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Mediocre Roar The Reporter’s Alexzandria Windley critiques the 2019 Lion King remake’s use of 3D animation and misguided acting amid box office excitement.

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Training Wheels FORUM

The MDC volleyball team starts the season with a freshman-laden squad as it attempts to qualify for its fourth straight national championship game.

A&E

North Campus offers a Florida Cannabis Policy and Regulation class this fall, laying the foundation for a medical marijuana certificate program.

Lady Sharks SPORTS

NEWS

Cannabis Class

Forum editor Alexa Hernández discusses the many routes students can take to jumpstart their future careers while still attending college.

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May your coffee be

stronger than your Monday!

4VOL. 8, ISSUE 2 —1SEPTEMBER 4VOL. 10, ISSUE — AUGUST 26, 2017 2019

TWO-TIME NATIONAL PACEMAKER AWARD WINNER

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RODICIO

Last Candidate Standing In Presidential Search—For Now. ‰‰ When Miami Dade College’s hunt for a new president was discarded this past July after a five-month search, the College’s Provost Lenore Rodicio was left as the only remaining candidate. The Board of Trustees will meet on Aug. 29 at Wolfson Campus to decide how the search will continue. By Heidi Perez-Moreno heidi.perez003@mymdc.net Who is Lenore Rodicio? “I am not Eduardo Padrón,” Rodicio emphatically told the Board of Trustees during her finalist interview on July 24, minutes before they rebooted the fivemonth presidential search process, temporarily leaving her as the lone candidate. Miami Dade College’s provost continued: “I’ve had the honor of working with him and seeing what he has built at this institution and the legacy

that he’s left behind. I don’t think there is anyone in this room that can argue that he has built a remarkable institution over the past 25 years… if I am so honored to be your next president, I would honor that legacy of innovation. But there are a lot of things I would do differently.” Others aren’t so sure. Trustee Marcell Felipe seemed skeptical when he questioned her during her Board interview. “How would you balance following in the footsteps of such a great leader while maintaining your own independence and TURN TO RODICIO PAGE 6

PHOTO COURTESY OF CYNTHIA VAISMAN / KENDALL CAMPUS MEDIA SERVICES

EXPANSION

Medical Campus Unveils Center For Learning, Innovation And Simulation ‰‰ The five-story, 132,000-square foot healthcare facility trains students using state-of-the-art equipment, focusing on hands-on experience that emulates the working conditions of a hospital. The $56 million complex features a simulation hospital, patient rooms, a home health apartment, examination rooms, a conference center and lecture halls. By Adriana Dos Santos adriana.dossantos002@mymdc.net Sirens blare at Medical Campus. Behind a glass door is a white, automated ambulance; its red and blue lights and movements are controlled by student paramedics and medical professors.

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The ambulance, one of 15 medical simulation rooms, is located on the third floor of the campus’ new Center for Learning, Innovation and Simulation—a five-story, 132,000-square foot healthcare facility designed to train medical students with realistic, hands-on scenarios. It features a simulation hospital housed on the third floor, 15 patient rooms, a home health apartment, ten examination rooms, four student break rooms and a physical therapy facility. West of the building is a new six-story parking garage that fits up to 1,554 vehicles. “The center provides a critical setting in which students can gain experience and make mistakes,” said nursing professor Marie Etienne. “It allows students to learn how to use critical thinking to solve problems

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where they don’t feel threatened by real consequences.” The $56 million facility comes equipped with $2.3 million worth of state-of-the-art medical technology—mannequins capable of giving birth, shedding tears, responding to medicine and speaking 50 languages. In addition, the building has a conference center and lecture hall for speakers, classroom space and events. It was unveiled on July 16, but officially opened its doors this fall. “Our professors now have an invaluable variety of resources that will help us log many more hours of practice on mannequins,” said Kele Ferriera, a student of the physician assistant program. “That will give us an advantage [when] we need to start our clinical practice.”

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A&E

The facility will serve as a practice space for aspiring medical practitioners. Victoria, an $80,000 silicone mannequin, is capable of giving birth. Her distressed moans and cries help simulate real-world birthing scenarios as part of the curriculum. After birth, students care for the infant in a nursery near Victoria’s bed. The baby cries, responds to treatment and requires routine medical attention from staff. Its functions are controlled by students in an adjacent room behind a frosted glass window. Many of the rooms are equipped with live recording cameras for classes to analyze how a procedure unfolded and to correct mistakes. “The new center helps [Miami Dade TURN TO EXPANSION PAGE 4

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THE REPORTER Reporter Alumna Lands Internship At Bloomberg

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Metromorphosis Gets New Literary Advisor Wolfson Campus English professor Ariel Gonzalez will serve as the new faculty advisor to Metromorphosis, the literary arts magazine at Wolfson Campus, for the 2019-20 school year. Metromorphosis, which publishes annually, features a widerange of creative works from Wolfson Campus GONZALEZ students such as poetry, prose and artwork. “If you want to express yourself, this is the place for you,” Gonzalez said. “[It provides] an insight into how writing works.” Gonzalez, who has worked at the College since 2007, will oversee the publication and serve as a mentor to student writers. He has published over 200 essays and book reviews in the Miami Herald, The Washington Post, HuffPost and Poder magazine, and interviewed novelists for Topical Currents, a now-defunct WLRN call-in program. —Danelis Olivera-Herrera

Military Scholarship Available To Students The Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant is currently available to students whose parent or guardian has died as a result of military service in Iraq or Afghanistan after the Sept. 11 attacks. Applicants must have been younger than 24, or enrolled in a postsecondary institution at the time of their parent or guardian’s death. They must also fill out a Federal Application for Federal Student Aid form. They are accepting applications on a rolling basis. Awards vary based on financial need. For more information, contact your respective campus’ financial aid office, or visit: studentaid.ed.gov/sa/ t y p e s /g r a n t s - s c h o l a r s h i p s / iraq-afghanistan-service —Patrick C. Gross

For more information, contact: Ariel Gonzalez T(305) 237-3641 agonzal2@mdc.edu

Wolfson Campus Graduate Receives Hidden Hero Award

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ANDREW GOODMAN FOUNDATION

Rebecca Diaz, an alumna of The Honors College at Wolfson Campus, was one of five Andrew Goodman Foundation Ambassadors to receive the 2019 Hidden Hero award. Diaz, 20, was selected for the award based on her ongoing service with the Andrew Goodman Foundation, and her efforts to ensure voting

rights in her local community. In September of 2018, Diaz and several student representatives from Miami Dade College obtained early voting sites at North and Kendall Campus, paving the way for more than 11,000 people to vote at these locations. “Winning this award validated the efforts that I’ve made toward my community,” Diaz said. “It represented how much Miami Dade College helped me grow.” Diaz received the award during the National Civic Leadership Training Summit at Montclair State University on July 22. She will attend the University of Florida in the fall in pursuit of a double bachelor’s degree in English and sociology. —Roxy Garcia

Reporter EIC Selected For The Chronicle of Higher Education’s 2019 Fall Reporting Workshop

LOGO COURTESY OF SCHOLARSHIP AMERICA

Scholarship Available For Families Of 9/11 Victims The Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund is providing financial assistance to children and dependents of those killed or permanently injured as a result of the 9/11 attacks. Eligible applicants include dependent children, spouses or domestic partners of victims, such as airplane passengers, World Trade Center and Pentagon workers and visitors, emergency medical and law enforcement personnel. The need-based scholarship is available to students born prior to Sept. 30, 2008, and must be enrolled in a post-secondary program prior or upon turning 24. Recipients may receive funds for up to four consecutive years, varying on total funding available. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis at www.familiesoffreedom.org/apply/.

