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Comeback Kid

Read about some of the Miami-Dade County candidates running for state legislature and their views on the economy, guns and funding for the College.

JeTaun Rouse’s, one of the Lady Shark’s newest basketball players, is making a comeback after several knee surgeries nearly derailed her athletic career.

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90's Flashback

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Conscious Choice

Celebrating the anniversary of some of the most iconic 90s rock albums, The Reporter’s Ciro Salcedo brings them back to life with his candid review.

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SPORTS

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Crucial Candidates

The Reporter’s Alexander F. Aspuru urges voters to select the best candidate based on substance rather than political affiliation.

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4VOL. 7, ISSUE 4 — OCTOBER 25, 2016

TWO-TIME NATIONAL PACEMAKER AWARD WINNER

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Republican

Elections

Clinton And Gore Bring Voter Registration Politicking And Climate Change Awareness To MDC For The GOP ‰‰ A new student organization, Miami Dade College Republicans at Kendall Campus, is rallying conservatives and riling others. By Maria Vizcaino maria.vizcaino003@mymdc.net

The case went to the United States Supreme Court where a 5-4 decision, after a recount of votes in Florida, made George W. Bush president. Once again, Florida is considered a crucial swing state with Clinton and Trump making numerous campaign and fundraising stops here. The College has played host to multiple election events. At the Kendall Campus event, the audience ranged from toddlers to senior citizens. It was a racially and religiously diverse encounter including white, black, Latino and Muslim people. Some held signs that read “I’m with HER,” but the vast majority frantically held up signs that read “Stronger Together.” Whenever the Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump was mentioned, the crowd booed. “I can’t wait to have Al Gore advising me when I’m President of the United

Marlon Montero calls himself a surrogate of the Grand Old Party. The 18-year-old freshman political science student took a stand in this turbulent electoral season and started a new political student organization: Miami Dade College Republicans—Kendall Campus. “I’m very proud to lead a group where we all think alike and we all believe in the ideals of the Republican Party,” Montero said. Approximately 40 students have become members since its start on Sept. 12. It has an odd composition—right-wing independents, libertarians and Montero claims, even a few former Bernie Sanders supporters. “This is not a Trump club. It’s a Republican club,” said Gianni Ginory, 18, vice president of the club and political science major at Kendall Campus. “There’s a place for everyone in this club, whether you want to learn, help out local candidates and hang out with friends.” His draw to the party’s platform comes from living under the Castro dictatorship in Cuba, one that he escaped six years ago. “I was the happiest guy in the world,” he said. “I couldn’t be more proud that I touched American soil. We got welfare when we came to this country, we got medicare, we got food stamps. You know how much it lasted us? Six months.” He takes pride in his family’s success in this country. SharkNet, the online platform for student organizations at MDC, describes the club’s mission as a way to give a voice to students, encourage political activism and engage students in real world politics. It says the College Republicans give students a way to advocate their beliefs through a respectable and structured organization. The club has received paraphernalia from local and national Republican campaigns and plans to host local Republican candidates that will address the organization’s members such as John Couriel, Frank Artiles and David Rivera. They say they want to host workshops sponsored by organizations like the libertarian Generation Opportunity and the conservative Americans For Prosperity. “We try to embrace the Republican ideals and we try to help all candidates up and down the ballot to win on Nov. 8,” Montero said. “The role as a college Republican is for me to lead and engage the students into the

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OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

“ 

Stronger Together: On Oct. 11 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and former U.S. Vice President Al Gore held a rally covering topics such as climate change and the importance of voting. The event took place at the Kendall Campus gymnasium. ‰‰ On Oct. 11 the Florida Democratic Party hosted a rally with its local, state and presidential candidates at the Kendall Campus gymnasium to bring awareness about voter registration and climate change. By Zayrha Rodriguez zayrha.rodriguez001@mymdc.net Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and former Vice President Al Gore made a campaign stop at the Kendall Campus gymnasium, on Oct. 11, a week before the Florida voter registration deadline. Before Clinton and Gore came to the stage the crowd chanted: "Sí se puede" (Yes we can), "Hillary" and "I'm with her." With a focus on the critical issues surrounding climate change, the speakers also urged the audience to vote Democrat in Florida. “Your vote really, really, really counts,” Gore told the 1,600 people in the audience. “You can consider me exhibit A. If you are not registered to vote do so today. If you

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I’m still not really sure for who I’m going to vote for, but I wanted to hear her side. I wanted to see her. It was a great experience. Coming here changed it a little. I’m looking at things a little bit different.

Joshua Elias, international relations major at the Honors College at Kendall Campus

are on the fence about whether to vote remember what is at stake in this election and if you think your vote doesn’t matter, take it from me, your vote can make all of the difference.” Gore was referring to the 2000 presidential election, in which he lost the Electoral College vote in spite of winning the popular vote.

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THE REPORTER IS THE FREE, BIWEEKLY STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE. ALL CONTENT IS PRODUCED BY MDC STUDENTS. THE REPORTER IS A PUBLIC FORUM FOR EXPRESSION.

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2 BRIEFING | OCTOBER 25, 2016

THE REPORTER North Campus Student Lands Computer Science Internship

// BRIEFING María Vizcaíno, Briefing Editor  // 

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B maria.vizcaino003@mymdc.net MDC Symphonies Perform At Halloween Concert

PHOTO COURTESY OF JORGE OTINIANO

Theater Production Raises Disability Awareness The Antiheroes Project will present the original free theater production Fluorescent Moon, on Oct. 28 and 29 at 8 p.m. at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2nd Ave., at the MDC Live Arts Lab in Room 1101. The piece marks Disability Awareness Month and deals with the experiences of blind actors and how they traverse their daily lives. It is presented in partnership with Miami Dade College's ACCESS Department (Disability Services) and the Wolfson Campus’ E3 Club (Engage, Empower, Excel) which advocates for students with special needs. “The development of the script will be interactive and aims to answer the question: ‘What do the blind see?’” said José M. Domínguez, one of the Antiheroes Project founders. “Lack of understanding and accessibility, the absence of opportunities for Latino blind individuals and the deficiency to engage them in social transformations in our community are the heart of the project.” The Antiheroes Project, a nonprofit organization formed in 2011, aims to instill an inclusive model and to raise accessibility awareness in the multicultural South Florida Community. Attendees can park for free at the Wolfson Campus parking garage. —Ciro Salcedo For more information, contact: José Domínguez T(305) 237-3544 jdoming3@mdc.edu

Basim Siddiqui, a first year computer science major at the North Campus Honors College will start an internship with the Miami-Dade County Public Schools this fall. In the position, he will assist information technology staff at Miami Lakes Educational Center with the school’s technological equipment including modems, routers and switches as well as help fix connectivity issues in the system. Siddiqui Siddiqui graduated from Miami Lakes Educational Center in 2015. Last school year he interned in the MDCPS information technology department’s headquarters. When he graduates, Siddiqui hopes to transfer to the Georgia Institute of Technology and one day have his own information technology company, serving as a network administrator.

The Miami Dade College Wind Symphony along with the Miami Dade College Symphony Orchestra will perform an original spinechilling score by guest composer Phil Collins at a screening of the 1926 silent film Frankenstein on Oct. 26 at 7:30 p.m. in the Kendall Campus Alfred L. McCarthy Hall, 11011 S.W. 104 St., Room 6120. “All of the pieces will be accompanied by a visual movie that is associated with the piece, just a bit scary to celebrate Halloween,” said Brian Neal, the director of instrumental studies. “This will be a fun stimulating event that you won’t want to miss.” The College’s wind symphony and the orchestra perform together at least once a year, and this time it will be for the Halloween concert. Phil Collins, a Californian veteran composer, will be a guest lecturer for the show. Other pieces like Toccata and Fugue by J.S. Bach, which are often associated with Dracula, will be performed. The show is free and open to the public. Those attending the show can park on campus for free. For more information, contact Brian Neal at (305) 237-2091 bneal@mdc.edu

Play Focuses On Desperate Economy

United Way To Fundraise By Selling Household Items

The Kendall Campus Theater department presents the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Glengarry Glen Ross at the Martin and Pat Fine Center for the Arts, 11011 S.W., 104th St., on Oct. 28 at 8 p.m. The plot revolves around four 1980s real estate sellers who become desperate when the company they work for sends a motivational trainer who announces that two out of the four will be fired by the end of the week. “[The play] suggested itself [because it] resonated the issues of today’s elections,” said Aaron Alpern, the play director and a theater professor at Kendall Campus. Written by David Mamet, the show contains profanity and vulgar language. It is free and open to the public. The doors to the show will open 30 minutes before it starts. Attendees may park on campus for free.

—Taylor Daley

—Jorge de Peña

The United Way will host a Learning Resources Bazaar on Nov. 2 in the InterAmerican Campus, 627 S.W. 27 Ave., at the Flag Courtyard from 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. At the event, everyday items will be sold in order to raise money for its organization. “This is my eleventh year doing this and the event seems to be getting bigger and better every single year,” said Clorinda Blanco, the instructional assistant at the InterAmerican Campus and co-chair of the United Way campaign. The United Way is a non-profit organization that works with offices throughout the country to pool efforts in fundraising and support. Items to be sold include decorations, clothing, toys, electronics and books. At the event, organizers will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner for students, faculty and staff. Admission to the event and parking are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Clorinda Blanco at (305) 237-6238 or cblanco@mdc.edu

Student Awarded Young Adult Leadership Award

—Jorge de Peña

For more information, contact: Aaron Alpern T(305) 237-2375 aalpern@mdc.edu

—Roland Ortega

A free, basic one time self defense training class aims to give the Miami Dade College community the power to stand up and be better prepared to protect themselves. The training will be facilitated by a public safety officer on Nov. 3 at the Kendall Campus, 11011 S.W. 104th St., Room G208, at 3 p.m. “We want to provide students with basic skills to protect themselves should they ever be in a situation that puts their safety at risk,” said Dion Webb, Student Life specialist at Kendall Campus. “It’s just reassurance for our students that they have that knowledge to protect themselves should they need to.” For more information, contact the Kendall Campus Student Life Department at (305) 237-2321.

