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Diet Shady

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Access Denied

Martina Brady slams Eminem’s most recent album Revival calling it a radiofriendly, neutered version of the rapper’s old Slim Shady persona.

FORUM

Armed with a near 90 MPH fastball, left-handed freshman pitcher Eliezar Garcia Jr. is expected to be a big part for the MDC baseball team this season.

A&E

Riane Roldan, former A/E editor and social media director for The Reporter, has been selected for the New York Times Student Journalism Institute.

Mound Presence SPORTS

NEWS

Cub Reporter

The Reporter’s Justin Marcano paints a dark picture of what surfing the internet might be like pretty soon after net neutrality was repealed.

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4VOL. 8, ISSUE 2— SEPTEMBER 4VOL. 8, ISSUE 8— JANUARY 26, 16, 2017 2018

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Back Again: Miami Dade College reopened on Jan. 9. At Kendall Campus, the palm trees peacefully sway at the Fred Shaw Plaza during the first week of the spring semester.

Journalism

The Reporter Looks Back At 2017 And Ranks Its Top Five News Stories ‰‰ In 2017, The Reporter published more than 60 news articles ranging from obituaries, to student/ professor profiles and crime stories. They included a high-ranking administrator accused of sexual harassment and the College reducing its administrative staff by three campus presidents. Here are our selections for the top five stories of the year: 1) North Campus Administrator Resigns After Allegations of Sexual Harassment By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez; Aug. 23. A North Campus administrator

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accused of sexually harassing an employee resigned after he was threatened with termination. Randel Carr, who served as

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director of campus support services for almost five years, resigned on March 6. In a notice of final action of ter m i nat ion, Carr’s supervisor Fermin Vazquez, the senior director of campus administration, wrote: “You held complainant by part of her neck and stated that if you ‘squeezed,’ you could leave a ‘hickey-like mark’ and she would

SPORTS

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have a ‘hard time explaining that’ to her husband.” The complainant, whose name is redacted from the report, said the incident occurred last November. It is unclear in which department she worked in. Go to this link for complete story: www.mdcthereporter.com/northcampus-administrator-resignsallegations-sexual-harassment/ 2) MDC Announces Leadership Restructuring By Maria Vizcaino and Alessandra Pacheco; June 9. Miami Dade College, which has eight campuses, announced on May 30 that it was reducing its

A&E

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2 BRIEFING | JANUARY 16, 2018

THE REPORTER Tower Theater To Screen French Film The Dancer

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Former Reporter Staff Writer Lands Job in Texas Stephanie Fernandez, a former staff writer for The Reporter during the 2013-2014 year, landed a multimedia journalist position at KGNS-TV Channel 8 in Laredo, Texas. Fernandez, 24, started the fulltime job on Jan. 8. Her responsibilities include pitching stories, interviewing, completing story packages and doing stand-ups in South Texas. “This [job] will give me more experience covering stories and anchoring,â€? Fernandez said. “I’ll get the chance‌to deliver great stories.â€? Fernandez attended Kendall Campus from 2012 to 2014. DurFernandez ing her time at The Reporter, she won second place for in-depth reporting from the Florida College System Publications Association. She graduated from Florida International University with a bachelor’s degree in communications in July. Fernandez aspires to return to Miami to become a local anchor and pursue a master’s degree. “I am very excited and grateful for the opportunity,â€? Fernandez said. “It is truly a blessing.â€? —Alessandra Pacheco

Bria Skonberg To Perform At Wolfson Campus Miami Dade College’s Jazz at Wolfson Presents will feature Canadian singer, songwriter and trumpeter Bria Skonberg on Jan. 24. from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. at Wolfson Campus in Room 1261, 300 N.E. 2 Ave. The concert is free and open to the public. Skonberg has received the Jazz at Lincoln Center Swing! Award in 2015, Vocal Jazz Album of the Year at the Juno Awards in 2017 and various awards from Hot House Jazz Magazine. Jazz at Wolfson Presents series is produced by the Wolfson Campus arts and philosophy department and offers free live performances by renowned jazz artists throughout the year.

MDC MOAD To Present Eleonora Fabião Brazilian artist Eleonora Fabião will perform I will have a Conversation about Any subject/Converso sobre Cualquier Asunto from Jan. 22 to Jan. 24. The performances will be from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fabião will perform at Domino Park in Calle Ocho on Jan. 22, Government Center in Downtown Miami on Jan. 23 and at Lincoln Road in Miami Beach on Jan. 24. During the performance, Fabião will be sitting barefoot as she faces an empty chair. The title of the performance will be displayed to invite guests to speak to her. Fabião has presented art performances since 2008. The Brazilian National Foundation of the Arts awarded her the Arts in the Streets Award in 2011. She is also a professor at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. The performance is under Miami Dade College’s Living Together Performance Series, where speakers and artists will be hosted in off site locations until April 2018. The event is free and open to the public. —Camilla Sposito

For more information, contact: MDC Museum of Art and Design museum@mdc.edu T(305) 237-7700

—Camilla Sposito For more information, contact: Wolfson Campus auditorium T(305) 237-3930

Tower Theater, 1508 S.W. 8 St, will screen the French drama The Dancer starting on Jan. 26. The movie will be available in English and French with English subtitles. General admission costs $11.75. Admission for seniors and Miami Dade College faculty and students is $9.50. Tower Theater members and Miami Film Society members pay $8. The historical drama follows American dancer Loïe Fuller as she moves from the United States to perform in Europe. The film stars StÊphanie Sokolinski, Lily-Rose Depp, Gaspard Ulliel, MÊlanie Thierry and François Damiens. PHOTO COURTESY OF MYRIAD PICTURES Parking is free and available behind the theater. For more information, contact the Tower Theater at towertheater@ mdc.edu or at (305) 237-2463. —Katherine Wallace-Fernandez

YES! Club To Host Art Show About Sustainability The YES! Club will be hosting the Arts for Sustainability Show on Jan. 30 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in Room 6100 at Wolfson Campus. Students who are interested in exhibiting their work must send a picture of their piece to eeiyeswolfson@gmail.com for approval by Jan. 26. Artwork or performances will be selected if it represents sustainability and is deemed appropriate by the club board. “The YES! club hopes to create an event that is meant to give students a way to express their support of sustainability as well as their freedom of expression in general, � said Albert Elmir, YES! club president. “While the YES! club is a[n] environmental club that encourages environmental sustainability, we are also encouraging students to present art highlighting other forms of sustainability such as in culture, globalization, economics, etc.� The YES! Club is under the Earth Ethics Institute and focuses on the environment and volunteer work.

My Barbarian will perform the play Bride of the White Widow on Jan. 20 from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the Light Box at Goldman Warehouse, 404 N.W. 26 Street In this performance, they will use a post-colonial tale to address globalism, cultural appropriation and environmental collapse. Through dance, songs and games, Dutch sailors will tell the audience how they feel about certain historical events. My Barbarian, which is composed of Malik Gaines, Jade Gordon and Alexandro Segade, use drawings, theater, music composition, plays, video and prints to address social problems. They have had solo exhibitions in New York, Los Angeles, Washington D.C, Mexico City and Jerusalem. General admission tickets are $15. Admission is free to Miami Dade College students with a student ID. Students who don’t attend MDC can pay $5 if they show a student ID.

