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The Dispatch November 27, 2020

Priceless

Serving Greater Delmarva Since 1984

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Sunday Sunrise: The view out to work on Sunday morning was a pretty one for these vessels leaving the Inlet bright and early.

Photo by Tyler Horton Photography

Revised Winterfest Off To Solid Start

Md. To Preserve Land Outside Berlin

White Horse Park Tensions Deepen

See Page 4 • Photo by Matt James

See Page 7 • Photo by Charlene Sharpe

See Page 18 • Photo by Charlene Sharpe


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

SERVING DELMARVA FOR NEARLY 60 YEARS

November 27, 2020


November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Thousands Attend Ocean City’s Modified Winterfest

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

Winterfest of Lights opened last Thursday night to warm temperatures and solid crowds of pedestrians. Photo by Matt James

OCEAN CITY – Blessed by unseasonably balmy weather, the first weekend of the walk-through Winterfest of Lights was an unqualified success with thousands enjoying the modified event. The 47th Annual Winterfest of Lights opened last Thursday with a virtual opening ceremony and tree-lighting. On a typical Thursday before Thanksgiving, thousands would cram into host Northside Park to watch the opening ceremonies, specifically the OC Stars youth singing group from Ocean City Elementary School, but, of course, this year has been far from typical. The annual holiday event, which runs roughly from the week before Th-

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November 27, 2020

anksgiving through New Year’s Day, typically attracts over 100,000 visitors who ride the Boardwalk tram through massive light displays arrayed throughout the vast Northside Park complex. This year, however, because of COVID-19, like so many of the town’s other special events, Winterfest of Lights has been dramatically altered, although the experience thus far has proven to be equally rewarding for many. There is still the massive Christmas tree with its synchronized lights and music and hundreds of large light displays situated around a roughly half-mile loop around the lagoon. This year, however, visitors are enjoying Winterfest of Lights as a walkthrough experience. Earlier this fall, there were discussions about moving forward with Winterfest in its traditional format with the trams while practicing social distancing and following other health department directives. There was even a brief discussion about creating a drive-through Winterfest of Lights experience, although that idea got little traction. There also was discussion about simply cancelling the event this year. However, Special Events Director Frank Miller and his staff came up with the idea of the modified pedestrian event, which opened last Thursday. Just four days into the 2020 event, the modified Winterfest of Lights is a critical success with positive feedback coming from all corners. Miller said the first weekend drew 6,635 visitors, a little less than half of which were on Saturday. With unseasonably warm temperatures last weekend, thousands of visitors got out and enjoyed the modified event. “It was a good start to the event,” said Miller. “Guests seem to enjoy the more intimate walk-through of holiday lights and the ability to do so at a leisurely pace. We’ve had many positive comments on the heavily modified experience. Needless to say, the weather has been a positive factor.” Miller said his department has received numerous calls and emails about the modified Winterfest of Lights, all of them positive. He shared one particular email from a local resident that appears to sum up the sentiments about the walk-through Winterfest. “I wish to extend my thanks to you, your department and all that worked so hard in making the 47th Winterfest of Lights possible,” the resident wrote. “Although I miss the full complement of lights from years past, you and all of those under your direction did an outstanding job of continuing a cherished holiday tradition.” The emailer said she and other members of a local camera club enjoyed the opportunity to walk through the light displays, which afforded them different perspectives than those from a moving tram. She also said it was a SEE PAGE 6


November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Shore Gives More Campaign Features 96 Area Charities

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BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – A local philanthropic organization is encouraging community members to participate in this year’s Shore Gives More campaign. On Tuesday, Dec. 1, the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore will host its annual Shore Gives More campaign. Each year, the organization provides a one-stop donation website for individuals wishing to support participating nonprofits that serve Worcester, Wicomico and Somerset counties. “Both the number of people contributing and the total amount raised have gone up each and every year,” said Community Foundation President Erica Joseph. “People are, in some

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

ways, building this event into their annual giving activities. It’s also been a good way for people to learn about what organizations exist in their community.” Each year, the Shore Gives More campaign coincides with Giving Tuesday, a global day of giving celebrated the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. Using the Community Foundation’s online donation portal – shoregivesmore.org – Joseph said individuals can research organizations and support local nonprofits of their choosing. This year, 96 nonprofits will participate in the Shore Gives More campaign. “Organizations are certainly in a position where financial support is more critical than ever,” Joseph said. “But it

could also be a challenge for people to give this year. We want to encourage as much support and giving as possible because we know the value these organizations bring to the community year-round.” The Shore Gives More campaign was first launched in 2015. In that first year, nearly $7,500 was raised for a few dozen organizations. In 2019, the event generated more than $218,000 in donations for more than 80 local nonprofits. “It’s grown tremendously, and it’s exciting to see people get enthusiastically behind it every year.” Joseph said. As in years past, the online donation portal will be open for 24 hours on Giving Tuesday. Beginning this week, however, participants can schedule

November 27, 2020

their contributions in advance. “If that day is not good for you, you can go online any time between now and then to schedule a contribution,” Joseph said. As local nonprofits contend with volunteer shortages and unanticipated costs related to the COVID-19 pandemic, Joseph said many organizations are struggling. She noted that the Shore Gives More campaign can help. “This year has been particularly stressful for a lot of organizations …,” she said. “There’s been more demand for their services. But at the same time, organizations have had to completely overhaul their operations.” For more information on this year’s Shore Gives More campaign, or to donate, visit shoregivesmore.org. “Even if they can’t participate on this day, we encourage them to keep charitable giving in mind,” Joseph said. “That could mean giving their time or donating items. It can also be doing something as fundamental as helping your neighbor.”

… 6,635 Visitors In First Weekend

FROM PAGE 4 pleasure to see young families walking through the numerous displays out in the fresh air. “I particularly enjoyed the opportunity to walk the park,” she wrote. “Moving at my own pace definitely allowed me to enjoy the experience longer. It was so relaxing to see so many people strolling the park with their dogs, pushing strollers or hand-in-hand with little ones.” Winterfest guests can experience the magic of the holiday season closeup this year. The walking tour contains several surprises along the way. With proper distancing practices in place, visitors still have an opportunity for photos with Santa and his sleigh in the Winterfest gift shop, which has been moved inside the Northside Park facilities this year instead of the traditional tents outside. Visitors are urged to dress appropriately for the weather with this walk-through event and masks are required when social distancing can’t be accomplished. Health checks are required when entering the Northside Park facility gift shop and Santa photo areas. In another departure from the norm, the opening ceremony and tree-lighting last Thursday was done virtually and aired live on Facebook. The hours of operation were also reduced this year. Winterfest is open on Wednesday through Sunday from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Admission is $5 for those 12 and over, and free for those 11 and younger. Tickets can be purchased on-site or online.


State To Buy 673-Acre Tracts For Public Space Outside Berlin

November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Bay Club property, located off Libertytown Road west of Berlin, is pictured before it closed. Photo by Charlene Sharpe BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Plans are underway to turn 673 acres just outside Berlin into public space. The Maryland Board of Public Works on Nov. 18 approved the Maryland Department of Natural Resources’ plan to purchase two parcels — the Bay Club and a neighboring farm — totaling 673 acres. Mayor Zack Tyndall shared the news at Monday’s council meeting. “That has passed the Board of Public Works unanimously so we can look forward to that property adding to the greenbelt that’s in our comprehensive plan and some of the passive use recreational activities that’ll be just right outside the boundaries of the Town of Berlin,” Tyndall said. “That’s good news for everybody.” According to the Nov. 18 Board of Public Works (BPW) agenda, officials were recommending that the board approve the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) proposal to accept assignment from Lower Shore Land Trust of its right to purchase two adjacent parcels totaling 673 acres. According to the meeting packet, the property contains a mix of forests and fields that will be managed by the Maryland Forest Service as an addition to the Chesapeake Forest Lands “for public hunting and trail-based activities such as walking and wildlife observation.” Equestrian trails will also be considered. “One parcel is a former golf course; fairways and fields will be reforested with a diverse mix of tree species to maximize hunting and other recreational opportunities while protecting water quality,” the BPW agenda reads. “Acquisition presents a rare opportunity to preserve a large tract of land in an area of

Worcester County that is experiencing rapid growth.” The price listed for the 437-acre Bay Club is $3,150,000 while the price for the adjacent farm is $1,075,000. Tyndall, on behalf of the town, had written a letter in support of the DNR proposal to the Board of Public Works on Nov. 13. In that letter he cited the traffic problems that would come with development of the former golf course, which was at one time discussed as a potential campground. “Although both of these properties are situated just outside of the incorporated limits of the Town of Berlin, their development will impact people who not only live in Berlin but also those that work and visit our town,” Tyndall wrote. “In the past, we have seen proposals for housing developments and campgrounds on the Bay Club property. If projects such as these would come to fruition our narrow town streets could not handle the volume of traffic imposed by increased vehicular traffic, especially by large campers.” He wrote that town leaders were relieved to hear of the DNR proposal. “The conservation efforts of the DNR will help the Town of Berlin work toward establishing a greenbelt around our town, a vital component of our comprehensive plan,” he wrote. “Additionally, the proposed passive recreation activities by the DNR will add to the growing economic trend associated with environmental tourism and work seamlessly with the hospitality industry that thrives so well in Worcester County. As a town, we look forward to possible partnerships with the DNR to help with their effort to conserve the natural beauty of our area. We hope that this acquisition will be the beginning of great things for the greater Berlin area.”

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Governor Launches ‘Compliance Unit’ For Holiday Weekend

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – After months of attempting to cajole Marylanders into following the various public health directives, Gov. Larry Hogan this week changed directions and promised stricter enforcement to gain compliance. Through the nine months of the ongoing COVID pandemic, Hogan has been consistent in his messaging regarding social distancing, the wearing of facecoverings and limiting gathering sizes, for example, with mixed results. This week, Hogan took a sterner approach with the announcement of “high visibility compliance units” coordinated with the Maryland State Police (MSP) to enforce the various public health directives and executive orders.

The announcement comes on the heels of steadily increasing key COVID metrics in the state. For example, the streak of days during which at least 1,000 new cases were reported reached 20 this week, including a stretch of days with 2,000-plus new cases. The number of new cases is likely a byproduct of increased testing, but perhaps a more important indicator is testing positivity, which has hovered around 7% for the last two weeks. As a result, while he stopped short of announcing more stringent directives this week, Hogan announced the launch of a new “all hands on deck” COVID compliance and enforcement operation in coordination with the MSP and allied county and local law enforcement agencies. Through the initiative, additional MSP

troopers will be assigned to each county in Maryland. In addition to the typical holiday drunk-driving saturation patrols, the additional troopers will be looking out for businesses and individuals who are not complying with the COVID directives. While part of the focus will be on education and outreach, it was clear from the governor the initiative announced on Monday is all about stricter enforcement. “I know that there is a growing frustration that we are still fighting this virus,” he said. “Many people are struggling emotionally and financially, and this is causing a great deal of stress for nearly everyone, but following the public health directives is the only way we will be able to stop this virus, keep Maryland open for business and keep hospitals from overflowing.” Hogan said the MSP has reached out

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to county sheriff’s departments and municipal police departments to assist with the compliance, education and enforcement operations. “Many people are following the advice and complying with the directives,” he said. “However, the orders are only effective if they are being followed and enforced. The vast majority are doing the right thing, but many are experiencing COVID fatigue and some individuals and businesses are becoming more and more lax.” Hogan pointed to what is typically one of the biggest nights of the year for bars and restaurants as potential superspreaders. “On the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, kids come home from school and they’re out celebrating with their friends and packing the bars,” he said. “I can’t stress enough how reckless that would be this year. We can’t let a few bad actors spoil it for the majority who are doing the right thing.” The governor said the new enforcement initiative will continue through the holidays and as long as it takes to quell the virus. “We’re deploying a highly visible initiative to step up enforcement,” he said. “There will be additional state troopers in every county in Maryland to investigate any reports of non-compliance. The high visibility initiative will begin Thanksgiving eve and continue through the holidays.” Locally, the Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) and the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office will work with the MSP on the ramped-up enforcement efforts. OCPD Deputy Communications Manager Ashley Miller said the department would likely attempt to educate violators before resorting to stronger enforcement measures if compliance is not gained. “If our department receives a complaint or observes a facility that is not complying with orders, we will attempt to make contact with the manager or owner to ensure they are aware of the requirements,” she said. “If the manager or owner on-site is not willing to comply with the orders, our department will document it and then contact the Worcester County Health Department, which will then follow their enforcement protocol.” For his part, Worcester County Sheriff Matt Crisafulli said his department would continue to work within parameters started at the beginning of the pandemic. “The Worcester County Sheriff’s Office will continue to work in conjunction with the Worcester County Health Department and our allied partners,” he said. “We will continue to educate our residents and seek voluntary compliance during this pandemic. The cohesive partnerships have been beneficial for our county. All charging decisions are made in consultation with and at the discretion of the state’s attorney.” Effective immediately, MSP will be hosting a hotline for any enforcement concerns. Citizens can call 833-9792266 or email prevent.covid@maryland.gov with any perceived violations.


OC Exploring Anti-Litter Campaign

November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – A resort committee last week was given a closer look into the town’s trash collection and cleanup efforts as part of an ongoing discussion on litter. Last week, public works officials met with the Ocean City Coastal Resources Legislative Committee (Green Team) to discuss solutions to a growing litter problem throughout the resort. “This year we really had a litter problem that we hadn’t seen before, and it was on the Boardwalk and side streets,” said Council Secretary Tony DeLuca, committee liaison. “We’ve never seen anything like it before.” DeLuca, who had first raised the issue in September, attributed the litter issue to an increase in carryout services, a decrease in litter citations, and broken trash cans, among other things. With the help of committee members and public works officials, he said the resort could develop a multi-faceted campaign for the coming summer season. “We said one of the things we want to do this year is we want to work on a positive program where ‘Every Litter Bit Hurts,’” he said. “Some sort of positive program for the residents, for the community, to get around.” Public Works Deputy Director Woody Vickers noted the town collects roughly 330 tons of trash annually. In the summer months, he said, crews worked 24 hours a day to empty the 380-plus Boardwalk trash cans and the nearly 700 beach trash cans. “It’s incredible the amount of tonnage that’s being collected …,” added Maintenance Manager Tom Dy. “It’s a challenge. But we do it, and we do it well.” But despite the department’s efforts, Vickers noted some of the behaviors the town had witnessed on the Boardwalk this year. “The trash can is right beside them, and you can walk down and see they put their trash under the bench,” he said. “Coming in on the weekend the seawall would be littered with trash.” Officials noted the campaign could address those issues. Committee member Pat McLaughlin suggested the re-

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sort consider messaging on the Boardwalk trash cans. “I don’t think it’s because people are lazy,” he said. “I think it’s because accountability goes down when people are away from their home.” Officials last week also noted the campaign could focus on residential trash collection. Vickers noted a number of residents continued to use aging and broken waste wheelers, and that a press release could highlight that bins, lids and wheels are available for purchase through the department’s website. “We do provide them for a cost,” he said. Committee members and public works officials last week also discussed weed control efforts along the town’s side streets, as well as the growing number of bulk pickup requests throughout the resort. “Bulk pickup this year has been off the charts,” Vickers said. “It’s nothing to get 25 or 30 a day.” Public works officials also discussed the department’s staffing limitations. In a letter to committee members, Public Works Director Hal Adkins noted the maintenance department – responsible for cleaning the beach, Boardwalk, streets, alleys, parking lots and bus shelters, in addition to several other tasks – consisted of roughly a dozen full-time staff members not assigned to specific tasks. “During the summer months, if we are lucky to find them, this department is expanded by 14 seasonal maintenance workers in the street division to help clean and five seasonal staff in the Boardwalk division to run what is known as the night barrel crew dumping the boardwalk trash barrels in the evening hours …,” he wrote. “There is not an army of cleaning staff (as in 50, 60, 70 … 100). That has never been the case.” Officials last week said the committee would continue to work on the litter campaign in the coming months, along with the help of the public works and police departments. “We have to figure out the message,” said Committee Chair Gail Blazer. “That’s what we’re going to work on this spring.”