Joshua Calarino, a North Campus student, received the national 2016 Voice Awards in the Young Adult Calarino L e a d e r s h i p category this summer for his effort in making his community a better place. “Winning means that I am making changes for the better, in my community and nationally,” said Calarino, 20, who graduated from International Studies Charter High School and is currently majoring in nursing at North Campus. “I want to be able to help anyone that needs help.” While in high school, Calarino joined Youth Move Miami, a local branch of a national organization dedicated to support people dealing with issues related to mental health, juvenile justice and child welfare. In 2014, Calarino became the vice president of the Miami chapter for the nonprofit. The national honor is given yearly by the federal government’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to honor leaders and individuals in the behavioral health community who shine a light and raise awareness on mental health and addiction issues. “I am rather unsure of what I want to do [in the future] at this time,” Calarino said. “All I know is that I want to help more people.”

The exhibit Beyond The Game: Sports and the Evolution of South Florida is on display at the HistoryMiami museum, 101 W. Flagler St. through Jan. 15. The 5,000-square-foot exhibition showcases artifacts from HistoryMiami’s own collection and individuals in the community, as well as the area’s sports venues and professional teams. Artifacts include Dan Marino’s contract, the Orange Bowl trophy from the University of Miami and the Hialeah Park infield sign. The exhibit is meant to appeal to a diverse audience with an interest in sports history, specifically from the Miami and South Florida area. The HistoryMiami Museum is the largest history museum in Florida showcasing Miami’s unique history that connects the Americas together. The exhibit is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students with an ID, $5 for children and free for children under six as well as for HistoryMiami members. For more information, contact HistoryMiami Public Relations Manager Michelle Reese, at (305) 375-1492 or at e.info@historymiami.org

—Taylor Daley

—Krystal Socorro

—Roland Ortega

Teaching Culture And Language Through Music Staff from the College’s Confucius Institute and the Chinese Culture Club invites students to learn folk and modern songs from the country on Oct. 26 at 11 a.m. in Room 1201 at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2nd Ave. “It does help to learn Chinese considering the beautiful melody which helps memorize new words,” said Jiangnan Wu, a Confucius Institute instructor. “Chinese has its own characteristic. It has four tones which is quite different from English, and Chinese character is the only ideograph still in daily use in the world today.” The nonprofit organization is affiliated with the Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China and aims to promote Chinese literacy and to teach the language in higher education institutions. The Confucius Institute offers credit and noncredit Chinese Mandarin classes for adults and children, Chinese Cultural Clubs meetings every week at the MDC Kendall, North, Hialeah and Homestead campuses, and a Chinese Mandarin proficiency test. MDC has the only Confucius Institute in the Miami area. “The students at MDC can sign up for Chinese language class,” said Wu. “Then they will be Confucius Institute students and there is a chance of winning studying in China Scholarship Council.” For more information contact Wu at jwu1@mdc.edu or visit www. mdc.edu/confucius —Ciro Salcedo

Kendall Event Focuses On Student Safety

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PHOTO COURTESY OF HISTORYMIAMI

HistoryMiami Takes Visitors Beyond The Game

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SEBASTÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

For The Cure: The Freedom Tower in downtown Miami lit up in bright pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month on Oct. 3.

PRIYA PERSHADSINGH \ THE REPORTER

Your Vote Counts: Miami Dade College students from various campuses pose during an event to encourage their peers to get out and vote. The event was held on Sept. 27 in front of the North Campus' Science Complex.

PRIYA PERSHADSINGH \ THE REPORTER

Standing Tall: On Sept. 27 the North Campus' Student Life Department held a voter registration rally event in front of the Science Complex to encourage students to get out and vote.

MARIA VIZCAINO \ THE REPORTER

Speaking Up: On Sept. 28 former National Basketball Association player Jason Collins speaks at the North Campus' Science Complex about LGBTQI+ issues and the importance of voting. www.mdcthereporter.com

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ANTONIO LATTE \ THE REPORTER

Sharing Her Ideas: Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein answers a question from a reporter on Sept. 30 at the Chapman Conference Center in Wolfson Campus.

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4NEWS | OCTOBER 25, 2016

THE REPORTER

// NEWS María Vizcaíno, Editor-In-Chief  // 

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B maria.vizcaino003@mymdc.net

Republican Party Club At Kendall Campus FROM REPUBLICAN, FRONT

political process.” The last time there was a Republican student club at MDC was around five years ago, according to Montero. Political clubs are rare on MDC campuses. The only other visible political club is the immigrant rights organization Students Working for Equal Rights (S.W.E.R.) which also started a chapter this year at Kendall Campus. The College doesn’t have a Democratic student organization, although there’s a Green Party club at Wolfson Campus. One of Montero’s activities this election season has been tabling on campus to recruit club members. His group elicits mixed reactions from students. Some congratulate them for their activism. Others approach their table to ask “Why Republican?” Recently, a small commotion arose during one of the group’s tabling events outside the cafeteria on Sept. 28, when more than 20 people debated on the presidential elections. Demetri Kendrick, 19, an English major at Kendall Campus, approached the table asking for three reasons to vote for Donald

Trump. “At some point it got very passionate and some words were derogatory,” Kendrick said. “They handled everything very well, we were just intensely debating.” Public safety remained vigilant of the table to avoid further escalation of the situation, according to Lauren Adamo, the student life director at Kendall Campus. It is not unlawful or against the student code of conduct to display support for candidates on campus at MDC. “It’s all part of the learning process,” Adamo said. “It’s great that he cares and cares enough to get students involved.” Although his first choice in the primary was former governor Jeb Bush, Montero will be voting for his party’s nominee, Donald Trump, whom he recently met personally at the Koubek Center and describes as a caring individual. But he acknowledges the candidate’s flaws, such as his remarks about women and his performance on the first presidential debate. “He’s such a gentleman,” Montero said. “I really do see him as a leader not a follower. The guy is tall and very, very respectful.”

Clinton And Gore At Kendall Campus FROM ELECTIONS, FRONT

States,” said Clinton, who spoke about clean energy and the economy. She mentioned the importance of bringing solar energy to the Sunshine State, which largely abstains from the energy source in comparison to states like New Jersey and Massachusetts. The rally included opposition voices. “Bill Clinton is a rapist!” a heckler screamed, but the audience quickly responded by chanting for Hillary Clinton. Other protesters who interrupted Clinton were escorted out by the secret service. Gore told the crowd to vote against Amendment One on the Nov. 8 Florida ballot. It has caused a large controversy because it holds accusations of misleading voters. It reads: “Amendment One would benefit the incumbent fossil fuels companies here in Florida by making it harder for homeowners to go solar.” The stage was also shared with an MDC student. “I want to make this state the progressive state that I know it can be,” said Miguel Zamudio, 18, a political science major at the Honors College at Kendall Campus. He spoke about the importance of immigration reform and the lack of quality in textbooks at public schools. Zamudio plans to become a Florida senator or serve in a public service position to help the country. Among the other speakers were South Miami Mayor Philip Stoddard, Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine, and Florida House of Representatives for District 109 Cynthia Stafford. “I was just curious to see how everyone acted and see what [Clinton] had to say about climate change, and what Al Gore had to say,” said Isabella Rodriguez, a supporter of Donald Trump who registered to vote at Kendall Campus that same day. “Pretty much just wanted to see the environment and the atmosphere of the rally today here at this area.” Other students who attended are still on the fence. “I’m still not really sure for who I’m going to vote for, but I wanted to hear her side. I wanted to see her. It was a great experience,” said Joshua Elias, 18, international relations major at the Honors College at Kendall Campus. “Coming here changed it a little. I’m looking at things a little bit different.” Early voting at certain locations begins on Oct. 24. For more information on polling place locations see miamidade.gov/elections EDITOR’S NOTE: The Reporter attempted to get press credentials for two Donald Trump campaign events held in Miami within the past month but was denied access both times.

OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

Reppin Republican: Marlon Montero leads a protest at Hillary Clinton and Al Gore's rally outside of the Kendall Campus gymnasium on Oct.

Tamarac

Student Pursues Local Public Office In Broward County ‰‰ Marlon Bolton, a criminal justice major at North Campus, is running for Tamarac city commissioner, aiming to represent the interests of the community and resolve issues that have affected his district for decades. By Adriana Falero adriana.falero001@mymdc.net Serving the community is something Marlon Bolton, 31, a criminal justice major at North Campus is drawn to. So it was natural for him to make the leap from pastor at the 300 member Praise Experience Church in North Lauderdale to candidate for public office in Tamarac, going door to door and introducing himself to more than 9,000 registered voters. Bolton, who is running for Tamarac city commissioner for District 1, is the youngest person to throw his hat in the ring for the position. Tamarac is located in western Broward County. He is competing against incumbent Pamela Bushnell, 74, who has held the position for the past eight years. “The people have expressed that they want a change,” Bolton said. “They are grateful that somebody has stepped up to make that happen. It’s a sigh of relief and a breath of fresh air to have somebody running and challenging the incumbent. Some of them feel that she’s not representing them...I really believe that now is the time for me to run.” Bolton said the issues facing his district include a deep socioeconomic divide, blight and lack of city services for children and families in the lower income, racially diverse east side. Lacking a public bus system, a library, a community center and a clinic, Bolton said his district is far less developed than the west side, which covers Districts 3 and 4 and has all of these services in addition to parks, restaurants and the only fire station. It is for this reason, Bolton said, that District 1 residents feel neglected. “It’s wonderful that a young minority male wants to get engaged in public office and serve his community. We need varied representation,” said Samantha Carlo, a professor at the School of Justice at North Campus and Bolton’s former instructor. “When young people see someone that looks like them doing good and trying to make change, it motivates them or at least gets them to reflect on what their potential is.” Bolton earned an associate’s degree in mass communications from MDC in 2013 and is currently pursuing a bachelor’s in public safety management with a criminal justice concentration at North Campus. He is married and has a one-year-old son. Originally from www.mdcthereporter.com

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BOLTON

Jamaica, he officially moved to the U.S. in 2007 and became a naturalized American citizen in 2013. On his campaign website, Bolton describes himself as a business owner in Tamarac. His LinkedIn profile says he is the owner of Forecast Holdings, LLC. with a description of marketing, advertising, new business and church administration compliance consultant. It also says as pastor of the Praise Experience Church he “mentors a follow-

ing of thousands.” Bolton owned a modeling company from 2003 to 2010. He has two blogspot websites that feature images of nearly nude male and female models with Miami Beach addresses—marlonbolton-no23 and marlonbolton-frontsteam— that list Bolton as a model booker. “In my past life, and at the time it was very lucrative,” Bolton said. “My convictions at that time were not religious. They have changed.” Still with a show business flair, Bolton has posted videos and singles on YouTube and iTunes of him singing in the praise style for his church and other groups. Bolton said he plans to address the issues in the Tamarac community by improving the current bus system so that it goes past State Road 7, creating a youth empowerment program focused on academics, athletics, and counseling and a clinic for senior citizens and pregnant women, as well as beautifying the district by planting trees and repairing houses. He has higher political aspirations. Bolton hopes to run for a state representative office in District 95. “For anyone who wants to do something like this, learn about what the opportunity entails, the hard work it takes,” said Mike Gelin, a campaign contributor who ran for Tamarac mayor in 2014. “And the hard work is really meeting the community, going door to door to the voters and find out what the issues are directly from them. There’s no special educational requirement; it’s all about public service, and we need regular people to serve in these roles because if they don’t, lobbyists and other different interests will control our community instead of people who live there every day.” The photo in this article was taken by Jaynell Perera.

