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The Dispatch March 5, 2021

Priceless

Serving Greater Delmarva Since 1984

www.mdcoastdispatch.com

Blue Sky Delight: After a rainy and cloudy stretch to end February, sunshine and blue skies were the norm for the first week of March to the delight of many.

Photo by Tyler Horton

Vaccine Supply Questions Continue

Decomposing Whale Odor Expected

Foreign Worker Concerns Remain

File photo by Charlene Sharpe • See Pages 6, 13

Photo by Campos Media • See Page 21

File photo by Chris Parypa • See Page 4


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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March 5, 2021


March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Foreign Workers’ Summer Fate A Major Unknown

March 5, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

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OCEAN CITY – The outlook for the J-1 visa programs remains in limbo as an action last week by President Biden stopped short of easing travel bans for seasonal foreign student-workers critical to the resort’s workforce. With the calendar flipping to March this week and the summer season suddenly approaching quickly, the clock is ticking on the J-1 summer work and travel program that supplies a significant number of employees to Ocean City’s seasonal workforce. In a typical summer, an estimated 4,000 foreign student workers arrive in Ocean City to fill out the resort’s seasonal workforce. With roughly 12,000 seasonal jobs in Ocean City each summer, the J-1 students represent about one third of the entire workforce and help keep many of the resort’s seasonal businesses up and running. However, last summer with COVID travel restrictions in place, the J-1 seasonal workers were not allowed to come, greatly crippling the workforce in Ocean City already struggling other COVID restrictions. Last week, local, state and regional hospitality organizations were relieved when Biden revoked one of former President Trump’s proclamations issued last year restricting travel for some non-U.S. residents. However, Biden did not revoke Trump’s proclamation covering the international student-worker seasonal visas. Trump’s Proclamation 10014, entitled “suspension of entry of immigrants who present a risk to the U.S. labor market during the economic recovery following the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak,” was lifted by Biden last week. In simplest terms, 10014 banned certain permanent immigration visas, or essentially, “green cards.” However, Biden did not revoke Presidential Proclamation 10052, which “suspends the entry of aliens who present a risk to the U.S. labor market following the coronavirus outbreak.” Proclamation 10052 was an extension of Proclamation 10014 signed by Trump last June. Biden last week revoked 10014, but did not technically revoke its extension, Proclamation 10052. It’s technical and somewhat confusing, but 10052 remains on the books. The language in the two proclamations is similar, but the differences are significant. Proclamation 10052 covers the U.S. Department of State’s BridgeUSA Exchange Program, also known as the J-1 exchange visitor program. Proclamation 10052 is set to expire on its own on March 31 and it is uncertain if the Biden administration will extend it. Advocacy groups for the J-1 exchange visitor program are urging the president to revoke Proclamation 10052 now, or at the very least let it expire at SEE PAGE 30


March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Commissioners To Write Governor Again Over Vaccine Equity Concerns

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

PUBLIC AUCTION - PARTNERSHIP DISSOLUTION SALE Valuable Commercial Property in Ocean City, MD

March 5, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

14 Worcester Street, Ocean City, MD 21842 Friday, March 26, 2021 at 11:00 AM Sale to be held on the premises

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For complete terms and conditions visit www.atlanticauctions.com or contact Bill Hudson at (410) 803-4177

SNOW HILL – Local officials are entreating the state to increase Worcester County’s COVID-19 vaccine allotment. Billy Birch, the county’s director of emergency services, asked the Worcester County Commissioners on Tuesday to again write to Gov. Larry Hogan and state officials regarding the need for more vaccine doses. There are now more than 6,400 people on the Worcester County Health Department’s vaccine waiting list. “I don’t think the Hogan administration is listening that we need more doses in Worcester County,” Birch said. Worcester County ranks second in the state in administration of the first dose of the vaccine, as 21% of the population has now received the first dose. As for the second dose, 13% of the population has received it. Those figures would be even higher if the county had more vaccine to offer, as there were 6,472 people on the health department’s waiting list as of Monday. “With our limited vaccine I think we’re doing tremendous…,” said Worcester County Health Officer Becky Jones. “We don’t sit on vaccine. We get it and it’s gone. I’m proud to say the health department has had zero wasted.” She said the health department worked closely with partners throughout the county to offer vaccine clinics in North Ocean City, Snow Hill and Pocomoke. While the clinics have been praised for their efficiency, they’re serving very limited numbers of citizens. The county continues to get just 300 doses a week when it has the capacity to vaccinate 3,000 people a week. “We’re kind of cooling our heels waiting for more vaccine,” she said. “We’re ready to go.” Jones said her department had repeatedly asked the state for more vaccine, citing the array of second homes in Ocean City and the fact that about

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28% of the population was over 65 years old, but that the weekly allocation didn’t appear to be increasing. She added that the county even had a mobile unit it could use if it had more vaccines to distribute. “Again, limiting us is our vaccine allocation,” she said. Birch echoed her concerns. He said a meeting with the Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) this week showcased plans for statewide mobile vaccine clinics when already established vaccine clinics like the ones in Worcester weren’t even able to operate at capacity because of a lack of vaccine. He said the allocation of doses to Worcester County had been and continued to be a major concern. “The way I can equate it to you, is we have fire trucks but they’re holding back the water,” Birch said. “They’re not giving us what resource we’re asking for.” He said that for years MEMA had advised jurisdictions that emergencies start local and end local. “They’re not listening to the locals,” he said. “There’s jurisdictions that are equal to our size or smaller that are getting more allocations of doses than we’re getting.” The commissioners agreed Tuesday to again reach out to Hogan and state officials seeking more vaccine doses. Maryland currently receives about 14,000 doses a day. There are now plans underway for a mass vaccination site in Wicomico County and Hogan indicated in a press conference Tuesday there could be changes in vaccine allocations if there were situations where they were underutilized. “The goal here is to get the vaccinations from the federal government, deploy them out immediately and into the arm of a person who needs it,” Hogan said. “Doses cannot be allowed to sit on shelves or in freezers whiles hundreds of thousands of people are desperately trying to schedule an appointment for a vaccine.”

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Berlin Requests 11% Increase In County Budget Funds

March 5, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – The Town of Berlin is asking the county to help fund a proposed Rails-to-Trails network as well as a feasibility study for a new community center on Flower Street. Mayor Zack Tyndall on Tuesday presented the Worcester County Commissioners with Berlin’s grant request for the coming fiscal year. The town is seeking an 11% increase in funding from the county that would help with a trail network, a July fireworks show and a feasibility study for a community center to replace the aging Berlin Multipurpose Building. “We want to see a community center on Flower Street,” Tyndall said. “There’s a demand for that. There’s been discussion in the community for a very long time. The first stage of that project would of course be a feasibility study.” Tyndall thanked the commissioners for the $465,000 the county granted the town last year, which was used to support fire, police and EMS, but said Berlin was seeking an increase to help with a few specific projects. The town is asking for $39,875 to help with a grant match associated with a Rails-to-Trails program that would create a passive use recreation pathway in the railroad right of way. “We talked a lot, the county and the Town of Berlin, and the Town of Snow Hill also, about a commuter train utilizing the railroad,” Tyndall said. “So the Railsto-Trails is a little bit different in the fact that it utilizes the easement that’s to the side of the railroad…” The town is also asking for $5,000 toward the $10,000 fireworks show planned for the Northern Worcester Athletic Complex and $7,500 toward a community center feasibility study. Tyndall said the town was working with the parties involved to find a way to build a community center where the Berlin Multipurpose Building exists now but that it could also be built on a nearby threeacre parcel the town owned. He said the first step in the process was a feasibility study, which is projected to cost $15,000. The commissioners also heard requests from the towns of Pocomoke and Snow Hill as well as the Ocean Pines Association this week. Pocomoke officials asked for a grant of $465,000 and an additional $32,490, or the equivalent of 10% of the funds the county received from table games revenue at Ocean Downs. Ocean City will make its request at a meeting later this month. Snow Hill officials requested an unrestricted grant of $500,000 as well as a $235,000 payment in lieu of taxes, $32,490 from table games revenue and $200,000 to go toward sewer line improvements. Town Manager Gary Weber said that like many towns, Snow Hill was struggling with antiquated infrastructure and needed to make improvements to prevent future problems. He pointed out that county buildings relied on that infrastructure.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

“We recognize that Snow Hill is only one of four municipalities for whom you provide funding, however, like no other municipality in the county Snow Hill is an integral part of the day to day operations of Worcester County and Worcester County is an integral part of the day to day survival of Snow Hill,” he said. Ocean Pines Association President Larry Perrone presented a request for $525,000 to help with public safety, $150,000 toward roads and bridges, $40,000 toward recreation and parks and $25,000 for tourism. “The major portion of our request deals with public safety,” Perrone said. “Our fire and EMS services last year were involved in 13,193 service calls and of those 332 of those calls were mutual aid. The money is being put to good use and it is critical for Ocean Pines.”

Berlin is seeking funding to help with building a new community center on Flower Street to replace an aging multipurpose building, pictured. File Photo

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Bills Seek Extra Eligibility Year For High School Athletes

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – In yet another odd fallout from the pandemic, a pair of state lawmakers have proposed bills that, if approved, would add another year of eligibility for student-athletes whose high school careers have been cut short by the pandemic. State Senator Justin Ready and House Delegate Haven Shoemaker, both Republicans of Carroll County, have introduced sister bills in the General Assembly that would allow graduating senior student-athletes who have missed their final year of eligibility because of COVID to return the following year to complete their senior seasons under certain criteria. Locally, fall sports were postponed and will resume this

weekend. Winter sports were eliminated altogether and will not be made up. Spring sports, which would be in full swing by now, will play an abbreviated season later this spring. The bills, introduced in the Senate and House by Ready and Shoemaker respectively, are in response to the unusual circumstances of the last year and the sacrifices many student-athletes have made. To be eligible, a studentathlete would have to have been enrolled in a state public school during the 2020-2021 school year and graduate in 2021. The eligibility waiver would be for graduating students in the 2020-2021 year only and they would have to meet the academic requirements, age restrictions and graduate eligibility rules spelled out by the Maryland Public Sec-

ondary Schools Athletic Association (MPSSAA). A returning athlete would only be allowed to participate in a sport at the public school from which he or she graduated, and the athlete could be enrolled at an institution of higher learning while participating in a sport at the high school level. “High school sports mean so much to all of our communities as well as the student-athletes who have worked for years to get where they are,” said Ready. “We want student-athletes to have the opportunity to finish their high school athletic careers properly.” Shoemaker pointed out many student-athletes across the state were on track for college scholarships in their respective sports, only to see their seasons eliminated or cut back. “The students that were forced to

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sacrifice all or most of their final year of high school sports deserve the opportunity to enjoy their final season, as well as compete for scholarships that may have been lost due to their inability to play,” he said. Typical MPSSAA rules have strict starting and ending times for fall, winter and spring sports seasons, but this year has been far from typical. Because of ongoing COVID restrictions, fall sports teams, such as football and soccer, only recently began practicing for what will be an abbreviated season this spring. For example, Stephen Decatur’s varsity football team opens its short, sevengame season on Friday on the road against Parkside. Decatur’s boys’ varsity soccer team opens what will certainly be an unusual season at home on Friday against Bennett. Meanwhile, traditional spring sports, such as baseball, softball and lacrosse, for example, will also play a shortened season later this spring. Winter sports, such as basketball and wrestling, for example, were wiped out altogether this year. The spring sports teams can begin practicing on April 17 and their seasons will span six weeks from May 7 through June 19. While the intent of the sister legislation appears to have merit, the bills are not without their detractors. For example, The Maryland Association of Boards of Education (MABE) opposes the legislation. MABE Director of Governmental Relations John Woolums provided written testimony against House Bill 817, for example. “House Bill 817 would disrupt this balance by introducing a significant separation between the status of high school athletes who are no longer enrolled students, the enrolled students in the educational setting, and the sports team on which the students and non-students are participating,” he said. Locally, Stephen Decatur wrestling coach Todd Martinek said he could support the proposal under the right circumstances. Martinek’s team was one of the winter sports teams that had its interscholastic schedule wiped out this year and many of his athletes would be getting serious looks from colleges and universities. To be fair, many of the Decatur wrestlers continued to compete in various tournaments around the region. “As long as taxpayers don’t have to foot the bill and they have to maintain some academic standard – say a 2.0 at a community college, I’m in favor of it as long as they are not 20 years old,” he said. “The MPSSAA allows 19-year-old currently, so I don’t want to see a 14year-old freshman against a 20-yearold. We allow 19 years old as the max, so I’m okay with continuing that.” Martinek also took off his coaching hat and put on his teaching hat. “Too much emphasis is put on athletics- parents, the congressman who proposed this,” he said. “Kids should focus their energies on their academic futures. About 99% of them will have to earn a living in something other than athletics.”


Two-Year Golf Course Acquisition Process Completed

March 5, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Pocomoke River State Park will increase in size with the addition of what was once the Nassawango Golf Course. More than two years after the process began the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has completed its acquisition of 212 acres in Worcester County. The addition includes the former Nassawango Golf Course

Needed Middle School Addition Moves Forward

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Construction of the addition to Stephen Decatur Middle School could begin as soon as this fall. The Worcester County Commissioners this week granted a request from the school system for $108,825. The funding will allow Worcester County Public Schools to proceed with pre-construction and bidding for the project. “Our funding request today will allow us to remain on schedule for the construction bid opening in August and, pending your final approval, starting construction on the addition this November,” Superintendent Lou Taylor said. According to the superintendent, the school system needed $108,825 to continue the bidding process for the addition of a new wing. The 24,000-square-foot addition, which will include 12 general classrooms as well as four science labs and storage and meeting space, is expected to cost $10 million. “Thanks to your previous design funding we have completed the construction documents for the project,” Taylor said. He added that the state had notified the school system that the Interagency Commission on School Construction was recommending approval of $3.7 million of the $4.8 million requested for the project. “The final state funding amount for the project will be announced in May,” Taylor said. On Tuesday the commissioners also approved the school system’s request for $1,452,942 for the replacement of the roof at Pocomoke Middle School. The state is providing $1,275,000 toward that project, which is being handled by Flynn Mid-Atlantic. “With your funding approval today we will execute a contract with Flynn and the work will be accomplished this summer,” Taylor said. The commissioners unanimously approved both funding requests.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

State Park To Grow By 212 Acres

with 1,400 linear feet of shoreline on the Pocomoke River. “We’re very excited,” Ranger Curtis Dale said. “It’s a unique opportunity to add a new park property.” The property, which cost $1.8 million, was acquired with Program Open Space funds and consists of two parcels near Snow Hill. The Board of Public Works unanimously approved the acquisition in November. According to DNR, the purchase provides for permanent conservation of significant natural resources including riparian forest along the Pocomoke River and a three-acre pond with waterfowl

habitat. “This acquisition is a significant opportunity to expand protected lands in Worcester County and to restore a former golf course to a natural landscape,” said Maryland Park Service Superintendent Nita Settina. “The property’s proximity to the Pocomoke River and Pocomoke State Forest present a great opportunity to preserve a very large tract of ecologically important lands and also provide interpretive and recreational experiences to Maryland residents and visitors. We look forward to initiating restoration work on this property and expanding access to this unique and beau-

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tiful region of the Lower Eastern Shore.” Dale said the restoration work would essentially include giving the property back to nature, ensuring native species were planted and providing responsible stewardship of the property. Eventually, the land is expected to provide an additional access point for the Pocomoke River Water Trail and expand recreational opportunities for hiking, biking and the like. “We’re still early on,” Dale said. He added that a strategic management plan for the property, which will include recreational access and trail development planning, was under development. Public input will be solicited during that process. “People can weigh in and say what they think it should be,” he said.


Ørsted Delays Offshore Wind Farm Project Completion Date

Page 10

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – One of two approved offshore wind energy projects planned off Ocean City has informed a state regulatory agency its target date for operation has now been moved to 2026. In 2017, the Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) approved two offshore wind energy projects off the coast of Ocean City, including Ørsted’s Skipjack project. Technically, the PSC awarded Offshore Renewable Energy Credits, or ORECs, to the two success-

ful bidders, including the Skipjack project. The PSC’s awarding of the ORECs came after the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) along with federal, state and local stakeholders, developed Maryland’s Wind Energy Area (WEA), a vast swath of open ocean consisting of roughly 80,000 acres. The Skipjack project would be sited in the northern section of Maryland’s WEA and the company has stated the closest it would site its first line of turbines, the 12-megawatt GE Halidade, called the largest commercially

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available in the world, was 19.5 miles from the coast. The Skipjack project was originally slated to have an estimated commercial operation date (COD) by the end of 2023. Last week, however, Ørsted’s legal counsel in a letter to PSC Executive Director Andrew Johnston advised Ørsted was now projecting a commercial operation date as long as five years out. “By letter dated April 21, 2020, Skipjack informed the Maryland Public Service Commission of a revision to its estimated commercial operation date (COD) such that Skipjack was targeting an estimated COD prior to the end of 2023,” the letter reads. “Skipjack is now writing to revise its estimated COD and currently targeting an estimated COD for the project prior to the end of the second quarter of 2026.” Ørsted did not give any indication for the roughly two-year pushback in the commercial operation date, but said in a statement it remains committed to the project off the coast of the resort. “Ørsted is fully committed to building, owning and operating the project and to delivering clean, reliable offshore wind energy to the Delmarva region,” the statement reads. “Skipjack represents a long-term partnership with the state of Maryland and we are proud to be a part of the state’s effort to achieve its ambitious renewable energy goals.”

