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Priceless

November 26, 2021

Serving Greater Delmarva Since 1984

www.mdcoastdispatch.com

Margaritaville Project Discussed

See Page 4 • Rendering by Becker Morgan

Ocean Pines North Gate Work Eyed

A Morning Sight: On an early drive to Assateague Island this month, a motorist saw a buck nearby, pulled off Route 611 and grabbed this image with his phone. A doe was nearby on the north side of the road.

Photo by Ed Chambers

See Page 14 • Photo by Bethany Hooper

Stephen Decatur’s Playoff Run Ends

See Page 56 • Photo by Vince Risser

Cutest Pet Of The Month

Holiday Time:

Resident Garrett Neeb brought the Kringle Kottage to Berlin Tuesday with his 1947 Farmall tractor. The cottage is a 60-year-old play house from Mariner’s Country Down on Sinepuxent Road. See Page 17. Photo by Charlene Sharpe

The winners of this month’s Cutest Pets of the Month were Cornbread and Finn, 4-monthold Bernefie and Golden retriever. See page 43 for this month’s contestants.

Submitted Photo


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

SERVING DELMARVA FOR 60 YEARS

November 26, 2021


November 26, 2021

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Resort Planners Hold Off Final Say On Hotel Project

November 26, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – Ocean City officials again delayed a decision regarding a Margaritaville Hotel and Resort proposed for the former Beach Plaza Hotel site. The Ocean City Planning Commission met Tuesday to continue deliberations regarding a 13-story hotel and conference center. The Margaritaville complex would encompass most of the city block between 13th and 14th streets. Pam Buckley, chair of the commission, made it clear at the start of the discussion a final determination wouldn’t be made Tuesday because the project as proposed relies on an alley swap that the Ocean City Mayor and Council isn’t set to vote on until next week. “I’m not going to call for a decision today until after the Mayor and Council makes their decisions on the right of way and the alley,” she said. “I don’t think it’s fair to us or the city or the council for us to send in something that doesn’t have proper numbers in it.” In August, developers presented the commission with conceptual plans for a proposed Margaritaville Hotel and Resort complex to occupy the Beach Plaza Hotel property. The plans call for 265 hotel rooms, three restaurants — including the JWB Grill, the Landshark Bar and Grill and a coffee shop and provisions store — as well as three outdoor pools, one indoor pool, a wellness center and gym, 14,000 square feet of convention space and retails stores facing the Boardwalk. Earlier this month, the commission hosted the required public hearing on the proposed planned overlay district (POD) that would allow for the redevelopment project. This week, commission members expressed various concerns regarding project specifics, including parking, landscaping and the number of units in the hotel. Buckley said she didn’t like the fact that the project’s landscaping included a green roof, as those had failed in Ocean City in the past. Staff noted that the green roof also didn’t help reduce nutrients or increase curb appeal but that even without the green roof the project featured slightly more landscaping than the property had now. Buckley also questioned the extensive retail portion of the project, which amounts to 20,000 square feet. Commission member Chris Shanahan said he didn’t object to the size of the retail area. “Space in retail is critical,” he said, adding that merchants needed to be able to spread their wares out and change displays. Other commission members questioned the retail being allowed as an accessory use, as the project is in an R-3 residential zone. Buckley said the project was not in the Boardwalk Commercial SEE PAGE 8


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021


Activists Allege Suspects Never Interviewed By FBI For Probe

November 26, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – Civil rights activists gathered in front of Worcester County District Court on Monday as court cases against the men arrested on the Boardwalk this summer in separate vaping incidents were postponed. The trials in Worcester County District Court in Ocean City for Taizier Griffin, 19, of Perryville, Md., and Brian Anderson, 19, of Harrisburg, Pa., were to begin Monday. Griffin and Anderson were charged with disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, failure to provide identification and second degree assault. Both cases were postponed this week with a new date set for Jan. 5. Outside of court Monday, representatives with the Caucus of African American Leaders (CAAL), NAACP branches and other civil rights groups joined together in support of four men involved in separate vaping incidents on the Boardwalk earlier this year. They were Griffin, Anderson, Jatique John Lewis and Kamere Anthony Day. “People are beginning to look at what happens in our criminal justice system,” CAAL convener Carl Snowden said in a press conference Monday. “Last week, we saw the decision that was made in Wisconsin, the nation is anxiously awaiting the decision that will be made in Georgia, and we today are awaiting a decision to be made here in Maryland.” In the two June cases, attempts to issue citations for vaping on the Boardwalk ended with physical confrontations between Ocean City Police Department

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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(OCPD) officers and the suspects. In one instance, cellphone video shows one of the suspects being kneed repeatedly by a police officer. In another, Griffin is seen being Tased by an officer. The individuals involved were arrested and charged with various offenses, including assault, failure to obey a lawful order, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. And in the days that followed, snippets of those incidents went viral on social media, prompting calls for an investigation. In July, a coalition of state and local leaders led a Freedom Bus tour of the Eastern Shore, which ended with a rally in front of City Hall to peacefully protest the police officers’ actions against the four men. Back in Ocean City this week, Freedom Bus riders say their work is not finished, as they plan to hold meetings with local law enforcement in the months to come. “We expect to come back on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, working to address issues of systemic racism in the Maryland justice system …,” Snowden SEE PAGE 9

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

A rendering of the Margaritaville project is pictured as it would be seen from Baltimore Avenue in Ocean City.

Rendering by Becker Morgan Group

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… OC Commission Majority In Favor Of Margaritaville

November 26, 2021

FROM PAGE 4 zone. Commission member Lauren Taylor agreed that the R-3 zoning was important. “Towns have what’s called a sense of place,” she said. “What you want in a city is something that is distinctive and unique and people come because it is what it is. Once you start putting huge buildings with facades of retail across the front, you might as well be in any large city there is.” She said the scope of the project should be smaller and the retail space should be adjusted. “It should fit into that sense of place and that residential feel, not commercial downtown Miami,” she said. Commission member Peck Miller said he felt the project worked but he didn’t want to set a precedent. Commission member Palmer Gillis brought up the letters submitted by the public regarding the project. “I read through the letters from the neighbors and I’ve listened to this panel say this project is too massive,” he said. “I guess what I’d like to understand if I can, is it five units too many? Fifty-five units too many?” Planning and Community Development Director Bill Neville pointed out that setting a number of units wouldn’t necessarily ensure changes the commission wanted would occur, as they didn’t know how the developer would adjust the project. Gillis said he’d nevertheless like to hear from his peers. The informal poll revealed four of the seven thought the proposal was acceptable as presented. “I think they did an excellent job,” Shanahan said. “This is an incredible opportunity for Ocean City. I think we should be receptive to the challenge they’re accepting. It’s a huge investment. It’s never a slam dunk. From where I sit I can’t arbitrarily say let’s reduce it 15 rooms. I think it’s good the way it is. I can’t say it’s too big. I don’t have that kind of experience quite honestly. I know the people at the Sea Mist and I empathize with them, but they seem to be the ones, the only ones complaining in the whole area.” Taylor said she thought it was a great project overall but that it shouldn’t exceed 12 stories. “I just think that 12 stories would be better for the city, better for the neighborhood and not as much pressure on the neighborhood,” she said. “The height bothers me.” Staff pointed out that the number of units currently in the project were contingent on the alley approval being considered by the Mayor and Council next week as well as the Baltimore Avenue adjustments being considered. The council has in the past been supportive of similar alley proposals if it results in the betterment of the overall project.


… Coalition Leaders Question Civil Rights Violation Investigation

November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

FROM PAGE 7 said. “We’ll be meeting with the state’s attorney’s office, as well as the police departments … including Ocean City.” Snowden also announced the CAAL would be forming a local chapter – led by the Rev. Jay Jones – to work with communities across the Eastern Shore. “The standing we will make is enough is enough,” Jones said this week. “We do not believe what has happened in this particular case warrants the physical treatment and abuse that these young men have absorbed. And we will stand, even when others don’t understand, until we prove that point.” Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan has stated both June incidents were subject to a multi-level internal review, which determined that both force issues “were reasonable by professional standards and that the officers’ actions were within the scope of OCPD policy.” In October, it was also announced an FBI inquiry into the police officers’ handling of the incidents resulted in no civil rights violations being found, confirming the police department’s own internal investigation. “The FBI did conduct an inquiry into

the two use force cases that occurred in early June 2021,” Meehan wrote in a letter dated Sept. 17. “We have recently learned that the FBI determined neither case rose to the level of a Federal Civil Rights Violation and that its inquiry is now closed.” Snowden said this week he disagreed with the findings. He noted the CAAL has filed a Freedom of Information Act request, seeking access to documents from the investigation. “One of the things I want to make clear, I’ve talked to defense attorneys and none of the young men were ever interviewed by the FBI …,” he said. “We find it difficult to believe the FBI conducted an investigation and then concluded there were no civil rights violations without talking to the victims of those civil rights violations.” Monday’s press conference featured comments from several civil rights groups across the state. The only suspect to have his case adjudicated in the June incidents has been Day, 20, of Harrisburg, Pa. In the Nov. 3 trial, Day pleaded not guilty to resisting/interfere with arrest. He was found guilty and sentenced to two years of unsupervised probation.

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Seacrets Liquor Store Reconstruction Plans Approved In OC

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – Planning officials approved minor changes to plans to replace the liquor store in front of Seacrets. The Ocean City Planning Commission on Tuesday unanimously approved minor revisions to the site plan for the Atlantic Beverage Center. The changes came after property owner Leighton Moore removed the employee housing proposed for the third floor to replace it with storage space. “What they do up there can drastically affect my license,” Moore said. “If they

are doing something that is illegal up there it’s in my licensed building. I just can’t have the two associated.” On Nov. 9, the commission approved Moore’s plans to replace the existing liquor store with a three-story building that would include retail space on the first floor, storage on the second and employee housing on the third. Moore returned to the commission this week because he’s abandoned the plan to include employee housing. “I have trepidations about employee housing on a licensed premise,” he said. He said that with the altered plan, he would have retail on the first floor, related

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November 26, 2021

storage on the second floor and storage for Seacrets on the third floor. “I would not have been as enthusiastic about the project being three stories the first time around had it not been that it was employee housing on the third floor,” commission member Lauren Taylor said, “because its a very large building for that area.” She said the existing store was “kind of funky and cute.” “Now in our family friendly town we have a major three-story liquor store,” she said. “I find it troubling that a week ago that was a good idea and a week later it’s not and now staff has to do the

whole thing all over again.” Moore, who pointed out there were several five story buildings across the street, said the employee housing posed a potential nightmare. “If you can imagine what I’m saying without me having to be specific, I can’t control the illicit activities of employees,” he said, adding that he didn’t want to jeopardize his liquor license or his distilling license. Commission members praised the appearance of the building, which Moore described as art deco. The commission voted unanimously to approve the site plan revision.

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

Slacum said he was seeking the board’s approval of a $717,113 contract with Field Turf USA that was done through the Keystone Purchasing Network. According to documents in the board packet, KPN provides predetermined preferential pricing through approved vendors. Because the products have been bid at the national level, individual schools don’t have to duplicate the bidding process. The existing turf field at Pocomoke was installed when the school’s renovation and addition was completed in 2010. “Degradation from the elements and ultraviolet light have deteriorated the playing surface to the point it must be replaced,” a report to the board reads.

$717K School Turf Field Approved

STAFF WRITER

NEWARK – Pocomoke High School is expected to have a new turf field in place by next school year. The Worcester County Board of Education voted unanimously last week to spend $717,113 to replace the turf field at Pocomoke High School. “We’re requesting Board of Education approval to replace the turf field at the home of the new Maryland state 1A field hockey champion, Pocomoke High School,” said Sam Slacum, the school system’s maintenance and operations manager.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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State Confirms Crosswalk Planned For Busy Route 113 Intersection

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

The intersection of Route 113 and Old Ocean City Boulevard is pictured.

