June 17

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June 17, 2022

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Community Salutes Slain Officer

See Page 28 • Photo by Campos Media

Tindley Mural Underway In Berlin

Air Show Weekend:

Ocean City hosted the 15th Annual OC Air Show last weekend, including the U.S. Air Photo by Chris Parypa Force Thunderbirds. See page 62 for more photos.

See Page 18 • Photo by Charlene Sharpe

State Allocates Route 90 Funding

See Page 34 • Photo by Charlene Sharpe

Significant Inlet Changes Proposed

Main Street Racing: A large crowd turned out for the 32nd Annual Berlin Bathtub Races last Friday night.

See page 78 for more photos.

Photo by Charlene Sharpe

See Page 4 • File Photo


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Inlet Improvement Plan Released

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

The yellow lines above represent the proposed channel boundary compared to the existing channel boundary marked in black. The thicker red line is a proposed breakwaters extension and spur with the blue box marking shoal removal. The smaller red area marked is another shoal removal. Photo by Army Corps

OCEAN CITY – In the latest effort to address ongoing silting in of the Ocean City Inlet and erosion on the north end of Assateague, federal officials released a draft of a more permanent solution. The Inlet and other channels in and around the commercial harbor naturally fill in and are in constant need of maintenance dredging, but the problem has become more acute in recent years to the point the Inlet is often impassable and unnavigable for larger vessels on even the highest of tides. The federal Army Corps of Engineers (ACE), with its state and local partners have been studying the conditions in and around the Inlet to alleviate the need for continued maintenance dredging and the constant erosion of the north end of Assateague

June 17, 2022

Island. The National Park Service (NPS) is a cooperating agency in the proposed project, with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Worcester County as the local project sponsors. The ACE has completed a draft Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the project as now proposed. The draft FONSI and EA are now available for public consumption and the clock is ticking on the public comment period as originally prescribed. If the project is approved and completed as planned, the Inlet and the areas around the north end of Assateague could change dramatically. “The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is proposing to realign approximately 3,360 liner feet of the Ocean City Inlet navigation channel to immediately south of its current position, where most water is already at the federally-authorized 10-foot depth,” the ACE public notice of availability reads. “ACE also proposes to construct two 300-foot-long rock structures, or 600-feet total, to close the gaps in the existing breakwaters at the north end of Assateague Island, and to construct a 150-foot-long jetty extending to the northwest into Sinepuxent Bay.” In its notice of public availability, ACE said the proposed drafts of the plan were developed after careful study in recent years. “From 2019 to 2021, ACE investigated physical environmental conditions, conducted extensive public and agency coordination, formulated alternatives, and modeled effects of alternatives using sediment and hydrologic computer models,” the notice reads. “The proposed navigation improvements are based on these economic, engineering and environmental analyses.” On its social media page, Assateague Island National Seashore posted a perhaps more succinct description of the project as proposed. “The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is proposing to realign the Ocean City Inlet navigation channel, close the existing gaps in the breakwaters along the north end of Assateague Island, and construct a new jetty extension to the northwest into Sinepuxent Bay,” the statement reads. “In according with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Army Corps has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment that is currently available for public review and comment.” While most agree the shoaling problem at the Inlet needs to be addressed, not everyone is pleased with the proposed solution. Closing the gaps in the breakwaters, for example, could cut off water access to the north end of Assateague entirely, or at least to some degree, an area popular for recreational boaters. Local recreational boater Robert Dougherty said this week he didn’t have a problem with some aspects of the proposed project, but voiced concern about closing the gaps and cutting off or limiting access to the north end of Assateague for boaters and Jet-Skis, for example. SEE PAGE 7


June 17, 2022

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June 17, 2022

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June 17, 2022

FROM PAGE 4 “I have spent leisure time at the north end of Assateague Island for over 30 years,” he said. “In my opinion, the access to this island is a local treasure and landmark. I am against filling in the gap between the first and second from the ocean. I agree the gap between the second and third jetties should be filled in due to erosion over the last five to 10 years. I have not witnessed much erosion between the first and second jetties.” Dougherty said last weekend’s Air Show and the traffic on the water around the north end of Assateague was evidence of the potential impact. “They’re going to close those gaps,” he said. “It will restrict access to any people that visit that north end of Assateague by vessel or Jet-Ski, and there are a lot of them. During the Air Show last week, there were hundreds of people out there.” Again, while most agree the Inlet issue needs to be addressed, Dougherty said this week it appears ACE is trying to bite off too much of the proposed project at once. He suggested closing just one of the two gaps at the north end of Assateague to determine if it is effective before tackling both. “I understand what they are trying to do,” he said. “It affects a lot of people. I don’t see why they can’t start out with a baby step. I think there is an opportunity for compromise here and still accomplish

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their goals. It doesn’t have to be all or nothing. Once they dump all of those rocks in there, they will never come out, whether the project is effective or not.” Dougherty said one of his biggest concerns, however, is the apparent lack of access for comments from the general public on the proposed project. The public notice of availability was released on May 23, setting in motion a 30-day public comment period on the draft proposals. The ACE public notice of availability includes a phone contact for an agency representative, but Dougherty said he tried the number multiple times, and it didn’t lead to the correct contact person. He said this week ACE officials acknowledged the glitch, but that he would like to see the public comment period extended until the problem is completely resolved. “My concern is they need to re-establish the time clock for the public comment period,” he said. “It seems like they got the information out to the people who are in favor of this, but not the public in general. Due to the inability to successfully communicate, I believe the public comment period should be extended from the point where there is a good working number for someone to inquire and ask questions and be able to gain knowledge and answers about this project.” The draft EA and the FONSI are available on the ACE website at www.nab.usace.army.mil/oceancity.

Through June 19th

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Bus Service Struggles With Driver Shortage, Ridership

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – In what amounts to essentially a chicken or egg situation, the resort’s municipal bus service continues to struggle with a driver shortage and associated decline in ridership. During Wednesday’s Ocean City Transportation Committee meeting, members got an overview of early summer season ridership numbers and a review of where the transit department stands on driver recruitment. While the system continues to meet the demand in general, there are times when the deployments and the need for more drivers are creating challenges. During the monthly meetings, the committee members review ridership numbers based on the latest available data. Because 2020 and much of 2021 were a

wash for the municipal bus system, 2019 is used as a baseline for comparison purposes. Transit Manager Rob Shearman said the numbers for early spring compared favorably to 2019, but there has been a noticeable drop-off since. “I felt like 2022 ridership was running close to 2019 earlier this year,” he said. “That was true until about mid-May. Now, I think we’re around two-thirds.” Just like about every other town department, transportation has struggled with recruiting and retaining personnel. As a result, the number of drivers available, and thus the number of deployments, continued to curtail the number of buses available at certain times, according to Shearman. “Our deployment currently is about 75% of what is was at the same time in 2019,” he said. So far in June, disturbingly, we’re deploying about 50% of where we were in

2019.” When asked if the recent decline in ridership was related to the lack of available drivers and deployments, Shearman said that is just one part of a larger equation. “It’s a variety of factors,” he said. “There is still some anxiety about COVID transmission among some riders. I do believe we’re leaving some people on bus stops.” Shearman said the town’s articulating buses were helping with moving people around during peak times with less drivers and less deployments, but that has not come without its challenges. Two of the town’s eight articulating buses are currently in the shop with various issues, making the number available at six. Public Works Director Hal Adkins said those two articulating buses in the shop could be deployed again soon, and there are more on the way.

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“We still have two artics in the grant tunnel,” he said. “That will get us back to eight. That should help address some of the ridership numbers.” Of course, through the first few weeks of June, the majority of the resort’s municipal bus system ridership is driven by recent graduates, often fraught with problems associated with young adults. Operations Manager George Peake said that has not changed this year, but that there have been few incidents on the buses and few cases of vandalism or destruction of property. “The graduates are still the bulk of our ridership at this time of June,” he said. “Generally speaking, this is the rough week. We haven’t seen any real issues. So far, so good.” Peake said the deployment and ridership numbers could go hand in hand. The number of municipal bus drivers currently available is 67. In the base-line year of 2019, there were 120 available. Peake said there were currently five drivers on medical leave, although a few could be returning shortly. Eight school bus drivers are also expected to join the ranks now that the school year is nearing its end. Peake said with the addition of the school bus drivers and the couple in the Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) process, the town could get to around 75, which could handle the peak demands for the transit system. Of course, keeping the town’s municipal bus fleet up and running is always challenging. Peake said there is also a dire need for vehicle technicians. “We have three currently,” he said. We’d really like to have 12. Our plan is to get through the season and re-evaluate. We’re going to do a lot of cross-training in the offseason, where our personnel can drive buses, be vehicle technicians or dispatchers, or whatever else we need at a given time.” With the shortage of drivers and the associated decline in deployments, a question arose about the service to the Park-and-Ride in West Ocean City. Peake explained there is one 10-hour shift dedicated to making a loop to the Park-andRide, which ends at 9 p.m. each day. After that, dispatchers will deploy a bus from its loop in town to meet the demand, if necessary, at the West Ocean City facility. The town’s municipal bus service provides a link for employees that connect to jobs in Ocean City via the Shore Transit system, but Peake said the demand is generally low. “The Park-and-Ride is not very popular right now,” he said. “There is no real demand to go over there after the last Shore Transit stop.” Mayor Rick Meehan said while it is important to provide transportation into town utilizing Shore Transit to reach the resort from other areas, he questioned if the transit department’s resources and manpower could be better served in town. “We need to maximize our resources,” he said. “If the number of riders is two, then maybe we need to reconsider a dedicated loop over there. We need to look at getting as many buses as we can on Coastal Highway during those hours when the downtown area is emptying out.”


Bond Agencies Hear ‘A Good Story’ With County Tour

June 17, 2022

BY CHARLENE SHARPE STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Two major credit rating agencies toured the Ocean City area this week as Worcester County prepares for the bond market. Officials provided representatives from two credit rating companies with a tour highlighting local attractions on Tuesday. While officials typically share the county’s pertinent information during a meeting on Wall Street, this year they opted to give the agencies a firsthand look at what the county has going for it. “We were very glad they were willing to

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come down,” said Weston Young, the county’s chief administrative officer. “We showed them a small snapshot of Worcester County.” Typically, any time the county prepares to go to the bond market local officials travel to New York to meet with bond rating agencies. The companies want to assess the county’s financial condition before assigning a rating. “They want a fresh rating,” Young said. “It’s similar to a credit score. They don’t use your credit score from a year ago when you go to buy a car.” The agencies review things like the county’s revenues, expenditures, primary

funding sources, population and the like. While local officials have often made the trip to Wall Street to present that information, this time they opted to invite representatives of Standard and Poor’s and Moody’s down to Worcester County. “There’s an excitement firsthand that you don’t get just staring at a packet on the 57th floor of some skyscraper,” Young said. Also on Tuesday, county leaders were joined by representatives of Standard and Poor’s and Moody’s on a bus. They then visited downtown Berlin, Ocean City, Assateague Island and Windmill Creek Vineyard and Winery.

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“They got to see Ocean City packed, the amount of development going on, they got to visit Assateague and hear about the park’s record visitation, and on top of that we gave our typical presentation,” Young said. “We have a good story to tell.” Information presented included the county’s assessed real property value, which was $15 billion in 2017 and is estimated to exceed $17.5 billion in 2023, as well as the fact that the county’s reserve fund balance has increased to 12% of its expenditures in recent years. Leaders touted Worcester’s property tax rate, the second lowest in the state, and income tax rate, the lowest in the state.


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SNOW HILL – Officials approved a liquor license for a new Ocean City bar but declined to grant it music privileges after hearing from a concerned neighbor. The Worcester County Board of License Commissioners (BLC) on Monday approved a beer, wine and liquor license for Bahama Bay Bar at 221 Wicomico St. The board did not approve any music for the establishment, however, after hearing from an upset neighbor. “I just don’t want to be given empty promises once again,” neighbor Bill Rank said. Attorney Mark Cropper approached the board this week asking that Bahama Bay Bar, which was previously Buddy’s Crabs, be designated as multiple license number two for the connections of Toast Café. Cropper said Toast Café’s Michael Berardinelli, along with Brian Shofi and Dr. Robert Masone, planned to open the new restaurant in July, depending on staffing. “It’s going to be faster food items,” Berardinelli said. “It’s going to be quality bar food.” Rank told the board he lived in Emerson Towers and was worried about the impact the new establishment would have on residents. He acknowledged that the condominium had been built with the restaurant space attached but said the last couple commercial tenants had created too much noise. He recalled incidents

June 17, 2022

when his windows were rattling and he was unable to have a conversation inside his condo. “I’m simply asking for you to give us whatever assistance you can… to return some quality of life,” he said. Rank added that he had little confidence Berardinelli would be any more respectful than prior tenants, as he’d witnessed him cursing and urinating off the dock at the site. Masone said that sort of behavior was unacceptable. He said that as Berardinelli’s uncle and a 10% owner of the business, he was trying to “help the young man grow.” Nevertheless, he was upset by what he heard from Rank and suggested delaying the hearing. “This can’t be swept underneath the carpet,” Masone said. After consulting with his clients, Cropper said Masone and Berardinelli were going to provide contact information to Rank so that he could reach out directly with any concerns. He added that the board retained control over the liquor license once it was granted and would have oversight. “The board has supervisory control over all licenses issued,” Cropper said. The board voted 3-0 to approve the license but with no music. BLC members said Berardinelli could come back and seek permission to have music if operations went well. “Give him a chance,” BLC Chairman William Esham said. “Let him crawl before he walks.”


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Boardwalk Tram Challenges Continue Airport Scores $3.6M Runway Grant

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BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – With the OC Air Show in the rearview mirror and the peak season rapidly approaching, the Boardwalk tram operation continues to face challenges, but there is reason for optimism. Like most town departments, along with the private sector business community, the Boardwalk tram operation continues to deal with a decline in personnel, including drivers and conductors. During Wednesday’s Ocean City Transportation Committee meeting, Transit Manager George Peake said the Boardwalk tram was operating at near-desired levels, but the staff continually monitors deployments to ensure enough trams are out there at the peak times. Two years ago, during the height of the pandemic, the Boardwalk tram operation was suspended for the entire summer season with strict distancing and other measures in place. Last year, the tram operation returned, but deployments were limited by staffing challenges. Thus far this summer, some of those challenges remain, although the situation has eased somewhat. Peake said on Wednesday the staff currently included 18 drivers and 18 conductors, which, with clever deployment strategies, have been able to meet the demand. However, with the peak season rapidly approaching, there will be more demand and more deployment challenges. “The trams are fully operational for the

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

most part,” he said. “We have 18 drivers and 18 conductors, which isn’t ideal. It’s a bit of a moving target.” Peake said that moving target includes some that went through the training and had the appropriate license, etc., but the job includes some special skills and there was some drop-off in the original numbers. “Some decided it wasn’t for them,” he said. “We’re still trying to hire there. If we could get to 28, we could do the target eight deployments. Right now, we’re running around seven.” One of the pivots when the tram service returned last summer was a noon start time, which allowed for somewhat limited resources to be deployed during peak times. That start time remains in place this summer as part of the department’s plan to maximize resources. “With tram staffing at around 80%, we are deploying two at noon each day and another comes on between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m.,” said Peake “In the evening, we’re operating four to five typically. There have been times when we’ve had six out there.” Mayor Rick Meehan suggested keeping a close eye on the ridership numbers for the noon start time. “Is noon the best time to get two out there?” he said. “We need to look at the numbers at noon. Maybe we can get one out there later and carry over into busier times in the evening. We need to maximize our deployment during the peak times.”

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – The second phase of Ocean City municipal airport rehabilitation project got a fiscal shot in the arm this week with the announcement of $3.6 million in federal funding for the project. Maryland’s delegation in Washington, including U.S. Senators Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen, along with Congressmen Andy Harris and David Trone, on Tuesday announced over $9.2 million in federal funding for three regional airport infrastructure improvement projects including two on the Eastern Shore and one in Western Maryland. Included in the federal funding package is $3.6 million for the continued rehabilitation of Runway 1432 at the Ocean City Municipal Airport in West Ocean City. Ocean City Airport Manager Jaime Giandomenico said the federal funding announced this week will cover the lion’s share of the second phase of the significant rehabilitation of Runway 1432, or the major east-west runway at the airport. “This $3.6 million grant is important,” he said. “It’s for a runway rehabilitation project that has been going on in phases. It’s one project in two grant years.” Giandomenico said the first phase of the runway improvement project was fully funded by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) last year, largely because of COVID-related federal relief funding for infrastructure projects. The $3.6 million

June 17, 2022

federal FAA grant announced this week for the second phase of the project comes with a 5% local match because most of the pandemic-related federal relief has been exhausted. Giandomenico said through the process, the award of the grant is announced, then it is carefully reviewed by the city manager and the city solicitor as a next step. He said the $3.6 million federal grant was never a foregone conclusion, so the town was happy to receive the news its airport would be included in the federal spending package for regional airports. “It’s really a time-sensitive project,” Giandomenico said of the rehabilitation project. “We will have to wait until after the season to really get going on it. We’ll start probably August 1 with what we can do, but the project won’t affect the runway until probably September 1 or so.” Giandomenico also explained the project was more complicated than, say, milling and repaving a highway, for example. “It’s going all the way to the surface and building it back up,” he said. “It’s the primary east-west runway. There are a lot of other components like new lights, electric upgrades and drainage.” Giandomenico pointed out the project does not include an expansion of the existing runway. “The runway doesn’t get any longer,” he said. “It will be much improved, though, and much safer.”


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022


Man Charged In Downtown Stabbing

June 17, 2022

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – An Ellicott City, Md., man is being held without bond this week following a downtown stabbing incident early Sunday morning that sent a male victim to Shock Trauma in critical condition. Around 4:15 a.m. last Sunday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers were dispatched to the area of 8th Street for a reported stabbing. Officers reportedly located a male victim, who was suffering from a stab wound to the abdomen. Ocean City EMS treated the victim at the scene and he was ultimately transported by Maryland State Police Trooper 4 helicopter to Shock Trauma in Baltimore. According to police reports, after emergency surgery, the victim was listed in critical condition. OCPD detectives responded to the scene and observed blood in the roadway at 8th Street. The blood trail went from the roadway to the steps of a nearby apartment building at 8th Street, which is where OCPD officers located the victim, according to police reports. An OCPD detective interviewed a witness, who told police he did not observe the stabbing, but saw the aftermath. The witness told police he saw the suspect, later identified as Henry James Trotier, 21, of Ellicott City, Md., standing in the roadway holding a knife, according to police reports. The witness provided a description of Trotier, according to police reports. The witness also told police the victim had told him he had been stabbed and he saw the victim bleeding from the abdomen. The witness reportedly told police a group of people chased Trotier north on St. Louis Avenue, but lost sight of the suspect in the area of 14th Street. The witness told police Trotier had been hanging out with a group of girls who were staying in the apartment building. Detectives interviewed a second witness, who reportedly told police he had observed the stabbing incident. The witness told police Trotier had been in an argument with the victim, which turned into a physical altercation in the street. The witness said both men fell to the street, and moments later, the victim told the witness he had been stabbed, according to police reports. The witness described the weapon as a push dagger, or a knife that is held between an individual’s fingers while making a closed fist, according to police reports. The witness told police a group of people had chased Trotier and had observed Trotier jump into the bed of a pickup truck, according to police reports. Detectives interviewed another witness, who said he was driving in his pickup truck on St. Louis Avenue around 4:15 a.m. when an individual matching the description of Trotier, jumped into the bed of his truck. The witness told police Trotier advised him a group of about six people were chasing him and that they were going to kill him, accord-

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ing to police reports. The witness reportedly told police he dropped Trotier off at the corner of Baltimore Avenue and 9th Street, which was the last location the witness had seen the suspect, according to police reports. Detectives met with the management of a hotel at 9th Street, who advised Trotier was staying there. Detectives went to the room and observed Trotier inside. The officer pointed his gun at Trotier and ordered him to put his hands in the air. Officers observed Trotier sitting on one of the beds in the room with a knife sitting next to him, according to police reports. Officers observed blood on the sheets of the same bed the knife was on, and also observed blood on Trotier’s arms and shoes as well, according to police reports. Trotier complied and was handcuffed. He refused to make any statements. A search and seizure warrant was executed at the hotel room where Trotier had been apprehended. Detectives seized multiple knives, including the push dagger-style knife believed to be used in the assault. Trotier has been charged with firstand second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and the use of a dangerous weapon with intent to injure. Following a bail review hearing on Monday, Trotier was ordered to be held without bond.

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Janasek Issued 90-Day Suspension

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – Ocean Pines officials voted last week to ban former board member Tom Janasek from the association’s food and beverage amenities for a period of 90 days following an altercation at the Yacht Club. In a special meeting last Thursday, the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors voted 5-2, with Directors Doug Parks and Rick Farr opposed, to prohibit Janasek from the Yacht Club, Golf Clubhouse and Beach Club for a total of 90 days. The motion – made by Director Frank Daly – comes less than a month after an altercation between Janasek and Director Josette Wheatley. “Our governing documents do give us the authority to provide for the safety at our amenities, not only for members of the association but anyone who comes to our amenities,” said Director Larry Perrone. “And while there are some contradictions in the bylaws, the bylaws clearly state that we have a right and obligation to provide for safety at our amenities.” A report filed with the Ocean Pines Police Department last month describes the series of events that took place between Janasek and Wheatley the evening of May 20. According to the report, Wheatley and her husband had approached Janasek at the Yacht Club’s

June 17, 2022

outdoor patio when the incident occurred. “Mrs. Wheatley stated that after she and her husband received their drinks, they went over and said hello to Rich [Kelly] and Mr. Janasek,” the report reads. “Mrs. Wheatley said Mr. Janasek stood up and said, ‘I’m going to do it.’” According to the police report, Janasek then began yelling at Wheatley. “Mr. Janasek stood over her and began yelling loudly at her because she did not vote for Doug Parks as President for their Board of Directors,” the report reads. Wheatley’s husband attempted to intervene while Janasek continued to yell at Wheatley, according to the police report. When attempts to separate Janasek from Wheatley and her husband failed, Janasek was escorted from the property. In the days that followed the incident, the Ocean Pines Board of Directors convened in a special meeting to discuss Janasek’s removal from food and beverage operations. A motion to suspend Janasek for one year, however, was tabled pending legal review. Wheatley has also since obtained a peace order preventing Janasek from contacting her for a period of six months. Back on the agenda at last week’s special meeting, Daly presented his motion to ban Janasek from the Yacht Club and its surrounding areas, the Golf ClubSEE NEXT PAGE rustyanchorsushi

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June 17, 2022

house and the Beach Club for a 90-day period beginning June 10 at 9 a.m. Perrone, however, proposed an amendment extending the suspension to coincide with Wheatley’s order. “I’d like to change the period from 90 days to a period to match the peace order that was issued by the court to Josette Wheatley regarding Tom Janasek …,” he said. “If in fact she has to obtain an extension to that peace order and the court grants it, then the suspension should be continued in conjunction with the time period established by the court.” The amendment, however, failed in a 3-4 vote, with Parks, Farr and Directors Amy Peck and Colette Horn opposed. “I understand you want to be coterminous with the peace order,” Parks said, “but I think it’s excessive, I think it’s unnecessary and I’m not going to support it.” With Daly’s original motion back on the table for discussion, Parks said he could not support a suspension that went against the association’s governing documents. “I urge my colleagues to consider the fact that continually disregarding our governing documents is not the way to manage or run or oversee this organization,” he said, “and I implore you to consider some of the options that are available to us under our governing documents to accomplish a way to address this issue.” Horn said she disagreed. “I think our governing documents falls short of this situation and I realize by stretching the limits of our governing documents we will be able to provide some kind of immediate relief from the risk that is there for Director Wheatley and other directors on this board that may be targeted, or members of the community who may be targeted,” she said. Daly argued the board had the responsibility to respond to the incident. “I’ll remind everybody here at the height of the pandemic we sat as a group and decided that given the economic ravages that the community was going through, that we would delay the assessment for 90 days,” he said. “You know what? That was in violation of our governing document using the same argument you just made. We did it because the charter tells us we have the right and responsibility to act, to protect our citizens so long as we do so under the existing Maryland Law. And that is exactly what we are doing right here.” Parks, however, asserted it was not a true comparison. “The relinquishing of the due date for the assessments based on the pandemic affected every single homeowner in Ocean Pines,” he said. After further discussion, the board voted 5-2 to ban Janasek from food and beverage operations for a period of 90 days and to have the general manager provide Janasek with a suspension notice.

