

Stacey L. Evans, Mark Wallace Maguire

17 BEST OF CHEROKEE From burgers to best spas, meet this year’s Best Of winners

CONTRIBUTORS

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32 RAMBLIN TO ROSEMARY Florida gem offers a great getaway in winter

Carla Barnes, Jennifer Carter, Chris Collett, Rebecca Johnston, Joan Durbin, Stacey L. Evans, Therra C. Gwyn, Meredith Pruden PHOTOGRAPHER

in every issue

Sam Bennett PHOTOGRAPHY

FROM THE DIRECTOR 05

HIGHLIGHTS

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Jennifer Carter

FEEDBACK

SCENE

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PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT

REFLECTIONS

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NEWS & NOTEWORTHY 06 REFLECTIONS

Marti Sacks PROOFREADER

Whitney Betts

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A D V E R T I S I N G S TA F F

ON THE COVER

ADVERTISING MANAGER

One of the sumptuous offerings from Canyon’s, voted best burger in Cherokee

Kim Fowler ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

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Tara Guest, Candace Hallford Paula Milton, Becky Opitz, Liz Ridley GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS Afterglow Spa Aqua Guard Basements Atlanta Lyric Theatre Autumn Joy Salon Bedoe's Bar & Grille Canton Main Street Program Canton Tire and Wheel Cherokee Arts Center Cherokee Bank Cherokee Charter Academy Cherokee County Farm Bureau Comprehensive Neurology of North Georgia, PC Darby Funeral Home Decorating Den Interiors Edward Jones 19 Falany Performing Arts Center at Reinhardt University Fowler Electric Free Home Traditions Fresh n Fit Frosty Frog Creamery & Café Guardian Angels Home Care Heritage of Brookstone Hot Stuff Jyl Craven Hair Design Main Street Canton Mid City Pharmacy

20 39 40 31 28 28 11 37 30 36 8 6 38 21

34 37 10 25 24 6 14 30 11 31 31

North Atlanta Fencing Center 15 North Cobb Spine & Nerve 9 Northside Cherokee Orthopedics & Sports Medicine 35 Northside Hospital Cherokee 43 Northside Hospital Sleep Disorders Center 7 Path & Post 18 Pinnacle Orthopaedics 3 Plastic Surgery Center of The South 16 Practically Perfect Day Spa & Salon 31 Salon • Spa Venéssa 15 Sosebee Funeral Home 44 Studio 121 31 Superior Plumbing 41 The Funk Hereitage Center of Reinhardt University 5 The Repair Barn 20 Three Sisters Gifts & Home Accents 24 Victoria Lee Photography 31 Wellstar 2 Woodstock Funeral Home 10 Woodstock Market 8 Yawn's Publishing 31

Beth Poirier, Jennifer Hall PRODUCTION CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Leigh Hall CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

Dave Gossett EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER

Otis Brumby III GENERAL MANAGER

Lee B. Garrett V.P. ADVERTISING Wade Stephens ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Jay Whorton I N F O R M AT I O N

Cherokee Life magazine is published six times a year by the Cherokee Tribune and distributed to more than 20,000 homes. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES

To request a copy or to subscribe to Cherokee Life, contact 770.795.5001 ADVERTISING

To advertise, contact Kim Fowler at 770.795.3068 SUBMISSIONS

Please send all editorial correspondence to mmaguire@cherokeelifemagazine.com Follow us on facebook


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F R O M T H E D I R E C TO R

BEST OF CHEROKEE STAFF PICKS Each year we present our

Best Of Cherokee voted on by you – our readers.

And, in what is becoming an annual tradition, we present some of our staff’s favorite Best Of picks. Longtime Cherokee Life columnist Carla Barnes faves include the Red Velvet Royale frozen yogurt at the new Menchie's in Canton, best hometown rock band The Thrillhammers and Learning Express in Towne Lake as best toy store. She also touted Dr. Robert A. Mills at Pathway Internal Medicine as best primary care physician and best customer service at the Lancome counter at the Belk in Canton. Staff writer and designer Stacey L. Evans said the best sushi is at Izumi in Woodstock. “I appreciate that they have inventive and yummy rolls for vegetarians, not just your standard avocado or cucumber roll. All their vegetarian rolls are outstanding— I have a difficult time choosing which ones I want.” She noted Blankets Creek as the best place to bike. For best group of volunteers and people making a difference she said Iron Hearts, a nonprofit therapeutic horsemanship program dedicated to empowering children and adults with special needs through equine-assisted activities, located in Canton. “It’s an awesome group of people who really make an impact.” Our food writer Joan Durbin said her favorite old timey Cherokee landmark is The Cherokee Market at Cumming Highway and Union Hill Road. “It would look right at home in any movie about the days of yesteryear. In addition to its funky appearance, depending on the time of year, the market sells everything from fresh produce to

Christmas trees and yard art. I’m told a developer has the market and the surrounding land in his sights, but losing this irreplaceable little gem would be a shame,” she said. She said the best sandwich few people know about is The Doner (pronounced dough-ner). The doner is made up of seasoned beef, lettuce, tomato, onions and a special yogurt sauce on thick pita bread. Although on first glance it looks like a Greek gyro, the seasoning in the meat and sauce is different, making the first bite a palatepleasing surprise. It will keep you coming back for more. This German specialty is proudly served at Frankfurt Doner and Meats in Ball Ground. She said her favorite New Yorkstyle pizza is Taste of Italy on Highway 92 in Woodstock. “It can’t be beat for pies that any denizen of the Big Apple would instantly recognize and appreciate. Top notch ingredients and respect for tradition puts this pizza on top in my book.” One of our photographers, Woodstock’s Jennifer Carter, said her favorite place for meeting authors is Foxtale Book Shoppe in Woodstock. “I don't know how the owners at Foxtale do it, but they are miracle workers when it comes to attracting the really big

authors to our little southern hamlet. It is not uncommon to see New York Times bestselling writers in the mix on their monthly calendar, and Foxtale ladies always have a knack for turning book signing events into a huge party for book lovers.” She said the Magnolia Thomas Restaurant in Woodstock is the best place to have a mimosa brunch. For favorite place to walk, she noted the wildflower fields at Gibbs Gardens in Ball Ground. “The Wildflower Garden at Gibbs doesn't always receive as much exposure as the extravagant Daffodil or Japanese Gardens. But it has my vote for a serene walk in a natural setting to gather one's thoughts. For an added treat, I take the ‘road less travelled by,’ at the trail's crossroads where you have the choice to go up the hill or not. I always choose the hill. From the top, there is a majestic mountain view over an ocean of wildflowers, and I usually have it completely to myself up there.” What about you? Have you got a favorite or Best Of Cherokee you want to share with us? Just email us at mmaguire@ cherokeelifemagazine.com. Best, Mark Wallace Maguire

The Funk Heritage Center of Reinhardt University Georgia’s Official Frontier and Southeastern Indian Interpretive Center • Hall of the Ancients and artifacts • Huge collection of historic hand tools • Native American art • Visit historic 1840’s log cabins 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Waleska, GA 30183 • 770.720.5970 www.reinhardt.edu/funkheritage Tues. - Fri. 9am-4pm Sat. 10am-5pm • Sun. 1pm-5pm January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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meet some of our contributors For almost 10 years Carla Barnes told Cherokee’s story for the Cherokee Tribune newspaper. Unknowingly she discovered her own story through its people and places, and built her life within its rolling landscape. When she is not writing, or thinking about writing, she is an avid reader, unapologetic anglophile and fashion devotee. She works in marketing for Kennesaw State University and is a proud honorary member of the Service League of Cherokee County. She loves to laugh and works at perfecting her “Yoda” voice which she occasionally shares with friends, particularly those under the age of eight.

Jennifer Carter is a photographer who recognizes roads on a map as “primary-colored possibilities” and odometer miles as “little victories.” She lives to travel, and her favorite thing in the world is waking up on a Saturday morning with a full tank of gas in her car and a fully-charged battery in her Canon 7D. Equally well, she loves putting down roots in her home county of Cherokee with her husband Benjamin, son Xavier, and her true blue hound dog Sadie Sue-Belle. Her photography has been published by the Marietta Daily Journal, the Cherokee Tribune, Cherokee Life Magazine, Cobb Life Magazine, Woodstock Patch and the city of Woodstock’s tourism brochure.

