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Oscar Blockbuster

Forward Savannah Clark is having a strong sophomore season for the Lady Sharks. She is leading the team in scoring, averaging 18.4 points a game.

The Reporter’s Corbin Bolies thinks this might be the year that the Oscar for Best Picture goes to a major blockbuster motion film. And he might be right.

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Mom And Dad FORUM

Super Sophomore

A&E

NEWS

Miami Dade College alumnus David Frederick published his first book, Lakay, on Oct. 24. He hopes the memoir will showcase Haiti.

SPORTS

My Haiti

The Reporter’s Jasmine Machado, who was adopted when she was 11 months old, talks about the strong bond she feels with her adoptive parents.

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Happy National French Toast Day!

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4VOL. 4VOL.8,8,ISSUE ISSUE26— —SEPTEMBER NOVEMBER 26, 28, 2017

TWO-TIME NATIONAL PACEMAKER AWARD WINNER

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Books

Authors, Drag Queens And A Former Vice President: Welcome To The Book Fair ‰‰ This year’s installation of the Miami Book Fair attracted thousands of avid literature fans to Miami Dade College’s Wolfson Campus with writers, political figures, children events and, of course, books.

By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net The 34th annual Miami Book Fair, which ran from Nov. 12 to Nov. 19., brought thousands of people to Wolfson Campus to enjoy writers, artists and presenters from around the world. Colorful tents lined the streets of downtown Miami while attendees explored events like Lights On at The Porch, where guests enjoyed live comedy and musical performances, Kitchen Stadium, which included live cooking demos and ReadCaribbean, a program that allowed visitors the chance to explore Caribbean literature. The Book Fair kicked off with it’s popular A Conversation With… event on Nov. 12, when journalist Dan Rather spoke about his current book What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism. Other speakers who appeared later in the week included singer Patti Smith, playwright Wallace Shawn and former Democratic National Committee chairwoman Donna Brazile who spoke with CNN political commentator—and Miami TURN TO BOOKS PAGE 4

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Comics Collection: From left to right, Juan Garcia, Leydis Jimenez and Yanius Alvarado patiently sift through comic books at the MVP Collective Books, Comics & Toys stand on Nov. 18 at the Miami Book Fair. The Book Fair took place from Nov. 12 through Nov. 19 in Downtown Miami. Turn to pages 8-9 for more coverage.

Crime

Champions

Custodian Robbed At Knife Point Lady Sharks Dominate Tournament— ‰‰ Jean Claude Jacinthe was robbed at Wolfson Campus at 2 a.m. on Oct. 24 as he waited for an Uber on a bench outside of building 2. The thief stole more than $110 in possessions. By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net Police are looking for a man who robbed an off-duty custodian at knife point at Wolfson Campus on Oct. 24, according to a City of Miami police report. The incident happened at 2 a.m. as Jean Claude Jacinthe, 66, was sitting on a bench outside building 2 waiting for an Uber. Jacinthe, who has been working parttime for the College since September, said a man riding a bicycle approached him and pointed a knife, ordering him to surrender his belongings. The assailant took a Haitian passport, a Florida ID, a social security card, a green card, a cell phone, a cell phone charger, a $5 bill, a notebook, a belt, three T-shirts, two

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bags and one can of Carnation milk. The items are valued at more than $110. Police describe the suspect as a 5-foot-6 inch, 165 pound, 35-40 year old black male wearing a long sleeve shirt and sporting a beard. According to Jacinthe, the subject spoke Creole. Jacinthe said the subject fled north on N.E. 1 Ave. The victim was not injured. Jacinthe reported the incident 18 hours later. The college did not issue an MDC alert through social media, text message or phone call to notify students or staff about the robbery. “Students and employees are always encouraged when possible to walk in groups to their vehicle or bus stop,” said Juan Mendieta, director of communications for Miami Dade College. Anyone with information about this incident can call the City of Miami Police Department at (305) 579-6111; Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at (305) 471-8477 or Wolfson Campus public safety at (305) 237-3100.

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NEWS

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4-6

Win Back-To-Back National Titles

‰‰ The Miami Dade College women’s volleyball team defeated the College of Southern Idaho 3-0 in Hutchinson, Kansas on Nov. 18 to win the National Junior College Athletic Association National Tournament. By Giovanni Del Fa giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net The Miami Dade College Lady Sharks volleyball team capped off a perfect 34-0 season by defeating the College of Southern Idaho 3-0 in Hutchinson, Kansas on Nov. 18 to win back-to-back national championships. “The girls did well, they never gave up,” said Lady Sharks head coach Origenes ‘Kiko’ Benoit, who has won eight national titles at MDC, two as the head coach and six as an assistant. “The pressure was on us and we were able to handle it.” Miami Dade College, which has won 44 straight matches dating back to Oct. 25,

SPORTS

10-11

A&E

2016, has won 10 national championships in volleyball. The Lady Sharks started off the tournament in the preliminary pool round with an effortless win against Wallace State College 3-0 (25-14, 25-18, 25-11). However, the National Junior College Athletic Association tournament was far from over. Regional opponent Polk State College gave the Lady Sharks a run for their money in the quarterfinals before MDC beat them 3-1 (25-18, 17-25, 26-24, and 28-26). During the semi-finals, MDC faced New Mexico Military Institute and defeated them 3-1 (25-23, 17-25, 25-23, and 25-17) in a nail-biting, back and forth match; they then beat the College of Southern Idaho 3-0 (2513, 25-21, and 25-18) in the championship match. This year’s run was far more dominant than last year’s championship. Last year, TURN TO CHAMPIONS, PAGE 11

8-9, 12-13

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2 BRIEFING | NOVEMBER 28, 2017

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New Public Safety Chief At Kendall Campus

Spotts

Richard Spotts has been hired as the new public safety chief at Kendall Campus. He started the position Oct. 23. Spotts retired from law enforcement with more than 34 years of service. His most recent position was police lieutenant at the Seminole Police Department. “In this position, I plan to use my experience to develop even greater performance from this department,” Spotts said. “I’m lucky to walk into such a great situation and hope to upgrade it even further.” His duties include maintaining the safety of the campus community and overseeing the day to day operations of public safety. —Justin Marcano

MDC Students To Perform 12 Angry Men Students will perform the play 12 Angry Men on Dec. 7 through Dec. 17 at Kendall Campus, 11011 S.W. 104 St., Room M-113. Showings will be Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The classic play, written by Reginald Rose in the 1950s, is about a jury’s deliberation of a murder trial. The cast members consist of fourteen student actors. Admission is free to the public but donations are welcome. Theater Program Coordinator Aaron H. Alpern said guests can expect, “a drama under two hours in length that will be exciting and topical.” For more information, contact Alpern at aalpern@mdc.edu or (305) 237-2641. —Julie O’Hare

Kendall Campus’ Chamber Singers To Perform At St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church The Chamber Singers, along with professor Kenneth Boos, will hold a Christmas concert on Dec. 3 at 4 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 14260 Old Cutler Rd. They will perform songs such as Ave Maria, The Christmas Song (Chestnuts roasting on an open fire) and Let the River Run. “This is a chance to come out and support young singers who are beginning their musical careers,” Boos said. The performance is open and free to the public. For more information, contact Kenneth Boos at kboos@mdc.edu or at (305) 237-2394. —Isabella Garcia

Yellow Pages United Is Offering $2,000 Scholarship The Yellow Pages United Mark Smith scholarship is available for students who can create an i n fog raph ic explaining how marketing and advertising has changed over time. The winner will receive $2,000. The deadline to apply is Dec. 22. Applicants must be full-time students by the spring 2018 term, a United States citizen or permanent resident, have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and be majoring in marketing, graphic design or a related major at an accredited U.S. institution. Students who meet these requirements need to fill out an application form and upload the infographic. Files must be in PNG, JPG or ZIP format and no larger than 2MB. Applications can be found at www.yellowpagesunited.com The Yellow Pages United created the Yellow Pages United Blog to post news, product updates and share success stories from business owners who have helped their communities. For more information, contact 866-355-6101 or scholarship@yellowpagesunited.com —Justin Marcano

National Scholarship Program Open For Dreamers

Miami Dade College Kendall Campus professor Kevin Wayne Bumpers will host his Annual Tis’ The Season Christmas Concert on Dec. 2 at 5 p.m. at the McCarthy Auditorium, 11011 S.W. 104 St. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors over 65 years old. Tickets will be $25 and $20 respectively at will call. Along with Bumpers, the MDC Kendall Campus Chambers Singers, the Sounds of Life Orchestra and solo artists will perform classical Christmas songs. “I wanted to stretch that feeling of joy and happiness to others and I thought that the best way to do that as a musician was through music,” Bumpers said. “We bring you something hot and ready every year.” Bumpers is a full-time professor at the college, coordinator of the Keyboards Arts Area, founder and artistic director of the MDC High School Piano Competition and the Piano Sonata Competition. For more information, contact Bumpers at kbumpers@mdc.edu or at (305) 237-2392.

