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GEMS Gem The Reporter’s Corbin Bolies explains how the GEMS Film Festival’s opening night film, Call Me By Your Name, is making waves in the film industry.

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Electric Ride FORUM

The Lady Sharks have not lost this season. They are 18-0 as they attempt to win back-to-back national championships on the volleyball court.

A&E

School for Advanced Studies senior Chris Rosario is part of a jump-rope team that won first place at the 2017 Amateur Athletic Union Junior Olympics this summer.

Undefeated SPORTS

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Jumping Champ

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The Reporter’s Luis Camargo-Carlos tells us how electric cars can be beneficial to the environment and your wallet and how they will soon be the next big thing. PAGE 14

4VOL. 8, ISSUE 2— SEPTEMBER 4VOL. 8, ISSUE 3— OCTOBER 26, 10, 2017

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Though Blind, This Man Musters Vision To Help Others Speech Professor

Attempting To Take Congressional Seat ‰‰ Kristen Rosen Gonzalez, a professor at Kendall Campus, has announced plans to run for the congressional seat in District 27. The position belongs to Ileana Ros-Lehtinen who said she will not seek re-election after her term expires in December 2018.

By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

sweet. “[Working with Gabriel] is interesting. It’s a good interesting,” Perez said. “The reason why I say it’s a good interesting is because there are a lot of laughs. A lot of good moments.” When he’s not at North Campus, Lopez works independently as a business consultant for private companies and nonprofit organizations, mainly within the blind community. He started working in the field after he moved to Miami from Honduras and was unable to practice corporate law—which he has a degree in—because of the differences in the two countries’ legal systems. Lopez visited Miami to seek a rehabilitation program to help him with his disability. In 2005, he found the Miami Lighthouse For The Blind, a nonprofit organization serving the visually impaired and blind. He won a scholarship and took part in a program there for eight months, learning about orientation, mobility and adaptive technology. He permanently moved to Miami in 2009 to study marketing and international trade at North Campus. But that wasn’t the reason he left his homeland. “I was afraid that I was not going to be so useful over there,” Lopez said. He has made great use of his time in

A Kendall Campus speech professor is taking aim at a congressional seat after political veteran Ileana Ros-Lehtinen announced she will not seek re-elecROSEN Gonzalez tion in District 27. Kristen Rosen Gonzalez, who currently serves as a Miami Beach commissioner, believes she can fill Ros-Lehtinen’s sizeable political footprint. Ros-Lehtinen, who has spent more than 35 years as an elected official, is leaving office after her term expires in December of 2018. “I plan to run a very grassroots campaign where hard work will play a starring role,” said Rosen Gonzalez who is running as a Democrat. The primary election for District 27 will be held Aug. 28, 2018; the general election is Nov. 6, 2018. District 27 encompasses parts of Miami Beach, Coral Gables, Pinecrest, Key Biscayne, South Miami, West Miami, Cutler Bay, Palmetto Bay and North Bay Village. Candidates also campaigning for the seat include Miami-Dade County Commissioner Bruno Barreiro, Former Federal Judge Mary Barzee Flores and Member of Florida State Senate Jose Javier Rodriguez. Rosen Gonzalez’s platform includes seeking more funding for transit, raising minimum wage, starting new educational programs and climate change. “Climate change, as you can see after these hurricanes, is probably one the biggest issues we face in Miami-Dade County because we could have been Puerto Rico or Houston,” Rosen Gonzalez said. “We are one step away from these catastrophic happenings.” Rosen Gonzalez, who studied French and Spanish Literature at Tufts University, has a long history of public service. From 1999 through 2004, she served as a senior editor for an internet based financial media company. In 2009 to 2010, she worked as a language arts teacher at Miami Central Senior High

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LESLIE VILLEGAS / THE REPORTER

Best Friends: Gabriel Lopez Kafati poses with his guide dog, Posh. Lopez is an adaptive technology specialist for ACCESS Services at North Campus. He has been working at the College, his alma mater, for five months. ‰‰ Gabriel Lopez Kafati is blind, but that hasn’t prevented him from assisting others. Lopez works at the North Campus ACCESS Services department to ensure students with disabilities get the assistance they need to thrive. By Adriana Dos Santos adriana.dossantos002@mymdc.net At first, nothing seemed out of the ordinary. But as nine-year-old Gabriel Lopez Kafati stepped into the optometrist’s office, he was struck by the darkness, black doors and the lack of windows in the room. “My parents never told me directly,” Lopez said as he recalled the memory 31 years later. It was the day he was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic condition that progressively degenerates the retina and causes vision impairments. “I knew that I had some condition in the eye, but it wasn’t very clear to me at that point.” Eventually the condition worsened. Simple activities like playing sports required more effort. Reading became impossible. So loved ones recorded themselves reading the books that he required for his classes. “I have every book that I used for college well recorded by my family and my friends,” Lopez remembered fondly.

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By his late 20s, the first signs of complete blindness appeared. “I wasn’t able to move around, walk myself,” Lopez said. “I couldn’t work anymore because I couldn’t use the computer.” His sight continued to deteriorate until he reached a point—eight years ago—where he couldn’t see at all. However, the impairment has not distorted the vision Lopez has for his life: helping others. Five months ago, he took a job at his alma mater, Miami Dade College. Lopez assists students with disabilities at North Campus as a part-time adaptive technology specialist for ACCESS Services. The program provides accommodations to students with disabilities, a service that often comes in the form of adaptive technology. Examples of the assistance provided are: screen readers, magnification for their computers and software that reads books aloud. Lopez also advises departments at the College on how to make their websites accessible to students with disabilities. “Gabriel is extremely responsible,” said Andrea Plunkett, the director of ACCESS Services at North Campus. “Very open to the students that come for assistance and definitely very patient.” Co-workers Dayani Perez and Maria Otiniano describe Lopez as chivalrous and

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2 BRIEFING | OCTOBER 10, 2017

THE REPORTER Wolfson Campus Welcomes New Top Cop

// BRIEFING Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Briefing Editor  // 

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B katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net InterAmerican Campus To Host Learn, Love, Grow Conference

PHOTO COURTESY OF DALTON PHOTOGRAPHY

Adjunct Professor To Hold Piano Recital At Koubek Center North Campus Adjunct Professor Ana Rodriguez will hold a piano recital called “Musica Viva� on Oct. 15 at 5 p.m. at The Koubek Center, 2705 S.W. 3rd St. “The purpose of this recital is to bring people to hear music of living composers,� Rodriguez said. “Most pianists do play one or two pieces in a program of a living composer, but it is not usual to have a whole program of music of living composers.� The performance will include composers such as Thomas Sleeper and Marc Douyon, and Grammy winners Yalil Guerra and Claudia Montero. Some of the compositions will be world premieres and some will be United States premieres. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Madeline Rodriguez Ortega at (305) 237-7750 or at mrodri68@mdc.edu —Claudia Hernandez

Microbiology Professor Awarded $2,500 Grant Dr. M. Nia Madison, microbiology professor at Miami Dade College, was awarded $2,500 from The L’OrÊal USA For Women in Science’s Changing the Face of STEM (CTFS) on Sept. 20. Recipients are awarded for their contributions in science, technology, engineering and math and commitment by serving as role models for younger generations. The grant serves as continued support for FWIS Fellows who have won the $60,000 postdoctoral research award. This will be Madison’s second time, in less than two years, to receive funding from L’Oreal USA. At MDC, Madison recruits high school students to Homestead Campus for a two-day workshop featuring research and lectures by prominent STEM oriented professional women. Workshop participants also attend catered luncheons with guest speakers and microbiology students to learn about collegiate life at MDC. —Justin Marcano

Sale And Exhibition Of Cuban Art Presented By VII Cuba Arte VII Cuba Arte will be selling and exhibiting Cuban art on Oct. 14 from 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. at The Koubek Center, 2705 S.W. 3rd St. “There are some beautiful pieces in the exhibit, even some that go back to the 19th century, along with beautiful jewelry and cigar boxes from Cuba,� said curator Sylvia Landa. The exhibit will feature paintings, sculptures and Cuban jewelry from artists like Santiago Caballero, Mari Sanchez and Hector Cata. The exhibition is open and free to the public. Parking is free. —Melba Silwany

