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Brian Rey will be one of the key offensive cogs for the MDC baseball team this year. Last year, he had a .404 batting average, six home runs and 38 RBI. PAGE 10

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Technology Overkill

The Reporter’s Justin Marcano says that Georgia rap trio Migos put their hypeinduced sound on full blast on their latest album Culture II, released Jan. 26.

FORUM

Three Kings

A&E

NEWS

Tuskegee University has awarded MDC students $2.5 million in scholarship funds since the schools signed an articulation agreement in 2008.

El Rey SPORTS

Scholarship Funds

Naila Lauzurique challenges readers to put down their cell phones and have a conversation with someone. She says technology is killing us.

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4VOL. 4VOL. 8, 8, ISSUE ISSUE 210——SEPTEMBER FEBRUARY 26, 13, 2017 2018

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Packs A Punch

With Miami-Based Indie Film ‰‰ Huracán, a low budget independent film, has many ties to Miami Dade College, including shooting scenes at North Campus and hiring various students as interns. Mark Pulaski, a 2015 MDC graduate, is working as a producer on the film. By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

Mark Pulaski quickly huddles with crew members across the street from KO Zone, a gym in Little Haiti. It’s almost 10 p.m. and today’s shooting for Huracán, a low-budget independent film being shot throughout Miami, has just wrapped up. Pulaski tightly clasps his hands and appears concerned. Earlier in the day, he

Internal Fight: Cassius Corrigan portrays Alonso Santos in Huracán, a low budget independent film about a mixed martial arts fighter with dissociative identity disorder.

TURN TO MDC ALUM PAGE 5 Omar Negrin / THE REPORTER

SB 540

Florida Senate Bill 540 Could Mean Big Changes To State College System ‰‰ Senate Bill 540 is currently passing through the Florida Senate and promises to add a new performance metric, a state board and an enrollment cap to four-year programs. According to Miami Dade College officials, the bill could severely impact the College. By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net Legislation proposed by Republican Senator Dorothy Hukill threatens to impact local institutions like Miami Dade College. School officials believe it could have adverse ramifications for the current structure of Florida’s state college system. Florida Senate Bill 540, filed by Hukill last October, aims to restructure the college system through the addition of a state oversight board, an enrollment cap on four-year programs and a new performance metric that bases funding on a two-year graduation rate.

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The bill was retained on the Senate calendar on Jan. 31 and awaits a vote. If passed, the bill would take effect in October 2018. Named the College Competitiveness Act of 2018, the bill is a priority for Senate President Joe Negron who has argued that the bill has addressed concerns from SB 374, a similar bill that was vetoed by Governor Rick Scott in 2017. “President Negron fundamentally believes we have a world-class college system,” said Katherine Betta, a spokeswoman for Negron. “374 included several components related to the state universities system as well as the state college system. Those policy goals are running as two separate bills.” In his veto letter for SB 374, Scott noted that the previous bill would hurt state colleges by “unnecessarily increasing red tape” in how they function. In a statement provided to The Reporter, the Governor’s office said they are reviewing SB 540. “As he does each year, Governor Scott

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will thoroughly review the budget line by line to ensure every dollar spent results in a return on investment for Florida’s hardworking taxpayers,” said Lauren Schenone, a spokeswoman for the Governor. “The Governor continues to encourage communities to be involved in the state budget process and looks forward to reviewing the budget at the conclusion of the ongoing legislative session.” Hukill’s office did not respond to repeated requests for comment. The bill and its House counterpart, HB 831, has faced criticism from MDC. The College argues that the bill makes it harder to operate, as the new performance metric ties half of the College’s base funding to two-year graduations even though most MDC students graduate within three to four years. “Most of the students are part-time students and they take more than two years to graduate,” said Victoria Hernandez,

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director of governmental affairs at MDC. “They’re working, they’re older, they’re raising families.” Seventy-nine percent of MDC students attended part-time during the Fall semester, the average age being 25.5. The average age of the 21 percent of full-time students was 21.6. However, the numbers can fluctuate, according to Juan Mendieta, the director of communications at MDC. The College’s current measure of funding is based on four metrics: completion in up to four years, the transfer rate to universities, post-graduation job placement and the starting salaries for those jobs. By adding a measure based on full-time students, Hernandez argues that the addition will place MDC in an impossible situation. “MDC (sic) does pretty well on those metrics, so when you add a fifth one, it’s only TURN TO SB 540 PAGE 5

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THE REPORTER IS THE FREE, BIWEEKLY STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE. ALL CONTENT IS PRODUCED BY MDC STUDENTS. THE REPORTER IS A PUBLIC FORUM FOR EXPRESSION.

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2 BRIEFING | FEBRUARY 13, 2018

THE REPORTER Miami Book Fair And Lip Service To Host Storypalooza!

// BRIEFING Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Briefing Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

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B katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

New ACCESS Director At North Campus Elizabeth Potenza has been selected as the new ACCESS director at North Campus. She started her position on Jan. 29. She will manage North Campus’ Americans With Disabilities Act, bring new educational programs, oversee the department budget and payroll and prepare accommodations for ACCESS students. “The population of ACCESS is a population that needs to be represented,” Potenza said. “So ethically and morally, it’s the best position for me.” She previously served as the former interim dean of students for North Campus, an advisor for OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER ACCESS and as an adjunct history professor at Miami Dade College. Potenza received a masters in history from the American Military College under the American Public University. —Alessandra Pacheco

Wolfson Campus To Host Better Food Movement Event The first annual Better Food Movement will be hosted at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2nd Ave., Room 3210, on Feb. 21 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The conference, in partnership with Natcom, which produces short digital videos, and Miami Dade College’s Culinary Institute, will present speaker series and networking sessions with industry professionals, entrepreneurs and media influencers to discuss sustainable food and agriculture systems. The keynote speaker will be executive corporate chef Einav Gefen from Unilever Food Solutions. Admission is free and VIP admission is $10. Guests can register at www.eventbrite.com

Third Annual STEM Career And Internship Fair At North North Campus, 11380 N.W. 27th Ave., will host its third annual STEM Career and Internship Fair on Feb. 20 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. in Room A104. The career fair will showcase companies like Biorasi and Tissue Tech. The United States Department of Labor will also attend. Students are encouraged to bring resumés, dress professionally and prepare for interviews. —Paola Fernandez

For more information, contact: Oliver Moreira omoreira@mdc.edu

Valentine’s Day Dance At West Campus West Campus’ student government association will host a Valentine’s Day Dance Cupid Shuffle on Feb. 13 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at 3800 N.W. 115th Ave., Room 1102. The entrance fee is five items of clothing or $5 for an individual ticket. Tickets are $8 for couples. Donations will be given to MDC Cares Closet, a clothing relief program. Guests are encouraged to dress in cocktail attire. —Justin Marcano For more information, contact: Student Life T(305) 237-8904 or visit Room 1122-01

How To Join The Student Newspaper At MDC

—Giovanni Del Fa For more information, contact: Manolo Barco mbarco@mdc.edu T(305) 237-1255

Wolfson Campus Alumna Selected As Puffin Fellow Miami Dade College alumna Maydee Martinez has been selected as a Puffin Fellow by the Andrew Goodman Foundation. Martinez is one of five graduate students in the nation selected. She began her two-year run as a Puffin Fellow in January. “It is an honor,” Martinez said. “I am thrilled to continue the work I started at Miami Dade College and work alongside individuals passionate MARTINEZ about civic engagement, voting and civil rights.” Martinez graduated with an associates in political science in 2016 from the Honors College at Wolfson Campus. At MDC, she was an Andrew Goodman representative. She currently attends Georgetown University. As a Puffin Fellow, Martinez wants to create projects that will enhance voter education systems. —Alexandra Vargas

—Dayana Romero

MDC Jazz Ensembles To Perform At Pinecrest Gardens The Civic Chorale of Greater Miami and jazz ensembles from Miami Dade College will perform A Lively Musical Journey In The Park on Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. at Pinecrest Gardens, 11000 Red Road. The concert will include jazz and pop music from the 1930s to the 1970s. The Civic Chorale of Greater Miami is a nonprofit community choir and the jazz ensembles will perform under the direction of Kendall Campus music professors Matt Bonelli and Larry Lapin. Ticket prices are set to $5 for students, $15 for seniors and $20 for adults. Children who are six years old or younger receive free admission. —Alexandra Vargas

—Katherine Wallace-Fernandez

The Reporter invites students interested in writing, reporting, photography, multimedia or design to join its staff. Published 15 times a year, the newspaper is distributed at all eight Miami Dade College campuses and has Campus newsrooms in Room 4209 at North, Room 1610 at Wolfson and Room M-239 at Kendall. Interested students should visit one of the three newsrooms to fill out an application form. The application is also available online at mdcthereporter.com/app-form Miami Dade College student newspapers have won 21 National Pacemaker Awards and received hundreds of honors from the Florida Community College Publications Association throughout the years.

