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Yeezy Season

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Shark Pride

The Reporter’s Ciro Salcedo takes a long look into the problematic comments made on Twitter by rapper Kanye West in his A&E column.

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The Miami Dade College men’s baseball season came to a screeching halt after they lost the first two games at the state tournament in Lakeland.

A&E

Miami Dade College will require students and employees to display their IDs on campus. The new safety initiative will be implemented by Fall 2018.

Bitter Ending SPORTS

NEWS

Safety Policy

The Reporter’s Justin Marcano bids an emotional farewell to Miami Dade College and credits his time here for making him the man he is today.

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Enjoy Your

Summer!

4VOL.4VOL. 8, ISSUE — SEPTEMBER 8, 2ISSUE 15 — MAY 26, 22, 2017 2018

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Student Profile

Nearly 17,000 Graduate During MDC Commencement Ceremonies

Blind Grammy Award-Winning Student Tours Latin America ‰‰ Humberto Molero, a Wolfson Campus student, is a drummer for San Luis a rock band, touring the United States and Latin America this summer. Molero, who has three Grammys, is learning English at Miami Dade College. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net

OMAR NEGRIN / THE REPORTER

School's Out: Graduates celebrate during North and InterAmerican Campus' commencement ceremony on May 5. Miami Dade College hosted five commencement ceremonies at two separate locations: the University of Miami's Watsco Center and the Kendall Campus gymnasium. For more photos from graduation, check out The Reporter online at www.mdcthereporter.com. ‰‰ Miami Dade College hosted five commencement ceremonies at the University of Miami’s Watsco Center and the Kendall Campus gymnasium on May 5. Nearly 17,000 students participated in the ceremonies. By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net Graduation was a family affair for Octavia Anderson. Anderson, 50, received her bachelor’s degree in criminal justice alongside her son, Philip Hardemon, and her nephew, Kenderick Watson, who both received bachelor’s degrees in supervision management. “It was a big accomplishment for myself and my son and nephew,” Anderson said. “To see it in a complete stage, it was exciting. I was overjoyed.” Anderson, a supervisor in the copy center at North Campus, initially pursued a career as a corrections officer but enjoyed the field of criminal justice so much that she decided to switch her focus. She hopes to find a part-time job dealing with juveniles in the justice system, focusing on rehabilitation. Anderson was one of almost 17,000 students who attended five commencement ceremonies on May 5, a record number for a college with more than 165,000 students. The ceremonies were at two locations: the

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University of Miami’s Watsco Center and the Kendall Campus gymnasium. “This generation that is coming to the College at the present time is the most resilient that I have ever observed,” said MDC president Eduardo Padron in an interview with The Reporter. “I think it shows the dedication and the perseverance and the sacrifices and how they honor their families by getting credentials that will lift up entire families, not just them.” Each commencement ceremony had a different speaker. Francis Suarez, mayor of City of Miami, at North’s and InterAmerican’s ceremony; Karen Stout, Achieving the Dream CEO, at Homestead’s ceremony; Allan Golston, president of the United States program of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, at Wolfson and Hialeah’s ceremony; Mildred García, president of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, at Medical’s ceremony and Laurene Powell Jobs, president of the Emerson Collective, at Kendall and West’s ceremony. “I was so excited to be asked,” said Powell Jobs in an interview with The Reporter. “Everything about MDC is the future of the United States.” Garcia mixed Spanish and English and drew from her own college experiences in her commencement speech. “I am a community college graduate and a proud one,” Garcia said. “From this

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moment forward, your education will be your first line of defense in a world that will challenge you.” Wolfson Campus student Julio Llorenty is ready for that challenge. Llorenty earned his associates in arts degree in political science after two and a half years at Wolfson Campus. Llorenty was never interested in higher education—he instead dropped out of high school and devoted nine years to military service, where he served as a sergeant to attend college. During his tenure, he spent a year in Afghanistan. Four years after leaving service, he found his footing at MDC. He hopes to use his degree to work in international relations and eventually with the United Nations. “They helped me by giving me the proper tools to better myself with a lot of programs I didn’t know about before,” Llorenty said. “Miami Dade gave me a chance to better myself and improve.” Llorenty, a 35-year-old father of three, took his children to graduation so they could watch him walk across the stage and receive his diploma. “I wanted them to see [my graduation] so that when they get older they can achieve their goals like I did,” Llorenty said. Staff Writer Christian Ortega contributed to this story.

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A&E

Humberto Molero lives a double life. He is a music business student at Wolfson Campus and a drummer for SanLuis, a Venezuelan-based band currently on a promotional tour in the United States and Latin America. Molero also has three Grammy awards under his belt. The feat is even more impressive because Molero has Retinitis Pigmentosa, a genetic disorder of the eyes that causes loss of vision through the degeneration of the retina. He was diagnosed with the disease when he was nine-years-old. But he never let that stop his passion for music. As a kid in Maracaibo, Venezuela, Molero’s fondest memories involved listening to rock songs on the radio. “I remember turning on the radio in the car, sitting back, and losing myself in the rhythm of the music,” Molero said. “From a young age, I was drawn to music and I just knew I had to keep chasing it.” When he decided to pursue a career in music, he initially bounced around, trying different instruments until he discovered the drums when he was 12. “I was trying to find the instrument that fit my life,” Molero said. “When you have a talent, sometimes you don’t really know what fits your passion. When I decided to start playing the drums, I felt an immediate connection to the drums. I could understand everything. The sound just fills my head and from that moment I thought to myself: ‘This is it. This is the instrument I was meant to play.’” For Molero, his impairment never affected his ability to master the drums. “I don’t think it was ever any different learning how to play. Once you memorize where each part of the drumset is, it’s permanent,” Molero said. “The drums are like an extension of my body. The moment the instructor first sat me down and explained to me how to position my body and play the instrument, I knew this would be my life.” Once he chose the drums, he took lessons from countless private instructors. Molero was first taught basic rhythm from the YAMAHA Music Academy and from there worked his way up the music world. He joined his first band accidentally at TURN TO STUDENT PROFILE PAGE 5

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2 BRIEFING | MAY 22, 2018

THE REPORTER Former Reporter Editor To Intern At Orlando Sentinel

// BRIEFING Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Briefing Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

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B katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program

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Former Reporter Editor To Intern At WLRN Former Reporter A&E editor and social media director Riane Roldan has been selected as a summer intern at WLRN. The 12-week internship starts on June 4. “I’m beyond happy,� Roldan said. “I really was looking forward to going back to Miami this summer and apply everything I’ve learned.� Roldan, 21, will write digital articles, take photos, produce radio podcasts and assist with WLRN’s social media platforms. She currently serves as the express editor for the Berkeley Beacon, the student newspaper at Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts, where she is studying journalism. Roldan previously interned in Miami at the Medill Justice Project, an award-winning investigative journalism program from Northwestern University. At The Reporter, Roldan was A&E editor during the 2016-17 year, where she won two first-place awards for her writing from the Florida College System Publications Association. —Katherine Wallace-Fernandez

Submissions For Paz Prize For Poetry Being Accepted By The Miami Book Fair The Miami Book Fair is accepting submissions for the Paz Prize for Poetry until June 15. The Paz Prize is awarded to an unpublished, Spanish-written book-length manuscript of poetry by a writer residing in the United States. The winner will receive $2,000 and their manuscript will be translated and published in a bilingual edition of Akashic Press. Manuscripts must contain a table of contents and be paginated. The suggested length is 48-64 pages. The winner will be selected by Rigoberto GonzĂĄlez, who is the recipient of the Lambda Literary Award, Lenore Marshall Prize from the Academy of American Poets, Barnes & Noble Writer for Writers Award and the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. Finalists will be announced in July and the winner will be allowed in September. Applicants need to submit manuscripts at thenationalpoetryseries.submittable.com/submit

Miami Dade College is accepting applications for the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program until June 12. The classbased program is located at the Freedom Tower and starts on Sept. 5. Applicants have to be an owner or co-owner of a business that’s been in operation for a minimum of two years, earned revenues of at least $150,000 in the most recent fiscal year and have at least four employees. Applicants can apply at 10ksbapply.com The program focuses on network opportunities, teaching business skills and panelists composed of Goldman Sachs professionals. Participants will be also able to practice businesses pitches to potential investors during Rocket Pitches. —Camilla Sposito For more information, contact: T(305) 237-7824  10ksbapply.com

Saul Eig and Lois Eig Watson Scholarship Awarded To Eight Students Eight students won the Saul Eig and Lois Eig Watson Scholarship by the Miami Dade College Foundation and the Eig-Watson School of Aviation on April 12. Reynaldo Aguero, Christopher Bazaka, Samantha Flores Romo, Edward C. Hoyosl, Matthew Lewis, German Andres Melo, Ezequiel Serrano and David F. Zambrano won the scholarship, which covers the cost of training The Saul and Lois Eig Watson Scholarship was established in 1988 through Lois Eig Watson in memory of her husband, Saul Eig. The scholarship has been granted to more than 200 students. —Julie O’Hare