Students can now apply for TheDream.US National Scholarship. Scholarships of up to $14,500 will be awarded to cover an associate’s degree and up to $29,000 for a bachelor’s degree. Candidates need to be under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, Temporary Protective Status or the meet TheDream.US’s immigration eligibility criteria. High school graduates need to have at least a 2.5 GPA and intend to enroll full time at one of TheDream.US Partner Colleges for the upcoming year. Community college graduates need to have at least a 3.0 GPA and have graduated from or be enrolled at an accredited community college or twoyear program, and plan to enroll full time for bachelor’s degree at a Partner College in fall 2018. The scholarship can be renewed annually. To remain eligible, the student has to be enrolled fulltime and maintain a 3.0 GPA. Deadline to apply is March 1, 2018. Winners will be notified in late April. To apply, visit www.thed r e a m .u s/s c hol a r s h ip s/ national-scholarship/

—Camilla Sposito

—Mendy Silva

PHOTO COURTESY OF MDC MEDIA RELATIONS

Professor To Perform Christmas Concert

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JESSE HUNNIFORD

MDC Live Arts Presents Performances By Tania El Khoury MDC Live Arts is hosting several performances by artist Tania El Khoury: Gardens Speak will take place at the Gleason Room at the Fillmore Miami Beach, 1700 Washington Ave., and As Far As My Fingertips Take Me will be at the Clinton Room at New World Symphony, 500 17 St. Gardens Speak will take place from Dec. 6 to Dec. 8 at 2 p.m., 3 p.m., 4 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.. On Dec 9, performances will be at 12 p.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.. As Far As My Fingertips Take Me will be showcased in multiple time blocks. Tickets are limited since performances are one-on-one. During Dec. 6 to Dec. 8, time block one will be from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and time block two will be from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Performances on Dec. 9 will be available on time block one at 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and time block two at 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tania El Khoury has been recipient of the Total Theatre Innovation Award, the Artsadmin Bursary and the Arches Brick Award for her interactive installations and performances. Her work has been curated at various international festivals. Tickets can be purchased at mdclivearts.org. Free tickets are available for Miami Dade College students. For more information, contact MDC Live Arts at mdclivearts@mdc. edu or at (305) 237-3010. —Claudia Hernandez

Kendall Campus Hosts Lunch For Disaster Victims

Gary Thomas To Perform At Wolfson Campus

Kendall Campus’ student life department will sell lunch for $6 on Nov. 29 at 12 p.m. in the building 2 breezeway, 11011 S.W. 104 St., to help people affected by recent natural disasters. Lunches will be from LaGranja and include chicken, rice, beans, plantains and salad. “This event was initiated from one of our Campus Activities Board students who felt strongly that we needed to assist those who are in need,” said Lauren Adamo, the Kendall Campus director of student life. “We like to be able to make an impact when possible, and I feel good about the students who are choosing to use their time and energy to make a positive impact on the world.” Student life will also be collecting feminine and dental hygiene, soap, gloves and batteries to donate.

Miami Dade College bass professor Gary Thomas will perform for the Jazz at Wolfson Presents Visiting Artist series Thomas on Dec. 6 at 12 p.m. at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2nd Ave., Room 1261. Thomas has performed in Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead, an international jazz program at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and has performed alongside artists such as Richie Cole, Ira Sullivan and Mary Wilson. Founded by MDC professor Michael Di Liddo, Jazz at Wolfson Presents has showcased performances by world renowned jazz artists. The performance is open and free to the public. For more information, visit www.mdc.edu/jazzatwolfson or call (305) 237-3930.

—Claudia Hernandez For more information, contact: Lauren Adamo T(305) 237-2738 ladamo@mdc.edu

—Melba Silwany

Luis Núñez Exhibiting Paintings At Homestead Campus The South Florida Landscape Paintings by Luis Núñez opened on Oct. 24 and will remain open until Jan. 12 at Homestead Campus in Room 222 building D, 500 College Terrace. The exhibit is open from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m on Saturdays. It is closed on Sundays. It consists of oil paintings of the Florida Keys, the Everglades and the Homestead/Redlands area. Núñez’s work has been exhibited at the United States Embassy in Maseru, Africa; Biscayne National Park, the Florida Department of State and the Frost Art Museum. The exhibit is free to the public. For more information, contact Núñez at LuisNunez@LNunez.com or visit www.LNunez.com

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MDC The Reporter


NOVEMBER 28, 2017 | BRIEFING

THE REPORTER Omar Negrin, Photo Editor  // 

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OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Culture Club: The Olympia Theater holds various cultural events throughout the year in Downtown Miami. On this particular night, the venue in collaboration with the Miami Book Fair, held a poetry reading.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Pizza And Politics: Katherine Rodriguez (left) and Joshua Elias (right) throw out empty pizza boxes that were used during Pizza And Politics, a recruitment event for the College Republicans and College Democrats clubs, on Nov. 20 in front of the KoffeeHouse at Kendall Campus.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Blue Cotton: Hansel Garcia, program director for Alternative Breaks, pours blueberry sugar into the cotton candy machine during an Alternative Breaks event at Kendall Campus on Nov. 15.

ELIZABETH GODEFOY / THE REPORTER

Dance Time: The New World Dance Ensemble rehearses on Nov. 8 for their performance celebrating New World School of the Arts's 30th anniversary.

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4 NEWS | NOVEMBER 28, 2017

THE REPORTER

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Miami Book Fair Had Something For Everyone FROM BOOKS, FRONT

resident—Ana Navarro about the challenging experience running the DNC during the 2016 election amid Russian hacking. “[Russian hacking] was a 21stcentury crime. It was a cyber crime. This was an attack by a hostile foreign power,” Brazile said in the hour-long conversation. “I still want the American people to be outraged.” The series also included anchor Katy Tur who spoke about her experiences covering the Donald Trump campaign and her novel Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History. . “I’m thrilled to be here. The Miami Book Fair is legendary,” Tur said. “It’s good for authors because you get a lot of recognition and get a lot of people getting curious about the book and it’s good for Miami because books are good for everybody.” All forms of writing found a venue to shine during the weekend at The Street Fair’s booths, which ranged from comic books to meditation guides. “Books are the physical

“ 

I’m thrilled to be here. The Miami Book Fair is legendary.

Leeann Tweeden. But that cancellation didn’t threaten to stop the Book Fair’s momentum as it hosted its keynote speaker, former Vice President Joe Biden, at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing

Arts on Nov. 18. Biden, on a book tour for his memoir Promise Me, Dad: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose, spoke with author George Saunders about the aftermath of his son Beau Biden’s death, where he

sees the country now and how he thinks it can move forward through “one of the most dangerous times in American history.” “We’re high-bound by traditions” Biden said. “The world is ours. There’s reasons for hope.”