Maria Elena Vizcaíno, who served as editor-in-chief of The Reporter during the 201617 school year, has landed a reporting internship at Bloomberg, a national business publication. Vizcaíno, 22, will begin the 12-week paid internship on Sept. 3. She will cover Latin American economies in their New York bureau. “I think learning how Bloomberg covers markets and other aspects of foreign economies will be transferable skills for other opportunities that may arise afterwards,” Vizcaíno said. During Vizcaíno’s time as editor-in-chief at The Reporter, she won first-place for inVIZCAÍNO depth reporting at the Florida College System Activities Association for a story centered around a student who was killed by her father in a murder-suicide. Vizcaíno served as a breaking news intern at The Dallas Morning News this summer, and has previously interned at the Orlando Sentinel. She served as the director of enterprise of The Daily Tar Heel, the student newspaper at The University of Chapel Hill at North Carolina, before graduating in May with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. —Alexa Hernández

Design Thinking Workshop At The Idea Center The Idea Center, 315 N.E. 2nd Ave., will present a five-session cognitive workshop entitled Designing for Change: Aiming for Sustainable Communities starting on Sept. 28 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in building 8, fifth floor. There will be additional sessions on Oct. 12 and 15 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and Oct. 19 and 24 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The workshop, led by Venture Hive director Megan Conyers, will teach participants to idenLOGO COURTESY OF THE IDEA CENTER tify challenges and craft solutions using design thinking methodology in order to create meaningful products. Tickets are available for $300 at: www.eventbrite.com/e/designing-for-change-aiming-for-sustainable-communities-tickets64624877749?aff=workshopspage. Miami Dade College students and faculty are encouraged to contact Miriam Kohel, academic coordinator at The Idea Center, at (305) 2377868 or at mkohelze@mdc.eduto to receive a discounted rate on tickets. —Adriana Dos Santos

For more information, contact: The Idea Center T(305) 237-7890 ideacenter@mdc.edu

Reporter Staff Writer Lands Position At América TeVé

Perez-Moreno said. Perez-Moreno, 19, is a Wolfson Campus student in The Honors College studying journalism. In addition to serving as editor-in-chief, she serves as briefing editor and social media director for The Reporter.

The United States Census Bureau is currently recruiting individuals for multiple positions that center around collecting demographic information in their designated areas. Some of the available positions include: recruiting assistant, office operations supervisor, clerks, census field supervisors and census takers. Applicants must be a U.S. citizen, at least 18, be willing to work flexible hours and have access to a car and computer. They are accepting applications on a rolling basis at: https://recruitment.2020census. g o v/a t s /c a r e e r s i t e /c e n s u s . aspx?site=1&c=census

Valentina Gonzalez, who served as Wolfson Campus bureau chief of The Reporter for the 2018-19 school year, has landed a part-time position with América TeVé, a Hispanic television station. Gonzalez, 21, began working for the station’s archives desk in July. She pitches, assigns and edits multimedia content. Gonzalez served as a news assignment intern at the station for the past six months, where she pitched and wrote stories. “Coming from Colombia, I wanted to work for a Hispanic TV station,” Gonzalez said. “Thanks to my effort and work at [The Reporter], I was able to get GONZALEZ this opportunity.” As Wolfson Campus Bureau Chief, Gonzalez oversaw The Reporter’s distribution schedule at the campus. She also served as a columnist and staff writer for the paper. She is expected to graduate from Miami Dade College in December with an associate in art’s degree in mass communications.

—Alina Halley

—Camille Fontix

—Adriana Dos Santos

PEREZ-MORENO

Heidi Perez-Moreno, who currently serves as editor-inchief of The Reporter, has been selected to participate in The Chronicle of Higher Education’s 2019 Fall Reporting Workshop. The two-day workshop will take place in Washington, D.C. from Oct. 17-18. Student journalists, selected from a national pool, will learn how to cover higher education and navigate public records alongside mentors at The Chronicle of Higher Education. Last year’s inaugural class included 12 students. “I’m excited to work with other students and learn from journalists with so much experience in higher education,”

—Alina Halley

U.S. Census Bureau Recruiting Census Takers

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Glimpses Of Haiti: West Campus is hosting the Fred Thomas exhibition, Relevance, in Room 1105. The collection features Haitian culture using vibrant colors and patterns. It's open until Sept. 27.

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Living Color: Freedom of the Mind is an art piece made by Haitian born artist Fred Thomas. It's featured at the West Campus Art Gallery through Sept. 27 as Thomas' exhibition Relevance.

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Save the Planet: Kendall Campus alum Danilo De La Torre presents his environmental conversation art project on behalf of his team during the North Campus Student Changemaking Summit on July 19. They created a solar panel and windmill generator out of jelly beans, cardboard, wooden sticks and a plastic cup.

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Shifting Gears: High School student René Rodriguez tinkers with team-made remote-control car at the 6-Week Robotics Summer Camp Competition at the 4000 building breezeway at North Campus on July 26.

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Medical Campus Expands With New Building FROM EXPANSION, FRONT

College] catapult into the most current technology and be competitive with other educational institutions,” said nursing professor Barbara Soto. “It will provide state-of-the-art technology simulation capacity for multidisciplinary use.” Planning for the new building began in 2010. Stewart and Design Enterprise Firm manager Kahler Slater traveled to several medical centers across the country to compare simulation hospital models. Students, faculty and neighboring health district partners were included in the Center for

Innovation, Learning and Simulation’s advisory committee to access what was needed. “Miami Dade College is intentional in that we rely on our advisor committee,” Stewart said. “We engage with them. They are more than just a checkbox.” Obrascón Huarte Lain, S.A. began construction in early 2017. The building is the start of an ongoing project to redesign Medical Campus, building-by-building. Renovation plans will commence in the fall for the campus’ learning resources, computer courtyard and café. “The building is 100% for the students,” Stewart said.

The new building will also be used to provide customized training for various South Florida hospitals to keep their medical staff updated on current practices. Medical Campus provided tours of the building on the first day of the fall term to faculty and students. “I’m really excited because Miami Dade College is truly invested in our students and has continued to give us the funding necessary to stay on top of the new world and the changes in the nation,” Etienne said. “We’re excited for the fall, as we are sure students will have a great learning experience.”

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Lets Talk: The new building houses a 150-seat lecture hall equipped with rotating chairs, built-in outlets, projectors and plexiglass boards.

Rock-A-Bye Baby: A baby mannequin rests in a nursery adjacent to Victoria, its $80,000 mother. It cries, responds to treatment and requires routine care from student nurses.

