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Production Crisis Gabriel Gatica writes about how the COVID-19 outbreak has affected the production and manufacturing of the video game console Nintendo Switch in Asia.

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Stop It FORUM

Raphy Almanzar-Rosario is providing offensive firepower for the Sharks this season. He leads the team with a .377 batting average and 15 RBI in 17 games.

A&E

Ana DeMahy is set to retire on March 31 as executive director of West Campus. She has worked at Miami Dade College in several capacities for 23 years.

Offensive Prowess SPORTS

NEWS

Farewell Ana

Natalie Gutierrez discusses how influencers on Youtube are affected by the popular cancel culture, and how the trend can lead to cyberbullying.

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4VOL. 10, ISSUE 12 — MARCH 24, 2020

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CORONAVIRUS

Student Uses Medieval Instrument To Connect To Spanish Roots

MDC Shut Down: Classes Move Online Due To Coronavirus ‰‰ Amid the coronavirus outbreak, Miami Dade College is set to move classes online beginning March 30, one of several measures meant to protect students and staff. By Heidi Perez-Moreno heidi.perez003@mymdc.net

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Connecting To Her Roots: Beatriz Martinez Trujillo, a student at Eduardo J. Padrón Campus, plays the Hurdy-gurdy, a medieval stringed instrument, whose sound resembles a violin. The instrument is a connection to her family's roots in Spain. ‰‰ Beatriz Martinez Trujillo plays the Hurdy-gurdy, a stringed fiddle that traces its origins to 10th century Europe. She made her debut playing the instrument on March 1 at Casa Juancho, a Spanish restaurant in Little Havana. By Adriana Dos Santos adriana.dossantos002@mymdc.net Beatriz Martinez Trujillo believes in paying close attention to your dreams. In 2002, she dreamt of walking along a narrow path in a rugged forest in Asturias— a region of northwestern Spain. Martinez Trujillo traveled into the region’s steep hills, historic sites and blue-green sea along the coast. “That dream was stuck in my head for a very long time,” said Martinez Trujillo, whose family descends from the area. “It’s one of those things that you either believe in or you don’t.” Sixteen years later she found herself studying the Hurdy-gurdy—a handcranked, medieval instrument that is only available in Asturias—at the very site she

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dreamt of. The stringed instrument, similar to the violin, traces its origins to 10th century Europe. It uses a rosined wheel instead of a bow to produce sound. “I love the magic that comes from the Hurdy-gurdy’s sound,” Martinez Trujillo said. “The Hurdy-gurdy has something special that connects me to it. Knowing that its sound is inside of me is something so rare.” Martinez Trujillo, who is currently enrolled in the English for Academic Purposes program at Eduardo J. Padrón Campus, first discovered the instrument while living in Cuba on a medieval music disc that was gifted to her by Spanish folkloric band Xareu D O’Chobre. The 43-year-old ordered the Hurdy-gurdy at an artisan shop in Galicia in 2018, and picked it up the following year. “I never even saw the instrument, I just listened to it, and it attracted me,” Martinez Trujillo said. “I blindly fell in love with it.” Martinez Trujillo, who practices on the weekends at the Iglesia Cristiana Juan Wesley in Coral Terrace, made her debut performance with the instrument on March 1 at

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Casa Juancho, a Spanish restaurant in Little Havana.

Classic Start Martinez Trujillo’s interest in music, and in the arts, goes back as far as she can remember. She was born on May 9, 1976 in Pinar del Río, Cuba. Although she never enrolled in formal art or music classes, Martinez Trujillo kept the passion alive by participating in schoolrelated events or national competitions. She began composing melodies from a small toy keyboard at age four. “I said to myself: ‘This is my world,’” Martinez Trujillo said. Her professional career started at 17 when she studied piano at the Escuela Provincial de Arte de Pinar del Río. It would often take Martinez Trujillo an hour to get to class on the bus, since she lived far from the school. She recalls wearing rain boots to walk through the muddy

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A&E

Miami Dade College joined hundreds of universities around the country moving classes online to protect students against the coronavirus. The College announced on March 16 that all campus services would be closed to prepare for the transition to remote learning. Classes are cancelled until March 29. On March 30, students will use Blackboard, the College’s online learning platform, to complete work. The first safety precaution the College took was on March 12 when they closed the Medical Campus after Fábio Wajngarten, the communications secretary to Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, tested positive for the virus. He accompanied Bolsonaro to meet with the local Brazilian community at a nonMDC event at Medical Campus on March 9, according to Brazil’s press department. The group rented the space; no MDC official or student was in attendance, according to Juan Mendieta, the College’s director of communications. The event was held in one of the meeting rooms at the Center For Learning, Innovation And Simulation. Mendieta said both of the meeting rooms had not been in use since then. The space isn't used by students, but rented out to outside companies to conduct meetings and training sessions. Following the event, an MDC employee was placed in quarantine after possibly coming into contact with Wajngarten. West Campus was also shut down after a student reported they were diagnosed with a non-threatening strain of coronavirus, according to Mendieta. The student has not been on campus since March 5. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are seven coronavirus strains, four of which are mild. Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. It can be spread when someone makes contact with a hard surface or object that carries the virus, and proceeds to touch their mouth, nose or eyes, according to the World Health Organization. The Medical and West campuses were both sanitized by local biohazard companies. Stay tuned to The Reporter’s website at www.mdcthereporter.com for updated information.

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Rocky Horror Dazzles The Stage At Kendall Campus

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Opening Act: Usserette, played by Naira Fairweather, performs The Rocky Horror Picture Show’s opening number Science Fiction/Double Feature.

The theater program students at Miami Dade College performed the 1975 classic musical, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, at Kendall Campus. It ran from Feb. 27-29 and March 5-7. The musical revolves around Brad and Janet, a young couple that seeks shelter from a storm in Dr. Frank-N-Furter’s gothic castle, and become trapped in a sci-fi odyssey. It was directed by James Alexander Bond, a stage director based in Manhattan. Showings were part of the OnStage series, which puts on several arts performances at Kendall Campus throughout the year. —Heidi Perez-Moreno

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Love Is In The Air: Brad Majors and Janet Weiss—played by Henry Cadet and Kelsy Williams—rejoice after Majors proposed to Weiss.

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Don’t Tell: Furter and Major lay in bed during act two of The Rocky Horror Picture Show.

Center Stage: Dr. Frank-N-Furter (pictured at center), played by Lorenzo Veloz, is caressed by Transylvanians that live in his gothic castle.

Board Of Trustees Scholarship Available To Students

Wolfson Professor Named Leading Lady Of The Year

Applications are being accepted for Miami Dade College’s Board of Trustees Award. Eight students—one from each Miami Dade College campus—are selected to receive the $5,000 scholarship. Eligible students will receive an email from the dean of students at their respective campus to apply. They must possess a minimum 3.5 GPA, demonstrate financial need, plan to graduate this semester with an associate in arts degree and move on to receive a bachelor’s degree from a four year university. Applicants must submit a letter of recommendation, résumé and short-response essay. Winners will be announced at the College’s Commencement Ceremony on May 2. The BOT serves as the College’s governing body. They offer the scholarship every spring semester. For more information, contact the Dean of Students office at your respective campus.

Daphnee Gilles, an English for academic purposes professor at Wolfson Campus, was selected as Miami Dade College’s 2020 Leading Lady of the Year. The award recognizes women at Wolfson Campus that have impacted the lives of students in honor of Women’s History Month, which runs through March. Gilles, who has worked at Miami Dade College since 2002, received the award during the Celebrating Women Ceremony on March 4. “I am simply honored and humbled, as I know so many of my women colleagues who equally deserve this award,” Gilles said. “Simply, I was in shock when I was contacted.” She also serves as the lead faculty member of The Honors GILLES College at Wolfson Campus, and has worked with the HC for a decade. Gilles earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Florida and a master’s degree in health services administration from Florida International University.

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SGA Changes Election Season Due To Coronavirus Outbreak

We are looking for students interested in writing, reporting, photography, multimedia or design to join its staff. Published 15 times a year, The Reporter is distributed at all eight Miami Dade College campuses and has newsrooms in Room 4209 at North Campus, Room 1610 at Wolfson Campus and Room M239 at Kendall Campus. Interested students should visit one of the three newsrooms to fill out an application form. The application is also available online at mdcthereporter.com/app-form The student newspapers at Miami Dade College have won 21 National Pacemaker Awards and received hundreds of honors from the Florida Community College Publications Association throughout the years. For more information, contact media adviser Manolo Barco at (305) 237-1255 or mbarco@mdc.edu

Miami Dade College has announced changes to the Student Government Association’s annual election dates due to class suspensions amid the coronavirus outbreak. Now, elections for SGA will take place from April 13-15—a week before it was originally scheduled. Student Life will notify applicants of their status by April 6 and campaigning will take place between April 7-15. Results will be announced on April 16. On March 12, the College announced classes would be cancelled to prepare for a transition to online coursework. For more information about SGA elections, contact the Student Life department at any MDC campus.