Katy Tur, anchor and author

manifestation of art,” said Gene Luen Yang, a comic-book artist and a national ambassador for young people’s literature, who frequents the Book Fair. Author and journalist Walter Isaacson also returned to the Book Fair on Nov. 18 to speak about his latest novel, Leonardo da Vinci. “Miami is a deeply creative city where people love the arts, the sciences, and the humanities,” Isaacson said. “I think creativity occurs when you have a tolerant, diverse community when people are both creative and love technology and that’s why I love Miami.” The Book Fair didn’t run completely without a hitch. Democratic senator Al Franken of Minnesota, set to be the closing speaker, canceled his appearance on Nov. 17 due to a sexual harassment accusation by radio host

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Hispanic Heritage: Colombian storyteller, columnist and screenwriter Juan Carlos Botero, speaks about the importance and influence of Gabriel García Márquez in Latin America during the fifty year anniversary event of Márquez's book Cien Años De Soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude) at the Miami Book Fair on Nov. 17.

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NOVEMBER 28, 2017 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

5

Vegan

Club Hopes To Bust Myths Associated With Veganism ‰‰ The Vegan Club hopes to educate and raise awareness of the trending lifestyle. The club started this semester and is looking for members— regardless of whether they are vegan or not. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net North Campus added some flavor to their club line up this fall. The Vegan Club, which held its first meeting on Nov. 17, is open to students seeking to learn about the trending, natural lifestyle. Jeffrey Atkins, the club’s adviser, believes the organization is the first of its kind at Miami Dade College. “The organization’s goal is to spread vegan awareness and support organization members and the community in the long journey toward a more sustainable and compassionate, plant-based future,” Atkins said. Focus of the club, which currently has nine members, will be on vegan diets and planning community service projects in partnership with Voice for the Voiceless, an organization that concentrates on bringing awareness to animal rights. Service projects will be geared toward assisting rescued farm animals and volunteering at events and wildlife sanctuaries. Club meetings will consist of fundraising opportunities, speaking about the vegan lifestyle and

sharing different affordable vegan recipes. Atkins said the organization’s aim is to rebuke stereotypes that people usually associate with the lifestyle, including its lack of protein and high cost. “What I hope to accomplish is that, through educating those who are curious about the club or the lifestyle, we can bust the myths people have and show that anyone, even college students, can be vegan without thinking they aren’t getting the right nutrients or that it will cost them too much money,” he said. A hummus recipe was passed around to members during the first meeting. Members see the organization as an opportunity to educate people on the vegan lifestyle and its health benefits and the impact it has on the environment. “We plan on spreading our message in the most inexpensive, positive and sustainable way we can,” said Priya Pershadsingh, the Vegan Club’s president. Pershadsingh was instantly drawn to the organization. “I had heard talks about there being a Vegan Club and if anyone was interested in joining it and I immediately became attached to it because I really liked the message the club had and the purpose behind it,” Pershadsingh said. This isn’t her first attempt at exploring a sustainable lifestyle. During the spring semester,

Pershadsingh campaigned around North Campus with the Institute for Civic Engagement and Democracy and the Earth Ethics Institute, collecting signatures in hopes of replacing the cafeteria’s styrofoam containers with renewable, environmentally friendly containers. Pershadsingh, a mass

communications and journalism major, helped collect 300 signatures. She is awaiting approval of the project. “I have been a vegetarian for about a year now because of animal rights reasons and I’m beginning to get into the vegan lifestyle,” she said. “This is something

that is very dear to me and I knew that being part of the club can help make a difference to a lot of people.” The club’s next meeting is scheduled for Dec. 6 at 12 p.m. in Room 4206. For more information, contact Jeffrey Atkins at jatkins@mdc. edu or at (305) 237-1684.

KATHERINE CALLE/NORTH CAMPUS MEDIA SERVICES

Vegan Vogue: The Vegan Club at North Campus held its first meeting on Nov. 17. Pictured from left to right are Jeffrey Atkins, the club’s adviser, and Priya Pershadsingh, the president.

Technology

College Launches MyMDC Mobile Application ‰‰ Miami Dade College’s web services and information technology departments co-developed the MyMDC application. The app, which will launch on Nov. 29 for iPhone and Android, features information about class schedules, financial aid, alerts, grades, parking and campus maps. By Alessandra Pacheco alessandr.pacheco001@mymdc.net Miami Dade College will soon be in the palm of your hands when the College launches a new mobile application on Nov. 29. In partnership with MDC web services and the informational technology departments, the College will release the MyMDC app with 10 features including data such as alerts and notifications, financial aid, grades and class schedules, library information, financial aid awards, campus maps and building information. “You’ll have a central place for most of the notifications the College has for you,” said Frederik Creugers, associate vice provost at MDC’s business solutions. To access all features, students must download it through the Google Play or the App Store, and log in with your student credentials. Once logged in, the application shows customized information like financial aid, any holds on the student’s account and checked out or overdue books from the library. “It’s something we knew the students wanted, but we had to figure out the backends of the application first,” said Andrew Seaga, the College webmaster and one of the MyMDC developers. The College hopes to expand use of the app to different audiences, such as faculty, staff and college visitors. Development of the product started in www.mdcthereporter.com

July of this year, but the process originally started four years ago. Plans were postponed due to the College’s switch from Odyssey to PeopleSoft. One of the features the developers are excited about is the campus map feature, which shows students where they are on campus. “The campus maps have different pins and when you click on the pin, it has a photo of the building and a description of its

respective services,” Seaga said. Seaga said the team hopes to have new features—the first update is planned for late February—out every three months, which will depend on student feedback. “We want students to drive that; tell us what you would like to have and propose those features to us,” Seaga said. Staff writer Corbin Bolies contributed to this story.

Man Found Dead At Hialeah Campus A man was found dead near the parking garage at Hialeah Campus on Nov. 20; police are treating it as a suicide. It is believed the man jumped from the parking garage, according to Hialeah Police Department detective Jose Torres. His body was discovered by a public safety officer who was doing routine patrols at around 4:15 a.m. Hialeah Fire personnel pronounced him dead shortly after. Police did not release the man’s identity because next of kin had not been notified. According to Miami Dade College’s Director of Communications Juan Mendieta, the man was not a student or employee at the College. About 45 minutes after the man’s body was discovered, the College sent a series of MDC alerts through social media and text message notifying students that classes were canceled until 10 a.m. The alerts warned students to not enter the campus because of police activity. Another MDC alert was sent around 6:30 a.m., notifying students that campus officials and the Hialeah Police Department had cleared the situation and that classes would resume at 7 a.m.. “If anybody is thinking of hurting themselves or others, they can receive help from multiple agencies including the Hialeah Police Department and professionals,” Torres said. —Katherine Wallace-Fernandez

PHOTO COURTESY MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

There's An App For That: Miami Dade College will launch its MyMDC mobil app on Nov. 29 to help students stay better connected to the College. mdc.thereporter

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6 NEWS | NOVEMBER 28, 2017

THE REPORTER

Alumnus Profile

From Undocumented To Resident—Haitian Author Tells His Story And Haiti’s In New Book ‰‰ David Frederick published his first book, Lakay, on Oct. 24. The memoir takes readers on a personal tour of Haiti where Frederick, 27, lived until he was 18.

By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net Wolfson Campus alumnus David Frederick hopes his first book, Lakay, helps readers have a different perspective about his homeland—Haiti. Frederick’s 186-page memoir was released on Oct. 24. The 27-year-old, who came to the United States when he was 18, began writing the book two years ago. “I want people to see Haiti can mean courageous. Haiti can mean resilient. Haiti can mean beauty,” Frederick said. “Haiti can mean so many beautiful, great things other than what they’ve always seen Haiti as.” Frederick says the title, Lakay, which means ‘home’ in English, was chosen to help readers find “hope in hopeless situations.” In the memoir, readers can find Frederick’s vivid descriptions of his childhood in St. Marc, his explanation of historical events like the massacre of de la scierie, his transition to the United States, his participation in the Trail of Dreams while at MDC and why he wants people to come together. Bible verses, photos and a forward by Year Up CEO and Founder Gerald Chertavian are also included. “David’s story is an important one: it shows the immense talent, creativity, and passion shared by young adults across this country,” Chertavian said. “I felt proud as I read through the book, getting a deeper insight into the challenges David has overcome and the accomplishments he has celebrated.” Writing Process On his iPhone, Frederick has hundreds of notes, ranging from full chapters to sentences, which he has written during slow times at his full-time job as an AT&T retail consultant.