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BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Worcester County Public Schools will continue distance learning until Jan. 4. Though Worcester County’s COVID19 rates are currently trending in the right direction, officials last week extended the distance learning that was already in place another month. At the time, rates had increased to the level that worried officials. “As we have monitored the metrics around community transmission throughout this week, we are not seeing any indications of progress toward a significant decline or stabilization in these metrics,” Superintendent Lou Taylor said last Thursday. “We have also consulted with our local health officials regarding current projections of spikes related to the upcoming holiday seasons. In light of this information, we have made the difficult decision to remain in Stage One – with all students engaged in distance learning – until January 4.” This week, Worcester County’s daily positive percentage has been trending down since reaching 7% on Nov. 16. As of Wednesday, the county’s positive test rate was 4.19% (statewide 6.77%), down from 4.33% Tuesday. As for the seven-day moving average case rate per 100,000, Worcester County’s had dropped to 13.12 Wednesday. When schools initially returned to

November 27, 2020

distance learning on Nov. 16, Taylor cited the fact that the county was at a 6.6% positivity rate and 18.3 cases per 100,000 people. Those figures were above the metrics recommended for a re-examination of the school system’s Responsible Return model. In his Nov. 19 announcement, Taylor said he hoped schools could reopen Jan. 4. “This will mean that once again we will begin phasing in our students in small targeted groups in waves, much like what we did earlier this fall,” he said. “However, as we continue to adjust our plans and enhance our safety protocols, we want to communicate that the lists of students invited back for each wave may change… Our schools are hard at work identifying students for the upcoming waves, and like before, they will be contacting families individually to invite students back to the classroom.” Transportation changes will occur too. “Our transportation department is working closely with schools on some changes in this area, but we want to let all of our families know well in advance that as your child is invited back to the classroom, bus transportation may not be available,” he said. “I know this is a lot of information to process, and we are heartbroken at the thought of not having students in our buildings over the next several weeks, but keeping our school system community healthy and safe has to be our collective priority.”


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Lodging Group Seeks State Relief

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 27, 2020

Current Measures Not Having Impact

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – The Maryland Hotel Lodging Association (MHLA) last week fired off a letter to Governor Larry Hogan urging targeted COVID relief for an industry twisting in the wind because of the ongoing pandemic. MHLA President and CEO Amy Rohrer last Friday sent the letter to Hogan and Commerce Secretary Kelly Schulz requesting targeted relief for the state’s ailing lodging industry. The letter points out Hogan’s $250 million Maryland Strong: Economic Recovery Initiative included a $100 million emergency rapid response fund for small businesses. The governor’s initiative sets aside $100 million that can be immediately deployed to areas where there is the greatest need as the pandemic continues to affect various sectors and state and local governments wait for the federal government to take action on additional stimulus relief. Of course, a second federal stimulus package, including potential relief for the failing lodging industry, remains mired in a political stalemate and state aid to the

lodging industry has been slow coming, according to the letter. “On behalf of Maryland’s lodging industry, I am reaching out with a critical request for targeted relief for Maryland hotels,” the letter reads. “Hotels have qualified for very little of the COVID-19 relief available to small businesses in Maryland, and yet the majority of hotels in the state are run by small business owners and operators who are among the hardest hit by COVID-19 restrictions.” In the letter, Rohrer explains year-todate hotel revenue in Maryland is down a little over 48% and occupancy rates among available rooms are down 33% during the same period. She points out over 6% of the total rooms in Maryland are completely closed down. Perhaps more ominously, a recent study released by the American Hotel and Lodging Association projects 71% of hotels reported they will not last six more months at current projected revenue and occupancy levels. “Absent further governmental relief, massive foreclosures and permanent closures are predicted,” the letter reads. “We hope to avoid the detrimental impact this will have on Maryland’s economic recovery. It’s not just hotels, but cities, counties and the state that would suffer greater economic loss with shuttered hotels leading to lower property value, tax assessments, loss of hotel tax, loss of sales tax, loss of jobs, etc. Relief is necessary for hotels to survive the tough winter ahead and be part of the economic recovery anticipated in the second quarter of 2021.” In the letter, Rohrer asserts the state’s COVID-19 layoff aversion fund is not reaching Maryland’s lodging industry. “Initially, the COVID-19 layoff aversion fund appeared to be something that would help get us through the next quarter,” the letter reads. “However, as we have applied and been denied, we’ve become aware that this program isn’t targeted for an essential industry that relies heavily on frontline employees who cannot be transitioned into working remotely. We need employees to keep hotels open, but we also need guests occupying the hotel at a high enough level for doors to stay open.” The letter adds, “The lodging industry was among the first to be impacted by the pandemic and we will be one of the last to recover,” the letter reads. “We respectfully urge your consideration of direct relief for hotels, similar to the $50 million grant program providing direct relief for restaurants. We are in need of relief that can be used for debt or operating expenses, such as mortgage payments, insurance, utilities, property taxes, payroll and payroll taxes, franchise fees and permit fees.”


November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Page 14

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 27, 2020


November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 15


Board Approves Three Liquor License Requests Berlin Approves

Page 16

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – The Worcester County Board of License Commissioners (BLC) approved a trio of liquor license changes this week. On Tuesday, the board approved two beer, wine and liquor license applications as well as the transfer and upgrade of another license. Highlighting the agenda was the approval of a license for Shore Liquor, which is the store on Newtowne Boulevard in Pocomoke that Worcester County has been trying to get rid of for years. “It’s a store the county has been trying to sell for two, two-and-a-half years,” said BLC Chairman William Esham. Attorney Paul Wilber told the board that his client was seeking a liquor li-

cense so he could buy the store. “This is part of a transaction where Worcester County is selling their liquor store in Pocomoke,” he said. “Mr. Patel, through his corporation, wishes to be licensed so we can complete the purchase of the liquor store.” Though Wilber did not have a site plan to present, he said the store would not be changed from its current configuration. “Mr. Patel does not intend to change what’s inside,” Wilber said. BLC member Charles Nichols pointed out that applicants typically supplied information such as a business plan and employee code of conduct. “While he has no violations I don’t know how he’s going to run his business,” Nichols said. BLC member Marty Pusey expres-

sed concern about the number of employees the store would have. “Your staffing is not very deep,” she said. Esham said the board had previously approved a license for the location before it became embroiled in a court case. “It’s the same location the county has had a liquor store since 2007,” Esham said. He added that the applicant intended to run the store in the same manner the county had been operating it. The board voted 3-0 to approve the license. On Wednesday the board also approved a license for Coastal Smokehouse, which is to be located in the old Hooters location in West Ocean City. The board also approved a transfer and upgrade of the license for Oaked 110 Whiskey and Wine Bar in Snow Hill.

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Deed Agreement With Developer

November 27, 2020

Road Paving Part Of Land Conveyance

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Town officials agreed to deed a small section of property to a developer in exchange for road paving and sidewalk installation on Maple Avenue. On Monday, the town council voted 4-0 to approve an agreement with the developer of the Willows at Berlin, the apartment project planned at the end of Maple Avenue. The town will convey a small piece of property to the developer in exchange for paving Maple Avenue and extending its sidewalk. “In fairness we’re looking at about $33,000 worth of work for a $10,000 piece of property,” Town Administrator Jeff Fleetwood said. Developers have been working for roughly the last two years on plans to renovate the Wolf Terrace apartments on Maple Avenue and expand the project to include 34 new units. A recent title search, however, revealed that a portion of what was thought to be the apartment complex’s property actually belonged to the town. Officials agreed last month to work with the developer to allow the project to proceed. Rather than selling the land outright, officials proposed a barter. The developer agreed to pave Maple Avenue, extend its sidewalk and ensure an easement to a nearby property was protected in exchange for the town deeding over the 11,000-square-foot piece of land. “They need this cleared up before they go ahead and complete their sale,” Planning Director Dave Engelhart said. Though the council initially agreed upon a motion to convey the land “upon satisfactory completion of these items,” the developer reached out during the meeting to express concern, as the land needed to be deeded before closing. Councilman Troy Purnell pointed out that there would be a bond on the improvements. “That’s going to be your assurance even after you’ve deeded the property over to him,” he said. The council voted to approve the agreement as initially proposed but without the language that mandated satisfactory completion of the improvements prior to conveyance.


Man Jailed Over April Gun Threat

November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 17

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OCEAN CITY – An Ocean City man, arrested in May on first-degree assault and other charges after pointing a loaded handgun at his girlfriend during a domestic dispute in April, pleaded guilty this month to possession of a handgun by a minor and was sentenced to five years, all but 18 months of which were suspended. In May, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer responded to a residence on 12th Street to investigate a reported domestic incident involving a handgun that had allegedly taken place weeks earlier. The officer met with a female victim who reported she had been living in the unit for about four months and that she previously lived there with her ex-boyfriend, identified as Nathan Smith II, 20, of Ocean City. According to police reports, the victim told the officer that during the month of April, she had been spending several days at a time with her aunt outside of town rather than in town with Smith. On April 17, the victim returned to the 12th Street unit and Smith reportedly became irate about the situation with the victim spending so much time away, according to police reports. While the victim was standing in a hallway, Smith went into a bedroom and emerged holding a black handgun. Smith reportedly manipulated the slide of the handgun, chambered a round and pointed the gun at the victim from a close distance. Shortly thereafter, Smith put the gun away and apologized to the victim. The victim then left the unit and stayed with her aunt for several weeks before returning. When she returned to the Ocean City unit, the victim kicked Smith out and told him he was no longer welcome to stay there, according to police reports. The victim told the officer she was afraid to report the April 17 incident to the police. When she finally told her family about the incident, they encouraged her to report the incident involving the handgun. In the meantime, Smith had been sending text messages to the victim telling her he had the handgun hidden in a closet in the bedroom and that he wanted to come back to the unit to retrieve it. The officer went with the victim to the closet in the bedroom and on the floor found a handgun wrapped in foil on the floor. The victim reportedly told the officer it was same gun Smith had pointed at her during the incident back on April 17. Smith was located near an uptown shopping center and was taken into custody without incident. He was charged with first- and second-degree assault and numerous weapons counts. He pleaded guilty this month to possession of a handgun by a minor and was sentenced to five years, all but 18 months of which were suspended. He was placed on supervised probation for three years upon his release.

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White Horse Park Community Seeks Closure Amid Legal Battles

Page 18

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Regardless of which side of the issue they’re on, property owners in White Horse Park agree the lawsuit regarding full-time occupancy has changed the community. While some highlight the newly enhanced security measures and increased accountability as improvements, others in the park decry their lack of privacy and cite board overreach and tunnel vision related to the court case. In a landscape already marred by the impacts of COVID-19, the issues related to the lawsuit continue to frustrate the community a year after it was filed. “At this point whatever the courts decide I’m happy with,” property owner Donna Linkins said. “It’s time to move

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on.” Last fall, a group of residents initiated a lawsuit against Worcester County over its plan to enforce decades-old occupancy restrictions in White Horse Park (WHP). While some people have lived in the park full time for years, the county in 2018 began efforts to bring the 465-unit community into compliance with its zoning restrictions, which state that between Sept. 30 and April 1 units can’t be occupied more than 30 consecutive days or an aggregate of 60 days. Though the full-time residents initially tried to amend county code to allow them to remain in their homes, the Worcester County Commissioners rejected that proposal and announced they’d begin fining residents who didn’t abide by the park’s occupancy restrictions. Those fines have yet to be issued but full-time residents are hoping to have a judge de-

cide they’re not legal. A year after it was filed, the case — which has been joined by the White Horse Park Community Association, listed as a co-defendant with Worcester County — continues to plod slowly through the court system. Though there were initially 55 full-time residents, many have now moved out. Others have passed away. There are now fewer than 40 fulltime residents. Changes at the park ensure management is aware of who those residents are. Ed Scheiner, a member of the park’s board, said that in the last year and a half a new security company has been hired, cameras have been added throughout the park and a new gate card system has been installed. “When we got on the board we found out nobody knows who’s in the park,” Scheiner said. “We instituted a number

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of things.” Board member Lynette Shutty praised the improvements. She believes lot owners have a responsibility to let the park know who is there. “Gate card accountability (before) was horrific, “she said. “They were handing them out like candy.” Other changes the current board has implemented relate to improved accounting controls. Scheiner said a failed audit in 2019 revealed the park’s financial records were in disarray. “What they discovered was absolutely appalling,” Shutty said, adding that credit card rewards weren’t monitored and petty cash wasn’t tracked. As a result, the board hired a professional to handle the park’s books and installed a professional park manager. Plans for a reserve study are also underway. “There’s a lot of things that haven’t been maintained at an optimal level,” said Melissa Peters, president of the board. Peters currently leads the park’s fourmember board. Though her term runs until 2022, the terms of her peers have technically expired. Board member Tim Mummert’s term ended in June but has been extended until whenever the 2020 election occurs. Shutty and Scheiner were both appointed by a board majority and were meant to serve until the 2020 election. Though the board mailed out ballots this fall, as plans were in place for a special meeting in November, COVID-19 concerns prompted the cancellation of the meeting. Peters said that because the meeting was linked to the election, the board decided not to have the election until next year. “We’re not advised by our attorney to separate the two,” Peters said. Scheiner said the elections committee was also uncomfortable handling ballots. “There are a lot of people that have extreme fears over this,” he said. “Whether justified or not it’s their personal decision.” The postponement of the election, however, has a large number of White Horse Park property owners upset. They say there’s no reason the ballots couldn’t have been mailed in and counted by the firm the board already hired to do the job. “We want to have the election,” 31year property owner Sylvia Devilbiss said. “We feel as if we’re being held hostage.” Devilbiss said the last in-person board meeting held was in September of 2019. The last election held was June of 2019. She said that the board has turned down suggestions for outdoor meetings and virtual meetings. “We have used the COVID excuse until we’re blue in the face,” she said. Devilbiss understood when the meeting planned for earlier this month got canceled as COVID cases were spiking, but was shocked to find out that the ballots already mailed out would not be counted. SEE PAGE 33


November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Donation, Match Challenge Issued To Fire Company

November 27, 2020

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

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“GHOSTS IN THE SURF” OPA Board Member Censured By Colleagues Instead Of Removed