The Miami Book Fair is partnering with Lip Service to host Storypalooza! on Feb. 18 at 11 a.m. at the Cuba Ocho Museum and Performing Arts Center, 1465 S.W. 8th St. The open mic with live feedback event is free and open to the public. Participants can present their stories live and receive feedback from a panel of writers and editors. LOGO COURTESY OF THE MIAMI BOOK FAIR Stories have to be personal, a maximum of 500 words and fit with the event’s love hurts theme. Attendees can sign up at the event. Storypalooza! is part of the Gay8 festival, a LGBTQ festival in Little Havana. Lip Service is a part of the MBF’s year-round programs and showcases live storytelling. For more information, contact the Miami Book Fair at wbookfair@ mdc.edu or at (305) 237-3258.

For more information, contact: Kenneth Boos kboos@mdc.edu T(305) 237-2394

Farm Share To Distribute Food At Homestead Campus Florida State Representative Holly Raschein and Farm Share will host a free food distribution and community resource fair on Feb. 17 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the central lawn of Homestead Campus, 500 College Terrace. The food bags distributed will include a combination of fruits, vegetables, meat, bread and canned food. “Community partners and Miami Dade College’s Homestead Campus departments will provide information about important services and resources available in the community,” said lliana Marin, the assistant to Homestead Campus’ president. Farm Share is a nonprofit organization that aims to alleviate hunger and malnutrition by distributing food. Students who want to volunteer can contact Kevin Moore at kmoore1@ mdc.edu or at (305) 237-5210. Faculty and staff can contact Sophia Cummings at scumming@mdc.edu to volunteer or at (305) 237-5045. —Claudia Hernandez

The Koubek Center Kicks Off 2017-18 Season

LOGO COURTESY OF THE IDEA CENTER

Idea Center To Host The Startup Nation Conference The Idea Center, in partnership with Tel Aviv University’s StarTAU, will host the Startup Nation Conference on Feb. 26 and Feb. 27 at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2nd Ave. The conference will join Israeli and Miami startup companies and showcase artificial intelligence, augmented and virtual reality and cybersecurity. Speakers will include Nimrod Cohen from TAU Ventures and Laura Maydon from Endeavor Miami. Tickets are $149 with a fee of $10.36. Guests can register at www. eventbrite.com —Claudia Hernandez For more information, contact: Idea Center T(305) 237-7809 ideacenter@mdc.edu

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Miami Dade College’s Koubek Center, 2705 S.W. 3rd St., will kick off its 2017-18 season with Danzón Cubano! On Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. Danzón Cubano! is under the Little Havana Social Club Series and is a 1940’s style ballroom social dance in tribute to famous Cuban singers Barbarito Diez, Benny Moré and Cachao. Federico Britos and his ensemble will perform along with the MDC Orchestra will perform. Cocktails and complimentary pre-concert dance lessons will be provided. Tickets for the dance are available at koubekcenter.org and are $20 in advance and $25 the day of the event. —Camilla Sposito For more information, contact: Koubek Center T(305) 237-7750

Former CIA Agent To Speak At North Campus Retired Central Intelligence Agency agent Martha Peterson will be a guest speaker at The Power of Story Series on Feb. 22 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at North Campus, 11380 N.W. 27th Ave., Room 3249. The event is free and open to the public. Peterson will speak about her book, Widow Spy, which chronicles her life as a woman in the CIA and her involvement in Moscow during the PETERSON 1970s and 1980s. “From the very first interview I had with CIA, I became aware that my road to become an operations officer would be difficult,” Peterson said. “Up until that time only a few women had achieved this position.” The Power of Story Series invites authors to speak to students and showcase novels and autobiographies. —Paola Fernandez

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FEBRUARY 13, 2018 | BRIEFING

THE REPORTER Omar Negrin, Photo Editor  // 

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Just Cause: Dancer Francesca Harper performs in multimedia artist Carrie Mae Weems' production of Past Tense at the Wolfson Campus auditorium on Feb. 3.

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Mood Setting: Music director and trombonist Craig Harris plays in Carrie Mae Weems' production of Past Tense at Wolfson Campus on Feb. 3.

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Power Vocals: Mezzo-soprano singer Alicia Hall Morgan belts out a note in Carrie Mae Weems' production of Past Tense on Feb. 3 at the Wolfson Campus auditorium.

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The Sound Of Music: Iranian musician and songwriter Sahba Motallebi performs traditional and original compositions with her tar for Honors College students at Wolfson Campus on Jan.25. She also discusses her background and cultural identity.

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4 NEWS | FEBRUARY 13, 2018

THE REPORTER

// NEWS Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Editor-in-Chief  // 

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Mathematics

‘Human Calendar’ At Homestead Campus Sets New Guinness World Record ‰‰ Yusnier Viera, also known as the “Human Calendar” reclaimed the world record for the number of times he correctly calculated the day for a given date in one minute. Viera is a math professor at Homestead Campus. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net Homestead Campus is home to a Guinness World Record holder. Mathematics professor Yusnier Viera took one minute to calculate which day fell on 132 dates between the years 1600 and 2100. It’s the second time the math wiz has broken the record. He originally set the mark in October of 2005 but a 12-year-old boy from India beat his record in 2016. Viera, 35, bested the boy’s mark on Jan. 27 by seven dates. “This record means a lot to me. It shows that with hard work and determination, you can accomplish what you set out to do,” Viera said. “After initially losing it, I knew I had to work harder, so once I won it back I just felt so happy to once again see my hard work pay off.” Viera’s penchant for numbers has been featured on CNN, ABC, the Discovery Channel series Superhero Showdown and the NatGeo Latin American show Súper Cerebros. In 2013, his brain was studied by

PHOTO COURTESY OF HIALEAH CAMPUS MEDIA SERVICES

Days Gone By: Homestead Campus math professor Yusnier Viera (pictured with laptop) reclaimed his Guinness World Record for the number of times he correctly calculated the day for a given date in one minute. He did it 132 times on Jan. 27. University of Sussex neuroscientists Ludovico Minati and Natasha Sigala. In the study, he completed a computerized version of the Raven’s Progressive Matrices Test with an IQ score of 157. The neuroscientists concluded that his expertise is a result of long-term practice and motivation. Despite his accomplishments, Viera says his biggest reward is inspiring others. Tomas Perez, a Homestead Campus School for

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Advanced Studies student, remembers sitting in front of his television in Cuba, watching Viera compete in Germany. “Seeing him in the competition and doing what he was doing was amazing,” Perez said. “I had no idea someone was capable of such a thing.” Viera grew up in Havana, Cuba. He received his bachelor’s degree in computer science and a master’s degree in applied

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mathematics from the University of Havana. It was there he put himself on the path to breaking world records as a means to escape Cuba. “I took this opportunity to get out of life in Cuba because I knew there was so much more the world had to offer,” Viera said. “When I had the chance to compete in Germany, I realized everything I was exposed to and taught in Cuba was a lie. It was in Germany that I realized that in Cuba, I wasn’t allowed to be free and think for myself.” When Viera practices his calculations, he uses a program that he created. The program is designed to generate random dates within a period of time. When he first began, Viera practiced up to eight hours a day, but has cut down to three to four hours to accommodate his schedule as a professor. Viera moved to Miami five years ago and soon began teaching at Miami Dade College. His strong drive and bright personality has rubbed off on his students and coworkers. “He’s just one of the most charismatic and brightest people I’ve worked with. He’s the kind of [person] who brightens everyone’s day and that’s something students have noticed,” said Homestead Campus associate professor Yanely Cordero. “Whenever I talk to them, they always say things like ‘He’s the coolest math teacher ever, he always helps us and breaks things down so that we understand what we’re learning.’ ”

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FEBRUARY 13, 2018 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

College System Faces Big Changes If Bill Passes FROM SB 540, FRONT

based on a small number of students,” Hernandez said. “When you put half of your money at risk, you’re not going to make it.” That would force budget cuts, which could impact the College’s six four-year baccalaureate programs— another measure SB 540 would affect, as the bill would cap a college’s enrollment of four-year programs at 20 percent. “If we can’t open more sections because we can’t hire more faculty, that’s going to be bad for students,” Hernandez said. “If you don’t have the money, you have to start cutting, [and] if you have to start making cuts, you start by cutting people.” That fear is shared by sophomore Andres Perez, 19, who set up a booth at Wolfson Campus for students to contact their legislator to oppose the bill. “I feel like this is a bill that’s targeting [students],” said Perez, who pays for MDC out of pocket. “I don’t think it’s fair for students like me, who’s doing everything they can, for Miami Dade College to be penalized.” The bill also creates a new state board to oversee Florida’s 28 state colleges, transitioning power away from the current system of trustee boards. It is meant to emulate the Board of Governors that governs state universities, though Hernandez stresses the differences between the two models. “That’s fine for the state universities because they are much more regional and international,” Hernandez said. “The composition of students come from all over. They have other missions.” Negron’s office says the bill would not affect the power of the board of trustees, viewing the state board as a compliment to the college by removing them from the purview of the K-12 system. “It would actually empower colleges because they would have their own independent voice at the state level apart from the K-12 system,” Betta said. “It shows how much we value the college system and the education of our students.” Hernandez disputes this, saying the state board would not be able to adequately make decisions that reflect the College’s largely part-time population with the bill’s focus on full-time students. “Why measure something that’s not reflective of your student body?” Hernandez said.

