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My Friend Dahmer

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Hidden Pain

The Reporter’s Ciro Salcedo said moviegoers should not miss My Friend Dahmer, a biopic about serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer.

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Arseniy Andreev, a 6-foot freshman from Russia, is making a name for himself as the starting point guard for the Miami Dade College men’s basketball team.

A&E

NEWS

MDC Live Arts is offering free tickets to Miami Dade College students for their 2017-2018 season, which concentrates on Muslim culture.

Russian Shark SPORTS

Free Tickets

Claudia Hernandez shares her experience living with fibromyalgia, an illness that affects the muscles and soft tissue but has few visible symptoms.

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Alexa

Feeling Lost On Campus? Now You Can Ask Alexa ‰‰ School for Advanced Studies senior Andres Gutierrez teamed up with Network and Media Services to tech up West Campus with Amazon’s Echo Dot: West Version. By Alessandra Pacheco alessandr.pacheco001@mymdc.net

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Books

Crime

It’s Time To Get Lit(erature) At Miami Book Fair ‰‰ The 34th Annual Miami Book Fair will start on Nov. 12 and run through Nov. 19 in downtown Miami. The book bonanza will offer guests the chance to explore books, listen to music and speakers, and watch performances and exhibits. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net Downtown Miami will once again be the destination for the highly-esteemed 34th annual Miami Book Fair. The book bonanza will run from Nov. 12 through 19, hosting hundreds of nationally and internationally renowned authors and speakers. “The most important thing to me about The Book Fair is that it is a kind of cultural event in South Florida that is very open and welcoming of all people,” said Lissette Mendez, director of programs for the MBF. “The spirit of the Book Fair is one of openness and inclusiveness so that we can bring as many people together as possible.” Among the slate of writers, journalists and poets scheduled to appear at the festival: former Vice President Joe Biden, author and 2014 Presidential Medal of Freedom winner Isabel Allende and Miami-raised

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Barack Obama inauguration poet Richard Blanco. Biden will be speaking about his memoir Promise Me, Dad: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose, on Nov. 18. at 7 p.m. at the Adrienne Arscht Center for the Performing Arts. Tickets will cost $40 and will include a copy of his book. The lecture will cover the big political moments of his career, life-altering choices and traits that he has developed to help him persevere through challenges, including the loss of his son, Beau. On Nov. 15 at 8 p.m., former Democratic National Convention Chair Donna Brazile will speak about her book Hacked: The Inside Story of the Break-ins and Breakdowns That Put Donald Trump in the White House which offers an in-depth look into the DNC during the 2016 election. The event will be held at the Chapman Conference Center in Room 3210 at Wolfson Campus , 300 N.E. Second Ave. Former First Daughters Barbara and Jenna Bush will also be speaking about their new book Sisters First: Stories from Our Wild and Wonderful Life, which takes readers TURN TO BOOKS PAGE 6

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NEWS

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SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Andres Gutierrez stands in the main rotunda at West Campus, hovering over a black plastic-top desk where an Amazon Echo Dot sits next to a sign that reads: Alexa, ask West. “Alexa, ask West where Testing is,” Gutierrez asks the most recent addition to Amazon’s voice recognition controlled interactive service. And Alexa comes to life. “Testing is in Room 2110, which is down the hall on your right, passed the Admissions Center,” Alexa responds. The new technology was developed and programmed by Gutierrez, 18, in partnership with West Campus Network and Media Services, to make the campus easier to navigate and more accessible for new students. “One of the influences for me to be involved in this project was what I felt when I first started at West Campus,” said Gutierrez, a School for Advanced Studies senior. “It took me a long time to get around. I was always lost.” That’s where Alexa comes in. Programed in Node.js, a version of the programming software JavaScript, Alexa’s knowledge of West Campus ranges from events, locations, department hours of operation and

general information about the campus and its administration. The project was originally approved by former West Campus President Roger Ramsammy last school year. Gutierrez, a computer science major, first started the project in February 2017 while doing an internship with West Campus Network and Media Services. The department’s manager, Pedro Santos, wanted to create technology that helps the student body. The duo brainstormed various ideas before they settled on reprogramming an Alexa Echo Dot. “I would call Andres at night and in the summer just to talk about the Alexa,” Santos said. “That’s how passionate we were about this project.” Gutierrez got to personalize a regular off-the-shelf Alexa by instilling it with a skill, a program designed to know information and have pre-programmed answers through lines of coding. “Because of Andres, the program was built,” Santos said. “He’s very hands-on. If you give him a problem, he works tirelessly to solve it.” The hardwork has paid off; response to the gadget has been positive. A live demo was done to launch the Alexa during the Coffee With the President event, where the campus president and faculty meet students over coffee and some light food. They also presented it to the chief innovation officer for MDC, Damian Thorman, when he visited West Campus. To interact with Alexa, all campus visitors have to say is: “Alexa, ask West...,” followed by their question.

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4-8

Two Students Assaulted At Kendall Campus ‰‰ On Oct. 21 and Oct. 26, a man assaulted two female students near the 8000 building. He kissed both of them— one on the hand and the other on the forehead—before fleeing the scene.

By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net Police are looking for a man who assaulted two female students by inappropriately kissing them at Kendall Campus. One of the victims was a 15-year-old dual-enrollment student. The assaults occurred on Oct. 21 and Oct. 26; none of the students were injured during the incidents. According to Kendall Campus public safety officials, the man is described as a 6-foot tall black male with a goatee. He was wearing a neon yellow traffic vest and yellow shirt. “Everybody has been on the lookout for him,” said Kendall Campus Public Safety Chief Richard Spotts. “If we come across him, we’ll notify the police.” A similar incident happened on Oct. 10 at Wolfson Campus. It’s unclear if that incident

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A&E

is connected to the other assaults, but officials said the subject fits the same description as the Kendall Campus perpetrator. According to the Clery Act, “institutions must provide timely warnings in response to crimes that pose a continuous threat to the campus community.” Kendall Campus posted a crime alert warning in the lobby of their public safety office on Oct. 30. Wolfson Campus posted similar notifications on two bulletin boards; one in its student life department and the other in the 3000 building. The alert in the student life department is surrounded by at least 20 other notes ranging from job postings to room for rent notices. In the past, the College has issued alerts via cell phone texts, emails and audio recorded phone calls to warn students about bomb threats and hurricanes. “I will say that simply posting a paper poster in a couple places on campus would not constitute a sufficient warning in the age of smartphones and electronic communication,” said Mike Hiestand, a legal consultant for the Student Press Law Center. TURN TO CRIME PAGE 7

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2 BRIEFING | NOVEMBER 14, 2017

THE REPORTER Eight MDC Students Awarded Coca-Cola Scholarships

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SAS Student Honored By Doral Councilwoman

North Campus To Host Fall University Expo

Natalia Mercado, a senior in the School for Advanced Studies at West Campus, was honored by City of Doral Councilwoman Christi Fraga on Oct. 11. The certificate recognizes Mercado’s leadership and service through academics, extracurricular activities and community service, specifically in organization Educities and project Girls Support Girls. Mercado, 17, decided to take initiative through a project she called Edu-cities when she noticed there were many immigrants who weren’t knowledgeable about the college application Mercado process. She teamed up with her sister and other volunteers to provide workshops and free SAT and ACT tutoring for people who could not afford it. In addition to this, she traveled to Bolivia in order to teach English to orphans and donated clothing and educational materials to an orphanage. Mercado called the project Girls Support Girls to bring awareness to the importance of female education. Though Mercado aspires to become a veterinarian, she was inspired by Malala Yousafzai, the youngest Nobel Prize winner and female education activist, to step out of her comfort zone and serve the community by focusing on education.