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Ørsted said Maryland has the potential to be a leader in the budding offshore wind energy industry in the U.S. “Because of its strong infrastructure assets and strategic location, Maryland is well-positioned to play a key role in the development of this new American industry,” the statement reads. “Ørsted has made, and will continue to make, significant investments in the state and region to support offshore wind development and operation for many years to come.” Ørsted said it takes the commitment to its Maryland project seriously and the delay should not be construed in another fashion. “The commitments we make to states and local communities are decades long and it is a responsibility the company takes seriously,” the statement reads. “We will continue to work with communities and stakeholder groups in the region as we progress the development of the Skipjack wind farm. Ørsted is committed to bringing the benefits of offshore wind to the Delmarva region and we look forward to our continued partnership with our stakeholders. We wish to thank the states of Maryland and Delaware and our many partners at the local, state and federal level for their continued engagement and look forward to making several exciting announcements in the weeks to come.”

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Wind Farm Developer To Reach Out To Regional Fishermen

Page 12

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – In an effort to allay concerns from area commercial and recreational fishermen, a company pursuing an offshore wind energy farm off Ocean City has partnered with a consulting firm to disseminate information and answer questions. US Wind, one of two companies holding leases approved by the Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) to develop offshore wind energy farms off the coast of Ocean City, announced

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last week it is partnering with Sea Risk Solutions, a private consulting firm, to aid the company’s engagement efforts with local commercial and recreational fishermen. From the beginning when the Maryland General Assembly first approved offshore wind energy development off the resort coast, the fishing industry’s interests have been twofold. On the one hand, commercial and recreational fishermen have raised concerns the development of massive offshore wind energy farms off the resort coast could disrupt fishing, change

migration patterns, cut off vast areas from fishing activities and harm species they target. The massive turbine fields could create navigation hazards for commercial and recreational fishermen. On the other hand, the substructure of the massive turbines could create new fishing opportunities once the wind energy farms are developed. It remains to be seen if the end result will be more of the former and less of the latter, but US Wind is partnering with Sea Risk Solutions to help ensure the local fishing industry is informed throughout the process. The partnership aims to ensure ongoing, consistent dialogue with local fishermen as US Wind’s development activities are expected to ramp up. Sea Risk Solutions’ Wolfgang Rain and Ron Larsen have been named as US Wind’s fisheries liaisons for the commercial and recreational sectors in the area. “US Wind is committed to early, often and continuous dialogue and information-sharing with the fishermen in our region,” said US Wind Director of External Affairs Nancy Sopko. “Getting Sea Risk Solutions onboard, particularly with Wolfgang and Ron with their vast experience and connections in the fishing community is a huge step forward in these engagement efforts.”

March 5, 2021

In 2014, US Wind acquired an 80,000-acre federal lease area off the coast of Ocean City to develop an offshore wind energy farm. In 2017, the PSC awarded the Offshore Renewable Energy Credits, or ORECs, for the first phase of its MarWin project. The partnership with Sea Risk Solutions will focus on the dissemination of information related to project milestones and survey activities. It will also promote collaborative business opportunities and coordinate regular opportunities to gather information and respond to questions and concerns from the fishing community, according to Rain. “We are excited to support US Wind in developing this critical offshore renewable energy project by acting as their fisheries liaisons,” he said. “By working closely with local and regional fishermen, we can facilitate an exchange of information to help inform the wind farm development activities. We look forward to engaging with the area’s fishermen and establishing a foundation for the long-term cooperative relationship US Wind desires with its offshore neighbors.” Sea Risk Solutions is a U.S.-based small business with global and regional experience in facilitating coexistence between offshore infrastructure developers and fishing communities.


Mass Vaccination Site Planned For Salisbury This Month

March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 13

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – A COVID mass vaccination site on the Eastern Shore will likely open in roughly two weeks, Governor Larry Hogan announced on Tuesday. During his weekly COVID-19 press conference on Tuesday, Hogan outlined the state’s efforts to quickly get vaccines into the arms of those that want and need them, but challenges remain. The state’s ambitious vaccination goals were buoyed somewhat late last week with federal approval of a third COVID vaccine produced by Johnson & Johnson right here in Maryland, but the state is getting roughly 50,000 doses of the recently-approved vaccine and more will not be coming from the federal government for at least the next two weeks. Meanwhile, mass vaccination sites are now open in Baltimore at the M&T Bank Stadium and at the Baltimore Convention Center, and others will open as soon as this week at other areas in the densely-populated western shore. Hogan announced on Tuesday the Eastern Shore’s mass vaccination site will open in Salisbury in a matter of weeks. “The Eastern Shore mass vaccination site at the Wicomico Youth and Civic Center will be open no later than Thursday, March 18,” he said. “Tidal Health has been selected as the clinical partner for this Eastern Shore site.” Hogan said with the opening of the Eastern Shore site in Salisbury, along with other mass vaccination locations in western Maryland and southern Maryland, the state will be able to distribute vaccines more efficiently and faster as long as the federal government continues to supply the doses in a timely manner. “This will give us at least one mass vaccination site in every region in the state,” he said. “Expanding the number, hours and capacity of all of our max vaccination sites is contingent on further increases in supply from the federal government.” Hogan said on Tuesday the state’s key COVID metrics continued to decline as the calendar flipped this week from February to March. It was mid-March last year when Maryland and much of the country began to shut down. “Maryland begins the month of March with more of our kids back in school, more businesses reopening and expanding and with fewer people getting infected and hospitalized,” he said. “We went from all 24 of our counties being in the federal red zone in terms of case rates to now having zero counties in the red zone.” Hogan said despite the challenges in receiving and administering the COVID vaccines, Maryland continues to outpace most of the rest of the country. “Yesterday, we hit a critical milestone with more than 40% of Marylanders ages 65 and older having been vaccinated,” he said. “We’re one of the very first states in America to hit this mark.” Again, the rate at which all Mary-

“I assure you every dose we receive, we are ready to deploy and get in the arms of Marylanders,” said Gov. Larry Hogan said at a press conference this week. File Photo

landers receive the vaccines relies on a steady stream of doses from the federal

we are ready to deploy and get in the arms of Marylanders,” he said. “White House officials have assured us they are working to produce an increase of all of the vaccines by the end of March and throughout April and May to enable us to accelerate the expansion of our staterun max vaccination sites.” Hogan said the state will continue to supply county health departments, hospitals and other administrators with vaccine, but would not hesitate to move doses around if they are underutilized. “The goal here is to get the vaccinations from the federal government, deploy them out immediately and into the arm of a person who needs it,” he said. “Doses cannot be allowed to sit on shelves or in freezers while hundreds of thousands of people are desperately trying to schedule an appointment for a vaccine.”

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Ocean Pines Agrees To Release Investigation Reports

Page 14

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – Citing the need for transparency, the association’s board this week directed legal counsel to prepare statements on two investigations involving association management and a recent complaint against President Larry Perrone before announcing they would not move forward with a special meeting to remove him from his post. In a virtual meeting held Monday, members of the Ocean Pines Association (OPA) Board of Directors had before them motions submitted by Director Frank Daly to waive board privilege on two investigation reports – a management report dated Dec. 7, 2020 and an investigative report that resulted from a B-08 complaint filed against Perrone.

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Following a nearly two-hour closed session, however, Daly withdrew his motions. Instead, legal counsel was directed to draft statements on the two reports, which would be released to the community by unanimous consent of the board. “I am withdrawing the motions, and based on unanimous consent of the board, directing counsel to release statements regarding the B-08 complaint and the management report dated Dec. 7, 2020 to provide maximum transparency to the community,” he said. Officials this week also announced a special meeting to consider Perrone’s removal from the board would not move forward, as Director Doug Parks withdrew his support of a motion made by Director Tom Janasek. “Doug Parks has withdrawn his sec-

ond for a special meeting regarding a motion to remove the president,” Perrone told community members. “The board has committed to use whatever tools or tactics are available so that this board can work in a more cohesive and effective manner.” Monday’s special meeting came more than a week after the board’s handling of a complaint against Perrone was called into question by the association’s membership. In January, Director of Amenities and Operational Logistics Colby Phillips filed a complaint against Perrone alleging he had violated Resolution B-08, which addresses director and officer ethics and misconduct. Following an investigation into the matter – and a closed board meeting in late January to discuss the complaint – the board found no violation

March 5, 2021

had occurred. Phillips submitted her resignation on Feb. 16, ending a nearly seven-year tenure with OPA. In a board meeting held Feb. 20, Jeremy Tucker, the association’s corporate counsel, outlined the board’s process for handling Phillips’ complaint. Several community members, however, took issue with the board’s actions. They noted while Perrone was in attendance for the closed meeting, Phillips was not invited to participate. “The board should not be able to hold a closed-door meeting to decide the outcome of Perrone’s actions without Colby and her attorney present,” resident Jackie Kurtz said. “Colby should have been given an opportunity to speak before a board decision, as Perrone should be able to present his side but not vote on any decision. Even if Perrone’s actions were legal or did not violate the B-08, it was wrong on every level. It’s wrong that the majority of the board was willing to put up with his behavior without any kind of censure and apology to Colby.” At that same meeting, Janasek made a motion to hold a special meeting for the removal of an officer, which was seconded by Parks. “There has been a pattern of behavior on this board that includes threats of legal action against directors, blatant lies to influence directors’ votes and interference with committees managing important projects such as drainage and food and beverage operations, to name a few …,” Janasek said at the time. “This is not a board of one or two, and that’s is what it’s become.” Daly also asked the board to consider amending, or even repealing, Resolution B-08. “We’re not the Central Intelligence Agency, we’re not the National Security Agency,” he said. “This cloak of secrecy that ties hands is extremely unfair, first to the community and second of all to the people involved … Like it or not, there are two sides to every story. And I don’t like a process that handcuffs one side.” In his motion this week to waive board privilege, Daly said current rules governing Resolution B-08 prevented the board from releasing an investigative report detailing the events and information that led to the board’s decision. He said releasing the reports would provide community members “maximum transparency.” In his comments this week, Parks said his decision to withdraw his support of a motion to hold a special meeting for Perrone’s removal came after careful consideration. “We’ve had several conversations about how did we get to this place, what can we do going forward …” he said. “It will be a challenge as we move forward over the next several months in order to address this issue. There are some issues that need to be addressed, and they need to be addressed boldly, they need to be addressed front and center, and there can’t be any loss of commitSEE NEXT PAGE


March 5, 2021

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 15

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The Ocean City Jeep Club held its 6th Annual Worcester County Humane Society Food and Supply Run last month. With over 50 jeeps in attendance, the club donated a large amount of food and supplies the shelter needed to continue providing services. Submitted Photos

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ment as we navigate through these difficult times. I made that commitment to my other directors, and I expect the same from them.” Director Colette Horn added she was proud of the board for its actions. “I think in the past boards have addressed their problems by waiting for them to solve themselves through director attrition, either by terming out or resigning,” she said. “We’ve also over the years addressed these problems by attempts to remove officers, attempts to remove directors. Neither of those approaches have yielding lasting improvements. In some cases, it yielded greater problems.” Horn said the board was committed to working on its problems and finding ways to move forward. “I think the public can count on that from us, and we will certainly recommit to that as we go through this process that we embarked on today,” she said. “I will also ask the public to give us the time and space we need to do this work and to respect this is going to be a difficult process for us. It’s going to take a lot of courage and honesty on our part, and we hope the membership will trust in us, in our commitment, and allow us the time and space we need to accomplish what we’ve committed to today.”

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Local Entrepreneur Appearing On ‘Shark Tank’ Friday

Page 16

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – A local entrepreneur will make an appearance on this week’s episode of the reality show “Shark Tank.” On Friday, March 5, Lewes-based company Pinch Me Therapy Dough will be featured on ABC’s “Shark Tank,” a reality show in which entrepreneurs pitch their products or services to self-made tycoons for a chance to secure lucrative business deals. Nancy Rothner, owner and founder of Pinch Me Therapy Dough, said the episode will air at 8 p.m. EST. “We are very much looking forward to it,” she said. Rothner began testing products for Pinch Me in 2012. As a clinical hypnotherapist specializing in stress reduction,

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

she said she recognized the need for stress-relieving tools and techniques that can be used anytime, anywhere. “The problem was I would come home at night and I would see in the news that stress statistics were on the rise everywhere, really for all groups … ,” she said. “I kept thinking how can I find a way to reach more people, to show what I found is effective in the office, techniques and strategies and ways to quickly destress. How can I share that? I had one of those epiphany, lightbulb moments.” After spending two years in development, and testing thousands of batches, Rothner launched Pinch Me Therapy Dough, a squishable, scented putty in a portable tin. “I find from my experience and belief it has the components necessary to

March 5, 2021

Pinch Me Therapy Dough founder Nancy Rothner is pictured at the taping of the “Shark Tank” show last September. Submitted Photo

make it fun, feel-good and effective in helping people quickly destress,” she said. In the years since, Rothner has gr-

own Pinch Me to include a range of scented putties, as well as a line of aromatic mists. Products are sold online and throughout the country. “It’s been a gradual process,” she said. “I didn’t know where or how. I just started out by getting the website up. Then I thought perhaps I want to see if this would sell in a store. I approached some stores – first locally, and then I expanded from there – to see if Pinch Me was something that would sell, and it sold very well. That continued over the years.” Rothner also attended trade shows in an effort to expand her client base. She noted, however, that everything changed last March at the start of the pandemic. “Everything that I had been doing to generate sales and continue to grow Pinch Me was completely shut down,” she said. “Whether it was wholesale or direct to consumer, everything was at a standstill. I just knew I needed help and guidance to maneuver and get through this abrupt change.” A year ago, Rothner applied to “Shark Tank,” beginning a months-long vetting process. Late last summer, she was invited to make her pitch in front of the “sharks.” And in September, she flew out to Las Vegas for a taping of the show. “They gave me the news and the next thing I know we were booking the airfare tickets,” she said. Rothner noted this is not her first time on national television. She once made an appearance on QVC, though she explained it was only for a few minutes and did not require much talking. “I felt like I really needed to muster up a lot of courage to get through this,” she said of the reality show. Rothner said she couldn’t disclose details about her appearance on “Shark Tank” until the episode airs on Friday. She noted, however, that the process of applying to be on the show was far more challenging than she had anticipated. “It was very long and very demanding,” she added. Nevertheless, Rothner said she would do it all over again. “I did it to bring greater awareness and opportunities for growth,” she said. For more information on Pinch Me Therapy Dough, visit pinchmedough.com. The company’s appearance on “Shark Tank” will air Friday, March 5, at 8 p.m. on ABC.


Snow Hill Hopes Riverboat Cruising By Memorial Day Operator Sought For ‘Floating Restaurant’

March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 17

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SNOW HILL – Final repairs are being made to the town’s new riverboat as officials prepare to bring it to Snow Hill by the end of the month. As repairs near completion, the Town of Snow Hill has spent the past several weeks seeking proposals from potential operators of what is essentially a floating restaurant. Proposals are due to the town by March 5. “We really want to have an independent operator that we lease the boat to,” Town Manager Gary Weber said. The Black-Eyed Susan, the 149-seat riverboat purchased in 2020 with a loan from Worcester County, has been at Murtech Marine in Salisbury since the fall undergoing repairs. Though Weber initially hoped to have the boat fixed up and docked in Snow Hill by mid-February, the extensive to-do list associated with bringing the boat to town, paired with delays associated with COVID-19, slowed the process. Work is now almost done however. “It’s looking really lovely,” Weber said. “They’re repainting everything. Most of the repairs are done.” He now expects the boat to be docked in Snow Hill by the end of March and potentially offering rides by the end of May. “We’re shooting for first cruise Memorial Day weekend,” he said. The boat will be docked at the end of Bank Street, a location Weber said was chosen because of the visibility it would give the vessel. “You’ll actually be able to see it from downtown,” Weber said. Weber said he’d had some interest from potential operators but that the town wanted to ensure everyone had a chance to review the opportunity and had issued a formal request for proposals in February. If Snow Hill doesn’t receive a suitable proposal, Weber said the town would hire someone to operate the boat if necessary. “It’s not difficult,” he said. “It’s basically a floating restaurant.” Weber said it would be up to the operator whether the Black-Eyed Susan would run year-round or not. Regardless, he says the community is looking forward to the addition of Snow Hill’s new attraction. “We’re very excited about it,” he said. “It’s going to make a major impact on our riverscape.”

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OC Neighborhood Watch Group Presents Annual Awards

Page 18

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

Corporal Jeff Heiser is pictured with Chief Ross Buzzuro after being named Neighborhood Watch Association Officer of the Year for 2020 Submitted Photos

OCEAN CITY – Although ongoing COVID concerns curtailed the traditional ceremony, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) Corporal Jeff Heiser has been named the Neighborhood Watch Association Officer of the Year for 2020. Traditionally, the OCPD and the Neighborhood Watch Association coordinators hold an annual Officer of the Year ceremony to recognize department personnel and volunteers for their accomplishments from the previous year. This year, however, as with so many other things, the traditional ceremony and dinner were not held because of the ongoing COVID pandemic and restrictions on gatherings.

