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Rebounding Season Freshman center Deidra Harris is supporting the Lady Sharks in rebounds with 10.8 this season, three years after tearing her right ACL.

A Miami Dade College professor and his former student released Fight Like A Girl, a documentary that features a group of female competitive gamers.

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MDC-TV won its second consecutive Suncoast Regional Emmy for Video Game Concert at the Rosen Centre Hotel in Orlando on Dec. 2.

City Under Water

Fight Like A Girl

A&E

Emmy Winners

The Reporter’s Justin Marcano takes a satirical look at the possible future of Miami if we fail to take proper action against climate change.

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Good luck on your finals!!! 4VOL. 4VOL.8,8,ISSUE ISSUE27— —SEPTEMBER DECEMBER 26, 12, 2017

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Bouncing Back: The Miami Dade College men's basketball team is off to a 7-4 start this season after enduring a 19 loss season last year. Head coach Kevin Ledoux (pictured left) is counting on veterans like sophomore forward Cedric Belemene (right), who is averaging 12.9 points and 7.4 rebounds per game. To read more, turn to page 10.

Haiti

Donation

Trump Administration Ends Temporary $50,000 Donation Provides Free Meals For Low Income Students At Wolfson Protected Status For Haitians ‰‰ On Nov. 20, the Trump administration decided to end Temporary Protected Status for Haitians, allowing them 18 months to prepare to return to Haiti. The status was given to Haitians in 2010 after a 7.0 earthquake devastated the island. By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net It was 4:30 p.m. on a Tuesday and Fedelene Camille wanted to climb onto the roof of her house. A common practice in Haiti, the then-12year-old went to the rooftop to relax after a long day in seventh grade. After climbing

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up the side of the house, she reached the top and took a moment to breathe. Then the earthquake hit. Camille, a sophomore at Wolfson Campus, has been under Temporary Protected Status since the 2010 disaster. However, Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke announced the termination of the program on Nov. 20, deeming that the harsh conditions from the earthquake no longer exist. “Since the 2010 earthquake, the number of displaced people in Haiti has decreased by 97 percent,” read a statement by the Department of Homeland Security. “Significant steps have been taken to improve the TURN TO HAITI PAGE 9

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‰‰ The new Shark Student Nutrition Program allows students who need financial assistance to step into Wolfson Campus’ Single Stop office and collect meal vouchers for breakfast and lunch at the Miami Culinary Institute Cafe. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net A $50,000 donation to the Miami Dade College foundation is allowing Wolfson Campus to offer low income students free meals. The Shark Student Nutrition Program started on Aug. 30. The private donor wishes to remain

SPORTS

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A&E

anonymous. “Most students of Miami Dade College come from low income families and have trouble choosing between looking for a meal or focusing on their studies,” said Mercedes Arenas, program coordinator for Single Stop at Wolfson Campus. “The vouchers create an opportunity for them to focus on studying instead of them finding their next meal.” To receive food vouchers, students must be currently attending Wolfson Campus on a part-time or full-time basis. They must verify eligibility by going to the Single Stop office in Room 3115-8 to TURN TO DONATION PAGE 4

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2 BRIEFING | DECEMBER 12, 2017

THE REPORTER Six Miami Dade College Students Awarded By NATAS

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Hialeah Campus Student Selected To Participate In The Frederick Douglass Fellowship Program

NWSA Presents One Festival In December

Sophomore Andres Colmenares, 20, is one of 10 recipients across the nation selected for the Frederick Douglass Global Fellowship Program. The program awards students $5,000 and a paid four-week study abroad program sponsored by The Council on International Educational Exchange in partnership with The Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions. This year's winners will travel to Cape Town, South Africa from July 17 until Aug. 12 and take courses on leadership and multicultural skills. Colmenares, who is an English major at Hialeah Campus, graduColmenares ated from Hialeah Gardens Senior High School in 2016. He applied to the program to meet people from different backgrounds and cultures. To be eligible, students must be registered at an accredited institution, be a current freshmen or sophomore with a minimum 3.0 GPA and demonstrate financial need. “It feels surreal [being selected]. I already feel fortunate getting chosen to begin with,” Colmenares said. “Knowing that I was one of ten from across the nation totally feels insane to me.” The CIEE, founded in 1947, is a non-profit organization that promotes international education. Every year the organization awards more than $5 million in scholarships for students and professors interested in study-abroad programs.

New World School of the Arts will present one person shows performed by 10 graduating seniors from the college theater program as their senior project. Performances will take place on Dec. 14, Dec. 15, Dec. 21 and Dec. 22 at the Louise O. Gerrits Theater, 25 N.E. 2 St. The 10 students will write, act and produce their own solo 20 to 30 minute performance. Programs A and B will be held on Dec. 14 and Dec. 15. Showings during program A will be on 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 14 and 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 15. Program B will have performances at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 14 and at 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 15. Programs C and D will be on Dec. 21 and Dec. 22. Performances for program C will be at 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 21 and at 7:30 p.m on Dec. 22. Program D will hold performances at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 21 and at 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 22. According to NWSA project coordinator David Kwiat, the performances “[contain] an abundance of creativity and self-reliance.” The event is free and open to the public.

—Camilla Sposito

—Justin Marcano

The Nutcracker To Be Performed At Tower Theater Tower Theater will present The Nutcracker on Dec. 18 at 7 p.m. at 1508 S.W. 8 St. General admission is $15, $13.50 for seniors and $11 for Miami Dade College students, Tower Theater members and Miami Film Society members. The Nutcracker follows Clara as she defeats the Mouse King and travels to the Land of Snow with the Nutcracker. The ballet is longer than two hours and is produced by Peter Wright, a British dancer, choreographer and member of the Royal Ballet, an internationally renown classic ballet company based in England. Cast includes Lauren Cuthbertson, Federico Bonelli, Francesca Hayward, Alexander Campbell and Gary Avis. For more information, contact Tower Theater at towertheater@mdc. edu or at (305) 237-2463. —Luis Camargo-Carlos

Tower Theater To Screen Oro On December 15 Spanish movie Oro will be exclusively screened on Dec 15. at the Tower Theater, 1508 S.W. 8 St. Tickets can be purchased at the door or online at www.towertheatermiami.com General admission is $11.75 and $9.50 for seniors and Miami Dade College faculty and students. Tower Theater members and Miami Film Society members pay $8. Based on the book The King's Gold by Arturo Pérez-Reverte, Oro follows Spanish conquistadors as they search the Amazon jungle for a city made of gold. For more information, contact the Tower Theater at towertheater@ mdc or at (305) 237-2463. —Dayana Romero

Payscale Scholarship Available For Women Studying STEM Payscale’s Women in STEM scholarship is available for college students majoring in science, technology, engineering and math. The deadline is Jan. 31. Two winners will receive $2,000. To qualify, applicants need to PHOTO COURTESY OF PAYSCALE submit a 300 to 500 word essay and fill out an online application at www.payscale.com/scholarships/ women-in-stem-scholarship Payscale is an online salary and compensation company. For more information, contact Cassidy Rush at cassidy.rush@payscale.com

For more information, contact: David Kwiat T(305) 237-3075 dkwiat@att.net

Six Miami Dade College students were awarded best audio/ sound and director by The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for their student silent film Never Too Late. Winners were announced on Sept. 12. PHOTO COURTESY OF NATIONAL ACADEMY Daniel Betancourt, Joanne CaOF TELEVISION ARTS AND SCIENCES simir, Michelle Perez, Luis Muñoz, Matthew Sosa and Acey Ace were awarded a NATAS certificate and a crystal pillar. The NATAS is an organization dedicated to the advancement and promotion of the arts and sciences within the television industry. The foundation offers educational programs for student journalists, as well as scholarships and publications. —Julie O’Hare