November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 21

Makes A Great Christmas Gift

Ocean Pines Association Board member Tom Janasek and General Manager John Viola exchange a fist bump at Viola’s request last Friday. Photo by Charlene Sharpe BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – The Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors voted unanimously to censure Director Tom Janasek after a vote to remove him from the board failed. At a public hearing Friday, Janasek apologized to General Manager John Viola, who’d filed a formal complaint regarding offensive remarks the director

made earlier this month. “I hope we can move forward from this without any kind of dissension or turmoil on the board because it has been a good working board for the last three years and I don’t want that to end,” Janasek said. According to the complaint made by Viola, on Nov. 5 Janasek made offensive remarks to the general manager while he was at a business lunch with the asSEE PAGE 22

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… OPA Board Member Apologies After Failed Vote To Remove Him

Page 22

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

FROM PAGE 22 sociation’s director of golf. Viola said it wasn’t the first time such remarks had been made. As a result of his complaint regarding Janasek, a public hearing was held Friday. Several residents spoke up in support of the director and criticized the board for letting the issue get to the point of a public hearing. “Why the hell can’t you act like adults, get by this, and get along?” resident John Reeves said. Former board member Esther Diller offered similar comments. She said that whether Janasek’s allegations had been made correctly or not it was unprofessional for the general manager to “threaten to quit, again, when challenged by one of his employers.” “This is politics, black and white,” she said. Diller added that Janasek had been elected by the OPA membership and if members weren’t happy with the job he was doing they would have a chance to remove him in the next election. “As I would say to my fellow directors when I was on the board, cut the shit and get back to work,” she said. “This town is tired of the childish antics.” President Larry Perrone said that Vi-

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ola had filed a formal complaint and the board had asked its legal counsel to investigate. Counsel reported to the board last Wednesday, when the board met in a four-hour closed session. “It was clear a motion for removal would be presented at this special meeting,” he said. Director Colette Horn went on to make that motion. “The purpose of this motion is not to punish Director Janasek but to achieve a remedy to this complaint that fulfills our obligation as a board to provide Mr. Viola a guarantee that there will be no further actions by Mr. Janasek that undermine his ability to successfully fulfill his contractual obligations to the association,” Horn said. After the complaint was read by Perrone, Janasek said he agreed and suggested the vote be called. Viola said he had not threatened to quit and had not demanded anyone be removed from the board. “All I have done is consistently bring up situations that occurred and placed them in the hands of the board,” he said. “I have never threatened to quit.” Director Doub Parks thanked him for the clarification. “It was unclear to me, maybe it was because I didn’t understand all of the moving parts associated with the discussions we had, I sincerely thank you for that,” Parks said. “That clears things up. The fact that you are adamant about that puts my mind at ease.” The motion to remove Janasek from the board failed, with Horn, Director Frank Brown and Perrone voting in favor while Janasek, Parks, Director Frank Daly and Director Camilla Rogers voted against it. Daly went on to make a motion to censure Janasek, which passed unanimously. The statement to censure, read by the board’s attorney, included agreement from Janasek. Janasek thanked the residents who spoke on his behalf and apologized to Viola. He also commended the general manager’s work. “If what I did and what was stated, if it was offensive I apologize for that and as of this moment with the censure this will never happen again,” he said. Janasek added that he’d lived in the community 45 years and was committed to making it a better place. “The way I approach things is not the way everybody approaches things and obviously I have to change my course a little,” he said. “I am loud. I am boisterous, and I say what I think. Sometimes doing that gets me in trouble. I am sorry for that. I didn’t mean to bring anybody into this position, I really didn’t. I can guarantee from here on out we’ll never have one of these sit downs and discussions about me ever again.”


November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 23


Suspect Faces Multiple Charges After Eventful Night

Page 24

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A Silver Spring, Md., man is facing numerous charges after a pair of incidents including allegedly defacing a restaurant’s entrance and hours later leading police on a chase in the uptown area. Around 5 a.m. last Saturday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was on stationary patrol in the area of 124th Street when he observed a vehicle doing donuts from the highway into the parking lot of a motel in the area. According to police reports, the vehicle made passes in the roadway, traveled the wrong way and failed to obey any safety lines or markers. According to police reports, the driver, later identified as Scott Orellana,

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

44, of Silver Spring, Md., began screaming a series of expletives out the vehicle’s open window along with, “I will kill you,” and other unintelligible profanities. According to police reports, Orellana accelerated wildly out of the motel parking lot without stopping, entered the highway and drove north, all while screaming out of the vehicle’s window in the officer’s direction and flailing his arms and appearing not to be in control of the vehicle. According to police reports, it was clear Orellana was directing his vulgarities and profanity, along with his reckless driving, so the police would observe him. The officer attempted to follow Orellana, but he accelerated away and drove east on 126th Street. The initial officer lost sight of Orellana, but another OCPD officer located his vehicle in a parking

spot on 125th Street near Wight Street. A friend of Orellana reportedly emerged from a nearby condo and the OCPD officers met with him. While officers were meeting with the friend, Orellana reportedly emerged from the rear of the condo and began screaming expletives at the officer, telling them to get a warrant and that they were not patriots, according to police reports. When asked why he was doing donuts in the highway, Orellana reportedly became enraged and stormed into the condo, slamming doors including one that hit one of the officers, according to police reports. The officers ordered Orellana to stop yelling, but that only incensed him further and he continued screaming profanity at the officers. Meanwhile, people in neighboring condos came outside and told police they

November 27, 2020

were awakened by his tirade. According to police reports, it was clear Orellana was under the influence of some unknown substance or in a mental crisis. When officers told Orellana he was under arrest, he braced in the doorway and flailed his body in an attempt to assault the officer. The officer was able to grab Orellana around the torso and tackled him to the ground. When the officer attempted to handcuff Orellana, he reportedly tucked his hands under his body and refused, all while continuing his expletive-laced tirade. The officers were eventually able to get Orellana back on his feet for transport, but he allegedly kicked at them with rear mule kicks as they walked him in handcuffs, striking an officer in the legs and shins. Throughout the booking process, Orellana continued to be combative, aggressive and in a highly agitated state, according to police reports. He was charged with second-degree assault, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct and numerous traffic violations. Around 10:50 a.m. the next morning, another OCPD officer was dispatched to a nightclub at 49th Street for a reported malicious destruction of property. The officer met with the bar’s security manager, who reported the night before, a male suspect walked onto the property after hours and vandalized five separate areas of the main entrance. Video surveillance reportedly showed a male suspect, wearing the same clothes and matching the description of Orellana, approach the main entrance of the nightclub. The video surveillance footage also reportedly shows a Subaru matching the description of the vehicle driven by Orellana during the incident earlier last Saturday morning. The suspect is seen entering the property around 11:50 p.m. The nightclub closed at 10 p.m. the night before because of the new COVID directives regarding closing times for restaurants and bars. In the surveillance footage, the suspect was reportedly observed willfully writing on the front gates of the establishment at least four times. The suspect then entered a walkway and out of view of the video cameras. When bar staffers checked for damage, they reportedly found “Is Some Racist Trash,” written on the front of the wooden doors and “KKK” written on the decorative skulls on the front gates. The OCPD officer recognized the Subaru as the same vehicle involved in the incident earlier last Saturday morning, and reportedly observed the suspect in the malicious destruction of property incident wearing the same clothes Orellana was wearing during the prior incident. The officers contacted the Public Safety Building and learned Orellana was just about to be released from the prior incident. Officers were informed to detain him because he was the suspect in the malicious destruction of property incident at 49th Street.


Ice Ice Berlin Event Set For Friday

November 27, 2020

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Shops will be open late in Berlin this Friday as the town celebrates the start of the holiday season with Ice Ice Berlin. On Friday, Nov. 27, shops will be open late in Berlin as the town hosts its first ever Ice Ice Berlin. In addition to browsing local shops, visitors can stroll downtown streets and admire more than 20 illuminated ice sculptures. The ice sculpture display has replaced what would have been Berlin’s annual tree lighting event, which was canceled this year because of COVID-19. “I truly believe there’s always a silver lining to everything,” said Ivy Wells, the town’s economic and community development director. “We’ve always looked for a way to have an ice sculpture event downtown. This could be the start of something Berlin implements in years to come.” From 5-9 p.m. Friday, shops will be open late as people are invited to stroll through downtown Berlin and admire the town’s Christmas tree and the ice sculptures that have been sponsored by local businesses. “The businesses were just as excited as I was when the idea was presented,” Wells said. Ice sculptor Erik Cantine has been working on more than 20 pieces that

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

will be displayed throughout town that evening. “He’s carving them in advance,” Wells explained. “They’ll be on display and illuminated that night.” Though Cantine has carved during the tree lighting event in years past, the work takes hours and many who come to town that night don’t get to see the finished product. With this week’s event, Wells said everyone would be able to enjoy the sculptures, which are all holiday themed and were chosen by the sponsoring businesses. “Everyone will be smiling behind their masks,” she said. She added that Cantine was thrilled to be able to feature his work in downtown Berlin. “This is a hobby for him,” she said. “He loves doing it.” Because of COVID-19, Mayor Zack Tyndall has issued an order requiring that face coverings be worn during Ice Ice Berlin as well as on two other major shopping days in town. Wells said streets would also be closed for the evening of Nov. 27. “Because the road is closed it’ll allow for more social distancing,” she said. Though carriage rides will not be offered during Ice Ice Berlin, they will be available weekends in December from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information on Ice Ice Berlin visit berlinmainstreet.com.

Page 25


Oyster Shell Recycling Program Impacted By Pandemic

Page 26

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Yet another unintended side-effect of the ongoing pandemic is a dire shortage of oyster shells critical to the ongoing recovery of the iconic shellfish in Maryland. Typically, November is a robust time for the consumption of oysters on the Eastern Shore and across the state, from crowded raw bars to oyster festivals all over the region. However, as the COVID pandemic continues, many restaurants are closed or are operating at limited capacity, and fall festivals are virtually non-existent due to limitations on gathering sizes. The Oyster Recovery Partnership (ORP) works with a coalition of hundreds of restaurants and other oyster

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consumers around Maryland and throughout the mid-Atlantic region to collect and recycle oyster shells critical to the recovery of the species in the Chesapeake and its tributaries. The ORP is the largest oyster shell-recycling operation in the nation. However, because of a decline in oyster sales at restaurants and raw bars, and a dearth of oyster and seafood festivals, the ORP has lost its major source for recycled oyster shells. “Oyster shell is the best material for getting young oysters into the Chesapeake Bay, making it the single most important resource to the oyster restoration process,” said ORP Shell Recycling Operations Manager Tommy Price. “Right now, we’re experiencing a major shell shortage and we’re calling on the public to help us close that gap.”

ORP’s Shell Recycling Alliance collects oyster shells free of charge from hundreds of businesses throughout the region and has seen its collection rates increase steadily over the years. However, for a variety of reasons including COVID, the organization has collected about half of what was projected this year. For example, roughly 14,000 bushels were collected from January to November 2020, compared to 31,000 bushels collected over the same period in 2019. The drop-off in shell collection is also indicative of declining oyster sales. With limited places to sell their product, harvesters have thousands of market-size oysters at the ready. Recognizing the need for an outlet for harvested oysters, the ORP for months has been encouraging residents to enjoy the bay’s boun-

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ty at home, including recipes, virtual shucking workshops and other ways consumers can continue to support their local seafood and restaurant industry. “We encourage oyster lovers to come together to support the Chesapeake seafood industry during a time when they need it the most,” said Price. “Buy local seafood from markets and restaurants, enjoy oysters at home and recycle your shells. It’s a win-win-win.” Natural oyster shell is vital to a healthy oyster population because it is the preferred material onto which oyster larvae attach themselves and grow. Every half-shell can host up to 10 spat, or baby oysters. Once collected, the shells are aged outside for a year, washed and set with spat by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory Oyster Hatchery in Cambridge. ORP works with its restoration partners through the spring and summer to deploy spat-covered shells onto local oyster reefs, making them larger, denser and taller with the ultimate goal of encouraging continued spawning. Over the past two decades, the ORP has planted roughly 8.5 billion oysters on 2,500 underwater acres, while recycling 225,0000 bushels of shells. The ORP maintains 70 oyster shell recycling dropoff stations in Maryland including 11 in Wicomico County.


Court Overturns Conviction Over Voir Dire Process Error

November 27, 2020

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A state appeals court has reversed last year’s burglary conviction of an Ocean City man. In February 2019, Robert Auble, now 48, was found guilty of fourth-degree burglary and rogue and vagabond after breaking into a downtown residence in July 2018 and was sentenced to three years in prison. Auble appealed the convictions on the grounds the trial court did not ask an important voir dire question of the potential jurors regarding the presumption of his innocence prior to the trial. Potential jurors are typically asked a battery of questions, or voir dire, prior to their selection to sit on a case and stand in judgment of a defendant. Auble as-

Six-Month Sentence For Indecent Exposure BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A Georgia man, arrested in May on indecent exposure charges after exposing himself to a group of people including children on the Boardwalk, was found guilty of indecent exposure last week and sentenced to six months in jail. Around 3:30 p.m. on May 10, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer on bicycle patrol responded to the south end of the Boardwalk for a reported individual who had exposed himself to a group of people. Upon arrival, the officer met with a male victim who reportedly told police a male suspect later identified as Dominic Dornan, 35, of Columbia, Ga., had exposed himself to him on the Boardwalk. The officer found Dornan, who was exhibiting signs of intoxication and admitted he had been drinking alcohol, sitting on a bench on the Boardwalk with his shorts unbuttoned and his zipper about halfway down, according to police. The officer met with a female victim who told police shortly before the officer arrived, Dornan took his penis out of his pants and was flapping it in her direction in plain view of a crowd on the Boardwalk while recording video of the incident with his cell phone, according to police reports. Based on the testimony of the victims, the officer determined Dornan had allegedly exposed himself to a large crowd of people on the Boardwalk while facing the whaleshaped playground piece on the beach near where a group of children were playing, all at 3:30 p.m. and in broad daylight.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

serted in his appeal the trial court did not ask the jury pool an essential question. Last week, the Court of Special Appeals agreed and reversed Auble’s conviction, remanding the case back to Worcester County Circuit Court for a new trial. Around 3:20 a.m. on July 19, 2018, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a reported burglary at a residence on Talbot Street. Responding officers were flagged down by the resident who told police someone had just broken into her unit. The victim told police she was awakened by her mother yelling at the suspect in the living room. According to police reports, the victim screamed at the suspect, later identified as Auble, to get out and Auble did eventually leave the unit. The victim

then realized her iPhone was missing along with her driver’s license, credit cards and around $70 in cash, which were stored in the phone case. Using the “Find my iPhone” app, OCPD officers were able to track the missing phone to a location on Dorchester Street. A woman told police she found the phone lying on the sidewalk in front of a nearby restaurant and set it on a bench in front of the Dorchester Street fire station. Through previous encounters, OCPD officers knew Auble lived in an apartment over the restaurant where the stolen phone was located. The phone and its contents were returned to the victim, but the cash was not located. Auble was arrested and charged with first-degree burglary and theft. On appeal, Auble asked the Court of

Page 27

Special Appeals to consider a mistrial because the trial court failed to ask potential jurors a critical question regarding the presumption of his innocence. “You must presume the defendant innocent of the charges now and through-out this trial unless and until, after you have seen and heard all of the evidence, the state convinces you of the defendant’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt,” the requested question reads. “If you do not consider the defendant innocent now, or if you are not sure that you will require the state to convince you of the defendant’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, please stand.” Citing case law, including a landmark Kazadi v. State case during which similar questions were raised, the Court of Special Appeals last week agreed and vacated Auble’s convictions.


