Page 1

K-Popping

PAGE 11

PAGE 5

Sour Note

Alexzandria Windley writes about the infusion of Korean pop bands like BTS that are flooding the musical landscape in the United States.

FORUM

The men’s basketball team is counting heavily on Duquesne University transfer Nicholas Kratholm this season. The 6-foot-9 inch Kratholm will play center.

A&E

The family of Pulitzer Prizewinning photographer Alan Diaz created a scholarship fund in his name to assist future journalists at MDC.

Big Man SPORTS

NEWS

Honoring A Legend

The Reporter’s Corbin Bolies strongly disagrees with the Wolfson Campus music department’s restrictions that don’t let all students use its pianos.

PAGE 13

PAGE 15

4VOL. 8, 9, ISSUE 2 — SEPTEMBER 26, 18, 2017 2018

TWO-TIME NATIONAL PACEMAKER AWARD WINNER

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

Startup

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

Vote

These Twin Brothers' Car-Sharing Startup Began In A Barn

On The Fence About Voting? Miami Dade College Can Help ‰‰ In an effort to increase voter turnout in this year’s midterm elections, Miami Dade College’s Institute for Civic Engagement is launching a voting initiative where voters can learn more about who to vote for, where to vote and how to register. By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net

PHOTO COURTESY OF CRISTIAN LAZZARI / MDC MEDIA RELATIONS

Bright Futures: Miami Dade College alumni Matthew (left) and Michael Vega-Sanz (right) started a car sharing-company, Lula, two years ago. The app is geared toward tourists and college students who want to rent a car for hours or days at a time. ‰‰ Miami Dade College alumni, Matthew and Michael Vega-Sanz launched their car-sharing company, Lula, two years ago. It allows automobile rentals for people who need a car for short periods of time. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net For Michael and Matthew Vega-Sanz, it was like every other Friday night. Two years ago, the twin brothers found themselves in their dorm, craving pizza. Their dilemma? No pizza place in Wellesley, Massachusetts was open beside Domino’s. The duo didn’t have a car to drive to Boston and Uber wasn’t cost-effective. When they looked outside their window, they noticed many unused cars in a nearby parking lot. That realization led them to their startup Lula, a car-sharing app geared toward tourists and college students. The app allows adults to rent a car for hours or days at a time. “I knew that one of my close friends would rent out his car to people as a way of making extra money on weekends and I thought that there had to be an easier way to legitimize this,” Michael said. The brothers, both Miami Dade College

INDEX:

BRIEFING

alumni, soon started doing surveys on their campus at Babson College. They spent the summer of 2016 working inside an old family-owned barn in Miami with no air conditioning or internet to hash out their business model. “We got rejected probably 99 percent of the time,” Matthew said. “We had no idea what we were doing and we spent days researching how to start a company.” It wasn’t until a basic version of the app got off the ground that money began to come in. There was progress, but more needed to be made before they could start allowing cars to be rented out. The brothers wanted 18-year-olds to be able to rent cars, something that no car rental company allows due to insurance liabilities. Over the course of 14 months, 47 insurance companies rejected Lula but the brothers remained steadfast in the belief that the company would flourish. “I remember there were nights where we would be hanging out, enjoying ourselves at [1 a.m.] and suddenly their phone goes off and they immediately headed out to take care of whatever issues came up with Lula,” said Arnaldo Carrillo, a close friend of Matthew’s said.

2-3

NEWS

Got News? Let Us Know. Contact Us:

mdc.thereporter@gmail.com

(305) 237-1254

4-7

Eventually, the hard work paid off. Lula partnered with Apollo Insurance to allow 18-year-olds to rent cars. In the two years since the startup was launched, their rental base has grown from 10 partners in Boston to more than 300 across 25 states, according to Matthew. “It wasn’t easy to get people to buy into our app and let us rent their cars,” Michael said. “We had to paint them a picture of what our vision was and let them know that no matter what, we will always be in contact with them to help them no matter what time it is.” A year ago, the brothers came to a crossroad. They secured internships in New York, but decided that the fledgling company required more attention so they spent that summer working on Lula. Eventually the first-generation college students, who graduated from Palmer Trinity School in 2014 and attended Kendall and West Campuses, decided to drop out of Babson College and concentrate on Lula. “It was hard for our parents at first,” Matthew said. “But they knew that this is what our dream was and no matter what, they would always be there to support us. They saw how much hard work we put into the app and knew that there was no stopping now.”

SPORTS

10-11

A&E

The political wave is coming to Miami Dade College. The College’s Institute for Civic Engagement and Democracy recently updated their voter engagement website to make it a widespread, nonpartisan voter engagement initiative ahead of the midterm elections on Nov. 6. “We want students to know there is no excuse to not vote,” said Joshua Young, director of iCED. “In spite of the incivility, of the problems with politics in our country, of our seeming inability to bridge differences and find common ground, opting out of voting and political involvement is not the answer.” The goal, Young says, is to inform students that they have a hand in the decisions made by their elected officials, as long as they cast their vote. “The decisions of elected officials impact students’ education, housing, transportation, the environment—every aspect of their lives,” Young said. “We want students to realize that it is up to them to create the future they want.” The plan starts with a revamped website. At www.mdc.edu/vote, students will be able to watch testimonials from other students stating why it is important to vote. The featured students are paid interns by MDC. Though the website has been available since the last midterm elections in 2014, Young felt that a reboot was necessary in order to further increase voter turnout. His plan for the improved website is to have it become a figurative “one-stop,” where students can use it to find all the information they may need to be informed citizens. “The youth is the largest voting block in America yet [they] don’t show it in elections,” said Fiorenza Diaz, a voter engagement worker at Wolfson Campus. “We must be involved in our democracy to make sure our voices are heard.” According to the National Study of Learning, Voting and Engagement through Tufts University, only 19.2 percent of MDC students, who were eligible to vote, cast their ballot in the last midterm elections in 2014. Young hopes to raise that total by 15 percent this year. The first step is to get students TURN TO VOTE PAGE 6

12-13

THE REPORTER IS THE FREE, BIWEEKLY STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE. ALL CONTENT IS PRODUCED BY MDC STUDENTS. THE REPORTER IS A PUBLIC FORUM FOR EXPRESSION.

FORUM

14-15 PLEASE RECYCLE


2 BRIEFING | SEPTEMBER 18, 2018

THE REPORTER Wolfson Campus Students Receive Grant For National Debt Awareness Campaign

// BRIEFING Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Briefing Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

Miami Dade College Homestead Campus Showcases Paintings By Gerardo Olhovich

PHOTO COURTESY OF LUCAS BLANCO

Miami Dade College will exhibit paintings by artist Gerardo Olhovich in building D at Homestead Campus, 500 College Terrace. The showcase, part of the College’s Hispanic Heritage Month festivities, will run through Oct. 19. Olhovich, a lecturer at the University of Miami, is known for his oil

and acrylic paintings. Homestead Campus invites three to four artists per year to exhibit their art. They are chosen based on the strength and quality of their artwork and are invited to exhibit for about two to three months. Homestead Campus chose Olhovich because he is one of the best artists currently working in Miami, according to Lucas Blanco, an art professor at Homestead Campus. The exhibit is open to the public. For more information, please contact Lucas Blanco at (305) 237-5242 or lblanco1@mdc.edu —Teresa Schuster

Javier Romero Of Sabado Gigante Fame To Speak At North Campus

A Night Of True Stories Out Loud Presented By Lip Service

Radio host and television star Javier Romero will speak at North Campus, 11380 N.W. 27th Ave., Room 2147 on Oct. 3 at 11 a.m. Romero will speak about his career in radio and television, sharing his experiences on the hit Hispanic TV series Sabado Gigante and as a morning radio host for Amor 107.5 owned by Univision Radio. This event is part of the Hispanic Heritage Month festivities at North Campus. The event is free to the public.

