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Karate Kid

Two Miami Dade College students—Reynier Montalvan and Tamara GomezOrtigoza—were awarded prestigious Jack Kent Cooke scholarships.

Engineering student David Bavaresco is an international karate champion who hopes to become an Olympian.

Gaming Odyssey

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Social Revolt

The Reporter’s Ciro Salcedo drops a couple of quarters in his in-depth look at Miami’s hotspot for video game tournaments.

FORUM

A&E

SPORTS

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Scholarship Winners

The Reporter’s Justin Marcano writes a personal account about the political, social and humanitarian crises in Venezuela including his family's struggle.

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4VOL. 7, ISSUE 15 — JUNE 13, 2017

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Presidents

‘He-Man’ Running For State Senate Seat

MDC Announces Leadership Restructuring ‰‰ Miami Dade College reduced its campus presidents from eight to five. The restructuring became effective May 31. The remaining campus presidents are Malou C. Harrison, Beverly MooreGarcia, Joaquin Martinez, Jeanne F. Jacobs and Richard Prentiss. By Alessandra Pacheco and Maria Elena Vizcaino maria.vizcaino003@mymdc.net

and universities. “I have students who’ve never used a computer before. I have students who don’t know how to write proper sentences,” Schlaerth said. “It’s because we’re too busy paying presidents and vice presidents and provosts way too much money.” Born in Buffalo and raised in Rochester, New York, Schlaerth graduated Magna Cum Laude from LeMoyne College in Syracuse, with a dual degree in history and sociology. While completing his bachelor’s degree, he hosted a radio show for the school’s station, served as the captain of the rugby team, earned a double black stripe in taekwondo and worked 30 hours per week at the school’s cafeteria. “After that, I tended bar, worked as a bouncer, bell-person and eventually became head chef at the Syracuse Best Western Airport Inn,” Schlaerth said. “I was what they call in the literature, under-employed.” In 2005, he moved to South Florida to attend graduate school at the University of Miami with a full scholarship. He earned his master’s in 2007 and doctorate in 2014, both in sociology. “I stayed for the weather and the people,” Schlaerth said. He began teaching introduction to

Miami Dade College, which has eight campuses, announced on May 30 that it was reducing its administrative staff by three campus presidents. Juan Mendieta, the director of communications at MDC, said the College does not know whether the changes are permanent or temporary. “We can’t really comment on the rationale for this, other than these were contracts not renewed,” said Mendieta. The presidents whose contracts were not renewed were: Richard A. Soria Jr (Wolfson Campus), Roger A. Ramsammy (West Campus), Joanne Bashford (InterAmerican Campus) and Mark Everett (Medical Campus). Effective May 31, the College’s campus presidents are Malou C. Harrison, for North and InterAmerican Campuses; Joaquin Martinez, for Hialeah and Wolfson Campuses; Beverly Moore-Gacia, for Kendall and West Campuses; Jeanne F. Jacobs, for Homestead Campus and the college wide General Education program; and Richard Prentiss is returning from retirement as the interim president at Medical Campus. An email sent by College President Eduardo J. Padrón on May 30 read: “Maintaining our obligations to [students] requires an on-going review of our operations and administrative structure to ensure we are not only effective, but also prepared for the long-term fiscal stability of the institution.” Harrison will continue to preside over the North Campus and also take the reigns of InterAmerican Campus. She was appointed president of the Harrison North and West Campuses in 2013, until Ramsammy took over the latter in 2016. Prior to that, she served as the North Campus’ dean of students for more than 10 years. Her career with the College started in 1989. She has served as the chief of staff for the College president, executive assistant to the Wolfson Campus president and an adjunct professor of English for academic purposes at Wolfson Campus.

TURN TO FLORIDA SENATE PAGE 4

TURN TO PRESIDENTS PAGE 6

JAYNELL PERERA \ THE REPORTER

I Have The Power: Miami Dade College adjunct professor Christian Schlaerth trains around five times a week, including doing bicep curls and high intensity interval training. Schlaerth enjoys training at the North Campus Aquatic and Fitness Center. ‰‰ Christian ‘He-Man’ Schlaerth, an adjunct sociology professor at North Campus, is running as an independent for the seat corresponding to District 40 in the Florida Senate. By Maria Elena Vizcaino maria.vizcaino003@mymdc.net Christian Schlaerth walks into the classroom at North Campus with a stone-cold face as Rage Against the Machine blasts through his earphones. The moment the clock hits 6:40 p.m., he takes them off, fixes his American flag blazer and begins his lecture on Karl Marx’s social conflict theory. Underneath the blazer, a purple T-shirt reads “VOTE FOR HE-MAN.” “In sociology, they talk about a lot of the problems, but how many of the sociologists who talk about all these problems actually go out and do something about it? Very few,” Schlaerth said. “I’m one of those that if I’m telling my students they have to go out and make change, I should be out there doing it with them.” Schlaerth, an adjunct professor at Miami Dade College, Barry University and the University of Miami, is known as ‘He-Man.’ He is running as an independent candidate to represent District 40 of the Florida Senate.

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The special election is scheduled for Sept. 26. Republican Sen. Frank Artiles, who won the seat with more than 50 percent of the votes in November, resigned in late April after using racial slurs and vulgarities toward colleagues over drinks earlier in the month. The district has more than 284,000 voters and encompasses part of Cutler Bay, Coral Gables, South Miami and Palmetto Bay. Currently, three Democrats and three Republicans are contesting Schlaerth for the seat. “I want to reach across party lines,” Schlaerth said. “That’s why I’m an independent. I’m willing to compromise.” His plans include knocking on residents’ doors, connecting with labor unions and collecting 27-dollar donations—alluding to Democratic Presidential Candidate Bernie Sanders’ campaign. “I think if you look at my platform, they’re very much in line with Bernie Sanders. I like to say that I’m Bernie Sanders with muscles,” Schlaerth said. A resident of his district, his stances include protecting the environment, legalizing recreational cannabis, expanding medicaid and investing in “human capital” to prepare students for the workforce through support services like tutoring for colleges

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THE REPORTER #CityLife Arrives at West Campus Art Gallery

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The West Campus Gallery, 3800 N.W. 115th Ave., will host the first solo exhibition of Austrian contemporary artist Chris Delias through July 21. The exhibition titled #CityLife explores the impact social media has on human interactions. The main issue the exhibit tackles is communication through symbols. In his artwork, Delias aims to depict emotions, humans and faces in unusual ways during the digital era. The gallery is free and open to the public upon request. To PHOTO COURTESY OF TATA FERNANDEZ access the gallery, call West Campus Public Safety at (305) 237-8000. For more information on the exhibit, contact info@contemporaryartprojectusa.com

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Former Reporter Editor Selected For Internship With NBC 6 Daniela Molina, who served as editor-in-chief of The Reporter last summer, landed a paid summer internship with NBC 6. Molina, 22, started the internship on June 5. She applied for the program through the Emma Bowen Foundation, a nonprofit organization that connects minority youth with careers in the media industry. She served as a staff writer for The Molina Reporter in the 2015-16 academic year and was promoted to editor that summer. During her tenure at the newspaper, she concentrated on crime and investigative stories and also contributed to the opinion and entertainment sections. Molina won second place for in-depth reporting from the Florida College System Publications Association last October. “Surrounding myself with people at The Reporter that were passionate about journalism really motivated me to want to pursue it professionally,” Molina said. Born in Matanzas, Cuba, Molina, a graduate of Hialeah Senior High School, is currently majoring in journalism and comparative literature at Indiana University Bloomington, where she oversees the campus’ Online News Association and the Society of Professional Journalists chapters. —Alexandra Vargas

Reporter Photographer Lands Internship At Miami Herald Sebastián Ballestas, a photojournalist with The Reporter, started a 10-week internship at the Miami Herald photo department on May 17. “I’m really excited because [the Miami Herald] is going to give me a whole new experience at a big newspaper,” Ballestas said. “I’m going to be working with people that have been working in media for a long time. I expect to learn a lot from this experience.” Ballestas, 24, started with The Reporter last July. He has shown versatility during his tenure at the paper, shooting photos in various sections including news, sports, A&E and photo briefing. Ballestas “It was a new experience that I was waiting for,” Ballestas said about his work at The Reporter. “It’s an opportunity I didn’t get in my country. It’s given me a perspective to document the society where I’m living.” Ballestas is currently a sophomore majoring in sociology at Wolfson Campus. He graduated high school in Colombia in 2010 before studying at Corporación Universitaria from 2011 to 2014 where he earned an associates degree in photographic technology. Ballestas aspires to work as a full-time photojournalist in the future.