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Medical Marvel: Medical Campus unveiled the Center for Learning, Innovation and Simulation during an inauguration ceremony on July 16. The facility opened to the public at the start of the fall semester. www.mdcthereporter.com

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6 NEWS | AUGUST 26, 2019

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Catholic Chemist At Forefront Of MDC Presidential Search FROM RODICIO, FRONT

voice,” Felipe asked. “Not simply a successor that will answer to a former president rather than a board.” She was the only candidate asked that question, one of many that remain as MDC looks to replace Padrón, who has led the College for the past 25 years. Board member Michael Bileca believes the College tried catching a big fish in a small pond during the initial search. He pushed to broaden the search pool. “There was a candidate that was a step above, or a couple steps above the rest of the candidate pool,” Bileca said during the final deliberations in late July. “My concern has been the pool. We fished in a narrow pond. My questions went more to metrics today, ‘How many students? What is the completion rate? How many people were you managing?’ We heard vastly different interpretations of what a budget is. When you boil it all down, we’re looking at some student populations that are a tenth of our current college. Smaller than most of our individual campuses. We weren’t interviewing for a campus president, we’re interviewing for a president of a system that is the top performing system in the country.” Felipe and Bileca did not respond to a request for an interview from The Reporter for this story. Is Rodicio a safety blanket to an institution that has seen incredibly rare continuity under Padrón’s leadership? “They feel safe. Some people have been working here for 30, 40, 15, 20 years and they’ve built something,” said Miami Animation & Gaming International Complex Department Chairperson Mauricio Ferreza. “Dr. Rodicio represents keeping what they’ve built and moving forward.” Jay Lemons, president of the headhunting firm Academic Search, understands such logic. “When you have an extraordinary leader like Eduardo J. Padròn who has served [MDC] extraordinarily well and really has had an impact on the national higher education environment, there is

a lot of belief in furthering that vision,” Lemons said. “It’s easy for me to understand how a campus community would be inclined to want to see continuity rather than change. So perhaps it’s the case that the internal community views the internal candidate in that light.”

The Lone Finalist Rodicio, a devout Catholic who attends St. Mary Cathedral in Little Haiti, is deeply ingrained in the community. Her husband, Sergio, is the business operations manager at the cathedral. They live in a four-bedroom old Spanish-style home in Little Havana the couple purchased in 1998. It sits less than a mile from Eduardo J. Padrón Campus. She has five children—Pio, Maria, Ana and Isabel; the youngest, Gabriela, is five years old. Rodicio was born on November 28, 1973 in Miami. Her grandparents played a large role in her upbringing. At a young age, she took a liking to making pastries and cakes, a passion she inherited from her grandfather, a baker. The pastime runs parallel with her love for science, both require many of the same ingredients—attention to detail, an ability to think analytically and methodically while remaining calm under pressure. “I might not practice chemistry on a day-to-day basis, but I’m still a scientist,” Rodicio said during her open forum presentation. Rodicio graduated from St. Brendan High School—a co-ed Roman Catholic school in Westchester—in 1991. She met Sergio at a parish youth group at St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church in 1993, according to a Florida Catholic article. In 1994, she received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Barry University. That same year, Rodicio was awarded the Board of Regents Graduate Fellowship to attend Louisiana State University. She spent five years working on her doctoral dissertation about ribosomal RNA sequencing using mass spectroscopy. The years were full of trial and error as she

PHOTO COURTESY OF CRISTIAN LAZZARI / MDC MEDIA RELATIONS

I Have Something To Say: Lenore Rodicio speaks at a Board of Trustees meeting on March 20, 2018. methodically designed and researched experiments in the lab. “She is the most determined person I’ve ever known,” said Kari B. Basso, one of Rodicio’s graduate school classmates. Rodicio was often the first person to finish her laboratory work. She also developed a penchant for performing under duress. While defending her dissertation, one of the committee members did not show up to evaluate her work; another committee member wondered aloud if the absence was a lack of belief in Rodicio’s ability. “She handled it with grace. You could tell she was flustered and nervous. It’s a high pressure situation. Someone you don’t know is challenging you,” recalled her doctoral advisor Patrick Limbach. “It struck me [because] I don’t know if I would’ve handled [it] as well if I had been in the student’s role.”

Back In Miami While in Baton Rouge, Rodicio never lost sight of her goal—returning to Miami. She called Sergio every day and made periodic trips to her hometown.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CRISTIAN LAZZARI / MDC MEDIA RELATIONS

Family Power: Lenore Rodicio receives the Outstanding Women in Education award at the 2017 In the Company of Women ceremony with her husband and children (Pictured left-to-right: Maria, Ana, Sergio, Lenore, Pio and Isabel Rodicio). www.mdcthereporter.com

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“She wanted very badly to be able to go back to Miami,” Basso said. “She loves her family and the community. She wasn’t going to leave without her Ph.D. She wasn’t going to quit.” After earning her Ph.D in 1999, Rodicio returned to Miami and married Sergio. By 2002, she had accepted adjunct positions teaching chemistry at Kendall and the then-InterAmerican Campus. She had no intentions of staying past one semester, but fell “in love with the students,” who she described as “special” and “from a wide variety of backgrounds.” That opportunity launched her 17-year career at the College. It has included roles as a professor, department chairperson, dean, project director, vice-provost and most recently—executive vicepresident and provost. As provost, Rodicio manages the College’s internal operations on a day-to-day basis. She oversees the College’s fiscal budget, facilities, academic curriculum, workforce development programs, faculty union negotiations and regularly advocates for the College in Tallahassee. “In all my years at Miami Dade College, Lenore Rodicio is the most competent and complete person I’ve ever met,” Padrón said in a reference letter to Diversified Search, the firm MDC used to find a new president. “She is the most outstanding Provost I’ve ever had, and I’ve had a number of great ones who have gone on to other college presidencies. She is the best. I used to have a Provost for Academics and a Provost for Operations—each a big job alone. She is so capable that she has both responsibilities and is doing a great job.” Rodicio routinely communicates with MDC administration, faculty and staff to provide support and academic expertise. Earlier this year, she worked alongside Ferraza to submit a grant proposal to the Aspen Institute on behalf of M.A.G.I.C. “She, for me, has been this invaluable source of information and knowledge, anything related to academics. She is very stable. Sometimes I get emotional or frustrated, and Dr. Rodicio has this very comforting personality that you can trust that she’s seeing a problem that I’m not seeing,”

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Ferraza said. “Everybody is 100 percent aware that she’s an amazing leader and provost because she understands this institution very well.”

‘Running’ The College Padrón told the presidential search firm that she, not he, has been “running MDC on a day-today basis” while he handles external projects. In recent months, she attended an international cabinet meeting in Israel and has spoken at various national conferences. When Padrón was unable to speak at a Lumina Foundation—a private foundation aimed toward increasing student enrollment nationally—meeting, he recommended Rodicio. “We didn’t know her at the time,” said Debra Humphreys, vice-president of strategic engagement at Lumina Foundation. “She came, and I remember talking to [Jamie Merisotis, Lumina Foundation CEO and President] as she was speaking. She was brilliant, as good or better than I had seen Eduardo [Padrón]. We looked at each other like, ‘Why hadn’t we invited her in the first place?’” Rodicio currently resides on four national academic boards and serves as vice-chair elect of the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Trustees will meet on Aug. 29 at 9 a.m. at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. 2nd Ave., Room 2106 to decide how they want to proceed in the College’s presidential search. “I hope they don’t ignore the talent in front of them,” said Richard Guarasci, former Wagner College president and past-chair of the Association of American Colleges and Universities. “Starting over with somebody new that comes from the outside, is a year or two just lost in building all those relationships. To have somebody so knowledgeable about all the processes and who’s so open to have real conversations about the next direction for [MDC]. That would be a real step back.” Rodicio declined multiple requests by The Reporter to be interviewed; some biographical information used in this story is from the Diversified Search Firm’s candidate profiles. MDC The Reporter


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Humanities Students Learn Culture And History In Europe

PHOTO COURTESY OF CLAUDIA MAZORRA MORALES

Historical Sight: A view of the Eiffel Tower from the Champ De Mars in Paris.