—Justin Marcano

—Gabriela Alvarado

Sahba Motallebi To Perform For MDC Live Arts Iranian musician and songwriter Sahba Motallebi will perform on Jan 27 at 8 p.m. at the North Beach Bandshell, 7275 Collins Ave. She will be accompanied by Persian percussionist Nagmeh Farahmand. Motallebi plays the tar and sitar. She has been selected as Best Tar Player at the Iranian Music Festival for four consecutive years. Admission is $20. On the day of the show, admission is $25. Miami Dade College students and faculty can receive free admission with reservations. Students can RSVP at mdclivearts.org. Tickets can be purchased online at mdclivearts. org/shows/sahba-motallebi/ Kathryn Garcia, MDC Live Arts executive director, said students PHOTO COURTESY OF JACK VARTOOGIAN can expect to be “transported to another culture. This is an opportunity to widen their global viewpoint while experiencing beautiful, meditative music.â€? The performance will be presented under MDC Live Arts’s 2017-18 OjalaĚ /Inshallah: Wishes from the Muslim World. The series focuses on showcasing Muslim culture. —Julie O’Hare For more information, contact: MDC Live Arts mdclivearts@mdc.edu T(305) 237-3010

For more information, contact: Abraham Elmir T(786) 317-7397 eelyeswolfson@gmail.com

Idea Center To Host Eduardo Coello At Wolfson Campus

My Barbarian To Perform Bride Of The White Widow In Miami

For more information, visit:  www.mdcmoad.org or call: T(305) 237-7700

School For Advanced Studies Senior Wins Prestigious Writing Award

Miami Dade College will host the Connecting the World and Shaping the Future of Commerce conference with Eduardo Coello, Regional President of Visa Inc., Latin America and the Caribbean, on Jan. 18 at 9:45 a.m at the Idea Center in Room 8503 at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2 Ave. The conference is part of the Mike Fernandez Global Business Leadership Series. The goal of the series is to provide students with first-hand experience of business and leadership strategies by inviting executives. With more than 25 years of experience, Coello is responsible for all of Visa’s operations in Latin America and the Caribbean such as regional business development and client relationship management with financial institutions and merchants. For more information, contact the Idea Center at (305) 237-7809 or at ideacenter@mdc.edu

School for Advanced Studies Senior Triniti Wade, is one of 15 winners of the National YoungArts Foundation’s Young Arts Merit Award in Writing. Wade, 18, is an English major at North Campus and hopes to pursue a career in cinema and film production. “I was honestly so shocked when I discovered I was named a winner for YoungArts. I know how competitive and large the applicant pool is,� Wade said. “It was a true honor to be on a list full of young people as dedicated and passionate about the arts as I am.� Winners receive up to $10,000 and are eligible to participate in Wade the YoungArts’ regional program where they will receive training from renowned mentors and have their work showcased in the Metropolitan Museum, John F. Kennedy Center and the New World Center. To be eligible for the YAMA, students must be between 15 to 18 years old or in grades 10 to 12 of high school before applying.

—Justin Marcano

—Camilla Sposito

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Back-To-Back: The Miami Dade College volleyball team attends a celebration on Dec. 6 at the Fred Shaw Plaza after they won the 2017 National Championship. The Lady Sharks have won back-to-back championships.

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Jubilation: Demetrius Williams shows off his dance moves at the Fred Shaw Plaza on Dec. 6 during a celebration for the Lady Sharks winning the 2017 National Volleyball Championship.

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Color Therapy: Stephanie Estrada (left) and Vanissa Usallan (right) draw during a “Paint Your Worries Away Before Finals Week” event held at the Kendall Campus breezeway on Dec. 14.

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Party Debate: Juliana C. Sanches (left) and Marlon Montero (right) debate about political issues and controversial topics during a Republican and Democratic Club debate held at Kendall Campus in front of the KoffeeHouse on Dec. 13.

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4 NEWS | JANUARY 16, 2018

THE REPORTER

// NEWS Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Editor-in-Chief  // 

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North Campus

MALLs To Unveil Outdoor Studio Dedicated To The Arts ‰‰ The Outdoor Studio, which will be located on the east side of building 5 at North Campus, will host performances such as poetry and music recitals. It is the second lounge constructed under the Multidisciplinary Academic Learning Lounges grant. By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net North Campus will unveil an outdoor studio for the performing arts on Jan. 24 at 10 a.m. on the east side of building 5. The project, made possible through the Multidisciplinary Academic Learning Lounges grant, will feature a small outdoor theater with a raised stage platform. It will be used by the arts and philosophy department to host various visual and performing arts events and artists looking to play music, draw, recite poetry dance and act. “The purpose of the space is to have an open area where students can come and enjoy together visual and performing arts regardless of their pathway,” said Evelyn

Rodriguez, director of MALLs. “Our North Campus students are talented in so many ways that this gives them an opportunity to express themselves during the times that they are not in class. It also gives an opportunity for all type of classes to engage in a new space.” Paying for the project is a $2 million Title V grant the Department of Education awarded to the North Campus and the Carrie P. Meek Entrepreneurial Education Center. The grant must be used throughout the next five years. The funds pay for construction of the three lounges, staffing and MALLs programs. The first lounge, dubbed the Hub, is located in Room 1164 in the heart of the 1000 building. It is the size of a typical classroom and features sleek study areas, quiet rooms and large whiteboards to promote student collaboration. A third lounge will be built at the Carrie P. Meek Entrepreneurial Education Center. “Each one of the three lounges the grant is funding is distinct to meet the needs of our students. The Hub Lounge allows students

to collaborate on assignments, study and network with other students. The Outdoor Studio is where creativity is explored through the arts,” Rodriguez said. “The last

lounge, which will be built at EEC, will be classrooms during the day and then flipped into the Innovation Lounge. Innovation gives the students at EEC the same opportunities as the Hub but it also

allows students to work entrepreneurship initiatives.” For more information, contact MALLs at (305) 237-1797 or at MALLs@mdc.edu

KARINA REY / THE REPORTER

Center Stage: An outdoor studio for the performing arts will be unveiled at North Campus on Jan. 24 at 10 a.m. on the east side of building 5.

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JANUARY 16, 2018 | NEWS

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Journalism

From The Reporter To The New York Times Student Journalism Institute ‰‰ Former Reporter arts and entertainment editor and social media director, Riane Roldan, has been chosen to attend The New York Times Student Journalism Institute. The program allows students to work under Times reporters and editors and cover events in New York City. By Camilla Sposito camila.sposito001@mymdc.net Riane Roldan, who served as the arts and entertainment editor and social media director for The Reporter during the 2016-2017 school year, was selected to participate in the 2018 New York Times Student Journalism Institute. The prestigious 16-day training program allows aspiring minority journalists to work under reporters and editors from The New York Times. Students will cover events that take place in New York City from May 19 until June 3. Some of the work will be published in The New York Times. “I’m excited to learn from people that work at a place that I’ve always considered to be the best of the best in journalism,” said Roldan, who was among hundreds of students who applied for the NYTSJI. “I also want to meet with other students that were also accepted to see what they have to offer because maybe in the future, they will be the people I’ll be working with as well.” Opportunities at the Institute will vary from reporting,

photography, copy editing, web production, video journalism, newspaper page design and interactive graphics and data journalism. While at The Reporter, Roldan won two first-place awards for her writing from the Florida College System Publications Association. The stories involved a poignant case involving the murder-suicide of a Miami Dade College student and her family and the story of a Grammy award-winning professor who made a controversial tweet about former president Barack Obama. “I credit my passion for journalism and what I do to The Reporter,” Roldan said. “Journalism is storytelling, learning about new things, places, other people. I can do so much with it—it’s not just limited to a newspaper.” During the spring semester of her sophomore year, Roldan, 20, who was part of the Honors College at Wolfson Campus, was selected for the second annual Hispanicize student project, an annual event held in Miami for Latino innovators, trendsetters and news producers. The program offers training to students in multimedia journalism while covering the conference, using social media as the main platform. This past summer, Roldan interned in Miami at the Medill Justice Project, an award-winning investigative journalism program from Northwestern University, attending court hearings related to