New York University Professor Karen Finley To Perform For Living Together Performance Series Karen Finley will perform Unicorn Gratitude Mystery on Jan. 13 at 8 p.m. at The Light Box at Goldman Warehouse, 404 N.W. 26 St. Tickets are $15 for general admission and free for Miami Dade College students. Finley portrays America’s political landscape by turning herself into a unicorn, Monica Lewinsky, Hillary Clinton and President Donald J. Trump to talk about citizenship, gender inequality and power abuse. Finley’s performance will be part of MDC’s Museum of Art and Design’s Living Together Performance Series, which will run until September. She is an artist, author and a professor of art and public policy at New York University. For more information, visit www.mdcmoad.org or call (305) 237-7700. —Gabriela Alvarado

The Miami Cuban Ballet To Perform The Nutcracker At Koubek Center

Pen Players Group To Perform Building The Wall At North Campus

The Miami Cuban Ballet will be performing its second act of The Nutcracker on Dec. 16 at 7 p.m. at the Koubek Center, 2705 S.W. 3 St. The performance is an hour and a half. It will include classical and contemporary ballet solos and ensemble performances. Tickets are $25 and are available at the door. “This would be a great way for children to hear the story of The Nutcracker for the first time through the art of ballet,” said Valia Gonzalez, owner and director of the Miami Cuban Ballet School. “It is definitely a family friendly event.”

North Campus’ Pen Players group will present Building the Wall from Dec. 15 to Dec. 17. at The Black Box Theatre, Room 5116, 11380 N.W. 27 Ave. The production is written by playwright Robert Schenkkan as a response to the 2016 elections and presidential campaign. It is free and open to the public. Showings will be held on Dec. 15 at 8 p.m., Dec. 16 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. and on Dec. 17 at 2 p.m. The production is directed by Andrew Quiroga, a North Campus theater professor and producing artistic director for The Pen Players, and Raul F. Hernandez Frederick, theater technical director.

—Alexandra Vargas

PHOTO COURTESY OF CONNECTHER

Girls Impact The World Film Festival Accepting Submissions

For more information, contact: Miami Cuban Ballet School T(305) 420-5208

Girls Impact The World Film Festival is accepting film submissions until Jan. 20. Films need to be between three to six minutes long and must focus on issues affecting women. Applicants must be 25 years old or younger, currently enrolled in an undergraduate program, high school or be an eighth grade student. The judges’ choice grand prize winner will receive $5,000. The judges’ first and second runner ups are given $2,500 and $1,000 and the people’s choice winner, based on facebook likes and tweets, will win $2,500. Girls Impact the World seeks to raise awareness and propose solutions for issues facing women around the world. Applications can be found at www.connecther.org/gitw/enter —Justin Marcano For more information, contact: filmfest@connecther.org

—Camilla Sposito For more information, contact: North Campus Arts & Philosophy Department T(305) 237-1450

SAS Senior Honored By Mayor Carlos Giménez

Castro

Ricardo Castro, a senior at the School for Advanced Studies at Kendall Campus, was honored by Mayor Carlos Giménez on Nov. 21 with the Pursuer of Excellence award from the mayor's Shining Scholars Awards. Castro, 17, has maintained a 4.0 GPA throughout his high school career as president of the National Honor Society and treasurer for the Pre-Med Club and Student Government Association. He also participated in a community service project with The Salt and Light Project, a nonprofit organization that collects hygiene and school supplies and works with missionary organizations to send them to countries such as Cuba, Ecuador, Colombia,

Dominican Republic and Myanmar. “I put a lot of work and dedication towards my community service work,” Castro said. “Being recognized in such a platform by Mayor Giménez made me feel really proud and it is also very inspiring for me to keep working even more in my projects.” —Justin Marcano

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Checkmate: Gabriel Custodio (right) teaches Brian Torres (left) how to play chess at the Fred Shaw Plaza at Kendall Campus on Nov. 30.

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Net Neutrality: Kendall Campus students including student government association members and campus activities board members march during an organized demonstration for net neutrality on Dec. 4.

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More S’mores: Students roast marshmallows on Nov. 30 in front of the Kendall Koffeehouse in an effort to promote campus life.

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Music To The Ears: The Flute Ensemble performs its yearly instrumental chamber concert at Kendall Campus in building R on Nov. 28.

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4 NEWS | DECEMBER 12, 2017

THE REPORTER

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Anonymous Donor Helps Fund Meals Program FROM DONATION, FRONT

complete an assessment with the program coordinator. Students who are homeless, come from low income homes or are not eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are eligible to receive the vouchers. The number of vouchers provided is determined by the student’s school schedule. However, most students receive two vouchers per day. “MDC serves a diverse population, in which sixty-six percent of students come from low-income households and forty-five percent live below the federal poverty line,” said Alyssa Zamora, director of communications and digital engagement for the MDC Foundation. “Seventy-six percent of MDC students receive financial assistance.” The vouchers allow students to obtain beverages, such as coffee, juices, teas and water, and any food item, including egg and cheese sandwiches, ham and cheese croissants, empanadas, cup of fruits, sandwiches, wraps, salads or the special of the day. Students can only use the

voucher at the Miami Culinary Institute café on the 1st floor of building 9 at Wolfson Campus. Each voucher is valued at $4 for breakfast and $6 for lunch. In the first month, more than 1,900 meal vouchers were distributed. Three months since its inception, 3,565 breakfast vouchers and 4,130 lunch vouchers have been distributed. “The students are very grateful for this type of assistance as most of them do not meet the food stamps criteria because they are students of higher education not working 80 hours a month or under the work study program,” Arenas said. The MDC Foundation is accepting donations to continue to fund the program. Donators can call (305) 2373240 or visit www.mdcfoundation. com/give and select the Shark Student Nutrition Program in the dropdown menu in the designation area. “We are grateful for the generosity of MDC donors who are helping to fill this need at MDC through the new Shark Student Nutrition Program,” Zamora said.

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Helping Hand: A $50,000 donation to the Miami Dade College Foundation is providing free meals for low income students at Wolfson Campus. The Shark Student Nutrition Program started on Aug. 30.

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5

Retirement

Jorge Perez To Retire After More Than 36 Years At North Campus Library ‰‰ Jorge Perez, an associate instructor for learning resources at the North Campus library, is retiring after 36 years. Perez is known for his contagious, bright personality, prioritizing students and being an avid fan of history and European music. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net An irreplaceable void will be felt at the North Campus library when Jorge Perez, an associate instructor for learning resources, retires after more than 36 years of service. Perez’s last day in the office will be Dec. 19. “He was more than just a great, calming presence at work,” said Stephanie Garcia, associate instructor for learning resources at the library. “He also brightened up the room, especially with his singing.” In 1980, Perez made his way to Miami from Cuba when he was 23 years old through the Mariel Boatlift, a mass emigration of Cubans in search of political freedom and economic opportunity. Here, he reconnected with his uncle who had previously escaped Cuba. His uncle gave him a chance to get on his feet. Perez’s first job was working in the kitchen at McDonald's for four months. On May 4, 1981, Perez got his first job working at the North Campus library, starting in library technical services as a clerk, where he was in charge of sorting through information cards and keeping information in order. Having studied library sciences in Cuba at the University of Havana, he describes working in a library as a passion that got fulfilled at Miami Dade College. “It was an amazing day for me, being able to finally have a chance at working a

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Institutional Knowledge: Jorge Perez is retiring after 36 years at the North Campus library. He is currently an associate instructor for learning resources. job I cared about so much,” Perez said. “It also has helped me learn so much. I’m just really grateful for it all and I’m grateful for the opportunity to be a part of this campus’ growth.” Today, Perez helps students check out materials and assists them with getting resources so they can do their research. He also helps the library faculty order new books. “After 28 years working with him, he always continued to be an amazing colleague and just a fantastic human being,” said Devi Singh, an instructing assistant for the library. “Whenever we would interact, he would always do his best to help everyone around him out.”