In high school, my college advisor told me that her only regret in college was never traveling in a study abroad program. During my first semester of college, I applied for a humanities study abroad program in France and Italy. On May 21, twelve Miami Dade College students and I embarked HERNÁNDEZ on a two-week journey through Paris, Rome, Pompeii and Napoli. We soon became immersed in the quick-paced, crowded city life of Paris. We had a welcome dinner at Bouillon Pigalle, an award-winning French restaurant in the heart of Paris. I ordered a selection of delicious French cuisine, from escargot to pain au chocolat—a French pastry roll with dark chocolate in the center. During the first week, we became acquainted with Parisian culture, from taking a packed subway everywhere we went to learning French etiquette— more specifically, I learned not to speak too loudly on the street and to eat slowly while enjoying a meal during conversation. We also visited iconic monuments like the Louvre Museum, the Eiffel Tower and the Arc de Triomphe. My friends insisted on seeing the Eiffel Tower lit up at night. The sight of the beautiful, bronze tower painted against a dark sky will forever stay in my memory. Two days later, we flew to Rome. The first meal I ordered in Italy was a delicious, hand-made margarita pizza. We later visited a beautiful Roman gallery that housed famous artwork from native artist Gian Lorenzo Bernini, and enjoyed a pasta dish with lemon seasoning and prawn butter sauce. The following day, we visited the historic Roman

Colosseum. As I stepped into the 47-meter high structure, I pictured all the ancient Roman emperors that had walked through the amphitheatre and brave gladiators that risked their lives to entertain the Roman public. We also visited the Vatican on May 27—a spiritual experience for many of us. At St. Peter’s Basilica, I saw the tombs of Catholic popes, including that of St. Peters—the first pope. Inside the Vatican, we visited Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel. We weren’t allowed to take photos of the ceiling because the room is considered too sacred to photograph. As I stared at the ceiling, I tuned out the sound of guards threatening to kick out tourists who tried taking photos. On May 29, we left Rome and went to Napoli by train. In Napoli, we stayed at a hostel—a unique experience. Instead of a typical hotel lobby, there was a front desk in a room with tables, couches, a piano and board games. During the night, people met to play games and converse. It felt like we were part of a small commune. Napoli was my favorite city. The fresh scent of the surrounding ocean made the city stand out in comparison to neighboring towns. It felt peaceful and tranquil. We visited Castel Dell’Ovo, an incredible seaside castle. At the top of the castle, the sound of the crashing waves and fierce wind felt therapeutic. The people in Napoli were extremely friendly and unbounded. After Napoli, we spent a day visiting the ruins of Pompeii. We saw the former living quarters of the people of Pompeii, and the preserved bodies of citizens that died in the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius. I was surprised at how the cities’ infrastructure remained intact after thousands of years of erosion. On June 1, the last day of our trip, we laughed and told jokes about the different experiences we had and recalled all the memories we made. My trip to France and Italy, enhanced my knowledge of European history and culture. It also helped me gain a newfound appreciation for religion and spirituality, pushed me out of my comfort zone, and made me stronger. —Alexa Hernández

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French Delight: L'artiste, a traditional French restaurant in Paris, outside the Montmartre district.

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Roman Holiday: Thirteen Miami Dade College students visited the Colosseum in Rome as part of their two-week study abroad humanities class in Europe.

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La Vie En Paris: Tourists gaze across the city of Paris outside the Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris.

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City Of Love: A love lock on the Pont des Arts bridge overlooking the River Seine in Paris. @mdcthereporter

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8 NEWS | AUGUST 26, 2019

THE REPORTER

RENOVATIONS

North Campus Cafeteria Reopens After Delayed Renovation Project ‰‰ A 10,284-square foot, cafeteria reopened at North Campus on Aug. 26. The updated facility housed on the first floor of the 4000 building features six diverse food stations and indoor and outdoor dining areas. By Roxy Garcia roxy.garcia001@mymdc.net The wait is over. North Campus opened a new, stateof-the-art cafeteria on Aug. 26—the first day of the fall term. The cafeteria was shut down for 15 months while the project was completed. The 10,284-square foot facility is located on the first floor of building four. It includes a food preparation area, serving station, 184-seat indoor dining area and a 104-seat outdoor seating area in the breezway of the 4000 building and the surrounding patio area. “The new cafeteria will [provide] a comfortable, collaborative dining environment

with brand new menu items and a fresh new experience for all,’’ said North Campus Director of Administration Fermin Vazquez, who oversaw the project. They will be open during regular school hours—8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Friday. The cafeteria will include a myriad of food options. It will be divided into six food stations provided by North Campus’ food vendor, Canteen. The cafeteria will offer a: Café station, a licensed Starbucks store that will offer a coffee, tea and pastry menu; Build Your Own Pizza station, where patrons can design their own personal pizza; JustBurger station, which offers a burger menu and traditional sides; The Main Dish station, a hot meal station that will change daily depending on the theme; MonduSun station, a crepe, sandwich and soup station and Outtakes, a grab-n-go station with ready-made options like prepacked subs and fruits. Prices will remain the same as they were before the remodel, according to Canteen

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Dine N' Grind: North Campus opened a new 10,284 square foot cafeteria on the first day of the fall term. Located on the first floor of building four, it features six food stations, indoor and outdoor seating.

VLADIMIR MOMPREMIER / THE REPORTER

Express Sub: Mondu Sub, one of six food stations, will offer sandwiches, crepes and soups at North Campus' newly renovated cafeteria. District Operations Manager Gina Duran. North Campus is expected to introduce HealthFit, a dietary guideline with caloric and macronutrient recommendations to promote healthy eating, in collaboration with the Aquatic and Fitness Center in October. The cafeteria will also include a vegan menu. Renovation costs were approximately $1.8 million—including construction, furniture, fixtures and equipment. Vazquez said construction began in May of 2018 in hopes of creating an interactive dining experience with updated technology, diverse food options as well as indoor and outdoor seating areas. “As a student, you don’t want to be in a dormant situation. You want life around you,” Vazquez said. “You want to engage with others and have technology available.” The building’s year-long construction process was not all smooth-sailing. After the renovation process was started last summer, it was halted due to “unforeseen conditions discovered in the back of the house,” according to Vazquez.