School Projects Outlined In Capital Improvement Plan

Page 28

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – Educational officials came before county leaders last week to highlight the need for funding three capital improvement projects. Last Thursday, Acting County Executive John Psota held a public hearing on the county’s proposed Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for fiscal years 20222026. The five-year planning document includes $94 million in general fund requests and $77 million for enterprise fund requests.

“This plan is intended for projects that have a significant scope and dollar amount …,” said Finance Director Pam Oland. “This is something that has a multi-year aspect to it, or a large dollar amount where we may have to borrow funds to fund it.” The proposed CIP, which totals roughly $171 million in project requests over the next five years, includes $19.6 million for the construction of a new public safety building, $7.4 million for the public library and $35 million for the Wicomico County Board of Education. Officials said the board’s requests

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would allow the school system to complete the replacement of Beaver Run Elementary, move forward with plans for a renovation and addition at Mardela Middle and High School and replace the roof at Westside Intermediate. “At this point in time, it’s our intention to find funding for those top three items,” Oland said. The proposed CIP includes more than $28 million for the Mardela Middle and High addition and renovation. The school system’s request for $10 million in fiscal year 2022 will allow crews to begin construction once the design phase is complete. Mardela Principal Liza Hastings encouraged county leaders last week to support funding for the school’s renovation and addition. She highlighted failing HVAC systems, safety concerns and inadequate instructional space. “My job as principal is to ensure my students are provided with a safe environment that is conducive to instruction,” she said. “Unfortunately, the condition of our current building makes this difficult to achieve.” The school system’s request also includes $4.7 million in fiscal year 2022 to complete the replacement of Beaver Run Elementary. Principal Curt Twilley said the final allotment of county funds would keep the project on track. “The $4.7 million we are requesting is going to be essential to completing this

November 27, 2020

project in a timeframe that is already laid out,” he said. In addition to the two school construction projects, the proposed CIP includes $1.7 million for a roof replacement at Westside Intermediate. While the state had deferred its portion of funding due to fiscal constraints, education officials encouraged county leaders to proceed with the project in the coming year’s budget. “To maintain the existing facility, Westside Intermediate is in definite need of a new roof …,” said Principal Christina Stewart. “While everyone recognizes the fiscal constraints we are under, and the many needs of our county, please remember that our school has waited three years now on something that is essential for the overall condition of our school and will support the learning environment for our students.” Superintendent Donna Hanlin told county leaders last week that while the school system had many needs, it had prioritized the three major projects. “In Wicomico County, we take great pride in data-driven decision making in our strategic planning, especially with the prioritization of our school facilities,” she said. “All of our decisions, as you’ve heard our principals say, are with the ultimate goal of educating our students, and in the best facilities possible.” Oland said the executive’s CIP would be submitted to the Wicomico County Council in December.


County, Shorebirds Amend Accord “Am I Crazy?”

November 27, 2020

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – An amended lease agreement will allow the Delmarva Shorebirds team to waive the remainder of its amusement tax payment for the 2020 season. Last week, the Wicomico County Council voted unanimously to amend a concessions agreement between the county and Delmarva Shorebirds team for the use of the Arthur W. Perdue Stadium in Salisbury. The amendment will waive the team’s $100,000 commitment for amusement tax payment for the 2020 season, and instead, have the county accept the $55,239 it had already collected for the year. The county will also reduce its $100,000 minimum to $44,761 in the 2021 season. “The new minimum would become the difference of the $100,000 and the $55,239 that was already paid to Wicomico County,” Delmarva Shorebirds General Manager Chris Bitters told the council last month. In return for the amended agreement, the Shorebirds team will waive its 2020 electric savings agreement and extend its concessions agreement with the

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

county an additional year. A vote on the concessions agreement comes less than a month after Bitters came before the council with the proposed amendment. He noted many Minor League teams were reevaluating their lease agreements with municipalities after the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the 2020 season. “Our goal is to make this request and still make the agreement whole essentially over a period of time,” he said. After a public hearing last week, the council voted 7-0 to amend the concessions agreement. The council last week also agreed to a five-year lease extension between the county and the Eastside Youth Sports Complex in Willards. The lease, which began in 1999, expired last year. Recreation, Parks and Tourism Director Steve Miller told the council late last month the county was interested in renewing the contract another five years. “From the county’s perspective, we hold a number of leases with volunteer groups and the Eastside is at the top of the list as far as the care and responsibility they take in the facility …,” he said at the time. “We feel they do an excellent job.”

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Berlin Electric Recognitions:

Berlin Mayor Zack Tyndall presented chief lineman Alan Parkinson Monday with the American Municipal Power Hard Hat Safety Award in recognition of his commitment to on-the-job safety procedures. “Your performance is a great credit to our entire electric department,” Tyndall said. Pictured, from left, are Town Administrator Jeff Fleetwood, Parkinson, Tyndall and Electric Utility Director Tim Lawrence. At right, on Nov. 9, Tyndall presented Electric Utility Director Tim Lawrence with the American Municipal Power Safety Award, recognizing the town’s electric department for 16,640 work hours with no reported injuries. Lawrence was also presented with an award recognizing the town’s power

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Chris Parypa’s Photo Of The Week:

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 27, 2020

Each week staff photographer Chris Parypa is tasked with submitting a photo from his vast library to be featured in this space. Above, a gorgeous sunset scene is pictured from Assateague Island last week. To purchase any of Parypa’s photos, click over to www.chrisparypa.com.


November 27, 2020

OC Recreation Boosters Dan Wormann, Honey Jarvis, Diane Jordan, Bob Jordan and Drue Clempner had the hot chocolate ready for opening night of Winterfest of Lights.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

People

By Jeanette Deskiewicz

FEATURING THOSE HELPING CAUSES IN THE RESORT AREA

Safely getting the carryout beef and dumpling dinners to hungry diners at the door, were the two Rays (McCabe and Robinson) of the Berlin Lions Club.

In Society

Page 31

Salisbury University Clay Club’s Danny Emond, Megan Hurley, Emily Montanye, Rachel Eure, and Isabelle Motigny had their creations for sale at the Holiday Marketplace last Saturday.

It wouldn’t be Winterfest of Lights without light up toys, and Judy Fallon and Bryce Kalchthaler had plenty available.

During Winterfest of Lights opening night, sisters Rylie and Kennedy Kirby handed out information on Atlantic General Hospital’s Annual Penguin Swim.

Mom and daughter, Jennifer and Paige Currie, checked in shoppers for the Holiday Marketplace 2020 Outdoor Event.

Custom bookmaker Abigail Klakring was joined by her proud papa, Dave Rose, at the Holiday Marketplace in promoting her services for gift giving.

At the Holiday Marketplace 2020, Alexis Witzke helped Tink Candle owner Haley Martin, get her smell goods into the noses of happy buyers.

The father and son duo of Jack and Brian Patternoster teamed up at their booth for the 2020 Holiday Marketplace in Salisbury.

Hats off to Peggy Hobbs, pictured with Joe Andrews in the Berlin Lions Club kitchen, for keeping the dumpling tradition rolling all these years.


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Plastic’s Marine Life Impact Detailed

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OCEAN CITY – While it is widely known plastic in the ocean and other waterways can have a devastating effect on marine life, a comprehensive report released this week documents the damage. A report released this week by the environmental advocacy group Oceana calls for stronger policies to reduce production and distribution of single-use plastic. Oceana surveyed dozens of government agencies, organizations and institutions around the country, including the mid-Atlantic, that collect data on the impact of plastic on marine animals to compile the alarming report. The survey found evidence of roughly 1,800 animals from 40 different species swallowing or becoming entangled in plastic. Of those 1,800, about 88% were species listed as endangered or threatened with extinction under the Endangered Species Act. Those statistics are likely conservative because they highlight documented cases where marine animals were found deceased and their deaths attributed to ingesting or becoming entangled with plastic, or animals that were discovered entangled and rescued. The data does not include those marine animals killed by ingesting or becoming entangled in plastic and are never documented, ac-

November 27, 2020

cording to report author Christy Leavitt, who serves as Oceana plastics campaign director. “This report is merely a snapshot of what’s happening to the animals inhabiting plastic-polluted waters around the U.S.,” she said. “Imagine how great the numbers would be if they included the animals not observed or documented by humans.” The report’s intent is to raise awareness about the dangers of single-use plastic that finds its ways into the ocean and other waterways, according to report author and senior Oceana scientist Dr. Kimberly Warner. “Before now, the evidence that many U.S. marine mammals and sea turtles were being harmed by plastic was not compiled in one place,” she said. “While there may never be a complete account of the fate of all marine animals impacted by plastic, this report paints a grim picture.” Bags, balloons, recreational fishing line, and food wrappers were the most common types of identifiable plastic consumed by the impacted animals. Bags, balloons with strings and sheeting were the most common types of plastic found entangling marine animals. Other items identified in the report included bottle caps, water bottles, straws, plastic chairs, plastic utensils, sandwich bags, polystyrene cups and kid’s toys. Marine animals swallow plastic when they mistake it for food, or inadvertently swallow while feeding or swimming. Once swallowed, plastic can obstruct their digestion or lacerate their stomachs and intestines, which interfere with their ability to feed and often leads to starvation and death. The research determined some marine animals perish after ingesting just one small piece of plastic. The harmful effects of plastic are not discriminatory. Nearly every species of ocean life is affected, especially sea turtles, seals, whales and other marine mammals. The report asserts 15 metric tons of plastic finds its way into the ocean every year. The equates to about two garbage trucks worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute. “The world is hooked on plastic because the industry continues to find increasingly more ways to force this persistent pollutant into our everyday routines, and it’s choking, strangling and drowning marine life,” said Warner. “This report shows a wide range of single-use plastic jeopardizing marine animals, and it’s not just the items the first come to mind like bags, balloons and bottlecaps. These animals are consuming or being entangled in everything from zip-ties and dental floss to those mesh onion bags you see at the grocery store.”

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… Worcester’s Legal Expenses To Date Exceed $50K

November 27, 2020

FROM PAGE 18 “There’s a group of us now that have had it,” she said. Several people now believe the board is determined to stay in power until the lawsuit is over. That, however, could be months away, as Hugh Cropper, the attorney representing the fulltime residents has asked for a continuance because of COVID-19. The day after he filed for a continuance, the board held an emergency meeting to postpone the election until March of 2021. Scheiner made the motion to postpone the election until “on or about March 13, 2021, due to the possible lack of a quorum, a out of state travel restriction advisory, Maryland Governor’s advisory against large gatherings…,” reads an email sent from the White Horse Park Community Association to members. Some, however, believe the board keeps postponing the election in an effort to ensure there’s no turnover before the trial. “At any rate, if the White Horse Park Community Association cannot safely hold an election, it is axiomatic that the parties cannot complete depositions in this case and hold a trial on December 15, 2020,” Cropper wrote in a supplement to his request for a continuance on behalf of the plaintiffs. Others made more direct assertions. “It appears as if they want to stay in power until a decision has been made so they can influence the decision being made,” said Patti McDermott, whose parents are full-time residents of the park. She says Peters has “stacked the deck” by appointing Scheiner and Shutty. “The people on the board are against negotiation of any sort with the fulltimers,” she said. Shutty, Scheiner and Peters, however, say there’s no truth to that. Shutty said the board operates by the book despite the fact that they’re harassed and bullied by park residents. “I’ve never seen people act so low class and trashy,” she said. “They’re not God-fearing Christians.” She maintains that the reason property owners contacted The Dispatch to share news of the election postponement is because they want to have people who support full-time occupancy elected to the board. “The people you have complaining to you are not telling you the complete facts,” Scheiner said. He said that the lawsuit had pushed full-time residents to become “more devious” and that had prompted some of the operational changes at White Horse Park. “In the past, it has been the wild wild west,” he said. Devilbiss — who did not support fulltime occupancy at the park — did not get concerned with park politics until she started seeing changes by park management. She said when she brought issues to the board, they overrode her

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

concerns and are focused only on the lawsuit. Mummert, the fourth board member, did not want to go into detail but acknowledged that he wasn’t pleased with the current situation on the board. For Devilbiss, the primary problems are the lack of election and unanswered questions about finances. Though the board provides financial statements, she said questions about specific expenses have not been addressed. She’s not even sure where to turn for help, as the White Horse Park Community Association is not a homeowners association and isn’t regulated by rules that apply to those organizations. “If someone has an idea on how we can get help, please notify us,” she said. Other property owners say the board wants too much control. They dislike the new lack of privacy they feel in the park now that there’s a new security team in place. “We have security guards walking around taking pictures of everybody’s tag,” property owner Beverly Quimby said, adding that it wasn’t necessary when gate access cards registered who was entering the park. “Because of that (lawsuit) we’re all being persecuted.” Shirley Skillman agreed. “They’re taking pictures of license plates and peeping in windows…,” she said. “It’s like you’re a bunch of criminals living there.”

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She says that the full-timers who could leave the park have done so. “A whole lot of them are gone,” she said. “I don’t know why they don’t just leave it alone.” The legal costs associated with the community association fighting the lawsuit have also become a concern for unit owners. In the past, the park spent about $1,000 a year on legal issues. “Our legal costs are pretty significant,” Scheiner acknowledged, declining to give an exact figure. “This case has been, by the plaintiffs’ games, delayed and deferred. They are throwing all the crap at the wall they can get to see what sticks. We will win.” The county, the other defendant in the case, has spent in excess of $50,000 in legal fees, according to its opposition to being dismissed from the lawsuit. While Quimby was ambivalent about fulltime residents prior to the lawsuit, others had strong objections to yearround occupancy. Linkins was one of many who felt that full-time occupancy shouldn’t be permitted in White Horse Park. It’s not that she was ever bothered by the full-timers, but that she didn’t want to see her park fees go up because of any infrastructure improvements required if the park were to allow yearround occupancy. Now, however, she believes the board is the bigger problem. Those on

opposite ends of the occupancy issue find themselves talking to one another to find a way to ensure a board election is held. “The board has brought us all together,” Linkins said. “We just want them out. If we can have a national election we can have a White Horse Park election.” She said there was no reason ballots couldn’t have been mailed in and counted. When advised of Peters’ concern regarding the fact that the bylaws linked the annual meeting to the election, Linkins said that didn’t change her opinion. “They’ve broken every other bylaw,” she said. “Does it really matter? All anybody wants is an election. For some reason they want to hold on to power.” Peters acknowledged that some property owners were unhappy with the current situation but said the park needed to err on the side of caution during the pandemic. “We’re doing the best we can,” she said. “We’re following legal advice every step of the way. It’s not personal at all.” Shutty echoed those comments. “We just want to make sure the right story is out there,” she said. “We all feel strongly we’re doing what the park’s documents say we’re to do… Because these people were enabled and facilitated by prior boards and park managers they feel they’re right.”