Rebecca Johnston is managing editor of the Cherokee Tribune and a lifelong Cherokee County resident. She has worked in the local media for 25 years in newspaper, radio and cable television. She has been honored with a number of awards for her columns and her work on radio, including Best Serious Column from the Georgia Press Association, most recently first place in 2011 and several GABBY awards from the Georgia Association of Broadcasters. Rebecca loves Cherokee County history and traces her roots in the county back to the time it was chartered in 1831. She wrote a comprehensive look at the county’s past, “Cherokee County: A History,” for the Cherokee County Historical Society. The book was published in 2011 and all proceeds benefit the Historical Society. In her spare time Rebecca loves to volunteer and is a member of the Cherokee County Historical Society and the Boys and Girls Club boards of directors, as well as a member of the Canton Downtown Development Authority. She is married to her childhood sweetheart and husband of 37 years, Harry Johnston, and they have two adult children. They live near downtown Canton.

Chris Collett is a life-long resident of Cherokee County. After spending 15 years with the Sheriff's Office, he is now the Chief Marshal and Director of 9-1-1. This includes Code Enforcement, Animal Control, 9-1-1, the Animal Shelter, and the Recycling Center. In his "spare time", he finds solitude at Canton Golf Club! Born and raised in Atlanta, Sam Bennett started photography in high school and continued at the University of South Carolina where he majored in Visual Communications. His work has previously appeared in several publications including the Marietta Daily Journal, Dawg Post, Score Atlanta and Johns Creek Herald. He also owns Cutting Edge Images that specializes in youth and high school sports photography. Sam has a passion for sports. He has served as a coach and umpire, acquired a black belt in Taekwondo and possesses a deep passion when rooting on his USC Gamecocks.

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NEUROLOGY AND SLEEP MEDICINE

Faiz E. Niaz, MD www.comprehensive-neurology.com Main office in Canton Other offices in Roswell and Blue Ridge Medical Director of the Sleep Disorders Center, Northside Cherokee Hospital

Dr. Niaz completed his residency in Neurology and fellowship in clinical neurophysiology/epilepsy and sleep medicine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, and was also on the faculty at Vanderbilt University. He treats patients with: • Sleep apnea and other sleep disorders • Seizures/Epilepsy • Stroke • Migraine headaches • Alzheimer's dementia • Parkinson's disease • Snoring • Restless legs syndrome • Multiple sclerosis • Carpal tunnel syndrome • Peripheral neuropathy • Sciatica / back pain • Neck pain • Dizziness / vertigo and other neurologic disorders

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[correction]

[feedback] Your article was an excellent snapshot of the evening

We incorrectly identified Cherokee resident Billy Hayes and his wife Brittany in the SCENE section of the November/December issue of Cherokee Life. The correct photo of the couple is above.

Dear Cherokee Life: I just received my copy of Cherokee Life in the mail today, and was excited to see the article on Les Marmitons of Atlanta beginning on page 26. I had been out of town for a few days, and several friends had called to say they saw my name mentioned in an article about Les Marmitons, but I hadn’t seen it yet. I was afraid I had missed it, but today my fears were put to rest! Your staff did an excellent job of this, truly! During the event, they were courteous, clearly interested in what we were doing, and very professional in their approach to understanding and covering what we do. The resulting article was, in my view, excellent! It captured all the essential elements of a fine evening of cooking, but more than that, it captured the essence of the club, which is enjoying cooking and good fellowship. Thank you, again, for a fine editorial project! In warm Les Marmitons friendship, Ron Seiberling Les Marmitons of Atlanta Woodstock

January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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[style] Working out style goes mainstream

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So long, dingy sweatpants. Workout clothes for women, once relegated to the back of the closet, are moving to the front of the fashion scene. Yoga pants are the new jeans, neon sports bras have become the "it" accessory and long athletic socks are hipper than high heels. "I've actually had more excitement buying workout gear than normal jeans and dresses," says Amanda Kleinhenz, 27, who wears workout gear both in and outside of the gym in Cleveland. "I want to look good." Blame it on the push by many Americans toward a more active lifestyle. Or call it an extension of the nation's fascination with fashion. Either way, these days jogging suits are just as likely to be seen on a runway in New York as a treadmill in Texas. In fact, sales of workout gear are growing faster than sales of everyday clothing — by a lot. Spending on workout clothes jumped 7 percent to $31.6 billion during the 12-month period that ended in August from the same period a year ago. That compares with a 1 percent rise in spending for other clothing to about $169.2 billion. But these aren't cheap cotton T-shirts and spandex jumpsuits. Top designers like Calvin Klein, Stella McCartney and Alexander Wang all rolled out fitness chic clothing lines, with everything from $50 leggings to $125 zip-front hoodies and $225 long john sweatpants. And big nationwide retailers like Gap, Forever 21, Victoria Secret and Macy's have fitness lines, too. "Active has become an important part of what customers are wearing," says Karen Hoguet, chief financial officer at Macy's, which is expanding its active wear label to 400 stores from 160. "Sometimes it's for athletic endeavors. Sometimes it's just to run errands." This is the latest evolution in fitness fashion. Sweatpants and tees were the hallmark of athletic clothing for decades. That changed with the invention of spandex in 1959, then again with the aerobics craze of the 1980s when tights, leotards, legwarmers and nylon track suits became popular. Athletic gear giants like Nike, Reebok and Adidas were popular for years as synthetic material like Gore Tex and Lyrcra gained popularity because of their performance qualities. Then, in the late 1990s, it became cool to wear workout clothes everywhere after the Lululemon athletic chain opened and gained a loyal following of fitness enthusiasts willing to shell out $100 for yoga pants. Annie Georgia Greenberg, a New York editor for style blog Refinery, 29, says she noticed the trend at the New York Fashion Week in September as more people were choosing shoes like the neon Nike Free Flyknit over designer pumps.


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Finally, You Can Sleep, Work, And Play Without Pain Again! How To Get Rid Of Neck Pain And Disc Herniations Without Surgery If you're suffering from neck pain, arm pain, or numbness in the hands, this may be the most important article you ever read about your health. This is, quite frankly, a vital message regarding your future health. It's about what is perhaps the most revolutionary treatment ever used for neck and arm pain. Even pinched nerves and disc herniation's can be successfully treated with this amazing therapy. You can recover. Joyful, pain-free living should be yours. My name is Dr. Amy Valente & I understand what it feels like to live in pain, because I see it every day. I've seen hundreds of people with neck problems and headaches leave the office pain free. When cushions in your neck joint, called discs, get injured or wear out, they begin to degenerate and cause pain. Bulging and herniation's begin to form, pressing on the nerve roots. The most common invasive treatment for disc herniation is surgery. Even with health insurance the patient is left with their own portion of the bill, in excess of $10,000-$15,000, and sometimes more. In addition, the recovery time and missed work can be anywhere from 3 to 6 months, not to mention the obvious severe risks associated with all surgeries. Before You Go Under The Knife And Opt For Spinal Surgery… You should seriously consider a less invasive approach called spinal decompression. Non-surgical spinal decompression is a new technology that has been proven to help disc herniation. It creates a vacuum effect on the disc, which pulls the disc back into its normal position and brings in a fresh blood supply to promote healing. The conditions this amazing treatment can help with are: • Serious neck pain • Shooting pains in the arms • Numbness and tingling • Migraine headaches • Bulging Cervical Discs

Just Listen to What our Patients Have To Say: When I began treatment at North Cobb Spine and Nerve I had agonizing pain in my neck and I could not feel my right arm. This had been going for so long that I thought my case was hopeless. Since I have started care movement in my arm and hand have been restored. I know longer have numbness in my arm and I can turn my head from side to side without pain. My energy has been restored and I can now play with my kids! I am so amazed after 30 years of pain I feel 100% better! Thank you, Colleen S. I sought out care at North Cobb Spine and Nerve for the pain and stiffness in my neck. The pain had been bothering me for about 4 months. I was unable to turn my head from side to side, which made driving difficult. Before seeking treatment I had tried multiple muscle relaxants and anti-inflammatory medications.Since starting my care I have improved 100%.The pain in my neck is gone and I am now able to turn my head with no pain. What surprised me most was that I have also had fewer headaches. The staff here has treated me great and always show genuine concern about my well -being. Thank you, Diana T. Until February 28, you can get everything for only $20. It's time for you to find out if spinal decompression will be your neck, arm and headache pain solution. For 2 months only, I'm running a very special offer where you can find out if you are a candidate for spinal decompression therapy.