Photo by Charlene Sharpe

BERLIN – A crosswalk is coming to Route 113 at its intersection with Old Ocean City Boulevard in Berlin. Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) officials confirmed this week that plans were underway for the installation of an automated pedestrian signal at a crosswalk on Route 113. The intersection is crossed regularly by pedestrians going to and from places like Food Lion and Rite Aid. “The project is in the design phase, and once design has been finalized, we will move forward with funding the construction phase, which will replace the

November 26, 2021

span wire signal with a traffic signal pole and incorporate the automated pedestrian signal at the crosswalk,” said Shanteé Felix, SHA’s assistant media relations manager. Earlier this month, Tony Weeg of We Heart Berlin, the local nonprofit working to increase recreation opportunities in town, wrote to Sen. Mary Beth Carozza asking for her help in bringing safety improvements to the intersection. “This is something long overdue for Berlin, and her residents, and if we do not step up, I am not sure who else will,” he wrote. “It’s been since 1952 that this highway Route 113 has separated our town, and the least we can do as a first step is create crosswalks where they currently do not exist.” Weeg also brought up the footpath — which is even visible on Google Maps — that residents of the Decatur Apartments traverse as they go to and from Food Lion. “I have personally witnessed sexagenarians walking through the field, crossing the highway, hopping the median barrier, and finally doing the same thing on the other side to get to the grocery store,” he wrote. Weeg isn’t the only Berlin resident who’s been expressing concern about safety on local roadways. Last week, in the wake of a serious accident at the intersection of Route 50 and Route 818, resident Tom Simon used social media to urge his fellow citizens to contact SHA. “The intersection of (Route) 50 and Main Street is dangerous,” Simon wrote Nov. 20. “It was absolute chaos yesterday around 5:15… There were several near misses while I sat there for 15 min. At times there were 7 cars in the median. It’s no wonder there are bad accidents there on the regular.” The safety of the intersection has also come up in discussions of a townhouse community proposed in the vicinity. While some residents say a stoplight would be the answer, town officials said last month SHA didn’t have plans for one. “We have had meetings with SHA and they have said there will never be a red light there,” Berlin Planning Director Dave Engelhart said during last month’s planning commission meeting. Felix said this week SHA was aware of local concerns and was evaluating options. “MDOT SHA has received customer concerns about the US 50/MD 818 intersection and we are continuing to evaluate the traffic circulation to determine the best path forward,” Felix said. “As development in this area expands, the district office will monitor the impacts and determine what mitigative measures will be necessary to maintain the state’s standard levels of safety and mobility.”


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Ocean Pines Officials Discuss North Gate Improvements

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – Officials in Ocean Pines are looking to improve the appearance of the North Gate entryway. Suggestions for improving the North Gate bridge and the surrounding area were presented to the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors last Saturday. Citing homeowner complaints, Director Frank Daly called on the association to make several enhancements – including power washing and staining the bridge, replacing lights and adding a Christmas display in the guard house – ahead of the holiday season. “We’re emerging from a pandemic,” he said. “Let’s lighten the place up.” Homeowner Vivian Koroknay came before the directors at last week’s board meeting to share her complaints regarding the North Gate entrance. She noted

she had sent a letter to the board and General Manager John Viola requesting changes be made. “We’ve been owning here for about 16 years now – we’ve been full-time for about seven – and I can tell you most definitely the appearance of the north entrance has continuously gone downhill, to the point now it is an abominable eyesore …,” she said. Koroknay noted a recent car accident at the North Gate bridge had damaged the woodwork. She told board members she was hoping the association would make improvements to the entrance in conjunction with the repairs. “That bridge is in sad shape,” she said. “I understand it’s functional, and I’m not saying we replace the bridge. I’m recommending we replace the wooden structure for the lane guards, the lights, which are filthy, broken, cracked, and have vines growing up the poles … and the guard

house.” She also called for an ongoing maintenance program at the north entrance. “This is our front door,” she said. “It’s like the curb appeal for our houses. You don’t want to drive up to the house on the block that has the ugliest curb appeal and think, ‘Boy, those people don’t have much pride in where they live,’ or that they can’t take care of it.” In his report last week, Viola noted the association was working to repair the bridge following the recent car accident, but that delays in acquiring materials could push the completion date out more than three months. “We are waiting for materials, but it is stabilized. It’s nothing structural …,” he said. “The total is around $15,000. And yes, insurance will be involved one way or the other on that.” Viola added that officials were receiving bids to power wash the bridge and

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working with Vista Design to address the approach to the bridge. However, he agreed with Koroknay that more needed to be done at the North Gate entrance. “I can’t just go in there and redo that bridge, take those lights down, or whatever,” he noted. “It’s a whole process, but I would be glad to do it. Obviously, it would start at the budget process.” Viola said improvements could start with the guard house, located between the span of bridges. “I can take out that guard house if instructed. I can’t just go in there and do it,” he said. “But I can tell you this, I can do it. At least it’s a start.” Officials noted the guard house could also be repurposed, or kept as a historical reference. “It might be another option to take a look at,” Director Doug Parks said. Daly said he was bringing complaints to the board in the hopes of moving forward with some improvements. “I’ve heard over the years we refer to the North Gate bridge as iconic,” he said. “I kind of refer to it as dilapidated. It’s showing its age, period.” Daly noted the bridge is slated for replacement in 2034, but that it was still structurally sound. “If we replace it tomorrow we would probably pay 100% of the replacement cost,” he said. “If we wait until it structurally deteriorates, we get a contribution from the state and county, which I believe is 80% of the replacement cost. So that’s a major factor.” He added the association also had to be cognizant of any future improvements to Route 589. “The other thing is if we had the money to do it and the inclination to replace the bridge today, I don’t know what we’d do because the bridge dumps out on the Route 589/Route 90 corridor, and it would be nice to know if we are going to have a stoplight there, a circle there, a two-lane road there, or a four-lane road there,” he said. “The truth of the matter is if you ask people responsible for that at the county and state level, their response back to you is ‘I don’t know what, and I don’t know when, those changes would be made.’” In the meantime, Daly said he was recommending some cosmetic changes to the North Gate entrance. “I really think given the lousy year most of the people in this community have had, I would be in favor of shutting down the North Gate entrance for several days, power washing it, staining it … making sure the lights all match, putting up some Christmas decorations …,” he said. While the lights being used on the bridge are no longer manufactured, Viola said he could look into replacing them with another option. “We tried to change them years ago, but we had a lot of pushback,” he said. “Maybe that’s changed.” Viola said he would put together a plan for improving the North Gate entrance. “Just say something, and I’ll call a special meeting and put the motion forward,” Daly said. “But let’s get it done for the holiday season.” President Larry Perrone agreed. “Whatever we can do to spruce it up, I agree we should go ahead and get it done,” he said.


OPA Expects Budget Challenges

November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Pictured at last Saturday’s OPA Board meeting were Doug Parks, Larry Perrone and Colette Horn. Photo by Bethany Hooper BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – Officials say inflation and minimum wage could have impacts on next year’s budget. In a meeting of the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors last Saturday, General Manager John Viola announced that preparations have begun on the proposed budget for the coming fiscal year. He noted that he and his staff were working closely with the association’s Budget and Finance Committee and all department heads to develop some preliminary numbers, which will be presented to the committee in January. “We addressed any assumptions, pricing, expense control, capital outlays in the DMA study, with the team,” he said. “We also addressed the surplus, so when I present the proposed budget it will probably be a little different this year. I will be addressing surplus that we have, surplus that we realized last year.” Viola said he is also taking other factors into consideration during this year’s budget process. “There are headwinds this year ...,” he said. “Inflation is certainly on the rise and that will affect the budget.”

Viola added that the association must also account for statutory increases in minimum wage this year. “We will break that out for everybody and what that effect is on our financials …,” he said. “There will also be a separate category for above minimum wage. As we’ve seen this year, between COVID and everything else, minimum wage maybe is not cutting it for us to hire people or even keep people.” Viola told board members those numbers would be broken out and analyzed during the budget process. He noted it also warranted a deeper look into the association’s amenities. “With the inflation and price increases, and with the increases in minimum wage and everything, it is prudent … to be looking at pricing increases for our amenities, aquatics, golf, racquet sports,” he said. “That will be part of it.” Public Works Office Manager Linda Martin noted that budget worksheets have been distributed to all department heads, and preliminary budget numbers have been reviewed with Viola. “The final draft will be reviewed by Budget and Finance on Jan. 4-6, with the review with the Board of Directors tentatively scheduled for later in February,” she said.

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Page 16

Sheriff Pitches County Public Safety Facility For Departments

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – A new public safety facility would provide law enforcement with much needed space and a more visible location, according to Sheriff Matt Crisafulli. Crisafulli met with the Worcester County Commissioners last week to talk about the need for a new public safety building. Currently, the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office is housed in the basement of the government building in Snow Hill. “We’re running out of space,” Crisafulli said. “We’re taking closet space to make offices.” The concept of a new public safety building came up in a recent discussion of the county’s capital improvement plan. The plan includes a $32.6 million facility that would house Worcester County Emergency Services, the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office and potentially the state’s attorney, fire marshal and child advocacy center. As a result, Crisafulli and other public safety personnel were in attendance at last week’s meeting to discuss the project. Crisafulli said when the government building was constructed, his office had about 50 deputies. Now he has 96. “We’re potentially going from 50 deputies in 2001 to 100 deputies in 2022,” he said. He added that a facility in a more visible location, such as on Route 113, would also be good for the county. “I think we need to be out in the public’s eye instead of in the basement where we’re not as accessible,” he said. When asked about square footage needs, county staff said that would be determined in a feasibility study. As for a potential piece of land for the building, Crisafulli said officials were considering the property the county owned between the health department and the jail. Commissioner Chip Bertino said he’d always questioned the sheriff’s office

DIRECT OCEANFRONT CONDOMINIUM

November 26, 2021

location in the basement but indicated the cost of a new facility would be significant. “Thirty-two million is a big lift certainly,” he said. Bertino added that the county had already committed to projects in the school system’s capital plan, which included a new Buckingham Elementary School and Snow Hill Elementary School. “Those are big ticket items,” he said. Bertino questioned if the county’s finance team had looked at bonding and how this would potentially fit in. “They are looking at it now,” Chief Administrative Officer Weston Young said. Crisafulli said his department would continue to work with what they had for now. He added, however, that unfunded mandates from the state, such as the police reform measures approved this year, would require him to add more support staff. “Our projections are also that potentially within the next 10 years we may have just as many support staff as we do sworn personnel to keep up with the changing times…,” he said. “This is for future planning.” Commissioner Diana Purnell said what Crisafulli had described was essentially a public safety campus. She praised the idea of making it more visible to the community. “I think what Berlin did when they decided to come from downtown and go on 113, it made a lot of difference,” she said. Commissioner Ted Elder said the project was an important one. “We’re going to have some tough times ahead,” he said. “It might destroy some of the plans like some people had, like the sports complex or some of the other things, because the only way we’re going to be able to sustain these kinds of costs is to really tighten our belts a lot. I hope we don’t end up like some of the other counties that have such a high rate of taxes.”

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Berlin Kicks Off Holidays Friday

November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 17

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – The town will kick off the holiday season this Friday with its annual tree lighting and Ice Ice Berlin. On Friday, Nov. 26, ice sculptures will line the streets beginning at 5 p.m. as people are invited to Berlin for an evening of shopping and holiday cheer. “Come down for this family event to get a head start on shopping and enjoy the beautiful ice sculptures,” said Ivy Wells, the town’s economic and community development director. “It’s a great way to spend time with your family outside.” From 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, the public is invited to downtown Berlin to view more than 30 ice sculptures and browse local shops. The evening kicks off with Annapolis Honored Town Crier Squire Frederick Taylor introducing Mayor Zack Tyndall, who will light the town Christmas tree in front of the Atlantic Hotel. A dance performance from Seaside Dance Academy is set for 6:30 p.m. while a performance by Berlin Heat is set for 7 p.m. A live ice carving station will be set up near Sterling Tavern starting at 6:15 p.m. Carriage rides will be offered throughout the evening. Though Ice Ice Berlin was just started last year as a way to still welcome people to town despite COVID-19, Wells said it’s become incredibly popular. “People keep asking me about it like it’s been going on for years,” she said. “This is just the second year.” This year’s event features even more ice sculptures, which are each sponsored by a local business, than last year’s event. Though sponsors selected from a list when choosing last year’s sculptures, this year they were able to choose any design they wanted. “A lot of them will be unique and different,” Wells said. She added that two sculptures would benefit artist Erik Cantine and his family. Cantine, the town’s longtime ice carver, is currently battling stage four brain cancer. Sculptures will be set up along Main Street as well as on Jefferson, Gay, Broad, Commerce, Pitts, Bay and William streets. Kids will also be able to visit with Santa during the event, as Kringle Kottage will be open from 5-8 p.m. Ice Ice Berlin is sponsored in part by a grant from the Maryland State Arts Council and a grant from the Worcester County Arts Council. While this week’s event launches the holiday season in Berlin, one of the highlights for local residents will be next week’s Christmas parade. The “Golden Anniversary” parade, set for 7 p.m. on Dec. 2, will feature 80 entries including Worcester County fire companies, marching bands, dance teams and community groups. This year’s parade will be emceed by Big Al Reno while judges will be Lou Taylor, Elaine Brady, James Tingle, Bill Shockley and Gregory Purnell. While they’ll rate most parade entries, Wells noted that marching bands were judged by a professional band judge.