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OCTOBER 25, 2016 | NEWS

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5

Success Story

Leading While Pursuing Stability ‰‰ Housing at the Camillus House homeless shelter has given student Enrique Sepulveda a foundation to pursue his degree and give back to the student body.

By Maria Vizcaino maria.vizcaino003@mymdc.net At his job at the Student Life office, Enrique Sepulveda, 22, vice president of the Student Government Association at Wolfson Campus, wears a neat button down shirt and politely answers the phone. He takes helping students become involved and connecting them to information seriously. “I am learning what it takes to inspire others, so they can become leaders themselves,” Sepulveda said. He is an ideal picture of an outgoing working student—professional and calm. But it was not always this way for him. His turbulent childhood included moving nearly a half a dozen times around Miami-Dade County, avoiding gangs in high school, getting kicked out of his house at 18, squatting in a foreclosed home and working in construction. Now Sepulveda has found stability allowing him to succeed in his studies by residing in a special program for homeless students at the Camillus House shelter in the city. “They helped relieve a lot of weight off my shoulder,” Sepulveda said. “I position myself to be on campus 12 hours a day, and Camillus House has provided a safe place for me to avoid all kinds of distractions. It’s a lot better than what I was used to.”

ways. As he waited for the bus one night of his junior year of high school, one of his friends was shot in the eye and Sepulveda got a gunshot in his mouth. Since it was a BB gunshot, he made it alive, but afterwards, he found none of his friends cared for him. The chaos in his life took a toll on his school performance. He went from being a popular all-star football athlete in high school with a 0.8 grade point average and three credits to an invisible repeating senior in 2013. “He kept engaging in fighting and his attendance was sporadic, but I think overall there was just a maturity that occurred with him.” said Allison Harley, the former principal at Palmetto Senior High School. “His life was very tumultuous.” After finally graduating high school in 2014, Sepulveda worked full-time as a salesman in a hardware store. Among the frequent customers were a group of general contractors who connected him to his next job. He worked in

The organization helps MDC students and immediate family members connect to public benefits and local resources. She also helped him with financial aid and signed him up for Educate Tomorrow, a nonprofit that serves MDC students under Single Stop, aiming to help them with their educational aspirations regardless of the situation they are in. “He was there on time, dressed very nicely, the same Enrique that we know now is who I met, very humble and he basically said ‘All I want to do is go to school,’” Joseph said. Sepulveda began at MDC in the summer of 2015 to study atmospheric science and meteorology and found a job at Target, where he worked the overnight shift restocking shelves. He was worn and exhausted, so his performance in classes was not ideal. “We can get a student in these doors but if I’m sitting here or a student is sitting in class and they’re worried about ‘where am I going to go sleep tonight? Am I going to

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We can get a student in these doors but if I’m sitting here or a student is sitting in class and they’re worried about ‘where am I going to go sleep tonight? Am I going to have food to eat today? Are my belongings going to be vandalized? Is my sister going to be okay? You can physically be sitting here, but if in your mind you’re thinking about all these other life challenges, you’re not going to be very productive.

Wendy Joseph, program coordinator for Educate Tomorrow

LIFE STARTED UNRAVELING Sepulveda’s home life has been filled with conflict and strife. He and his sister Destiny Sepulveda, 20, were dismissed from their Palmetto Bay home in the fall of 2013, after their mother and stepfather arrived drunk and a fight between the mother and the sister raged, according to Enrique Sepulveda. With the hope to end it, Sepulveda intervened. But then his stepfather walked into the room. “He points his finger at me and him and I start fighting right after,” Enrique Sepulveda said. “My mom started screaming and told both of us to get out.” A friend suggested for the siblings to spend the night in an empty foreclosed house in Coconut Grove. Destiny soon moved in with her boyfriend but Enrique called it home for the next two years. At the beginning he did odd jobs, like favors for friends who would pay him for cutting the grass in their yards. However Sepulveda, had decided to change the direction his life was taking long before. “I see myself as being a victim of things that I did to maintain because everywhere I looked around me there were negative influences,” Sepulveda said. “It was a bad neighborhood where there was gang violence going on all the time.” Violence struck him in other

SEBASTIÀN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

Student Success: Enrique Sepulveda, 22, vice president of the Student Government Association at Wolfson Campus, lives at the Camillus House homeless shelter in Somerville. a landscaping company laboring 12 hours every day until an arm injury, in the spring of 2015 forced him to leave his position, since he could not bear the physical labor it entailed. “I was working for million-dollar clients and truly that experience was sort of the exposure I needed to decide that I needed a college education because I was exposed to the way that they live,” Sepulveda said.

FOCUSED ON EDUCATION Sepulveda then decided to enroll in MDC, clueless of the paperwork it required for someone in his situation, he went to Kendall and North Campus to register but had no luck. He reached out to Wendy Joseph, the program coordinator for Educate Tomorrow, who helped him enroll at Wolfson Campus.

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have food to eat today? Are my belongings going to be vandalized? Is my sister going to be okay?’” Joseph said. “You can physically be sitting here, but if in your mind you’re thinking about all these other life challenges, you’re not going to be very productive.” In a chance encounter during a meeting with Joseph, Sepulveda introduced himself to Jaime Anzalotta, the dean of students at Wolfson Campus. “I saw a spark of willingness to achieve in Enrique,” Anzalotta said. “[He] was going through some very very tough personal issues.” Anzalotta helped Sepulveda get a part-time, weekday position in the Student Life Department. He soon became involved with the Student Government Association at Wolfson Campus and was elected in March as the vice president for the 2016-17 year. But his housing situation was

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still unstable. The foreclosed house where he had lived in for two years had been repossessed. “One day the bank came knocking on the door to change the locks and they had the house refinished,” Sepulveda said. When this happened, his ex-girlfriend’s brother offered him a couch to crash but after an argument he found himself homeless again. Sepulveda went to make amends with his mother, but once she took him in, he saw the movie of his childhood playing out again. “I had started already with the school lifestyle and living with my mother just created a whole other form of negative influences and distractions,” Sepulveda said. “Again, my grades kept declining, I wasn’t getting sleep and I was just really stressed out.” For a couple of weeks, he parked his car by Margaret Pace Park and slept in it. “I was embarrassed,” Sepulveda

said. “I knew I had to get myself out of the situation.”

A BETTER HOME That’s when Sepulveda reached out to Anzalotta and was directed to Camillus House, a full service center for low income and homeless people. Based on the community’s need, last April, Camillus House opened a housing program for young adults who, like Sepulveda, have the desire to succeed but are limited by their homelessness situation. The Catholic Churchbased charity offers meals, medical care, showers, shelter and drug treatment to thousands of men, women and children yearly at numerous downtown Miami sites. The young adults in the Youth Housing Program go home to dorm-like colorful rooms in their building in Overtown. A requirement to reside in the program is to be enrolled in an educational path. Currently, there are five women and 12 men between the ages of 18 and 24. One of the rooms houses LGBTQI+ youth, providing them a safe space to succeed. “They were house-surfing, they were surfing from house to house in different individuals couches and they really had no stable environment,” said Fred Mims, Director of the Direct Care Ministry at Camillus House, “But they had the desire to go back to school and continue their education as well as work.” The participants have to be referred by Educate Tomorrow, Project Safe, or any of the partner organization of Camillus House in order to be part of the youth housing initiative. The program offers three meals per day, psychological assistance, and a case manager that tracks their progress and connects them with resources to get free bus passes and free books, among other necessities. “We’re also trying to teach independence,” Mims said, “So at one level when they start working and doing things they might move to a higher level of living where they might have to pay a contribution in the near future.” In early October, the Camillus House facility at Somerville started hosting the second phase of the program for those who have succeeded in Overtown. Sepulveda moved to Somerville. Sepulveda is not the first homeless student to pursue studies at the College. Up to this past summer, MDC had enrolled 771 students who qualified as homeless during the last five years. By state law, Miami Dade College waives tuition for homeless students. His life experience has inspired him to change his major to political science. Sepulveda is expected to graduate from MDC next spring with an associate’s degree. Then he hopes to transfer to Florida State University in Tallahassee to complete a bachelor’s degree in political science and eventually a master’s in public administration. “Enrique is truly the epitome of success, resilience, dedication, commitment,” Anzalotta said.


