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Solid Start

Check out our centerspread of the 34th annual Miami Film Festival, which took place March 3 through March 12.

The Miami Dade College baseball team is off to a strong start this season with a 17-8 overall record, including six wins in conference play.

New Nintendo

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Political Apathy

The Reporter’s Alexandra Camargo reviews Nintendo’s latest gadget and game, the Nintendo Switch and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

FORUM

A&E

SPORTS

NEWS

Film Festival

The Reporter’s Gabriel Exposito encourages youngsters who feel disenfranchised by the current political landscape to become more engaged.

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WE CAN DO IT! 4VOL. 7, ISSUE 12 — MARCH 21, 2017

TWO-TIME NATIONAL PACEMAKER AWARD WINNER

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Riane Roldan \ THE REPORTER

Schloss Leopoldskron: The view of the Untersberg Mountain from the Schloss Leopoldskron, the hotel and palace where the 2017 Global Citizenship Seminar was held. More than 40 students from the Miami Dade Honors College participated in the seminar hosted by the Global Citizenship Alliance in Salzburg, Austria from Feb. 19 to 26. Read The Reporter's Riane Roldan's first-hand account of the trip on page 6.

Technology

Professor Transports Students To Virtual World ‰‰ Since last semester, Kendall Campus English professor Christine Robinson has been incorporating virtual reality into her classes to allow students to get more engaged with technology.

By Adriana Falero adriana.falero001@mymdc.net Students in professor Christine Robinson’s ENC 1102 course sit in a dimly lit computer lab with 25 iMacs and two large screen projectors—a classroom setting that is expanded with a virtual reality experience that transports them to Ernest

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Hemingway’s colorful Key West house and Edgar Allan Poe’s somber temporary home in Richmond, Virginia. “To summarize it in one word, I would say engagement,” Robinson said. “I like to add Robinson whatever tech I can to the class [because] my students are certainly entertained and engaged. Students who are engaged just learn better.” TURN TO TECHNOLOGY PAGE 5

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Legislature

Bill Could Mean Less Funding For MDC ‰‰ After passing in the State Senate, the Florida Excellence in Higher Education Act of 2017 will soon be voted on the House of Representatives floor. Miami Dade College has tracked Senate Bill 2 because the new performance standards could shrink the funding allocated to the College by the State. By Maria Elena Vizcaino maria.vizcaino003@mymdc.net Miami Dade College fears a fast-moving higher education bill, up for a vote during this year’s current legislative session in Tallahassee, will harm students and the school’s funding. “Although most of the bill is good, there [are] a few parts to the bill that will have a

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drastic effect on everybody on the whole statewide, first-time, full-time college students getting their associate’s in arts degrees,” said David Marin, a college governmental affairs officer. “So if you don’t speak up now, it’s a negative effect for the students that come after you.” The Florida Excellence in Higher Education Act of 2017 is a priority for Senate President Joe Negron. It passed on the State Senate floor on March 9—only two days after this year’s session kicked-off. But for months, Miami Dade College students and administrators have been raising concerns to amend the bill, which would translate into a rise of the standards by which the College receives funding.

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MDC Live Arts Looks For Student Actors The Live Arts Lab is accepting video auditions for its original production, Trigger. Open to all students regardless of previous experience, to submit an audition, applicants must film themselves singing an eight-bar maximum accapella or rap song of their choosing and send it to mdcl ivea r ts@mdc. edu before April 1. Trigger was created in response to the Virginia Tech shooting of PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE LUGO 2007 as an original oratorio with the goal of heightening gun violence awareness at college campuses. “Gun violence takes so many different forms, right? It’s a large issue,” said Kathryn Garcia, the executive director of MDC Live Arts. “That’s why they’re so interested in finding a cast that really has a relationship to the issue, that really wants to make their voices heard.” The performance focuses on the effects of gun violence. It sends a message of healing to the audience by bringing together a group of diverse individuals to tell one story, and how we as a community stand stronger together in the face of its consequences. Trigger will be performed on April 21 at 8 p.m., in North Campus’ Lehman Theater, 11380 N.W. 27th Ave. Admission will be free. —Alexandra Santiesteban

Love Of Baking And Books Come Together In Contest The Delicious Books edible book contest will take place on April 12 from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the North Campus library, 11380 N.W. 27h Ave., Room 2001. The cakes must be inspired by a book, character or literary theme. “It is an opportunity for the Miami Dade College community to show off their creativity and their love of books and reading,” said librarian Laurel Fennell, who has lead the contest for the past two years. “The winning entries will be selected based on their creativity and how well the entry relates to or symbolizes the book, character or literary theme.” The first place for each category is a $100 Visa gift card and $50 Visa gift card for the second place. Those interested must complete the form available at the North Campus library or online at http://libraryguides.mdc.edu/ediblebooks and submit it via email to nlibrary@mdc.edu or in person at the library’s desk before 5 p.m. on April 5. —Claudia Hernández-Ortiz For more information, contact Laurel Fennell T (305) 642-8085 lfennell@mdc.edu

AmeriCorps Seeks Year-Long Committed Volunteers AmeriCorps, a U.S. federal government civil society program, is seeking volunteers able to commit for a 12-month period to work with the nonprofit Children of Inmates. The organization helps children meet with their incarcerated family members and provides services such as counseling, housing, food stamps and education. “We have a wide range of [volunteers] majoring in disciplines regarding social work, education, psychology, early child education, pastoral ministry [and] teaching,” said Brielle Obando, an AmeriCorps member who works at the Children of Inmates Program. “Basically anything that deals with working with children and working with disadvantaged/wounded populations.” Obando said the program accepts volunteers from other majors and can cater to the volunteers' educational needs. Volunteers can sign up by visiting nationalservice.gov/programs/ americorps. The deadline is ongoing. For more information, contact Brielle Obando at (786) 716-2699 or brielle@hopeformiami.org —Claudia Hernández-Ortiz

Wolfson Campus Offers Free Health Certifications The Miami Dade College Student Wellness Department and Jewish Community Services will be offering free Mental Health First Aid Certification at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2nd Ave., Room 7128 on April 1 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The nationally recognized certification usually costs $150. The certification will teach MDC students and staff how to identify, understand and refer people with mental health concerns over to peer and professional support. Attendees will also learn about suicide prevention and substance use disorders. The day will be interactive and include videos and discussions. Space is limited and must be reserved. In order to reserve a seat, contact Renee Lambert, the Mental Health First Aid grant coordinator, at rlambert@mdc.edu —Devoun Cetoute

Wolfson Student Named Achieving The Dream’s Dream Scholar Student Government vice president at Wolfson Campus Enrique Sepulveda was named Achieving the Sepulveda Dream’s Dream Scholar on Feb. 21. Through Sepulveda’s nomination, Miami Dade College received the Achieving the Dream’s Leah Meyer Austin Award for the first time, in recognition for the increase in student graduation rates—from 31 to 34 percent. Achieving the Dream is a national, nonprofit organization that assists colleges in helping students achieve their academic goals, focusing on low income students and students of color. Working with 200 colleges, 100 advisors and multiple investors, it closes achievement gaps and increases student academic and economic accomplishments. Back in 2010, barriers like disorganized student pathways and excessive academic choices prevented students from completing their education. The College organized surveys and examined student data to create new programs such as Shark Path, a guided pathway to assist students from before they start at MDC until they transfer to a baccalaureate program or a workplace. “We are especially proud to receive this award because it acknowledges the heart of our mission to changes lives through accessible, high-quality teaching and learning experiences,” said Lenore Rodicio, the executive vice president and provost at MDC. “It is a testament of the work that our faculty and staff do day in and day out to ensure that our students have every opportunity to succeed and achieve their dreams for a college degree.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF YAMILA IMAGES