As a result, the College installed new electrical circuits, equipped the back of the house with state-of-the-art machinery, repaired the plumbing system and installed new lights throughout the facility. The underground utility work and additional electrical work cost around $156,000. North Campus will invite students to submit name ideas for the cafeteria through an online survey until Sept. 30 in order to select eight to 10 finalists. The survey can be found at: www.mdc.edu/north/cafeteria/ A final survey will be sent to students through their MDC emails to select the most popular one. The final name is expected to be selected by late October. The official name will hang above the cafeteria’s utensils area, and oversee the entirety of the indoor dining area. “We want to make [students] feel like this is their cafeteria,” Vazquez said. In addition to the cafeteria, North Campus is expected to reopen its Computer Courtyard in Room 2102 during the first week of the fall term.

CANNABIS

Miami Dade College Aims To Become The ‘Epicenter Of Cannabis Education’ ‰‰ Florida Cannabis Policy and Regulation is a 16week course being offered at North Campus this fall to introduce students to cannabis legislation and regulation. The class will set the foundation for a future 19-credit Biotechnology Cannabis Science Specialist certificate program. By Alina Halley alina.halley001@mymdc.net North Campus will offer a course this fall meant to teach, and destigmatize, medical marijuana. The course—Florida Cannabis Policy and Regulation—provides an overview of the state’s medicinal cannabis legislation, marijuana classification, and state and federal regulations. It was initially introduced as a Summer B term course, and will

set the foundation for a 19-credit Biotechnology Cannabis Science Specialist certificate program. The program is in the development stages at North Campus in collaboration with the School of Justice and School of Science. “We’re known to start programs that prepare our students for tomorrow’s workforce,” said North Campus chemistry, physics and earth sciences department Chairperson Pablo Sacasa. “This is an industry that’s growing drastically. In Florida, there are jobs opening every day because this industry is opening new facilities in all areas—from business, marketing, science and culinary.” Conversation for the program began after Governor Ron DeSantis legalized smokable medical marijuana in March, two years after Florida voters approved a constitutional amendment to legalize medical marijuana.

“Everyone was talking about the cannabis industry and what’s going on and the changes in the legislature,” said Michaela Tomova, Dean of Faculty at North Campus. “So we got together and decided that this is going to be an interdisciplinary program.” The Florida Cannabis Policy and Regulation class—CJL2990— will be offered every Monday during the fall semester at 5:40 p.m. It will be taught by professor Ivonne Villar Duran. North Campus is redesigning its botany course curriculum for the fall to include marijuana plant characteristics and life cycles. The class is recommended for students that plan on taking biology of cannabis and chemistry of cannabis, which teaches the physiology of cannabis plants, oil extraction and cannabis industry techniques. Both classes are currently pending approval to begin in the

spring semester. “The industry is telling us, ‘We need folks who know how to extract, purify, understand the techniques and are well versed in the science behind the industry’,” North Campus Associate Dean of Academic Affairs Efrain Venezuela said. “We turned this into a multi-disciplinary approach. We have biology, chemistry and criminal justice. That’s the way the entire program is going to grow.” Faculty stress that students will not grow marijuana as part of their program, but instead will use tomato plants or hops due to the similar plant composition. North Campus will also invite law, science and business professionals to speak on the cannabis industry and its future to the community as part of a speaker series. “There is a lot of misinformation, stigma, and things that are precluding this industry from

being noticed,” Venezuela said. The program is expected to eventually develop an associate in science degree in plant technology and feed into a new bachelor’s degree in pharmacology. “It focuses on the term pharmacology, which has to do with bioprospecting or discovery of compounds from natural sources that have human benefits,” said North Campus biology, health and wellness department Chairperson Mark Meade. Once the certificate program is developed, it will be the first in the Florida College System. Cannabis education is typically offered in master’s or doctorate degree programs, but are rare at the associate and baccalaureate levels. “The goal is that Miami Dade College becomes the epicenter of cannabis education,” Venezuela said.

To be part of The Reporter, contact Heidi Perez-Moreno at (305) 237-7464 or heidi.perez003@mymdc.net

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AUGUST 26, 2019 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

On Friday, Sept. 6th, join the Miami Dade College community in celebraang I AM MDC Day! AAend your special campus event to show your Shark pride, make a gii and wear blue.

Sharks Wear Blue!

Make a gii of $25 or more and get an official I AM MDC Day t-shirt! Hurry, limited quannty.

GET YOUR TTSHIRT! DON’T MISS US AT YOUR CAMPUS! Hialeah AUG 26 | 8am - 1pm | Student Services Lobby

North AUG 27 | 11am - 12pm | Building 1000, North-side

Homestead SEPT 5 | 10am - 11am | Student Lounge, A118

Padrón AUG 28 | 12pm - 1pm | Student Life Breezeway

Kendall AUG 30 | 10:30am - 12pm | Fred Shaw Plaza

West AUG 29 | 9:30am - 12:30pm | In front of bookstore

MEEC SEPT 3 | 11am - 12pm | Atrium

Wolfson AUG 28 | 11am - 1pm | Kyriakides Plaza

Medical AUG 28 | 11am - 1pm | Shark Paao

For more informaaon contact MDC Office of Alumni Relaaons at 305.237.3240 or email alumni@mdc.edu.

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#IAMMDC

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10 SPORTS | AUGUST 26, 2019

THE REPORTER

VOLLEYBALL

Lady Sharks Volleyball Returns With Freshmen-Laden Team ‰‰ The Lady Sharks have played in the National Championship game three straight years, capturing two national titles. This year’s squad features nine freshmen from four different countries. By Jose Tovar jose.tovar007@mymdc.net The Miami Dade College volleyball team is starting the season with a very clear goal—to win the national championship. They won the National Junior College Athletic Association Division I national title in 2016 and 2017 and fell just short of capturing a third consecutive crown in 2018. The Lady Sharks lost in the championship game last year to the College of Southern Idaho. Head Coach Origenes “Kiko” Benoit attributed the defeat to a lack of concentration and consistency in the decisive match. “Unfortunately, we all decided to make mistakes on a very key day for the national championship.” Benoit said. “We have to keep working very hard and learn from our failures. In the end, we are humans and we make mistakes. The good thing about that is that we can get up and learn from them.” This year, the pressure to win remains the same. Since 2016, the Lady Sharks have accumulated an impressive 87-7 record. That translates to a 92.55% winning percentage, which has allowed MDC to be the

top-ranked team in the state. Despite losing key performers like setter Tiziana Baumrukova, who averaged 10.82 assists per set (third in the NJCAA), and right side hitter Samaret Carabello, who had 550 digs, the Lady Sharks bring back several key sophomores. Outside hitter Scherine Dahoue had 252 kills last year, middle blocker Kimberlie Apolinario Correa boasted a .409 hitting percentage and 187 kills and outside hitter/right side hitter Yaniris Miller Green contributed 96 digs and 171 kills. That group will be augmented by nine freshmen from four countries including Brazil, Dominican Republic, Sweden and the United States. Dominican players Erika Asencio and Camila De La Rosa, who have played for their national team at the Federation International of Volleyball under 18 World Championships. Asencio, an outside hitter, played in Argentina in 2017 and De La Rosa, a setter, played in Mexico in 2019. Wilma Calmfors, an outside hitter, has played for the Swedish National Team in the under 17 and under 19 groupings as well as the country’s senior team. “From what I’ve been able to see off the court, the key to this team is the union,” Benoit said. “It’s a team that gets along very well. The girls are always together and that is something that transmits [to] the court.”