Berlin is pictured during last year’s first Ice Ice Berlin event and tree lighting ceremony.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 19


Page 20

Pines Committee Pulls Support For Turf Grass Idea For Geese

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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November 26, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – An Ocean Pines committee has withdrawn its support for the use of a specialty turf grass to deter geese. Last Saturday, Director Amy Peck, board liaison for the Environmental and Natural Assets Advisory Committee, announced a proposal to test FlightTurf, a low-maintenance turf grass, at the North Gate pond has been withdrawn after further research by General Manager John Viola, Public Works Director Eddie Wells and Golf Superintendent Justin Hartshorne. In September, the committee brought the proposal before the board as a method to deter wildlife, including geese and deer, in areas around the ponds and Worcester County Veterans Memorial. The FlightTurf product was estimated to cost $2,600 an acre. “I’m very proud of the committee and the work they did and the research they did on the FlightTurf,” she said. “Once we got more information from John Viola and Justin and Eddie Wells, it became apparent that this became a very cost-prohibitive approach, so it’s back to the committee.” In 2018, the association brought in officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to euthanize nearly 300 Canada

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geese in an effort to mitigate problems relating to excrement and environmental pollution. That decision, however, drew the ire of some Pines residents protesting the “wholesale slaughter” of the birds without the community’s knowledge. In a presentation to the board earlier this fall, former Director Tom Janasek said the committee had explored alternatives in dealing with the community’s goose population. That research, he said, led them to FlightTurf. “When we had the issue with the geese a few years ago, there was a lot of dissention in Ocean Pines,” he said at the time, “and we didn’t need to create any more of that.” In last week’s board meeting, President Larry Perrone noted the committee had withdrawn its support for the proposal. Viola, however, noted that the process for vetting the product had worked as it should. “The committee had some good ideas,” he said. “We did do research, we followed up, but the process worked.” Peck agreed. “They are now researching other options, options that they’ve used in the past,” she said of the committee. “Right now, they are looking at increasing the vegetative barrier, to see if that would work on the goose population. They continue to work on that, and I will keep everybody updated.”

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Wicomico Records Increase In Overdose Cases, Deaths

Page 22

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – Wicomico’s health officer reports the county is seeing an uptick in overdose deaths. Last week, Health Officer Lori Brewster presented the Wicomico County Council with an update on the health of the county. While the health department continues to monitor COVID-19 statistics, Brewster said the agency is seeing an increase in overdose cases and deaths. “This year, we are seeing a 25% increase in our overdose deaths, which is

very concerning,” she told council members. “There are about five jurisdictions in the state that are seeing a decline in their overdose deaths, but that is for the first six months of the year. The rest of the state is seeing an increase again.” Brewster noted the county health department reported 41 overdose deaths in 2019 and 47 overdose deaths in 2020. In the first six months of 2021, the agency reported 16 deaths, or a 25% increase from January to June of 2020. “Just yesterday, I believe we had three overdose cases, which is very concerning,” she said. “So we’re getting out there and trying to reach these people, provid-

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ing them with the resources needed so they don’t succumb to an overdose death.” When asked if the health department continued to offer naloxone training, Brewster said it did. “We were even offering that during COVID,” she said. “We were doing virtual training, and there’s a number of other organizations that are legally able to provide Narcan training as well.” Brewster added the department is also increasing access to naloxone in local restaurants and businesses. “We have recently seen an uptick in overdoses in bathrooms in businesses,” she said. Brewster noted a town hall meeting at Salisbury University last month produced a series of recommendations to address the opioid crisis, including increasing access to resources for family members and care coordination for released inmates. “A big one that the health department focuses on is addressing stigma throughout the community related to substance use disorders,” she said. “Believe it or not, it’s still a big issue in Wicomico County, as it is across the state, because people feel that individuals can control their use.” Brewster told council members last week the agency continues to work with Hudson Health, and the Community Outreach Addictions Team to provide resources to community members. “In addition, there’s going to be additional funding coming out through the opi-

oid settlement that Wicomico County signed onto, but we don’t know how much money that’s going to be,” she said. Councilman John Cannon asked, “Is the increase due to the fact you think there are more addicts in this area or is it simply the fact that there is more fentanyl and its more dangerous to experiment with drugs?” Brewster said it was a number of issues. “What we’ve seen all across the country is an isolation issue,” she added, “and people not being able to be around other people, becoming depressed and seeking out drugs to treat their mental health issues.” During last week’s presentation, Brewster also highlighted the county’s COVID19 statistics. “We generally have been well above the state average for quite a while,” she said. “And if you look at our vaccination rate, we are fourth from the bottom still. We’re at 59% of residents ages 12 plus being fully vaccinated.” Brewster added that the health department was working with the Wicomico Public Library to distribute at-home COVID testing kits. “The state is providing us with at-home COVID test kits for distribution to the public, and the library has agreed to be the group that will provide those,” she said. “I think this will be an opportunity for people to receive at-home test kits that can’t otherwise afford them because they are pricey.”

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Bays Program Updates Pines On Jenkins Point Restoration

November 26, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – A Maryland Coastal Bays Program (MCBP) presentation highlighted efforts to seek state funding for a restoration project at Jenkins Point. Last Saturday, MCBP Watershed Coordinator Steve Farr came before the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors to present an update on the Jenkins Point resilience project. Late last year, MCBP applied to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for funding to reestablish the eroding Jenkins Point Peninsula, lo-

Berlin Continues Modified Operations After Positive Tests

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Town offices reopened to the public Tuesday but with modified hours after multiple employees tested positive for COVID-19. The town announced Tuesday that the Berlin Planning Department and the Berlin Welcome Center had reopened to the public. Town Hall will be open to the public only on Wednesdays. “Our top priority is protecting the health and safety of our employees and residents all while not jeopardizing the delivery of vital town services,” Mayor Zack Tyndall said. While the planning department and welcome center are now open, Berlin Town Hall will be open to the public only on Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. This schedule will remain in effect until Jan. 3, 2022. The change comes after several employees in multiple departments tested positive for COVID-19. Public meetings in December are expected to be held as scheduled. Though the town council canceled its Nov. 22 meeting, the Dec. 13 meeting is still scheduled. There is also a Berlin Historic District Commission meeting on Dec. 1 and a Berlin Planning Commission meeting Dec. 8. “All public meetings in December are scheduled to continue,” a news release from the town reads. “However, in-person attendance will be limited, everyone will be required to wear a mask, and seating will accommodate social distancing guidelines.” The town’s customer service team is working and available to help customers with utility bills and processing payments. Customers can drop their payments off at either of the two drop boxes located at Town Hall, pay bills in-person on Wednesdays, or pay online by visiting www.berlinmd.gov and clicking “Online Payments” at the top right. For more information, call Berlin Town Hall at 410641-2770.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

cated in the Isle of Wight Bay just offshore of the Ocean Pines Yacht Club. To that end, the local agency approached the association with plans to pursue grant funding for the project. “Last year, we approached [Director] Doug Parks to consider some opportunities for resilience projects because we know that Maryland DNR had put out this RFP and was looking for opportunities to protect community assets as well as protect habitats,” Farr said. “We looked at several opportunities in Ocean Pines, and Jenkins Point really popped out above anything else.” Farr noted the proposal MCBP had submitted was not selected, but officials were encouraged to reapply. And in May, the board voted to commit $10,000 toward the project as part of the grant process. “We have since had discussions with DNR and they have encouraged us to

submit another proposal for this project,” he said. “In the interim, they said one of the main reasons it did not rate higher, relative to others was that there was no local cost share offered, which we brought to the attention of Doug and the board, and last summer a $10,000 cost share was approved to go along with this grant, to basically match the DNR resources. That’s always a big help with grants like these, to show local skin in the game.” Farr told board members last week he was making a presentation as part of the grant requirement. He added he was also seeking some reconfirmation from the board in support of the project. “The total budget is somewhere in the realm of $80,000, including that $10,000 from Ocean Pines,” he said. “The project would be limited to design and permitting for this project. It would not involve moving forward with implementation. Of course, we would look to partner closely

Page 23

with you all and the community – if the project is approved and we have funding for it – to monitor and participate in the development of the design.” During his comments last week, Association President Larry Perrone said he had concerns about Ocean Pines’ funding commitments. “The second part of this is whether or not DNR is going to be looking for Ocean Pines to put a substantial amount of money into this,” he said. “If I remember from seeing the original documents, we’re talking about a multi-million-dollar project.” Farr said MCBP would work with the association to secure any funding for the project. “We would work with you to seek other grants if DNR funding was not enough to move forward with the project,” he said. “There are other opportunities to get money for projects like this.”


Page 24

Fenwick Island Plans Deeper Dive On Existing Dumpster Rules

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

Pond Foliage:

The cold temperatures of late have resulted in some beautiful foliage scenes throughout the region, including around the South Gate pond in Ocean Pines. Photo by Chris Parypa

FENWICK ISLAND – A review of the town’s dumpster code highlighted a recent meeting of Fenwick’s commercial planning committee. Last Thursday, the Fenwick Island Commercial Planning and Building Review Committee met to discuss the town’s commercial dumpster ordinance. “The town council has requested we look at the dumpster ordinance and see if they need to be upgraded, enforced or otherwise changed,” said Councilman Richard Benn, committee chair. “I have personally been through the ordinance in our code, and I think we have a really

November 26, 2021

good ordinance.” According to the town code, all dumpsters used in the commercial district must be situated on a paved area no less than 10 feet away from any neighboring property line. The code also calls for tight-fitting lids, and for property owners to maintain clean, odorless containers. “As many of you have probably noticed, this hasn’t been universally enforced,” Benn said. “I think the first step is to recommend that the council do a better job of enforcing it.” Benn reiterated that dumpster issues were not so much a code issue, but an enforcement issue. He noted the town would be inspecting dumpsters throughout town in the coming weeks. “There’s a $200 a day fine if you don’t comply …,” Benn said. “I just want the property owners to realize that we will be monitoring it.” Benn added that the town council had also wanted the committee to review hours of pickup for commercial dumpsters. “We’ve had some complaints that they come really early in the morning,” he said. Town Manager Pat Schuchman noted the town code set pickup times between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. She added that residents should call the police department’s direct line for any noise complaints. “Our officers are looking at the problem,” she said. “Call the police number. That’s their job.” A motion to recommend that the town do a better job at enforcing its dumpster ordinance passed unanimously. Schuchman noted that town officials would be inspecting dumpsters on Dec. 17, but would also work with the commercial property owners. “In some cases, the dumpsters are not 10 feet from the property line and there’s no other place for them to go …” she explained. “That is the ordinance, but that’s not going to apply across the board.” Committee members spend most of last week’s meeting discussing enclosures for commercial dumpsters. While the town code does not require any screening, Benn said a potential requirement was a discussion the town should have with business owners. The committee agreed to refer the matter to the town’s business development committee. “I want to be careful about burdening current businesses about enclosures,” he said. Benn noted screening requirements for dumpsters could be added to the town code, or included in site plan reviews for new development. “I don’t think it’s an unreasonable request,” he said. “All the communities around us do it.” The committee also agreed to refer the matter to town’s charter and ordinance committee. “All we’re saying now is it requires further discussion,” Benn said.


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 25


Alley Swap OK’d For Redevelopment

Page 26

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – The proposed alley swap to accommodate a restaurant redevelopment was formalized last week with the passage of an ordinance on second reading. Last year, the Ocean City Planning Commission reviewed a proposed site plan for the redevelopment of the BJ’s on the Water property on 75th Street. The property is now owned by connections to the Ropewalk with plans to develop Windward OC. The Ropewalk group operated the restaurant in its original footprint this summer as the Atlantic Beach House, but the long-term plan calls for the old restaurant to be torn down and replaced with a new two-story establishment on the same site with a sandy beachfront along the water, nearly 9,000 square-feet of dining areas including over 700 square feet on a rooftop terrace and other amenities. To accommodate the new restaurant project, the developer requested a swap of a city-owned east-west alley between 74th Street and 75th streets. What is essentially a paper alley with no public purpose is needed to accommodate expanded parking for the new restaurant project. Under the proposal, the town would

Lifesaving Efforts Recognized:

The Worcester County Commissioners honored Ocean Pines Clubhouse Bar and Grille bartender Rob Ruszin and manager Judie Scotti for their roles in saving the life of a male patron exhibiting symptoms of cardiac arrest in October. Ruszin and Scotti utilized an automated external defibrillator (AED) to shock the individual and then continued to provide lifesaving assistance until public safety professionals arrived. Pictured, front from left, Ocean Pines Association General Manager John Viola, Ruszin and Scotti; second row, Ocean Pines Volunteer Fire Department President David Van Gasbeck and Commissioners Chip Bertino and Jim Bunting; and, back, Commissioners Ted Elder, Bud Church, Diana Purnell and Josh Nordstrom. Submitted Photo

convey the 100-foot paper alley to the property owner. In exchange, the developer would convey an easement to the town for a 100-foot section of alley that runs north-to-south between the existing restaurant parking lot and the Quiet Storm surf shop and the Station 3 firehouse at 74th Street. That alley already exists and is 10 feet wide, allowing for vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian traffic between 75th and 74th streets. With the property owner conveying an

easement to the town at 10 feet wide, the north-south alley would essentially become a 20-foot wide alley. In a nutshell, the property owners would gain access to the under-utilized 100-foot east-west alley between 74th and 75th Street, while the town would get an expanded 20-foot alley running north to south between 74th and 75th Streets. When the land swap was first proposed, it was pointed out there was a utility pole in the portion of the public

right-of-way the town was getting in exchange for the paper east-west alley, which would impede vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian traffic and limit the use of the entire 20-foot right-of-way. The developer has since agreed to relocate the utility pole out of the town’s right-of-way. The developer also agreed to repave the 100foot section of the north-south alley as part of its redevelopment plan. The council voted unanimously Nov. 15 to approve the swap.