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Mural Depicting Gospel Icon Tindley Underway In Berlin

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Work is underway this week on the long-awaited mural depicting the Rev. Dr. Charles Albert Tindley. Tindley, the gospel music icon born in Berlin, is being recognized with a mural on the side of the Bruder Hill building. Artist Jay Coleman is on site this week painting the expanse of what was once empty wall. “I hope that it does what it was intended to do—educate people about this individual and bring some pride to Berlin,” Coleman said. Tindley, whose “I’ll Overcome Someday” is considered the basis for the U.S. civil rights anthem “We Shall Overcome,” was born in Berlin in the 1850s. In an effort to celebrate Tindley and his connection to the town, officials applied for a grant last year to have Coleman paint a mural of him in the downtown Berlin Arts and Entertainment District. While Beach

Artist Jay Coleman works on the Rev. Dr. Charles Albert Tindley mural in Berlin Tuesday. Photo by Charlene Sharpe

to Bay Heritage Area was successful in getting the grant, it took several months of working with citizens and members of the Berlin Historic District Commission to settle on an appropriate building and suitable design for the mural. Just last month, the historic district commission approved the

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June 17, 2022

buy in on this and feel a part of it.” Coleman, a Washington, D.C., artist, started work on the mural Monday. The first step was getting the outlines of the design on the wall. “My process is very organic,” Coleman said. “Sometimes I’ll freehand. Rarely do I grid.” In order to move the project along a little faster, Coleman said he did project the design onto the wall late Monday night to complete the outline. Tuesday, despite rain, he was on the electric lift with both spray paint and a paint brush, shading and filling out the design. “I’m going to fill it in and get it all together and make it look like it’s supposed to look, and then make it look better than it was supposed to look—workaholism is real,” he joked. Though Coleman typically paints bright, vibrant images, community input resulted in a monochromatic design for the Tindley mural. “I wish it had a little more color but I’m going to try to make it as vibrant as I can with shades of gray,” he said. Coleman said the mural will be finished by Saturday, when it will serve as the centerpiece for a community Juneteenth celebration. Coleman, who initially worked in special education and has only recently turned to art fulltime, is thrilled to have been chosen to paint the Tindley mural, particularly in a town like Berlin. “Whenever I have the opportunity to do something historical I jump on it,” he said. “I also think it has a greater impact in a smaller town.” Coleman said that African art is traditionally functional, something he believes this will be in that it will share a piece of local history. He worries that in today’s society, people focus too much on the moment, thinking only about their latest Instagram post. “This is functional in that it’s an educational piece,” he said. “So many people today are ahistorical.” Coleman said Tindley should be remembered in his hometown. “It’s huge for the town,” he said. “He didn’t really get a lot of his pub until he moved to Philadelphia but this is where it started so it needs to be commemorated.” Coleman said working on public art was a joy to him. “You don’t see the fruits of your labor when you do public art,” he said. “It’s not like it’s in a gallery and people come to your show and look at it and say ‘oh this is great.’ You never know the impact that you’re going to have. And you don’t know how long it’s going to last, somebody may come down the street that I’ve never met, that I never will meet, that’s inspired by this, either the content or the artwork.” Ivy Wells, Berlin’s economic and community development director, said the project would be part of a larger African American history trail throughout the Lower Shore. She said the mural would also add to Berlin’s growing array of public art. “This makes Berlin even cooler,” she said, adding that the town was making great strides in adding public art. “This is the third mural within the last year going up in our downtown,” she said.


Broadway Play Rescheduled For Nov.

June 17, 2022

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Due to various circumstances and unexpected staffing challenges, Thursday’s scheduled performance of Fiddler on the Roof has been postponed. The show has been rescheduled by the promoter for Sunday, November 13, at 7 p.m. Tickets for the Thursday, June 16, performance will be honored at the new date. “While this is disappointing news, we will continue to bring Broadway to the Beach in Ocean City with several new shows scheduled this fall,” said Tourism

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

and Business Development Director Tom Perlozzo. “We are pleased to announce several new shows joining Fiddler on the Roof, including Chicago the Musical, Hairspray and R.E.S.P.E.C.T. On-sale dates for these three shows will be announced soon.” Chicago the Musical is set for the Performing Arts Center on Oct. 19, Hairspray is set for Nov. 30 and R.E.S.P.E.C.T is set for March 21, 2023. Ticket holders for Thursday’s postponed and rescheduled Fiddler on the Roof show at the PAC will receive a $5 discount for tickets to either Chicago or Hairspray. Ticket holders are urged to contact their original point-ofsale for more information.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Parking Spot Squabble OCEAN CITY – A Pennsylvania woman was arrested last weekend after allegedly throwing a glass object at two inviduals parked in her assigned parking spot at a north-end community and then ending up being charged with DUI as well. Around 12:30 a.m. last Sunday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers were dispatched to a residence on Newport Bay Drive for a reported disorderly female. Ocean City Communications advised the female, later identified as Robin Sills, 56, of Littlestown, Pa., had returned home and had been throwing objects at a vehicle in her parking space, according to police reports. As officers arrived, they observed Sills’ vehicle not in a parking space and still running with the hood warm to the touch, according to police reports. Officers were attempting to locate the vehicle’s owner when Sills exited a nearby residence, according to police reports. She reportedly told officers she just drove home and noticed another vehicle in her assigned parking space. Sills report-

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COPS & COURTS edly got angry and confronted two individuals about parking in her space. Sills told police she blocked the other individuals’ vehicle so they could not leave and called the police, according to police reports. Numerous witnesses in the area told police they observed Sills throw a glass object at the other two individuals. Officers interviewed the two individuals, who reportedly told police Sills had thrown a glass object at them, and it did not hit them, but it would have if they did not move out of the way. The two individuals reportedly told police they would have simply moved their vehicle, but Sills had blocked them in. Other witnesses reportedly told police they could hear Sills from across the canal. The witnesses said Sills was yelling so loudly that they could not sleep and came out of their residences to see what was going on, according to police reports. Witnesses reportedly told police the commo-

tion made them angry and they wished Sills had just parked somewhere else for the night and gone to bed. Sills was detained for disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace. When questioned, Sills told police she had been driving the car. She first told police she had been home for three hours, and then told officers she had been home for 40 minutes. She then told police she had been home for four hours, each time changing her confusing story, according to police reports. Sills also told police she had been home, but then told officers she had been out drinking, according to police reports. Officers observed Sills showed signs of intoxication. They also determined she had been in control of the vehicle prior to their arrival and just before she called 911, which was about six minutes apart, according to police reports. She was charged with DUI, disorderly conduct and

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June 17, 2022 assault for throwing a glass object at the other two individuals.

Eviction Then Resisting Arrest OCEAN CITY – A Forest Hill, Md., man was arrested last weekend after getting evicted from a downtown hotel and then disturbing the peace and resisting arrest. Around 8:10 p.m. last Friday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a hotel on Talbot Street to assist with an eviction. OCPD officers observed a hotel employee evict and permanently trespass two occupants of a room on the second floor. A hotel manager also evicted and permanently trespassed another male from the property, identified as Justin Henson, 34, of Forest Hill, Md., in the officer’s presence. According to police reports, Henson appeared intoxicated, and officers learned from employees at a nearby bar he had been cut off from ordering drinks because of his level of intoxication, according to police reports. Henson was advised he had been trespassed from the property and that he needed to exit the premises immediately. At first, Henson was defiant, but eventually complied, according to police reports. He then walked out on to Talbot Street loudly and continuously yelled in an aggressive tone at hotel employees about how they should refund his money, according to police reports. At that point, Henson was placed under arrest. Henson reportedly resisted arrest, twisting his body to avoid being handcuffed. Three officers were ultimately able to detain him. During the incident, Henson grabbed hold of one officer’s utility belt and additional charges of second-degree assault were tacked on. During a search of his person incident to the arrest, OCPD officers located a spring-assisted knife in his pants pocket and additional weapon charges were tacked on.

Manager, Officer Assaulted OCEAN CITY – A Fairfax, Va., woman was arrested last weekend after first being found flailing around the yard of a downtown hotel and then allegedly assaulting the hotel’s night manager and a female police officer. Around 1:40 a.m. last Sunday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer on bicycle patrol in the downtown area observed a female suspect, later identified as Kelsey McPherson, 25, of Fairfax, Va., laying in the yard of a hotel on Baltimore Avenue. The officer observed McPherson shouting and screaming at passersby to get away from her, according to police reports. The officer reportedly observed McPherson stretched out in the yard while kicking and throwing her arms around, before curling up in a ball. The officer approached McPherson and attempted to talk to her, but she was uncooperative, according to police reports. After numerous attempts, officers were able to get McPherson on her feet and walking toward her hotel. McPherson was able to make it to the back door of the hotel, but the door was locked and she began banging on it aggressively. The hotel’s night manager unlocked the door to allow McPherson in. While officers were walking McPherson to her room, she grabbed the night manager by the front of his shirt. The officer was SEE NEXT PAGE


June 17, 2022

... COPS & COURTS able to separate McPherson from the manager and she removed her hand and walked out of the hotel shouting and using profanity, according to police reports. McPherson was arrested. While officers were attempting to detain McPherson, she opened her mouth and bit a female cop on her shoulder. She was charged with two counts of second-degree assault and disorderly conduct.

Jail For Domestic Assault OCEAN CITY – A Takoma Park, Md., man, arrested in February on first-degree assault charges after allegedly attacking his wife in a downtown hotel room in the presence of their young children pleaded guilty last week to second-degree assault and was sentenced to five years, all but 46 days of which were then suspended. Around 12:15 p.m. on Feb. 15, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was dispatched to a hotel at 32nd Street for a reported domestic assault. OCPD officers arrived and found the female victim, who had been relocated to a different room with her children. The victim reportedly had red marks on her throat and shoulder areas. The victim told police her boyfriend, identified as Scott Edward Jones, 30, of Takoma Park, Md., had choked her and slammed her to the ground about 15 minutes before she called 911, according to police reports. OCPD officers interviewed the victim, who told police she had come to Ocean City with Jones and her children the previous Sunday and were planning to

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch leave on Thursday. The victim reportedly told police they had gone to breakfast and she mentioned Jones’ drinking to him, which made him mad and aggressive. When they returned to their room, Jones became angry, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police she was attempting to open the door when Jones grabbed her neck and throat area and threw her to the ground, according to police reports. The victim reportedly said she cried for help a few times and tried to call 911, but Jones grabbed her and threw her down to the ground again. The victim told police Jones threw her to the ground four more times during the incident, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police Jones grabbed her face in the area of her mouth and neck and squeezed hard. The victim told police during the incident, her five-year-old son attempted to stop Jones from assaulting her. Officers asked for permission to interview the fiveyear-old and the victim agreed. According to police reports, the child told police “Daddy knocked Mommy to the ground five times,” and also told the officers, “don’t let daddy back into the house.”

Breaking And Entering, Assault OCEAN CITY – A Pennsylvania man was arrested on multiple charges last week after allegedly attempting to break into his ex-girlfriend’s apartment twice, successfully doing so the second time and assaulting her. Around 10:30 a.m. last Sunday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers were dispatched to a residence at 42nd Street for a reported domestic dispute.

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OCPD officers met with a female victim, who reportedly told police her ex-boyfriend, identified as Kemillion Morales-Febus, 31, of Reading, Pa., had been trying to force his way into her unit and had just left prior to the officers’ arrival. OCPD officers observed a damaged bedroom window screen and debris knocked from the front door onto the foyer floor, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police Morales-Febus attempted to open the window with his hand and strike the window and front door multiple times with great force. The victim provided a description of Morales-Febus, and a search was conducted in the area to no avail. Later that same morning at around 11:25 a.m., OCPD officers were dispatched to the same unit on 42nd Street. The victim told officer Morales-Febus had returned to the resi-

dence and this time was successful in forcing his way into the unit. The suspect was no longer on scene, but was found nearby in a parking garage at 45th Street by other officers. The victim told police she saw MoralesFebus walking through an alley near her residence. When she opened the door to see if he was still in the area, Morales-Febus forcibly pushed his through the door and stood in the foyer. In doing so, he forced the door into the victim’s surgicallyrepaired ankle, according to police reports. As the victim attempted to turn away from Morales-Febus, he grabbed her arm and spun in such a way that her arm was locked behind her back, according to police reports. He was charged with breaking and entering, second-degree assault, malicious destruction of property and disturbing the peace.

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Liquor Board Denies Upgrade Request

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

BY CHARLENE SHARPE STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – A Snow Hill store will not be able to add liquor to its inventory following a decision by a local board this week. On Monday, the Worcester County Board of License Commissioners (BLC) voted unanimously to deny a request for a liquor license from Duck In II on East Market Street. Though the convenience store’s connections had hoped to add liquor to its beer and wine inventory, BLC members said the town didn’t need another liquor store. "The public is being adequately served," BLC member Charles Nichols said. Muhammad Usman Ali of Duck In approached the board this week asking for an upgrade from a beer and wine license to a beer, wine and liquor license. Ali said currently, Snow Hill only had one store that sold liquor. "Everyone has to go there," he said, adding that if they wanted to look for cheaper prices they had to travel to Salisbury or Berlin. Pete Cosby, Ali’s attorney, said that permitting a second store to sell liquor would allow competition within the town. He added that Duck In served clientele from Route 113 and they often asked to purchase liquor when they stopped. Mike Hamad, owner of the building, agreed.

"There's a lot of traffic," he said. "There's a lot of need." He said the Town Market Basket, Snow Hill's current lone liquor store, shouldn't be a monopoly. Snow Hill resident Demetria Leonard pointed out Town Market Basket closed relatively early and those who tried to shop after work often weren't able to do so. She added that there were enough people in Snow Hill to support two businesses selling liquor. "Snow Hill is a gold mine," she said. "It's enough here for everybody." Attorney Hugh Cropper, representing Town Market Basket, said there were only about 2,000 people in Snow Hill and that Duck In was less than a mile away from Town Market Basket. “We’re not here about competition, we’re here about public need,” Cropper said. “This sets an incredible precedent if we’re going to put liquor sales seven tenths of a mile from other liquor sales on a straight shot of a road.” Cosby stressed that Duck In could serve customers from the highway who wanted to buy liquor. “For them to be able to pick up what they need at that location and not have to drive downtown to get one item, it just makes all the sense in the world, he said. “It's serving a real public need.” BLC member Marty Pusey said that for years Snow Hill had only had one liquor store and that its population had decreased in recent years. The board voted 3-0 to deny the upgrade request.

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OC Planners Forward Code Changes

June 17, 2022

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Resort planners last week advanced a pair of code amendments that would clean up certain arcane sections of the town’s code that do not permit certain uses in certain areas. The Ocean City Planning Commission last Tuesday held public hearings on two different code amendments that would provide opportunities for different activities in areas where they are currently not permitted. The first would allow a farmers market to continue operating out of a section of the north-side parking lot at Gold Coast Mall. The farmers market for years existed on a site on the north side of 142nd Street, but that parcel is part of a larger redevelopment project and the market needed a new home. Recently, the farmer’s market was permitted as a temporary use on a portion of the Gold Coast Mall parking lot. Zoning Administrator Kay Gordy explained the proposed code amendment before the planning commission last Tuesday would allow the farmers market to remain in place in that location. “We do feel the comprehensive plan does support small business and generates local revenue,” she said. “Also, it supports green business and encourages eating well, which the farmers market does.” Farmers market manager Phyllis Wimbrow explained the weekly operation for the market. “We’re there a maximum of four days a week,” she said. “Everybody brings in their produce, sets up, sells and then breaks it down. We’re out of there by 1 p.m. The Gold Coast Mall is happy to have us, and we’re happy to stay in town.” Wimbrow explained the farmers market in Ocean City was just that, a venue for local farmers to distribute their produce. She said it would not evolve into something other than that. “We are the only true farmers market in the area,” she said. “All of our vendors only sell what they grow. We pride ourselves in that. We are not a flea market by any sense.” Planning commission chair Pam Buckley said she is a regular visitor to the farmers market in Ocean City and said the proposed code amendment made sense. “I have to say as a customer, it’s very enjoyable,” she said. “It’s always clean and well-organized. It’s the right location and the right space for this.” The second code amendment presented for public hearing last Tuesday dealt with allowing miniature golf courses in the downtown Boardwalk B-1 district and the Inlet, or I-1, district. At different times over the years, miniature golf courses existed on the Boardwalk and in the downtown area, but subtle code changes disallowed the

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

use, largely because it was believed property planned for potential redevelopment would likely be more valuable as some other use. Planning and Development Director Bill Neville explained there was some desire expressed in allowing mini-golf in those downtown zoning districts. “It was promoted by a downtown business owner,” he said. “Inquiries came in on whether or not miniature golf was allowed in the downtown area. Buckley said there were mini-golf venues in those districts in the past. “All I can remember is there was a miniature golf course on the west side of Baltimore Avenue downtown,” she said. “We might find it is appropriate if someone can make a go of it.” Planning commissioner Lauren Taylor recalled eliminating mini-golf in those districts was not because the activity was somehow undesirable. “It was a matter of cleaning up the code,” she said. “The idea was the land value wouldn’t support it. It wasn’t like mini-golf created some kind of moral dilemma. It’s a well-established, familyfriendly activity.” The planning commission voted unanimously to forward a favorable recommendation to the Mayor and Council on both proposed code amendments.

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Wicomico County Sheriff’s Deputy Killed In Line Of Duty

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

Sheriff Mike Lewis is pictured with Gov. Larry Hogan, local law enforcement personnel and county leaders at a press conference Monday to share details of Sunday’s fatal shooting. Submitted Photo

PITTSVILLE – The entire Lower Shore community this week is mourning the loss of a Wicomico County Sheriff’s deputy killed in the line of duty on Sunday evening in Pittsville by a known armed and dangerous suspect wanted in several jurisdictions around the state. Shortly before 8:30 p.m. on Sunday evening, Wicomico County Sheriff’s Deputy Glenn Hilliard responded to the Talbot Apartments in Pittsville after getting a tip that fugitive Austin Davidson, 20, whose listed address is in Delmar, Md., was at the apartment complex. At first, Wicomico County Sheriff’s deputies did not locate Davidson, but Hilliard spotted him near the apartment complex and a brief foot pursuit ensued, according to police reports.

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With Hilliard in pursuit, Davidson reportedly turned and fired a semi-automatic pistol at the deputy, striking him. Fellow deputies attempted to treat Hilliard at the scene, but he was transported to TidalHealth Peninsula Regional Hospital, where he was declared deceased. Hilliard, a 10-year veteran with the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Department, also served with the Berlin Police Department and was a seasonal officer with the Ocean City Police Department in the past. Davidson fled to a wooded area nearby and an extensive manhunt by multiple law enforcement agencies ensued, but he eventually surrendered to Maryland Natural Resources Police and Maryland State Police about two hours after the shooting when he exited a tree line near the apartment complex. The weapon was found nearby, according to police reports. Davidson was wanted in multiple jurisdictions around the state including Worcester County, Somerset County and Baltimore City. In 2019, Davidson was arrested for the armed robbery of a McDonald’s restaurant in Baltimore City, but was granted probation before judgment and was placed on supervised probation for three years. Davidson was arrested on second-degree assault and other charges in Worcester County in March, but failed to appear for a scheduled court appearance on May 18. On May 13, an arrest warrant was posted for Davidson in Somerset County for burglary, felony theft and other charges after an alleged incident in that jurisdiction. After Sunday’s fatal shooting of the Wicomico County Sheriff’s deputy, Davidson is being held without bond. He has been charged with first- and seconddegree murder, first- and second-degree assault and other charges. Davidson has a bail review hearing scheduled for Tuesday. Berlin Police Chief Arnold Downing recalled Hilliard’s service to his department for five years. Hilliard was a University of Maryland Eastern Shore graduate and came to the Berlin Police Department after graduating from the police academy. He entered the Berlin Police Department as a lateral officer, also serving with the Crisfield Police Department at the same time. “He really came into our agency running,” he said. “He was quickly an instructor and the field training officer for some of our other recent grads. He was a member of our SWAT team and was just really grounded in the profession.” Downing said Hilliard was originally from New Jersey, but his wife and extended family were from the Berlin area. “His family was really entrenched in the community,” he said. “There are a lot of people hurting from this. Those who knew him personally really saw the best in him. He was a better officer when he left for Wicomico and it was just a better opportunity. He was never running from anything. He was always running to something, even on his last day.” At midday on Monday, the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office, along with Gov. SEE NEXT PAGE


… Suspect Arrested After Sunday Incident In Pittsville

June 17, 2022

Larry Hogan and other law enforcement and Wicomico County officials held a press conference to outline the details of the incident as they are known, although the investigation is ongoing. Largely, however, the press conference was an indictment of sorts of the criminal justice system, which repeatedGLENN HILLIARD ly allowed Davidson to remain on the streets despite numerous arrests. Hogan pointed to Davidson’s probation following the 2019 armed robbery in Baltimore. “Someone like this should not have been on the streets,” he said. “The fact this guy was out with no jail time after committing armed robbery is unacceptable. Today, we pray for his family and all of our law enforcement community.” Wicomico County State’s Attorney Jamie Dykes vowed that will not be the case this time for Davidson. “The case will be presented to the grand jury,” she said. “Many people came together last night. Many more will come together to see that justice is done in this case.” Acting Wicomico County Executive John Psota said the entire community was grieving over the loss of Hilliard. “We grieve for the family of this deputy,” he said. “We grieve for the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Department, and

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we grieve for this entire community. This is totally unacceptable. We’re going to focus on why we’re here today.” An impassioned Wicomico County Sheriff Mike Lewis held up a picture of Davidson during the press conference and called on the state’s judicial system for stronger sentences and incarceration for suspects. “This is the man responsible,” he said. “He is just 20 years old. Had he been incarcerated and if we had appropriate sentences in Maryland, our deputy would still be alive. We have had our law enforcement family ripped apart. We haven’t had a deputy killed in the line of duty since 1969.” Lewis provided more details of the incident during the press conference. “The suspect stepped out of a wooded area and was taken into custody by the Natural Resources Police and the Maryland State Police” he said. “I’m so proud to have our Natural Resources Police working with us. They were on the front lines in this incident.” Lewis said Davidson’s long pattern of criminal behavior was the issue, not stronger gun control laws. “This is not a gun issue, it’s a behavioral issue,” he said. “He was granted probation before judgment for the armed robbery of a McDonald’s in Baltimore City. When asked why he did it, he said ‘Because I can.’ Those were his words.” Lewis during the press conference

provided more details about the fatal shooting of one of his deputies on Sunday evening. “He had a laser-sighted handgun and used it on a Wicomico County Sheriff’s deputy. The deputy clearly saw Davidson depart and deployed his Taser, but Davidson turned and shot the deputy. He peacefully surrendered when he came out of the wood line.” For his part, Hogan vowed to continue to wage the battle against increased crime across the state. “There is no question crime across the state is out of control,” he said. “We talk about increased penalties, but yet this continues. It’s very frustrating. People talk about defunding the police, but we’re doing the opposite. We funded $500 million in police initiatives. We’re going to keep backing them, but the judges and prosecutors have to do their job. I don’t know when it’s going to stop, but we’re going to do everything we can to make it stop.” The press conference turned to a remembrance of Hilliard and his law enforcement service in Wicomico, Berlin and Ocean City. “He was very special,” Lewis said. “He was an incredibly effective deputy and law enforcement officer and he was particularly good at electronics. He was a jokester and always had a smile on his face. He was a beloved member of our family. His wife is an incredibly strong

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woman and he had a beautiful family. The pain is inescapable.” Lewis said his department and the entire community will mourn the loss of Hilliard in the days to come. “The days ahead will be challenging, but for now, we are mourning the loss of an incredible human being,” he said. “Deputy Glenn Hilliard was a son, a husband and a father to three beautiful children, a brother to those he worked with, and an exemplary public servant to the citizens of Wicomico County and to the state of Maryland.” Lewis said his law enforcement organization was feeling the pain of the loss on Monday. “As an organization, we are heartbroken over this senseless and tragic murder,” he said. “This loss exacts an enormous emotional toll on the sheriff’s office family, but we will do what is necessary and proper to honor Glenn and support those who knew and loved him.” By Monday morning, Ocean City Police Chief Ross Buzzuro acknowledged the loss during a Police Commission meeting. “I want to take a moment to acknowledge the passing of Wicomico County Sheriff’s Deputy Glenn Hilliard,” he said. “He was killed in the line of duty last night, and he was a former Ocean City seasonal police officer. Our thoughts and prayers are with Wicomico County and their sheriff’s department as well.”