Nonetheless, in keeping with tradition, the OCPD worked closely with the Neighborhood Watch Association on the annual awards and this week announced Heiser has been selected as Officer of the Year for 2020. Heiser was selected by the seven Neighborhood Watch coordinators. Also nominated for the award this year were Pfc. Nathan Denny, Pfc. Amy Gutowski, Pfc. Justin Hoban, Pfc. Joseph Laughlin, Pfc. Harry Miller and Pfc. Tyler Sheffy. Traditionally during the ceremony, the OCPD also recognizes officers that were awarded with departmental commendations for exemplary service. Earning Silver Star commendations this year were Lt. Frank Wrench and Pfc. David Whitmer. Earning Meritorious Service Commendations were Wrench, Laughlin and Public Safety Aide Frank

March 5, 2021

Brown. Earning Special Commendations this year were Miller, Gutowski, Pfc. Chelsea Kautz, Sgt. Michael Kelly, Cpl. Ryan Flanagan, Cpl. Nicholas Forsyth, Cpl. Christopher Wrench, and Pfc. Brian Nieto. Excellent Performance Commendations went to Forsyth, Gutowski, Kautz, Nieto, Sheffy, Cpl. Joseph Lotito, Cpl. Christopher Snyder, Pfc. Benjamin Berry, Pfc. Michael Dzurnak, Pfc. Daniel Jacobs, Pfc. Jessica Johnson, Pfc. Kory Moerschel, Pfc. Erika Rhode, Officer Daniel Richardson, Officer Riley Scott and CST Sharon Schultz. Unit Citations went to the front desk personnel and the south evening shift personnel. The OCPD is fortunate to have a solid core of volunteers, who donate hundreds of hours of their time to the department and the citizens of Ocean City. In 2020, the volunteers donated 1,257 hours to the department, including an astounding 959 by Kathy Grimes, who was named the 2020 Auxiliary Officer of the Year. Other officers were honored by the OCPD and the Neighborhood Watch coordinators for their retirements in 2020 including Lt. Glen McIntyre, Sgt. Ronnie Townsend, Corporal Albert Custer, Property and Evidence Technician Mary Marshall and Records Management Supervisor Michelle Monico. Combined, the retirees this year served a total of 137 years with the department. Several others were honored for receiving promotions in 2020. Those who received promotions this year included Lt. James Runkles, Sgt. Charles “Chip” Green, Sgt. Michael Kelly, Sgt. Michael Richardson, Sgt. James Schwartz, Corporal Ryan Flanagan, Corporal Nicholas Forsyth, Corporal Shawn Lindsay, Corporal James Rodriguez, Corporal Christopher Snyder, Pfc. Mark Cutter, Pfc. Connor Finch, Pfc. Alexander Hawkins, Pfc. Kevin Herbert, Pfc. Brian Nieto, Pfc. Yovanny Ramirez, Pfc. Tyler Sheffy, Pfc. Todd Stahm, Pfc. Corwin Vincent, and Custody Officer Sara Hetherington.

The Auxiliary Officer of the Year award was presented to Kathy Grimes by Buzzuro.


March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 19


High-Speed Internet Goal ‘All About The Finances’

Page 20

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – County officials want a communications company to put together a proposal to bring high speed internet to the entire county in three years. Following a presentation from Talkie Communications on Tuesday, the Worcester County Commissioners asked the company for a proposal on what it would take to bring fiber internet to the entire county. “I’m serious about this,” Commissioner Jim Bunting said. “This is a major issue in my district. We’re getting a lot of heat.” Representatives from Talkie Communications, the internet provider the county agreed to partner with in its efforts to expand rural access to broadband, met with the commissioners Tuesday. Andrew De-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Mattia, CEO of Talkie, and Andre DeMattia, COO of Talkie, told the commissioners the company had secured $3 million in grant funding to use over 10 years. “As soon as those grants are released we’d like to start building out Worcester County,” Andre DeMattia said, adding the company planned to start in the south and work its way north. He acknowledged, however, that $3 million wouldn’t take the county too far, as a 2020 broadband study indicated it would take $52 million to bring fiber to the county. “It’s going to take a long time to do the entire county,” he said, adding Talkie was looking for other grants and hoped to have the county done in six years. Bunting said the county couldn’t wait six years. “With additional funding we could go

faster,” Andre DeMattia said. Commissioner Chip Bertino agreed something needed to be done quickly and asked if Talkie could put together a proposal on what it would take to bring fiber to the entire county in three years. “We’re already behind the eight ball by many years,” he said. When Andre DeMattia said it could be done, Bertino suggested the company be added to the April 6 meeting agenda to present information on the potential timeline and costs. Bertino said fiber was no different than any other infrastructure maintained by the county and a presentation regarding the process and cost would give the county a better idea of what it would take to make broadband a reality for rural residents. “This is what our community needs,” he said. “Taxpayer money for something

March 5, 2021

like this could be justified.” Commissioner Ted Elder asked why fiber was a better internet solution for the county than wireless. Andrew DeMattia said the grant could only be used for fiber and wireless was better in high density areas. Wireless is also impacted by factors such as weather and tree coverage. “For rural deployment, that type of internet, it’s just not feasible,” he said. He added wireless could be used as a stopgap but that in the long-term fiber would be a better solution. Commissioner Joe Mitrecic pointed out based on the county’s broadband study, it would take roughly $49 million to install fiber throughout the county. Andre DeMattia agreed it was a good rough estimate. Bunting stressed the county needed to do something, as there were areas in various districts where residents had no access. “It can be done,” Andrew DeMattia said. “It’s all about the finances.” Brian Jones, the county’s IT director, said the pandemic had highlighted the county’s connection problems. “Since the pandemic hit, people that were just getting by are no longer getting by,” he said. “It’s becoming a major issue.” He also advised the commissioners to pursue fiber rather than wireless solutions, which he said would not deliver the desired internet speed.


Crews Remove Whale From Beach

March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 21

Your Countertop Specialists

A deceased female humpback whale is pictured on the northern end of Assateague Island Feb. 20. Photo by Campos Media BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

ASSATEAGUE – Ten days after a deceased 30-ton humpback whale washed up on Assateague, the creature was finally removed from the beach last weekend, but its presence on the barrier island will likely remain for a while. On Feb. 18, a female humpback whale stranded on the beach at Assateague for reasons unknown and perished. Throughout the following week, Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) biologists conducted a necropsy and collected tissue samples in an effort to determine the whale’s cause of death, the results of which are not yet known, although early indications are there are no signs of a non-natural death. As of late last week, the deceased whale remained in the same position on the beach where it stranded. Assateague Island National Seashore (AINS) crews last Tuesday attempted to move the whale from the beach to no avail. Last weekend, with the necropsy completed and the tissue samples collected, Assateague Island National Seashore crews again attempted to move the whale from the beach, this time with success. According to a statement from the AINS Superintendent Monday, crews used heavy equipment over two days last weekend to remove the deceased whale

from the shoreline and moved it to an undisclosed location on the island. “The whale was successfully moved off the beach on Saturday,” the superintendent’s statement reads. “Thank you to the talented team of park staff, and especially the heavy equipment operators, who labored and innovated to finally successfully move the 30-ton animal. This process took approximately five hours over two days.” While it is not clear exactly where the whale’s carcass has been moved, it will continue to make its presence felt on the barrier island. Because Assateague Island is essentially a natural, wild area, the marine mammal will decompose naturally, according to the superintendent’s statement. “The whale will be allowed to decompose naturally, as would any dead animal within the boundaries of the seashore,” the statement reads. “Be advised there will be period when this process includes strong, unpleasant smells. For that reason, approaching the carcass is not advised. Also, the remains are protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act, which makes it unlawful to collect or take any parts of a dead marine mammal.” The female humpback was a wellknown visitor to the Gulf of Maine affectionately known as Pivot. Pivot was first cataloged by the Center for Coastal Studies in 2008.

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Berlin Ping Pong Tables Pitched

Page 22

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

During a Zoom meeting this week, Berlin citizen Tony Weeg is pictured discussing hopes to add outdoor ping pong tables to a town park on William Street. File Photo

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BERLIN – The Berlin Parks Commission reviewed plans to add ping pong tables to Burbage Park this week. On Tuesday, Berlin resident Tony Weeg shared a concept plan for the addition of ping pong tables to Burbage Park on William Street. “The nonprofit I’ve started, We Heart Berlin, has already started collecting donations for this,” Weeg said. Weeg initially started a We Heart Berlin Facebook page last year as a candidate for town council. Though he wasn’t elected, he’s hoping to use the momentum he built online to spur positive change in the community. The first project he has planned is ping pong tables for Burbage Park. He also started a fundraising effort for a skate park. Weeg told the commission this week he was hoping to buy locally made tables and install them on concrete, or permeable, pads at the small park. He also envisions a white picket fence and hedge to keep balls, and people, from going into the road. “Everybody on the council has heard my spiel about this,” he said. “A lot of them are in favor of this.” Weeg, who has started a Go Fund Me page to help with fundraising for the project, believes donations will increase once We Heart Berlin’s nonprofit status is final, since donations will then be tax

March 5, 2021

deductible. When asked about the estimated cost of the project, Weeg said the concrete and tables would cost less than $15,000 but that he had yet to get pricing on the fence and hedge. Town Administrator Jeff Fleetwood asked who would handle. “I'd love for most of this, what we're changing there, to not need much maintenance,” Weeg said. He added that grass cutting, which the town already handled at the site, would have to occur either way. “The nonprofit, part of our mission statement is improving the parks in the town,” he said. “That could certainly fall under improvement. Whether we're going to cut the grass there I'm not sure but we're definitely going to take care of the place.” Deputy Town Administrator Mary Bohlen told Weeg that while the parks commission only provided recommendations to the mayor and town council, she thought the first step in the process should be consultation with Miss Utility. “At this point in time I have no idea what might or might not be under that ground,” she said. “Obviously the presence of existing utilities would greatly impact what ends up happening.” Weeg agreed and said if there were utilities underground that would prevent his plans from moving forward, the tables could be installed in one of the town’s other parks.


Motorist Sentenced In High-Speed Chase

March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 23

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A Gwynn Oak, Md., man arrested in June on weapons and traffic charges and leading police on a high-speed chase pleaded guilty this week and was sentenced to six months in jail. On Wednesday, Dedrick Harrell, now 19, pleaded guilty to one count of possession of a firearm by a minor and one count of attempting to elude police and was sentenced to six months. The other 19 counts against Harrell stemming from the June 16 incident were placed on the stet, or inactive, docket. Around 8:30 p.m. last June 16, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was on stationary patrol in the area of 25th Street when he observed a Chevy Camaro with a distinctive paint design heading south on Philadelphia Avenue at a rate of 74 mph in a 35-mph zone. The officer activated his lights and siren as the suspect, later Harrell, blew past his location. The officer began to pursue Harrell, but the suspect accelerated away from him, reaching speeds of over 100 mph at 17th Street as he weaved through slower-moving vehicles. The officer followed as Harrell turned west off Philadelphia Avenue around 12th Street. The pursuing officer spotted Harrell again along St. Louis Avenue. By now, other OCPD officers and Worcester County Sheriff’s deputies had converged on the area and joined the pursuit. OCPD and allied officers continued to broadcast Harrell’s location as he raced through the downtown area along St. Louis, Philadelphia and Edgewater avenues along with the side streets. Harrell ultimately raced across the Route 50 Bridge where he was stopped and blocked in by allied officers at a fast-food restaurant. An OCPD officer arrived on the scene and questioned Harrell, who did not have a license in his possession. Through the investigation, the officer learned Harrell’s license had been suspended since July 2019. Harrell reportedly admitted to consuming an alcoholic beverage at his Ocean City hotel before heading toward the restaurant in Ocean City. At that point, Harrell was arrested on numerous traffic violations including driving on a suspended license and suspicion of driving while intoxicated. During a search of his person, OCPD officers located two unused rounds of 9mm ammunition in his pocket. According to police reports, a loaded 9mm Luger handgun was located under the front passenger seat. There was one round in the chamber and another six rounds in the 10-round capacity magazine. A background check of the weapon revealed it had been reported stolen in Virginia. Harrell was arrested on 21 total traffic and weapons charges.

Bridge Scene: Vehicles are pictured entering and exiting Ocean City via the Route 50 Bridge on Wednesday.

Photo by Chris Parypa


Page 24

Cops & Courts The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Theft Scheme Arrest OCEAN CITY – An Ocean City woman was arrested last week after detectives were able to connect her to a fraudulent theft scheme involving her mother’s credit card. In September, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer met with a female victim who advised her credit card information had been compromised and an unknown individual had been using Cash App to disseminate money from her account to different individuals. The victim had contacted her credit union to investigate the apparent fraud of her credit card, which she had in her possession. The investigation revealed there had been 39 transactions totaling over $2,100, all using Cash App. The victim identified two individuals who could have had access to her credit card account number including her daughter, Evelyn Cordner, 28, of Ocean City, and her boyfriend. The couple had lived with the victim for a period of time. In December, the OCPD detective assigned to the case met with Cordner, who was being held at the OCPD booking facility on an outstanding warrant from Delaware. The warrant from Delaware was for theft and fraudulently using a credit card which belonged to her boyfriend’s father. The detective informed Cordner she was being held on the war-

rant from Delaware for allegedly using Cash App to disseminate money to a number of individuals, according to police reports. The OCPD detectives provided Cordner with two names of individuals who had been recipients of money through Cash App. According to police reports, Cordner acknowledged knowing the two individuals, but denied fraudulently sending them money, saying “Just because my Cash App was used doesn’t mean I’m the one who sent the money,” and “I’m not going to jail for anyone.” A review of Cordner’s Cash App activity confirmed transactions to one of the individuals whom the officer provided to Cordner. Bank records reportedly showed numerous payments from Cordner to the named recipient. The payments were reportedly made between Sept. 4 to Sept. 9.

In December, the OCPD detective talked with the recipient via telephone and asked her about the transactions. The recipient told the officer she had received and sent numerous transactions from Cordner. The officer asked the recipient if she could access her Cash App account and provide data from the dates in question. The recipient then sent the officer an email containing screen shots of text messages and a record of the recipient’s Cash App transactions. The information revealed Cordner had allegedly sent money to the recipient through the app and asked her to send it right back to her, according to police reports. The detective was able to compare the recipient’s Cash App transactions with Cordner to the bank statements of the victim, Cordner’s mother. The victim later informed the officer her credit union

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March 5, 2021 had credited her account for all the fraudulent transactions. Based on the evidence, the detective acquired a warrant for Cordner’s arrest, charging her with theft and theft scheme. She was taken into custody last week and formally charged.

Local Man Arrested After Pool Table Ruckus OCEAN CITY – A Pocomoke man was arrested on multiple charges last weekend after allegedly causing a ruckus over whose turn it was on a pool table at a downtown bar. Around 1:10 a.m. last Saturday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a bar at 8th Street for a reported assault that had already occurred. The officers arrived and allegedly observed a male, later identified as Albert Hicks III, 49, of Pocomoke, screaming at the staff of the establishment. As officers approached, a female later identified as Hicks’ daughter, was attempting to calm him down. OCPD officers observed a wooden board that was part of the outside bar was detached and lying on the sidewalk. The board had nails sticking out of it and was about three feet in length. The officers escorted Hicks and his daughter away from staff and other patrons of the bar, according to police reports. Officers then separated Hicks from his daughter and asked her to report what had happened and she agreed. The daughter said she and her father had been at the casino earlier in the evening and around midnight came to the bar with the intention of playing pool. The daughter told police they got in the queue of patrons waiting to play pool and when it was their turn, another man stepped in and took control of the table. The daughter told police she confronted the man, whom she believed had taken their spot at the table, and he aggressively began to scream at her and pushed her with both hands on the side of the ribs. Bar staff quickly intervened and removed Hicks and his daughter from the bar. The daughter said she believed it was unfair they had been removed while the other man remained inside. According to police reports, throughout the interview with the daughter, she repeatedly changed her story about the confrontation with the other man over the pool table. At first, she said he SEE NEXT PAGE


. . Cops & Courts

March 5, 2021

pushed her with both hands on the side of her ribs. She later said the other man punched her in the stomach and struck her in the mouth with an open hand. It should be noted the police report indicates the daughter did not have any signs of physical injury, nor were her clothes disheveled in any way. In addition, she did not appear to be in any pain, nor was she nursing any injuries, according to police reports. Next, OCPD officers interviewed the man allegedly involved in the confrontation and he reportedly told a different version of the events. The man reportedly told police he and his wife had come to the bar and were waiting to get on a pool table. The man told police bar staff refused to serve the daughter alcoholic beverages and had to remind her several times to wear a face mask. According to police reports, the man told the officer bar staff told him it was his turn for a pool table, but as he approached the table, Hicks’ daughter confronted him and began to aggressively argue about whose turn it was. As the man attempted to seek help from bar staff, Hicks approached him and shoved him with both hands onto the pool table, according to police reports. At that point, bar staff removed Hicks and his daughter from the establishment. During an interview, the man’s wife corroborated his version of the events. The officers checked bar surveil-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch lance video to gain a timeline of the events. According to police reports, the video footage shows the male victim and Hicks’ daughter conversing near the pool table. Hicks approached the area aggressively and pushed his daughter aside to get to the male victim. Hicks then allegedly shoved the male victim with both hands onto the pool table before he and his daughter were escorted out, according to police reports. Video footage from the sidewalk outside reportedly shows Hicks attempting to gain entrance to the bar while other patrons attempt to restrain him. The video footage reportedly shows Hicks intentionally grab the wooden board from the outside bar and rip it from where it was attached, which is when police arrived. All in all, Hicks was charged with second-degree assault, malicious destruction of property, intoxicated endangerment and disorderly conduct.