School Calendar Options Differ On End Dates In June

November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

NEWARK – School system officials unveiled two calendar options this month for the next school year. At the November meeting of the Worcester County Board of Education, school system officials presented two calendar options for the 2022-2023 school year. One calendar ends the academic year June 8 while the other, which features longer breaks, ends the school year June 20. “We intend to publicize these calendar options as soon as possible alongside that traditional survey tool that we use to give all of our stakeholders the opportunity to weigh in on what option they prefer and any suggestions they may have,” said Carrie Sterrs, the school system’s coordinator of public relations and special programs. Each fall, officials present the school board with at least two calendar options. One option aims to end the school year as early as possible while the other features longer breaks. “These two proposals for our 20222023 calendar were designed to meet state and local requirements while maintaining those focus areas our stakeholders most often choose between,” Sterrs said. “I want to note that with both proposals three inclement weather days are built into the end of the school year. However as we’ve done this year as well as last year’s process, we note that beyond those three days it’s our intention as a board not to further alter the calendar with any closures but to transition to distance learning.” The calendar geared toward early release features a start date of Sept. 6. “The first proposal seeks end of the school year as early as possible in June,” Sterrs said. “Highlights from this proposal include a winter break kicking off with an early dismissal on Friday Dec. 23 with students returning on Jan. 2. Spring break is extended for students with an early dismissal day prior to a professional day as well as state mandated holidays of Good Friday and Easter Monday. This calendar potentially ends the school year on June 8.” The second proposal also features a Sept. 6 school start. “In the second proposal, which intends to provide more frequent or longer breaks, you see a full week break for Thanksgiving, a week and a half winter break in December and the addition of two days to spring break in April,” Sterrs said. “This calendar would potentially end the schoolyear on June 20.” Now that the proposals have been presented to the board, the school system is preparing to release a survey to gauge community input. Sterrs will return to the board with survey results and a recommendation from the superintendent in early 2022.

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State Commission Approves Five Sports Wagering Licenses

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

Island Wildlife: A deer on Assateague Island is pictured earlier this month.

Photo by Chris Parypa

BERLIN – Sports wagering at the Ocean Downs Casino moved closer to becoming a reality last week after the state’s application review commission approved the license for the local casino and four others around the state. Last month, the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Commission (MLGCC) determined the Ocean Downs Casino met the qualification requirements for a sports wagering license. That approval forwarded the applications for sports wagering for

November 26, 2021

five casinos in Maryland, including the Ocean Downs Casino, to the state’s Sports Wagering Application Review Commission (SWARC), which is responsible for awarding the gaming licenses. The SWARC has been criticized somewhat for dragging their feet on approving the first round of sports wagering licenses. In the last week, pressure has come from the applying casinos and even Governor Larry Hogan after SWARC did not approve the applications in October. On Thursday, however, SWARC voted 5-2 to approve the sports wagering licenses for the five casinos including the Ocean Downs Casino. Other applicants approved by SWARC on Thursday included the Hollywood Casino in Cecil County, the Horseshoe Casino in Baltimore, the Live Casino in Anne Arundel County and the MGM Casino at National Harbor. Last year, the General Assembly approved legalized sports wagering in Maryland for as many as 17 potential locations. The divided 5-2 SWARC vote on the five casino locations on Thursday is indicative of a divided commission on the initial round of applications. Those on the commission who were opposed reportedly cited an unfair playing ground by awarding the first batch of licenses to established gaming facilities in the state. The two nay votes reportedly wanted equal consideration for minority-owned and women-owned businesses seeking sports wagering licenses. SWARC awarding the five sports wagering licenses to the five casinos on Thursday, including the Ocean Downs Casino in Berlin, sets in motion the next step in the process. Earlier this month, the MLGCC approved the sports wagering partners for each of the five casinos. Each of the five casinos qualified for sports wagering will partner with an independent third party to run the operations. On Thursday, the MLGCC approved the licenses for the third-party operators. For Ocean Downs Casino, the sports wagering partner approved on Nov. 18 is TwinSpires. Gov. Larry Hogan last Thursday said he was pleased SWARC approved the first batch of sports wagering licenses. “No one has been pushing harder than I have to get sports betting up and running here in the state of Maryland,” he said. “Today, the legislature’s Sports Wagering Applicant Review Commission has finally acted after weeks of delay to approve licenses for five entities. We have been pushing the commission to swiftly approve these licenses and look forward to getting sports betting underway as quickly as possible in time for the NFL playoffs and the Super Bowl.”


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 29


Va. Convenience Store’s Request To Use Pocomoke Sewer Denied Town Seeks Plan Amendment

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Plans for a Virginia convenience store to hook up to Pocomoke City’s sewer system have come to a halt following concern from county officials. Several of the Worcester County Commissioners last week expressed opposition to Pocomoke City’s plans to provide sewer service to the Royal Farms just over the Virginia line in New Church. A motion to schedule a public hearing on the proposal, which would require an amendment to the Worcester County Comprehensive Water and Sewerage Plan, failed with just two votes of support. “This is Accomack County’s problem,” Commissioner Chip Bertino said. “Let them fix it. If there’s a public hearing to be had let them have it. It shouldn’t come before us.” According to a staff report, the Town of Pocomoke City was seeking an amendment to the county’s water and sewerage plan that would allow the town to extend sewer service to Royal Farms, as its septic system was failing. Commissioner Josh Nordstrom, who represents

the Pocomoke area, was quick to make a motion to schedule a public hearing for the proposed amendment. Commissioner Jim Bunting said he didn’t agree with the request. He said other businesses would want to hook up to the sewer line if Royal Farms did. He added that Royal Farms was in Virginia. “The company is not paying any property taxes to Worcester County or the Town of Pocomoke,” he said. “I don’t think this is the right thing to do and I will not be voting for it.” Nordstrom said the town had been working toward the project for some time. He said the town was already pumping out the septic at Royal Farms and delivering it to the Pocomoke Wastewater Treatment Plant. Nordstrom added that the connection fees involved would provide Pocomoke with enough money to make necessary improvements to its wastewater plant. “The line is already running down there, the Virginia welcome center is on that line, so we’re not exactly setting a

precedent,” he said. He added that the business was in the Pocomoke watershed. “This is just one business right at the state line that desperately needs help. Your closest wastewater plant is about 20 miles south, down the road in Onley,” he said. “This is in the Pocomoke area. it’s in the Pocomoke watershed. If we were to have an environmental disaster because this septic system fails and there is no way to contain it, then we would have a problem in the Pocomoke watershed.” Commissioner Bud Church said he was opposed to the proposal. “We’re picking and choosing who we’re going to do business with,” he said. Bertino also voiced opposition. “I’m certainly sensitive to the fact that Pocomoke is interested in doing this but I disagree wholeheartedly when it’s said an environmental problem or situation is on Worcester County’s shoulders,” he said. “The fact is Royal Farms made a

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determination when they built that store that they were going to do it and build it in Accomack County.” He said the store’s connections should go talk to Accomack County officials. He added that while the county did extend sewer to the Virginia welcome center, that agreement was with the Commonwealth of Virginia not a private business. Though the Worcester County Planning Commission found the proposal consistent with the sewerage plan, Bob Mitchell, the county’s director of environmental programs, acknowledged they’d had some of the same concerns the commissioners did. He said Pocomoke’s wastewater treatment plant was already receiving the Royal Farms septage, but that it was being trucked in not delivered by sewer line. “I would note that our three towns receive a considerable amount of septage, it’s a money maker,” Mitchell said. “It’s an income generator for the towns. We allow them to do this… Pocomoke serves almost half of the Eastern Shore. You don’t have public sewer until Onley…” Bunting said several members of the planning commission – including the county’s former environmental programs director – had concerns about the proposal. He added that when the welcome center connection had been approved, paperwork stated that would be the only connection. “This piece of paper from Pocomoke that says this will be the only tie in, it’s worthless,” he said, ripping the page in half. “Accomack County needs to step up and take care of this issue.” He said if Pocomoke connected Royal Farms, they should consider waiving property taxes to other businesses. When Mitchell attempted to continue his input, Bunting interrupted. “I don’t want to hear what you’ll add Bob,” he said. Bertino pointed out that if Pocomoke was in need of wastewater plant improvements, it could use American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding and wouldn’t need the hookup fees from Royal Farms. “I want Pocomoke to be successful,” Bertino said. “I hope Royal Farms deSEE NEXT PAGE


Dec. 6 Public Hearing Planned On Fenwick Height Regulations

November 26, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – Officials have scheduled a public hearing on proposed amendments to Fenwick Island’s commercial height regulations. The Town of Fenwick Island will hold a hearing on Dec. 6 to receive public comments on a proposed ordinance amendment that would include mechanical equipment into the calculation of a commercial building’s height. “It’s basically marrying up what is already written in the residential side of the height ordinance to the commercial side,” Councilwoman Natalie Magdeburger said last month.

… Commissioners Refuse To Hold Public Hearing

cides to move across to Worcester County. At that point I’d have no problem welcoming them. I don’t see that we should be held responsible for the lack of planning on the part of Accomack County.” Nordstrom said that Pocomoke wanted to make the connection with its own wastewater treatment plant. “They have plenty of capacity,” he said. His peers maintained that a precedent would be set. Nordstrom’s motion to schedule a public hearing failed, with he and Commissioner Diana Purnell in support and Bunting, Bertino, Church and Commissioner Ted Elder opposed. When contacted after last week’s commissioners meeting, Accomack County Administrator Mike Mason said this issue had not been presented to the Accomack County Board of Supervisors. “In fact, this is the first I have heard of it,” he said in an email. “In Virginia, onsite sewage systems are regulated by the Virginia Department of Health so any problems with the system currently located on the Royal Farms property would have been addressed by this state agency not the county.” He added that other than Pocomoke City’s sewer line, there was no public or private wastewater collection system within 10 miles of Royal Farms. “It is my understanding that Pocomoke’s sewer line already slightly extends over the state line in close proximity to Royal Farms so if they desire to connect to a centralized treatment system, it is more than likely the only practical solution,” he said. “We have no purview over whether Royal Farms connects to this existing system.”

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

According to the town’s zoning code, total building height in the commercial district cannot exceed 30 feet – or 32 feet if the building has a freeboard that elevates the structure. But there are exceptions for roof-mounted solar panels, chimneys and elevator shafts, which can extend 4.5 feet above the maximum height to accommodate the elevator’s service equipment. The ordinance in question would be amended to add that “mechanical equipment and any other items attached to or mounted onto a building shall be included in the calculation of a building’s height.” A draft of the proposed amendment passed on first reading at the August town council meeting and was subsequently referred to the Char-ter and Ordinance Committee for further discussion. And in October, committee members agreed to schedule a public hearing before advancing the amendment to the town council for a second reading. The public hearing will take place Monday, Dec. 6, at Fenwick Island Town Hall. The meeting will also be held virtually. For more information, visit fenwickisland.delaware.gov.

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Wicomico Reviews Five-Year Capital Improvement Plan

Page 32

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – School renovations, parks and recreation projects and civic center improvements highlight just some of the requests included in this year’s capital planning document. Acting County Executive John Psota and Finance Director Pam Oland held a public hearing Nov. 17 on the county’s proposed Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for fiscal years 2023-2027. The fiveyear planning document outlines $68.5 million in general fund requests and $76.9

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

million in enterprise fund requests. “We created a process where we do a CIP, which is a five-year plan to give us an estimate of what we see up and coming for the next five years …,” Oland said this week. “We use that five-year plan to take the first year of that plan and use it to help us budget for the next fiscal year.” This year’s proposed CIP, totaling more than $145.4 million, includes $11.3 million for recreation and parks projects and $9.46 million for improvements at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center, though most of those requests will be funded with state and federal grants.