For more information, contact: Koubek Center T(305) 237-7750  www.koubekcenter.org

Wonder Woman Art Exhibit At InterAmerican Campus Miami Dade College’s InterAmerican Campus will host the art exhibit Wonder Woman on Nov. 7 at 627 S.W. 27 Ave., in Room 3113. The exhibition is free to the public and will run until Dec. 22. Wonder Woman features works by 21 Israeli male and female artists who capture their perspectives of women’s empowerment through multiple artistic approaches. Pieces on display include Rachel Achunov’s “Geula Cohen,� Boris Enberg’s “The Seasons� and Eyal Eilat’s “Woman of Valor.� As part of the Building Global Leaders Arts and Culture International Series and in partnership with the Consulate of Israel in Miami, the North Campus hosted the opening reception of Wonder Woman on Sept. 6. For more information, contact Diana Herrera at (305) 237-6186 or at dherrer4@mdc.edu —Justin Marcano

InterAmerican Campus’ School of Education will host the Learn, Love, Grow Conference on Oct. 27 at 627 S.W. 27 Ave., Room 3103 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. In partnership with FundaciĂłn Querer, a nonprofit organization that joins neurological professionals to develop ways to deal with specialized language disorders in children, the conference will host various speakers to discuss developmental techniques to combat brain-based language disorders in children. “The work these people are doing [is] changing the trajectory of these children’s lives and giving families hope they did not have in the past,â€? said School of Education Dean Susan Neimand. “The match was very clear.â€? Speakers will include professor of psychology from Columbia University Dr. Sarah Woolley, associate professor of Clinical Neurology at Mount Sinai Medical School Dr. Steven Wolf and associate director of Mt Sinai-Beth Israel Medical Center’s Developmental Disability Center Patricia McGolddrick. Attendance is free, but the conference is prioritizing speech pathologists and school psychologists from Miami-Dade County Public Schools. For more information, contact Dr. Michelle Thomas at (305) 2376150 or at mthomas2@mdc.edu —Corbin Bolies

Jose Gonzalez has been selected as the new public safety chief at Wolfson Campus. He started his position on Aug. 14. Gonzalez retired from the law enforcement field with more than 30 years of service. His most recent position was deputy commander with the Miami Police Department’s Special Investigations Section. “My plans are to ensure and maintain the continued safety of all our students, staff, faculty and visitors, while providing public Gonzalez safety services to the College,� Gonzalez said. “This endeavor is a top priority as we Segway toward security in the 21st Century.� As public safety chief, he will be in charge of providing public safety services, overseeing public safety foot patrols and being a liaison between the public safety department and the MDC community. —Alessandra Pacheco

Want To Join The FBI? There’s An Info Session Waiting For You Recruiters from The Federal Bureau of Investigation will be at North Campus on Oct. 12 at 5:30 p.m. and Oct. 24 at 11 a.m. in Room 8333. Miami Dade College students and alumni from all academic majors are invited to attend. This event will provide information about career opportunities in the federal government, allow students to ask questions directly to recruiters and become acquainted with FBI hiring policies. Recruiters will discuss career paths such as special agent, intelligence analyst, surveillance, forensic accounting and language analyst. Attendees should bring their resumÊ and dress professionally. —Luis Camargo-Carlos

For more information, contact: Elizabeth Lugo Martinez T(305) 237-1194 elugomar@mdc.edu

Reporter Alumna Lands Job As A Crime Reporter D a n i e l a Hurtado, who served as editorin-chief of The Reporter, has landed a job as a crime reporter for KFYR-TV, an Hurtado NBC affiliated television station in Bismarck, North Dakota. Hurtado started the position on Sept. 25. Her duties include covering trials, murders, break-ins and news relating to law enforcement. “My new position for KFYR as a crime reporter is definitely challenging,� Hurtado said. “But it is an amazing experience and I am so happy to be in Bismarck and to work alongside such an amazing team.� Before landing her job at KFYRTV, she served as a reporter, anchor, producer, director and technical director for the University of Florida owned station WUFT-TV. She also worked as a radio reporter and producer at WUFT-FM. Hurtado graduated from the University of Florida with a bachelor’s in telecommunication/news with a concentration in political science on Aug. 4. She earned her associates in arts degree in journalism/mass communications from Kendall Campus in May of 2015.

Hispanic Heritage Committee and Urbana To Celebrate HispanicAmerican Writers InterAmerican Campus’ Hispanic Heritage Committee and literary and arts magazine, Urbana, will be hosting the Identity of Emerging Hispanic-American Writers on Oct. 18 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. at 627 S.W. 27 Ave., Room 401. The event celebrates emerging Hispanic-American writers featured in the student publication. Attendees can expect live readings and literary discussions by writers and staff handpicked by Urbana. All Miami Dade College students are welcomed to attend. The Hispanic Heritage Committee has a history of promoting the Hispanic community’s endeavours in both the academic and creative fields. From Hispanic folklore dance events, art exhibits and scientific discussions, the Hispanic Heritage Committee has something for students of all interests. —Alexandra Vargas For more information, contact: Amy Blanco T(305) 237-6615 ablanco1@mdc.edu

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Jubilation Dance Ensemble To Perform For Hispanic Heritage Month Miami Dade College’s Jubilation Dance Ensemble will showcase Lleva el Ritmo en tu Corazón: Carry the Rhythm in Your Heart on Oct. 12 at the Kendall Campus Alfred L. McCarthy Hall, 11011 S.W. 104 St., Room 6120. The dance ensemble will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month by featuring a variety of dances such as traditional/folklore, contemporary and rumba. The first show will run at 11 a.m. and will have free admission. The following showtime will start at 7:30 p.m. and will have a $5 entrance fee that can be purchased at the door. The Jubilation Dance Ensemble holds various performances during the year on and off campus. The program’s mission is to assist emerging artists. Parking is available anywhere on campus. For more information, contact Michelle Grant-Murphy at (305) 2372638 or at mgrantmu@mdc.edu —Lazaro Bosch

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Muscular Marine: Students watch as Marines Corps Recruiter Sergeant Brian Hernandez does pull ups during a Shark Fest event that took place at Kendall Campus on Sept. 22. Caught Off Balance: Brian Abreau laughs as he watches Allison Newsome fall off the Gladiator Joust at the Miami Dade College Kendall Campus Shark Fest event on Sept. 22.

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Overcoming Obstacles: Students climb down a rock wall at Kendall Campus Shark Fest on Sept. 22.

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What A Rush: Robert Muñoz of the archery club at Kendall Campus takes aim during Club Rush on Sept. 27.

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Jesus' Crew: A faith-based club at Miami Dade College Kendall Campus, Cru, was one of the many clubs at Club Rush on Sept. 27. They handed out Christian literature and water bottles.

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4 NEWS | OCTOBER 10, 2017

THE REPORTER

// NEWS Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Editor-in-Chief  // 

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CONSTRUCTION

Post Construction, You May Not Recognize This Campus ‰‰ The Medical Campus broke ground on a five-story building—the Center for Learning, Simulation and Innovation—in February and is expected to initiate work on a six-level parking garage later this fall. Construction is expected to be finalized by spring 2019. By Camilla Sposito camila.sposito001@mymdc.net Medical Campus is expected to open its doors to a new five-story building and a six-level parking garage by spring 2019. Both projects are anticipated to cost $90 million in total. Construction for the building began in February. The parking garage project is expected to start later this fall semester. The new building, the Center for Learning, Simulation, and Innovation, will be located east of building 2. It will be home to an auditorium, eight new labs, multipurpose rooms, classrooms, collaborative student spaces and a conference room. It will also include a simulated

virtual hospital, with an operating room, a built-in home environment and ambulance box on the third floor. The building will also relocate existing programs such as the respiratory, nursing, histology and physical assistant programs. “In the new learning center, students will be exposed to the latest simulation technology through advanced human patient simulators,” said Ramona Edwards, director of campus administration at Medical Campus. “By using this technology and simulators, students practice and master

the necessary skills to effectively care for patients in a controlled environment.” The new parking garage will have space for 1,552 cars and will be positioned in front of building 1. For students like Student Government Association President Carlos Torres, the new parking garage will be a welcomed addition. “If you don’t arrive before 8 [in the morning] the [student parking] lot might be full and we would have to park in a smaller lot across the street,” Torres said about the current parking conditions at the

campus, “and even then, you still might not get a spot.” According to Torres, because of the lack of parking spots, students also carpool or ride the free shuttles from the Culmer metro station to a trolley stop near campus. “With a new parking structure, I hope parking becomes less of an issue as times goes on,” Torres said. The company responsible for the building’s construction is OHL-Arellano—the same company that was responsible for the construction of building 6 at InterAmerican Campus.