VLADIMIR MOMPREMIER / THE REPORTER

Back At It: The Lady Sharks are attempting to play in their fourth straight national volleyball championship game this season. They won national titles in 2016 and 2017. The Lady Sharks are poised to improve on last year’s impressive run that included 25 straight wins to start the season and 32 victories in 34 matchups. They ranked sixth in the country in kills per set (13.25), fourth in hitting percentage (.283), third in assists per set (12.64), seventh in digs per set

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(18.98) and fifth in points per set (17). To do so, the team will count on a feisty group of freshmen to step up. “I like to be really loud, motivate my teammates and bring the team up when we are down,” said freshman defensive specialist Darlenis

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Medina. “I came to MDC to improve my volleyball skills and help the team win something big.” The Lady Sharks next game is August 30 versus Polk State College at the Polk State Invitational in Winter Haven, Florida at 7 p.m.

MDC The Reporter


AUGUST 26, 2019 | SPORTS

THE REPORTER

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// SPORTS Alina Halley, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B alina.halley001@mymdc.net

2019 - 20 Miami Dade College Volleyball Team Kimberlie Apolinario Correa

Ana Araujo

Erika Asencio

Wilma Calmfors

Scherine Dahoue

Middle Blocker

Setter

Setter

Outside Hitter

Outside Hitter

Sophomore Brazil

Freshman Brazil

Freshman New York

Freshman Sweden

Sophomore France

Sara Da Silva

Camila De La Rosa

Alexis Dow

Darlenis Medina

Yaniris Miller Green

Middle Blocker

Setter

Middle Blocker/Right Side Hitter

Defensive Specialist

Outside Hitter/Right Side Hitter

Freshman Brazil

Freshman Dominican Republic

Sophomore Miami

Freshman Lake Worth

Sophomore Dominican Republic

Julia Ortiz

Paola Pimentel

Isaura Santos

Daniela Tobar

Vanda Zimova

Outside Hitter

Defensive Specialist

Outside Hitter

Defensive Specialist

Middle Blocker

Freshman Miami

Freshman Brazil

Sophomore Pembroke Pines

Freshman Miami

Sophomore Slovakia

ALL PHOTOS TAKEN BY VLADIMIR MOMPREMIER

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12 A&E | AUGUST 26, 2019

THE REPORTER

HOLLYWOOD

Peak TV’s Casts Netting Top Actors ‰‰ Corbin Bolies writes about the talent that boards the most acclaimed shows, with actors from Emmy-winning shows like Big Little Lies and the upcoming His Dark Materials blurring the distinction between the big and silver screens. By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net As peak television has grown, so too has the quality of its casts. With traditionally A-list actors blurring the lines between the big and silver screens, the television landscape has started to mirror the films those stars frequent. Shows like Big Little Lies, His Dark Materials and Watchmen, among others, provide them with opportunities to flesh out their acting talents and dip into more detailed stories. When Big Little Lies was first announced, it garnered significant attention due to the magnitude of its cast. Toplined by the likes of Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern and Nicole Kidman, who have a total of eight Oscar nominations combined with two wins, the show centers on five women whose lives intersect for better or worse in Monterey Bay, California. The talent continued to span, adding Shailene Woodley and Zoe Kravitz (famed for their roles in the Divergent series), Parks and Recreation’s Adam Scott and True Blood’s Alexander Skarsgaard. The caliber in front of the screen

helped propel the series to one of HBO’s most-watched of 2017, leading to a surprise second season renewal and the addition of Oscarwinning(-winning-still winning) actress Meryl Streep. That same caliber led the talents of Ruth Wilson (The Affair), James McAvoy (the X-Men series) and Lin-Manuel Miranda (Hamilton) to His Dark Materials, a BBC and HBO co-production based on the novel series. The show is the

second adaptation of the books, with the former being 2007’s widely-panned The Golden Compass. It’s also an example of how television projects, ones that take their time delivering its story, helps attract higher talent. It’s not just A-list stars that are drawn. Stranger Things provides the best example, as the show utilized actors known throughout its time period (Winona Ryder, Sean Astin

and Paul Resier, among others) and gave them new life, both literally and figuratively. It’s seen a return on its investment, as Ryder’s name now runs synonymous with the show’s and the series itself has been the recipient of a multitude of awards. It remains to be seen how well a show can do in the long-term when not having to promote its cast. While some can begin to grow its cast with them (as is the case of

Game of Thrones, whose audience witnessed the actors from a young age), others are subjected to actors that are already well-versed in the acting world like Netflix’s House of Cards, featuring actors from a number of famous projects before joining the series. However, no matter how familiar they are to larger screens, famous actors continue to venture toward the smaller ones for better roles.

PHOTO COURTESY OF HBO

Cross Barriers: A-list actors continue to jump from the big screen to the silver one in a quest for better stories and more range, as shown in HBO's Big Little Lies.

STREAMING

Video Games Expand Into The Streaming World

‰‰ Ethan Toth writes about the impending video game streaming service from Google and how video games have become the next frontier of the streaming market. By Ethan Toth ethan.toth001@mymdc.net The world of non-physical media has been incorporating itself into the mainstream audience for years—streaming movies and television has become the norm and is a household occurrence, with streaming video games becoming the latest medium. With Xbox Game Pass and PlayStation Now, gamers are getting their hands on lots of games at a low price, and the playing field is about to have a new competitor with Google Stadia. But what does a streaming-focused gaming ecosystem look like? More importantly, how does it even work? Looking back at the two main players, PlayStation and Xbox,

their individual services started in 2014 and 2017, respectively, and had a simple concept: pay $10 to $20 a month and get access to an enormous library of games available on each platform. After that, you download your game and get to playing, the only caveat being the loss of the game should the subscription end. It was a simple model—until Google Stadia stepped onto the scene. Announced in October of 2018, Stadia leans all the way as an only—streaming game console. There isn’t even a console, per se—the service has you access games directly through your Google Chrome browser on desktops, laptops, tablets, phones or through

a Chromecast Ultra to play on your television. With two tiers of service, a free and paid one like Playstation Now and Xbox Game Pass, it will contain the same features that most console users are familiar with such as online multiplayer, a friends list and party chat, with achievements being implemented after launch in November 2019.

Consumers have had reservations for this service since its initial announcement. Physical media still has a place in gamers’ hearts, with the line between ownership and licensing getting blurrier. There seems to be two sides to this coin: the apathy of game streaming from the market and companies doubling down on this new service. Addressing the first point, the consensus seems to be that a sole game streaming market doesn’t seem feasible. Hesitation could be due to unclear target audience, worries of data caps or reservations about Google’s first foray into the gaming market. In fact, a recent report by GameIndustry. biz said that, out of four European countries— the United Kingdom,

France, Spain and Germany—70 percent of gamers said they were not interested in a video game streaming service. Despite this view in Europe, American companies charged ahead, even Xbox is still throwing their hat in the ring with their XCloud service. A similar service, it will work in tandem with the new Xbox model, Project Scarlett, that releases next year. Even the Xbox All-Digital edition, released last May, doesn’t take discs, moving in the direction of non-physical media. Being on the cusp of a new generation is scary, with new technology shaping the future of video games. But Playstation CEO Jim Ryan may have described it best in an interview with CNET. “Who knows how it might evolve?” Ryan said. “Hybrid models between console and some sort of cloud model? Possibly that. I just don’t know. And if I did know, I wouldn’t tell you.”