—Justin Marcano

U.S. Department Of State Seeks Interns For Spring 2018 COURTESY OF JULIO SOTO SOUTH BEACH GRAPHICS

Miami Cuban Ballet Arrives At The Koubek Center Miami Cuban Ballet will present the Tales of Peter Rabbit at the Koubek Center, 2705 S.W. 3rd St., on June 17 at 7 p.m. The performance is based on the famous children’s book by the same name and choreographed by the Miami Cuban Ballet’s artistic director Valia Gonzalez. The story revolves around a young disobedient rabbit who defies his mother’s orders and sneaks into a garden in order to eat a delicious carrot. Tickets can be purchased at InterAmerican Campus at Room 1118 or via phone at (305) 420-5208 for $25. Valet parking will be available for attendees. —Jessica Genao

Recent NWSA Graduate Receives Presidential Scholar Award

A group of nursing students at Medical Campus and professor Lori Eduartez fundraised $1,000 to install a parking meter covered in the art of Romero Britto as part of the Adopt a Meter program of the Miami-Dade County’s Homeless Trust. The new parking meter is located in front of the campus’ cafeteria. In the fall semester of 2015, Eduartez taught a community health nursing class in the BSN program and took the semester to implement her plan to fundraise and adopt a “Britto meter.” The program allows local organizations, private corporations and SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER individuals to sponsor a parking meter, a collection device, to promote public awareness of homelessness and collect funds for the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust. The donations in the “Britto Meter” will aid the homeless on 17th Street, just three blocks south of the campus.

N e w W o r l d School of the Arts 2017 graduate Adriana de la Torre will travel to Washington De La Torre D.C. to receive the U.S. Presidential Scholar in the Arts award on June 18. She submitted two YoungArts portfolios and was chosen as a finalist in the Visual Arts category. De la Torre is the 19th NWSA student to receive a Presidential Scholar in the Arts award since the school’s inception 30 years ago. During her time at NWSA, de la Torre registered 1,050 community service hours; co-founded the school’s literary magazine; was vice president of the French Honors Society; secretary for the Student Government Association; and a member of the Future Business Leaders of America and the Gay/Straight Alliance club. She is also a recipient of the Scholastic Gold Key Portfolio. Her artwork will be displayed in the Hall of Nations in an exhibition made up by this year’s recognized visual artists and writers. In the fall, she will continue her studies at The Cooper Union to major in fine arts.

—Justin Marcano

—Alexandra Vargas

—Jaynell Perera

Students Install Parking Meter For The Homeless

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The U.S. Department of State Student Internship Program is taking applications until June 30 for the spring 2018 term. The unpaid, 10-week internship provides students the opportunity to work in embassies, consulates, bureaus and department offices located across the United States or overseas. Through the program, students are given the opportunity to garner college credits and gain work experience. Students are eligible if they have 60 credit hours or a minimum 3.0 grade point average, are U.S. citizens, can pass randomized drug tests and a background check. Applicants must subscribe to email updates to be notified of new vacancies within the internship. Applications must be sent through USAJOBS, the federal government official employment site. The selected applicants will be interview by a hiring manager and then notified if they're chosen. For more information, visit careers.state.gov —Jorge De Pena

Artists Invited To Join En Residencia// In Little Havana Registration for the En Residencia//In Little Havana, an artist-in-residency program hosted by the Koubek Center, will be open until June 30. The chosen artists will spend three months researching and planning work for the Little Havana community and three months presenting their findings at the Koubek Center through artistic means such as music, visual arts and theater, among others. “[The participants] will learn about the people that live [in Little Havana], their struggles, and the strengths that the city has,” said Jessica Gloria, the general manager at the Koubek Center. Funded by the Knight Foundation, four winners will receive a $5,000 commission for new work created through En Residencia and priority reservation of the Koubek Center’s space. For further information, visit http://www.koubekcenter.org/ —Daniela Figueredo

PHOTO COURTESY OF ALVIO DOMINGUEZ

Math Team: Pictured from left to right: Cesar Cardoso, adviser Alvio Dominguez, Noel Membreno, Vanessa Hernandez and Alexander Loureiro.

Wolfson Math Club Places Third At State Competition The Wolfson Campus Mathematics Club placed third in the team category at the Florida State Math Olympics held on April 15 at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. Noel Membreno, a mechanical engineering major who graduated from Miami Dade College this spring, also placed third on the individual category. “Winning third place in the team portion of the Olympics was such an immense accomplishment...” said Alvio Dominguez, the adviser for the club. “It is one of those feelings almost impossible to explain, but extremely rewarding. One of those experiences that will stay forever.” There are three events in the competition: a 40-question multiple choice examination and two 10-question free response examinations, one with calculators allowed and one without calculators.

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JUNE 13, 2017 | BRIEFING

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SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

Freedom For Generations: Five-year-old Sebastián Rodríguez holds up a poster that says "Libertad," Spanish for freedom, at a protest of the Venezuelan government held in front of the Freedom Tower in downtown Miami on April 19.

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

True Colors: The Freedom Tower was lit up yellow, blue and red, the colors of the Venezuelan flag on April 19. Earlier that day, a rally was held to protest against the Venezuelan government.

OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

Haitian Heritage: Miami Dade College student Ersulia Jeune sings a native Haitian song on May 17 at the North Campus conference center located in the 3000 building during the annual Haitian Flag Day celebration. www.mdcthereporter.com

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SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

Moment of Silence: Beatriz Márquez and Víctor Márquez close their eyes for a minute to imagine peace in Venezuela. The couple was part of a demonstration held at the Freedom Tower on April 19 to protest the social and political upheaval happening in Venezuela. @mdcthereporter

MDC The Reporter


4 NEWS | JUNE 13, 2017

THE REPORTER

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Sociology Professor Running For Florida Senate Seat

“ 

FROM FLORIDA SENATE, FRONT

I want to reach across party lines. That’s why I’m an independent. I’m willing to compromise.