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Showcase: New World Schools of the Arts students perform What A Long, Strange Trip It Has Been during The Spectrum: BFA Dance Concert at the New World Dance Theater on Feb. 21. The event brought featured original pieces from dancers and choreographers from NWSA’s college dance program.

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Evolution: Miami Dade College’s Jubilation Dance Ensemble perform a dance show entitled Vote! at Kendall Campus on Feb. 25. As part of Black History Month, the production used dance to explore how voting rights for African Americans have changed throughout history.

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Harmony: Devertte Cooper, a baritone soloist on the North Campus College Choir, performs Bridge Over Troubled Water during the during the Sounds of Civil Rights event on Feb. 28 in the building four breezeway at North Campus. The choir, alongside the Chamber Singers, sang various gospel songs that connect to African American culture in honor of Black History Month.

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Focused: Students perform a dance routine entitled Consuption at The Spectrum: BFA Dance Concert at the New World Dance Theater. Performances aim to showcase student's progress throughout the semester.

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PRESIDENTIAL SEARCH

Professors Protest MDC Presidential Search, Say ‘It's The Death Of Education’

‰‰ More than 50 Miami Dade College professors rallied against the school’s ongoing presidential search on March 5 at Kendall Campus. The protest was organized by the United Faculty of Miami Dade College, the College’s full-time faculty union. By Heidi Perez-Moreno heidi.perez003@mymdc.net Carrying a wooden coffin down 104th street in front of Kendall Campus, a conga line of professors protested what they feel is a lack of transparency in the College’s search to find its fifth-ever president on March 5. Decked out in black graduation regalia, they chanted “we demand transparency,” and “we are the people’s college.” Some hoisted signs that read, “R.I.P, Here lies the integrity of the presidential search at Miami Dade College.” “We feel that it’s the death of education,” said Juan Carlos Martinez, the Wolfson Campus vicepresident of the United Faculty of Miami Dade College—the College’s faculty union that organized the protest. The search to find Eduardo J. Padrón’s successor started last February, but was scrapped five months later after the Board of Trustees decided the candidate pool was too narrow on the same day they were scheduled to make a decision. The decision sparked

HEIDI PEREZ-MORENO / THE REPORTER

In Unison: More than 50 professors at Miami Dade College protested the ongoing presidential search at Kendall Campus on March 5. They feel that professors haven't been given a voice while the College's looks for Eduardo J. Padrón replacement. controversy, and a second hunt— spearheaded by AGB Search—began in September. As of Monday, 15 candidates have applied for the position. Eleven of them come from academia, and the other four candidates come from diverse fields like business, medical, energy management and engineering world.

HEIDI PEREZ-MORENO / THE REPORTER

Walking For Change: SOS Miami Dade College—a marketing campaign organized through the United Faculty of Miami Dade College— took to the streets of Kendall Campus on March 5 to bring awareness to the College's ongoing presidential search.

None of the candidates currently serve as the president of an educational institution, but John Frederic Garman ran Berkeley City College in California from 2001 until 2006. The school has just over 6,400 students. Another candidate, Efrain Vasquez-Vera, formerly served as president of the Humacao Campus at the University of Puerto Rico from 2014 to 2016. The campus has more than 4,700 students. By comparison, one of Miami Dade College’s smallest campuses, the Eduardo J. Padrón Campus has 6,500 students. Faculty believe a big part of the problem is that the new search does not include enough faculty representation on the 17-person search committee—only two, the last search led by Diversified Search had three—and is tailored for candidates outside the educational sphere because a terminal degree is a preference, not a requirement. “We started with such high hopes looking for our next leader for the College,” said Elizabeth Ramsay, president of UFMDC. “Now, the lack of any academic credential or any higher ed administrative experience [for candidates] seems to mark the end of an era of academic excellence.” That is a drastic shift from the initial search, which required candidates to have a doctoral degree and a decade’s worth of senior-level management experience, and

at least six years of experience in academia. AGB Search facilitated three hour-long listening sessions between students, faculty and administrators to aid in the search. Professors began raising concerns about the process during a listening session at Wolfson Campus on Jan. 17. “There’s a basic disconnect right now between faculty and the search process,” Ramsay said in an interview with The Reporter, a day after the meeting. According to sources, the meeting was tense. Faculty felt they were invited under false pretenses. The invitation to the meeting said it was an

opportunity to comment on the search, and discuss challenges facing MDC. The firm, however, used notes from the meeting to craft the College’s extended profile. “I think they heard the words we were saying, but I don’t think they took it to heart,” said Steve Kronen, a librarian at West Campus. Rod McDavis, managing principal at AGB Search, said the faculty’s grievances were passed along to Trustee Nicole Washington, who chairs the search committee. The Reporter obtained AGB Search’s notes from the meeting, which mentioned the faculty’s complaints. However, those complaints were not listed on the notes that AGB Search gave Washington. So, What’s Next? The priority deadline for candidates to apply is March 23. Three days later, the search committee will select eight to 10 semifinalists during a meeting at Wolfson Campus and semi finalists will be interviewed on April 23-24. However, candidates can apply after the March 23 priority date. Under that scenario, Washington would determine if the committee reviews the candidate. Judith Wilde, chief operating officer of the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University, said the maneuver could be a way to sneak applicants in at the last minute without public scrutiny. “It’s a way to get around the [Florida] Sunshine Law,” said Wilde, who is working on a research study at GMU that examines secret presidential searches at colleges and universities. The BOT will interview finalists on May 13-14. Trustees are expected to select a new president by May 19. The president is expected to start by July.

HEIDI PEREZ-MORENO / THE REPORTER

Making A Point: Pictured left-to-right are Miami Dade College professors Lomer Pierre-Philippe, Patrick Mc Curry and Juan Carlos Martinez carrying a wooden coffin during the United Faculty of Miami Dade College's protest of MDC's presidential search at Kendall Campus.

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CORONAVIRUS

Now That Coronavirus Has Canceled Your Study Abroad Trip, Here’s How To Get A Refund ‰‰ Students who had their study abroad trip canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak are being asked to submit their payment receipts onto the College’s study abroad site, Terra Dotta.

By Heidi Perez-Moreno heidi.perez003@mymdc.net So your study abroad trip was canceled because of the coronavirus outbreak? Here’s how to get your money back. Upload all payment receipts to your application on the College’s study abroad site, Terra Dotta. You should also email Gabriela Esteves, director of Global Student Programs, to confirm the amount that needs to be refunded. Miami Dade College will begin the reimbursement process this week. “Kindly note that the process is lengthy and can take several weeks,” Esteves wrote in an email to students. Nearly 100 students planned to attend one of eight trips scheduled for this summer to countries like Italy, Spain and Japan, according to college officials. “Please know that this has been a difficult decision given all the effort and enthusiasm we all have invested in the program...,” Esteves wrote. “However, the safety of our students and our faculty is our top priority.” The cancellation comes after a recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to cancel study abroad trips due to the virus’ spread. Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, is a respiratory virus with no treatment as of yet. It originated in China, and has spread to 77 countries worldwide with 90,893 cases reported as of today, according to the CDC and World Health Organization. The WHO said the Republic of Korea,