Maria Elena Vizcaino, who served as editor-in-chief of The Reporter during the 201617 school year, has accepted a reporting internship at the Orlando Sentinel. Vizcaino, 21, will start the 10-week paid internship on June 4. “I’m so excited,� Vizcaino said. “I can’t believe I’m finally going to be in a newsroom from eight to five and see the 24-hour news cycle happen before my eyes and contribute to it.� She currently serves as a reporter for The Daily Tar Heel, the student newspaper at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, where she is studying journalism. At The Reporter, Vizcaino Vizcaino won a first place award for indepth reporting in 2017 from the Florida College System Press Association for a story she wrote about an Honors College student killed by her father in a murder-suicide. “The Reporter is where I learned everything I know,� Vizcaino said. “I’m so grateful for the opportunity of [having] been editor-in-chief.� —Katherine Wallace-Fernandez

Exhibition: The Dolls Of Japan At North Campus Exhibition: The Dolls of Japan will be showcased at North Campus, 11380 N.W. 27th Ave., in Room 5107 until June 1. The exhibit is a collaboration between Miami Dade College, the Consulate General of Japan in Miami and the Japan Foundation. The collection will exhibit 75 works focusing on Noh Ningyo (Noh dolls), Oyama Ningyo (dolls depicting young women), Hakata Ningyo (Hakata dolls), Hina Matsuri (Girls’ Festival) and Tango no Sekku (Boys’ Festival). The exhibit was previously showcased at Luxun Academy of Fine Arts in Shenyang, China. —Claudia Hernandez For more information, contact: Zoraya Cuesta T(305) 237-1191 zcuesta@mdc.edu

Hugo Diaz Kinetic Space Intervention Exhibited At West Campus Miami Dade College will exhibit Hugo Diaz Kinetic Space Intervention at the West Campus Gallery, 3800 N.W. 115 Ave, Room 1105 from May 24 to July 3. The exhibit will showcase kinetic art through the use of shapes, reflections and movement. Diaz is a Venezuela native and is known for creating optical illusions through the use of vibrations and contrasting surfaces. Diaz’s work has been showcased at Art Santa Fe 2017 in New Mexico, ArtsPark of Hollywood in Florida and the Museum of Geometric and MADI Art in Texas. The exhibit is free and open to the public. —Claudia Hernandez For more information, contact: Tata Fernandez T(786) 262-5886

Reporter Alumna Lands TV Job In Texas

The Koubek Center, 2705 S.W. 3rd St., will showcase a workshop and performance by artist Niurca MĂĄrquez alongside dancer Damaris Ferrer on June 3. The workshop is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and the performance is at 6 p.m. The event is under the Koubek Center En Residencia program, a six-month artist-in-residence program which supports Latino artists. The workshop is for women of all ages and teaches storytelling and doll crafting while focusing on flamenco and Spanish culture. Marquez and Ferrer will perform siempre quise ser bailaDora, a 30 minute duet with music by guitarist Jose Luis Diaz de La Paz. The performance will be followed by a Q and A session. Tickets are available at www.koubekcenter.org RSVP is required. For more information, contact the Koubek Center at koubekcenter@ mdc.edu or at (305) 237- 7750.

ReadCaribbean will present A Map to Wakanda: Creating (Diverse) Comic Books at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2nd Ave., on Aug. 25 and Aug. 26 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The workshop will focus on teaching artists and writers how to create comics with characters of different backgrounds, how to use various cultures in comics and how to present stories of people who have been dehumanized through comics. The workshop will be taught by Vanessa R. Del Rey, Emily Joynton, Kevin Joseph, Juan Navarro, Alexis Ziritt and Manny Duran and will be moderated by Thomas Logan. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact M.J. Fievre at mfievre1@mdc.edu

Nicolette Perdomo, who served as editor-in-chief of The Reporter during the 2015-16 school year, has accepted a position as a multimedia journalist position at KAMC, an ABC-affiliated television station, in Lubbock, Texas. She starts June 5. Her duties will include being live from the studio, being live on scene, reporting daily and completing stories for the 6 p.m. newscast. Perdomo, 22, graduated from the University of Florida with a bachelor of science in telecommunication in May. At UF, she Perdomo reported and anchored the 5 p.m. newscast for WUFT, a PBS-affiliated television station. “I eventually want to be a reporter in Miami, and this will be a way for me to gain reporting experience and enhance my skills,� Perdomo said. “Journalism and writing great stories have been my passion for years and I want to tell great stories for the rest of my life, so I think this new job will be great for me.� At The Reporter, Perdomo, who graduated from the Kendall Campus' Honors College in 2016, won first place from the Florida College System Press Association in the news story category for a story she did on two Miami Dade College students who were struck by a car and killed. “It was a great experience becoming editor-in-chief of The Reporter,� Perdomo said. “It allowed me to become passionate about writing and editing.�

—Valentina Gonzalez

—Justin Marcano

—Claudia Hernandez

—Katherine Wallace-Fernandez

Koubek Center Features Workshop And Performance By Niurca MĂĄrquez

Diverse Comic Book Workshop At Miami Dade College Wolfson Campus

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PHOTO BRIEFING

SEAN MOW / THE REPORTER

Music Concert: Miami Dade College's Fourth Annual Concerto Competition was held at Kendall Campus on April 18. Pictured left to right: Karla Gonzalez, Miguel Alba, Alexa Lugones and Brian Neal. Lugones placed first with the flute, Alba placed second with the piccolo trumpet and Karla Gonzalez placed third with the trombone.

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New Exhibition: By The People: Designing a Better America is being hosted at Miami Dade College's Museum of Art and Design until September 2018. The design exhibit focuses on solving challenges that rural, urban and suburban communities face.

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Brass Fingers: Karla Gonzalez played the trombone at the Fourth Annual Concerto Competition at Kendall Campus on April 18. Gonzalez placed third. www.mdcthereporter.com

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Kingdom of Dolls: North Campus is exhibiting Dolls of Japan in Room 5107. Seventy-five Japanese dolls are currently on display in the gallery.

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Security

New Safety Initiative Requires Students And Employees To Display IDs ‰‰ Miami Dade College’s new safety initiative requires students and employees to display their ID’s while on campus. The College said the measure is scheduled to be implemented by Fall 2018. By Paola Fernandez paola.fernandez005@mymdc.net Miami Dade College plans to implement a new safety initiative which will require all students and employees to display their ID while on campus by Fall 2018. The new rule, dubbed We’re All In It Together, Wear Your MDCard, was proposed by the Office of Emergency Management and district and college leadership, according to Juan Mendieta, the director of communication for MDC. Currently, MDC is rolling out the initiative through a soft launch. “Given events from earlier this year and following our regular reviews for best practices, we feel this new policy will increase safety by allowing all members of the College community to be more easily identified,” Mendieta said.

“The reality is that we all already carry our MDC cards. Now we will simply wear them on the outside. This has long been a policy in other governmental agencies and in the private sector and anything we can do to enhance our safety is welcome.” Students or employees who do not have an MDCard can get one at their campus’ student life department. Students must provide a government issued ID and a paid schedule for the current term. Employees must provide a government-issued ID and their employee number. The first card is free but a replacement card is $15. Lanyards will also be distributed in the Student Life department and employees can collect a lanyard from their respective department manager. Students will be provided blue lanyards and employees will be provided black lanyards. Hialeah Campus is providing tutors with lanyards in various colors. “However, lanyards are optional. IDs can be displayed and visible with either a lanyard or a clip,” Mendieta said. “Students and

employees may also simply clip the ID to their clothing and not use the lanyard. Whatever they feel is more comfortable. The key is that the ID is displayed and visible.” According to Mendieta, MDC has spent several hundred dollars in lanyards for the IDs. Each lanyard costs several cents to a dollar. “They are a little bit annoying. After all the stuff that’s been happening in the United States, it’s better to take some type of measure than do nothing,” said Benjamin Quintano, treasurer of student government association at Hialeah Campus. “I would rather be annoyed than be in a dangerous situation.” Public safety officers and employees have been directed to tell anyone without an ID how to obtain one. “Part of the rollout will focus more on educating the college community and kindly reminding people to wear their IDs if not displayed correctly,” Mendieta said. “Our aim is to build community and rapport at the outset. Down the road, there will be increasing enforcement and warnings, before penalties may be applied.”

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IDs Please: Starting this fall, Miami Dade College will implement a new safety initiative requiring all students and employees to display their IDs while on campus. IDs can be obtained in the student life office. Students have the option of using blue lanyards, like the ones pictured here, to display them.