And the best part about it is... No Dangerous Drugs, No Invasive Procedures, And No Painful Exercises. Spinal decompression treatments are very gentle. In fact, every once and a while I even catch a patient sleeping during sessions. The normal price for this type of evaluation,including x-rays,is $250 so you're saving a considerable amount by taking me up on this offer. Call today and we can get you scheduled for your consultation, exam and x-rays as soon as there's an opening. Our office is located just off the loop near Wal-Mart, just a few minutes from you. When you call, tell the receptionist you'd like to come in for the Decompression Evaluation so she can give you proper credit for this special offer. Sincerely, Dr. Amy Valente

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12/18/2013

1:21 AM

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Cherokee Life January/February 2014

For years, the joke in the auto industry was that a mass-produced car that runs on hydrogen was always a decade away. That will change next year when Hyundai starts selling a Tucson SUV powered by a hydrogen fuel cell. It will be the first mass-market vehicle of its type to be sold or leased in the U.S. "These things are now ready for prime time," John Krafcik, Hyundai's North American CEO, said. Even as the industry focused on battery-powered and hybrid cars, automakers such as Hyundai, Honda and Toyota kept up research on fuel cells. Now they appear to have conquered obstacles such as high costs, safety concerns and a lack of filling stations. These vehicles could help the companies meet stricter future fuel-economy standards. Automakers have been dabbling in hydrogen-powered cars since the 1960s. General Motors announced a test fleet of hydrogen-powered Chevy Equinoxes in the mid-2000s, and Honda leased about two-dozen FCX Clarity models for $600 per month starting in 2005.


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President George W. Bush allocated $1.2 billion for hydrogen research and said in his 2003 State of the Union address: "The first car driven by a child born today could be powered by hydrogen and pollution free." But the program was largely scrapped by the Obama administration, which focused more on battery-powered vehicles. Hyundai now is making Bush's forecast come true, beating other auto companies to the mass market with Tucsons that have electric motors powered by a stack of hydrogen fuel cells. Hyundai plans to start selling the vehicles in Southern California and eventually spread to other areas as filling stations are built. Hyundai says it has overcome safety and storage issues with a rear-mounted tank that has passed numerous crash tests without incident. As for filling stations, the California Air Resources Board says there currently are nine open to the public in the state. Legislators recently allocated about $200 million per year for 100 more, to be built by 2023. Honda Motor Co. is scheduled to show off a fuel-cell concept vehicle, which it says hints at the aerodynamic

design of the next generation fuel-cell vehicle to be launched in 2015. Further details weren't available. General Motors continues work on its fuel-cell vehicles. The largest U.S. automaker, which has spent a lot of time and resources on battery-powered cars such as the Chevrolet Volt, has no fuel-cell vehicles currently in its new product pipeline, spokesman Dan Flores said. He said more work needs to be done on cost and infrastructure to make the cars viable. Hydrogen cars likely will help automakers meet new goals from eight key states to put more zero-emissions cars on the road. The states, including California and New York, pledged late last month to work together to put 3.3 million battery-powered cars, plug-in hybrids and other clean-burning vehicles on the roads in those states by 2025. That's more than 15 times as many zero-emission vehicles projected to be in use in the entire U.S. by 2015. The other states in the pact are Massachusetts, Maryland, Oregon, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Vermont. The eight states together represent about 23 percent of the U.S. auto market.

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January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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12/18/2013

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Love

& marriage



By Rebecca Johnston/Photography by Sam Bennett



After 55 years of marriage, Mary and Bill Johnston of Woodstock still have plenty to celebrate on Valentine’s Day. Love is not something they remember just once a year, but the underlying component of a marriage that has flourished since they first met and got married more than five decades ago.


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Mary Beavers, as she was then, grew up in the Macedonia community in east Cherokee County. The two were married on June 20, 1959, in a ceremony at Macedonia Baptist Church. They were introduced by friends Tom and Shirley Fowler in 1957 after Bill, a Woodstock native, returned from his time serving in the U.S. Air Force. For Bill, at least, it was love at first sight. “I knew right away that she was the one,” Bill said as he sat in the living room of his family home in downtown Woodstock 56 years after he first met Mary in December 1957. Mary glanced lovingly at her husband with that unspoken communication that close couples have as she admits it took her a little longer to come around, but once she did, the rest is history. The couple dated for a year, and on Christmas Eve 1958 Bill asked Mary to be his wife. “I liked her and I liked her family,” Bill said. “She is a solid, ambitious, smart person.” Bill and Mary Johnston of Woodstock.

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“You have to work hard, it is a give and take. It is not about how glamorous you are, you have to be a helpmate. It is about honesty.” — Mary Johnston

Mary points to similar traits when she explains what caused her to say yes to Bill’s proposal and why the marriage has lasted for 55 years. “He is hard working and honest, he helps me with everything, he is just a good person to have around,” Mary said. Bill agrees that the foundation of a longlasting relationship is mutual respect and common goals. “She has always helped me and we have always worked together,” Bill said. And he says it doesn’t hurt a bit that she is a great cook. “It’s my biscuits that have kept him around,” she responds with a laugh. But on a serious note, Mary points to the importance of commitment and the willingness to listen and compromise. “You have to work hard, it is a give and take. It is not about how glamorous you are, you have to be a helpmate,” Mary said. “It is about honesty.”

January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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12/26/2013

1:08 PM

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REFLECTIONS

By Chris Collett

Real resolutions, real solutions It’s a new year and many will have made resolutions that will fail, with only a few being successful at keeping their promises to themselves. Some will plan on regular trips to the gym. Some will make a resolution to quit smoking or some other unhealthy vice. Come to think of it, most resolutions involve improving health. And that is a good thing. But few have the true desire to succeed. So as a fellow Cherokee resident, let’s make some resolutions together that can only improve the quality of life for each of us. Let’s make a resolution to not say anything about other people unless it is something good. This resolution would include not making personal attacks against public servants. In other words, our political comments should be about the issues and not a personal attack against the candidates. This will be tough for some because they aren’t smart enough to understand the

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Cherokee Life January/February 2014

issues. So personally attacking candidates is all they can do politically. I am one of those that aren’t smart enough to always understand the issues. But then again, I know it and I’m not out bashing our leaders. Another good resolution for us to adopt as a community would be to remember those that are less fortunate than us year around as opposed to only around the holidays. Those same people that are in need at Christmas are usually in need at all times during the year. This can be accomplished in many ways. Choose your own path. An important resolution for us to make is to make sure that we are important in the life of some child whether the child has our DNA or someone else’s. Many clamor to develop relationships with the rich and famous thinking that it will make their own lives seem more important. But most reasonable people would agree that if you want to really make Cherokee a better place, make the life of a child better. This would include our actions in front of children. They might appear as if they aren’t watching and listening, but they are. If we were to simply follow these three resolutions, Cherokee County would be a better place for all of us to live. But following these three make going to the gym and quitting smoking seem like child’s play. Because following these three is more about our character than our health. I wish all of you the best whether you made a resolution or not. Cherokee County is blessed with many blessings. But her greatest asset is the people she calls citizens. If we can keep that in mind, 2014 will be better than we can imagine. Happy New Year!