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To his coworkers, Perez, 60, was more than just a helping hand. He brightened everyone’s day, whether it was through his love of history, his jokes, his attire or the songs he sings to himself. Perez developed his love of music at the age of 10 when he watched the Festival Internacional de la Canción de Varadero, a music festival where artists from multiple countries perform on television, and fell in love with the music of Eastern Europe and Italy, since many of their musicians performed at the festival. “Each day was always a pleasure working with him,” Garcia said. “You never know what it would be, but he always found a way to brighten your day by just being himself.”

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One of the ways Perez would make others happy would be with history. “There were so many instances of him talking about history that it’s hard to pinpoint one,” Garcia said. “You can tell by the way he spoke that this was a subject that he loved learning about and was always happy to share his knowledge with others, even if it was for just a second.” His love for history comes from his desire to learn more about the past and his fascination with other cultures, mainly Europe. “I always found it great to learn about other cultures and history, particularly ancient Rome and the renaissance,” Perez said. “There’s something great about diving into the history of a country or region and I feel that by listening to the music. I get a deeper understanding of the culture that I can’t get through just reading books.” During retirement, Perez says he plans to take it one day at a time, enjoying his free time by doing what he loves most, relaxing while listening to his favorite musicians, like Italian artist Mina, and spending time with close friends and family. “When I worked in the library, I never took any day for granted,” Perez said. “I wanted to enjoy each day to its fullest and that’s how I want to treat my retirement too.” Perez also hopes to continue traveling to Cuba to visit his mother and finally visit Italy. “I don’t like to pay too much attention on myself. I like being humble and just enjoying the opportunities I have. I’ve been given such a great chance to work here for so long, why wouldn’t I love it?” Perez said. “After 36 years, this campus has grown so much and the students here have accomplished so much. I’m lucky to not only watch it grow the way it has, but be a part of the growth too.”


6 NEWS | DECEMBER 12, 2017

THE REPORTER

Emmy

MDC-TV Just Won Back-To-Back Emmys—How About That ‰‰ On Dec. 2, the college-based network won a Suncoast Regional Emmy for their coverage of Video Game Concert at the 41st Annual Suncoast Emmy Awards at the Rosen Centre Hotel in Orlando. This is the station’s second Suncoast Regional Emmy. By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net MDC-TV won their second consecutive Suncoast Regional Emmy on Dec. 2 at the 41st Annual Suncoast Emmy Awards in Orlando. The network won for their coverage of Video Game Concert under the Special Event Coverage (other than News or Sports)–Edited category. The winning team included: director Ariel Rubalcava, conductor Alberto Bade, videographer and post production supervisor Maikel Garcia, videographer Daniel Rodriguez, technical director Raul Hernandez Frederick, concert director Julio Licona, broadcast engineer Amed Torrecilla and videographer and broadcast engineer Richard De La Vega. “I feel very lucky to win with a group of students and our crew. We are competing with more than one thousand TV stations around our region,” Rubalcava said. “Most of these stations have more equipment and experienced personnel but at the end imagination, passion and drive to do a good job win.” MDC-TV is a college-based television station that records productions at North Campus and broadcasts seven days a week

JUSTIN MARCANO / The Reporter

Déjà Vu: MDC-TV won their second consecutive Suncoast Regional Emmy on Dec. 2 for their coverage of Video Game Concert. Pictured from left to right are the production's director Ariel Rubalcava and conductor Alberto Bade. in English, Spanish, Creole and French. It reaches more than 1.3 million households in the region. Video Game Concert was performed on May. 17 at the North Campus’ William and Joan Lehman Theater by the MDC Symphony Orchestra. Covering the 75 minute performance provided various challenges for the technical crew and orchestra. “There were times when we did not think

we would have a show,” Rubalcava said. The concert created an immersive experience by utilizing lights and visual effects alongside interactive visuals and soundtracks of popular videogames and animes such as Skyrim, Kingdom Hearts, Pokémon and Naruto. “There are two main elements to the live performance coverage; one is the concert and then we have the interviews. The concert takes place in front of a live audience

so I make decisions regarding camera positions.” Rubalcava said. “Some inexperienced directors might take positions where the cameras are out of the way far from the action. I don’t. I fight for every camera position to get as close to the action as possible.” The orchestra worked on the music for various weeks prior to the concert. Once all the music was in order, the key factor of the click track was introduced to bring the different facets of the show together. “This is [a] challenging endeavor considering the orchestra must play in perfect time for the whole program. Ultimately, it’s a necessary measure we take in order for the music to perfectly synchronize with the images on the screens,” Bade said. “This program is a multimedia presentation which this is not common ground for a typical Symphony Orchestra. Yet, the students rose to the occasion and handled the task with great energy and enthusiasm.” Daniel Rodriguez, 22, who is majoring in film, television and digital production at North Campus, relished in the experience and recognition the production earned. “Getting my first Emmy win on this production definitely is gonna open opportunities for me going forward in my career as well,” Rodriguez said. “The experience of covering this event was extraordinary to say the least. There was so much going on behind the scenes. The audience doesn’t notice when it comes to the crew and trying to get the shot you need, but it was really just a treat to see these games and anime come to life.”

Exhibition

Want To See Dead Bodies And Santeria? This Photo Exhibit Has You Covered ‰‰ Kendall Campus photography professor Tony Chirinos and his former student Ranses Fundora will exhibit Hope & Reality at Space Mountain Miami through Dec. 20. The exhibit combines the photographers’ projects, Requiescat in Pace and God Boxes. By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net To most, Santeria and dead bodies seem like an odd pairing. But a new photo exhibition— Hope & Reality—by Kendall Campus photography professor Tony Chirinos and his former students Ranses Fundora, aims to create a visual narrative of the contrast between religion and death. Chirinos' Requiescat in Pace, w h i c h means rest in peace in Latin, and Fu ndora’s project God Boxes are feaCHIRINOS tured at Space Mountain Miami, 738 N.W. 62 St, through Dec. 20. “The support we received was overwhelming, I couldn’t have been more happy with the results,” Fundora said. “Moments like those remind me why I’m an artist.” Fundora, who has been a lab technician at Kendall Campus for the past two years, managing the color lab, darkroom and digital lab, made the connection with Space Mountain Miami, a not-for-profit

PHOTO COURTESY OF RANSES FUNDORA

scent was unbelievable.” Chirinos black and white photographs show bodies wrapped in white sheets peeking out of the compartments and resting on steel gurneys. “Whoever is looking at it, is going to have to confront the fact that you’re going to be lying in one of these sooner or later,” said 51-year-old Chirinos. Fundora, 28, started God Boxes when he was Chirinos’ student at Kendall Campus from 2008 to 2012. He started referring to the small cement caves where hand held versions of saints are placed as God boxes after he heard a

professor use the name. He wanted his photos to show that Santeria wasn’t just about sacrificing animals. So Fundora drove around Miami, searching for botanicas and befriending people who owned shrines to create colorful photographs of saints, God boxes and religious offerings such as cake and flowers. “When I tell people that I did a project on Santeria, they expect blood and dead goats and what I was trying to convey to the viewer is that there’s a lot more to Santeria then that aspect of it,” Fundora said.