Huracán Barrels In With Miami Dade College Talent FROM MDC ALUM, FRONT

mentioned shooting overtime next week because of a potential scheduling issue at the gym. “I didn’t do it but I have to fix it. That’s what a producer does— fixes everything regardless of who caused the problem,” Pulaski said. Pulaski, a 2015 graduate of the film, television and digital production program at MDC, is a producer on Huracán, a film that focuses on Alonso Santos, a mixed martial arts fighter trying to make it big while suffering from dissociative identity disorder. Cassius Corrigan, who plays the part of Santos and is also the screenwriter and director of the film, came up with the psychological thriller. He pieced together multiple stories about the rough upbringing of multiple MMA fighters and kids that shuffle through the juvenile court system. Corrigan also researched various mental illnesses cases. Huracán has a Screen Actors Guild Ultra Low Budget, which means the production can’t spend more than $250,000. Filming started on Jan. 22 and wrapped on Feb. 10. On set, Pulaski, 32, is a multitasker. He negotiates deals, hires crew, oversees the budget, answers emails, tapes up walkie talkies and carries coolers. “A producer is the hardest title to nail down exactly what that person does because its any and everything to get the movie done,” Pulaski said. “Like, 'get the movie done' is my title.” Pulaski spends the biggest chunk of his time talking on the phone. On a recent day, his phone was bombarded with a flurry of calls that ranged from 7:03 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 7:42 p.m., 7:47 p.m. and 7:48 p.m. “I spend a whole lot of time on the phone talking to other people on the crew, our lawyer— SAG called me and yelled at me like a little kid the other day,” Pulaski said. “A lot of answering phone calls and emails and running around.” There’s a mix of seasoned film veterans and interns, most with MDC roots, which Pulaski has to oversee like his assistant Mariana Serrano.

“He’s like really into doing it yourself and that’s not what most producers do,” said Serrano, who is majoring in film, television and digital production at MDC. “It’s very involved. He’s very motivated and interested, so whatever he needs to me to do I’ll do.” Pulaski got the job after meeting Corrigan through Ryan Beharry, another MDC alumni and associate producer on the film. Corrigan knew he wanted his first feature film to be shot in Miami, so he sought people like Pulaski. “I had never shot anything in Miami,” Corrigan said. “Everything I’ve done was in LA or New York, so I didn’t have any production infrastructure or network whatsoever.” Ironically, when Pulaski first met Corrigan, he didn’t take him seriously. “I thought he wasn’t really ready to make a movie because it takes a lot of money to make a movie,” Pulaski said. “So, I blew him off and then I learned that he had a decent little budget, like $125,000 at the time, so then I signed on.” After editing, Huracán will be entered into the Cannes Film Festival and the Toronto International Film Festival. “This is a complete 305, homegrown film and it’s the kind of production that’s going to bring back filmmaking to South Florida,” said EK Keratsis, another proPulaski ducer on the film. Before becoming a producer on the film, Pulaski worked on other projects. He wrote, co-directed, acted and produced in a two-minute film called Dream Recall, which won the Vimeo Weekend Challenge in 2015, and worked as an extras casting assistant on Ride Along 2. He also co-produced 78 on 79th, a Miami-based drama starring Patrick Decile (Moonlight) in 2017. “He has been very successful in the past few years after graduating, working steadily in features and television, primarily in production departments,”said Joshua Ellis, a film professor at MDC. “I was able to visit the set of Huracán, and could see immediately that he was doing a wonderful job and had gathered together some of the best crew talent in the region. I’m very proud to call Mark a graduate of our program at SEDT.”

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THE REPORTER

Confucius Institute

Senator Marco Rubio Urges MDC To Terminate Its Affiliation With The Confucius Institute ‰‰ With concerns of propaganda and censorship shrouding the Confucius Institute, Republican Senator Marco Rubio sent a letter to Miami Dade College urging the school to terminate its association with the program.

By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net Senator Marco Rubio sent a letter on Feb. 5 urging Miami Dade College to end its relationship with the Confucius Institute, a Chinese state-run program that has faced resistance at other universities due to accusations of censorship and promoting the Communist country’s policies. The Confucius Institute, founded in 2004 and implemented at MDC in 2010, is designed to incorporate Chinese language and culture into Western educational institutions. There are more than 500 institutes in operation with more than 100 of them in the United States. It currently has locations at the College’s Wolfson and Kendall Campuses. In his letter, Rubio, a Republican, condemns China's “increasingly aggressive attempts to use ‘Confucius Institutes’ and other means to influence foreign academic institutions and critical analysis of China’s past history and present policies.” It also states how he believes the program is designed to promote the Communist ideals of the Chinese government in United States educational institutions.

“These institutes are overseen by a branch of the Chinese Ministry of Education, and are instructed to only teach versions of Chinese history, culture or current events that are explicitly approved by the Chinese government and Communist party,” Rubio wrote. Xuejun (Jim) Yu, the director of Confucius Institute at MDC, said he was unaware of Rubio’s letter when approached by The Reporter. “I haven’t heard anything about that,” Yu said. When reached for comment, MDC’s director of communications Juan Mendieta acknowledged the letter. “We are in receipt of the letter and have no additional comment at this time,” Mendieta said. The senator was not available for an interview. Rubio, the chairman of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, cited reports written by the National Association of Scholars and the American Association of University Professors, each of which outlined concerns over the influence of Chinese propaganda in American schools. The letter also mentions that in 2014 the University of Chicago and Pennsylvania State University both decided to shutter their Confucius Institute programs. “Given China’s aggressive campaign to ‘infiltrate’ American classrooms, stifle free inquiry, and subvert free expression both at home and abroad, I respectfully urge you to consider terminating your Confucius Institute

“ 

Given China’s aggressive campaign to ‘infiltrate’ American classrooms, stifle free inquiry, and subvert free expression both at home and abroad, I respectfully urge you to consider terminating your Confucius Institute agreement.

Marco Rubio, U.S. Senator

agreement,” Rubio wrote. The letter was sent to the University of South Florida, the University of North Florida, the University of West Florida and Cypress Bay High School along with their respective boards of trustees. According to the Miami Herald, MDC Board of Trustee member Bernie Navarro was the finance chairman of Rubio’s 2016 presidential and senate campaigns. Despite the controversy, the Confucius Institute at MDC has drawn some praise over the years. It won the 2015 Confucius Institute of the Year award at the Global Confucius Institute Conference. The Institute also donated a 500-pound bronze statue to Kendall Campus in 2015 and has hosted events like the Confucius Institute Cup and Chinese Culture Night.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Controversial Statue: In 2015, the Confucius Institute donated a sixfoot-tall, 500-pound statue of the Chinese philosopher Confucius to Miami Dade College. The bronze statute was unveiled at Kendall Campus on May 16 of that year.

Tuskegee

Tuskegee University Shows MDC Students The Money—$2.5 Million Of It Since 2008 Agreement

‰‰ In 2008, Miami Dade College and Tuskegee University joined forces and created an articulation agreement for potential transfer students. Since the agreement was signed, more than $2.5 million in scholarship funds have gone to MDC students. By Alessandra Pacheco alessandr.pacheco001@mymdc.net After graduating from Miami Dade College in 2015, Louvins Pierre needed assistance to continue his education. When Tuskegee University, a private Historically Black College and University in Alabama, offered a full-tuition scholarship, it was a godsend. “If I hadn’t gotten that scholarship, it was a question as to whether I would be able to finish my bachelor’s degree,” said Pierre, 23, who graduated from Tuskegee University this past December. “It got rid of a lot of the financial stress.” Pierre is one of many students who have benefited from an articulation agreement between MDC and Tuskegee University. Since the agreement was signed in December of 2008, more than $2.5 million in scholarship funds have gone to MDC students, according to Frederic Toney, a Tuskegee University alumni and the assistant director at North Campus’ advisement department. Written by Toney, the agreement grants MDC students that transfer into Tuskegee

LAUREN MORGAN / THE REPORTER

2018 Transfer Class: Pictured from left to right, Rodney Claude, Frederic Toney (the assistant director at North Campus’ advisement department), Rodahina Pasteurin and Jermaine Jackson. Claude, Pasteurin and Jackson were awarded the Distinguished Presidential Scholarship from Tuskegee University that covers two full years of tuition, roomand-board and gives recipients an $800 textbook voucher. University full acceptance with an MDC associate’s degree. It also provides the possibility of the Distinguished Presidential Scholarship and the Transfer Marriage Scholarship. “The students that come from MDC, and I’ve dealt with all of them, they are bright, determined, have a goal, and do very well here,” said Thelma Vines, assistant director of admissions at Tuskegee University.