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BY JENNIFER CARTER, JOAN DURBIN, STACEY L. EVANS, MARK WALLACE MAGUIRE, MEREDITH PRUDEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM BENNETT AND JENNIFER CARTER

BEST OF CHEROKEE

>>2014


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Best Of CHEROKEE

BEST VOLUNTEER >>Melissa Whatley Canton resident Melissa Whatley works diligently every day as an executive administrative assistant to the superintendent of the school district, but it’s what she chooses to do in her spare time that has garnered public admiration from Cherokee Life readers. Voted “Best Volunteer,” Whatley is currently serving her eighth year as a member of the Service League of Cherokee County. Whatley is performing the duty of Caseworker this year, but her previous roles have included Treasurer, Riverfest Chair and others. When asked what motivates her volunteerism, she doesn’t hesitate to emphasize the instrumental role the Service League plays in helping the children of Cherokee County. “The opportunity to help our community’s most at-risk children is what motivates me and the other 90 women of the League to volunteer. As Caseworker, I hear from school counselors about the needs of these children, and I feel truly blessed to be a part of the group who strives to meet those needs,” said Whatley. “Through referrals from local schools and community organizations, the Service League is able to provide assistance with basic needs such as eyeglasses, clothing, dental or medical care, or with a family’s rent or utility bill.” In addition to its regular casework, the League also strives to touch the lives of children through its annual Christmas Children program providing not only toys, but also often basic necessities like a bed for a child, a warm blanket for a baby and sneakers for a student athlete. “It is an incredible honor to be recognized by my peers and to have the opportunity to serve through the Service League,” said Whatley of being awarded the title “Best Volunteer.” “I cannot say enough great things about the League and its mission. I hope that this recognition will lead others in our community to support the League as a sponsor, a patron or a member... you will make a difference in the life of a child.”

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Linda and Coy Adair of Canton.

BEST MEAT AND THREE >>Keithsburg Cafe 2452 Ball Ground Hwy, Canton 678.880.1714

One of the nicest things about Cherokee County is that wonderful little places like Keithsburg Café do not only survive, but thrive. It’s not much to look at from the outside. Looking like a former service station or old country store (it once was both), the building almost fades into the background and is easy to pass by. Coy Adair, who owns the café with his wife Linda, said he’s had several first-time customers tell him they’ve driven by the place scores of times but had just decided to stop in one day. Once they try the Adairs’ homestyle cooking, they’re hooked. You can get a terrific breakfast here, complete with some dynamite homemade biscuits, but it’s lunch that really puts the café’s country roots in the spotlight. Plates of one of the meats and two veggies, as well as a biscuit, piece of cornbread or roll, run just $6.95 and are sure to please. There are always staples like country fried steak and ham on the menu, but Adair also has a few daily specials. On a recent afternoon, there was what was billed as roast beef, but actually was tender, tasty, pot roaststyle beef with luxurious brown gravy. And even though usually I’m not a big fan of ham, Adair won me over completely with his succulent slice. Among the many choices for sides are fried yellow squash, mashed potatoes, spinach, green beans and crowder peas. This is not the place to expect overly salty or highly seasoned food, so if more pep is desirable, there is a handy bottle of hot sauce on each table.

Bret Bond Canton, Riverstone Pkwy 770-720-7835

Ned Castleberry, CFP®, AAMS® Downtown Canton 770-720-6245

Kelly Geiken, CFP®, AAMS® Hickory Flat 678-297-0154

Rob Means, Jr. Woodstock 770-926-0909

Charles Simon BridgeMill 678-493-9520

Steve Tuck Woodstock 770-926-5503

Tawanna Wesson Prominence Point/Canton 770-479-4758

January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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12/26/2013

Best Of CHEROKEE

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BEST BARTENDER >>Kevin Hoffman, PURE 405 Chambers Street, Woodstock, GA 770.952.7873 http://puretaqueria.com/woodstock woodstock@puretaqueria.com

Bartender Kevin Hoffman has all the makings of a great bartender: he has worked his way up through the ranks from a busboy position during his three years at PURE, was trained in-house to finally land himself behind the bar, is especially attentive to his customers, and perhaps most importantly, he can make an extremely tasty peach mojito. What’s more, he’s not afraid to get creative. “I like to formulate new cocktails that are inspired by the season and are exclusive to PURE,” Hoffman explains. His favorite drink to mix is what he calls the “reposadorita,” which is a tasty concoction of the signature PURE margarita mix combined with Patron Citronage and the juice of three limes. Jessica Laudermill, general manager of PURE, believes that Cherokee Life readers love the atmosphere and bartenders so much because they prove that you don’t have to go to Buckhead to have a good time. “PURE is a fun, loud, upbeat restaurant where employees and guests go to have a good time,” said Laudermill. “Our staff is like a big family so we want to make sure our guests feel like part of the family, too.”

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Cherokee Life January/February 2014


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12/26/2013

1:05 PM

BEST FINE DINING >>Goin’ Coastal 125 West Main Street, Canton 770.479.3737 www.goincoastalseafood.com https://www.facebook.com/ GoinCoastalSeafood In landlocked north Georgia, reliably fresh and well-prepared seafood served in an atmosphere that’s both comfortable and stylish qualifies as one of the best kinds of fine dining experiences. That’s what diners can look forward to at Goin’ Coastal. Chef and owner Zach Kell is a graduate of Johnson & Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island. He opened the original Goin’ Coastal in Canton five years ago and a second one in Virginia Highlands in 2010. “The restaurant’s mission is to provide our guests with the highest quality product and service in a relaxed, unpretentious atmosphere,” Kell said. Seafood is the star of the menu, with as many as eight different fish available each day. “We source our sustainable seafood from a number of purveyors who deliver to the restaurant daily to ensure freshness. All of our fresh fish is listed on our chalk boards and when the fish is sold out we erase it from our boards,” Kell said. On a recent night choices included mahi mahi, grouper, swordfish, Scottish salmon, yellowfin tuna and snow crab. Signature dishes include an appetizer of fresh domestic jumbo lump crab cakes with Dijon lemon butter and an entrée of fresh dry pack New Bedford sea scallops served over white truffle risotto.

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Best Of CHEROKEE ucked away in the unassuming Hickory Flat Village Shopping Center, Frosty Frog Creamery & Café is one of those coveted places where in-the-know locals go when their sweet tooth is craving a fix. Whether you’re seeking a slice of pie and coffee for your breakfast, an after-school ice cream treat with your children or a Saturday night dessert-date with your partner, Frosty Frog offers something to suit everyone’s taste. Owners Frank and Glenda Cole, residents of the Hickory Flat community, take pride in their made-fromscratch selections and hired in-house baker Sharon Murphy seven years ago to carry on this tradition of excellence. Murphy continually tries to surprise customers with new recipes, and her latest creation is the pecan praline cake. Already a winner in the customers’ eyes (and mouths), the café is having a hard time keeping it in the case, according to Glenda. The cake’s layers of crunchy pecans and gooey praline give way to a creamy filling and a spice cake, all for the perfect balance of both sweet and savory. Served with a dab of whipped cream and a caramel sauce, the cake is a perfect ending to a meal or superb all by itself. Other worthy recommendations include their coconut cream pie, banana split, or a family favorite, “S’moresFor-Four.” Whole pies and cakes can also be specially ordered for special occasions.

T

BEST DESSERT >> Frosty Frog Creamery & Café 6205 Hickory Flat Highway, Canton 770.704.9333 www.frostyfrogcreamery.com info@frostyfrogcreamery.com

BEST OLD THING >>Canton Courthouse 100 North Street, Canton 770.345.3288 http://rockbarn.org/facilityCourthouse.php The building is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and visitors are welcome. The Historic Courthouse Jail is open for tours by appointment.

Voted Cherokee’s “Best Old Thing,” the Corinthiancolumned, historic courthouse that towers over Canton’s downtown square still has a few tales to tell. On the same steps where you now see schoolchildren on field trips, you once would have run into busy judges, deputies and occasional fleeing prisoners who liked to shimmy down the marble walls with tied bedsheets.

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Cherokee Life January/February 2014

The courthouse was built in 1927 by the architect A. Ten Eyck Brown, and marble slabs were carried in from nearby Tate for the construction of its Neo-Classical Revival design. According to an article posted on the Cherokee County Historical Society website, the cells that line the front of the courthouse building and overlook the rear of the marble eagles led to a popular Cherokee County euphemism for incarceration: a prisoner was not "in jail," but "behind the eagles."