“If I’m not doing much, I just pick up my phone and start putting notes and I just love it,” Frederick said. “When I go home, [I] transcribe the notes to the book, the computer, and just check everything in paragraphs.” Chapter five, Trail of Dreams, and chapter seven, The Audacity of Faith, in Lakay relied heavily on his old journal entries. “I wanted to put in the book what I felt at that time and I could only do that by going through and re-reading the journals,” Frederick said. “Not just thinking of what happened, but really writing what it is.” He does this when his family is asleep, but his wife Elpidia Frederick teases him about his constant phone use and the lack of sleep he gets. “I’m not doing anything wrong. Trust me, I’m not doing anything,” Frederick said. “I’m just taking notes or I’m googling something.” The couple, who have been married for three years, lives in a four bedroom home in North Miami Beach with their twoyear-old son Davheed Jasper Frederick. They are expecting their second child—a daughter—soon. Coming To America Frederick moved to the United States more than nine years ago. He started work on his associates in arts degree in international relations in 2009 at Wolfson Campus. Frederick graduated from the College in 2013 and is now a part-time student at Florida International University, working toward a bachelor’s degree in international relations. He is also founder and host of Impact The Outcome, a podcast about Haiti’s history and tourism. At the College, he was president of Minority Students For College Success, where students can receive tutoring services and listen to speakers, and MDC Wesley, a christian club. He was also a member of Year Up, a program that helps disadvantaged students learn work skills and intern at companies. He arrived in the United States in July of

LOONI INGRAN / The Reporter

Haitian Pride: Wolfson Campus alumnus, David Frederick, published his first book Lakay on Oct. 24. The book talks about his life and his love for Haiti. Frederick is pictured here at a book signing on Nov. 18 at the Sant La Haitian Neighborhood Center in North Miami. 2008 on a visa but overstayed his visit hoping to get political asylum. In 2010, Fredrick received Temporary Protective Status after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti. He became a resident of United States after marrying his wife in June of 2014 but has never forgotten the state of being “in a limbo” undocumented students face. Frederick was devastated by the Trump Administration’s decision to terminate TPS for Haitians on Nov. 20. More than 50,000 people under the program need to leave the United States by July 2019—or they will face deportation. “We need to push and find a way for congress to realize, okay these people and Haiti is not ready,” he said.

like Jacmel, Jérémie, Port Au Prince and St. Marc. “It’s to really show Haiti in a way that’s never been seen before,” Frederick said. An episode has already been filmed in Jacmel. He plans to release the show on April 2018. Frederick hopes to have the series available on National Geographic, PBS, Netflix, or NBC. Frederick hopes his entrepreneurship galvanizes others to do better. “Toward the end of the book, I talk about the beauty, the crime— I talk about the struggle,” Frederick said. “I wanted to end it in a hopeful way. I talk about the next generation, how I think we have some of the requirements to do some good.”

On The Grind

Lakay is available for purchase online at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Friesen Press and Frederick’s website www.davidfrederick.net/. He plans to start a book tour in February and visit cities like Philadelphia and Boston.

Frederick is determined to keep pushing forward. He began filming his documentary series Window To Haiti, where he displays the food, history and residents of cities

Children's Holiday

You Better Watch Out, Santa Is Coming To North Campus ‰‰ The annual North Campus Children’s Holiday event will take place on Dec. 9. The program features various attractions including a meet and greet with Santa Claus, performances by Miami-Dade County Public Schools students and a 12-foot fake snow mountain. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net Before students take their final exams or plan that winter break trip, they might want to head to North Campus to help the community. On Dec. 9, North Campus, 11380 NW 27th Ave., will host its annual Children’s Holiday event. The holiday celebration is open and free to the public, but attendees are encouraged to bring unwrapped toys to donate to disadvantaged children in the community. “Thousands of visitors come every year to experience the magical transformation that North Campus undergoes with its themed tents, festive Christmas music, live show entertainment and delicious foods suited for the entire family,” said Jesenia Patino, assistant to the senior director of campus administration at North Campus and cochair of the event. As soon as Santa Claus lands on campus at 10:30 a.m. to lead the parade, the event, in

science exhibit allowing guests to make slime and try foods infused with liquid nitrogen. “One of the best things about Children’s Holiday is to see the North Campus students, faculty and staff participating in the event by hosting tents and activities and coordinating throughout the year to host the best event possible for the families that visit,” Patino sad. There will be three stages showcasing different performances, ranging from the Norland Middle School Dance ensemble and the Ferguson High School Steel Drum Band. Other groups, such as the Hip Hop Kidz dance group, will be returning from last year’s event. Plus, a food court, The CanCOURTESY OF NORTH CAMPUS MEDIA SERVICES dy Land Pavilion, will offer various vendors and food trucks to satisfy its twelfth year, will officially be underway. After the parade, children and parents guest’s cravings at economical prices. “This year we have expanded our health will have the chance to meet and greet with Santa Claus, which includes a photo pavilion and have added a special character tent with more than 40 characters from opportunity. Other exhibits include a 12-foot fake snow various comic books and well-known animountain, an Enchanted Jungle, where mated characters,” Patino said. The event will also feature a Holidays guests can get face-to-face with wild animals and Elsie’s Greenshop, an interactive Around The World Center, showcasing www.mdcthereporter.com

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global holiday customs and the Scholastics Book Shop, where elves help attendees choose a book to purchase and money collected will be donated to a school in need. “MDC is committed to serving the needs of the community. Many families struggle financially and cannot afford to celebrate. The North Campus creates this festive event in hopes of bringing holiday merriment and celebration to all,” said Jackie Muni, chairperson of social sciences for North Campus and the other co-chair of the event. “Attendees also take part in cultural and educational programming, while having the opportunity to enjoy games, rides, and performances.” Students and faculty are encouraged to donate gifts to student life prior to the event and to also sign up to volunteer through the North Campus website, http://mdc.edu/ north/childrensholiday/ “The event serves as a great way not only to bring the community together, but also serves as an additional way for MDC North Campus to give back to the community in a fun and family-friendly environment,” Patino said. “It is great to see the families enjoying the activities in a safe and supportive atmosphere.” For more information about the Children’s Holiday event, call (305) 237-1141.

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MDC The Reporter


NOVEMBER 28, 2017 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

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8 A&E | NOVEMBER 28, 2017

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Miami Book Fair Takes Over Downtown The 34th annual Miami Book Fair took over the streets of downtown Miami from Nov.12 through Nov. 19. Thousands of book lovers flocked to listen to and buy books from more than 450 authors and 250 booksellers for a weeklong festival of food, literature and culture. Among the star-studded lineup at this year’s Book Fair: Former Vice President Joe Biden, Miami-raised poet Richard Blanco, former first

daughters Barbara and Jenna Bush, 2014 Presidential Medal of Freedom winner Isabel Allende, former Chief official White House photographer Peter J. Souza and former Democratic National Convention Chair Donna Brazile. It also included Book Fair staples like the Street Fair, Light’s On At The Porch, Evenings With events and Children’s Alley. —Camilla Sposito

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Candid Conversation: Former Democratic National Convention Chair Donna Brazile speaks about her book Hacked: The Inside Story of the Break-ins and Breakdowns That Put Donald Trump in the White House at the Chapman Conference Center on Nov. 15. The book offers a no-holds-barred look into the DNC during the 2016 election.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Book With A Purpose: Vice President Joe Biden was the featured guest at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts on Nov. 18. He spoke about his book Promise Me, Dad: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose.