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“They have a mission, are appreciative of the scholarship and of the opportunity of educational growth.” Students applying to the Distinguished Presidential Scholarship must have been accepted into Tuskegee University, applied for financial aid, have a minimum 3.5 GPA, submit two recommendation letters and a completed essay. The DPS, granted to three MDC applicants yearly, covers two full

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years of tuition, room-and-board and gives recipients an $800 textbook voucher. “The Distinguished Presidential Scholarships helps [recipients] go to one of the most highly regarded private schools debt-free,” Toney said. “That’s a huge weight off their shoulders.” This year’s three DPS recipients are Rodahina Pasteurin, Jermaine Jackson and Rodney Claude. All three are in their final semester at North Campus. “This was truly a blessing from God,” said Pasteurin, a 19-year-old biology major studying to become a general surgeon. “I’m going to be a first generation college student at an amazing university where I’m valued.” For TMS, students must have at least a 3.3 GPA. Under the partial scholarship, recipients are granted paid tuition for two full years and the $800 textbook voucher. The 2018 recipients have not been disclosed as of yet, but 11 MDC students have been in the past. The College currently has 77 articulation agreements with colleges and universities around the nation. “Miami Dade College is full of students with financial hardships,” Toney said. “So, to me it was important to connect them with this opportunity.” Students interested in applying to Tuskegee University and the scholarships for the 2019 transfer class can email Frederic Toney at ftoney@mdc.edu or call (305) 237-1662.

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JANUARY 30, 2017 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

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7


8 NEWS | FEBRUARY 13, 2018

THE REPORTER

Love Is In The Air At Miami Dade College For Valentine’s Day, The Reporter reached out to several Miami Dade College couples to see what the holiday truly means to them. Plans ranged from watching movies or performances to going out for dinner. In addition, we asked them to share intimate details about their first date and their wedding. The couples' marriage ranged from seven years to 37 years but they all had one thing in common—they couldn’t stop gushing over each other. —Camilla Sposito

Stephanie Fernandez and Yakir Fernandez As Valentine’s Day approaches, couples like Stephanie and Yakir Fernandez look forward to an evening of watching the musical Wicked and grabbing dinner. Stephanie, the chief of public safety at Hialeah Campus, and Yakir, the director of emergency management at the College, have been married for seven years. The pair met in Rhode Island and married on Aug. 14, 2010 on a cruise ship. “I met him in Providence, Rhode Island at the same university we used to work at but in different states,” Stephanie said. “I was introduced to him from my captain when he traveled to Rhode Island for a meeting. I was actually working on my day off that day too.” During their first date, they went on a horse and carriage ride, wandered through downtown Boston's historic district and ate at a steakhouse. “We spent the day [in Boston]. I showed him around the city then we went to downtown Boston and walked around and toured also the historic areas,” Stephanie said. “We ate dinner at Morton’s Steakhouse. After that we left back to go to Rhode Island and, on the way back, we got lost in Chinatown Boston.” After years of working together and being married, the two seem to bring the best out in each other. “My favorite quality of hers is her unrelenting drive to succeed,” Yakir said. —Ciro Salcedo

OMAR NEGRIN / The REPORTEr

Officer And A Gentleman: Stephanie and Yakir Fernandez met in Rhode Island and married on Aug. 14, 2010 on a cruise ship.

Esther Rios and Alejandro Rios Alejandro and Esther Rios will be traveling to New York to watch Robert Plant and the Sensational Space Shifters perform at the Beacon Theatre for Valentine’s Day. “Our secret is that every day is Valentine’s [Day]— roses, chocolates and dinners happen all year round,” Esther said. Currently, Alejandro is the hispanic media specialist for Miami Dade College’s media relations department. In October, he released his first book La Mirada Indiscreta, a compilation of Riós' weekly columns published in El Nuevo Herald from 2007 to 2017. Esther has served as the network coordinator at West Campus since 2008. The couple have been married for 31 years—having just celebrated their anniversary on Jan. 31. The couple met in Havana, Cuba in 1983 while working at the Cuban Ministry of Culture. “[It was] love at first sight.” Alejandro said. “The most beautiful girl in the world.” After coming to Miami in 1992 as political exiles from Cuba, Alejandro and Esther started working at Wolfson Campus the same year. The couple still feels the same as they did on the park bench in the neighborhood of El Vedado on their first date. “My husband is the best lover, friend and father that any women can have,” Esther said. —Justin Marcano OMAR NEGRIN / The REPORTEr

In The Mood: Alejandro and Esther Rios have been married for 31 years. They met in Havana, Cuba in 1983 while working at the Cuban Ministry of Culture.

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FEBRUARY 13, 2018 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

Colleen Ahern-Hettich and Michael Hettich Colleen Ahern-Hettich and Michael Hettich say they don’t have any formal plans for Valentine’s Day, but have their sights set on watching a movie or going out for dinner. The pair got married in Red Rocks, Colorado on Aug. 2, 1980. Michael is an English professor and Colleen is the director for the Earth Ethics Institute. They both work at Wolfson Campus. They met in Denver, Colorado on June 25, 1979, when Michael interviewed Colleen to become part of Big Brothers, Big Sisters, an organization that provides children facing adversity with mentorship. After the meeting, the two decided to go backpacking up the mountains the following day. Michael said that Colleen impressed him with her fishing skills and her interest in nature. Colleen remembers it a little differently. She recalls sliding down a snow covered mountain after losing control of her sled as she furiously barreled toward some rocks. Suddenly, Michael jumped in front of her to cushion her fall. For Colleen, her husband’s best qualities—besides being a lifesaver, of course— are being a great father, poet, teacher and a self-realized man. “He always knew that he wanted to be a poet,” Colleen said. “He always knew he wanted to teach and he always knew he wanted to be a father. He’s just a very giving person who’s able to balance those three things really well.” Michael struggled in choosing her best quality. “When she loves something, she will be completely dedicated to that. She’s very sensitive, very creative. One of the things that makes us different is that she’s good at a lot of different things and I’m only good at a few things,” Michael said. “She can do what she’s doing now, she can do writing, she can also do carpentry, she’s very good in building things and she’s much more hands on than I am.” —Camilla Sposito

OMAR NEGRIN / The REPORTEr

The Outdoorsy Type: Colleen Ahern-Hettich and Michael Hettich got married in Red Rocks, Colorado on Aug. 2, 1980.

Stephanie Garcia and Alberto Ramos

OMAR NEGRIN / The REPORTEr

Love At First Sight: Stephanie Garcia and Alberto Ramos got married on Sep. 9, 2006 in North Miami Beach but they have been a couple for more than 15 years.

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Stephanie Garcia and Alberto Ramos have a tradition. Every Valentine’s Day, Ramos gifts Garcia flowers and a heartfelt card. They got married on Sep. 9, 2006 in North Miami Beach but have been a couple for more than 15 years. Garcia is an associate instructor for Learning Resources at North Campus and Ramos is an internet technician network specialist at Kendall Campus. After meeting each other through a mutual acquaintance, Ramos took Garcia on their first date at Wasabi Japanese Restaurant in Pembroke Pines. When asked about their first date, they both agreed that it was “love at first sight.” For Ramos, he admires Garcia’s leadership skills, especially when it comes to being a mother. “There’s too many great qualities of hers to choose from. I cannot pick just one,” Ramos said. “I admire how she takes charge of certain situations and how she handles being a mother with grace.” Garcia and Ramos have two kids, Nicholas, 10, and Natalia, 4, and enjoy spending time together as a family. “One of my favorite qualities about my husband is that he is funny,” Garcia said. “He is a great father, has been my best friend and I still feel the same way that I felt when I met him 15 years ago.” —Julie O’Hare

9


10 SPORTS | FEBRUARY 13, 2018

THE REPORTER

Baseball

Center Fielder Causing Trouble For Opposing Pitchers

“ 

At MDC, it’s been a great step of the learning process in baseball because you learn how to grow as a ball player and person here through failure and experience. My teammates here at Miami Dade are great guys who are competitive and who love to win. We’re all set on a goal this year and I’m glad to be surrounded by those on the same mission as myself.