Eternal Hope: Ranses Fundora started his project, God Boxes, as a student at Kendall Campus. Fundora photographed saints, God boxes and religious offerings such as cake and flowers that are used for Santeria. 5 01 (c) (3) or g a n i z ation that prov ides artists and musicians with space for exhibits and performances. “It defin i t e l y FUNDORA was a lot easier than I thought it was going to be,” said Fundora, who goes by the name Baker. “We just showed [Alicia Hancock Apfel the owner of Space Mountain] a few samples of what we wanted to show, a written proposal and once she okayed it, it was up to us to hang it the way we saw fit.” Requiescat in Pace was Chirinos’ thesis project when he was studying for his master of fine arts at Columbia University from 2001

until 2003. “The project actually started because I was interested in finding out more about my Catholic background,” said Chirinos, who has been a full-time photography professor at Miami Dade College since 2006. As a medical photographer for Mt. Sinclair Medical Center, he was able to get access to a morgue. But when he first started, problems arose because most people only saw the dead bodies and not the artistry in the photography, such as the framing and timing. After consulting with Columbia University photography professor Thomas Roma, Chirinos asked a coworker to lock him in the same refrigerated compartments where the dead bodies were stored at the morgue. “I went in and started hearing voices and started feeling people touch me,” Chirinos said. “The

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PHOTO COURTESY OF TONY CHIRINOS

Grim Reality: Kendall Campus photography professor Tony Chirinos took photos of dead bodies for Requiescat in Pace, which was his thesis project at Columbia University.

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Temporary Protective Status For Haitians Terminated By Trump Administration FROM HAITI, FRONT

stability and quality of life for Haitian citizens, and Haiti is able to safely receive traditional levels of returned citizens.” The program is set to end in 18 months to allow Haitians under the protected status to prepare for their departure by July 2019. According to the Center for Migration Studies, more than 32,000 Haitians under TPS reside in Florida. It was signed into law by former President George H. W. Bush in 1990 to grant protection for people who fled their countries from dangerous conditions such as natural disasters and violent conflicts, allowing them to live, work and study in the United States. The government’s decision to end the program has put the future of many Haitian residents in doubt. “I’m not even worried about if I get [sent] back to Haiti. I’m scared for my education,” Camille said. “I won’t be able to move up and I won’t be able to achieve my goals.” That ambition has been with Camille since the day of the earthquake. After attempting to enter her home during the natural disaster, she fell from a staircase and landed on her leg, suffering internal bleeding.

Her family spent two weeks travelling between make-shift hospitals called “tents.” Camille was repeatedly turned away because they determined her injury was not as serious, she said. “I could remember seeing all of the people stacked on top of each other—dead bodies,” Camille said. “As I was going from tent to tent and nobody could help me, I realized God was helping me.”

Arriving In The US When she arrived in the United States under TPS, an X-Ray showed a shattered bone fragment, leading her to Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital in Hollywood, Florida, to receive a metal plate to bridge the gap. After months of physical therapy, Camille enrolled at Linda Lentin K-8 Center in the fall of 2012 to complete seventh grade. Eventually, she graduated from William H. Turner Technical Arts High School’s Academy of Medical Sciences with a 4.6 GPA and gained acceptance into the Honors College at Wolfson Campus. “I want to contribute to the place I live in, the place I reside in,” Camille said. “I don’t have dreams for myself, they’re for my community where I reside in. If this [program ends], all that

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Uncertain Future: Fedelene Camille is an Honors College student at Wolfson Campus who has has been under Temporary Protected Status since a 7.0 earthquake devastated Haiti in 2010. goes away.” Camille’s hard work isn’t limited to her classes. She also serves as the vice president of the Haitian Boukan Club, a forum designed to inform students about Haitian culture, and

participates in cancer research at the University of Miami in partnership with ARCOS. The program allows students at Wolfson Campus to gain experience in STEM related fields, to pursue her goal of becoming a

pediatric oncologist. But now, instead of concentrating solely on her studies, she is also concerned with how TPS ending will affect other Haitians. “If you are a human being, consider the peoples’ lives of what would happen,” Camille said. “There’s people that built a life here. There are people here who had kids. What do you say to the people whose kids are citizens?” The decision to end TPS for Haitians has spurred a number of petitions and denouncements with criticism centered on the government’s focus on the condition of Haiti rather than the lives of those with TPS. “The administration, when looking to renew TPS, weren’t looking at the impact locally. They were just looking to see where Haiti recovered,” said Adonia Simpson, the director of the family defense program at Americans for Immigrant Justice. “It’s not taking into [account] the impact of people returning to a country they don’t know.”

The Future Camille, a recipient of TheDream.US national scholarship, credits MDC with allowing her to continue her education. However, she feels like the issue of TPS

is being ignored compared with the rescindment of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. “It’s frustrating because people don’t understand what TPS is,” Camille said. “At the school, they’re always talking about DACA students. TPS students are never recognized.” According to the registrar, MDC does not list any currently enrolled student with TPS. Instead, Camille is listed as an “unspecified refugee/asylee.” Juan Mendieta, director of communications for the college, says MDC remains committed to ensuring the safety of all students. “Just like with DACA students, at MDC, we believe education is a universal right,” Mendieta said. “We believe that everyone should be respected and valued regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation or immigration status. We have been very public with this and have hosted several rallies and community events.” In spite of these setbacks, Camille remains headstrong about her future— wherever it may be. “Haiti is my home country and I reside in the United States, but the world is my home,” Camille said. “They can’t hold me back.”

AUTHOR

Alejandro Riós Refuses To Be Discreet In La Mirada Indiscreta ‰‰ Alejandro Rios published La Mirada Indiscreta, a collection of weekly columns from El Nuevo Herald, on Oct. 23. Riós has worked as a hispanic media specialist for Miami Dade College since 1992. By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net TV personality, journalist and culture aficionado Alejandro Riós released his first book La Mirada Indiscreta on Oct. 23. The 774-page book is a compilation of Riós' weekly columns published in El Nuevo Herald from 2007 to 2017. The columns are listed in chronological order and range from topics such as his childhood, family, movies, classic rock music, Cuba and Miami. Each column is around 600 words. Riós, who is currently the hispanic media specialist for Miami Dade College's media relations department, came to Miami in 1992 as a political exile from Cuba. Riós started working at Wolfson Campus the same year. At the College, he began the Cuban Cinema Series, where he showcased Cuban films, like Fresas y Chocolate and La Bella Del Alhambra, at the Wolfson Campus auditorium. Later TV Martí offered to convert the series into the TV show La Pantalla De Azogue, which was later called Pantalla TVM. More than 17 years later, the show was cancelled because of a change in administration. In 2007, Riós began the TV program La Mirada Indiscreta on América TeVé, a cultural program where he discusses Cuban cinema with Cuban directors and filmmakers. The show is available every Sunday on Channel 41 at 9 p.m. "The program, just like the columns, are like a democratic history of Cuban cinema where everything can appear," Riós said. www.mdcthereporter.com

“ 

I always wanted to publish a book, but I didn't want to release a book just to have it published. I waited to have something important to tell and I think here is something interesting that people can relate to.

Alejandro Riós, Hispanic media specialist at Miami Dade College

"In Cuba, the history of cinema has always excluded some directors because of them being prohibited, but I include everyone. That's the idea of the program, to include everyone." The title is a play on the Spanish title of Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window. In Spanish, the movie is named La Ventana Indiscreta. 'Being indiscreet is, especially as a social or political term, to reveal what somebody does not want to reveal. In this case, it's the Cuban Government," Riós said. "They would prefer if the book or the program didn't exist, because I am putting in information that they don't want to release at the disposition of the public." Riós, 65, waited for the right opportunity to publish the book. "I always wanted to publish a book, but I didn't want to release a book just to have it published," Riós said. "I waited to have something important to tell and I think here is something interesting that people can relate to." When he decided he wanted to publish his columns, he contacted Pablo Diáz Espí, director of Diario de Cuba, and Ladislao Aguado, editorial director of Hypermedia, a publishing company under Diario De Cuba. mdc.thereporter