6 NEWS | OCTOBER 25, 2016

THE REPORTER

Crucial Can

Florida State Senate District 36 Florida State Senate District 37

René García // Republican René García was born and raised in the city of Hialeah to Cuban American parents. García was elected to a two year term on the Hialeah City Council in 1997 and to a four year term in 1999. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in political science from Florida International University and a master's in business administration from the University of Miami. García was elected to the Florida House of Representatives in 2000 and served there until 2006. Then, he was elected to Florida's State Senate in 2010 and currently serves as the chairman of the Healthcare Regulation Committee. García also serves on other committees such as the Agriculture, Budget Subcommittee on Health and Human Services Appropriations, Governmental Oversight and Accountability, Reapportionment and Transportation. MDC: “I believe in the mission of the College and that’s why I’ve always helped with whatever issues the college has brought our way. From trying to get funding for job training programs to helping to increase funding in different specific programs within the College. I have a proven track record that is very evident that I’ve always helped the College.” Jobs: “One of the things we can do is retrain the workforce. You can retrain the workforce based on the need of individual industries that are looking to relocate to Miami or bring their businesses here. Last year we filed legislation to help small

businesses, giving small business a small sales tax holiday. The reason we have that is to help the small businesses in our community. We have the big tax holidays for the big tax chains but what are we doing for small businesses? Small businesses are the cornerstone of our economy, and we have to start treating it that way. So whatever I can do to help alleviate some of the regulatory burdens that exist on small businesses and try to help with the taxing scheme. Those are small things you can do to try to create more employment opportunities.” Minimum Wage: “The cost of living is going up everywhere. One of the best things you can do for any community is education. If we have an educated and skilled population, you will see that employers will start coming back into our sector. What we need to do is use our college and university system and retrain the workforce to the needs that exist at that time and that way they’ll have meaningful employment. They won’t have to worry about the $15 per hour minimum wage because they’ll be making more than that.” Guns: “I’m a firm believer in the Second Amendment. It’s a right that we as Americans have. I’m not really a fan of limiting the rights individuals have to carry weapons and firearms but when it comes to the carry on campuses we need to think that through. It’s just a matter of thinking that through and seeing how it works but I’m just not really a fan of having weapons on university campuses.”

Annabella Grohoski // Democrat Anabella Grohoski, a long time resident of Miami Springs, was born in Guatemala and came to the United States at the age of 21, fleeing the civil war in her country. She’s a Miami Dade College alumni who studied education, and started making a living by cleaning houses and babysitting. She then worked for various international companies like Corporate Express, and for nonprofit Habitat for Humanity International. In 2004, she started her own business in construction permits expediting and has managed it for more than 10 years. MDC: “I support education one hundred percent. I think that if you’re on your own, if you’re a student going part time to school or even full time you should be entitled to financial aid. You should not have to pay for college. I want to fight for that.” Jobs: “I think that small businesses should get tax credit or some kind of incentive that we need to work on in order to make [salaries] affordable. That should be

across the board.” Minimum Wage: “I think that $15 per hour minimum wage is doable. We just need to push for that in Tallahassee. People deserve better. Not only are rents higher but if you own a house you’re paying a lot of taxes. Food is expensive; gas is expensive. We need to adjust to the cost of living. Everything is going up and the salaries are staying the same, if not lower. The state of Florida is one of the lowest paying states. We need to address that issue. That’s something I would want to work very hard on in Tallahassee.” Guns: “I believe that guns should be regulated. That’s not to say I don’t believe in the Second Amendment. Everyone has the right to their own weapon. But I think it needs to be regulated. Tougher restrictions need to be imposed. I don’t think any high school or college or university should allow guns on their campuses.” —Riane Roldan

Miguel Díaz de la Portilla // Republican Miguel Díaz de la Portilla was born and raised in Miami, Florida. He attended the University of Miami in 1982 where he earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy and English literature. He then went to law school at the University of Miami and graduated in 1987. He served as a commissioner for Miami-Dade County in 1993 and chaired the county commission for two terms, from 1996 until 2000. He now serves in the Florida Senate and is part of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Tourism, and Economic Development, the Rules Committee, the Community Affairs Committee, the Finance and Tax Committee, the Regulated Industries Committee, and chairs the Judiciary Committee. He is running for re-election. MDC: “I think it’s very important for us to continue to support Miami Dade College’s funding request, and every year in the legislature there are funding requests for specific programs and specific things that Miami Dade College wants and I’ve always supported it.”

Minimum Wage and Jobs: “My track record on wages is that I’ve always supported a living wage for working people. And I am in favor of generally increasing minimum wage as well. I think we need to do everything we can to bring it up so that people who are working can provide for their families because there’s nothing worse than being working poor, working as much as you can, as hard as you can and not being able to pay for your basic necessities.” Guns: “There’s been a campus carry bill introduced in Florida legislature, which allows college students with a concealed carry permit to bring handguns to college campuses and university campuses. I killed the bill twice. This particular piece of legislation, I didn’t think was good public policy. I didn’t think it would make our campuses any safer. I thought that if this bill would become law, it would create significant issues for public safety departments at public universities and it would create significant issues of accidental shootings and other accidents happening at public universities. It would create issues for college presidents, university presidents rather. I just didn’t think it was good public policy.”

José Javier Rodriguez // Democrat José Javier Rodriguez was born and raised in Miami. He attended Brown University for his undergraduate degree and received a bachelor's in international relations, political economy of development. He then served in the Peace Corps for three years. After, he attended Harvard Law School and received his graduate degree in law. He serves as a representative in the Florida House of Representatives and is part of Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee, the Judiciary Committee, the Justice Appropriations Subcommittee, the Rules, Calendar & Ethics Committee, and serves as the Democratic Ranking Member for the Finance and Tax Committee. He is running for Florida Senate. MDC: “So I think that the most important thing is we can do at the state level is invest in education, higher education and infrastructure. The fact is, it’s more expensive to educate here so we should get more funding, and so adjusting those

formulas and making sure that we get extra money because of how expensive a year it is to educate and because we have needs here that other areas don’t have.” Minimum Wage and Jobs: “Yes, I support a gradual increase of the minimum wage. I’ve worked and advocated on wage issues since I was a legal aid lawyer before I was elected. The minimum wage challenge is a gesture symbolizing things to help draw attention to how little the minimum wage is. If you work full time all year round on minimum wage you’re still below the federal poverty level and that should not be that level. We’re trying to change that in legislation.” Guns: “I have a very strong record on advocating for regulations in favor of gun safety and absolutely opposed guns on campus bill, and my opponent in the general election is somebody who more recently came to that position and so I think that’s where I would be.” —Alessandra Pacheco

Florida State House of Representative District 118 Robert Asencio // Democrat Robert Asencio joined the United States Army Reserves, where he finished high school and took college courses. He recently retired from the Miami-Dade Schools Police Department, where he served as captain, after 26 years. MDC: “Given that state colleges received funding from the general budget, then there is naturally going to the state colleges. At this point the burden of cost then is shifted to students. The students are forced to pay more. So by arguing the importance of committing to better funding at the college level, it would reduce the burden on student.”

Minimum Wage and Jobs: “We cannot provide better job prospects if we cannot improve education and the employment pool. There are certainly other plans but the main focus is education. We need to improve the employment pools and make it so that companies want to come to South Florida. We need [the] certainty that the jobs that are created are living wage jobs.” Guns: “As a career law enforcement officer, as a parent, as a person who’s been in the military, I think bills like that are very short sighted and create liability. I have to tell you that if the legislature’s intent is to create safety, than I would commit to dedicating resources that would improve public safety.”

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OCTOBER 25, 2016 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

ndidates

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ONLINE TEASE VIDEO | Watch The Reporter's Givoanni Del Fa tests student knowledge on state elections. Go to our website for the video. www.mdcthereporter.com

Florida State House of Representatives District 103

Ivette Gonzalez Petkovich // Democrat Ivette Gonzalez Petkovich graduated from the University of Miami with a bachelor’s degree in business administration and a majored in political science. Then she received a doctorate from St. Thomas University in Law. She has served as assistant state attorney, first dealing with criminal cases and then working in the insurance fraud unit. She is part of the Miami-Dade League of Women Voters, the Cuban American Bar Association, and several other organizations. MDC: “I will support any and every piece of legislation and sponsor it myself if I have to that allows for the proper funding to return to Miami Dade College.” Jobs: “I think there’s a lot of industries that the legislature ignores or doesn’t want to pursue. For example, the film industry. The film industry loves Miami-Dade County but unfortunately, there’s legislation in place that makes it very difficult for

the film industry to operate here. And so, the people who work in that industry are required to travel outside of Florida.” Minimum Wage: “We should work toward a $15 minimum wage but also, it’s important that when we have these conversations that we educate the community this requirement should not apply blankly to every single business because a lot of businesses cannot sustain $15 minimum wage. Businesses with less than 100 employees should be exempt from this particular minimum wage. And it should be incremental” Guns: “I would love to tackle mental health and gun reform and merge those two issues so that, you know we can just become more vigilant, and we have an opportunity to potentially identify, you know, potential gun violence, you know, through that route.”

Manny Diaz Jr. // Republican Manny Diaz Jr. is running for re-election after holding this seat since 2012. He graduated from St. Thomas University with a bachelor’s degree in human resources/ education. Then he received a master’s from Nova Southeastern University in educational leadership. He chairs the Choice and Innovation Subcommittee, Education Committee, K-12 Subcommittee, Education Appropriation Subcommittee, and the Health Innovation Subcommittee. MDC: “I’ve become a big advocate for Miami Dade and our community in Tallahassee. If I am re-elected and I’m able to go back, I would be in a position where I can provide more help to Miami Dade, even more than what I’ve been able to do in the last four years.” Jobs: “Continuing to provide a beneficial tax rate here in Florida, specifically in my district, bringing back dollars and new sources to create, you know, repair and create new infrastructure that would make it possible for new businesses to come in and create jobs. I think that the jobs, the role of government is to provide infrastructure and safety and a low tax environment where businesses are attracted to

come in and are able to produce those jobs.” Minimum Wage: “I think that actually increasing minimum wage would actually hurt our economy and hurt workers in Miami-Dade because entry level jobs would disappear because they would become too expensive. And then those folks who would be entering the workforce, the price of goods will increase and their buying power would be less.” “...there’s a new economy, there’s a service economy, there’s an information economy. We need to prepare our students and our graduates for that economy, so that they can enter the workforce and get those higher paying jobs.” Guns: “If someone wants to do harm at a Miami Dade campus right now, what stops them from carrying a gun on campus illegally? Nothing. So what I’m saying is that if a law-abiding citizen who goes through the trouble of getting a concealed weapons permit, they’re following the law. The only people who are following the law are law-abiding citizens. Those folks that carry guns to do harm, they don’t care about the law.” —Maria Vizcaino

Florida State House of Representative District 114

Daisy Baez // Democrat Daisy Baez was born and raised in Dominican Republic. At 17, Baez migrated to the United States and joined the United States Army. She earned her bachelor’s degree in social work at the University of Central Texas and a master’s degree in counseling at the Sam Houston State University in Texas. Now, she serves as the executive director of the Dominican Health Care Association of Florida, which she founded. She is also a member of the Board of Directors at the Merrick House Museum in Coral Gables. In 2014, Baez ran for the same position yet, she was defeated by the current Representative of District 114 Erik Fresen MDC: “The state should fully fund its commitment to community schools and higher education. We have seen a scaling back on the support and funding of Bright Futures Scholarship. I believe we need to fully fund Bright Futures Scholarship. Students should not leave school loaded with debt.”