Koubek Center Presents Puerto Rican Bomba And Plena Puerto Rican band Plena Es will perform its high-energy Caribbean dance music on March 25 from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., at the Koubek Center, 2705 S.W. 3rd St. The concert features the Puerto Rican folkloric genres Plena and Bomba. Plena was formed in Ponce, Puerto Rico around 1900 and is recognized for spreading messages, similar to the corridos in Mexico. Bomba was created by West African slaves on the island and is known for the creative connection between the drummer and the dancer. The event will also feature a pre-concert dance lesson, DJ set, specialty food and cocktail vendors. Tickets at the door are $20 and $10 for MDC students, and can be purchased online at http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2724838 for $15. For more information, contact Madeline Rodriguez Ortega at (305) 237 7750 or mrodri68@mdc.edu —Claudia Hernández-Ortiz

The Olympia Theater Hosts A Tech Love-Themed Event MDC Live Arts will showcase Nufonia Must Fall, a performance based on a graphic novel that narrates the love story between an office drone and an obsolete robot on April 8 at 8 p.m. at the Olympia Theater, 174 E. Flagler St. “Nufonia Must Fall is a unique love story that offers audiences an extraordinary live theatrical experience through its special combination of music, puppetry and film,” said Kathryn Garcia, the executive director of MDC Live Arts. The live film experience will be enacted by puppets on stage, then filmed, edited and projected to create a real-time live stage on a screen, accompanied by the sounds of DJ Kid Koala’s set and the Afiara Quartet ensemble. Tickets are $35 for the general public and $10 for Miami Dade College students. Attendees can purchase VIP admission for $50 to access an after party with DJ Kid Koala. For more information, contact MDC Live Arts at (305) 237-3010 or visit mdclivearts.org.

Documentary Screening Discusses Concerns About GMO A film screening of GMO, OMG will be presented at the Hialeah Campus, 1780 W. 49th St., on March 23 at 5:30 p.m. in Room 5101A. The film focuses on film director Jeremy Seifert, and his journey to understand how Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) affect the food people eat, especially with children, as well as the health condition of the Earth. “The purpose of the film is to inform viewers of questions that consumers are raising about GMO,” said Andrea M. Forero, the director of campus administration at Hialeah Campus. Students who attend are encouraged to participate in a discussion after the film. For more information about the event, contact Luis Rodriguez, the Hialeah Campus director of continuing education and professional development at lrodrig8@ mdc.edu —Ruth Gonzalez

—Roland Ortega

3D Vibrations Exhibit Shakes West Campus The Art Gallery at West Campus, located at 3800 N.W. 115th Ave., is exhibiting 3D Vibrations a retrospective of Venezuelan kinetic artist Jose Margulis through April 14. The collection shows the diverse stages of the artist development from his beginnings up to today. Margulis describes his work as patterns and designs that are not absolutes and change as the viewer changes their point of view. 3D Vibrations was conceived by PHOTO COURTESY OF LEO DI TOMASO Contemporary Art Projects USA gallery in Sunny Isles Beach curator Maria Velia Savino and Margulis and proposed by gallery executive director Tata Fernandez. “This exhibition is an important insight on one of the new tendencies of contemporary art," Savino said. "Especially in the field of geometric abstraction and the use of new materials, media and techniques in art." Visitors must request access from the Public Safety Department to enter the gallery. Admission is free. MDC students and employees with decals can park in available campus parking. For more information, contact MDC Galleries of Art + Design: (305) 237-7700. —Jessica Alvarez

—Katherine Wallace-Fernandez

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Play Time: Three-year-old Ashley Bonaga, plays with sand during the Caring for Kids event at InterAmerican Campus on Feb. 25. The event is an initiative to make communities a safer place for children to grow up.

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Catatonic: A stout orange and white cat peacefully gazes into the air as it sits on a sidewalk at Kendall Campus near building R. It was unclear if the cat was looking to register for classes.

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Free Press: Marlon Montero, president of the Miami Dade College Republicans club, speaks to NBC 6 morning reporter Melissa Adan on Feb. 27 at Kendall Campus. Adan, a Reporter alumna, spoke about the role of the free press and her career in journalism.

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Helping Hands: Vigilia Mambisa, a human rights organization, helps collect food and medical supplies for women, men and children immigrants who are detained at Mexico's border. The organization collected supplies in Little Havana on Feb.

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Senate Bill 2 Could Threaten College's Funding If Passed In The House FROM LEGISLATURE, FRONT

The Florida Legislature funds state colleges based on a performance-metrics system that measures completion and retention rates, continuing education and job placement and entry-level wages. Reaching the silver standard of the current model, MDC ranks 15th in completion rates for first-time, full-time students who obtain an associate’s degree within three years of having enrolled at the College. The bill aims to change the time period to two years. The most recent data from the College, pulled from the 20122013 academic year, indicates only 34.5 percent of these students meet that requirement—only a 3.5 percentage increase from the previous year. Senate Bill 2 requires all 28 state colleges in Florida to meet 50 percent completion rates in this category as part of the excellence standards, which according to the same data, only three have achieved. Critics argue that this portion of the bill neglects specific obstacles many state college students face when working toward completion of their degree. “Some students have a full-time job and some of them are also full-time students...and some have children to raise... and they wouldn’t be able to get their associate’s degree within two years. It would be almost impossible,” said Priya Pershadsingh, a North Campus student, who went to Tallahassee to speak in front of the legislature in February. At MDC the average age of students enrolled in credit programs is 25 years old, and nearly two-thirds attend school part-time. In addition, a quarter of the student body works full-time and two-thirds care for dependents, according to Marin. However, the bill has some positives too because it

augments funding for scholarships aimed for high-achieving students, such as Bright Futures, creates a new scholarship fund for migrant workers and their children, and strengthens the 2+2 partnership between state colleges and universities. It was first introduced by Republican Senator Bill Galvano from Hillsborough and Manatee counties in early January. The bill passed in the Senate 35-1. At the moment, SB 2 sits in the House, where its counterpart HB 3 has failed to move at the same pace. Marin recommends students reach out to State Representative Bryan Avila, the sponsor of HB 3, who was Student Government president at Wolfson Campus in 2003-2004 and also a former adjunct professor at MDC. “He’s familiar with the College and the type of students we have, maybe just nicely sending messages like going out to his office, or email or something [explaining] how the students’ normal daily life is and why they might not be able to meet the two-year requirement of graduation,” Marin said. The concern is about the long-term consequences the new standards may bring. “Colleges have that ‘open door mandate,’ that we help the community. So it doesn’t matter, as long as you have a high school degree or a GED and a dream for a better life, you can come to the College and make something of yourself, but if the funding starts relying on students graduating, and not every student is the same,” Marin said. “[If the bill becomes law] in the worst case scenario, the College starts denying certain students depending on their grades, like a university can pick and choose, the College may have to start picking and choosing in order to get the students that would pass so the College gets funding.” If passed, the bill will be enacted starting on July 1.

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Kendall Campus Professor Fuses Technology Into English Curriculum Given the fact that our students are infused with technology, I believe it is a great way to teach them about new advances in education and to learn to appreciate literature that much more. Dr. Robinson has taught me several things about technology. Every time I have an issue or question, I always go to her first.