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Makeshift Weapons Found At Traffic Stop OCEAN CITY – A Smithsburg, Md., man was arrested last week after police allegedly found a bizarre combination of weapons in his vehicle after a routine traffic stop. Around 12:25 a.m. last Thursday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was patrolling in the area of 13th Street when he observed a vehicle with tags that had expired in 2018. A background check confirmed the Maryland tags were expired and that the vehicle was uninsured. The officer conducted a traffic stop and made contact with the driver, identified as Joseph Stanton, Sr., 60, of Smithsburg, Md. The officer detected an odor of marijuana coming from inside the vehicle and observed a partially full can of beer in the driver’s side cup holder, although Stanton did not appear to be intoxicated, according to police reports. Stanton was asked to exit the vehicle. During a search of the vehicle, the officer located a silver meat cleaver with a roughly seven-inch blade fashioned to a tennis racket handle concealed under the driver’s seat, according to police reports. The officer also located a deer antler that appeared to have a sharpened point on one end and a handle on the other end. In the report, the officer noted both handmade weapons were capable of causing serious bodily harm. As the officer was observing the two makeshift weapons, Stanton reportedly said “those are just for protection.” The officer op-

Cops & Courts The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

ened the center console and located a marijuana grinder with raw marijuana residue inside. The officer also reportedly located a plastic straw with a white powdery residue believed to be cocaine. Stanton was arrested and charged with various weapons and drug charges.

More Weapons In Vehicles OCEAN CITY – A Pennsylvania woman was charged with carrying a loaded handgun in her vehicle following a traffic stop last weekend. Around 1:10 a.m. last Sunday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was patrolling in the area of 30th Street when a vehicle was observed driving erratically, drifting from one lane to another and back again. Through the rear window, the officer observed what appeared to be a verbal argument between the female passenger and the driver, identified as Ramona Sciullo, 24, of Pittsburgh, Pa., according to police reports. The officer observed Sciullo and the passenger yelling at each other and swatting their arms at each other, ac-

cording to police reports. The officer pulled the vehicle over at 34th Street and approached it. Sciullo was already in a position leaning forward with both of her hands flat and palms-down on the dashboard. The officer advised the occupants of the reason for the traffic stop. According to police reports, the officer told Sciullo she could relax and sit up, but when she removed her hands from the dashboard, a large bulky item, which turned out to be a handgun in a holster, was left on the dashboard. The officer reached into the vehicle and secured the handgun, which had a magazine loaded in the grip portion. Sciullo voluntarily stated she was a permit holder in Pennsylvania. At that point, she was told to get out of the vehicle and was arrested for the possession of a deadly weapon. During a search incident to the arrest, the officer located a spring-assisted, switchbladestyle knife in the center console. During a subsequent interview, Sciullo reported told police she bought the gun in Pennsylvania and that she believed there were six rounds of ammuni-

November 27, 2020 tion in the magazine and one round in the chamber. She reportedly told police she carries the handgun wherever she goes and that she researched the rules for carrying in Maryland, but that she must have misunderstood the rules. “I know I was carrying illegally, I should have done more research,” she reportedly told the officer.

Domestic Assault Arrest OCEAN CITY – A local man was arrested on assault charges last week after allegedly choking and holding a dart to the neck of his girlfriend during a domestic incident. Around 10 p.m. last Wednesday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a residence at 12th Street for a reported 911 call regarding a domestic assault. Upon arrival, the officers located the male suspect, later identified as Trey Drouillard, 25, of Ocean City, sitting in a pick-up truck outside the residence. The officers made contact with the female victim, who reportedly confirmed Drouillard was her boyfriend and that he had a history of assaulting her, according to police reports. The victim was holding a six-month old child. The victim told police on that night, the couple had been in a verbal argument and the Drouillard had choked her with one hand from the front, but that she did not lose consciousness. According to police reports, the victim told the officers Drouillard then grabbed a dart from a cork dart board hanging on the wall and held it up against the right side of her neck. OCPD officers reportedly observed a red mark on the victim’s neck where she had been choked and where the dart had been held against her neck, according to police reports. For his part, Drouillard acknowledged he had been in a verbal argument with the victim, but denied any physical altercation had occurred. Based on the evidence and victim testimony, Drouillard was arrested and charged with seconddegree assault.

Two Face Assault Charges OCEAN CITY – A Pennsylvania couple was arrested on assault charges last week after an alleged domestic dispute at a resort hotel. Around 1:20 a.m. last Friday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer patrolling in the area of 84th Street observed a vehicle traveling at a high rate of speed. The officer tried to catch up to the vehicle, which pulled away and continued to gain further separation. The officer was reportedly traveling at least 65 mph, but the suspect vehicle continued to pull away. It was eventually stopped at a red light at 120th Street. The officer met with the driver, identified as James Parker, 33, of New Columbia, Pa., and the female passenger, identified as Tiffany Wade, 33, also of New Columbia. According to police reports, the officer observed fresh red marks, scratches and bruising on Parker’s neck and his shirt was stretched with holes in it, consistent with being in an altercation. When asked about the injuries, Parker reportedly began crying and told the SEE NEXT PAGE


. . Cops & Courts

November 27, 2020

officer Wade had assaulted him about an hour-and-a-half before he had been pulled over. Parker reportedly told police the couple had a verbal argument that turned physical in their hotel room. Wade reportedly admitted assaulting Parker, and Parker admitted assaulting Wade, but only after she attacked him first. Both Wade and Parker had physical signs of injury. Both were arrested and charged with assault. Parker was also charged with driving while impaired after failing a series of field sobriety tests.

Guilty Plea In Assault Case OCEAN CITY – A Pennsylvania man, arrested in September after allegedly punching his wife in the face during a domestic incident at a resort hotel, pleaded guilty this week to providing a false report to police. Around 12:40 a.m. on September 3, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer responded to a motel at 27th Street for a reported domestic assault. The officer arrived on scene and met with a female victim, who reportedly told police her husband, identified as Coswin Murray, 46, of Wilkes Barre, Pa., had punched her in the face. The victim reportedly told Murray she wanted to go home to Pennsylvania, which angered him. When the victim started packing her belongings, Murray punched her on the right side of her face, according to police reports. The victim then went to the hotel’s front desk to get help, which is when the police were called. The victim reportedly told police she had an active protective order against Murray and that he was wanted in Pennsylvania. A check with Ocean City Communications confirmed the protective order and the active warrant. As the victim was packing her belongings, she noticed her iPhone with a pink cover was missing. A short time later, another OCPD officer observed Murray walking in an alley near the hotel carrying an open bottle of wine, according to police reports. When the officer detained Murray, he provided the false name of Shawn Yawrdwarn and refused to provide his date of birth, according to police reports. OCPD officers were eventually able to identify Murray from his Pennsylvania driver’s license. During a search of Murray’s person incident to the arrest, an iPhone with a pink cover was found in his back pocket. While in booking, Murray reportedly denied there had been a fight. When asked if he had hit his wife, Murray reportedly said, “If that’s what she said, then that’s what happened.” When asked if he wanted to provide his side of the story, Murray reportedly said “no, you already made up your mind,” according to police reports. He was charged with second-degree assault, theft, providing a false statement to police and violating an out-of-state protective order. This week, he pleaded guilty to providing a false statement to police.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 35

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Ruth Lit Mongelli BERLIN – Ruth Lit Mongelli, age 92, died Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020 at home. She was born on Feb. 4, 1928 in Baltimore and was the daughter of the late Richard and Agnes (Ehart) Klima. She resided in Ocean City most of her life, Marco Island, Fla., and most recently in Mystic Harbour in Berlin. Ruth was employed as the Head Hostess/Manager at the former Mario’s Restaurant in Ocean City for over 26 years. She also operated the Beach House Apartments on 54th Street for many years. She was a mem- RUTH LIT ber of Holy Savior Cath- MONGELLI olic Church, St. Luke’s Catholic Church, the Mystic Harbour Ladies Club and a volunteer at the American Legion Post 166 in Ocean City. She was preceded in death by her first husband, Bernie Lit Sr.; her stepson, Bernie Lit Jr.; her second husband, Peter J. Mongelli; and her seven siblings Richard, Frank, Phillip, and William Klima, Mildred Schofield, Thelma Gatewood and Virginia Beland. She is survived by her best friend and devoted daughter, Kimberly Lit Hudson and husband Chris of Ocean City; two stepdaughters, Jerri Lit Sunstrom of Glen Burnie and Nina Lit Nozemack of Lutherville; and two grandchildren, Blair Donahue of San Francisco, Calif. and Brian Hudson and wife, Allison, of Gainesville, Fla. She also leaves behind her loving step-grandchildren and nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian burial was held at 9:30 am on Monday, Nov. 23 at Holy Savior Catholic Church in Ocean City. Burial was in the Maryland Veterans Cemetery in Hurlock.

Obituaries The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to Holy Savior Catholic Church, 1705 Philadelphia Avenue, Ocean City, Md. 21842 or Coastal Hospice, PO Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21802. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com.

James Richard Burbage, Jr. SALISBURY – James Richard Burbage, Jr. “Dick”, age 77, died Sunday, Nov, 15, 2020 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. Born in Berlin, he was the son of the late James Richard Burbage, Sr. and Jane Messick Burbage, and was raised by his grandmother, Mrs. Anna A. Burbage. He is survived by his children, Deborah (Rick) McCabe, Patricia Brittingham, Cynthia Burbage, Theresa (Sam) Gill, Katherine Kelly Johnson and James R. Burbage, III. Also surviving are his grandchildren, Franklin (Teddy) Purnell, Alex, Molly, Morgan and Brock McCabe, Brandon Brittingham, Sophia Burbage, Ryan and RebecJAMES ca Johnson, Gabrielle RICHARD Carrion, Samantha, Za- BURBAGE, JR. chary and Aiden Gill and Carly, Emma, Olivia and Jackson Burbage. Other survivors are brothers Chad, Keith and Kirk Burbage and sister Patrice Lehmann. Also surviving are six great-grandchildren, several nieces and nephews and Patricia K. Burbage of Salisbury, mother

of his children. Dick was a graduate of Stephen Decatur High School Class of 1961. He attended William and Mary College in Williamsburg, Va. and was a graduate of the University of Maryland at College Park. He was a Physical Education teacher at Stephen Decatur High School and coached all Junior and Senior Varsity Sports. He then became an assistant basketball coach at Salisbury University working with Ward Lambert for several years. In later years, he coached his grandchildren and was an assistant coach for the Salisbury School girls’ basketball team. Dick worked for many years as a funeral director and mortician at The Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. He also worked at an investment company in Florida with his son, James. He was a member of the Berlin Lions Club and Ocean City Jaycees. Throughout his life he enjoyed all sports, playing in baseball, softball, and basketball leagues, wrestling in college, and in later life working out at the gym. A funeral service was held on Monday, Nov. 23 at 1 p.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Berlin. Rev. Michael Moyer officiated. Interment was private for the family in the Burbage family cemetery. In lieu of flowers, a donation in his memory may be made to the Stephen Decatur High School Alumni Association, (memo) Athletics Department, c/o Lou Taylor 12329 Vivian St., Bishopville, Md. 21813. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are

November 27, 2020 in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

Emma May Marco BERLIN – On Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, Emma May Marco of Berlin passed away peacefully in her sleep at the age of 96. Emma May was the daughter of Emma Sophia Ramming and Frederick Adreon Andrews and was born on March 30, 1924 in Baltimore. She was a 1942 graduate of The Girls Vocational School while specializing in Needle Trades and gaining the admiration of her classmates. She maintained this passion for sewing throughout her life as EMMA MAY MARCO she became an expert seamstress crafting everything from uniforms for the armed services to the finest needlepoint handkerchief. In her youth, Emma May was an accomplished athlete helping lead her softball team to the championship game. She was a formidable opponent on the croquet pitch and miniature golf course, avid fan of professional golf, aficionado of word search puzzles, and enthusiastic dog lover (especially Lucky). Emma May was also a master baker who annually graced her friends and family with tins of her amazing holiday cookies. Emma May held a strong faith throughout her life and was an energetic, caring contributor to her congregations at St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church (now United Church of Christ) in Baltimore where she had eight consecutive years of Sunday School attendance, and at St. Philips Lutheran Church of the Deaf (now Christ the King Deaf Church) in Philadelphia where she served as treasurer of the Lutheran Ladies Aid. Her keen sense of humor was appreciated by her family and her group of close friends in the Philadelphia deaf community, who shared many adventures and celebrated life milestones with her. In her later years, she enjoyed her active membership in the Widows and Widowers Club of Ocean Pines. Emma May is survived by her loving and devoted sister Dorothy Andrews Sarter of Ocean Pines; her sister-in-law Marie Marco of Newark, Del.; and her 14 adoring nieces and nephews. She will remain forever in their hearts and her iron willpower is an inspiration to all who SEE NEXT PAGE


. . Obituaries

November 27, 2020

knew her. In addition to her parents, she was pre-deceased by her beloved husband, Eugene Marco of Jenkintown, Pa.; her step-father John J. Clancy of Baltimore; and her dear brothers Carroll Adreon Andrews and Clarence Elmer Andrews. There will be a private family burial at Baltimore Cemetery on Wednesday, Dec. 2. In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory can be made to the American Society for Deaf Children https://deafchildren.org/donate/ or Christ the King Deaf Church’s (West Chester, PA) human services program https://www.deafcanpa.org/online-donation/.