REPORTER FILE PHOTO / CLAUDIA MAZORRA MORALES

Au Revoir: Miami Dade College announced plans to cancel study abroad trips for the summer due to the coronavirus outbreak. Students that were planning on attending are being asked to upload their payment receipts onto the College’s study abroad site, Terra Dotta. Italy, Iran and Japan are the areas of greatest concern. The College had three trips planned in these locations—an introduction to cultural anthropology class in Japan, an arts and humanities class in Italy and a month-long anatomy and physiology class in Florence. The month-long trip to Florence, facilitated by Hialeah Campus math professor Carlos Ruiz, was meant to teach students about Italy’s contributions to science and the arts through a human anatomy and physiology 2 and lab supplement at the Lorenzo de’ Medici School. Students also planned visits to historical sites and museums to learn about the country’s origins. Other trips, not taking place at any of the WHO’s hotspots, have also been canceled

in case any more countries are added to the list. “The way that the trends are looking, you know, countries can be added,” said Juan Mendieta, director of communications at MDC. “We want to take the most precautionary posture possible.” Study abroad trips are meant to expose students to different cultures around the world. The trips are facilitated with MDC professors, and range between one to six weeks. Cost, which fluctuates between $2,168 to $2,999, generally includes round-trip airfare, lodging, transportation and cultural site visits, depending on the trip. Sierra Bice, a 19-year-old education major from Wolfson Campus, was accepted into

the Japan program. “It would’ve felt like a burden to go because it’s like, ‘oh no, I have to, you know, prepare for this coronavirus’,” Bice said. “It’s already here in Florida, so just imagine having, you know, 100 students or like 30 students come back with possibly having a virus.” Bice has paid $2,400 thus far for the trip, including a $300 non-refundable deposit. It is unclear whether she will get that deposit back. Other colleges around Florida have canceled or postponed their study abroad trips. They include the University of Florida, Florida State University and Florida Atlantic University. Last week, Florida International University canceled trips to Italy, Singapore, Japan and South Korea. Mendieta said this is the first time the CDC has given strict guidelines to colleges and universities to cancel study abroad trips. When contacted by The Reporter, Esteves and Liza Carbajo, executive director of the Office of International Education, both declined to comment, referring the matter to Mendieta. The cancellations will not affect the 42 students currently attending the Salzburg Global Seminar in Austria because the region is not in a hotspot. Miami Dade College said they are not implementing any additional safety precautions for the students, who are scheduled to return March 6. There are 24 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Austria as of today, according to the Federal Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and Consumer Protection in Austria. For more information, contact Gabriela Esteves at (305) 237-3008 or gesteve1@mdc. edu.

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6 NEWS | MARCH 24, 2020

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COMEDY

Improv Comedy Troupe Believes ‘You’re Never Too Old To Be Weird’ ‰‰ Dash Ruiz, a media services coordinator at West Campus and Alicia Garcia, an English professor at Eduardo J. Padrón Campus—co-founded the Society Circus Players improv troupe. The eight-member group has performed at more than 70 venues across Miami since 2014. By Roxy Garcia roxy.garcia001@mymdc.net The sound of a bell tinkling sends members from the Society Circus Players into a frenzy. Suddenly, someone yells: “New choice, new choice.” Members of the Miami-based improv comedy troupe frantically play out a scene that features three friends feasting on chicken wings at a local bowling alley. Carlos Fernandez playfully mutters between scenes: “You’re never too old to be weird, remember that.” The snippet is one of several improv games the performance group, an eight-member

posse founded in 2014, rehearses weekly. The comedy troupe—co-founded by Dash Ruiz, a media services coordinator at West Campus and Alicia Garcia, an English professor at Eduardo J. Padrón Campus—has performed at more than 70 venues across Miami since forming in 2014. They also host free improv workshops for children at the Shenandoah Branch Library. “As an adult, you don’t get playtime, but improv is like, ‘hey, we are having a playdate with my friends’,” Ruiz said. “Improv is like a place for all the weirdos to go. We were all misfits and once we found improv, we found our tribe and we’re all accepted.” Group members range in age from 28 to 53. They perform once a month at shows, festivals and charity events. In the past, they have performed at the Nicklaus Children’s Hospital and JDRF, a non-profit that funds diabetes research for children. Every October, the SCP hosts an improv show at West Campus for Breast Cancer Awareness and Hispanic Heritage Month. “We do put a heavy focus on charity work

ALICE MORENO / THE REPORTER

Dynamic Duo: Members of the Society Circus Players Alicia Garcia and Matthew Romeu act out an improvised scene during the group’s weekly rehearsal on Feb. 27.

ALICE MORENO / THE REPORTER

Let’s Laugh It Out: Members of the Society Circus Players discuss their most recent show, MardiGrasHaHa. The eight-member improv troupe was founded in 2014 and performs under the belief that keeping things weird is always best. and volunteering,” Ruiz said. “We like to give back and do our best to raise awareness and let people know that improv is a thing. Not many people really know about improv, and give it a stigma that it’s cheesy and corny.” The group formed in August of 2014 after another group—Negative 4 Months—that Garcia and several other members were a part of disbanded. For five years, the SCP performed at Just The Funny, a comedy improv and sketch theater in Coral Gables, but they left that venue after issues arose with the tenant over performance times. The group then hopstoched across venues in Miami for a year, but eventually found refuge, in late 2019, at Duffy’s Tavern, a restaurant in Westchester. They perform improv sketches there every other month. “Sometimes, we don’t even know what’s going to happen, so sometimes we crack ourselves up,” Ruiz said “Scripted performances are just [like] ‘I need to get this right’ and with improv it’s more freeing,

‘I’m just going to be up there and I’m going to have a good time.’” But everything hasn’t always been fun and games for the group. They have faced their share of challenges. Dustin Aiken, a long-time member, committed suicide in August of 2017. “He always loved improv. He loved laughing and making people laugh,” said Garcia, who was Aiken’s roommate. “I attribute a lot of our growth and accomplishments to him.” Shortly after his death, the sketch group hosted a show in his honor. They also designed black leather bracelets with his initials and the phrase Keep it Weird inscribed on them, a motto he lived by. The group has kept Aiken’s memory alive by building their performances around two tenets he embodied: positivity and laughter. “Right now, the time we are in, a lot of people just focus on the negative,” said Matthew Romeu. “[Improv] reminds people to laugh.”

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Student's Musical Repertoire Takes On A Medieval Twist FROM STUDENT PROFILE, FRONT

sidewalks. The long distance meant Martinez Trujillo couldn’t go to class some days, and practiced from home. She eventually took a break from school to work as a hair and makeup artist, and earned enough money to build a music room inside her parents’ house. “It was really hard,” Martinez Trujillo said. “Anything I earned was for cement and construction materials to build the room. Without having any other financial support, it was very hard.” The room, located on the second floor of the three-bedroom house, housed a 500-pound piano and a bagpipe. She used the room to play on her own or work with private tutors. In 2004, Martinez Trujillo formed Resurrection, a music group that focused on classical music with baroque and renaissance influences. In addition to singing in the group, she organized concerts and managed the band’s image. The band—made up of eight vocalists—performed Palestrina music, which consists of polyphonic vocal music written by 16th-century Italian composer Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina. They often used pianos, violins and cellos, depending on the repertoire. The band eventually added a bagpipe to the mix, which made them the first Cuban group to play Celtic music, according to Martinez Trujillo.

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Getting In Tune: Beatriz Martinez Trujillo tunes her Hurdy-gurdy before a performance at Casa Juancho, a Spanish restaurant in Little Havana, on March 1. Bishop Siro González Bacallao, who worked at the Catedral de Pinar del Rio, let the band practice at his church, and provided them sheet music for them to perform, such as partitures from baroque composer Esteban Salas. Due to the limited space, the vocalists practiced in different rooms in order to hear themselves, and later regrouped to practice together. Sometimes they practiced inside bathrooms. Within a year of their debut,

Resurrection gained an immense following. They performed at a concert salon in Havana—a major step from their roots in rural, mountainous Asturias. The group began experimenting with alternative rock by adding a drum set, as well as a bass and electric guitar to their lineup. “We were a phenomenon in Pinar del Rio,” Martinez Trujillo said. “It wasn’t normal for people from the province to do this kind of group.”

At the time, the musician also worked as director of culture of the Federación de Asociaciones Asturianas de Cuba, a community center for Cubans with Asturian lineage. She organized parties and dances that connect to Asturian culture.

Bienvenidos A Miami In 2011, Martinez Trujillo faced a tough choice, emigrating to the United States or Spain. Problems

with traveling paperwork made Spain a difficult feat, so she moved to Miami. She currently works as a private tutor, giving piano and singing lessons and also teaches Spanish and French. Martinez Trujillo has remained committed to her Asturian roots. She connected with Father José Luis Menéndez, who organizes the religious services at the Centro Asturiano de Miami— a non-profit organization that celebrates Asturian culture. “[Beatriz is someone] with a broad musical culture, talented, and restless,” said Hilda Avello Garcia, president of the Centro Asturiano de Miami. “[Through the Hurdy-gurdy, she] has helped build a greater knowledge of our culture, roots and traditions, as well as a legacy for future generations.” In 2018, Martinez Trujillo was offered a scholarship to study Asturian culture at the Escuela Asturiana in Spain. She has participated in two of the annual seminars, and is set to take part in a third one in 2020. “Culturally, the interconexion is always interesting,” said José Ángel Llaneza, who teaches history and folklore at the Escuela Asturiana and has helped Martinez Trujillo with learning the Hurdy-gurdy. “The fact that Beatriz is related to the instruments through the Asturian School is an incentive and a contribution for an institution that tries to enlarge the image of Asturias abroad. I hope that, by Beatriz's achievements, people can learn a little more about Asturias in Miami.”