Lip Service will present A Night of True Stories Out Loud on Sept. 8 at 8 p.m. at The Lightbox at Goldman Warehouse, 404 N.W. 26th St. Eight true stories will be presented before a live audience on the show’s theme, Craving with Consequences, which focuses on obsessions and cravings. Lip Service, produced by the Miami Book Fair, was founded in 2006 by writer Andrea Askowitz. Tickets to the event are $20 and can be purchased at www.miamibookfair.com/event/lip-servicepresents-a-night-of-true-storiesout-loud-3/

—Lauren Dominguez For more information, contact: Jesenia Pation jpatino@mdc.edu T(305) 237-1724

—Valentina González For more information, contact: Miami Book Fair wbookfair@mdc.edu T(305) 237-3258

Teatro Prometeo Launches New Season With Casa Ajena Miami Dade College’s Teatro Prometeo will present Casa Ajena, a bilingual version of Lisa Loomer’s play Living Out, from Sept. 21 to Sept. 23 and Sept. 28 to Sept. 30 at the Koubek Center, 2705 S.E. 3rd St. Casa Ajena kicks off the 2018-19 Teatro Prometeo season. Living Out focuses on the relationship between a Salvadorian nanny and the American lawyer who employs her. The play touches on topics such as class, race and legal status. Tickets are available at www.brownpaperticktes.com and at the box office one hour before showtime. Seniors and MDC faculty and students pay $10 for tickets. Showtimes on Fridays and Saturdays are at 8 p.m. and on Sundays at 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.teatroprometeo.org or call (305) 237- 3262. —Genesis Sotomayor

UFMDC Offering $500 Scholarships The United Faculty of Miami Dade College is offering at least 15 $500 scholarships. The deadline to apply is Jan. 31. Applications can be accessed at www.ufmdc.org Students must complete at least twelve credit hours by the end of the fall semester, have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and plan on either continuing their studies at MDC or transfer to a four-year institution. Students who meet these requirements must then obtain a sealed letter of recommendation from a MDC professor who is a member of UFMDC. Applications must be mailed to UFMDC offices at 11420 North Kendall Drive in suite 107. UFMDC is the teachers union for MDC that became the official bargaining agent on behalf of faculty in 1998. For more than a decade, they have been offering scholarships to students. The scholarships were named in remembrance of the founding members and close associates to the union. —Katherine Wallace-Fernandez For more information, contact: UFMDC union@mfmdc.org T(305) 279-0021

New Director Of Retention And Transition Services At North Campus

Wolfson Campus Honors College students Shawn Torres, 19, and Bryan Montes, 18, received a $1,000 grant from Up to Us to support their awareness campaign for national debt. Up to Us is a non-partisan nationwide, campusbased campaign that launched in 2012. The students must use the money to sponsor various events on campus. “Our goal with this campaign is Torres to make it a fun and educational experience with a lot of prizes and competition,” Torres said. “I’m very optimistic about our campaign.” Torres is majoring in business. He is the president of the Phi Beta Lambda WolfMontes son Campus chapter and aspires to start his own company. Montes is majoring in economics and wants to work for the Federal Reserve or the World Bank. “The national debt is something that will for sure impact us all,” Montes said. “I am extremely excited about the program because it will bring awareness to a serious issue that will affect everyone but especially the younger generation.” —Stephany Matat

MDC MOAD To Host The Politics Of Public Space In Latin America

Federal Government Employment Opportunities Information Session

Miami Dade College’s Museum of Art and Design will host a panel on The Politics of Public Space in Latin America at the Freedom Tower, 600 Biscayne Blvd, on Sept. 26 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Panelists Alejandro Haiek, Jorge Pérez Jaramillo and Lorena Zárate will give their perspectives on urban initiatives and neighborhood revitalization in Latin American cities. The panel is part of the museum's design exhibition, By the People, which explores problems faced in urban, suburban and rural communities in the United States and bordering countries. The event is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Professor Jairo Ledesma will host Diversity in the Workplace: Internship and Employment Opportunities with the U.S. Federal Government on Oct. 9 from 9:50 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Homestead Campus, 500 College Terrace, Room 222. The information session will host representatives from the United States Department of State, Immigration & Custom Enforcement , U.S Agency for International Development, Peace Corps and the Central Intelligence Agency. The session will cover internships and employment under the U.S. federal government. The event is open to the public.

—Stephany Matat For more information, contact: MDC MOAD museum@mdc.edu T(305) 237-7700

—Valentina González

For more information, contact: Jairo Ledesma jledesma@mdc.edu T(305) 237-5005

Crystel Lewis is the new director of retention and transition services at North Campus. She started her Lewis position on Sept. 4. Lewis will oversee academic advising, career exploration, community resources and ACCESS disability services. Prior to this position, Lewis served as director of advisement and career services and director of student life at InterAmerican Campus. She also served as student life manager at Hialeah Campus. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English from University of South Florida and a master’s degree in higher education administration from Florida International University. “I am brimming with excitement about this opportunity,” Lewis said. “I get to work with exceptional professionals at the North Campus who exhibit care and concern for the students every day, which is amazing. I am passionate about higher education and motivated to contribute to the campus community as we reach even higher heights.”

MDC Live Arts will open its 2018-19 season with Black Queen in the Live Arts Lab in building 1 at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2nd Ave., on Sept. 27 and Sept. 28 at 8 p.m. Black Queen tells the story of medieval queen Barbora of Celje through medieval melodies, poetry, electronics and a voice-controlled interactive star ceiling. The performance is a collaboration between Live Arts Lab Alliance artist Juraj Kojš, Jennifer Beattie and Adam Marks. “It is an exploration of what historical truth can bring to our contemporary life in a broader sense,” Kojš said. “It is a captivating story of a medieval queen and a parallel of women in power.” MDC Live Arts is a performing arts presenter founded in 1990. LALA is made up of six local artist to be in residence at the MDC Live Arts Lab. Tickets are free for Miami Dade College students. General admission tickets are $10 and can be purchased at brownpapertickets.com/ event/3589841 For more information, contact MDC Live Arts at mdclivearts@mdc. edu or (305) 237-3010.

—Claudia Hernandez

—Sophia Cruz-Peraza

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

PHOTO COURTESY OF SOPHIA VON WRANGELL

MDC Live Arts To Showcase Black Queen

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter


SEPTEMBER 18, 2018 | BRIEFING

THE REPORTER

3

PHOTO BRIEFING

1 SEAN MOW / THE REPORTER

1

Bust A Move: An impromptu dance battle ignited during Kendall Campus' Welcome Back Bash on Aug. 29.

2

In The Zone: Two students play foosball during Kendall Campus' Welcome Back Bash on Aug. 29.

3

All Smiles: Miami Dade College President Eduardo Padrรณn (center) poses with Julie Grimes (right), chair of the board of directors at the MDC Foundation, and Bernie Navarro (left), chair of the board of trustees at MDC, during I AM MDC DAY on Sept. 6 at Wolfson Campus. The College raised more than a $1 million for student scholarships during the campaign. To donate go to https:// www.mdcfoundation.com/give-now-students.

4

Juggling Act: Jue Zhou, a graduate teaching assistant at the Confucius Institute, shows off her ability to use a diabolo during I AM MDC DAY on Sept. 6 at Wolfson Campus. A diabolo is a traditional Chinese toy, similar to a yo-yo.

2 SEAN MOW / THE REPORTER

3

4

ELIZABETH GARCIA / THE REPORTER

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

ELIZABETH GARCIA / THE REPORTER

MDC The Reporter


4 NEWS | SEPTEMBER 18, 2018

THE REPORTER

// NEWS Christian Ortega, Editor-in-Chief  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B christian.ortega005@mymdc.net

Video Games

M.A.G.I.C. Students Create School’s First-Ever Video Game ‰‰ The M.A.G.I.C. club, in partnership with Alienware and Telltale Games, created the school’s first-ever video game. Void was launched in May. By Valentina González valentin.gonzales001@mymdc.net The M.A.G.I.C. club has game, literally. A cohort of 24 students created the school’s first-ever video game while taking a game development and design class at M.A.G.I.C. Void, an Agatha Christie-style procedural murder mystery, was launched on May 2. It features a dead crew member on an interactive spaceship. To survive, the player needs to solve the murder mystery and keep five lost crew members safe. The video game was created throughout two semesters in partnership with Alienware, a computer company known for its highperformance computers geared toward the gaming community, and Telltale Games, a video game developer and publisher known for their hit video games The Walking Dead and The Wolf Among Us.