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Penmanship: Confucius Institute volunteer Mona Liu writes a name in Chinese characters on Nov 17.

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

All Gold Everything: Artist Joanah Alyssa Whitely paints a portrait during a street performance at The Porch at the Miami Book Fair on Nov. 17

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SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Book Hunting: Andia Bici looks at a book at the Glover's Bookery booth during the Miami Book Fair Street Fair on Nov. 17.

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NOVEMBER 28, 2017 | A&E

THE REPORTER

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Groovy Times: From left to right, Magic City Hippies members John Coughlin and Robby Hunter perform at The Porch at the Miami Book Fair on Nov. 18.

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Little Reads: Los Libros Más Pequeños del Mundo (The Smallest Books in The World) were displayed in a tent at the Miami Book Fair.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Sister, Sister: Former first daughters Barbara (green dress) and Jenna Bush (red dress) speak about their new book Sisters First: Stories from Our Wild and Wonderful Life at the Chapman Conference Center at Wolfson Campus on Nov. 16. The book is a behind the scenes look at their lives as first daughters.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

The Fruit Bar: Willy Garcia (right) and Nuvix Guerrero (left) pose in front of the Greenbar Smoothies stand on Nov. 17 in downtown Miami.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Poetic Possibilities: Poet Chen Chen reads from his book When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities at the Olympia Theater in downtown Miami on Nov. 15. www.mdcthereporter.com

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Porch Of Poems: Poet Roojerry Dangervil recites a poem while the band Elements performs at The Porch at the Miami Book Fair on Nov. 17. @mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter


10 SPORTS | NOVEMBER 28, 2017

THE REPORTER

Women's Basketball

Forward Savannah Clark Is A ‘Quiet Beast’ On The Court ‰‰ Forward Savannah Clark is providing quiet leadership for the Lady Sharks this season while being the team’s leading scoring. Clark is averaging 18.4 points per game for the Lady Sharks who are off to a 4-4 start. By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net Savannah Clark has been a quiet storm this season for the Lady Sharks. The soft-spoken sophomore is leading the team in scoring, averaging 18.4 points and grabbing six rebounds per game. Clark has scored in double figures in five games this year, including a 33 point game versus Hillsborough Community College. “Savannah is quiet and focuses on getting it done in the classroom and on the court,” Lady Sharks head basketball coach Susan Summons said. “She is a little more vocal off the court this year because she wants to be a better leader for the team.” Clark is originally from Maywood, Illinois where she attended Proviso East High School. The 6-foot-tall forward played varsity basketball all four years there, averaging 8.7 ppg and 3.5 rpg in 98 games. As a child, Clark never ventured into any sports. Instead, her mother placed her in dance with her older sister, Sarah Clark. Clark couldn’t recall the style of

dance she participated in, but she remembers all the decorative costumes from recitals. Clark started playing basketball after making the team in the sixth grade. Why she tried out is ironic. “My older sister was trying out for the basketball team and I was trying to be like her so I tried out too,” Clark said. “I ended up making the team and she didn’t.” From the beginning of her basketball career, Clark had a natural feel for the game, so she began to hone her skills. “We recruited Savannah Clark out of Chicago from a dear, dear friend and spiritual brother, Hank Hicks, a high school coach at national powerhouse Whitney Young Magnet High School,” Summons said. “I watched video footage and saw the tremendous potential and knew she would be a good fit in our system. I knew we could help take her to the next level.” Although Clark is seen as timid by most of her teammates, they also see the dominance she displays when she plays basketball. “On the court she’s a quiet beast. You don’t know what she’s doing until she does it,” sophomore forward Cheal Rael-Whitsitt said. “She’s quick, not just fast. There is a difference.” Clark and Cheah Rael-Whitsitt, who are roommates, form a formidable duo. Rael-Whitsitt is averaging 13.1 ppg and 8.4 rpg. Besides basketball, Clark isn’t interested in many other pastimes

“ 

Savannah is quiet and focuses on getting it done in the classroom and on the court. She is a little more vocal off the court this year because she wants to be a better leader for the team.

Susan Summons, Lady Sharks head basketball coach

apart from hanging out with her teammates. Off the court she is a homebody who prefers to stay in and sleep or watch movies with her teammates. After finishing her career at Miami Dade College, Clark hopes to continue playing basketball at a Division I school and earning her degree. She is currently majoring in criminal justice and wants to eventually work her way up to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, working in the Special Victims Unit. “I want to go DI and see where that leads me, either the WNBA or overseas,” Clark said. “But if not I’ll pursue my dreams of becoming a detective.” The Lady Sharks’ next game will be on the road versus Eastern Florida State College on Dec. 1 at 4 p.m.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Quiet Storm: Sophomore forward Savannah Clark is averaging 18.4 points and six rebounds per game for the Lady Sharks this season

Men's Basketball

Shooting Guard Hill Provides Offensive Fire Power And Leadership For Sharks

“ 

I don’t see him just being a regular guy, I see him being the supervisor or the boss.

‰‰ Guard Elijah Hill is a team leader both on and off the court this season for the Miami Dade College men’s basketball team who are 6-3. He is averaging 17.3 points and 3.6 rebounds for the Sharks. By Anthony Fernandez anthony.fernandez027@mymdc.net Sophomore shooting guard Elijah Hill is a natural-born leader and the lionhearted team captain of the Miami Dade College men’s basketball team. Despite his passion for the game, Hill’s love for basketball came by chance. Hill, who became the only collegiate athlete in his family, made academics a top priority as a child. “My mom is big on education, so I was into books and school but it was pretty nice and I enjoyed it,” Hill said. The Alabama native’s journey on the hardwood began during his last few years of high school when his friend’s travel team needed an extra player. Hill thought it would be a one-time appearance, but he soon realized it was something he should invest his time into. The rest is history. Attending Woodlawn High School in Birmingham, Alabama, Hill was named Birmingham’s Most Outstanding Player during his senior year, warding off the

Ward Griffith, Sharks assistant coach

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Sophomore Stud: Sophomore shooting guard Elijah Hill is averaging 17.3 points and 3.6 rebounds for the Sharks this season.

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football-heavy stereotype Alabama has. The accolade was one of many feats that drew the interest of the Sharks’ coaching staff, especially assistant coach Ward Griffith. “[Elijah’s AAU coach] contacted me and gave me a list of players,” Griffith said. “The only one that stood out to me was Elijah.” Griffith received interest from Division I schools before signing with Miami Dade College, but the 6-foot-2-inch guard knew he had to take the junior college route. His family lived in Miami before he was born, so he decided to give it a shot by himself. As a freshman, Hill scored a career-high 33 points against Palm Beach State. But he sees room for improvement after averaging 12.3 points, 3.7 rebounds and 0.8 assists per game last year. He made that a focal point this offseason.

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The hard work paid off. Hill is second on the team in scoring this year with a 17.3 average and also contributes 3.6 rebounds and 1.1 assists per game. “When the team has bad energy, he picks it up and gives us a spark,” said freshman guard/forward William Jarrell Jr. Sharks’ head coach Kevin Ledoux describes Hill as a competitive player who is well-liked by his teammates and is an extension of the coaching staff. He said Hill welcomes in new recruits with his personable character while showing them the ins and outs of Miami Dade College basketball. Outside of basketball, Hill is a criminal justice and sociology major who enjoys the South Beach lifestyle and reading in his spare time. He hopes to pursue a career as a criminal profiler after his basketball career is done. Until then, Hill would like to graduate with his associate’s degree and play Division I basketball at Florida International University or Florida Atlantic University. “I don’t see him just being a regular guy, I see him being the supervisor or the boss,” Griffith said. The Sharks’ next game will be at home versus South Georgia Technical College at the Theodore R. Gibson Health Center, 11011 S.W. 104 St.,on Dec. 1 at 8 p.m.