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Grammy Award-Winning Venezuelan Drummer Learning English At MDC FROM STUDENT PROFILE, FRONT

16. His older sister, Maria Alcira, told him about a group of musicians whose drummer needed help learning songs. When Molero came over to teach him, the bandmates insisted he join them. That band’s name was Polbo Sonico. From that moment, he began gaining notoriety. But it wasn’t until he joined the rock band Voz Veis in the early 2000s that he gained commercial success. Voz Veis was awarded three Latin Grammy Awards for Best Short-Form Music Video and Best Latin Children’s album in 2008 and for Best LongForm Music Video in 2010. In 2011, Voz Veis split up and Molero joined the newly-formed group, SanLuis. Santiago Castillo, a former singer for VosVeis, and founder of SanLuis and Molero’s friend for more than 20 years, knew he had to bring Molero along with him. “He brings with him so much creativity and talent that without him, the band seems to be missing a piece,” Castillo said. In 2016, Molero moved to Miami to continue developing his talents as a musician. Though he received a bachelor’s degree in law from the Universidad del Zulia in 2001, Molero didn’t want to limit himself. He wanted to test the waters of music management and business, which brought him to Miami Dade College where he is studying music business and taking English classes at Wolfson Campus. “Coming to the United States, there were a lot of challenges that I

had to face. Learning English and being visually impaired, there are a lot of challenges that just make the obstacles difficult to get by,” Molero said. “There were times when I was really scared and overcome with emotion that I didn’t know what to do but the most important thing is knowing that at that moment, you have to keep fighting.” This spring was his first semester at MDC. He faced a lot of adversity, adjusting to the workload and a new background. Working with tutors, the ACCESS Department and the World Languages Department helped Molero adjust. At MDC, he grew close to Maria Verona Garcia, the World Languages Department chairperson at Wolfson Campus. They met on the elevator on her first day where he brought up his love for music and their relationship blossomed. Since then, he visits the department almost daily, looking for assistance or just to chat. “When he comes to visit, it’s the best day,” Verona said. “When he’s here, the day becomes more fun and real. He’s really amazing, having accomplished so much and overcome everything he has.” After graduating, he hopes to earn a master’s degree and get a job in the industry. During the summer, Molero will continue taking English for Academic Purposes classes and tour with SanLuis. Dates have not yet been announced. “You’re always going to have

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS / THE REPORTER

Grammy Winner: Humberto Molero is a music business student at Woflson Campus and a drummer for Venezuelan-based band San Luis. Molero has won three Grammy Awards. obstacles in your life, but the hardest part can be staying confident that you’re going to get past them. It’s easy to view being visually impaired as a setback and

it can really bring you down but when you overcome all of those challenges, it makes things feel so rewarding,” Molero said. “Being visually impaired has also helped

me see the world from a different perspective and I think it’s amazing to share with people and help them understand that anything can be overcome.”

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JKC Scholarship

Honors College Students Win Prestigious Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship ‰‰ Four Miami Dade College Honors College students were awarded the Jack Kent Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship. Each recipient will receive up to $40,000 per year to ease the cost of transferring to a four-year institution. By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net Four Miami Dade College Honors College students were awarded the prestigious Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship: Daniela Alvarez, Casey Amaya, Fedelene Camille and Gabriela Rodriguez. This year, the scholarship was awarded to 45 community college students with academic ability and financial need who wish to transfer to a four-year institution. Each recipient receives $40,000 per year for up to three years to cover tuition, living expenses, books and required fees.

Daniela Alvarez Daniela Alvarez had a hard time adjusting to Miami after she moved from Havana, Cuba just days before her fourth birthday. “I used Alvarez to cover my eyes and not want to touch the floor because I was scared of forgetting about my family in Cuba, but eventually when I started school I got over it,” Alvarez said. When Alvarez received an email notification from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, she was shocked. “I couldn’t stop crying, and I couldn’t even utter the words that I received the scholarship,” Alvarez said. “It was an exciting moment that I had worked extremely hard toward achieving for these past two years.” Alvarez credits her success to her mother and sister who made the move with her. “They molded me into the person I am today—passionate and persevering. I admire my mom and my sister in an indescribable way. They are my rock and they’ve inspired me to work hard to achieve my dreams, no matter how big they are because they will

always be right there next to me, cheering me on,” Alvarez said. During her time at the North Campus Honors College, Alvarez founded the Integrated Law and Ethics Society. She also served as head delegate of North Campus’ Model United Nations, vice-president for the Political Science Club, Vote Everywhere ambassador for the Andrew Goodman Foundation and program coordinator for the UN Sustainable Development Goals Service-Learning Project. Alvarez aspires to be an immigration attorney. “Daniela Alvarez is the epitome of being the exemplary human being you would want on your side of any challenge involving justice, fairness, inclusion, service, caring, daring and sharing with a good heart, a bright and rigorous mind and relentless spirit,” said Michael Lenaghan, a professor at North Campus. Daniela Alvarez has been accepted to University of Virginia, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, the University of Miami and Cornell University.

Casey Amaya Being the first in her family to graduate from college, Casey Amaya has encountered many financial obstacles. Born in Havana, Cuba, Amaya Amaya i m m ig r ate d to the United States when she was six years old. “The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation has allowed me to turn adversity into opportunity,” Amaya said. “Essentially, this award has allowed me to turn higher education into a goal that’s tangible and concrete.” At the Honors College at Wolfson Campus, Amaya served as president of the Phi Theta Kappa Wolfson Campus chapter, a student ambassador for the Student Government Association, Civic Engagement Ambassador for the Institute for Civic Engagement and Democracy, student representative for the Alumni Hall of Fame, vice-president of Engage Empower Excel and mentor for Wolves in Training. Amaya aspires to become the first female Supreme Court Chief Justice. She plans to transfer to The Honors College at Florida

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International University and earn a bachelor’s degree in political science. “Prior to her admission, Casey was already set on pursuing a career that would allow her to serve and protect those that are vulnerable,” said Mercedes Medina, a professor at Wolfson Campus. “Her passion for social justice is evidenced in all of her community outreach and service learning projects.”

Fedelene Camille Fedelene Camille was forced to flee to the United States after an earthquake struck Port-auPrince, Haiti in 2010. W h e n Te m p o r a r y Camille Protected Status for Haitians was terminated, Camille realized she would be unable to receive federal or state financial aid after July 22, 2019. The Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship has now become fundamental to her future. “I didn’t know where I would get funding. I come from a low-income household. I knew that my mom would not be able to add a dime to my education,” Camille said. “Now, I have something. I can go to almost any school of my choice. I can fulfill my dreams.” At the Honors College at Wolfson Campus, Camille served as president of Modelle International, vice president of Haitian Boukan Club, fundraising and outreach director of Phi Theta Kappa, tutor at the Mathematics Lab, a WolfPack mentor in the ARCOS Program and a connect specialist at Macy’s MEN'S at Aventura Mall. She also did undergraduate cancer research at University of Miami through ARCOS’s URPO program. “She consistently exceeds expectations and I have no doubt that she will continue to do so throughout the rest of her schooling and into her career,” said Ryan Cassell, a professor at Wolfson Campus. “Her passion to learn and her drive to be the best is transparent.” Camille is majoring in biology and aspires to become a pediatric oncologist. She has been accepted into the University of Michigan, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, University of

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Wisconsin-Madison, University of Central Florida, Florida International University and University of South Florida. Camille is still waiting on decisions from Duke University, Cornell University, Boston University and her top choice, the University of Pennsylvania.

Gabriela Rodriguez Born and raised in Villa Clara, Cuba, Gabriela Rodriguez moved to the United States at 15 with her parents to pursue the American Rodriguez Dream. “I am truly honored to be one of the recipients. It still surprises me to be one of the winners,” Rodriguez said. “It is an amazing feeling to know that I will continue my studies without placing a financial burden on my parents and myself.” In Cuba, Rodriguez practiced several sports including gymnastics, volleyball and chess. In 2004, she entered the primary school of arts Escuela Vocacional de Artes Olga Alonso to specialize in ballet. During her time at the Honors College at InterAmerican Campus, Rodriguez served as Phi Theta Kappa President and led the Honor Society to earn a Five Star Status (highest rating for a PTK Chapter) by earning more than 1,500 hours of community and service learning hours and inducting more than 220 new members. She is also director of Sports4Spirit, a nonprofit project for unprivileged, and as a volunteer dance instructor at Magic Dance Studio. "Her determination, tenacity and overwhelming curiosity for her field are second to none," said Diego Tibaquirá, a professor at InterAmerican Campus. "She will do great not only because of her determination to finish what she starts but because she is determined to come back to her community and help as many people as possible. Gabriela is a true changemaking agent." Rodriguez aspires to become a cardiothoracic surgeon. She plans to attend the University of Miami and major in biology. “Dancing has always been my passion and I plan to keep it with me somehow, but being a surgeon is what I aspire to do,” Rodriguez said.