‰‰ Baseball has been Brian Rey’s main focus since he was a little leaguer. With the support of his family, he paved a path of success during his first season at Miami Dade College. As Rey prepares for his final season at MDC, he is expected to be a key contributor. By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net As a kid, Brian Rey got into some trouble playing the game he loves—baseball. In his wake, smudged walls and broken windows. It was the result of throwing balls against walls to practice. These days, the only trouble Rey is causing is for opposing pitchers. Last year, as a freshman at Miami Dade College, the center fielder flourished. He battered opposing pitchers with a .404 batting average, six home runs, 38 RBI, 30 runs scored and a .603 slugging percentage. “In order for us to have a special season, he needs to be special like he was last year,” said Sharks assistant baseball coach Adrian Morales. “Especially with all the talent that is around him. If he stays disciplined and smart, he should have an even better year.” Born in Chicago but raised in Deltona, Florida, Rey began his baseball career playing at Dewey O. Booster Park for the Carolina Tar Heels little league team. “My dad [Orlando Rey] loved baseball but never really had the

Brian Rey, sophomore center fielder

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Offensive Firepower: Center fielder Brian Rey is expected to be a key component of the Miami Dade College baseball team this year. Last year, he had a .404 batting average, six home runs, 38 RBI, 30 runs scored and a .603 slugging percentage.

talent to play at a competitive level so when he saw that I could play a little bit he saw his dream in me,” Rey said. “My dad and my mom [Maritza Feliciano] have made many sacrifices to make sure I got to every practice and game that I had, and for that I am grateful.” At Deltona High School, Rey made the All-County team all four years, winning two district championships. In 2016, he was awarded Florida Region All-High School Senior 2nd Team by Perfect Game.

Rey originally committed to play at the University of North Florida but changed his mind and opted to play at MDC instead hoping to land a scholarship at a bigger school. It seems to have been a good gamble. Rey is committed to play at North Carolina State University next year. “At MDC, it’s been a great step of the learning process in baseball because you learn how to grow as a ball player and person here through failure and experience,” Rey said. “My teammates here at Miami Dade are great guys who are competitive and who love to win. We’re all set on a goal this year and I’m glad to be surrounded by those on the same mission as myself.” Teammates gravitate toward him because he elevates the team morale and performance. This season, he is hitting .395 with 10 RBI and 12 runs scored in eight games, sparking the Sharks' 8-0 start. “I knew instantly we’d be really good friends,” Sharks sophomore closer Garrett Bye said. “Can’t say enough about him. Brian really is a natural leader. He shows up with the same energy and positive mindset everyday and really serves as someone people can look at as a model of what a successful, hardworking player is and should be doing.” The Sharks' next game as at the Kendall Campus, 11011 S.W. 104th St., baseball field on Feb. 14 versus ASA College at 2 p.m.

Softball

Pitcher Not Letting Shoulder Injury Put A Damper On Sophomore Season ‰‰ Despite a right shoulder injury, Emma Maitland is preparing to come back as the leader of the Lady Sharks after a rough first season. She is the only returning sophomore on the Miami Dade College softball team. By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net Pitcher Emma Maitland’s freshman season was a disappointing one. Despite having a solid 9-10 record and 125 strikeouts on the mound, the Lady Sharks finished the season 23-24. As the lone returning sophomore, Maitland, who is slowly recovering from a posterior internal impingement on her right shoulder, suffered during a bullpen session this past October, is expected to give the team veteran leadership. This season, the 5-foot-6 inch right hander has made two appearances, losing both games while striking out 10 batters and carrying a 3.75 earned run average. “I want to get my arm better and back in shape,” Maitland said. “I want to be able to pitch longer once I’m better.” Maitland’s passion for softball came at a young age. Her parents' athletic experience shaped her passion for competitive sports. “My dad was a football star in

“ 

When I was little what made me first fall in love with softball was the excitement of going to the field everyday with my dad. The first ball I hit into the outfield my dad was so proud of me.The feeling of love and support is really what fed into the game for me.

game for me.” Now the Broward native is excited to get her softball career back on track after the shoulder injury, so she can continue playing collegiately. Maitland has a few colleges considering her and hopes to get an offer at the end of the season. “I’m trying to go to other places and get a scholarship for softball so hopefully something kicks off there,” Maitland said. “I’ve gotten interest from Webber and St. Thomas University.” Being the only sophomore on an 18-player team can be a little odd, but Maitland has already earned respect from her younger teammates. “She’s an assertive leader,” pitcher Tiffany Dodson said. “When she’s out there on the field it feels kind of different cause she’s better experienced.” Head coach Gina De Aguero believes Maitland’s experience will serve her well in her final season at MDC. “She’s a gamer,” De Aguero said. “When she’s going out there and stepping on the mound, she’s going to work hard and be competitive. She’ll always step up to the competition.”

Emma Maitland, sophomore pitcher

highschool and my mom played soccer all through college,” Maitland said. “I kind of was pushed into being an athlete, but then ended up liking it.” Maitland ventured into softball when she was six, while also playing soccer and volleyball. Because of financial reasons, she was eventually given an ultimatum: pick a sport. She chose her first love, softball. “When I was little, what made me first fall in love with softball was the excitement of going to the field everyday with my dad,” Maitland said. “The first ball I hit into the outfield my dad was so proud of me. The feeling of love and support is really what fed into the

GIOVANNI DEL FA / THE REPORTER

Veteran Presence: Sophomore pitcher Emma Maitland, who won nine games for the Lady Sharks softball team last year, is the lone returning player from last year's squad.

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The Lady Sharks are currently 3-7. The team’s next game will be at the Kendall Campus, 11011 S.W. 104th St., softball field versus Seminole State College Of Florida on Feb. 17 at 12 p.m.

MDC The Reporter


FEBRUARY 13, 2018 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

11

// SPORTS Giovanni Del Fa, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net

MDC Sports

33 National Championships Have Won MDC Athletes Nothing But Empty Seats ‰‰ Despite a successful year for the Miami Dade College athletics department, including the volleyball team winning another national championship, the support in the stands continues to lack. Most games start and end with little fanfare. By Giovanni Del Fa giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net Miami Dade College has one of the most decorated community college sports programs in the nation. Del Fa The volleyball team is a force to be reckoned with. They have won back-to-back national championships and haven’t lost a game since 2016. That is a 44-game winning streak for those keeping count. Our Lady Sharks softball team won a national title in 2010. The baseball team under the leadership of Danny Price is a perennial 30-game winner. Miami Dade College has won 33 national titles and 116 state titles since 1964. That is a whole lot of winning. However, the winning hasn’t been reciprocated with a strong fan base. No matter how well the teams are doing, the attendance at games is lower than the Cleveland Browns winning percentage the past two years. “We’re working on it,” said MDC Director of Athletics Anthony Fiorenza. “Our coaches go to high schools and market games. High school coaches come to games

JUSTIN MARCANO / THE REPORTER

Little Fanfare: Despite winning 33 national championships, Miami Dade College athletes receive very little support at games. Most of the times, the stands are empty like in this photo. The Sharks won that game at Kendall Campus, 23-4, against Keiser University (JV) on Feb. 5. and bring their teams.” The poor support hasn’t been because the teams have lacked starpower. Since the programs inception, MDC has been blessed with supreme talent. Mike Piazza, Raul Ibañez, Bucky Dent and Mickey Rivers all started their careers at MDC before ascending to greatness in Major League Baseball. We have seen recent success too. Outfielder Brian Goodwin was drafted in the first round of the

2011 MLB Draft. Point guard Xavier Munford has played for the Los Angeles Lakers, Memphis Grizzlies and Milwaukee Bucks of the National Basketball Association. They both played at MDC before making it to the pinnacle of their sport. So what gives? Why aren’t we supporting our student athletes? One of the biggest hurdles MDC faces when it comes to attendance at games is that it is a commuter college. We don’t have on-campus

housing and the vast majority of our students work; they leave campus after class is over. So, as a result, they aren’t on campus in the evening or on weekends when the majority of the games are played. The average attendance per game at MDC sporting events is 150 people, according to Fiorenza. “If we play on a Sunday, which we hardly ever do, we pack the baseball stadium and softball too,” Fiorenza said. “Kids and parents can come on Sundays. We hardly

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

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ever play on Sunday because other schools don’t want to.” As sports editor of The Reporter for the past two years, I have been to my fair share of MDC sporting events. I recall very few games where 150 people were watching. Miami Dade College also faces the uphill battle of competing for the attention of South Florida’s sports fans, a rabid fan base that has a bevy of options with professional baseball, football, basketball and hockey teams in our backyard. Not to mention that we are competing for attention against wealthier athletic programs such as the University of Miami and Florida International University. “I think the smaller [the] town you go to that doesn’t have much going for itself except that school, in a town like that, you’ll see more people,” head baseball coach Danny Price said. However, MDC is a bargain. Unlike UM or FIU, students do not pay an athletic fee. The games are completely free. Who doesn’t enjoy sitting in the front row of a sporting event? “I honestly dislike how people don’t show love especially when we’re winning and doing well,” said Lady Sharks women’s basketball player Cheah Rael-Whitsitt. “We had way more support and fans in high school.” While the lack of fan support is upsetting to the players, it hasn’t kept the athletes from performing. Currently, the women’s basketball team is 18-8 and ranked 1st in the Southern Conference. But you wouldn’t know it—judging by the number of fans in the stands.