Haskell Co. is in charge of building the new parking facility. The corporation was also in charge of the construction of Hialeah and West Campus’ parking garages. Currently, the 4.3 acre Medical Campus hosts two buildings, features 22 classrooms, 13 labs, and dental, health and vision clinics. The campus enrolls 7,000 students annually. “Through the establishment of this new building, the college will be well-positioned to support current and future demand for healthcare professionals,” Edwards said.

BIANCA PASCI / THE REPORTER

Expansion Project: The Medical Campus broke ground on a five-story building—the Center for Learning, Simulation and Innovation—in February. It will include an auditorium, eight new labs, multi-purpose rooms, classrooms, collaborative student spaces and a conference room.

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OCTOBER 10, 2017 | NEWS

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TV Station

Cameras Are Still Rolling After Nearly A Decade Of On-Air TV ‰‰ Miami Dade College’s award-winning TV station will celebrate its 10th year on the air in early 2018. The station offers students an opportunity to gain experience both on and off camera using state-of-theart equipment. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net Get ready to blow out the candles because MDC-TV is turning 10. The channel, formerly managed by Miami-Dade County and known then as Cable TAP, has grown into an award-winning TV station in the last decade since MDC took control of it in 2008. Today it provides content to thousands of households in Miami-Dade County while providing students with a built-in learning laboratory. “MDC-TV creates video content that supports the mission of Miami Dade College,” said Ariel Rubalcava, senior producer/director of MDC-TV. “We are here to foster education and longtime learning; sometimes we create content with faculty and staff and other times we cover events produced by MDC.” The majority of the station's shows are shot at North Campus. Some of them include MDC In Focus, a show that promotes the

College’s programs and events, Health Connections, and other programming that highlight the school’s academic areas such as the Miami Culinary Institute and the business program. Students help with many of the shows. They get experience shooting video, editing, writing scripts, hosting shows, directing, and operating cameras. “We have interns and volunteers. I send emails letting them know of upcoming projects and they get involved. I try to get involved with each student to see what position they feel they want,” Rubalcava said. “ In TV you can be talent, producer, editor, videographer or a combination of two. There are also management positions which deal more with the legal aspect of the business.” The channel has attracted some top-flight talent along the way. Rubalcava, who oversees day-today operations at the station, has worked as a producer and editor at Telemundo and as a director at KPRC TV, the NBC channel in Houston, Texas. On-air personality James Pierre, an award-winning journalist with nearly two decades of experience, hosts various shows and producer Tony Leal, who previously worked for Univision and the Home Shopping Network, are a few examples.

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The hard work is paying off for the upstart station that can be viewed on AT&T U-Verse (Channel 99) and on Comcast (Channel 78). It has garnered several accolades including a coveted Telly Award. In 2016, the station won a Suncoast Emmy, a regional version of the Emmy Awards.

With thousands of hours of programming under its belt, MDCTV continues to broadcast seven days a week in English, Spanish, French, and Creole, keeping the community they serve informed. “This station has been transformed into what it is today over the last 10 years,” said MDC-TV

post-production supervisor Maikel Garcia, who has been with the station from the start. “It has always stepped forward to serve the students and the community.” For more information about MDCTV and its programming, go to www.mdc.edu/mdctv/

REPORTER FILE PHOTO / PETER CARRERA

Happy Birthday: Miami Dade College Television is celebrating 10 years on the air next February. The awardwinning station offers students hands-on experience both on and off camera.

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6 NEWS | OCTOBER 10, 2017

THE REPORTER

Creative Arts Magazine

AXIS Magazine Selected As Finalist For Prestigious National Literary Award ‰‰ The North Campus student literary magazine was selected as a finalist for the Associated Collegiate Press Pacemaker ward on Sept. 21. Winners will be announced on Oct. 28. By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net AXIS, the creative arts magazine at North Campus, has been selected as a finalist for the prestigious Pacemaker award given by the Associated Collegiate Press. Winners will be selected on Oct. 28 at the National College Media Convention in Dallas, Texas. This is the first time AXIS has been selected as a finalist for the Pacemaker. “I’m extremely proud of what we’ve done,” said Priya Pershadsingh, who served as the magazine’s editor during the 2016-2017 school year. “When I first heard we were finalists, I started tearing up. All those late nights on campus and the amount of hard work we put into this issue has truly paid off. However, it’s paid off not because we are finalists, but because I know we’ve touched the lives of many people with this publication.” The ACP received 105 entries for the competition. Submissions were produced by students during

the 2016-17 school year. The ACP at North Campus. separates magazine entries into This year’s magazine features two categothe work of r ies—feat u re more than 40 and literary students. I’m extremely art. AXIS is in Bucher and the literary art proud of what professor Kathcategory. leen Noonan we’ve done. AXIS was serve as the When I first created 14 m a g a z i n e ’s heard we years ago as a co-adv isers. creative outlet were finalists, I started Graphic defor students at sign professor tearing up. All those North Campus. Eric Cornish The magazine late nights on campus and art proaccepts poetry, and the amount of hard fessor Victor short stories, work we put into this Gomez guided essays, photogstudents with raphy, paint- issue has truly paid off. the design elings, mixed However, it’s paid off not ement of the media, sculp- because we are finalists, magazine. tures and mu“I’m really but because I know sic submissions excited,” Noonyearlong from we’ve touched the lives an said. “We’ve students. of many people with this been entering It is final- publication. national comized during the petitions for the spring semester past four years and is released Priya Pershadsingh, 2016-17 AXIS and this is the to the public editor highest recogduring the fall nition we’ve semester. received.” The theme for volume 14 derived from stu- To submit a piece for this school dents saying: “We just want to year’s magazine or to join AXIS, keep it organic. We don’t want to students can go to Room 7321 or force it,” said AXIS co-adviser Car- send an email to AXIS magazine at men Bucher, an English professor axis.creativearts@gmail.com

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PHOTO COURTESY OF AXIS MAGAZINE

Pacemaker Finalist: AXIS, the creative arts magazine at North Campus, has been selected as a finalist for the coveted Pacemaker award given by the Associated Collegiate Press. Winners will be selected on Oct. 28 at the National College Media Convention in Dallas, Texas.

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Rosen Gonzalez Attempting To Go From Miami Beach City Commission To Congress FROM POLITICS, FRONT

School, assisting 11th and 12th graders who had failed the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. “It was the first time that I really began to see where our social injustices lay and why we were having some of the problems that we’re having. I began to understand inequality better and it taught me that we need to improve our school system,” she said. “We need to improve how we teach, what we teach and we need to be very compassionate for a large, black community here at South Florida that has not had the same opportunities as many other people.” Her political career started in 2011 when former Kendall Campus President Lourdes Oroza suggested she travel to Tallahassee with MDC’s Legislative Advocacy Committee to lobby against pension cuts. Despite their efforts, the cuts were made. However, the political advocacy inspired her. “At that moment I knew that I loved politics, but it wasn’t until later that somebody completely independently approached me and said, ‘I think you should run for the Miami Beach commission,” Rosen Gonzalez said. In November of 2015, she was elected onto the Miami Beach city commission. Getting there was tough. At first, Rosen Gonzalez had difficulty getting financial backing. ”They [potential donors] would sit down with me, they would meet me, they would nod their heads and then nobody returned my phone calls. Nobody donated to my campaign,” Rosen Gonzalez said. “So, I had a talk with my campaign manager and he said,

‘You know this is a joke.’ He said, ‘You’re going to these meetings, nobody cares.” She began walking through neighborhoods in Miami Beach, knocking on doors and standing in front of local supermarkets and churches, to meet residents. “By the end of my campaign, no matter where I was in the city, on the street in ground level, I knew everybody’s names,” Rosen Gonzalez said. After being elected, she acknowledges that she went through a learning curve. “When I first got elected and I sat on the seat, I had never seen a meeting agenda for the City of