Christian 'He-Man' Schlaerth, adjunct professor at North Campus

sociology at Homestead Campus in the summer of 2007. The next year he began teaching at Barry University as well as the University of Miami. Schlaerth claims it’s difficult to be an adjunct professor at three schools. Although he teaches seven classes per semester, he has no benefits as a part-timer, except for what he calls a “small” retirement fund he has as an MDC employee. “I was teaching social problems the night of the [presidential] election, and I remember reading of the election results for the state as they were reporting, and I had students in the class crying because they were afraid,” Schlaerth said. “They were asking me ‘What are we going to do?’ And I said, ‘Despair is a useless emotion right now. You gotta get angry, and you gotta get involved.’ So this is me putting my money where my mouth is.” His current campaign manager and fellow rugby aficionado, Neil Jones, suggested Schlaerth should run for Senate when the seat opened in April. Jones has worked in several local government campaigns and two parliamentary campaigns in the United Kingdom. Schlaerth is the only candidate for District 40 who attempted to get on the ballot through petitioning. In a week, he collected more than 2,500 signatures by tabling at events in the area, but to submit his candidacy he needed around

JAYNELL PERERA \ THE REPORTER

Laying Down The Lecture: Miami Dade College adjunct professor Christian Schlaerth talks about Karl Marx's social conflict theory during his introduction to sociology class at North Campus. 2,900 signatures. “He-Man is the most authentic candidate I have ever ever worked with. He’s totally real. He’s totally honest and he’s consistent with his views. He doesn’t pander,” Jones said. “This week someone told me I should get him to wear a suit, and I’m like ‘no, that’s not how he is.’” Schlaerth wears his girlfriend’s golden ring in his left ear, a bottleopener ring on his left hand and has some tattoos. “I like to have this tough guy look. A lot of people are like ‘He must have a motorcycle or a truck.’ [And] I don’t. I drive a Toyota Yaris,” Schlaerth said. His nickname, which is on the ballot as well, came from his rugby teammates. He was baptized as

‘He-Man’ in reference to the muscular comic book character from the ‘80s. According to Schlaerth, he was the strongest man in the team, so the nickname stuck. “When I first met Christian, I knew him as ‘He-Man’. I was introduced to him as ‘He-Man.’ I didn’t know his name was Christian until after like six weeks,” Jones said. Both Jones and Schlaerth filed an affidavit to explain the nickname is not to mislead voters. After struggling with self-image throughout high school, Schlaerth joined LeMoyne College’s rugby team and began training. Ever since, he’s played rugby and participated in weightlifting competitions. In 2010, he led his team, the

JAYNELL PERERA \ THE REPORTER

Home Bar: Miami Dade College adjunct professor Christian Schlaerth has a bar at his home located in Kendall. Schlaerth is an alcohol enthusiast and has a wide collection of spirits. www.mdcthereporter.com

mdc.thereporter

“ 

He-Man is the most authentic candidate I have ever ever worked with. He’s totally real. He’s totally honest and he’s consistent with his views. He doesn’t pander. This week someone told me I should get him to wear a suit, and I’m like ‘no, that’s not how he is.

Neil Jones, campaign manager

Miami Rugby Football Club, to first place by lifting a total of 1,585 pounds in bench press, squats and deadlifts for the Miami Rugby weightlifting competition. Schlaerth trains five days per week for about 90 minutes at the North Campus Aquatic and Fitness Center, and follows a high intensity interval training routine, typical of bodybuilding athletes. “I do it because I like how I feel afterwards. I like seeing the improvements and the gains,” he said. When he’s not at the gym, teaching or campaigning, he is at the German American Social Club of Greater Miami in South Miami, where he serves on the board of directors and coaches a couple of teenage rugby teams. A bartending enthusiast, Schlaerth volunteers at the club’s annual Oktoberfest and partakes in the Stein Holding contest—a

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competition consisting of holding a one-liter beer mug with a static arm and then drinking it. At home he works in his ‘cat cage’ because his cancer-surviving dog Clio is the only one not allowed inside. In the ‘cat cage,’ his two cats relax as Schlaerth catches up with grading and emails; books and beer abound, with posters of classic characters like Captain America and He-Man hang on the wall. He also has an odd collection of spoons which he began gathering after his late deceased aunt gave him one from the Olympics in Seoul, South Korea when he was a teenager. Among the antiques and souvenirs, his assortment includes more than 1,000 spoons, the most special being a Rolex spoon. As a senator, he would continue his endeavors in academia for the fall and defer his classes for the spring when the State Legislature convenes. “It’s nice that he has opened up his thoughts and ideas,” said Jackie Muni, the chair of the Social Sciences Department at North Campus. “I looked him up and saw he has no party affiliation, which would sound like something that he would do.” If he doesn’t win the election, he plans to run again in 2018. His long-term goal is to start the Social Democratic Labor Party, which would reflect the platform he’s currently running on. “You know that is my constitutional right, so I’m not going to tell anybody who I’m going to vote for,” said his girlfriend Elaine Walters, who is registered as a Republican.“But yes, I’ll probably vote for him.”

MDC The Reporter


JUNE 13, 2017 | NEWS

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6 NEWS | JUNE 13, 2017

THE REPORTER

Four Campus Presidents Not Retained FROM PRESIDENTS, FRONT

Harrison worked at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo as the assistant to the director of TRIO Educational Opportunity Center. She holds a bachelor’s degree from SUNY in management, a master’s from Florida International University in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), and a doctorate in higher education/community college leadership. Martinez was tabbed as the new president for Wolfson Campus, and will continue to preside Martinez over the Hialeah Campus. He began at Miami Dade College in the late ‘90s as an English and civics professor to refugee students who sought their college degrees. During his two decades at the institution, he’s held positions as chairperson of World Languages and associate dean of Academic Affairs at Kendall Campus, associate provost for student achievement at Wolfson Campus District Office, and dean of academic and student affairs at Hialeah Campus. He graduated from Middlebury College in Vermont with a joint degree in political science and modern foreign languages. He continued his education at Florida

Atlantic University, where he received a doctorate in higher education research. MooreGarcia will continue to serve as the Kendall Campus president Moore-Garcia while also presiding over West Campus. Before becoming the president at Kendall Campus, she was the associate provost, and later became vice provost of Academic Affairs at the College. Prior to that she was the vice president of Northwest Community College in her homeland of Canada, and rooted her career in academia as associate provost for faculty initiatives at MDC. Moore-Garcia graduated from Florida International University with a master’s degree in international development education and later on with a doctorate in higher education administration. She also received a master’s degree in school psychology from Texas State University. Moore-Garcia completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Windsor in Ontario, Canada. J a c o b s will continue presiding over the Homestead Campus and will now also Jacobs oversee the college wide General Education

program. Since 2005, she’s served at the Homestead Campus. Prior to joining MDC, Jacobs was the vice president for instruction and dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Sinclair Community College in Dayton, Ohio. She also worked at Calhoun Community College in Decatur, Alabama as associate dean for Human Resources and Legal Affairs. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee; a master’s degree in adult education from Alabama A&M University; and a doctorate in administration of higher education with a minor in English from the University of Alabama. Prentiss will return from retirement as the interim president of the Medical Prentiss Campus, replacing Mark Everett. He started at MDC more than 35 years ago and has since worked as faculty, chairperson for the School of Health Sciences and director of the College’s Quality Enhancement Program. Prentiss received an associate of arts degree in general education and an associate of science in respiratory therapy from MDC, a bachelor’s in health science, a master’s in health management from St. Thomas University, and a doctorate in higher education administration from FIU.

mdc TV

Medical Campus Hosts Health Show On MDC TV

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called Health Talks, that focused on medical issues and diseases. Health Talks was produced in the MDC TV studio at North Campus. “We wanted to revamp and relaunch a medical show that not only covers medical issues, but educates and connects the community with resources, educating them with prevention and awareness,” said Everett, who served as president until the end of May. The show is hosted by Hunter Reno, a Medical Campus student, who just received her associate in science degree from the physical therapist assistant program. She hopes to become a physician’s assistant in the future. Reno is the niece of former U.S. Attorney

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Healthy Living: MDC TV in partnership with the Medical Campus has created a new series titled Health Connections. The host, Hunter Reno, gives viewers tips on living a healthy lifestyle.