Marisol Varela, Kendall Campus English professor

Jaynell Perera \ THE REPORTER

Virtual Realm: Kendall Campus English professor Christine Robinson plays the Second Life game inside her office in the English Department. FROM TECHNOLOGY, FRONT

The lively technology enthusiast currently teaches two blended ENC 1102 classes at Kendall Campus and a Virtual College ENC 1101 course. Last fall, Robinson bought 30 iBlue cardboard headsets online for about $1.50 each, which were used in her ENC 1101 blended class for an essay assignment that requires students to chronicle an emerging technology of their choice. As an example, Robinson brought her “brick” Motorola cell phone to class to discuss the evolution of cell phones and the future of 3D technology. In the ENC 1102 course students compare author Ernest Hemingway’s novels such as The Old Man and the Sea and A Farewell to Arms to some of writer Edgar Allen Poe’s famous pieces by exploring how they are radically different in style. To further grasp the contrast between the two authors, they take a walking tour of their houses through the VR headsets. Robinson likes to enhance her lessons with virtual reality because of its visual and hands-on nature. This growing technology is used in other subjects, such as in biology for dissecting bodies, according to her. She foresees web VR, currently available in Chrome 56, will become more prevalent as it allows for a three dimensional experience directly on websites. Robinson has always exhibited an interest in technology. She and English professor Cary Ser were the only ones, that she knew of, to use Commodore Amiga computers in the 1980’s, which were among the earliest personal computers. She taught herself basic computing skills, such as working with word processors and spreadsheets. Originally from New York, she moved to Miami at the age of two. After her teachers in secretarial school convinced her mother of her potential, she enrolled in Miami Dade College as this was the

only higher education institution her parents could afford. Robinson graduated with a general associate’s in arts degree from North Campus in 1968 and continued her studies at Florida Atlantic University, where she obtained a bachelor’s in English education in 1970. Two years later, she earned her master’s in English from the University of Miami. In 1975, she received an education specialist Ed. S. degree and an Ed. D. in higher education in 1976, both from FAU. In 1975, Robinson started working at the College as a grant writer and became an English professor at Kendall Campus three years later. “[Robinson] is an overachiever,” said Michael Vensel, the chairperson of the English and Communications Department at Kendall Campus. “She works tirelessly on creating lessons while keeping her students’ best interest in mind. She has great ideas and is not afraid to try new things in her classroom.” According to Robinson, her modern approach to education appeals to her students. Apart from using their smartphones for the VR experience, they also download their books from the Google Play mobile app and access their assignments through the Blackboard app on their phones. When deadlines near, Robinson sends students video reminders through Blackboard with a Voki avatar she created of herself. She also introduced them to augmented reality by hiding figures of cats, easter eggs, and sandwiches in their paper handouts that can be seen with the Aurasma app. She estimates her student drop rate to be around two students per class and her return rate from ENC 1101 to ENC 1102 to be around 60 percent. An anonymous review about Robinson found on RateMyProfessors.com reads: “She is a great teacher and I’m taking her for ENC 1102. If you are considering

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not taking the class because it’s a blended course, don’t worry, it’s awesome!” Her usual schedule is four blended classes and four Virtual College classes, but this semester she is dedicating time to imparting information about virtual reality at the Center for Institutional and Organizational Learning, the training arm for the College, in which faculty and administrators learn how to navigate the College’s online system. She compiled a list of YouTube videos she recommends to watch with the cardboard headset and shared it in the workshop. Any YouTube video can be watched with a cardboard headset on a smartphone with the latest version of YouTube installed by clicking on the More Options icon in the upper right corner of the video and selecting “View in Cardboard.” Robinson encourages the use of cardboard virtual reality headsets in the classroom because of its low cost and potential in any discipline. “Given the fact that our students are infused with technology, I

believe it is a great way to teach them about new advances in education and to learn to appreciate literature that much more,” said Marisol Varela, an English professor at Kendall Campus. “Dr. Robinson has taught me several things about technology. Every time I have an issue or question, I always go to her first.” An avid reader, Robinson conducts her personal tech research via a technology thread on Google News. She prefers Google products and services because they are either free or low priced, and she says the company’s intent is to make education democratic so that anyone anywhere can have access to knowledge. The original Google Cardboard headset costs $15. However, since Google released the cardboard headset model, other brands are selling it at much lower prices. Robinson purchased her class’ headsets on eBay and assembled them herself. Although it took her quite some time to assemble all of them, she says it’s not that difficult, especially with the countless YouTube tutorials explaining the

process. “People are surprised because I’m not a young male, and for people of my age and female it’s unusual to be that enthralled with tech,” Robinson said. “I think if I were to re-do my education, I might do a STEM of some kind, certainly in this job market.” Robinson is the tech-savvy one at home now that her son is in Seattle working as a software engineer for Yelp. She helps her husband, a law professor at UM, cast from a smartphone to the TV using Google Chromecast. In her spare time, Robinson enjoys jewelry making and visual arts. She makes jewelry using watercolor paper, construction paper and wires. Her picturesque office is decorated with multiple art pieces, including wall hangings and a painting of a woman created by herself. She was initially an interior design major, but she says she has never regretted the switch to education. As far as plans for the future, Robinson wants to continue implementing virtual reality in her classes and kindling students’ interest for technology. “As people understand that they can see a very decent selection of VR everything with a little cardboard headset, I think there will be more and more of that,” Robinson said. “Use technology tools to the extent that they can make your life not only more comfortable and efficient but also so you can have fun.”

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A New Dimension: ENC 1101 students in professor Christine Robinson's class watch a virtual reality YouTube video with their phones and a cardboard headset last November.

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Global Citizenship Seminar Advocates Empathy And “Learning To Unlearn” I was one of more than 40 students from the Miami Dade Honors College that was selected to attend the 2017 Global Citizenship Seminar hosted by Global Citizenship Alliance in Salzburg, Austria from Feb.19-26. The seven-day intensive educational seminar focused on discussing issues like disparities, ethnocentrism, globalization and more. We arrived around 10 a.m. on Feb. 19 after an eight-hour flight. Despite our sleepiness, jet lag and sore necks, we were all roused by the charming and scenic city of Salzburg. Spread across 17 acres, the Schloss Leopoldskron—with its 17th century rococo palace and 55-room Meierhof—was our home for the next seven days. Our mornings and afternoons consisted of lectures, coffee breaks and walks to and from the hotel and palace, set against a view of the mountains that was impossible to get tired of. But the grandeur of the setting was far from the fundamental purpose of the seminar. If anything, it only highlighted this year’s overarching theme: disparities. With lectures on ethnocentrism, mapology, sustainable development and globalization, we initially engaged with the theme of disparities by studying the parts that made up the whole. But as the week went on, as we began to understand these parts more clearly, I understood that we have to look at the world not just as the sum of its parts, but as a whole. It’s not about looking at what we can do amongst just ourselves, our community or our college but what we can do globally as a collective. The seminar taught me about the importance of education and curiosity. None of the world’s most pressing issues can be solved, or even talked about, if we don’t understand them. It’s up to us as citizens of the world to take responsibility for this learning—whether it shows us who we are in a

good or bad light. Take for example our visit to Dachau. On the third day of the seminar, we traveled to the Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site, the first of the Nazi concentration camps opened in Germany. Dachau was a place of horror, torture and violence. It’s a place that shows the worst of humanity. But instead of hiding it or destroying it, it’s a place of remembrance. This, I think, is an important part of what being a global citizen is all about. We have to revisit our past, even if that past is a painful one. If I learned anything from the professors, historians and entrepreneurs—all experts in their fields—who spent the week teaching us, it’s that being a “global citizen” is not a certification you can earn or a destination you can reach. Jochen Fried, the president and CEO of Global Citizenship Alliance, said: “You never are a global citizen. You become one.” It’s this constant state of becoming that has stuck with me since arriving back home. Ultimately, global citizenship is about taking ownership of our education and taking responsibility not just for our own actions but for those around us. It’s about learning to unlearn the ideas that keep us divided, keeping current with what’s going on in the world, and yes—checking our facts. But it’s also about knowing that often we’ll have more questions than we do answers. While in Austria, I read A Field Guide to Getting Lost by activist and author Rebecca Solnit. I think she captures these sentiments best when she says: “For it is not, after all, really a question about whether you can know the unknown, arrive in it, but how to go looking for it, how to travel.” —Riane Roldan