Miami Beach,” Rosen Gonzalez said. “It was like reading Chinese. I’ve learned a completely different language.” Rosen Gonzalez, 44, plans to use the same grassroot effort during this campaign. “It’s a lot bigger, but I will still walk every single neighborhood in that district even though it will take me a full year to do, and I will meet the people,” Rosen Gonzalez said. “I will understand the issues of District 27 and, by the time that primary rolls around, I will have knowledge about District 27 that very few people will have.” As commissioner of Miami Beach, she has focused on

renewable energy, passed legislation on paid parental leave and instituted new school programs such as a substance abuse program that invites experts to teach students about drugs and alcohol. But Rosen Gonzalez has not been without controversy. In May, after a police involved shooting on Miami Beach, Rosen Gonzalez sent an email to Miami Beach City Manager Jimmy Morales suggesting that the city’s Police Chief Dan Oates was “failing his troops.” “We need to give the cops back their bullets, remove their body cams, give them their dignity, and let them work all the off hours stuff

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Running For Office: Kristen Rosen Gonzalez, a speech professor at Miami Dade College, is running for the congressional seat in District 27. www.mdcthereporter.com

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At that moment I knew that I loved politics, but it wasn’t until later that somebody completely independently approached me and said, ‘I think you should run for the Miami Beach commission.'

Kristen Rosen Gonzalez, speech professor

they want,” Rosen Gonzalez said in the letter. A week later, she wrote an apology in the Miami Herald’s letter to the editor section. “I have always believed in strong civilian oversight of our police force, from our chiefs of police to the cops on the beat,” Rosen Gonzalez’s letter stated. “How I expressed myself has caused a lot of anger and frustration and for that, I apologize. I actually voted in favor of body cameras. Now we need to understand the root of the problem and do some research to improve their use.” Despite the incident, Rosen Gonzalez is excited about the future. She is currently working on her doctorate degree in leadership in higher education administration from Barry University. The single mother of three clearly has a full agenda. “Can you imagine being a single mother of three and a congressional candidate on top of it?” Rosen Gonzalez said. “I’m a busy woman.”

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OCTOBER 10, 2017 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

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student profile

‘Speed Demon’ Breaks National Record At Double Dutch Championship ‰‰ School for Advanced Studies senior Chris Rosario is part of a jump-rope team that won first place at the 2017 Amateur Athletic Union Junior Olympics this summer in Detroit, Michigan. By Alessandra Pacheco alessandr.pacheco001@mymdc.net For Chris Rosario, watching a jump-rope show at his elementary school for the first time was like watching fireworks. “The show made my jaw drop, so I picked up a jump-rope a week after that,” said Rosario, an 18-yearold School for Advanced Studies senior at Wolfson Campus. Rosario was hooked. “He came home that day and told me that he wanted to jump,” said his mother, Debra Cleveland. “All I said was that if he was dedicated to the sport, I would be too.” Soon after, Rosario started performing with the Kendale Elementary School jump-rope team.

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

At the time, the 7-year-old didn’t know the sport would become more than a hobby. Eleven years later he is an integral part of the local jump-rope team the Miami Supersonics. He has been with the team since 2012. “I knew that I was part of this team and I felt like I belonged there,” Rosario said. This summer, the Miami Supersonics won first place at the 2017 Amateur Athletic Union Junior Olympics hosted in Detroit, Michigan. Rosario placed second in the solo jump rope division and his team also broke the national record for double dutch speed. Double dutch is a jump rope category that features two long jump ropes being turned in opposite directions while one or more players jump them at the same time. The Miami Supersonics, founded in 2000, range in ages from 7 to 18 years old. Rosario is the oldest member of the group. They are coached by former Kendale Elementary teacher Dillon Bethell. “He does not like to lose and he’s very tough on the kids,” Cleveland said in describing Bethell’s coaching style. “He’s rough, but between 4 to 6 p.m., my son is his property. He can scream and yell at him and be firm. At 6:01 p.m., he’s my property again.” Bethell considers Rosario “a son” and has seen his dedication and perseverance to the sport increase throughout the years. “He’s a natural born leader,” Bethell said. Rosario’s concentration is on double dutch

speed and single rope freestyle. He practices with the team four times a week for two-hour sessions. “He’s always had a natural talent to jump,” Bethell said. “But about four years ago, he started to stick out. He turned into a speed demon. He became a light switch. He was that fast.” As Rosario improved, so did the Miami SuperSonics. The team won the 2015 National Level USA Jump Rope Championship for having the best double dutch speed team. They also placed in the Top 12 catherogy nationally in 2014 for double dutch. At that event, Bethell said Rosario was frustrated and not performing well. When it was time for his solo category, he surprised everyone. “You could see it in his body language and he started to lash out and he had a speed event,” Bethell said, “but he nailed it. He hit 92-93 steps in 30 seconds.” Rosario has continued to give his fans plenty to celebrate. “I scream his name from the stands and he hates it,” Cleveland said. “But he’s my son. He’s my baby.” In October and November, he’s flying to Detroit and Connecticut, respectively, for jump-rope workshops to teach single rope and single rope freestyle. He hopes to compete at the collegiate level after the Miami Supersonics. Rosario, a biology major, is also excelling academically. He is simultaneously taking a full compliment of high school and college courses through his rigorous SAS

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Doubling Up: Chris Rosario, a senior in the School for Advanced Studies at Wolfson Campus, is part of a jump-rope team that won first place at the 2017 Amateur Athletic Union Junior Olympics this summer. program. It will allow him to attain his associate in arts degree from Miami Dade College in April and a high school diploma in June. He plans to study medicine after graduation. Rosario aspires to

become a pediatric surgeon. “One thing about Chris, he has a tremendous heart, and he’s so smart, it’s beyond me” Bethell said. “Wherever he goes, he’s going to give it his all.”

This Man Helps Others With Disabilities, Despite Having His Own FROM DISABILITY AWARENESS, FRONT

Miami. Lopez earned a master’s degree in business administration from Barry University and landed several jobs, including a position at Baptist Health International which represents international patients served by all the Baptist Health South Florida hospitals. Today, Lopez lives in a threebedroom house in Miami Lakes. He enjoys culinary arts and creates dishes that feature salads, chicken breasts and quinoa on the weekends. Lopez uses timers and thermometers and has developed a technique for chopping to safeguard against cutting his fingers. He has also earned a reputation as a snazzy dresser. His look usually includes a button down shirt, dress trousers and a blazer to accent his formal attire. Lopez uses a color identifier—a device that works by taking a picture of the clothes he selects and then tells him what color it is. “As I lost my vision, I said to myself: ‘Okay, I need to figure this

out because I am not going to be dressing poorly’,” Lopez quipped. An integral part of Lopez’s daily life is Posh, his mellow female guide dog. The six-year-old yellow Labrador was provided to him by the Guiding Eyes for the Blind, a nonprofit organization that trains dogs to assist people who are legally blind. Lopez applied for a dog at Guiding Eyes for the Blind four years ago. The process was tedious. To find the best match, the school got to know his personality, walking speed and voice pitch. After matching him with several dogs that best fit his traits, the school trained them for four months. Lopez interacted with those dogs before he was matched with Posh. They trained nonstop for a month in New York to build a strong bond. Posh, who wears a brown leather harness when on duty, has proved invaluable when the duo navigates the terrain at North Campus. She remembers patterns like their usual walking path during lunch

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KARINA REY / THE REPORTER

Executive Chef: Gabriel Lopez Kafati washes a fork as he prepares to cook quinoa pasta, one of his many favorite dishes. and has mastered anticipating Lopez’s every move. For Lopez, his ability to adjust to life’s changing landscape has empowered him to persevere. “After you learn to overcome,

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and you learn to live with it, you know it’s not the end of the world,” he said. “It’s just finding different ways to do things.” A version of this story ran in The

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Lead, the student newspaper for the Miami Dade College High School Journalism Institute, a sixweek dual-enrollment summer program for students interested in journalism.