A balanced a nutritious meal

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MDC TV

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Miami Dade College TV has partnered with the Medical Campus to produce a show called Health Connections that explores medical issues impacting the community. “The purpose of the show is for the community to learn about anything medical,” said Jose “Tony” Leal, who has been an MDC TV producer for more than five years after working for Univision. The show premiered near the end of the fall term with the episode “Health Literacy and a Healthy Mouth.” It was a show focused on dental health and the importance of being health literate. The second episode covered how to achieve better physical and mental health. Viewers can see the show on Comcast channel 78, AT&T UVerse channel 99, or on the MDC TV YouTube channel or website www.mdc.edu/MDCTV. Each episode lasts approximately 30 minutes and has one to three segments covering a variety of topics like dental health, health resources and various illnesses. The program started as an idea, more than a year ago, by former Medical Campus President Mark Everett who wanted to produce a show similar to an old show

POINT

el

By Alessandra Pacheco alessandr.pacheco001@mymdc.net

General, Janet Reno. A planning team, consisting of Leal, Reno, and four to five faculty members and shareholders of Medical Campus, meets once a month to brainstorm ideas for the show. Then MDC TV starts writing the script, with Medical Campus calling hospitals to book guest speakers. Some Medical Campus students are also asked questions in on-camera interviews. “This show is beneficial to everyone,” said Eloisa Echazabal, assistant to the Medical Campus president. “It teaches the community on what resources are out there for them.” Doctors from hospitals like Baptist Health South Florida, Larkin Community Hospital and Jackson Health Systems have participated in the show. For the most part, shows are filmed either at Medical Campus, in the MDC TV Studio at North Campus or sometimes at local hospitals. “The public is just yearning for health information because of the current health system and rising costs,” Everett said. “This show teaches them how to better take care of themselves and how to get in contact with a primary care provider.” The program will tape its third episode in late June, and it will air the first week of July. The episode will be about summer health-related problems such as nutrition, sun burns and mosquito-transmitted diseases. It will be taped at the Miami Culinary Institute and at Tuyo with chefs cooking and teaching about nutrition.

our points

‰‰ MDC TV has partnered with Medical Campus to produce Health Connections, a 30-minute program that connects the public with health information and resources.

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JUNE 13, 2017 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

7

graduation

Thousands Attend Commencement Ceremonies ‰‰ On April 29, nearly 14,000 Miami Dade College students participated in graduation ceremonies at the James L. Knight Center and the Kendall Campus gymnasium.

By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net Andy Oquendo’s educational pursuit took an abrupt detour in November of 2010 after a tragic car accident killed his 13-yearold brother and left him in a coma for two months. More than six years later, Oquendo, who is still impaired by the accident, showed his strength by being one of nearly 14,000 students who walked in five different Miami Dade College graduation ceremonies on April 29. Oquendo, 24, got his associate in arts degree in mass communication, graduating alongside his mom, Nilsa Oquendo, who earned a certificate in massage therapy from the Medical Campus. She fulfilled the dream of her late daughter, Maite Oquendo, who wanted to take the course. “There is no other words; it’s a miracle,” Nilsa Oquendo said about her graduation. “I’m happy. It never occurred to me when I took the course that I could graduate...I’m very happy and very proud that I can walk next to my son who is a warrior.” Andy Oquendo, who started his undergraduate educational journey at Florida International University, transferred to

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Family Matters: Andy Oquendo and his mom, Nilsa Oquendo, are overjoyed at graduation on April 29. Andy Oquendo earned his associate in arts degree and Nilsa Oquendo earned a certificate in massage therapy.

Kendall Campus in 2012 after the accident. He plans to return to FIU to complete his bachelor’s degree in mass communications and aspires to work at a television station. But for now, he is cherishing the moment. “I feel like a duck in water or whatever that means you know,” Oquendo said. “I feel like I’m at home, you know, these are my peeps.” Miami Dade College held five commencement ceremonies across two locations—the James L. Knight Center and the Kendall Campus gymnasium. Each commencement ceremony had a different speaker. Joseph Aoun, the president at Northeastern University, spoke at the North Campus ceremony; Robert Sanchez, CEO of Ryder Systems, spoke at the InterAmerican and Homestead ceremony; Brian Fitzgerald, CEO of the Business-Higher Education Forum, spoke at the Wolfson and West Campus ceremony; and Freeman Hrabowski III, the president at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County spoke at the Hialeah and Medical campus ceremony. “When we come together in common cause, we are greater than the sum of the parts,” said Donna E. Shalala, trustee professor of political science and health policy at the University of Miami, as she closed the evening at the Kendall Campus commencement ceremony. “There is truth in the Ethiopian proverb, when spider webs unite they can tie up a lion.” Staff writer Alessandra Pacheco contributed to this report.

scholarship

MDC Students Win Prestigious Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Scholarships ‰‰ Reynier Montalvan, an Honors College student at InterAmerican Campus, and Tamara Gomez-Ortigoza, a School for Advanced Studies graduate at Wolfson Campus, both received the prestigious Jack Kent Cooke Foundation scholarship. Each student will get up to $40,000 per year toward their education to complete their bachelor’s degree. By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net Miami Dade College students Reynier Montalvan and Tamara Gomez-Ortigoza were awarded the prestigious Jack Kent Cooke Foundation scholarships. The scholarship covers up to $40,000 per year. Costs include tuition, books and living expenses through the completion of the students bachelor’s degree. Winners are selected based on

exceptional academic achievements and financial need. Gomez-Ortigoza graduated from the School for Advanced Studies at Wolfson Campus in early June and Montalvan graduated from the Honors College at InterAmerican Campus in late April. “I always had Jack Kent Cooke in mind especially because it’s not community service-oriented like a lot of other big scholarships, and community service wasn’t my forte in terms of college applications” Gomez-Ortigoza said. “So I thought this one was better for me, because it was more... leadership and character-oriented.” This year, the transfer scholarship was awarded to 55 scholars and the college scholarship was awarded to 80 high school students. Applicants were required to write an essay, provide information about their extracurricular activities and awards and submit two letters of recommendation. At SAS, Gomez-Ortigoza was challenged

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College Gains: Reynier Montalvan, a graduate of the Honors College at InterAmerican Campus, was one of two Miami Dade College students to be awarded the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship this year.

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Going Ivy: Tamara Gomez, a graduate of the School for Advanced Studies at Wolfson Campus, was awarded the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship. She will be attending Dartmouth College in the fall.

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to be innovative. She came up with an idea for a hydroponic tower, a vertical structure where plants are raised, without soil, in a water based solution that her classmate Nickan Hussaini built. The $80 tower was constructed by buckets, tubes and rockwool. Gomez-Ortigoza also founded The Lifestyle Chronicle, an online magazine where members write about topics such as dorm pets and organic farming, and she also served as president of the National English Honor Society. She will attend Dartmouth College, an Ivy league institution located in New Hampshire. “I felt like I would be a really good fit for Dartmouth and I guess they felt the same way,” Gomez-Ortigoza said. Montalvan, who moved to the United States from Cuba in 2014, became a mentor for PeaceJam, an educational program influenced by Nobel Peace Prize Laureates and for Advocating for Immigrant Scholars,

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an MDC organization where students can assist their immigrant peers. He also volunteered outside of campus by helping in FarmShare to assist low-income families to obtain food and co-founded the club Agua es Vida, where he and other members received the opportunity to go to the Dominican Republic to build aqueducts in a community named Las Rosas located northwest of Santo Domingo. Montalvan, has been accepted to the University of Illinois and Bentley University, and is waiting to hear from the University of Michigan, the University of Texas and the University of Florida. He plans to complete his bachelor’s degree in accounting and aspires to work for a prominent accounting firm, such as the multinational professional service firm Deloitte, and ultimately open his own tax company or work for the Internal Revenue Service. “You have to prioritize your studies because that’s what’s going to take you to the


8 THE REPORTER | JUNE 13, 2017

Class Of 2017 Says Goodbye On April 29 approximately 14,000 students turned their tassels to become Miami Dade College graduates. Five ceremonies were carried out throughout the day at the James L. Knight Center and at Kendall Campus’ Theodore R. Gibson Health Center. Among the black gowns, decorated caps, colorful sashes and cords representing degrees and achievements stood out. The College awarded associate’s and bachelor’s

degrees as well as certifications in technical areas. Commencement speakers, included the President of Northeastern University Joseph E. Aoun, Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, the President of The University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Donna E. Shalala, the former United States Secretary of Health and Human Services under the Bill Clinton administration and former President of the University of Miami. —Maria Elena Vizcaino

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Captivating Crowd: A panoramic view of the Miami Dade College Kendall Campus commencement ceremony that was held at the James L. Knight Center on April 29.