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Real News: Riane Roldan, who served as the arts and entertainment editor and social media director for The Reporter last school year, was selected to participate in the 2018 New York Times Student Journalism Institute from May 19 until June 3. a murder case. She wrote several stories, including a 1,200-word feature story. Her hard work paid off, earning her an academic scholarship to Emerson College in Boston where she majors in journalism. Currently, she serves as deputy express editor at the Berkeley Beacon, Emerson College’s weekly student newspaper that is transitioning into a daily publication. She assigns and covers breaking

news stories concerning Emerson College. Allison Hagan, the Berkeley Beacon’s editor-in-chief, said Roldan’s passion for journalism stands out. “I still remember how enthusiastic she was about working on the Beacon. She thrived her first semester on staff despite having just transferred to Emerson,” Hagan said. “I am beyond appreciative of her presence in the newsroom. From her quick yet constructive

editing, to her standout reporting, to her endearing personality, I couldn’t ask for more.” Those who know Roldan say this is only the start. “Riane is a rising star in the student journalism arena,” said Manolo Barco, the media adviser to The Reporter. “She is dedicated, diligent, hardworking and passionate about everything she does. She exemplifies the traits that make a great journalist.”

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6 NEWS | JANUARY 16, 2018 SAS

THE REPORTER

School For Advanced Studies Students Win Prestigious QuestBridge Scholarship

‰‰ Three School For Advanced Studies students were awarded the QuestBridge National College Match Scholarship. Students accepted are matched to a college partnered with QuestBridge and receive full tuition from the institution.

interest in writing with a minor in English, crediting it with his acceptance. “I don’t want to give it up, it’s something I grew up to love,” Velasco said. “I feel like it’s an outlet to some emotional distraught I have inside me.” While there, he hopes to accept himself more while maintaining his high standards. “I’m willing to put the effort to prove how UChicago is such a prestigious school,” Velasco said. “I’m working hard to prove myself to all the people that put me down.”

By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net School for Advanced Studies students Dianelis Lopez, Luis Velasco and Luis Camargo-Carlos have been selected as recipients of the QuestBridge National College Match scholarship. Each student will receive full tuition at a partner college. Founded in 1994, QuestBridge is a program that strives to connect low-income and first-generation students with prestigious universities. This year, 918 high school seniors from across the country were awarded the scholarship.

Luis Camargo-Carlos

Dianelis Lopez As soon as she saw her cousin at Duke University, Dianelis Lopez, 17, knew where she aspired to be. Through the scholarship, she got one better than that—a full ride to Princeton University, an Ivy League institution located in Princeton, New Jersey. She plans to major in anthropology and neuroscience. As a one-year-old immigrant from Cuba, Lopez and her younger sister grew up in an environment that didn’t usually cater to future success. Her mother, though, didn’t let that stop her and worked as a housekeeper to provide for her children. “My mom always wanted more for me and my sister,” Lopez said. “She came here for this; for me and her to study and pursue our dreams.” That drive enabled Lopez, a SAS student at Wolfson Campus, to push through her childhood difficulties, leading to

OMAR NEGRIN / The Reporter

Windy City Bound: Luis Velasco, a School for Advanced Studies student at Kendall Campus, is going to major in economics and public policy at the University of Chicago. accomplishments like a 5.2 weighted grade point average. She also formed the chemistry club at Miami Dade College. Though not fully decided on Princeton—she’s waiting to hear from other schools— Lopez realized that her academic future isn’t tied to the hardships of her youth. “I had 33 schools on my original list and I had to narrow it down. The Ivy Leagues were not a possibility,” Lopez said. “[But] if such a prestigious school is willing to take a chance, it will probably increase my chances in applying to other prestigious schools.”

Luis Camargo-Carlos, a SAS student at North Campus, wasn’t surprised when he found out he was selected to be a Questbridge Scholar, but he was surprised that he was accepted at the California Institute of Technology, a college located in Pasadena, California that focuses on science and engineering. “I didn’t know I was going to get into Caltech,” Camargo-Carlos said. “So, I was actually really surprised when I found out I won and I was really happy.” Camargo-Carlos, 17, applied to the program because he wanted to not worry about expenses, like room and board and tuition, and instead focus on his studies. “It’s a really big relief like not getting to worry about all that and being able to focus on studying and learning new things,” Camargo-Carlos said. “It’s really going to help me.” He was attracted to Caltech because of its small size, jazz band, where he plans to join as a drummer, undergraduate research opportunities and programs such as NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where students can apply to assist with research of the solar system. He plans to major in physics. At SAS, Camargo-Carlos maintained a weighted GPA of 5.02 and was a member of the music club, math club and National Science Honor Society. He was also a staff writer at The Reporter where he wrote for the briefing and forum sections, penning columns on artificial intelligence, Bitcoins and stem cells.

Luis Velasco

OMAR NEGRIN / The Reporter

Ivy League Material: Dianelis Lopez, a School for Advanced Studies student at Wolfson Campus, has been accepted into Princeton University. She has not yet fully committed to attending Princeton but will be majoring in anthropology and neuroscience while pursuing her bachelors degree.

​W hen Luis Velasco, a SAS student at Kendall Campus, thought about college, the University of Florida and Florida International University came to mind. Until his QuestBridge match for the University of Chicago came in. “I was under the impression that I wasn’t going to get it because it’s such a competitive scene,” the 18-year-old said. “I was genuinely shocked.” Velasco’s quest for QuestBridge began in his junior year, earlier than most. As part of the College Prep Scholars program, an extension of QuestBridge, he was able to get a headstart on the application process, starting QuestBridge’s National College Match in June rather than August. Even with that, Velasco still doubted himself. “Unfortunately, I don’t put myself on a high pedestal,” Lopez said. “[QuestBridge] was something I had never thought I would achieve through my high school years.” His record begs to differ. During his tenure at SAS, Velasco became treasurer of SAS’s Future Business Leaders of America chapter, vice president of its National English Honors Society and president of its Sports Club—all while maintaining a 5.2 weighted GPA. “I still feel I haven’t done enough,” Lopez said. ​Velasco aspires to take that drive to UChicago, a private university in Chicago, Illinois, with plans to major in economics and public policy. While there, he hopes to expand his

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West Coast Flavor: Luis Camargo-Carlos, a School for Advanced Studies student at North Campus, will major in physics at the California Institute of Technology.