“Throughout each phase, I, along with the rest of the team were independent of our professors and advisors so that when we [finished] the game, we [could] truly call it our own creation,” said 25-year-old Josh Field, who graduated from M.A.G.I.C. in May and created the idea for the video game and directed the project. Students at M.A.G.I.C. worked on every facet of the video game, from programming to writing dialogue. Although staff members from M.A.G.I.C., Telltale Games and Alienware were available to guide them, students were mostly left on their own to replicate conditions they could face if they were working on a project for a developer. “Throughout the process, all the hiccups and challenges we never considered that they don’t teach you in the textbook, made this project very rewarding for us,” Field said. “We didn’t have anyone to hold our hand so we had to face each challenge head-on, only asking for help in emergencies.” Void is free and available for download for Windows and Android users at the

PHOTO COURTESY OF M.A.G.I.C.

Whodunit: Void, an Agatha Christie-style murder mystery video game set in space, was created by M.A.G.I.C. students last spring as way to learn what it's like to develop a video game from scratch. Alienware website: https:// na.alienwarearena.com/ experiences/void-magic-at-mdc Next on deck for M.A.G.I.C. students is another video game and the program’s first virtual simulation.

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

Pre-production and production will begin in the spring. “We are going to do our first augmented reality simulation video game featuring the Berlin Wall across the street [Wolfson Campus has a small section of the Berlin

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

Wall on campus],” said Mauricio Ferrazza, department chairperson for M.A.G.I.C. “The idea is that with your phone you are going to be able to put it in front of the Berlin Wall and you are going to see Berlin around it.”

MDC The Reporter


SEPTEMBER 18, 2018 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

5

Scholarship

Journalism Scholarship Created In Memory Of Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographer Alan Diaz ‰‰ The Miami Dade College Foundation is collecting donations for a scholarship fund in memory of Alan Diaz, who took the iconic photograph of Elían González being taken from his relative's Little Havana home in 2000. The scholarship will benefit students at The Reporter and the MDC High School Journalism Institute. By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net Pulitzer Prizewinning photographer Alan Diaz died on July 3 at the age of 71. Miami Dade College hopes to keep his memory alive— with a scholarship. Marta Lavandier, the news editor for Diaz photos at the Associated Press, reached out to MDC to create the scholarship. The MDC Foundation created a webpage to collect donations for the scholarship. The funds will benefit student journalists at The Reporter, MDC’s student newspaper, and the MDC High School Journalism Institute. More than $5,000 has been donated at the time of this article’s publication. "We just want to honor his memory," said Aillette Rodriguez-Diaz, Diaz's daughter. "He's a Pulitzer Prize winner. He won the 2001 Pulitzer in the breaking news photography for [the photo of] Elían González. Anything to keep his memory alive through journalism, I think that is the best way to honor him." The Foundation expects the scholarship to be available by the Spring 2019 semester.

“They were very clear in their choice of reaching out to Miami Dade College and said that because of the way Alan always believed in supporting people in the community, this was the perfect place for the scholarship,” said Ana Martinez, interim assistant vice president of development at the Foundation. Diaz was known for shooting the iconic photo of six-year-old Cuban immigrant Elían González while the boy was taken by a United States immigration officer from his relative's home in Little Havana. The photographer was born in New York in 1947 to Cuban parents. He spent his adolescence in Cuba, where he studied photography under Alberto Korda, who was responsible for the 1960 portrait of Che Guevara, an Argentine Marxist revolutionary. Diaz moved to Miami in 1978, where he freelanced for various news organizations while teaching English and managing a trucking company. “He had about three jobs, but the freelance—that’s his go-to job,” Rodriguez-Diaz said. “It’s something that he always wanted to do.” Diaz was freelancing for the AP when González was found floating in the sea in an inner tube by fishermen in 1999. He and two others survived when a small aluminum boat carrying dozens of passengers fleeing Cuba sank. Elían's mother drowned during the trip. González was taken in by relatives in Little Havana, starting a politically charged custody battle between relatives in Miami and the boy's father in Cuba. Diaz earned the relative's trust by following their one rule: to not speak to Elían. That trust led Diaz to being the only photographer to capture the image of United States immigration officers seizing

PHOTO COURTESY OF The ASSOCIATED PRESS

Iconic Photo: Alan Diaz won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Breaking News Photography for taking the photo of a United States Immigration officer seizing ElÍan González from his relative's home in Little Havana in April of 2000. González from his relative's home in 2000. Rodriguez-Diaz recalls her mother, Martha Rodriguez, waking her up that morning at 5 a.m. and telling her, "They took Elían, they took Elían." “I remember turning on the news and the picture had been all over the news, but no credit to any photographer and immediately upon looking at that picture, I knew it was my dad’s photo,” Rodriguez-Diaz said. “I just knew it.” Diaz was hired as a staff photographer by the AP two months after the photo was taken. Under the news agency, Diaz covered the 2000 Florida election recount, the recovery in New York after 9/11, damages caused in Florida by hurricanes in 2004 and 2005 and the Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting in

2016. Diaz retired in December 2017. “He had a way of working a scene,” Lavandier said. “He was always able to get in there and get a photo of the moment.” Diaz is survived by children: RodriguezDiaz, Alan Ernesto Diaz, Aileen Casimis and Alin Diaz. His wife, Martha Diaz, passed away nearly two years ago. “I think he was part of the growth of many photographers,” Rodriguez-Diaz said. “Very open and willing to teach, he took great pride in his work. He was a man of his word. [Taking photos] was a 24-hour job for him. [He] never said no to assignments.” If you are interested in donating to the Alan Diaz scholarship fund, go to: www.mdcfoundation.com/alan-Diaz-journalism-fund

Listen, never trust anyone who has not read Listen, never trust anyone who has not read

Manolo Barco | (305) 237-1255 | mbarco@mdc.edu @mdcthereporter @mdcthereporter MDC The Reporter Manolo mdc.thereporter Barco | (305) 237-1255 | mbarco@mdc.edu

www.mdcthereporter.com


6 NEWS | SEPTEMBER 18, 2018

THE REPORTER

Updated Website Educates Students In The Voting Process FROM VOTE, FRONT

informed about the issues. “We want every student who is eligible to vote to receive the support and information he/she needs to register and become informed,” Young said. “We also want students to know that MDC is making it easy for them to be election ready.” It starts with voter registration. iCED is planning voter registration

to fill Miami-Dade County’s goal of 6,000 poll workers for the Nov. 6 elections. “[The midterm elections are] an opportunity for citizens to express their concerns in the form of a vote,” said Herby Zephir, a voter engagement worker at Homestead Campus. “It empowers citizens to appoint a representative that’ll push forth initiatives that favor them.”

events on every campus on Sept. 25 to coincide with National Voter Registration Day, and continuing up until the Oct. 9 deadline. The group is also partnering with the League of Women Voters to host Decoding the Ballot events to help students understand the paper ballot. The College will also organize transportation to early voting sites and encourage people to sign up for poll worker positions, aiming

ELIZABETH GARCIA / THE REPORTER

Voter Engagement: Miami Dade College's Institute for Civic Engagement and Democracy interns Jessica Saint-fluer (right) and Demaree Fae Rios (left) are helping to inform students about voting dates and voter registration at Wolfson Campus.