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Best Of CHEROKEE

BEST BBQ >>Scott Boys BBQ 4864 Cumming Highway, Canton 404.217.2365 www.scottboysbbq.com www.facebook.com/pages/ Scott-Boys-BBQ Even if readers hadn’t voted Scott Boys the best barbecue in Cherokee, driving by the food truck at Union Hill Road and Cumming Highway I would never have been able to resist the tantalizing smoke wafting from their two wood-burning cookers. Couple that amazing aroma with the down home eye appeal of the funky food truck, the cars and trucks parked two deep and several customers patiently awaiting their orders, and it was clear that this was ‘cue worth stopping for. One bite of the moist, tender pulled pork revealed the secret. This meat had some serious smoke in it, just the way I like it. That same bold smokiness permeated the baby back ribs and chicken. Maybe it’s because Russ Scott burns a variety of woods, including peach and pecan, for his ‘cue. Maybe it’s due to his excellent and efficient “cookers,” built by BBQ pitmasters and award-winning competition cooks Scott Smith and Tim Thomas in Acworth. Or perhaps it’s because Russ has been barbecuing for at least 30 years and has developed the golden touch. He and his wife, Ann, live in East Cobb and are

the ones who actually run the business, but his brother Paul, a certified barbecue judge who still lives down in Crawford County, also occasionally contributes some time and expertise. Other than the smokiness, for me, what really sets the ribs apart is the unique preparation. Coated with a dry rub that includes cumin, garlic, raw sugar, chocolate, ancho chile and finely ground coffee, smoked at 200 degrees for one hour and 250 degrees for the second hour, the ribs are then plopped into a pan a doused with a concoction of apple jelly, butter and pineapple juice. “The salty and smoky rub is offset by the apple,” Russ explained. The meat is then finished off at 300 degrees and the ribs are done in around three hours because Russ says he prefers “hot and fast” to “low and slow.” The texture of the finished product is flavorful and just tender enough for a good chew. The mustard-based Hog Tonic, Scott Boys’ proprietary sauce, has a hint of sweetness but with pleasing tang. Other sauces include a Carolina vinegar and a sweet smoky red. For sides, Ann makes a dynamite cole slaw with apple and mango and a loaded baked potato salad.

BEST NEW THING >>Cherokee Aquatic Center 4864 Cumming Highway, Canton 1200 Gresham Mill Pkwy, Holly Springs 678.880.4760 http://www.crpa.net

Russ Scott, longtime pickmaster, slices up a batch of ribs.


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BEST FRIED CHICKEN >>Downtown Kitchen 140 E. Marietta St., Canton 770.479.1616 www.thedowntownkitchen.com

For 10 years, the folks at Downtown Kitchen have been putting out great food in one of Canton’s older buildings just off the main drag in the historic part of town. The restaurant has a cool vibe and bills itself as a “new American steakhouse,” but other items such as game meats and seafood also grace the menu. One of the most popular items on the bill of fare, the DT Kitchen Fried Chicken, is a standout. It is one of the most frequently mentioned items when diners go online to praise the restaurant. “The fried chicken is a fresh local chicken breast that is flash fried and served with a bacon and fresh thyme gravy,” said Chef Zach Kell, who owns the restaurant with partner Corey Shupert. “The chicken is so good because of the gravy and the freshness of the product. Plus, it is cooked to order.”

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12/26/2013

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ooking for an upscale yet comfortable salon experience without the headache of driving downtown? Well, look no further than Intercoiffure America/Canada member Jyl Craven Hair Design. Since 1999, Jyl and >> Jason Craven and their 7970 Knox Bridge Hwy., Canton staff have been providing a pleasantly hip salon 770.345.9411 experience to tons of www.jylcraven.com happy customers at the couple’s eponymous Canton salon. “Our main focus was to bring something outside the Perimeter that you previously could only go into Atlanta to get,”Jyl said. Widely recognized for cutting-edge color techniques and innovative treatments for fine, thinning hair, such as Evolve and Kerastase, the team also is Vidal Sassoon trained cutters with an overall focus on hair and education. “We pride ourselves on education,” Jyl said. “We have a full time education director, and we all travel for education here and abroad, so the team is constantly learning the latest and greatest trends and going back to basics as well.” It’s that kind of dedication to the craft combined with a whole lot of talent, skill and creativity that has earned Jyl Craven Hair Design numerous industry accolades, including the Salon Today Magazine 2012 Salon of Distinction award and a win at the L’Oreal Professional 2012 nationwide INOA Hair Color contest. Today, they can add one more to their trophy case — Best Salon in Cherokee!

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CHEROKEE

BEST SALON Jyl Craven Hair Design

Jyl Craven, owner

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Best Of CHEROKEE

BEST GIFT SHOP >>What a Girl Wants 1455 Riverstone Pkwy., Ste. 120, Canton, GA 30114 770.720.2040 www.shopwhatagirlwants.com

Sisters Jessie Cheshire, and Janice Perkins, both of Canton.

Where can you go for a shopping experience that’s never quite the same on any two visits? At Canton boutique and gift shop What a Girl Wants, owners Janice Perkins, Jessie Cheshire and Lisa Castleberry pride themselves on weekly updates to their quirkily cute retail store. “We order from different companies and replenish weekly,” Perkins said. “So, you’re always going to find something new when you come in.” In business for three years, the motherdaughters trio and long-time Canton residents said they love fashion and had always wanted to work together—even during their previous lives as student, teacher and stay-at-home mom, respectively. “We loved the idea of building a business together,” Cheshire said. “And, we grew up in this community, so, it’s nice to see familiar faces in the store.” Today, What a Girl Wants is a specialty boutique that exemplifies the distinct yet complementary personalities of its three owner-partners as a virtual treasure trove of clothing, accessories and gifts for girls and women of all ages. Housing everything from Behind the Glass jewelry, Caren Original bath goodies and collegiate paraphernalia to Mudpie chalkboard wine charms, trendy chevron patterned leggings and Mogo bracelets for the kids, What a Girl Wants more than earns its Best Of spot as a one-stop-shop for fashionistas.

BEST GOLF COURSE >>BridgeMill Athletic Club 1190 BridgeMill Avenue, Canton 770.345.5500 http://bridgemillathleticclub.com/golf Nestled into the rolling hills of the affluent BridgeMill neighborhood of Canton, this 18-hole championship golf course has become revered by golfers not only in its home county of Cherokee, but throughout the metroAtlanta region. With its par-72 layout, this well-maintained course was designed by golf greats Desmond Muirhead, designer of Mission Hills of the LPGA Nabisco Championship, and Georgia’s Larry Mize, the 1987 Masters Champion. Its sixteenth hole, featuring a true island green, is a particular club favorite. Members also appreciate BridgeMill’s comprehensive

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practice facilities, their separate short game practice area, and a hearty meal at Featherstone’s Grille after a game. To check rates and book a tee time, visit http://bridgemillathleticclub.com/book-a-tee-time/.


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BEST BIKE SHOP >>Outspokin’ 8594 Main St., Woodstock, GA 30188 678.483.0200 www.outspokinbikes.com For Outspokin’ owner Kevin Poske, opening a fullservice bike shop in downtown Woodstock was the culmination of a lifetime love affair with the sport. “I’d been cycling for 35 years and wanted to do something I was passionate about,” Poske said. “I picked this area because I grew up in a railroad town, and there weren’t any [bike] shops around here.” Now, a decade later, he and his team of bicycle enthusiasts have built a thriving business from a strong foundation of quality products, unmatched expertise and impeccable customer service. And, they’ve done so in one of the most bustling cities in Cherokee County. “I didn’t know Woodstock was going to expand like it has,” Poske said. “But one of my favorite things about having the store here is the relationships we’ve built with customers, riders and the community.” At Outspokin’, riders of all ages and skill levels can get everything they could ever possibly need to hit the road (or the trails) on two wheels. And, they can always trust that the shop’s wide variety of bikes, accessories and services will be vetted by avid riders. “Most of us ride just about every day,” Poske said. “We ride the product that’s in our shop, and if we don’t like it, we don’t sell it.” With a philosophy like that, it’s no wonder they’ve been voted Best Bike Shop!