North Campus’ Advisement and Career Services will be hosting a Fall University Expo on Nov. 15 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the building 3000 breezeway. The expo will introduce Miami Dade College students to universities and institutions from Florida and give them the opportunity to meet with university advisors and recruiters who can provide answers to all of their questions. Institutions attending the Fall University Expo include Nova Southeastern University, Barry University, Florida International University, St. Thomas University and many others. The event is free and students are encouraged to have their resumes ready to receive the best possible estimate on their transferring options. For more information, contact the advisement and career services at nadvisement@mdc.edu or (305) 237-7700. North Campus is located at 11380 N.W. 27 Ave.

—Gabriela Alvarado

—Melba Silwany

Film Series Seeks Connection In A World Of Division Miami Dade College’s Museum of Art and Design’s Living Together Film Series opened on Sept. 28. The series will present academy-nominated films, festival selections and independent productions until April 2018. The Living Together Film Series accompanies Living Together, a six-month-long series that includes performance art, readings and workshops. “This is about finding places of connection rather than the division that we are seeing today [in our country],” said Rina Gonzalez, chief curator at MDC MOAD. “The artist’s works deal with issues of immigration, segregation and religion.” Because of MDC MOAD’s Museum Without Boundaries, events will be held at different venues across Miami. Miami Dade College students receive free admission to all MDC MOAD events. The next film to be presented is Uncle Gloria: One Helluva Ride! on Nov. 30 at 7 p.m. at the Bill Cosford Cinema, 5030 Brunson Dr., at the University of Miami. —Justin Marcano

New World School of the Arts Celebrates Its 30th Anniversary The New World Dance Ensemble will celebrate New World School of the Art’s 30th anniversary by performing on Nov. 17 and 18 from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the New World Dance Theater, 25 N.E. 2 St., Room 5808. New World School of the Arts dancers will perform works by choreographers such as Paul Taylor, Annabelle Lopez-Ochoa and Jennifer Archibald. The event is open to the public. General admission is $10 and tickets can be purchased at the door or at nwsa.mdc.edu —Mendy Silva

For more information, contact: Mary Lisa Burns T(305) 237-3582 mlburns@mdc.edu

Eight Miami Dade College students have been awarded a $1,000 scholarship from the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society as 2017 Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise PHOTO COURTESY OF THE COCA-COLA SCHOLARS FOUNDATION Scholars. Two students were also awarded top national honors. Seven of the winners were from InterAmerican Campus: Rachel Fernandez, Johnathan Jimenez, Carlos Morales, Luis Ravelo, Osvy Rodriguez, Cesar Sarmiento and Felipe Zwanzger. Luis Ravelo, 20, was one of seven students to receive a Global Leaders of Promise Scholarship. The eighth winner is Victor Garnica, a 26-year-old business major at Hialeah Campus who serves as president for the Beta Pi Theta Chapter there. He was named a Coca-Cola Military Leaders of Promise Scholar and received $1,000. Garnica was also one of only ten students to receive a 2017 Pearson Scholarship for Higher Education. The Pearson scholarship includes $5,000, free textbooks, access codes and a mentor that will guide him throughout his bachelor's degree. The Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise awards $1,000 to up to 200 students and provides new PTK members with financial resources while enrolled in a two-year accredited institution. The application period runs from March to May and selected students are notified in September. “I am honored to be one of ten nationally to win this prestigious award.” Garnica said. “This accomplishment significantly boosts my resume and chances at earning future scholarships and internships.” —Camilla Sposito

United Faculty Of MDC Offering $500 Scholarships The United Faculty of Miami Dade College is offering several $500 scholarships. The total number of scholarships will be determined by the amount of applications received but will not be less than 14. Deadline to apply is Jan. 31. Applications can be accessed at www. ufmdc.org Students must complete at least twelve credit hours by the end of the fall semester, have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and plan on either continuing their studies at MDC or transfer to a four-year institution. Students who meet these requirements must then obtain a letter of recommendation from a MDC professor who is a member of UFMDC. UFMDC is the teachers union for MDC that became the official bargaining agent on behalf of faculty in 1998. For more than a decade, they have been offering scholarships to students. The scholarships were named in remembrance of the founding members and close associates to the union. For more information, please contact the UFMDC by email at union@ mfmdc.org or (305) 279-0021. —Julie O’Hare

Engineer To Speak At Kendall Campus Structural and forensic engineer Jim O’Kon will hold a lecture on Maya culture at the Corn, Cotton, Chocolate event on Nov. 15 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Room K-422 at Kendall Campus, 11011 S.W. 104 St. “This is open to anyone who is interested in Maya culture. Usually, students who major in anthropology, history [and] sociology would benefit from this lecture.” said the chair of social sciences, Lourdes Rassi. O’Kon has professionally studied the ancient Maya and released a book called The Lost Secrets of Maya Technology. The Kendall Campus bookstore will be presenting copies of the speaker’s book during the event. Students who attend the series can apply for a travel scholarship to Maya sites with experts in Maya history and culture. The event is free and open to the public. —Claudia Hernandez

Idea Center Awarding Prizes For Innovative Business Ideas Woodwind Ensemble Concert At North Campus

CRISTIAN LAZZARI / MDC MEDIA RELATIONS

MDC Receives $700,000 From JPMorgan Chase Bank JPMorgan Chase awarded $700,000 to Miami Dade College on Oct. 17 at the college’s board of trustees meeting in an effort to produce more eligible candidates in the information technology, trade and logistic fields. Each year for the next two years, 100 to 150 MDC students ages 16 to 24 will be able to receive fast-track training through the MDC Career Connect initiative because of the donation. “It is critically important for young people to gain the skills needed to have successful careers,” Southeast Communications Director Michael Fusco said. “The information technology, trade and logistic fields are growing and with it, a gap to fill. We are making a large investment to help close that gap and assist students in landing those jobs.”

The North Campus Arts and Philosophy Department will host the Woodwind Ensemble Concert, North Winds, at the Studio Theatre, 11380 N.W. 27th Ave., Room 5116, on Nov. 15 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. The ensemble, directed by North Campus music professor Casey Maltese, will play works by Mozart, Faure, Sousa and others. The woodwind ensemble includes oboes, clarinets, flutes and French horn, that will be played by six North Campus students. For more information, contact the North Campus Arts & Philosophy Department at (305) 237-1450. —Alessandra Pacheco

The Idea Center is awarding MDC Innovation Prizes to students who create innovative business solutions to help solve problems in the community. The deadline to apply is Dec. 15. Both students and recent alumni (within the last five years) are welcome to apply. Categories include climate change, housing, health care, public safety and public transportation. To apply, students need to fill out a form and send a one-minute video submission at //theideacenter.co/solutions/ Four winners will be chosen for the start-up and existing business categories. Existing businesses who win first place will earn $25,000 and a potential $250,000 investment. The second place winners will be awarded $15,000. Two start-up businesses will receive $5,000. Winners will also be able to attend a branding strategy session with an industry expert, be featured in the Idea Center’s newsletter and receive free enrollment to any Idea Center workshop in 2018. Winning solutions must be scalable, replicable and be able to solve similar challenges in other communities. For more information, contact the Idea Center at ideacenter@mdc.edu or at (305) 237-7809.

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Proud Art: Jazmin Welcome (left) and Yaneris Calimano (right) show off the artwork they created at the "Painting With A Twist" event at the Fred Shaw Plaza at Kendall Campus on Nov. 1.

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All-Star: Isairis Rodriguez sings at the Kendall Campus Jam Session event held in front of the KoffeeHouse on Nov. 3.

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Jamming: The Kendall Campus hosted an instrumental jazz concert in the auditorium consisting of seven musicians on Oct. 30. Pictured, left to right, are Christian Romero on the piano, Jorge Fernandez on the red guitar, Robert Valdes on the bass, Sebastian Olaya on the white guitar, Julian Cabrera on the trumpet and Marcel Diaz and Andrew Collado on the saxphone.