International University Expo I S SI O

N

DM

N

ISSIO DM

A

WATSCO CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI 3 pm - 7 pm

A

OCTOBER 11

www.studyandgoabroad.com

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter


SEPTEMBER 18, 2018 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

7

TRIO

TRIO Program Provides Assistance To First-Generation College Students ‰‰ Through specialized one on one help and an environment geared toward learning, the TRIO program at Miami Dade College has motivated many low-income and first-generation college students to pursue a degree and succeed in life. By Chika Ojukwu chika.ojukwu001@mymdc.net For first-generation college students, college can be a daunting task. With no parent or sibling paving the way before them, students often have a hard time adapting to college. That is why the TRIO program at Miami Dade College was created—to help students better acclimate to college life. TRIO is open to students who need tutoring, peer mentoring, academic advisement and financial aid counseling. ”They accepted me with open arms,” said Tanisha Simon, a student in the program, who aspires to be a nurse. “They didn’t judge me, but just wanted to help me.” To be eligible for TRIO, students have to be a U.S. Citizen or permanent resident, be accepted for enrollment or currently enrolled at MDC, be a first-generation college student, need to be economically disadvantaged, must be seeking an associates degree, must have completed less than 30 credits and must have a minimum 2.0 GPA. Simon stumbled across the TRIO program when she followed her friend there one afternoon. She believes that TRIO was the reason she passed her classes that semester. When she didn’t understand something, she went to TRIO and there was always someone there to help her succeed in

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANTHONY SANTOS/THE LEAD

School Pride: College flags representing the schools that former TRIO students have gone to is a source of motivation for current students who want to go on to four year colleges. her work. “TRIO has made me want to be better, to be something, to be different from the rest of my family,” Simon said. Students from different ethnicities congregate at TRIO to learn from each other. The TRIO program has an event called Tuesday Talk, where current students and alumni speak about financial issues and how to be smart with your money. “This program is different from other TRIO programs in the country because it has a family dynamic, where both former and current students mentor each other

on various topics,” said Carlton Daley, who has been program director of TRIO at MDC since 2006. Daley, who has a master’s degree from Florida International University, knows firsthand the benefits of a college education. “Students of TRIO have a higher graduation rate than Miami Dade College [students] as a whole and go on to be lawyers, nurses and teachers,” Daley said. Graduates of TRIO often move onto fouryear colleges, with many of them going to universities such as Tuskegee University, Florida A&M University and the University

of South Florida, among others. TRIO influences its students to get involved on campus, with some creating their own student clubs. One of those clubs is Minorities of the Future, a club of young minority males that support each other to ensure that they reach their potential. That is what Daley calls “seeking out excellence,” something he always shares with students to urge them to improve their future. Ashley Polanco, who is pursuing a degree in sonography, took Daley’s advice to heart. She is president of Influential Ambitious Motivated Women (IAMW) at North Campus. “TRIO was amazing. I loved it. It keeps you focused on school and studies. Everyone was always studying, always getting straight A’s,” Polanco said. “I had trouble picking my major, but because of the help I got there, I was able to finally choose a major.” For students who plan to transfer from Miami Dade College, TRIO routinely does a summer college tour free of charge. Among the campuses visited: Florida Gulf Coast University, Florida A&M University, Florida State University, University of Central Florida and several others. “Education is a great equalizer that helps you move outward in life,” Daley said. For more information about the TRIO program, call (305) 237-1333. This story originally ran in The Lead, the student newspaper for the MDC High School Journalism Institute. The Institute is a six-week dual-enrollment summer program for students interested in journalism.

The Reporter has something for everyone! Contact us to find out!

(305) 237-1255 www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter

mbarco@mdc.edu


8 NEWS | SEPTEMBER 18, 2018

THE REPORTER

is currently looking for a web developer.

wants YOU to be part of our

MARKETING & ADVERTISING DEPT. Contact: Manolo Ba

rco (305) 237-1255

Must know the following: • Wordpress • HTML 5 • CSS 3 Bonus Skills: • PHP • Google Analytics • File Zilla • Some web design

| mbarco@mdc.edu

du

Contact: Manolo Barco | (305) 237-1255 | mbarco@mdc.e

D E T N A W R E N IG S E D IC H GRAP nt at

you wa e c n e i r e p et the ex

r! e t r o p e R e Th

G Are you seeking experience in videography?

Requirements

• MUST know how to film • knowledge of video editing • know how to report

shop obe Indesign, Photo • Knowledge of Ad MUST and Illustrator is a hic Design 1 • Taken at least Grapderstanding of print un d an • Knowledge A Big Plus: b design • Knowledge of we • Illustration skills

www.mdcthereporter.com

iez@mdc.edu

z | 305.237.3368 | ad

Contact: Aracelia Die

Contact: Manolo Barco (305) 237-1255 | mbarco@mdc.edu

mdc.thereporter

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter


SEPTEMBER 18, 2018 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

CLASSROOMS ARE FOR LEARNING

NOT HIDING FROM GUNFIRE TIME AND TIME AGAIN, STUDENTS HAVE DEMONSTRATED THAT WE WILL SHOW UP TO END GUN VIOLENCE. WE CAN HELP CHANGE GUN LAWS AND THE LAWMAKERS WHO DECIDE THEM. IT’S TIME TO BE A

GUN SENSE

VOTER REGISTER TO VOTE AT

EVERYTOWN.ORG/REGISTER

www.mdcthereporter.com

PAID FOR BY EVERYTOWN FOR GUN SAFETY ACTION FUND.

mdc.thereporter

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter

9


10 SPORTS | SEPTEMBER 18, 2018

THE REPORTER

Volleyball

Lady Sharks Remain Undefeated To Start Season

‰‰ Despite a few close calls this season, the Lady Sharks volleyball team has remained perfect (8-0) this season. The team has not lost a game in nearly two years, winning back-to-back national titles during that run. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net The Lady Sharks have opened the season 8-0—losing only five sets—to extend their win streak to 42 games—the team’s last loss was on Oct. 25, 2016 to Palm State College. The team, despite still trying to improve their chemistry, has put together an excellent string of performances, including defeating third-ranked (now second) Iowa Western Community College 3-0. “The team has put together a lot of great games and shown how tough they are,” head coach Kiko Benoit said. “They’ve shown the necessary toughness to keep their heads straight and dig themselves out of a hole when games get tough.” Against Polk State, the Lady Sharks won the deciding set 15-6 after splitting the previous four. They have improved in other areas as well. What was at one point the team’s largest weakness—their

SEAN MOW / THE REPORTER

More Than A Team: Off to a hot start, this year's Lady Sharks volleyball team hopes to capitalize on their success and continue building their chemistry. For new teams, what happens during practices and off the court can make the difference between ending there season with a championship or a disappointment. chemistry—has slowly improved. “Even though we all come from different backgrounds and countries, we’re becoming more like a family and getting closer,” outside hitter Valeria Alegrias said. Throughout their practices, each scrimmage has the intensity of a live game. With each point scored, the girls cheer each other on to help

maintain the momentum. When one side loses though, they have to go through conditioning drills. It’s Benoit’s way of keeping the girls focused. “We always cheer after we score,” sophomore setter Tiziana Baumrukova said. “It helps keep our heads down and allows us to get rid of all the nerves we may have, whether it’s in practice or an

opponent.” In the midst of the success, the team realizes the need to stay in the moment and not look ahead. “I don’t think about the last game,” Baumrukova said. “I keep focusing on the game we have now. We don’t focus on keeping the streak alive, just winning.” Though the season is still young, the sophomores have stepped up

their leadership both on and off the court. Alegrias, who’s 44th in the nation in kills (82), though quiet, has been a steady force on the team. “I feel like I’ve gained a lot in experience,” she said. “I’ve been working on new ideas to improve my game and I’ve been trying what I can to correct myself from a coach’s point of view.” Baumrukova, who’s ranked in the top ten in both assists and assists per set (304 and 10.86 respectively), credits her time in the summer playing for the Czech National team as part of her continued growth. However, the Lady Sharks know they have to continue improving if they want to win a third-straight national title. Though they’re ranked third in digs per set with 20.93 and are top ten in most offensive categories, they’re in the middle of the pack when it comes to total attacks, blocks per set and points. “We’ve been playing more as a team,” Benoit said. “Chemistry is something that takes time to develop but every day we’re getting better.” The Lady Sharks next game is on the road versus Broward College on Sept. 19. at 6 p.m.