MDC The Reporter


NOVEMBER 28, 2017 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

11

// SPORTS Giovanni Del Fa, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net

Lady Sharks Dominate Tournament—Win Back-To-Back National Titles FROM CHAMPIONS, FRONT

the team got off to a rocky start, going 6-4 in their first 10 games. They also had 12 games canceled for a variety of reasons including Hurricane Matthew, a bomb threat on campus and a Hillary Clinton speech. “They wanted it so bad. Last year we won but we went through a lot and this year was a lot easier for us,” Benoit said. “Especially the sophomores, they wanted to finish high with a national championship trophy.” Teamwork won the Lady Sharks a second national title, but the team also had some superb individual performances. Outside hitter Massiel Matos finished second in the NJCAA in serving aces per set with an average of 0.63. Matos also led the Lady Sharks in kills (368) and kills per set (3.68). Libero Thais De Castro Andrade did the dirty work for the Lady Sharks. She led the team in digs (455) and digs per set (4.89). Other notable performers were outside hitter Sun Wenting who led the team in hitting percentage (.343); middle blocker Paula Barbosa Louro who averaged 1.17 blocks per set and Tiziana Baumrukova who led the team with

“ 

The girls did well, they never gave up. The pressure was on us and we were able to handle it.

Origenes "Kiko" Benoit, Lady Sharks volleyball head coach

10.36 assists per set. “I feel that every effort we made is worth it,” Louro said. “I gave everything that I had so I’m proud of myself. Actually not just me but the whole team.” Several players racked up accolades with their performance during the tournament: Camila Hernandez, Wenting and Matos were named to the 2017 NJCAA Volleyball National All-Tournament team. Matos was named the NJCAA Volleyball National Tournament Most Valuable Player for the second year in a row. Benoit was named the Coach Of The Tournament. “The feeling of winning the national championship back-toback is amazing,” Andrade said. “This team has a unique bond. We deserve this title.”

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

National Champions: The Lady Sharks defeated the College of Southern Idaho 3-0 in Hutchinson, Kansas on Nov. 18 to win back-to-back national volleyball championships.

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

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12 A&E | NOVEMBER 28, 2017

THE REPORTER

Oscars

Blockbusters Make A Case For Best Picture ‰‰ With major genre films like Wonder Woman and Get Out making waves with critics and audiences, 2017 seems like the year the Oscars will recognize these massive projects. By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net In a year of unprecedented change, the 2017 Oscar race might be next on the list. While the Academy Awards have traditionally been dominated by art films produced and distributed by smaller studios, 2017 has given room to a number of blockbusters to launch competitive Oscar campaigns including Dunkirk, Wonder Woman and Get Out. These include re-releasing films to freshen voters’ minds, hosting question-and-answer screenings with filmmakers and actors and sending out For Your Consideration DVDs to voters—all in hopes of bolstering the chances of their blockbuster film’s nomination. Warner Bros. is in an especially enviable position. Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan’s critically-lauded World War II epic, has long been considered a frontrunner for Best Picture since its release. Consistently dubbed as Nolan’s

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES

Big and Bold: While it's rare to see a major blockbuster nominated for Best Picture, 2017 seems like the year where Oscar voters might change their minds. best film, the film earned major praise for its story structure, direction, acting and Hans Zimmer’s intense score. The film also grossed an impressive $525 million against a $100 million budget, giving Warner Bros. a leading contender in the Oscar race outside of technical categories (editing, art direction, special effects, etc.). The studio also holds the title

of releasing the highest-rated superhero film on Rotten Tomatoes, Wonder Woman. The film, starring Gal Gadot (Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Furious 7) as the Amazonian princess, became the studio’s first critical and commercial success for its DC film universe with critics commending its direction, script and message of female empowerment.

Warner Bros. has capitalized on this, making major pushes for Gadot and director Patty Jenkins (Monster) in their respective categories, including a Best Picture campaign. Other studios haven’t fallen behind. Universal has begun to push Get Out, Jordan Peele’s directorial debut for Best Picture.

While the film was released in late February, a rather ignored section of the year by Academy voters, the film’s cultural resonance and its addressing of social issues has made it linger among the Hollywood sphere. Walt Disney Studios has also begun an extensive campaign for Beauty and the Beast, its liveaction reimagining of the fairytale epic directed by Bill Condon (Dreamgirls, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Parts 1 and 2), with For Your Consideration advertisements appearing on entertainment websites. The studios are hoping to take advantage of 2009 and 2011 rule changes in the Best Picture category, which allowed between five and ten films to be nominated for the award. This was changed to allow films that made ground in technical categories to be more competitive in the Best Picture race, something evidenced in the nominations of Inception and Gravity. While the blockbusters still have to contend with award favorites like Call Me By Your Name and The Florida Project, 2017 has given rise to the possibility that a blockbuster film can compete with an art one, something that will be tested when Oscar nominations are announced on Jan.23.

Hero

Anime Subverts Comic Book Tropes ‰‰ As My Hero Academia enters its second season, fans can expect more twists on established cliches to their favorite superhero story.

By Juan Requena juan.requena001@mymdc.net With the recent releases of Thor Ragnarok and Justice League, it seems that American superhero films are a cultural staple that are here to stay. So, when a country like Japan puts their own spin on an American trend, it is more than just another superhero film. Take My Hero Academia, for example. Published weekly in Shonen Jump since 2014, My Hero Academia is set in a world where humans encounter another step toward evolution, thus creating a new breed of superhumans. Unlike other japanese animes, My Hero Academia offers a much more realized world. Instead of a generic modern Tokyo, the city is constantly expanding throughout each episode. The characters evolve past the basic expectations of a comic book hero. It becomes clear that these character’s face complex decisions. Their values become blurred; a plot point that has not been explored by American super heroes. In both the DC and Marvel universes, being a superhero means to be good. In My Hero Academia, being a hero does not come with a moral compass—instead, it comes with state of the art perks and notoriety. This is what would happen in

PHOTO COURTESY OF FUNIMATION

Holding Out For a Hero: My Hero Academia offers anime and comic book fans a change of pace by not heavily relying on cliches to tell its story. reality: aiming for a profession for the sake of financial gain. While there are few characters, such as All Might (the anime’s version of Superman), who has shown the true qualities of a hero, by showing concern for the safety and prevalence of the world. Aside from that, there is a huge moral gray area, which makes

this anime a breath of fresh air for comic fans. Of course, it being an anime, it may be too goofy for some. It is not entirely serious like a traditional Batman story and not radically zany like a Deadpool comic. But among the silliness there are moments with a realistic and hard approach.

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Taking on a massively popular genre from the west is no easy task. My Hero Academia subverts any clichés that come with big comic book adaptations and adds a lighthearted, yet realistic, approach to its execution. It doesn’t concern itself with bright characters who save the world because it’s the right thing to do, but super

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powered beings who do it out of convenience. This anime is well worth checking out and will keep any comic or anime fan invested from beginning to end. It’s deserving of the title “The Eastern Marvel.” Fans can check it out on the anime streaming service Crunchyroll.

MDC The Reporter


NOVEMBER 28, 2017 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

// A&E Ciro Salcedo, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

Tacos

Tacology Brings Tex-Mex To Brickell ‰‰ Located at 701 S Miami Ave, on the top floor of Brickell City Center, Tacology brings an urban style twist on a favorite dish.