12 A&E | FEBRUARY 13, 2018

THE REPORTER

Oscars

Film’s Biggest Night Is Full Of Tough Competition ‰‰ 90 years of winners, losers and snubs have paved the way for the 2018 Oscars Ceremony. Films like Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, The Shape of Water and Lady Bird all have fighting chances to take home Best Picture, while the likes of The Florida Project and Blade Runner 2049 are mysteriously snubbed.

By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net The Academy of Motion Pictures and Sciences announced their nominations for the 90th Academy Awards on Jan. 25 and, with it, the regular hysteria that ensues—the snubs, surprises and the upteenth Meryl Streep nomination. Me? I’m just hoping Call Me By Your Name wins Best Picture. It’s certainly up against a stacked field, one in which it’s not the favorite. The race, a virtual three-way contest between Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, The Shape of Water and Lady Bird, has been thrown curveballs of precursor awards distributed all over the place and the #MeToo movement sending shockwaves through the industry. Early favorites like Call Me By Your Name, about a passionate romance between a 17-year-old and 24-year-old, has seen mild criticism over its age gap while The Disaster Artist, detailing the unusual process of creating Tommy Wiseau’s equally unusual opus, The Room, managed to garner only a single nomination (Best Adapted Screenplay) after sexual harassment allegations surfaced against James Franco, the film’s star and Rap

PHOTO COURTESY OF ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES

Film Fight: The 90th Academy Awards are shaping up to be an interesting one. Love stories, biopics and fantasy films will duke it out for the coveted gold statues. director. It says something about the strength of the movement, as Franco was widely expected to earn a Best Actor nomination and the film could’ve easily filled the remaining slot in the Best Picture category. That remaining slot is also something worth mentioning since the Academy continues its baffling decision to not use the 10film rule they voted to implement. Films like Wonder Woman had heavy campaigning and a womenempowerment message and Blade Runner 2049 earned high praise

throughout the year. It’s incredibly surprising that the Academy refuses to acknowledge the creativity of big-budget studio films. Especially in the case of Wonder Woman—which was completely shut out of the awards while DC’s prior (and criticallypanned) effort Suicide Squad earned an Oscar—it’s almost an injustice to the diverse year that was 2017. That’s not to say the nominations didn’t have pleasant surprises. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread, Daniel Day-Lewis’s final film (until he’s undoubtedly

brought back for a film that “spoke to him”), drew in six nominations, including Best Picture, Director, Actor and Supporting Actress. Christopher Plummer, the only great piece in Ridley Scott’s good All The Money in the World, also earned a Supporting Actor nomination, becoming the oldest person to ever be nominated for a competitive acting award. That’s to say nothing about the Best Director race, with Greta Gerwig (Lady Bird) and Jordan Peele (Get Out) both nominated for their directorial debuts. It’s hard to make definitive

predictions on what will win since the awards aren’t for another month and a half. However, as the next stage of awards season arrives and the #MeToo movement continues to power on, this year’s Oscar nominations are certainly an interesting culmination of 2017’s year in film. Comedian Jimmy Kimmel will be hosting the show for the second consecutive year. The 90th Academy Awards will be presented on March 8 at 8 p.m. on ABC.

Migos Bring The Hype With Culture II

‰‰ After dominating the pop charts with the likes of Katy Perry and Liam Payne, Migos brings their iconic trap sound to a third studio album. Culture II is more of the same party music, but it will satisfy any fan of the rap trio. By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net The Georgia-made rap trio, Migos, has returned and they brought back their standard, hype-inducing sound to their third major album. Culture II is the sequel to their sophomore LP, Culture, which has been teased since 2017 with singles such as Motorsport and Stir Fry dropping toward the end of the year. Migos has seen a spike in their popularity with Quavo featuring on hit pop songs, Donald Glover shouting out the group at the Golden Globes and Offset’s engagement to rapper Cardi B. Quavo has been featured on pop songs, Donald Glover gave the group a shoutout at the Golden Globes and Offset’s engagement to rapper Cardi B has made headlines. Even with these pop

sensibilities, fans eagerly awaited the Jan. 26 release date. When the album finally dropped at midnight, many people stayed up to mow through the 24-song hulk of an album. Fans usually know what to expect from a Migos album: blaring 808s, perpetual energy and countless references to their jewelry. Those elements are all there and heavily get their due alongside anew sound showing a growth in the pack. A prime example of this growth, is the combination of the DJ Durel and Quavo produced, Narcos. Sampling Espoir by Les Difficiles de Pétion Ville, Migos delivers their most complete performance on the album. Drawing clear inspiration from the Netflix hit and namesake, Narcos, the trio create a beautiful piece of transitional art—mixing both elements of their past selves’ tendency for bass-infused rhythm while looking into the future with melodic undertones. The song represents the album as a whole—energy-filled beats and melodies from Quavo (who is getting comfortable in the producer’s chair), Offset showing off complimentary choruses and verses that leave listeners with

neck pains from its head-bopping hooks and Takeoff delivering as the top lyricist and performer in the group. If three is company, then this ring of producers, writers and

features is a full-out block party. Showcasing the mastery of the Migos collaboration skills, BBO featuring 21 Savage, Walk It Talk It featuring Drake, CC featuring Gucci Mane and White Sands

PHOTO COURTESY OF CAPITOL RECORDS

For The Culture: One of Atlanta's most popular imports, Migos, returns with another album full of trap beats and their iconic party attitude.

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featuring Big Sean, Travis Scott and Ty Dolla $ign highlight that Migos garners the respect of the entire spectrum of the rap game. This is seen further in their illustrious list of producers, which reads like a rolodex of the best in the business. The likes of Kanye West, Metro Boomin, Pharrell Williams, Zaytoven and many others offer their hand in in the album’s production. For as long as the collaborators list is, the only length that is a problem is the amount of songs (24). In comparison, Culture only had 13 songs—nearly half of its successor. Migos could have benefited from trimming out the fat of filler songs like they successfully did on Culture. Even with its faults, Culture II is a wonderful answer to the question of whether Migos can produce another smash hit of an album. That answer being, yes. Culture II isn’t the college sociology course that Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN. is. It’s the nightly weekend drive with friends on the way to a party. I wouldn’t want Migos any other way. MDC The Reporter


FEBRUARY 13, 2018 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

// A&E Ciro Salcedo, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

Pop

Fall Out Boy’s New Sound Is Manic On MANIA ‰‰ In an almost four-year mission to remain relevant, Fall Out Boy misses the mark on MANIA. It’s an album full of catchy hooks, oversaturated production with a complete lack of focus and direction. By Martina Brady martina.brady001@mymdc.net On Jan. 19, pop-rock band Fall Out Boy released MANIA, the group’s third LP since their fiveyear hiatus following their foray into pop with albums like Save Rock and Roll and American Beauty/American Psycho. Described by the band as a “palette cleanse” from their previous albums, MANIA is a genre-bending departure from the pop-punk sound that made them famous. Fans of Fall Out Boy won’t hear anything familiar in this release, which features unexpected forays into electronic dance music and dancehall.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ISLAND RECORDS

Fall Out Of Style Boy: With a career spanning almost 20 years, it seems that Fall Out Boy is desperate to cling onto any sort of relevance.

Young And Menace, the lead single of the album, is widely disliked among fans—for good reason. The cacophonous bass drop sets the tone for a consistently ear-splitting barrage of sounds. The packaged drum machines on this track are a constant throughout the tracklist. HOLD ME TIGHT OR DON’T is driven by a thumping Latin beat, riding the wave of songs like Despacito. It plays like a tropical house tune and is a radio-ready earworm reminiscent of Maroon 5. Last Of The Real Ones features Patrick Stump’s screeching vocals over an anthemic production jam-packed with commercial pop hooks. Heaven’s Gate is a highlight of the album and a welcomed relief from the loudness. Its R&B harmonies allow Stump to showcase his soulful vocal style, instead of straining to be heard over busy production.