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Environment

Bees Cause New Buzz At North Campus ‰‰ Christian Acevedo, along with local nonprofit Public Hives, are collaborating to plant hives at North Campus. The hives will contain native bees and honey bees and educate the college community on the insects. By Christian Ortega christian.ortega005@mymdc.net Miami Dade College is looking to make North Campus a sweeter place. Its solution? Bees. Through the efforts of Christian Acevedo, an environmental science major at North Campus, the local nonprofit Public Hives and North Campus, beehives will be featured behind the Science Complex starting in June. With hives on campus, Acevedo hopes to bring awareness to the ever-decreasing local bee population, increase nearby pollination and educate about the impact bees have on the environment. “I wanted to do this project to leave an impact on the campus,” Acevedo said. “The moment I got on campus, I knew this was going to be my mission.” Acevedo initially heard about Public Hives through Sam Van Leer of the Urban Paradise Guild who then got him in contact with Danielle Bender, founder of Public Hives. Public Hives is a nonprofit organization founded in April 2017 in an effort to get beehives in public areas to educate the public about bees and their roles in the ecosystem. They have hives in Little River, Allapattah and Opa-Locka. Public Hives holds weekly workshops that occasionally allow attendees to build their own hives for native bee species.

After visiting the hives that had already been set up in Little Haiti in November, Acevedo “immediately fell in love.” “He’s been so involved and engaged and has really been pushing for a location at Miami Dade College,” Bender said. “He has done everything he can to spearhead this project and take charge of getting hives placed in Miami Dade College.” Once the hive is built, Acevedo will lead teaching sessions about beekeeping for community members and students. “This is an excellent opportunity for him because he’s so civically minded and also it allows him to take on a great leadership role in his community,” Bender said. When Acevedo got in contact with Bender, his next step was getting permission to build the hives at North Campus which, according to Acevedo, went without a hitch. “Everyone was excited to be a part of this,” Acevedo said. The largest concern was making sure the hives were insured to avoid liability. Through his experience working with Public Hives, he was able to quickly file all the paperwork necessary. The next step in the process is planting native flowers in order to attract native bee species. Once the flowers have been in place for at least two weeks, the hives will be built. Acevedo is aiming for mid-June. There will be two types of hives built: one for honey bees, which prefer to live in colonies, and another for native bees that don’t produce honey and are solitary. After setting the hives up, they will be available for the public to visit. Acevedo wants to use this opportunity to educate those who are curious and help erase the

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All The Buzz: Christian Acevedo, an environmental science major at North Campus, is building bee hives behind the Science Complex at North Campus to bring awareness to the impact bees have on the environment. stigma bees have. The hives will be equipped with beekeeping suits that fit children and adults of all sizes along with EpiPens for those who may have an allergic reaction. In all his time working with bees, Acevedo says he has reached a point of comfort where he doesn’t require a suit to interact with them. To him, it’s all about reaching a point of comfort with the bees where he knows how to handle them safely. He says he’s only been stung once. But Acevedo still urges those who are new

to the hobby to handle bees with care, as they can be delicate creatures. Though the native bee hives won’t produce honey, Acevedo hopes to subsidize the hives by selling the honey the other bees produce. Acevedo also plans to host workshops at North Campus beginning early this fall. As the overseer of the hives at North Campus, Acevedo is charged with mentoring the next generation of students who are interested in beekeeping. He also hopes to expand the hives to other campuses.

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8 SPORTS | MAY 22, 2018

THE REPORTER

Baseball

Sharks’ Strong Season Ends Early In Lakeland ‰‰ The Miami Dade College baseball team managed to pull off another 30-plus win season to earn a spot in the Florida College System Athletic Association state tournament in Lakeland. But despite their strong 35-17 record, the Sharks lost their first two games at the state tournament. By Daniela Pachon & Justin Marcano daniela.pachon001@mymdc.net After a 35 win regular season, the Miami Dade College baseball team came into the state tournament in Lakeland with high expectations but instead had their hopes extinguished after losing back-to-back games. In the opening round the Sharks lost 11-8 versus Chipola College on May 11. The next day they lost 12-3 to Hillsborough Community College and were eliminated from the tournament. The team finished the season with an overall 35-17 record including 18-10 in Southern Conference play. “We were hoping it would’ve gone better. But, both games were incredibly hard fought and it just wasn’t our tournament this time unfortunately,” said sophomore pitcher Garrett Bye. “We played well but we made some mistakes at crucial moments where we really needed big-time plays.” Bye, who averaging 10.19 strikeouts per nine innings, appeared in 13 games this season, including seven starts. He will be attending

REPORTER FILE PHOTO / JUSTIN MARCANO

Season Ends In A Dud: Despite wining 35 games during the regular season, the Miami Dade College baseball team was eliminated from the state tournament after losing back-to-back games in Lakeland the University of Alabama in the fall. “A lot of coaching, a lot of teaching and a lot of learning. We showed flashes of being a very dangerous team but were not consistent enough to maximize our full potential,” said assistant coach Adrian Morales. “Obviously we wanted a better showing at the state tournament. All we can ask our players to do is play hard

all the way through and they did that.” Infielder Brian Rey was another one of the team’s leaders. He had a .398 batting average and led the team in RBI (51) this season. Rey will be attending North Carolina State University next year. The team also got strong pitching performances from Yusniel Padron-Artiles, who was 8-2, and Zachary Helsel, who was 7-2.

Despite those performances the Sharks lacked consistency all year. “We won 10 in a row, we lost six in a row, we won 11 in a row, and then we got iffy,” Price said. Some of the consistency issues can be attributed to an abundance of injuries. The team lost two key pitchers this year. Anthony Medina was forced to redshirt because of a herniated disk and Ernesto Pino suffered a torn labrum earlier

this year that required surgery. “We had guys playing in other positions they had never played before,” pitcher Nelson Alvarez said. Despite the team’s disappointing ending, head baseball coach Danny Price said he was proud of his team’s effort. “Some people really stepped up and embraced the next-man-up [mentality],” Price said.

Softball

Lady Sharks Fail To Qualify For Postseason ‰‰ The Miami Dade College softball team (15-30) failed to qualify for the Southern Conference tournament, losing three of their final four games this season. The Lady Sharks are hoping their freshmanladen team gained experience for next season. By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net For the second straight year, the Miami Dade College softball team endured a 30-loss season. The Lady Sharks finished with an overall record of 15-30 and 8-11 in Southern Conference play and failed to qualify for the conference tournament, losing three of their last four games. Fielding a team almost entirely composed of freshman, the Lady Sharks never seemed to find their groove. “I think our season didn’t go as well as we would’ve hoped. We didn’t come out where we wanted to and we lost a lot of games we should have won,” said sophomore pitcher Emma Maitland. “But we had a team of freshman and I have high hopes for the girls next year.” Maitland did her part as the Lady Sharks’ only sophomore, leading the team with a 2.64 earned run average and 80 strikeouts. Through the onslaught of losses

REPORTER FILE PHOTO / OMAR NEGRIN

Season Finale: With a 15-30 record, the Lady Sharks have ended another season without qualifying for postseason play. The team had an 8-11 record in conference play. the Lady Sharks suffered through, the underlying message was building for next year. “They’ll have much more experience and more knowledge of the game, so that will be a huge advantage for them,” Maitland said.

“I think they have the potential to do great things next year.” Much like the beginning of the now-formidable Philadelphia 76ers, the Lady Sharks will have to endure their own version of “The Process.”

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As for now, the Lady Sharks have plenty of room for improvement. Plagued by a lack of timely hitting, the Lady Sharks were only able to muster 131 runs batted in. “I think our biggest weakness was not being able to hit when we

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needed to,” said freshman pitcher Tiffany Dodson. “We have some unbelievable hitters on our team, but sometimes when we need those hits, we can’t seem to get them.” The Lady Sharks were also strike-out prone, enduring 174 K’s. Despite the bleak season, they did not let the losing affect their effort on the field. One of the bright spots was shortstop Melissa Mayeux. She boasted a team-leading .371 batting average, with eight home runs and 27 runs batted in. Another key improvement for the Lady Sharks was team chemistry. “We had each other’s backs and we’re there for each other,” Dodson said. “During the games, if one of the girls is down, we all try to help her move on and try to get her back up and say things like ‘you’ll get the next out or next time up to bat you’ll get a hit.’” They hope to use that unity to improve on the field next year. "I know that next year we will be a lot stronger and our chances will be a lot better," said Lady Sharks head coach Gina De Agüero. "Being a younger team this season, we had to build from the ground up. I feel that next season we will just have to implement what we learned this season."