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THE REPORTER

7

The Top Five 2017 News Stories From The Reporter FROM JOURNALISM, FRONT

administrative staff by three campus presidents. Juan Mendieta, the director of communications at MDC, said the College does not know whether the changes are permanent or temporary. “We can’t really comment on the rationale for this, other than these were contracts not renewed,” Mendieta said. The presidents whose contracts were not renewed were: Richard A. Soria Jr (Wolfson Campus), Roger A. Ramsammy (West Campus), Joanne Bashford (InterAmerican Campus) and Mark Everett (Medical Campus). Go to this link for complete story: w w w.mdct herepor ter. com/mdc-announces-leadershiprestructuring/

3) MDC Back In Session After Hurricane Irma By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez; Sept. 22. Miami Dade College reopened its doors on Monday, Sept. 18— more than a week after Hurricane Irma wreaked havoc on the school’s campuses causing water and landscaping damage. Uprooted trees were the main culprit. Most debris has been removed and fans were used to dry wet areas. One area that remains closed after the storm is the North Campus library in the 2000 building. It is currently closed so officials can assess possible moisture damage and water penetration caused by Hurricane Irma. Students who want to borrow books from other Miami Dade College campuses or Florida schools through sharing

services can still do so at the Computer Courtyard located above the library in Room 2201. According to North Campus Director of Campus Services Fermin Vazquez, the library will be closed for at least two to three weeks. Go to this link for complete story: w w w.mdct herepor ter. com/mdc-back-session-hu r r icane-irma/ 4) Music Professor Incites “Twitter Mob” With Controversial Obama Tweet By Riane Roldan; Jan. 18 Music business professor Eduardo Calle is facing backlash on social media after a controversial New Year’s Day tweet about

President Barack Obama’s citizenship prompted dozens of Twitter users to demand his dismissal from the College. Calle’s tweet was in response to an article posted by Scott Dworkin, co-founder and senior advisor of the Democratic Coalition Against Trump. The link was an article from New York Magazine making the case for Presidentelect Donald Trump’s impeachment, to which Calle responded: “Yeah, right. Let’s work on impeaching the Kenyan first.” Go to this link for complete story: w w w.mdcthereporter.com/music-professor-incites-twitter-mobcontroversial-obama-tweet/ 5) Remember That Creepy Bird? It’s In Alabama Now By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez; Oct. 27. For the past eleven years, an eerie 13-foot tall dove statue with half its scalp ripped off and its right claw torn off has greeted Wolfson Campus students. The bird peered at people as they entered the 1000 building on

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the west side of campus. It’s view was partially blocked by three trees and sat just a few feet from the big black “X” sculpture. Known as Violata Pax Dove or the Wounded Peace Dove, the statue was on loan to the College courtesy of Alabama artist Fred “Nall” Hollis. But the bird has flown the coop. On Oct. 13, it was quietly removed using a telehandler and shipped to its new home: Troy University in Montgomery, Alabama. Go to this link for complete story: www.mdcthereporter.com/ remember-creepy-bird-alabamanow/ —Camilla Sposito


8 SPORTS | JANUARY 16, 2018

THE REPORTER

Women's Basketball

Lady Sharks Enjoying Bounce Back Season ‰‰ After a rollercoaster season that saw the Lady Sharks women’s basketball team finish with a 16-14 record last year, the team is off to a strong start (10-6) as they head into the heart of their conference schedule.

guard Michelle Wright, who leads the team with a 59.3 percent shooting average from three point range, and freshman guard Ganette Chism, who averages 20.1 points, 4.4 assists per game. “The Lady Sharks are working hard and beating teams that are ranked in the nation and in the state,” Summons said. “A strong schedule has produced a strong competitive team.” Although the Lady Sharks are off to a hot start, the team still feels it needs to compete harder to vie for the championship. “Our communication has improved way more. We are starting to really get together,” Clark said. “I believe this team is more focused on winning. We all have the same goal. Team chemistry on the court will be the x-factor, Summons said, but with a more cohesive unit this season, their mission, they say, has become simpler this season. “I think our chemistry has made a big difference for the team, but I think we need to improve on finishing games and encouraging each other,” Chism said. Focusing on a balanced effort from the entire team, the Lady Sharks are working on keeping their offense steady and ratcheting up their defensive prowess. “The goal for the season is for this team to give a strong effort and push for a conference championship and compete at the state championship level,” Summons said. “They need to carve out their own team history and legacy in Shark nation.”

By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net A young, retooled roster has the Miami Dade College women’s basketball team on the comeback trail after a mediocre 16-14 season last year. Heading into the meat of their conference schedule, the revitalized Lady Sharks are 10-6. They are currently ranked ninth in the National Junior College Athletic Association Region 8 Womens’ Basketball Coaches Poll. The Lady Sharks are a young team with only four sophomores on their 13 member roster. Last year, they managed to average 74 points and 43.5 rebounds per game. This year’s rejuvenated squad is averaging 80.7 points and 44.9 rebounds per game. They are also being backed by a stout defense. “We must continue to improve our defense,” head coach Susan Summons said. “Offense wins games but defense and rebounding wins championships.” Sophomore forward Cheah Rael-Whitsitt is currently ranked fifth in the NJCAA in rebounds with 12.7 per game that is bolstered by her 14.3 scoring average. Second year forward Savannah Clark is averaging 19.5 points and 5.3 rebounds per game. Other key contributors are sophomore

The Lady Sharks' next game will be at the Theodore R. Gibson Health Center, 11011 S.W. 104 St., versus ASA College on Jan. 16 at 5 p.m. Clark

Rael-Whitsitt

men's Basketball

Liberty City Raised Freshman Shooting Guard Providing A Lift For Sharks ‰‰ Freshman Kaevon Tyler has quickly become an integral part of the Miami Dade College men’s basketball team lineup this season. The 6-foot2-inch freshman shooting guard is currently leading the team in three-point shooting percentage. By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net During his first season at Miami Dade College, Kaevon Tyler has been a pleasant surprise for the men’s basketball team. The freshman guard is averaging 15.2 points per game and shooting 37 percent from threepoint range. “He’s definitely one of the best shooters that I have seen in a while,” said Sharks assistant basketball coach Brandon Cosby. “From [the first meeting] on, I just saw a kid that wanted to get better and learn. In practice, since day one, he’s always the loudest one cheering guys on. He’s all about the team. He’s all about getting better.” Tyler made his presence known on the basketball court early on. In the team’s season opener on Nov. 2, he scored 25 points and added seven steals during a lopsided 142-60

OMAR NEGRIN / The Reporter

New Addition: Freshman Kaevon Tyler is averaging 15.2 points per game and shooting 37 percent from three-point range for the men's basketball team this season. www.mdcthereporter.com

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win versus the Red Devils Basketball Academy. “Kaevon is laid back and a very confident person, probably one of the best shooters I’ve played with,” said sophomore shooting guard Elijah Hill. Tyler grew up in Liberty City. His tough upbringing shaped who he is today. The 6-foot-2-inch tall shooting guard said he got accustomed to hearing police sirens and gunshots on a regular basis. “Days wasn’t always bad, some people might buy you a bag of chips from the corner store or you could get your money taken too,” Tyler said. “Outside my house, I could always see a homeless person walking around or you could see someone selling crack outside.” Tyler used basketball to keep himself out of trouble. When he was 11 years old, he started playing for the South Beach All-Stars, now known as Nike South Beach. Basketball has helped him garner a variety of

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accolades. In 2016, he was selected third team All-Dade at the Sports Leadership and Management (SLAM) Charter School and, in 2017, he was a Florida Hoops Top 25 senior shooting guard at South Miami Senior High. “He’s just a hard worker. Everyday he came to get better and in this offense you have to be able to shoot the ball,” Cosby said. “That’s his strength so he forced his way into the line-up a lot quicker just with his ability to shoot from the three-point [range]. He’s a pure shooter.” After his basketball career comes to an end at MDC, Tyler dreams of attending a four-year university and finishing his business administration degree. “From day one, my father, Alvin Tyler, and my older brother, Lowan Tyler, was there with me every step of the way. We would always work out together and motivate and challenge each other everyday to get better,” Tyler said. “Now all the hard work has paid off.” The Sharks’ next game is at home against ASA College at the Theodore R. Gibson Health Center, 11011 S.W. 104 ST, on Jan. 16 at 7 p.m. They are 11-8 on the season and 0-1 in Southern Conference play.