Constantine Anton Anthony OCEAN CITY – Constantine Anton (Gus) Anthony, age 97, was born in Cumberland on June 18, 1923. He is the son of the late Anton Constantine Anthony and Alexandra Caramichalis (Mitchell) Anthony. He is survived by his wife of 41 years Patricia Boyce Anthony and their four children -- Ronald Anthony and his wife Anne and their two sons, Michael Anthony and his wife Jessica and Nicholas GUS Anthony; Alexandra Hall ANTHONY and her husband Dr. Michael Hall and their two children, Alexander Hall and Stephanie Autry and her husband Jackson Autry, great grandchildren Wyatt and Savannah; Byron Anthony and his wife Jill and their three children, Gabrielle, Philip and Dimitri Anthony; and Angela Rauscher and her husband John Rauscher. Gus graduated from Alleghany High School in 1941 and enlisted in the Army that fall. He served until October of 1946 and was later recalled in 1951 for the Korean War and served as an Aircraft Performance Engineer aboard B-36 airplanes. He separated in 1959 after 18 years of service as Strategic Air Command (SAC) Captain. He proudly served during WWII and the Korean War. Involved with franchised Tastee Freeze, he built a chain of 52 restaurants in Delaware, Maryland and Vir-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch ginia. He served as president and later chairman for four years in the Virginia Restaurant Association. Active in civic affairs, he served as president of the Peter Derzis Chapter #436 of the Order of AHEPA in Washington D.C and founded the Constantine Anthony AHEPA Chapter #511 in Ocean City. He founded and served as president of the Atlantic National Bank (later sold to BB&T) of Ocean City in 1974 and also served as chairman of their executive board for 22 years. He was one of the founding members of the Ocean City Today newspaper. Constantine served many years with various church Parish Council's and served twice as President at St. Katherines Greek Orthodox Church in Falls Church, Va. He also served twice as president of the parish council of St. George Greek Orthodox Church in Ocean City. He was appointed for two years to Governor William Donald Schaefer’s Judicial Selection committee. He received the highest non-clerical award of the Greek Orthodox Church when he became an Archon of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople. He became a member of the leadership 100. He was fluent in Greek and English, he enjoyed boating, tennis, computers, amateur radio, coin collecting and photography. A funeral service will be held on Friday, Nov. 27, 2020 at 11 a.m. at Saint George Greek Orthodox Church 8805 Coastal Highway in Ocean City. Rev. Chris Wallace and Rev. Dean Morales will officiate. Friends may call one hour prior to the service. Seating will be limited; facemasks and social distancing are required due to COVID-19 restrictions. Interment with military honors will follow in Sunset Memorial Park in Berlin. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the St. George Greek Orthodox Church 8805 Coastal Highway Ocean City, Md. 21842 or to St. Mark Greek Orthodox Church 2100 NW 51st St, Boca Raton, Fla. 33431 or to Constantine Anthony AHEPA Chapter # 511, 8805 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842 or to AHEPA Chapter #487, 2100 NW 51st Street, Boca Raton, Fla. 33431. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage funeral home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

Page 37


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Grants Provide Tech Resources To Help Patients

November 27, 2020

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – A local agency is offering free resources to caregivers of people with dementia. At MAC Inc., Area Agency on Aging, a Caregiver Resource Center is directing caregivers to resources and assistive technology that can improve the safety and wellbeing of those with dementia. Using grant funding from the Maryland Department of Aging, Caregiver Resource Center Coordinator Janet Parke said the agency was able to acquire an array of assistive technology – items or tools that help the elder or disabled do the activities they have always done, but must now do differently. She said that could include anything from magnetic button-down shirts and fidget muffs to alert devices and specialty doorbells. And while the devices aren’t for sale at the resource center, Parke explained that caregivers can make appointments to see and learn about the assistive technology and to talk about their needs. “When folks come into MAC’s Caregiver Resource Center, they generally have something in mind that has been frustrating them in caring for their loved one,” she said. “They are looking for tools, tips that will improve the independence of their loved one, their family life and to make things just easier.” Parke said the use of assistive technology can improve and maintain the quality of life of both patients and caregivers and maximize independence. The agency noted that devices can improve medication management, home safety and the ability to perform simple activities such as bathing and dressing. Parke added MAC’s free resource center not only offers information on assistive technology, but provides oneon-one consultations for caregivers, among other things. She said appointments are available over the phone and in person. “It’s a way to take some of the burden off the caregivers,” she said. The agency’s program is being held in conjunction with National Family Caregiver Month, a time when the MAC Center recognizes and thanks unpaid caregivers for everything they do. Helping caregivers with information about assistive technology is the focus of MAC’s activities this month. For more information on the Caregiver Resource Center, or to make an appointment, call 410-742-0505. For more information on MAC programs, visit macinc.org.


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November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 39

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BLACK FRIDAY WEEKEND SPECIALS The General Levin Winder Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) welcomed member Jane Bunting’s daughter Beth Sise as a new member during a meeting celebrating Veterans Day at the Ocean Pines White Horse Park pavilion. Regent Gail Weldin and Chaplain Barbara Rusko administered the oath of membership. Pictured, from left, are Bunting, Sise, Rusko and Weldin.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Millennial Economy Wealth Of Knowledge

November 27, 2020

BY KRISTIN COANE

SPECIAL TO THE DISPATCH

BERLIN – The millennial generation hasn’t had it so great. A recent economic analysis reports that since entering the workforce five to 20 years ago, the average millennial has experienced slower economic advancement than any other generation in U.S. history. It’s not just a matter of long periods of high unemployment. It’s also because getting that first “real” job during a recession often means a lower entry-level salary that can affect their lifelong earning potential. Not only that, but millennials can’t seem to catch a prolonged break. They’ve experienced the impacts of 9/11, the Great Recession and now the COVID-19 pandemic — all within the past 20 years. These setbacks matter to all generations because millennials represent the future of the U.S. economy. As of July 2019, millennials surpassed baby boomers as the nation’s largest living adult generation. It’s important that this demographic make inroads in entrepreneurial or job creation endeavors while KRISTIN continuing to advance COANE industries, both old and new. Growth in these areas increase GDP and wealth prospects for the entire nation. And yet, in contrast to the historical trend of each generation boasting progress faster than the prior generation, this has not necessarily been the case among millennials. On one hand, as of 2018, 40% owned their own homes and 40% of millennial women had children. However, their numbers pale compared to Generation X, among which 45% owned their homes and 53% of women had children at the same age as today’s millennials. While millennials constantly seem to be playing catch-up, it’s not a problem of their own making. This generation is the largest to suffer from widespread student-loan debt, the lingering effects of successive economic declines, and substantially increased health care and housing costs during their young adult years. Fortunately, these millennial misfortunes have made them a rather practical generation of young adults. Even during the pandemic, they have stepped up to assume roles as first-time homebuyers, accounting for more than a third of residential sales this past July. Yet, we all know that the road to success is frequently uneven. The recent pandemic has had a varying effect on young adults. While some have had to move back home with their parents, others have taken advantage of their remote-work situation to engage in domestic travel indulgences, working wherever they go. Remember, regardless of your age, income or assets, we are here to help support your insurance needs. Contact us for more information. (The writer has been part of the Key Financial team for over 15 years. Their entire team can be reached at 410-6290357).


November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 41


WPS Sports Awards:

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Worcester Prep students from around Delmarva captured fall sports awards and Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference (ESIAC) honors in cross country, field hockey, golf, soccer and volleyball. Three teams won their ESIAC Championship, including boys’ cross country, boys’ soccer, and co-ed golf. One coach (boys varsity soccer coach Jon Adkins) and four athletes earned individual awards including two Runners of the Year (Caitlin Hoen and Graham McColgan) and two Championship Game MVPs (Jack Gardner for the boys varsity soccer team and Morgan White for the girls varsity soccer team). In addition to the conference awards, the school held its own awards ceremonies for all fall sports. Pictured, front row from left, are C.C. Lizas (varsity volleyball MVP); Sophia Ludt and Moorea Phillips, (varsity volleyball co-coaches award); Maddy Warren and Sara Freih (varsity volleyball co-most improved); Caitlyn Hoen (girls’ varsity cross country MVP); Caroline Anderson (girls’ varsity cross country coaches award); Sydney Lamson-Reich and Natalie Foxwell (girls’ varsity cross country co-most improved); Graham McColgan (boys’ varsity cross country MVP); and Sajiv Satyal (boys’ varsity cross country most improved). Back, from left, are Claire Williams (varsity field hockey MVP); Caitlin Williams (varsity field hockey coaches award); Elaina El-

rick (varsity field hockey most improved); Morgan White (girls’ varsity soccer MVP); Ava Nally (girls’ varsity soccer coaches award); Myranda Beebe (girls’ varsity Soccer most improved); Michael We-

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hberg (boys’ varsity soccer MVP); Brice Richins (boys’ varsity Soccer coaches award); Vishnu Mohan (boys’ varsity soccer most improved); T.J. Bescak (co-ed varsity golf MVP); Vanesska Hall (co-ed

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varsity golf coaches award); and Riley Schoch (co-ed varsity golf most improved). Not pictured was Riley Moyer (boys’ varsity cross country coaches award). Submitted photo ROOFING

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Students

November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 43

In The News

Ocean City Elementary second graders Matthew Chavarria-Aguilar and Nathan Simm ended a busy week of learning recently with a cardboard high-five in Maria Graham's class.

HERE’S MY CARD

As part of the school’s “Called To Service,” Most Blessed Sacrament intermediate students Kate and Bryn Wanner opened a lemonade stand on their own time to raise money for local emergency responders. The sisters were able to both contribute $34.50. Submitted Photos

Berlin Intermediate School Assistant Principal Dr. David Gell gave an Origami lesson earlier this month in Heather Riser’s 3D Art. Above, fifth grader Delaynie Kerrigan and Gell show off the finished product.

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Business And Real Estate News

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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BERLIN – Atlantic General Hospital and Health System officials recently announced a new provider has joined its behavioral health program. Diane Skolka, a board certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP), provides psychiatric and behavioral health care at the Atlantic Health Center alongside psychiatrist Bryce Blanton, MD. Skolka has 19 years of experience as a registered nurse. She has a background in critical care/post anesthesia care in addition to her previous role as a patient care coordinator in case management and population health. DIANE SKOLKA She earned her bachelor’s degree in nursing at Wilmington University and her master’s degree in PMHNP studies at Eastern Kentucky University. Skolka provides diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders including, but not limited to, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, PTSD, ADD/ADHD, and personality disorders, with use of psychopharmacology and therapy. Her philosophy for practice is based on facilitating positive personal change and growth. She incorporates a whole person approach to care with respect to the mind-body connection.

New Surgery Center Home SALISBURY – Peninsula Orthopaedic Associates (POA) announced Deer Pointe Surgical Center not only has a new name – POA Surgery Center – it also has a new address. POA Surgery Center is now located on Salisbury’s “S” curve at 641 South Salisbury Boulevard, which was the former location of Delmarva Surgery Center. The state-of-theart completely remodeled surgery center includes four operating rooms as well as a pain management suite. POA Surgery Center provides an unmatched same-day surgical experience for all orthopaedic conditions. POA Surgery Center offers a wide variety of surgical services including total joint replacement of the knee, hip, and shoulder, sports medicine, spine, hand, wrist, and elbow, fracture care, as well as pain management. These procedures are performed by the first-class, fellowshiptrained, orthopaedic surgeons at POA as well as Dr. Brian Kahan for all pain management procedures. “POA proudly partners with TidalHealth to raise the bar and offer the most advanced and comprehensive orthopaedic care on the Eastern Shore,” said POA President Dr. Thomas Brandon. “POA Surgery Center provides a warm, safe, and individualized experience for patients receiving orthopaedic surgery.” “TidalHealth is honored to partner with POA to continue offering patients an ex-

November 27, 2020

ceptional outpatient orthopaedic surgical experience close to home,” said TidalHealth CEO Steven Leonard.

Commercial Building Sold SALISBURY – Principal Chris Davis and Advisor Meredith Mears recently collaborated to sell a commercial building on the east side of Salisbury. Upon their retirement, the owners of Delmarva Collections enlisted Davis to sell the property they had occupied for more than 20 years. Mears recognized the building’s redevelopment potential and quickly worked to secure a contract on behalf of a local investor and community revitalizer. The 3,744-square-foot building is located on a bustling corridor connecting Routes 50 and 13, leading into the heart of downtown Salisbury. The building is comprised of three separate units, one of which has already been leased to a medical tenant by NAI Coastal Advisor George Merritt. The remaining two units are available for lease and total +/- 1,250 square feet, each. The purchaser has already begun renovations on the property and plans to continue its redevelopment in the coming months. “This property’s location and existing leasing potential propelled the vision for the investor’s redevelopment plans,” said Mears. “The units are offered for lease at below market rates, giving potential tenants the opportunity to lower their overhead costs or make that jump to expand their operations.” The two now-vacant units offer flexible leasing terms with below market rates and options for custom build out.

Medical Group Absorbed POCOMOKE – Blue Heron Medical Group in Pocomoke City has become part of TidalHealth. The providers will remain the same, but its name and phone number will change. The office will be TidalHealth Primary Care and its number will be 410-912-6167. Dr. Paul Fleury, Dr. Mary Fleury and Dr. Amy Johnson have been providing expert and friendly care to families in the Pocomoke area for many years, and TidalHealth is proud to have them as part of its team. Current patients will be able to keep seeing their providers and will have access to TidalHealth’s network of hospitals, primary care, specialty providers across the Delmarva Peninsula and online medical form resources. “In order that we could continue our 40 years of primary care services to Pocomoke and the Lower Eastern Shore, we recognized the need to partner with a larger entity,” said Dr. Paul Fleury. “We chose TidalHealth because we believe it provides us with the best opportunity to continue to provide our brand of personal care in an environment that is seamlessly connected to the most specialists and advanced medical services available on the Shore.”


Best Beats

November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

on the beach

FULL CIRCLE Seacrets: Saturday, November 28

DUNEHOUNDS The Globe Gastro Theatre: Friday, Nov. 27

OTTO GRUNDMAN Downy Oshun: Every Thursday

TAYLOR KNOX Crabcake Factory Bayside: Wednesday, Dec. 2

LAUREN GLICK DUO Downy Oshun: Saturday, Nov. 28

BEATS BY STYLER Pickles Pub: Friday & Saturday, Nov. 27 & 28

TRIVIA W/ BIGLER The Globe Gastro Theatre: Monday, Nov. 30

Page 45


The Dispatch

Page 46

Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 WEBSITES: www.mdcoastdispatch.com www.facebook.com/thedispatchoc J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

NEWS DEPARTMENT SHAWN J. SOPER Managing Editor ssoper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHARLENE SHARPE Staff Writer/Copy Editor csharpe@mdcoastdispatch.com BETHANY HOOPER Staff Writer bhooper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHRIS PARYPA Photographer

SALES DEPARTMENT TERRI FRENCH Account Executive Entertainment Editor terri@mdcoastdispatch.com JEANETTE DESKIEWICZ Account Executive jeanette@mdcoastdispatch.com

ART DEPARTMENT COLE GIBSON Art Director cole@mdcoastdispatch.com DAVID HOOKS Graphic Artist/Webmaster dhooks@mdcoastdispatch.com

BUSINESS OFFICE Bookkeeper/Classifieds Manager classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com

The Maryland Coast Dispatch (USPS #015125) is an official and legal newspaper for Worcester County. Periodical postage paid at Berlin, Maryland, and additional mailing offices. The Maryland Coast Dispatch, 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, Md. 21811, is published weekly on Friday mornings, 52 weeks a year. Subscription rates are $75 per year, $55 for six months. POSTMASTER: Please send change of address to Maryland Coast Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Maryland Coast Dispatch offices are located at Route 346 and Graham Avenue, Berlin, Maryland.