MDC The Reporter


MAY 22, 2018 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

9

// SPORTS Giovanni Del Fa, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

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B giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net

Volleyball

Successful Season Nets Scholarship Offers For Sophomore Lady Sharks

Andrade

‰‰ After a perfect season and back-to-back national championships, all six sophomores on the Lady Sharks volleyball team were offered scholarships to continue their athletic and educational pursuits. The school’s range from as close as Florida Atlantic University to as far away as Bakersfield College in California. By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net All six sophomores who won back-to-back national championships with the Lady Sharks volleyball team were awarded scholarship offers to continue their careers at four-year schools. Outside hitter Massiel Matos will be attending Florida Atlantic

Bonifacio

Hernandez

University; outside hitter Sun Wenting will be attending the University of Missouri; outside hitter Rafaella Bonifacio will be attending Bakersfield College in California; libero Thais De Castro Andrade will be attending Columbia College in Missouri; libero Camila Hernandez will be attending Texas A&M University and middle blocker Paula Barbosa Louro will be attending Park University in Missouri. “They need to remember that they are coming from Miami Dade College and to represent us well,” said Lady Sharks head volleyball coach Origenes “Kiko” Benoit. “They have a goal to get a degree, get an education and keep working hard.” Matos was the team’s top player. She averaged 3.68 kills per

Louro

set, totaled 368 kills this season, 2.31 digs per set and averaged .63 service aces per set. Matos was named the National Junior College Athletic Association Volleyball National Tournament Most Valuable Player two years in a row. “My season was amazing and unforgettable,” Matos said. “It was a team that any player would like to have. We managed to be champions because the teamwork was key in every game, always united on and off the court.” Wenting also played a huge role for the Lady Sharks. She averaged 3.45 kills per set, totaled 324 kills this season while averaging 2.96 digs per set. Wenting also had 278 digs and a hitting percentage of .343. “The season for me was the best season forever,” Wenting said. “It’s

not because we didn’t lose any games, but also because we fight together. To be a volleyball player, my dream is to play a game that don’t care to win or lose but use all my power to play every point with my teammates. After I played for the sharks my dream became reality.” Bonifacio averaged 3.10 kills per set, totaled 291 kills, 348 digs and averaged a hitting percentage of .314. “My season was perfect,” Bonifacio said. “My team is awesome. I will never forget this team. We won every game of the season. I do not think it was easy, but I think we worked very hard for this.” Liberos, Thais De Castro Andrade and Camila Hernandez also contributed to the team’s success. Andrade contributed 455 kills

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Matos

Wenting

and averaged 4.89 digs per set. Hernandez was named to the 2017 NJCAA Volleyball National AllTournament team. Louro led the team in blocks per set (1.17). With back-to-back national titles, a 34-0 perfect season and a 44-game winning streak dating back to Oct. 25, 2016, the departing sophomores leave a legacy but all agree they also got a ton from their time at MDC. “The important thing is not how to be a better player, but how to be a better human being,” Wenting said. “That is also what Coach Kiko always taught us about. No matter where I am going in the future, I will never forget that I was a shark. And I will take the spirit of MDC with me the rest of my volleyball career.”


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MAY 22, 2018 | A&E

THE REPORTER

11

// A&E Ciro Salcedo, A&E Editor  // 

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B ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

Marvel

Infinity War Is What The MCU Has Lead Up To

‰‰ After 10 years and 18 movies, Avengers: Infinity War sees big changes in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Filled with great action, special effects and some surprising emotional weight, Infinity War is one of the MCU’s best movies. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net It seemed crazy in 2008. A series of films based off of Marvel comic book characters that all exist within the same universe. It was a gamble. It paid off. The Marvel Cinematic Universe has made some of the most profitable and beloved superhero films in the decade, with films like Iron Man, Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Black Panther, achieving high levels of financial and critical success. The films have attracted big-name and independent directors such as Jon Favreau, Shane Black and Ryan Coogler to try their hands of helming a film, with most having massive success. Avengers: Infinity War is the latest film in the MCU. Directed by Anthony and Joel Russo, the film takes place after the events of Civil War (also directed by the Russo brothers), where the Avengers are fragmented after differing morals and ideals from events prior. To avoid spoilers, plot details will be brief. The film boils down to this: an intergalactic being known as Thanos (Josh Brolin) intends to wipe out half of the universe with the use of Infinity Stones. Now, it is up to

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARVEL STUDIOS

Endgame: Featuring dozens of characters and plenty of superhero action, Avengers: Infinity War is overstuffed in all the best ways.

several heroes from the Marvel Universe to stop him. This film was positioned to be what the last 18 MCU movies has been leading up to. Thankfully, most of that hype is well met. The film has its fair share of emotional heft. Characters die or go through some awful tragedy, heightening the tension above usual superhero fare. Sure, the occasional bouts of that classic MCU humor are still present, for better or worse. While the humor is a good change of pace, it was a distracting element. The stakes are high here, why does Tony Stark feel the need to quip? The film is also long. At 149 minutes, the length is definitely felt. Thankfully, the film is a marvel (no pun intended) to look at. The Russo Brothers made some interesting choices with typography, similar to Civil War. The cinematography is also top notch, opting for a more dynamic series of camera angles. There are scenes with long continuous shots, including some well-choreographed fights. The past MCU movies have all had an element of sameness to them, so it is refreshing to see this one try some new things with its presentation Infinity War is an excellent (and overstuffed) experience. If the MCU was a serialized television series, this film was the season finale, complete with a compelling cliffhanger. It not only provides the big spectacle Marvel is known for, it also provides some real emotion, something other blockbusters should look to as inspiration.

Nintendo

Saturday Morning RPG Makes Its Way To Nintendo Switch ‰‰ After several ports to IOS, PC and Playstation 4, Mighty Rabbit Studios finally brings their fun and earnest throwback to the 1980s to the Nintendo Switch. Being able to play portably and at home adds so much to an already packed game. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net It seems as if nostalgia for the 1980s will never die despite the decade officially ending more than 29 years ago. While some gaming companies fail to replicate the iconic feel of the '80s, Mighty Rabbit Studios does more than just deliver a blast from the past. Saturday Morning RPG takes the world’s collective love of pop culture of the decade and wraps it all into a fun role-playing game. Players assume the role of Marty, a high school student who is thrust into an adventure around several open-worlds. The game is presented as a traditional Japanese role-playing game. Marty can travel across the gaming world and explore while occasionally triggering random battles. Battles play out like traditional turn-based ones with players planning out their attacks and waiting on enemies to plan theirs. Similar to the Paper Mario games,

players use timingbased minigames to block attacks or to use special items. Filling the game with '80s memorabilia and references, it feels like something transported straight out of the time period. Special items in the game range from trucks that resemble Optimus Prime from the animated Transformers series to a joystick modeled after the Atari 2600. Taking inspiration from 16-bit RPGs like Earthbound or Final Fantasy VI, the game places heavy emphasis on player exploration. The game sports PHOTO COURTESY OF MIGHTY RABBIT STUDIOS an art style in the same vein as RPGs Throwback: With an art style reminiscent of 16-bit RPGs and an overabundance of '80s pop culture references, Saturday from the decade like Morning RPG is a fun time for any Switch owner. Chrono Trigger or Secret of Mana. The character sprites has both the option of playing por- collectibles the game world has to just the fix for that simple, yet enare very detailed, even if most of tably or docked on a TV screen. offer. Random non-player charac- tertaining gameplay. Mighty Rabthe enemies look exactly. The en- That option is the Switch’s best ters give out special items as well bit Studios has crafted a perfect vironments sport a pseudo-3D advantage over the other versions as useful information to complet- love letter to the era as well as a of the game, as the mobile version ing quests, similar to ones found in beautifully crafted game for a rislook alike. ing console. For fans of Saturday more modern open-world games. The game is divided into four can’t be blown up on a TV. Though it can be repetitive, Sat- morning cartoons and Japanese That portability makes the epiepisodes in which the player fights a series of different enemies. Four sodic nature of the game easier to urday Morning RPG is a fun ride RPGs or just Switch owners lookthrough '80s nostalgia. For anyone ing for something new, Saturday worlds allow and encourage open digest. itching for a throwback-type video Morning RPG definitely fits that Completionists will appreciexploration, immersing the player. The Nintendo Switch version ate the dozens of side quests and game, Saturday Morning RPG has bill.