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RENZO FRANCEZA / THE REPORTER

Music Man: Matthew Bonelli, the jazz coordinator at Kendall Campus, plays the bass during the campus' jam session/open mic BBQ event held in front of the KoffeeHouse on Nov. 3.

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Under Duress: Pictured, left to right, are Jorge Olivieri, Clarissa Rodriguez and Carlos Ortiz as they act out a scene from Fuddy Meers at Kendall Campus on Nov 3.

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5 OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

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THE REPORTER

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Student Organization

New Kendall Campus Club Makes History ‰‰ History major Angela Rey partnered up with professor Sandra Castillo to create Kendall Campus’ first history club, where students gather to discuss historic figures and landmarks. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net According to history aficionados Angela Rey and professor Sandra Castillo, in 50 years since the Kendall Campus opened, there has never been a history club. It wasn’t until Rey stepped into Castillo’s AMH2020 class that the club started taking shape. They originally intended to start a blog but things quickly snowballed. “I approached Castillo to start our own club and the next thing I know, she hands me paperwork from student life,” Rey said. The club held their first meeting on Oct. 25 Today, Rey, a 19-year-old history major, is president of the Miami Dade College History Club, which has 20 members. Castillo serves as the adviser and fellow history major Cameron James Kalajainen is vice president. The club’s goal is to encourage discussion about history, especially local history. “When people think Miami, they’re not thinking history, just EDM and the beach,”

Rey said. “Nobody thinks of it like New York, Chicago [or] Boston, so it’s nice to have a club to talk about local history.” Rey argues that the city of Miami is so diverse that it includes Latin, European and Southern history. “History is a large subject with strong ties to many others, as such we give our interested peers a place where they can discuss ideas and belong,” Kalajainen said. A typical meeting for the organization includes discussions about historical figures, places and events. But most of the time is spent on planning trips, including one to Fort Jefferson. The fortress located in the Keys is famous for housing the conspirators against Abraham Lincoln during post-Civil War America. “It’s cool because no one considers an event as big as Lincoln’s assassination as something that can be related to Miami’s history,” Castillo said. The club hopes to visit Fort Jefferson in early January and will soon start fundraising for the excursion. On Saturday, Oct. 28, the members visited cemeteries that were affected by Hurricane Irma to pick up branches and debris left by the storm. The club met up at the Miami City Cemetery, the oldest and most exclusive cemetery, where only people who have played significant roles in the community are buried.

JUSTIN MARCANO / THE REPORTER

Making History: Kendall Campus started the campus' first history club in October. The organization is pictured in this photo. Angela Rey (far left) serves as the club's president and professor Sandra Castillo (far right) is the adviser. “It sounds creepy, but it’s really nice when you do it with other people,” Rey said of the clean up. “One portion is segregated with soldiers, catholics and even a Cuban president.” Rey recalled the time a gravestone listed a man as being a native of Florida. Curiosity led them to delve into records and they discovered that the gravesite was wrong, he was actually from Philadelphia, which prompted another discussion for the group.

“What’s important about this club is how it impacts the students more than they think,” Castillo said. “Local history isn’t known, as most of us are kind of sheltered and not everything that’s historical happened a long time ago.” Students interested in joining the club can email Rey at angela.rey001@mymdc.net or attend a meeting. The club meets every Wednesday in Room 6206 at noon.

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West Campus Gets Techy Thanks To SAS Student FROM ALEXA, FRONT

“They’re fascinated,” Gutierrez said. “They’re very curious and try to talk to the Alexa just to hear it reply.” Students aren’t the only ones who are impressed. The project also got Gutierrez recognition from Amazon. They sent him a T-shirt as a gift. The shirt has a technologically deconstructed Amazon Echo Dot on the front and the phrase “Amazon Alexa // Developer” on the back. “I got it in the mail and for someone that isn’t super involved in voice technology, it’s just a cool reward for the work we’ve done,” Gutierrez said. Gutierrez, who hopes to attend Massachusetts Institute of Technology next fall, already has a successor on board to take over the project once he graduates in May. The anxious understudy is Andres Mota, a West Campus Network and Media Services employee who has been with the department since September 2017. “I’m super nervous, but in a good way,” Mota said. “It’s going to be my first professional project and I’m eager to start.” The trio meets on a weekly basis and continues to develop and refine Alexa’s skills. Eventually, they hope to increase the amount of Alexas at West Campus to three and expand the project to other campuses. “The project is definitely still in its infancy,” Gutierrez said. “It’s new technology, but it’s nice we all had a part in it.”

Alexa can be found in the main rotunda on the first floor at Miami Dade College West Campus. For

information on how to get involved, email Pedro Santos at psantosa@ mdc.edu

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Talking Tech: School for Advanced Studies senior Andres Gutierrez programmed an Amazon Echo Dot to help students better navigate the terrain at West Campus.

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Book Bonanza Prepares To Take Over Downtown FROM BOOKS, FRONT

behind the scenes of their lives as first daughters, on Nov. 16 at 6 p.m at the Chapman Conference Center. The official opening of the Book Fair was with Light’s On At The Porch on Nov. 12. The event included music, food trucks, outdoor games, a community coloring wall from The Wynwood Coloring Book, Silent Poetry Disco curated by the Academy of American Poets, outdoor photo exhibits, the Miami Stories Recording Booth and Biscayne Bay Brewing Beers. The Porch, which began in 2015 and is considered one of the hot spots of the Book Fair, will feature a lineup of local performers, including improv, comedy, live music, cabaret, film and art all week long. Another Book Fair staple is the Street Fair, which will take place Nov. 17 through Nov.19, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Participants who purchase a ticket will be able to walk the streets between the Wolfson Campus and see an array of books, including comic books and graphic novels and various other exhibitors. The Fair will also feature the IberoAmerican Program, which will include more than 80 authors from around the world, including Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Spain and more to take part in a series of readings and discussions ranging from the reach and limits of Latin American populism to a tribute in honor of

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez. Tickets for the Book Fair are free

on Nov. 17 and will be $8 the weekend of Nov. 18 and Nov. 19. Guests between the ages of 13 and 18 and

older than 62 pay $5 to enter the Street Fair; children under 12 receive free admission.

The event is free for Miami Dade College students, faculty and staff with a valid ID.

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Book Brigade: The 34th Annual Miami Book Fair will run from Nov. 12 through Nov. 19 in downtown Miami. It will feature hundreds of renowned authors and speakers.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2017 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

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Wolfson Campus Assault Possibly Related To Kendall Campus Incidents FROM CRIME, FRONT

The Oct. 21 incident happened at around 12:35 p.m. in a cement seating area sandwiched between the bookstore and the pool. The man approached a 15-year-old student who was waiting to be picked up by her mom. According to a public safety report, he told the girl that “she was beautiful” before forcibly hugging her multiple times and kissing her on the forehead. He unsuccessfully tried to lure the girl to a more secluded area. Five days later, the man approached another student who was sitting in a seating area between the 6000 and 8000 buildings at 9:45 a.m. The man kissed the girl’s hand, grabbed her shoulders and asked for her phone number. She gave him her Snapchat username, which he accepted before leaving, according to Miami-Dade Police detective Argemis Colome. The Wolfson Campus incident

occurred on Oct. 10 in a practice room on the fourth floor of the 3000 building. A man, who was wearing blue jeans, a red shirt and a Florida International University hat, started a conversation with a student before pulling her toward him and forcibly kissing her, according to the timely warning flier posted in student life. As the student tried to leave, the subject blocked her path and kissed her again. She fled the area after another person entered the room. The incident was reported 20 days later. “If you feel any situation getting weird or uncomfortable you can call 911 or go to a more populated area,” Colome said. Public safety officials can escort students, staff or faculty to their vehicle if they feel unsafe. To contact Kendall Campus public safety department call 305-237-2100; to contact Wolfson Campus public safety department call 305-237-3100.