By Nicole Pineda nicole.pineda002@mymdc.net With the popularity of Tex-Mex style at places such as Chipotle, Moe’s or Cantina Grill on the rise, it seems appropriate that another restaurant would want to throw their hat into the beef and cheese ring. Tacology is a Mexican-style market with an urban twist. The menus consist of the standard Mexican food fare, like tacos, ceviche, tostada, nachos and much more. Located at 701 S Miami Ave, on the top floor of Brickell City Center, Tacology offers both indoor and outdoor dining options. Videos from concerts and performances by various singers are projected on one of the walls while the music is blasting throughout the restaurant. The space is decorated with mismatched furniture, dangling lanterns and tables with different patterns on them, providing the modern hipster feel that most establishments fall short on. Waiters are present to refill drinks for customers' convenience, but they aren’t needed to take orders. Each entourage gets

their own tablet that doubles as a menu and an easy way to order food, so the power is in the customer's hands. Using the tablet to order is a lot more convenient than conventional ordering, especially when dinner rush hits. To start off the table, we got an order of the Guacamole & Quinoa, which consisted of Mexican avocados mashed with quinoa, cilantro, tomato and roasted corn. That was a personal favorite of mine; I had never had quinoa, but it was delicious when it was mixed in with the guacamole. One of the two specialty menu items offered were the Mexican Nachos. The dish abandons the classic nacho look and takes on a new angle with nachos garnished with corn tortilla chips, melted Mexican cheese blend, black beans, roasted corn, avocado slices, shrimp and chipotle crema. Though the look is visually appealing and refreshing, the nachos has the same taste as any other nacho platter you can find in Miami. For my main course I had the Ceviche Tasting. The dish had three small samples of ceviche served at the restaurant—octopus, red snapper and shrimp. The octopus ceviche was mixed with pico de gallo, citrus and cilantro, all joined to create a dish

LOONI INGRAN / THE REPORTER

Taco Tuesday: Tacology is a modern and urban alternative to traditional tex-mex establishments, complete with a full bar. that blended well and was not spicy. The shrimp ceviche incorporated heirloom tomatoes, sangritalime marinated, avocado puree, fresh horseradish and cilantro. Usually, shrimp is my favorite type of seafood but I was slightly disappointed because it mostly tasted like marinara sauce with a spicy

kick to it. The final sample on the platter was the snapper fish ceviche, which paired red snapper, quinoabulgur, aji amarillo marinated, red onion and cilantro. This was definitely too spicy for my taste buds, but those who can stand a little heat would like this tangy dish.

Though we did not order dessert, Tacology offers a range of different options varying from classic hispanic sweets like flan and rice pudding, to more american treats, like carrot cake and ice cream cookie samplers. Tacology might be the next destination for your Taco Tuesdays.

Local Music

Calm Bomb Sets Off Sparks On Debut EP ‰‰ Combining sounds of heavy metal, punk, alternative and progressive rock, South Florida indie group Calm Bomb’s debut, I Am The God I Fear, is an exciting start to a local band’s career. By Martina Brady martina.brady001@mymdc.net The independent progressive scene is a tough one to categorize, considering it is such a niche genre. Thankfully, one of the few bands to fit the description is actually pretty good. Calm Bomb, a South Florida based band consisting of members Paul Petrac, Nathaniel Spiner and Mitchell Parke, released their first EP I Am The God I Fear on Nov. 9. With themes of nihilism, death, the infamous Fyre Festival and drug use, Calm Bomb is trying hard to make a grand first impression. The EP begins with A Loss For Words, a short melodic intro consisting of intricate arpeggios. The second track, In My Way, is a power rock anthem, clearly defining the band’s musical direction. Quiet and understated vocals grow into belting, with an electrically charged and emotional chorus. The song’s changing dynamics offer some diversity and is something that will keep listeners hooked. Kicking Rocks begins with a shuffling drum beat and a catchy, repetitive guitar riff. www.mdcthereporter.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF CALM BOMB

Loud and Proud: With the sounds and influences of punk, metal and progressive rock, Calm Bomb's debut makes a strong case for the South Florida group. mdc.thereporter

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Having worked at rapper Ja Rule’s infamous Fyre Festival in April of this year, the band’s experience undoubtedly influenced this song. Written from the perspective of a disappointed festival-goer, it states, “it wasn’t what we thought it was/what you promised us/ on the island that you turned to dust.” The unexpectedly sad and pop-culture relevant subject matter makes the song a standout on the EP. Here To Stay has heavy metal influences, featuring intense, head-banging solos. The heaviest song on the album, its distorted power chords in the beginning contrast with interludes of softer guitar arpeggios. Raw, angry vocals sing a story of heartbreak and distance from loved ones. Tomorrow is an optimistic song about overcoming challenges and was released as a single earlier this year. It has a much softer sound, with thoughtful and introspective lyrics and atmospheric guitar. I Am The God I Fear is a strong debut from Calm Bomb. The introspective lyrics, original song content and skillful instrumentation make this EP worth a listen for rock music fans. However, their sound easily melds into similar indie and punk groups of the local scene. Overall, while off to a steady start, Calm Bomb needs to step it up next time to differentiate themselves from other South Florida rock bands.


14 FORUM | NOVEMBER 28, 2017 Homeless

THE REPORTER

Not Your Usual Lunch Date

‰‰ Justin Marcano writes about what he learned when he had lunch with someone that most people would rather shy away from—a homeless man in his 50s with HIV asking for money.

By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net He was a man in his late 50s; his face bared black and white stubble and his tall, wiry frame was draped in old clothing. His name was Tyrone but he told me, “people call me World.” It never dawned on me to ask him why he received that nickname; I’d soon find out that I would leave with many unanswered questions. I first met World in front of Miami Dade College’s Wolfson Campus when he approached me and asked what my major was.

When I explained that I was double majoring in international relations and journalism, his eyes widened and he whistled as though he ate a hot pepper. “That’s something deep” he said. I sensed that he was dreading his next question. He asked for money, but I knew that I could do more than just handing him a dollar and moving on with my day. I looked over his shoulder to the McDonald’s across the street and decided to invite him to lunch. He went to the restroom after we ordered. I sat down with our food and waited patiently for him to return. He returned with a subdued grin that quickly turned to a smile as he noticed me. As he sat down, I asked him if everything was alright. He let out a long sigh and looked down as if he was looking for the words to say on the floor. “I’m dying. There is no other way to put it,” World said. “I have HIV. I just spent the last 10 minutes coughing up blood.” But it didn’t phase him and he continued to speak as though nothing had occurred. I, being hungry, began to eat my food rather quickly. He smiled at me and chuckled. “Where [are] you trying to head off to so quickly?” he asked. I replied by saying nowhere. “So then eat calmly,” he answered. He spoke next of prison, or how he called it “the cage”. He spent 13 years inside “the cage” and

Politics

By Hannah Loop hannah.loop001@mymdc.net Cases of partisan gerrymandering—the practice of redrawing legislative and congressional districts to sway elections in favor of an incumbent party —can be traced back to the early 1700s, when counties surrounding Philadelphia refused to revise jurisdiction lines that would account for its growing population. Today, the United States is still grappling with the political repercussions of partisan gerrymanders and the problem is only getting worse. This is partially due to the lack of oversight by the judicial branch, which is notoriously sheepish toward cases involving gerrymanders. In Vieth v. Jubelirer in 2004, the Supreme Court concluded that political gerrymandering was not justiciable because “discernible and manageable standards” had not been developed to identify extreme cases of partisanship. But Justice Anthony Kennedy, whose vote determined the Court’s result, challenged the lower courts to find a workable test. Now, statisticians are helping the lower courts devise that. Around this time last year, in Whitford v. Gill, a three-judge panel in Western Wisconsin’s District Court outlined a method for evaluating claims of

that’s where he got his nickname. I didn’t ask how he got in there, but he spoke of how poorly he and others were treated and how tragic the situation of prisons and law enforcement continues to be. We then began our goodbyes. He told me he was heading to Boca Raton to try and receive treatment.

“There’s nothing left for me here,” he said. I gave him money for his trip and watched as he walked away. Although I was left with unanswered questions and unsaid words, I left learning the life and story of someone most people wouldn’t usually sit down and have lunch with.

Adoption

The Supreme Court And Gerrymandering—Is AI The Solution? ‰‰ Hannah Loop writes about partisan gerrymandering, where legislative and congressional district lines are redrawn in favor of an incumbent party, before the Supreme Court decides to protect or outlaw the act in 2018.