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MDC The Reporter


12 A&E | MAY 22, 2018

THE REPORTER

Top Five

Ciro’s Five Favorite MCU Films

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARVEL STUDIOS

‰‰ With billions upon billions of dollars being made every year, the Marvel Cinematic Universe is an ambitious and popular series of films that has amassed quite the following. These are the five greatest films in the canon. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net With the release Avengers: Infinity War, the Marvel Cinematic Universe hype is through the roof. The MCU was an ambitious idea that has paid off extensively, with each film proving to be a massive commercial and critical success. Each film has its fans and detractors, so here is a list of my five favorites. To keep things from getting too recent, I did not include Black Panther or Infinity War. Both films are excellent, but need a little time before being judged among the best of all time. 5. Captain America: Civil War (2016) Director(s): Anthony and Joel Russo Phase: Three In 2014, the Russos took on their first MCU film with Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Known for directing the pilot episode of

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARVEL STUDIOS

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARVEL STUDIOS

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARVEL STUDIOS

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARVEL STUDIOS

Arrested Development and a couple episodes of Community, the two successfully directed a great superhero film. Two years later, they brought one of the strongest MCU films in the canon with Civil War. Loosely based on the comic of the same name, the Avengers find themselves conflicted within, with Captain America facing a moral dilemma. This is the one that shifted everything and leads perfectly into Infinity War. It has the usual Marvel trappings, but it also does a good job of balancing the heroes it introduces and welcomes back. Despite missing Hulk and Thor, Civil War introduced the world to Black Panther while giving audiences a glimpse of Tom Holland’s take on SpiderMan. While the action itself wasn’t too great, it delivered a lot of emotional depth, especially with a villain as reletable as Baron Zemo. Civil War was where the MCU saw real change, both in its fictional universe and in the way its stories were told.

raccoon. Sure, this sounds like a strange set up for a Simpsons joke but it turns out to be one of the freshest Marvel films in recent memory. Taking an obscure comic series and turning it into a smash hit, James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy effectively combines humor, science-fiction and a soundtrack that rivals a Tarantino film to make something truly unique. Coming at a time when superhero movies felt stale and big blockbusters were just overstuffed CGI-fests, along comes this gem of a romp to show the world that a group of ragtag misfits in space can save the world. Plus, props to Gunn for including Redbone’s Come and Get Your Love.

totally-consistent film, full of all the usual tropes that come with a Spidey story. Here, the humor never feels forced or out of place. Instead, every joke feels right and every supporting character feels like they fit into the larger narrative. The action and special effects are the standard fare, but its the characters that make any SpiderMan film great. Thankfully, both good and evil characters deliver something worth watching.

1. Iron Man 3 Director(s): Shane Black Phase: Three In 2008, Iron Man was released to major commercial success. It also propelled Robert Downey Jr. into the highest-grossing actor of all time territory. Before that, in the year 2005, Shane Black revitalized RDJ’s career after near-collapse with Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. That film was Black’s directorial debut and showed the world that Downey was a phenomenal actor (2008 also brought his performance in Tropic Thunder). Iron Man 3 was a match made in heaven. All of the great Shane Black-isms (narration, playing with time and a great love for noir storytelling) are preset. What sets it apart is how well the story plays out. It plays on themes like age, post-traumatic stress disorder and the realization that no matter how powerful anyone may seem, it can all come to rapid end. Iron Man 3 not only elevated the MCU’s storytelling but finally gave a great screenwriter/director his chance to shine with a big blockbuster. It’s a film that made me fall in love with the MCU and one that gets better with each and every viewing. Excelsior, my friends.

4. Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) Director(s):James Gunn Phase: Two The writer of the two live-action Scooby-Doo films directed a scifi film starring the fat guy from Parks and Recreation and a talking

3. Spider-Man: Homecoming Director(s): Jon Watts Phase: Two First things first: Hannibal Buress being canon in an MCU film is easily the greatest thing, ever. The first film in the MCU to star everyone’s favorite bug-themed superhero (sorry Ant-Man), Spider-Man: Homecoming was a great look at the life of post-Civil War Peter Parker (Tom Holland). It was part coming-of-age story and part superhero flick, complete with Michael Keaton’s turn as villain Vulture. It’s a fun and

2. Thor: Ragnarok Director(s): Taika Waititi Phase: Three Taika Waititi is much better known for directing the deadpan comedy What We Do in the Shadows. Those skills were put to good use with Thor: Ragnarok as it is the funniest film the Marvel canon. Taking on a lighter tone (and brighter palette) than most superhero movies, the third film in the Thor series changes things up by putting its titular hero’s charm to good use. Thor: Ragnarok takes inspiration from all great campy '80s films, such as the gaudy and bright colors from Flash Gordon to the science-fiction spectacle that Star Wars was. Thor: Ragnarok sets new standards for comedic superhero films, standards that are going to pretty hard to top.

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MAY 22, 2018 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

// A&E Ciro Salcedo, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

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B ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

Artist Review

The Abomination Of Obama’s Nation: Why We Need To Talk About Kanye ‰‰ Rapper, producer, fashion mogul and political correspondent Kanye West has made the rounds in the media lately. Instead of crashing award shows he has turned his eyes toward President Donald J. Trump. Unfortunately, things don’t seem too bright for the hip-hop artist. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net Hip-hop has always been an art of trailblazers. Artists have been pushing the envelope on what could be done musically for years, finding ways to not only push their respective genres but the medium of music as a whole. Within the past 20-something years, albums such as Outkast’s ATLiens, Jay-Z’s The Blueprint or even Danny Brown’s Atrocity Exhibition have found ways to break hip-hop out of a niche corner that many thought the genre to be in. Even with the popularity rap has enjoyed, one artist has managed to embrace commercial influence while attaining his creative freedom. That artist being Chicago-based rapper Kanye West. Labeling Mr. West a genius is an understatement. The man has found countless ways to innovate and provoke discussion in the community, whether it’s the use of samples, manipulating vocal tracks as if they were instruments or even just reinventing himself with concurrent releases for the past 14 years. His artistry can’t be denied.

AMINAH BROWN / The Reporter

Unfortunately, it’s not his musical talent that’s in the spotlight these days. It all started on April 13, 2018. Kanye West is back on Twitter after a break and he is back to his usual antics right before a new album. It wasn’t too bad. Yes, there was his usual pseudo-philosophical stuff but nothing that reaches “Bill Cosby is innocent” levels of cringe-worthiness. If anything, Kanye’s Twitter was a blessing. In the span of a couple of days, Mr. West not only announced his latest album, he also announced a collaboration between him and rapper Kid Cudi. Days later, he announced that he was producing new albums by

Pusha T and Nas. As a fan, I was happy. Unfortunately, that happiness came at a price. He began tweeting some erratic things, most notably an endorsement for President Donald J. Trump. That was not a big of a surprise considering he had supported him before, although he retracted that support shortly after. It still is a concerning sight for sure. Kanye West is not only a big figure in the music world, he is an international celebrity. His influence can be seen everywhere, including in these recent outbursts on Twitter. Here, Kanye’s ignorance shines through by saying how he likes the

way Trump thinks, describing the two as brothers and both having “dragon energy.” Out of character? No. Kanye is natural-born contrarian. He thrives on drama and loves the attention, doing anything he can to get his name out there. Now that his album is coming out, he feels the need to promote it any way he can. Unfortunately, this promotion is just proving to us how morally bankrupt a person can get just to sell an album. It’s disgusting to see the man who proclaimed “George Bush doesn’t care about black people” on a Hurricane Katrina PSA drag himself like this.

Yes, he’s not outright aligning himself with a political party, as he’s said on Twitter. He’s merely attracted to the kind of person Trump is. Trump, like Kanye, is a cocky and power-hungry person who loves attention. The two of them are outspoken, have opinions on everything and need to deactivate their Twitter. What’s concerning is that Kanye is already messing with a divisive administration, something veterans of Nixon’s era can attest to. As a celebrity and, most importantly, a black man who’s had his fair share of issues with race in America, Kanye is in no position to say what he’s saying. At the time of writing this, Kanye has made more controversial statements, including a TMZ interview where he spoke on his opioid addiction and his view that slavery was a choice. Look. Kanye West is a musical genius and nothing will change that. However, it is time we held our heroes to a much higher standard. Coming from someone who considers Devil in a New Dress the best rap song of the decade, memorized every lyric to every song on Yeezus and called The Life of Pablo the greatest album of 2016, that is a lot. At some point, Kanye either has to do some serious damage control to his promotional cycle or raise a white flag to the hip-hop genre as a whole. Frankly, the latter is a possibility I would like to avoid.