Page 25

According to police reports, the officer observed the front seat passenger and the rear seat passenger making furtive movements. The officer reportedly observed the passengers reaching around the floorboard near the front passenger seat. The officer observed one of the passengers, identified as Hunter Branco, 18, of Millsboro, Del., lean forward and reach under the front seat as if he were attempting to conceal something. For safety reasons, the observations and the furtive movements of the passengers, the officer ordered the occupants out of the vehicle. Branco and the other occupants consented to a search of their persons, which turned up nothing of evidentiary value, according to police reports. The officer did detect the

odor of raw marijuana coming from the passenger compartment and searched the vehicle, according to police reports. In the vehicle, the officer reportedly located a large, fixed-blade knife with a red bandana tied around the handle inside a black sheath. There was also another folding knife inside a backpack on the rear passenger side floorboard, but it was not a spring-assisted knife. The fixed-blade knife was roughly 12 inches long. It was located directly where Branco had been seated in the vehicle and the backpack was located in the area where Branco had been reaching around under the front passenger seat. Branco denied ownership of the knife and the backpack. Based on the evidence, Branco was arrested for carrying a concealed deadly weapon.

Get Ready To March Into Our Madness

Knife Found In Traffic Stop OCEAN CITY – A Delaware man was arrested on weapons charges last week after a large knife was allegedly found during a routine traffic stop. Around 8 p.m. last Wednesday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was patrolling in the downtown area when he observed a vehicle turn from Caroline Street to southbound Philadelphia Avenue directly in front of his marked vehicle. The officer reportedly had to apply his brakes to avoid a collision with the vehicle and initiated a traffic stop.

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Fenwick island ‘passed over’ For Beach replenishment

Page 26

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – A beach replenishment project will not take place in Fenwick Island this fall as originally planned, according to town officials. In a Fenwick Island Town Council meeting last Friday, Mayor Gene Langan announced the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers would not return to town this year for its scheduled beach replenishment project. “We found out the end of last week that the Army Corps in Washington did not have us in the budget for replenishment for this year,” he said. “We’re on a four-year cycle. We were due to be replenished this fall, and it doesn’t look like we’re going to get it now.” Langan noted that other projects in Delaware were also turned down for beach replenishment funding. He said Fenwick was working alongside the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), the Association of Coastal Towns, and state and federal representatives to advocate for much needed beach replenishment projects. “We can just see what happens,” he said. “We’re going to be one year off on beach replenishment, as it doesn’t look like we’re going to get it this year.” Councilman Bill Weistling told council members last week replenishment proj-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

ects in Fenwick were typically coordinated with replenishment projects in Ocean City, despite the two towns being in separate districts of the Army Corps. This fall, the Army Corps Baltimore District will return to Ocean City for its next round of beach replenishment. “They would always try to time Fenwick Island with the beach replenishment in Ocean City, Md.,” he said. “I know it comes out of two jurisdictions of the Army Corps, but it saves a tremendous amount of money on mobilization, which is usually about 20% of the entire project … It’s going to end up costing more money in the future.”

Weistling said replenishment projects were critical to maintaining the town’s beach and dune system. He encouraged the town to draft its own letter in support of beach replenishment. “I think it’s going to be important for us to stay up on this,” he said. “I think the town should send a letter stating our concerns about this.” Town Manager Terry Tieman explained while the Army Corps Philadelphia District gave the Fenwick replenishment project the highest priority, funding was withdrawn once it reached Washington, D.C. “When it got to Washington, this project, along with two other projects in Dela-

ware and one renourishment project in New Jersey, were withdrawn …,” she said, relaying her conversations with DNREC and federal officials. “It will most likely be picked up next year when they do Dewey and Rehoboth. It’s the first time where Fenwick Island has been passed over for renourishment. It is not the first time it’s happened in Delaware. It’s happened one other time in Bethany Beach.” Officials said they were hopeful Fenwick would be added to the project list for next year. “We don’t need any resolutions on this,” Langan said. “We just need to keep moving forward.”

BY BETHANY HOOPER

capacity contributed to dropped calls and slower internet speeds. To that end, officials proposed installing small cell antennas onto utility poles throughout Fenwick. The town council also approved a wireless ordinance, which acted as an agreement the town could use when contracting with any provider wishing to install wireless infrastructure on town poles. “The intent, then and now, was to provide 5G service for Fenwick Island and to improve our service,” Councilman Bill Weistling told committee members last week, “especially during the summer

months with the heavy beach traffic and the heavy usage that’s involved.” In the years since those initial discussions, officials said Verizon had installed 14 small cell antennas in and around Fenwick. At last month’s meeting, Verizon representative Bonnie Metz told committee members that Fenwick would have 5G service for the coming summer season. “These nodes, all of them are 4G and 5G nodes,” she said. “That means if people use a 5G phone, they’re going to be using 5G service come the summer. That’s going to free up space on the 4G network.” Metz said Fenwick was the first town in Delaware to adopt a wireless ordinance that would pave the way for improved cell service and infrastructure investments. With the installation of new small cell antennas, Metz told committee members the town would no longer need temporary cell towers to meet the demand of wireless usage during the summer season. She said the new technology would not only improve coverage along Coastal Highway, but on the beaches as well. “We appreciate the partnership and the discussions we’ve had when there have been issues, and our ability to work through them together to achieve our objective, which is to make sure our customers have the service that they need,” she said. Town Manager Terry Tieman said the improved cell service would enhance safety. “One of the reasons we were so concerned about the cellphone coverage, and that we adopted the ordinance we adopted, was because we had a real safety issue,” she told committee members. “Our police use wireless in their vehicles and there were some cases in which the police were having to move the car back and forth. Sometimes they couldn’t get a connection and would allow the perpetrator to leave because we couldn’t make a connection to the system we needed.” Weistling applauded the town’s partnership with Verizon. “That worked out very well for the town,” he said. “I know the people in town were concerned about having a proliferation of poles. It doesn’t seem like that’s happening now.”

5G Wireless service expected this summer STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – An update on cell service improvements highlighted a recent Fenwick Island committee meeting. On the agenda for discussion at last month’s Fenwick Island Infrastructure Committee meeting was an update regarding cell service throughout the resort. In 2017, the town began working with Verizon representatives to improve cell service in Fenwick Island. At the time, officials noted the town’s limited wireless

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Wicomico Sheriff Looks Past Critics With Sanctuary County Proclamation

March 5, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – Sheriff Mike Lewis issued a proclamation this week declaring Wicomico a Second Amendment sanctuary county. In a meeting of the Wicomico County Council on Tuesday, Sheriff Mike Lewis presented a proclamation declaring Wicomico County as a Second Amendment sanctuary. “This is not a resolution,” he said. “This proclamation is formally issued by me. A resolution can only be passed by council majority vote. Why a proclamation? Quite simply, I was uncertain as to whether I had sufficient council support to successfully pass a resolution here tonight. But by proclamation, I promise you, as a citizen of Wicomico County I will do everything in my power as your elected sheriff to protect and preserve your constitutional, inalienable rights to keep and bear arms.” Last year, Lewis brought forward a resolution to the county council to declare Wicomico a Second Amendment preservation county, or a county that opposes the enforcement of gun control measures viewed as a violation of the Second Amendment. Lewis told officials at the time “legislative hurdles” made it difficult for law-abiding individuals to legally purchase firearms. He said the resolution would send a message that local elected leaders supported Second Amendment rights. However, a coalition of seven organizations – including the Lower Shore Progressive Caucus, Wicomico County NAACP, Wicomico PUSH4Education, Wicomico Truth and Reconciliation Initiative, the City of Salisbury Lynching Memorial Task Force, Salisbury Junior Chamber of Commerce and Moms Demand Action – issued a statement calling on the Wicomico County Council to delay voting on the resolution, arguing it did not take into account racial disparities in how minorities are treated in gun ownership and used language “that is currently anti-democracy and contrary to Rule of Law.” Lewis ultimately withdrew the resolution last June in the wake of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis, but vowed to bring the matter back before the council. This week, Councilman Bill McCain questioned why the proclamation was on the council’s agenda.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

President Larry Dodd said he added it at the request of the sheriff. “We get requests for proclamations all the time,” Dodd replied. McCain questioned if Lewis would continue to enforce the laws of the state. The sheriff replied that he would. “As sheriff, I have the distinct pleasure to represent everyone here in this county, and I treasure this distinction,” he said. “Regardless of your race, ethnicity or gender, I represent you, I represent your families and I represent your futures. It is my constitutional duty to protect you, and that’s why tonight I’m issuing the following proclamation.” During a public comments portion of the meeting, Wicomico County NAACP President Dr. Brante Dashiell spoke in opposition to the proclamation. “We know we’re at a very hypersensitive point, not just with COVID but from all the things that happened this summer with George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery,” she said. “We really want to be consonant on what we are signing, what we are promoting and what synergy that sends to our community.” Councilman Ernie Davis stressed that it was the responsibility of sheriff’s office to enforce all laws. “If any law is passed through the state, we as a county cannot override them,” he said. “We cannot pick and choose what laws we want to abide by. If the state passes a law we don’t agree with, you have to go to the state and fight them. We cannot fight that battle. Whether I agree with this Second Amendment right to bear arms or not, we do not have a position and we do not have the authority to say we want to make Wicomico a Second Amendment sanctuary because that’s what we want. We cannot do that.” Councilman John Cannon, however, argued Lewis’ proclamation was symbolic. “He is a man of integrity and has a lot of concern for every citizen in this county, and he does, and would, put his life on the line for anyone in this room or any one of the 100,000 citizens of this county …,” he said. “He said it was symbolic, he upholds the values of the Constitution and respectively the Second Amendment, and I think that was simply his position tonight.”

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March 5, 2021

And Real Estate News Ladies’ Boutique Opens

OCEAN CITY – Monkee’s of Ocean City, an upscale ladies’ boutique featuring designer shoes, clothing, and accessories, opened last weekend. This is the first Monkee’s franchise in Maryland with 27 independently owned and operated Monkee’s franchise boutiques in the United States. Located on 59th Street, the boutique is owned by franchisee Michelle Fager, who works with her husband John on his well-known restaurant, Fager’s Island and helps oversee operations at the Lighthouse Club and Edge hotels, as well as the Atlantic Hotel in Berlin. Fager has always loved fashion and cannot wait to introduce Monkee’s unique and upscale shopping experience to Ocean City residents and visitors. “What distinguishes the Monkee’s brand is their commitment to outstanding customer service. Here at Monkee’s of Ocean City we will be committed to providing that exceptional service, along with constantly curating fresh looks for our customers and working to enhance and empower the Ocean City community,” said Fager. Designed to look like your (wellheeled) girlfriend’s closet, the boutique’s signature chandeliers, eye-catching textiles and stunning shoe galleries are all staples in a Monkee’s store. However, each location has a personality of its own. “Monkee’s boutiques are beautiful, welcoming places with fantastic designers and irresistible gifts. Everyone who works at Monkee’s is passionate about fashion and our staff is very excited to help our customers find that perfect outfit or accessory,” said Fager.

Real Estate Market Update BERLIN – Winter is in full force, and

like every year the market on the Eastern Shore has cooled down a little, however, it is still remarkably stronger than the last several years. The median home price dropped slightly in January from $263,000 to $255,000 but the average sales price is up $30,000 from January of 2020. Inventory continues to be the major issue. There were 543 active listings in the lower three counties compared to 1,798 in January 2019. This means a supply of only 1.65 months, which is low compared to the 8.4 month supply we had last year at this time. In all three counties throughout January, new settlements were up 58.9% compared to the same time last year. Individually, new settlements throughout January were up by 18.7% in Wicomico, 75.8% in Worcester, and 175% in Somerset. New listings in January were down 11.3% compared to the same time last year in all three counties. Individually, new listings were down by 13.8% in Worcester, 7.1% in Wicomico, and 4% in Somerset from January of 2020. Active listings in all three counties were down by 59.9%. Individually, there were 290 active listings in Worcester, 181 in Wicomico, and 72 in Somerset. The average Cumulative Days on Market (CDOM) for January was 55, or 51.8% less than the same time last year. Over the last five years, the average DOM was 132 for January. The median sale price for the Lower Shore dropped a little in January to $255,000 which is still 13.3% higher than this time last year. “January and February are always slower months for home sales on the Eastern Shore, but I am concerned that as spring approaches we are not going to have the inventory we need to satisfy the home buyers looking to move to our

Monkee’s of Ocean City owner Michelle Fager, fourth from left, is joined by supporters and Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce representatives at last Friday’s ribbon cutting for the new Monkee’s of Ocean City boutique on 59th Street. Photo by Terri French

area,” said CAR President Joni Martin Williamson. “Spring and summer are always our busiest seasons, and if we don’t have the inventory we will lose home buyers and businesses to other markets.” Williamson added, “We only have a month and a half of inventory right now, and that is way below what we would like to see for a healthy market. Home prices have gone up. which is great for homeowners and sellers, but without new inventory, it’s going to be harder for first-time homebuyers to enter the market. Local and State governments should be doing everything they can to stimulate new construction to make sure our area stays affordable and available for new residents.”

Bank Announces Promotion OCEAN CITY – John W. Breda, President and CEO of The Bank of Delmarva, recently announced Mark Gosnell was promoted within the corporation. Gosnell joined the MARK bank in 2019 and was GOSNELL recently promoted to the role of Assistant Vice President-Network Engineer. He previously worked as Network Engineer-Assistant Cashier. He has aided the bank in network installation and configuration, server migration, VOIP phone systems, and hardware and software applications.

New Website Launched SALISBURY – Wicomico County State’s Attorney Jamie L. Dykes has announced the launch of a new website at www.wicomicostatesattorney.com. The website incorporates easy to access resources for those navigating the criminal justice system with community stories and information about the great work of the Office of The State’s Attorney. Every year the Office of The State’s Attorney handles more than 30,000 cases, affecting an untold number of people’s lives. The website provides not only useful information on the court process, but also the human stories that walk through the doors of 309 E. Main Street in Salisbury every day. “In a time when our community is asking for more transparency, openness in process and ease in communication, the Office of The State’s Attorney is proud to open our digital doors,” said State’s Attorney Jamie Dykes. “We couldn’t be more excited to share this engaging resource with our community. In today’s world, stories and information are shared across many platforms. This website incorporates all of them. From frequently asked questions about the court process, to heartwarming videos about the everyday heroes who have the privilege of working in this building, to social media applications and more, this website helps demonstrate what we do and who we SEE NEXT PAGE

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. . Business News

March 5, 2021

are.”

Two Firm Promotions

SALISBURY – George, Miles & Buhr, LLC (GMB) announced the promotion of Andrew J. Lyons, Jr., to Vice President/Sr. Project Manager as well as welcomed Lyons as a new owner of the firm. Lyons began his career with GMB’s Seaford, Delaware office in 2003 after earning a Bachelor of Science Civil Engineering degree from the UniversANDREW J. ity of Delaware. In his LYONS nearly 18-year career, he emerged as a leader in our Civil/Municipal Engineering Group. Lyons will now manage the Seaford office operations. Lyons has expertise in municipal street and utility restoration, ADA design, sewer and water systems, wastewater treatment, storm drainage and storm sewers, site design, and highway entrance design. He is also experienced in construction inspection, having served as Resident Project Representative (RPR) for upgrades at Pocomoke City’s wastewater treatment plant. Currently, Lyons serves the Town of Millville as town engineer, assisting the town with a wide variety of projects, in-

Strategizing When To “Buy Low”

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

cluding the recently completed Evans Park at Millville. He is also working with the Town of Millsboro and the Town of South Bethany on street improvement projects. Lyons is a lifelong resident of Sussex County and a 1997 graduate of Indian River High School. A native of Millville, he now resides in Dagsboro with his wife and three children. He is active in community organizations, including serving as Past Master of Doric Lodge #30 AF & AM in Millville, as well as helping to bring sports opportunities to local youth of all backgrounds through the Ball 4 All Foundation. GMB also announced the promotion of Dean B. Culver to Construction Services Group Leader. Culver joined GMB in 2014 with over 20 years of prior construction inspection experience. He has worked on a variety of municipal infrastructure projects throughout the Delmarva Peninsula. Culver holds a certification from NASSCO’s Inspector Training and DEAN B. Certification Program CULVER (ITCP) and is a Delaware Certified Construction Reviewer (CCR). He is currently overseeing the southerly extension of water and sewer utilities for the Town of Millsboro, Delaware, as well as scheduling Construction Services Group resources. Culver is a 20-year high school football official in Delaware and a softball coach at Laurel High School. He resides in Laurel, Del., with his wife and two daughters.

Wealth Of Knowledge

BY COLLIN MACOMBER

SPECIAL TO THE DISPATCH

BERLIN – The beginning of the year is typically full of hope. We make New Year’s resolutions, and it may take a few months for our enthusiasm (and vigilance) to wane. There’s also the “January Effect,” when the stock market generally gets a performance boost thanks to tax harvesting in December and subsequent reinvestments. But even that phenomenon tends to fade. When it comes to investing in the stock market, we recommend a strategic approach. First, you want to consider COLLIN your big picture — which MACOMBER includes how you ultimately want to use accumulated assets (e.g., college tuition, retirement) and when you’ll need them. You also want to make sure you don’t take on too much risk, so that requires a strategic asset allocation across a diverse group of investments. Finally, one of the basic tenets of stock investing is to buy low and sell high. We can help with these tactics. We expect 2021 to be an interesting year. Assuming wide distribution of COVID-19 vaccines and successful containment of the virus, the economy should get back on track. But as we saw in 2020, even the coronavirus didn’t have a long-

Page 29

term impact on the stock market. Merrill Lynch sees a broad market uptrend in 2021. In equities, the money manager sees upside in cyclical sectors (e.g., financials, materials, industrials), U.S. small-cap value stocks and emerging markets — which are supported by the continued downtrend in the U.S. dollar. Bear in mind that while some of these investments pose higher risk, they also follow the tenet of buying low and selling high. The key is to find stocks that are currently selling at low prices but have the potential to rise given the current economic environment, market trends and individual company fundamentals. When rebalancing, if prices seem too high to reinvest, don’t be hesitant to hold cash for a short time. Investment legend Warren Buffett maintained a highly liquid allocation over the past year, but he did so in preparation to pounce on good buying opportunities. On the other hand, there are times when buying low may not be advisable. For example, airline stocks continue to struggle despite congressional relief. Industry experts predict that revenues are unlikely to return to pre-pandemic levels for several years. Note that stocks tend to rise on positive news, especially if that news shows some promise of economic growth. (The writer is an investment advisor with Key Financial Services. The entire KFS team can be reached at 410-629-0357.)