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partisan gerrymandering. This method, known as the efficiency gap, proved that the state’s republican legislature used redistricting to lock the democrats out of power. The panel ordered Wisconsin to redraw its district maps by November 2017. But the state appealed the panel’s decision to the Supreme Court, which held oral arguments in October. A ruling is expected in June 2018 before the Court’s summer recess begins. The Supreme Court must make a choice: should it proclaim an equal protection rule to combat partisan gerrymandering, or rid itself of this political hotbed? Furthermore, if gerrymandering is deemed unconstitutional, how will the states generate district lines that are impartial, transparent and, most importantly, fair? As statistical software and demographic accuracy becomes more precise, and with the 2018 midterm elections and 2020 census looming, the result of Whitford v. Gill could easily determine American politics for the next century. With so much at stake, the real question we should be asking ourselves is why are politicians still mapping districts in the first place? Surely, we’re capable of developing nonpartisan algorithms to draw district lines after each census— this is the 21 century, after all. The problem is that algorithms cannot decide the criteria for creating districts on their own. Humans must feed algorithms parameters, making them susceptible to political ambition. If the Supreme Court can agree upon quantifiable criteria for what constitutes fair districts, apolitical algorithms may become the automated solution to partisan gerrymandering this country so desperately needs. Ultimately, the ruling of Whitford v. Gill will show us whether the Court Justices have the intelligence to define such criteria and apply it effectively through Artificial Intelligence or other nonbiased remedies.

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I’m Not Related To My Family By Blood And That’s Okay ‰‰ Jasmine Machado was born in Russia and adopted by a Cuban family. She writes about how she learned about adoption as a child and the taboos associated with living with a family that most people think she’s not related to.

By Jasmine Machado jasmine.machado001@mymdc.net I was born on June 8, 1999 in Magnitogorsk, Russia. I was adopted on May 26, 2000 by a Cuban couple. Before my adoption, I used to live in an orphanage in a small town near the Ural Mountains. Though not related by blood, I have spent most of my life surrounded by these people. I never questioned whether they were my family or not; I simply was. When my parents decided to adopt, they contacted an agency that facilitated adoptions from other countries. By sheer chance, I was the first child the saw. After being enamored with me, they spent the next 10 months toiling to finalize the adoption.

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I always knew I was adopted. It was never a secret kept from me. When I was a child on my way to school, I asked my mom if I was ever “in her belly.” It didn’t take her long to explain that I was not “in her belly,” but I was “in another woman’s belly.” That woman couldn’t take care of me, so she decided to care for me. Even as a child, I understood what she meant, even though she never used the word ‘adoption’ or the word ‘abandoned.’ To me, being adopted doesn’t mean being abandoned or lost. I may not look like my mom or my dad. I may do things differently than the rest of the family, but they have never told me that they were not my family. A lot of people have asked me about my “real” parents. Let’s get this straight, my mom and dad are my real parents. They took care of me, bathed me and nurtured me. I’m not going to degrade their parental status just because of some stupid DNA test. My “biological” parents, however, are a different story. I don’t know a lot about them. I know that my biological mom was young and couldn’t take care of me, so she decided to give me up for adoption before I was born. My biological dad was never in the picture. That’s okay. I’m not upset about it and I don’t hate them for it. My mom always told me that it wasn’t easy for my biological mom to give me up and to not be mad at her for it. I love being adopted. I love hearing the story of how my parents had to go through all this stuff just to get me. I’m not ashamed that I’m not blood related to my family. The bonds of love are much stronger than that.

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Cryptocurrency

Bitcoins—What Are They And Why Are They So Important? ‰‰ Luis Camargo-Carlos explains what and how to use bitcoins, a noncentralized cryptocurrency using encryptions to protect transactions. Even though there are still many obstacles to overcome, Camargo-Carlos still believes bitcoins can be the currency of the future.

By Luis Camargo-Carlos luis.camargo001@mymdc.net We all hear about bitcoins and how they will be the next “big thing.” Well, it seems like they will be. Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency, a type of currency that uses encryption to ensure the security of all transactions. Because of these encryptions, many prefer to use bitcoins instead of other forms of payment. As bitcoins become more commonplace, it is important to understand exactly what they are, so we can know how to use them properly and possibly use it as a form of investment. So, what exactly are bitcoins?

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The cryptocurrency was created in 2009 by an anonymous individual who went by “Satoshi Nakamoto.” Bitcoins are not centralized. There is no government or central group that controls the value or distribution of bitcoins. To obtain bitcoins, you do not need to share any of your information. There are no transaction fees. To get bitcoins, there are two options. First, you could buy them on an exchange website. The value of bitcoins varies greatly from day to day, sometimes experiencing

drastic changes in just a couple of hours. At the time of writing this article, one bitcoin is equal to $7,599.99, which is relatively high for this past month. The other way to get bitcoins is through a process called mining, where a person renders a service to the bitcoin network. In exchange for the valuable service, such as network maintenance and transaction processing, miners may receive transaction fees from customers who want to speed up a certain transaction or from solving

complex mathematical problems associated with the transactions. Usually, for each problem solved, a miner may receive up to 25 bitcoins. Most miners have specialized softwares that can process the type of transactions that come with bitcoins. There is a limited supply to bitcoins. There has been a cap set on the number of bitcoins to be produced, which is estimated to be 21 million. Every year, the number of bitcoins produced is cut in half. But, after the production ends, transaction fees will be implemented to motivate miners to continue working. So, bitcoins are sure to continue to be an important currency in the future. Currently, bitcoins aren’t a dominant currency in any nation. However, it could be used as an investment opportunity. Bitcoins are much like stocks except that the value of bitcoins depend less on governments and economies, but rather on the common people. Because of this, the value of bitcoins is much more volatile than stocks. However, with careful planning and a watchful eye, investment in bitcoins could be very lucrative. Bitcoins are certainly becoming more common and they might soon be our main form of currency. Even though there are still many challenges to deal with like quantum computers, a computer that stores information by using the quantum state of subatomic particles. But one thing is for certain, bitcoins are here to stay.

Feminism

If A Man Can Do It, Why Can’t A Woman? ‰‰ Claudia Hernandez explains her definition and stance on feminism. She also explains why the movement is drastically needed and why it should be exercised in today’s society.

By Claudia Hernandez claudia.hernandez047@mymdc.net Centuries ago, women were denigrated because of the belief that they were inferior to men and because of this unequal treatment, it was illicit to even think about saying the word feminism. Today, this term is thought of as strong and powerful. Women are no longer afraid to stand up for their rights and represent what modern feminism truly is— an ongoing movement urging for

change and striving for equality of women in society. E v e n t h o u g h people are b e c o m ing more aware about inequality, it doesn’t mean that inequality has been solved. Men are still catcalling women, femicide cases (when a man kills a woman because of her gender) are reported monthly and phrases like “runs like a girl,” “choose a career where you can be successful as a woman” and “what did she expect when dressed like that?” are still used in

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day-to-day conversations. So why is the word modern being added to the term ‘feminism?’

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Because not only do people believe in this topic, but big companies and celebrities are finally bringing this issue to the spotlight. For instance, the makeup company CoverGirl launched a campaign in 2014 called the #GirlsCan movement where they involved big artists like Ellen DeGeneres, Sofía Vergara, Katy Perry and Queen Latifah to promote it in their commercials. Plus, they donated five million dollars to nonprofit organizations that help women achieve their dreams and advance professionally in male dominated fields. Also, the battle of inequality has changed since its rise in the 1800s. Now, we are fighting sexual abuse issues that women have been fighting against and suffering from in silence by calling out and shaming their powerful abusers. We should all be part of this because together we can make a positive change. After all, it is something that can affect you or your loved ones. So, now let me ask you: do you consider yourself a feminist? Because, at the end of the day, we are all humans. If a man can do it, why can’t a woman? MDC The Reporter

The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

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