Restaurant Review

The Crazy Toston Brings A New Twist To A Miami Favorite ‰‰ Miamians who can’t get enough of their fried plantains are in for a treat with The Crazy Toston. This hotspot offers some affordable and delicious new twists to the South Florida favorite. By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net Being a South Florida native, plantains are a vital addition to almost every meal. Whether they’re fried, boiled or doublefried then mashed, plantains can be seen as a Miami staple. For the uninitiated, tostones are essentially twice-fried plantain slices. These treats make a great side-dish to any traditional Miami plate. The Crazy Toston, located at 12039 S.W. 117th Ave., is a hidden plantain paradise in the Pine Lake Shopping Center. It's sure to satisfy any Miamian. First opened in March of this year, this South Floridian delicacy is well-represented in this hotspot. Upon discovering the restaurant through its social media praise, customers can expect exactly what they see in photos. The design of each tostone is almost too full and nicely placed to directly dive into. The “Megaton” consists of a choice of meat or veggies, with an ample amount of toppings, including coleslaw, avocado and

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various sauces. The hearty entree is affordable, ranging from $7-9. With the large portions and inexpensive price, this is surely a perfect food spot for college students. With several different plantain variations on the menu, there’s going to be a meal for everyone to enjoy. Whether you’re in the mood for something savory, (The Pork Megaton) or sweet ( The Banana Boat) there’s an option for every plantain lover. The indoor seating itself is minimal, but when in the West Kendall area and looking for a quick lunch spot that isn’t fast food, The Crazy Toston hits the spot. It’s five minutes away from Kendall Campus making it a new meal option in between classes. The Megaton alone could feed SEAN MOW / The Reporter you and a friend, or just yourself if Plantain Paradise: The Crazy Toston, 12039 S.W. 117th Ave., offers a modern twist on a Miami classic. you have a big appetite. A side dish you should definitely con- addition of garlic and cilantro aioli sauce Although it’s hard to see while driving sider, if you’re willing to treat yourself, is with cotija cheese was exactly the perfect down 117th Ave., those lucky enough to spot the sweet potato fries. This is guaranteed to condiments to place on top of these fries. this delightful fried haven are in for a treat. The Crazy Toston is already on Ubereats make your experience at The Crazy Toston Infusing the popular dish with toppings and arrives in under 30 minutes. This way from several different cultures makes The that much better. Being a sweet potato fanatic, their you’ll never be without your tostones. Crazy Toston a South Florida treasure.

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14 FORUM | MAY 22, 2018

THE REPORTER

Graduation

Finding A Home At Miami Dade College ‰‰ Justin Marcano reflects on his time at Miami Dade College and how the College has helped him grow into the person he is today.

By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net For sharks to live, they must keep moving endlessly. They must always find a way forward. I, like many of the students moving on from our time at Miami Dade College, are the

sharks—both in name and in spirit. Whether we arrived here by choice or by necessity, we had taken a step forward in our life. When I had first arrived at Miami Dade College, there were times where I felt discouraged— embarrassed even—at the fact that I was “stuck at Dade like everyone else.” However, in time, I found myself a place in this vast and daunting reef of a school. For me, It came in the form of The Reporter. Being introduced to the student newspaper by a suggestion from my English professor, I came to know that there was more to MDC then being “High School 2.0.” Starting as an opinion writer, I slowly began to learn how to write articles and that led me to eventually being published in every section of the paper. What I came to realize was that

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it wasn’t just about the stories I was writing and the photos I was taking, it was about putting a part of myself in this black ink—in every letter and every punctuation. I also came to know that forward

was never a direction but a state of mind. Forward is the urge to learn what you had never known and work like you never had before. The last two years were a time for, not finding myself, but

Editorial

Money

Tech Meets Money In Cryptocurrencies ‰‰ Teresa Schuster explains the background of cryptocurrencies and how they can potentially become the money of the future.

By Teresa Schuster teresa.schuster001@mymdc.net We’re used to having physical currency. For thousands of years, from gold coins to paper dollars, “money” has always been something that we can touch, feel and hold in our hands. But we may soon see a drastic shift from that precedent with the advent of cryptocurrencies. Cryptocurrencies are virtual currencies, meaning that they don’t exist anywhere physically. Cryptocoins are generated through a process called “mining.” Now, imagine an extremely complicated equation. So complicated, it can take a very powerful computer days to solve it. When the computer finally does, it will be left with a long string of numbers as the answer. Obtaining that long string of numbers is

rewarded with a cryptocoin. The person who owns the computer transfers the coin electronically to an online wallet. Later, he or she purchases something online. With one click of the mouse, hundreds or even thousands of dollars are sent online to someone else’s account. As the world becomes increasingly advanced technologically, cryptocoins seem to represent many new possibilities for commerce and a step forward. However, while cryptocurrencies have a lot of potential, there are some definite drawbacks connected with them. Because they are stored and created online, they are particularly susceptible to hacking and technical failures. A technical glitch in the code of a trading platform can delay transactions for however long it takes to resolve the issue. If a hacker breaks into the code, millions of virtual coins can disappear overnight. And with the decentralized and anonymous nature of the blockchain, there is often little chance they will ever be recovered. Cryptocurrencies aren’t just for commerce; some people also treat them as investments. They are good for short-term trading, mainly because they are so volatile. The value of certain coins can fluctuate as much as 150 percent in a day and sometimes more. With the right trading strategy, the potential for profit is enormous. But that volatility has a downside. Last December, the value of Bitcoin, one of the most popular

cryptocurrencies, was more than $20,000 per coin. But in the space of a few days, it had plummeted to under $11,000 each. Since cryptocurrencies don’t have a constant value, neither does the amount converted to them. That means if you have 100 USD worth of Bitcoin, the next minute the same amount of Bitcoin might be worth 120 USD. And the next day, it might be worth 85 USD. With that much volatility, it would be difficult to determine exactly how much money is in an account and even more difficult to buy and sell things with it. Since Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies don’t have any physical value, their value is completely dependent on their values in the stock market, which are determined entirely by supply and demand. This is true for other currencies, like the U.S. dollar, but the difference is that the dollar is used to buy and sell far more widely and is what most prices are quoted in. If the price of something says it is ten dollars, you will pay ten dollars, regardless of how the dollar performed against the Euro that day. Cryptocurrencies are an amazing invention and have incredible potential. In the future, Bitcoin and other virtual currencies may be what money looks like. But until they begin to be widely treated as methods of commerce in themselves, and not just investments to be transferred to dollars, they won’t be a good choice for actually performing transactions in most cases.

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creating myself—creating the person I always wanted to be. I had created my voice, one that I never truly believed I had or ever would have. I made myself into not only a more complete writer, but a more complete person. At the time of this being published, I will have already reached the end of my MDC journey. I will have walked across the stage of graduation and received my diploma. I may already be on my way to my next destination. Wherever I may go next, be it near or far, I will be moving forward. I know that I will go on to make myself better than I am now. I will be in search of greater achievements and a brighter future for myself, As should you, the reader. We stand now at the edge of the reef. Out in front of us, lies the open ocean. Like sharks, we must move forward.

More Confusion Than Safety With New ID Policy With a new policy requiring all students and faculty to display their Miami Dade College IDs, MDC hopes to cement its campuses as safe educational locations. But with a late-term rollout, a vague enforcement policy and uncertainty in regards to longterm benefits, the measure seems to add more confusion than safety. After the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in February, according to MDC’s director of communications Juan Mendieta, school officials met to review the school’s college-wide emergency management plan and discuss areas of improvement. In deliberating multiple policies, they decided the best idea would be the ID policy. “It’s what is already in place in other governmental institutions,” Mendieta said. But the implementation of the policy has been haphazardous at best. When The Reporter inquired about it during its initial introduction, campuses had little to no knowledge of the policy. Then, as the rollout continued throughout April, student awareness was low. North Campus has posters featuring students encouraging others to wear their ID, but at other campuses, the policy is almost an afterthought. That makes it harder for such an initiative to be enforced. The current policy, Mendieta says, is for public safety officers to engage with ID-less individuals, inquire about their role at MDC and then explain the new requirement for future reference—that’s it. But when most MDC students are part-time and have other responsibilities in their lives, it can be much harder for them to remember to wear their IDs, especially when their time on campus is more limited. And, if all they can expect from not wearing them is a talking-to, the policy is more likely to fade to the back of students’ minds. Mendieta stresses that the

policy is still fluid and the explanations could grow into written warnings come the fall semester. “We don’t want to punish people out the gate,” Mendieta said. “We want this to be a positive experience.” But that still doesn’t confirm whether that “could” will turn into a “will” or if the enforcement will go beyond written warnings, making it harder for students and faculty to understand the potential consequences for issues that could relate to human error. With a policy affecting almost 200,000 students and hundreds of faculty members, that isn’t acceptable. Also concerning is the late-term rollout. School shootings having been a national issue since the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School and only increasing after the 2013 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the question comes down to whether MDC could have implemented this policy sooner or if, because the Marjory Stoneman Douglas attack occurred in South Florida, it was only introduced due to the more local impact thereby showing that the College was eager to show its response to the attack versus it being an addition to current safety procedures. The College views it as both, according to Mendieta. The plan was to “soft launch” it during the spring following the shooting and increase awareness throughout the summer, making changes throughout the way. Therefore, by the fall term, the policy will become fully integrated into the College. “It’s what higher education has always been about,” Mendieta said. “We constantly review our plans, constantly review our training exercises.” But, when the policy has to go through so many leaps and bounds to be integrated, especially when all the details haven’t been fully locked in, it’s hard to see how people can feel safer.