State Property Purchase Critical For Berlin The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 27, 2020

HOW WE SEE IT

The State of Maryland’s $4.2 million purchase of 673 acres of land once considered ripe for development near Berlin is a major acquisition. At the risk of being hyperbolic, we view this transaction as one of the most significant open space deals in the region in recent years and critical for the future of Berlin. Four years ago, the Berlin Town Council was presented with plans to transform the former 36-hole Bay Club golf course property into a 434-site campground. The project would have been allowed by code but required an exception through the county zoning board. There was talk at the time about Berlin potentially annexing the property but the council ultimately in 2016 took a wait-and-see approach as the campground plans were preliminary at that point. Developing that golf course property into a campground would have changed Berlin forever. Though camp-

grounds have clearly thrived over the last decade in this area and across the country, the property off Libertytown Road was not the right place for one. The town’s narrow streets and practical limitations would have made getting to the campground a logistical nightmare. Thoughts of wayward RVs cruising through the downtown area and congesting secondary roads around the town were baffling. A collective sigh of relief should be waffling out of the Berlin community this week as campground plans and other thoughts of a large residential community are off the table as a result of the state buying the properties through its Open Space program. It’s a wonderful use of the state’s funding. In the Board of Public Works packet this week included a description of the opportunity to increase recreational trail opportunity for this part of Worcester County. The description read, “The property contains a mix of forests and

fields that will be managed by the Maryland Forest Service as an addition to Chesapeake Forest Lands for public hunting and trailbased activities such as walking and wildlife observation. The potential for equestrian trails will be explored. One parcel is a former golf course; fairways and fields will be reforested with a diverse mix of tree species to maximize hunting and other recreational opportunities while protecting water quality. Acquisition presents a rare opportunity to preserve a large tract of land in an area of Worcester County that is experiencing rapid growth.” This transaction is something Berlin residents and merchants should be thankful for this holiday season. Development of this property would assuredly have impacted existing qualities of life forever. The state’s acquisition will allow for a better use of the land moving forward with a focus on green space and recreational opportunities.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Events Misrepresented Editor: Your editorial regarding late September events is troublesome as you consistently refer to them as being held on the “weekend.” Bike Week -- as Cruisin Week -- are officially monikered thusly as they begin Thursday, by definition midweek: three days behind, three days ahead. The same with Springfest and Sunfest. Indeed, the latter's most hyper occupied day was the first, Thursday. It's unfortunate that the media continues to unintentionally reinforce the perception that we're the place to go on Saturday/Sunday at the expense of the weekdays which as you know the town is trying to promote. Continued use of the term "weekend" simply serves to repeat the misconception that that's the time to visit when in fact the opposite is true: less crowded, more specials, good deals and discounts and a more agreeable non "weekend warrior" class of people (most locals don't work weekdays and are out and about as well). Remember, perception is reality. Stone Scruggs Ocean City

Political Reactions Editor: •How can people really believe Biden fairly defeated Trump? They probably don’t believe it but don’t care as long as they won. But they didn’t win because they lost some of their democracy they have always taken for granted. They are indeed “useful idiots” as Vladimir Lenin would term them. They are too brain washed to consider facts

which they hate and ignore and prefer propaganda from sources they don’t even know. Facts: Trump got nine million more votes than in 2016 and held rallies all over America totaling millions in attendance. Biden was the worst candidate, probably, in American history having early signs of dementia with a very unpopular running mate. He hardly campaigned, had very few accomplishments in politics in 47 years, provably aided his son getting rich because he was vice president, has implied his own racism, etc. Add to this a whole host of irregularities in the election some of which are: •Pennsylvania governance changed state voting laws without legislation approval. •Philadelphia election observers were forced to stand 30 to 100 feet away from vote counting. Giuliani claims that over 450,000 votes were un-observed and fraudulent. •Pennsylvania postal worker was directed to back date ballot envelops by his employer. •23,000 blue ballots appeared overnight and found in Pennsylvania. •450,000 ballots only voted for Biden and no other items on the ballot. •Michigan Republican poll challengers were removed from Detroit election stations for large periods of time. •A county in Michigan identified a Dominion software glitch that resulted in changing 6,000 votes from Trump to Biden. The same Dominion software is used in 47 other polling locations in Michigan and 30 other states. •135,000 blue ballots appeared over-night via a van and found in De-

troit, Mich. where poll observers were not allowed back into the room. •Nevada witnesses claim that 1,000 votes were filled out at one time at a Biden/Harris van outside an election station. •Las Vegas election observers were asked to leave with 1 ½ hours of work left to do on day one of the election. •Arizona had a Sharpie scandal where in several election locations voters were handed Sharpies (that their website says should not be used as they bleed through). •Maricopa County, Ariz. reports that substantial number of votes were wrongly rejected. How can these Biden supporters be honest with themselves and be happy with a president that got into office as one would in a totalitarian regime elsewhere?? The Democrats never stopped, in four years, accusing Trump of stealing the 2016 election with absolutely no evidence. They launched a $38 million, 2.5-year inquiry looking for a crime with no evidence. Here we have a fire hose of evidence needing to be proven and Democrats are resisting. They are amazing hypocrites. Our democracy depends on rooting out the evil that has overtaken this country. The greatest fear we should have is not a Harris/Biden presidency that will go away in four years, but the phenomenally shortsighted, naive and Trump hating Americans that voted for Biden. This is the real systemic sickness that will be with us for a long time. What is wrong with the minds of these Americans that are willing to throw away the SEE NEXT PAGE


November 27, 2020

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR greatest democracy the world has ever known which can never be replaced? Dennis W. Evans Berlin

Day’s Sales Will Be Donated Editor: Now more than ever, we understand that it is really important to support the people in need in our communities. SoDel Cares has been a long-standing partner to many organizations in Delaware that help children, at risk youth and adults and the elderly that live in our local communities. We are committed to doing whatever we can to continue that support during one of the most challenging times the restaurant industry has faced. While we are saddened that we are unable to hold an inperson event to raise money for our foundation this year, we are asking our customers to help us in something we can do. On Tuesday, Dec. 1, we will be donating 100% of in house and carry out food, beverage, and alcohol sales at each of our 12 restaurants on the culinary coast to SoDel Cares. We ask those in our communities who can contribute to purchase your favorite meal from a SoDel Concepts restaurant on that day, and maybe add on a cocktail to give a little extra. For those not in the area on Dec. 1, we will also be setting up a wine auction, where you can purchase a bottle or two of wine and pick it up at a later date. In the past five years, SoDel Cares has donated 100% of its proceeds, exceeding in total $600,000, to help those in need. As a company, we have made a commitment to supporting our communities, in good times and in bad. It is part of our mission, and part of what motivates us to go to work every day. This year we ask you to help us help them. Scott Kammerer (Th writer is the president of SoDel Concepts.)

Home Tour Appreciation Editor: We did it — in spite of the pandemic. The all-new, all-virtual 16th Annual Sand Castle Home Tour went on in 2020 — although in a brand new way — and was a huge success. From Oct. 1-15, more than 1,800 visitors toured 10 fabulous resort homes online, viewing nearly 25,000 pages of content. Fifteen lucky tour goers also won prizes from our daily give-a-ways. It truly took a village to get this new kind of tour off the ground, and we are so grateful to everyone in our community who pitched in. Thank you to the 10 homeowners who opened their doors to our videographers and writers and allowed us

Between The Lines

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

to share their personal spaces: Cheryl and Jay Taustin, Todd Burbage, Jim and Hanne Crystal, Mike and Mary Foelber, Mary Strittmatter, Bryan and Renee Mercer, Kevin Myers, Ian and Karen Hunter, David Bradley and Tom and Megan Buterbaugh. Thank you to our sponsors, who took a chance and funded this first-year endeavor. We couldn’t have done it without you, and congratulate you on your many click-throughs. A shout out to our Ocean-level sponsors: Bethany Resort Furnishings/Donaway Furniture, Casual Designs, Creative Concepts, Gateway Builders, Monogram Furniture, and T&G Builders. To our Sandlevel sponsors: Arctic Heating & Air, Bradley Construction, Deeley Insurance Group, Innerbloom Floral, and Bryan LeCompte Yard Designs. And to our Boardwalk-level sponsors: Bank of Ocean City and the Town of Ocean City. To our Sea Shell-level sponsors: American Granite & Tile, Beachwood Builders, Brasure’s Carpet Care, Delaware Elevator, Dunes Manor, The Framing Corner, Impact Home Technology, Kitchen Concepts, Oceans East Apartments, Piney Island Construction, and Worcester County Tourism. To our Umbrella-level sponsors: Celtic Nations, Denney Lighting & Design, OCMD Hotels, and Rina Thaler Art. We also appreciate the support of our media sponsors who helped us get the word out — OC Today, Clear Channel Outdoor, Coastal Style Magazine, Delmarva Public Media, The Dispatch, 47/ABC, and Ocean 98 — and of the generous donors who provided our daily prize packages. We can’t forget to thank our talented production crews, our creative and hard-working staff, our dedicated volunteer committee, and the fabulous artists who painted the home portraits. Thank you, again, to everyone who made this year’s very-different Sand Castle Home Tour a success. The proceeds from this event continue to provide sustaining funds to support the Art League, your community nonprofit arts organization, and help us fulfill our mission of promoting artistic expression and appreciation for the creative arts. The tour also helps to keep the Ocean City Center for the Arts free and open to the public. Our virtual Sand Castle Home Tour proved to be an innovative way to spotlight the many builders, decorators, and businesses who provide home design services here on the Shore. We look forward to expanding it next year along with a return to an inperson home tour. Rina Thaler Executive Director Art League of Ocean City Ocean City Center for the Arts

TO OUR READERS: The Dispatch welcomes any and all letters from our readers. All letters are encouraged typed, but not required, and we reserve the right to edit each letter for clarity, accuracy and brevity. Letters should include writer’s name, address and day and evening telephone numbers. If we are unable to reach the writer, we will have to withhold the letter. Due to space restraints, letters under 500 words in length will be given top priority. Letters can be mailed to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811, emailed to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com or faxed to 410-641-0966.

Page 47

By Publisher/Editor Steve Green

Press releases from Maryland’s governor would oftentimes be more appropriate than press conferences. The fears and stress associated with Gov. Larry Hogan’s press conferences are real. These pressers are announced in the early morning for the late afternoon typically, resulting in business owners and residents being on edge all day. In fact, one restaurateur said this week he halted all his supply orders immediately upon hearing of the press conference being scheduled. He even told this media outlet his advertisement for this week would be cancelled if Hogan instituted any more restrictions on capacity. The latter situation has played out each week in the spring and this fall with Hogan holding businesses’ fate with each announcement. This virus is serious, but it’s a dramatic enough of a situation based on the facts alone. Announcing these highly theatrical press conferences amid skepticism and fears is unnecessary. In the case of this week’s creation of a “widescale compliance and education enforcement operation” ahead of the holiday weekend, a press release to announce it and the associated snitch hotline would have been a better route. I don’t expect any changes in the near future, however, as it’s clear there is campaigning for 2024 underway. If the metrics continue in the positive direction for Worcester County, public school officials should reconsider last week’s closure of school through the first of the year. Worcester County’s daily positive percentage has been trending down since Nov. 16 when it was 7%. As of Wednesday, the county’s positive test rate was 4.19% (statewide 6.77%), down from 4.33% Tuesday. As for the seven-day moving average case rate per 100,000, Worcester County’s dropped Wednesday to 13.12 (37 statewide), down from 14.48 Tuesday. This level reached 24.32 on Nov. 16. Readers will remember county public schools were closed to in-person school instruction because the positive test rate had exceeded 5% and the cases per 100,000 had exceeded 15. These are benchmarks set by the state mandating when exceeded school systems should limit in-person instruction. As far as school announcements this week, it was mostly quiet on the Lower Shore. Somerset County Public Schools did announce an extension of its in-person closure until Dec. 7 tentatively. The school system closed its schools on Nov. 9 when the county’s seven-day positivity percentage was 7.72% and its new case rate per 100,000 was 24.54. The school system website read, “Somerset County's 7-day test positivity rate must be 5% or lower, and new case rate per 100,000 of 15 or lower for 7 consecutive days before in-person learning may resume.” Unlike Worcester’s metrics, Somerset’s numbers are going the wrong way. It’s clear Somerset students will not be in school anytime soon. Each jurisdiction should be able to make its own decisions based on the variables at play. In Worcester’s case, there’s a lot more to consider than just the health numbers. It’s these other factors that will keep schools closed. There are the ongoing connectivity issues as well as busing concerns. There is also the matter of the morale of the teachers, who have concerns about their health as well as the work conditions that have been frustrating this fall due to the connectivity issues and the constant pivoting they must make between in-person and virtual teaching. Those concerns have been articulated by local teachers on social media throughout the fall and in more detail during private conversations I have with many in casual settings, including on the sidelines of athletic games, grocery store runs and waiting for carryout at restaurants. Outside of the connectivity inconsistencies experienced in Worcester, most of the teacher concerns expressed of late were confirmed in a letter from the Maryland State Education Association President Cheryl Bost to State Superintendent Dr. Karen Salmon. “As you are aware, it is a huge effort to create lessons and transfer them to virtual then adapt them for in-person, or to bring materials home to teach virtually then move into a classroom situation and back again. No doubt that the stress is felt by all—students, families, educators, administrators, and the entire community. Add the lack of adequate federal funding and a failed national public health response, and the result is deeper stress and greater uncertainty,” she wrote. “In this moment, you can provide certainty and calm. While we believe that recent local decisions to rollback in person learning have been conducted wisely and with the best interest of the health and safety of students and educators in mind, we also know that setting return dates for partial in-person learning in two-week increments is not the appropriate response at this time. It is overly stressful on everyone and doesn’t allow for any type of continuity of learning or the ability for educators and families to plan ahead. We should give Marylanders a better ability to plan. … We urge you to work with educators and local school system leaders to prevent these elevated workload levels from turning into a prolonged burnout crisis that sets us even further back in our already struggling efforts to recruit and retain outstanding educators in our profession.”


Page 48

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Adventures Of Fatherhood By STEVE GREEN

y kids have a way of simplifying life for me, helping to keep the journey in perspective. In these times, it’s so welcomed because there’s not much straightforward about life right now. I spent last Friday with Carson at home in virtual learning. Pam will be with him during the week so long as schools are closed. The least I can do is give her a spell on Fridays. I was impressed with how far Carson, 11, has come since September with his independence. He still needs help but it’s more in the realm of guidance now when before it was handholding and directing. There were several occasions when he flat out pushed my hand off the iPad to let him do it as I was not doing something properly or, more likely, as quickly as he desired. As we worked through his subjects, there were instances when I had to really keep him focused. It’s to be expected because we are home and there’s a lot of distractions, including unstable internet on this particular day on our end for some reason. When it came time for math, I quickly realized he doesn’t need me at all to work through his lesson with Mr. Lloyd. While he doesn’t require help, I learned as soon as I tried to get up he wanted me there. In his nonverbal way, I was able to garner he wanted an audience as he rocked the material. It was a delight to watch him run through the lesson and at one point enter an answer to the teacher’s question in the Zoom chat. He didn’t need my help one bit. He just wanted me to observe how well he did. In life, especially during these crazy times, we must seek the silver lining in everything. As much as I loathe virtual learning for my kid and all others, the positive in this situation was the tremendous inspiration I get to take in from my special needs son. Next Friday I’m going to try and leave

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T

him alone at the computer during math class. He might not let me, but there’s worse things in the world in all honesty.

he difference in appearance between Beckett’s mask before and after school is always interesting. Everything looks clean and in good shape at morning dropoffs. By the time he gets home, the inside of it is filthy on most days. It looks sometimes as if he’s drinking or eating out of it. While I am grateful he’s wearing it appropriately – at least most of the time -- I have to wonder how it gets so dirty. He told me one day he often puts his Invisalign trays in his mask, which he dangles from his ears, while he eats lunch. I told him that probably explains the color change on the inside. He reminded me he puts the trays in the Invisalign case first and then puts it in his mask. I told him it’s a mystery to me how dirty his mask becomes. He simply shrugged his shoulders, saying, “I guess we should wash it then.” By “we” he meant me or his mom, of course. Nonetheless, a big difference between us is I can’t get beyond the mystery of the dirty mask. I asked him the next morning to focus on how his mask gets so dirty during the day. When I picked him up and looked at the inside of his mask, it was orange. I figured it was his orange Gatorade at lunch. He said he didn’t spill it, but, “I will ask tomorrow.” I have no idea who he plans on asking. He didn’t know either. The conversation did not his attention. I am starting to realize there will be puzzling conversations with our 12-year-old. There seem to be more and more of these of late.