... Foreign Workers’ Availability For Summer Unknown

Page 30

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

FROM PAGE 4 the end of this month as scheduled. Even if the proclamation is allowed to expire, there are questions on whether the foreign embassies and the State Department can process applications fast enough to help Ocean City’s labor market this summer. As a result, hospitality and exchange program advocates, including the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce and the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association (OCHMRA) locally, have embarked on a letter-writing campaign to the president urging him to revoke Proclamation 10052, or at the very least, let it expire on March 31. While the March 31 expiration date is still not ideal, it would set the clock in motion the process to bring a significant number of foreign studentworkers to Ocean City. There are significant issues to resolve for that to happen, making the revocation of Proclamation 10052 extremely timely. The student-workers have to obtain their J-1 visas and work with sponsor organizations to secure employment and obtain housing. The latter is getting tricky in Ocean City. Many of those who rent seasonal housing to the foreign student-wor-

kers are, or soon will be, forced to make decisions on whether to rent their properties long-term or other alternatives. To that end, the Alliance for International Exchange this week sent out an action alert urging advocacy groups to join their letter-writing campaign to Biden and the State Department to revoke Proclamation 10052 immediately, thereby easing the restrictions on the summer work and travel programs. The organization provided a stock letter which representatives of advocacy groups can sign. It also provided an opportunity for organizations and associations such as the chamber and the OCHMRA, for example, to localize their responses to the president. “I am writing to urge you and your administration to ease travel restrictions for exchange participants to help prevent the current crisis from worsening dramatically in 2021,” the stock letter reads. “The international exchange community has been significantly impacted by the pandemic.” The Alliance for International Exchange’s stock letter to the president asserts easing the travel ban for seasonal workers can be accomplished safely while protecting all involved as COVID

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wears on. “I support efforts to protect the health and safety of everyone involved in making exchange programs possible, including consular affairs officers,” the stock letter reads. “I believe that the U.S. Department of State can achieve those goals while also easing the travel restrictions for exchange programs.” Ocean City HMRA Executive Director Susan Jones took the opportunity to localize the issue in her letter to the president. Jones pointed to the severe labor shortage in Ocean City last year that curtailed hours of operation for many businesses in the height of the summer season and even forced some to close. “In our resort community of Ocean City, we typically have 12,000 seasonal positions to fill,” the HMRA letter reads. “By sheer numbers, our population does not offer us the opportunity to fill these positions, and now with Americans enjoying their unemployment checks, we are in a crisis to fill seasonal jobs.” A statement from the Intrax Cultural Exchange and Educational Program, a sponsor organization that facilitates the J-1 program locally, also points out Biden’s actions last week stopped short of

easing the travel restrictions for summer seasonal workers in Ocean City. The organization praised the president’s action last week, but pointed out the revocation did not include the J-1 visas so important to the resort. “While this is great news, it’s important to point out that this currently affects only immigrant visas,” the statement reads. “Non-immigrant visas, such as H2-B and J-1 work and travel visas are not included in this. The visa ban on non-immigrant visas is still set to expire March 31, but we are hopeful that the advocacy efforts of the sponsor community will result in the ban being lifted, or at least being not extended.” The Intrax statement also pointed out the growing concerns for adequate housing for the seasonal workers, but holds out hope for the 2021 season. “Housing is definitely going to an issue for our participants this year and we will have to limit the number of participants that we can place in Ocean City unless the host companies are able to assist in providing or locating housing,” the statement reads. “It’s going to be a struggle, but we are still hoping for summer 2021 to be a great year for all.”

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Coalition Aims To Spotlight Bike, Pedestrian Activities

March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

and pedestrian activity in Worcester, but that it didn’t seem to be connected,” she said. “There wasn’t a lot of cross-conversation and planning.” With Carozza’s help, ESIMBA reached out to Worcester County Recreation and Parks. And by May, an online survey was sent to stakeholders in Worcester County about their interest in joining a coalition where they could share relevant information and collaborate on project plans. “We started reaching out to the towns, and then the nonprofits, that had some sort of event or project related to bike and pedestrian activity,” she said. With a positive response, the Worcester County Bike and Pedestrian Coalition held its first meeting last June 25, with Stevens, Denk and Worcester County Recreation and Parks’ Derek Jarmon serving as co-chairs. Since that time, the group has grown to 20 members, including representatives from the towns of Berlin, Snow Hill and Pocomoke, the Worcester County Health Department, Lower Shore Land Trust, and Worcester County Development Review and Permitting, to name a few. “It’s really a public-private partnership,” Stevens said.

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – A new coalition is bringing together towns and agencies to improve bike and pedestrian resources in Worcester County. Since June, members of the Worcester County Bike and Pedestrian Coalition have been hard at work sharing information and supporting projects that promote bike and pedestrian infrastructure and activities. “We started with a primary focus of a safety coalition,” Co-Chair Patti Stevens said. “But we are broadening to be supportive of fun, economically positive events that are supportive of biking.” In February 2020, Stevens – an Ocean Pines resident and Eastern Shore representative of the Maryland Bike and Pedestrian Advisory Committee – accompanied Eastern Shore International Mountain Biking Association (ESIMBA) President Tres Denk to Bike Lobby Day in Annapolis, where they met with Senator Mary Beth Carozza to discuss ways to expand bike and pedestrian resources on the Eastern Shore. “We told her there was a lot of bike

Page 31

Coalition members agreed that collaboration would likely improve competitiveness for grant funding and that all would benefit by sharing expertise and prioritizing projects. To that end, the group began to focus their efforts on supporting shoveland program-ready projects. Through the coalition’s efforts, Stevens said, ESIMBA was able to work with the county’s recreation and parks department to expand its youth bike safety course. The group was also able to support grant applications for local trail development projects and develop plans for community bike rides. “May is National Bike Month, and we plan to have a series of community bike rides about five to 10 miles in length …,” she said, noting events would take place in Berlin, Ocean Pines, Snow Hill and Pocomoke. “We’ll also use the event to remind riders of safe biking practices.” The coalition will also be involved in the upcoming Maryland Coast Bike Festival on May 8. Stevens noted the development of trails and events not only promote bike and pedestrian activity, but tourism and economic development as well. “The coalition a community partner in

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that event to showcase what a great place this is to visit and live,” she said. As efforts to promote bike and pedestrian resources advance at the county level, Stevens said the coalition is eager to partner with outside agencies. In her role as an Eastern Shore representative of the Maryland Bike and Pedestrian Advisory Committee, Stevens said she has been able to form a network of bike and pedestrian advocates throughout the nine shore counties. “We look forward to improving those connections, not only in Worcester County but through the shore,” she said. “We can learn from each other.” For more information, or for volunteer opportunities, visit the coalition’s Facebook page, or email patti59.stevens@gmail.com. Coalition meetings are held on the third Wednesday of the month from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. “There’s been a huge growth in both biking and walking …,” Stevens added. “There’s been a doubling in both the number of people and in the number of miles people are riding, even in the off season … We want to respond to that and prepare for it by making our community safer for those people.” MVA LICENSED

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Josephine J. Smith BERLIN – Josephine J Smith, [Jo] died on Feb. 23, 2021 following a 22-year battle with cancer. She was born Mazie Josephine Mills in Parkersburg, W.Va. on Dec. 8, 1939 to Herbert and Dorothy [Davis] Mills. Her parents were divorced when she was very young. She lived with her Davis grandparents and then her Mills grandparents. She was adopted by her paternal aunt, Mazie [Mills] and Charles Johnson, at age JOSEPHINE 15. She lived in Japan J. SMITH for one year and then returned to the DC area. She attended Frostburg State Teachers College where she met and married Charles D. Smith, Jr. They recently celebrated their 61st wedding anniversary. Jo was preceded in death by her natural and adopted parents and two sisters, Carolyn Harmon and Barbera Sue Morrison. She is survived by two children, Teresa Wheatley (Elsworth) and Gregory Smith (Cynthia). She leaves four super

Obituaries

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

grandchildren, Sarah, Pamela and Lillie Smith and MaryJo Wheatley. Her siblings include Martha Mills, Carren Julian, Kenny Hartley, Lonnie Hartley, David Mills, Chris Johnson [Rosalie] and Steve Johnson. Jo worked at Baltimore County Recreation and Parks and Wicomico County Recreation and Parks Jo loved family, nature, cooking, friends and travel. She and Charles took 15 cruises including one river boat cruise in Europe. They also took four, 90-day, cross country trips, including driving to Alaska. They visited all 50 states, over 15 islands and 20 foreign countries. And Charles bragged he was married to the best cook east of the Mississippi. She was also an excellent bridge player. Jo also supported the Optimist International [OI] organization. She loved the programs they supported and were “friend of youth”. She worked with Char-

les for over 50 years to support OI. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations be made to the Ocean City/Berlin Optimist Foundation scholarship endowment funds. Make checks out to Optimist Foundation Endowment and add Jo Smith to the memo line. Mail to OC/Berlin Optimist, P O Box 1403, Ocean Pines Md. 21811. There will be no service or reception at this time. Arrangements are in the care of Eastern Shore Cremation and Funeral Service, 504 Franklin Avenue, Berlin, Md. 21811. To send condolences to the family, please visit www.easternshorecremation.com.

Donald A. Pelletier OCEAN CITY – Donald A. Pelletier, 76, of Ocean City, went to be with the Lord on Feb. 20, 2021. Don was born in New Britain, Conn. on July 28, 1944 to Donald and Alice Pel-

March 5, 2021 letier. He was preceded in death by his parents and his sisters, Jerry and Joan. He is survived by his loving wife of 39 years, Diane K. Pelletier. Don is also survived by a large and loving extended family in Connecticut. A Marine Corps Veteran and Purple Heart recipient, Don “Pell” Pelletier served honorably in Vietnam, and was a proud Marine throughout his life. Don was a wine connoisseur and an accomplished professional in the food and beverage DONALD A. business where he found PELLETIER joy in sharing his knowledge with friends and colleagues. A legend in the hospitality industry, Don helped many restaurants with their wine lists. A decision on a particular wine would be final. Owners and managers bragged that he had written their wine list. Although he had worked at other places in Ocean City, he found his true passion in his 42 years at Fager’s Island. If you were lucky enough to have Don as a friend you were extremely fortunate. His loyalty was unquestioned. Friends would seek out Don’s advice on many issues and they could count on a direct opinion. You always knew exactly where he stood on any subject. There was no gray area with “Pell.” On any given day he could be found shooting the breeze with a cast of characters at Ocean City’s favorite places. He brought his unique sense of humor to every story he told. Always well respected among his peers, his friends included people from all walks of life, from around the globe. Don would never hesitate to remark about the significance of his marriage to Diane. Time after time he would say, “I have Diane to thank for that”. Everyone knew them as “Don and Di”. There was no Don without Diane. Years ago, Don had a reconciliation with God which led to a mecca to the Holy Land and a lasting relationship with the Lord. This along with daily mass had a profound influence on Don’s outlook toward life. He fought a valiant fight against cancer with dignity and grace. He was special to all who knew him and he has left an everlasting mark on the history of Ocean City – a town he truly loved. RIP dear friend, we already miss you. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Macky and Pam Stansell House Coastal Hospice, 1500 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Md. 21811. Condolences may be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

Gary Lynn Lough OCEAN CITY – Gary Lynn Lough “Poncho” passed away Feb. 2, 2021 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. He was born in Baltimore on May 21, 1953. Ocean City was his home for the last 40 years. He worked at The Dutch Bar on the Boardwalk as well as several local hotels over the GARY LYNN LOUGH years. He will be missed by some family members and his Ocean City family and his many friends. We love you and God Bless you. A memorial service will be held at a later date.


OC Film Festival Entrants Now Available Online

March 5, 2021

OCEAN CITY – Many live workshops and question-and-answer sessions are available at no charge to the general public as part of the 5th Annual Ocean City Film Festival, streaming now through March 11. Included are free live question-and-answer sessions with the filmmakers as well as a free live workshop with an Eastern Shore connection. In 2001, the historic town of Berlin, was chosen as the location for a new Hollywood film, “Tuck Everlasting.” The movie crew that came to Berlin that year included Steve and Lorrie Walker, current Lewes, Del. residents, who were prop masters on the film. The Walkers will live stream a free workshop during the film festival about their Berlin experiences and also their work in the film industry in and around Baltimore for more than 30 years. The free workshop, entitled “Props: The Little Things That Make a Movie Work,” is scheduled for Tuesday, March 9, 4-5 p.m. at https://watch.eventive.org/ocmdfilmfestival2021/live. Beginning in the early 1980s, the pair designed, constructed, and dressed sets for hundreds of television commercials and small films. In the 1990s, they moved on to work predominantly as property masters on feature films and television series including “Homicide,” the D.C. location filming of “The West Wing,” and movies by John Waters, Barry Levinson, and Bruce Beresford. Four of the movies — “Clara’s Heart,” “Silent Fall,” “Swimmers,” and “Tuck Everlasting” — were shot mainly on the Eastern Shore. Steve Walker was also an extra in “Tuck Everlasting,” portraying the card dealer, a small role that depended on his props knowledge of how the cards should be played. This year marks the 20th anniversary of filming in the town, according to Ivy Wells, director of Berlin’s Chamber of Commerce, where the movie runs in a loop at the Visitor’s Center. The free props workshop and the free live Q&A sessions will stream as part of the Ocean City Film Festival, which runs from March 4-11 with live stream opportunities spread out throughout the week. To see a full schedule of workshops and to access them live, go to https://watch.eventive.org/ocmdfilmfestival2021/live. Festival tickets and passes are on sale now at OCMDFilmFestival.com or by calling 410-524-9433. Prices allow customization to create a personal viewing experience. Tickets start at $10 per feature film or film block. Multi-film passes are also available: 6 features and/or film blocks, $49; 13 features and/or film blocks, $99. All-access passes are $149.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 33

Students Excel In Writing Contest: The Eastern Shore Literacy Association (ESLA) announced 14

Worcester Preparatory School students earned finalist status in the Young Authors Contest for short story or poetry. Each finalist finished in the top three of their respective category/grade level. Pictured, from left, are Charlize Damouni, first place, grade one, poetry; Isabella Brueckner, second place, grade one, short story; Serena Jaoude, first place, grade two, poetry; Madelyn Bobenko, third place, grade two, short story; Lea Jaoude, first place, grade three, poetry; Ellie Phillips, third place, grade five, poetry; Rani Yonker, third place, grade five, short story; Gabriella Damouni, second place, grade six, poetry; Mia Jaoude, second place, grade six, short story; Jude Damouni, third place, grade seven, short story; Landon Schul, second place, grade eight, short story; Sara Freih, second place, grade nine, poetry; and Madi Nechay, third place, grade nine, poetry. Not pictured was Ryan Shipp, first place, grade five, short story. Submitted Photo


Page 34

Fenwick Acquires Police Vehicles

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – Citing recent challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, Fenwick Island will move forward with the purchase of an additional patrol vehicle. The Fenwick Island Town Council voted last month unanimously to purchase a pre-owned patrol vehicle from Delaware State Fleet at a cost of $10,000. Fenwick Island Police Department Chief John Devlin told officials the additional vehicle would reduce officer exposure to COVID-19, as officers were currently sharing patrol cars. “Because of COVID, and sharing cars, we’ve had two incidents with our officers,” he said. “One had COVID and another was out due to COVID. The officers were sharing the same vehicle. So I looked around to see if I could find something that worked for us that would be cost effective.” Devlin told officials the town had originally planned to purchase a new patrol vehicle. However, the expenditure was removed from the budget in response to possible shortfalls resulting from the ongoing pandemic. “A new vehicle would normally cost us $46,000 to completely get it ready and on the street,” he said. While the pre-owned vehicle has a price tag of $10,000, Devlin told officials last week the installation of a mobile radio, partition and computer stand would

March 5, 2021

add $9,000 to the cost. He said it still represented a savings of $27,000. “If we ordered a new car in the next budget in August, we wouldn’t see it until January or February of next year …,” he added. “For the cost, I think this is worth looking into.” With no further discussion, the council voted unanimously to approve the purchase of the patrol vehicle. “I think it’s pertinent to look into this idea, separating officers for their safety,” Devlin said. The police chief last week also presented the council with an update on the town’s acquisition of free vehicles through the Law Enforcement Support Office (LESO) program. By way of background, the LESO program allows the transfer of excess Department of Defense equipment – from clothing and office supplies to vehicles and rifles – to law enforcement agencies across the country. And earlier this year, the town was provided an opportunity to acquire free vehicles – a high-water vehicle, a Humvee, a Ford F150 pickup truck, a Kubota Mule all-terrain vehicle and a backhoe – through the program. “We did obtain three of the four vehicles. We did not get the backhoe …,” Devlin told the council last week. “We did obtain the Hummer, we did obtain the five-ton truck for rescues, and an F-150 pickup truck.” Devlin added the town was still in the process of registering the three acquired vehicles.