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Gov. Larry Hogan is pictured on Monday visiting the floating island project in Maryland’s coastal bays. Submitted Photo BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Three species of endangered colonial nesting birds in the coastal bays are showing signs of rebounding thanks to an innovative floating island project that has created nesting habitat. Three of Maryland’s state-listed endangered colonial nesting water birds, including the common tern, the royal tern and the black skimmer, have seen their numbers in the coastal bays decline significantly in recent years. To that end, through a partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Audubon Mid-Atlantic and the Maryland Coastal Bays Program (MCBP), a series of floating platforms that mimic the endangered species’ natural nesting habitats have been installed and appear to be achieving the desired results. Now in its second year, the project is providing a floating wooden-framed platform in the coastal bays as a nesting site for the endangered colonial water birds, which have seen their numbers decline a staggering 90% to 95%

since the mid-1980s due to sea level rise and erosion of their natural sand nesting islands in the coastal bays. The initial year of the program was deemed an instant success with 23 pairs of common terns using the platform for nesting, making it the largest breeding colony of the species in the coastal bays last year. On Monday, Gov. Larry Hogan visited the floating islands in the coastal bays as part of his larger tour of the Lower Shore area in conjunction with the Maryland Municipal League (MML) convention in Ocean City. On the same day, Hogan announced an additional $13.5 million in Waterway Improvement Fund grants to enhance public boating access, facilities and navigation around the state including funding for several projects in Worcester and the Lower Shore. Audubon Mid-Atlantic Director of Bird Conservation Dr. David Curson said he was encouraged by the success of the floating islands now entering their second year, but cautioned against a complete turnaround for the endangered water birds just yet. SEE NEXT PAGE


… Floating Islands Built In Md. Coastal Bays

June 17, 2022

“The immediate success of the project is encouraging,” he said. “But the fact that the largest common tern colony in the coastal bays system last year on this small artificial island illustrates just how dire the situation is for these birds. In 2003, there were more than 500 pairs of common terns nesting at six natural colony sites in the coastal bays. Today, most of these former sites have been degraded by erosion and some have been washed away entirely.” This year, the partnership has expanded the size of the nesting platform from 1,024 square feet to over 2,300 square feet by adding five new raft sections to the four used in 2021. The rafts are latched together in a square formation that flexes at the joints as the waves roll beneath it. The design allows the platform to safely withstand large waves and strong winds during storm events. The project partners hope the larger platform will not only support a larger tern colony, but also may attract black skimmers to nest alongside the terns. This year, the MCBP added Archer Larned, Ph.D., to the newly-created position of coastal bird habitat coordinator to assist with the project, using funds from US Wind. “Early signs are encouraging,” said Larned. “We will monitor the platform closely during the 2022 breeding season. Remote cameras installed on the platform show about 50 common terns are already using it for roosting, and we are hoping that nesting activity will begin soon.” Dave Brinker of the DNR Wildlife and Heritage Service has been monitoring colonial nesting water bird populations for over three decades. Brinker said he is encouraged by the early success of the floating island project. “This project shows great promise in offering endangered colonial nesting birds much-needed nesting sites,” he said. “But, in order to fully recover and sustain populations of terns and skimmers in the coastal bays, it is essential that we restore and maintain former sand islands that have been lost to erosion. To achieve that, we will need a long-term strategy that allocates locally-dredged sand for island restoration.” The DNR is providing technical assistance, materials and funding through federal grants from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The state provides matching funds through Program Open Space. DNR Secretary Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio said her department is happy to partner in the project. “Addressing the population declines of these important bird species is a high priority for our department and our partners,” she said this week. “We are pleased to support innovative measures and long-term efforts to give them the best possible chance to rebound.”

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June 17, 2022

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Hogan Announces $15M To Advance Route 90 Improvements

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

Gov. Larry Hogan is pictured at a press conference Monday at the foot of the Route 90 bridge to announce $15 million in funding to complete planning for Route 90 improvements. Photo by Charlene Sharpe

OCEAN CITY – Gov. Larry Hogan on Monday announced $15 million in funding to complete planning for Route 90 improvements. With the Route 90 bridge in the background, Hogan announced Monday that $15 million in funding would advance the state’s “Reach the Beach” plan to improve safety, access and congestion relief projects on Route 90. The project has been a local priority for years. “Today, at my direction, the state is investing $15 million to accelerate forward the entire planning phase and to move the Route 90 improvements ahead into the design phase which is an important and critical step closer to making this a shovel ready project,” Hogan said. Last summer, Hogan announced that the state’s Consolidated Transportation Plan would include $850,000 for Route 90

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planning. The 12-mile corridor between Route 50 and Coastal Highway carries about 33,000 vehicles a day on weekends in the summer and has long been in need of improvements. This week, just days after announcing the launch of a $28 million Bay Crossing study, Hogan said the state would provide $15 million in funding to finish Route 90 planning. “Today we’re taking another important step in our ‘Reach the Beach’ plan, addressing one of the top transportation priorities for Ocean City, for Worcester County and for the state of Maryland…,” he said. “Route 90 was originally built to help get beach bound travelers to the rapidly growing parts of northern Ocean City but it was designed also to be a primary hurricane evacuation route. For many years upgrading Route 90 has been a top priority not only for safety, for access and for the local economy but also for its vital role in emergency response.” Hogan said the St. Martin River crossing and the Assawoman Bay crossing were built in the 1970s and half a century later were in need of upgrades. The planned improvement study will look at the bridges as well as the entire Route 90 corridor. “Obviously we will continue to collaborate very closely with Worcester County, with Ocean City, throughout the entire process to ensure the new and improved Route 90 corridor will meet the growing economic needs of the region while also preserving the rural small-town atmosphere that residents and visitors alike have come to know and love,” Hogan said. Sen. Mary Beth Carozza, who was among the officials in attendance for the announcement, praised Hogan’s commitment to Eastern Shore priorities. She noted that the Route 113 improvements in Worcester County had been completed while Hogan was in office. “When we do have a priority project in Worcester County, like the Route 113 widening – that was completed under Governor Hogan’s leadership,” she said. “Then when we did the pivot on the next project, Governor Hogan has made it a priority.” Worcester County Commissioner Ted Elder said he was thrilled to see safety improvements being planned for one of the county’s key roadways. He pointed out that Route 90 was a vital way in and out of Ocean City. “It’s great to finally get things moving on this,” he said. “It’s really a safety issue. If anything happens with the bridge on Route 50 and you have an emergency, this is it. The sooner we get it done the better it will be.” Earlier this month, the Maryland Department of Transportation State Highway Administration announced the start of a “Planning and Environmental Linkages” study for Route 90. The public will have the opportunity to learn about the study, which is expected to evaluate the improvements needed, during a virtual public meeting set for June 21. A link and information regarding the virtual public meeting, which will be held June 21 from 6:30 to 8 p.m., can be found on the agency’s website.


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Tax Credit Approved For Injured Officers, Firefighters

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – County leaders this week approved a legislative bill allowing a property tax credit for disabled officers and rescue workers. Following a public hearing Tuesday, the Wicomico County Council voted to approve a legislative bill, which amends the county code to include a property tax credit for Wicomico law enforcement officers, correctional officers and rescue workers disabled in the line of duty, or for the surviving spouse of a fallen offi-

cer or rescue worker. “It sets up a mechanism by which people in a particular class can request and receive a tax exemption on their county real estate tax,” said council attorney Andrew Mitchell. “It sets a cap and things of that nature.” According to state code, local governments are able to grant such tax credits to permanently disabled first responders and officers, or their surviving spouses. Officials noted the proposed legislation would allow Wicomico County to adopt its own tax credit program.

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In this week’s public hearing, however, Wicomico County Volunteer Firefighters Association President John Hilton said he had concerns about the proposed legislation. “If you look around this room tonight, you see no one here in support of it from corrections, fire service or police service,” he said. “I think it would be a better use of time to go back and reevaluate this and get support from them before you pass this.” Hilton argued that the proposed tax credit would provide another benefit to those receiving some form of compensation. “Most of the ladies and gentlemen that are going to benefit from this bill have received some form of workers compensation or disability payment,” he said. “I feel this is almost a double dip. I understand it is a thank you … but I think this is doing more than what the county should be doing at this time.” Resident Tim Arnet disagreed. “This is a very simple gesture to say thank you to the workers that do get injured, or God forbid killed, in the line of duty in this county,” he said. “We do have workers comp benefits, those are state benefits. We don’t have anything from the county that says thank you for their years and years of service to this county.” Arnet added that the proposed tax credit program had a minimal tax im-

June 17, 2022

pact. He questioned, however, why the proposed legislation did not include a reciprocity agreement for Wicomico personnel injured while working for another county. “We don’t have a county fire department that is a career paid fire department, so we force people to go outside the county to look for that employment,” he said. “If they are injured outside the county, the way that the bill is written now, they will not receive that credit.” Following the public hearing, Councilwoman Nicole Acle made a motion to amend the legislation to include a reciprocity agreement with counties that have existing tax credit legislation for officers and rescue workers. Council President John Cannon, however, said mutual aid was considered in the legislation. “The bill as it is right now does state if it’s a matter of mutual aid, where Wicomico County is assisting Dorchester or somewhere else, it will be compensated,” he said. Councilman Bill McCain agreed. “I think that was the main reason we decided to leave it like this, because they were covered in that situation,” he added. A motion to amend the bill failed with Cannon, McCain and Councilmen Josh Hastings and Ernie Davis opposed. A motion to approve the bill then passed unanimously.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Body Cameras Installed In Resort

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

Ocean City Police Corporal Jeff Heiser is pictured with the body camera attached to his uniform. Photo by Campos Media BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – Ocean City’s police chief says a new body-worn camera program is now in place. In an Ocean City Police Commission meeting Monday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) Chief Ross Buzzuro presented an update on the resort’s new body-worn camera program. “Everyone in the field, everyone in the department, has gotten the training and wears body-worn cameras,” he told commission members this week.

Last year, the Maryland General Assembly passed legislation mandating law enforcements agencies to use bodyworn cameras by 2025. Last July, however, the OCPD announced plans to launch a program by the start of the 2022 summer season. Since that time, officials have formed a committee, met with camera vendors, initiated trial runs and selected the private provider Axon as its vendor. And as of this month, Buzzuro said, all officers have been trained and equipped with body-worn cameras. “We have 100% of our personnel in the field wearing them,” he said, “and they’ve already been a great resource for us working in the field.” The police department’s aggressive campaign to launch a body-worn camera program came last year after a series of highly publicized Boardwalk incidents in which the agency’s use of force was called into question. In two cases, attempts to issue citations for vaping on the Boardwalk ended with physical confrontations between OCPD officers and the suspects, and the online circulation of cellphone footage showing snippets of the incidents. The FBI conducted an inquiry into the police officers’ handling of the situations, resulting in no civil rights violations being found. The FBI’s probe confirmed the OCPD’s own internal investigation. During this week’s presentation, Mayor Rick Meehan noted the body-worn camera program would not only benefit members of the public, but OCPD officers, as the cameras would capture and record incidents and save footage. “It’s there, it’s working, it’s seamless and makes a big difference to all our residents and visitors – and I know to all the officers – that are out there,” he said. OCPD Capt. Mike Colbert said the implementation of the body-worn camera program was made possible with the help of instructors and IT staff. He added that forensics had also hired two technicians. “They are onboard now and are going through training as we speak …,” he said. “We are training them specifically in evidence.com and being able to handle video and those kinds of things.”


Commission Forwards Tow Ordinance Changes To Council

June 17, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – Clarifications and housekeeping matters relating to the town’s towing ordinance highlighted this week’s meeting of the Ocean City Police Commission. On Monday, Ocean City Police Department Capt. Mike Colbert presented commission members with a resolution adopting an administrative fee for towing reimbursements. The new addition, he said, would allow the department to implement a 10% service charge for towing companies that don’t collect their reimbursements within 90 days. “Companies make the tow, turn in their paperwork and they ask for reimbursements that we verify. We release the car, get money from the owners of the vehicles and then give a certain amount of that back to the tow company …,” he explained. “What we’re asking is that we adopt an administrative fee if the tow companies don’t ask for reimbursement after 90 days.” Colbert told commission members the proposed resolution resulted from the department’s recent experience with a local tow company. “Last year we had a tow company that didn’t ask for reimbursement for their tows for the whole year, and they made a ton of tows,” he said. “It was well into

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

five figures we returned to them … It took us a while to go back and verify we actually owed it to them.” While the town’s towing ordinance requires tow companies to ask for reimbursements within 30 days, Colbert said the companies wouldn’t be charged the administrative fee until the 90-day mark was reached. In addition to the administrative fee, Colbert introduced a second resolution updating towing procedures to reflect the new fee. “In any case, if they don’t do it within 90 days, we’ll still give them their money but will charge 10% of the cost of the tow,” he explained. Council President Matt James, commission member, questioned why the 30-day requirement wasn’t enforced. “If the 30 days comes up, and they haven’t requested it, can we just tell them oh well, you didn’t do it?” he asked. City Solicitor Heather Stansbury disagreed. “We do hold people’s hands a lot, but they are legitimately owed the money … ,” she said. “I think a 10% service charge will compensate us for us having to go back and help them fill out their paperwork.” Councilman and commission member Peter Buas questioned why the administrative fee was introduced by resolution and not by ordinance. “How is everyone going to get notice of this update?” he asked.

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Colbert noted that tow companies would be informed during the application process, which is conducted annually. Stansbury added that a resolution would expedite the approval process. “We changed the tow ordinance two years ago to allow you do it by resolution because we were having to do two readings and publication and it was getting a little lengthy …,” she explained. “We’re trying to get away from setting fees by ordinance.” With no further discussion, the commission voted unanimously to forward the resolutions to the full Mayor and Council with a favorable recommendation. Colbert also presented the commission this week with an ordinance amendment involving towing ordinance complaints. “This is a piece of paper that needs to be filled out every time a tow company tows off a private lot under the blue sign,” he explained. “We tightened this form up to a degree because we had an instance of a single tow company excessively dealing in predatory towing.” Last year, the commission voted to uphold Police Chief Ross Buzzuro’s decision to suspend a tow license held by a local tow company after a criminal investigation into the company’s operations allegedly revealed nearly 50 criminal and civil violations. Colbert said the company would reapply for its license

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this year, and that the department was seeking changes to the complaint form. “One of the things this does is tighten up the form, which completely lays out what the requirements are,” he said. One of the proposed changes, he said, is a requirement for property owners or managers to take a picture of the unauthorized vehicle being towed. “What we’re really trying to prevent is the tow company doing something unlawful,” Stansbury added. “Generally speaking, if you own a property and you really want something towed, you’ll make sure to get a picture.” Colbert said the proposed changes were ultimately written to clarify the rules and prevent predatory towing. “With predatory towing, they would just go in, see a blue sign and tow a car that they thought shouldn’t be there, when in fact they are supposed to get, in writing, a signature from a representative of the property and actually be called by them …,” he said. “It basically requires that a property owner or their representative be present and make the call and sign this paper with the tow company.” After further discussion, the commission also voted unanimously to forward the ordinance amendment to the Mayor and Council with a favorable recommendation. “There are a number of changes, but in essence the changes kind of tighten up the rules,” Colbert said.

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Wicomico Names New Superintendent

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

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SALISBURY – The Wicomico County Board of Education has appointed Dr. Micah Stauffer to serve as the school system’s new superintendent. In a special meeting held Wednesday, the school board appointed Stauffer to a four-year term as superintendent beginning July 1. He will replace Dr. Donna Hanlin, who announced her retirement late last year. “Finding a new superintendent is one of the most important tasks of the Board of Education,” Board Chairman Gene Malone said in a statement. “This has been a carefully and conscientiously conducted search process with expert support from the Maryland Association of Boards of Education and with input from the entire community.” He continued, “Each finalist’s video interview was viewed approximately 1,100 times, and many, many people then shared their input on the finalists through a survey. We’re confident that any one of our three finalists would have been an excellent leader for Wicomico County Public Schools. We’re proud to announce that Dr. Stauffer will be the next superintendent of Wicomico County Public Schools.” Dr. Donna Hanlin, Wicomico County’s current superintendent of schools, announced last fall that she would be retiring effective June 30, 2022. Appointed to the position in 2016, Hanlin has served as the school system’s superintendent for the last six years. Much of her 43-year career was spent in Wicomico County Public Schools. To that end, the school board began working with the Maryland Association of Board of Education to begin the search process for the next Wicomico County Public Schools (WCPS) superintendent. And in early May, the names of three finalists were announced – Dr. Frederick Briggs, WCPS’s chief academic officer, Dr. Eric Minus, Baltimore County Public Schools’ executive director of secondary schools, and Dr. Micah Stauffer, WCPS’s chief finance and operations officer. Since that time, candidate biographies and interviews have been posted

June 17, 2022

on the school system’s website, which also featured an online survey to collect community input on the three finalists. After review and consideration, the school board voted unanimously on Wednesday to appoint Stauffer as the next superintendent. “As I’ve said throughout this entire process, a great school system always has a great team behind it. Everyone is working together toward a common interest and common goals, and we should always be leading and looking at the success of our students as the priority of our school system. That’s the only way we can be successful …,” Stauffer said on Wednesday. DR. MICAH “We have a fantastic STAUFFER school system, amazing students, wonderful families, dedicated staff and a vibrant community and a great foundation to build from. And as we move forward, we will do just that, together as a team. So thank you all very much. I appreciate it, and I’m very honored.” Stauffer has served as the school system’s chief finance and operations officer since 2019, and prior to that was the director of secondary education (2014-2019). Stauffer has served as principal of Parkside High and Mardela Middle and High and assistant principal of Mardela Middle and High and Wicomico Middle. He taught science and coached at Parkside High and is a graduate of Wicomico High School. “I’m invested in this county,” Stauffer said in his finalist video interview. “I went to schools in this county and grew up here. My wife graduated from WiHi, as did I. My son recently graduated from James M. Bennett and is doing well now at West Point, in college, and my daughter’s a freshman at James M. Bennett, doing well in her activities and in school. The reason I want to be superintendent is because I’m invested in this county and I believe I have the strengths and the leadership skills to help us move forward together as a team.”


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Local Horseshow Crab Team Seeks Volunteers

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

Higher Perspective: These two men had a great view of Berlin’s annual bathtub races last Friday night, utilizing the windows of their rental apartments over Main Street.

Photo by Charlene Sharpe

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WEST OCEAN CITY – The Maryland Coastal Bays Program (MCBP) is seeking volunteers for its new Stranded Spawning Horseshoe Crab Recovery Team. As horseshoe crabs begin to spawn in the bays, the local organization is gearing up for its new Stranded Spawning Horseshoe Crab Recovery Team, which recruits volunteers to go out and help rescue stranded horseshoe crabs. “The Maryland coastal bays is a hotspot for horseshoe crab spawning and as a result the Maryland Coastal Bays Program conducts annual surveys to assess how the population is doing,” a statement on MCBP’s website reads. “Unfortunately, there are some areas in the coastal bays that have obstacles that the horseshoe crabs get stranded on while spawning. These strandings lead to mass causalities which is why MCBP is establishing a team of dedicated volunteers to go out to these locations and help rescue stranded horseshoe crabs.” Horseshoe crabs are invertebrates that have remained anatomically the same for millions of years, MCBP reports, and are beneficial to the bays systems as their eggs are a vital food source for birds, fish, and other animals. This species has also become a valuable resource, particularly for medicinal purposes, MCBP says. A protein found in the horseshoe crab’s blue blood – Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) – is used by pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers to test injectable drugs for the presence of endotoxins, bacterial substances that can cause fevers and even be fatal to humans. Every year, during the late spring and early summer high tides, tens of thousands of horseshoe crabs gather on the beach to spawn. However, MCBP says horseshoe crabs are at risk when they do so, as many become stranded either in rocks or by being flipped onto their backs. Often, they are not able to right themselves. To that end, the organization is seeking volunteers to join its Recovery Team. Those interested in helping the horseshoe crabs are encouraged to sign up for training, which will include a short background on MCBP, horseshoe crabs and their ecological importance, how to fill out a data sheet, and answers to questions. For more information, contact Carly Toulan at ctoulan@mdcoastalbays.org. The Maryland Coastal Bays Program also assists the Maryland Department of Natural Resources each year in conducting annual horseshoe crab surveys to measuring spawning abundance in the coastal bays. The survey has existed since 2002 and provides data used in fisheries management. Surveys start in late May and continue through early July. Those interested in volunteering are also asked to contact Carly Toulan.