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Words Of Encouragement: From left to right Paola Quintero-Cota, the outgoing West Campus SGA president and Enrique Sepulveda, the outgoing Wolfson Campus SGA vice president talk and congratulate the graduates during the Wolfson and West campus commencement ceremony held at the James L. Knight Center on April 29.

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Selfies For Memories: Homestead and InterAmerican Campus graduates snap selfies and pose for their families and friends as they wait to be seated for the commencement ceremony held at the Kendall Campus Gymnasium on April 29.

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The Waiting Game: From left to right Jonathan Major, Frantz Cerisier and Pierre Coq, graduates of the bachelors of applied science in supervision and management program at North Campus, sit and wait for their names to be called at graduation. www.mdcthereporter.com

Greeting The Graduates: Homestead Campus President Jeanne F. Jacobs greets and congratulates a student as he walks across the stage at the Homestead and InterAmerican Campus commencement ceremony.

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JUNE 13, 2017 | THE REPORTER 9

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Tears Of Joy: Kendall Campus graduate Lorena Gonzalez wipes a tear after receiving the Miami Dade College Board of Trustees Scholarship.

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Walk Of Fame: Hialeah and Wolfson Campus President Joaquin Martinez and College President Eduardo J. Padrรณn walk toward the stage at the Medical and Hialeah Campus commencement ceremony.

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Taking A Moment: Kendall Campus Honors College graduate Jordan Llanes takes a moment as guest speakers and students speak about life, love and their journey ahead during the Kendall Campus commencement ceremony held at the James L. Knight Center on April 29. www.mdcthereporter.com

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10 SPORTS | JUNE 13, 2017

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Softball

Lack Of Consistency Plagues Lady Sharks Season ‰‰ The Miami Dade College softball team lost two of three games at the State Tournament in late April to put an end to a lackluster season for the Lady Sharks that saw them go 18-30 and 1010 in Southern Conference play.

By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net After losing two of three games at the Southern Conference Tournament in late April, the Lady Sharks softball was eliminated from postseason play. The team finished with an 18-30 overall record and a 1010 conference record. The Lady Sharks started the season off strong, winning three of their first four games, but they weren’t able to pick up much traction after. They had several long losing streaks included losing 15 of 18 games in February and a seven game losing streak in April. “When you go through a situation like this, lots of times people lose confidence, which I think that’s what happened to us,” said sophomore second baseman Megan Garfinkel. A factor that affected the Lady Sharks season was the team’s inability to win on the road. The team was 6-14 while playing away from Kendall Campus this season. Offensively, the Lady Sharks scored 188 runs, had 43 doubles, 11 triples, and nine home runs, but they struck out an 184 times. During the Southern Conference Tournament, it was more of the same. The Lady Sharks lost their first game 2-0 against College of Central Florida. They won their next game against Hillsborough Community College, 8-0, before losing 4-3 to the State College of Florida to be eliminated Baseball

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Rough Waters: The Lady Sharks softball team ended its season with a 18-30 overall record and 10-10 in conference play this year. from tournament play. Maitland was named All-Southern Conference First Team at the State Tournament. Garfinkel, Kiana East, Yurie Hampton and Kasy Trickey all received All-Southern

Conference Second Team honors. Some of the bright spots for the team this year included Trickey, Kiannah Molina and Emma Maitland. Trickey had the highest batting average

for the Lady Sharks hitting .331 and she also added 13 stolen bases. Molina led the team with 24 runs batted in and two home runs. Maitland boasted a 3.27 earned run average.

Sharks Season Ends In Lakeland

‰‰ The Miami Dade College baseball team’s season ended at the State Tournament on May 9 after a 6-1 loss to Palm Beach State College. The Sharks finished the season with an overall record of 34-17 and a conference record of 20-8. By Giovanni Del Fa giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net The Miami Dade College baseball team’s 30-plus win season came to an end after they were eliminated from the State Tournament in Lakeland on May 9 after a 6-1 loss versus Palm Beach State College. Miami Dade College finished with a 34-17 overall record and a staunch 20-8 record in conference play. “I think we had awesome chemistry. I think the guys worked together extremely well,” said Head Baseball Coach Danny Price. “That was the key to it, how hard they worked.” After losing six of their first nine games this season, the Sharks turned things around by winning 14 of their next 15 games. The team’s longest winning streak was an eight game streak in February. After a loss snapped the winning streak, the Sharks went on to win six consecutive games. However, the Sharks struggled with games played on a neutral field (4-5) and they suffered several injuries to their pitching staff. “I am not leaving because I had Tommy John surgery last season and I will play next year at Miami Dade,” said right handed pitcher Ernesto Pino who suffered an injury to his right elbow this season. Standout players for the Sharks included sophomore outfielder Ramon Varela, sophomore first baseman Christian Garabedian and freshman shortstop Brian Rey.

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Standing On The Sidelines: The Miami Dade College baseball team ended its season with a 34-17 overall and 20-8 in conference play. They made it to states but failed to advance. Varela and Garabedian finished first and second on the team in various offensive categories. Varela led the team in at bats (180), runs (43) and was second in hits with 66. Garabedian finished second in at bats (179), runs (40) and first in hits with 67. Rey led the team in home runs (6), and www.mdcthereporter.com

batting average (.404) and and slugging percentage (.603). As a whole, the Sharks played their way to the top of the Southern Conference standings and made it to state competition. The team had a .343 batting average and a .474 slugging percentage.

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“As far as next season, we’re in great shape. We got a lot of people coming back. Ten guys returning,” Price said. “I got high expectations for the team next year and I spend a lot of time recruiting players and signing players.”

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// SPORTS Giovanni Del Fa, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

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B giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net

Karate

Student Uses Karate To Shape His Life ‰‰ David Bavaresco, an engineering major at Wolfson Campus, is a two-time US Open national champion in karate and he uses the sport as a foundation on how to live life. By Giovanni Del Fa giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net As a shy six-year-old, David Bavaresco left his first karate class in Venezuela in tears. His grandfather, Eduardo Bavaresco, predicted that karate wouldn’t be the kid’s forte. “Then at 10 my mom said I had to start a sport and I chose karate,” Bavaresco said. “My mom was shocked, but ever since then it’s been my lifestyle.” And it’s been a pretty successful lifestyle. Today, Bavaresco, 21, is a thirddegree black belt. This past April he became the 2017 US Open karate champion in the 18-34 male advance kata category. It’s the second time he has garnered the accolade. “David is everything a karate dojo expects from its students,” sensei Jesus Costa

said. “David is a capable and enthusiastic young man. He always has ideas and projects and is very involved in his studies.” Bavaresco left his hometown of Valencia, Venezuela when he was 18 years old to seek better opportunities away from the political turmoil currently plaguing his country. “The situation in my country was harsh,” Bavaresco said. “I thought about quitting. The economic, social and political situation forced me to take a break.” Although Bavaresco no longer represents the Venezuelan national team, he sees himself as a voice for his compatriots during the country’s difficult times. “I’m still representing Venezuela, not on the national team, but as a proud Venezuelan, and I’m a voice for those who can’t speak up,” he said. Bavaresco, who also has a parttime job at the student life department at Wolfson Campus, is currently majoring in engineering. His passion for karate has driven him to attempt to open a karate

club at Wolfson Campus. He hopes to have the organization active by this coming fall semester. He also explores other interests like aviation at the Miami Seaplane Base and running in marathons. “I refuel the planes,” Bavaresco said. “I help out with anything that is needed.” But he remains focused on karate. When he is not preparing for a competition, Bavaresco trains twice a week and sporadically goes on long runs. His preparation is both physical and mental. As a competition approaches, he trains five times a week doing everything from cardio to practicing technique and building strength. Bavaresco, who hopes to one day compete at the Olympic level and have a career where he can combine engineering with his love for aviation, said karate grounds him. “It’s a way of life,” Bavaresco said. “It shapes me as an individual; it shows me how to act toward society.”