8 NEWS | OCTOBER 10, 2017

THE REPORTER

Entrepreneurship

Lyft And Facebook Leaders Spice Up Business Program

“ 

We wanted to rethink how we taught business education, more importantly entrepreneurship.

‰‰ Miami Dade College’s Idea Center at Wolfson Campus collaborated with TheVentureCity to form a new two-year degree that will let students learn from top business leaders. The program started on Aug. 28. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net Students at Miami Dade College are now gleaning knowledge from some of the top business and technology minds in the industry thanks to a re-vamped two-year business program. Leaders from Lyft, Facebook, eMerge Americas and the Cisneros Group will be among those spewing knowledge to scholars as part of a re-tooled associates in science degree in business entrepreneurship launched this fall. “We wanted to rethink how we taught business education, more importantly entrepreneurship,” said Romi Bhatia Executive Director of The Idea Center. “Often what is learned in the classroom doesn’t translate to the real world so the program is here to bridge the gap between the classroom and changing trends in the real world.” The program is a collaboration between the Idea Center, the College’s entrepreneurial hub, and TheVentureCity, a tech accelerator that focuses on helping startups and business ventures grow. It is different than traditional two-year business degree programs because it serves to expose students to business leaders in Miami by using the latest technology and innovation. “We don’t want this to be a lecture-style course. We want to be hands-on and have the students working on projects within

Romi Bhatia, executive director of The Idea Center

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Business Minded: Captoria McGriff (left) and Emily Perez (right) listen intently during an anthropology course at Wolfson Campus on Sept. 28. The class is part of a re-tooled associates in science degree in business entrepreneurship program launched this fall. the classroom and have the students work individually and in groups to make the learning structure more dynamic and engaging,” said Jimena Zubiria vice president of University-Americas for TheVentureCity. “The environment we are trying to cultivate is a collaborative and innovative environment and a safe environment where people aren’t afraid to make mistakes while trying to mimic the real world.” Each course in the program has a lead instructor from MDC and hosts various local industry leaders who teach sections and mentor students. Instructors include Adriana Cisneros,

CEO of Cisneros; Francesca de Quesada Covey, Head of Platform Partnerships for Facebook in Latin America; Melissa Medina, executive vice president of eMerge Americas; Sam Cohen, gm for Lyft in Florida; and Laura Gonzalez-Estefani, CEO and founder of TheVentureCity. Topics covered within the courses include startup strategy and execution, product development, project management, digital and social media marketing, user experience design, human resources and team management and organizational development. The courses will also include humanities

courses such as art appreciation and introduction to anthropology and sociology to foster creativity and innovation outside of the traditional business environment. “What I’m doing through this course is focusing on human innovation and showing examples throughout history about how humans have met and faced challenges,” said anthropology and sociology instructor, Benjamin Augustyn. “Throughout history, humans have recognized challenges and through the sharing of cultures, recognized ways to address those challenges.” Currently, the new program is only offered at Wolfson Campus, but it may expand to other campuses in the future. There are also plans to make the core courses into a certificate program so students in other majors will have access to the opportunities the program offers. “The objective of this program is to provide students with an understanding of how to become an entrepreneur while focusing on three possible outcomes: start their own venture, join someone else’s founding team or join an existing company/organization that is looking to innovate, create new products, services within the organization,” said Ramiro Almeida, Director of the Innovation Lab at The Idea Center at MDC.

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10 SPORTS | OCTOBER 10, 2017

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Lady Sharks Slam Broward College Seahawks On Home Court The Lady Sharks volleyball team remained perfect, defeating Broward College 3-0 (25-11, 25-15, and 25-10) on Oct. 4 at the Theodore R. Gibson Health Center. Miami Dade College is 18-0 and 2-0 in Southern Conference play. Outside hitter Massiel Matos led the team with 13 kills. Setter Tiziana Baumrukova and libero Thais De Castro Andrade both contributed 12 digs each. Baumrukova also had 22 assists. Their next game is against Palm Beach State College on Oct. 12 at 6 p.m. —Giovanni Del Fa

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Team Unity: The Miami Dade College volleyball team huddles up at center court after defeating the Seahawks on Oct. 4. They remain undefeated this season in their quest to defend last year's national championship.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Graceful Serve: Outside hitter Massiel Matos floats in the air before jump serving a ball at the Theodore R. Gibson Health Center.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Winning Smiles: The Lady Sharks celebrate on Oct. 4 after defeating Broward College 3-0 at the Theodore R. Gibson Health Center. The team is now 18-0 and 2-0 in conference play.

Bloopers: Outsider hitter Rafaella Bonifacio cups her mouth and laughs after spiking the ball and going under the net, falling onto the opposing team's side.

Volleyball

Lady Sharks Off To Undefeated Start

‰‰ The Miami Dade College women’s volleyball team has breezed to a 18-0 start this year, handily defeating most of its opponents in their quest to defend last year’s national championship. By Giovanni Del Fa giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net There is dominant and then there’s Lady Shark dominant. After winning a national volleyball championship last year—the team’s ninth in its history—the Lady Sharks are off to a sterling 18-0 start, losing only eight sets during the run. “We are very focused on every game,” said outside hitter Sun Wenting. “For us, this season is a new beginning, no matter what we achieved last year.” The Lady Sharks have used strong team chemistry to play almost flawless volleyball. They are first in the nation in assists per set averaging 12.15, third in the country in kills per set with 13.25, third in hitting percentage at .316 and seventh in digs per set with 19.07 per game. The Lady Sharks have also increased their blocks per set from 2.09 last season to 3.07 this year, which ranks fifth in the nation. “This is great because it makes us feel confident and closer to accomplish our goal,” said middle blocker Paula Louro. With a roster full of international players

including some from the Dominican Republic, Brazil, Colombia, China and the Czech Republic the team has used its diversity to its advantage. They have blended seven new players onto this year’s roster without interrupting the team’s success. The team’s 18 game winning streak is its longest to start a season this decade. Some of this year’s stalwarts have been Dominican outside hitter, Massiel Matos and Brazilian libero, Thais De Castro Andrade. Matos leads the team in four separate categories: kills per set (3.61), kills (148), hitting percentage (.318) and serving aces per set (0.54). Andrade, a 5-foot-6-inch sweeper, leads the team in digs (239) and digs per set (6.29). Despite the success, the team has faced adversity this year. They eked out wins against the College of Central Florida on Sept. 22 and Florida State College at Jacksonville on Sept. 23. They won both of those games 3-2. “Through these games, we also found some problems…” Wenting said. “Coach Kiko often tell us how to solve the problem, and we have some targeted training about that.” With the team getting into the brunt of their conference schedule in October they will rely on the lessons they have learned so far this season to ensure they qualify for the state tournament in the first week of www.mdcthereporter.com

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Team Ball: The Lady Sharks are off to a 17-0 start this year in their attempt to win back-toback national volleyball titles. It is the team's best start this decade. November before even thinking about the national tournament. “Always there are somethings to adjust,” Louro said.

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The Lady Sharks next game is on the road versus Palm Beach State College at the Elisabeth W. Erling Gymnasium, 4200 Congress Avenue, on Oct. 12 at 6 p.m.

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OCTOBER 10, 2017 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

11

// SPORTS Giovanni Del Fa, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net

Women's Basketball

Center From Senegal Poised To Help Lady Sharks ‰‰ Amy Cole Soumare, a 6-foot-4-inch center from Senegal in West Africa, is expected to add size and a three-point shooting touch to the Lady Sharks frontline this season. She attended Ombudsman-Charter Metro high school last year in Arizona.