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// FORUM Corbin Bolies, Forum Editor  // 

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Diversity

The New Majority Will Bring Diversity ‰‰ Michidael Ceard writes about how minorities will be the new majority in the future by representing 56 percent of the United States’ population. Because of this increase, minorities will bring more flavor to American culture, which, Ceard explains, is currently bland.

By Michidael Ceard michidael.ceard001@mymdc.net Ever since immigrating to the United States, I’ve sat in my history classes and was taught stories I couldn't relate. I also noticed

that these stories did not reflect my classmates. What did homogeneous Anglo-Saxon men have to do with students who were vibrant, colorful and multi-faceted? As students, we are lost in the American soup and we don't have no hope for a culture that accepts those who arrive to bring new rations to this great stew. In this big cauldron, tensions have brewed ten-times fold. Society has never been so divided. People are realizing that this collective American history has been thrust on various marginalized groups and has constantly suffocated their interests. I have spoken to many Miami Dade College students and many think that the United States will never be for them. With MDC becoming one of the number one colleges that graduates minority groups, the culture on campus is far from what textbooks teach. We each have diverse backgrounds and cultures that take on

a life of their own within the Miami collective. However, we are taught to be uniform and basic and we are pushed to excel in an environment that requires more than those two elements. What a bland soup these students have been forced to eat. Nonetheless, from this same pot has emerged the new majority. According to the New Census Bureau Report, people of color are set to make up more than 56 percent of the American population by the year 2060. The ingredients in this new American soup will become more representative of the people who eat it. How can we prepare this stew for success in the future? We must tell a new history that incorporates and adequately represents the stories of whom will create this new America. In Literature classes, instead of reading Shakespeare, students should read the works of Gabriel García Márquez. In music classes, Beethoven was an excellent

composer but so was Joseph Bologne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges. I am not arguing that the history that made the United States become the world hegemon that it is today should be neglected. In fact, this history is equally as rich and vibrant as the parts that make up America. However, to adapt to the ever-changing demographics of a great nation, the changes, accomplishments and roots of these people should be documented and taught in the years that follow. The soup may seem bland today, but I know it will be tasty in the future. Minorities will become a majority, which will level out the playing field. Will racial injustices stop and economic inequality be done away with? No. However, the power will lie in the hands of what this new population does. I am ready for this new majority and I hope that you are too. What new ingredients will you bring to this scrumptious stew?

The Crisis Of Crisis Pregnancy Centers

By Julia Gomez julia.gomez001@mymdc.net Crisis Pregnancies Centers, also called CPCs or Pregnancy Support Services, are pro-life combatants against abortions. These “antiabortion clinics” lure women with unplanned pregnancies into their offices by totting similar names to and even locating within miles of abortion clinics. There, the staff harshly criticizes, harasses, manipulates and lies to women to convince them to not abort the fetus. “CPCs, as a rule, not only discourage abortion but also refuse to provide referrals to abortion clinics, although they often provide ‘counseling’ about ‘dangers associated with premarital sexual activity,’” wrote the American Medical Association(AMA) in the AMA Journal of Ethics. Their purpose is "to provide medical advice on a variety of issues, including sexually transmitted infections, early

pregnancy, and abortion…seek[ing] to target women who are most likely to seek abortion, particularly low-income women and women of color." What’s even scarier than the fact they’re attracting women with free pregnancy tests and ultrasounds is that they’re are offering these services without any medical licenses. They aren’t even required to be listed as licensed medical facilities. “They strive to appear as sites offering clinical services and unbiased advice. Lay volunteers who are not licensed clinicians at CPCs often wear white coats and see women in exam rooms… CPCs that are not licensed medical clinics cannot legally be held to the privacy provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPAA),” AMA continues. Which means CPCs aren’t responsible if any of a woman’s information is leaked. HIPPAA was enacted to protect a patient’s information, and if violated can result in huge fines, jobloss and even jail time. Centers are not held to the standard of regular clinics, yet they’re allowed to receive government funding and pander for donations. Most CPCs are religiously affiliated or part organizations committed to spreading their pro-life message, even at the cost of spreading lies that are harmful toward the woman. CPC employees are legally able to give false information about the risks tied to abortions. In fact, there are more risks with carrying the pregnancy to term than if a woman were to just get an abortion. CPCs not only lie about the risks involved in pregnancy and

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“The state is endorsing these enabortions, they also lie about the development of the fetus. There tities now, they are legitimized... have been reports, including by and unfortunately there is no Vice News and HuffPost, of staff oversight over these locations [to lying to women and claiming they ensure they don’t] provide [womneeded to wait two more weeks en] bias and judgmental informabefore they were able to get an tion on various sorts of health care abortion, or even saying a woman services,” said Kimberly Scott. could get an abortion whenever And it’s true, these places don’t she wanted, even in the third tri- have to deal with any regulations or inspecmester. tions. AcThis is, not cording to only misAMA, their leading prac t ices but false are clasinfor masified as tion. AborFreedom tions are of Speech also time and theresensitive. fore pro“A f t e r t e c t e d the first u n d e r t r i mester, the First your opAmendtions for ment. It the kind of isn’t illegal abortion KALEY PENICHE / THE REPORTER to lie. is reduced L i e s to an inclinic procedure,” said Kimberly and manipulation aren’t going Scott, the Legislative Affairs Man- to reduce the rate of abortions in ager at Florida Alliance of Planned America. We need access to birth Parenthood Affiliates. “Woman control and better sexual-eduunknowingly trust facilities like cation. In all my years of public CPCs to tell them the facts, not school, I didn’t receive one sex-ed fallacies that can harm and drasti- class—everything I learned was thanks to YouTube and Planned cally change their lives.” On March 19, 2018, Florida Gov. Parenthood’s website. But others Rick Scott approved House Bill 41, may not be lucky enough to have introduced by Rep. Jackie Toledo the same access I did. When a woman is facing the (R-Tampa), which will go into effect July 1. HB 41 legitimizes CPCs possibility of an unplanned pregas pregnancy wellness centers nancy, she deserves to know all and allows them to receive state her options and not be shamed funding, meaning our tax dollars for her decision. She deserves to are funding programs that lie to be treated like a human being women about their bodies, ma- and not be stripped of her choices nipulates them and shames them and freedom because of someone else’s religious beliefs. for having sex out of wedlock.

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Bureaus ———————————

North Campus Bureau covers North, West, Hialeah and MEEC B 11380 N.W. 27th Ave. Room 4209 Miami, FL 33167 T (305) 237-1254 ————————————————— Kendall Campus Bureau covers Kendall and Homestead B 11011 S.W. 104th St. Room M239 Miami, FL 33176 T (305) 237-2715 ————————————————— Wolfson Campus Bureau covers Wolfson, Medical and InterAmerican B 300 N.E. Second Ave. Suite 1610 Miami, FL 33132 T (305) 237-3368

Editorial Board ——————————— Katherine Wallace-Fernandez Editor-in-Chief/Briefing Editor Ciro Salcedo A&E Editor Corbin Bolies Forum Editor

Women

‰‰ Julia Gomez writes about the nature of crisis pregnancy centers and how, instead of helping women through their pregnancy decisions, they try to make it for them.

The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

MDC The Reporter

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Art Department ——————————— Eduardo Badal Designer

Issue Staff ——————————— Eduardo Badal, Sebastián Ballestas, Aminah Brown, Michidael Ceard, Paola Fernandez, Reyna Figueroa, Julia Gomez, Valentina Gonzalez, Looni Ingran, Claudia Hernandez, Aiyana Ishmael, Justin Marcano, Sean Mow, Julie O’Hare, Christian Ortega, Daniela Pachon, Kaley Peniche, Karina Rey, Teresa Schuster, Camilla Sposito

Manolo Barco, Media Adviser B mbarco@mdc.edu T NORTH.........................(305) 237-1255 T KENDALL......................(305) 237-2323 T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3477 Aracelia Diez, Student Media Assistant

B adiez@mdc.edu T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3368 ——————————— Letters to the Editor ——————————— The Reporter welcomes letters to the editor. All submissions should be 300 words or less and must be typed. Writers must include their full name, contact number, campus, student number and e-mail address. Faculty and staff should include the title, department and extension. All letters are subject to editing for purposes of brevity and clarity. Letters can be sent via e-mail to mdc.thereporter@gmail.com, with the subject “letter to the editor.”

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The Reporter Volume 8 Issue 15  
The Reporter Volume 8 Issue 15  
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