Efforts To Improve Drainage Continue BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – Officials say efforts are ongoing to improve drainage issues in Fenwick Island. In a meeting of the Fenwick Island Infrastructure Committee last month, Public Works Manager Mike Locke told members a recent inventory of stormwater infrastructure had revealed damaged valves at all of the town’s bayside street ends. “The conclusion we came to is they all need to be replaced,” he told committee members. “A lot of the flappers were either broke or different types of mollusk keep getting inside and allowing the flapper to not property close.” While new valves have been ordered, Locke said the public works department had yet to install them. “Because of the way this fall went, we haven’t gotten to installing all of them, or even any of them,” he said. “But we plan on getting those installed.” What started as an update on the town’s valve project however, turned into a larger discussion about the town’s drainage system. Officials highlighted several streets prone to flooding. “We’ve wrestled with this for a while and it’s a constant concern of the residents in town …,” said Councilman Bernie Merritt, committee chair. “Every street has its own problem.” On West Farmington Street, for ex-

ample, officials say drainage issues contribute to standing water near Our Harvest restaurant. Town Manager Terry Tieman noted the town had worked with various engineering companies to try and fix the problem. “We’re at sea level,” she said, “and that’s the problem.” Locke agreed, noting that drainage pipes leading to the bay were often submerged. “During normal tides half of the pipe is submerged in the water, so we have a separate issue of the pressure of the canals and the bay forcing or not allowing the water from the roads to discharge properly,” he said. “The problem is you can’t raise them like you should be because you lose the very minimal grade you have. The backflow preventers should help with that.” Officials said a comprehensive plan developed by engineers would take the town’s various drainage issues into consideration. Councilman Bill Weistling noted that the town had completed 19 separate drainage projects, totaling 2,300 linear feet of work, since 2014. “The town of Fenwick Island is the only town in the state of Delaware where 100% of all the properties are in the flood zone, so it’s a very difficult project,” he said. “I think public works has been doing an excellent job and Terry with the engineers … It’s going to be an ongoing process.”


High Court Rules Text Messages Acceptable Evidence

March 5, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – A Virginia Beach man, convicted last March by a Worcester County jury of possession with intent to distribute heroin and sentenced to eight years, had his bid for a new trial denied this week by the Maryland Court of Special Appeals. Last March, David Russell, now 50, of Virginia Beach, was found guilty of possession with intent to distribute heroin and sentenced to eight years after a large quantity of the drug was discovered concealed within the dashboard of his vehicle during a routine traffic stop on Route 113 in Berlin. Russell appealed the conviction and sought a new trial, asserting the state erred by admitting text messages on his phone as evidence. This week, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals disagreed and upheld Russell’s conviction. Around 4:50 p.m. on Aug. 28, 2019, Worcester County Sheriff’s deputies initiated a traffic stop on a vehicle on Route 113 north of Berlin because Russell was using his cell phone while driving. According to police reports, Russell was sweating profusely, and his hands were shaking during the stop, leading the deputies to believe criminal activity was afoot. The deputies issued a warning to Russell for using his cell phone while driving and asked him if they could search the vehicle. Russell consented to the search, according to court documents. During the search, deputies recovered a digital scale, some small tools and two mobile phones. The detectives also searched a portion of the dashboard near the radio that appeared to have been altered. Behind the panel, the detectives located a white, cloth drawstring bag that contained two small rectangular items wrapped in newspaper and secured with tape. Inside the newspaper, the detectives discovered 99 small bags of heroin. Each of the bags had the words “alien rock” written on them, according to court documents. At that point, Russell was arrested and charged with possession with intent to distribute heroin. Forensic analysis of the cell phones recovered during the search revealed text messages that appeared to be incriminating. According to court documents, one text message said, “Bro Mike, you not gonna believe that I just found them alien rocks that I thought old.” Another incoming text message said, “I need B.” Yet another text message said, “Remember what I was saying about the dude that fixed my car? It wasn’t true. I didn’t retrieve everything that I thought. I thought I retrieved everything, but I didn’t.” Based on the amount of heroin recovered behind a hidden panel in the vehicle, and the forensic analysis of the cell phone text messages, a Worcester County jury found Russell guilty of pos-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

session with intent to distribute heroin. He was later sentenced to eight years in jail. On appeal, Russell asserted the Worcester County Circuit Court abused its discretion by admitting text messages as evidence. In particular, Russell asserted on appeal the incoming text message “I need B” could have had several different meanings. During trial, the Worcester County Sheriff’s detectives testified the “B” in the incoming text message was street slang for heroin, which is often packaged for distribution in bundles, or “B.” However, Russell asserted on appeal the text message could have had other meanings, and that the admission of that message, and other text messages found on the recovered cell phone, should not have been admissible as evidence. The appeals court did not see it that way.

“Russell asserts that the text message ‘I Need B’ is not relevant because it does not increase the likelihood that Russell distributed heroin or any other controlled dangerous substance,” the opinion reads. “Russell posits that ‘B’ could have referred to any number of things and that testimony presented regarding the likely meaning of ‘B’ was mere speculation. We disagree.” The appeals court determined Russell’s effort to seek a new trial was unfounded because the evidence presented at trial was sufficient for the conviction. “We agree with the state that the challenged text message is relevant because it makes it more probable that Russell possessed the heroin recovered from his vehicle with the intent to distribute it,” the opinion reads. “When considered within the context of the other evidence presented in this case, we

Page 35

are more than satisfied that the text message satisfies the low bar for a relevance determination.” The high court determined the evidence presented, including the 99 bags of heroin recovered behind a hidden panel in the dashboard, along with the text messages and a recorded call from jail, were sufficient and denied Russell’s request for a new trial. “The recorded jail call and text messages provided further support for Russell’s conviction,” the opinion reads. “In the record jail call, Russell stated that he thought he retrieved everything, but he didn’t. In the context of the other evidence presented, a jury could have interpreted this statement to mean Russell had previously had more heroin in his vehicle, retrieved some, and left 99 small bags that were ultimately recovered during the search of the vehicle.”

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Page 36

Berlin Lions Club members Russ Barrett and Wes McCabe packed containers for the carryout only model of this year’s sausage sale.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

People

By Jeanette Deskiewicz

FEATURING THOSE HELPING CAUSES IN THE RESORT AREA

Bea Huber (Fager’s Island) came over to help Michelle Fager (owner) and Delaney Manning (general manager) set up for their grand opening ribbon cutting for Monkee’s of Ocean City.

In Society

March 5, 2021

It was a family affair at the Berlin Lions Club Sausage Sale with Amy, Rick, Matthew, and Nancy Holland working the carryout window.

Coming out to congratulate Delmarva Health thru CBD on one year of business were Loretta Kletzli and Berlin Councilmember Shaneka Nichols.

Ocean City Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Lachelle Scarlato and new Ambassador Madelyn Dieffenbach were on hand for the Monkee’s of Ocean City ribbon cutting.

Nothing was going to stop Jack Mumford and Joe Andrews from cooking up their infamous sausage sandwiches for the Berlin Lions Club annual fundraiser.

Representing our state legislators at the Monkee’s of Ocean City ribbon cutting were Pat Schrawder (Senator Mary Beth Carozza) and Dave Wooten (Comptroller of Maryland).

Off The Hook Restaurant Group provided the food for the Fire & Ice Festival Tour de Fuego with Sabrina Buchanan and Toni Lovatch serving crab bisque.

Lord’s Landscaping employees Dennis Norwood and Sam Michels greeted attendees of the Fire & Ice Festival Tour de Fuego to benefit Santa’s Letters.

Delmarva Health thru CBD owners Dawn and Nathan Gears recently celebrated one year at their location in the Healing Arts Center of Berlin.


The Dispatch Classifieds

March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

$15/Week For Minimum Of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available)

HELP WANTED LANDSCAPE WORKERS NEEDED: Must have valid DL. Reliable transportation to work. Call 410-641-2177. The Moore Companies, Berlin, MD. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– CONDO CLEANERS: Clean condos in Ocean City. Spring, Summer, and Fall. Lisa’s Cleaning Service. 443-783-5033. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– SMALL ENGINE MECHANIC: Needed for local landscape company in the Bishopville-Berlin area. FT/PT. The Moore Companies. 410-641-2177. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

CARPENTERS & CARPENTERS HELPERS

Must have: Tools, Transportation, Driver’s License

Exp. Required! PATTERSON & SONS BUILDERS

Apply in Person IN THE OF FENWICK

Call 410-641-9530

THE SPINNAKER NOW HIRING FULL-TIME SEASONAL: FRONT DESK HOUSEKEEPING MAINTENANCE/ BELLMAN Daytime & Evening Positions Available

APPLY IN PERSON 1800 Baltimore Avenue Monday-Friday 11am-4pm

BOAT CAPTAIN/MATE - WEST OC PART-TIME MAY-SEPT 2021 Great opportunity for retired Captain or someone qualified looking to make some extra $$$$. Job duties include taking boat owner bay and offshore fishing and cruising on 273 Everglades CC. Would also be responsible for picking up bait and anything else needed for that day. Looking for weekends and some weekdays. Great opportunity for the right person. Call or text 410-404-7118 with your per hour wage offer.

HIRING AT BOTH LOCATIONS ALL POSITIONS INCLUDING MANAGEMENT Apply In Person South Location 31st St. Coastal Hwy. 410-289-2581

I NDI A N RI VER MA R INA NOW HI R ING SUMMER POS I TIONS!

•FUEL DOCK ATTENDANT •DOCK HANDS •RAMP ATTENDANTS

Apply Online at delawarestatejobs.com For additional information, please contact the Marina office at 302.227.3071 AA/EOE

PART-TIME FRONTLINE ASSOCIATE

NOW HIRING - YEAR ROUND EXPERIENCED BARTENDER Now Hiring •ALL KITCHEN POSITIONS

PUT YOUR LOGO IN COLOR FOR JUST $10

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811

Deadline For Insertions, Cancellations And Payment Is 3 p.m. Tuesday. Pre-Payment Is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard. SOUTHSIDE GRILL WOC: Hiring Line Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers. YR, FT or PT. Ambitious, willing to work individuals only. Pay neg. based on performance. 9923 Stephen Decatur Hwy. 410-2131572. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– PARAMOUNT CONSTRUCTION SERVICES: Seeking experienced professionals to join our organization in Ocean City, MD. Applicants should have several years of experience with knowledge of kitchen and bathroom remodeling for residential homes and condominiums. Paramount is currently looking for Project Managers, cabinet installers, tile setters, painters/drywall, electricians, and plumbers. Please call 443-6647689 or send resume to ocjobs@paramountserv.com –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Page 37

Call 410-726-7061 for Interview Work With the Best Ocean City has to Offer ... We Invite You to be a Part of our Family!

Year Round Positions ~ROOM ATTENDANT ~LAUNDRY ~LOBBY ATTENDANT ~OVERNIGHT CLEANER ~HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISOR ~FRONT DESK AGENT ~NIGHT AUDIT ~RESERVATIONS ~PAINTER Seasonal Positions ~SERVER ~BARTENDER ~HOSTESS/HOST ~BUSSER ~FOOD RUNNERS ~POOL ATTENDANT ~WAREHOUSE CLERK ~GRILL COOKS ~BEACH STAND ~SECURITY EXCELLENT BENEFITS! FAX RESUME & SALARY REQ. to: 410-723-9109 Online at www.clarionoc.com APPLY IN PERSON Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. CLARION RESORT FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL 10100 COASTAL HWY. OCEAN CITY, MD. 21842 EOE M/F/D/V

Farmers Bank of Willards has a Part-Time Frontline Associate position available at the Talbot Branch, Ocean City location. Looking for professional and motivated individuals with extraordinary customer service skills. Cash handling experience & excellent computer skills a must. Please send resume to 12641 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD 21842 or email: jennie.rice@fbwbank.com Application cut off is 03-15-2021 “Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirmative Action Employer”

I NDI A N R I V ER MA R I NA I S NO W HI R I NG! •MAINTENANCE •NIGHT WATCH 3PM-11PM SHIFT

•GENERAL CLERICAL

Apply Online at delawarestatejobs.com For additional information, please contact the Marina office at 302.227.3071 AA/EOE


The Dispatch

Classifieds

Page 38

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Attention Independent Cleaning Contractors in the Ocean City area. Coldwell Banker Vacations is looking for experienced, energetic individuals to deliver Truly Remarkable Service by providing quality cleaning services in a limited time window for the 2021 season. Weekend hours, license, insurance, references and a great work ethic required. Smartphone for Cleaning Portal Access.

Contact Kay, Jen or Sue at 410.723.8507 or email cclean@cbvacations.com

WORCESTER COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT SEASONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AIDE Duties include conducting water quality analysis at public swimming pools/spas in Ocean City, Maryland. Some evening and weekend work a possibility. Applicant must be a high school graduate or possess a GED. Valid driver’s license required. Pool Operator Certification preferred. Background check is required. Please send resume and cover letter by March 17, 2021 to Bart Dorsch, 13070 St. Martin's Neck, Bishopville, MD 21813, e-mail bart.dorsch@maryland.gov or fax to 410-352-3369 We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability. Appropriate accommodations for individuals with disabilities are available upon request by calling 410-632-1100 ext. 1221.

POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES NOW HIRING CARPENTERS & PLUMBERS. $1000 SIGN ON BONUS AFTER 90 DAYS! We offer paid training, vacation, and personal days, as well as a quality benefits package including health, dental, vision, and life insurance. Wage is BOE from $12-$30/hour. Based in the Berlin/OC area. What we require: -Min. 4 Years Experience -Valid Drivers License -Reliable Form of Contact -Background Check -Ability to Pass a Drug Test -Positive Attitude & Willingness to Learn

Come Join Our Winning Team!

MAINTENANCE We are looking for motivated individuals to join our maintenance department. Some experience in plumbing, electrical, painting and drywall desired. Prior hotel experience preferred, but not mandatory. We will train the right person willing to learn a skillset. Salary commensurate with experience and skill level. Email resume to jobs@carouselhotel.com or walk in and complete an application at the Front Desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check.

Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

FULL-TIME PERSONAL BANKER Farmers Bank of Willards has a Full-Time Personal Banker position available at the North Ocean City location. Looking for professional and motivated individuals with extraordinary customer service skills. Cash handling experience & excellent computer skills a must. Please email your resume to kelly.drexel@fbwbank.com or call Kelly Drexel at 410-250-1512 Application cut off is 03-15-2021 “Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirmative Action Employer”

RENTALS

SERVICES

WINTER RENTAL: 122nd St., ocean side, 1BR, 1BA condo. Clean, Cozy, Furnished. Non smoking. $700/mo + elec. & sec. dep. Water incl. 443-373-5638. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– YEAR ROUND: 70th St., OC, MD. Avail. in April. Y/R 2nd flr, unfurnished apt., 1 block from ocean. 2BR/1BA, W/D. $1800/mo + util. + 1 mon. sec. dep. req’d. Application and background check performed. Call Denice 443-497-0140. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

NEED KINDLING?: I will crack it at your house. $25/hour. Call Bill at 443-717-1635. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

WEEKLY RENTALS Poolfront Room $215. Efficiency Room $245. 2 BR Apartment $350. 3 BR Suite $400.

Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave.

UPSCALE MIDTOWN OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT: 2,130 sq.ft. No CAM fees. 443-880-2225. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– FOR LEASE: Retail Banking Center with drive thru. Contact Brian Gamm. 443-880-2225. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 1 OfficeRetail and 1 Warehouses. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Currently hiring manpower for

Please apply in person at 11935 Hammer Rd, Bishopville, MD, or apply online: http://allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

Looking for assistant to help with Retro-Fitting Lighting. Electrical knowledge a plus, but not necessary. Part-time to start, but could turn into full-time. Must have own transportation. Call 410-212-3507 for more information.

COMMERCIAL

POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES

Experience Preferred. Tools, transportation & a valid driver’s license are a plus. Competitive benefit package available.

RETRO-FITTING LIGHTING ASSISTANT

410-289-8581

If you feel that you can fill one of these positions, please call us to set up an interview. We can be reach at 410-251-1096.

•STUCCO & EIFS MECHANICS •CARPENTERS •CONCRETE BLOCK •COATINGS SPECIALISTS •FLAT CONCRETE •CONCRETE REPAIRS •PT WELDER •COMMERCIAL CAULKING •WINDOW & DOOR INSTALLERS •WAREHOUSE HELP (DRIVER’S LICENSE REQ’D)

March 5, 2021

NOW HIRING AWESOME PEOPLE

Holding open interviews

EVERY SAT & SUN 11am-2pm

(Starting Feb. 12th-March 19th)

for:

•SERVERS •HOSTS •BUS STAFF •KITCHEN STAFF •SECURITY

Come by and join our 2021 family!

54th ST OCMD 410-723-5565

Behind Chauncey’s Surf Shop

Ceja’s Landscaping & More!

•YARD MAINTENANCE •PAINTING •POWER WASHING 410-251-3425 410-202-2545

YARD SALES HUGE YARD SALE: 7804 Coastal Hwy., OC. (Next to Sheppard Realty Inc.) Saturday 8am-2pm. Furniture, lamps, accessories, clothing, bunk beds, etc. Rain Date Sunday 8am-2pm. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Upcoming Yard Sale? The Dispatch is the BEST way to get the word out!