BEST MUSICIAN >>Thomas Fountain www.thomasfountain.com www.youtube.com/user/tefountain

Country music artist Thomas Fountain sings pretty close to home. Though his Ball Ground residence is only about 15 minutes from where he grew up in Jasper, he also draws down deep and belts out a tune whose notes ring so true that even the rowdiest of crowds are forced to pause and listen. If you’ve ever wanted to see a country star right before he makes it big, now’s your chance. Fountain, who was named as a finalist for Georgia Male Country Artist of the Year in 2013, just returned from his first tour and is busy recording in Nashville. He’s also been performing gigs throughout Atlanta, with many scheduled in Cherokee County venues like Jump Kitchen & Sports Saloon in Woodstock and The Painted Pig in Canton.

Fountain, who attended Kennesaw State University for a degree in Health and Physical Education and had begun coaching for local schools, admits that it was one of the toughest decisions of his life to give up what he’d been educated to do to pursue a career in music. Coaching had always been a passion for him, he said, but in the end, he just had to follow his dream to be a musician. “I can always come back [to coaching], but music for an artist is different,” said Fountain. “So it's now or never for me as an artist.” And fans have responded well to this career move. Fountain has been drawing crowds with his traditional country style, playing old favorites as well songs he’s written himself. The recognition and fan support that he’s received is what he says spurs him on to do what he loves. “As a songwriter, you’re wearing your heart on your sleeve and then you’re putting your story out there to people who ‘know you,’ but might not know these things about you,” said Fountain. “That made me a little nervous, but the response has been overwhelming. The support from the community has been more that I could ever imagine. It just fuels me to do a little more.”


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BEST PLACE TO CELEBRATE >>The Painted Pig Tavern 190 East Main Street, Canton 678.880.1714 www.paintedpigtavern.com Voted “Best Place to Celebrate” by Cherokee Life readers, the Painted Pig Tavern will be doing a little celebrating of its own Jan. 24 which marks the upscale pub’s first anniversary. Co-owners Nick Vecchio and Joseph Guynup plan to revel in the occasion with a Hawaiian Luau and a pig roast for its loyal customers. And although it has only been in downtown Canton for a short time, the Painted Pig has quickly established a county-wide reputation for its lively gatherings and the owners’ penchant for nightly entertainment. “The Painted Pig is the best place to celebrate because not only do we offer an outstanding selection of pub fare, craft beer and whiskey but it is also the only place around where you can find the variety of entertainment that we offer,” said Vecchio. “Whether you'd like to see a live band, watch stand up comedy, play team trivia, sing karaoke, play pool, darts or ping pong, we've got it all and more.”

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The Autumn Hill Nursery, a Cherokee County favorite since 1992, is not just a place to find unique plants, although the selection there is extraordinary. With locations in both Woodstock and Canton, co-owners Kari and Eric Hill also carry everything their customers need to create dynamic outdoor showplaces for their properties, including fountains, pottery, wind chimes, statuary, bird feeders, arbors and other garden accents. Setting them apart from other nurseries, Autumn Hill loves to create elaborate displays to help inspire their customers with unique landscaping possibilities. “We show them ideas they can incor-

BEST GARDEN ACCESSORIES >>Autumn Hill Nursery Woodstock Location: 4256 Earney Road, 770.442.3901 Canton Location: 100 Pea Ridge Road, 770.345.5252 www.autumnhillnursery.com porate into their own yards,” said Eric. “Whether it is creating a cozy little sitting area in the corner of their back yard, decorating their patio, or creating an entry that welcomes

guests.” For a list of upcoming events and helpful gardening demonstrations, be sure to visit their website and sign up for their newsletter.

BEST PLACE TO SEE A PLAY >>Elm Street Cultural Arts Village 8534 Main St, Woodstock 678.494.4251 www.elmstreetarts.org The performing arts world has begun to take heed of Cherokee County’s wealth of talent thanks to the theatrical gems now being produced on Woodstock’s Elm Street stage. The Elm Street Cultural Arts Village, with the help of Artistic Director G. Lora Grooms, a devoted staff and generous donations from patrons, is becoming a thriving arts mecca, offering performances, instruction and exhibits year round. You’ll find live plays and musi-

cals, camps and classes in drama, art and music as well as concerts, recitals, pageants, art exhibits, the iThink Improv

Troupe and much more. Elm Street currently holds their performances at City Center Auditorium and Offices, 8534 Main Street (the old Woodstock Community Church). Exciting new developments, however, are in progress on their four-acre property where plans are underway for community gardens, restoration of a one hundred year old farmhouse into art gallery and studio space, historic preservation programming and in the future final phase – a state-of-the-art performing arts center.


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BEST ARTIST >>Elly Hobgood

CHEROKEE

www.ellyhobgood.com

Although Elly Hobgood always walked through the world with an artist’s hand, she did not immediately respond to its insistent calling. In fact, after a brief oil painting-stint in her twenties, the talented Canton painter put down her brush and palette to pursue a career in nursing that would span almost 30 years. It wasn’t until returning to Emory University for a Masters degree and taking on even more responsibility that she decided to relieve some job stress by taking a few classes in watercolor. “When I retired, I immersed myself in watercolor. Before long, people would say my paintings ‘made them happy,’” said Hobgood. “I was hooked.” Hobgood began to be accepted in regional and national exhibitions. She has also earned her Lifetime Signature Status with the Georgia Watercolor Society.

BEST FESTIVAL >>Canton Festival of the Arts http://cherokeearts.org/festival 770.704.6244 (Cherokee Arts Center)

OVER 3,000 SQUARE FEET FROM STORAGE AUCTIONS TUESDAY IS SENIOR DAY - 20% OFF 9539 Highway 92 • Woodstock, GA 30188 • 678-346-0891 Open Monday - Saturday 9am-8pm • Sunday 10am-6pm Across from Goodwill in the Shopping Center with Folks and Waffle House

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Every May, Brown Park in downtown Canton is completely transformed into a vibrant, two-day juried arts and crafts show that includes a fine art marketplace, a literary festival and children’s hands-on art experiences. Presented by Cherokee Arts Center, the Canton Festival of the Arts is gearing up for its eleventh year in 2014 and is scheduled for May 17 to 18 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Last year’s event attracted over 60 exhibitors from nine states, panels and book signings with authors from all over the Southeast, and featured food concessions including a wine and beer garden. Children were also entertained by lessons in mural painting, photography, drawing, dance and drama.


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The Canton Main Street Program invites you to

MidCity Pharmacy 196 E. Main Street

GA 770-479-5533 Canton, Billy Cagle, Pharmacy Owner

Family Owned • Diabetic Shoes and Supplies Compression Stockings and Fitting Flu, Shingles, Pneumonia and B12 Injections Durable Medical Equipment (walkers, wheelchairs and ostomy supplies)

Bubble Packing • Orthopedics and Braces Compound Medications and Bill Insurance Medication Therapy Management We offer competitive prices on prescriptions FREE Local Delivery • Fast Friendly Service


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escape to Rosemar y Beach by Stacey L. Evans | photos courtesy of Rosemary Beach and Stacey L. Evans


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With swooping trees, vast green spaces and stunning coastal-inspired homes, Rosemary Beach is in a word, idyllic. Located between Panama City and Destin, Florida, this unique vacation destination revives the classic allAmerican small town. There are rental cottages, condos, a hotel and one inn, but many houses are residences or vacation homes. That strengthens the sense of community in the charming little town. Neighbors greet each other with genuine smiles. Couples laugh as they zoom by on bicycles. Children play games in wideopen parks. Homeowners watering their plants ask about your day as you pass. Restaurant owners talk excitedly about

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their endeavors. It’s a friendly neighborhood that just so happens to have a beautiful beach at its doorstep, top-notch dining and quaint shops. As a vacationer, you feel welcomed into the Rosemary Beach community right from the start. On day one you’re likely thinking ‘this place is great, we should go ahead and book it again for next year,’ but by day three you’re heading over to Rosemary Beach Realty to peruse the homes on the market because, well, wouldn’t this be a great life? The community was actually planned with that goal in mind, to represent the “New Urbanism.” The concept is a blend of intimate neighbor-

hoods and public spaces that’s pedestrian (and bicycle) friendly—it’s sort of anti-what the typical beach town has turned into, congested with cars, fastfood and tacky souvenir shops. At Rosemary Beach, everything you need is just a beautiful, serene stroll away. Enchanting footpaths, boardwalks and secret passages provide a beautiful pathway for leisurely walks to admire the grand homes and gardens. Walking from your cottage to any of the four pools, the gym (which has yoga, pilates and water aerobics classes), the spa, tennis courts, quaint shops, dining, and of course, the beach, is no more than a five minute stroll, and there are very few cars on the roads. January/February 2014 Cherokee Life