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Indiscreet Gaze: Alejandro Riós released his first book La Mirada Indiscreta, a collection of columns previously published in El Nuevo Herald, on Oct. 23. Riós is the hispanic media specialist for Miami Dade College. "La Mirada Indiscreta could be understood as a summary of what has been the sociocultural Cuban life in the past 10 years," Aguado said. "Alejandro Riós' columns in El Nuevo Herald have been marking the guidelines and principal successes of our events as a nation.” He presented his book at the Miami Book Fair’s De La Entrevista A La Crítica Cinematográfica on Nov. 18. At the event, Riós' books sold out. "I was satisfied because everything sold out. I don't know how many books were @mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter

sold, but there were 10 or 20 [people] who were left without books," Riós said. Riós has written hundreds of weekly columns for El Nuevo Herald since 2007. The columns are published online on Wednesday and published in print on Thursday. He chose to write columns because he prefers to write from personal experience. "To me it's one of the most interesting genres because it’s a genre that's very personal," Riós said. "It's part of a journalist's personal experience. I prefer to practice journalism through personal experiences without ignoring the truth." His first column was about his hope for young Cuban filmmakers. His last column in the book is about his wife of 30 years, Esther Riós, who is a Network Coordinator at West Campus. The two met in Cuba when they worked at the Cuban Ministry of Culture. "I've always supported him. I've admired him since the beginning; he is a very cultured man. He has been like a teacher to me. He has transmitted his knowledge and enriched my life," Riós said. "His book is a deserved recognition of his large trajectory as a journalist, critic and cultural promoter. We are all very proud of him." Riós has plans for a sequel, but wants to publish it in two years instead of 10. According to Aguado, presentations of the book are planned at Books & Books in January, and at the Feria Internacional del Libro in Madrid this June. Hypermedia is also planning to have their own book fair in the spring to showcase their authors. "People feel fulfilled when they have a child, publish a book and plant a tree," Riós said. "I have accomplished all three.” La Mirada Indiscreta is available in paperback through Amazon for $28.90.


10 SPORTS | DECEMBER 12, 2017

THE REPORTER

Men's Basketball

Sharks’ Improving In Second Season Under Ledoux ‰‰ After a lackluster 19 loss season in his first year as a head coach, Kevin Ledoux has reignited the Miami Dade College men’s basketball team, leading them to a 7-4 mark this season. By Anthony Fernandez anthony.fernandez027@mymdc.net After Kevin Ledoux’s first season as the head men’s basketball coach ended with a 10-19 record, he knew he had a lot of work to do. Ledoux decided to build on the promise his young squad showed last year. The Sharks scored 101.7 points and made 12 three-pointers per game, both good enough for third in the nation. This year’s team is on pace to put up similarly gaudy numbers. They are currently first in the

nation in scoring with an average of 121.3 points per game. The Sharks have scored more than 100 points in every game this season. That scoring ability has proven to be a key component for the team getting off to a strong 7-4 start. “They’re maturing and buying into the system everyday,” Ledoux said. Returning sophomores Cedric Belemene (12.9 points and 7.4 rebounds per game) and Elijah Hill (16.2 points and 3.5 rebounds per game) are providing a spark for the Sharks. Freshman guards Montese Blake, who is averaging 19.1 points and four assists, and Kaevon Tyler, who is averaging 15.6 and 3.1 steals per game, are helping the team establish a balanced and aggressive presence on

the court. Although they are off to a hot start, the team still feels they need to bring more intensity to their game. “It doesn’t matter how good we can be, if we don’t play like every game is our last, then we need to improve our energy,” Belemene said. Team chemistry is also a point of emphasis on this team, Ledoux said, but the returning players are a step up from last year’s squad in that facet. The court IQ on this Sharks offense has increased. They are averaging 1.1 more assists and 1.4 more rebounds per game. They are second in the nation in three pointers made per game (14) and field goal percentage (42.7 percent) and fourth in the nation in steals

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Scoring Threat: Freshman guard Montese Blake is leading the Sharks in scoring this year, averaging 19.1 points per game. He is also adding four assists per game.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Fast Start: The men's basketball team is counting on a high-octane offense to win games this year. The team is 7-4 this season and is averaging 121.3 points per game.

(16 per game). With numbers like these, the team understands becoming a “we” is essential to be effective in Ledoux’s fast-paced system. “We’re selfish, but we play hard,” said sophomore guard Luis Rivera. “Everyone cares and that

is the most important part right now.” The Sharks' next game is at home against Hillsborough Community College at the Theodore R. Gibson Health Center, 11011 S.W. 104 ST, on Dec. 16 at 4 p.m.

Student Profile

Wagner College Transfer Must Sit Out Fall Semester Due To Academic Issues ‰‰ Shooting guard Connor Ferrell, who transferred to Miami Dade College from Wagner College in New York, is sitting out the fall semester because he is academically ineligible after failing several classes this summer. By Darian Vega darian.vega002@mymdc.net Connor Ferrell, a Division I transfer who was expected to provide a scoring punch to the men’s basketball team, is not playing this semester because he is academically ineligible. The issue stems from several classes Ferrell failed this summer, which dropped his GPA below the required 2.0, according to sources. He is currently practicing with the team and taking classes and could return to the active roster in January. According to his bio on the Miami Dade College athletics website, he is majoring in sports medicine. Sharks head coach Kevin Ledoux and Ferrell did not respond to several requests for interviews for this story. Ferrell, a 6-foot-4-inch shooting guard from Conyers, Georgia, transferred to MDC from Wagner College in Staten Island, New York. The 20-year-old sophomore started in 20 games during his freshman season at Wagner College, averaging 5.5 points, 2.4 rebounds and 0.8 assists per game. Ferrell has previously said that he transferred to MDC for an opportunity to be recruited by a bigger Division I program. As a junior at Rockdale County High School in Georgia, Ferrell averaged 16.1 points per game. By his senior year he

improved his scoring average to 16.8 points and was named to the All-Conference first team for offense and defense. Ferrell scored more than 1,000 points during his high school career. After high school, Ferrell attended DME Sports Academy in Daytona Beach, FL., a post-high school sports academy that prepares athletes for college. During the 201516 season, he averaged 11 points, four rebounds and three assists per game. Ferrell’s father Duane Ferrell played in the National Basketball Association for 11 years for teams such as the Atlanta Hawks, Indiana Pacers and Golden State Warriors. Sports editor Giovanni Del Fa contributed to this story.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Sidelined: Shooting guard Connor Ferrell watches his teammates during a recent practice. Ferrell, who transferred from Wagner College in New York, is not playing in live games this semester because he is academically ineligible. www.mdcthereporter.com

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// SPORTS Giovanni Del Fa, Sports Editor  // 

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Women's Basketball

Freshman Overcomes ACL Tear To Support Lady Sharks In Rebounding ‰‰ Three years after tearing her right ACL during a high school basketball practice in Decatur,Georgia, freshman center Deidra Harris is leading the Lady Sharks in rebounding, averaging 10.8 per game. By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net Deidra Harris has been a rebounding machine for the Miami Dade College Lady Sharks basketball team this season. The freshman is averaging 10.8 rebounds through 10 games. She corralled 23 rebounds in a game against Hillsborough Community College on Nov. 10. In addition to being second in rebounding for the Lady Sharks, who are 5-5 this season, she also has 16 steals and 14 blocks while averaging 5 points a game. “We have always had great success with training post players to be ranked in the nation and in the state,” said head coach Susan Summons. “Deidra is working on strength training, uses a weighted sports rope and conducts individual player development sessions.” The 6-foot-3-inch center was born and raised in Decatur, Georgia where she attended Columbia High School. Harris played varsity basketball

“ 

It was difficult to come back but the pain was really inside my head because I was scared to tear it again. But I’m starting to get over it now.

opportunity for myself. It’s a way I can actually help [my family],” Harris said. “There wasn’t anything really holding me in Georgia besides my family. I lived in a rough neighborhood, everybody was dying, this was a good way to get out.” Despite having a tough upbringing, Harris, 18, always has a constant smile on her face. “Off the court Deidra’s a goofy and funny person,” said shooting guard, Michelle Wright, who is also Harris’ roomate. “She’s always cracking jokes and laughing about something.” When not playing basketball Harris’ favorite pastime is cosmetology. She enjoys doing makeup and hairstyles like box braids and sew-in weaves. Harris is currently a pre-med major at MDC. She wants to continue playing collegiate basketball at a Division I school and eventually go into the obstetrics and gynecology field. “Being an OBGYN to me is like one of the most rewarding jobs because you get to bring a new form of life into the world,” Harris said.