By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net The Miami Dade College women’s basketball team has added a 6-foot-4-inch center from Senegal in West Africa. Amy Cole Soumare is billed as a versatile front court athlete. “I was searching for one more player with nice size and ability to shoot the three ball and play multiple positions on the basketball court,” Summons said. Summons was tipped off about Soumare by a mutual friend from the Harlem Globetrotters who introduced them. The 20-year-old freshman moved to the United States last year. She attended OmbudsmanCharter Metro in Arizona. She also participated in the Elite 1 Academy Wings, a basketball program

in Phoenix. “Once Amy gets in better physical shape she will certainly be among the strong contributors to helping this team win a lot of games,” Summons said. “She adds size, depth, and offensive power.” Soumare is expected to augment the talents of Cheah RaelWhitsitt, who averaged 12.2 points and 10.7 rebounds per game last year. Her athletic ability was first nurtured on the soccer field. The sport is her first love. When she turned 15, her older brother, Khadim Soumare, introduced her to basketball. “In the beginning I was a little bad, but after a while I got better,” Soumare said. “I practiced everyday.” Adjusting to life in the United States has been tough. The food is different: “I only like it a little bit, Soumare said. Food isn’t the only thing she has had to adjust to. She misses her family. “I talk to my family three times a week,” Soumare said. “I miss them so much. They tell me they’re praying for me.” At MDC, Soumare an economics major, is getting accustomed to

her new family. Her roommate is freshman guard Ganette Chism from Chicago. “Amy is very quiet but she’s kind. It’s cool living with her because I always hear her speaking her language to her friends and family,”

Chism said. “It’s very different and unique to hear other languages.” Soumare said her goal is to eventually play in the Women’s National Basketball Association— her role model is Candace Parker, a center for the Los Angeles Sparks—but for now she is focused

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The Lady Sharks start their season on the road at the Tallahassee Jamboree on Oct. 12.

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Front Line Help: Amy Cole Soumare, a 6-foot-4-inch center from Senegal in West Africa, is expected to add depth to the Lady Sharks front court this year.

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on helping the Lady Sharks. “I want to help my team win a championship,” Soumare said.

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12 A&E | OCTOBER 10, 2017

THE REPORTER

Milkshake Review

This Milkshake Bar Is Sure To Take You Back In Time ‰‰ With shows like Stranger Things and movies like It banking on 80's nostalgia, it seems like a perfect time to visit a place that recreates the era to perfection. Vicky’s House does just that while serving some pretty good milkshakes. By Nicole Pineda nicole.pineda002@mymdc.net The 80s was a simpler time, one where an alien with an appetite for cats could get his own primetime show, where a song like Africa by Toto was considered one of the best things ever written and one when the world had no reason to hate Mel Gibson. For every criticism that the Reagan-era politics gets hit with, there is still a longing to bask in that nostalgia. For those not fortunate enough to live in those times, there’s this milkshake shop

in Coral Gables that can give you a taste of that sweet 80's goodness. Located on 3190 Commodore Plaza in Coconut Grove, Vicky’s House is an 80's themed milkshake shop. Modeled after the owner, Matt Kuscher’s (founder/owner of popular florida restaurants Lokal and Kush) childhood home, and named after his mother, Vicky, the restaurant recreates the sights and sounds of the 80s in beautiful, cheesy fashion. Rick Springfield and Cyndi Lauper blast through the speakers as the wait staff is dressed in 80's garb. Props like the phone booth from Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure, that acts as a secret entrance into the bar, and a working Galaga arcade machine surrounding tables, giving the authentic feel of stepping back a couple of decades. Being a milkshake bar, they have all kinds of desserts consisting of malts, milkshakes, root beer

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Modern Retro: Vicky’s House keeps a retro but slightly modern look in its Coconut Grove milkshake shop.

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

Blast To The Past: Customers come by Coconut Groves Vicky's House for a deliciously cool treat during a hot day in Miami on Sept 29. floats and even ice cream sandwiches. Of course, all of them are named after different 80's films and TV shows. There’s “ET goes to the movies to watch The Goonies,” a salted caramel milkshake with chocolate frosting along the rim with caramel popcorn on top of the chocolate frosting, whipped cream, Hershey’s chocolate syrup, Cola gummies Reese’s pieces and a fun size Baby Ruth all piled on top. That entire description alone is so chocked full of references to both movies. Golden Girls, is a banana milkshake with a cream cheese frosting rim, whipped cream, caramel

sauce, loaded with Golden Grahams Cereal, a Twinkie, vanilla wafers, a homemade blondie and topped off with a cherry on top. Singing Thank You For Being a Friend is entirely optional while consuming. Last but not least, we have The Breakfast Club which is a vanilla milkshake with a peanut butter rimmed, whipped cream, drizzled with maple syrup, and has toppings such as Captain Crunch cereal, Miami Smokers Bacon, a glazed donut from Salty Donut and a shot of colada. Prices for these shakes are $15 and are perfectly sized to share. While you’re waiting for your

drink or sipping on your scrumptious dessert, there’s a pretty cool den that recreates the one Kuscher hung out in. Complete with a working Nintendo Entertainment System. There, you’re able to sit back and completely destroy your friends in Tecmo Bowl (use Bo Jackson and the LA Raiders to run past the defense). Topping off the authentic aesthetics is Kuschner’s original bedroom dresser and the toys he played with when he was a child located in the bathroom. Nailing not only the 80's feel, but also serving some great sweets, Vicky’s House is definitely a hotspot and a true blast to the past.

Movie

Call Me By Your Name To Open GEMS Film Festival ‰‰ A year after LGBTQ+ film and critical acclaimed Moonlight was released, Call Me By Your Name seems to be making waves before its South Florida debut.

By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net ​ year after Moonlight brought Miami A and the LGBTQ+ community to the national film stage, Call Me By Your Name, the opening night film of the 2017 Miami GEMS Film Festival, brings things full-circle. ​The film, about a young adult (Timothée Chalamet) who falls in love with his father’s assistant (Armie Hammer) in Italy, made waves after its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year. As the film travelled the festival circuit, earning its critical acclaim, it landed at the steps of Jaie Laplante, the director of the Miami Film Festival. ​“Immediately, we recognized it as a ground-breaking film which we believe will be remembered as one of the decade’s most important movies,” Laplante said in an email interview with The Reporter. ​The film’s ground-breaking status draws similarities to Moonlight, Barry Jenkins’ coming-of-age drama about a gay black man in Miami. Both films ranked as the best film in their respective year on Metacritic, a review aggregator, while a number of critics have favored Call Me By Your Name as the front-runner for Best Picture at the 90th Academy Awards—less than a year after Moonlight claimed the title for itself, a fact not lost on Laplante.

“ 

We knew instantly that Call Me By Your Name was the perfect choice to be the opening night film of GEMS 2017.

Jaie Laplante, director of the Miami Film Festival

“​ The [success] of ‘Moonlight’ will be felt for many years to come,” he said. “I think the success of ‘Moonlight’ will give confidence to creatives working on stories with LGBTQ+ characters that their stories have proven worldwide impact.” That worldwide impact can be felt at home. Call Me By Your Name opens the third year of the GEMS Festival, continuing the festival’s streak of bringing nationallyacclaimed films to Miami’s door. Previous entries include “Brooklyn,” a 2016 Best Picture nominee, and The Salesman, the winner of the 2017 Best Foreign Language Oscar. ​“We knew instantly that Call Me By Your Name was the perfect choice to be the opening night film of GEMS 2017,” Laplante said. “I think anytime you open with a movie that goes on to incredible success, it demonstrates the gravitas and important work being done in Miami’s film scene on a programming level.” ​ all Me By Your Name opens the 2017 MiC ami GEMS Festival on Oct. 12 at the Tower Theater. Tickets can be purchased for $25 at gems2017.miamifilmfestival.com. www.mdcthereporter.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF FRENESY FILM COMPANY

Monumental Release: Call Me By Your Name is scheduled to open GEMS Film Festival on Oct. 12 at the Tower Theater in Little Havana. It will mark the film's debut in South Florida.