MDC The Reporter


JANUARY 16, 2018 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

9

// SPORTS Giovanni Del Fa, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

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B giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net

Baseball

Freshman Pitcher Expected To Make Impact On The Mound For Sharks Left hander Eliezar Garcia Jr. has been a baseball fanatic since he was young. Now at Miami Dade College, he hopes to put his years of dedication to the sport to good use on the mound for the Sharks.

By Gabriel Urrutia gabriel.urrutia002@mymdc.net Freshman left-handed pitcher Eliezar Garcia Jr., who boasts an impressive repertoire that includes a changeup, a breaking ball and a near-90-MPH fastball, is expected to make an impact on Miami Dade College's baseball team this season. Coaches are still trying to decide if Garcia will be a starter or a reliever, but he is expected to be one of the team’s best pitchers. “He has a chance to be really good,” said Sharks head baseball coach Danny Price. Garcia’s passion for baseball started at a young age. When he was 10, his father, Eliezar Garcia, put him in the Latino Americana Baseball Academy so he could develop as a player. While at the academy, Garcia bolstered his work ethic. He practiced Monday through Saturday and played in tournaments and leagues year round. Garcia played in the league until he reached high school. During his high school career, Garcia played at South Dade Senior High School before transferring to Miami Killian Senior High School for his senior year. As a senior, Garcia compiled a 5-2 record with an earned run average of 1.89. He was named to the 2017 9A-16 All-District Team and was also selected for the 2017

Senior All-Star Public School Team. Price said he knew that Garcia was a player he wanted on his team as far back as two years ago. The southpaw pitched for the Florida Legends, a prestigious South Florida summer team. The program gave Price an opportunity to get a final look at Garcia. “[Pitching] Coach [Kevin] Long found him,” Price said. “We have seen him throw for a couple years and he has continuously gotten better and better and better.” Garcia spends his free time running or working out to improve his overall condition. When his baseball career is over, Garcia would like to start a baseball academy to inspire others to play the sport he loves. “When I played for an academy when I was little it was so much fun,” Garcia said. “I want every kid to get a chance to experience that feeling and to learn a lot of baseball.” The Sharks open their season on the road Jan. 26 at 5 p.m. versus Pensacola State College at the St. Petersburg Tournament in Clearwater, Florida. Sports Editor Giovanni Del Fa contributed to this report.

Big Arm: Freshman left-handed pitcher Eliezar Garcia Jr., who boasts a near90-MPH fastball, is expected to be a big contributor to the Miami Dade College baseball team this year. OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

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JANUARY 16, 2018 | A&E

THE REPORTER

11

// A&E Ciro Salcedo, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

Movie Review

Album Review

All The Money In The World Can’t Save A Hollow Film

Revival Is A Disappointing Mess ‰‰ Once considered a wildcard in the rap genre, Eminem’s latest effort, Revival, is a neutered collection of radio-friendly songs. Rather than elevating the genre as he did in the past, Marshall Mathers simply jumps on current trends, signaling his own death in the community. By Martina Brady martina.brady001@mymdc.net

PHOTO COURTESY:TRISTAR PRODUCTIONS

Big Bucks: After $10 million in reshoots and an extra two months of editing, All The Money In The World is an admirable, if somewhat empty experience. ‰‰ Even the most skeptical critics have to applaud Ridley Scott editing out Kevin Spacey two months before a release, but even Christopher Plummer’s performance can’t help when most of the emotion in the film feels so off. By Corbin Boiles corbin.boiles001@mymdc.net Well, Ridley Scott did it. After a tumultuous two months that led All The Money in the World’s original star, Kevin Spacey, to be edited out and recast with Christopher Plummer, Scott has managed to deliver a film that is coherent, which is an achievement under the circumstances. Whether it’s fully complete, though, is another story. All the Money in the World dramatizes the kidnapping of oil tycoon J. Paul Getty’s (Plummer) grandson, J. Paul Getty III (Charlie Plummer, unrelated), and his family’s quest to get the elder Getty ransom. With Getty unwilling to pay, the boy’s fate rests with his mother Gail (Michelle Williams) and the tycoon’s adviser, Fletcher Chase (Mark Wahlberg). With a stacked cast like this, supported by Timothy Hutton and Romain Duris, the expectations are certainly high. And, for the most part, they’re met. The movie’s script, written by David Scarpa based off John Pearson’s Painfully Rich: The Outrageous Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Heirs of J. Paul Getty, is certainly well-structured and tight. Williams and Wahlberg are at their best, with the former turning in a strong follow-up to her

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Oscar-nominated performance in 2016’s Manchester by the Sea. Scott, just recently turned 80, shows that he can still deliver a compelling drama after last year’s dismal Alien: Covenant. In short, the parts are there for a great film. Despite this, we’re left with a good one. All the Money in the World serves as both a crime thriller and a family drama, balancing the stakes of young Paul’s kidnapping with Gail’s constant plea for Getty to pay the ransom. While both are compelling on film, the movie never truly breaks through the screen. I can see Gail crying for her son, but I can’t feel her despair. I can detect family tension, but I never feel in the middle of it all. As the film continues throughout its two hours and 12 minutes, the disparity becomes more noticeable. Ironically, the film’s best component is the elder Plummer. Reportedly Scott’s first choice before being pressured to cast a “bigger star” in Spacey. Plummer alleviates any fear one may have had going into the film. As Getty, Plummer brings a certain pompousness to the role, infusing a certain charisma to the frugal, close-minded businessman, almost like a comedic Captain Von Trapp. Is it Oscar-worthy? Not quite, but it’s certainly entertaining to watch. All the Money in the World is certainly not a bad film. In fact, it’s probably the best cinematic achievement of the year solely due to its existence. Yet, despite the ingredients for greatness, the film manages to be a solid “good.”