Roldan

All Photos taken by Riane Roldan \ The Reporter

The Untersberg: The snowy mountain was used in the opening and closing scenes of the 1965 movie The Sound of Music. Seen here is a gravesite at the top of one of the mountain's many peaks.

Old Town: A scenic view of the Hohensalzburg Fortress from the base of the scenic Old Town in Salzburg. The fortress is more than 900 years old.

Salzburger Dom: The oldest cathedral in the city and one of the largest in Austria, the Salzburg Cathedral is where the composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was baptized.

Farm Life: A family of goats look on at the tourists passing by their home on a farm in Salzburg, Austria.

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Miami Dade College’s 34th Miami Dade College’s 34th Annual Miami Film Festival took place from March 3 through March 12. It featured more than 150 screenings and hosted filmmakers from many different countries. The festival this year showcased full-length feature films, short films, documentaries and more. It was jam packed with red carpet events, Q&A sessions with directors, parties, award ceremonies and a plethora of workshops. The program line-up held a bevy of categories including: Special Events, Marquee Series, Soiree Series, CINEDWNTWN Galas, Special Culinary Events, Knight Competition, Knight Documentary

Achievement Award, HBO Ibero American Competition, Jordan Ressler Screenwriting Competition, Canada 150, Cinema 360º, Florida Focus, Miami Film 2017, Miffecito, Special Presentation, Google Talks On Gender & Racial Gaps In Film & Tech, Short Competition, Shorts, From The Vault and Masterclass. Venues depended on what film was being played. Most of the films were broadcasted at MDC’s Tower Theater. For more information about the Miami Film Festival, visit: http://2017.miamifilmfestival.com. —Jaynell Perera

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Bright Lights: The Olympia Theatre was one of the venues screening movies from the 34th annual Miami Film Festival. The event ran from March 3 to March 12.

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Sassy: Spanish actress Rossy de Palma poses for the cameras during a red carpet event at the Olympia Theater on March 4. She starred in Traveling Lady, a story narrating the life of the American journalist Nellie Bly. The play was written and directed by Jessica Mitrani.

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Selfie: Fans snap a few selfies on March 6 with Nathalie Sar-Shalom (white blouse), the producer of El Inca at the Tower Theater, where her film was screened.

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Middle Man: Pictured from left to right, Nathalie Sar-Shalom, Jaie Laplante and Ignacio Castillo Cottin smile for the cameras on a red carpet event at the Miami Film Festival at the Tower Theater premiere of La Soledad and El Inca on March 7. www.mdcthereporter.com

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Tropical Vibes: Director of Give Me Future, Austin Peters, poses on a red carpet event at Regal South Beach before his film screening on March 8.

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Annual Miami Film Festival ONLINE TEASE VIDEO | Visit us online for a recap of the 2017 34th annual Miami Film Festival. www.mdcthereporter.com

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Stellar Night: Miami Dade College President Eduardo J. Padrón and a guest pose at an event for the opening night of the Miami Film Festival on March 3. He and others recognized organizers in charge for the festival that brings directors and actors from more than 40 countries.

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

Releasing New Projects: Joseph Cedar (left) and Richard Gere (right) talk about their experience making the film Norman.

Fancy Pants: Jaie Laplante, director of programming, talks during the opening night of the Miami Film Festival. He also presented actor Richard Gere and filmmaker Joseph Cedar who talked about the festivals opening night film, Norman.

OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

All Smiles: Actresses Elaine Del Valle (left) and Joy Jolise (right) pose on a red carpet event after the screening of Hot Girls Wanted on March 8.

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OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

Dynamic Duo: Jorge Thielen Armand (left) and Rodrigo Michelangeli (right) are interviewed about their new film La Soledad, at the Tower Theater on March 6.

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10 SPORTS | MARCH 21, 2017

THE REPORTER

Men's Basketball

Sharks Tough Season Comes To An End ‰‰ The Miami Dade College men’s basketball team struggled this season, finishing with a 10-19 record (4-11 in Southern Conference play). They failed to qualify for the State Tournament and lost the last game of the season against Eastern Florida State College by 31 points. By Aiyana Ishmael aiyana.ishmael001@mymdc.net The Miami Dade College men’s basketball season came to a screeching halt when they lost their season finale against Eastern Florida State College by a whopping 31 points. After winning the first three games of the season, the Sharks were never able to sustain a winning streak longer than two games. They had four losing streaks that lasted at least three games—three that lasted four games—and they lost 11 of their last 15. “Losing was very tough on myself, our staff, and the players as well,” said Sharks first-year Head Basketball Coach Kevin Ledoux. “They need to learn that things

aren’t just given.” The Sharks finished the season with a 10-19 overall record and a dismal 4-11 mark in Southern Conference play. They struggled with turnovers and personal fouls all season, averaging 16.9 per game in both categories. “We didn’t do too well as far as record,” said Sharks forward Darnell Dunn. “We were trying to come together as a team.” Despite the consistent losing, the Sharks were able to score a lot this year. They averaged 101.7 points and 45 rebounds per game. Some key contributors were 6-foot-6-inch sophomore Darnell Dunn, who averaged 18.3 points per game, freshman forward Cedric Belemene, who averaged eight rebounds, and sophomore power forward Karol Kott, who shot 42.6 percent from three-point range. The Sharks hope to use this past season as a learning tool. They are expected to have eight players returning to the team next season. “I’ve got some stuff to adjust for next year,” Belemene said.

SEBASTIÁN BALLESTAS \ THE REPORTER

Returning Player: Cedric Belemene, a 6-foot-6 inch forward for the Miami Dade College men's basketball team pictured in a game earlier this year against the Red Devils Basketball Academy. Belemene, who averaged 8.5 points and eight rebounds as a freshman for the Sharks, was one of the team's bright spots.

Women's Basketball

Williams Shines On Court For Lady Sharks ‰‰ Jamaria Williams, a sophomore point guard for the Miami Dade College women’s basketball team, was a key player for the Lady Sharks this season. She averaged 12.4 points, five assists and 3.2 rebounds per game this season. By Arthur Lantigua arthur.lantigua001@mymdc.net Lady Sharks point guard, Jamaria Williams’, all-around game was on full display this year. The soft-spoken sophomore known for having a competitive nature averaged 12.4 points, five assists and 3.2 rebounds for the Miami Dade College women’s basketball team this season. That output included an explosive 40-point performance on Feb. 22 versus Florida SouthWestern State College. “It’s great playing with Jay,” said shooting guard Michelle Wright. “She’s so explosive and a good passer so she keeps you on your toes.” Williams has been playing basketball since the first grade in Chicago. As a high school senior, she averaged 21 points per game at North Lawndale College Prep High School on the west side of Chicago. A coach on an opposing team in Illinois suggested she contact Lady Sharks Head Basketball Coach Susan Summons. Her decision worked out well for both parties. Williams formed a strong duo with 6-foot forward Emporess James, who averaged 15.1 points and 12.8 rebounds for the Sharks this year. “They say me and [Emporess] have a connection. We read each other well,” Williams said. “I know she needs me, and I need her to score and for her to rebound.”