RETIREMENT

West Campus’ Executive Director To Retire After More Than Two Decades At MDC ‰‰ After 23 years at Miami Dade College, Ana DeMahy, who has worked at Wolfson and West campuses will retire on March 31. She is currently the executive director at West Campus. By Adriana Dos Santos adriana.dossantos002@mymdc.net Ana DeMahy is a jack of all trades. For the last 13 years, she has overseen construction, public safety, financial budgets and student services at West Campus. DeMahy has watched the campus grow from an outreach center when it first opened its doors in 2006 with 156 students to an official campus in 2018 that now enrolls 4,474 students. “I do not believe we accomplish and succeed on our own. [The] successful projects, and accomplishments were collaborative efforts,”said DeMahy, who currently serves as executive director at the campus. “If I had to choose one thing it would be my connection to students.” DeMahy is retiring on March 31 after 23 years at Miami Dade College. Before coming to West she worked at Wolfson Campus for 10 years. “She is upbeat and always optimistic with a smile on her face,” said Rene Garcia, a retired MDC administrator who worked closely with DeMahy. “Sounds like a cliché, but she is so committed to students. She knows no limits when it comes to serving students. Nevertheless, she holds them to the highest expectations and they seem to respond to her.” DeMahy has not made concrete plans for her life after retirement, besides taking a cruise to Alaska, remodeling her home and traveling to Europe. She’s also considering taking a part-time job in interior design. “It’s time for me to look for a different modality of life— a different way of life, a different phase of life,” DeMahy said. “[I want] to continue to work at a different pace then be able to get up in the morning and buy coffee and look at my orchids.” Before her time at the College, DeMahy was torn between two careers—psychology and interior design. “Interior design, color spaces, space utilization, low traffic, all that type of thing was always a passion of mine,”

DeMahy said. “Psychology was as well, so I was always very torn.” After graduating from Hialeah High School in 1971, DeMahy earned an associate in science’s degree in interior design from MDC in 1974. DeMahy later worked as a purchasing assistant for Bouterse, Perez and Fabregas Architects Planners, Inc., an architectural firm. She obtained price quotes for suppliers, assembled purchasing packages and built relationships with clients. She took a break from school after graduating from MDC to get married, raise her two children and figure out what she wanted to pursue as a major. ALICE MORENO / THE REPORTER DeMahy eventually earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Florida Next Chapter: West Campus’ Executive Director Ana DeMahy is set to International University. retire on March 31 after working at Miami Dade College for 23 years. She “I love [psychology because] it helped wants her legacy to be the connections she’s made with students. me understand a lot of things in life and people, and triggers for people and individuals,” DeMahy said. “[It’s about] moving forward— potential on a, not deep psychological clinical point of view, how do you overcome hurdles? how do you deal with but more on a superficial level: finding motivation, finding what your love is,” DeMahy said. challenges?” That’s when her tenure at the College began. DeMahy DeMahy developed a passion for education while interning at the guidance center at the Dr. Marvin Dunn Academy started as the Student Life Director at Wolfson Campus, for Community Education in El Portal, where she was even- where she oversaw student government, campus life and clubs. In addition, she taught some psychology courses. tually promoted to dean of students. Eventually, DeMahy made the switch from Wolfson to She worked with kids that had behavioral and attendance West Campus when the late Maria “Toni” Bilbao, who was issues, and enjoyed helping them find solutions. Three years later, DeMahy earned a master’s degree in executive director of West Campus at the time, tabbed her counseling psychology from Nova Southeastern Univer- as director of student services and administrative services. Colleagues describe DeMahy as a perfectionist with an sity. She completed coursework for a doctorate degree from Northeastern University, but never finished her dissertation immense understanding of the College. They also point to her commitment to students. due to family issues. “Ms. DeMahy is someone who has a love for the work she An internship at the Senior Citizen Center in Miami Beach helped DeMahy realize that counseling wasn’t for does with students everyday,” said Veronica Gonzales, diher. She preferred to help select clients on a long-term ba- rector of advisement and career services at West Campus. sis, instead of seeing multiple patients every day for 30-50 “She ensures that everything she does is with the utmost excellence—from choosing a piece of furniture for the camminute sessions. “I liked the piece where I could help people reach their pus to having an interaction with a student.”

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MARCH 24, 2020 | NEWS

THE REPORTER

9

MFF

Movie-Goers Flock To 37th Annual Miami Film Festival

Miami Dade College’s 37th Annual Miami Film Festival was cut short on May 12 due to the coronavirus concerns but not before movie-goers got six days of action. Starting on March 6, the festival, which was originally slated to end on March 15, featured more than 180 screenings at several movie houses across Miami, including the Olympia Theater, Coral Gables Art Cinema, Tower Theatre and Silverspot Cinema. It showcased full-length feature films, short films, documentaries

and more. It was jam packed with red carpet events, Q&A sessions with directors, parties, award ceremonies and a plethora of workshops. The line-up featured a bevy of events including: CinemaSlam, Bakoso: Afrobeats of Cuba, Art of Trailer Editing With Joseph Hackman—Oolite Art Skills Master Class, Experiential Storytelling: Entertainment Spaces of the Future, Knight Heroes, Shorts Programs, Conversation with Josh Fox and more. —Heidi Perez-Moreno

VANESSA GIMENEZ / THE REPORTER

Listen Up: Josh Fox, an Emmy Award-winning and Oscar-Nominated filmmaker, sheds light on environmental conversation and climate change during a discussion with Pure Nonfiction podcast host Thom Powers at the Silverspot Cinema on March 10.

ALICE MORENO / THE REPORTER

BYRON THOMPSON JR / THE REPORTER

Hamming It Up: Jose Navas, who directed and produced the 2019 film El Balsero, poses at the Miami Film Festival’s opening red carpet at The Olympia Theater on March 6.

Class Is In Session: Product designer Savannah Niles is joined by video game designer Lindsay Grace (right) and Paris-based narrative director Alyssa Landry (left), who discuss the usage of virtual reality in modern filmmaking during a masterclass on March 7 at the Silverspot Cinema.

BYRON THOMPSON JR / THE REPORTER

BYRON THOMPSON JR / THE REPORTER

Sharing Knowledge: Film Director Lulu Wang answers questions from the audience during the Knight Heroes discussion at The Olympic Theatre on March 8. She joined film directors Stella Meghie (right) and Joe Talbot (left) as they discuss emerging trends in the film industry. www.mdcthereporter.com

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Welcome Back: President Emeritus Eduardo J. Padrón discusses his love for the Miami Film Festival with reporters during the festival’s opening red carpet at The Olympia Theater on March 6. MDC The Reporter


10 SPORTS | MARCH 24, 2020

THE REPORTER

WOMEN'S SOFTBALL

Freshman Continuing Sister’s Legacy With Lady Sharks ‰‰ Raissa Bianco is one of the Lady Sharks’ best players. She is a starting pitcher and a third baseman for the Miami Dade College softball team and is following in the footsteps of her older sister, Raquelli, who played at MDC from 2012-2014. By Daniel Tamariz daniel.tamariz001@mymdc.net Raissa Bianco is used to following in her sister’s footsteps. When she was four years old, Raissa watched her sister

ALICE MORENO / THE REPORTER

Sister Act II: Raissa Bianco is following in her sister Raquelli's footsteps playing softball for the Lady Sharks. She leads the team in home runs (three) and RBI (25) and is 5-3 on the mound.

Raquelli’s baseball practice and mimicked her moves in Pinhais, Brazil. Seven years later when Raquelli made the transition from baseball to softball, Raissa did the same. So it was almost inevitable that Raissa would follow Raquelli to Miami Dade College, where the older sibling carved out an impressive career from 2012-14 winning 10 games as a freshman and hitting eight home runs the following season. “[They] are very competitive,” said Lady Sharks Head Coach Gina De Agüero, who has coached both sisters. “They are very hard on themselves and definitely do not settle for mediocrity.” Like her sister, Raissa is a dual-threat. The freshman is a starting pitcher and a third baseman for the Lady Sharks. Through 20 games, she is hitting .443, leads the team in home runs (three) and RBI (25), and is 5-3 on the mound with 27 strikeouts. “People think because I’m the older sister that she is the one looking up to me and following my footsteps, but in my opinion, it’s the complete opposite,” Raquelli said. “I admire her passion, work ethic, discipline and [the] kindness she shows in everything she does. She makes it easy to be proud of her.” Raissa started playing softball when she was 11 years old for Central Glória, one of the few teams in Brazil. But problems arose when Raissa’s team was disbanded, so she started playing baseball. Her baseball career took her to Taipei City, Chinese Taipei where her Brazilian national team was invited to the II IBAF 12U Baseball World Cup in 2013. The team finished in 8th place in the tournament. As a teenager, Raissa traveled to Miami to work on her game during the summers. She stayed at the home of Ashley Knapp, who is now her teammate with the Lady Sharks. Raissa, 19, ended up at MDC after De Agüero invited her to practice with the Lady Sharks in the summer of 2019 and offered her a scholarship afterward. “We’ve been through a lot of ups and downs together,” said Knapp, now a sophomore infielder at MDC. “When I’ve gone through hitting slumps, she’s gone with me to the cages to go practice.” Raissa is now helping the Lady Sharks navigate a rough

start. They are 9-16 and have lost three in a row with a bevy of Southern Conference games coming up. They are counting on Raissa and a trio of outfielders to elevate their play. Alexandra Jugenheimer leads the team with a .460 batting average, Tara Melassi has two home runs and has scored 12 runs and Amber Dalfonso is batting .354 batting with 16 runs scored and seven RBI. “Sometimes we play as individuals, and not as a team,” Raissa said. “ We need to work and figure it out.” The Lady Sharks’ next game will be on the road versus Palm Beach State College on March 28 at 1 p.m.