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Rosemary Beach is named for the herb that grows wild in the area, and it’s a fitting name as preserving the environment was an important part of planning the community. The plants and flora outside of walls and fences are native to the area, while interior gardens within closed courtyards feature plants that require protected sanctuaries. Oh yeah, and the beach. The gulf’s azure waters are typcially tranquil, complementing the soft, white sand. The beach is bordered by protected dunes, which adds a nice aesthetic to the 2,500 feet of beachfront. What to do Start off with an invigorating and soul soothing yoga class. Grab a smoothie at Amavida Coffee or if you’ve worked up an appetite, head over to Cowgirl Unforgettable sunsets Kitchen for a Soft sand that caresses hearty breakyour feet fast before hitting the beach. Azure gulf waters In an adventurous Butterfly dances mood? Sea Oats rents Crisp Miami-style pools kayaks, Hobie Cats and padGenuine greetings with a warm smile dleboards, or rent a bike The kick of a Moscow from Bamboo Mule at Havana Bar Bicycle Company for a Bike rides on boardtrek down the walks surrounded by scenic 30A lush gardens and with that leads to overhanging trees Deer Lake State Park. The charm of a town bell that rings the numThere’s no ber of the hour reason why any one would Reading rooms with want to vensailboat chandeliers ture out, but if you’re up for Luxurious cottages it, Eden Gardens State Award winning archiPark is a short tecture and homes drive away worthy of a tour and features Moonlit strolls underthe 1897 hisneath a cascade of stars toric Greek Revival home showcasing a collection of Louis XVI furniture that is the second largest in the United States. The home is on breathtaking grounds overflowing with lush live oaks and magnolia trees, camellias and azaleas,

Rosemary Beach is…

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overlooking the Tucker Bayou. Bookworm or a rainy day? You will fall in love with Hidden Lantern, the quaint bookstore with cozy couches underneath a sailboat chandelier, a knowledgeable staff and an art gallery attached. From antiques and interior design shops to beach concessions and souvenirs, the downtown shops offer a diversity of shopping opportunities. Where to eat For a place so small and quaint, Rosemary Beach is abundant in excellent dining. This isn’t your average lazy beach town fare. I was impressed at not only the quality of dining, but the creativity of menus and atmosphere inside each restaurant. You really can’t go wrong with any of the dining options. Some standouts: For more casual fare, Cowgirl Kitchen has a fun atmosphere and unique breakfast items. Try one of their specialties, migas, which is an egg scramble with tortilla chips, onions, tomatoes and

Eden Gardens State Park. jalapenos, topped with queso and fresh chives and served over grits and bacon with two flour tortillas. For a special occasion or date night, pop over to the elegant Paradis for an exceptional meal paired with recommended wine. End the night with a round of drinks at Havana’s bar, or if you want something more low-key, Wild Olives often has live music on weekends.

INFORMATION: Rosemary Beach Cottage Rental Company 866/348-8952 (toll-free) www.rosemarybeach.com rentals@rosemarybeach.com For Rosemary Beach Realty 850/278-2000 (phone) Note: Vacation packages and last-minute specials can be searched online at www.rosemarybeach.com, under the heading “vacation rentals.”

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JULIA BULLOCK, SOPRANO>>> Start the year with a song and a rare chance to see an operatic star on the rise. Soprano Julia Bullock, fresh off performing the title role in Henry Purcell’s semi-opera The Indian Queen in Spain and Russia, is appearing in concert at the Falany Performing Arts Center. The young singer has been collecting awards and accolades for a few years now, including a nod from New York Arts magazine which noted her “vivid presence” and “full, very beautiful voice…and real charisma.” When and where: Jan. 12 at 3 p.m. Falany Performing Arts Center on the Reinhardt University campus, Waleska. Tickets: $25 for adults; $20 for seniors (55 years and older) and students; $10 for children 12 and younger. More information: 770.720.9167 or boxoffice@reinhardt.edu Online: http://www.reinhardt.edu/ Events/2014/julia-bullock,-soprano.html SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD>>> Woodstock’s residential (and by their own definition “semiprofessional”) theater company, Academy Theatre at Compass, presents a musical that spans the centuries, taking the viewer on a trip with characters who are all struggling to get somewhere in life. Locales vary from a 1492 Spanish sailing ship to contemporary New York City, 57 stories above Fifth Ave. A multi-ethnic cast tackles a score that runs the gamut of current popular music.

A closer look at events and activities throughout Cherokee this season When and where: Jan. 16, 17 at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 18 at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Cherokee Arts Center, 94 North St. Canton. More information: 678.697.8959. Online: http://www.atcwoodstock.com/our-season TOM SAWYER>>>Mark Twain’s classic 1876 novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer proved just as enduring once it was adapted for the stage, spawning a myriad of productions and showing no sign of slowing anytime soon. Presented here by Elm Street Arts Tom Sawyer chronicles the adventures of Sawyer, friends Joe Harper and Huckleberry Finn and other familiar characters including the winsome Becky Thatcher, stern Aunt Polly and mysterious Injun Joe. A portion of proceeds from the play will benefit teen programs at Families of Cherokee United in Service. When and where: January 17 & 24 at 7:30 p.m., January 18, 19, 25, 26 at 2 p.m. City Center Auditorium, 8534 Main St., Woodstock. Tickets: $10 in advance online (ages 2 and up) $12 at the door. More information: 678.494.4251 Box office hours: Monday through Friday 1 – 6 p.m., and 30 minutes prior to show times. Online: http://www.elmstreetarts.org/performingarts/current-season/


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DOC SEVERINSEN AND THE SAN MIGUEL 5>> Grammy-award winning trumpeteer and band leader, Carl “Doc” Severinsen’s career has spanned more than six decades, produced 30 albums and included stints with Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman, plus famously playing musical sidekick to Johnny Carson for 30 years on “The Tonight Show.” After moving to Mexico in 2006 he formed the San Miguel 5 with guitarist Gil Guitierrez, violinist Charlie Bisharat, percussionist Jimmy Branly and bass player Kevin Thomas. At 85years old Severinsen is still blowing strong. His witty banter and wild wardrobe continue unabated as well. Note: This show will sell out. When and where: Jan. 30, 7:30 p.m. Falany Performing Arts Center at Reinhardt University, Waleska. Tickets: $35 - $50 for adults; $30 - $45 for seniors (55 years and older) and students; $20 - $35 for children 12 and younger. More information: 770.720.9167 or boxoffice@reinhardt.edu Online: http://www.reinhardt.edu/Events/2014/doc-severinsenand-the-san-miguel-5.html THE HANDSOME DEVILS PRESENT SQUIRM BURPEE>> Vaudeville re-energized and reinvented for a new family audience, Colorado’s Handsome Devils Productions bring The Squirm Burpee Circus to town. Expect an eye-catching show from skilled circus acts like The Human Cannon and The Ladder of Love and don’t forget - there’s always that old stand-by crowdpleaser, chainsaw juggling. Dancing and classic Vaudeville routines round out a theatrical circus that is appropriate for ages 4 and up. When and where: Feb. 21, 7:30 p.m. Falany Performing Arts Center at Reinhardt University, Waleska. Tickets: $35 adults; $30 for seniors (55 years and older) and students; $20 for children 12 and younger. More information: 770.720.9167 or boxoffice@reinhardt.edu Online: http://www.reinhardt.edu/Events/2014/squirm-burpeeby-the-handsome-little-devils-2-21-14.html

Worth The Gas To Go: THE ATLANTA JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL>> Founded in 2000, the AJFF is now the largest film festival in Atlanta (and the second largest Jewish film fest in the United States), attracting more than 30,000 attendees in 2012. Twenty-two days of films that you often can’t see anywhere else in the region, this cinematic event focuses on Jewish culture, history and personalities, presenting a wide range of movies from comedies to documentaries. When and where: Jan. 29 through Feb. 20 at various venues in metro Atlanta More information: Box office reps can be reached at 866.214.2072 Online: http://www.ajff.org/

LIVE IN THE THEATER!