Williams is in the process of rebounding from the Lady Sharks' narrow miss of the State Tournament this season. “That’s always my number one goal, to win a title anywhere I go,” Williams said. “For me to not accomplish that put me at a low and it makes me feel like I could’ve done more to help my team.” Despite the setback, life after MDC seems bright for Williams.

She is on track to graduate soon and is currently being sought after by several Division I schools such as Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University and Jacksonville State University in Alabama. The criminal justice major hopes to become a crime scene investigator and she aspires to play in the Women’s National Basketball Association.

OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

Game Changer: Sophomore point guard, Jamaria Williams dribbles down the court on Feb. 27 during the Lady Sharks' final game of the season versus Indian River State College. Williams averaged 12.4 points, five assists and 3.2 rebounds for the Miami Dade College women’s basketball team this season. www.mdcthereporter.com

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MDC The Reporter


MARCH 21, 2017 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

11

// SPORTS Jonathan Perez, Sports Editor  //  Giovanni Del Fa, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net

T (305) 237-1254 

// 

B jonathan.perez019@mymdc.net

Baseball

Sharks Start Strong Despite Injuries To Pitching Staff ‰‰ The Miami Dade College baseball team started the season 17-8 despite losing two of its pitchers to injury. Right handers Ernesto Pino and Yadiel Fonseca are out for the remainder of the season. By Giovanni Del Fa giovanni.delfa001@mymdc.net Despite having their pitching staff decimated by injury, the Miami Dade College baseball team has gotten off to a strong start (178 overall and 6-2 in the Southern Conference). “We started 1-3. We were bad, then we slowly inched back and we’ve gotten better as a team,” said Head Baseball Coach Danny Price. “We had some injuries that happened to us.” The team struggled at the start of the season after right handed pitchers Ernesto Pino and Yadiel Fonseca were lost for the remainder of the season after suffering injuries. Pino had Tommy John surgery to his right elbow and Fonseca will soon have surgery on his left knee after dislocating it. “Those things happen, but I

for the team lead in home runs with three each. Sophomores Raul Cabrera and Ramon Varela have added two home runs each. The Sharks have a team batting average of .353, which ranked 10th in the National Junior College

think they’ve taken on things very well. We have to pick one another up,” Price said. “The pitching coach is doing a great job.” The Sharks rebounded by playing well at home. They are 10-3 on their home field, which bodes well given that they will play five of their next 7 games at home. A trio of freshman pitchers, Nelson Alvarez, Jason Grana and Joshua Lopez, all have two wins for the Sharks this year. “So far, I think what we’ve done best as a team is pitching and defense. I wouldn’t really say we’ve lacked hitting; I think we just haven’t reached our full hitting capability as a team yet,” said sophomore infielder Bruce Martin. “But I trust and believe in the process.” Two key contributors on offense have been freshman utility player Edgar Martinez and first baseman Christian Garabedian. Martinez has the Sharks’ highest batting average (.450) and slugging average (.713). Garabedian has a .484 onbase percentage and a .389 batting average. Garabedian, Martinez and catcher Danny Mondejar are tied

Athletic Association. They also rank fourth in the NJCAA with 16 sacrifice flies. “This team is pretty talented, but it all comes from how much and how far they want to go,” Price said. “We’re competing but I think

we can be so much better.” The Sharks next game is on the road versus Indian River State College on March 21 at 3 p.m.

OMAR NEGRIN \ THE REPORTER

Swing, Batter, Batter: Sharks Shortstop Jose Rojas waits for a pitch in a game versus Palm Beach State College, which the Sharks won 5-3 at home on Feb. 27. Rojas went one for four with a run scored in the game.

WHEN YOU PLAY

TO YOUR

STRENGTHS

YOU ONLY GET

STRONGER You’re driven, ambitious, and focused. Shouldn’t your college be, too? With research and internship opportunities, small classes, and personalized career guidance, Nova Southeastern University is designed to help you realize the power of your potential. Learn more at nova.edu/miami Business | Education | Educational Leadership | Mental Health Counseling | Nursing | Pharmaceutical Affairs | School Counseling | Speech-Language and Communications Disorders | Speech-Language Pathology www.mdcthereporter.com

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12 A&E | MARCH 21, 2017

THE REPORTER

China

Top Five Hollywood Movies Infiltrated By China

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEGENDARY EAST

‰‰ China is a major influence in American economies, goods and cars. Now, the extent of the superpower’s reach goes beyond economics and politics, seeping into culture, movies and Hollywood. By Erik Jimenez erik.jimenez001@mymdc.net Hollywood may have met its box office match in China. It is estimated that by the end of 2017, China may become the world’s biggest movie box office, even bigger than the United States. Moviegoers in China paid an estimated $8.3 billion last year, which is about $2.5 billion away from catching up to the United States and Canada. In fact, many movies today are being made with the Chinese market in mind. If a movie wants to have a piece of that $8.3 billion market, it’ll have to play by China’s rules—or more accurately—the Chinese Communist Party’s rules. China only allows 34 foreign (i.e. films made outside of China) films into the market per year. This isn’t because they are trying to protect China’s own film industry, it’s more about censoring ideas that the Communist Party says “may disrupt social harmony.” So if Hollywood wants to get into what is becoming the world’s biggest movie market, they must either censor themselves or get censored by the SAPPRFT (State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television of the People’s Republic of China). But unfortunately, this is more about making sure that the Chinese people don’t see any movies that don’t “practice core socialist values.” This is also part of a concerted effort by the CCP to control what comes out of Hollywood—and the way Americans and the rest of the

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARVEL STUDIOS

PHOTO COURTESY OF CENTROPOLIS ENTERTAINMENT

world think about China. When Angelina Jolie was promoting Maleficent in Shanghai, she got a question from a reporter about her favorite Chinese director. She named Life of Pi and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon director Ang Lee and then said: “I don’t know if you would consider Ang Lee Chinese though, he’s Taiwanese.” This statement made the CCP angry because she implied that Taiwan was a separate entity from China (even though it has its own government, currency and Olympic team). Users on the Chinese version of Facebook, Weibo, called her a “deranged Taiwan independence supporter.” Disney was worried that this would hurt the film’s chances in China and they made Jolie apologize to the Chinese for “hurting their feelings.” Maleficent soon went on to make nearly $50 million from Chinese audiences alone. But it’s not just celebrities who need to be careful now. Everyone needs to be careful too because there is a pretty good chance that the next blockbuster you watch will have been changed to appease the CCP. Here are five Hollywood movies that have already done so.

The same Chinese company that also owns the biggest theater chain in the world, Wanda Cinemas, which has most of its locations in Asia. The Great Wall may have given the Chinese government the soft power movie they crave, but look on the bright side, at least they gave Matt Damon back.

5. The Great Wall (2017) In the film set 1,000 years in the past, Matt Damon’s character saves China from monsters. But there is more to the story than the average white savior narrative. The film is produced by legendary entertainment honchos: the studio that brought you Godzilla, Jurassic World and Warcraft amongst other big blockbusters. It’s an American company, but it was bought last year by the Dalian Wanda group.