REPORTER FILE PHOTO / IRMA GUTIERREZ

Blast From The Past: Raquelli Bianco played for the Lady Sharks from 2012-2014 and earned First-Team All Southern Conference honors both years. She is now graduate assistant coach at Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach.

MEN'S BASEBALL

Shortstop Getting Offensive For Sharks ‰‰ Sophomore infielder Raphy Almanzar-Rosario has been a big part of the Miami Dade College baseball team’s 15-4 start this season. He is hitting .377 and leading the team with 15 RBI and six doubles this year while providing his trademark stellar defense.

By Jose Tovar jose.tovar007@mymdc.net Coming into this season, shortstop Raphy Almanzar-Rosario was confident about his defense.

ALICE MORENO / THE REPORTER

Defensive Wizard: Sharks' shortstop Raphy Almanzar-Rosario won a gold glove last year and was selected as the Florida College System Activities Association Defensive Player of the Year.

Last year, the Sharks’ slick-fielding infielder won a gold glove and was tabbed as the Florida College System Activities Association Defensive Player of the Year. But he lacked consistency at the plate, batting a mediocre .267 with six doubles in 51 games. This off-season, Almanzar-Rosario made a commitment to improve offensively. He spent the summer playing four games a week in Liga del Cibao, an amateur league in the Domican Republic, took batting practice using softballs instead of baseballs to enhance his power and hit corn kernels to improve his hand-eye coordination. The hard work paid off. Almanzar-Rosario leads the Sharks in RBI (15), doubles (6) and is second in base hits (22) while hitting a robust .377 in 17 games. Despite striking out at an alarming rate—every 4.51 at-bats—his new-found aggressiveness has served him well. “He’s gotten a lot better with the bat,” said Sharks’ head coach Adrian Morales. “Now his game is more well-rounded. He’s not just a defensive player. We trust him now more with the bat and expect him to be one of our key contributors.” Baseball has always been in AlmanzarRosario’s blood. He grew up playing the sport in Bonao, a small city in the Dominican Republic. When he was seven years old he joined Liga Bonao Sport. Originally an outfielder, he switched to the infield at Academia Fausto Mejia when he was 13 because his wiry frame was better suited for the position. Four years later he entered the scouting program Dream Big, which helps Dominican players get baseball scholarships in the United States. On the strength of his defense, Almanzar-Rosario was offered a scholarship www.mdcthereporter.com

to Mid-America Christian University in Oklahoma but picked Miami Dade College on the rec om mendat ion of one of his coaches at Dream Big who knew Danny Price, who was the Sharks’ head baseball coach at the time. A l m a n z a r- R o sario has been an integral part of the Sharks’ strong start this season. The team won 12 of their first 13 games and are off to a 15-4 start including a 7-0 record at home. They have a .329 team batting average (best in ALICE MORENO / THE REPORTER the state) and have scored 111 runs in Carrying A Big Stick: Raphy Almanzar-Rosario, who dedicated 17 games. himself to improving his offensive output this offseason, is hitting “[The] guys are .377 this year for the Miami Dade college baseball team while leadlosing themselves ing the team in RBI (15) and doubles (6). in the game,” Mostraight Southern Conference championrales said. The team’s offensive prowess has been ship and extend their season beyond. “I am more confident [this year]. I know aided by consistent performances from multiple players including second baseman what to do. I know the league. I know the Erick Orbeta (25 base hits), first baseman coaches,” Almanzar-Rosario said. “I believe Sujel Arias-Auzon (.371 BA), third baseman it’s going to be a better year for all of us.” Henry Wallen (10 RBI) and outfielder Ian The Sharks’ next game is at the Kendall CamJenkins (three home runs). With their newfound offensive firepower pus, 11011 S.W. 104th St., baseball field verand a good mix of experience and talent, the sus Eastern Florida State College on March Sharks are looking to capture their second 24 at 3 p.m.

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11

// SPORTS Jose Tovar, Sports Editor  // 

T (305) 237-2715 

// 

B jose.tovar007@mymdc.net

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL

Lady Sharks’ Season Ends At State Tournament ‰‰ The Miami Dade College women’s basketball team participated at the Florida College System Activities Association State Tournament in Niceville from March 4-7. They lost in the semifinals to Gulf Coast State College 71-64. By Jose Tovar jose.tovar007@mymdc.net Miami Dade College’s women’s basketball team was eliminated from the Florida College System Activities Association State Tournament after losing in the semifinal game, 71-64, to Gulf Coast State College on March 6 in Niceville, Florida. ”I feel we were as good, if not better than the other two teams,” said freshman forward Alise Markova. “In the end, it’s always one winner. Unfortunately, this time it wasn’t us.” The Lady Sharks, who were ranked ninth in the state, won their opening round game versus Santa Fe College, 87-82, on March 5. The victory was boosted by a superb performance from sophomore point guard Daliyah Brown. She scored 41 points, grabbed 14 rebounds and delivered seven assists in that game. However, their luck ended at the semifinals. They were ahead most of the game, and took a 37-30 lead going into halftime; however, their fate was sealed in the last five minutes of action. The score was tied at 62 with four minutes and 55 seconds left to play, before the Commodore’s took control, outscoring the Lady Sharks 9-2 down the stretch. The Lady Sharks finished the season with a 20-12 record and a rocky 7-5 mark in conference play. They oftentimes struggled with consistency, following up wins with

losses. Miami Dade College started the season strong with a 6-2 record in November, but faded in December, going 3-4 during that stretch. After the winter break, they went 11-6 from January to March. It was the first time in three years that the Lady Sharks failed to capture the Southern Conference title. Led by strong performances from Brown and freshman forward Nazlah Morrow, the team boasted impressive numbers this season. The Lady Sharks team ranked first in the state in three-point and free-throw percentages with 36.1% and 74% respectively. They also ranked third in rebounds (49.1) and blocks per game (5.5). “I’m proud of my team and what we have accomplished,” Morrow said. “We played strong and we played together. That’s all I can ever ask of my team.” Several players were given top honors after the tournament. Brown (First in the nation with 26.6 points per game, 9.1 RPG), Morrow (14.5 PPG, 9.6 RPG) and freshman point guard Ahmari Young ALICE MORENO / THE REPORTER (10.9 PPG) were selected to the FCSAA All-SouthEnd Of The Road: The Lady Sharks, who were 20-12 this season, were ern Conference First Team. eliminated from the State Tournament on March 6 after losing to Three freshmen—guard Anija Payne (9.3 RPG), forward Alise Markova (6 PPG, 5.7 RPG) and center Gulf Coast State College, 71-64, in Niceville, Florida. Larissa Abreu (8.2 PPG)—also received All-Southern Conference Second Team awards. believes the loss at the State Tournament will serve as motiBrown, who was named Southern Conference Player of vation for next season. the Year for the second consecutive year, will leave a big of“This is a talented group of freshmen,” Summons said. fensive void to fill next season. She received a scholarship to “These players will work harder, be more hungry and moplay at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. tivated to get back to and be in the State Championship Head Women’s Basketball Coach Susan Summons finals.”

WE’RE LOOKING FOR

SPORTS WRITERS. Think you have what it takes? Step up to the plate.