Sunshine Riptide, featuring Nigerian reggae artist Burna Boy, is a questionable attempt at combining rock and dancehall. Overall, MANIA is an overproduced mishmash of genres at maximum volume. The packaged synths and infectious hooks are miles away from the pop punk sound that defined Fall Out Boy in the early 2000s. For someone who enjoyed the band’s early singles like Dance Dance and Thnks fr th Mmrs, the new direction Fall Out Boy has taken since 2013’s Save Rock and Roll holds very little appeal. The wordy titles and emo-pop charm they were known for 15 years ago have been discarded in favor of over-processed attempts at commercial success. MANIA is a bold experimentation that reaffirms the belief that the band is better off returning to their roots if they want to top the charts again.

Movie Review

I, Tonya Is A Gold Medal Of A Film ‰‰ The attack on Nancy Kerrigan was the biggest event of 1994 and shook the sports world. Craig Gillespie’s I, Tonya plays out the events the way they happened, no matter how ridiculous they may seem. It’s a funny, tragic and well-acted representation of one of the biggest crimes of the 20th century. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net I think it would be unfair and dishonest for me to say I had no expectations for a film about Tonya Harding and the Nancy Kerrigan incident. Every article, archived news footage and “Weird Al” Yankovic song (Headline News) told me what to think of the former skater. Craig Gillespie’s film, I, Tonya, did not tell me what to think of the former social pariah and opted to present the facts. It uses a dramatized, mockumentary style to frame events. Taking place in the present day, Harding (Margot Robbie) details her life growing up in Portland, Oregon. At the hands of her sadistic and abusive mother (Allison Janney), she is forced to ice skate, and winds up meeting future husband Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan). The film then descends into a spiral of abuse, jealousy and class warfare, taking the spirit of competition into one of the greatest crime comedies of the decade. Reminiscent of Martin Scorsese’s Goodfellas or Wolf of Wall Street, the film breaks the fourth wall to directly tell the audience what is going on. What’s going on is unflinching and sometimes hard to believe. That’s what I love about movies like these—they show terrible events amped up to a point of hilarity. Yes, it is tragic that the narrative had to end the way it did. Yes, the events are messed up in any other context. Yes, there is still a moral gray area that needs to be addressed. I did not care. I just left I, Tonya with more questions

PHOTO COURTESY OF NEON

Notorious: Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie) is brought back into the public eye with the excellent movie I, Tonya. about that major incident. I asked myself those questions while laughing at some well-timed jokes and in awe of Robbie’s transformative role. Here was a woman abused by her mother, husband and the media. Stan’s performance as her abusive, self-righteous husband is what Henry Hill from Goodfellas would be like if he were the supporting character. The real show-stealer is Janney, a brutal, unforgiving behemoth of a mother who finds every chance to bring her daughter down. These performances are presented with steady

filmmaking and a touch of respect for its subjects. Gillespie makes the audience come up with their own conclusion at the end. After a two-hour punch to the gut full of 70's and 80's pop music and cheap costumes, the grey area of the entire incident just became greyer. I, Tonya is this generation’s definitive crime comedy, taking a true story and presenting it with unflinching honesty. No fourth wall is safe and no story thread is left untouched. At the end of the day, whatever happened in 1994 made for one of the best films to come out in 2017. I, Tonya is a wide release that no one should miss.

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Feminism

Communication

Feminism Isn’t A Dirty Word ‰‰ Even though many people don’t agree with Jasmine Machado or anyone being a feminist, she won’t stop fighting for it because she believes it’s needed to combat sexual and physical abuse.

By Jasmine Machado jasmine.machado001@mymdc.net I don’t understand how "feminism" has become a dirty word. When I say I am a feminist, I get two reactions. The first one is a crowd pleaser—people laugh as if I blurted out a killer joke. They giggle as if the idea of me wanting gender equality is so hilarious and say, “Well women already have rights.” They are right. We finally received rights after fighting for centuries. If you were a woman in the 1960s forget about owning a bank account. Women weren’t allowed to open a bank account without their husband’s or father’s permission. Also, forget about serving on a jury. Women couldn’t serve on juries because not being home taking care of the children and chores would be an inconvenience for their families. The second reaction isn’t my favorite. It’s disgust. Some people hate that I am a feminist. Surprisingly, I’ve seen this reaction in other women. These people claim that I just want women to rule and be above men. I know from both reactions that these people don’t realize how badly I need

feminism. I need feminism because every day when I walk down the street I’m reminded that my body doesn’t belong to me. I see men lick their lips as they stare at me like I’m a piece of meat. I need feminism because the first time I was catcalled I was 11 years old. It was terrifying. No young girl should ever have to go through that, but it seems that most women have their own catcalling story I need feminism because when people find out a girl was raped one of the first things that they dare to ask is, “Well, what was she wearing?” People don’t realize that clothes aren’t an invitation to be raped. I also need feminism because whenever I try to explain that the reason that feminism exists is because of gender equality, some men say, “If women are equal I can punch you, right?” It’s ridiculous how men say this because, according to the National Domestic Violence Hotline, more than one in three women in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence and/or stalking by an intimate partner. Men are already hitting women. We would like them to stop.

KALEY PENICHE / THE REPORTER

Equality Can’t Be Achieved

By Alexander Jürgen Klemm alexander.klemm001@mymdc.net Imagine a professor is giving a test to a class. When the test is over, he adds up all the scores and uses the average as a grade. By definition, this is equality. Everyone gets the same result. The only people who would profit from such a system are the students who perform worse than the class average. The result of such a policy would be that the high achievers in the class would stop putting as much effort into their work as they used to, because there is no incentive to do so, which would further drop the average test score. That is equality. Equality is a cemetery of people and civilizations who thought they could outsmart their ancestors and failed. I believe the experiment of equality is exclusive to the West. In terms of historical context, our modern perception of equality has yet to survive the test of time. History

has taught us that nearsighted experts look through the wrong end of the lens and progressives are arrogant enough that they are willing to trade in our modus operandi on the off-chance of being right this time. They’ll have you believe that history is an ever growing and inevitable progression toward liberty, equality and egalitarianism, but history is not a long tranquil river. It’s a series of falls, rapids and mouths. Equality of opportunity, from a legal standpoint, already exists in this country. The 19th amendment gave women the right to vote and the Equal Pay Act, the Civil Rights Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination. This creates the question that perhaps equality is not the end goal of the screeching political minority. “From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs,” the philosopher Karl Marx said. Doesn’t that very statement argue that each individual has different abilities and needs? If so, does that not make the very notion of equality absurd? If we assume, for the sake of the argument, that equality is achievable—how would you go ahead to establish it? Certainly, it would require some people to be more equal than others. Abstract and external beliefs that gain a foothold in our societies such as the false notion of “equality” will always go extinct. These self-indulgent, self-flagellating and self-congratulating ideologies are the ones that we come up with when we’re sitting on a mountain of success and we have the luxury to let our minds drift off from our work. When the riches become rags, all notions of equality come crashing down and then the cycle starts anew.

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‰‰ Naila Lauzurique agrees that technology can be a great tool to allow people to connect to others around the globe. However, she also warns how technology is stripping people of their communication skills.

By Naila Lauzurique naila.lauzurique001@mymdc.net Technology allows for amazing things. With it, we are able to communicate with people from other towns and continents. Phones have evolved into tools that allow us to express ourselves through text messages and through social media we can reach millions of people. The messages we want to share are no longer restrained by the miles we can’t travel. However, technology can also stunt communication. It’s easy to speak your mind behind a screen, but when it comes to orally voicing their thoughts, people are struggling. I first noticed this issue when someone I grew up with failed to have a proper conversation with me. We were neighbors, but we used to call each other cousins. When I moved away, we stayed in touch through

text and Facebook. Later, we ran into each other at a family gathering and he couldn’t look me in the eye. The only words he uttered were “hello” and “goodbye.” He lacked the ability to speak to me in person, but the next day he texted me and managed to have a full conversation with me. Our dependence on technology is stripping us from human interaction. We are having full conversations through a screen and then choking up and stuttering in person. We are activists on social media, but reserved in our everyday exchanges. This might seem like an insignificant matter because people are still communicating, but words on a screen can never hold the same power as spoken word. Technology has granted us a new platform to share our thoughts. However, it has also led to the end of face-to-face conversations. A text lacks the level of tone, attitude and emotions that can be conveyed in a face-to-face conversation. Also, these three elements are crucial for an impactful argument. Conversations are important on a social level, but also important on an individual level. We need honest and full conversations to create relationships. Your waitress is now a tablet, your bank teller is an ATM and your cashier is a computer. We have already given our professional positions to computers, let’s not give technology our entire ability to communicate and build relationships. As society grows more dependent on technology, we could lose human interaction all together. So, turn off your phone, look your friend in the eye and talk. It’s not as scary as it seems. You might actually learn something new about one another.