“A majority of those projects are grant funded,” Oland said, “so most of it will be coming from sources other than the general fund.” The proposed CIP also includes $7.5 million for Wor-Wic Community College, which has plans to use some of that funding for the construction of its applied technology building. Oland added the planning document also includes money for a new Pittsville library branch. “There’s requests to look at doing a Pittsville library,” she said, “so that is in here for the library.” A lion’s share of requests, however, come from the Wicomico County Board of Education. The school system’s requests, totaling $21.2 million over five years, include funding for its three priority projects: $18.8 million for the Mardela Middle and High School renovation/addition, $1.48 million for a Wicomico High School roof renovation, and $978,000 for a Parkside High School roof renovation. “We’re looking to fund Mardela out of bond and the other two we are hoping to pay with pay-go funds,” Oland said. In her remarks, Superintendent Dr. Donna Hanlin thanked Wicomico County officials for their support. She noted the $10 million in county appropriations through fiscal year 2022 will allow the school system to execute construction on the Mardela project. “After discussion with various stakeholders, including the School Building

November 26, 2021

Commission, we are also exploring the use of Built to Learn funds to assist in addressing the project’s overall cash flow needs,” she told county leaders. She also thanked officials for incorporating the two roof replacement projects in the five-year planning document. She said the 210,000-square-foot roof project at Wicomico High and the 128,000square-foot roof project at Parkside are the next two replacement projects in the school system’s Roof Asset Management Plan. “Although we only highlighted three priorities, I wanted to note there are a number of other projects included in our FY23 capital planning budget, including site work, plumbing, cameras and access control at various locations throughout our school system,” she said. “And we’re also pleased to report that we were able to initiate and complete various CIP projects from the previous fiscal year through other funding sources, including ESSER and COVID relief funds of approximately $26 million to address various HVAC, windows and doors and roof replacements.” Oland told attendees officials propose funding capital requests through various sources, including bond proceeds, grants and pay-go funds, or funds from the county’s savings account. She said the capital planning document will be submitted to the Wicomico County Council in December.

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State’s Attorney Briefs County Officials On Body Camera Impact

November 26, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Worcester County State’s Attorney Kris Heiser outlined the staggering impact she expects the police body camera mandate to have on her office this week. Heiser met with the Worcester County Commissioners Nov. 16 to brief them on the far-reaching effect Maryland’s body camera mandate would have on Worcester County. It’s her office that will have to process all of the video footage produced. “The state’s attorney’s office is the primary destination for all of the evidence law enforcement collects,” she said. “That’s what these body cameras will be. They are an entirely new body of evidence for every single case that we prosecute.” While the cameras don’t have to be in place until 2025, Heiser said she was approaching the commissioners now because her office would need to increase its staffing in order to deal with the influx in video it would be processing once cameras were being worn. “Our workload will increase exponentially,” she said. “Every case will have a video associated with it. Probably more than one video.” She used past Boardwalk incidents as an example. There could be a situation with multiple defendants and multiple officers involved. Her team will have to watch the video, prepare it as evidence and redact sections to comply with other requirements, such as HIPAA. They then have to provide the video to the defense in time to meet discovery requirements. “Once agencies go live with these body cameras it’ll be like drinking from a fire hose for our team at the state’s attorney’s office,” she said. “There would be no way we could keep up with that volume.” Commissioner Jim Bunting said he didn’t think any changes needed to be made until they had to be – in 2025. “Maybe something will happen between now and then,” he said. Heiser said the issue was that her office worked with 12 different law enforcement agencies. Several of them, including the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office and the Ocean City Police Department, plan to implement cameras before 2025. Her office has to be ready for that. “I’m going to have to start building staff now to be able to manage the influx,” she said. She said that the safety of the county would suffer if her office, which already has the highest caseload per prosecutor in the state, couldn’t successfully prosecute cases. “Everything our police do leads to prosecution,” she said. “If there’s no

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 33

prosecution, there’s effectively no law enforcement.” She said studies indicated the county should likely hire one additional prosecutor for every 50-75 officers wearing cameras. There are more than 400 officers in Worcester County. Other issues that need to be considered are space – her office is already full – and the technicalities of the cameras themselves, the software and storage that will be required and an anticipated increase in Public Information Act requests for video. Commissioner Chip Bertino said officials recognized the difficulties of dealing with a new unfunded mandate. “You’re going to have to keep these plates in the air while they’re spinning them,” he said. Heiser said one of her primary concerns was getting the necessary staff when she’d be competing with other state’s attorney’s offices throughout the state, as all will need more personnel to deal with the new requirements. When asked if local law enforcement agencies were aware of her concerns regarding body camera implementation, Heiser said they were and that she hoped all the entities involved could work together.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Pictured at a recent awarding of grants ceremony are, back from left, Steve Parsons of Coldwell Banker, JoAnn Blackmon of the Epoch Dream Center, Rhonda Evans of ERA Martin, Leslie Zimmerman of the Alzheimer’s Association, Michael Dyer of United Needs and Abilities, Chuck Shorley of Shore-Lea Realty, Rusty Mumford of the Community Players of Salisbury, Gary Finley of Finley Appraisals and Aurelio Giannitti of Wicomico Libraries; and front, Bernie Flax of Coastal Life Realty, Kim Nock of the Humane Society, Darla the Dog, Sara Bianco of ERA Martin and Cam Bunting of Bunting Realty. Submitted Photo

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Coastal Awards Grant Funding To Nonprofits 6 Selected

November 26, 2021

BERLIN – The Coastal Association of REALTORS® (Coastal) has announced it has awarded $4,750 in grants to local charities through the Coastal REALTORS® Foundation during its latest round of funding. This year to date the foundation has awarded $13,750. Received grants in the Coastal REALTORS® Foundation’s latest round of funding were the Alzheimer’s Association of the Eastern Shore, Community Players of Salisbury, Epoch Dream Center, Humane Society of Wicomico County, United Needs and Abilities and Wicomico Libraries Reader Van. The Coastal REALTORS® Foundation is a charitable fund held by the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore. The association raises money for the fund through an annual charity golf tournament as well as other efforts throughout the year. The fund is accessible to members of Coastal through an application process administered by the association and reviewed by a committee of members. Grant recipients must be 501(c)3 organizations and must be located in Somerset, Wicomico, or Worcester counties. “This is our foundation’s third year and we are very honored and excited to continue to give back to the Lower Shore especially during COVID when so many people and organizations are struggling,” said Coastal President Grace Masten. “Our annual golf tournament raised $12,000 this year and we look forward to continuing to support the causes important to our members and the community.” Grants are awarded three times a year, and the next deadline is Feb. 15, 2022.


Online Contest Results In New Name For Assateague Filly

November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 35

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

ASSATEAGUE – Supporters and enthusiasts of Assateague’s famed wild horses have spoken, and a new foal birthed on the barrier island last spring is now officially known as Polaris. The Assateague Island Alliance (AIA), the friends group of the Assateague Island National Seashore, which advocates on behalf of the island’s most famous residents, each year hosts naming contests for the foals born into the herd on the Maryland side. Often, the contests are held as auctions through e-Bay, for example, and the naming rights go to a single successful bidder. This fall, however, the AIA launched a different kind of poll to gauge the public interest in naming a chestnut filly born in mid-May to afford the entire community an opportunity to participate. The foal, heretofore, was known only as N2BHSJT. Decades ago, the National Park Service began assigning alpha-numeric names to the wild horses on Assateague to better track to which bands they belonged and areas on the island they tend to frequent. The foal born in May was birthed by Shasta and the likely sire is Chestnut. The filly is living with mother mare and birth band on the north end of Assateague Island National Seashore. Throughout the last several weeks, members of the community and Assa-

Polaris was born in May and is commonly seen around the north end of Assatague Island.

teague wild horse enthusiasts have been submitting name suggestions for the new foal. The foal-naming team earlier this month winnowed the list of suggestions down to the five most popular. The five most popular name suggestions in alphabetical order were Gale, Little Chesta, Millie, North Star and Polaris. This week, the AIA announced the name receiving the most votes in the online poll was Polaris, which is synonymous with

North Star. Hence, the new foal birthed by Shasta in May will now forever be known as Polaris. Each vote came with a $2 donation and there were no limits to the number of times one could vote. For example, if someone preferred Polaris, which they clearly did judging by the results, he or she could vote as many times as they chose. If someone chose Polaris and voted 10 times, the donation to AIA would be $20. The public clearly em-

Submitted Photo

braced the concept as over $1,500 was raised during the AIA poll for the naming rights, meaning over 750 votes were cast. Meanwhile, a separate e-Bay online naming auction for a foal birthed by Susi Sole was conducted last week. Money raised through foal-naming fundraisers support AIA’s mission to promote the awareness, education and protection of the wild horses on Assateague and its natural resources for the enjoyment of current and future generations.


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Company To Seek Fed Grant For $15M Broadband Project

Page 38

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – Choptank Electric representatives came before the county council this month to pitch plans for broadband infrastructure projects totaling $15 million. The Wicomico County Council met with Choptank representatives Nov. 16 to discuss a $15 million infrastructure project that is expected to bring broadband to unserved areas of the county. Valerie Connelly, vice president of government affairs, said the cooperative was looking to partner with Wicomico to submit a grant request to the Office of Statewide Broadband for funding. “It’s too expensive to get to rural areas,” she said. “That’s why you have so many unserved locations. The cost per mile and the cost of infrastructure for such a low density is nearly impossible to do without grant funding.” In 2020, the Maryland General Assembly passed legislation allowing Choptank to become member regulated to start its new broadband business, Choptank Fiber. Using its existing fiber infrastructure, the company’s goal is to begin offering broad-

band service to its members and ultimately expand its services to others in the community. As part of that effort, Choptank representatives told council members this week the cooperative had met with Acting County Executive John Psota and IT Director John Monar to present infrastructure projects that would bring broadband to 1,400 unserved homes in four of the five county districts. While the projects would cost roughly $15 million, Connelly said Choptank was hoping to partner with Wicomico in applying for grant funding to bring the project to fruition. The locations of the proposed infrastructure projects were not disclosed this week. “The unique thing about this grant is that the cost share, or the matching funds, is tiered in this grant process,” she said. “We believe all the areas we are looking to serve in Wicomico County fall into the lowest tier for matching requirements, which is 10%. What we would propose is that Choptank would pay 5% and the county would pay 5%.” Under that proposed formula, she said, Wicomico County would contribute $758,-

November 26, 2021

000 toward the project. “This is unique because we’ve never seen a cost share or match this low,” she said. Connelly noted the grant request was time sensitive, as applications had to be submitted to the Office of Statewide Broadband by Jan. 14 and it’s a competitive market. “The concern is that now there is going to start to be redevelopment of infrastructure in more urban areas that is going to use a lot of the new money in future years,” she said. “So we are looking at this as one of the really unique opportunities to grab as much money as you can for rural infrastructure needs here in Wicomico County.” Councilman John Cannon noted there were at least six internet service providers (ISPs) vying for the same broadband business. He questioned what made Choptank different. “How would Choptank distinguish itself, separate itself, from the other ISPs?” he said. Leroy Sverduk, vice president of engineering, noted Choptank was a nonprofit entity looking to bridge the gap in broadband services. He added the cooperative

also had a warehouse of materials to begin projects immediately. “That’s positioning us really well to hit the ground running,” he said. Councilman Joe Holloway questioned if the cooperative was working with other counties on separate grant projects. “I want to make sure the money the county puts up is to serve our county,” he said. Connelly reassured the council that the county’s match would fund Wicomico projects. “The thing about the cost share money is that it’s all reimbursable …,” she said. “We have those financial resources to do the entire build, then we get reimbursed from the state and reimbursed from the county after the work is done. You wouldn’t be putting money on the table up front.” Councilwoman Nicole Acle thanked Choptank representatives for presenting information to the council. “Just to be clear, this is an executive decision, to partner with someone for the grant,” she said. “… I know the county executive and Mr. Monar are working on this project, and we do have other ISP providers who have requested to come in for work sessions after this.”