Deidra Harris, freshman and Lady Shark basketball player

half of her sophomore year before tearing her right ACL during practice. The incident kept her out her entire junior year, but she was able to return to the basketball court her senior season. After the knee injury, Harris was weary of coming back but didn’t give up on pursuing her basketball career despite warnings from doctors that she might not be able to play for a long time. “It was difficult to come back but the pain was really inside my head because I was scared to tear it again,” Harris said. “But I’m starting to get over it now.” Harris knew she wanted to play basketball collegiately so she used her skills to get out of Glenwood, a poverty stricken city in Georgia. “ I knew me leaving was a better

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Rugged Rebounder: Freshman center Deidra Harris is supporting the Lady Sharks in rebounding this year, averaging 10.8 per game.

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The Lady Sharks next game will be at home at the Theodore R. Gibson Health Center, 11011 S.W. 104 St., versus North Central Missouri College on Dec.13 at 5:30 p.m.


12 A&E | DECEMBER 12, 2017

THE REPORTER

Documentary

Fight Like A Girl Celebrates Female Gamers ‰‰ Directed by professor Agustin Gonzalez and MDC alumna Nicole “Wulf” Maldonado, Fight Like A Girl is a documentary featuring a group of female gamers and their journey to be the best.

By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net The landscape of video gaming has continually changed since the dawn of the medium. Not only are graphics getting a lot more realistic and stories becoming a lot more immersive, but the attitude toward gaming has changed. Once thought to be just a boy’s club, the industry has changed to better reflect the times. Directed by Miami Dade College film professor Agustin Gonzalez and Miami Dade College graduate Nicole “Wulf” Maldonado, Fight Like A Girl is a short documentary on the competitive gaming scene with women at the front and center. It premiered this fall on the streaming platform Twitch. The doc features a group of women and their journey in competitive gaming. Specifically Nintendo’s fighting series Super Smash Bros., which is one of the most popular professional competitive games. Each player details what game got them into the medium. Priscilla “Port” Sortino talks about how her first time playing Sonic Adventure 2: Battle ignited her love for games and how she plays online

“ 

I am hoping that it will keep the conversation about women and gaming going. But that it will also give it a template for how to celebrate the women who play, which is something we cannot forget to do.

Agustin Gonzalez, Miami Dade College film professor

competitive games. She shares the sentiment that most female gamers do: there is never another girl’s voice over the headset. “Games are not male dominated but the competition aspect of it is,” Maldonado said. “Women have been breaking out of their shells as of the last few years and will continue to even the playing field.” The documentary focuses on the latest Smash game, Super Smash Bros. for Wii U (dubbed Smash 4 by the community). Twenty-six-yearold Taylor Rose, who plays Smash professionally, feels that the journey was an enlightening one. “It’s been a fun journey,” she said. “I made many friends and have had plenty of good times in my year of traveling and playing with others.” The film itself is interesting

PHOTO COURTESY OF AURA SANTANA

Girl Power: Fight Like A Girl is an interesting look at a South Floridian group of professional female gamers.

and I hope it gets a feature-length counterpart. In the span of 12 minutes, audiences are taken to some of the best players and competitive venues around. The best aspect of the film comes from the sense of community, something that is important in games. With the idea of toxicity and some dangerous attitudes spreading, it is a refreshing sight to see people just get along and play games. That passion is present throughout. “Directing and producing this film was an amazing experience,” Maldonado said. “I was able to connect with all sorts of players, mostly female, who had a burning fire within their hearts to compete.” Gonzalez and Maldonado hope to screen the film at festivals. As of now, Twitch is the exclusive platform to catch the documentary until it is available online in the Spring. Audiences can follow the film’s social media for updates. Their Twitter is @FLAGMovie2017. In this landscape, it is nice to see a positive impact that video games can have on a community and how anyone can compete in their favorite games. “I am hoping that it will keep the conversation about women and gaming going,” Gonzalez said. “But that it will also give it a template for how to celebrate the women who play, which is something we cannot forget to do.”

Scandals

Hollywood Sees Fall Of Role-Models

‰‰ From Kevin Spacey to Louis C.K., some of the most famous figures in media and culture are being slapped with sexual misconduct accusations. As a consequence, comes different ways to process those realizations when watching their work.

his starring role as Frank Underwood on Netflix’s House of Cards, the show that arguably propelled Netflix to the forefront of prestige television. This led to multiple programs where Spacey mentored young actors, including an online MasterClass—all discontinued due to allegations of misconduct at some

of these programs. While many aspiring actors looked to him as their role model, their ambitions were preyed upon and cut short due to his fame. These events aren’t just limited to the world of film. Journalists like Charlie Rose, Matt Lauer and Glenn Thrush have excelled in their respective

fields. In each case, they are accused of using their power—two of them as lead anchors on broadcast networks, another as a White House correspondent for the New York Times—to lure young, aspiring female reporters into uncomfortable sexual encounters. Incidents like these discourage

By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net I spent my entire birthday, Oct. 5, on a Greyhound bus. While scrolling through my Twitter feed to pass the time, a New York Times article broke—“Harvey Weinstein Paid Off Sexual Harassment Accusers for Decades.” And thus began the fall of my supposed role models. The Harvey Weinstein story, further reported by the Times and the New Yorker, has resulted in multiple revelations of sexual harassment in all corners of the media. From actors such as Louis C. K. and Kevin Spacey, to politicians like Al Franken and Roy Moore, every week seems to darken the white clouds that hung over notable individuals. But, while much has been said about the deserved ending of some of these men’s careers, the impact of their legacies extend beyond their finished products. A two-time Academy Awardwinning actor, Spacey’s name alone came with prestige. This has further increased with

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Fall From Grace: House of Cards star Kevin Spacey is one of many men in Hollywood who have been accused of sexual misconduct. www.mdcthereporter.com

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people from seeking advice in their fields of interest, as it makes them wonder which of their role models they can trust. In Vox’s expose on Thrush, it noted how his stature in political journalism made women want to stay on good terms with him to further their careers. I mention these cases because, as I’ve watched seemingly every man I’ve looked up to deal with some form of sexual misconduct, I’ve come to the realization that their actions didn’t end with their direct victims. Every film they’ve starred in is tainted, every piece they’ve written is stained—no one can view their product without judging the artist, discouraging people everywhere from seeking out their talents. That’s not to excuse their actions. What the Kevin Spaceys and the Matt Lauers of the world did merited their careers ending because sexual misconduct should never be tolerated. But one can’t claim they weren’t talented at their roles. Kevin Spacey is a great actor, capable of cracking a role to perfection. Charlie Rose is a masterful interviewer, able to immerse his audience in intimate conversations on his program. These people did terrible things and failed as role models, but their contributions to society should continue to be studied.

MDC The Reporter


DECEMBER 12, 2017 | A&E

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B ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

Binge-worthy

Movie Review

The Fall Is A Gem, Worthy Of The Disaster Artist Is A Funny Look At A Beautiful Mess A Spot On Your Netflix Queue ‰‰ With a myriad of dark detective shows on Netflix, The Fall rises above the rest and offers a thrilling ride in its three seasons.