New Level: Game developers are pushing streaming services as the new method of playing video games, with the Xbox One S All-Digital Edition being one component of the plan. PHOTO COURTESY OF MICROSOFT

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AUGUST 26, 2019 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

// A&E Corbin Bolies, A&E Editor  // 

T (305) 237-7657 

// 

B corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net

DISNEY

2019’s The Lion King Has No Roar ‰‰ Alexzandria Windley writes about the missteps Disney’s remake of The Lion King suffers from, focusing on the lack of 2D animation and the misguided casting of singer Beyoncé.

By Alexzandria Windley alexzandr.windley001@mymdc.net The Walt Disney Company has never been one to shy away from taking creative liberties. From their parks to movies and shows, Disney has always been at the forefront of innovation. That’s why when the newest The Lion King remake was announced, fans and movie critics alike waited patiently to see if their childhood memories would be re-lived. Unfortunately, the dream was not only crushed but also stomped on, brought back to life and stomped on again. What happened? How did one of the most anticipated movies of the summer become one of Disney’s worst investments? One can argue that this project was doomed from the start. What made the 1994’s The Lion King so special was the use of 2D animation. With this 2019 remake and the use of photorealistic animals, facial expressions and body movements were severely limited due to its visual realism. It made the lions and other characters look

too real, to the point where it was a bit unnerving. That took the audience out of the story and became disengaging. But that’s not the only gripe viewers had with this film. For all of her greatness and popcultural relevance, Beyoncé has shown time and time again that acting isn’t in her skill set, which also applies to her voice acting. The main issue with having someone like Beyoncé play one of the most important characters in the film is that it takes away from the viewing experience. It’s the equivalent of having Christopher Walken play Elvis. You want to believe it’s Elvis Presley, but you just can’t get past Walken’s sunken-in stare and obvious voice. With Beyoncé, it’s no different. The way she reads her lines were dry and uninspiring, leading to the question of why was she hired in the first place. Some may argue that Disney knowingly hired Queen B in order to generate more buzz for the film. Unlike other live-action adaptations, the original The Lion

PHOTO COURTESY OF WALT DISNEY STUDIOS

No Love Tonight: The Lion King, while portraying more realistic animals, suffers from a lack of expression and misguided casting. King was beloved and celebrated and, to be frank, a remake wasn’t needed. Adding Beyoncé and her legion of fans became a “security blanket” of sorts for Disney. Because of these variables, the film has received a mountain of

backlash for the same reasons listed above. Although the movie may be a visual masterpiece and technologically advanced for the time, it appears that no matter how much time and money was poured into

this project, it’ll never replace the nostalgia that the original film had. Disney should learn from this, and hopefully, their next live-action movies won’t suffer the same fate.

LOCAL MUSIC

Miami’s Music Scene Feels Muted

‰‰ Corbin Bolies writes about the current lack of relevance to Miami’s music scene, especially with the chaos of Ultra and the preference of its art culture.

like Leonardo DiCaprio, Kanye West and Lil Wayne taking to the city’s streets in recent years to celebrate the arts (and the parties). However, despite the plethora of events across mediums that

occur throughout the week, music doesn’t showcase itself much. That’s especially true with the music events currently hosted. Ultra has garnered heavy criticism from local officials and residents

unhappy with the traffic conditions caused by the electronic festival. It caused organizers to find a new location—Virginia Key—which made matters worse, creating widespread chaos as

By Corbin Bolies corbin.bolies001@mymdc.net It’s quite remarkable that Miami, even with its multitude of clubs and music weeks, isn’t primarily known for its music. That’s not to say there is a shortage of it. The city has long been home to the Ultra Music Festival, which spanned multiple locations throughout its 20-year history. Recently, it’s been the location of the Overtown Music Festival, III Points and will go on to host the inaugural Miami Beach Pop Festival in November. However, despite these offerings, the city hasn’t attempted to cement its image in the music scene. While hosting a multitude of clubs that house a range of genres from reggaeton to hip-hop to jazz, the city has long leaned into the art and exotic nature that’s become its reputation. That’s evident from its cultural crown jewel—Art Basel. Generally the first week of December, and preceded by its own Art Week, the event draws in talent from all over the world, with celebrities

REPORTER FILE PHOTO/ KAREN LA SPINA

Broken Record: Miami’s music scene has faltered in recent years, especially due to the turbulence around Ultra and the lack of local music lounges.

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festival-goers lacked transportation. The festival is currently without a home, showing the chaos that envelopes Miami’s music scene. That’s not to say that there’s no hope. Organizers of the Okeechobee Music & Arts Festival announced the Miami Beach Pop Festival, a three-day event geared toward pop and alt-pop. That’s evident in its initial line-up, which hosts the likes of Chance the Rapper, Jack Johnson and Maggie Rogers. The city also welcomed the return of III Points to Wynwood, an alternative music festival that hosted, among others, SZA and A$AP Rocky. Its local scene is also slowly growing, with the addition of Room 25, a bar and lounge in Coral Gables that pays homage to the speakeasies of the Prohibition era with drinks and live jazz music. In order to enter, one must discover the secret passcode located through their social media channels and present it at the door. Miami’s music scene isn’t as known as its art or social, with most tourists flocking to the likes of Ocean Drive and the beach than the dive bars and music lounges. However, its relevance to the music landscape isn’t completely gone and, with potential in new festivals and local spaces, the city has room to grow.


14 FORUM | AUGUST 26, 2019

THE REPORTER

COLLEGE

Now Is The Time To Start Your Career Exploration

‰‰ Alexa Hernandez shares her insight on what students can do to expand their knowledge on career development and some actions to take if you’re stuck between career options.

By Alexa Hernández alexa.hernandez004@mymdc. net College students are constantly revising and updating their resumes, exploring career options, and hoping to land their ideal job. In order to expand your professional reach, one important outlet is creating a LinkedIn account so you can network with professionals from all across the country. Another critical action is obtaining an internship. They are a great way to gain hands-on experience and learn new skills at a

company or organization. The truth is that whether you think you’re set on a career or not, you may not have a clue what that job entails until you’re directly exposed to it. Internships are a way to figure out whether or not you actually want to go into that industry. You may do an internship and find that the work environment was too boring, or too stressful or you may fall in love with the way the industry operates and works. If you’re having trouble finding good internships, you can visit internship websites like Indeed.com or Internships.com, or ask professors, advisors or mentors at your campus. Despite doing an internship and getting to know some aspects of an industry or field, you won’t always be interning in the specific position you want a career in. Therefore, it’s also important to read up on careers that interest you. Taking various factors into consideration like average annual salary, entrylevel education requirements, and job outlook, may help you decide on different career options and find what best fits you and your future goals. For many students who

ALEXANDER ONTIVEROS / THE REPORTER

have no clue what career or industry they want to go into, this information can seem useless. Understandably, it’s difficult to apply for internships or research career opportunities when you’re on the fence about

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what you want to spend the rest of your life doing. Perhaps a good step to take is to reflect on what truly interests or fascinates you—whether that’s helping others, being creative, writing, or experimenting.