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Eminem’s ninth studio album Revival has become his eighth studio record to top the charts. Released on Dec. 15, the rap-rock and rap-pop album features artists like Beyonce and Kehlani. Unlike the aggressive, offensive persona in his early albums, this new release exposes the rapper’s softer side, seen in albums like 2010’s Recovery. On Revival, the ever popular, drug-addicted and violent persona Slim Shady is nowhere to be heard. Having abandoned the shock value and rough, raw vocal style, the new smoothvoiced Marshall Mathers is almost unidentifiable. The lead single and first track on the album, Walk On Water, is a soft, reflective piano ballad featuring Beyonce. On Believe, Eminem adopts current hip-hop trends, rapping in a syncopated style over a trap beat. Similarly, he adopts 2017’s social justice craze throughout the album. On Untouchable, he discusses racial inequality and calls out band Die Antwoord for their use of racial slurs. Like Home, a radio-ready hit with packaged synths featuring Alicia Keys, is an anti-Trump anthem

based on a freestyle performed at the 2017 BET Hip Hop Awards. On the track, he speaks out against President Donald J. Trump’s transgender ban in the military, a far cry from the homophobia and anti-gay slurs rampant in his early lyrics. Likewise, it’s hard to picture the controversial figure behind controversial songs like Bonnie and Clyde ‘97 or Just Lose It rapping alongside the gentler and more thoughtful Ed Sheeran on River. The album, like most of Mathers' releases, also takes influence from classic rock with samples of Joan Jett’s I Love Rock and Roll, and The Cranberries’ 90s hit Zombie. In Your Head, the latter track, Eminem showcases some insecurity when he laments the lack of success of his 2009 album Relapse, threatening to abandon his rap career. Nowhere Fast, which features Kehlani, is 2017’s answer to Love The Way You Lie. Castle is an apology to his daughter, Hailie, for addiction and overdoses. The song reflects on Eminem’s life before she was born as he struggled to make it in the music industry. The remorse shown in the song is an emotion not typically heard in Eminem’s music. The Eminem of Revival has lost the hard edge that made him hated by mothers all over America at the height of his career. Once an innovative, controversial outsider to the rap game, he now represents the commercialization of hip-hop, one he criticized in his landmark song, The Way I Am. While containing some strong tracks, Revival ultimately falls flat. If he does indeed want to end his rap career, he left on a low note.

PHOTO COURTESY: INTERSCOPE RECORDS

Please Don't Stand Up: Eminem's latest album sounds like a watered-down version of his past work. @mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter


12 A&E | JANUARY 16, 2018

THE REPORTER

Movie Review

Star Wars: The Last Jedi Is A Stellar Sequel ‰‰ In the 40 years since the first Star Wars was released, The Last Jedi is the first to feel like an evolution for the franchise. With beautifully shot action scenes, great performances and some of the riskiest scenes in any Star Wars film, it truly stands as the new blueprint for franchise filmmaking.

By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net As cliché as it is to talk about the preceding film before its sequel, I feel it is necessary. Star Wars: The Force Awakens was easily one of the single greatest experiences I had in a theater (right next to Mad Max: Fury Road and The Nice Guys) and reinvigorated a franchise that I hold near and dear to my heart. It was a great film, flawed in its overreliance to stick too close to the past few films. It was comfortable in sticking to story threads and following the beats that A New Hope set in motion. So now two years have passed and we have the next chapter in the Star Wars saga, The Last Jedi. Out of the gate, it’s a messy, sprawling and ambitious film, and sees the franchise go into uncharted territory. Writer/director Rian Johnson (Brick, Looper) clearly knows the risks he’s taking. Thankfully, that all pays off into the greatest film in the franchise since 1980’s The Empire Strikes Back. To avoid potential spoilers, I’ll stick to the very basics of the plot. Taking place immediately after the end of The Force Awakens, the First Order is pushing through and taking out more and more resistance fighters. Meanwhile, Rey (Daisy Ridley) receives training by a now-recluse Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and tries to convince him to assist in the fight against the First Order.

PHOTO COURTESY:LUCASFILM

The Next Chapter: Rian Johnson's take on the Star Wars universe is an ambitious and rewarding experience that will keep people talking.

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The plot’s sense of urgency is one of the film’s many strengths. Death has played a huge part in the series, yet it feels like a massive threat in this movie. The dire situations each character finds themselves in carries a lot of emotional heft, one anchored by stellar performances. Specifically, Adam Driver as the tortured Sith Lord Kylo Ren is the highlight of them. He’s a tour-de-force (no pun intended) and commands the screen. Even the more subtle scenes where he interacts with Rey are something amazing. Mark Hamill also gives his best performance as the older Luke Skywalker. Shedding the brashness and innocence that the character is known for, Hamill is now the mentor, full of rage, regret and an infinite wisdom that only a Jedi master can have. The performances compliment the tone of the film. It’s brutal, yet has its moments of humor, with some jokes landing and others missing the mark. Overall, it remains a consistent experience. That is, until a jarring arc in the middle of the film takes viewers into this overly long journey with Finn (John Boyega) and a new character Rose (Kelly Marie Tran). It isn’t the worst, but it does drag on for too long. Even with that blemish in the second act, The Last Jedi really shines when it breaks series conventions. It’s a major slap in the face in some aspects but provides the biggest breath of fresh air all year. While The Empire Strikes Back is still the best film in the series, The Last Jedi is easily a close second, providing some of the most exciting and downright surprising moments of almost any science-fiction this year.

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JANUARY 16, 2018 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

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Top 5

Ciro’s Five Favorite Albums Of 2017

PHOTO COURTESY OF PAX AM

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRAINFEEDER

‰‰ In a year of divisiveness and turmoil, it is always nice to kick back and listen to a good album. Established artists like Country veteran Ryan Adams and new school rap groups like BROCKHAMPTON have released some stand out albums this year, making it one of the best years in music in a long time. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net Before I start, I feel it’s important to mention that albums like DAMN. by Kendrick Lamar or Melodrama by Lorde won’t be on this list. They were far from bad albums, but the five I’ve selected offer a good mix of genres, and really represent some of the best music this year. If anything, it’s a testament to the quality of the music this year. It’s been a crazy year, but music has been stronger than ever. I’m happy to see some great debuts, comeback efforts and just general surprises in the world of music. I would like to stress that these albums are my own opinion and I know there will be plenty of disagreements. Without any further delay, here are my five favorites of 2017. 5. SATURATION II by BROCKHAMPTON This California rap outfit (self-described as a boy band) made a name for themselves

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROC NATION

in 2016 with their debut mixtape All-American Trash, but it wasn’t until the summer of 2017 when they became a household name. Their SATURATION trilogy, released in 2017, are ambitious albums full of some of the best lyrics and production in rap music. The second, SATURATION II, is the strongest and sees the group channeling other groups like A$AP Mob, Odd Future and even the ever-revered Wu-Tang Clan. Like those groups, they display a bravado missing from rap music that is put on full blast. Songs about awful childhoods, drugs and love are recurring, but it’s so fresh, so raw and is a promising introduction to the new era of rap groups. As an added bonus, like any good boy band, these beautifully harmonious songs are interwoven into the rap songs. It’s not an easy listen at times, but it’s an experience that is definitely worth it. 4. Lust For Life by Lana Del Rey It’s easy to dismiss Lana Del Rey as derivative of her influences and trying too hard to cling onto the 50s and 60s. As true as it is, she’s almost had a Kanye-level of evolution throughout her career, as each album builds upon the previous and improves on the sound (with the exception of Honeymoon, a decidedly weaker effort). Lust for Life aims to shut her detractors up, playing with her earlier motifs. The songs all hit Lana’s iconic themes such as summer (Summer Bummer),

PHOTO COURTESY OF INTERSCOPE RECORDS

feminism (God Bless America – and All the Beautiful Women in It) and, of course, pure nostalgia and love (Love). Production is littered with trap beats, strings and the occasional acoustic guitar while featuring an impressive guest list of artists and producers like A$AP Rocky, Playboy Carti, Metro Boomin and even former Fleetwood Mac singer Stevie Nicks. Del Rey dominated in making the best album of the summer and one of the best of the year. 3. 4:44 by Jay-Z Magna Carta...Holy Grail was easily the most disappointing album to come from the once masterful Jay-Z. Four years after that, 4:44 proves to be his strongest release in more than a decade. Detailing the highs and lows of his career, Jay-Z’s central theme is that of racism and humility. After more than a year of infidelity rumors, feuds with Kanye and fatherhood, Mr. Shawn Carter uses his vulnerability as a platform to spit the strongest lyrics of his career. The Story Of O.J. details the trials and tribulations of black men in the United States, Kill Jay Z mentions his feud with rapper Kanye West and Bam addresses his need for an ego in the music industry. 4:44 stands above any other rap album this year, and shows that the best MCs can hold their own among the SoundCloud generation.