4. Iron Man 3 (2013) When the main villain of your film is based off of an offensive Chinese stereotype, you could understand why the CCP would want that changed. But Iron Man 3 takes it a step further. In the Chinese version, they added a four minute scene featuring famous Chinese actors Fan BingBing and Wang Xueqi as the doctors that save Tony Stark’s life. Not to mention the frequent product placement of Chinese only products like Yili Milk. The Chinese have milk products in pouches similar to juice boxes. Disney also partnered with Beijing-based studio DMG Entertainment over the production of the film, which not only helped Iron Man 3 break past the 34 foreign film limit, it also meant that Disney got a bigger share of the profits. Forty percent instead of the usual 25 percent. That’s because the Chinese government normally gives film studios only 25 percent of the box office revenue made in China. Actor Robert Downey Jr. also said on a press tour in Beijing to reporters: “I’m interested in all things Chinese, and I live a very Chinese life in America.” By which I can only assume he means working for $5 dollars a day, dealing with corrupt local officials and staying away from political issues to avoid having his organs harvested.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF PARAMOUNT PICTURES

3. Independence Day: Resurgence (2016) Question: how do you make the sequel to the highest grossing film of 1996 a hit in a country it was never shown in? Step 1: Get rid of the whole America saves the world thing. Instead, why not have America team up with China to save the world together as part of the Earth Space Defense to defeat the Aliens? Step 2: Throw in famous Hong Kong pop star Angelababy. Step 3: Don’t forget to promote Moon Milk, a competitor to the Yili Milk from Iron Man 3. In fact, Independence Day: Resurgence had so much Chinese product placement that Chinese state run media The Global Times made fun of it for that. On the plus side, this level of teamwork got the movie a same day release date in China as the U.S., which is pretty rare because there is usually a long censorship process involved. Fortunately, they just made censorship part of the script writing.

2. World War Z (2013) The great thing about this movie is that even if you read the book, it will still seem fresh. That is because it’s an entirely different story. Spoilers for the book: The zombie virus that sweeps the world begins in China because it is spread through the Chinese military black market organ trade. Now spoilers for the film: There is none because none of that happens. In fact, nothing in the book happens in the film because the book was banned in China. It was all changed in the hopes of getting a Chinese release, which they didn’t even get. Plus, the Chinese regime has

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had problems with Brad Pitt (going so far as to ban him from China) ever since he was in the film Seven Years in Tibet, which is about The Dalai Lama and the persecution the Tibetan Buddhists faced under the Communist party.

1. Transformers: Age of Extinction (2014) It’s not just the toys that are made in China. Transformers: Age of Extinction was a co-production between Paramount Pictures, Chinese company Jiaflix Enterprises and state run newscaster and Communist Party mouthpiece China Central Television. That means that the Chinese Communist Party was directly involved in the making of the film. And, if you look closely, you might be able to make out their fingerprints on it. For instance, the villain of the film is the American government, specifically the CIA. One U.S. authority puts a gun to the hero’s (Mark Wahlberg) daughter’s head to get him to reveal information on the whereabouts of Optimus Prime. As an op-ed writer from popular entertainment magazine Variety wrote: “My first reaction to Age of Extinction was that it was an astonishingly unpatriotic film. But I was wrong….It’s just Chinese patriotism on the screen, not American.” And what did Paramount Pictures and filmmakers get for teaming up with the Chinese government to essentially make anti-American propaganda? More than $300 million dollars surpassing China’s previous top grossing movie Avatar. Paramount must have really enjoyed the experience working with the Chinese regime, because the Dalian Wanda Group wants to buy a 50 percent stake of Paramount Pictures.

MDC The Reporter


MARCH 21, 2017 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

// A&E Riane Roldan, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-7140 

Movie Review

// 

B riane.roldan001@mymdc.net

Logan’s Last Bloody Stand

‰‰ Released on March 3 with a more than $127 million budget, Logan chronicles Wolverine’s final chapter in the epic X-Men series that fans all across the world know and love. By Ciro Salcedo ciro.salcedo001@mymdc.net As trailers for Logan started premiering all across the internet, people have universally compared it to The Last of Us, Naughty Dog’s critically lauded game from back in 2013. The comparison is simple. A bearded, grizzled man treks a desolate future with a task to escort a young girl out to a sanctuary. My initial comparisons were to a different video game, for different reasons. Namely, Hideo Kojima’s Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots and Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. Both games are a sort of goodbye for their respective heroes. A discharge, after more than a decade of service. Both also feature older, hairy men completing one last mission. That was the impression for most from the trailers. After watching it, my reactions were the same. This isn’t a whimper of a goodbye for Hugh Jackman’s signature role. It’s a bang. A bloody, violent bang. It takes no prisoners, leaves no survivors and shatters

all expectations. Shatters them in the very best way, exceeding whatever hype we could ever have for a solo Wolverine film. In our current state of blockbuster fatigue, Logan stands above them. It never comes off as a superhero movie. Instead, it’s an edgy, almost western-like thriller. There’s no advertising for fifty other films in the series, no constant callbacks to the X-Men films before, no magical macguffin that comes into play because a villain in another movie needs it. There is none of that. Instead, it gives its viewers something different. It gives them a movie. Just one movie. One that makes you forget about the other overly dramatic, CGI-filled messes that Marvel and DC constantly put out. Logan (Jackman), through a series of violent events, takes a road trip to deliver a young mutant named Laura (Dafne Keen) to safe place for other mutants. Now ageing greatly, him and long-time friend Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) must come to terms with the impending doom that awaits them in their advanced ages. There’s a different tone to the film than to others in the series. Director James Mangold has taken cues from westerns like Shane and The Cowboys, both visually and thematically. All of it feels very

PHOTO COURTESY OF DONNERS' COMPANY

Empire of Dirt: A much needed break from the overly dramatic, CGIfilled messes exhausted by Marvel and DC Comics, Logan is the violent, graceful and unforgettable end to a series that fans (and Wolverine) rightfully deserve.

understated, even in moments of extreme violence, which is plenty in this film. Logan earns its R-rating, and takes advantage of that. Arms are chopped off, people are decapitated and wounds heal in graphic detail. It’s unflinching and brutal, with an underlying lesson that life is short. It maintains the value that old westerns had—that even honor and truth come at a price. And that in the most grim of moments, hope has to be seeked out. It’s the most human that a film about mutants and super powered men can be. Logan elevates the superhero genre. Instead of being confined to a PG-13 rating, the claws come out and give everything they possibly could until the end credits roll. This is the Wolverine movie not only fans deserve, but one that moviegoers who want subtlety and grace in their genre films deserve too. This is the end of a 17-year old journey, one that leaves the future wide open for a new generation of hopeful audiences. Simply put, it’s one of the greatest, bloodiest and most sentimental comic book movies to be released echoing everything from The Dark Knight to Mangold’s own 3:10 to Yuma. Get some rest Logan, you’ve earned it.