Jobs: “We need to expand jobs that required a college degree. One way is to expand Medicare in Florida. If you expand Medicare to 800,000 people, you are going to need more doctors, nurses, lab technicians, x-ray technicians, psychologists, builders, and accounts. Also this administration has focus a lot in tax incentives for companies to come, I believe when companies are looking to relocate to Florida they not only look at the tax advantages. I think they also look at quality of education, transportation, the environment, drinking water, entertainment. By allocating funds to all of these issues we help the economy and bring more jobs to Florida.” Minimum Wage: I support the $15 minimum wages. It goes back to my idea that people who have more disposable income can participate in the economy better. Guns: “I’m opposed to guns on campus. I’m a veteran, I’m not afraid of guns. I just don’t think a school environment is appropriate for guns. I’m not opposed to guns or people carrying guns, if they have the proper training, background checks and certificates.”

John Couriel // Republican John Couriel is a native to South Florida born to Cuban-American parents. He graduated from Christopher Columbus High School. He attended Harvard College and then Harvard Law School. After graduation he clerked for John D. Bates of the United States District Court for the the District of Columbia. Then Couriel practiced law at Davis Polk & Wardwell. He is currently a private practice attorney. On 2009, Couriel became an assistant United States attorney. In 2014, he ran for Florida State Senate District 35, and was defeated by incumbent Gwen Margolis (DEM). MDC: He will keep Miami Dade College at the forefront for career development and make sure it gets resources the college needs. He will work to expand the Bright Futures scholarship by working effectively with the leadership to set priorities. Jobs: He believes in attracting the right careers in the science, technology, engineering and math field (STEM). He has a bill planned to pass, if elected, that will

focus on students in the STEM field. The bill has a GPA requirement, provides loan assistance and the students must commit to staying in Florida for five years after graduation. He states that having a work-ready population allows to bring more industries to state. Additionally, he encourages career pathways transparency in college, meaning students know the salaries of the jobs they decide to pursuit. Minimum Wage: “I don’t support the $15/hour living wage. A increasing in the minimum wage is not the right way to increase the economy. This will make it harder for obtain any low level entering jobs. I believe the best way to deal with the cost of living in Miami is to have better careers in the community. Guns: I believe the Second Amendment protects the right to bear arms. We need better enforcement of laws, a better community health resources. However, it’s up to the college to decided whether or not allow students to carry weapons on campuses. —Zayrha Rodriguez

David Rivera // Republican David Rivera was born in New York but has resided in Miami for more than 40 years. He graduated from Florida International University with a bachelor’s degree in political science and a master’s in public administration. Rivera has been elected to represent District 112 in the Florida House of Representatives three times, and served as the speaker of the House during his tenure. In 2010 he was the representative for Florida District 25 in the United States House of Representatives, where he sat in the Foreign Affairs Committee and the Natural Resources Committee. MDC: “Higher education is the stepping stone to success. Miami Dade College is a great school that fosters many talented students. As a legislator I will ensure adequate funding for MDC and growth for our economy creating better paying jobs for MDC graduates. My voting record shows that I’m a strong believer in higher education. As chairman of appropriations in 2010, I not only made sure MDC received the funding requested, but also secured

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PECO funding which is used for buildings/repairs. I have experience serving on both the budget and substantive policy committees for higher education. I believe my experience in the legislature will serve me well in promoting the interests of MDC and its students.” Minimum Wage and Jobs: “Florida has also created one million jobs in the past two years. We need to continue this growth to allow students to enter the job market as soon as they graduate. I believe we can continue the growth but also not be complacent. We should keep aiming for more growth by pursuing policies that incentivize businesses to relocate to Florida, including tax and regulatory relief.” Guns: “I am a strong supporter of the second amendment and I look forward to hearing from all concerned parties regarding both concealed weapons on college campuses and open carry.” —Lorena Umaña

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8 SPORTS | OCTOBER 25, 2016

THE REPORTER

Women's Basketball

Former High School Phenom Looking To Bounce Back From Injury-Riddled Past ‰‰ JeTaun Rouse, a guard who previously played at Marquette University, is looking to revive her playing career at Miami Dade College after suffering multiple severe knee injuries that threatened her basketball future. By Peter Carrera peter.carrera001@mymdc.net After multiple surgeries due to degenerative cartilage in both knees derailed her basketball career at Marquette University in Milwaukee, JeTaun Rouse is attempting a comeback at Miami Dade College. Rouse, who was once one of the most coveted high school guards in the country, brings an aggressive, fast paced style to the Lady Sharks. "Every day for her is game day and because of that passion, positive energy and courage she will no doubt outweigh any of the possible negatives that most ordinary players may experience that lack the fierce passion and positive attitude,” said MDC Head Women’s Basketball Coach Susan Summons. She left Marist High School in Chicago with a boatload of accolades. Rouse averaged 21.7 points per game her senior year, and was ranked as a top-45 guard on ESPN’s National Top 100 High School Women’s Basketball Players List. Her prolific scoring allowed her to leave the school as the team’s all-time leading scorer, amassing more than 2,000 points in her career.

That got the attention of Division I school, Marquette University. It was at Marquette that Rouse’s knee issues surfaced. “It was actually our first official practice when I hurt my knee, and after that, everything just went downhill,” Rouse said. The official diagnosis was that the cartilage in her right knee had been mostly missing, due to degenerative cartilage, causing friction between her bones and resulting in knee problems. The injury forced Rouse to be redshirted her freshman year. Then things continued to spiral downward. Soon, the same knee complications would occur in her other knee, and both knees would eventually require several surgeries to repair the damage. “I was in a depression,” Rouse said. “[I] messed up my grades just because I had basketball taken away from me.” Rouse, 21, was given her shot at redemption when her seventh grade Amateur Athletic Union coach, Marc Irvin, put her in contact with MDC Head Women’s Basketball Coach Susan Summons. "[Summons] took me in when no one else would,” Rouse said. “She gave me the second chance that I had been asking for and praying for, and she just accepted me with open arms. She cares about me as a person before [she cares about me] as a player, and I really like that." With the season starting in

November, Rouse is doing everything possible to give her knees the best treatment possible. Her regular regiment ranges from constantly putting ice on her knees to stretching and working with MDC’s strength and conditioning coach, Phillip Glatzer, on exercises that strengthen her quad muscles and other areas of her legs. Despite the precarious state of her knees, Rouse intends to play hard and play as much as possible this season. Her goal this year is to average 40 minutes per game. “I just want to let [NCAA DI coaches] know that I’m still working hard, and I haven’t given up,” Rouse said. The Lady Sharks play their regular season opener on Nov. 3 at 5:30 p.m. on the road versus Hillsborough Community College.

Comeback Kid: JeTaun Rouse, a 21-year-old guard, is hoping to get her basketball career back on track after multiple knee surgeries.

ONLINE TEASE VIDEO | Visit us online for a behind the scenes look at JeTaun Rouse in action. www.mdcthereporter.com OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

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Homestead 11/10/2016 Wolfson 11/15/2016 West 11/28/2016 Wolfson 12/06/2016 Homestead 12/08/2016 Homestead 01/12/2017 Homestead 02/09/2017 Homestead 03/09/2017 Homestead 04/13/2017 Homestead 05/11/2017

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OCTOBER 25, 2016 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

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// SPORTS Jonathan Perez, Sports Editor  //  Peter Carrera, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

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B peter.carrera001@mymdc.net

T (305) 237-1254 

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B jonathan.perez019@mymdc.net

Women's Volleyball

Freshman With International Experience Adds Flare To Lady Sharks Volleyball Team ‰‰ Massiel Matos, a 6-foot outside hitter from the Dominican Republic, has competed at the highest level in her country and on the international stage. Matos has brought that experience to Miami Dade College this season.

By Giovanni Del Fa giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net In a home game versus Eastern Florida State College on Sept. 20, freshman outside hitter Massiel Matos offered a snapshot of her potential. Matos racked up 13 kills for 21.5 total points (7 of those kills were serving aces) in a 3-0 win against the EFSC Titans. The athletic Dominican has been making her name known in the National Junior College Athletic Association. She is leading the NJCAA DI in serving aces per set with 0.85. Matos has 40 serving aces through 13 games, which is good for 17th in the league, and she is averaging 4.49 kills per set (3rd in NJCAA). Matos, 18, has proven to be one of the most important pickups for Head Volleyball Coach Origenes “Kiko” Benoit this season. Benoit originally discovered Matos during the NORCECA championship tournament, a tournament for all nations to compete in volleyball. He couldn’t take his eyes off of Matos because of her play. “She was playing for the Dominican Junior National team and it caught my attention that in every NORCECA championship,

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

Lighting It Up: Massiel Matos, a native of the Dominican Republic, is leading the team in three statistical categories (points, kills, and kills per set). She was awarded NJCAA Region 8 Player of the Week for the week of Sept. 12-18. she was always either one of the top hitters or the best right side,” Benoit said. Matos possesses volleyball knowledge and experience beyond her age. Her love for the sport can be traced back to her childhood in Higüey, a small town in the Dominican Republic. “I was 12 when my dad would take me to a field to play like kids do, that’s

when I started enjoying it and soon enough a coach saw me,” Matos said. She was offered a spot on the youth national team and later on the Under-20 national team, a squad she is still a part of. “I would go train sometimes but my mom wouldn’t let me often because I was just 12 and I’d have to stay in town,” Matos said. Slowly but surely, Matos started to travel to

other countries, gaining experience while honing her craft. “I knew I loved this sport when I was around 15,” Matos said. “I said if I can make it on the national team, then anything is possible. This is my thing, that’s when I knew this is what I wanted to do.” She has already participated in two world championships. Matos has won one. She has spent the last four years on the national team for the Dominican Republic. “When we won the Sub-20 World Cup in Puerto Rico, the final was against Brazil, which has an amazing team,” Matos said. “No one expected a small country with limited resources like the Dominican Republic to win.” Matos met Benoit while playing with the national team. She took a leap of faith to attend MDC because she didn’t know English, leaving behind everything and everyone she knew for an opportunity to better her life both athletically and academically. “When I first arrived, I wasn’t having such a good time,” Matos said. “At first it was a new country, a new language. Starting over is the hardest part.” While Matos is focusing on her studies, volleyball wise, she has her sights set on a National Championship. The Lady Sharks are 9-4 this season and 4-1 in conference play. “First, we have to concentrate as a team, and then we’ll see,” Matos said.