Volleyball Profile

Baumrukova Brings Czech National Team Experience To Lady Sharks ‰‰ Lady Sharks setter Tiziana Baumrukova spent this summer competing in the European Golden League, where she and the Czech National Team came in third. This season, Baumrukova hopes to use the experience she gained to lead the Lady Sharks as its captain. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net It’s every athlete’s dream to represent their country on the national stage. This past summer, Lady Sharks setter Tiziana Baumrukova got that chance,

www.mdcthereporter.com

playing in 33 out of 34 matches, leading the for what to expect here,” Zimova said. “She’s team in assists with 1,026 assists. Only one always there for me, whenever other freshman last season played in at least I need help or have a prob30 matches. lem. She is always there. But the transition to Miami was not an It helps that she speaks easy one. my language [Czech] As someone who was raised in the too.” Czech Republic, where winters get Baumrukova is once as cold as 10 degrees Fahrenheit, she again excelling on the missed the change of seasons that she volleyball court this grew up with. Last year, she was the only season. She ranks in the player on the team from Europe, which top ten in both assists made her feel alone at first. Though she (304) and assists per set felt lost culturally, the rest of the team (10.86). was quick to embrace her and “Volleyball make her feel like part of is my life,” the Lady Shark family. It’s Bauma sentiment she hopes rukova to extend to this year’s said. “I group of freshman. would “Tiziana is the heart love to of the team,” said Lady spend Sharks head coach Orim y genes “Kiko” Benoit professaid. “She plays with s ion a l complete confidence ca reer and has always been playfriendly and welcoming ing in of her teammates.” cou nBaumrukova has emtries braced the role of team l i k e leader. On the court during Germany practices, she enthusiastiand Italy cally cheers on teammates, where I can encouraging them to play play at the harder. Off the court, she highest has done everything she level.” can to help bring everyone together. Her roommate, Vanda Zimova, a freshman middle blocker who is from neighboring Slovakia, credits Baumrukova with helping her get used to life in Miami. European Star: After a successful freshman sea“I would write to her son, setter Tiziana Baumrukova is looking to lead even before I came here the Lady Sharks volleyball team to a third-straight and she helped prepare national championship.

mdc.thereporter

SEAN MOW / THE REPORTER

SEAN MOW / THE REPORTER

Killer Serve: Setter Tiziana Baumrukova serves a ball at a Lady Sharks' practice. After spending the summer playing for the Czech National team, Baumrukova is looking to lead her team to a third-straight national championship.

competing in the European Golden League where her team placed third. “It was a dream come true,” Baumrukova said. “To be able to represent my country and play on the level of professionals was one of the greatest things to happen in my career so far.” Though her playing time was limited, Prague-born Baumrukova took her time with the team to learn from those who have spent years competing at the highest level of the sport. The experience allowed her to share the court with her older sister, Veronika Dostálová, for the first time in her career. “When I first got the call that said I was picked to play for the senior team, I was so excited. I booked the soonest flight I could to get there,” Baumrukova said. “In the meantime, I had to find a way to get my classes done, so I decided on taking them online where I was able to get my work done around my practice and playing schedule.” Baumrukova, 20, started playing volleyball at the age of six. Both her parents played the sport. Though she first picked up tennis, she fell out of favor with it due to the fact that it was an individual sport. She preferred being part of a team. “I felt very good on the court when I first started playing and I knew, at the time, that I was going to be a setter,” Baumrukova said. “I always wanted to be a setter because I can be able to do what I want with the opponents on offense and defense.” Later, as she started playing for a club team, her mom was her coach. As she excelled, she was called up to represent the Czech Republic on the youth level, captaining the U17 and U19 teams. “I love everything about it,” she said. “It’s hard to say what one thing I love most about it.” Baumrukova first heard about Miami Dade College when former Lady Sharks outside hitter Massiel Matos told her the team needed a setter, she said. As a freshman, Baumrukova excelled,

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter


SEPTEMBER 18, 2018 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

11

// SPORTS Christian Ortega, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B christian.ortega005@mymdc.net

Basketball Profile

Duquesne University Transfer Brings Unique Skill-Set To Sharks ‰‰ Nicholas Kratholm, a Duquesne University basketball transfer, is expected to be one of the Sharks top offensive weapons this season. The Louisville-born power rotation player is expected to play center. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net Nicholas Kratholm, a 6-foot-9-inch tall center, has the prototypical, modern-day, basketball game. He’s tall, has long limbs, shoots effectively from all over the floor, can run an offense and can anchor a team’s defense. This year, the Miami Dade College basketball team is counting on the Duquesne University transfer to use his unique skill set to take them to another level. “We’re really excited to have him,” said men’s basketball coach Kevin Ledoux. “We’re going to be able to run things we haven’t able to do so in the past.” Kratholm will be asked to carry the Sharks offensively and defensively. The Sharks expect him to bring the ball up on offense and provide reliable shooting from three-point range. They also hope his presence can improve a porous defense that allowed opponents to score at least 100 points in 18 games and allowed 99.8 points in Southern Conference play. “What’s really impressed me from watching him in shootarounds and his tapes is his ability to read both sides of the floor,” Ledoux said. “He has phenomenal basketball IQ.” Kratholm has not always been a basketball player. His first love was baseball and his parents, Lars and Julie Kratholm, played volleyball their entire lives. According to Kratholm’s youth coach, Dion Lee, it was hard work and perseverance that allowed Nicholas to become the

player he is today. “When I first saw him play, I didn’t see a diamond in the rough, I saw a coal,” Lee said. “But I also saw a player that was hungry and someone that was willing to work hard to get to where he wanted to be.” Though he was always tall, Kratholm lacked the natural talent many in the Louisville area like Brooklyn Nets guard D’Angelo Russell had, who was also coached by Lee. To compensate, Kratholm spent his life in the gym. “After each practice, I would work on getting extra shots in. If I got tired I worked on ball handling,” Kratholm said. “I wanted to do what I could to be a better player.” That work ethic led to success both on and off the court. Kratholm was his graduating class’ valedictorian at Wagner High in Louisville before attending IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida to open up his recruiting options, which allowed him to play against elite talent. It worked. He was offered a scholarship to play forward at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh but he played sparingly. Kratholm saw action in nine games as a freshman, averaging one point per contest while shooting 23 % from the field. “I was looking for the kind of program where all the players felt welcomed, cared for and [they] pushed us competitively,” Kratholm said. “I knew [Duquesne] was a good program but I didn’t feel like it was the right fit for me and I had to make a change.” He transferred to MDC to get a fresh start. “The [MDC] program is very different,” he said, “I feel like the team is organized differently and it has a bigger team-first mentality with everyone showing a high level of mutual respect for each other.”

A Fresh Start: Big man Nicholas Kratholm hopes to use this season at Miami Dade College to turn his basketball career around. He averaged one point per game as a freshman at Duquesne University while shooting 23 percent from the field.

SEAN MOW / The Reporter

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter


12 A&E | SEPTEMBER 18, 2018

THE REPORTER

Local Bands

MDC Student Bands Rock Out Stephany Matat writes about three local bands at Miami Dade College and how they’ve capitalized on the creative music scene in Miami.

By Stephany Matat stephany.matat001@mymdc.net The Miami local band scene is a vast one, ranging from diverse neighborhoods in Miami and including people from different walks of life. Here are three such bands: Mahogany Purple Mahogany Purple is one of those bands that have emerged onto the scene. They followed their guitarist, Gabe Garcia, 20, after his solo artist career. The primary trait that stands out about Mahogany Purple is that they have a brass section. Their trombonist Alam Monsivaiz, 20, an economics major, and his jazzy

input adds a special tone that fans are shocked to hear in Miami’s rock-heavy and alternative-heavy music genre. Garcia, who finished his associate’s in arts degree in music the past spring, is now seeking his associate’s in science degree in music business to get more experience as his band grows in popularity. Each member of the band has their role in handling each performance. They all know how to control a crowd. Within their unique alternative style, they have found a way to make their sound completely different from other Miami bands. Their constant construction of new ideas and various experimentation is

PHOTO COURTESY OF MAHOGANY PURPLE

Rocking Out: When not writing down notes on a notebook, Mahogany Purple is playing notes at shows.