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Tech students celebrated:

The Worcester County Commissioners presented commendations to honor Worcester Technical High School students who earned gold medals in eight individual and team categories during the SkillsUSA Maryland Virtual State Championship last April. Those pictured include, front, advisor Crystal Bunting, students Matt Burns, Aryavir Sangwan, and Myra Cropper, advisors Rick Stephens and Denise Coston, student Jessica Beck, and advisor Tammy Hearne; and, second row from left, students Jeff Eichelberger and William Kozma, Commissioners Bud Church, Jim Bunting, and Joe Mitrecic, student Jacob Yankalunas, Commissioners Diana Purnell, Ted Elder, Josh Nordstrom and Chip Bertino, Superintendent of Schools Louis Taylor, and WTHS Principal Tom Zimmer. Thanks to the outstanding performance of staff and students, WTHS earned the National Gold Level as a Chapter of Excellence for the fifth consecutive year during the virtual 2021 National Leadership and Skills Conference last June. Submitted Photo

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Page 40

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021

COMMUNITY News In Photos

The Ocean City Lions Club recently welcomed Lower Shore Land Trust (LSLT) Executive Director Kate Patton to discuss current initiatives to support trails, pollinators, conservation and the management of invasive species. Patton, right, is pictured with OC Lions President Scott Stark, who provided a donation to the LSLT.

The Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum hosted its annual Storm Warriors 5K/Walk Run this month. Pictured are the participants who placed in the race with museum volunteers and staff. Submitted Photos The Lions Club International Foundation supports the efforts of Lions clubs in serving communities locally and globally, giving hope and impacting lives through humanitarian service projects and grants. Pictured with a donation are OC Lions Director Ken Robertson, President Scott Stark and Director Doug Parks.

Dan Clayland, a local realtor with Coldwell Banker, held the winning raffle ticket for a trip for two to Sedona, Ariz. He is pictured with Art League of Ocean City Executive Director Rina Thaler. The raffle raised funds for the nonprofit organization.

The Ocean City Lions Club donated $1,500 to the Lions Vision Rehabilitation Foundation to support low vision research and rehabilitation. The foundation partners with the LVR Rehabilitation Center at the Wilmer Eye Institute of The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Pictured are OC Lion Past President John Topfer, President Scott Stark and Past President Mike Hooper.

The Kiwanis "Dawg Team" was hard at work last month for the Ocean Pines Halloween Festival in White Horse Park in Ocean Pines. Working under the pavilion were, from left, Dick Clagett, Mike Castoro and Roy Foreman.

Through Stephen Decatur High School, the Greenwood family collected and donated 444 pairs of glasses to the Ocean City Lions Club for Community Service. Pictured, from left, are Past District Governor Norm Cathell, Abby (senior), Charlie (10th grade), Jack (11th), Gail Greenwood and OC Lion Past President John Topfer.


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BUSINESS And Real Estate News

Page 41

You’ll Find Lots Of Holiday Decorations And Gift-Giving Ideas In Our Local Antique And Country Craft Stores

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The Coastal Association of REALTORS® (Coastal) welcomed 24 new members this month. Pictured, back from left, are Tim Arnett of ERA Martin, Christian Bonebrake of Atlantic Shores Sotheby’s, Ryan Basch of Coldwell Banker, Lisa Jackson of Engel & Volker, Cassie Stuart of Sheppard Realty, Coastal Association of REALTORS® President Grace Masten, Kasey Riddle of Keller Williams, Lisa Lebow of Engel & Volker, Ron Harris of Atlantic Shores Sotheby’s, Amanda Manning of Coldwell Banker, Ryan Finnegan of SVN Miller, Jenny Catron of Engel & Volker, James Briddell of ERA Martin; and, front, Brandon Green of Engel & Volker, Brent Esham of Esham Real Estate, Gailynn Mullins of Keller Williams, Bethany Alaniz of Coldwell Banker, Barbara Derrickson of Coldwell Banker, Lila Goodwin of Keller Williams, Amy Coy of Berkshire Hathaway and Shelly Kingsbury of Charis Realty. New members not pictured were Logan Burke of Keller Williams, David Capobianco of ERA Martin, Andrea Laurenzano of Keller Williams and Craig Lynch of Atlantic Shores Sotheby’s. Submitted Photo

New Members Welcomed BERLIN – The Coastal Association of REALTORS® (Coastal) welcomed 24 new members during new member orientation on Nov. 4. New member orientation is a requirement for all members of Coastal. Attendees are introduced to services provided by the association. The class is held quarterly. “We are very excited to welcome 24 new members to the Coastal. This is one of the largest new member classes we have held in a while and is evidence of how strong the market is. We wish them all the best of luck in their new career,” said Coastal President Grace Masten.

Professors Recognized SALISBURY – The International Leadership Association (ILA), the largest global organization for leadership scholars and practitioners, recently announced Salisbury University’s Drs. Chrys Egan and Sherry Maykrantz as Women and Leadership Award winners. They will receive their honors at the annual Women and Leadership Conference in June 2022, in Portsmouth, England. Egan, associate dean and professor of communication in the Charles R. and Martha N. Fulton School of Liberal Arts, received the ILA Women and Leadership Outstanding Practice with Local Impact Award for her years of mentor-

ing work with the Youth Innovation Academy, Peer to Peer Women’s Circle, Mosaic Mentoring and Office of Undergraduate Research and Creativity Activity (OURCA). She has served as past chair of the ILA Women and Leadership Committee and past president of the Popular Culture Association in the South, and is second vice president of the Maryland Communication Association. She is coeditor of Pathways into the Political Arena: The Perspectives of Global Women Leaders. She also has earned SU’s President’s Diversity, Outstanding Faculty, Alumni Faculty Appreciation, Outstanding Research Mentor, and Distinguished Faculty awards. Maykrantz, assistant professor of public health in the College of Health and Human Services, received the ILA Women and Leadership Outstanding Scholarship for Emerging Scholars Award. Since earning her Ph.D. in 2017, she has published seven journal articles on a variety of topics including the role of trust in information and cognitive resources in shaping health protective behaviors. She also has published on self-leadership and coping. She has delivered 10 academic conference presentations on important public health issues. Her grants include U.S. Department of Health and Human Services support to address opioid addiction, and an International Programs Grant to lead a study abroad course on drug reSEE PAGE 42

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

... BUSINESS NEWS FROM PAGE 41 lations in Portugal. She serves as chair of the SU Student Research Conference Committee and has earned an SU Libraries Information Literacy Partner of the Month Award. The ILA brings together professionals from every sector, discipline and profession across the globe to produce rigorous research, cultivate a deeper understanding of the world and generate new insights into how to exercise effective leadership. These awards recognize Egan and Maykrantz’s dedication to practicing leadership in their respective disciplines and their commitment to supporting diverse leadership.

Annual Award Recipients SALISBURY – The Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore honored four award recipients and celebrated annual grant-making efforts at its Annual Meeting and Report to the Community on November 5th. The foundation celebrated a total of $5.1 million in grants made in fiscal year 2021, including more than $542,000 in scholarships to local students. “While the need for nonprofit assistance has been both tremendous and unique this past year, the Community Foundation has been able to grow, connect donors and resources, and act as a leading philanthropic resource for our community,” says CFES President, Erica Joseph. “The continued generos-

ity of our friends, partners, donors, and volunteers have allowed us to create incredible impact on the Lower Shore community, for which we are thankful.” The Mary Gladys Jones Volunteer of the Year Award was awarded to Martin Hutchison for championing the community’s homeless, youth, and nonprofits in a selfless, dedicated, passionate, and resourceful way. Always one to step up wherever needed, often without being asked, he has touched the lives of countless organizations and individuals. In 2015, he established the Camden Community Garden which has created a major impact through hosting school classes, encouraging citizens to garden, and promoting healthy nutrition. With his guidance and mentorship, several other community gardens are thriving throughout the Lower Shore. He has stepped up as leader of the food group for Tri Community Mediations’ Vulnerable Population Task Force, helped the development of Newton Community Center, and mentors students at Pinehurst Elementary School. Martin is the Pastor of Community of Joy Church and manages Community of Joy’s Community Emergency Shelter Project each winter. For his unwavering dedication and love for the local community he will receive a $1,000 gift to designate to the charity of his choice. The Nonprofit Award of Excellence honoring Richard A. Henson was awarded to The Ward Museum of Wild Fowl Art. As a leader in the cultural heritage field, the Ward Museum is a con-

November 26, 2021

stant source of education and advocacy for the region’s arts and culture for visitors of all ages. Established in 1968, the organization attracts locals and tourists to the Eastern Shore as it creates opportunities for learning about artistic traditions, community heritage, and connections to the natural environment. In FY19, more than 12,000 visitors flocked to events and exhibitions. During the COVID19 pandemic the staff adapted and got creative. They reworked their programming, exhibits, and events to fit the virtual world, including virtual festivals, weekly story time and crafts for preschoolers, virtual field trips with inquiry kits for hands on learning, virtual after school STREAM programming, and much more. For their dedication to providing truly unique experiences of nature, art, heritage, and folklife to the Lower Shore, The Ward Foundation will receive $5,000 to support their work. The Frank H. Morris Humanitarian Award was awarded to Peggy Bradford for her massive community impact, compassion, and generosity that knows no bounds. Bradford has worked to enhance the quality of life of seniors, caretakers, and family members in our area, along with advocating for animals. She served as Executive Director of MAC for 37 years and is a board member for the Salisbury Kennel Club. She helped create the “MAC Loves Pets on Wheels”, a project to provide pet food, health and training tips, and other resources for the home-bound senior pet owner. An individual of many talents,

she has shared her grant writing skills with many organizations and secured funding for the Ocean City Elks Lodge, Meals on Wheels of Worcester and Wicomico Counties, and more than $200,000 for Chesapeake Housing Mission. Through her years of service, she has impacted the lives of thousands in the community, and her kindness, patience, humility, and willingness to help others is unparalleled. For her dedication to making her community a better place Bradford will receive a $1,500 gift to designate to the charity of her choice. The Chairman’s Award was presented to Jim Thomas. He has been a CFES board member for 11 years. During this time, he has supported and mentored CFES staff, junior board members, and has served on five CFES committees, including the Executive Committee. As evident by his additional and concurrent leadership positions on several other organizational boards, he is dedicated to the betterment of the local community. Thomas is always kind and positive, asks important questions, and brings about effective solutions to community challenges. From helping to serve lunches at a summer youth program, to Chairing the Board of Directors for two years, he has made it his mission to serve alongside the staff, fellow volunteers, and our community partners throughout their tenure. Thomas is the epitome of a servant leader and his years of dedication and service have been invaluable to the Community Foundation.

Adopt A Pet From The Shelter These Loving Animals, Sponsored Each Month By Local Businesses, Are Available For Adoption At The Ocean City Humane Society: 410-213-0146. To Sponsor A Pet, Call 410-641-4561 • Annually, 10% Of The Proceeds From This Page Are Donated To The Shelter The Humane Society Desperately Needs Volunteers To Help Care For The Cats And Dogs. Any Amount Of Time You Can Spare Will Be Appreciated.

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Maryland Title Service 11500 Coastal Hwy., Suite 7, OC 410-723-2000

Elliott’s Hardware Rte. 611, West Ocean City 410-213-1088


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 43

The Dispatch’s Pets of the Month

Pet’s Name: Rayelle Pet’s Age/Breed: 3-month-old miniature Dachshund Pet’s Owners: Ray & Eleanor Tagnon

Pet’s Name: Maxwell & Penny Pet’s Age/Breed: 10-week-old English springer spaniels Pet’s Owners: Deck & Kathy Decker

Pet’s Name: Tiger Pet’s Age/Breed: 18-year-old tabby Pet’s Owner: Jeanne DiMichele

Pet’s Name: Stella Pet’s Age/Breed: 8-year-old hound shepherd mix Pet’s Owner: April Gottsagen

EDITOR

STEVE GREEN The Dispatch presents the latest edition of its Pets of the Month Contest. Each month one special animal, or two, in some cases, is picked as the cutest photo of the bunch through a private vote of our staff. Here we present this month’s pets, submitted by our readers. On the front page is last month’s winning entry, Cornbread, owned by Colton Haugh and Annie Seiff and Finn, owned by Charlie Haugh and Savannah McCauley. Those interested in participating in future months’ contests are invited to send their lovable pet photo to us at editor@mdcoastdispatch.com (preferred) or to P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 or drop it off at our office in Berlin at 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Please be sure it’s a high-quality photo suitable for reproduction and to include your mailing address, the pet’s name, age and breed and the owner’s first and last name. The next series will appear in this space on Dec. 17.

Pet’s Name: Cosmo Pet’s Age/Breed: 2-year-old Aussie shepherd Pet’s Owners: David Susco

Pet’s Name: Cleopatra Pet’s Age/Breed: 16-year-old westie Pet’s Owners: Barbara & David Mandarino

Pet’s Name: Hairy Houdini Pet’s Age/Breed: 7-year-old American longhair Pet’s Owner: Patrick Priest

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Page 44

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021

People in Society American Legion Post 123 hosted its first oyster fritter sale of the season with ALA members Rosalee Palmer and Meghan Campbell helping out SALS Jackie Cooper, Morris Jones, Rick Jordan, and Richard Widgeon in the kitchen.

by Jeanette Deskiewicz Featuring Those Helping Causes In The Resort Area

Donte Hawkins, joined his wife Kejuana Walton at the Maryland Insurance Administration booth during the Autumn Home & Condo Show, where she talked about the agency’s consumer education and advising services.