CASA Program Expands To Wicomico, Somerset Counties

June 17, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – A volunteer program that advocates for children in the court system will expand into Wicomico and Somerset counties next month. Beginning July 1, the Lower Shore CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) program – currently serving foster children in Worcester County’s child welfare system – will expand its operations into Worcester and Somerset counties. Sally Rankin, program development facilitator, said the expansion will allow volunteers to better serve children in the community. “It’s an extremely valuable program for not only the children who benefit from it, but for the courts and the community as well,” she said. Lower Shore CASA advocates for children under the protection of the court system due to abuse, neglect or abandonment, the organization reports. Simply put, the program trains volunteers to become court appointed special advocates. These advocates are then appointed to a child and are tasked with advocating for the child’s best interests. “The fiscal year 2021 CASA report says children who were assigned a CASA before their cased reached the review stage spent an average of 16.6 fewer months in care. That’s more than a year’s difference,” Rankin said. “There’s also evidence that shows with CASA volun-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

teer involvement, these children have fewer placements. They have a permanent home.” The idea of training volunteers to advocate for children in court first began in Seattle. And by 1990, the U.S. Congress encouraged the expansion of CASA with the passage of the Victims of Child Abuse Act. In 2002, Lower Shore CASA began operating in Worcester and Wicomico counties. In 2008, however, funding for the Wicomico area was no longer provided. Rankin – who had worked for several years in the Maryland court system – said efforts to expand the program began in earnest three years ago, when she was approached by First Circuit Administrative Judge S. James Sarbanes, who had expressed an interest in bringing a child advocacy program to Wicomico. “He said, ‘I have a job for you. I just got funding to start a child advocacy program in Wicomico County,’” she recalled. That first year, Rankin said she worked with the circuit court to develop an advocacy program for abused and neglected children. And when funding wasn’t extended, officials began working with Maryland CASA and other local agencies to expand CASA services into Wicomico and Somerset counties, a move that was also supported by Somerset County Circuit Court Administrative Judge Daniel W. Powell. “Maryland CASA was really pleased

with it because there are only three counties in Maryland that didn’t have the program – Wicomico, Somerset and Garrett,” Rankin said. Working with state and local agencies, officials submitted their funding request to the state and hired Rankin to help expand and develop the CASA program. Earlier this month, the program received official membership notice from National CASA. “I have seen the need firsthand for a CASA program for our foster care children,” Sarbanes said in a statement. “Not only do children with CASA volunteers spend less time in foster care, they tend to perform better academically and behaviorally in school.” Powell agreed. “I still see a widening gap that needs to be filled for the children involved in child welfare cases,” he said. “A CASA has the potential to positively affect the overall health and well-being of these children, both now and into the future. The impact of COVID, the lack of social constructs and isolation has only made a CASA's involvement even more imperative.” Officials report they will be partnering with the Life Crisis Center, Inc., which will act as the sponsoring organization for the tri-county program. The expansion will launch on July 1, the start of the next fiscal year. “Life Crisis has an excellent reputation for the many services provided to

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those in need on the Lower Shore, including advocacy,” Sarbanes said. “Executive Director Jamie Manning worked with Lower Shore CASA when she was a supervisor at the Department of Social Services so she is well-equipped to bring this plan to fruition.” In a statement issued last week, Manning said a successful CASA program needed strong community support. “There are many ways to support the Lower Shore CASA program,” she said. “You can become a CASA volunteer, help us fundraise, donate to the program and spread the word about the needs of these vulnerable children. By getting involved you can make a difference in our community by giving a child hope for a brighter childhood and future.” Rankin noted the CASA program relies on volunteers to support children in the welfare system. She encouraged those who cannot volunteer to donate to the CASA program or share the program’s mission with others. “Even if you can’t be a volunteer, or aren’t in a position to donate, you may know someone who can do either or both,” she said. Lower Shore CASA will have office space in the Circuit Court for Worcester County and the Circuit Court for Wicomico County. To learn more, visit lowershorecasa.org, email casa@lifecrisiscenter.org or call Lower Shore CASA director Jerrona Smith at 443-782-3585.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

COMMUNITY News In Photos

Ocean City American Legion Post 166 donated $2,000 to the Life Crisis Center as part of its monthly program to help organizations that serve the community. Receiving the donation at the Post was Julie Landon, community outreach liaison for the Life Crisis Center. The presentation was made by Chaplain Ben Dawson (Left) and First Vice Commander Pat Sharkey.

Atif Gaddis, BSA Officer for Taylor Bank, recently spoke to the Ocean City Berlin Rotary Club about elder abuse and fraud. Pictured from left to right are Gina Shaffer, Dan Harris, Dr. Larry Michnick, Atif Gaddis, Margaret Mudron, Arlan Kinney and Steve Gragert. Submitted Photos

Guest speakers from the Maryland Coastal Bays Program (MCBP) talked about the organization’s efforts at a recent meeting of the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City. Pictured from left to right are MCBP Executive Director Kevin Smith, Environmental Scientist and Educator Cailyn Joseph and Kiwanis President-Elect Bob Wolfing.

Mabel Rogers, co-board president of the Ocean City Museum Society, spoke about “Ocean City Before Condominiums” at a recent meeting of the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City. Rogers is pictured with Tim Lund, president of the club.

The Worcester County Arts Council awarded $23,440 in the Community Arts Development Grants program to 12 art projects and events to be presented by local nonprofit organizations during the granting cycle beginning July 1, 2022. Grantees, pictured, were recognized on June 7th during the Arts Council's annual Arts Celebration held at the Berlin library.

The Republican Women of Worcester County (RWWC) held their general meeting and luncheon on May 26th at the Restaurant at Lighthouse Sound in Bishopville. Maryland Gubernatorial candidates were invited to speak. Pictured from left to right are Robin Ficker, candidate, Liz Mumford, first vice president of RWWC, Sandy Zitzer, president of RWWC, Diana Waterman, representing candidate Kelly Schulz, and Delegate Dan Cox, candidate.


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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University Center Named SALISBURY – When Salisbury University (SU) President Charles Wight dedicated SU’s Center for Equity, Justice and Inclusion in 2018, he did so with the hope of building upon the campus’s culture of diversity and inclusion. In recognition of his dedication to those ideals, SU’s executive leadership recently announced that the facility will be renamed the Charles A. Wight Multicultural Center for Equity, Justice and Inclusion. Campus leaders surprised Wight with the tribute just weeks prior to his planned retirement from the presidency on July 14. “SU has been my home for the past four years, and I can’t think of any place I would rather have been,” said Wight. “To know that my name will have a permanent place on campus is a great accolade, and to have it associated with SU’s diversity and inclusion efforts, which I championed as a major initiative from my first day in the President’s Office, is one of the highest honors of my career.” “President Wight’s commitment to diversity and inclusion included the reinstatement of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, new staff positions dedicated to multicultural student services, the campus’s first climate study, and the continuation of the recently renamed President’s Diversity and Inclusion Champion awards,” said Eli Modlin, SU chief of staff. “The opening of the Center for Equity, Justice and Inclusion, less than six months after he began his SU tenure, was a landmark initiative that symbolized his commitment to ensuring all students feel welcome on campus and led the way for other accomplishments.” In addition to overseeing SU’s diversity and inclusion initiatives for the past four years, Wight notably took a stand against acts of social injustice both on and off campus, publicly condemning racially and sexually charged vandalism perpetrated by an off-campus community member in 2019 and 2020, as well as the Minneapolis Police murder of George Floyd while in custody in 2020. Currently located in Blackwell Hall, the Wight Multicultural Center for Equity, Justice and Inclusion serves as the home of SU’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, as well as the University’s African Diaspora Center, American Asian Pacific Islander Center, American Sign Language Zone, disAbility Resource Center, Latinx Center, LGBTQIA+ Resource Center and Women’s Center. University leaders also honored Wight with the Spirit of Salisbury Award. Presented to select individuals who have

BUSINESS And Real Estate News

Coastal Lending Group, LLC, a Maryland-based mortgage company, recently held a kickoff party and ribbon cutting ceremony with the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce to celebrate the company’s new Ocean City office. Pictured, from left, are Bethany Brunelle, Jolene Barnes, Anissa Dysart, Ashley Ball Crist, Jonathan Vitak, Lachelle Scarlato, Dave Richardson and Toni Keiser. Submitted Photo

made continuous and notable contributions to SU’s mission, quality and character, the award has been presented only twice before: to the late Dr. Norman Crawford, who served as SU’s president from 1970-1980, and to Dr. Janet Dudley-Eshbach, Wight’s presidential predecessor from 2000-2018. Since becoming SU’s ninth president in 2018, Wight has focused on priorities including ensuring educational accessibility and affordability, building on SU’s culture of diversity and inclusion, being a steward of financial resources and the environment, and furthering mutually positive community relationships, all with the ultimate goal of providing students with the greatest opportunities for success. In addition to the Center for Equity, Justice and Inclusion, new facilities opened under his leadership have included the Dave and Patsy Rommel Center for Entrepreneurship at SU Downtown and an enhanced 3-D arts studio. Academically during Wight’s tenure, SU has been lauded among the nation’s top universities and best values in higher education by national publications including U.S. News & World Report, Forbes, Money, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance and The Princeton Review. The university also has launched three new academic majors and 18 new minors. Wight, who began his higher education career as an assistant professor of chem-

istry at the University of Utah in 1984, has continued to play an active part in the classroom, teaching one course each year. He will continue that role into fall 2022 as a part-time faculty member in SU’s Chemistry Department.

Business Welcomed REHOBOTH BEACH – The Rehoboth Beach – Dewey Beach Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting to welcome Leadership Techniques, LLC to Delaware, where they are excited to “Teach from the Beach!” Dave Newman and Lisa Hammer are the co-founders of Leadership Techniques, LLC. Leadership Techniques, LLC, formed in Frederick, Md., in 2010. Newman and Hammer recently relocated their company (and their families) to Delaware, a move they describe as a “dream come true.” They love the area and feel confident that their unique team approach to leadership training will be a huge hit here in the First State. Newman and Hammer stated that they are a small company with a big mission – to help make the world a better place. They do this by helping business and technical leaders understand how to apply motivational techniques and inject positivity to propel their teams to greater success and satisfaction. Newman and Hammer have supported their bold mission through the years by offering training

and assistance to the business community both locally and across the country. They always integrate the concepts of employee engagement and happiness into everything they teach – from scheduling and risk management to emotional intelligence and interpersonal communications. As Newman puts it, “We know through several studies that happier people are more productive, so whether we’re talking about conflict resolution, or the mechanics of management, we always strive to help frontline leaders reduce stress in the workplace, both their own and the people working for them.” Lisa emphasizes that “We love what we do, and it shows. We have a true passion for project management and supervisory leadership. Our greatest reward is seeing the positive impact that our training can have on individuals, teams, and entire organizations!” Newman and Hammer also offer certification courses in the many of the most popular project management certifications available today, including the Project Management Professional (PMP) and Disciplined Agile Senior Scrum Master (DASSM). They also offer training and consulting services from employee engagement and power skills, to include interpersonal communications, emotional intelligence, and servant leadership, among many others. Leadership Techniques, LLC, is a proud member of the Delaware Business Community and often finds way to give back to the community. Newman and Hammer have both served in leadership positions on the boards of community-oriented volunteer organizations and have been quite involved in their community over the years with special attention to veterans and those in need.

Units Sold SALISBURY – Flo Brotzman, advisor, and Henry Hanna, CCIM, SIOR, senior advisor, with SVN Miller recently represented Delmarva Heart in the sale of three Milford Street Professional Center units. An investor from Virginia purchased the units. Located just two miles from TidalHealth Hospital, the Milford Street Professional Center is home to numerous doctors, dentists, and professional users. Delmarva Heart will continue to utilize this location. “We were delighted to work with Delmarva Heart and are currently have their facility in Berlin, MD under contract,” said Brotzman.


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June 17, 2022

People in Society Ted Tull, left, celebrated his birthday at the Berlin Bathtub Races Friday with his wife Phyllis Tull and Barbara Leone.

by Charlene Sharpe Featuring Those Helping Causes In The Resort Area

Tim and Emily Vocke are pictured with Buckingham Elementary School Principal Chris Welch, center, at a PTA fundraiser at Burley Oak Brewing Company.

Cate Nellans, Chrissy Maddy and Emily Bradshaw attended Pints for Pencils to support Buckingham Elementary School’s PTA.

Patrick, Melissa, Sarah and Ed Reid are pictured enjoying Sunday’s Ronny Smith Quintet jazz concert at the Calvin B. Taylor House Museum.

Randy and Cassandra Brown volunteered at the 32nd Annual Berlin Bathtub Races.

Vanessa Stein and Donna Pellinger paused for a picture at Pints for Pencils. The event raised more than $1,100 for Buckingham’s PTA.

Allison and Lucas Early are pictured at the Berlin Bathtub Races.

Jack Orris and Carol Rose, board members at the Calvin B. Taylor House Museum, are pictured at Sunday’s jazz concert on the museum lawn.

Guest servers Suzanne Evans and Jez King are pictured at Pints for Pencils, a PTA fundraiser held at Burley Oak Brewing Company.

Ali Giska and Courtney Baeurle volunteered at the Taylor House Museum’s jazz concert Sunday.


James Shanklin: Surviving An Eventful Rookie Year

June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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OCBP Alumni of the Week

(Editor’s Note: The following is a series on the men and women who have spent their summers protecting all those who came to Ocean City for fun and safe vacation.) OCEAN CITY – James Shanklin never gave much thought to the idea of spending his summer in Ocean City and becoming a member of the beach patrol. That changed after the summer of 1976, when his best friend, Mark Spence, returned from the beach and began to tell James all about his adventures guarding. As Mark related his tales of life in the surf, he suggested that James join him the next summer and try out. “I honestly was not a swimmer.” James recalled. But the stories that he heard made him determined to give guarding in Ocean City a shot. “So in January of 1977, I started with one lap in the pool at Catonsville Community College in Maryland. I went each day, every day and kept building on it, until I was up to a mile a day. And I loved it,” he said. While he trained, James contacted the beach patrol and informed them of his interest in becoming a guard. “I received my date and time for the test. It was a cold rainy day in May. If I remember correctly the water temp was 53 degrees. As we hit the water my body screamed ‘mistake,’” he recalled. “But we made our way out to the end of the rocks and waited for the

whistle and took off. I will admit that the first clump of seaweed to brush over my legs made me think of a Great White looking for a little breakfast.” James passed the test and began his first year with the Ocean City Beach Patrol. It did not take long for him to begin collecting his own stories; beginning his first week on the stand. James was sitting on 10th Street when he saw something in the water that “looked like a dead body. I asked Russell Hayman, who was next to me, ‘should we go get it?’ He looked at me, put his head down, and then signaled go, go, go.” James raced into the water and swam quickly to the object “discovering it was a large green garbage bag.” Not knowing what it could be, he began towing it to shore. “The first wave hits, the bag splits, and five million orange peels immediately float out and cover the surface of my entire block. I wanted to disappear, but only after I killed Hayman. For about an hour after that, people kept coming to me asking ‘why did you do that?’ I told them that once every summer we do that to keep the jellyfish away.” It was quite a way to start his first summer on the stand, but for James, it wouldn’t be the only memorable moment that rookie season. One day, a young teenager found himself floating toward the

James Shanklin is pictured on his stand in the late 1970s. Submitted Photo

rock jetty during a heavy surf day. James remembers that “he had fallen off his raft and as soon as I saw him go, I went in. When I reached him, a wave smacked us and forced us closer to the jetty. Another wave was right behind pushing us towards the rocks. I knew we wouldn’t make it out and away from the jetty, so I grabbed him in a bear hug and rolled, keeping myself between him and the rocks. Once we were on the other side of the jetty, we easily made it to shore. On the beach, I asked if he was ok. With a horrified look on his face, he just nodded ‘yes.’ His mom came

running over, grabbed him and said to me that she was so sorry. I noticed that she had a similar horrified look on her face. As I started back to my stand, I had the feeling that everyone was looking at me, and all with that same horrified expression. It was just about this point when my entire body started to sting. I realized that it was from hundreds of tiny slices in my skin, made by the mussels and their razor sharp edges, attached to the jetty. I looked down and saw that being wet made me look like I had lost a fight with a paper shredder. It looked much worse than it felt, but it was still pretty embarrassing.” James survived that momentous first year and went on to guard two more summers in Ocean City. Every year added to the number of stories he could tell, and every story and adventure helped to change his life. “OCBP was one of the best decisions I ever made,” he said. “It helped to shape me into a responsible person and gave me great perspective on life. It taught me to react to the needs of others without hesitation. It taught me that I am capable of doing way more than I think I can.” James now lives in Los Angeles where he writes and acts. He can be seen in films like “Moneyball” or “Mission: Impossible III” or in TV shows like “Hell on Wheels” and “NCIS: Los Angeles.”

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

Chris Parypa’s Photo Of The Week: Each week staff photographer Chris Parypa is tasked with submitting a photo from his vast library to be fea-

tured in this space. Above beach-goers look up Sunday to take in the sights and sounds of the OC Air Show. To purchase any of Parypa’s photos, click over to www.chrisparypa.com.

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June 17, 2022

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THE DISPATCH Crossword Puzzle

Page 51

Stevenson United Methodist Resuming In-Person Church Services Every Sunday At 9 a.m. – Sunday School Back in Session

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123 North Main St., Berlin, Md. 410-641-1137 • www.stevensonchurch.org

ANSWERS ON PAGE 86

HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21 to April 19): In- lowing you to make some important formation you need might be coming in changes in a personal situation. Resporadically, but at least what you're member to seek balance and avoid exgetting is valuable. Continue to wait tremes as you proceed. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): until more is available before acting on This is a good week to get out and enthat career move. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): You joy the fine times you missed while you continue on an upbeat cycle, and with were so deep in those workaday projthat strong Taurean energy you should ects. Be sure to share it with that spesee favorable results from your hard cial person. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. work. A pleasant surprise awaits you in 21): Work and play are in balance this your private life. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): A week. However, expect news that could misunderstanding needs more time to tip things toward the workplace for quite be worked out. Don't give up on it just a while. But all to a good end. yet. Remain open to providing explanaCAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): tions, if called for. Another friend offers You're more productive on the job than good advice. you have been in some time. That's CANCER (June 21 to July 22): Fast good. But be careful not to overlook action can correct a seemingly minor some situations developing in your priproblem that has taken on some unex- vate life. pectedly difficult aspects. Stay with it AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): until it's resolved. News on a more pos- You've been doing a lot for others (as itive note is due soon. usual). But now it's time to focus on LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): Some your needs, including finally going on snags could cause delays in those that long-delayed trip you've been hopplans you're eager to see put into op- ing to make. eration. But be patient. The Clever Cat PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): It's will soon have good reason to cele- all smoothly going on 'twixt you and that brate a job well done. very special person in your life. But a VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): Be colleague causes some disruption on careful not to let that Virgin sensitiv- the job that you might be called on to ity dissuade you from being the hard- help settle. headed realist you should be at this BORN THIS WEEK: You are sensitime. Your goals are in sight. Stay fo- tive to the needs of others. But you're cused on them. no pushover. You would make a fine LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): A teacher, psychologist or minister. (c) 2022 King Features Syndicate, Inc. more positive aspect opens up, al- ON PAGE ANSWERS 46

– Service Also Livestreamed On Facebook


The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 52

Things I Like...

OCEAN CITY vanishing

June 17, 2022

WITH BUNK MANN

By Steve Green

Remembering chats with Mike Beatty OC Air Show’s practice day

Berlin’s Broad Street Station

Students learning financial literacy A smooth phone update

Watching crowd reactions at the Air Show A pool dip after yard work

The growth of Berlin’s bathtub races Parental mixed emotions that come with the last day of school When my teenager hears me

Sunshine after a quick storm

Although there had been a few individual surfers in the post WWII era, surfing in Ocean City began in earnest in the early 1960s. With no local surf shops at the time, wetsuits were purchased from the Diver's Den in Baltimore and paraffin wax from the local supermarket. Prior to Ocean City's first surf shop in 1964, surfer Danny Herlihy recalls ordering his boards from California and having them shipped to Salisbury by train. There were no restrictions on surfing until June of 1963 when the mayor and council decreed no surfing be allowed between 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Some of the surfers moved up the beach to 94th Street (not in the city limits until 1965) while others surfed at Assateague and near the Indian River Inlet in Delaware. The documentary film "The Endless Summer", songs by The Beach Boys and Jan and Dean, and the silly but popular Beach Party movies helped spread surfing to a whole new audience. By the mid-1960s surfing in Ocean City was here to stay. To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishingoc.com. Photo courtesy Danny Herlihy


June 17, 2022

WPS Graduates 46:

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 53

Worcester Preparatory School’s 46 graduates received over $7 million in merit scholarship offers and will attend 31 different colleges and universities in 13 states and D.C. this fall. During last month’s ceremony, Head of School Dr. John McDonald announced the Top Senior Award recipients including Valedictorian Ayush Batra, below left; Salutatorian Marshall Mumford, below middle; and Best All-Round Student, Anderssen Taylor, below right. Distinguished WPS alum Peter Buas ‘09, associate attorney with Williams, Moore, Shockley & Harrison, LLP and Ocean City council member, delivered the Commencement Address to the Class of 2022. Of the 26 females and 20 males in the class, 17 students (37% of the class) entered the school in either Pre-K or Kindergarten, making them WPS “lifers.” Ninety-one colleges and universities offered admission to one or more WPS seniors. Seventeen private and 14 public colleges and universities are represented in the enrollments. The graduates include, top front from left, Hannah Brasure, Brooke Emeigh, Brooke Phillips, Aria Islam, Lily Baeurle, Grace Baeurle, Hanna Zajdel, Anna Williams, Sumira Sehgal, Sophia Haines, Anna Carpenter, Ashlyn Roselle and Kate Abbott; second row, Josie Miller Gonzalez, Ava Nally, Jenna Beaver, Sydney Lamson-Reich, Anna McDonald, Myranda Beebe, Faith Sens, Morgan White, Natalie Brushmiller, AnnaMarie Buas, Camden Rayne, Charlotte Catapano and Megan Waller; third row, Marshall Mumford, Hugh Thomas Cropper, Ayush Batra, Nick Hearne, Jordan Willey, Graham McCabe, Tristan Weinstein and Jack Tucker; and, back, Austin Cannon, Josh Conway, Carter McCabe, Anderssen Taylor, Jarett Sofronski, Brice Richins, Riley Schoch, Bennett Tinkler, Kurt Zender, Michael Wehberg, Alex Bunting and Hayes Peterson. Submitted Photos


Sand Hole Collapses Pose Serious Threat Each Summer

Page 54

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

GUARDING THE BEACH

BY DAMIEN SANZOTTI

SPECIALS TO THE DISPATCH

Part of the training exercises for the beach patrol members include simulated sand hole collapses. Submitted Photo

OCEAN CITY – Rip currents, lightning and sand hole collapses cause the most deaths on the beach. Out of those three, the public is most naive about the dangers of sand hole collapses. For some reason, there is just something fun about digging a hole on the beach, but we must remember sand holes are dangerous. Here in Ocean City the beach patrol enforces an ordinance in which a hole’s maximum depth should be no greater than knee deep for the person standing in the hole or the smallest person in the group. That means if I dig a hole for my son or daughter to stand in, it must be less than knee deep for him or her, not me. With large populations in the water and

spread out across the beaches, it is sometimes difficult for the lifeguards to spot a hole being dug behind the umbrellas on the beach. If you notice someone digging a large hole, please notify the lifeguard immediately so we can address the issue. If we see a hole that is knee deep, we are going to ask that you stop digging. Even when the hole is knee deep, please avoid tunneling. Our latest event occurred a few summers ago when a young DAMIEN girl kept asking the lifeguard SANZOTTI if the hole, she was digging, was too deep. She kept it below knee depth, laid down in it and began to dig a tunnel. The guard and her parents thought she was just lying in the shallow hole. As she dug, the tunnel became large enough so that she could fit her head in, and as soon as put her head into that tunnel, the sand caved in. Thankfully, her parents and the lifeguard were only few feet away and assisted her out in seconds of the collapse. She made it out ok but was shaken. The most surprising thing about the sand hole collapses is how long it takes to dig out a “target.” Even if we know exactly where the hole was, it takes many rescuers working diligently and cooperatively to make sure the hole does not collapse again as the rescue is taking place. The beach patrol has developed a specific procedure to quickly try and free a trapped individual before it is too late. In recent years, this serious danger has been widely documented throughout the world and was even featured in the New England Journal of Medicine. Victims typically become completely buried in the sand when the walls of the hole unexpectedly collapse, leaving virtually no evidence of the hole or the location of the victim. Never attempt to tunnel under the sand or dig into the side of a sand mound. One of the most frustrating experiences SRTs have is when they are explaining a safety concern and the parents have an attitude they can handle the situation if something were to occur. This couldn’t be more wrong. Even witnessing a sand collapse you may not be able to extricate the person in time. Studies have shown that over sixty percent of sand collapse victims die and many of the ones that have survived needed CPR and are left with a permanent disability. Although the beach patrol is proactive and effective in monitoring sand hole digging while we are on duty, holes that are being dug after we go off-duty each day pose a serious risk. This risk is not only to those digging the hole but often these extremely deep holes are attractive to others who find them and want to “play” in them. These “craters” (holes) that remain after the people who dug them leave the beach for the day also pose a safety risk for the maintenance crews who work the beach overnight so that you have a nicely maintained beach when you return the following morning. If you dig it fill it. If you notice this dangerous practice at any time, notify someone immediately and please pass on this message, you may save a life. (The writer has been with the beach patrol for 19 years and is currently a sergeant. He is a physical education teacher for the Worcester County Public School system.)