A

little blast from the past from 2017 this week: Carson, 9, cracks me up on a daily basis without saying a word. On Thanksgiving, my sis-

ter came up with a game involving gratitude. While going through the alphabet, each person would say what they were grateful for with that particular letter and she would write it down. We told Carson he could use his device to say what he wanted to put on the list. Because he’s smart, Carson immediately went right to the geography page in his device. He loves the subject of geography and knows all the state capitals. Therefore, he was thankful for Alabama, Boston, California, Dallas, Eugene, Ore., Frankford, Del., Georgia, Havre de Grace, Md., Illinois, Jefferson City, Mo. and the list goes on. When we asked him to try something different because we weren’t buying that he was thankful for North Dakota, he began recounting school subjects, objects and toys he was grateful for instead. He got us all good when he said Kit-Kat bars. Another example was last weekend I had a grocery store list in the works on the counter. I walked away for a few minutes and noticed some new additions to the list. At first, I just figured Pam had added things I forgot. It turns out Carson had come across the list and quickly added, “Beer, bananas, water,” to the list in his own handwriting. When it came time to hit the grocery store, he came running over to the door. When I told him I just wanted to make this run by myself, he made it clear he didn’t want to come. He pointed to “beer” on the list, padded me on the chest and giggled to himself as he ran back upstairs to his room. As I was walking out the door, a shirt fell on my head. I looked up and there was shirtless Carson rubbing his belly. I’m not sure what that was about, but it was hilarious. It’s the little things I tell you. (The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

Locally INSIDE SEATING & CARRYOUT Famous OPEN 7 A.M. DAILY For 40 Years!

Cafe

Breakfast Try Our Casino Omelette SUBS • SANDWICHES Rt. 50-West Ocean City • 410-213-1804

Located Between Comfort Inn Suites & Starbucks Across From Outback Steak House


The Dispatch Classifieds

November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

$15/Week For Minimum Of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available)

HELP WANTED

AUTOMOTIVE/ MARINE

Now hiring for full and part time, SALES ASSOCIATES for busy automotive store. Excellent pay and benefits. Call 302-539-8686 ext. 3014

TOW TRUCK DRIVERS

Now Hiring for full and part time, experienced tow truck operators for the Ocean Pines/ Ocean City area.

Excellent Pay Plan!! Call 302-228-2353

NOW HIRING!

AUTOMOTIVE GREAT-GREAT-GREAT OPPORTUNITIES! Busy auto service & tire center, est. in 1984 with locations in Ocean Pines, Bethany Beach, and Long Neck, is now accepting applications for: - MARyLAND STATE INSPECTOR -TEChNICIANS - LUBE TEChS Must have valid drivers license. ASE’s a hUGE PLUS, but not required. EXCELLENT PAY & BENEFITS! Call 302-344-9846

Full Time, 1st Shift Hours, Pay DOE.

Text to Apply: Ocadmin www.arksysinc.com or call 410.995.1220 ask for HR

Currently hiring manpower for

•STUCCO & EIFS MEChANICS •CARPENTERS •CONCRETE BLOCK •COATINGS SPECIALISTS •FLAT CONCRETE •CONCRETE REPAIRS •PT WELDER •COMMERCIAL CAULKING •WINDOW & DOOR INSTALLERS •WAREhOUSE hELP (DRIVER’S LICENSE REQ’D)

NOW HIRING - YEAR ROUND FULL TIME DRIVER Call 410-726-7061 for Interview

RENTALS

WEEKLY RENTALS Poolfront Room $215. Efficiency Room $245. 2 BR Apartment $350. 3 BR Suite $400.

Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave.

410-289-8581

Experience Preferred. Tools, transportation & a valid driver’s license are a plus. Competitive benefit package available. Please apply in person at 11935 Hammer Rd, Bishopville, MD, or apply online: http://allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

The Dispatch

Legal Notices

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

THIRD INSERTION

We are hiring for our Ocean City, MD office.

Electricians, Fire Alarm Service Technicians, Front Office Administrative Assistant

yARD SALES

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER: 2BR condo, 12 69th St., 1st floor, one BUILDING off beach. The Wight Clipper. Asking $190,000, negotiable, make offer. 410-467-1362.

LESLIE LOBOS, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-20-000232 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

v. ALEXIS BAXTER FITZPATRICK, ET AL. Defendants

COMMERCIAL WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 1 OfficeRetail and 1 Warehouses. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– UPSCALE MIDTOWN OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT: 2,130 sq.ft. No CAM fees. 443-880-2225. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Christmas Arts & Craft Fair

Come Find A Gift For Everyone On Your List. 9308 Carey Road Berlin, MD 21811 9:00am-7:00pm November 27th-29th & Every Saturday & Sunday in December *Free Admission *One of a Kind Gifts *Free Personalization *Masks Required For More Information Call or Text 443.365.9111 or 443.365.5434

PUT YOUR LOGO IN COLOR FOR JUST $10

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811

Deadline For Insertions, Cancellations And Payment Is 3 p.m. Tuesday. Pre-Payment Is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard. CONSTRUCTION WORKERS NEEDED: Laborers & Skilled Persons. On job training. Starting wage $16.00/hour. Call 302-4367533 for information. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– BOOKKEEPER NEEDED: Must be proficient in QuickBooks. Flexible hours. Call 443-614-0234. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Page 49

SERVICES Ceja’s Landscaping & More!

•YARD MAINTENANCE •PAINTING •POWER WASHING 410-251-3425 410-202-2545

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BORDERLINKS I CONDOMINIUM OCEAN PINES, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-20-000232, the undersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Borderlinks I Condominium, located at, 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Monday, November 30, 2020 at 11:00 a.m., the following timeshare intervals: Time Condomimium Unit Interval Be31 Bu47 Cb54 Bv48

20 23 49 34

As19 Ak11 Bz52 As19 Cb54 Bu47 Bj36 Bv48 As19 Aa1 Bz52 As19 Aq17 Bo41 Aq17 Bz52 Be31 Cb54 Be31

25 30 3 48 1 18 44 24 34 23 38 31 26 30 22 13 45 18 41

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Borderlinks I Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2020 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the


The Dispatch

Page 50

LEGAL RATES: Legal advertising rate is $7 per

column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or

purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Leslie Lobos, Esq., Trustee, at 240-449-8862. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 13, 2020 3x 11-13, 11-20, 11-27

THIRD INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-20-000239 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff

following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Time Unit Interval Bf32 Aj10 Bc29 Aj10 Am13 Bc29 Bc29 Bf32 Ad4 Bc29 Bq43 Bq43 Bq43 Bf32 Bq43 Bf32 Bg33 Bb28 Ag7 Am13 Bg33 Am13 Am13

4 8 43 22 32 4 8 16 13 44 49 47 7 7 3 1 24 12 16 51 21 47 48

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Villas of Ocean Pines, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records.

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES, BORDERLINKS CONDOMINIUM OCEAN PINES, MD

The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids.

By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-20-000239, the undersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Villas of Ocean Pines, located at, 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Monday, November 30, 2020 at 11:00 a.m., the

Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2020 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at

v. ANTHONY FRISBY, ET AL. Defendants

Legal Notices The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Leslie Lobos, Esq., Trustee, at 240-449-8862. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 13, 2020 3x 11-13, 11-20, 11-27

THIRD INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-20-000250 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff v. STANLEY KROL, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BORDERLINKS I CONDOMINIUM OCEAN PINES, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-20-000250, the undersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Borderlinks I Condominium, located at 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Monday, November 30, 2020 at 11:00 a.m., the following timeshare intervals: Time Condomimium Unit Interval Bv48 Bz52 Be31 Ak11 Bi35

7 47 23 17 23

Bo41 Aq17

34 2

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Borderlinks I Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2020 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Leslie Lobos, Esq., Trustee, at 240-449-8862. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 13, 2020 3x 11-13, 11-20, 11-27

THIRD INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811

November 27, 2020 cluding an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-20-000252 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff v. RANDOLPH CRIPPS, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BORDERLINKS I CONDOMINIUM OCEAN PINES, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-20-000252, the undersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Borderlinks I Condominium, located at, 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Monday, November 30, 2020 at 11:00 a.m., the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Unit Ak11 Ak11 Ak11 Ak11 Ak11 Aq17 Aq17 Aq17 Ar18 Ar18 Ar18 Ar18 As19 As19 As19 As19 As19 As19 As19 Ba27 Ba27 Ba27 Bi35 Bi35

Time Interval 13 20 40 41 44 11 36 50 13 41 47 50 6 9 11 12 42 46 47 8 9 41 10 17

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Borderlinks I Condominium, in-

The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2020 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Leslie Lobos, Esq., Trustee, at 240-449-8862. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 13, 2020 3x 11-13, 11-20, 11-27

THIRD INSERTION

MARIANNA BATIE, ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18458 To all persons interested in the estate of JOHN STEPHEN CHITWOOD, ESTATE NO. 18458. Notice is given that JOHN CHARLES ECKARDT JR, 999 38TH AVE., ST. PETERSBURG, FL 33704 was on, OCTOBER 13, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JOHN STEPHEN CHITWOOD, who died on JUNE 26, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by con-


The Dispatch

November 27, 2020

LEGAL RATES

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Legal Notices

Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. tacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 13TH day of APRIL, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 13, 2020 JOHN CHARLES ECKARDT JR. Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 11-13, 11-20, 11-27

THIRD INSERTION

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18491 To all persons interested in the estate of BERNARD R MCALEESE, ESTATE NO. 18491. Notice is given that DONNA GUTRIDGE, 10342 KEYSER POINT ROAD, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 was on NOVEM-

BER 04, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of BERNARD R MCALEESE, who died on OCTOBER 11, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 4TH day of MAY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 13, 2020 DONNA GUTRIDGE Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 11-13, 11-20, 11-27

THIRD INSERTION

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18468

To all persons interested in the estate of ANTHONY PAUL THOMAS SR., ESTATE NO. 18468. Notice is given that MICHELLE KNIGHT, 5430 WHITLOCK ROAD, BALTIMORE, MD 21229 was on, OCTOBER 15, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ANTHONY PAUL THOMAS SR., who died on JULY 23, 2020, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 15TH day of APRIL, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 13, 2020

Page 51

SECOND INSERTION

SECOND INSERTION

FIRST INSERTION

MICHAEL B MATHERS ESQ. WEBB, CORNBROOKS, WILBER, VORHIS, DOUSE & MATHERS, LLP PO BOX 910 115 BROAD STREET SALISBURY, MD 21803-0910

J. HARRISON PHILLIPS III, ESQ. 115-72ND STREET OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18445 To all persons interested in the estate of WINIFRED JOSEPHINE RILEY, ESTATE NO. 18445. Notice is given that DANIEL E. RILEY, 8816 EVANS ROAD, BERLIN, MD 21811 was on, SEPTEMBER 28, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of WINIFRED JOSEPHINE RILEY, who died on JUNE 05, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 28TH day of MARCH, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 20, 2020

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18459 To all persons interested in the estate of WILLIAM HOWARD FORMWALT, ESTATE NO. 18459. Notice is given that JOHN WILLIAM FORMWALT, 153 NAUTICAL LANE, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 was on, NOVEMBER 17, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of WILLIAM HOWARD FORMWALT, who died on AUGUST 27, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 17TH day of MAY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 20, 2020

ESTATE NO. 18500 To all persons interested in the estate of GEORGE RUFUS PHILLIPS. Notice is given that GEORGE R. PHILLIPS, 10648 PINEY ISLAND DRIVE, BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813, and JEFF PHILLIPS, 12610 MURRAY ROAD, WHALEYVILLE, MD 21872 was on NOVEMBER 19, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of: GEORGE RUFUS PHILLIPS, who died on OCTOBER 14, 2020 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 27, 2020 GEORGE R. PHILLIPS Personal Representative

MICHELLE KNIGHT Personal Representative

DANIEL E. RILEY Personal Representative

JOHN WILLIAM FORMWALT Personal Representative

JEFF PHILLIPS Personal Representative

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 11-13, 11-20, 11-27

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 11-20, 11-27, 12-04

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 11-20, 11-27, 12-04

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 11-27


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 27, 2020


November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 53


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Horoscopes

ARIES (March 21 to April 19): Don't feel sheepish about looking to spend more time with that special person during the upcoming holidays. Do it because it's the right thing to do. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): Never mind letting misunderstandings repair themselves. Consider speaking up while the healing process can be shorter and sweeter and leave fewer scars. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): Romance is easily awakened in the Geminian heart, especially around the happy holiday season. So go ahead and make those plans with that special someone. CANCER (June 21 to July 22): Moon Children can glow with their own inner light as the holiday season magic takes hold. It's a very special time for Cancers and Libras together. Enjoy. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): It's a good time for you fabulous Felines to take pleasure in your special gift for, well, taking pleasure! Look for this holiday season to give you every reason to purr. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): This is a good time to let others who are in your life get a little closer to you. You'll both find out what you've been missing for far too long. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22):

OCEAN CITY vanishing

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Open up your eyes and see some welcome surprises you've missed or overlooked for too long. What you find can lead to other favorable changes. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): What you expect to be potentially troublesome might simply be especially challenging and well worth your efforts to check out. Good luck! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): A friendship might not seem as trustworthy as you'd like. OK. Ask your questions, get your answers and settle the matter once and for all. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): A family situation moves into a new area because of (or, maybe, thanks to) some decisions you might have felt you could not avoid making. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): You could be cutting it very close if you hope to make those holiday plan changes in time to avoid problems. Get a friend or family member to help. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): Friends show how important you are to them. Keep these precious relationships thriving. They affect much that will happen to the fabulous Fish in the new year. BORN THIS WEEK: Time spent at home alone nurtures your mystic self. Spending your time with others nurtures them. © 2020 King Features Synd., Inc.

Things I Like ...

November 27, 2020

WITH BUNK MANN

The Miami Court was the first motel in Ocean City. Built in 1948 by Ridge Harman Sr. on 22nd Street and Philadelphia Avenue, the site is now the parking lot for Fish Tales and Bahia Marina. The term motel comes from “motor-hotel.” A motel offered lowerpriced accommodations in a less formal setting with “drive up to the doorstep parking.” This appealed to families with young children in the post-World War II “baby boom” era. Within a decade, motels had sprung up all over Ocean City and the area from 15th to 33rd streets became known as “motel row.” To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishinPhoto courtesy of Kathleen Harman goc.com.

The Dispatch Crossword Puzzle

By Steve Green

Fresh air after removing a mask

Supportive teammates on a youth team When history repeats itself

Berlin’s holiday lights contest concept Blue sky afternoons after a cloudy morning

Leftovers that last a weekend A moving church sermon

When my tween falls asleep early Definitive survey results

A weekend break from social media Successful virtual fundraisers

ANSWERS ON PAGE 48


November 27, 2020

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 27, 2020

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