Fans dance along to their hit song Sunshine,which features the smooth and voluminous voice of Avery Davis, 21, the beat of drummer Justin Godbolt, 23, and an engaging treble-filled guitar sound. Tongue Tied

PHOTO COURTESY OF REMYZ

All The Buzz: In between studying, REMYZ manages to find time to play their passion in music. what gives them a fresh feel for the industry. REMYZ REMYZ has been around a bit longer than other bands. They started out as a group of friends who went to Miami Palmetto Senior High School. Their guitarist Oscar Familia, 23, bassist Chris Martinez, 23, and guitarist Christian Rolon, 22, went on to study at Miami Dade College. For the past four years, not only has this band grown and learned how to compose music and record themselves, but they have become high-end names in the Miami band scene. After playing gigs at The Falls for two years every

weekend, REMYZ started to set up their own gigs and gain connections with open mic nights, hosting at different venues, and performing at various festivals. They now perform all over Miami and are regulars at Wynwood Yard. “Playing for four years has taught me how to almost control a crowd and feel out situations,” Rolon said. “Variables such as race, age, amount of people in the audience are all something we take note of on stage in order to adapt and appeal to them more that specific moment.” During the past four years, they have evolved from a high school band to a buzzing name that brings fans to a euphoric state.

Tongue Tied is a relatively young band that recently made its way into the Miami band scene and, despite being a band for only two years, they have made quite an impression. Walking into one of their shows, the audience have their jaws dropped while witnessing Danny Collazo, 16, shredding his guitar with ease. Meanwhile, Alex Alfonso, 19, engages the crowd with her grunge-like

persona. Alfonso, while majoring in music business, takes advantage of all the tactics she has learned in her classes, immediately reflecting onto her band. “With this band, it feels like there are no pieces that are missing,” Alfonso said. “Our music taste and symmetry when we play on stage is overall very happy and we want it to make people feel genuine and also make them actually enjoy themselves.” In two years, this band’s unity has brought them into an entirely different place in the local community. They not only represent the younger generation of music, but they also show that friendship and communication are the key ingredients.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TONGUE TIED

Young Generation: When not cramming for a midterm, Tongue Tied prepares for their next gig.

Cinema

Miami GEMS Festival Announces First Films ‰‰ Corbin Bolies previews the first films of the 2018 Miami GEMS Festival and how their prestigious accolades heightens their importance to the festival. By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net As the film landscape heads into awards season, so too does the Miami GEMS Festival. The Miami Film Festival announced the first four films of their 2018 lineup—Diamantino, The Heiresses, Hopelessly Devout and Boys Cry. All four films will compete for the Jordan Resser First Feature Award, a jury-selected prize that grants the winning filmmaker $10,000 for their winning debut. Each film adds the international touch the GEMS festival is known for, with each coming from Portugal, Paraguay, Spain and Italy, respectively. Their inclusion also brings an element of prestige to the event, with the titles Diamantino and The Heiresses earning recognition at film festivals like Cannes and Berlin. Diamantino, the breakout comedy-drama debut of Gabriel Abrantes and Daniel Schmidt,

International Acclaim: The Heiresses is one of the first four films announced for the 2018 Miami GEMS Festival, bringing its international prestige to the city. PHOTO COURTESY OF LUXBOX

tells the story of a disgraced soccer player whose career ends after a broken knee. After the injury, the player begins to explore the more twisted elements of life. The film was warmly received after its premiere at Cannes in May, eventually winning the Grand Prize during the event’s Critics Week. The stakes are also high for The Heiresses, a drama centered around two female partners whose financial situation forces them—and their lives—to change.

The film has been acclaimed since its premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival, earning the Silver Bear—named for individual achievements for directing and acting—for Best Actress and the Alfred Bauer Prize, an award given to films that open up new, cinematic art pieces. The other two films, Hopelessly Devout and Boys Cry, round off the four-film lineup. The former, the winner of the Audience Award at the Malaga Film Festival, centers

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

on a woman who must fight back against waves of sexism after being passed on a leadership role with her church. The latter—the winner of the Silver Ribbon, the Best Feature Film of the Year award by Italy’s National Syndicate of Film Journalists —lies on the opposite end of the gender spectrum, with Damiano and Fabio D’Innocenzo’s Boys Cry details the loss of innocence of two teenage boys after they get swept up in the mob.

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

The films are only the latest films to compete in the GEMS festival, the home of other renowned films like Brooklyn, The Salesman, Youth and Call Me By Your Name, the latter of which won Best Adapted Screenplay at the 90th Academy Awards. The 2018 Miami GEMS Festival will be held Oct. 11-14 at Miami Dade College’s Tower Theater, 1508 S.W. 8th St. Tickets will be available once the full program is unveiled later in September.

MDC The Reporter


SEPTEMBER 18, 2018 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

// A&E Corbin Bolies, A&E Editor  // 

Music

T (305) 237-7657 

// 

B corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net

K-Pop Arrives In America

‰‰ Alexzandria Windley writes about the infusion of Korean pop—K-pop—into the United States and the cultural wave it’s made. By Alexzandria Windley alexzandr.windley001@mymdc.net

In the United States, we have the tendency to brush off anything that isn't in our comfort zone. Maybe it's this “American exceptionalism” that has been ingrained into our culture or perhaps it's indicative of a larger problem, one that permeates everything we get our hands on— including the music industry. The U.S. used to have a strong aversion toward most music that wasn't in English. Fortunately, songs like Despacito and I Like It have been burning up the charts, signaling a change in the way we consume our music. In no other music genre is this current musical climate more perfect than Korean pop music. K-pop is a relatively new thing in the U.S. For years, there have been numerous acts that have come from South Korea to America with the hopes of leaving their footprint in an entirely different country. In the early days, there was a Movies

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAWN

Breaking In: Korean pop bands like BTS have begun to break ground in the United States. flurry of girl and boy groups who attempted to break the east/west divide. From bands like The Wonder Girls, Girls Generation and 2ne1 to solo acts like Rain, PSY and BoA, with the latter debuting in the U.S. with the single Eat You Up and

eventually dropping a full English album. Since then, Korean pop acts have been trying to burst onto the U.S. music scene for years. So, when the band BTS stormed onto the U.S. scene just a little more than a year ago, it came to a fairly big shock to not only South

Korea but to most western K-pop fans as well. How is BTS any different from the K-pop groups that came before them and how did they manage to escape the clutches of irrelevance like many South Korean acts that preceded them? One can argue

it's their extreme likability and sound. Most Korean pop acts can come off as impersonal and rather cold; this may have something to with the language barrier. With BTS, most of them have some understanding of English and one of the members is fluent in the language. On top of that, the music they're putting out is unlike anything we hear on American Top 40 radio. The blend of dorky personalities and their unique sounding discography is just the perfect combination to get, and keep, the attention of the American public. Of course, BTS isn't the only band to make the push into the states. Groups like Momoland, EXID, NCT 127, GOT7 and Monsta X have all made the foray into western music territory. It seems that they have taken the BTS formula —likable members and ear-catching music—and improved on it tenfold. With interviews with Billboard and Buzzfeed, it's only a matter of time before we have multiple Korean pop acts charting on the Billboard Hot 100, much to the delight of K-pop fans everywhere.