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OCTOBER 10, 2017 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

// A&E Ciro Salcedo, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

Netflix

Album Review

Lady Gaga Creates A Perfect Illusion ‰‰ Selling millions of albums, getting stadiums to sing along and influencing a host of imitators seems like fun for a celebrity. Lady Gaga’s latest Netflix documentary, Five Foot Two, tries to showcase the pop juggernaut’s life away from the standard glitz and glamour. By Karina Rey karina.rey001@mymdc.net Distressed musicians and celebrities are always surreal to see. Most of what we know about them is how they decide to portray themselves on the media: posh, polished, perfect. And then we see the documentaries show us the lives of these celebrities and we get a glimpse into their life struggles. Lady Gaga makes sure to have no filter for her new documentary Five Foot Two. She wants fans to feel the grittiness and disorientation of her day-to-day and how her work is slowly tearing her apart. In the doc, we follow the shaky camera from her recording sessions for her newest album Joanne, up until her performance at the Super Bowl LI (the peak of any popular musician). If you have had the chance to listen to her latest album, you can hear the clear changes she’s going through, compared to her meat dress-wearing days. She focusses on her inner self and her family; channeling the emotions of Stefani Germanotta, the name she left behind for her stage persona Lady Gaga. The songs are heavy-hearted and about her trials and tribulations throughout the years. She claims that the album is ‘the real her.’ ”I am Joanne,” Gaga says in the documentary, as she talks about the song she wrote for her late aunt Joanne, the person whose story inspired the album. The doc is full of these sort of personal moments. Moments where it’s no longer Lady Gaga on screen. Instead, we see Stefani Joanne

Angelina Germanotta, the woman behind the artist. Despite her hip spasms that declare her motionless, the paparazzi always looking to catch her at her worst, but Gaga always rises to the occasion. The promise of a spectacle fuels her passion to perform and when she performs, there is no room for error. She expects perfection in everything—from the outfits she wears, to her backup dancers and especially from herself. It’s all or nothing and nothing is not an option.

With her battle between wanting to stay true to theatrics and revealing her true self, Gaga’s body and soul is painfully deteriorating and it is apparent throughout the whole documentary. Gaga aims to inspire with this documentary, basically saying that no matter your size, you need to work hard and push through to achieve your dreams. Fans with a Netflix subscription should not miss this inside look at a true pop icon. They’ll definitely gain a newfound respect for Gaga.

Hell On Earth Is An Ambient, Somewhat Distant, Album

PHOTO COURTESY OF MINIOAN MUSIC

A Personal Hell: Although conceptually interesting, Hell on Earth is not the kind of easy listen most people would be willing to pay for. ‰‰ Coupled with literary allusions and an interesting production style, Hell on Earth is probably one of the more interesting pieces of work to feature eccentric actor John Malkovich, but it makes for a jarring, less catchy listening experience. By Martina Brady martina.brady001@mymdc.net

PHOTO COURTESY OF LIVE NATION PRODUCTIONS

The Fame Monster: Five Foot Two, a Netflix documentary, gives fans an in depth and honest portrayal of Lady Gaga's day to day life.

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Actor/director John Malkovich, composer/producer Eric Alexandrakis, and photographer/director Sandro Miller have partnered together for the electro-ambient record Hell On Earth. The album, the trio’s 6th collaboration, has been described by the music site Spectrum Culture as “a blend of philosophy and electronica that aims to be more than novelty.” Hell On Earth’s 10 tracks begin with Revelation, an apocalyptic auditory experience. Crashes, screams, shattering glass and other cacophonous sound effects paint a picture of a dystopia in the listener’s mind. The next track, Inferno, features crackling flames, thunder, and eerie, ambient noise that continues into Purification & Regenesis. The glitchy, futuristic beats and atmospheric synthesizers on Awakening flow smoothly into Skepsis 1 [Migration]. In Skepsis 1 we finally hear Malkovich’s voice. Over the electronic noise he theatrically narrates a series of Aristotle’s truisms, including “no great mind has ever existed without a touch of madness,” reflecting the album’s theme. In Skepsis 2 [The Order of The Universe] the Aristotle monologue continues and chaos ensues, with dramatic strings and syncopated, industrial-sounding percussion. Skepsis 3 [The Disorder Of The Universe] is the most melodic track on the album, with choir-like pads and sparkling arpeggios layered

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under glitchy beats. Skepsis 4 [Entropy] devolves back into ambient noise, then further into a rain track that continues into Repurification, four minutes of rain and storm sounds concluding into a small trickle. The final track, Electroorganic [The Beginning] features Malkovich recounting “The Allegory of the Cave” from Plato’s The Republic, with the robotic vocal effect creating an eerie mood. Hell On Earth is challenging and leaves the listener both contemplative and slightly disturbed. The album tests the limits of what we consider music but is it music? From its conceptual tone to the soundtrack-style production, Hell On Earth might be more suited as a short film than an album. While time-tested, the idea of technology persisting past human extinction has been overworked ever since Ray Bradbury’s 1950 short story There Will Come Soft Rains. Even though Hell On Earth was supposed to offer a unique perspective on modern smartphone addiction, it falls flat. Moreover, the concept isn’t clear within the actual album. Apart from the apocalyptic sound effects in the first two tracks, Hell On Earth would appear to be more about Ancient Greek philosophers than humanity’s destruction through technology. Each track on Hell On Earth is a soundscape that creates a visual journey in the mind’s eye. The album succeeds in pushing boundaries and provoking thought. However, the concept falls flat with its hackneyed criticism of modern technology and social media. Ultimately, Hell On Earth is worth a listen for the open-minded listener, but best avoided by those who prefer music they can sing along to.


14 FORUM | OCTOBER 10, 2017

THE REPORTER

Environment

Electric Cars: How Close Are They? ‰‰ Today, electric cars aren’t common on the streets, but Luis Camargo-Carlos knows they can start benefitting us and the environment in the near future.

By Luis Camargo-Carlos luis.camargo001@mymdc.net

ARIEL TRAWICK / THE REPORTER

With rising gasoline prices and growing concern over climate change, electric cars (not hybrids, fully electric cars) seem to be the solution to make our lives better. Right now, there are few electric cars on the road. During the end of 2016 in the United States, electric cars only represented 1.5% of cars bought. To combat car emissions effectively, that number will have to be much higher. How far are we from electric cars being mass produced and affordable to the public? Will electric cars truly be more

beneficial than gasoline cars when it comes to the environment? And how much money could you expect to save by switching to an electric car? For now, electric cars seem to be owned only by the rich, so when will electric cars be affordable to the average person? It may not be long. Tesla has made announcements of a new car model, the Model 3, which may be the cheapest electric car yet. It’s starting price may be around $35,000 (manufacturer’s suggested retail price which may seem a bit

high, but in the long run will pay off (more on this later). As with any new product, more demand leads to cheaper prices. The price is a significant drop from the last Tesla model, the model S, priced at $70,000 plus. Other companies, such as BMW, have also committed to mass producing electric cars by 2025. At this pace, electric cars may be the norm by the end of 2030. Electric cars have proven to be more environmentally friendly than its gasoline powered counterparts. However, electricity

is only as clean as the way it was produced. Electricity is often produced by means of gasoline, coal and other fossil fuels. However, electric cars do not give off any emissions. Car emissions in the US as of 2016 account for nearly 30% of the total US global warming emissions. Electric cars can reduce emissions even when the electricity is produced from a non-renewable source. If the electricity is produced from a renewable source, the emission of an electric car will be zero. When it comes to electric cars, like most things, it’s all about the money. How much can you expect to save by using an electric car? We could look at a current electric car (such as the Tesla model S) and see that we could save more than $27 per 300 miles. If the average person drives 12,000 miles per year, then in a year the savings would add up to more than $1,080. Additionally, these saving are sure to rise as technology improves and the efficiency of electric cars are increased. Overall, electric cars have several benefits going for them. It is a rare sight, but that will likely be changing soon. Although there is a lot of room for improvement, electric cars are poised to be the next big thing, making the environment cleaner and your wallet happy.

Faith

Faith-Based Institutions And Their Perspective On Natural Disasters ‰‰ Camila Sposito talks about how faith-based institutions have a different approach on natural disasters based on the current environmental events.