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Urgent: A crime alert warning hangs on a bulletin board at the Student Life Department at Wolfson Campus informing students about an incident that happened on Oct. 10. In the incident, a man forcibly kissed a female student in a room on the fourth floor of the 3000 building.

MDC Live Arts

Free Performing Arts Tickets Waiting For You ‰‰ For the first time, MDC Live will offer Miami Dade College students free tickets for all their shows during the 2017-18 season. The season began in November and concentrates on Muslim culture.

ticket per show. The free tickets are only available the night of the performance.

Students need to arrive at least 30 minutes prior to the start of the show and provide student

ID. Tickets are available on a first come, first serve basis. MDC Live Arts will also be

By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net MDC Live Arts is offering free admission to Miami Dade College students for their 2017-2018 season. This will be the first time MDC Live Arts is offering free tickets to MDC students; previously, student tickets were available at a discounted rate of $10. “We have always strived to make our shows accessible to students because of our strong belief in the arts as a powerful teaching tool” said Kathryn Garcia, executive director of MDC Live Arts. “Artists inspire, offer new perspectives and challenge the statusquo. Attending a concert, dance or theater performance can be transformative, changing the way you think and feel about a particular topic or culture.” Students can only receive one

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL ARAB ORCHESTRA

Live Arts: The National Arab Orchestra performs during an event at the Detroit Music Hall Center for the Performing Arts. The orchestra will be part of the MDC Live Arts season closing gala on May 12 at the Olympia Theater entitled Layali al-Andaluz: Ojalá/Inshallah.

offering a 15% discount to all MDC employees. Employees must use the code: MDCFAC when purchasing tickets online and they must show a valid employee ID when picking up the tickets at Will Call. The offer is limited to one discounted ticket per employee. This season, entitled: Ojalá/Inshallah: Wishes from the Muslim World, is designed to use the arts to challenge widespread assumptions concerning contemporary Muslim identity and to highlight diversity within Muslim culture. The season opened on Nov. 4 with The Sachal Ensemble: Song of Lahore at The Olympia Theater. MDC Live Arts’ next performance will be Dec. 6 through Dec. 9: Tania El Khoury: Gardens Speak & As Far As My Fingertips Take Me at The Gleason Room at the Fillmore Miami Beach. For more information about obtaining a free student ticket, go to www.mdclivearts.org/about/ student-ticket-policy. And for more information about MDC Live Arts performances during the 2017-2018 season, visit http://mdclivearts. org/

Library

North Campus Library To Remain Closed Until Spring Semester ‰‰ The library at North Campus has been closed for two months following damages caused by Hurricane Irma. It will reopen in the spring after it’s repainted and new carpet and bookcases are installed. By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net The North Campus library will undergo renovations including a fresh coat of paint and new bookcases and carpet after the facility suffered moisture damage and water penetration from Hurricane Irma. It will reopen in the spring semester, but Fermin Vazquez, the director of campus administration at North Campus, could not

provide a specific date. The renovations will include twenty rows of 24-feet-long bookcases that will replace the old bookcases, which have been in use since the campus opened in 1960. The walls will be painted the same color, but the accents will be baby blue to match the blue hue of the new carpet. “I’m hoping that they notice the change and that it’s a conducive space for them to study and learn,” Vazquez said. In the meantime, the campus is continuing to provide library services to students and faculty in the computer courtyard located above the library in Room 2201. Students who want to borrow books from other Miami Dade College

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campuses or Florida schools can continue to do so there through sharing services. North Campus is also offering a limited amount of books from its personal collection. The interim location, manned by librarians and library staff, is also outfitted with computers for the students to use and study areas have been allocated. Copy machines and printers are also available. “Everything is working out very well,” Vazquez said. Library hours are: 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. For more information about the library, call (305) 237-1142

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Closed: The North Campus library will remain closed until the spring semester to fix damage caused by Hurricane Irma. Services are being provided on the second floor in the computer courtyard.

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8 NEWS | NOVEMBER 14, 2017

THE REPORTER

Islam

Lecture Series Aims To Break Stereotypes About Islam ‰‰ Miami Dade College partners with the Coalition for South Florida Muslim Organizations and the Mohsin & Fauzia Jaffer Foundation to host Mohamad Homayounvash, the college’s first visiting lecturer on Islamic studies. By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net Miami Dade College welcomes its first lecture series on Islamic studies, aiming to break widespread stereotypes. The project is a collaboration with the Coalition for South Florida Muslim Organizations and the Mohsin & Fauzia Jaffer Foundation. It will be anchored by Mohamad Homayounvash and is scheduled to start in January 2018. The program will be based out of Homestead Campus with Homayounvash there to provide students information. That will complement his lectures, which will be free to the public. Homayounvash's lectures will focus on topics associated with the Muslim community, such as jihad, sharia and political violence, in an effort to break through stereotypes associated with Islam. “I’m trying to debunk a lot of misconceptions through student engagement,” Homayounvash said. “We want to talk about it through a geopolitical lense, not just the ideology.” Eventually, Homayounvash hopes to tour all nine of the College’s campuses, expanding his outreach among students. “My goal is for them to have a sophisticated understanding of these issues so they don’t have a tunnel vision of them,” said Homayounvash, who holds a doctorate in

CRISTIAN LAZZARI / MDC MEDIA RELATIONS

Islamic Culture Education: Mohamad Homayounvash will be Miami Dade College's first visiting lecturer on Islamic studies. The College's lecturer on Islamic studies series is expected to start in January of 2018 at Homestead Campus. international relations. “Giving them exposure will give them more sophistication about the Muslim community. It will have a good ripple effect.” The series is in collaboration with Islam Today, a series launched by Randall Kaufman, the dean of faculty and student services at Homestead Campus, to increase awareness on the Islamic community. Kaufman was approached by COSMOS,

a nonprofit organization dedicated to expanding outreach among the Muslim population in South Florida, because of his work on Islam Today, which led to the introduction of a visiting lecturer. “We wanted to have a resource at the college,” Kaufman said. That need for a resource was brought forth by the students, Kaufman said, as a way of better understanding the Muslim

community. He aims to use this new platform to help break through the media glass and shine a light on the true nature of Islam. “You can’t always be a bystander,” Kaufman said. “If you understand someone, it’s harder to hate them.” Kaufman’s desire to bring awareness comes from personal experience. He grew up in a Jewish household in New York. His family struggled with the ramifications of the Holocaust, leading him to help launch the Holocaust Genocide and Education Program in 2008 at MDC, which currently hosts five courses and other events. “We have no survivors [of the Holocaust] in my family,” Kaufman said. “What we hoped with the Holocaust genocide program, we hope for this.” This view is shared by COSMOS. “We want to share our stories” said Tehsin Siddiqui, a board member for COSMOS. “We are here, we are neighbors, and we want what is best for the community collectively as Americans.” Homayounvash will also take over the Islam Today series from Kaufman, hoping to expand the program with courses and programs centric to the Muslim community. Classes will center on topics such as Islam in America and an introductory course into Islam, both taught by Homayounvash in an effort to view the community both as an ideology and civilization. When people think of Muslims, Kaufman said, they are usually unknown and unaccustomed to their beliefs. “They’re [thought of as] outsiders to the traditions of the country,” Kaufman said. “Similar, but not the same.” With this series, Kaufman hopes the lines will finally begin to blur.