Black Cinema Taking Center Stage In 2018

‰‰ Ethan Toth writes about how Black cinema has become a cultural melting pot for quality films and the history behind its rise—and where it’s going from here. By Ethan Toth ethan.toth001@mymdc.net After Barry Jenkins’ historic Best Picture win with 2016’s Moonlight, moviegoers were head over heels for the film and its specific, African-American point of view. It’s a subject that’s sought after in film amongst the Black community and is becoming even more important in an era of political unrest and social tensions. Films with Black culture at the forefront of storytelling have become more than pandering to an audience and have now transformed into major critical and financial successes. Movies in recent memory like the aforementioned Moonlight, Get Out, BlacKkKlansman, Black Panther and Sorry to Bother You are all capable of being voted Best Picture now without being a surprise. It’s fair to say that these films have all drawn the public’s eye. From Black Panther’s impressive worldwide gross of $1,346,844,034 to Moonlight’s captivating portrayal of sexuality and identity in a black man’s life. These films are showcasing the creative capabilities and how

crafting narratives in response to real world events connect us to stories portrayed on the big screen. What better example than this year’s BlacKkKlansman, Spike Lee’s true story of Ron Stallworth, the first Black officer on the Colorado Springs police force and his infiltration of the Ku Klux Klan — extremely timely with the growing number of “far right” movements in the country. Sorry to Bother You, directed by Boots Riley, also has messages about classism and politics under the surface of its witty and quirky exterior. However, this renaissance didn’t happen overnight. That started in the 1970s’ with the arrival of the “blaxploitation” films, movies that had primarily black casts and featured them as the focus of the movie, the first ones being Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song and Shaft both released in 1971. These films did for Black cinema what Crazy Rich Asians and Searching are doing for the Asian-American community; both released this year. Now is when studios can see the results of an ethnic blockbuster and hopefully continue to create more like them. Representation is one of the factors that goes into encouraging more people of color to get into arts and entertainment. In a survey from March by YouGov.com, 58% of Black Americans said that

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

PHOTO COURTESY OF FOCUS FEATURES

Black Cinema: Films like BlacKkKlansman are examples of the new wave of Black cinema that is sweeping through Hollywood. growing up, they did not have television and film role models that looked like them. Maybe if they had, the entertainment industry could have had more writers, producers and directors of color—a prospect the current generation could change. As the end of 2018 draws closer,

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

what do we have to look forward to and where is Black cinema headed next? Jenkins is returning with his widely anticipated If Beale Street Could Talk, a likely Oscar contender based solely off his name alone. Another film to look out for

MDC The Reporter

includes Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, the first film adaptation of Miles Morales, the first black Spider-Man. Also keep an eye on The Hate U Give and Monsters and Men, both tackling the subject of police brutality and unjust killings of African-Americans in this country.


14 FORUM | SEPTEMBER 18, 2018

THE REPORTER

Soccer

Miami Doesn’t Need Another Stadium ‰‰ Valentina González urges voters to not be be starstruck by David Beckham. She believes his soccer stadium deal isn’t as good as it sounds and other options exist that include sharing space at already built sports facilities.

By Valentina González valentin.gonzales001@mymdc.net Many opinions have been put forth about the soccer stadium that David Beckham has planned on building in Miami for five years. The majority of Miami residents, however, are skeptical about his proposal.

Beckham has now abandoned four properties and decided to partner with Jorge Mas, an heir and Miami native, to once again attempt the construction of a huge stadium and park complex valued at $1 billion. The current plan is to build the complex, called the Freedom Park, over the Melreese Country Club, a public golf course that would be paved over by the soccer star. A recent Miami New Times analysis on the Melreese Country Club determined that developing any new construction on the golf course would need to include a massive cleanup that would add millions to the originally stated cost. According to David Villano, a journalist and activist, the landfill where the stadium is planned to be built is toxic and incinerated with ash. Understandably, this matter has concerned many residents. What is more concerning is that neither Beckham nor Miami Mayor Francis Suarez has responded to the matter. Another issue that has been following Beckham and his financier is that, according to them, the soccer stadium will pour millions

KALEY PENICHE / THE REPORTER

into the city. However, research does not support this. Emilio Gonzalez, the city manager of Miami, estimated that $44 million per year could be generated from the project, of which $21.2 million is supposed to come through the sales tax at the complex, which is planning to include, in addition to

the stadium, a hotel, offices, golf facility and 600,000 sq. feet of new retail space. Miami officials and citizens are distraught due to the fact that these numbers are nonsense. This will only result in taking more money from taxpayers, and probably all to satisfy the salary and

needs of Beckham’s major league soccer team. Voters should keep in mind that Miami already has more than three stadiums that could be used and shared by Beckham’s team. Instead, he insists on having a stadium of his own and on using public space to build his billion-dollar construction. Some see the construction of Freedom Park as an opportunity for nearby businesses and households to leap up. But remember the Marlins Park? It’s been more than seven years since its inauguration, yet no increase of valorization has happened. And the idea of creating new retail space doesn’t seem to be beneficial to the retail stores currently around the area. I understand that Miami is very influenced by celebrities and athletes and that the idea of having a stadium and soccer team created by this soccer star sounds good. But there are many factors that need to be considered by the citizens and many questions that still need to be answered in order to make the right decision as to whether this project should be approved. Hopefully, it will be beneficial for all of us.

Education

Cancer

Reaching For The Stars At MDC

Donating Hair Can Make A Difference

‰‰ Alexandra Joseph writes about why students should take advantage of the resources Miami Dade College offers. She believes the College’s atmosphere allows students to reach their full potential.

By Alexandra Joseph alexandra.joseph005@mymdc.net College is nothing like high school, yet sometimes college can feel exactly like high school. However, in my experience there is one main difference: college has many more resources than high school does. Between labs, professors’ office hours, academic advisers and even mental health counseling, help is always there—as long as we make time for it. In college, I’ve learned how crucial it is to learn how to manage your time, because your future is at stake. My first week of college was filled with anxiety because I feared not making the correct choices, which could lead my future into a ditch. Picking classes and times that correspond with my part-time job and getting involved with the college newspaper can be a lot to manage. I’m no adviser, but I can say one thing: in order to be successful in

college you must want to be successful and want to make time for the work required. The aid is there, the professors are there, but will you show up? Will you spend those long nights studying and your evenings in tutoring and labs to perfect your craft? You must love what you do to be motivated to invest extra time and energy in it. Folding under pressure should be a thing of the past. You finally have a say in your life’s outcome. You have the chance to become exactly who you want to be. Success is when opportunity meets preparation, and college is where you prepare to handle the opportunity that presents itself to you. My experiences have sometimes been exhausting and frustrating, but there’s no place I’d rather be than Miami Dade College. For the first time, I’m around innovators who don’t just want to make money but want to change the trajectory of the world. I have met activists and journalists that plan to make a difference in the world. School is more than just taking classes. It’s a college that is based on a community of individuals who change their circumstances and brighten up every aspect of the college experience. So, don’t be bummed out that you’re starting at a community college, because MDC is full of professors who don’t take no for an answer and are willing to go to amazing lengths to give students a place to speak their mind and help them reach for the stars. As long as I am at MDC I will remain limitless, and you should too.

‰‰ Claudia Hernandez writes about donating her hair to benefit cancer patients and explains why others should consider doing it as well.

By Claudia Hernandez claudia.hernandez047@mymdc.net Cancer sucks. It is unfortunate that the majority of people reading this have experienced the devastating loss of a loved one to this incurable disease. I have lost two of my favorite humans to cancer—my paternal grandma to breast cancer and one of my best friends in middle school to melanoma. It creates rage, depression and uneasiness to be unable to help someone suffering from this disease. Every time I have an in depth conversation with someone about cancer, it becomes clear that many people want to raise awareness and support cancer patients, but they don’t know how to. Last year, when one of my aunts was diagnosed with this malignant illness, I became one of those people. I researched ways to help and donate, and I found that the easiest way to help is not to give money or buy T-shirts and bracelets (which are also great ways to spread the message), but to donate hair to make wigs for cancer

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

patients. When I read an article from a blogger narrating her hair donation experience, I decided to do so as well. Every time I told someone what my goal was, they looked at me like I was crazy because nobody had ever seen me without my long hair before. They tried to convince me to donate in other ways because they said that hair takes a lot of time to grow back. Other people reminded me that if I wanted to donate my hair, I had to keep it healthy and could not dye it. After seven months of letting my hair grow and ignoring all the criticism, I finally reached the 12inch length needed for donation. Doing it was a challenge, but I felt that I had to. I was doing this for others, not myself. The process of donating involves putting your hair into a ponytail

@mdcthereporter

and then cutting it off. I asked the woman who cut it why it is so important to motivate people to donate their hair and she answered with three main points: it can take 18 to 20 ponytails to create one custom hairpiece, cancer fighters not only suffer physically but also experience great emotional pain when they see themselves with no hair and motivating each other to do something helpful for others is what can help the world become a better place. I urge you to donate your hair if you are able to. There are many places where you can go: Pantene Beautiful Lengths, Wigs for Kids and Locks of Love, to name a few. If you love having long hair like me, this can be a huge challenge. But we have to remember why and for whom we are doing it. Remind yourself that you are helping someone who is suffering, even if it’s only in a small way.