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Reflecting on what type of work or activities you thrive in the most may help you find some career options to look into. You may also find value in simply asking yourself: what do I want my future to look like?

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Thinking about the place you want to live in, how many hours you want to work in a week, and the general lifestyle you desire, are all important factors to consider when thinking about career options. Oftentimes, we get so engulfed in figuring out what we’re passionate about that we forget the fact that we want to do more things than just work all our lives. While some students thrive under pressure and seek a career that will challenge them, others want a more practical occupation that will facilitate a comfortable lifestyle while also allowing time for leisure and family. Even if you’re still not sure, you can always focus on building your resume and having an online professional profile to share with others, whether it’s LinkedIn, other social media accounts or your very own website. If your interests change, just update your profile. And most importantly, give yourself time to figure things out. It’s not the end of the world if you decide to change your career goals or major. Just listen to your heart— and your brain.

MDC The Reporter


AUGUST 26, 2019 | FORUM

THE REPORTER

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// FORUM Alexa Hernández, Forum Editor  // 

T (305) 237-1253 

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B alexa.hernandez004@mymdc.net

POLITICS

Political Candidates Need To Get With It ‰‰ Alina Halley writes about the disconnect between voters and their representatives and the importance of political candidates diversifying their teams to appeal to different types of voters.

prime example is Beto O’ Rourke, former U.S. Representative from Texas, who broke out in pretty fluent Spanish in the middle of a response to a question from Savannah Guthrie. I’m sure he gained more Latinxs votes than he started the debate with. A case where it didn’t work out so well was when Hillary Rodham Clinton kept using the song Fight Song by Rachel Platten. Before she was even named the Democratic nominee, people were tired of the song and could care less about the subliminal message it had for her campaign or that Clinton was “fluent” in pop culture.

There are even cases where a campaign message doesn’t come across as intended, such as in 2004 when Sean “Diddy” Combs launched a “Vote or Die” campaign—which quickly led to a parody episode on South Park of Diddy killing hesitant voters. But this doesn’t just happen with presidential campaigns. I remember back in 2014 there was a video of then-Florida Governor Rick Scott and then-Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett that was edited to imitate a GOP spinoff of TLC’s Say Yes to The Dress. One of the people in the video said that “Rick Scott is a trusted brand,”

almost making it seem as if he was the Vera Wang of GOP candidates. Candidates need to look at their teams and see what they are lacking. Does their team resemble the community they are trying to operate in? Do they have people of color? Is there equal representation amongst the group? If not, then a workplace strategy needs to be put in place so that there is. Candidates should learn from their mistakes and be open to change. As a society, we are constantly becoming more diverse and our representatives need to adapt to us if they want our votes— not the other way around.

By Alina Halley alina.halley001@mymdc.net

The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

Bureaus ———————————

North Campus Bureau covers North, West, Hialeah and MEEC B 11380 N.W. 27th Ave. Room 4209 Miami, FL 33167 T (305) 237-1254 ————————————————— Kendall Campus Bureau covers Kendall and Homestead B 11011 S.W. 104th St. Room M239 Miami, FL 33176 T (305) 237-2715 ————————————————— Wolfson Campus Bureau covers Wolfson, Medical and InterAmerican B 300 N.E. Second Ave. Suite 1610 Miami, FL 33132 T (305) 237-3368

Editorial Board ———————————

Ever since I can remember, when there is any type of national election, candidates go above and beyond to appeal to different voters such as Latinxs or 18-to -30-somethings—who are notorious for rarely showing up. And, to be quite honest, the effort is appreciated sometimes. But for the most part, it makes many candidates come off as cringey and uncomfortable to watch. I understand that candidates need to grab as many votes as possible, especially when running for president, but I am sure most of us can agree that the tactics some use are tacky. In the most recent Democratic debate of 2019, we saw a somewhat good display of candidates trying to appeal to Latin voters. A

Heidi Perez-Moreno Editor-in-Chief/Briefing Editor/Social Media Director Corbin Bolies A&E Editor Alexa Hernández Forum Editor Vladimir Mompremier Photo Editor Alina Halley Sports Editor

Issue Staff ———————————

ALEXANDER ONTIVEROS / THE REPORTER

PERSONAL GROWTH

Angel Diaz, Adriana Dos Santos, Alina Halley, Alexa Hernandez, Vanessa Gimenez, Roxy Garcia, Patrick C. Gross, Camille Fontix, Natalie Gutierrez, Vladimir Mompremier, Sean Mow, Danelis Olivera-Herrera, Alexander Ontiveros, Giuliana Restrepo, Ethan Toth, Jose Tovar, Alexzandria Windley

You Are Never Too Old To Grow ‰‰ Roberto Fano Viamonte writes about the capability for all of us to grow and fulfill our aspirations no matter the age and about how people of all ages face hardships in their lives. Fano has worked as a custodian at Kendall Campus for six years.

By Roberto Fano Viamonte rfano@mdc.edu To express some opinions on the mechanism of human aging, the French biologist Jean Rostand began by saying: “A mature person,

say a man of fifty years…” André Maurois, a French author, opined that the line of shadow in which one finds that the regions of youth are long behind them, should also be placed in the years close to fifty. Many people have shown excellent achievements even after their fiftieth birthday. Below are a few examples of outstanding accomplishments, but surely there have been many others that, without being so outstanding, were useful and carried out valuable work in their communities. Outstanding People In The Sciences Louis Pasteur: French chemist and microbiologist. At the age of 51, Pasteur created a novel procedure to prevent the contamination of wines. At 57, he carried out the first important study related to vaccination. Then, at 63, Pasteur gained glory and fame for vaccinating a boy bitten by a rabid dog. Barbara McClintock: American geneticist.

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At 81 years of age, McClintock received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine “for her discovery of mobile genetic elements.” Outstanding People In The Arts Walt Whitman: American writer. Expatriate American poet and critic, Ezra Pound, referred to Whitman as “America’s poet.” Among his works are Democratic Vistas, which he wrote at age 52; Memoranda During the War, at age 57; and Specimen Days, written at age 63. Tiziano Vecelli: Italian painter. At 54 years of age, Vecelli painted David and Goliath; St. John the Evangelist on Patmos at 59, Penitent Magdalene at 72; Danae Receiving the Golden Rain at 77, and Allegory of Prudence at 82. Outstanding People In Sports Min Bahadur Sherchan: Former Nepalese soldier. At age 76, Sherchan climbed Mount Everest (29,029 feet tall). Diana Nyad: American swimmer. At 64, Nyad crossed the Florida Strait, between Cuba and Key

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West, after swimming for almost 53 hours without the protection of a shark cage. The reason many people, like those previously mentioned and many others not included, have had achievements in their lives after reaching 50 years of age could be because they sought out an active exchange with the environment and everyone around them. They faced challenges, winning and losing, and took the initiative to be of service to their communities. No one knows with certainty how long their career will last. In the state of nature, all ages must endure challenges. In the path of life, one must measure one’s own abilities, adopt new knowledge and skills, and set new goals to be in accordance with the present, and active in the society in which one lives; to build; to create; to feel fit and alive; with the right to act in the scene presented and play in the game offered; to learn and teach; to win and lose; to move on—until the end.

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FEB. 19, 2013 | THE REPORTER

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The Reporter Volume 10 Issue 1  

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