FCA

Fellowship Of Christian Athletes Brings Spiritual Bonding To Players ‰‰ The Fellowship of Christian Athletes, a worldwide organization founded in 1954, plays a major role in the lives of Miami Dade College athletes by offering moral and spiritual guidance. By Peter Carrera peter.carrera001@mymdc.net If you speak with current or former members of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, you are sure to get similar comments about their experience with the organization. “It was honestly a blessing,”said former Miami Dade College baseball player Michael Perez on his time with FCA. “The things I had to go through at a young age, it was really comforting to be with them. It was more than a club, it was a friendship.” The Fellowship of Christian Athletes has been supporting MDC and its athletics teams for the past four years, lending their services to the players and coaches that want it. The purpose of FCA, which is involved with four out of the five MDC teams, is to give athletes a platform to connect, convene and support them through the common interests of sports and Christianity. “We try to support them on the other dimensions of their life, the spiritual dimension, such as life and making the right choices,” said Jerry Beverly, an FCA area representative in the West Kendall district. The range of ways in which FCA supports teams and athletes is very broad. They can help by giving a team Gatorade or water bottles at practices, or by lending moral and spiritual support. Head Baseball Coach Danny Price regularly brings in speakers from FCA to speak with the baseball team. They usually talk about important topics such as how to be an upstanding student athlete or how to manage being away from home for those who are out-of-state students. Erin Sundook, one of last year’s top softball players, was vice president of the Kendall Campus chapter. She www.mdcthereporter.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF JERRY BEVERLY

Lending A Hand: Former Miami Dade College baseball player Cleveland Westbrook (right) and a teammate ride a cart carrying trees as they and several other baseball players helped to clean up a women's pregnancy center located across the street from Kendall Campus on April 7 as part of volunteer work by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes organization.

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organized weekly meetings with the softball team to discuss topics such as togetherness, respect, and teamwork. Sundook, like most members at one point, was not initially aware of the club’s existence. “I was not actively seeking a club related to athletics and my faith, but I did not know one existed,” Sundook said. “So when I was introduced to FCA I was excited to know there was a group of like minded individuals I could meet with.” Aside from FCA supporting its athletes, the athletes themselves support each other as well. Members meet regularly with each other during lunch or after school hours. They form study groups, hold meetings, practice their faith or just hang out together. “I’m hoping that as president, we can attain members and have small groups, life coaching, really build relationships with one another and really help each other,” said current Kendall Campus Chapter President Lydia Gonzalez. “We’re all young. We’re all starting college. We’re all trying to figure out what life is, so as a small supportive group, I would really love to see us grow.” Membership is not just restricted to being an active player or coach. There are no requirements, no fees or required materials. Meetings usually take place at conference rooms in churches that support FCA or in classrooms. The organization does not have a designated meeting place at Kendall Campus. Entering its fifth year working with MDC, FCA hopes to continue its mission of providing guidance and companionship to athletes and resources and supplies to coaches to connect people through sports and religion. “Being a part of a team already makes the team close, but if FCA can help bring them closer and [allows them] to support each other, that’s a great thing to see,” Gonzalez said. For more information about the Fellowship of Christian Athletes at Kendall Campus, send an email to lydia.gonzalez005@mymdc.net


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OCTOBER 25, 2016 | A&E

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// A&E Riane Roldan, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-7140 

// 

B riane.roldan001@mymdc.net

Miami Film Festival Presents GEMS 2016 The third annual fall film festival, today known as GEMS, l took place from Oct. 13 until Oct. 16 at Miami Dade College’s historic Tower Theater located at 1508 S.W. 8 St. in downtown Miami. GEMS is a precedent to the 34th annual Miami Film Festival, taking place in March of 2017. The four day long festivities featured a heavily curated 13 film lineup. The films have all been critically acclaimed, generating major Oscar buzz. Previous films screened at GEMS, like Brooklyn directed by John Crowley, went on

to win three Oscar nominations. The first night of the festival was accompanied by a screening of The Rolling Stones Olé Olé Ole: A Trip Across Latin America directed by Paul Dugdale. Following the film there was an opening night party sponsored by vendors Stella Artois, Bunnie Cakes and more. Some festival favorites were films like Certain Women, directed by Kelly Reichardt featuring actress Kristen Stewart and Gimme Danger directed by Jim Jarmusch, a film centering around the life and career of Iggy Pop. —Alessandra Pacheco

ONLINE TEASE VIDEO | Visit us online for a behind the scenes look at the Miami Film Festival GEMS. www.mdcthereporter.com SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

Projecting Talents: Miami Dade College Tower Theater hosts GEMS, a film festival that brings some of the most acclaimed filmmakers and actors to Miami.

OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

All Smiles: (left) Executive Director and Director of Programming Jaie Laplante and (right) Wolfson Campus President Rick A. Soria, pose on the red carpet at Miami Dade College's Tower Theatre on Oct. 13.

OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

The Reveal: Juan Gatti unveils the Miami Film Festival poster on Oct. 12 at the Faena Hotel in Miami Beach on Oct. 12.

OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

Rockin' Out: Brothers of Others performs to keep the visitors and staff occupied until the premiere of Ole Ole Ole begins at Miami Dade College's Tower Theater on Oct. 13. www.mdcthereporter.com

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Time To Mingle: Guests enjoy complimentary snacks and refreshments at the opening night party for GEMS on Oct. 13. @mdcthereporter


12 A&E | OCTOBER 25, 2016

THE REPORTER

Movie Review

2001: A Space Odyssey, Putting A Sci-Fi Twist On Halloween ‰‰ 2001: A Space Odyssey is a science fiction film that was produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick in 1968. The epic story was inspired by the screenplay The Sentinel written by Arthur C. Clarke. By Hector D. Gonzalez hector.gonzalez012@mymdc.net If you’re looking for something a little different to satiate your horror-seeking bug this Halloween, it’s Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. You won’t find much gore or gruesome scenes like other classic horror films, but if you’re patient, or simply a fan of Kubrick’s previous work like The Shining or A Clockwork Orange, this film is for you. Shown in 70mm film on Oct. 7 at the Coral Gables Art Cinema, a full house of spectators were present to enjoy the film. The small theater needed extra seats and an extra screening day to satisfy the high demand for this beyond the earth flick. The first 10 minutes of the film are slow, tempting viewers to disengage, but the film promises a more engaging plot and storyline throughout the rest of the film. It is an intellectual film and confusing at times, but the visual and cinematic techniques are stunning and way beyond their time.

PHOTO COURTESY OF EVERETT COLLECTION

Space and Time: 2001: A Space Odyssey tells the epic adventure of astronauts David Bowman and Frank Poole racing against time to discover the meaning of the monolith. The film has a calm and quiet feel to it as viewers watch normal life carried out in space, but Kubrick is a master for creating inward delirium even with little outside action throughout the movie. It’s no surprise that 2001: A Space Odyssey to this day can still draw a fan base. The movie will guide you through a space journey accompanied by a few space cadets portrayed by Keir Dullea and Gary

Lockwood, who travel on a mission to planet Jupiter to solve the mystery of a foreign black monolith. The monolith appeared in the middle of the moon, causing several weird occurrences to follow. It’s a slow and sneaky terror but from the superb sound designs, beautiful cinema of what a modernized space life would look like, to the voice of a crazed and smart spaceship human killer computer named

HAL9000, it is an undeniable piece of art. Kubrick, who loves to tell a story from different point of views in his movies, uses an analogy in the beginning of the movie with flesh eating apes who discover the use of violence after an encounter with the black monolith. So if you’ve become weary and tired of Hollywood’s typical dose of scary flicks such as Blair Witch, The Conjuring 2, Clown and Viral, give this film a shot. The one mysterious thing, however, is that Kubrick leaves his audience with the puzzling question of the meaning of the black monolith. It seems Kubrick wanted to explain the evolution of humans or possibly predict the future. The meaning is still debated today. It is also not clear how or why the bizarre computer, HAL9000, whose ability to function, converse and show emotion became a monstrous silent killer at the end of the movie. Nonetheless, it’s evident there is some type of higher power behind all of eccentric happenings that occur throughout the film. If you’re a sci-fi fanatic with enough tolerance to endure two hours of space drama, cool spacey colors, a slow journey to Jupiter and even a silly death song like “Daisy, Daisy…” then you’ll like this movie.

Video Games

Top Four Horror Games To Play On Halloween

PHOTO COURTESY OF Scott Cawthon

‰‰ For most, Halloween is all about going out and dressing up. But for some, it’s all about staying in and experiencing the night through the virtual world’s most terrifying video games. By Alexandra Camargo alexandra.camargo002@mymdc.net Halloween is just around the corner and for all of you gamers, it’s the perfect opportunity to turn down the lights, put on some headphones and play some of the best horror games the video game world has to offer. Here is a list of games that will surely keep you scared and awake this Halloween.

1. Five Nights At Freddy’s Five Nights At Freddy’s is a survival horror game that was created, developed and published by Scott Cawthon. It was released on Aug. 8 in 2014 and can be played on Microsoft Windows computers and any Android or iPhone devices. The game revolves around the player working as a night guard in a pizzeria known as Freddy Fazbear’s Pizzeria. The pizzeria is filled with animatronic characters that later become mobile and homicidal. In order to survive, the player must occasionally check security cameras and close

PHOTO COURTESY OF EA Redwood Shores

PHOTO COURTESY OF Red Barrels

PHOTO COURTESY OF STARBREEZE STUDIOS

doors before the creepy characters end the player’s life. Playing this game will make players hope they never land a job as a night guard at any Chuck E. Cheese franchise.