AMINAH Brown / THE REPORTER

@mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter


SEPTEMBER 18, 2018 | FORUM

THE REPORTER

15

// FORUM Teresa Schuster, Forum Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B teresa.schuster001@mymdc.net

Music

Pianos Are There To Play, Not Pay For ‰‰ Corbin Bolies writes about the Wolfson Campus music department’s restrictions on piano usage and how they, while understandable, can inhibit someone’s ability to learn music.

By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net I grew up playing piano. A selftaught hobby, it became my second outlet to express whatever was in my head. When I came to Miami Dade College, I hoped to continue that hobby and further its growth—until I was met with the Wolfson Campus music department’s restrictions. According to the music department, the pianos housed in two practice rooms are available solely for students who are majoring in music-related fields or are taking a music class. While the reason is certainly an understandable one—to prevent students with no experience from tampering with the

// FORUM FUN

instruments—it gives the impression that you must pay to learn music. That impression is one that runs counter to what MDC is. A school that labels itself as “Democracy’s College” shouldn’t force its students to pay for the right to learn an instrument, especially when some students want to teach themselves. This isn’t just based off my personal beliefs. In a 2014 National Geographic article, Diane Cole laid out multiple reasons why learning instruments, especially while older, can help improve cognitive functions and increase awareness. That’s besides the added skill and opportunities learning an instrument can provide. To put it simply, life gets better when you learn music. Which makes the music department’s policy all the more confusing. By requiring students to either take music classes or enroll within the music department—thereby paying money—they’re making it harder for students to better themselves, and that isn’t acceptable. MDC disagrees. According to Juan Mendieta, director of communications for the College, the rooms are part of the fee music students pay toward the College. “MDC does pride itself in providing open access but even at open access facilities anywhere there are always areas with limited access to preserve equipment,” Mendieta said. “Perhaps in

North Campus Bureau covers North, West, Hialeah and MEEC B 11380 N.W. 27th Ave. Room 4209 Miami, FL 33167 T (305) 237-1254 ————————————————— Kendall Campus Bureau covers Kendall and Homestead B 11011 S.W. 104th St. Room M239 Miami, FL 33176 T (305) 237-2715 ————————————————— Wolfson Campus Bureau covers Wolfson, Medical and InterAmerican B 300 N.E. Second Ave. Suite 1610 Miami, FL 33132 T (305) 237-3368

Editorial Board ——————————— Christian Ortega Editor-in-Chief/Sports Editor KALEY PENICHE / THE REPORTER

the future, we can identify a place in a common area here at Wolfson where a surplus piano can be placed for the enjoyment and use by all.” I don’t propose opening up the practice rooms to any individual who wants to play and I don’t dispute the need to prioritize them for students majoring in musicrelated fields or are taking a music class. It is their focus and the practice rooms are their resources. However, a better solution would be to open the rooms up

during certain intervals. If the rooms were available to all students during certain hours of the day—say, a morning between the hours of nine and noon—it would make the rooms available to music students for the majority of the day while also allowing other students to make use of them. I understand the need to provide resources for students majoring in certain fields. But with a language as universal as music, it’s hard to justify a restriction that makes it harder to engage with it.

Finding Your Passion Is Harder Than It Looks

By Crystel Davila crystel.davila001@mymdc.net

krazydad.com

Bureaus ———————————

Passion

‰‰ Crystel Davila writes about her realization that discovering your life’s passion doesn’t happen by itself. She is currently on a mission to discover her passion.

Growing up, we are bombarded with decisions to make. In high school, our educators drill in us that we must prepare for the future and figure out exactly what we want to do in life before entering college. This is easier said than done. I am approaching the end as a Miami Dade College student and I still have no clue what I really want to do with my life. What I do know is that I want to find a job

www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

that makes me feel good about getting up in the morning. When searching for guidance, be it from advisors or Google, I am usually told that the best way to figure out what to do with my life is to follow my passion. When faced with my dilemma, this seems like the best and most logical solution. When you follow your passion, you embark on the path to purpose, which allows you to live a life that has meaning and fulfillment. In this way, a person can be successful in whatever they decide to pursue. Again, this is harder than it looks. Previously, my perception was that my passion would one day wake me up in the middle of the night, and I would have the answer to what I’m meant to do on this planet. I realize that for me, this moment hasn’t come yet and it won’t unless I do something about it. Passion isn’t something that just finds you. It’s something you must find within yourself and the world around you. British author Marcus Buckingham once said that “passion isn’t something that lives up in the sky, in abstract dreams and hopes. It lives at ground level, in the specific details of what you’re

@mdcthereporter

@mdcthereporter

actually doing every day.” So, how does a passionless individual start their journey to discover their passion? When beginning my pursuit for passion, I found that many experts suggest that you should reflect on what your likes or dislikes are, and what you love to learn about or teach others. You could ask close friends or family about what you always talk about, review the books you read, music you listen to and the videos you watch to notice any common themes. All in all, finding one’s passion comes from finding what you love and nurturing it. However, it’s important to note that one thing doesn’t have to absorb all your passion. I challenge myself and others to take these suggestions and use them to discover the top three things you love and then add a little passion to each. The ultimate goal isn’t having it all figured out when you graduate or stressing about landing the job that pays the most. It’s about finding a correlation between your career and your passion. This takes some work, but with heart and persistence it can be achieved. Just don’t forget to have fun in the process. MDC The Reporter

Katherine Wallace-Fernandez Managing Editor/Briefing Editor Corbin Bolies A&E Editor Teresa Schuster Forum Editor

Art Department ——————————— Eduardo Badal Designer

Issue Staff ——————————— Aminah Brown, Sophia Cruz-Peraza, Crystel Davila, Lauren Dominguez, Elizabeth Garcia, Valentina González, Claudia Hernandez, Alexandra Joseph, Stephany Matat, Sean Mow, Hausser Nodarse Perez, Chika Ojukwu, Kaley Peniche, Anthony Santos, Genesis Sotomayor, Ethan Toth, Alexzandria Windley

Manolo Barco, Media Adviser B mbarco@mdc.edu T NORTH.........................(305) 237-1255 T KENDALL......................(305) 237-2323 T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3477 Aracelia Diez, Student Media Assistant

B adiez@mdc.edu T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3368 ——————————— Letters to the Editor ——————————— The Reporter welcomes letters to the editor. All submissions should be 300 words or less and must be typed. Writers must include their full name, contact number, campus, student number and e-mail address. Faculty and staff should include the title, department and extension. All letters are subject to editing for purposes of brevity and clarity. Letters can be sent via e-mail to mdc.thereporter@gmail.com, with the subject “letter to the editor.”

Advertising ——————————— B thereporteradvertising@gmail.com T (305) 237-7657


FEB. 19, 2013 | THE REPORTER

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

AL IENS

LOVE IT.

YOU WILL TOO.

Are you interested in: WRITING, REPORTING, PHOTOGRAPHY, DESIGN, ADVERTISING, or MARKETING? Are you majoring in: JOURNALISM, ENGLISH, MASS COMMUNICATIONS, BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, or GRAPHIC ARTS?

GET INVOLVED! MANOLO BARCO (305) 237-1255

MBARCO@MDC.EDU

TION, LAZARO GAMIO, © 2010 www.mdc.edu/thereporter

The Reporter

@TheReporter_MDC

9

The Reporter Vol. 9 Issue 2  
The Reporter Vol. 9 Issue 2  
Advertisement