By Camilla Sposito camila.sposito001@mymdc.net From strong monsoons in South Asia to a wildfire hitting California, Colorado and Nevada,

to hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria and earthquakes in South, Central and North America, these are just examples of some of the natural disasters that happened this year. In fact, as I write this column, a 7.1 magnitude earthquake has just hit Central Mexico. The fact that these events happen every year, however, make us think these unproportional disasters are something normal and it’s just nature showing its dark side. What is not expected though is their strong intensity, power and magnitude and, as the years pass by, their tendency to get stronger and destructive. Nevertheless, after studying all my life in Catholic schools abroad, we get the idea that sometimes

God sends some of these natural disasters to certain areas as a way of punishing humanity. To others, such as Nathan A. Jones from the Christian Prophecy Organization, said and affirm that these catastrophes are a sign that the anointed one may be coming back soon. While others, such as Gary Ray, writer for The Charismatic Christian Publication, believes signs from the nature such as the solar eclipse that happened on Aug. 21 may be a warning of rapture, but showing a different sign without any destruction. However, if we think about all the eclipses that have had happened since 1901, it would be like 71 signs that the son of God is coming back. In fact, it would probably take

me months to register all-natural disasters that happened in the last 10 years. Following the wrong path can be not going to church often, getting more tattoos, piercings or changing their bodies to ways that would probably make them happier. But, mistreating the planet is also a way of following the wrong path. Though it varies from religion to religion, for example, a research conducted by BBC showed that Catholics are more environmentally friendly than Christians. The research also showed that Christians support the destruction of sacred sites of other religions because they are associated with a traditional faith that they consider evil. Being religious or not causes

the destruction of sacred sites that usually cover gigantic protected forest areas which will probably lead to an increase in natural disasters. How? Let’s take Florida as an example and how it got hotter when thousands of trees that provide us shade went down after Irma’s passage. Now let’s look at it on a bigger scale. Destroying those bigger areas will cause an increase in temperature and with this increase icy areas will melt faster, the ocean level will rise and cause hurricanes and monsoons to be stronger since they feed off of warmer waters. This could all cause the real apocalypse and we should not wait until it happens for us to start changing our attitudes toward the environment.

Confederacy

Confederate Statues Have No Place In Today’s Society ‰‰ Lazaro Bosch writes about how confederate statues are a part of history but how he disagrees with the way the altright have been fighting for the statues to stay in place.

By Lazaro Bosch lazaro.bosch00@mymdc.net Confederate statues are a part of history, but protestors need a better understanding on why these statues were put in place. The methods protesters are using to get their point across isn’t justified. As tempers flare and

emotions are at an all-time high, the debate has become more than the statues themselves. It is a tug of war between those who favor removal and those who do not; those who see them as monuments to white supremacy and those who believe the removal is an attempt to erase history. “The US, having a history of systemic racism, now has many elected officials who are black, even a black president. So, let [the] state[s] fly their confederate flags and let the memory of the confederacy remain. Let us remember and move on,” said David Alvarez, an 18-year-old economics major at West Campus. While race does play a part on this issue, it isn’t what current officials represent and they are not the reason why the statues are up. The confederacy is not hard to explain. It was a time in our country when southern states wanted to secede from the union because they were what we call “white supremacists” today and wanted to

AMINAH BROWN / THE REPORTER

maintain slavery, while the North abolished it and told the South to do the same. Of course, slavery is not something I agree with. However, there is still debate on whether the reason why people want to keep the monuments is in support of southern pride and not in commemorating a pro-slavery piece.

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Like Alvarez, many think the solution is to increase diversity in our government or local municipalities, but politics have fanned the situation. “I wonder: Is it George Washington next week, and is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You know, you really do have to ask yourself—where does it stop?”

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said President Donald J. Trump in a press conference in August. He later reiterated these arguments on Twitter calling it “foolish” to take down Confederate monuments. “Trump is not [although he is] an alt-righter himself. POTUS' actions and tactics such as attacking his opponents on a personal level and humorously are tactics generally seen on the alt-right. But also his bombastic personality has inspired the movement, especially through the use of memes,” said Alvarez when asked if Trump has impacted these protests. I highly believe that the President's campaign actions have fueled the flames of the United State’s racism and has awoken conservative views. But, whether this debate is a racial or political fight, we must respect other people’s opinions and try to do what is right for this divided nation just as Abraham Lincoln once did to preserve the union.

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Everglades

We Are Destroying Our Own Backyard ‰‰ Justin Marcano writes about the destruction of the Everglades from growing urban development and worries about the Trump Administration’s stance on climate change.

By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net “There must be progress, certainly. But we must ask ourselves what kind of progress we want, and what price we want to pay for it. If, in the name of progress, we want to destroy everything beautiful in our world, and contaminate the air we breathe, and the water we drink, then we are in trouble,” said Marjory Stoneman Douglas, who was a heroine of the environmentalist movement and is revered in South Florida as “The Mother of the Everglades.” But her voice has been drowned out by the sounds of construction and expansion inching closer into the place she guarded so fiercely until the day she died. The charge toward climate

BROOKE STEWART / THE REPORTER

change conservation was at its peak during the Obama Administration. The United Nations came together for the Paris Accords, a multinational agreement to reduce the damage that had built over the years from man-made destruction. But now, with the actions of the Trump Administration, all the progress has been halted by leaving the Paris Accords and assigning an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator that gutted the agency and let loose the reigns for the fuel industry to tear into unchecked regulations.

I suppose it is up to the students to save themselves from the problems caused by generations prior. But what will future generations say of what we did now to protect our world? In our own backyard, we see a disregard for nature as we inch forward into the Everglades through construction and farming. Miami-Dade County reviews its development every seven years. The Comprehensive Development Master Plan (CDMP) is reviewed and updated through a process known as The Evaluation and Appraisal Report (EAR). In

general, the cycle has arrived under strained political tension. The debate, this time around, lies in whether or not to expand the Urban Development Boundary. The UDB is an invisible line running along the south and western areas of the county buffered by agricultural lands. The agricultural area separates densely packed urban development from the Everglades—the main source of water for 8 million Floridians. There is cause for concern due to support for an extension of the Dolphin Expressway through the UDB that would ease traffic concerns, but would also be tempting for even more development surrounding the Kendall area. According to the Florida Museum of Natural History, urban development, industry and agriculture pressures have destroyed more than half of the original Everglades. Ever-increasing population and industry growth in South Florida has resulted in large metropolitan areas and rising pressures on surrounding natural environments. The Everglades has always been under threat by human consumption and encroachment. The battle between the conservation of the Everglades and human development is a microcosm of what is currently taking place on an international scale. The result of how this situation is handled here will have an immense impact on what is done globally.

Florida

Why Adam Putnam Should Be Florida’s Next Governor ‰‰ Ethan Suquet discusses how Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam should be voted in as the state’s next governor to keep a pattern of conservative leaders which can benefit Florida.

By Ethan Suquet ethan.suquet001@mymdc.net Since early May, Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture has been running a campaign to keep the state under consistent conservative leadership which has

historically overseen the creation of 1.3 million Floridian jobs under Governor Jeb Bush and one million under Governor Rick Scott. Adam Putnam knows how to continue this rapid job growth which this past year was nearly double the national average. The reason he understands job creation so well is that as a young citrus farmer he was a job creator. Putnam brought this knowledge to the Florida House at 22-yearsold and at 26-years-old he was the youngest member of Congress. He took his experience as a job creator all the way to Washington D.C. He has an impressive voting record which emphasized his commitment to free markets, strong families and an active military and also showed the nation that he stood on principle rather than party by asking an attorney general from his party to resign after acting in ways inconsistent with the Constitution. Time and time again, Putnam

has shown a commitment to a robust and prosperous Florida. Unlike most politicians that have to run away from their record, Putnam can run on his record which is an important distinction. As Commissioner of Agriculture, Putnam has pushed a proveteran, pro-second amendment agenda through the expansion of access to concealed carry licenses and through Operation Outdoor Freedom, which has allowed many veterans hunting and fishing opportunities in Florida. As Governor, Putnam would be committed to protecting these freedoms as he has always done. Students at Miami Dade College, even ones that are not veterans or gun enthusiasts, would benefit under a Putnam administration because he is so committed to lowering taxes. Many of you may become parents soon and can benefit from his governorship. Putnam believes in the voucher system because every parent

should have a choice and every child should have a chance. “Florida can be more than the prize for a life well-lived somewhere else. I believe Florida can be the launch pad for the American Dream. So it’s critical that we provide our students in K-12, college and training programs the tools they need to succeed, to compete in this increasingly global economy and win,” said the Putnam campaign when reached out for a statement. When I spoke to Putman on the phone, he said that he is committed to making sure that the dual enrollment program is not only there for high schoolers that want a liberal arts education, but also for those that want to pursue technical education, so that they too can thrive when they go directly from high school into the workforce. Overall, Putnam has a record that Florida can be proud of. A vote for Putnam is a vote to put Florida first.

To write for the forum section, contact Katherine Wallace-Fernandez at (305) 237-2715 or katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

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The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

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