Video Games

A New Era Of Nintendo Begins

‰‰ With the arrival of Nintendo’s latest gaming system, the Nintendo Switch, and the 19th The Legend of Zelda game, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, it’s safe to say that Nintendo’s latest gadgets are changing the video game world one click and level up at a time. By Alexandra Camargo alexandra.camargo002@mymdc.net

On March 3 the Nintendo Switch, the new console produced by Nintendo, was released and a new addition to the Legend of Zelda series was also unleashed: Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. The Switch and the game caused major discussion for months and now that both have arrived players are finally able to see what all the fuss is about. Nintendo Switch: The Nintendo Switch is Nintendo’s new console that can be played at home and on the go. The console itself is a battery-powered tablet that has an LCD screen that is about 6.2 inches wide and weighs about 10.48 ounces. The tablet is touch screen, with an audio jack for headphones as well as speakers. Although the LCD screen is beautiful, dropping the console might prove disastrous. The console also includes two left and right Joy-Con controllers, which can be removed from the console itself to play multiplayer games with friends. The right Joy-Con controller has an near www.mdcthereporter.com

field communication reader, which allows players to use Nintendo’s Amiibos with certain games. The reader is directly under the thumb-stick and is easy to use. However, the left controller has been known to cause some problems with its sensor bar. When the sensor bar is being covered it tends to remove the player from the game but then reappears once the sensor has been uncovered. Most electronic devices are known to have small glitches upon release. These problems may be annoying, but at least the console has no reports of exploding or causing serious harm. At the moment, the console has yet to have online multiplayer features. Players are able to add their friends but are not able to interact with them. There are reports that the console will later have the option for players to play with friends online and have voice chat. Along with being able to interact with friends, there will also be a monthly classic game giveaway within the Nintendo eShop. These are just a few of the exciting upcoming features for the Nintendo Switch.

PHOTO COURTESY OF Nintendo

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Reaches of Hyrule: A sandbox game full of mystery and adventure, there is plenty in Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild to be explored. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is an action-adventure game that was developed and published by Nintendo. This is the 19th game within The Legend of Zelda series and it is like no other. The story takes place in Hyrule and follows the famous hero Link, who awakens from a 100 year slumber to a mysterious voice that guides him to defeat Calamity Ganon. Link must explore his surroundings to complete trials which reward him with skills that help him defeat his enemies. Nintendo has stepped out of the box with their new game. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild has an open world environment that is much larger than any other Legend of @mdcthereporter

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Zelda game. Not only is the world much larger, players are also able to use the environment to help make food and materials to survive its changing environment. Players are also able to explore the world and find a variety of shrines that contain clever and interesting puzzles. Each shrine also has some treasure. Once completed, the player receives a spirit orb which can be combined with three others in order to expand their stamina or add an extra heart to the player’s life. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild has definitely been a game-changer for the series. With its new features, players are now able to explore the world of Legend of Zelda in a whole new way.


14 FORUM | MARCH 21, 2017

THE REPORTER

Politics

Town Halls Came To Miami, But Where Were All The Young People? ‰‰ Gabriel Exposito observes the lack of youth participation in recent local town hall meetings and emphasizes the importance of encouraging political efficacy among college students.

GABRIEL EXPOSITO \ THE REPORTER

By Gabriel Exposito gabriel.exposito001@mymdc.net In recent weeks, members of Congress have been holding town halls—a local meeting with their constituents—throughout the nation in order to address the concerns of citizens regarding immigration reform, the Russian interference on the 2016 election, and the then-unknown Obamacare replacement plan. Local South Florida representatives have not followed the trend of other senators and representatives

Here For A Meeting: Local Republican and Democratic residents demand meeting with Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Leihtenen in front of her office on Feb. 22. by skipping on some locally organized town halls. On Feb. 22, dozens of activists gathered outside congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen’s office demanding a meeting with the congresswoman. Amongst them was 25-year-old FIU student Tomas Kennedy, who said he wanted to see the Congresswoman RosLehtinen take “stronger positions

on healthcare and immigration.” Later in the evening, I met with Ileana Ros-Lehtinen’s chief of staff Maytee Sanz, who insisted that the congresswoman, despite being busy meeting with other constituents at the moment, was in favor of “comprehensive immigration reform” as well as maintaining support for the DREAM act, which prevented people who arrived to

Femininity

How Femininity In Men Is Perceived ‰‰ Katherine Wallace-Fernandez explores why many men still don’t have a feminine woman role model because of societal pressures to be masculine and rough.

By Katherine Wallace-Fernandez katherine.wallace001@mymdc.net In an interview with Fresh Air’s Terry Gross, actress Meryl Streep shared that it wasn’t until she played a tough and cold hearted boss in The Devil Wears Prada that she ever had a man tell her he empathized and related to one of her characters. Streep has played a plentiful selection of characters from Sophie Zawistowski in Sophie’s Choice to Julia Child in Julie & Julia, and it would be difficult to find a woman who doesn’t relate or look up to at least one of her characters. Mostly because women are allowed the luxury of being a hyperfeminine damsel in distress, a tomboy, a femme fatale or anything in between or not. Men, on the other hand, are shamed into a small mindset that only allows them to be dominant, tough-skinned and heroic to achieve masculinity. They may admire women if they share the same traits, but if women portray opposite traits such as being submissive and gentle, men must look at them as someone they desire to have. There are men, who are not interested in masculine characteristics, who have escaped this small mindset and explored their

feminine side. They admire women like Elle Woods in Legally Blonde, understand the Spice Girl’s stance on “girl power,” and appreciated photographer Petra Collins’ girly aesthetic and portrayal of girlhood. Women have fought to reclaim feminine behaviors and ideas such as the housewife, makeup, and the color pink can be powerful symbols for themselves, but men face a different challenge before they can embrace being feminine. They must overcome the fear of being “girly” in a gender that is known for throwing around terms such as “real man” and “boys don’t cry.” Gay communities even have their own, more obvious phrases to show their preference of masculinity like “masc4masc.” Fortunately, there are men who exist today who are able to explore and show the power of male femininity. Author Diriye Osman wore a dress on the cover of his book Fairy Tales for Lost Children—a short story collection narrated by gay Somalis as they learn about their own identities—and shared on VICE’s website that he felt empowered when he wore the dress. Designer Marc Jacobs, who is also known to have worn dresses, has used the used term “#malepolish” on social media pictures of his own painted fingernails and even created unisex beauty products described as “boy tested, girl approved.” Another designer, Kenneth Nicholson, creates apparel that not only touches on the subject of gender boundaries, but also expands the limit on the options in men’s clothing with silhouettes consisting of mostly flowing tunics and bell bottoms. Photographer Tyler Udall challenges the expected modern traits of men in pictures of young men being portrayed as vulnerable and intimate in his project, Auguries of Innocence. Even though these men exist to show feminine traits in men can be celebrated, it will be a long and complex journey before most men can view femininity as admirable.

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the United States illegally as minors from being deported during the Obama administration. The following day, a second town hall meant for senator Marco Rubio to attend was hosted at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Miami by local political organization Indivisible Miami. Local officials attending the town hall included South Miami mayor Philip K. Stoddard and Miami Beach Commissioner and speech professor at Kendall Campus Kristen Rosen Gonzalez, who alongside an anxious crowd, condemned Senator Rubio’s absence from the event. Aside from being strongly displeased with Senator Rubio’s absence, the residents who attended still voiced their concerns with the hopes that the Senator will come across them. Not only were the concerns at this town hall similar to those raised just the day before at congresswoman Ros-Lehtinen’s office, but the demographics of the events closely mirrored each other; aside from a handful of young people, the crowds were mostly composed of Generation Xers and Baby Boomers, a distinct contrast from the anti-Trump marches in downtown Miami following the

2016 election results. Town halls are important events where public policy is debated between representatives and their constituents. The lack of young people present in said events is not only detrimental to our interests but it also severely undermines our voices. According to the Pew Research Center, voters under 30 now rival baby boomers at the voting booth being roughly 31 percent of the electorate, yet the lack of political efficacy from young people in crucial moments such as town halls makes representation of young people disproportionate. It is no surprise then that the topics addressed in both town halls focused primarily on healthcare—something senior citizens are especially concerned about— while higher education, the DREAM act, and DACA were mentioned less frequently. If you are a young voter who feels disenfranchised by current politics, I would like to leave you with the words of Gonzalez: “If you are an immigrant or you know anybody who is an immigrant or you know anybody who is undocumented, now is the time for all of you to become active.”