Spector, a married, loving father of a two. When night falls, he turns into a sadistic serial killer, targeting women with traits similar to detective Gibson, which is the root of their cat-and-mouse relationship. The effort placed in the two main leads is quickly diminished by the fact that the secondary characters lack personality and complexity. They all play a key role in the series, but at the end of the day you can’t help but notice they are nothing more than puppets placed to keep the game going, until one of the main characters ultimately gives in. Despite its setbacks, The Fall has kept the interest of its audience by producing five to six episodes per season, allowing the show to focus on character development and storytelling, which in turn allows the audience to organically grow with the show. Audiences are presented with an array of notions that maybe are more relevant than they were four years ago when the series was released. It begs the questions: how can we truly trust anyone? How can a loving father and caring husband be an incredibly dangerous serial killer? Why does our society allow for women to be dismissed in their claims? So next time, you find yourself scrolling for something to binge watch and your fourth viewing of The Office just isn’t cutting it, just press play on The Fall.

By Agustin Toriz agustin.toriz001@mymdc.net What could be considered as another cookie cutter crime series in this morbidly obsessed world we live in, The Fall stands out among the cliché detective shows. Having premiered in 2013 on the British Broadcasting Channel (BBC) as well as on the popular streaming service Netflix, The Fall stars cult favorite actors Gillian Anderson (The X-Files) and Jamie Dornan (Fifty Shades of Grey). Within the first seven minutes of the pilot episode, heart pounding moments are presented. Both main characters, detective superintendent Stella Gibson (Anderson) and serial killer Paul Spector (Dornan), are introduced in a unique way. The Fall makes it known that this isn’t your ordinary Baker Street mystery series, but instead a psychological thriller which observes both ends of the mystery. Detective Gibson is the ultimate alpha detective, using the fact that she is a woman in a primarily male field to her advantage. She uses charm and emotional manipulating to get her way. On the opposite side of the coin, we find

PHOTO COURTESY OF A24

Oh Hi Mark: James Franco's journey into the making of the "Citizen Kane of bad movies" is a funny and insightful look of why dreams should not always come true. ‰‰ James Franco and company are back with the in-depth story of how one of the very worst movies came to be, and validates that a amount of love can go into a work of art, no matter how poorly made. By Dante Nahai dante.nahai001@mymdc.net In the history of bad movies, no film is ever mentioned as much as the critically derided, The Room, released in 2003 by director Tommy Wiseau. The movie is often called “the Citizen Kane of bad movies.” Fourteen years later, James Franco decided to tackle the making of the cult classic in his latest film, The Disaster Artist. Originally a book written by The Room co-star Greg Sestero, it details how Sestero met Wiseau and the trials and tribulations of making the movie. Franco plays Wiseau and his younger brother, Dave Franco, plays Sestero. Wiseau is a strange, hulking figure with an odd accent and a love of actors like James Dean. After various unsuccessful auditions, he and Sestero decide to form a friendship and make a movie for themselves. It is a strange

journey, filled with stressful takes of filming and the constant questions of where Wiseau is getting funding for the film. The acting is great, though at times James Franco just sounds like he is doing a Tommy Wiseau impression. At times it is very convincing, though Wiseau could have probably played himself and it would have felt the same. The other cast members did a good job, with the younger Franco playing a supportive, yet concerned friend and Seth Rogen as a stressed script supervisor. There were also a lot of cameos from an array of actors, ranging from Bryan Cranston to Judd Apatow. Having seen The Room in the past, it was enjoyable to see the callbacks to that film and it paints a clearer picture to how the weirder scenes were filmed. Whether you are a fan of the cult classic or you have never heard of it and you’re just interested in the strangeness of it all, I definitely recommend it. I only wish they would have shown an aftermath of what happened after the film release, because the ending felt rushed. It’s funny from start to finish and an interesting look at what it took to make one of the worst films ever.

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Rise Above The Rest: Fans of shows like The X-Files or True Detective might want to binge The Fall on Netlfix. www.mdcthereporter.com

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14 FORUM | DECEMBER 12, 2017

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Climate Change

Net Neutrality

Miami: The New Atlantis

‰‰ Justin Marcano writes from the future and tells of a Miami very different from the one we currently live in. Miami, or the New Atlantis, is completely submerged underwater and its inhabitants are Cuban mermaids.

By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net

grew into a hotbed for the arts and innovation. What broke this once seemingly invincible paradise? Mankind, as always, was the killer of its own creation. With their endless imagination, humanity could not stop the destructive path of ignoring the warning signs that came with continuing the use of fossil fuels and deforestation. “We will be diving through the famous Calle Ocho. Here, you will see Cuban Mermaids. Rather than evacuating when the land dipped under water, they rapidly evolved to survive,” the guide continues. “It makes sense. It is said that when the hurricane season came around, Cubans partied as the raging Category 5 hurricanes rammed into the landscape and storm surges would rise to 20+

feet.” Cuban Mermaids are able to live entirely underwater and they thrive solely on what they call “coladas,” which are fed through pumps plugged on themselves to absorb the espresso through their gills. They gather at coral reeflike structures which they call La Carreta and Versailles, talk about Marlins and Dolphins and pray to a shiny piece of metal known as The Turnover Chain. Miami stood no chance against the effects of global warming and was deemed a lost cause. One would think that we would at least make an effort to save this city, but what actually occurred was a race toward possible profit. Because what would be more economical than a city of the future? A city of ruin, apparently.

The year is 2075. South Florida is underwater. Miami and its rich history is lost under the waves of time and share the same fate as the mythical city of Atlantis. So, Floridians did what Floridians do best—make amusement parks. “Welcome! All aboard the submarine S.S. Pitbull. Today, I will be your guide as we dive through the ruins of the Magic City,” the guide yells. “A place that vanished as quickly as it appeared, Miami: The New Atlantis.” In the time before it sunk, the city was a thriving metropolis that blended Caribbean and Latin American cultures. A place that

EDUARDO BADAL / THE REPORTER

Reflection

By Alexander Jürgen Klemm alexander.klemm001@mymdc.net Imagine living in a tribal society in prehistoric times, hunting for food and resources with the lads, when your mate Australopithecus finds some berries. Australopithecus eats the berries, eventually complains of stomach pains, and shortly after rolls over dead, foaming at the mouth. The hunting party unanimously agrees that those berries shouldn’t be eaten, and you proceed to write down your findings and share them with the rest of your tribe. Congratulations! You just made history and some poor idiot had to die for it. Here’s to hoping that this knowledge won’t be forgotten 10 generations later to prevent some other unfortunate soul’s untimely demise. This is why history matters; it’s essential for survival. The struggles of the human race have

‰‰ Camilla Sposito argues that changes to net neutrality will let companies like AT&T and T-Mobile manage what content users can see and sell user’s’ private information. Net Neutrality will be voted on Dec. 14.

By Camilla Sposito camila.sposito001@mymdc.net We have all heard about net neutrality. Some of us are wondering why we are talking so much about it and some of us are desperate and fearing that our internet freedom may be at risk. Net neutrality was introduced in 2002 by Tim Wu, a law professor at Columbia University and means the prohibition of internet providers such as AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Comcast from showing favoritism toward certain applications, websites, and browsers. It also protects users’ online information, which includes what websites were accessed, from being sold to private advertising companies. Net neutrality became part of

our legal system back in 2005 after a small company started preventing its clients from calling others from an internet application known as Vonage. The Federal Communications Commission will be voting on changes to net neutrality on Dec. 14. It’s extremely likely that these changes will occur because FCC has three out of five chairs held by Republicans, who are known to be supporters of the changes and are backed up by internet provider companies. With net neutrality rolled back, it’s likely that other countries will pay attention to our decisions. A Portuguese internet provider, Meo, shows different packages that users can buy based on the apps they want to use and the kind of data they want. Customers pay $4.99 per month to use social applications such as Facebook and Instagram and another $4.99 for messaging apps such as Imessage, WhatsApp and Facetime. Meo also charges users extra fees to use music and email apps. Without net neutrality, only the big apps will be used and the upstart apps will be out of the way, because big companies can pay internet providers to show favoritism to their apps. It’s hard to say what will happen if new net neutrality laws pass, but I do know that it will give more power to companies to control what we can and cannot see on the internet. Our online freedom may be living its last days.