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 55

with Scott Lenox Greetings all and welcome to the Fish in OC fishing report. We had a great week of fishing in and around Ocean City this week with some decent offshore fishing, some awesome blue fishing in the back bays and a couple of first fish of the season. The big fishing news last week was the capture and release of the highly sought after first white marlin of the season out of Ocean City. On Tuesday June 7 at 9:03 a.m., just after we had gone to press, the crew of the Wrecker with Captain Bobby Layton at the helm caught and released the first white marlin of the season. Angler Kevin Gibbs of the Dough Roller was on the rod when the white took a skirted ballyhoo in the Baltimore Canyon and was quickly released unharmed after a short fight and a couple of pictures. Wrecker will be awarded a very nice prize for catching and releasing the first white marlin thanks to contributions from three different entities. The Town of Ocean City will contribute $5,000, Fishermen United of Ocean City will contribute $7,000 and since the Wrecker is also a member of the Ocean City Marlin Club, they will win another

$5,000. That brings the total prize to a hefty $17,000 for angler Kevin, Captain Bobby and the crew of the Wrecker. Congratulations to all. Offshore tuna fishing was hit or miss over the past week with a few bluefins, a few bigeye and some inconsistent yellowfin tuna action. The week started slowly with catches of just a few legal sized yellowfins, but ended on a good note with some boats boxing catches of 10 or more keeper fish. There are plenty of throwback sized fish that are under the 27” minimum size, a few more “BLTs” or “Barely Legal Tuna” just over the 27” minimum size and some fish in the 30 to 50 pound class. There are also a few bigeye tuna mixed in with the largest fish between 150 and 200 pounds. We saw the largest tuna of the season so far hit the dock at the Ocean City Fishing Center when the crew of Spring Mix II dropped a very nice 243-pound bluefin off for the fish cleaners. Bottom fishing for sea bass and flounder has been decent recently with some very nice sea bass and more and more flounder being caught. Captain Chase Eberle SEE PAGE 56

Captain Austin Ensor and the crew of Primary Search caught four tuna and the first swordfish of the season this week. Submitted Photos


Page 56

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

Above top left, 92-year-old Bill Dempsey landed this 23” flounder over ocean structure using the Fish in OC Double Trouble in white. Above top center, Captain Joe Drosey of Rhonda’s Osprey had an awesome day for this crew releasing a white marlin and boxing 10 yellowfin tuna. Above top right, this young angler had a great time releasing some rockfish on board Bayside Guide Above left, angler Kevin Gibbs of the Dough Roller caught the first white marlin of the season with Captain Bobby Layton and the crew of the Wrecker. Above right, Jimmy caught a nice 4.28-pound flounder on board the Angler with Captain Chris Mizurak. Opposite page, top left, Rich won the fish pool on board the Morning Star with Captain Monty Hawkins with this dandy sea bass. Opposite page, top right, Captain Andrew Dotterweich and the crew of the Fish On had a great day with 10 yellowfin tuna. Opposite page, middle left, a successful offshore fishing trip last week included some nice tuna and a mahi. Opposite page, middle right, this group had a limit of fat flounders and a bonus triggerfish on board the Chasin’ Tides with Captain Chase Eberle. Opposite page, bottom left, the crew of Spring Mix II dropped a very nice 243-pound bluefin and many other beauties off for the fish cleaners. Opposite page, bottom right, Shaun Flaherty landed this 34” rockfish at the south jetty while casting a Roy Rig.

... Fish In OC FROM PAGE 55 of Chasin’ Tides Charters had a few trips in a row with flounder limits for his crews with some fish over 5 pounds. The oceangoing party boat fleet is still seeing some sea bass, and though there aren’t as many keepers around, there have been some bigger fish to as large as 4 pounds. Flounder fishing in the back bays slowed a little this past week, but bluefish action more than made up for it. Anglers fishing the OC Inlet and Route 50 Bridge areas have been hav-

ing great luck with bluefish from 20” up to 35” and over 10 pounds. Casting lead heads with shad bodies or bottom fishing cut bait on the incoming tide have been the two best methods for landing bluefish. There has also been some great catch and release rockfish action at the route 50 bridge over the past week with some keeper sized fish between 28” and 35” also landing in coolers. Lead head and shad combos like the Fish in OC Thing a Ma Jig or Roy Rig have been catching both rockfish and bluefish and “dredging” Stretch type lures has been producing the keeper sized rockfish. Big Bird Cropper and Shaun Flaherty have perfected these methods for catching bluefish and rock and have had great

catches of both over the past several weeks. This weekend the ladies take center stage as they do battle in the 2nd Annual Tuna and Tiaras Ladies Only Tuna Tournament held at the Ocean City Fishing Center. Tuna and Tiaras is a fish one of two day event taking place June 17 and 18 with scales action taking place at the Ocean City Fishing Center in West Ocean City. Weigh-ins will be held from 4 PM until 7 PM both nights with awards immediately following scales action on Saturday night. Last year’s inaugural event was a big success with several big money payouts. The crew of Hocus Pocus was the big winner of the 2021 Tuna and Tiaras cashing a check for over

$23,000. Good luck to all of you lady anglers. Don’t forget, for my Daily Angle fishing report head to www.FishinOC.com, check out our TV show Hooked on OC every Sunday morning at 7 a.m. on WMDT 47 ABC and check out my radio fishing report with Mike Bradley at 8:20 a.m. every Friday on 92.7 WGMD. And as always, look for the Fish in OC report right here every Friday in The Dispatch. Until next week, tight lines. (The writer is the owner of Fish in OC and host of Ocean City’s fishing television show Hooked on OC. He has worked in the fishing industry and been fishing the waters in and around Ocean City for over 25 years.)


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 57


MAC, Inc. Marks 50th Anniversary With Celebration

Page 58

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

SNOW HILL– MAC, Inc. celebrated its 50th anniversary Saturday with an exciting daylong program at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center in Salisbury. More than 1,000 people attended. The centerpiece of the day was MAC’s Active Aging Expo, designed to showcase the many ways seniors can stay engaged, healthy and independent as they age. Numerous area businesses and community organizations also were on hand offering information on their services that enhance the lives of seniors. A total of 60 booths were open. Other Expo offerings were speakers, demonstrations, raffles, door prizes and giveaways, entertainment, networking opportunities, and much more. The day started with MAC’s Soles for Seniors walk. Teams and individuals signed up to walk a mile, with proceeds to benefit MAC’s Connections senior center activities, Life Bridges Dementia Day Program, and Senior Emergency Fund. Nearly $6,000 was raised for the programs. TidalHealth brought its popular HealthFest to the Civic Center, filling the Flanders rooms with all kinds of health

June 17, 2022

Participants are pictured warming up for last weekend’s Soles for Seniors Walk. Submitted Photo

screenings and medical information. The Blood Bank of Delmarva was on hand to hold a community blood drive. In the afternoon, MAC presented nu-

merous Community Partnership Awards. The Empower Award was presented to VFW Meuse Post 194, in recognition of its longtime generosity and support of

MAC in its mission of meeting the critical needs of Wicomico County seniors, and particularly veterans, across the Lower Shore. A Connect Award went to Tri Community Mediation in honor of its work leading a unified community response to support area vulnerable populations. A Connect Award also was presented to Dr. Memo Diriker, in recognition of his leadership of the GrayShore Summit and advocacy for seniors on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Engage Awards were presented to the Wicomico County Commission on Aging for its many years of service addressing issues that impact seniors’ quality of life; and to the Worcester Commission on Aging, Somerset County Commission on Aging and Delmarva Community Services in Dorchester County, to recognize each for many years of providing exemplary services that enrich the lives of seniors. Following the awards was the presentation of GrayShore Report 2022 Aging in Place: A Report to the Community. The report examines challenges older people face as they age in place, such as health care, housing and transportation.

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June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 59

First lady Visit: The Art League of Ocean City on June 13 hosted a reception for Maryland First Lady Yumi Hogan at the Ocean City Center for the Arts. Herself a

working artist and teacher at the Maryland Institute College of Art, Hogan visited with artists and guests at the event and toured the facility. Above left, Hogan, third from left, is pictured with Dee Dobson, Judy Schoelkopf and Rina Thaler. Above right, she is pictured with Board members Al Handy, Crystal Collins, Emily Schwab, Virginia Outten and Thaler. Below left are Kari Berger, Hogan and Dr. Leonard Berger. Below right, studio artist Gerilyn Gaskill greets Hogan. Submitted Photos

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OP Farmers, Artisan Market Continues Saturday

Page 60

OCEAN PINES – It's 3:30 a.m. on Saturday morning, but White Horse Park is already abuzz. Farmers market merchants are starting to arrive with their trucks filled with fruits and vegetables. Freshly harvested produce will soon be stacked onto market stands, ready for shoppers when the Ocean Pines Farmers & Artisans Market opens at 8 a.m. By the headlights of her SUV, Debbie Synder of Synder's Produce and Pretty Things unloads several flats of strawberries that she's brought to the market for her customers. Among the carefully displayed containers are gardens of annual flowers that Synder potted up earlier in the week. The late-season berries become a garnish to the market stand's lush garden products. "Our marketplace is such an interesting space to be in,” Market Manager Dav-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

id Bean said. “When you go to a grocery store it’s just a generic experience. You want to hurry up and get out of there.” Lenore Brady of Stag Run Farm, an urban farm in Georgetown, Del., recommends going to the farmers market and taking everything in. "There is something new every week and there is fun to be had, as well as a lot of fresh foods,” she said. People from all over the mid-Atlantic visit the market in Ocean Pines. It’s an experience that has appealed to locals and visitors, as well as children, families, and grandparents. "By late June, locally grown blueberries will be at their peak. Many people buy a few extra boxes and pop them in the freezer for pies, muffins, or smoothies,” Bean said. “You can also freeze fresh herbs this summer to use in soups and stews next winter. Food harvested only

hours before the market opens will stay fresh for longer, and its more nutritious and tastes better.” David Joseph Deacon is the co-owner of D.J. David, a marketplace greengrocer shop. Deacon enjoys sharing information about what his farmers are growing, as well as trading recipes with his customers. "Eating with the seasons and eating what is most bountiful will definitely get you more bang for your buck,” he said. "People enjoy talking with us, asking questions and learning about our fruits and vegetables." Deacon said many customers buy big hauls of summer tomatoes, and then spend several days cooking them down to fill their pantries with jars of homemade sauce that will last until next summer. “It's a yearly ritual that they look forward to,” he said. “Also, if you're concerned about rising meat prices, stir fries

June 17, 2022

and bigger salads using fresh produce allow you to use a smaller amount of meat without sacrificing taste and satisfaction. Incorporating more plant-based options in your diet can help offset the high cost of meat.” Janice Curtis, the coordinator of market events and happenings, including the Marketplace Kitchen and Kids Market Zone, said the experience of going to the market can help expand the palette of fussy eaters. "For many busy mothers, it's easier to get their kids to eat vegetables when they have been to the farmers market and helped mom pick out dinner," she said. "Fresh-picked carrots taste sweeter. String beans straight off the vine crunch when you eat them raw,” she continued. “There is no comparison between a salad bar cucumber and a crisp, fragrant cucumber fresh from the field." Curtis and her husband are also the owners of JABBS Seasonings, a spice shop at the market. "Farmers markets are so cool, because they offer a unique experience for children,” she said. The Ocean Pines market first opened in 2012 as a small seasonal farmers market. It was expanded and renamed in 2017 to also include artisans. In 2022, more than 130 merchant businesses are enrolled in the market. The Ocean Pines Farmers & Artisans Market is open Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. in White Horse Park.


Art Addiction Competition Held

June 17, 2022

The Art League of Ocean City recently hosted the Worcester County student artists who submitted entries into the Lower Shore Addiction Awareness Visual Arts Competition, sponsored by the United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore. Above, from left, are first place winner Isabella Huber, Art League of Ocean City Executive Director Rina Thaler, United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore President and CEO Pam Gregory and Art League Education Director Katrin Huber. Huber is a 10th grader at Worcester Preparatory School. Above right, Teagan Martin, a seventh grader at Stephen Decatur Middle School, won third place in the competition. Submitted Photos

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

————— OC Air Show Pictorial By Chris Parypa —————

June 17, 2022

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June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 63

2021 Town Of Willards Annual Drinking Water Quality Report April 2022 • PWSID #0220007

We’re pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source is two (2) wells drilled three hundred twenty feet (320’) into the Manokin Aquifer. We have a source water protection plan available from our office that provides more information such as potential sources of contamination. This plan is also available from Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) or at the Wicomico County Public Library. For more information call 1-800-633-6101. I’m pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets all federal and state requirements. As you can see by the table which follows below, our system had no violations. We constantly monitor for various contaminants in the water supply to meet all regulatory requirements. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Water Drinking Hotline (800- 426-4791). If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Pete Merkl at 410-835-8192. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the second Monday of each month at the Town Hall Building at 7:00 p.m. The Town of Willards routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. This table shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2021. As water travels over land or underground, it can pick up substances or contaminants such as microbes, inorganic or organic chemicals, and radioactive substances. All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. It’s important to remember that the presence of these contaminants does not necessarily pose a health risk. In this table you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following definitions: Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) – one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years, or a single penny in $10,000. Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter – one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000. Action Level – the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Level – The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal – The “Goal” (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Note: Test results are for year 2021 or as otherwise indicated; all contaminants are not required to be tested for annually. We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some contaminants have been detected. The EPA has determined that your water IS SAFE at these levels. All sources of drinking water are subject to potential contamination by substances that are naturally occurring or man made. These substances can be microbes, inorganic or organic chemicals, and radioactive substances. All drinking water including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Town of Willards is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your drinking water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791 or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated contaminants, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect. We at The Town of Willards work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future. Violations Table Nitrate [measured as Nitrogen] Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue-baby syndrome. Violation: Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen) Monitoring, Routine Major 01/01/2021 12/31/2021 We failed to test our drinking water for the contaminant and period indicated. Because of this failure, we cannot be sure of the quality of our drinking water during the period indicated.


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

Things To Do Every Sunday: Berlin Farmers Market From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., several streets will be closed to allow producers to display their goods. Live music from 10 a.m.12:30 p.m.

Every Monday: TOPS Meeting 5-6:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Berlin. Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a support group promoting weight loss and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Call Rose 443-8808444.

Every Tuesday: TOPS Meeting Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a weekly support and education group promoting weight loss and a healthy life style. Meetings are held at the Worcester County Berlin Health Department at 9730 Healthway Drive, Berlin from 3:30-4:30 p.m. every Tuesday. 410-289-4725. Every Tuesday: Dancing The Delmarva Hand Dance Club holds dancing at the Selbyville Elks Lodge 2173 from 5:30-9 p.m. delmarvahanddancing. com.

Every Wednesday: Bingo Elks Lodge 2645, corner of Sinepuxent Avenue and 138th Street in Ocean City. Has bingo all year. Doors open 4:30 p.m. with first game sharply at 6:30 p.m. Kitchen open for light fare. 410-250-2645.

Every Thursday: Beach Singles Join the club, 55 plus, at Harpoon Hann-

a’s in Fenwick Island, 4-6 p.m. 302-4369577 or BeachSingles.org.

Every Friday: Bingo Knights of Columbus hosts with doors open at 5 p.m. and bingo beginning promptly at 6:30 p.m. Held at the Columbus Hall at 9901 Coastal Highway, behind St. Luke's Church. Play every game for just $24. Light refreshments available. Call 410524-7994 with any questions. June 17: Surf Film Premiere The premiere of a new surf documentary film by local surfer/filmmaker Danny Herlihy has been announced for Friday, June 17 at Seacrets Morley Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m. with the premiere at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 at the door.

June 18: Teach A Kid To Fish The Ocean Pines Anglers Club will host the annual Teach A Kid To Fish Day from 9-11 a.m. at the South Gate Pond near the Sports Core Pool. Kids of all ages are invited to learn fishing skills and techniques with the members of the Ocean Pines Anglers Club. Please bring your own rod. Bait will be provided. There will be a drawing for a free rod and reel. The event is free. No preregistration is required. June 18: Summer Fun Kickoff Join Germantown School Community Heritage Center for its annual Summer Fun Kickoff from 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. This family-

friendly, FUN, free event offers a moon bounce, "Tales & Scales," a touch tank, a fire truck display, sheriff department dog show, museum tours and more. Rain Date is Saturday, June 25.

June 18: Juneteenth Celebration Join the Sturgis One Room School Museum in Pocomoke for a Juneteenth celebration block party with food, fun, and fellowship from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at 209 Willow Street in Pocomoke. Everyone is invited to this free event featuring free tours of the Sturgis Museum, a bounce house for kids, music by DJ Rob Little, and great food like fried fish and fries by Unionville Lodge #45. Vendors are still accepted and registration is open at sturgisschoolmuseum.com/events.

June 20: Bike Night Bikers Without Borders Foundation will be hosting a June bike night to benefit Special Olympics Maryland at OC Eateries. DJ Mikey will be spinning the tunes and 10% of all the sales from the evening at will be donated directly to Special Olympics Maryland, one of the BWOB core charities. Car and Jeep clubs always welcome. bikerswithoutbordersfoundation@gmail.com. June 22: Monthly Meeting The First State Detachment of the Marine Corps League meets the fourth Wednesday each month at the Ocean City American Legion Post 166 on 23rd Street and Coastal Highway at noon. Any Marines and Navy Corpsman who have served in the Corps, living in Worcester and Sussex counties, are welcome to join to meet fellow veterans and consider joining the Detachment and support the mission for community service through camaraderie and volunteerism. 410-430-7181 or email websergeant@firststatemarines.org. June 23: NARFE Meeting The National Active Retired Federation Employees (NARFE) Chapter 2274 Ocean Area’s next meeting is to be held at Denny's at 6104 Coastal Highway at 9:30 a.m. Breakfast meeting cost is $10 for a complete meal.

June 24-25: Pollinator Garden Tour The second annual Pollinator Garden Tour will take place with an exclusive preview event at Newport Farms. A self-guided tour covering eight pollinator-friendly gardens across Maryland’s Lower Eastern Shore. Visit beautiful gardens landscaped with native plants, watch artists painting “en plein air” and gain inspiration for your own gardening projects. Tickets are $25 in advance or $30 at the door, available at www.lowershorelandtrust.org on the News and Events page. There are five tour locations in Worcester County, one in Wicomico County and two in Somerset County. Attendees can visit the gardens between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Garden homeowners, Lower Shore Land Trust Staff, Master Gardeners, and volunteers will be available throughout Friday and Saturday

to answer any garden related questions and share their unique stories and experiences.

June 25: Community Sale The Parke at Ocean Pines is holding its community sale (rain date is Sunday, June 26) from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the driveways of our residents. The Parke is an active 55+ Adult community of 503 homes. Parke residents are selling their treasures for others to enjoy. There are clothes, lamps, artwork, household items, electronics, furniture and more. Maps will be available at the main entrance of the Parke located at Central Parke West, located off of Ocean Parkway at the south entrance of Ocean Pines. June 25: Church Rummage Sale Ocean City Presbyterian Church on 13th Street will host from 7 a.m.-1 p.m.

June 25: BBQ, Singing A backyard barbecue and hymn sing will be a great evening of food, fellowship, and song with all profits to benefit Stevenson United Methodist Church’s "Restore the Light" stained glass window refurbishment campaign. BBQ starts out in Stevenson's courtyard outback at 4:30 to 6 p.m. and the hymn-sing/concert begins at 6:30 p.m. in the sanctuary. Everyone is welcome.

June 26: Church Anniversary The public is invited to the Sturgis Park pavilion, 100 River Street in Snow Hill at 3 p.m. for a worship celebration of the Makemie Presbyterian Church’s 350th anniversary. This site honors the original location of Makemie Memorial Presbyterian of Snow Hill, which was within a block of the Pocomoke River. The celebration will center on Psalm 100 and will feature music and sermonettes from each century. Featured preachers are Rev. Len HedgesGoettl, Rev. Kirk Dausman, Rev. Kerry Shull, and Rev. Barb Hedges-Goettl. Music is being organized by Rev. David Jones. (Anyone who would like to sing in the choir is invited to come for rehearsal at 2:30 p.m. on that day.) The public is invited to stop by the church building at 103 W. Market Street in downtown Snow Hill. You can open the front doors and come in to see the historic Gothic Revival building, which is on the national register.

July 5: Candidates Forum The Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce and Snow Hill Chamber of Commerce will host a public forum with the Maryland Congressional District 1 Democratic candidates from 6:308 p.m. The event will take place at the Old Firehouse located at 212 W. Green Street in Snow Hill. Heather Mizeur and Dave Harden are both vying for the Democrat vote during the state’s upcoming primary election on July 19. The public is invited to attend and will have the opportunity to ask questions of both candidates.


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 65

The Dispatch Classifieds $15/Week for Minimum of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available) Deadline for Insertions, Cancellations & Payment is 3pm Tuesday Pre-Payment is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard

HELP WANTED ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: For busy Landscape Contractors office in Berlin. This is a multi-tasking position for detail oriented individual including customer scheduling & routing crews. Must have strong computer skills and a pleasant personality. Call The Moore Companies, 410-641-2177 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– LANDSCAPE WORKERS NEEDED: Must have reliable transportation to work. Call 410641-2177. The Moore Companies, Berlin, MD. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– CLEANERS WANTED FOR OC: If you are a conscientious individual or team looking for great pay & minimal hours on summer Saturdays in OC, then we are the cleaning company for you. Exp. preferred. Cell phone and vehicle required. (443)880-0525. ___________________________ C L E A N E R S / VAC AT I O N RENTALS: Needed for Ocean City and Ocean Pines. Experience preferred but not necessary. Text or call 443-397-1189. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

SEASONAL OC HOTEL NOW HIRING FOR:

Seasonal

Maintenance Employee

6 Days/Week 3pm-10pm Experienced Only Need Apply. Must have valid Driv. Lic.

Call Seahawk Motel

410-250-3191

HELP WANTED

CONSERVATION TECHNICIAN/ MARINA TRAVEL LIFT OPERATOR

Position will be responsible for the daily operation and maintenance of the travel lift and forklifts. Duties will include the operation and maintenance of the marine travel lift, proper boat docking and large forklift operation plus daily supervision of the boatyard staff.