For more information, contact Manolo Barco: (305) 237-1255 or mbarco@mdc.edu www.mdcthereporter.com

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12 A&E | MARCH 24, 2020

THE REPORTER

NINTENDO

How The Coronavirus Is Affecting Production Of The Nintendo Switch ‰‰ Gabriel Gatica writes about the effect of the recent coronavirus outbreak in Asia on the manufacturing process of Nintendo Switch, a video game console produced in Japan by the consumer electronics company and video game developer Nintendo Co. By Gabriel Gatica gabriel.gatica001@mymdc.net Nintendo Co. is feeling the effect of the coronavirus. Shuntaro Furukawa, CEO of the consumer electronics company, confirmed in a news briefing with Reuters that Nintendo Co. is experiencing production and shipping delays of its Switch console and complementary accessories like the Joy-Con controllers. The Kyoto-based company moved part of its production line from China to Vietnam last year to escape the financial barriers brought by the Sino-American trade war, Reuters reports. However, the coronavirus outbreak in China poses new barriers for Nintendo Co. According to Bloomberg, the outbreak has slowed down the export of manufacturing materials from China to Vietnam, where a major assembly factory used to build consoles for retail in the United States is located. Lack of manufacturing components to build the Switch consoles this month means that once existing inventory is sold through, Nintendo Co. will be faced with insufficient supply of the product. The video game developer will likely be unable to meet

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANTHONY ASHLEY

Manufacturing Problems: The coronavirus outbreak has taken a toll on the Japanese manufacturing process of the Nintendo Switch, a video game console produced by Nintendo Co. consumer’s demand for the Switch console in its United States and European markets. Bloomberg reports that “people with knowledge of the company’s supply chain” foresee shortages of the Switch console as soon as April. Nintendo Co. had previously reassured consumers that the coronavirus would not impact production for their U.S. and European markets.

“We can confirm that the manufacturing of some Nintendo products for the Japanese market has been delayed due to the impact of 2019-nCoV coronavirus outbreak,” the company said in a statement to the technology blog network Engadget. “Nintendo does not anticipate a significant impact on our broader global supply chain for systems and accessories at this time, and product sales in North

America and Europe, including pre-orders, are not affected.” However, issues with production coming from the coronavirus have already impacted the Japanese market. Nintendo Co. is expected to release a Switch console with a special design based on the upcoming life simulation video game Animal Crossing: New Horizons. The release date has been delayed

to March 20, however, with pre-orders being pushed back from Feb. 8 to March 7. This isn’t the first time that Nintendo Co. has faced adversity in their manufacturing process. The video game giant has previously struggled to keep up with large demand for the Switch console, as it happened during the console’s initial release in March 2017. Lewis Ward, the director for gaming of the International Data Corporation, told CNBC that despite high sales, Nintendo Co. could have made a bigger profit when the Switch console was first released. Sadly, it is not just Nintendo that is feeling the impact of the coronavirus. Sony announced on Feb. 19 that it will not attend the PAX East gaming convention due to concerns about the health and safety of their workforce in face of the coronavirus outbreak, GamesIndustry reported. According to Business Insider, Sony was scheduled to show 25 new games—including “Final Fantasy VII Remake” and “The Last of Us: Part 2”—for PlayStation 4. Facebook followed in Sony’s footsteps a day later, announcing their future absence from PAX East. Smaller companies are also feeling the consequences of the virus, with developer Private Division postponing their version of The Outer Worlds for Nintendo Switch until further notice. Only time will tell how Nintendo and other video game developers will react to the growing international threat that is the coronavirus.

FOREIGN FILMS

Parasite Shines Spotlight On Foreign Films ‰‰ Sebastian Castellanos uses the South Korean drama and mystery film Parasite, which became the first non-English movie to win an Oscar earlier this year, to explain why the public should be more open to watching foreign films. By Sebastian Castellanos sebas.castellanos002@mymdc.net At the 92nd Oscars, the big winner for Best Picture was given to the little movie that could: Parasite. The South Korean thriller created a landmark moment when it became the first foreign-language movie to win Best Picture, beating Martin Scorses’s crime epic The Irishman, Quentin Taratino’s love letter to old Hollywood in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and Todd Philips’s mature take on the classic Batman villain Joker— all of which many saw as clear frontrunners. The movie, written and directed by Bong Joon-Ho, also won the most awards of the ceremony with the titles Best Foreign Language Film, Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay and Best Director. Parasite has been sailing on a tsunami of positive word of mouth and critical acclaim since winning the Cannes Film Festival’s highest prize, the Palme d’Or. The film’s first screens debuted in America

took place in New York and Los Angeles during the month of October, selling out almost all tickets. According to Business Insider, the movie earned a whopping $376,264 in that sole month. After expanding nationwide, the film went on to earn a total of around $35.5 million in the United States and amassed a worldwide total of around $165 million, The New York Times reports. The runaway success of Parasite, the discovery of Joon-Ho’s other films by the mainstream public, and the advancement of digital distribution through Netflix and Amazon has opened a discussion about foreign-language movies. With streaming services like Netflix and Amazon’s Prime Video, watching a foreign movie is as simple as touching a screen with one’s fingertip. This year alone, Netflix has acquired the distribution of two Oscar nominees, the French animated film I Lost My Body and the Mexican epic drama film Roma. It also bought worldwide rights to the Senegalese and French awardwinning movie Atlantics. Amazon Studios has followed on Netflix’s footsteps, acquiring the rights of France’s Les Miserables and Brazil’s The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao. The company also distributed the 2018 Oscarnominated Polish film Cold War

and the 2016 Iranian film The Salesman. The latter got attention after the United States placed a travel ban on Iran that prevented the film’s director, Asghar Farhadi, from attending the Academy

Awards and receiving the Best International Film award he won. Not only have these streaming services acquired distributing rights for these international movies, but they also have gotten

licenses to temporarily stream films owned by other distributors. This creates a wealth of movies from all around the world waiting to be discovered.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CJ ENTERTAINMENT

Game Changer: South Korean movie Parasite, the winner of the Best Picture award at the 92nd Academy Awards, has opened up the door for non-English movies to succeed in the Western film industry.

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MARCH 24, 2020 | A&E

THE REPORTER

13

// A&E Adriana Dos Santos, A&E Editor  // 

MOVIES

T (305) 237-1254 

// 

B adriana.dossantos002@mymdc.net

The Best Five Movies Since 2019

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‰‰ Leslie Badillo gives you her list of the best movies released since 2019. This is her personal top five list with details on what makes them stand out. By Leslie Badillo leslie.badillo001@mymdc.net Despite 2020 just being three months in, there are already a lot of interesting films out there for moviegoers to watch. Last year was also a great year for movie lovers to watch a widevariety of films. Here are my top five movies to watch since 2019: 5. Parasite Parasite is a foreign film that won four awards at the 92nd Academy Awards. The movie became the first non-English film to win an Oscar, amassing huge fandom, boosting

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PHOTO COURTESY OF NETFLIX

its box office sales since then. The movie, centered on economic class discrimation, shows the poor Kim family con their way into the wealthy Park family. Once they infiltrate, the Kims create a never-ending mayhem full of surprises and cinema twists. If there’s a reason to go see Parasite, besides its amazing ensemble and brilliant director Bong Joon-ho, it’s the originality portrayed by the dark thriller comedy.

Rosie Perez and Ella Jay Basco. The movie is also directed by Chinese-born American film director Cathy Yan. Although underperforming at the box office, many consider Birds of Prey as one of DC’s best comic book-to-film adaptations and has been praised for its visuals, performances and soundtrack. This fun and ambitious movie is definitely worth watching.

childhood through womanhood. The love, warmth, friendship and sisterhood in this movie will have you hugging those you love as a sign of appreciation.

3. Little Women 4. Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey Birds of Prey is the eighth installment of the extended DC Universe. It features Harley Quinn becoming allies with three unexpected women in an attempt to survive the target on her back after her breakup with the Joker leaves her vunerable. The film stands out because of its largely female cast including: Margot Robbie, Jurnee SmolletBell, Mary Elizabeth Winstead,

Greta Gerwig’s film adaptation of the popular novel Little Women hit theaters last December on Christmas Day. The six-time Oscar winner has been praised ever since for a starstudded cast that includes actors Saoirse Ronan, Laura Dern, Timothée Chalamet, Emma Watson and Florence Pugh. Little Women centers on the lives of the four March sisters and emphasizes their journey from

2. To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You is the sequel of To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before. It was released by Netflix on Feb. 12 and explores Lara Jean’s love conflict when she reunites with another recipient of one of her old love letters while in a relationship with Peter. The movie received mixed reviews, with some praising the relationship between Lara Jean, Peter Kavinsky and John Ambrose played by Jordan Fisher, and others criticizing the switch from a female to a male director. A third installment of the series will be released next year, so we’ll have to wait and see if it will live

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up to the series’ standards. 1. Honey Boy Honey Boy is a drama that describes the childhood of actor Shia LaBeouf. The film showcases the contentious relationship between 12-year-old Otis (who represents LaBeouf) and his abusive father (played by LaBeouf himself) after the child begins finds success as a television star. Shia LaBeouf wrote the movie’s script as a form of therapy during court-ordered drug rehab. His writing then turned into a film. Honey Boy is raw, honest and therapeutic. The performances of Noah Jupe and Lucas Hedges (both of who play Otis), as well as LaBeouf’s, are worthy of praise and attention. Director Alma Har’el made the film strikingly beautiful and helped convey the depths of a heartwrenching story.