Windows computers and was later released for PlayStation 4, Xbox One and MacBook computers. Outlast takes place in a run-down psychiatric hospital that is filled with homicidal patients. The player will be controlling Miles Upshur, a freelance investigative journalist who received an anonymous tip that inhumane experiments were being conducted within the hospital. As the player enters the hospital, they immediately discover that the whole staff has been brutally murdered by the patients, which are known as “Variants.” The player must then find their way through the hospital of terror to escape. This game style imitates video footage and can be quite frightening due to the fact there isn’t too much light and the “Variants” occasionally pop out. The player must constantly keep their eyes open if they wish to survive the nightmare of this hospital.

This multiplayer game has gamers come together as a group of survivors attempting to escape from another player who is a homicidal murder. The survivors, which are usually four players, must escape the killer by either repairing a number of disabled generators or by escaping through a trapdoor, which only opens when there is one survivor left and at least two generators have been successfully repaired. The killer, on the other hand, must capture each survivor by either hitting them twice with their weapon or by grabbing them in one move. They have the option of catching their victims while they repair generators, attempt to escape through the trapdoor along with many more options. The killer does not have the ability to run or crouch but does have the ability to walk slightly faster than the survivors. This game can be a bit nerve-racking because it’s quite difficult to keep track of the other fellow survivors with a killer on the loose. But when played as a team, survivors can find the best way to escape the killer. Be warned, the killer can try to go for anyone who separates from the group. These are just a few horror games that can keep players frightened this Halloween. Just remember, you always have to watch your back.

2. Dead Space Dead Space is a science fiction thirdperson survival horror game that was developed by EA Redwood Shores and was released Oct. 13 in 2008 for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Microsoft Windows computers. The gamer plays as Isaac Clarke, a ship systems engineer who must fight his way through a mining starship that is infested with horrifying aliens. These terrifying creatures have slaughtered the crew of the ship, whose corpses turn into creatures known as “Necromorphs.” It’s up to the player to repair the ship, escape and destroy the terrifying creatures. This game will surely have players on their toes, for these sci-fi creatures pop up around every corner. To be successful, the player must always watch their back.

3. Outlast Outlast is a first-person survival horror game that was developed and published by Red Barrels. The game was originally released on Sept. 4, 2013, for Microsoft

4. Dead By Daylight Dead By Daylight is a multiplayer survival horror game that was developed by Behavior Interactive and published by Starbreeze Studios. The game was released on June 14, 2016 and is available for Microsoft Windows computers.

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OCTOBER 25, 2016 | A&E

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13

// A&E Riane Roldan, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-7140 

// 

B riane.roldan001@mymdc.net

Music Review

Alt-Rock Celebrates Big Anniversaries This Year

The 1990s that brought the world Wayne’s World, Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater and the Tamagotchi. It was also a decade that gave us some excellent pieces of rock music. Here are three albums that defined the decade and celebrate their anniversaries this year. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

PHOTO COURTESY OF WARNER BROS.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GEFFEN RECORDS

PHOTO COURTESY OF GEFFEN RECORDS

Blood Sugar Sex Magik by The Red Hot Chili Peppers (Sept. 24, 1991)

Nevermind by Nirvana (Sept. 24, 1991)

Pinkerton by Weezer (Sept. 24, 1996)

It isn’t hard to deny how great The Red Hot Chilli Peppers are. After more than 30 years of performing and releasing records, they’ve tweaked their sounds and gone through minor lineup changes but the spirit of what makes them special is still very much alive. Their success can be traced back to the year 1991. Already four albums into their discography, they released a fifth LP that year. Blood Sugar Sex Magik is what brought the manic Los Angeles quartet to the public eye. Under the supervision of veteran producer Rick Rubin, the album gave listeners a more focused and concise side of the band. Earlier albums combined the genres of punk and funk rock into a messy (though cool) grab bag of sounds. In Blood Sugar Sex Magik the Peppers experimented with different sounds to create their most deeply personal album ever. Well, as personal as they can get with sexual innuendos and loud, bombastic riffs. It’s an alt-rock classic that ranks among the greatest releases of the ‘90s.

With an album as iconic as their cover, Nirvana’s Seattle trio never set out to the change the landscape of rock music in the early '90s. Responsible for bringing grunge music to the mainstream, Nevermind is easily one of the best records in the genre. Distorted guitar riffs, Dave Grohl’s frantic drumming, and frontman Kurt Cobain’s trademark, pitch black and humorous lyrics made this album a masterpiece that was way ahead of its time. It contains both mainstream interest with tracks like “Smells Like Teen Spirit” and “In Bloom” while its deep cuts boast some of the group’s most memorable moments. With the release of Nevermind, Pearl Jam’s Ten and Soundgarden’s Badmotorfinger, the Seattle music scene exploded in a way that no music fan could have predicted. Music was changed that fateful day in 1991, and it was for the better.

In the saddest story of rock music history, Weezer’s sophomore effort, Pinkerton, received less than stellar reviews upon its release. Coming off of a major success with their debut album, The Blue Album, Weezer frontman Rivers Cuomo channeled his biggest fears and struggles with depression into an interestingly dark album. Pinkerton deals with Cuomo’s struggle as a rock star and how he navigates a world of groupies, loneliness and the probability of obscurity. The result was 11 tracks that took influence from other bands and even classical Japanese theater. Deeply misunderstood at the time, Pinkerton is the greatest album the band released. It may not have the pop appeal that their other LPs possess, but it is truly something special from a band that received the short end of the stick throughout the ‘90s.

Best Songs:

Best Songs:

“The Power of Equality” An anti-violence, racist and sexist anthem that lead singer Anthony Kiedis sings over a funk-infused bassline. “Under the Bridge” A deeply sentimental and personal ballad that details Kiedis’ dependence on drugs and his experience with heartbreak. One of their earliest and softest tracks.

“Lithium” A showcase in Dave Grohl’s skills as a drummer. Kurt Cobain’s vocals and guitar work also make this song cut shine. “Come As You Are” A cello-laden track with an eerie chorus that deserves more credit than the lead single.

“The Good Life” The ultimate song about not wanting to grow up, Cuomo’s lyrics about wanting to live the rest of life as a rockstar will resonate with anyone wanting a taste of the past. “Falling for You” A loud and disoriented song about love and distrust, it will make those who fall in love too quickly think twice about who they want to be with.

Photo courtesy of Gus Van Sant

Photo courtesy of DGC Records

Photo courtesy of Atlantic Records

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Best Songs:


14 FORUM | OCTOBER 25, 2016 Trump

THE REPORTER

Let’s Not Trump NATO

‰‰ Gabriel Exposito argues that Donald Trump’s plan to isolate the U.S. and his stance on NATO pose a threat to the security of eastern European countries as well as to the fight to end terrorism.

By Gabriel Exposito gabriel.exposito001@mymdc.net The most successful military alliance to have ever existed is under threat, not by a Warsaw Pact 2.0, but by the very people it has protected for more than half a century. The trend of romanticizing isolationism, amplified by Donald Trump’s rhetoric, has gained momentum.

In Trump’s words, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) has become “obsolete” due to its ineffectiveness at fighting terrorism as well as other member states not paying enough money to the organization. His hostile approach is based on both his short-sightedness and plain ignorance. NATO covers 28 countries, several of which are former Soviet Bloc members. Significant portions of the populations in eastern NATO countries like Estonia and Albania live in relative poverty in comparison to their wealthier western European counterparts. Demanding that the poorer member states “pay up” is detrimental to the alliance and empowers NATO’s historical nemesis: Russia. Said countries are the closest to the Russian border and are therefore crucial in NATO’s mission of containing Russia’s aggression in the former Soviet Bloc. They are at the frontline should Russia commit any further acts of aggression as seen in Crimea in 2014. Trump’s consideration of abandoning NATO not only puts several countries at risk, but also

ENIO ACOSTA JR. \ THE REPORTER

undermines the efforts of countless U.S. presidents to guide eastern European nations into the path of selfdetermination. The claim that NATO has been ineffective at fighting terrorism is subjective at best and detrimental to the alliance and the security of

Voting

the world at worst. In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. invoked Article 5 of NATO, which states that an attack on one is an attack on all. The alliance went to war alongside us in Afghanistan to overthrow the Taliban government harboring Osama Bin Laden.

Although it took more than 10 years to locate Bin Laden, the U.S. sent a powerful message to all who took part in terrorism: they will not be allowed to hold and control land without serious repercussions. It’s impossible for the U.S. and NATO to prevent every terrorist organization from acquiring land at some point such as ISIL in Iraq in 2014. However, said occupation has been under constant attack by several NATO allies and a U.S.-led coalition of Arab nations. Terrorists aim to create fear and resentment in order to discourage intervention, and Trump is giving them exactly what they want. Don’t be fooled by Trump’s rhetoric, “We are winning.” The moment we abandon our allies and concede to terrorists’ demands is the moment that we lose. It’s important for us to have allies if we wish to create a more free and democratic world. The U.S. military is not a private military contractor, and fighting an asymmetrical war is not an easy, quick task. Trump’s ignorance and shortsightedness is a danger to everyone who is trying to build a more stable and peaceful world.

Local Elections

Why Millennials Should Vote Based On Conscience, Not Fear Vote In Local Elections ‰‰ Alexander F. Aspuru writes about voting for the presidential candidate who best represents one’s ideals, regardless of party identification or fear of another candidate rising to power.