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10 SPORTS | NOVEMBER 14, 2017

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Men's Basketball

From Russia With Love—Point Guard From Moscow Leading Sharks Offensive Attack ‰‰ Arseniy Andreev, a 6-foot freshman from Moscow, Russia, is the starting point guard for the Miami Dade College men’s basketball team this year. He is leading the team in assists with 6.3 per game and is also contributing 9.6 points. By Darian Vega darian.vega002@mymdc.net Power forward Andrei Kirilenko and center Timofey Mozgov are Russian athletes who have made their mark on the basketball court. Arseniy Andreev a 6-foot, 185-pound guard hopes to add his name to that list soon. The stocky point guard is averaging 9.6 points and 6.3 assists per game this year as the floor general for the Miami Dade College men’s basketball team. The Sharks are 2-1. “Arseniy is a player that you need on your team on and off the floor,” Shark’s head coach Kevin Ledoux said. “Tough defender. [He] doesn’t back down [from] anyone.” That tenacity has been there since his youth. He has channeled it on the basketball court. Andreev, who was born and raised in Moscow, was a key contributor to the Junior Russian National Team that won four consecutive Russian National Championships from 2011-2014. He has also played against some elite level talent such as Lauri Markkanen, a Finnish basketball player that now plays for the Chicago Bulls, and Frank Ntilikina, a French basketball player who plays for the New York Knicks. Andreev quietly became his country’s top-rated point guard after playing for Parma, one of the top club teams in the region.

“It was a good experience playing for my country and being around a lot of good players,” Andreev said. His play there led him to be recruited by athletic powerhouse IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida. The transition wasn’t an easy one. “I did not feel as comfortable speaking [English],” said Andreev, who today speaks Russian, English and French.“It took me some time to get comfortable with the language.” But basketball still came natural to Andreev at IMG Academy. He reached the Dick's Sporting Goods High School Nationals tournament in New York, playing against some of the top high school teams in the country as a senior. Andreev impressed enough to be recruited by some Division I schools such as Western Kentucky University but he connected with Ledoux after he played in a Hoop Group event in Philadelphia this past July. He was attracted to MDC, he said, by the program’s rich history, the school’s education and Miami’s balmy weather. In the classroom, the 19-year-old freshman is majoring in mathematics. He aspires to earn a doctorate degree and get a job in the mathematics field in the United States or Russia. “He carries a 4.0 GPA and has a very bright future,” Ledoux said. “I am looking forward to seeing his game grow in our pressure defense and up-tempo offensive system this season.” The Sharks next game will be on the road versus St. Petersburg College at 7 p.m. on Nov. 15.

GIOVANNI DEL FA / THE REPORTER

Women's Basketball

Sophomore Guard Works Her Way Back Into Lineup After Left Leg Injury ‰‰ Sophomore shooting guard Michelle Wright is looking to improve her midrange game and three point shooting this year despite leading the state in three-point shooting percentage last year (50 percent). By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

After missing the Lady Sharks' first four games this season due to a left leg injury, Michelle Wright, one of the top three-point shooters in the state last year, is ready to reassume her role as one the team’s leaders. Wright, a 5-foot-7-inch shooting guard, shot 50 percent from three-point range last year while averaging 3.6 points per game. “Michelle is a very tenacious defender, talker and solid three-point shooter,” said Lady Sharks head coach Susan Summons. “She continues to improve her mid-range jump shot.” Wright is originally from Hollywood, Florida where she attended South Broward High School. As a child, she played a variety of sports including tennis, gymnastics and track. Her older brother, Nigel Wright, introduced her to basketball when she was eight years old. “I ended up falling in love with basketball because of him,” Wright said. “He taught me everything I know.” Michelle and her brother played at the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA). She remembers losing to him every time; it ultimately made her work harder, which in turn made her a better player. She immediately saw the shooting guard position as a natural fit.

Sharp Shooter: Sophomore shooting guard Michelle Wright led the state in three-point shooting percentage (50 percent) last year.

“I’ve never really had another position,” Wright said. “I love to shoot and I love to shoot three pointers. I’ve always been that type of guard.” Wright initially had no plans to play basketball collegiately, however, after seeing her play in an All-Star game, Summons offered her a scholarship to join the Lady Sharks. “She is very focused on academics and helping the team win a championship, using good leadership on and off the floor,” Summons said. Wright’s goal for her final season with the Lady Sharks, who are 2-2 this season, is focusing on improving her offense. “I feel like I can expand my game outside the three,” Wright said. “I want to get into the mid-range and get to the basket.” Off the court, Wright is a Netflix junkie and enjoys spending time bonding with her teammates. “Michelle holds the team together. She’s very positive and is a great person to look up to,” freshman guard Natasha Polanco said. “She loves giving advice and helps everyone become a better version of themselves.” Wright is a sports science major at MDC. Her passion for sports medicine ignited during her sophomore year of high school after a back injury. “I want to become a physical therapist for a professional basketball team, that’s my plan,” Wright said. The Lady Sharks next game will be on the road versus Florida Southwestern State College at the Suncoast Credit Union Arena in Fort Myers on Nov. 15 at 5:30 p.m.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2017 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

11

// SPORTS Giovanni Del Fa, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

Volleyball

// 

B giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net

“ 

Once A Bench Player In Brazil, Andrade Provides A Spark For Lady Sharks ‰‰ Libero Thais De Castro Andrade is the clear cut vocal leader for the Lady Sharks as they attempt to win back-toback National Championships. She also leads the team in digs (442) and digs per set (5.26). By Anthony Fernandez anthony.fernandez027@mymdc.net Thais De Castro Andrade’s energy is omnipresent on the volleyball court. The diminutive 5-foot-6-inch Lady Sharks libero can be heard barking instructions during games. “I don’t shut up,” Andrade conceded. That loquacious nature—and her skill— is what makes Andrade the team’s unquestioned vocal leader. She currently leads the Lady Sharks in digs (442) and digs per set (5.26). Andrade received AllSouthern Conference honors this year while leading the Lady Sharks to a perfect 30-0 mark as they attempt to win back-to-back national titles. Andrade, 20, fell in love with volleyball at the age of 10 in Sao

She understands the game better and that only comes with playing time. When you practice with great players you’re always going to work hard and eventually you’ll get to that level.

Taking Charge: Libero Thais De Castro Andrade is the unquestioned vocal leader of the Lady Sharks volleyball team.

Origenes "Kiko" Benoit, Lady Sharks volleyball head coach

Paulo, Brazil. In the beginning, it wasn’t necessarily her choice. When she struggled in school as a child, her parents searched for ways to improve her grades so they signed her up for volleyball. It worked. The sport was a natural fit for Andrade, whose father played volleyball in Brazil until a knee injury shut down his career. He went on to use his love for the sport as a way to bond with his daughter, becoming her first volleyball coach. At first, she didn’t receive a lot of

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

playing time, serving as a secondstring libero. In her final year, she was named a starter and she shined. Andrade’s play caught the attention of Miami Dade College. She was recruited by Kelly Dantas, an assistant coach for the Lady Sharks. Dantas played volleyball in Brazil and knew the landscape. When she arrived at MDC, Andrade, who is majoring in biology and plans to pursue a career as a veterinarian, had a difficult time transitioning. She had a hard time learning English, struggling to pronounce simple words. But now, her teammates can’t contain her garrulous personality. “She understands the game better and that only comes with playing time,” said Lady Sharks head coach Origenes “Kiko” Benoit. “When you practice with great players, you’re always going to work hard and eventually you’ll get to that level.” The Lady Sharks volleyball team will attempt to defend their national title at the Hutchinson Sports Arena in Hutchinson, Kansas from Nov. 16-18.

Champs

Lady Sharks Crowned State Champions

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OMAR NEGRIN / REPORTER File Photo

The Miami Dade College volleyball team defeated Polk State College (3-0) on Nov. 5 in the championship game at the Florida College System Activities Association State Volleyball Tournament in Bradenton. It is the second year in a row that the Lady Sharks have captured the state title. This season they did it with relative ease, defeating Hillsborough Community College, St. Petersburg College and Polk State

College twice. The Lady Sharks won all four games and lost only one set in the entire tournament. Several players on the team were named to the 2017 FCSAA All-Tournament Team: Rafaella Bonifacio, Sun Wenting, Massiel Matos, Camila Gomez Hernandez and Tiziana Baumrukova. Matos was also named the Tournament’s Most Outstanding Player and head volleyball coach Origenes “Kiko” Benoit was named the 2017 FCSAA

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Coach of the Year. Miami Dade College is 30-0 this season. The Lady Sharks have not lost a single game since Oct. 24, 2016. They are attempting to win back-to-back national championships. The Lady Sharks will head to Hutchinson, Kansas to compete in the National Junior College Athletic Association National Volleyball Tournament on Nov. 16.