ONLINE TEASE VIDEO | Visit us online for an exclusive interview with Karate student David Bavaresco. www.mdcthereporter.com

Stretch And Conquer: David Bavaresco stretches and warms up before a long day of practice and formation exercises at the dojo he trains at in Hialeah.

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THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE

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12 A&E | JUNE 13, 2017

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frost museum

Phillip And Patricia Frost Museum Of Science Opens In Downtown Miami Tens of thousands of Miamians trekked to the grand opening of the long-awaited Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science in downtown Miami during it’s opening week in early May. The three-building science compound, which took five years to complete and cost $305 million, boasts various attractions,

such as a 500,000-gallon aquarium, where guests can watch hammerhead and tiger sharks, mahi mahi, devil rays and more. It also hosts a variety of displays and interactive exhibits for guests to enjoy, like a room called MeLab, where guests participate in their own experiment to test and study their health.

The museum will also feature laser light shows on the first Friday of every month. Here, guests can unwind to the sounds of Pink Floyd, The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix and more, all while watching a multitude of colorful lasers choreographed to the music inside of the museum’s 67-foot dome planetarium.

Admission for visitors over the age of 12 costs $28. For children aged 3 to 11, tickets cost $20. Frost tickets include access to the exhibits, aquarium and one show at the planetarium. Miami-Dade residents can enjoy a 15 percent discount, reducing the price to $23.80 for adults and $17 for children. —Riane Roldan

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Virtual Earth: The planetarium features 8K projections and 250 seats. It presents two shows: Dynamic Earth and Asteroid: Mission Extreme 3D.

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Birds Of Prey: A 30 foot-long Yutyrannus Huali is part of the "Feathers to the Stars" exhibition that shows the evolution of the feathered dinosaurs to human crafted space shuttles.

Curious Mind: Enrique Muñoz takes a look into the microscope to see the microorganism found in the sea at "The Dive" section of the aquarium.

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Aquarium Oculus: Visitors take a glance into "The Dive" where different species of sharks swim through the aquarium that goes from the second to the fourth floor of the museum. The grand opening of the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science was on May 8.

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Shark Senses: From left to right: Mike England and Lisa Brocks experience the sharks' sensory system at "The Dive" section of the museum.

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JUNE 13, 2017 | A&E

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// A&E Ciro Salcedo, A&E Editor  // 

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B ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net

arcade

Kendall Area Arcade Provides Community for Gamers ‰‰ Operating since 2011, Arcade Odyssey in Kendall not only has pinball, import and racing games, but also regular tournaments that give gamers of all backgrounds a common place to meet. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net The blinking lights of a Killer Instinct arcade machine blare as the X-Men machine across from it repeats the same demo animation. Awaiting quarters, rows and rows of games sit idly, illuminating a dark room full of teens socializing. Arcade Odyssey has remained a popular mainstay in Kendall, providing patrons with hours upon hours of digital entertainment. Located at 12045 S.W. 117th Ave., the arcade was founded in 2011 by avid video game collector Rick Medina. Its popularity has been seen as a bonus for the video game community. “I guess you can say I’ve been collecting games for over 25 years…I was always captivated by them, and I was also captivated by the technology behind them. It was a natural step to go from the collection to an arcade,” Medina said in an interview with Groupon. Aside from the assortment of games old and new, there are also competitions. Andrew Quintero has been competing in the biweekly Street Fighter V

tournaments. “I was never a big player of fighting games. I got into them when I went into college,” said 31-year-old Quintero. Failure proved informative for Quintero, who said he only got better after losing to better players and mimicking them. His competitive nature started with the release of the popular Capcom VS SNK 2. He is usually accompanied at Arcade Odyssey by his friend, 31-year-old Peter Castillo. “This arcade has been here for a long time, as far as I remember,” Castillo said. “I’m usually here every two weeks to compete.” Street Fighter V is the most recent installment in the popular fighting series, and despite its mixed initial reception from fans and critics, has been popular among the tournament scene. Every week, the arcade hosts a different tournament, with every other week either being Street Fighter V or the popular racing game, Initial D. The arcade also attracts those not interested in competing. “I’m not a fan of tournaments nor never really joined one, but it’s cool seeing people coming together and connecting based on on common thing,” said nineteen-year-old Kameron Salehi. The mechanical engineer appreciates the arcade, and sees it as way to preserve some gaming history. “I do like the arcade,” Salehi said. “I’m not a full fan of Street Fighter but I mostly

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Pinball Wizards: From air hockey to pinball tables, Play Stations to high end gaming PCs, there's something for everyone at Arcade Odyssey. go there for pinball, Crazy Taxi, House of the Dead, Galaga, and Initial D.” Nineteen-year-old Florida International University student Stacy Santalis shares that sentiment. “It gives people access to old school games as well as providing a sense of community within the arcade, since it’s a social

setting,” Santalis, a psychology major said. That sense of community is important for the competitive scene. “Everyone who comes here every two weeks for Street Fighter knows each other and it’s nice,” Castillo said. “Those who are new are welcomed to come by whenever.”

movie review

Alien Covenant Delivers More Groans than Scares ‰‰ Ridley Scott’s third Alien film has a great cast and some interesting ideas, but is bogged down by a lackluster script and an overreliance on CGI. By Alexander F. Aspuru alexander.aspuru001@mymdc.net During Ridley Scott’s Prometheus, the crew attempts to revive an alien’s 2000-year-old decapitated head. During the process, the alien’s eyes open, sputtering and gurgling up blood. It’s confused and scared. The alien’s head bubbling and twitching. As the crew expects it to say something, the head explodes, leaving the lab a mess and the crew disappointed. Scott’s Alien: Covenant is the severed head in this scenario, and the crew’s disappointment is the audience’s own feelings watching this. In trying to revive the Alien franchise, Scott breaks his promise to fans by producing a film as coherent and graceful as the garbling of the aforementioned alien head. Alien: Covenant, the sequel to Prometheus (2012), follows the crew of the Covenant, a spaceship filled with colonists en route to a

faraway planet. Walter (Michael Fassbender), the ship’s android, watches over the colonists during the journey. After a bizarre space anomaly causes the ship to malfunction, the Covenant’s crew receives a distress message from an unexplored planet. Despite protests by the ship’s second- in-command Daniels Branson (Katherine Waterston), Covenant captain Christopher Oram (Billy Crudup) leads a scouting expedition on the unknown planet. The film’s narrative is then divided between xenomorphs (the scary aliens that appear in all the films) hunting the Covenant’s crew and the personal story of David 8, a character from Scott’s Prometheus who’s also played by Fassbender. However, Scott fails to manage these two stories seamlessly. Scenes of crew members being slaughtered by aliens are followed by philosophical conversations between David and Walter. Rather than feeling natural, these narratives are so stark in tone and purpose that they seem like two different films forced to share one. The most menacing thing about Alien: Covenant is the writing. With the exceptions of Danny McBride, who plays Covenant pilot