PHOTO COURTESY OF EMPIRE DISTRIBUTION

2. Drunk by Thundercat Go listen to this album. Just please. The third album by the Los Angeles bassist, known professionally as Thundercat, is such a strange, over-the-top and disorganized mess of ideas. Yet, it somehow blends together to make this one of the best releases of the year. Think about it like this: what other album devotes entire songs to Dragon Ball Z and Gundam? Which artist this year decided to have an album featuring Kenny Loggins, Michael McDonald and Wiz Khalifa? It’s perfect for jazz, rap and even dance fans, with just the right mix of yacht rock and R&B. No other album can claim any of those titles. 1. Prisoner by Ryan Adams Some may find intimacy constricting and want out. Ryan Adams thinks the opposite. Freedom from his marriage has obviously imprisoned him. Trapped by his loneliness and finding no escape anytime soon, Prisoner seems like his only way out of the rut of his love life. It’s the best albums I’ve reviewed this year, and the only one to make it on this list. The shaggy-haired, North Carolina native released the best album of his career in 2017 and the only album to remain consistent in tone, themes and overall mood. Thankfully, all that heartbreak was worth it.

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14 FORUM | JANUARY 16, 2018

THE REPORTER

Net Neutrality

Technology

A Search For Cyber Freedom Quantum Computers—A New Age ‰‰ Justin Marcano writes about how pioneers will travel to search for a mysterious place where they can access free internet. He explains this is what the future might look like because of net neutrality being repealed.

By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net All is quiet on the cyber frontier. Dusk has settled on the desolate landscape that was once a free and prosperous internet. Rumors spread among the masses in high end chatrooms—a place out west where the free-spirit of net neutrality lives on and the bitcoins flow like the raging waters of the Yukon. “It was slow at first,” an elder speaks. “But when we lost, we lost it all.” Before, the internet was a place for free thinking and interaction. But when Big Business came to Washington D.C., they acted like alligators. They ripped the web apart and death-rolled the country into paying for what was always meant to be free; carving out the world wide web for themselves. Protests were rampant. At the beginning, it seemed as though the alligators would never be able to get away with something so

blatantly corrupt. But, oh, did they ever. It came down to one factor and we had nowhere else to go. We were trapped in a labyrinth we built around ourselves. We needed the internet. It became so much of who we were that there was no other way. No boycotts. No sit-ins. No marching. There was never a good strategy to combat the desolation. There was nowhere to turn to, even though we argued that shutting down your computer and wrapping up wires would be likened to smothering yourself with a pillow and ripping out your own veins. What were we supposed to do? Walk outside? Read an actual book? Are you kidding? The internet was the world and the world became the internet. What happens next in our present world? One who has already allowed one pillar to fall. Could we allow it to fall into a lawless frontier of a society where only the rich could enjoy the internet as it was truly intended? After a day’s search for the promised land, hopeful pioneers sit under the binary code sky and wonder if they could ever get back to such a place. Gathered around a camp firewall, they reside beyond the reach of the Federal Communications Commission hawks and software sheriffs. They told stories of authorized free speech as far as the eye could see and open access to all the world’s knowledge. As they continued their march, they came across an outcrop of rock. “There’s free and open internet access in them near hills,” an old roaming hermit declared. “WI-FI Ridge, I tells ya.” Hiking the terrain was worth it, as they found w— [To continue internet access, click to view our subscription packages.]

‰‰ Luis Camargo-Carlos explains what a quantum computer is and how they are leagues better than the everyday computer because of their use of qubits and possible benefits and radiology through optimization.

By Luis Camargo-Carlos luis.camargo001@mymdc.net During recent years, a new type of computer has been intensely studied and developed: the quantum computer. Although they are currently only used in large corporations and universities, quantum computers will likely replace our everyday computer. As such, it is beneficial to understand how a quantum computer works and why it could be so much better than the computers we have now. Let’s begin by describing how quantum computers work. Classical computers use bits to store information. Each bit can have the value of either one or zero. Quantum computers use qubits to store information, and each qubit can be a one and zero at the same time. This ability relies on physical phenomena known as superposition, which means that each qubit is in both states (one or zero) until the qubit is “measured” to either be a one or a zero. Using this principle,

Society

Science

Society Still Has A Lot To Learn ‰‰ Naila Lauzurique believes that society has become more open and accepting, but it still discriminates against race, sexuality and gender. Lauzurique uses tattoos as an example on how society can still advance and be more understanding toward differences.

By Naila Lauzurique naila.lauzurique001@mymdc.net Society has come a long way. Today, we are more understanding and accepting, and we no longer discriminate based on what’s on the surface. Most of society has surpassed all the bias and inequality that once ruled us. But this progress does not excuse the fact that there is still room to grow. There is still a large number of people who continue to hold on to the prejudice instigated centuries ago. So, why is society still racist, misogynistic and homophobic? We don’t need to look at such serious issues to see that many

these machines can complete highly complex tasks in a much shorter time frame than normal computers and supercomputers. Obviously, this technology are very powerful, but how useful will they be in the future? There are many ways. One is artificial intelligence. Quantum computers can handle much more information at the same time than traditional computers. Computers will be able to use “machine learning,” which would advance artificial intelligence more than ever. Quantum computers will also benefit optimization, the maximizing of pros and/ or the minimizing of cons. In any situation, we want to know what option will give us the best value for our money or reduce the cost of a project. Even if there is an enormous number of variables, these computers will be able to easily handle all the factors and give the best solution. Radiotherapy is one area where optimization could be extremely beneficial. The goal of radiotherapy is to cure diseases by avoiding as much collateral damage as possible. In any patient, there are usually too many variables for a traditional computer to handle. These computers will also be used to understand protein folding, which is the natural process proteins go through to gain its shape. This can be used to develop powerful new drugs that can be more effective with minimal side effects. Quantum computers could eventually be widely used in the medical field to develop medical plans for almost any patient. Clearly, the field of quantum computers is promising. It will likely take years of research to fully comprehend how quantum computers work. However, its possible quantum computers will change the way the world works.

people are moving forward while plenty are still living in the past. Tattoos are a simple and valid example. Throughout history, tattoos have been marks that only delinquents or gang members had. This would explain the obvious negative connotation that was present when referring to tattoos in the past. Today, tattoos have become a social norm that many individuals from all kinds of races, ages and professions wear. Tattoos are often even seen as works of art. Regardless of their popularity, many people don’t completely agree with the stigma surrounding tattoos. The issue comes from the notion that one individual feels superior to another because of a mark that resides on the other person’s body. Obviously, the pressing issue stems from more serious matters such as the racism, misogyny and homophobia that is still present. If we can’t come together as a society to agree that tattoos don’t make you any less of a person than your ink free counterpart, how will we ever look past the discriminations that are as old as time?