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12 A&E | NOVEMBER 14, 2017

THE REPORTER

Tower Theater

Local Music

My Friend Dahmer Shines A Light On the Late Killer

Miami-Based Band Brings ‘60s Sounds Back

‰‰ An acting showcase for Ross Lynch, My Friend Dahmer is a gripping coming-of-age tale about the serial killer. The film opens exclusively in Miami at the Tower Theater. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net Jeffrey Dahmer is a name every American knew in 1991. At 31, Dahmer had murdered, raped and dismembered 17 men and boys. Of course, he was not the definition of a sane man, but every monster has its origin. Writer/director Marc Meyers explores that origin in My Friend Dahmer. The film opened exclusively in Miami at the Tower Theater, 1508 S.W. 8th Street, on Nov. 10. Instead of providing a simple slasher or horror film, Meyers presents a coming-of-age tale. Dahmer (Ross Lynch) is a clearly disturbed youth living in Ohio. His free time consists of killing small animals and seeing what they look like on the inside. Struggling with a deteriorating home life and trying to come to terms with his sexuality, he is an outcast among his peers in high school. He adopts a class clown persona, which attracts the attention of classmate and aspiring cartoonist John Backderf (Alex Wolff) who decides to use him for a series of pranks around the school.

The film chronicles the period during Dahmer’s life as he navigates through high school. Before the killings, he was an ordinary boy like so many others in high schools around the country. In a way, it’s empathetic. Dahmer is relatable; watching him get bullied is depressing. Even Backderf (who wrote the comic that

this film is based off) treats him poorly, but it never places blame on just him. The entire thing shows that people create the monsters around them if they don’t offer help. The coming-of-age aesthetics are more in tune to the films of Richard Linklater. Pop music from the late ‘70s plays throughout while

PHOTO COURTESY OF FILM RISE

Making a Murderer: Ross Lynch's performance as a young Jefferey Dahmer is as haunting as it is career making.

period appropriate clothing is well-recreated. Shots of rural Ohio and some great tracking shots never allow the tension to leave. That’s another thing. Tension. The film creates it and utilizes Lynch’s acting to create some eerie moments. This was a boy fascinated with skeletons. A boy who stalked a man who jogged by his house with fantasies of killing him. It never becomes this clichéd scene where scary music plays and there’s a montage of killings. It’s a subtle descent into the mind of America’s most dangerous man, at the time. Lynch carries the film. His slumped posture and nervous demeanor sell him as an outcast, and as someone we’ve all known or been in high school. The rest of the cast is good too, but Lynch offers the most compelling reason to watch. Shedding the squeaky clean Disney image, he embodies the killer, in a way unseen since Michael Rooker’s performance in Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer. Meyers never makes the audience sympathize with Dahmer. After all, his depraved and unspeakable acts are unforgivable and damning. Instead, he offers a look into the mind and life of a figure that suffered at the hands of his peers. My Friend Dahmer is not a simple monster movie. It’s the movie of the man behind the monster, and one that audiences should not miss.

Food Review

Forget Starbucks, This Tiny Shop Has Reinvented Coffee

‰‰ Oh My Gosh! Brigadeiros, located at 2298 Coral Way, offers its patrons a sweet taste of Brazil and an alternate coffee choice to Starbucks. By Nicole Pineda nicole.pineda001@mymdc.net For those experiencing Starbucks fatigue and in need of something new in the realm of coffee and sweets, Oh My Gosh! Brigadeiros, might be the answer. Located at 2298 Coral Way, the bright pink hotspot is a small venue that offers Miamians exotic treats from Brazil. The shop’s main feature is the brigadeiros, a delicacy made up of condensed milk, cocoa powder, butter and chocolate sprinkles covering the outside layer. There are fifteen different flavors to choose from, ranging from milk chocolate to churro-flavored. All brigadeiros are egg free, and eight out of the fifteen options are gluten free for

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAEMAX RECORDS

Sounds From The 305: Miami-based band Cannibal Kids' recent release has an indie pop sound that takes inspiration from all styles of music. ‰‰ Formed in 2014, indie outfit Cannibal Kids brings many classic styles into their music. Their debut LP makes sure that the sounds of ‘60s and ‘70s pop is never lost. By Martina Brady martina.brady001@mymdc.net Cannibal Kids is a Miami based indie-pop band consisting of South Florida natives Damian Gutierrez, Dustin Diaz, Luke Faulkingham and Jordon Hernandez. The musical project started in 2014 as an attempt to recreate the surf rock sounds of the 1960s. They describe their sound as alternative rock “with coastal indie-vibes.” Cannibal Kids said they were heavily influenced by bands likes Oberhofer and Local Natives. With a humble beginning—playing at house parties—the band went on to perform at Vans Warped Tour in the summer of 2015 and garnered attention from SoundCloud releases such as Where Are The People and Graphing. Cannibal Kids released their first LP, Bloom, on Oct 29. The lead single Troubled Mind is an upbeat and sunny punk-inspired song. The surf rock influences are clear with lush guitar strumming and a thumping bassline. Graphing has a funky 70s style guitar and ringing bells. To You, For You. From Me., a song about a failed relationship, is the most melancholy moment of the album. The darker, thoughtful lyrics contrast against the relatively upbeat mood of the song. My Boy/My Girl starts out with strippeddown guitar arpeggios, with hard-hitting drums in the chorus. The band’s Miami roots are evident in the final track of the album, Outro (I Will Always Love You). The song, the album’s only genre switch, begins with the sound of crashing waves fading into a jazzy bossa novainspired melody. Overall, Bloom contains lyrical themes of young love, the ocean and heartbreak. The songs are catchy, but often monotonous in style. The instrumentation, song structure and use of varying dynamics is consistent throughout each song. Fans of bands like Two Door Cinema Club and Best Coast will enjoy this release. Though its sound is somewhat repetitive, Bloom is worth a listen for indie pop fans.

BIANCA PASCI / THE REPORTER

Sweet Tooth: Oh My Gosh! Brigadeiros offers patrons a taste of sweet Brazilian delicacies. those who have gluten allergies or just prefer the gluten free lifestyle. Brigadeiros are available for purchase individually for $1.65, or in boxes that can hold up to 24 pieces, which can cost $39.60. They also have mini cake jars filled with brigadeiro ingredients. For those with a sweet tooth, the “Perfect Jar” is topped with a scoop of vanilla ice cream and brigadeiro drizzle.