By Alexander F. Aspuru alexander.aspuru001@mymdc.net Our country should be a mirror. We should see ourselves in its reflection, filling the curves of race, gender and politics outlined on our frame. There are 318.9 million people in the United States according to the U.S. Census Bureau, each with their own experiences. However, as wide as our perspectives may be, we are primarily presented with only two avenues for representation: the Democratic or Republican parties. Most recently, these avenues have become specialized to either Pro-Clinton or Pro-Trump. Both of these individuals have shoved us away from the mirror, fighting for a glimpse of their own visage. They have succeeded in garnering the support of their respected parties and, based on popular polls, the support of most voters. However, what happened to the 13.2 million people who voted for Bernie Sanders, whose beliefs would more align with Jill Stein than Hillary Clinton? What happened to the fiscally focused Republicans who voted for Ron Paul in 2012, whose views would

align more with Gary Johnson than Trump? The major dysfunction in U.S. politics is that most people do not vote based on their ideals. Instead, they either agree with the policy positions of one of the two governments or grumble, complaining about a two party system but participating in it anyway. Even worse, some vote based solely on party affiliation, ignoring candidates who may better represent them in favor of tribal loyalty. Of course, third party candidates are running for office. But most of their supporters are bombarded with the argument that a vote for a third party would be a wasted vote at best or a vote for either Trump or Clinton at worst. A vote for a third party candidate is not an idealistic decision; it is a realistic one. If we want to both dismantle the two party system, and see our beliefs manifested in our future presidents, we need to vote for candidates who best represent our positions. As citizens we have one chance to have our opinions heard as in regards to the office of the president, and that is during the election. We should not squander this opportunity by voting in fear, whether of Trump or Clinton. Voting for Clinton to stop a Trump presidency ignores why Trump (and to a lesser extent Bernie Sanders) rose to prominence in the first place, disillusionment with the monopolization of the government by lobbyists and career politicians. A vote for Clinton or Trump out of fear only succeeds in keeping the two party machines alive, silencing the American conscience. The only way to have more options for the office of the president is to show that there is a demand for more choices. In this vein, please vote for the candidate who best represents your beliefs, whether it is Trump, Clinton, Johnson, Stein, Rosque De La Fuente Guerrera or Darrell Lane. Failing to do so is as beneficial as not voting at all.

‰‰ Most of the attention gravitates toward the presidential election during election year. Madison Monzon argues that millennials should also vote for their local representatives to influence policies that directly affect the group of young voters.

By Madison Monzon madison.monzon001@mymdc.net This year has been largely dominated by the talk about the upcoming presidential election. Ashley Rodriguez, a first year psychology major at Kendall Campus, has not registered to vote. However, she plans to only vote in the general presidential election, saying: “I am more prone to vote in the presidential elections rather than the local elections, because there’s been so much media coverage on the candidates, and I feel like I know nothing about my own district.” This problem is common among millennials as we face an election year; we become too preoccupied with the media circus that has become our presidential election to even pay attention to local matters. The lack of voter turnout for local elections has become so dire that, according to The New Tropic Online, only 20 percent of South Floridians eligible to vote actually voted in local elections. There may be some reason behind the

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hesitation to participate in local politics. Some reasons may be as simple as ignorance of the issues or the fact that local government does not have the impact that federal government does. Zoe Henderson, a freshman English major at Kendall Campus, said: "I'm not completely turned off by local government, but I feel that real change stems from the representatives in the federal government, not at the state level."   Many voters don’t realize that those elected to our local governments can influence issues that directly affect us. Low voter turnout, specifically from young voters, sends a message to their local officials that representation in Congress is not important. Not voting in local elections is indicative of not voting for the issues that affect us most, and unfortunately, representatives will not ‘represent’ a group of voters that does not support them. To make changes that will impact us, we need to begin within our community; specifically, with our local representatives. These representatives determine how the budget is proportioned, and not voting means that issues specific to your identity will not be of any concern to the local government. One of the most highly debated issues in Florida has been the implementation of statewide standardized testing. Whether you agree with the use of Common Core in Florida, state representatives are the ones who decided whether or not public schools are mandated to base their entire core curriculum around passing the exam. These laws could largely impact our lives as students, yet we rarely ever have a voice in the matter. Many students are unaware that profound change actually begins at the local level. Voting for the representative of your district is the key to supporting these changes. Thousands of people are denied the right to vote; yet we take this insanely powerful advantage for granted.

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OCTOBER 25, 2016 | FORUM

THE REPORTER

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// FORUM Adriana Falero, Forum Editor  // 

T (305) 237-1254 

// 

B adriana.falero001@mymdc.net

Elections

New Political Party Can End Injustice Against Minorities ‰‰ Janiah Adams argues that African Americans and Hispanics are not receiving justice and support from the two major political parties. The creation of their own political parties would allow minority groups to protect themselves.

By Janiah Adams janiah.adams001@mymdc.net The U.S. is currently in one of the most critical periods of its history, also known as the election season. This election is an important one, especially for people of color. Yes, both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have spoken about issues like police brutality and immigration, but I find it hard to believe that either of them will truly make changes. First off, when her husband was

president, Hillary Clinton supported many of the bills that he put into place. One of them was the 1994 Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, and when Bill Clinton left office in 2001, the U.S. had the highest rate of incarceration in the world. Research conducted by Human Rights Watch found that “in seven states, blacks made up 80 to 90 percent of all drug offenders sent to prison, even though they were no more likely than whites to use or sell illegal drugs.” It is true that Clinton did not make those decisions, but she was a very active first lady who supported her husband and participated in the political world. As for Trump, his appeal to black voters was: You're living in poverty. Your schools are no good. You have no jobs. 58% of your youth in unemployed. What the hell do you have to lose? The Huffington Post reports that racism has been a pattern for Trump throughout the years. He was fined $200,000 in 1992 because managers would remove Black workers at the request of a certain gambler. A former employee at Trump’s casino told The New Yorker, “When Donald and Ivana came to the casino, the

Venezuelan Miss Universe Alicia Machado “Miss Housekeeping,” saying that Mexican judge Gonzalo Curiel was biased because of his heritage as well as saying he would build a wall separating the U.S. and Mexico, are examples of Trump’s stereotypical and degrading attitude toward Hispanics. Both candidates have shown signs of racism and prejudice in their histories. Putting our trust in either one of them will be taking a huge gamble in a very critical time. This is why Minister Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, proposed forming our own political party called the Justice Party. “We’re not Democrats. We’re not Republicans. This is the Justice Party!” he said during a convention in Detroit, Michigan this past February. “Come out of those parties that won’t give you justice! Set up our own candidates, run them in the cities, take down the weak bloodsuckers of the poor and cast them out and set up people that will KEVIN FLORES \ THE REPORTER fight for justice!” Forming our own political party bosses would order all the Black will take the dealings of justice out people off the floor.” Mostly everyone has seen how of the hands of others and will alTrump has shown discrimina- low us to do it ourselves and care tion against latinos. Calling for our communities ourselves.

The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

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Social issues

Voters Should Also Focus On Social Issues ‰‰ Ruth Gonzalez argues that some matters such as economy and terrorism are given more weight than others during election season. She writes about how voters should consider issues surrounding people in poverty, the disabled and the LGBTQI+ community.

By Ruth Gonzalez ruth.gonzalez008@mymdc.net Election time is always a frenzy of debates, potential candidates pointing fingers and promises being made. Many issues are on voters’ minds, wondering which candidate is best fit to deal with them as the next president. A poll conducted by the Pew Research Center this past June found the most important issue for voters is the economy (84 percent), followed by terrorism (80 percent) and foreign policy (75 percent). These are very important issues that the country must deal with. However, there are others issues that are left in the back burner that also

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to be trapped inside the criminal justice system, with little to no rights. There have been recent confrontations with law enforcement and those who are in emotional distress. The majority of them have ended in unnecessary deaths. More training from law enforcement, equal expansion of services and equal and unconditional rights are part of the solution. In the same Pew Research Center poll, only 40 percent of voters acknowledge that the treatment of LGBTQI+ individuals is important to them. ARNELLE CARBON \ THE REPORTER I recently visited a church where the pastor made a reference to gays and lesbians sayneed attention. The Atlantic reported last year that more ing that they truly don’t have God in their hearts. than 20 percent of minorities are experienc- I had the strong urge to get up and leave, but I reing poverty. It is much worse for women and mained seated, internally seething. That reference pales in comparison to the inflamchildren, who make up 32 percent of the population living in poverty. It seems unbe- matory sermon by Pastor Steven Anderson, who said lievable that the so-called greatest country “there’s 50 less pedophiles in this world” referring to on earth could have people living below the the Orlando shooting. The reason I am pointing this out is the continpoverty line, struggling day after day and ued demonization of the LGBTQI+ community, from living off paycheck after paycheck. Another issue that needs attention is the church sermons to the so-called religious freedom rights of the disabled. Although the Ameri- laws being passed in states like Indiana and North can with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed Carolina. This is a direct reflection of the civil rights into law in 1990 and prohibits the dis- era of the 1960s. Each voter is different and each issue is not like the crimination against people with disabilities, they are still being marginalized. And other. Although there are some issues that matter it certainly doesn’t help if Donald Trump more to others, it is not an excuse to ignore the ones openly mocked a journalist with a physical that have been on the sidelines for far too long. This coming November is the time for those disredisability. People with a mental disability are likely garded voices to have their say in the polls.

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Enio Acosta, Jr., Janiah Adams, Alexander F. Aspuru, Sebastián Ballestas, Alexandra Camargo, Arnelle Carbon, Taylor Daley, Giovanni Del Fa, Jorge De Peña, Gabriel Exposito, Kevin Flores, Hector D. Gonzalez, Ruth Gonzalez, Antonio Latte, Madison Monzon, Omar Negrin, Roland Ortega, Alessandra Pacheco, Priya Pershadsingh, Zayrha Rodriguez Ciro Salcedo, Krystal Socorro, Lorena Umaña

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B mbarco@mdc.edu T NORTH.........................(305) 237-1255 T KENDALL......................(305) 237-2323 T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3477 Dina Weinstein, Newsroom Assistant

B dweinste@mdc.edu T NORTH.........................(305) 237-1370 T KENDALL......................(305) 237-2157 T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-7464 Aracelia Diez, Student Media Assistant

B adiez@mdc.edu T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3368 ——————————— Letters to the Editor ——————————— The Reporter welcomes letters to the editor. All submissions should be 300 words or less and must be typed. Writers must include their full name, contact number, campus, student number and e-mail address. Faculty and staff should include the title, department and extension. All letters are subject to editing for purposes of brevity and clarity. Letters can be sent via e-mail to mdc.thereporter@gmail.com, with the subject “letter to the editor.”

Advertising ——————————— B thereporteradvertising@gmail.com T (305) 237-7657


THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

AL IENS

LOVE IT.

YOU WILL TOO.

Are you interested in: WRITING, REPORTING, PHOTOGRAPHY, DESIGN, ADVERTISING, or MARKETING? Are you majoring in: JOURNALISM, ENGLISH, MASS COMMUNICATIONS, BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, or GRAPHIC ARTS?

GET INVOLVED! Contact g MANOLO BARCO tel: (305) 237-3477 email: MBARCO@MDC.EDU

POSTER + ILLUSTRATION, LAZARO GAMIO, © 2010

The Reporter Volume 7, Issue 4  
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