Pip the Beach Cat has moved to Ocean Pines, with his parents Jack Bulak and Emily Meadows holding a ribbon cutting ceremony at his new Kitten Emporium last month.

On dish duty for their October Community Supper were Charles McCready and John Hughes in the Knights of Columbus Council #9053 hall kitchen on 99th Street.

At the OC Pet Expo part of the Autumn Home & Condo Show, Delmarva Cat Connection’s Lois Banks and Jill Kelly collected donations for their furry friends.

Knights of Columbus Council #9053 Community Suppers have started back up for the fall, with Tom Anderson and Bill Link serving the Oktoberfest themed meal.

Hailing from Pasadena with their small batch sauces, were Diane Wilkins and Bobby Giles in the Arts and Craft Fair section of the Autumn Home & Condo Show.

At the ribbon cutting for Pip the Beach Cat's Kitten Emporium, store volunteer Christian Martin, and his mom, Lybbi, enjoyed holding Coconut during Kitty Play Time.

Servers Haley Maitz and Cindy Alvarez did a great job keeping the food and drinks flowing for Ocean Pines Chamber members during the Ribbon Cutting/Business After Hours at the new OC Eateries.

The Fidanza Family, father and son, Franco and Raffaele, welcomed the local community into their new OC Eateries at their recent ribbon cutting hosted by the Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce.


Reasons Behind Higher Prices

November 26, 2021

Wealth of Knowledge

BY KRISTIN COANE

SPECIALS TO THE DISPATCH

BERLIN – You may have noticed higher prices on the things you buy regularly, like groceries and gas. However, many consumers may not realize that economic factors such as backed-up supply chains, extreme weather events, labor shortages/higher wages, and higher demand are not currently reflected in many consumer prices. Why is that? In some cases, merchants and corporations are absorbing the extra costs rather than pass them on to consumers. In situations where that is impractical, some vendors have even removed goods from their shelves rather than pay or reflect those KRISTIN COANE higher prices. For example, your local restaurants may have taken favorite dishes off the menu. In fact, some chicken wing specialty restaurants are having trouble sourcing their namesake dish. However, large coffee chains like Starbucks are not yet affected by occurrences like the unusual frost on Brazil’s Arabica bean crop last July, as only 5% of the price you pay for its coffee reflects the bean price. Your local coffee shop around the corner, on the other hand, may have to increase prices to cover that cost. According to Morgan Stanley, by absorbing higher costs to keep consumers happy, company profits are taking a hit. If supply chain and labor shortages continue, it’s only a matter of time until investors are affected. It’s a matter of balancing the threat of inflation on consumer prices against the squeeze in profit margins. Investors need to be aware that these types of factors could eventually impact their portfolios. For example, if inflation continues to rise, the Federal Reserve may increase interest rates. If companies continue to absorb elevated costs, their earnings expectations will decline and thus, so might stock prices. That’s why it’s important to have an investment advisor who stays current with economic indicators and how they can impact market events. If we feel that any of our clients are over-exposed to vulnerable holdings or sectors, we let them know. Feel free to contact us whenever you want to discuss the current market environment. If you’re worried about the impact of higher prices on your portfolio, you may want to consider adding an inflation hedge, such as precious metals. Morgan Stanley offers a good primer on the differences and benefits of gold and silver on its website. It’s also important to remember that you don’t have to purchase the actual physical metals to diversify your portfolio, as they also are

Symphony Plans Holiday Shows

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

available via mining stocks, mutual funds, and exchange-traded funds. Given the potential for rising interest rates, some investors – particularly those nearing retirement – may want to consider repositioning high-risk assets into the bond market. In its latest market roundup, Morgan Stanley highlighted bond market opportunities that are less influenced by the direction of interest rates. Specifically, it recommends looking at U.S. high yield, mortgages and securitized assets, convertible bonds, and emerging markets. (The writer is part of the team at Key Financial Services. The entire team can be reached at 410-629-0357.)

OCEAN CITY – The Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra is continuing its tradition of sharing seasonal cheer with its popular Holiday Joy program, with acclaimed French soprano Norah Amsellem as guest soloist. “Holiday Joy affords us the opportunity to celebrate the season with orchestral and vocal works representing a variety of cultures and traditions, reminding us of the diversity of society and demonstrating the power of music to bring us together,” said Music Director Julien Benichou. “We are delighted to be joined by the talented Norah Amsellem, who has performed leading roles with major opera companies in the United States and in Europe.” Featuring a selection of seasonal favorites, the festive program will be presented on Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. at the Avalon Theatre in Easton; on Dec. 4 at 7 p.m. at Cape Henlopen High School in Lewes,

Page 45

Del.; and on Dec. 5 at 3 p.m. at the Ocean City Performing Arts Center in Ocean City. Tickets for the program are $50, and may be purchased in advance at www.midatlanticsymphony.org or by calling 888-846-8600. Tickets also are available at the door. To ensure the safety of its audience members and musicians, the orchestra requires proof of COVID-19 vaccination for everyone entering venues. Some venues also may require that masks be worn. A winner of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions and member of the Met’s Lindemann Young Artist Program, Amsellem made her official debut with the company in October 1995 as Micaela in Carmen. She has performed at the Met more than 30 times in roles including Liù in Turandot and Gilda in Rigoletto.


Page 46

Chris Parypa’s Photo Of The Week:

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021

Each week staff photographer Chris Parypa is tasked with submitting a photo from his vast library to be featured in this space. Above is a scene from Assateague Island this month shortly after sunset. To purchase any of Parypa’s photos, click over to www.chrisparypa.com. This week's Photo of the Week is sponsored by Ørsted, the world leader in clean energy. Learn more at orsted.com/md-de


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 47

HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21 to April 19): Keep those sharp Sheep eyes focused on a hazy situation. As things begin to clear up, you'll find a sharper picture emerging, showing something you'll need to know. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): Watch your expenses through the end of the month. Later, you'll be glad to have extra money to pay for something that will make an acquisitive Bovine's heart beat faster. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): You're now ready to make that oft-deferred commitment, if you still believe it's what you want. Don't be afraid to change your mind if you feel you should go in another direction. CANCER (June 21 to July 22): Now that you are moving on with your life after that recent disappointment, how about reactivating your travel plans and taking someone special along with you. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): Many new friends come into your personal life, which suits all of you social Lions just fine. However, one new friend might make demands that you could find difficult to deal with. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): Communication doesn't exist unless it's twoway. So, if you're getting no replies to the signals you're sending, it could be time to look for someone more receptive. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): A workplace complication that you

thought was ironed out develops new wrinkles that need attention. Meanwhile, expect continuing improvement in your home life. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): A tense personal problem needs to be talked out before someone decides to walk out. Resist making decisions until full explanations are offered from both sides. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): A technological glitch that caused problems recently will soon be repaired, and life can return to normal. A colleague has a surprising message to deliver. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): Your partner might feel that you haven't been as open with him or her as you should be. Deal with this now, before it turns into something more difficult to handle. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): Good news: Many of the stumbling blocks that affected the progress of some of your career projects are fading away. Things also start to look up on the home front. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): You'll need that strong Piscean pluck to get through waters that will be turbulent for a while. A more positive aspect soon emerges, along with some welcome news. BORN THIS WEEK: You are zealous in the pursuit of truth. You would make an excellent research scientist. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

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OCEAN CITY

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 48

Things I Like... By Steve Green

Close football games on Thanksgiving Assateague scenery photos

No jacket days in November

Easy to understand tech articles Thanksgiving leftovers

A personalized autograph in a book A fountain drink with crushed ice

Remembering memorable words of advice Teens not obsessed with their phones Friday lunches with my wife

My son practicing on his drums

vanishing

November 26, 2021

WITH BUNK MANN

Ocean City has had its share of colorful characters over the years. The blind musicians Tex, with his 10-gallon hat, and Shorty, with his banjo and dog Mandy; “Pop” Wendling with over 200 Popeye tattoos and his novelty joke shop; and the late Boardwalk Elvis (who passed away this year) were just a few of the folks who made memories for all those who love Ocean City. One of the most popular characters in the 1970s was Roy Beckett whose claim to fame was playing a kazoo while standing on his head. Roy lived with his sister in Snow Hill and would catch a daily ride to Ocean City where in addition to performing his act on the Boardwalk he worked for Hall’s Restaurant. Roy Beckett has not been seen for many years but his legend lives on as part of “Vanishing Ocean City.” It is a certainty that other unique and interesting characters will always be around to entertain future Boardwalk visitors. To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishingPhoto by John “Wonder” Wright oc.com.


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 49


Page 50

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021

Best Beats On The Beach Who’s Where When atlaNtIC Hotel 410-641-3589 2 North main st., berlin Mondays: Earl Beardsley buxy’s salty Dog/ Dry DoCk 28 410-289-0973 28th st. & Coastal Hwy. Saturday, Nov. 27: TBA

CaPtaIN’s table 410-289-7192 15th st. & baltimore ave. In the Courtyard marriott Fridays: Phil Perdue CoINs Pub 410-289-3100 28th st. Plaza on Coastal Hwy. Friday, Nov. 26: Lennon LaRicci Saturday, Nov. 27: Chest Pains Wednesdays: DJ Wax

CrabCake FaCtory baysIDe 302-988-5000 37314 lighthouse rd., rte. 54 selbyville, De Friday, Nov. 26: Rick & Regina Wednesday, Dec. 1: Bilenki Duo Crawl street taverN 443-373-2756 wicomico st. Downtown o.C. Friday, Nov. 26: Rogue Citizens Saturday, Nov. 27: Trailer Park Romeo Sunday, Nov. 28: Karoake with Jeremy

DJ robCee Fager’s Island: Friday, Nov. 26

beats by wax Pickles Pub: tuesdays & thursdays Coins Pub: wednesdays

leNNoN larICCI Coins Pub: Friday, Nov. 26

beats by styler Pickles Pub: Fridays, sundays, mondays & wednesdays saturday, Nov. 27

DJ bIlly t Harborside: Friday, Nov. 26 sunday, Nov. 28 thursday, Dec. 2

DJ tuFF seacrets: Friday, Nov. 26

Cork bar Saturday, Nov. 27: Shots Fired Duo

Fager’s IslaND 410-524-5500 60th st. In the bay Friday, Nov. 26: Great Train Robbery, Pop Stereo DJ RobCee Saturday, Nov. 27: Honey Extractor, Jumper, DJ Groove

DJ Jeremy Harborside: saturday, Nov. 27 Crawl st. tavern sunday, Nov. 28

DJ groove Fager’s Island saturday, Nov. 27


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 51

Who’s Where When GREENE TURTLE NORTH 410-723-2120 116th St. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, Nov. 26: TBA

FIRST CLASS Ocean Club/Clarion: Friday & Saturday, Nov. 26 & 27

CHEST PAINS Coins Pub: Saturday, Nov. 27

ROGUE CITIZENS Crawl St. Tavern: Friday, Nov. 26

GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY Fager’s Island: Friday, Nov. 26

FULL CIRCLE Seacrets: Saturday, Nov. 27 & Thursday, Dec. 2 (duo)

SIDE PROJECT Harborside: Saturday, Nov. 27

BILENKI DUO Crabcake Factory Bayside: Wednesday, Dec. 1

TRAILER PARK ROMEO Crawl St. Tavern: Saturday, Nov. 27

Stevenson United Methodist Resuming In-Person Church Services Every Sunday At 9 a.m. – Sunday School Back in Session

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Page 52

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Dine And Dash, DWI Arrest OCEAN CITY – A Delaware man was arrested last weekend after first running out on his check at a downtown restaurant and later found allegedly driving while intoxicated. Around 9 p.m. last Sunday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was dispatched to a restaurant at 35th Street for a reported male leaving without paying his check. While the officer was arriving, Ocean City Communications advised the male suspect had left the restaurant parking lot in a red sedan with Delaware tags and drove away at a high rate of speed, according to police reports. The officer arrived and met with the restaurant manager, who reportedly told police the suspect, later identified as Mario Magana-Zavala, 27, of Newark, Del., had left the business without paying his check. The manager told police he attempted to stop Magana-Zavala, but he backed up his vehicle in the parking lot and drove away fast, according to police reports. The manager presented the officer with Magana-Zavala’s check, which included three Fireball shots, one top-shelf Long Island Iced Tea and a pizza totaling nearly $49. The manager told police MaganaZavala had been talking with other patrons about where he was staying and mentioned a hotel on 43rd Street. The officer responded to the hotel and located a red sedan with Delaware tags in the parking lot. The headlights and brake lights were activated and the driver and lone occupant, later identified as Magana-Zavala, was in the front seat with

COPS & COURTS the engine running and his hand on the gear shift. The officer approached the vehicle and determined Magana-Zavala exhibited signs of intoxication, according to police reports. Magana-Zavala reportedly told police he had been sitting in the vehicle for about 30 minutes, and admitted to having a couple of alcoholic beverages throughout the evening. Magana-Zavala told the officer he had been at another resort bar before driving to “some pizza place” and then returning to his hotel, according to police reports. He agreed to submit to field sobriety tests, which he did not complete to the officer’s satisfaction and he was arrested for driving under the influence at that point. While in the intoximeter room, he made several unsolicited statements such as “It’s my fault,” and “I’m a little intoxicated, I’m not going to lie,” and “I listened to my friends,” among others, according to police reports. When questioned about the restaurant check, Magana-Zavala admitted he did not pay for his dinner and that he was upset with himself for that, according to police reports. Magana-Zavala

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told police he believed another male in the restaurant was going to pay for his dinner. He was charged with theft and DWI.