This idea came from Rio de Janeiro-born Luciano Brilho. Growing up in his native Brazil, he remembers this popular treat at every event he went to and, of course, the times he has visited his grandmother. Wanting to share his love for the bite-sized dessert, he opened the first brigaderia in Florida. Aside from the Brazilian delicacies, the chocolate and coffee boutique is www.mdcthereporter.com

famously known for their cappuccinos with a twist. Along the rim of the cup, a thick layer of Nutella or Dulce de Leche drips from the top. The entire thing is topped off with chunky sprinkles that make for a great sugar substitute that can be mixed with coffee. These delicious cappuccinos are priced at $4.50 a cup. Milkshakes, teas and espressos are also served.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2017 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

// A&E Ciro Salcedo, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

Marvel

Ragnarok Finds Humor Among The Action ‰‰ The latest film from the Marvel Cinematic Universe injects a colorful and charming sense of humor into the long-running series of films. By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net Thor: Ragnarok is more of a comedy film than a superhero one. Director Taika Waititi (What We Do in the Shadows, Hunt for the Wilderpeople) raises the likes of Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston and Cate Blanchett to their comedic peaks, providing for a mostly charming, subversive addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). The film, set two years after Avengers: Age of Ultron, revolves around Thor (Hemsworth) and Loki’s (Hiddleston) quest

writing. The script, penned by Eric Pearson, Craig Kyle and Christopher Yost, boasts the most laughs of any previous Marvel movie. With each joke, we’re introduced to comedic talents unseen in actors like Hemsworth and Ruffalo, whose characters have traditionally been more serious in earlier films. It especially works in context, which can't be said of most Marvel films. In one action scene, Hemsworth expertly balances a running joke while in a heated exchange with an antagonist, blending the seriousness of battle with sharp wit. That’s only possible through great performances, which Waititi delivers. Hemsworth delivers his best portrayal of the God of Thunder, lifting Ragnarok’s already impressive script to new heights.

to defeat their newfound sister, Hela, the Goddess of Death (Blanchett). In order to do this, they must escape imprisonment from a foreign planet-Saakar, led by the Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum)-with the help of the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) and Valkyrie (Tessa Thompson) -all while trying to prevent the destruction of his homeknown as “Ragnarok.” While a seemingly convoluted storyline, the film balances its plot threads well. It starts off in the heat of the action and doesn’t skip a beat, an improvement on previous entries in the Thor series. Each plotline in the film, whether it’s Thor’s quest to leave Saakar or Hela’s attempts to control Asgard, is developed to the fullest, making Ragnarok the most self-contained film in the MCU. That is largely due to its

Other returning actors like Ruffalo, Hiddleston and Anthony Hopkins (along with other cameos from some Marvel heroes) bring new life to their roles, with Ruffalo especially having his most fun as the green beast. Even new additions, such as Thompson’s Valkyrie and Blanchett’s Hela, shine through the sprawling cast. Especially, Goldblum’s irresistibly humorous Grandmaster, who steals every scene he’s in. Thor: Ragnarok manages to continue Marvel’s streak of ending their trilogies on strong notes. With one of the best comedic scripts of the year, an exceptionally talented cast and a story to blend the two together, Ragnarok kicks off the fall movie season strong.

PHOTO COURTESY OF WALT DISNEY PICTURES

Friends From Work: The latest Thor film offers up a funny adventure, making it different than most superhero films.

Movie Review

A Great Cast Makes Daddy’s Home 2 A Good Time ‰‰ Just in time for the Holiday season, Daddy’s Home 2 features a great cast and some funny situations to deliver a hilarious comedy. By Giovanni Del Fa giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net At a time when it seemed like the majority of comedies had lost both value and meaning, 2015’s Daddy’s Home introduced audiences to a different kind of story. It was the tale of a gruff father who is no longer in the picture. Dusty Mayron (Mark Wahlberg) competing with his kids’ clumsy step-father, Brad Whitaker (Will Ferrell) leads to all sorts of rough and goofy encounters. With both fathers vying for the main role in this family’s life, relationships are tested and people get hurt. Now fans of the movie can get a second dose as Daddy’s Home 2 opened in theaters nationwide on Nov. 10. Daddy’s Home 2 is meant to please and be a good time and it isn’t trying to be something that it’s not. It tells the story of two families leading happy lives.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PARAMOUNT PICTURES

Second Time's The Charm: The sequel to 2015's Daddy's Home brings a bigger cast and even more laughs.

Dusty is now in a relationship with Karen (Alessandra Ambrosio) and has a stepdaughter of his own that biologically belongs to Roger (John Cena in an attempt to get further into comedy). Meanwhile the Whitaker’s are happy and awaiting the holidays with the whole family gathered together; and thus begins the arguments and family commotion. As if the movie didn’t have enough Grade-A actors, Mel Gibson plays the part of Kurt Mayron, Dusty’s father. He carries a certain charm to him and adds to the over the top humor of the film. The movie stays within a safe PG-13 rating with a touch of light violence and mild language here and there. This can be seen as a light version of director Sean Anders’ work in movies such as Horrible Bosses 2 and We’re The Millers. Although I’m not a huge fan of making a movie season based, Anders makes it work well by focusing the plot on bringing the family together for the holidays. For those looking for a funny film that will fill time this holiday season, they should definitely check out Daddy’s Home 2.

Do you want to write for the A/E section? Contact: Ciro Salcedo, A&E editor, at ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net or {305} 237-2715

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14 FORUM | NOVEMBER 14, 2017

THE REPORTER

Latin Women

Latin American Women Face Double Standards ‰‰ Jasmine Machado explains the double standards that Latin American women see constantly in their daily lives, whether it’s in their families, their sexuality or their appearance.

By Jasmine Machado jasmine.machado001@mymdc.net "No, mija, let the boys do it. Make sure you leave the door open. Go serve your brothers and cousins. When are you going to learn to cook for your husband?" Sound familiar? If you grew up in a Hispanic household as a woman, then it probably does. Every weekend your mother or grandmother were on your back, asking you to clean the house with them at 7 a.m., while your brothers or other male relatives slept in, enjoying their dreams. A woman in our culture is supposed to cook all the food,

clean the house, wash the clothes and do all the household chores. While the men are out working on the cars and being doted on by the females. Then the men sit down at the dinner table and the mom, grandmother or girlfriend gets up and serves the men’s before they serve themselves. But it doesn’t stop there. The machismo culture is very prominent in Latin America especially in more adult themes like relationships or body perception. The machismo culture is very prominent in Latin America especially in more adult themes like relationships or in the perception of the body. Let’s start easy: relationships. If I brought a boy over, my mom would make us sit in the living room with several

ARIEL TRAWICK / THE REPORTER

Latin America

Colombia Is More Than Pablo Escobar And Drugs ‰‰ When Valentina Gonzalez thinks of Colombia, she thinks of the iconic figures and coffee, but she finds herself still arguing that her country is much more than the overrated and violent drug dealers portrayed in the media.

By Valentina Gonzalez valentin.gonzales001@mymdc.net There are many stories that have been written and filmed about Colombia, but most people are fascinated with the life of the city Medellín’s narcos. The proof of this unhealthy fascination derives from the myriad of series and films that revolve around the paisa drug dealers. Many Colombians, including myself, are fed up of with the multiple semi-fictional displays of our country’s painful past. Most Colombians don’t like being associated with Pablo Escobar; he became famous for being one of the most violent, brutal, ambitious and powerful drug dealers of modern history. Escobar was responsible for at least 4,000 murders and this is only one of the reasons we dislike associating Colombia with him. We understand that Escobar is a popular character around the world

thanks to the Netflix series “Narcos” and other documentaries, international movies and Hispanic telenovelas. This is why every time someone asks me where I am from, I hope they won’t associate me with drugs, Pablo Escobar or narcos. I will never forget my first day of college when every professor wanted us to introduce ourselves to our classmates. It was the worst experience I’ve ever had because every single one of them wanted me to talk about “Columbia” (yes, with a “u”), cocaine and all the negative stereotypes the “Narcos” portray. I understand that perspective, but, on the other hand, the show tells a story that happened more than 30 years. It is not depicting present day Colombia. Colombia is much more than narcos and Escobar. If Colombia should be known globally for one thing it should definitely not be cocaine. It should be our biodiversity. Back home, my room had the most beautiful view of a snowy mountain called Nevado del Ruiz, even during the sweltering summers. This is what makes Colombia one of the most touristic countries—Oh, and don’t forget our well-known coffee. As a Colombian, I am proud of the many characters who make our country feel proud, and Escobar is definitely not one of them. Colombia is Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Radamel Falcao, James Rodriguez, Sofia Vergara, Shakira, Carlos Vives...and the list goes on. I really hope that when people meet a Colombian they ask about other things besides narcos. If some people were more cultured, they would identify us with something completely different because the name “Columbia” is as fake as narcos in our modern society.

feet between us. If we were in my room, the door needs to be open. But if one of my male relatives brought his girlfriend over, he could have her in his bedroom, close the door and no one would think twice about it. They would just say, “he’s becoming a man.” Machismo says there’s a preciousness in our sexuality and virginity that should be kept from the world and we shouldn’t explore it. If I asked my mom about sex, she would tell me “Why do you want to know? You’re too young for that.” Meanwhile, if my cousin asks the same question to his dad about sex then he is getting a completely different answer. As for the perception of our bodies, that’s a little more difficult to talk about. Not because it’s controversial but because so many people are used to it, they don’t see anything wrong with it anymore. If my cousin or any other male was walking around without their shirt on, and we do see it around here and in Cuba, no one even blinks. But If I were to wear a tank top and shorts, which I do because it can get hot Florida, I am suddenly promiscuous or I’m asking for it. I would get catcalled or be told that I shouldn’t show so much skin because it isn’t appropriate. We are the next generation and it is our job to get rid of the old ways and make things equal for everyone, men and women.