BOATS PONTOON BOAT WANTED: 27’ Tri-Hull with Trailer. Ocean Pines or surrounding areas. 410-8323824. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

The Dispatch

Legal Notices

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

THIRD INSERTION

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18604

1319 CHEROKEE LANE, BEL AIR, MD 21015 was on, FEBRUARY 09, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of A. LEONARD LENTOWSKI, who died on JANUARY 08, 2021, with a will.

To all persons interested in the estate of A. LEONARD LENTOWSKI AKA ALBIN LEONARD LENTOWSKI, ESTATE NO. 18604. Notice is given that DIANE MURPHY,

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.


Legal Notices

The Dispatch

March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

LEGAL RATES: Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 9th day of AUGUST, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication FEBRUARY 19, 2021 DIANE MURPHY Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 02-19, 02-26, 03-05

THIRD INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000292 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff

vs. DANNY WAYNE MEANS, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 9th day of February, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of March, 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of March, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare

Price

Wk 44, #Ay25 Wk 45, #Ay25 Wk 47, #Ay25 Wk 50, #Ay25 Wk 52, #Ay25 Wk 18, #Bb28 Wk 36, #Bb28 Wk 47, #Bb28 Wk 14, #Bc29 Wk 46, #Bc29 Wk 50, #Bc29 Wk 05, #Bf32 Wk 20, #Bf32 Wk 03, #Bg33 Wk 49, #Bg33 Wk 50, #Bg33 Wk 07, #Bh34

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication FEBRUARY 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 02-19, 02-26, 03-05

THIRD INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000296 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.

11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. LARRY ALLIO, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 9th day of February, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of March, 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of March, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare

Price

Wk 38, #Bh34

$1000.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication FEBRUARY 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 02-19, 02-26, 03-05

THIRD INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000012 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff v. DOROTHY MATCHETT, ET AL. Defendants

Page 39

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES, BORDERLINKS CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN PINES, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000012, the undersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Villas of Ocean Pines, located at, 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Monday, March 08, 2021 at 11:00 a.m., the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Unit Ag7 Am13 Am13 Bb28 Bb28

Time Interval 18 14 49 9 43

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Villas of Ocean Pines, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the

purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Leslie Lobos, Esq., Trustee, at 240-449-8862. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication FEBRUARY 19, 2021 3x, 02-19, 02-26, 03-05

THIRD INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000297 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. JOHN C DREXEL, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 9th day of February, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of March, 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of March, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals:

Timeshare

Price

Wk 17, #Bx50 Wk 36, #Bx50

$50.00 Not Offered For Sale $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 Not Offered For Sale Not Offered For Sale Not Offered For Sale Not Offered For Sale Not Offered For Sale

Wk 43, #Bx50 Wk 46, #Bx50 Wk 47, #Bx50 Wk 52, #Bx50 Wk 02, #By51 Wk 15, #By51 Wk 43, #By51 Wk 44, #By51 Wk 52, #By51

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication FEBRUARY 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 02-19, 02-26, 03-05

THIRD INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000271 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. SHARON PRETTYMAN, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 11th day of February, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of March, 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three suc-


The Dispatch

Legal Notices

Page 40

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

LEGAL RATES

Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. cessive weeks, before the 8th day of March, 2021.

CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN PINES, MD

The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals:

By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000016, the undersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Villas of Ocean Pines, located at, 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Monday, March 08, 2021 at 11:00 a.m., the following timeshare intervals:

Timeshare Wk 20, #Bi35 Wk 40, #Bi35 Wk 05, #Bj36 Wk 08, #Bj36 Wk 10, #Bj36 Wk 14, #Bj36 Wk 19, #Bj36 Wk 18, #Bk37 Wk 47, #Bk37 Wk 48, #Bk37 Wk 04, #B041 Wk 14, #B041 Wk 40, #B041 Wk 41, #B041 Wk 44, #B041 Wk 01, #Bz52 Wk 02, #Bz52 Wk 11, #Cb54 Wk 11, #Cb54 Wk 11, #Cb54

Price $1000.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 Not Offered For Sale $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 Not Offered For Sale $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication FEBRUARY 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 02-19, 02-26, 03-05

THIRD INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000016 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff v. DEBORAH ERTAFA, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES, BORDERLINKS

Condomimium Unit Am13 Bf32 Bg33 Bg33 An14 An14 Br44

Time Interval 19 45 5 7 8 44 7

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Villas of Ocean Pines, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final

ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Leslie Lobos, Esq., Trustee, at 240-449-8862. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication FEBRUARY 19, 2021 3x, 02-19, 02-26, 03-05

SECOND INSERTION

JAMES A. LIST, ESQ. THE LAW OFFICES OF JAMES A. LIST 5700 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 100 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18610 To all persons interested in the estate of JEANNE I. DONOVAN, ESTATE NO. 18610. Notice is given that LESLIE E. DONOVAN, 2403 NORMANDY SQUARE PLACE #E, SILVER SPRING, MD 20906 was on, FEBRUARY 18, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JEANNE I. DONOVAN, who died on JANUARY 16, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 18th day of AUGUST, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, ex-

cept if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication FEBRUARY 26, 2021 LESLIE E. DONOVAN Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 02-26, 03-05, 03-12

SECOND INSERTION

LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE MARIANNA BATIE ESQ 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 18611 Notice is given that the ORPHANS’ COURT of LANCASTER COUNTY, PA, appointed DEBORAH A. MILES, 1405 PENNSCOTT DRIVE, LANDISVILLE, PA 17538 as the EXCUTRIX of the Estate of ROBERT LEE SMITH, who died on OCTOBER 27, 2020, domiciled in PENNSYLVANIA, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is MARIANNA BATIE ESQ, whose address is 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HWY. STE 112, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER. All persons having claims

March 5, 2021 against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

(2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred.

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication FEBRUARY 26, 2021

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MARCH 05, 2021

DEBORAH A. MILES Foreign Personal Representative

FRANCES A. ZIMMERMAN Personal Representative

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 02-26, 03-05, 03-12

FIRST INSERTION

JAMES A. LIST, ESQ. THE LAW OFFICES OF JAMES A. LIST 5700 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 100 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18617 To all persons interested in the estate of SAM B. SMITH JR., ESTATE NO. 18617. Notice is given that FRANCES A. ZIMMERMAN, 12321 FALLS ROAD, COCKEYSVILLE, MD 21030 was on, FEBRUARY 24, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of SAM B. SMITH, who died on JANUARY 23, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 24th day of AUGUST, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 03-05, 03-12, 03-19

FIRST INSERTION

B. RANDALL COATES ESQ. COATES, COATES, & COATES 204 WEST GREEN STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18621 To all persons interested in the estate of EUGENIA HICKMAN PERDUE, ESTATE NO. 18621. Notice is given that JOHN AVERY PERDUE, 6618 SNOW HILL ROAD, SNOW HILL, MD 21863 was on, FEBRUARY 26, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of EUGENIA HICKMAN PERDUE, who died on JANUARY 30, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 26th day of AUGUST, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy


The Dispatch

Legal Notices

March 5, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

LEGAL RATES

Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MARCH 05, 2021 JOHN AVERY PERDUE Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 03-05, 03-12, 03-19

FIRST INSERTION

REGAN J. R. SMITH ESQ. WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18622 To all persons interested in the estate of SANDRA M. QUILLIN, ESTATE NO. 18622. Notice is given that JEHU DIRICKSON QUILLIN III, 11107 CHARLIE DRIVE, BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813 was on, FEBRUARY 26, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of SANDRA M. QUILLIN, who died on DECEMBER 22, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 26th day of AUGUST, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MARCH 05, 2021 JEHU DIRICKSON QUILLIN III Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 03-05, 03-12, 03-19

FIRST INSERTION

MARK H. WITTSTADT, ESQ. JUSTIN HOY, ESQ. QUINTAIROS, PRIETO WOOD & BOYER, PA 1966 GREENSPRING DRIVE, SUITE LL2 LUTHERVILLE-TIMONIUM, MD 21093 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY 409 BONNEVILLE AVENUE POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 21851

By virtue of an Order in the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-20-000321, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction, at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, MD 21863, (Sale will be held at the courthouse door), on MARCH 25, 2021 AT 1:00 PM All that lot or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Pocomoke, in the Election District, Worcester County, State of Maryland, and BEGINNING for the same on the Northeasterly side of Bonneville Avenue at the line of the property now or formerly of Lewis Gunby, and running thence by and with said Bonneville Avenue in a Southeasterly direction a distance of 47 feet and 6 inches the line of the property now or formerly of George H. Long, which was conveyed to him by deed from Quince Ashburn and wife; thence running in a Northeasterly direction by and with said Long land a distance of 85 feet to the line of a certain Johns Sidney Collins to a point a distance of 102 feet from an iron pin driven in the ground on the inside of the sidewalk on Fifth Street, said iron pin being a boundary between the property now or formerly of the said John Sidney Collins and the property now or formerly of Harrison Hargis; thence running in a Northwesterly direction by and with the line of the said Collins property a distance of 47 feet and 6 inches to the line of the property now or formerly of Lewis Gunby; thence running in a Southwesterly direction by and with the line of the said Gunby land a distance of 85 feet to the place of beginning; The improvements thereon being known as 409 Bonneville Avenue, Pocomoke City, Maryland 21851. The property is residential and is believed to be improved by a dwelling. The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable but is offered for informational purposes only. Neither the auctioneer, the Trustee nor their agents or attorneys make any representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy of the information.

Prospective purchasers are urged to perform their own due diligence with respect to the property and the uses thereof, prior to the foreclosure auction. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $2,345.00 in the form of certified check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If the purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of ratification, the purchaser relinquishes their deposit, and the Trustee may file an appropriate motion with the

Page 41 court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Trustee and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 6.375% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Trustee. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or

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homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, (including agricultural transfer taxes, if applicable), documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. If the Trustee is unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Trustee, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MARCH 05, 2021 MARK H. WITTSTADT SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE JUSTIN HOY SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE AUCTION.COM 1 MAUCHLY, IRVINE, CA 92618 3x, 03-05, 03-12, 03-19

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Page 42

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

March 5, 2021

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Art League Continues To Thrive Amid Pandemic Restrictions

March 5, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Despite the challenges of the pandemic, the Art League of Ocean City continued to thrive over the last year with creative, out-of-thebox ideas to reach out to the community and promote the arts. Art League of Ocean City Executive Direct Rena Thaler on Tuesday presented her annual update to the Mayor and Council on the goings-on at the organization’s Center for the Arts complex at 94th Street and all around the resort and region over the last year. In the five decades-plus since the Art League was first formed in a portion of City Hall to the Center for the Arts complex, the organization has steadfastly promoted all of the arts in the resort and has become a cultural hub in Ocean City. This year was a little different for the Art League with limited personal interaction in classes, exhibits, shows and film screenings, for example. Instead, the organization continued its mission in new and creative ways. Thaler said on Tuesday despite the challenges, the Art League exceeded its expectations. “This year has been extremely challenging, just as it has been for all nonprofits,” she said. “What we realized during the pandemic and quarantine is people shut in still needed the arts. Through online classes and social media exhibits, we reached over 800,000 people. In a typical year, about 20,000 come through the building.” Most of the Art League’s activities went virtual during the pandemic, but the organization was able to fulfill its mission of providing a cultural outlet in the resort and beyond. There were thousands of online classes and some properly spaced in-person classes. The Art League continued to present exhibits through social media, screened locally produced films online and at the drive-in movies at the convention center, and the like. The Art League continued its Empty Bowl project and initiated a “Hug Heart Project,” wherein local artists created pieces of art and sent virtual hugs to the staff at Atlantic General Hospital. That was just one of the many initiatives undertaken by the Art League over the last year. Throughout the pandemic, the organization found creative ways to keep its members and the community engaged in much-needed cultural experiences. During COVID, Thaler said the Art League created a “We Made It” cookbook with original art and recipes from members. “Some members found a way to get through the pandemic was painting or cooking and eating,” she said. “We developed a cookbook with different ideas for the arts.” While much of the organizations activities were virtual this year, there was

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

still plenty going on at the Center for the Arts. “We are still open seven days a week with plexiglass panels and social distancing and the wearing of masks,” she said. “We are staying safe, but we’re keeping people engaged in a variety of ways.” In a typical year, the Art League hosts a Sandcastle Tour featuring homes throughout the resort area. During the pandemic, the tour went virtual and actually attracted more visitors. “The virtual Sand Castle tour attracted 1,800 website visits,” she said. “Normally, 1,000 people take the tour. This promotes the Ocean City lifestyle and gives people thinking of buying here and moving here a little glimpse of what life could be like.” Thaler said the challenges of the

last year made her realize the community’s reliance on art and cultural experiences. “This past year has underscored for me how important art is for Ocean City and the community,” she said. “It has given people meaning in their life and a purpose in their life in these difficult times. The arts heal, they relieve stress and they create a connection.” Despite the challenges of COVID, the Art League continued to grow in membership and its various offerings. “I have never seen anything like the growth of the Art League from the day I got involved to where it is today,” she said. “It has become a cultural institution and it has such potential for the town of Ocean City as a driver to tourism. It brings positive publicity and added value to the Ocean City experi-

Page 43

ence. It attracts new audiences of all ages to the resort.” Art League of Ocean City President John Sisson agreed the organization was able to successfully adjust and adapt to the challenges of the pandemic in creative ways. “During the pandemic, it looked like we were going to have to cut back on what we were doing, but we really couldn’t do that,” he said. “We decided to concentrate on our mission and our core values and we redoubled our efforts.” After the presentation, Mayor Rick Meehan praised the Art League for all it does to promote the arts and tourism in Ocean City. “The Center for the Arts exceeds all of our expectations and you continue to do that,” he said.


The Dispatch

Page 44

Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 WEBSITES: www.mdcoastdispatch.com www.facebook.com/thedispatchoc J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

NEWS DEPARTMENT SHAWN J. SOPER Managing Editor ssoper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHARLENE SHARPE Staff Writer/Copy Editor csharpe@mdcoastdispatch.com BETHANY HOOPER Staff Writer bhooper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHRIS PARYPA Photographer

Drone Shows Should Wait A Year In Ocean City The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

March 5, 2021

HOW WE SEE IT

Considerable discussion was held last week on the possibility of adding drone light shows to Ocean City’s special events offerings this summer. These are worthwhile talks, but there is no need to rush this year to fund the $200,000 required to hold eight drone shows over the next two summers. Illuminated drone shows set to music are the rave currently internationally and domestically, and online videos of the shows confirm they are impressive. It would be a wonderful addition to Ocean City’s special events programs and would create a buzz among traditional and social media outlets, but this should be viewed as something to consider for future years. This is not the summer for it. If Ocean City opts to bring in the popular drone shows, we believe it needs to be done within the existing special events budget, meaning events already being planned should be scrapped. Adding $200,000 to this line item would be irresponsible heading into a summer with unknown restrictions on capacity and gathering sizes. According to a budget overview presented to the council last week, the resort will spend about $382,400 for special events in 2021. Along with the $35,000 producer fee to T.E.A.M. Pro-

ductions, the fees are broken down as $115,000 for fireworks shows; $84,000 for five beach concerts; $62,400 for 12 drive-in movies on a LED wall at the Inlet; $23,000 for the ArtX Concert; $23,000 for labor for events; $20,000 for the Memorial Day Big Flag event; and $20,000 for the Octoberfest Halloween activities. The possibility of adding drone shows excited at least a few members of the Ocean City Mayor and Council last week. There was enough interest to ask the promoter to return with budget estimates and specifics on the shows. A rough indication was to expect about $200,000 to produce eight shows over the course of two years. Allocating more funding for special events is unnecessary for 2021. This summer is all about being outside, embracing some traditional summer favorites, like the beach, ocean, bay, fishing, golf and relaxation. There does not need to be a massive investment in funding for special events. The focus does not need to be on value-added events. This summer is about a gradual return to normalcy. There were not as many families here last summer because many were uncomfortable traveling to a crowded place like Ocean City in the summer.

This season does not need drone shows. It’s not going to be a typical Ocean City summer. We should just hope for a great weather season that allows people to be as safe as possible while relaxing on vacation. We expect this summer to be better than last summer on most fronts, but Ocean City needs to be conservative with its planning with many unknowns currently about restrictions and regulations. We need to be realistic about how this summer will progress. President Biden says all adults who want to be vaccinated will have at least their first shot by May. It’s shocking to hear an elected official make an absurd claim like that. We had enough of those empty promises from the previous administration. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan made some bold claims about dates earlier this winter and has subsequently realized impressive vaccination numbers are going to take much longer to achieve based on supply vs. demand issues. We support further pursuing the drone shows for next year as a replacement for some of the fireworks events, but this year we do not need the added attractions. At this point in March, there remains too many unknowns on exactly how special events can be held this summer and under what restrictions.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

SALES DEPARTMENT TERRI FRENCH Account Executive Entertainment Editor terri@mdcoastdispatch.com JEANETTE DESKIEWICZ Account Executive jeanette@mdcoastdispatch.com

ART DEPARTMENT COLE GIBSON Art Director cole@mdcoastdispatch.com DAVID HOOKS Graphic Artist/Webmaster dhooks@mdcoastdispatch.com

BUSINESS OFFICE Bookkeeper/Classifieds Manager classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com

The Maryland Coast Dispatch (USPS #015125) is an official and legal newspaper for Worcester County. Periodical postage paid at Berlin, Maryland, and additional mailing offices. The Maryland Coast Dispatch, 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, Md. 21811, is published weekly on Friday mornings, 52 weeks a year. Subscription rates are $75 per year, $55 for six months. POSTMASTER: Please send change of address to Maryland Coast Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Maryland Coast Dispatch offices are located at Route 346 and Graham Avenue, Berlin, Maryland.