STREAMING SERVICES

Watch Movies For Free On Swank And Kanopy ‰‰ Kevin Boulandier writes about Swank and Kanopy, two streaming services that give Miami Dade College students free access to films, movies and documentaries. By Kevin Boulandier kevin.boulandier001@mymdc.net Did you know that every student at Miami Dade College has free access to a wide variety of movies on Swank and Kanopy, two streaming services they can access on the College’s website? Yes, you read that right: the movies are free. The College partnered with Swank Motion Pictures and Kanopy to give students access to the catalog of movies that they can stream at any moment of the day. Swank is more for the modern crowd. It features motion pictures that have aired in the movie theaters and have been mass distributed. Examples include A Star Is Born, the Harry Potter series, Titanic

and The Jeffrey Dahmer Files. Kanopy will touch the hearts of those who enjoy films based on more classic topics like Metropolis and Finding Altamira. The platform offers classic cinema, indie films, documentaries and international films from all over the world. Its catalog includes films that have aired at the Sundance Film Festival and the Tribeca Film Festival. The films offered by Kanopy and Swank are comparable to those provided by more common streaming platforms like Netflix or Hulu without the cost. “[These platforms cost] about 20 dollars a month to have access to them,” said professor Carmen Mise, who teaches English at North Campus. “Instead of having to pay a monthly fee, students can watch a lot of film and entertainment for free.” The cost of streaming services can be painful to college students who are often on a tight budget. Money saved on monthly

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subscription fees can be used to buy books or a bus pass. “The college wants equity,” said Israel Sanchez, library director at North Campus. “Many students are financially struggling and having access to movies, documentaries and videos puts them at the same level as anyone else in the country.” The partnership between MDC and the streaming services began several years ago, when the College’s library switched from storing videos on DVDs to streaming them online. Sanchez said the transition was the College’s way to stay on top of the technological evolution and the world students live in. “[The transition was meant to] meet the students where they are because streaming provides additional access to students,” Sanchez said. “Anywhere you have internet, you can stream the platforms.” Partnering with Swank and Kanopy also provides professors with new resources that facilitate

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PHOTO COURTESY OF KANOPY

Free Movies: All Miami Dade College students can access Swank and Kanopy, two film streaming services, for free at the College’s website. the way they teach classes. “Some of the films are documentaries, so some faculty can use it in conjunction with their curriculum,” Sanchez said. “For example, in a course of English students can read a book that has a film adaptation on one of the platforms and watch it.” Some films even have transcripts that students can use as sources for research papers or can MDC The Reporter

include in their presentations, as Faculty Librarian Erin Fennell noted. To access Swank and Kanopy, students can use the following link: https://libraryguides.mdc. edu/c.php?g=392611&p=2667199. The page will ask for a borrower ID and a pin. The borrower ID is the student’s MDC ID, while the pin is the last four digits of that same MDC ID.


14 FORUM | MARCH 24, 2020

THE REPORTER

YOUTUBE

Let’s End Youtube's Cancel Culture

‰‰ Natalie Gutierrez brings attention to the toxic issue of cancel culture in Youtube and discusses how cancelling influencers enables cyberbullying and leads to alienation.

By Natalie Gutierrez natalie.gutierrez007@mymdc.net In recent years, cancel culture has emerged within the YouTube community. This culture refers to a boycott of a person, usually a celebrity or influencer, who has voiced an unpopular opinion or has acted in an arguably offensive manner, resulting in them being called out on social media. The idea of canceling was prompted by a higher demand for influencers to take accountability for their words and wrongdoings and while accountability is necessary, the act of cancelling has only made YouTube a hostile, toxic and unhealthy online environment for users and content creators. Notable examples of cancelled Youtubers include James Charles and Logan Paul. In January 2018, influencer Logan Paul became notorious for uploading a video of he and his friends visiting Japan’s Aokigahara forest, a suicide site, where he came across a dead person’s body and filmed it. Upon discovering the corpse, he COFFEE

proceeded to senselessly crack jokes. The internet outrage followed him almost immediately after the video’s release. Many claimed it was insensitive for him to ridicule and disrespect the suicide victim and his or her family. Paul lost subscribers, faced countless death threats and lost business deals. In fact, according to the Huffington Post, a petition was made seeking to remove him from Youtube; it gathered approximately 500,000 signatures. Fellow Youtuber Rebecca Black and actress Sophie Turner also scolded Paul for his lack of social awareness. Despite posting an apology video in which he promised to “be better,” viewers still attacked him for being self-praising and uploading inappropriate content to begin with. Since this incident, he has been involved in more controversies, though not as significant. Still, regardless of the internet’s attempts to officially cancel Paul, he manages to keep coming back. A more recent example is the cancelling of beauty guru James Charles last year. In May 2019, makeup star Tati Westbrook posted a video titled “Bye Sister” explaining why she was no longer interested in having a professional or personal relationship with Charles. To contextualize, Westbrook owns her own vitamin company called Halo Beauty and, according to her video, Charles advertised a rival supplement’s company on social media, which she deemed a betrayal. She also accused him of using his fame as a tool for manipulative behavior. This tarnished his reputation in a matter of days, so much so that he lost about three million subscribers after having reached 15 million. Death threats flooded his comment

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sections and he was soon considered cancelled by the beauty community. To everyone’s surprise, Charles pulled an UNO reverse card, as they say. In a 41-minute video titled “No More Lies,” James Charles essentially debunked every single accusation made by Westbrook, showing “receipts” or evidence—which mostly consisted of text messages and direct messages on Instagram—that proved Westbrook’s blatant dishonesty about the situation. He regained his followers shortly after and was able to bounce back. The most disheartening aspect of this though was the quick, easy willingness of people to bully

and cancel the young YouTube star, without knowing both sides of the story. In conclusion, cancel culture, especially within Youtube, only promotes cyberbullying and the dehumanization of people. While YouTube personalities should not evade responsibility for their actions, it is important to recognize that they are human and make mistakes, just as their subscribers do. There are more effective ways to have these influencers learn their lesson. Cancelling the cancel culture is perhaps the first step to getting rid of this toxic mentality.

No Coffee, No Problem

‰‰ Suseth Mena writes about the widespread consumption of caffeinated beverages among college students and how this leads to sleep deprivation, ultimately hindering health.

By Suseth Mena suseth.mena001@mymdc.net There are more than 700 Starbucks locations in the state of Florida. Most of them are in heavily populated areas near schools and jobs enticing people of all ages, but a large portion of its customers are young adults in the 18 to 24 age demographic. In addition to easy access, social jetlag and recurrent all-nighters join forces to create the perfect storm for college students to continue the cycle of over-caffeinating and undersleeping. This chronic lack of sleep is associated with deleterious short-term and long-term effects that can ultimately lead to greater morbidity and a shortened

lifespan. According to the American Chemical Society, adenosine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that inhibits the activity of neurons and is one of the reasons we feel sleepy at the end of the day. It builds up every hour throughout the day and binds to the adenosine receptors on neurons. Once it binds, proteins that slow down nerve activity are released resulting in drowsiness after many hours of buildup. Interestingly, caffeine has a similar structure to adenosine. It binds to adenosine receptors and ultimately blocks adenosine from binding. This tricks the brain into thinking that it is earlier in the day and results in wakefulness. While this might be exactly what college students are trying to achieve, an unintended side effect is that their sleep at night can be compromised. Caffeine’s half-life is approximately six hours, meaning that half of it will still be in the body six hours after it is initially consumed. Because many young adults drink coffee or other caffeinated beverages more than once per day, many of them may be going to sleep with a non negligible amount of caffeine still not metabolized in their body, leaving them jittery and unable to fall asleep at night. Why does this really matter? Sleep can be broken down into non-rapid eye movement (NREM)

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and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Some research indicates that the deep stages of NREM sleep are associated with memory consolidation which is when short-term memory is converted to long-term memory, and REM sleep is crucial to learning. Low REM sleep has also been associated with increased depression, anxiety, and suicidality. A college student cannot optimally study or learn with seven hours or less of sleep each night. This not only impacts creativity, problemsolving, and GPA but ultimately

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every student’s future. These effects can be seen even after just one night of sleep restriction, but in the long run, chronic sleep deprivation is associated with dementia and cancer. Sleep deprivation can cause increased sympathetic nervous system activation which is what triggers the fight or flight response. The sympathetic nervous system stimulates the adrenal glands to release adrenaline and noradrenaline which keep us alert. Noradrenaline, however, also causes glial cells in the brain to swell.