DISCRIMINATION

The Unfair Slight Toward Blacks At Award Shows ‰‰ Vanny Veras writes about how several black artists have unfairly failed to win Grammy and Academy Awards because of their controversial race related pieces.

By Vanny Veras vanny.veras002@mymdc.net As heartbreaking as Beyoncé's Grammy snub was, it was, sadly, completely expected. For years, artists of color have been the recipients of slights in the entertainment industry, especially when their contributions are related to controversial issues such as race or sexuality, and are polemic in nature. Just last year, Kendrick Lamar, after receiving 11 nominations for his album To Pimp A Butterfly, a deeply moving and socially conscious piece, lost to Taylor Swift in the album of the year category for her album 1989. When one album is juxtaposed with the other, it’s very clear that the Grammy’s just went with the more marketable, “safer” album. Another instance was in 1990 with what many call one of the biggest snubs of the history of the Academy Awards. Spike Lee’s culturally significant piece Do the Right Thing, which focuses on racial issues boiling over in a Brooklyn neighborhood, was

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looked over for Driving Miss Daisy, another racial piece but with a much more idealistically amicable ending. Do the Right Thing, a film that unequivocally still strongly resonates with modernday society, didn't receive the accolades it deserved, and Beyoncé's Lemonade album has unfortunately joined the ranks. The album was an intimate portrayal of a black woman dealing with the turbulent emotions evoked by the betrayal of her partner. The visual album was groundbreaking in itself with poignant and powerful imagery, heavily symbolic and filled with allusions to race, sadness, betrayal and female, more specifically, black female power. Its inclusion of the mothers of victims of police brutality such as Trayvon Martin was meant as recognition of the pain and plight of the black community concerning police violence. The album as a whole was deeply moving and so important to our community. The world literally stopped when Beyoncé dropped that album. Yet it didn't win. Adele's almost two-year-old album 25 won instead, a win that even Adele felt was unfair. "But I can’t possibly accept this award," Adele tearfully stated during her acceptance speech. "And I’m very humbled and grateful and gracious but the artist of my life is Beyoncé. And this album for me, the Lemonade album, was so monumental and so well thought out and so beautiful and soul bearing.” This year’s Academy Award was highlighted with the groundbreaking best picture win for the movie Moonlight, in a fairytale-esque twist where the wrong winner had been mistakenly called. The win for this all-black cast, LGBTQ film has left many asking if this will be a whole new chapter for minorities in the entertainment industry. Many are too cynical to hope after years of disillusionment, but it is a nice possibility.

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MDC The Reporter


MARCH 21, 2017 | FORUM

THE REPORTER

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// FORUM Adriana Falero, Forum Editor  // 

T (305) 237-1254 

// 

B adriana.falero001@mymdc.net

Anxiety

Advice To Ace Exams And Overcome Anxiety ‰‰ Now that midterms are over, Matthew Garcia shares his advice on effectively preparing for final exams and eliminating test anxiety.

is remaining confident and never letting anxiety get the better of me. Tests are supposed to be a challenge. Worrying about how difficult it may or may not be is only going to make things harder on yourself. If you studied and you

understand the material, then trust in your ability to do well. I guess this is the main reason I was never too keen on studying a whole lot. I always trusted myself to at least do well enough to pass. Obviously, you should always look to do better instead of settling

By Matthew Garcia matthew.garcia010@mymdc. net Let’s face it, stress and anxiety are part of our lives. But there are certain times each semester when they are at an all-time high for a lot of students including myself, that is, midterm and final exam seasons. Historically, I have never been big on studying for long periods of time because I either lose focus after a while or feel like I know enough to do well. Not the best strategy when it comes to test taking, so I do not recommend anybody follow my example and not prepare for tests properly. With that said, one thing I do excel at during these times of testing

JONATHAN MUNOZ \ THE REPORTER

for above average. Therefore, try to find a healthy balance between studying when testing time is back and minimizing stress and anxiety. You definitely should not study for hours on end. That serves to exhaust your mind and you are likely to forget most of what you covered because you were mentally exhausted halfway through that study session. The most effective way to prepare for finals would be to study for a couple hours a day. Set those two hours to fit into your schedule leading up to your exam days so that you have time to prepare. Do not wait for the last minute to study. Speaking from experience, bad things happen every time you do this. Avoid it at all costs. Mix up your studying pattern as well. Quiz yourself some days, make flash cards, meet up with friends in study groups, or just find online practice tests. The more practice you get with the material you need to know, the more it becomes second nature to you and once it hits that point, you will excel at your test. It might be time I take my own advice on studying because tests are challenging, and I do not want my anxiety to make it that much more difficult to focus on my next test.

Help

How Helping Others Will Benefit Yourself Too ‰‰ Claudia Hernández-Ortiz encourages students to help others to improve their lives and simultaneously enjoy other benefits like personal gratification.

By Claudia Hernández-Ortiz claudia.hernandez047@mymdc. net When was the last time you helped someone and immediately noticed how that person’s day and your day became better? I’m confident that when you recall that moment, a feeling of happiness and satisfaction rises up to your soul and just makes you feel wonderful. This happens because when you support others, the beneficiaries of your thoughtfulness are not the only ones receiving the rewards. There is a huge number of advantages in it for you, as well. We are lucky to be part of a college that gives us the opportunity to share experiences with people

of different cultures and different social classes. In other words, it opens our eyes to the real world. We have to become aware of this to become interested and help others who might not have the same privileges as we do. It is very true that our main focus during our college years should be to study and work hard to graduate. However, even when time seems to be shrinking as our courses advance, we must never stop searching for ways to help others. Despite the notion that donating to charities is one of the most common ways of helping, it is not the only option. Volunteering in service activities, taking time to explain something to classmates when they don’t understand, or even just helping someone who doesn’t have many friends by talking to them and getting to know them, are other positive and more personal ways of helping. For me, my favorite way of helping others is by listening to them. Nowadays, it seems people struggle a lot with meeting someone who is willing to give advice without judgement or trying to impose themselves in the situation. This is why I listen and try to give my best opinion with the only intention of helping them to improve the situation they are going through. I have noticed

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throughout time that I have benefited my mind and heart by doing this. For instance, I have learned to let people make their own choices even if they are not following my advice because it is their lives, being aware that I am only the main character of my life. Additionally, as a result of growing up and preparing ourselves to be professional adults in the real world, during our college years is when we start developing a mature character. Adequately, the act of helping will make you a more sympathetic, noble and kindhearted person. Plus, according to the National Institutes of Health,

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by helping other people, you radiate constructive vibes which improves friendships. Thus, help others and, when you’re done, try and help a little more. It’s not only beneficial to your well-being, but life will treat you better in the future as a reward. Nevertheless, don’t help just to expect something in return; it is an action that has to come from the goodness and kindness of your heart. Be a helping hand to someone and always encourage collaboration and compassion, like I hope I did for you by writing this.

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The Reporter Volume 7 Issue 12  
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