Songs For a New World January 16th & 17th at 7:30pm • January 18th at 3 pm & 7:30pm Presented by Academy Theatre at Compass

The audience is transported from the deck of a 1492 Spanish sailing ship to a ledge 57 stories above Fifth Avenue to meet a startling array of characters. With a small powerhouse, multi-ethnic cast and a driving, exquisitely crafted score running the gamut of today’s popular music, SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD is a great way to bring the next generation into the theatre.

DAILY BREAD PERFORMANCE: February 8th The theatre will host the talents of The Daily Bread, a trio who sings southern gospel in a breathtaking family three part harmony. See website for details.

January Classes: Kim Bates "Basic Digital Photography"

Compiled by Therra C. Gwyn Got an item, just email WhatsHappeningGA @gmail.com

Upcoming Workshops:

Kathryn Collins RYT 200 "Svaroopa® Yoga" Patty Cure "Acrylic Painting" Trisha Gotte’s "Drama" Elly Hobgood’s "Paint Group" John Horne’s "Drawing Classes" Heather Lyon’s "Creative Movement & Dance"

THE FIDDLEHEADS>> Home-grown Georgia talent, this group of bluegrass-and-more musicians from Dahlonega pleased audiences on America’s Got Talent in 2011, have played at the Grand Ole Opry and keep picking up new fans at every live show. When and where: Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m. Falany Performing Arts Center at Reinhardt University, Waleska. Tickets: $25 adults; $20 for seniors (55 years and older) and students; $10 for children 12 and younger. More information: 770.720.9167 or boxoffice@reinhardt.edu Online: tp://www.reinhardt.edu/Events/2014/ the-fiddleheads-2-27-14.html RESIDENTIAL

Linda Maphet’s "Oil and Acrylic Painting"

JANUARY 25, 2014: 1-3pm Social Media – Let’s take the leap to online, Entrepreneur! Presented by Camille Ronay MARCH 15, 2014: 1-3pm Social Media – The Next Step for the Entrepreneur Presented by Camille Ronay

To sign up for classes call 770-704-6244 or e-mail info@cherokeearts.org. Include name and phone number. Check our website for dates, times and fees. 94 North Street | Canton, GA 30114

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BridgeMill golf

The Golf Fore Charity Tournament took place at BridgeMill Athletic Club in mid-October. All proceeds go to The BridgeMill Sixes Service League which helps the needy in Cherokee County. 1. From left, Tracy Angle of Canton, Christina Carpenter of Woodstock, Jeanna Tlumak of Canton, and Terry Johnston of Canton. 2. Darryl Fulton of Canton, David Capalbo of Acworth, and Jeff Hall of Cartersville. 3. Suzanne Taylor, Jay Patouillet, and Marlyn Patouillet, all of Canton. 4. Susan Staudt, Kaitlin Gavin, and Elaine Casey, all of Canton. 5. Kathleen Atkins and John Cochran, both of Canton.

1 PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER CARTER

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Remembering a life well-lived...

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6. Terry Groulx of Canton, Tom Eckstrom of Kennesaw, and Eric Sandler of Marietta. 7. Sarah Golemi and Terri Zahorodny, both of Canton. 8. Hank Dunlap and Steve Gillenwater, both of Canton. 9. Kathy Fulton and Ruth Clark, both of Canton.

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Goshen Valley Golf

The Goshen Valley Classic took place in October at the Cherokee Country Club. Funds raised from the event benefit the Goshen Valley Boys Ranch. 1. From left, Sharon Woods of Kennesaw, Katie Lopez of Atlanta, and Kim Paris of East Cobb. 2. Brian Venable of Canton, Jason Butcher of Canton, and Charles Venable of Big Canoe. 3. Reynold Jennings of Marietta, Kim Menefee of Marietta, and Joe Brywczynski of Acworth. 4. Sabrina Southern of Acworth and Beth Elder of Marietta. 5. Jack Snyder of Suwannee and Don McDonnell of Roswell.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER CARTER

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6. Bill Durell of Woodstock and Dianne Depuy of Kennesaw. 7. Mary Pat and Jim Ferreira of Kennesaw. 8. Mike Pollitt of Roswell and Keevy Hood of Marietta. 9. Brandon Reese of Atlanta and Christian Stevens of Canton.

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REFLECTIONS

To thy selfie be true The word, selfie (or selfy) is now A picture does tell a lot, but I wonder if included in Oxford Dictionaries. If you in our efforts to record our most glamdon’t know, a selfie is the picture you orous selfs we are missing those fleeting take of yourself to post on social media moments that make for the best stories. channels. According to the website, the A perfect example of this came while I first documented selfie was posted after was watching Robin Thicke perform his a person had a little too much to drink popular song “Blurred Lines” to the and fell down with the result being delight of a room full of screaming women their teeth protruding through their botduring a recent music awards show. tom lip. Walking along the aisles of the venue, Thankfully I have seen thousands of microphone in hand, he sought out a fan to attractive selfies versus those that give some special attention to. Instead of might require a waste basket nearby. arms outstretched to pull this hunky croonAccording to Oxford Dictionaries, er closer, there she was typing frantically “occasional selfies are acceptable, but on her iPhone clearly unable to look into posting a new picture of yourself his eyes and take in this once of lifetime everyday isn’t necessary.” brush with celebrity. It was over in secBY CARLA BARNES I took my first selfie this summer onds and I suspect a blurry picture is all when I was sitting poolside and feeling that she has left. particularly goddess-like. To clarify, it was only a headshot My husband, Doug, who has heard at least 95 percent of – enough to show my large black sunglasses and smiling all my editorial comments (at least five percent are about lips. I did end up cropping out my furrowed brow that I him and thus he would not hear those) got to hear my comcould blame on the sun, but I suspect I am inadvertently mentary about this particular moment in history. “The holding my face that way too often these days. world has officially gone crazy,” I started in. “Instead of My second selfie was taken on a football Saturday. I living out one heck of a moment and handing off her phone was wearing my blinged-out University of Georgia T-shirt to her friend she missed it.” and the perfect shade of red lipstick. A quick click and One of my favorite editorial cartoons in “The New there I was looking at Yorker” magazine by Liam least 50 pounds thinner Francis Walsh shows a man all thanks to the perfect wearing the cone of shame camera angle. The mesand telling his date, “It sages came soon after. keeps me from looking at Have I been working my phone every two secout? What diet was I on? onds.” It became my profile I am sure there are stats picture. I will never on how many times we change it ... ever. look at those tiny screens. I In People StyleWatch don’t even want to know magazine this month how many times I look at there are quick tips on mine. I am thankful though taking the perfect selfie. that I still keep it on silent This is something we most days and stow it away should all be well versed on because there are exin my purse during most occasions. boyfriends and girlfriends “creeping” everywhere on social One such event was a chamber breakfast where former media. UGA athletic director and coach Vince Dooley was the A friend, who will remain nameless, deliberately takes guest speaker. He and I have met at least a dozen of times regular selfies of herself not to post on social media, but to over the past 20 years, but I still get butterflies when he do what she calls a “fat check,” because you never really enters a room. I reached my hand out in greeting and know what you look like. Most of us still carry the mental instead of shaking it he bent his head down and kissed it. picture of ourselves when we were 18 years old and at the I swooned and while there is no photographic evidence top of our game. My grandmother said she would always of this particular moment there was a fellow Dawg fan ask the question, “Who is that old lady?” when she looked close by who captured the scarlet cheeks and giggles of in the mirror. this Southern girl caught up in the moment.

In People StyleWatch magazine this month there are quick tips on taking the perfect selfie. This is something we should all be well versed on because there are exboyfriends and girlfriends “creeping” everywhere on social media.

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Profile for Otis Brumby III

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