Good Energy

History Is A Survival Tool ‰‰ Alexander Jürgen Klemm writes why mankind's past failures and lifestyles have been recorded, making history essential for our survival, education and knowing our identity.

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been chronicled, in more or less detail, for some 4,000 years. If we attempt to study similar periods of time from multiple countries, we can discover the same patterns repeated under widely different climates, cultures and religions. Many say that the culmination of history is that men never learn from history, which is a sweeping generalization by Cliff Note historians, but an accurate one nonetheless. Personally, I blame the politicization of history dominated by emotion and the outright boycott of certain periods of history by describing them as “boring”. The patterns of civilizations in history are as follows: The Rise, which is marked by conquest, commerce, affluence and intellect, and The Fall or Decadence, which is marked by defensiveness, pessimism, materialism, frivolity, negative birth rates, an influx of foreigners, the welfare state and a weakening of religion. Decadence is due to a long period of wealth and power, selfishness and the lost sense of duty. One may view this cycle as: bad times create hard men, hard men create good times, good times create weak men and weak men create bad times. While each civilization met their end in different ways, the histories of great states are amazingly similar, regardless of time, origin or location. One may argue that the study of history is the epic quest to break the pattern of civilizations and decode the societies, economics, religions, militaries and politics which defines modern international relations. History well told is beautiful. History being used as art and entertainment serves a real purpose. It’s a collection of stories to inspire us and connect us to our ancestors that have shaped our identity. Because without identity, what are we?

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Positivity Is A Powerful Tool To Create Change ‰‰ Claudia Hernandez believes that being surrounded by bad news can negatively affect us, so we need to be nicer and more compassionate toward others.

By Claudia Hernandez claudia.hernandez047@mymdc.net Negativity is everywhere. No one can deny that. Today we see outrageous and devastating news on every media platform. I feel like nobody focuses on the positive anymore. This surplus of bad news can make us unconsciously act negatively. Because most of us try searching for the most painless and simple way to live, we tend to take the easy route and complain and give up instead of making the effort to make positive changes. We don’t have to wait for a disaster to

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happen to be kind. We need to be kind with each other, always. We need to change our bad habits by training our mindset to see the good in every situation. For instance, I constantly see people sitting alone who look like they feel lonely and stressed. These are the times where we should be helping our classmates by showing them how to think positively. I emphasize this because sometimes we tend to mistreat people without giving them a chance to explain themselves because we’re always focused on seeing the malice in everyone. But, we have to realize that we all have problems, no matter how big or small they are. We all suffer and have our down moments. But we need to realize that being a negative person does not only affect us but could also affect others. It is up to us to act kindly toward ourselves and others. It truly takes only one person to make lots of people smile. “Attitude is a choice. Happiness is a choice. Optimism is a choice. Kindness is a choice. Giving is a choice. Respect is a choice,” said Roy T. Bennett in his book The Light in The Heart. We may not have the power to stop hateful events from happening, but we do have the power to control our thoughts and actions to make them positive. I’m sure that by switching to positive thoughts, we can change the world together and make it a better place little by little.

To write for the forum section, contact Katherine Wallace-Fernandez at (305) 237-2715 or katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

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Sex Ed

Proper Sex Education Is Necessary ‰‰ Stephanie Thelemaque argues that children and young adults are going to be exposed to sex, so parents and teachers should prioritize proper sex education to help them learn about teenage pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases.

By Stephanie Thelemaque stepha.thelemaque001@mymdc.net I had sexual education earlier than most children thanks to three publications: an intermediate first aid book, which included how to deliver a baby and a study of female sex organs, a book about the pleasures of sex that belonged

to my aunt and a graphic AIDS pamphlet. Sex education is usually a very uncomfortable conversation. Parents are supposed to have “The Talk” with their children. If they fail, that job falls to teachers. However, it seems that only a few states actually mandate accurate and comprehensive sexual education. As a result, teens are left vulnerable to their own ignorance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that people ages 15 to 24 account for 50 percent of all new sexually transmitted diseases reported in 2013. According to IndexMundi, a website containing multiple statistics from multiple countries, this age range makes up less than 15 percent of the current population. You can blame lawmakers for this. The Sexuality Information and Education Council of The United States says that since 1981, they have funded abstinence only sex education. In an article published in 2011 for The National Center for Biotechnology Information, Kathrin Stanger-Hall and David Hall, professors at the

University of Georgia, stated that abstinence only sex education actually increases the amount of teen pregnancies in the United States. According to the The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, many states have decided to use different methods to combat teen pregnancy and we’ve seen a decline in teen pregnancies all over the United States lately. These methods have greatly impacted states such as Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Stranger-Hall and Hall have researched other states that still stress abstinence over expansive education about sexually transmitted diseases have higher pregnancy rates than other states, which include Florida and Indiana, where Vice President Mike Pence once resided as a governor. Parents should take control of their children’s sex education and shouldn’t be so afraid of introducing it to children because guess what? They’re going to find out about it anyway!

Ignoring sex is hurting everyone. Teenagers are not ready to tackle the responsibilities of parenthood and neither are their bodies. There’s no need to mention the financial burdens that parents have to deal with. Proper sex education also includes LGBTQ issues. These days we’re likely to hear about children being aware of their otherness very early. Not talking about it may lead to depression and suicide, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In November, NBC reported about a father who killed his 14-year-old son for being gay. In some accounts of child molestation, the child doesn’t understand what was happening, and therefore they were not able to speak about what was happening to them. For this reason, children need sex education as they approach the age of reason, which is well before puberty. The best thing to do is equip them with accurate information to help guide them as puberty nears and enables them to make the best choices for themselves.

International Students

The Struggles Of Being An International Student ‰‰ Valentina Gonzalez explains the hardships of being an international student, which include homesickness, different time zones and confusing paperwork. However, she writes that her struggles are worth studying abroad for.

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for class in the morning when your body thinks it’s the middle of the night. Language needs to be prioritized too. If you choose a country where you are not familiar with the language, it can delay your career. Paperwork is a nightmare. If you have never heard about I-94, I-20, F1 and OR J1, you are lucky. I’ve spent up to six months dealing

Gabriela Alvarado, Eduardo Badal, Sebastián Ballestas, Corbin Bolies, Aminah Brown, Luis Camargo-Carlos, Anthony Fernandez, Valentina Gonzalez, Claudia Hernandez, Aiyana Ishmael, Alexander Jürgen Klemm, Justin Marcano, Dante Nahai, Julie O’Hare, Christian Ortega, Bianca Pasci, Karina Rey, Dayana Romero, Alexandra Vargas, Mendy Silva, Camilla Sposito, Stephanie Thelemaque, Agustin Toriz, Darian Vega

Manolo Barco, Media Adviser B mbarco@mdc.edu T NORTH.........................(305) 237-1255 T KENDALL......................(305) 237-2323 T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3477 AMINAH BROWN / THE REPORTER

By Valentina Gonzalez valentin.gonzales001@mymdc.net

with these visas, certificates and forms to keep me from being deported. Homesickness will also hunt you the entire time. You will miss the food from your hometown and being away from family is extremely hard during holidays and birthdays. You need to be strong in order to be an international student. All these hardships are worth it though. I went through hell, but the experience is irreplaceable and will help me advance in my career. My advice for any student who is thinking about studying abroad is to do plenty of research and to learn as much as you can academically and socially. It’s on you if the experience is worth it or not.

What’s it like to study abroad? Studying abroad feels like you are navigating a jungle as you encounter different languages, cultures and people all while your mom is calling you every hour. There are many factors that can negatively or positively affect your experience as an international student. It’s amazing to study abroad but you should definitely consider the hardships I’ve gone through. You’ll have to choose where you want to study. There are so many options to choose from and indecision will easily take control of you. Try to study in a city that fits your personality and professional aspirations. Take into consideration time zones. It is devastating getting up

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