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PHOTO COURTESY OF TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX

A Terrifying Disappointment: Original Alien director Ridley Scott fails to bring much to Alien: Covenant, a disjointed and stiff film. Tennessee Farris, and Fassbender, Alien: Covenant’s cast succumbs to a shoddy script. Character

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development is pushed aside in favor of the characters telling the audience what to notice. Everything, MDC The Reporter

from major plot points to the quietness of the unknown planet is remarked upon, as if Scott is afraid these developments will slip past the viewer. However, while Fassbender provides fantastic performances for both David and Walter, those expecting the David from Prometheus (or anything else related to Prometheus) will be disappointed. Elizabeth Shaw's search for the meaning of creation and the Adonis-like Engineers are discarded in the film, with no hope for return, while David has shifted off-screen from an emotionally tormented android to a clichéd sci-fi Dr. Frankenstein. Those expecting a movie akin to Scott’s Alien (1979) or James Cameron’s Aliens (1986) will also be disappointed. Scott abandons practical effects, using exclusively CGI to display the xenomorphs. Additionally, he places the xenomorphs in either open or heavily lit spaces, destroying any sense of claustrophobia or tension in the aliens’ appearance. Coupled with a blue filter that robs the color and vibrancy of the film and a twist ending as subtle as a chestburster, there is little to differentiate Alien: Covenant from a standard summer blockbuster.


14 FORUM | JUNE 13, 2017

THE REPORTER

social media

The Dark Side Of Social Media ‰‰ Vanny Veras explains how viral challenges and marketing tactics in social media can induce anxiety and stress in its most active users.

By Vanny Veras vanny.veras002@mymdc.net Any young person active on social media (and let’s be honest most of us are) is aware of The Bow Wow Challenge, one of the most recent social media trends. The challenge sprung from rapper and actor Bow Wow after being caught posturing for the “gram,”

leading his followers to believe he was about to board a private jet. Instead he was caught on camera hours later on board a commercial flight. Before you knew it, Black Twitter created a challenge where people take pictures showing off a glamorous lifestyle, and then upload another picture revealing that it was all a lie to flex for social media. As funny as the situation may seem, it sheds light on a greater issue: the social pressures experienced every day because of social media. Social media sites such as Facebook and Instagram have been linked with depression, anxiety and stress. In an article for the American Psychiatric Association by Nick Zagorski, a national survey is mentioned where 1,787 young adults were asked about their usage of popular social media platforms. The findings showed that the people who used them the most had more than three times the risk of depression and anxiety than those who used them less. Through social media, users seek validation through likes, which can lead to anxiety when they aren’t receiving the feedback they’d like, or expect,

AT&T

When people hear the term water protector and Standing Rock, North Dakota comes to mind. Last summer in Standing Rock, protests and water protector camps were made on the reservation for peaceful resistance against the pipeline that was being built there, which would endanger the drinking water of millions. People from all over the world, many with indigenous roots, such as myself, joined. I slept in freezing temperatures during December, witnessing historic unity between 600 tribes and their allies. The camps were crushed in January, but other camps have spread. The Sabal Trail Pipeline is being built through three states. A water protector camp is only an hour drive from the Everglades on Seminole and Miccosukee territories. A woman nicknamed Sioux Z, who I met in Standing Rock, was severely injured

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20 k likes 32.2 comments #BowWowChallenge May 12, 2017

from a post. Seeing as young people are frequent users of social sites, they run a high risk of being afflicted with this phenomena. “There was actually a time where I deactivated all of my social media accounts to take a break from all that negative energy it can bring you,” said Edelyn Casilla, a 20-year-old student at Kendall Campus. “I really caught myself stressing over trying to keep up with the lifestyle of certain celebrities, and the minute I realized it, I just knew I needed a detox from it all. It was really for the best.” The anxiety from this pressure is something marketing companies are tapping into and capitalizing from. Many brands, such as Puma and other giants, have paired up with celebrities to use their social media accounts as a marketing ploy. When Rihanna or Kylie Jenner are wearing a certain article of clothing most people feel the instinct to go out and buy it. It’s honestly a genius strategy, but realistically speaking, the emotional and mental toll it can take on the minds of social media users is being drastically understated.

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Net Neutrality

Activism At Home And Beyond

By Alexander Suarez alexander.suarez002@mymdc.net

29%

Instagram cure17

environment

‰‰ Alexander Suarez interviews local activist, Sheri Lewis Green, on environmental activism in Standing Rock and the Everglades to stop the destruction of important Native lands.

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The Dangers Of Controlling Net Neutrality

by police there. I was able to get in touch with Sheri Lewis Green who started Camp Standing Rock Florida (renamed United Indigenous Camp) with Sioux Z. In late March, Green was a panelist at an environmental event held by Campus Greens, a club at Wolfson Campus I used to be a part of. She was also at Standing Rock. She stayed throughout November and then came again in January—just missing me. Green explained what it means to be a water protector, “It comes from being a mother, connection with creation, thinking of children. My last child was a water birth. Protecting mother earth, all humanity, protecting all life.” A walk through the Everglades was led by Natives, and also Green who has Native American roots as well. I was one of approximately 30 who participated until we reached Miami. According to Green, the Everglades are a prehistoric ecosystem which is precious, and sacred to Natives. The pipeline, and such paths, would endanger the Everglades. “First in Naples, Feb. 10, they wanted to build a concrete bike path through the Everglades for 80 miles; our walk primarily was bringing attention to this,” said Green about ongoing efforts with the Naples and Miami City Councils to protect the Everglades. “Naples decided in February, if Miami went along, they would cancel these plans, so on April 4, after we had marched into the city council in Miami, they decided to cancel the plans. On May 12, Naples went along with it.” To conclude, I think it is a small world, especially for activists. It’s also a journalist’s responsibility to shed light on this. The 80-mile long and 51,200 acre path they would have built, could have cleared the way for Sabal, but it barely got the coverage, the effort to prevent it or the connection to Standing Rock. This is an issue that students should look at.

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‰‰ David Rivas explains the concept of net neutrality, and how the internet will be heavily influenced by big name companies with its removal.

By David Rivas david.rivas005@mymdc.net The internet is one of the greatest infrastructure projects humanity has ever created. It has helped society grow and interact. It has simplified business, socializing, banking and gaming. The “open” internet has always been something that millions of people utilize and take for granted. The idea of net neutrality is that all internet service providers should not influence the content that users request; companies like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon should treat all internet traffic equally. In 2010, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) created net neutrality rules, Titles 1 and 2 of the Communications Act of 1934, to regulate internet service providers (ISPs). All ISPs were placed under

a loosely regulated Title 1. After a lawsuit from Verizon claimed that the FCC did not have the authority to regulate ISPs under Title 1, they stated that if the FCC wanted to regulate them, ISPs must be placed under Title 2 to grant them much stronger oversight. Moving ISPs back to Title 1 from Title 2 creates the possibility of companies altering and choosing what sites we visit and at what time. For example, if Time Warner Cable saw that Microsoft was giving them more money than Google, they could choose to throttle down Google’s web sites, or make them slower, and speed up Bing’s web site to make it more appealing to the average consumer. President Donald J. Trump’s administration appointed a new chairman of the FCC, Ajit Pai, who is known for being anti-net neutrality, and has worked for the Justice Department of Verizon. Pai claims that ever since net neutrality was created, infrastructure investment has declined. “To be real clear, this does not influence the way we invest,” said former Verizon Executive Vice President Fran Shammo who held a conference call in 2014 with Verizon’s investors about how Title 2 affected Verizon’s plans in infrastructure development. “We’re going to continue to invest in our networks and our platforms, so nothing will influence that.” Net neutrality is placed to keep the internet open for the world, to prevent the influence of companies, and to establish the power the FCC can use to oversee and keep the internet free. In 2006, Time Magazine was deciding who to place as person of the year. The cover rolled out to the public and stated, “You. Yes, you. You control the Information Age. Welcome to your world.”