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811 Why work indoors?? Coastal Kayak is the perfect "fun" second job, ease-into-retirement job, excuse-to-get-outside job, or learn-something-new job! Hiring beach staff, office staff, delivery drivers.

Info@CoastalKayak.com

Apply online at delawarestatejobs.com

For further assistance, you may contact us by phone at 302.739.5458 or email at jobs@delaware.gov

THE SPINNAKER NOW HIRING DAYTIME HOUSEKEEPING STAFF APPLY IN PERSON

ENGLISH TEACHER Worcester Preparatory School is located in beautiful Berlin, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. The school is an independent, coeducational college preparatory day school serving over 500 students in grades PK -12. We are seeking an experienced and motivated Upper School English Teacher for the 2022-2023 school year. This vibrant individual will have a strong education background and be capable of teaching the highest levels of high school English. Bachelor's degree from an accredited college with a major in English, successful classroom experience, and the ability to participate in other areas of school life are requirements forth is position. Advanced Placement experience and advanced degree would be desirable. Interested candidates should mail or email resume with cover letter to: Linda Watson, Director of Human Resources, 508 South Main Street, Berlin, MD 21811 or lwatson@worcesterprep.org

1800 Baltimore Avenue Monday-Friday 10am-3pm

AUTO MARINE SALES PERSON Currently Hiring Manpower For:

Busy Auto & Marine parts store with locations in Ocean Pines, Clarksville and Long Neck, is now hiring for full and part times sales persons. Experience a plus but will train the right person. Great Pay & Benefits. Call Joel 302-344-9769

Carpenter | Laborer | Painters Stucco & EIFS Mechanics Concrete Work o Experience preferred. o Tools, transportation & valid driver’s license are a plus. o Excellent pay and a competitive benefits package available. Please Apply Online: https://www.allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

Or Contact Our Office at 410-352-9800

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIANS Busy Tire & Service Centers with locations in the Rehoboth, Bethany and Ocean City areas, is now hiring for experienced technicans. Must be dependable.

Exc. Pay and Benefits. Call Matt - 302-344-9846

THUNDERBIRD BEACH MOTEL NOW HIRING FULL TIME DAY HOUSEKEEPING PART TIME NIGHT AUDITOR APPLY IN PERSON

Housekeeper Full Time Eastern shore resident is seeking a mature, responsible and experienced person to perform various housekeeping duties at a Berlin, MD estate five days weekly. Full time position with benefits and 401K. Reliable transportation necessary. Call 410-803-4135, fax resume to 410-272-2249 or e-mail:

Monday-Friday 9am-3pm Thunderbird Beach Motel 32nd Street, Ocean City

tgreaver@bscamerica.com. Cleaning services need not apply.

Check Out The Dispatch’s E-Dition Online - www.mdcoastdispatch.com

INDIAN RIVER MARINA IS NOW HIRING! •FUEL DOCK •DOCK HANDS •RAMP ATTENDANTS •BOATYARD •NIGHTWATCH •MAINTENANCE •SHIP STORE CLERK •GENERAL CLERICAL (SEASONAL YEAR ROUND)

NOW HIRING! PAYING TOP DOLLAR! •LINE COOKS •FOOD RUNNER •SERVERS •BARBACK Please apply in person. Greene Turtle West Rt. 611, West OC 410-213-1500 WEST OC’S MOST FUN PLACE TO WORK AND MAKE $$$$

Apply Online at delawarestatejobs.com For additional information, please contact the Marina office at 302.227.3071 AA/EOE

NOW HIRING FULL TIME CUSTODIAL STAFF We are currently looking for Part Time custodial employees. Hours are 3:30pm-6:30pm. Monday through Friday. Apply to Linda Watson at lwatson@worcesterprep.org or mail application to Linda Watson 508 S Main St Berlin, MD 21811.

•DRIVER Call Pam at 410-726-7061 Or Apply Within at 56th Street

Now Hiring For: Line Cooks Prep Cooks Host/Hostess

Call Matt at 302-593-4141 or email thesterlingtavern@gmail.com


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Classifieds CONTACT INFORMATION $15/Week for Minimum of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Deadline for Insertions, Cancellations & Payment is 3pm Tuesday Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Pre-Payment is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

CARPENTERS & CARPENTERS HELPERS Must have:

Tools, Transportation, Driver’s License Exp. Required! PATTERSON & SONS BUILDERS

Call 410-641-9530 ELECTRICIAN

THE DISPATCH IS ONLINE WWW.MDCOASTDISPATCH.COM

Full-time, Year-round Now accepting applications. Established company, 5+ years exp, service type projects, health, dental, paid vacation, 401k w/matching, company van. Hawkins Electric 443-856-2001 ask for John Ross.

Fourth Insertion PUBLIC NOTICE

32707 Lighthouse LLC, Petitioner vs. Donna M. Wilkerson, Respondent (Civil Action No.: S22M-04-023 MHC) Petition to Compel Satisfaction of Mortgage

and Lillian Coates and recorded at Book 1286, Page 113 at the Sussex County Recorder of Deeds should not be marked satisfied on the record.

YR RENTAL: Condo/Studio, 32nd. St. $850. per mo. + util’s. Immed. occupancy. 302-745-5994. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

COMMERCIAL WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 2 Office/Retail Spaces for Lease. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

AUTO FOR SALE 2003 LINCOLN TOWN CAR: Black with sun roof. Loaded. Runs great! 140K miles, $6,500. Call 410-251-3412. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

How will I find it Among the broken pieces, Faith, then forgiveness?

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 27, 2022

4x 05-27, 06-03, 06-10, 06-17

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

tice is given that PAUL FRANCIS ZIOLKOWSKI,31189 CHARLES BARNES ROAD, WESTOVER, MD 21871, was on MAY 26, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JOANN HOWELL, who died on FEBRUARY 01, 2022, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

Third Insertion ORDER FOR RULE TO SHOW CAUSE On the foregoing Petition to Compel Satisfaction of a Mortgage, it is this 17th day of May, 2022, ORDERED, that a Rule to Show Cause be issued, requiring Donna M. Wilkerson to appear in the Superior Court of the State of Delaware for Sussex County at 1 The Circle, Suite 2, Georgetown, DE 19947 and answer the Petition on the 1st day of July, 2022, at 11:00 am, to show cause why the Mortgage granted by Gary V. Coates

THOMAS J. MALONEY, ESQ. COCKEY, BRENNAN & MALONEY, PC 313 LEMON HILL LANE SALISBURY, MD 21801 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19243 To all persons interested in the estate of JOANN HOWELL, ESTATE NO. 19243. No-

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 26TH day of NOVEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-03, 06-10, 6-17

Third Insertion

Third Insertion

B. RANDALL COATES, ESQ. COATES, COATES, & COATES 204 WEST STREET PO BOX 293 SNOW HILL, MD 21863

AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000161

RENTAL

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

June 17, 2022 Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-03, 06-10, 6-17

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19247 To all persons interested in the estate of MARGARET E. BAKER, AKA: MARGARET ELOISE BAKER, ESTATE NO. 19247. Notice is given that ZANDERLEE BAKER, JR., 107 SHOWELL STREET, BERLIN, MD 21811, was on MAY 26, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARGARET E. BAKER, who died on JANUARY 20, 2022, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 26TH day of NOVEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.

PAUL FRANCIS ZIOLKOWSKI Personal Representative

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022 ZANDER LEE BAKER, JR. Personal Representative

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT

BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff vs. NORMAN ELLIS, ET AL. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 31st day of MAY, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings,made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of June, 2022 The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. DBC: DLEMARVA BEACH CLUB, LLC CONDO- TIME MINIUM INTERUNIT VAL 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201

1 3 4 6 10 15 16 20 21 25 28 41 43 45 49

PRICE

PURCHASER

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $250.00 $200.00 $4,000.00 $100.00 $60.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

BC BC BC BC BC BC BC DBC DBC DBC DBC DBC BC BC BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-03, 06-10, 06-17


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 67

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000184 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff vs. LOUISE MULL, ET AL. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 31st day of MAY, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings,made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of JUNE, 2022 The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. DBC: DLEMARVA BEACH CLUB, LLC CONDO- TIME PRICE MINIUM INTERUNIT VAL 312 312 312 401 401 401 401

24 25 39 1 4 8 10

PURCHASER

$4000.00 DBC $3750.00 D.DEVITO $50.00 BC $60.00 DBC $50.00 BC $60.00 DBC $50.00 BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022

TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-03, 06-10, 06-17

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000191 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff vs. REGINALD W. STALLING, ET AL. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 31st day of MAY, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings,made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of June, 2022 The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. LJCH = LEMONJUICE CAPITAL HOLDINGS, LLC CONDO- TIME MINIUM INTERVAL UNIT 401 401 401 401 401 401

12 13 16 17 31 36

PRICE

PURCHASER

$50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $5500.00 LJCH $100.00 ROBERTSAUER

CONDO- TIME MINIUM INTERVAL UNIT 401 401 401 401 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402

40 45 49 50 3 7 8 9 14 15 16 17 44

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

PRICE

PURCHASER

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-03, 06-10, 06-17

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000194 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff vs. DODD FANALE, ET AL. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 31st day of MAY, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings,made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of June, 2022 The Report of Sale filed in

the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PCP = PALMETTO COAST PROPERTIES, LLC CONDO- TIME MINIUM INTERUNIT VAL 402 402 402 403 403 403 403 403 403 403 403 403 403 403 403 404 404 404 404 404 404 405 405 405

45 48 52 1 3 8 10 12 15 37 45 46 48 50 51 6 7 8 44 47 49 1 6 7

PRICE

PURCHASER

$100.00 $50.00 $100.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

PCP BC PCP BC BC BC BC PCP PCP PCP BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-03, 06-10, 06-17

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000181 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff vs. OTTO A. SILVA, ET AL. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 31st day of

MAY, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings,made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of June, 2022 The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. LJCH = LEMONJUICE CAPITAL HOLDINGS, LLC CONDO- TIME MINIUM INTERUNIT VAL 305 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 307

52 2 14 16 17 21 33 34 38 41 50 51 32

PRICE

PURCHASER

BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 $3500.00 LJCH $2000.00 LJCH BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 $5100.00 MICHAEL S.ZORICH

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-03, 06-10, 06-17

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307

Berlin, Maryland 21811 Plaintiff vs. PAUL COLLINS, ET AL. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 31st day of MAY, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings,made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of June, 2022 The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BTIOA = BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.

CONDO- TIME MINIUM INTERVAL UNIT Ae5 Aq17 Ar18 As19 As19 Bi35 Bj36 Bo41 Bo41 Bv48 Bz52

14 15 38 7 51 34 4 12 39 3 15

PRICE

PURCHASER

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

BTIOA BTIOA BTIOA BTIOA BTIOA BTIOA BTIOA BTIOA BTIOA BTIOA BTIOA

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-03, 06-10, 06-17

Third Insertion

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000200

AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307

BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC 11029 Cathell Road

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND


Page 68

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch JUNE 10, 2022

The Dispatch Legal Notices

TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-10, 06-17, 06-24

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000206 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. I 1029 Cathell Road Berlin, Maryland 2I8II Plaintiff vs. MILTON HELLMAN, ET AL. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 31st day of MAY, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings,made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of June, 2022 The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: VOP= VILLAGE OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. PURCONDO- TIME PRICE CHASER MINIUM INTERVAL UNIT Bq43 Br44

34 4

$50.00 $50.00

VOP VOP

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-03, 06-10, 06-17

Third Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19212 To all persons interested in the estate of ALICE JEAN JONES, ESTATE NO. 19212. HOLLIE ANNE SCOPA, 22

HEROLD ROAD, W. PEABODY, MA 01960 and PAMELA B. WALTERS, 350 WILSON ROAD, HUNTINGTOWN, MD 20639, were on MAY 20, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ALICE JEAN JONES, who died on JANUARY 17, 2022, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 20TH day of NOVEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 03, 2022 HOLLIE ANNE SCOPA PAMELA B. WALTERS Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-03, 06-10, 6-17

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE

ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000062 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. Cyril Byron, Sr., et al. Defendants

AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000045 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. JAMES S. LANDIS, et al. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 1ST day of JUNE, 2022,that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of JUNE, 2022. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval:

TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PCP = PALMETTO BEACH CLUB, LLC. DBC = DLEMARVA BEACH CLUB, LLC

TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PCP = PALMETTO BEACH CLUB, LLC. DBC = DLEMARVA BEACH CLUB, LLC

CONDO- TIME PRICE PURMINIUM INTERCHASER UNIT VAL

CONDO- TIME PRICE PURMINIUM INTERCHASER UNIT VAL

18 19 18 19 21 17 18 38 17 21 18 20 36 18 19 17 19 46 16 17 18 20 17 36

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1100.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1450.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $100.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

BC BC BC BC DBC BC BC BC BC DBC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC PCP BC BC BC BC BC BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication

TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-10, 06-17, 06-24

205 205 205 205 205 205 206 206 206 206 206 206 206 206 206

14 40 43 45 50 51 2 6 7 9 11 14 16 18 31

$50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $50.00 BC $100.00 PCP $100.00 PCP $100.00 PCP $6600.00 MICHAEL ZORICH

206 206 206 206 206 206 206 206 206 206

34 37 39 40 41 42 43 44 46 47

$2500.00 $100/00 $100.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

DBC PCP PCP BC BC BC BC BC BC BC

Name of Newspaper:

JUNE 10, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-10, 06-17, 06-24

Second Insertion

Second Insertion

ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 1ST day of JUNE, 2022,that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of JUNE, 2022. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval:

207 208 210 210 210 211 211 211 212 212 307 308 308 309 309 310 310 401 405 407 407 407 408 408

June 17, 2022 Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 10, 2022

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000221 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. MARCIA V. STREET, et al. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 1ST day of JUNE, 2022,that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of JUNE, 2022. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. DBC = DLEMARVA BEACH CLUB, LLC CONDO- TIME PRICE PURMINIUM INTERCHASER UNIT VAL 405 405 405 405 405 405 405 405 405 405 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406

11 14 15 16 17 43 47 49 50 52 2 7 9 10 12 14 17 19 20 40 45 46

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $60.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC DBC BC BC BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication

AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000224 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. THERESA STOLTZ, et al. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 1ST day of JUNE, 2022,that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of JUNE, 2022. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. DBC = DLEMARVA BEACH CLUB, LLC CONDO- TIME PRICE PURMINIUM INTERCHASER UNIT VAL 407 407 407 407 407 407

17 18 20 28 29 39

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $3300.00 $50.00 $50.00

BC BC BC DBC BC BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 10, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-10, 06-17, 06-24

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000005 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21842-3307 Plaintiff

FOR WORCESTER COUNTY MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-OOO124 PRINCESS ANNE PROPERTIES LLC 12 WILLIAM STREET BERLIN, MD 21811 PLAINTIFF VS. WALTER VANDEGRIFT 39 YOUNG BIRCH RD LEVITTOWN, PA 19057 DEFENDANT AND

vs. GROUPWISE, INC, et al. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 1ST day of JUNE, 2022,that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 5th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of JUNE, 2022. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. CONDO- TIME PRICE PURMINIUM INTERCHASER UNIT VAL 409 409

20 36

$50.00 $50.00

BC BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 10, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-10, 06-17, 06-24

Second Insertion RYAN T. WEST, ESQ. WEST AND WEST, P.A. 12 WILLIAM ST BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT

WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND SERVE ON COUNTY ATTORNEY: ROSCOE LESLIE, ESQ. 1 WEST MARKET ST., ROOM 1103 SNOW HILL, MARYLAND 21863 AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN,PARCEL NUMBER 03034178, ASSESSED TO WALTER VANDEGRIFT DEFENDANT AND UNKNOWN OWNER OF PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST, BERLIN, PARCEL NUMBER 03034178, ASSESSED TO WALTER VANDEGRIFT, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, A D M I N I S T R ATO R S , GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST DEFENDANT WORCESTER COUNTY MARYLAND ORDER 0F PUBLICATION THE OBJECT OFTHIS PROCEEDING IS TO SECURE THE FORECLOSURE OF ALL RIGHTS OF REDEMPTION IN THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, SOLD BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES FOR THE STATE OF MARYLAND AND TREASURER OF

WORCESTER COUNTY TO THE PLAINTIFF IN THIS PROCEEDING: 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN, PARCEL NUMBER 03034178, ASSESSED TO WALTER VANDEGRIFI. THE COMPLAINT STATES, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE AMOUNTS NECESSARY FOR REDEMPTION HAVE NOT BEEN PAID. IS THEREUPON THIS 3RD OF JUNE 2022 , BY THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, ORDERED, THAT NOTICE BE GIVEN BY THE INSERTION OF A COPY OF THIS ORDER IN THE DISPATCH HAVING A GENERAL CIRCULATION IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, ONCE A WEEK FOR 3 SUCCESSIVE WEEKS, WARNING ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE PROPERTY TO APPEAR IN THIS COURT BY THE 2ND DAY OF AUGUST, 2022, AND REDEEM THE PROPERTY 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN AND ANSWER THE COMPLAINT OR THEREAFIER A FINAL JUDGMENT WILL BE ENTERED FORECLOSING ALL RIGHTS OF REDEMPTION IN THE PROPERTY, AND VESTING IN THE PLAINTIFF' A TITLE, FREE AND CLEAR OF ALL ENCUMBRANCES. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 10, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-10, 06-17, 06-24

Second Insertion RYAN T. WEST, ESQ. WEST AND WEST, P.A. 12 WILLIAM ST BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY MARYLAND CASE NO.: C-23-CVó21-000079 CHRISTINA LUNSFORD 12 WILLIAM ST. BERLIN, MD 21811 PLAINTIFF, v. STEVEN E. SCHOOLFIELD

111 OAK ST. POCOMOKE, MD 21851, and AMERICAN BUSINESS MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., A FOREIGN CORPORATION 5 BECKER FARM ROAD ROSELAND, NJ 07068 Serve On: CSC-LAWYERS INCORPORATING SERVICE COMPANY 11 E. CHASE ST. BALTIMORE, MD 21208, and JEFFREY M. RUBEN, AS TRUSTEE 5 BECKER FARM ROAD ROSELAND, N] 07068 and L. DEAN GUY 1621 COLONA RD. POCOMOKE, MD 21851, and DEBORAH N. GUY 1621 COLONA RD. POCOMOKE, MD 21851, and WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Serve on: ROSCOE LESLIE, COUNTY ATTORNEY 1 WEST MARKET STREET, ROOM 1103 SNOW HILL, MARYLAND 21863 and ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MD: 5848 SQ FT N SIDE 111 OAK STREET POCOMOKE, MD, PARCEL NO. 01015974,ASSESSED TO RUDEAN N. FLETCHER AND STEPHEN SCHOOLFIELD and UNKNOWN OWNER OF PROPERTY LOCATED IN W'ORCESTER COUNTY, MD: 5848 SQ FT N SIDE 111 OAK STREET POCOMOKE,MARYLAND, PARCEL NO. 01015974, ASSESSED TO : RUDEAN N. FLETCHER AND STEPHEN SCHOOLFIELD, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND ' PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY' OFTHEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS,: GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST DEFIENDANTS. Order of Publication The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the property located in Worcester County, Maryland, sold by Phillip G. Thompson, Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Treasurer of Worcester County, to the Plaintiff in this proceeding and described on the Certificate of Tax Sale as: 5848 SQ FT N SIDE 111 OAK

Page 69 ST POCOMOKE, Parcel No. 01015974, assessed to Rudean N. Fletcher and Stephen Schoolfield, being generally known as 111 Oak Street, Pocomoke, Maryland 21851. The complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary to redeem the property has not been paid. It is thereupon this 3rd 0f June. 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Ordered, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County, Maryland, once a week for 3 successive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to appear in this Court by the 5TH day, of AUGUST 2022. and redeem the property described as 5848 SQ FT N SIDE 111 OAK ST POCOMOKE, Parcel No. 01015974, assessed to Rudean N. Fletcher and Stephen Schoolfield, and answer the complaint or thereafter a final judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 10, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-10, 06-17, 06-24

(or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 6TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 10, 2022 COLLEEN COPELAND Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-10, 6-17, 6-24

Second Insertion

Second Insertion

MARIANNA BATIE, ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY STE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

COATES, COATES & COATES, P.A. RAYMOND D. COATES, JR. ESQ. 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 300 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19253

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 12217

To all persons interested in the estate of HERBERT BRENT ASHLEY, ESTATE NO. 19253. Notice is given that COLLEEN COPELAND, 424 EAST NORTH POINTE DRIVE, APT 268, SALSIBURY, MD 21804, was on JUNE 06, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of HERBERT BRENT ASHLEY, who died on MAY 2, 2022, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment

NOTICE IS GIVEN that the ORPHANS COURT of PHILADELPHIA COUNTY, PA, appointed DARRELMARK GATEWOOD, 1700 N. 57TH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19131, as the EXECUTOR of the Estate of IRVING HUDSON, AKA: JOHN IRVING HUDSON, who died on MAY 21, 2001, domiciled in PENNSYLVANIA, AMERICA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is RAYMOND D. COATES, JR., ESQ., whose address is 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 300, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND coun-


Page 70

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com ties: WORCESTER COUNTY. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for WORCESTER COUNTY with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 10, 2022 DARREL MARK GATEWOOD Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 6-10, 6-17, 6-24

Second Insertion COATES, COATES & COATES, P.A. THOMAS K. COATES, ESQ. 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 300 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19242 To all persons interested in the estate of DOROTHY M PROSISE, ESTATE NO. 19242. Notice is given that ALAN B PROSISE III, 5275 LEESBURG PIKE, FALLS CHURCH, VA 22041, and NANCY M. WEST, 6444 HONEY TREE COURT, BURKE, VA 22015 were on JUNE 07, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of DOROTHY M. PROSISE, who died on DECEMBER 12, 2008, with a will.

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 7TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 10, 2022 ALAN B PROSISE III NANCY M. WEST Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-10, 6-17, 6-24

First Insertion CLAIM FOR ABANDONED VESSEL NATURAL RESOURCES 8-721(A) ANNOTATED CODE OF MARYLAND Notice is hereby given that the following vessel has been abandoned for more than 180 days on the property of Advanced Marina, 12008 St. Martin’s Neck

Road, Bishopville, Md. 21813. The vessel is described as: registration MD 6898 E. The hull number is FGBU1281D595. The make/ model of the boat is 1995, 21’ Chaparral Boat, the color is blue. Application for title will be made in accordance with Section 8-722 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, Natural Resources Article if this vessel is not claimed and removed from the property within 30 days of this notice. Questions regarding this issue may be addressed to Advanced Marina, P.O. Box 521, Ocean City, Md. 21843. Phone number 410-7232124. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 1x 6-17

First Insertion MICHAEL B. MATHERS, ESQ. WEBB, CORNBROOKS, WILBER, VORHIS DOUSE & MATHERS, LLP PO BOX 910 115 BROAD STREET SALISBURY, MD 218030910 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19255 To all persons interested in the estate of JOYCE F. BLAYLOCK, ESTATE NO. 19255. Notice is given that MARY ELLEN ARNONE, 109 MT. VERNON AVENUE, CAPE MAY, NJ 08204, and DONALD CASHORE, 1002 E. BUTLER PIKE, AMBLER, PA 19002 were on JUNE 07, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JOYCE F. BLAYLOCK, who died on APRIL 06, 2022, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 7TH day of DECEMBER, 2022.

Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 MARY ELLEN ARNONE DONALD CASHORE Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 6-17, 6-24, 7-01

First Insertion LEWIS MCDANIELS, LLC 50 CITIZENS WAY SUITE 305 FREDERICK, MARYLAND 21701 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000132 DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS ALLEN B. BLOUNT, JR.; E. SCOTT TAWES; WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS OF THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 47.6' X 108.6' 523 YOUNG STREET POCOMOKE AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 01-020536, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS 523 YOUNG ST., POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; AND, ANY AND ALL PERSONS

June 17, 2022 THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 47.6' X 108.6' 523 YOUNG STREET POCOMOKE AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 01- 020536, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS 523 YOUNG ST., POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, DEFENDANTS. ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Worcester County, Maryland, to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary for the redemption for the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 7th day of June, 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having general circulation in Worcester County, Maryland, once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, on or before the 4th day of JulY 2022, warning all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property described above to appear in this Court by the 7th day of AUGUST, 2022, and redeem their respective property or answer the Complaint, or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title in fee simple or leasehold, as appropriate, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complaint described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property being rendered by this Court against them. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Test Copy SUSAN R. BRANIECKI

Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

First Insertion LEWIS MCDANIELS, LLC 50 CITIZENS WAY SUITE 305 FREDERICK, MARYLAND 21701 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000130 DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS ANALYTIC PROCESS REALTY GROUP, INC.; WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS OF THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS REVSD PAR 132 24750 SQ FT S SIDE BACK ST CONSD PL ANALYTIC GROUP AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 03- 002608, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS VACANT LOT ON BACK ST., WHALEYVILLE, MD 21872, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADM I N I S T R AT O R S , GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; AND, ANY AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS REVSD PAR 132 24750 SQ FT S SIDE BACK ST CONSD PL ANALYTIC GROUP AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 03-002608, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS VACANT LOT ON BACK ST., WHALEYVILLE, MD 21872, DEFENDANTS. ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Worcester County, Maryland, to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary for the redemption for the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired.


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com It is thereupon this 7th of June. 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having general circulation in Worcester County, Maryland, once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, on or before the 4th day of July, 2022, warning all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property described above to appear in this Court by the 7th day of August, 2022, and redeem their respective property or answer the Complaint, or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title in fee simple or leasehold, as appropriate, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complaint described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property being rendered by this Court against them. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

First Insertion JAMES A. LIST, ESQ. THE LAW OFFICES OF JAMES A. LIST 5700 COASTAL HIGHWAY SUITE 100 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19259 To all persons interested in the estate of JAMES M. HARRISON, JR., AKA: JAMES MADISON HARRISON, JR., ESTATE NO.

19259. Notice is given that JAMES A. LIST, 5700 COASTAL HIGHWAY, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 was on JUNE 08, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JAMES M. HARRISON, JR., who died on MAY 25, 2022, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000124

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 8TH day of DECEMBER, 2022.

WALTER VANDEGRIFT 39 YOUNG BIRCH RD LEVITTOWN, PA 19057 DEFENDANT

Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 JAMES A. LIST Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 6-17, 6-24, 7-01

First Insertion RYAN T. WEST, ESQ. WEST AND WEST, P.A. 12 WILLIAM ST BERLIN, MD 21811

PRINCESS ANNE PROPERTIES LLC 12 WILLIAM STREET BERLIN, MD 21811 PLAINTIFF VS.

AND WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND SERVE ON COUNTY ATTORNEY: ROSCOE LESLIE, ESQ. 1 WEST MARKET ST., ROOM 1103 SNOW HILL, MARYLAND 21863 AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN, PARCEL NUMBER 03034178, ASSESSED TO WALTER VANDEGRIFT DEFENDANT AND UNKNOWN OWNER OF PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN, PARCEL NUMBER 03034178, ASSESSED TO WALTER VANDEGRIFT, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST DEFENDANT ORDER 0F PUBLICATION THE OBJECT OF THIS PROCEEDING IS TO SECURE THE FORECLOSURE OF ALL RIGHTS OF REDEMPTION IN THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, SOLD BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES FOR THE STATE OF MARYLAND AND TREASURER OF WORCESTER COUNTY TO

THE PLAINTIFF IN THIS PROCEEDING: 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN, PARCEL NUMBER 03034178, ASSESSED TO WALTER V A N D E G R I F I . THE COMPLAINT STATES, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE AMOUNTS NECESSARY FOR REDEMPTION HAVE NOT BEEN PAID. IT IS THEREUPON THIS 3RD OF JUNE 2022 , BY THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, ORDERED, THAT NOTICE BE GIVEN BY THE INSERTION OF A COPY OF THIS ORDER IN THE DISPATCH HAVING A GENERAL CIRCULATION IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, ONCE A WEEK FOR 3 SUCCESSIVE WEEKS, WARNING ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE PROPERTY TO APPEAR IN THIS COURT BY THE 2ND DAY OF AUGUST , 2022, AND REDEEM THE PROPERTY 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN AND ANSWER THE COMPLAINT OR THEREAFIER A FINAL JUDGMENT WILL BE ENTERED FORECLOSING ALL RIGHTS OF REDEMPTION IN THE PROPERTY, AND VESTING IN THE PLAINTIFF' A TITLE, FREE AND CLEAR OF ALL ENCUMBRANCES. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

First Insertion LEWIS MCDANIELS, LLC 50 CITIZENS WAY SUITE 305 FREDERICK, MARYLAND 21701 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000131 DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF VS. CONNIE M. KEEFER, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF RONALD C. KEEFER, JR.; THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF RONALD KEEFER, JR., DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE

Page 71 DECEDENT; LARRY V. LAYMAN; WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS OF THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 39' X 62' N SIDE 501 LAUREL ST POCOMOKE AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 01-021125, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS 501 LAUREL ST., POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; AND, ANY AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 39' X 62' N SIDE 501 LAUREL ST POCOMOKE AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 01-021125, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS 501 LAUREL ST., POCOMOKE CITY, MD 2 1 8 5 1 , DEFENDANTS ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Worcester County, Maryland, to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary for the redemption for the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) seperate pre-suit notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 9th of June, 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having general circulation in Worcester County, Maryland, once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, on or before the 4TH DAY OF JULY, 2022 warning all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property described above to appear in this Court by the 8th day of August, 2022, and redeem their respective property or answer the Complaint, or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title in fee simple or leasehold, as appropriate, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer

or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complaint described above, that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property being rendered by this Court against them. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Test Copy SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

First Insertion LEWIS MCDANIELS, LLC 50 CITIZENS WAY SUITE 305 FREDERICK, MARYLAND 21701 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000129 DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF VS. THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF ALFRED ARMWOOD, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE DECEDENT; THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF ARNETTE ARMWOOD, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE DECEDENT; KERI FOSTER, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF CORNELIUS AMES BYRD; THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF C. AMES BYRD A/K/A CORNELIUS AMES BYRD, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE DECEDENT; DONNA M.BYRD; GEORGE W. TAYLOR, JR.; BONNIE TAYLOR; WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS OF THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 55.5' X 105.24' X 51.5' X 107.25' NR W SIDE GERMANTOWN RD AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 03020940, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS VACANT LOT ON GERMANTOWN RD., BERLIN, MD 21811, THE


Page 72

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADM I N I S T R AT O R S , GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; AND, ANY AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 55.5' X 105.24' X 51.5' X 107.25' NR W SIDE GERMANTOWN RD AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 03020940, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS VACANT LOT ON GERMANTOWN RD., BERLIN, MD 21811, DEFENDANTS.

fee simple or leasehold, as appropriate, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complaint described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property being rendered by this Court against them.

ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Worcester County, Maryland, to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary for the redemption for the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this _th of June, 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having general circulation in Worcester County, Maryland, once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, on or before the 4th day of july 2022, warning all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property described above to appear in this Court by the 8th day of August, 22, and redeem their respective property or answer the Complaint, or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title in

True Test Copy SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland

First Insertion IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO C-23-FM-22-000200 IN THE MATTER OF BRANDON EDWARD DURDEN

jection must be supported by an affidavit (written statement confirmed by oath or affirmation) and served on the Petitioner (Md. Rule 1321). If no timely objection is filed, the court may issue a judgement or grant the name change. A copy of this notice must be published one time in a newspaper of general circulation in the county at least fifteen (15) days before the deadline to fine an objection. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 True Test Copy SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, MD Room 104 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 06-17

First Insertion

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 GEORGE V. TRALA Personal Representative

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19163

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 6-17, 6-24, 7-01

The above petitioner has field a petition for Change of Name to change their name from BRANDON EDWARD DURDEN to BRANDON EDWARD DREW. The petitioner is seeking a name change because: THE MAN WHOSE NAME I AM ADOPTING HAS BEEN MY FATHER FOR THE LAST 10 YEARS. Any person may file an objection to the Petition for Change of Name on or before JULY 04, 2022. The ob-

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 14TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must

NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION (ADULT) (MD. RULE 15-901)

present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

MARK H. WITTSTADT, ESQ. 1966 GREENSPRING DRIVE SUITE LL2 LUTHERVILLE, MD 21093

To all persons interested in the estate of CLEMENT ROBERT MERCALDO, JR. , ESTATE NO. 19163. Notice is given that GEORGE V. TRALA, 12516 OCEAN REEF DR., BERLIN, MD 21811, was on JUNE 14, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of CLEMENT ROBERT MERCALDO, JR., who died on DECEMBER 16, 2021 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO BRANDON EDWARD DREW

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811 Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice.All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter.

First Insertion HAROLD S. LINK, ESQ. 875 VICTORIA PARK DRIVE SUITE 303 SALSIBURY, MD 21801 SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19128 To all persons interested in the estate of JOHN L. COSTON. Notice is given that YALONDA SHERESE WHITE, 721 BISHOP ISSAC JENKINS STREET, POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, was on JUNE 14, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of: JOHN L. COSTON, who died on NOVEMBER 5, 2020 with a will.

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 YOLANDA SHERESE WHITE Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 6-17,

First Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19263

To all persons interested in the estate of ROBERT J. SMITH, ESTATE NO. 19263. Notice is given that RACHAEL E. SMITH, 214 CAYMAN COURT, WILMINGTON, DE 19808, was on JUNE 13, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ROBERT J. SMITH, who died on JUNE 03, 2022 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 13TH day of DECEMBERR, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 RACHAEL E. SMITH Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 6-17, 6-24, 7-01

Expanding Our Reach. Broadening Our Commitment. The Dispatch Is On The Web: www.mdcoastdispatch.com


June 17, 2022

Local Lax Clubs Enjoys Big Tourney Weekend

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

SPORTS

Page 73

Seahawks Earn All-Bayside South Honors In The News

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Stephen Decatur’s varsity baseball team was well-presented when the All-Bayside South Conference postseason awards were announced this week. The Seahawks went 17-2 in the regular season and won the Bayside Conference championship with a win over

St. Michael’s last month. Named to the All-Bayside South First Team from Decatur were Shawn Rosemond, Logan Tapman, Ryan McLaughlin and Gus Croll. Named to the All-Bayside South Second Team from Decatur were Caden Shockley, Lukas Loring and Owen Knerr. Earning All-Bayside South Honorable Mentions from Decatur were Adam Gardner, Stephen Wade and A.J. Kolb.

Tuna And Tiaras Set For This Weekend BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – The second annual ladies-only Tuna and Tiaras Tournament is set for this weekend based out of the Ocean City Fishing Center. Registration and a captain’s meeting was held on Thursday, but the real action for the Tuna and Tiaras Tournament gets underway on Friday, the first of two fishing days. The offshore action continues on Saturday, with an awards banquet set for Sunday. Hosted by the Ocean City Fishing Center, the Tuna and TiarasTournament is a ladies-only event for the benefit of Women Supporting Women, a grassroots organization founded in 1993 to provide awareness, education and support for those affected by breast cancer. Funds raised by the organization stay on Delmarva and provide free services and support to local breast cancer survivors. Teams of lady anglers will fish one of the two scheduled fishing days on

Friday and Saturday and the teams will be limited to six anglers. Weighins will be held at the Ocean City Fishing Center each day from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The targeted species will be yellow fin tuna, blue fin tuna, long fin tuna, wahoo and mahi. A total of 36 boats competed in the inaugural Tuna and Tiaras Tournament last year and over $64,000 was doled out to the winners in different categories. In the heaviest tuna division, the crew on the Hocus Pocus came in first with a 98-pound tuna. Second place went to the crew on the Tighten Up with a 97-pounder, while the Chain Reaction was third with an 84-pounder. In the heaviest stringer division, the C-Boys took first with a total of 204 pounds. The Hocus Pocus took second with 172 pounds. By virtue of finishing first in the heaviest tuna category and second in the heaviest stringer category, the Hocus Pocus was the tournament’s top prize winner with over $23,000. The Reel Chaos was third in the heaviest stringer division with 160 pounds.

The Saltwater Lacrosse Club’s boys’ 2031 team last weekend won their division in the Aloha Beach Lax Festival played on fields all over northern Worcester County. Submitted Photo BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – The local Saltwater Mid-Atlantic Lacrosse Club enjoyed a highly successful weekend, bringing home first-place trophies in various age and gender brackets in area tournaments. The Aloha Lacrosse Beach Lax Festival was held at venues all over northern Worcester County last weekend.

Saltwater Mid-Atlantic boys’ 2031 team won the championship, going 4-1 in their division. The Saltwater boys lost to MadLax, 5-4, in their opener, but then ran the table to win the title in their division. Meanwhile, the Aloha Lacrosse girls’ Beach Lax Festival was going on at Northside Park in Ocean City all weekend. Saltwater Mid-Atlantic’s girls’ 2026 team ran the table, to win the title game in the “B” division.

The Saltwater Mid-Atlantic Lacrosse Club’s girls’ 2026 team won the championship in their division in the Aloha Beach Lax Festival in Ocean City last weekend. Submitted Photo


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Who’s Where When 45TH ST. TAPHOUSE 443-664-2201 45th St. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, June 17: Aaron Howell Saturday, June 18: Rachel Quillen BUXY’S SALTY DOG 410-289-0973 28th St. & Coastal Hwy. Saturday, June 18: Aaron Howell Duo Sunday, June 19: DJ BK COCONUTS BEACH BAR & GRILL OCEANFRONT CASTLE IN THE SAND 37TH & 38TH ST. 410-289-6846 Friday, June 17: Darin Engh, Lauren Glick Saturday, June 18: The Everafter, Stratus Fear Sunday, June 19: Shortcut Sunny, Rick & Regina Monday, June 20: Nate Clendenen, Smooth & Remy Tuesday, June 21: Jack Worthington, Aaron Howell Trio Wednesday, June 22: Kevin Poole, Bell Bottom Blues Thursday, June 23: Garrett Mabe, Acoustic Campfire

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Best Beats BEATS BY WAX Pickles Pub: Tuesdays & Thursdays Coins Pub: Wednesdays

DJ BK Buxy’s Salty Dog: Sundays

MOVIN’ & GROOVIN’ OC Fontainebleu Resort: Friday, June 17

FAGER’S ISLAND 410-524-5500 60th St. In The Bay Friday, June 17: DJ RobCee, Rich Mascari Band, Under The Covers Saturday, June 18: The 8-Trax, DJ Hook, Under The Covers Sunday, June 19: Bryan Clark Monday, June 20: Josh Christina, DJ RobCee, Lush Tuesday, June 21: DJ Hector Thursday, June 23: DJ Groove, Sons Of Pirates, DJ Greg GREENE TURTLE WEST 410-213-1500 Rt. 611, West O.C. Saturday, June 18: Foggy May Sundays: Karaoke w/ DJ Jeremy

BRYAN CLARK Fager’s Island: Sunday, June 19

JIM LONG BAND Coin’s Pub: Saturdays

BEATS BY STYLER Pickles Pub: Fridays, Sundays, Wednesdays

DJ BILLY T Harborside: Friday, Sunday &Thursday

SURREAL Purple Moose: Friday & Saturday, June 17 & 18

CRABCAKE FACTORY BAYSIDE 302-988-5000 37314 Lighthouse Rd., Rte. 54 Selbyville, DE Sunday, June 19: Bilenki Duo Tuesday, June 21: Cal Toner Wednesday, June 22: Lost & Found CRAWL STREET TAVERN 443-373-2756 Wicomico St. Downtown O.C. Friday, June 17: Voodoo Tribe Saturday, June 18: The Dunehounds Sundays: Karaoke W/DJ Rut Thursdays: DJ DeoGee

DJ ROBCEE Fager’s Island: Friday, June 17 & Monday, June 20

On The Beach

COINS PUB 410-289-3100 28th St. Plaza On Coastal Hwy. Friday, June 17: Walk Of Shame Saturday, June 18: Jim Long, Wes Davis Wednesdays: DJ Wax CORK BAR Sunday, June 19: Trailer Park Romeo

June 17, 2022

DJ PAPI ROISTEROUS Lookout Lounge: Sundays Purple Moose: Wednesdays

DJ DEOGEE Crawl St. Tavern: Thursdays

THE DUNEHOUNDS Crawl St. Tavern: Saturday, June 18

KAROAKE W/JEREMY Harborside: Saturdays Greene Turtle West: Sundays

WES DAVIS Coins Pub: Saturday, June 18

DARIN ENGH Coconuts Beach Bar: Friday, June 17

UNDER THE COVERS Fager’s Island: Friday & Saturday, June 17 & 18


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Who’s Where When HARBORSIDE 410-213-1846 South Harbor Rd., West O.C. Fridays: DJ Billy T Saturday, June 18: Rogue Citizens, DJ Jeremy Sunday, June 19:DJ Billy T, Opposite Directions Thursdays: DJ Billy T

OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS Harborside: Sunday, June 19

TRANZFUSION Ocean Pines Yacht Club: Friday, June 17

OC FONTAINEBLEU RESORT 410-524-3535 10100 Coastal Hwy. In The OC Friday, June 17: First Class, Movin’ & Groovin’ Saturday, June 18: First Class Sunday, June 19: First Class, Troll Tribe Monday, June 20-Thursday, June 23: First Class OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 410-641-7501 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, Ocean Pines Friday, June 17: Tranzfusion Saturday, June 18: Kaleidoscope Sunday, June 19: Rockoholics

FOGGY MAY Greene Turtle West: Saturday, June 18

DESERT SHADES Pickles Pub: Saturday, June 18

SMOOTH & REMY Coconuts Beach Bar: Monday, June 0

FIRST CLASS OC Fontainebleu Resort: Friday-Thursday, June 17-23

WALK OF SHAME Coins: Friday, June 17

AARON HOWELL DUO 45th St. Taphouse: Friday, June 17 Dry Dock 28: Saturday, June 18 Coconuts Beach Bar: Tuesday, June 21

BILENKI DUO Crabcake Factory Bayside: Sunday, June 19

BIRD DOG & THE ROAD KINGS M.R.Ducks: Sunday, June 19

PICKLES PUB 410-289-4891 8th St. & Philadelphia Ave. Fridays: Beats By Styler Saturday, June 18: Desert Shades Sundays: Beats By Styler Mondays: Karaoke with Wood Tuesdays: Beats By Wax Wednesdays: Beats By Styler Thursdays: Beats By Wax PURPLE MOOSE SALOON Between Talbot & Caroline Sts. On The Boardwalk 410-289-6953 Friday & Saturday, June 17 &18: Surreal Sunday: June 19: Adam Dutch Monday, June 20: DJ Rut Saturdays, Tuesday, June 21 & Thursday, June 23: DJ Adam Dutch Wednesdays: DJ Papi Roisterous SEACRETS 410-524-4900 49th St. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, June 17: DJ Bobby O, Fish Out Of Water, S.T.O.R.M., DJ Tuff, Lost In Paris Saturday, June 18: DJ Bobby O, Liquid A, S.T.O.R.M., Nowhere Slow, DJ Tuff, Gypsy Wisdom Sunday, June 19: DJ Davie, DJ Tuff, DJ Bobby O, Turning The Tide, S.T.O.R.M., Steal The Sky Monday, June 20: DJ Davie, DJ Bobby O, Full Circle, DJ Tuff, Yawd Lynk, Turning The Tide Tuesday, June 21: DJ Davie, DJ Bobby O, DJ Tuff Opposite Directions, Yawd Lynk, My Hero Zero Wednesday, June 22: DJ Davie, DJ Cruz, DJ Bobby O, Spokey Speaky, Kono Nation Thursday, June 23: DJ Cruz, DJ Bobby O, DJ Tuff, John McNutt Band, GoGo Gadjet, Spokey Speaky


‘We Had A Spectacular Turnout’

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

Berlin Police Sgt. Merle Bragg, above left, serving as the finishing line judge, proclaimed the Ocean 98.1 team winners of the bathtub races last Friday. Above right, Sheppard Realty’s mother-and-son team of Gussie Sholtis and Kyle Hill are pictured winning their heat against Berlin Mayor Zack Tyndall and Councilman Jack Orris. Photos by Charlene Sharpe

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BERLIN – Bathtubs hurtled down Main Street as onlookers cheered for their favorite teams last week during the 32nd Annual Berlin Bathtub Races. Whether it was the runner who lost a shoe or the tub that careened off course, there was plenty to keep fans entertained during the Friday evening event. “We had a spectacular turnout,” said Ryan Nellans, executive administrator for the Berlin Chamber of Commerce. “A few folks mentioned to me that it may have been the best attended race in recent memory and I’m inclined to agree.” Twelve teams competed in this year’s event, which featured local businesses and even a team of elected officials, as Mayor Zack Tyndall and Councilman Jack Orris took part in their first bathtub race. After numerous heats, the final race came down to a battle between last year’s winner, Camp Coast from Worcester County Recreation and Parks, and the Ocean 98.1 team. The Ocean 98.1 tub, piloted by Lindsay Owens and pushed by Jake Owens, crossed the finish line just ahead of Camp Coast’s small blue racer. While ecstatic to have won, Jake Owens admitted he was worn out. “It was exhausting,” Owens said of the racetrack, which started in front of Taylor Bank and extended to the Atlantic Hotel. “It was a lot longer than I thought.” Though they didn’t make the final round, Tyndall and Orris enjoyed their first attempt at racing. “Being a participant for the first time was really fun,” Orris said. “I’m already thinking of things for next year.” New at this year’s event was on-track advertising, which gave local businesses a chance to have signs displayed on the straw bales that line the track. “It was super successful,” Nellans said. “We’re going to have more opportunities like that for local businesses next year.” An added element that let those who weren’t in attendance get a glimpse of the bathtub races was the live video produced by Delmarva Sports Network. “We’re hoping we can work with them again in the future,” Nellans said.