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Glial cells, a part of the recently discovered glymphatic system, shrink during sleep to allow cerebrospinal fluid, or CSF, to clear the brain of toxic proteins such as beta amyloid and tau protein—both of which are associated with Alzheimer’s disease. In an NIH funded mouse study, it was suggested these cells swell during the day and during states of chronic sleep deprivation which reduces CSF flow and brain cleansing. In other words, there may be a link between a lack of sleep and the eventual onset of dementia. Natural killer cells attack and eliminate cells infected with viruses and tumor cells. Research indicates that restricting sleep can reduce natural killer cell activity after one night of sleep loss and increase the risk of dying from cancer. In 2019, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that night shift work is a probable carcinogen which is another indicator that sleep deprivation should not be taken lightly. The brain does not finish developing until one reaches approximately 25 years of age. College students, the majority of which are younger than 25, are particularly susceptible to the negative consequences of sleep deprivation, and the habit of drinking excessive amounts of caffeinated beverages throughout the day to function is not helping one bit.

MDC The Reporter


MARCH 24, 2020 | FORUM

THE REPORTER

15

// FORUM Alexa Hernández, Forum Editor  // 

ADOPT

T (305) 237-1253 

// 

B alexa.hernandez004@mymdc.net

Why You Should Adopt, Not Shop

‰‰ Victoria Avalo addresses the “adopt, don’t shop” movement and why adopting a pet from an animal shelter and not a breeder or puppy mill makes all the difference in the world.

up for adoption. They are of all breeds, ages and desperately need a home. This devastating situation is present all throughout the country and has sparked the “adopt, don’t shop” movement. The goal of “adopt, don’t shop” is not only to clear the shelters but to shut down stores like Petland and breeders that have been sued for harsh conditions and have been investigated and deemed not only unsanitary but negligent toward animals. The fact that people ignore this reality breaks my heart. My

passion for this movement began with Frankie. Frankie was a bulldog that ran into the school I work at and was underweight and desperate. He wasn’t a regular street dog and didn’t know how to walk on the road. After chasing him around for two hours, I finally managed to catch him and get him home. After bathing him and feeding him, he was taken to the shelter in Doral and claimed by his family. From that day on, my heart was empty, and I wanted another dog. For about a week I searched the

By Victoria Avalo victoria.avalo001@mymdc.net Pets are a part of our lives. Everyone wants one and eventually most people experience a pet. When looking for a pet, the right fit seems impossible. There are so many choices and breeds. Everyone wants a purebred kitten or a puppy. This raises the question of where to go to find a kitten or puppy. Many people choose places like Petland or go to breeders without realizing that there are thousands of animals up for adoption in their city. In the Doral shelter alone, there are around 500 dogs and 70 cats

ALEXA HERNANDEZ / THE REPORTER

shelter’s website and came across Oreo. Oreo was a six month old mutt who caught my eye from the minute I saw her. She was a bigger dog and had been adopted previously but abused and then returned. After begging and pleading for another dog, I went to Doral and picked up Oreo. From that day on, she became part of the family. Watching her grow has been amazing. In the beginning she was very cautious and skittish toward everything but over time she became more comfortable and accepted her new lifestyle. Adopting Oreo changed my life. She has made me more social— since I go to the dog park often so she can play with her friends. She has changed the way the whole family interacts with each other. She has positively impacted our other dog by making her more active, to the point where her arthritis is completely gone. Compared to our other dog who was from a breeder, Oreo is very different. She is more grateful and loving. She deeply appreciates us, while our other dog is simply accustomed to her lifestyle. Not only are people making a meaningful difference in the world by adopting and rescuing a pet, they are finding a lifelong companion.

COMMUNICATION

Can We Just Talk About It? ‰‰ Lucia Galeano addresses the lack of communication skills among many people growing up in the 21st century and how schools can play a crucial role in teaching students to effectively partake in civil discourse.

By Lucia Galeano lucia.galeano001@mymdc.net With the upcoming elections, we have all seen how unwilling politicians are to cross the aisle and work together for the sake of the people. It is frustrating to witness our country’s leaders so against one another that they do

not even display actions of common courtesy. However, upon closer inspection, their behavior simply mirrors how people have been acting for the past decade: unwilling to listen. Having grown up in the last decade, where mediums of communication have increased greatly, it is shocking to see how we have lost this core action of speaking to each other. This is mostly seen when discussing politics with others. Everyone has their beliefs and values and they also usually don’t seem to shy away from expressing them. Still, when the switch is flipped, people have difficulty understanding or empathising with those that have opposite beliefs. Some even become frustrated and the conversation turns into an argument. I would like to explore where this stems from, whether it stems from the classroom, technological advancements, or something else. Focusing on public school and looking at how class time is divided, there is an emphasis on

learning the material and understanding it. Rarely, though, is there a time to discuss it and gather different opinions from students. While it is difficult to see how this can affect someone negatively in the moment, these situations may hinder students from being effective communicators in the future and being capable of carrying a conversation with someone who has opposing views. One needs to develop these communication skills, such as patience, empathy, and respect, in order to effectively have these difficult conversations. While some may argue that these conversations should be had within the family, children typically inherit their beliefs from their parents. Therefore, it would be difficult to have a conversation with different perspectives within a family. Perhaps another reason for people not communicating effectively is that they are not used to receiving responses to their comments. With the start and rise of social media in the past decade, there is a whole new generation

that expresses their beliefs on various platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. This is problematic because when having a conversation about beliefs, or even just posting about them, it is difficult to communicate effectively since one is not physically with the other person. Instead, only the ability to agree and disagree with the post exists. When adding this to the lack of communication skills that people have, it is not hard to see why conversations on social media typically become heated arguments. What can be done about this, though? Perhaps we could start by implementing time in classrooms to discuss the material in greater depth among students. This would allow students to develop skills in listening and understanding at an early age. Ultimately, this can only start if we begin to have conversations about how to effectively have a conversation. Otherwise, we will continue to become less able to listen and fall deeper down the spiral of polarization.

To write for the forum section, contact: Alexa Hernández at (305) 237-1254 or alexa.hernandez004@mymdc.net

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MDC The Reporter

The Reporter is the free, biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty or student body.

Bureaus ———————————

North Campus Bureau covers North, West, Hialeah and MEEC B 11380 N.W. 27th Ave. Room 4209 Miami, FL 33167 T (305) 237-1254 ————————————————— Kendall Campus Bureau covers Kendall and Homestead B 11011 S.W. 104th St. Room M239 Miami, FL 33176 T (305) 237-2715 ————————————————— Wolfson Campus Bureau covers Wolfson, Medical and Eduardo J. Padrón B 300 N.E. Second Ave. Suite 1610 Miami, FL 33132 T (305) 237-3368

Editorial Board ——————————— Heidi Perez-Moreno Editor-in-Chief/Briefing Editor/Social Media Director Adriana Dos Santos A&E Editor Alexa Hernández Forum Editor Jose Tovar Sports Editor

Issue Staff ——————————— Victoria Avalo, Leslie Badillo, Kevin Boulandier, Sebastian Castellanos, Beatriz Fernandez, Lucia Galeano, Roxy Garcia, Gabriel Gatica, Vanessa Gimenez, Patrick Gross, Natalie Gutierrez, Suseth Mena, Claudia Mazorra Morales, Alice Moreno, Sean Mow, Alenis Olivera, Danelis Olivera-Herrera, Alexander Ontiveros, William Sanchez, Daniel Tamariz, Byron Thompson Jr., Elena Torrens

Manolo Barco, Media Adviser B mbarco@mdc.edu T NORTH.........................(305) 237-1255 T KENDALL......................(305) 237-2323 T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3477 Aracelia Diez, Student Media Assistant

B adiez@mdc.edu T WOLFSON....................(305) 237-3368 ——————————— Letters to the Editor ——————————— The Reporter welcomes letters to the editor. All submissions should be 300 words or less and must be typed. Writers must include their full name, contact number, campus, student number and e-mail address. Faculty and staff should include the title, department and extension. All letters are subject to editing for purposes of brevity and clarity. Letters can be sent via e-mail to mdc.thereporter@gmail.com, with the subject “letter to the editor.”

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