Education

We Need To Reevaluate How We Educate And Value Teachers ‰‰ Before American teachers can be paid more, Daisy Collazo argues that the United States needs to reevaluate how teachers are educated and how they are thought of in society.

By Daisy Collazo daisy.collazo001@mymdc.net The cost of living has gone upward, so why are teacher’s wages being cut? Many people agree that teachers are not being paid enough, even students agree and they don’t always know the inner workings of the education system. According to the Washington Post: “Average weekly wages (inflation adjusted) of public-sector teachers decreased $30 per week from 1996 to 2015, from $1,122 to $1,092 (in 2015 dollars). In contrast, weekly wages of all college graduates rose from $1,292 to $1,416 over this period.” Teachers are as important as doctors, lawyers and even judges. Where else would doctors have learned about identifying illnesses and how to treat them? How would mathematicians learn the pythagorean theorem without the aid of their high school teacher?

Let’s take a step back and find something to compare this to. The Edvocate (a “website devoted to advocating for education equity, reform and innovation”) ranks Finland as having the eighth best education system among 20 other countries. The United States did not make it on their top 20 list. Probably because Finland’s education system is as far as it can be from The United States. One of the largest differences is that a Finnish teacher’s education is more rigorous. Teachers in the United States get a degree in a subject and a quick certificate in teaching. In Finland, they go through examinations and practice and, even then, only the very best are hired once they receive their master’s degree. Unfortunately in the United States, some teachers who didn’t accomplish their dream of becoming mathematicians or scientists, go into the career of education as a back-up plan. Don’t be mistaken. There are teachers who only have a certificate for teaching and prepare their students not only for tests, but also for the future. Those few teachers care as much as a teacher with a higher degree. They have admiration for education. “My teacher, Ms. Jean-Paul from high school, motivated me to broaden my writing abilities and to not settle for less,” said North Campus student Jordan Richardson, 19. She prepared me for college-level writing.” Teachers are an essential part of our communities and futures, so the United States should make teachers hold up to that belief.

To write for the forum section, contact Katherine Wallace-Fernandez at (305) 237-2715 or katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

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Fibromyalgia

Living With A Hidden Illness ‰‰ Claudia Hernandez talks about living with the misconceptions and symptoms of fibromyalgia; an illness that is often referred to as a "fake" because of it's unknown cause and lack of visible symptoms.

By Claudia Hernandez claudia.hernandez047@mymdc.net Fibromyalgia. I know. The name is difficult to read and say out loud. I’m pretty certain you haven’t heard of it before, and, if you have, you probably already forgot or feel like you don’t have enough information to explain it to someone. Fibromyalgia is a lifelong, chronic pain disorder that affects only 4% of the world’s population, which is perhaps the reason why it’s misunderstood and unfamiliar. The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases have confirmed that the causes for this illness are still unknown which has led to various debates on whether the disease is real or not. However, because

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of the unfortunate number of patients that are being diagnosed with this illness today, it has finally begun to be treated as such, but a cure has yet to be found. Even though there is no definite cause, there are still a lot of symptoms. The primary symptom is pain. It can be in some places or all over the body, but each patient has around 11 to 18 tender points (the specific locations of the pain) that

start from the muscles and end up causing widespread burning sensation, stiffness and aching pain. Other major symptoms are fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression and anxiety. These symptoms cause disturbances in mood and concentration. “The pain and disability seen in fibromyalgia is typically worse than almost any other chronic pain condition… [the pain] doesn’t

just affect one area of the body you can avoid moving, and often is accompanied by severe fatigue, sleep, memory and other issues,” Doctor Daniel Clauw, a professor of anesthesiology, medicine/rheumatology and psychiatry at the University of Michigan, said in a HealthDay article. I am a very reserved person and I don’t let a lot of people know about my personal struggles. However, this is an illness that I struggle with and feel strongly about clearing up some misconceptions associated with it. I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia at the start of my senior year when I was 17 years old. My illness caused me to miss two months of my senior year in high school. I had to take multiple medical tests (for example: functional magnetic resonance imaging, skin tests, spine tests and bone tests). It has been the hardest time of my life so far. It felt like my body was giving up on me and my brain tried to convince me that my life was over and the anxiety from it did not allow me to breathe properly. Learning to deal with this disease in my everyday life, after suffering through many long days and nights is still a challenge I have to face. But I am reminded by my doctors that I am a lucky for being diagnosed at a young age (most patients get diagnosed in their 30s and 40s) because I can start testing which medicines reduce the symptoms faster before it gets worse as I get older. But I have learned a lesson as a result of living with this disease: We all have problems and hidden conflicts in our lives.

Science

The Potential Of Stem Cells ‰‰ To Luis Camargo-Carlos, stem cells can be used as a treatment to possibly save millions of lives, but scientists still have many obstacles to tackle before we can reap the benefits.

By Luis Camargo-Carlos luis.camargo001@mymdc.net Researchers and doctors are constantly searching for new cures for thousands of diseases. To some scientists, stem cells seem to be the solution to many

problems. However, there is much controversy surrounding both the research and the implementation of stem cells into medical treatment. But, in the future, it is still possible that stem cells could be used to cure many diseases, so it is important to look at why stem cells are so useful and what their controversies are. Unlike other cells, stem cells can grow to form into any type of cell. Often, scientists wait for months on a single fertilized egg to ensure embryonic cells are created. When scientists want the stem cells to change, they just modify the environment of the stem cells according to what cell they want to produce. If someone has severe damage to their heart or liver, instead of waiting for a transplant, stem cells could be used to repair the damaged organ. The stem cells could be

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regulated so that they grow into organ-specific cells with unique functions. This would cut down the time before a patient’s organs are treated properly. Not only those who receive the stem cell treatment will wait for shorter times, but also those whose only solution is a transplant. Heart disease will be much easier to treat when stem cells are used. Same thing for diabetes. Same for arthritis. Same for so many other diseases. However, there is a lot of controversy surrounding stem cell research and implementation. Stem cells are not easily found. In adults, stem cells are found throughout the body, especially in the bone. Because it is spread out, it is difficult to gather much stem cells from adults. The only way that stem cells are

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easily accessible are in embryos or fertilized eggs. As mentioned before, stem cells for cultivation are derived from fertilized eggs in the laboratory, not from a woman’s body. Pro-life individuals believe that the destruction of an embryo in any way is unethical. This group, which represents a large part of the population in the United States, must be convinced that stem cell research is safe and ethical before scientists have full freedom to move ahead with their life-saving research. Stem cells is a possible solution to many problems, but there are many obstacles to overcome before stem cells can be used as a treatment. Besides the obstacles mentioned earlier, there is still more to learn about the behavior of stem cells before scientists and doctors know how to use them well enough. But, eventually, this might be a be a life-saver for millions.

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