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Ocean Pines Fire Dept. Meeting Set For June 30

June 17, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – A town hall meeting to discuss renovations at the Ocean Pines Vol. Fire Department (OPVFD) South Station will be held later this month. On Thursday, June 30, the fire department will host a town hall meeting to talk about plans for a major renovation at its South Station. The event, scheduled to begin at 6 p.m., will take place at the South Station. “This will ensure all interested parties can hear from each other …,” a statement posted on the department’s Facebook page reads. “Representatives from a Manns Woodward associate as well as Chief [Steve] Grunewald and President [Dave] VanGasbeck will give a presentation followed by time for Q&A from the community.” In late March, Gov. Larry Hogan submitted his $2.8 billion supplemental budget to the Maryland General Assembly. Included in the list of funded projects was a line item dedicating $1.35 million for renovations to the OPVFD South Station. In April, VanGasbeck confirmed preparations for a renovation project at the facility began in earnest last year, when the department contracted Manns Woodward Studios to complete a feasibility study. Of the options presented to the department, officials opted for an extensive renovation of the facility, which includes the demolition of its living and administrative quarters and the addition of a two-story building. “The only thing we are keeping is the existing three bays …,” he said at the time. “A two-story addition will be attached, and another set of bays will be added to the other side.” Officials say the decades-old facility currently fails to comply with standards set by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and building codes. In addition to settling concrete in the administrative portion of the building, the department has also reported mold issues in the apparatus bay. “This is not a project that lasts five years,” VanGasbeck said in April. “This is a 50-year build. Another thing to add is it’s not the Taj Mahal, it’s not a wish list. This is simply to comply with NFPA, ADA and building standards.” In addition to the state contribution, the department reports it plans to fund a portion of the project itself. It is also seeking community support for the project. The town hall meeting will begin at 6 p.m. at the OPVFD South Station, located at 911 Ocean Parkway in Ocean Pines. Officials are also exploring the use of livestreaming services for those who cannot attend. For more information, call 410-641-8272 or email admin@opvfd.com.


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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OBITUARIES Michael Kent Beatty OCEAN CITY – Michael Kent Beatty was born in Baltimore on Sept. 23, 1948, to the late Robert H. Beatty and Margaret L. Beatty (nee Sullivan). He is survived by his wife of 44 years, Cindy, and his sister Barbara ("Bobbie") Corbett. He was pre-deceased by his other sister, Harriet L. Johnson. Joining the Air Force in 1967, his final duty station in 1970 took him MIKE BEATTY to Ching Chuan Kang Royal Chinese Air Force Base, Taichung, Taiwan, where he performed duties as an Admin in Special Actions, and as a Disc Jockey for American Forces Radio. While overseas, Airman Beatty also participated as the hospital liaison for "Operation Amnesty," a program that assisted individuals with drug problems to get the aid they needed and guarantee

to them no less than a medical discharge. Michael's love for radio began in Ocean City as a part-time DJ on WETT in 1966. His career in radio reached a high point in 2006 when he was hired by Ocean 98 in Ocean City, and had a weekend position playing music, mostly from the 60's, the music that he loved so much. Michael was certainly best known for his career as a club DJ in Ocean City where he was known as "DJ Batman." Offering to play some music for his friend that opened a new bar in OC on Memorial Day weekend in 1981, he fully expected to only play that weekend as a favor to his friend, but fate had other plans. His unique format and crowd participation caught on immediately and resulted in a 40-plus year career that included over 8,000 bookings at over 500 different venues, including over 25 colleges throughout the mid-Atlantic region

and beyond. Michael was also very active with many local charities, volunteering his services always for free to the fundraiser. He saw this as a way to give back something to a town he loved so much a town that gave him the opportunity to live a wonderful life. His proudest moment came when he was asked to deliver the keynote address at the Worcester County Veterans Memorial on Memorial Day 2015. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, June 23, 2022, at St. Luke’s Catholic Church in Ocean City. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to Worcester County Humane Society, 12330 Eagles Nest Road, Berlin, Md. 21811, in Michael’s name. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of The Burbage Funeral Home. SEE PAGE 84

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Page 84

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022

OBITUARIES FROM PAGE 83

Robert Kurt Rosenberg SELBYVILLE – Robert Kurt Rosenberg, age 60, of Selbyville, Del., formerly of Bethesda, passed away on Thursday, June 9, 2022, at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. Kurt was born in Washington, D.C. on May 3, 1962, son of the late Robert G. Rosenberg and the late Pauline M. (White) Rosenberg. He was the owner and operator of Midlantic Marine Center in Selbyville, ROBERT K. Del. for over 20 years. ROSENBERG Kurt worked hard and lived his life to the fullest not letting anything slow him down. He loved animals of all types, especially dogs, and would never miss a chance to say hello to any dog passing by. Kurt was always fostering or rescuing older dogs with difficult health issues and provided them with a loving and nurturing environment. He was an avid boat racer with his friends, and just loved being on the water. When he wasn’t working, he enjoyed traveling, spending time on a boat and listening to live music usually with a whipped orange crush in his hand. Kurt was always dedicated to supporting the community and humane society, his generosity was well known by all. He was a great friend to many wonderful people and always found time for a friendly conversation. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his sister, Susan Rosenberg. He will be missed by his beloved wife, Justyna M. Rosenberg, and many friends. A visitation will be held from 10-11 a.m. on Monday, June 20, 2022 at the Ocean View Chapel of Melson Funeral Services, 38040 Muddy Neck Rd., Ocean View, Del. where a prayer service will begin at 11 a.m. Interment will follow at Mariner’s Bethel Cemetery in Ocean View, Del. In lieu of flowers, Kurt would want you to make a donation in his name to the Worcester County Humane Society, 12330 Eagles Nest Rd., Berlin, Md. 21811 or by visiting www.worcestercountyhumanesociety.org Online condolences may be sent by visiting www.melsonfuneralservices.com

Donna Valerie Hreshko OCEAN PINES – Donna “Dee” Valerie Hreshko, 84, of Ocean Pines, passed on June 10, 2022. She was born to Don Leo and Gertrude Leo on July 17, 1938. She was preceded in death by her parents and her son, John Hreshko, Jr. She was married to the love of her life, John Hreskho Sr., for 61 years and boy did they live. It was a life well lived. They traveled together, worked together and built a beautiful life and family. They finally settled in Ocean Pines in DONNA V. HRESHKO 1981. Together, they raised two children, John Hreshko, Jr. and Dana Ward (Nelson Ward). She was a sister to Gail

Schulties, Mark Leo (Maureen Leo), and June Leo-Randazzo and an aunt to several nieces and nephews. She was an amazing grandmother to four grandchildren, Kelsie Bowen (William Bowen), Jonathan Ward (Kelsey Ward), Blaine Ward and Rachel Hreshko. She also had five great-grandchildren, Jackson Ward, Everleigh Bowen, Ryder Ward, Lincoln Bowen and Scarlett Ward. Her family was her pride and joy; she loved spending time with them; she never missed a birthday or a holiday with them and took every opportunity she could to make memories. She was intelligent, witty, never turned down a game of Rummikub or mancala, and always had the last word. Donna worked in real estate for over 40 years and was passionate about creating. She was known to be “artsy” and handy; she could fix or make just about anything and created beautiful works of art, stained glass was her specialty. Dee loved living on the Eastern Shore and greatly enjoyed fishing, crabbing and clamming. The memories and traditions Dee created will live on forever in the hearts of her family, she was a truly amazing woman. Donna requested a celebration of life be held in her honor as opposed to traditional funeral services. Details for friends and family will be provided at a later date. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home.

Kellyn R. Landis OCEAN CITY – Kellyn R. Landis, age 54, passed away peacefully at her home in Ocean City on Tuesday, June 7, 2022. She was born in York, Pa. on July 28, 1967, and was the daughter of Ruth A. (Shindler) Landis and the late Samuel M.O. Landis. In addition to her loving mother, she is survived by her brother, Andrew P. Landis and wife Jessica of Red Lion, Pa., and nephews Brandon, Chase, and Connor. Kel- KELLYN R. LANDIS lyn also leaves to cherish her memory many aunts, uncles, cousins and so many friends, local and far. Kellyn loved to fish and clam in her favorite Ocean City spots, traveling to Florida and dining at her favorite local venue, the Full Moon. She had a love for football, especially the Baltimore Ravens and Denver Broncos. She had a passion for animals, music, and American Idol. And there was no bigger Bon Jovi fan than Kellyn as she knew and would sing every word. Kellyn graduated from Lincoln Intermediate Unit 12 in May 1988 and spent 12 years as a Laborer at Shadowfax in York, Pa. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Monday, June 20 at BishopHastings Funeral Home, 19 S. Main St. in Selbyville, Del. Visitation will begin at 10 a.m., the service at 11 a.m., and a luncheon immediately following at Selbyville Volunteer Fire Hall, 30 N. Main

Street, Selbyville, Del. In lieu of flowers, donations in Kellyn’s memory may be made to the Ocean City Reef Foundation, P.O. Box 1072, Ocean City, Md. 21843 (ocreefs.org) or to the Worcester County Humane Society, P.O. Box 48, Berlin, Md. 21811. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com

Camillo Jerry Arcilesi OCEAN CITY – Camillo “Charles” Jerry Arcilesi, age 86, of Ocean City, died June 3 at Gull Creek Assisted Living in Berlin. He was born in Baltimore to Camillo Joseph Arcilesi and Marie Pribyl. Charles is survived by his wife of 65 years, Norma Lee; son David J. Arcilesi (Brenda); and daughter Leslie M. Watzin (Jim). He was so proud of his grandchildren -- David Jr, Kirsten Richards (Justin), Amanda Simmons (Nathan), Natalie Arcilesi, Shaleen “Shay” Kappel (Michael), Sabrina Cosick and Andrew Gusick (Christie). Charles loved his great grand-children -- Charlee, Lincoln, Trent Kappel, Sebastian and Cecilia Simmons, Cali, Bennett and Lawson Cusick. He is survived by his brother, Richard Arcilesi. Charles was preceded in death by his brother Salvatore Alfred Arcilesi. While living in Baltimore, he graduated from Baltimore Poly Tech and Johns Hopkins University. Charles enjoyed working in the space industry. He worked for NASA for 38 years as a project and program manager at Goddard, NASA headquarters and Marshall Space Flight Center. After retiring, he returned to work at Aerospace and DARPA in DC. He always loved living on the water. His favorite hobby was crabbing on the Wye River. A celebration of his life will be held at a later date. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.easternshorecremation.com.

James Franklin Roseman, Jr. BERLIN – James Franklin Roseman, Jr., age 72, passed away at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin on Thursday, June 2, 2022. Born in Harrisburg, Pa., he was the son of the late James Franklin Roseman, Sr. and Jean McGrady Roseman. Jim graduated from Juniata College in 1971 with a BS degree in Business Administration. He excelled as a pitcher on both his high school and college baseball teams, and then continued coaching both his sons and their little league teams for 12 years. Jim owned Roseman Insurance Assoc. for 37 years until he and his wife Mary retired to Ocean Pines, Md. This is where Jim and Mary celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in October of 2021. Jim loved going to the beach, fishing, taking cruises, and really loved spending time with his family and five beautiful granddaughters. He is survived by his wife, Mary Roseman; two sons, David Roseman (Tara),

and Daniel Roseman (Ashley); a sister, Jill Leffler; and five grandchildren, Madison, Macie, Ava, Emilia and Cora. Services were held. Letters of condolence can be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

Gyula Gaal OCEAN PINES – Gyula (Julius) Gaal, age 85 years, passed away at Tidal Health Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury on Sunday, June 12, 2022. Born in Hungary, he was the youngest son of the late Gabor and Margit (Gondol) Gaal. A Freedom Fighter for the Hungarian Resist- GYULA GAAL ance, Julius escaped from Hungary in 1957 at the age of 20. He joined his sister Irma’s family in New Jersey. He proudly became a US citizen. He moved to Washington, DC, where he earned his Business degree from Benjamin Franklin University, and became the first hotel Controller of the famous Watergate Hotel. Julius met his wife, Sandy, at the Watergate, and they started their family in Takoma Park. As part of the Marriott Corp., he became the first Controller/Budget Director of the new Carousel Hotel in Ocean City and moved his family to Ocean Pines. In 1985, Julius became the first general manager of the Dunes Manor Hotel. After leaving the hospitality industry, Julius became a Realtor where he specialized in the lower Eastern Shore for over 20 years, helping clients to find their dream homes before finally retiring. He loved tending to his yard and garden, and sitting on the porch, watching and being entertained by the people and nature around him. Julius’ mastery of Hungarian cuisine for the home kitchen was greatly cherished by close friends and family. He is survived by his wife, Sandra Gaal; son, John Gaal (Kim); daughter, Margit Ellis-Gaal (Jamie); grandchildren, Tiffany Gaal, Joshua Gaal (fiancée Megan) and Sawyer Ellis-Gaal; brother-in-law, John Ross and sister-in-law, Jeannie Hummel; nieces, Margit Meszaros and Susan Kiraly; nephew, Frank Kiraly (Valerie); and many other beloved nieces and nephews. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his two brothers and three sisters. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Friday, June 24, 2022 at 11 a.m. at Holy Savior Catholic Church in Ocean City, Maryland 1705 Philadelphia Ave, Ocean City, Md. 21842. A viewing will be held Thursday, June 23, 2022 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Burbage Funeral Home, 108 Williams Street, Berlin, Md. Contributions in Julius’ memory may be made to the Worcester County Veterans Memorial, PO Box 1576, Ocean Pines, Md. 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.


June 17, 2022

The Dispatch Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 ONLINE WEBSITES: mdcoastdispatch.com facebook.com/thedispatchoc twitter.com/thedispatchocmd instagram.com/thedispatchocmd J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Lessons To Learn In Deputy’s Death How We See It

It’s been almost 55 years since a member of the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office died in the line of duty. As it was said numerous times over the last week, 41-year-old Glenn Hilliard’s death was preventable. It’s what it makes it hurt so much. The court system deserves scrutiny as well as those in the community who did not alert police about the whereabouts of Austin Davidson, a wanted felon in four jurisdictions. First, there is the court side of things. Austin Davidson was convicted in 2019 as a 17-year-old for armed robbery of a McDonald’s in Baltimore City. Davidson, now 20, received probation before judgment in 2020 and time served. Part of the deal included Davidson going into a juvenile placement program, which became unavailable due to the pandemic. The rub was if the program was unavailable Davidson would be sentenced to 10 years in jail with all but 18 months suspended. A judge chose probation before judgment with three years of supervised probation. Davidson immediately violated the terms of his probation, resulting in an arrest warrant being issued. As Sheriff Mike Lewis said, since escaping a lengthy jail sentence, Davidson has “wreaked hell all over the lower Eastern Shore.” Indeed, he had outstanding arrest warrants in Wicomico, Somerset and Worcester counties before he shot a deputy in a field at night. Outstanding charges listed in those local warrants include firearm possession with a felony conviction, second degree burglary, illegal ammunition possession, second degree assault, malicious destruction of property and theft. In fact, for many of these charges, he was held locally before posting bail. While the court process in Baltimore deserves scrutiny, there is reason to question the local judicial system’s discretion as well. When in doubt about a suspect returning to court, the thought should always be to not offer bail. There was a system breakdown. The tough talk from Lewis and Gov. Larry Hogan was warranted but should be pointed at all the judicial systems at fault, not just Baltimore City. "We must hold people accountable. Until we do these crimes will continue to occur," said Lewis. "… individuals who are not held accountable here in the state of Maryland for their crimes will continue to offend." Hogan added, "Someone like this should not have been out on the streets. Especially the judges in Baltimore City letting people out, the fact that this guy was out with not serving any jail time for an armed robbery is just unacceptable." While true, and internal reviews are needed by all counties involved, fault needs to be found with those who protected Davidson from authorities. Responsibility for the deputy’s death lies with those folks who did not do the right thing as well. There are many lessons to learn from this tragedy.

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Between The Lines by Publisher/Editor Steve Green Sincerity – it’s the word that comes to mind when I reflected on Mike Beatty’s passing this week. He was a genuinely nice guy who always had a kind word to share. It was this authenticity merged with a fun, entertaining light-hearted personality that resonated with people. It’s impactful when Ocean City loses these types of popular and endearing individuals with an ocean of friends from all walks of life. In fact, when news of Beatty’s passing was shared on our Facebook page Sunday afternoon, the post reached more than 120,000 people within two hours and about 400,000 within 24 hours. He was an Ocean City icon. Batman’s passing this week makes last year’s surprise proclamation as an “Ocean City Legend” and “Night Time Mayor” and key to the city at Buxy’s Salty Dog – where he got his start at the former bayside Pub – all the more special. After being recognized by Mayor Rick Meehan, Beatty told the assembled group of friends, “I am stunned that you all are here. You have no idea what this means to me. A few more drinks and I’m going to take his microphone and tell some stories … This means the world because I love this town. This town has been so good to me. I always say my heart is in Baltimore, but my soul is here in Ocean City. It’s because of you people, every single one of you, you have no idea what you mean to me.” It was fitting all over social media last Sunday when people posted pictures of themselves raising a glass with the simple word, “Social.” As I walked into the Berlin Intermediate School “Rise Up” ceremony this week, it was interesting to note the large police presence. It was unclear initially until Superintendent of Schools Lou Taylor spoke. He pointed out police officers from Wicomico and Worcester counties were presented to support fallen Wicomico Sheriff Deputy Glenn Hilliard’s son, a student at the school who would be celebrated as the students finished up their final days at the school before moving on to middle school. The officers – including Wicomico Sheriff Mike Lewis and Worcester Sheriff Matt Crisafulli – wanted to be there for Trenton Hilliard as he received recognition and specific honors for the President’s Education Award and Principal’s List. While his father could not be there, his fellow men and women in blue were to ensure the young man felt supported, admired and loved. There were plenty of emotions in the room throughout the ceremony as parents experienced the pride of seeing their kids complete a journey in their lives. What most of us parents will remember forever, however, was the moment when Hilliard received his recognition. When the child’s name was called, the room immediately rose to give him a standing ovation. We had been asked by Principal Ryan Cowder to hold all applause for the more than 300 students until the end to allow for a timely ceremony. It was certainly fitting for all of us to put aside the request. It was impossible to not be moved by this show of support. I will never forget this moment, one full of raw emotion, sincerity and humanity as well as tremendous strength by this young man. His father had been killed just 48 hours before the ceremony, but he showed tremendous fortitude in being present for the event and handling himself with remarkable composure. His father would surely have wanted his son to stand proud of his work at the school. Berlin Police Chief Arnold Downing, who hired Hilliard and worked with him for six years as a town officer, put it well when asked to comment on his passing. He said, “His family was really entrenched in the community. There are a lot of people hurting from this. Those who knew him personally really saw the best in him. He was a better officer when he left for Wicomico, and it was just a better opportunity. He was never running from anything. He was always running to something, even on his last day.” There are various events to cover each summer when the Maryland Municipal League convention is held in Ocean City. Most of the stops are purely public relations type of things for state dignitaries, but this week’s announcement of an injection of $15 million toward the Route 90 dualization project is significant. Though the timeline of the project has never been discussed publicly, realistic minds put the project completion date at somewhere between five to eight years as the process is thorough before ground is even broken. It seems realistic based on this week’s announcement that Gov. Larry Hogan was allocating the new $15 million in funding to advance the planning and design phase for dualizing Route 90, a 12-mile road with two bridges that connects Route 50 and Coastal Highway in Ocean City. During a brief off-the-record conversation with an official this week, I was cautioned about using the word, “dualization.” He said the project could include other improvements that did not necessarily mean four lanes but would not expand on what he meant. It was interesting to review state documents and find “dualization” is not a word used, although it would seem obvious. The corridor study newsletter read, “MDOT SHA has initiated the MD 90 Planning and Environmental Linkages (PEL) study as part of this effort. The PEL study will identify long-term transportation needs, including traffic operations, capacity, safety, economic development, pedestrian and bicyclist accessibility, and emergency evacuations. The PEL study also will identify and prioritize individual, stand-alone projects within the corridor.”


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Puzzle Answers

I

June 17, 2022

The Adventures of Fatherhood

by Steve Green

PUZZLE ON PAGE 51

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n his 1993 legendary speech, late great Jim Valvano offered some thoughts on what makes a great day – laughter, tears and thought. Just eight weeks before he died from cancer, Valvano, a long-time college basketball coach, said at the ESPYs, “To me, there are three things we all should do every day. … Number one is laugh. You should laugh every day. Number two is think. You should spend some time in thought. And number three is, you should have your emotions moved to tears, could be happiness or joy. But think about it. If you laugh, you think, and you cry, that’s a full day. That’s a heck of a day. You do that seven days a week, you’re going to have something special.” For me, Tuesday was one of those days. The emotions run deep with Carson, our youngest with special needs. He has overcome so much in his 12 years. As young child, he was a handful. He was unpredictable, prone to unexpected violence and defiant. There were dozens of unfortunate incidents related to bad behavior. Some days he was a nightmare, resulting in prayers for strength and patience, but most importantly the answers to help him. Remembering, not harping, how serious and upsetting our challenges were in the past results in a true appreciation for what we see today. Life for and with Carson is not easy. It might always be this way for him and us. Never say never, but we expect he will always need us as his caregivers. We suspect an independent life could be a reach. We have also learned, however, to not underestimate him because he is a champion and can rise to the expectations. He has proven this time and time again. When he does meet the challenges and overcomes it brings on tears of pride and joy.

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Tuesday at Berlin Intermediate School was one of those instances. Before the pandemic, Carson was showing signs of overcoming his shyness. He's an introverted kid. The fact he’s aware he is nonverbal, has a disability and is different from others his age certainly heightens his reticence. He’s shy by nature, but he was showing signs of being comfortable in his own skin and around other people. COVID wrecked Carson’s maturation. The isolation heightened his social anxiety. In recent months, as a “rise up” ceremony was approaching at his school, we were worried. Right up until his name was called Tuesday, we didn’t know if he would walk down the center aisle, stand in front of the big crowd, receive his recognition and sit with his classmates. During the ceremony, the classroom teachers presented their students who would be moving on from the school this week. As his classroom neared, we could see Carson in the back of the room with his other graduates, making their way to the front. By his side was his trusted Educational Assistant Mr. DJ, who has been his amazing one-on-one most of the last two years. At this point in Carson’s life, there is no way he would do this sort of thing on his own. It’s a goal for sure, but not realistic at this point. We just hoped he would walk to the front with Mr. DJ, get recognized and get his picture taken with his principal and superintendent. Carson was able to do it. He did need to have a trusted stuffed animal from home in his hands, but it’s okay. It’s how he walks into school each day too. It gives him security and it’s a fight we are not going to tackle. If it makes him content and he can walk into school ready to start the day, it’s fine with me. In Tuesday’s case, if carrying a stuffed animal to the front of the as-

sembled area while wearing a jacket and tie with his trusted EA is what it takes to get it done so be it. The photo will be a keepsake we will treasure. I got emotional during this 30-second event. My wife did as well. It represents a lot for him and us. The last thing Carson ever wants is to be the center of attention. He despises it and avoids it all costs. He knew on this day he deserved to be recognized and he rose to the occasion. I love a conversation Mr. DJ relayed to me after the event. He told Carson it was just fine to be nervous about being in front of all the people. He reminded he is growing up and becoming a big boy, though. Part of getting older and going through life is overcoming these moments. He was right. It worked. Throughout the ceremony this week, I found myself getting choked up, as I saw other special needs kids we have met and got to know over our school journey also rise to meet the challenge. To varying degrees, kids with disabilities understand they are different. Each comes with unique struggles, but most fear the spotlight. To see these kids we have known for six to eight years be recognized was an incredible thing. Equally touching was we were told repeatedly on this day how much Carson will be missed. A staff member told Pam and I looking skyward and holding her heart, “We are going to miss that boy so much.” It’s heartwarming to hear of his impact. He’s nonverbal but connects. He’s amazing in this way. As Valvano said, it was “a heck of a day.” (The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

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June 17, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

June 17, 2022