EDUARDO BADAL / THE REPORTER

Millennials are probably the most criticized generation, but we are the most accepting. We have learned to not only tolerate, but to accept those who are different than us. We know better than our ancestors did. Sadly, it seems that a lot of us want to continue with the old tradition of tearing each other down. We need to come together and overcome this hatred and ignorance. If most of us now see a symbol that once was affiliated with gang activity as art, why can’t we do the same to learn our other differences? Let’s continue to move forward and make society a more cohesive and inclusive environment and here’s a challenge—learn to love our distinct inks.

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Ethics In Scientific Studies ‰‰ Daisy Collazo explores if ethics should be a factor during scientific research by using Henrietta Lacks and The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, where uniformed participants were unaware of how they were contributing to the research.

By Daisy Collazo daisy.collazo001@mymdc.net When people discuss vaccinations, treatments or cures, they rarely think about the research, or the sacrifices that are made during studies or even how informed people must be in these types of studies. Cells were taken from Henrietta Lacks’ body, a patient admitted into John Hopkins Hospital, and is still used in labs today to help find cures and treatment to better the lives of everyone, but they were taken without her knowledge and her nor her family were compensated for her contribution to the science community, according to The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. However, through the use of her cells, Henrietta Lacks saved lives. The Tuskegee Syphilis

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Experiment, a 40-year study by the University of Tuskegee to research untreated syphilis in AfricanAmerican men, which also failed to inform the participants of the study, changed how people were treated when they were involved in medical research. All of this begs the question of whether or not ethics should be involved in scientific study. Infringing upon anyone’s rights is not only offensive, but it is immoral. However, through these immoral decisions and unfortunate sacrifices, millions of lives were saved. If ethics was an important factor for these researchers, we wouldn’t be where we are now. This does not change the fact that what was done is wrong. To have your rights violated is wrong. I know this seems like a distant problem where, if it doesn’t happen to you or anyone you care about, there isn’t any point to form an opinion other than it is wrong. But what if you or a loved one was used without consent? What if you helped cure cancer without knowing you saved millions of lives? Ethics has a very firm place in scientific research because of past mistakes where rights were violated. However, technology has advanced so much that perhaps this is a moot point if experiments can be done on computers instead of human beings. But if ethics has no place in science, perhaps we, as a species, have not progressed as much as we may think. MDC The Reporter


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// FORUM Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Forum Editor  // 

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Latinos

Does Language Define Your Identity? ‰‰ Jasmine Machado has to practice her Spanish before speaking to others and didn’t grow up with Cuban fairy tales such as El Ratoncito Pérez, but she still defines herself as Latina because she believes other factors, such as family, define her identity.

AMINAH BROWN / THE REPORTER

By Jasmine Machado jasmine.machado001@mymdc.net Speaking Spanish is extremely important in Latino identity. But what if you don’t speak Spanish? Does that make you less Latino? I went to eat lunch with a friend of mine at a Mexican restaurant the other day. We’re both Hispanic and can speak the language. She

ordered first. Her Spanish and accent were flawless. I had recited in my head what I was going to say and practiced before she ordered. When it was my turn, my Spanish and accent wasn’t up to par. After the waitress took our orders and left, my friend turned to me and said: “Oh my God, your Spanish!” I felt my cheeks flush with embarrassment before I could get a word out. I felt like I wasn’t Latina enough.

In the past, people who moved to the United States were discriminated against because they didn’t understand or speak English. When these people had children, they decided they wanted their children to focus on speaking English, instead of Spanish, to save them from being discriminated against. In this case, does not speaking Spanish make you less Latino? Does speaking Spanish make you

more Latino? Um, no. For example, Mexican singer Selena wasn’t raised speaking Spanish. She had to learn the language as a young adult. Despite this, she is still referred to as a Latino idol. Not speaking Spanish is, unfortunately, a common issue with those of us who are of Latino descent but were raised in the United States. It puts up a wall between us and our culture. But our culture also claims if you don’t do this or you don’t speak this then you’re not Latino enough. If you don’t know the slang of your country or if you didn’t grow up with certain stories or fairy tales, you’re can’t refer to yourself as Latin. I grew up with characters like the Tooth Fairy and the Boogeyman, but my cousin who was raised in Cuba did not. He grew up knowing the stories of El Coco (or El Cuco) and El Ratoncito Pérez. Does that make him more Cuban than me? Or make me less Cuban than him? No. Our culture is more than just the language you speak or the stories you hear. It is about family, love, laughter and so much more.

The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

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Epidemic

China’s Online Opioid Market Reaches Miami ‰‰ Hannah Loop explains how the United State’s current opioid epidemic stems from China’s weak regulation of their online market, and how it has already affected Miami by claiming a ten-year-old victim from Overtown in June.

By Hannah Loop hannah.loop001@mymdc.net During his recent trip to China, President Donald J. Trump asked President Xi Jinping to “do something” about the United State’s opioid epidemic, which has been declared a public health

emergency. China has become the world’s top manufacturer and exporter of synthetic drugs over the past half-decade. Now, China is being accused of flooding the synesthetic pain medication, fentanyl, which is 30 to 50 times stronger than heroin, into the American drug market through online drug bazaars, according to the New York Times. Although China has vowed to work with the United States to fight the opioid crisis, the ease of buying fentanyl on the web suggests this market will continue to boom. According to the same article published in the New York Times, almost 100 Chinese companies sell fentanyl to anyone with a bank account and a shipping address through Weiku.com, which is based in Hangzhou. Experts say it will be difficult to shut down websites such as Weiku.com because of China’s lax regulation of chemical companies. A management consultant for the chemical industry in

China, Kai Pflug, told the New York Times that many fentanyl producers label their products as industrial rather than pharmaceutical, allowing them to evade detection from the government. Other producers simply tweak their formulas to bypass new bans or disguise existing products that are already prohibited. Most of China’s fentanyl is being shipped directly or smuggled into to the United States. Upon arrival, fentanyl is often mixed with heroin, oxycodone or counterfeit prescription pills. This has led to a drastic increase in accidental overdoses across the country. In Miami, fentanyl-related deaths are ravaging the city’s poorest communities. According to Assistant Miami Fire Chief Pete Gomez in an article by Business Insider, the fire department has seen a considerable increase in polydrug (typically heroin and fentanyl) overdoses in the past year. This testimony concurs with the Miami medical examiner’s report

that, in 2016, nearly 300 overdoses in Miami-Dade County involved fentanyl. What’s truly chilling about fentanyl’s presence in the Magic City is its potency. This June, 10-yearold Alton Banks died after visiting a pool in Overtown, where he was accidently exposed to tiny amounts of fentanyl. “It could have been [on] a towel at the pool. We just don’t know,” said Katherine Fernandez Rundle, Miami-Dade state attorney, to Business Insider. To combat this epidemic, the Florida Legislature passed a law in October to punish dealers caught with four grams or more of fentanyl. But until the United States and China get a handle on Chinese chemical companies’ exploitation of weak regulations, Miami will continue to see a rise in fentanylrelated deaths. As Pflug puts it in his interview with the New York Times, “As long as, in China, you can produce chemicals without serious supervision, the problem will persist.”

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Issue Staff ——————————— Gabriela Alvarado, Eduardo Badal, Sebastián Ballestas, Corbin Bolies, Martina Brady, Aminah Brown, Luis Camargo-Carlos, Daisy Collazo, Aiyana Ishmael, Naila Lauzurique, Hannah Loop, Jasmine Machado, Justin Marcano, Julie O’Hare, Alessandra Pacheco, Karina Rey, Camilla Sposito, Gabriel Urrutia

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