Think Florida Editor: Florida is wide open. Positivity rate is lower than California, which is totally shut down. Schools in Florida have been completely open all year and not one student death in the entire state from COVID-19. What else do we need to know? Open schools, stop canceling events and open Maryland. Let the people decide whether they want to come out or stay home. John Fager Ocean City

Watch Groups Serving OC Editor: “See Something Say Something” Simple words that echo with law enforcement agencies in the country and a potent rallying cry to bring a community together to deter crime. Neighborhood Watch Program was formed to identify and address criminal activity within a community. Ocean City is fortunate to have eight active neighborhood watch groups Bay Shore Drive, Boardwalk, Caine Keys II, Caine Woods, Edgewater Avenue, Little Salisbury, Montego Bay and Sundowner Park.

After a particular trying summer, two Downtown Neighborhood Watch Groups (Boardwalk and Edgewater) held four meetings with business leaders and property owners in the south end of town to develop crime deterring solutions to bolster security and promote public safety for the downtown area. At January and February Police Commission meetings, many of these crime-deterring solutions gained support and will be implemented this coming tourist season (reported in OC Today/Coast Dispatch articles). To join a neighborhood watch group, contact Ashley Miller, deputy communications manager for the Ocean City Police Department. Newt Weaver Margaret Pillas (Weaver is the Boardwalk coordinator, while Pillas is the Edgewater Avenue coordinator.)

BJ’s, Leo’s Will Be Missed Editor: A couple of our favorite places to meet friends and to enjoy great food have closed their doors. So many good times to remember over what seems to be a lifetime in Ocean City. Weren't they always there, in mid-town and on the

north end? Both a popular gathering place, year-round cause the owners and the staff were always so pleasant and welcoming. BJ's had that local bar feeling with a view of the bay and duck feeding daily, add the live bands and what's not to love. The owners Billy and Madeline Carter were always so generous to all the organizations and groups who ask for support in their charity work. They stayed active in all things Ocean City and of course a big hit with their float in the St. Patrick's Day Parade. Leo's was one of the best diner feeling places ever, always welcoming, soft chatter and hot coffee. He made the best homemade vegetable soup and fried chicken (to order) and his rice pudding and the crabs were seasoned just right. A great meal, "Blue Plate" special, (as it was once called) eat in or carry out. You got to dine in a wonderful art gallery of oil paintings, a big collection of artist located in Greece and its surrounding islands. They looked as lifelike as a photograph. "Pete" and his wife are part of a Greek family who own other great restaurants in town. They are very active in the Greek Church. All of us in the area say, “thank you very much.” Nelson and June Kelly Selbyville, Del. SEE NEXT PAGE


March 5, 2021

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Hospice Applauds Support Editor: I would like to bring to your attention an extraordinary effort by our Lower Shore community. In a year like no other, donors came out in full force to support our annual Coastal Hospice “Be An Angel” campaign, contributing a recordbreaking $176,389. As no one is ever turned away because of financial need, this is a crucial fundraising effort. Proceeds offset patient costs that are not covered by Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance and will support our Bereavement Program which is free to anyone in the community. Nearly 1,360 individuals and families donated in support of the drive, almost every one of them in honor of or remembrance of a special person. Eight Angel Trees throughout the region displayed donors’ angel ornaments, showcasing the names of those loved ones. There is no way to thank everyone by name here, although a full list will appear in our next newsletter. We would be remiss, however, if we did not acknowledge the commitment of our longtime media sponsor 47ABC. They host a tree and read many of the names written on the ornaments during the morning news each day, all month before Christmas. We also thank the following organizations for hosting trees: The Atlantic Hotel, Coastal Hospice Thrift Shop, Crisfield Elks Lodge #1044, Crisfield American Legion Post #16, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Hurlock Town Hall and The Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa and Marina. And most importantly, thank you to every Angel who supported the campaign. Rest assured, you have made a difference in someone’s life. Alane Capen Salisbury (The writer is the president of Coastal Hospice.)

Vaccine Website Flawed Editor: Whoever designed the vaccine website doesn't know the meaning of "user friendly." I wasted a few days clicking on "find vaccination clinics" until a friend told me I had to click on the second blue box "find other vaccination clinics." Then you can't click on the sites that have available appointments but you can on the sites with no appointments. There should have been one list for the entire county instead of everyone contacting the health department, hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, Walmart, etc. What I really don't understand is why the state opened up the eligibility list to 65-74-year-olds (of which I am one) before they took care of all of the older people. I know 80- and 90-yearolds who still can't get an appointment. I was on several waiting lists and then AGH called for me to come in for the shot. They were very professional and organized. I have heard other

Between The Lines

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

places are also so thanks to all the health care workers. Dianne Denmark Ocean City

Education Stance Welcomed Editor: On Monday, the U.S. Department of Education issued guidance to states on standardized testing in 2021. Essentially, it made clear that every state was required to administer standardized tests to assess student learning. I am the Black parent of three middle school children, a veteran and I am a co-chair for “We The Parents” in NY. As a parent leader, I want to thank the Biden administration for putting children at the center of the national education discussion. It is imperative that we as parents and communities have a clear understanding of the depth of the educational impact of the pandemic. We cannot address the issues around the massive learning loss until we have a clear picture of where our children are academically. It is rare that politicians at any level, especially the highest level stand firm on promises they make during the campaign. So, bravo President Biden. The educational effects of this pandemic will be felt for the next decade. Especially since Black children in urban school districts are more likely to be in schools that decided to stay fully remote in September of 2020. This is in stark comparison to suburban schools and private schools that were much more likely to open fully in person or in a hybrid model. The most important lesson to take from this statement is that parents need to stay encouraged when speaking up for the children in their communities. Parent leaders from across the country have expressed their concern with the drastic learning loss over the past year. Often met with “we can’t do assessments”, “or it’s not that big of learning loss”, parents have seen the difference in the quality of education and the pace of their child’s learning. The statement from the Biden administration validates what parents have been vocalizing for months. Parents have a voice, and parents have power, we just need to do better at using them both. Duncan Kirkwood Buffalo

To Our Readers: The Dispatch welcomes any and all letters from our readers. All letters are encouraged typed, but not required, and we reserve the right to edit each letter for clarity, accuracy and brevity. Letters should include writer’s name, address and day and evening telephone numbers. If we are unable to reach the writer, we will have to withhold the letter. Due to space restraints, letters under 500 words in length will be given top priority. Letters can be mailed to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811, emailed to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com or faxed to 410-641-0966.

Page 45

By Publisher/Editor Steve Green

During last fall’s election season, all five mayoral candidates in Berlin vowed not to raise property taxes in their first year. Then-Councilman Zack Tyndall said, “I think it’s important for the people to understand that the role of the mayor is to one, set the tax rate, and two, present a balanced budget to the mayor and council. As the mayor you really have a lot of control over the amount of spending that’s done by the municipality. Granted there is going to be council review and input you have to take into consideration, but I didn’t see the necessity of the previous tax increase.” The official public budget process gets underway next week with the mayor’s introduction of the proposed tax rate. Though Tyndall is proposing keeping the same tax rate for the next fiscal year, according to the meeting packet, it’s important to note the same 80-cent rate per $100 of assessed valuation will bring in an additional $101,593 due to property values increasing. To bring in the exact same amount of revenue as last year, the tax rate would need to fall to 77.8 cents. A public hearing on the proposed budget will be held on March 22. A reasonable question from Zoom attendees at the hearing would be what the town is planning to do with the new revenue of $101,593, the result of keeping the tax rate the same when property values increase. Once the vaccines get to the local folks, they appear to be administered in a smart, efficient manner. Those who have bene fortunate enough to get vaccinated report a smooth and efficient process at the clinics offered by the health department, AGH and the pharmacies. The problem, as everyone knows, is there’s just not enough supply getting to Maryland and its jurisdictions. For example, Worcester County on average is receiving about 300 doses a week of the state’s 98,000 weekly allocation. Health officials said this week there is enough manpower and practical ability to vaccinate 3,000 people a week. At the current rate of 300 doses per week (.31% of the state’s total weekly by the way), it will take more than three years to fully vaccinate the 50,000-plus Worcester County citizens. If the supply gets to about the 3,000max weekly distribution, mark, it would take about five months. Complicating those estimates is the one dose vs. two dose requirements, of course. The bottom line is even if the current rate triples it’s going to be next year at the earliest before all county citizens are vaccinated. This is disturbing. At this week’s County Commissioners meeting, issues with vaccine equity were discussed and the elected officials will write the governor’s office again raising concerns. Worcester County Emergency Services Director Billy Birch was blunt with the commissioners. The county is getting screwed by the state. “They’re not listening to the locals,” he said. “There’s jurisdictions that are equal to our size or smaller that are getting more allocations of doses than we’re getting. … The way I can equate it to you, is we have fire trucks but they’re holding back the water. They’re not giving us what resource we’re asking for.” At the end of Tuesday’s press conference, Hogan was asked once again about what he would say to Marylanders who are agitated about the pace of the vaccinations and the severe lack of supply. “Well, I completely understand the frustration. I’m frustrated. Everyone up here is frustrated …,” Hogan said. “There are about a million people who are currently eligible for the vaccine who we cannot schedule for a vaccine. But it’s not about a website or a process. It’s about the fact that there aren’t any vaccines. … the bottom line is, you can’t schedule appointments for vaccines that don’t exist. … It’s not a perfect process, but yes, I’m convinced that everyone is working as hard as they can and we’ve got as good or better a process than anybody else in the country.” On the accountability front, I apologize for a mistake made in this space last week. Along with many others, I wrongly assumed President Biden’s revocation of a proclamation governing travel from foreign countries impacted the summer workers who come to Ocean City each season. Though he did revoke a similar proposition regarding foreign travel, Biden did not touch Proclamation 10052, which shuts down the summer work travel program until March 31. There was hope Biden would revoke this proclamation early in his term based on his pro-immigration take. With the latest COVID relief bill seemingly taking priority currently, Biden does not appear poised to act on this measure. The question now is whether he will simply let the proclamation expire or renew it. If he renews it, the foreign workers will not be here. Most in the know seem to think he will take no action, allowing it to expire. This would be good news for Ocean City, but timing is of the utmost importance. One employer familiar with working with the foreign workers said this week if the proclamation expires and the embassies and the State Department work quickly the resort could see an influx of foreign workers by July. He said he estimated the best-case scenario would be half of the 4,000 typically seen here in a summer. This is better than nothing. The timelines and volume of workers remain a guessing game at this point, but everyone in local tourism is rooting for Biden to revoke the proclamation as soon as possible because a few weeks will make a big difference.


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The Adventures Of Fatherhood By STEVE GREEN

ow hard to push is a constant mental battle with our kids. Expectations are a good thing, but it requires more intestinal fortitude from parents than I ever could have imagined. Though our home dynamic is unique with a kid with Autism, I think it’s true each kid must be parented differently. With our 12-year-old Beckett, maintaining high expectations with him is complicated. One day this week after school he was outside playing football, soccer and skateboarding with friends for more than three hours. It was great to see them enjoying being outside and having fun. When he came inside, we told him it’s time to shift gears, have dinner and do homework. He had other things in mind. He wasn’t hungry and wanted to jump on his phone and Facetime with friends. He made it sound like he needed some downtime. To us, it was bewildering. He needed to kick back and rest before doing his homework and having dinner. We said it was fine for a bit while giggling to ourselves. An hour later, he was still talking with friends, but we insisted he eat dinner. An hour later, he had done some of his homework. An hour later, he had started his last assignment, but it was not completed. By 9 p.m., I had enough of the procrastinating, telling him no more chatting until his homework was done. We later had a long talk on how to go about the after-school time. He abhors these sorts of discussions. We don’t think he should have to walk into the house and do his homework the second he walks in the door (though we had great luck with that when he was little). We know the school environment is challenging for him. Therefore, we agree he needs to get outside and move around.

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It’s about balance. If he works hard at school (and this particular day he had three tests), he should be able to have fun for a while before doing his homework. I don’t think it’s asking too much for him to fit in 45 minutes of homework in between three hours of playing outside and two hours of talking with friends inside before bed. In his tween mind of warped fairness concepts, it’s unreasonable because his friends don’t have as much homework as him and they get to stay online hours past we allow him. He says, “so and so parent’s trust him.” I told him it’s because the boy’s parents are not aware he is texting and calling you at 4 a.m. on a school night. He said again his parents trust him. The conversation goes around and around like this often with our middle school kid. I’m told often this is just how middle school is and advised to just weather the storm of constant battles. I’m looking forward to sunny skies on this front, though I don’t expect us to roll back expectations anytime soon. It’s different with our special needs son Carson, but balance with him centers around independence. I was thinking about this week after dropping him off at school one morning. It was 7:40 in the morning and I had already taken 4,000 steps without working out, according to my FitBit. It was just the morning routine around the house. I realized I am doing too much for him and with him in the morning. He should be able to brush his teeth when he wakes up, get dressed on his own and gather his school belongings. I don’t see a time when he’s making his own lunch, but he could pitch in with making his own breakfast. It’s going to take time, but I am guilty of taking the path of least resistance. It’s easier for me to just do everything because I will do it right. Though it’s helping him in the short term, it’s doing nothing for him in the long run. It

seems to be causing a sense of entitlement. I need to get it together. Aside from the daily exhaustion each morning from all the running around required before school, it hit home recently when Pam and I were watching the movie, “Peanut Butter Falcon.” I fully recommend it if you have not seen it. It’s a 2019 movie about a 22-yearold man, Zak, with Down syndrome who does not have a legal guardian. It chronicles his journey as he runs away from a nursing home where he lives in nothing but his underwear to pursue his dream of attending a wresting school called The Salt Water Redneck. Zak befriends Tyler, a troubled, but kind-hearted, waterman who takes him under his wing and agrees to escort him to the wrestling school. Zak’s caretaker at the nursing home, Eleanor, catches up with Zak and Tyler and insists on returning him to the nursing home where he is safe and can be cared for appropriately. Though blunt and not well spoken, Tyler has an exchange with Eleanor that hit home. It’s a little rough and pardon the language being used but he was convincing Eleanor Zak should not be underestimated. He encouraged her to give him more credit because he can be more independent than she realizes. By the way she has coddled him and micromanaged him, Tyler said, “You might not be saying the word ‘retard’, alright, I’ll give you that, but you damn sure as making him feel retarded. That ain’t going to help his life.” The concept is called “ableism.” It’s certainly unintentional and comes from love, but it’s something I am going to work on starting next week. (The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

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March 5, 2021

Horoscopes

ARIES (March 21 to April 19): You might feel more encouraged about changes in your personal and/or professional life. However, it might be best not to rush things but rather work with them as they evolve. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): The Bovine's business sense is especially keen this week. But remember that it's always best to investigate before investing. Make sure there are no hidden factors that can rise up later on. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): Working on a family project could create tension between and among those concerned. Your good sense and your patience can help reduce bad attitudes and raise positive feelings. CANCER (June 21 to July 22): You should be seeing more progress in the development of your plans and more supporters joining in. News from the past could help change someone's longheld position. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): With personal aspects strong this week, Leos and Leonas might want to spend more time with family and others who are especially close to them. Also expect news of a possible career change. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): Taking a strong stand can be helpful this week. But be careful you don't cross the line into obstinacy. Best to take a position on facts as they are, not as you want them to be. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): You have a strong sense of the needs of oth-

OCEAN CITY vanishing

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

ers. This week, turn some of that sensitivity into an honest self-appraisal, and let it find places where you can help yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): Creating an emotional comfort zone to handle a personal problem helps at first. But by midweek, you'll realize you need to deal with it directly or it could linger for too long. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): Turning the page on a mistake to start fresh might not be the thing to do. Better to go over each step that led up to the decision you made and see which one misled you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): Goats enjoy a varied diet, but eating crow isn't on the menu -- at least not this week. An embarrassing situation might have gone wrong before you got into it. Check it out. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): Your sense of honesty might impel you to speak up about a situation you disapprove of. That's fine. But do so without sounding accusatory. You might not know all the facts behind it. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): Being asked to create a reassuring attitude in the middle of chaos isn't easy, but you can do it. Support for your efforts comes slowly, but it does come. Enjoy an artsfilled weekend. BORN THIS WEEK: Your honesty about people and issues is expressed in a positive, not painful, way. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

Things I Like ...

Page 47

WITH BUNK MANN

In the 1950s, a new town known as Ocean Beach was being promoted on the northern end of Assateague Island about five miles south of Ocean City. The development faced several problems, however, including access — there was no bridge to Assateague in those days and the small ferry could only carry three cars. Another problem was the situation with mosquitoes and greenhead flies on a west wind that could make life unbearable. At its peak, Ocean Beach boasted several miles of paved roads with street signs and power lines in place. By 1961, several hundred lots had been sold and at least 40 homes had been built. This all ended abruptly when a powerful storm in March 1962 left most of the lots under water and destroyed much of the infrastructure. The development of Assateague ended forever when President Lyndon Johnson signed a bill on Sept. 21, 1965 making Assateague a “national seashore.” Today wild ponies graze on the remnants of Ocean Beach. To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishingoc.com. National Park Service photo courtesy of Allen Sklar

The Dispatch Crossword Puzzle

By Steve Green

A school delay on Monday morning Seeing smiling kids leaving school

Thrasher’s after a long walk on the boards Embracing the positives

Learning from the negatives A smooth settlement day

Finding brick when removing a wall Eating with a view of the water

Constructive criticism from a reader At least one nice weekend day

In-depth Sunday newspaper articles

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