MDC

The Real Definition Of “Go Sharks!”

Equality

‰‰ Alexander Jürgen Klemm explains why he believes equality doesn't exist and can't be achieved. He also writes how equality does exist from a legal standpoint through various laws and amendments.

Technology Is Destroying Human Interaction

‰‰ Justin Marcano reveals what the Miami Dade College slogan means to him and he explains the many situations where the phrase can be used such as while waiting in line or traffic.

By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net Outside Miami Dade College’s student body “Go Sharks!” is just another school motto for cheering on school pride. However, there isn’t much of that going on at the country’s highest enrolled college. You’ll find that it is usually quite the opposite. You’ve seen it as the caption on many of MDC student’s social media posts. Usually in the form of in-traffic snaps, pre/post-test reactions and other follies of the average MDC student. The phrase may seem simple. It’s almost shallow, but it swims much deeper in the depths of underhandedness. If you have never uttered the hallowed words, perhaps you might have felt the sensation of “Go Sharks!” without even knowing it: sitting and watching life pass you by like a time-lapse video while sitting in the financial-aid queue, calling Academic Support Services and being able to recite the

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automated on-hold script while your arm has been locked in place due to the atrophy of holding the phone for so long or a chain of people one-upping each other over whether they have had the worst experience at MDC. “Go Sharks!” It has become the face of the passiveaggressive nature of those who call MDC “home” and at the heart of the two-year experience of studying here. Throughout the years MDC, has become a diverse and innovative institution. Yet, there still lies a fog of mundaneness which blankets the College’s students with a sense of dejection. It’s overwhelming against MDC's restless attempts to brighten our spirits—it is as indecipherable as it is undeniable. We were not born with this. it has been built into us through pure shock and despair. From the ever moody WI-FI to the DMV-esque appeal of student services, the loathing builds up inside each and everyone of us and it comes back out in the form of a new-found thirst for sarcasm. Its the South Florida equivalent of the now de-funked “Thanks Obama!” We utter it in moments of failure. However, there is more substance in “Go Sharks!” Where “Thanks Obama!” was met with laughter, “Go Sharks!” is met with despondence and the triple-threat combo of sighing, looking to the sky and thinking “where did it all go wrong?” or my personal favorite “May 5, where you at?” Ultimately, it’s a coping mechanism we use to get us through our first steps of seeing the unforgiving and fathomless open ocean of adulthood beyond the safe coral reefs of our youth. “Go Sharks!” will always stay with us. It is like our associates degree, a symbol of growth in a time of great change in our lives. A scar we wear proudly as though we too have been attacked by a shark.

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FEBRUARY 13, 2018 | FORUM

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15

// FORUM Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Forum Editor  // 

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B katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

Trading

Insider Trading Can Help Civilization ‰‰ Teresa Schuster explains what insider trading is and how society depends on it. She expounds how it can help the stock market by making a company’s worth public.

By Teresa Schuster teresa.schuster001@mymdc.net We live in a world where it’s crucial to have the best and most accurate information. Considering this, it seems that legislators would try to encourage an environment in which the free flow of information is fostered and encouraged. Most of the time. The glaring exception is legislation concerning insider trading. It's usually defined as the act of making a trade in the stock market

using information that isn’t currently available to everyone else. Also, it’s illegal. At first glance, this is somewhat logical. People shouldn’t be allowed to make profits because they have an advantage over other people, right? Wrong. Our development depends on people’s willingness to share information. As a result, we have numerous venues dedicated to help people do just that. We have newspaper, television and social media. We also have the stock market. The stock market is perhaps the best definition of information exchanges. Every second the price fluctuates because of the large amount of information constantly shared. Thus, a company’s worth is determined at that moment. This seems like a good system—it just hinges upon the market having accurate information on the current state of the company. The main argument against insider trading is that it concerns information that is not public. However, it’s not illegal to make that information public. If someone uses a talk show or newspaper article to do it, they wouldn’t be

prosecuted. So why is it fair for someone to be prosecuted for choosing to share that information through the market instead? In some ways, it’s even more public. There’s no guarantee that every person trading the stock of a given company would read a certain newspaper article or watch a video, but if the information is shared through the market, everyone can see it. This is not the only way to share this information, but it’s probably the best way. Isn’t it wrong that the people of insider trading make a profit from it? No, not really. The entire point of trading stocks is to make a profit. This is a good thing. It’s an incentive to share information, which benefits everyone. So it’s natural that anyone trading stocks should make a profit out of it, and so should insider traders because insider trading isn’t a victimless “crime.” It helps people. However, there are victims of insider trading being illegal. The victim is the person who lost his retirement savings when he unwittingly put money into a company doomed to fail, the person who lost money trying to trade

off of what was incomplete information or the person who spent years in jail for making a stock trade. One of the biggest financial scandals in recent times concerned Enron Corporation, an energy and commodity company. The company’s management schemed to mislead the public about its true financial situation, but they couldn’t keep it up forever. On Dec. 2, 2001, the company declared bankruptcy. Shares plummeted to about 26 cents and thousands of people lost their investments. What if the market had accurate information on the true value of the company? Do we want a free flow of information, so that prices can move smoothly and react to each development, or have Enron, where the facade that had been erected for years crumbled in mere months? If insider trading was allowed, and market’s information was correct, people would have had time to see what was truly happening and they could have gotten out in time. Would that have been a bad thing? The current legislation says yes, but perhaps it’s time to rethink it.

Imperfections

Self-Care Is Recognizing Flaws

‰‰ Stephanie Thelemaque is dissatisfied with compliments and believes that recognizing flaws is an essential part of self care. By discovering these imperfections, one can learn how to treat them and improve as a person.

By Stephanie Thelemaque stepha.thelemaque001@mymdc.net I feed off of compliments. Throughout the years, I’ve come to expect them often, but I’ve always resented their effect on my confidence. After all, how I think about myself holds more power, so why do compliments even matter? The widely popular drag queen RuPaul often says, “If you don’t love yourself, how in the hell you gonna love somebody else?” However, this iconic quote has been contradicted for good reasons. It’s easy to recognize the

AMINAH BROWN / THE REPORTER

good qualities that one believes are missing but the wrong kind of partner can exploit the way someone feels about their flaws. As a result, you may find yourself in an abusive relationship. On the other hand, the very basis of many forms of therapy is to have someone who is given support and love until they realize why they should love themselves as well. Low self-esteem can be attributed to many things, but not from

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one's self. From the minute we are born, there are expectations waiting for us outside the womb and whether or not we live up to them has a great effect on us. Society treats these expectations like laws. However, everyone seems to ignore that the person who would fit each mold and follow these laws doesn’t exist. For certain people, it’s even worse. They may belong to multiple communities, making it

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conflicting to try to fit in each group. Many find themselves at war with themselves. Some try to lead separate lives where they can express themselves in different ways, but it usually ends in disaster when their true self is revealed. This isn’t a solution and it can take a big toll on one's self-esteem. Most people would agree that not everything is black and white, but when it comes to love, everyone seems to expect it to be perfect and unconditional. Love is about recognizing strengths and accepting flaws because people are made up of both and it’s possible to embrace them at the same time. I think that love is as much a choice as it is not. The people we allow into our lives contain flaws we choose to accept. Thus, we find self-love, confidence and willpower in finding and accepting the truths about ourselves. The purpose of life is to constantly evolve and become improved versions of ourselves. Accepting the bad in ourselves doesn’t mean that we should leave it alone, but we shouldn’t let it eclipse the good. Discovering our flaws can also reveal the ways that we can improve them so they won’t cause discomfort and diffidence. Finally coming to terms with our flaws means that no one can use them as a weapon against you. MDC The Reporter

The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

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Editorial Board ——————————— Katherine Wallace-Fernandez Editor-in-Chief/Briefing Editor/Forum Editor Ciro Salcedo A&E Editor Giovanni Del Fa Sports Editor Omar Negrin Photo Editor

Art Department ——————————— Tetyana Shumkova Designer

Issue Staff ——————————— Sebastián Ballestas, Corbin Bolies, Martina Brady, Aminah Brown, Paola Fernandez, Renzo Franceza, Elizabeth Garcia, Claudia Hernandez, Alexander Jürgen Klemm, Aiyana Ishmael, Naila Lauzurique, Jasmine Machado, Justin Marcano, Lauren Morgan, Julie O’Hare, Alessandra Pacheco, Kaley Peniche, Dayana Romero, Cesar Sarmiento, Teresa Schuster, Camilla Sposito, Stephanie Thelemaque, Alexandra Vargas

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