To write for the forum section, contact Katherine Wallace-Fernandez at (305) 237-2715 or katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

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JUNE 13, 2017 | FORUM

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// FORUM Katherine Wallace-Fernandez, Forum Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net

venezuela

The Current Turmoil In Venezuela

‰‰ Justin Marcano mentions family as he compares the Venezuelan government’s surpressing tactics to a boa constrictor and fighting students to gamblers.

By Justin Marcano justin.marcano001@mymdc.net I proceed to inform and convey, with much anguish and agony, the desperation divulged in this work. What will be recounted are the words of my family who are suffering alongside their nation; a message in a bottle cast away from a desolate country cut off from the world. Their story and their cry for justice is a voice of desperation shouting from across the Caribbean Sea hoping to fall on the ears of any that care to listen to their pain. The blood of my father’s home has been drawn with the likeness

of a Jackson Pollock painting. The lives of Venezuela’s children, mothers and fathers have been cut short. A generation lost at the hands of the government, which are meant to protect and not subdue its people. Like the tactics of a boa constrictor, the Chavista regime has been suffocating the innocent, and with every instance of resistance, the snake crushes the lungs of the troupial ever so tightly. The government has taken steps to avoid judgement by ripping out the tongues of those who may criticize them by eliminating freedom through the destruction of journalism, oppositional parties and universities. Venezuela’s currency, the Bolivar, has been turned into a useless reminder of promise that the nation once showed. The nation with the largest oil reserves in the world is in financial disarray, and with that comes a diminished spending power. Lack of supplies such as food, medicine and surgical equipment has driven people to desperation. In areas hit the hardest, people fight with tooth and nail for rations. In other areas, such as Puerto La Cruz, where my family lives, people queue for most of the day in the equatorial heat hoping that the food truck yields enough food for their turn

Bureaus ———————————

North Campus Bureau covers North, West, Hialeah and MEEC B 11380 N.W. 27th Ave. Room 4209 Miami, FL 33167 T (305) 237-1254 ————————————————— Kendall Campus Bureau covers Kendall and Homestead B 11011 S.W. 104th St. Room M239 Miami, FL 33176 T (305) 237-2715 ————————————————— Wolfson Campus Bureau covers Wolfson, Medical and InterAmerican B 300 N.E. Second Ave. Suite 1610 Miami, FL 33132 T (305) 237-3368 tetyana shumkova \ THE REPORTER

in line. If they’re not so lucky, they head home with empty hands and empty stomachs. The doctors have been left to figure out how to improvise care for their suffering patients. According to an unofficial survey by a network of more than 200 doctors in August 2016, 76 percent of public hospitals lacked the basic medicines that should be available in any functional public hospital, including many that are on the World Health Organization’s (WHO) List of Essential Medicines. The criminals that brought

this once prospering nation to its knees face no internal judgement, for they control the judiciary and have bribed the surrounding nations to silence. University students have armed themselves against the government, in protest and in resistance, to the neverending wave of corruption. They see no other way out and place all their chips in the middle of the table, gambling their lives, and hope that they will be rewarded with an answered prayer for a rebutted injustice. As my aunt told me, “We are in the hands of God.”

alt right

The Political Right Has An Edge Over Its Leftist Counterparts ‰‰ Gabriel Exposito argues against President Donald J.Trump’s supporters’ most successful political strategy, misinformation, through the use of echo-chambers and popular fake news outlets.

By Gabriel Exposito gabriel.exposito001@mymdc.net The most powerful tool the Trumpian right has employed to maintain support is a massive misinformation campaign. I am not suggesting there is a reactionary media conspiracy in the works, but rather, that many President Donald J. Trump supporters run to their echo-chambers (the right’s version of a safe space) whenever confronted by facts. Several rightwing fake news outlets and propaganda YouTube channels, such as

Prager University and Infowars, have helped spread misinformation by stretching half-truths and cherry picking data. Most notably, Infowars front man Alex Jones put out a $5,000 prize on Oct. 2016 to anyone who appeared on TV yelling “Bill Clinton is a rapist!” Supporting Jones and Infowars – a man and an organization who claimed the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings were a hoax and the government is “putting chemicals in the water that turn the frigging frogs gay” – while claiming other news outlets and independent publications are fake news for criticizing Trump (as the College Republicans have already done) is not only deplorable, but very hypocritical. This use of misinformation, however, has given the political right an edge over the left. They follow Trump’s philosophy when it comes to facts and the press. He writes in his book, The Art of the Deal, “From a pure business point of view, the benefits of being written about have far outweighed the drawbacks. It’s really quite simple.” The College Republicans at Kendall Campus have taken Trump’s advice and hopped on a new high horse by having their press secretary, Miguel Granda, write a column in The Reporter defending

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The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

Editorial Board ——————————— María Elena Vizcaíno Editor-in-Chief/Briefing Editor

Jaynell Perera Photo Editor/Multimedia Editor Ciro Salcedo A&E Editor Katherine Wallace-Fernandez Forum Editor Giovanni Del Fa Sports Editor

Art Department ——————————— Tetyana Shumkova Designer

Issue Staff ——————————— Alexander F. Aspuru, Sebastián Ballestas, Patricia Cordon, Jorge De Pena, Gabriel Exposito, Daniela Figueredo, Jessica Genao, Aiyana Ishmael, Antonio Latte, Justin Marcano, Omar Negrin, Alessandra Pacheco, Priya Pershadsingh, David Rivas, Riane Roldan, Alexander Suarez, Alexandra Vargas, Vanny Veras

Manolo Barco, Media Adviser

B mbarco@mdc.edu T NORTH.........................(305) 237-1255 T KENDALL......................(305) 237-2323 T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3477 Aracelia Diez, Student Media Assistant

GABRIEL EXPOSITO \ THE REPORTER

the discrimination of same-sex marriage under the pretense of “religious liberty” and using a token agnostic to justify his position. Defining marriage as a union exclusively between a man and a woman, because of one’s religious preferences, is like defending the Jim Crow South as a way of life because of the “separate but equal” precedent established in the 1896 Supreme Court Case Plessy versus Ferguson. Marriage is not just a church formality. Marriage is a legal status that provides perks in the tax code such as claiming more deductions and exclusion of income if the proprietary value on a personal residence increases. Defining marriage as a union between

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a man and a woman is discriminatory because it bars same-sex couples from enjoying the same economic benefits a straight couple would enjoy. Weaponizing the media by making conspiracy theories mainstream, going as low as to defend discrimination, making as much noise as possible and then framing themselves as the victims has been the Trumpian right’s political strategy, and so far it has worked. If our great nation ought to make it through one of the most unpopular and corrupt administrations in our history, we must recognize that we are entitled to our own opinions, but we are not entitled to our own alternative facts. MDC The Reporter

B adiez@mdc.edu T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3368 ——————————— Letters to the Editor ——————————— The Reporter welcomes letters to the editor. All submissions should be 300 words or less and must be typed. Writers must include their full name, contact number, campus, student number and e-mail address. Faculty and staff should include the title, department and extension. All letters are subject to editing for purposes of brevity and clarity. Letters can be sent via e-mail to mdc.thereporter@gmail.com, with the subject “letter to the editor.”

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