Vase Tossed At Girlfriend OCEAN CITY – A local man was arrested on assault charges last weekend after allegedly throwing a phone and a ceramic vase at his girlfriend during a domestic incident. Around 6:40 p.m. last Friday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers were dispatched to an apartment building on 12th Street for a reported domestic assault. Officers met with a female victim, who advised she came home around 4 p.m. and saw her boyfriend, later identified as Morris Sheehan, 65, of Ocean City, sitting on the front porch swing, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police Sheehan had been drinking alcohol and that he had been going through her phone. When the victim told Sheehan he could not use her phone anymore, he became angry and threw the phone at the victim, striking her, according to police reports. Sheehan reportedly started calling the victim names and at one point, threw a ceramic vase or pitcher at her, according to police reports, causing it to break and give her cuts on her right hand. The victim told police Sheehan then started coming at her, but he slipped and fell between a couch and the hallway, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police Sheehan became more enraged when she could not pick him up from the floor. When OCPD officers arrived, Sheehan was still sitting on the kitchen floor with lacerations on both of his hands and forearms, according to police reports. OCPD officers called for Ocean City EMS to respond to treat Sheehan, but he refused to go to the hospital, according to police reports. Sheehan reportedly told officers he

November 26, 2021 had been drinking, but he never physically hit the victim. Sheehan told police he did throw something at the victim, but did not remember what, according to police reports. Based on the evidence, OCPD officers arrested Sheehan and charged him with second-degree assault.

It’s Johnny, Not John OCEAN CITY – An Ocean City man was arrested last week for first throwing trash on the ground on a downtown street and then allegedly lying to police about his identity and age. Around 8 p.m. on Sunday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer patrolling in the downtown area observed a male suspect stumbling on the sidewalk on Sunset Drive. As the officer watched, the suspect, later identified as John McKay, 19, of Ocean City, threw a large white object, later determined to be a whiteboard, onto the public sidewalk, in close proximity to parked vehicles that could have been damaged. According to police reports, McKay made no attempt to throw the object in a trashcan that was just a few feet away from him. McKay then jogged away from the item toward Philadelphia Avenue. The officer reportedly yelled for McKay to stop. McKay looked at the officer in full uniform and then continued stumbling away from the officer, according to police reports. The officer reportedly yelled to McKay to stop at least four more times, and caught up to him at the corner of Robin Drive and Philadelphia Avenue. McKay exhibited signs of intoxication, according to police reports. The officer told McKay the reason he was being detained, but he denied throwing anything on the ground, according to police reports. McKay reportedly told the officer he did not believe the officer had seen him throw anything on the ground. The officer invited McKay to walk back to the area where he had thrown the object on the ground and McKay accepted the offer, according to police reports. While walking back, the officer asked McKay what his name was, and he responded Johnny McKay. The officer asked McKay if Johnny was his legal name that would appear on his license or identification, and McKay continued to insist his name was Johnny. When the officer asked McKay for his SEE NEXT PAGE

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... COPS & COURTS date of birth, McKay simply replied 23 without any dates, according to police reports. The officer reportedly showed McKay the item he had seen him throw on the ground and McKay picked it up and attempted to throw it in a nearby trashcan, but was advised not to. The officer asked McKay if it was his whiteboard, or if he had found it. McKay told the officer he had never seen the item before, according to police reports. OCPD officers had reportedly dealt with McKay in the past and knew he was lying about his name and age, according to police reports. Ocean City Communications confirmed his legal name was John McKay, and that his date of birth confirmed he was 19 and not 23. McKay was arrested and charged with intoxicated endangerment, littering and fraud to avoid prosecution.

Not Guilty On All Charges OCEAN CITY – A local man charged in July after allegedly assaulting a female victim was found not guilty recently of all charges. On July 27, Rocky Kimbrew, 59, of Ocean City, was charged with seconddegree assault following an alleged domestic incident in the resort. In October, Kimbrew was found not guilty on all the charges against him in District Court.

Officer Assaulted OCEAN CITY – A Burtonsville, Md., man was arrested last week after al-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch legedly assaulting a resort police officer attempting to remove him from a residence where he was not wanted. Around 8 p.m. last Wednesday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a residence on Rusty Anchor Road for a welfare check. Officers spoke with a female complainant who advised her ex-boyfriend later identified as James Thompson, 45, of Burtonsville, was in her residence without permission. The complainant also advised Thompson had made suicidal and homicidal threats against her new boyfriend, although she did specify how Thompson planned to carry out the alleged acts. The complainant also advised Thompson was in possession of the threemonth-old puppy he could not care for. OCPD officers went to the unit and made contact with Thompson, and he invited them in. The officers explained why they were questioning. When they told him they were informed he was not on the lease and needed to leave, he got up from his position on the couch and became aggressive, and walked toward the officers. When an officer put his arm straight out to stop Thompson’s advance, Thompson reportedly swatted the officer’s arm away. At that point, officers attempted to place Thompson under arrest, but he continued to be aggressive, according to police reports. Thompson grabbed an officer and pulled his jacket until he eventually had to be taken to the ground. Thompson was finally subdued and handcuffed. He was charged with sec-

Page 53

ond-degree assault and resisting arrest.

Hotel Disorderly Arrest OCEAN CITY – A Bethany Beach man was arrested last weekend after allegedly causing a disturbance in and around a downtown hotel. Around 1 a.m. last Saturday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer responded to a hotel on 32nd Street for a reported disorderly male. The officer met with the front desk clerk, who advised a male suspect identified as Alexander Petrillo, 24, of Bethany Beach, had exited the hotel and walked toward the beach. OCPD officers canvased the beach for Petrillo, but were unable to locate him. While searching the area near one hotel, Ocean City Communications ad-

vised Petrillo had been seen at another nearby hotel. OCPD officers responded to that area and were approached by another unidentified male who reportedly told police “You have help me, this guy over there won’t leave me alone and he’s being really aggressive.” According to police reports, the victim appeared to be clearly shaken up and scared by his interaction with Petrillo. By now, Petrillo was on the opposite side of Coastal Highway, but he crossed over the roadway toward the officers. He reportedly exhibited signs of intoxication. OCPD officers learned before Petrillo had entered Ocean City, he had been escorted out of the casino in Berlin by Maryland State Police. He was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and public intoxication.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021

STUDENTS In The News

Worcester Preparatory School’s 10th Grade held the annual Fall Fun Festival for lower school students to enjoy as well as raise money for the class. Sophomores created their own game stations for the lower school grades to play, including the equipment, rules of play and the number of tickets per game. They also brought in candy, treats and prizes! Multiple games were provided, such as bowling, musical spots, lacrosse, basketball, scooter racing, candy corn obstacle course, frisbee and fortune telling. Above, Sara Freih, Esi Mehilli, Natasha Richter and Moorea Phillips are pictured with grade sponsor teacher Bianca Geesaman. Below, Carter Merryman and Emery Anthony had their faces painted during the festival. Second from bottom, Brooke Arnold reaches for her prize at Hunter Simons’ station. Bottom, Evelyn Westman, Ava Conaway and Maggie McCabe told fortunes at the festival. Students in Andrese Foreman's third grade class at Ocean City Elementary completed a unit on fossils during Reading class. Learning about fossils and how they form, sparked students' interest to learn more about dinosaurs. As a result, they each chose a dinosaur and became an expert on it for a project. Submitted Photos

Ocean City Elementary fourth grade students Hunter Rodriguez, Sofia Valle Diaz, Yaretzi Castro-Gutierrez, Mason Kramer and Logan Quick recently helped kick off the fourth grade March Madness Book Project. Fourth grade students will be responsible for reading 16 books in the coming months and will vote for their favorites in March.

Teacher Jenn Corron’s Senior College Prep Physics class at Worcester Prep met in the lab to build roller coasters. The project kicked off their study of kinetic and potential energy after their recent trip to Busch Gardens, Williamsburg. Minimum requirements included an 8 second "ride", a working loop and limited materials. Pictured with their coasters are Charlotte Catapano, Kate Abbott, Josie Miller-Gonzalez and Camden Rayne.


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 55

50-year celebration:

The Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association’s 50th Anniversary Gala was held last weekend at the Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel. The evening provided an opportunity for the tourism organization to celebrate the present and future while remembering the past and its long-time mission of “uniting hospitality.” Top right, past presidents and board members of the HMRA were recognized for their volunteerism and support. Top left, businessman Shawn Harman of Fish Tales was surprised at the event with the Paul Hazard Award. He is pictured above left with Ann Hales, Hazard’s daughter, and Shenanigan’s owner Greg Shockley, the last recipient of the award. Harman became just the 20th honoree of the award, named after Hazard who was past president of the HMRA and long-time owner of the Stardust Motel, which formerly occupied the site of the Hilton on Baltimore Avenue. At right, HMRA Executive Director Susan Jones, who has been leading the organization since 1995, is pictured with her husband Clay and daughters Ally and Lindsay. Far right, pictured with proclamations presented to commemorate the HMRA are Senator Mary Beth Carozza, Jones, HMRA President Danelle Amos and Delegate Wayne Hartman. Below, Jones recognized the contributions of HMRA past president Tom Tawney at the event. Photos by KRR Photography

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Two Mallards Soaring To Next Level

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

SPORTS

Decatur Playoff Run Ends With 28-14 Loss Turnovers Lead To 2nd Half Touchdowns

November 26, 2021

In The News

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Stephen Decatur’s varsity football team’s magical late run through the state playoffs came to an end last weekend with a 28-14 loss to Huntingtown in the state 2A-Region quarterfinals. The Decatur offense had been hot all year, piling up yardage and points throughout the season. To beat Huntingtown, that trend would have to continue for the Seahawks, but it wasn’t meant to be last Friday on the road. The two teams battled back and forth through the first half, but neither team would get on the board as the game was tied at 0-0 after two quarters. Huntingtown broke the ice first with an 82yard touchdown pass in the third quarter to take a 7-0 lead. Decatur responded quickly and tied the game on a seven-yard touchdown run by Caden Shockley to make it 7-7. That was pretty much it for Decatur offensively the rest of the way. Shockley’s touchdown run was uncharacteristically the only offensive score for the Seahawks on the night. Throughout the season, the Seahawks typically went up and down the field and score points quickly and in bunches, but the Huntingtown defense was just too much for Decatur last Friday. Meanwhile, Huntingtown got its offense cranked up late after being held scoreless by Decatur through two quarters. Huntingtown scored 21 unanswered

points in the second half to begin to pull away with a 28-7 lead. Decatur got a kickoff return for a touchdown late by Zimere Handy to cut the lead to 28-14, but the damage had been done and Huntingtown closed out Decatur to advance. Snelsire, who had been outstanding all season and led or was near the top in several passing categories in the state, statistically had a challenging night against Huntingtown. He finished with 21 completions on 42 attempts with no touchdowns and four interceptions. He also ran the ball six times for 17 yards. Handy was the leading rusher for the Seahawks with 10 carries for 35 yards. He also had the kickoff return for a touchdown late in the game. Shockley had just one carry for seven yards, but it resulted in Decatur’s only rushing touchdown. Luke Mergott caught six passes for 102 yards, while Marqui Henry had four catches for 13 yards. Handy finished with six catches for 29 yards. The loss did little to tarnish what was otherwise a remarkable season for the Seahawks. Decatur finished the regular season with a 6-3 record and at one point won four straight. The Seahawks routed Queen Anne’s, 42-6, in its playoff opener for its first home playoff win in 17 years. In its second playoff game on the road, Decatur edged Bayside South rival Wicomico, 30-27, on a late field goal to advance to the state quarterfinals against Huntingtown.

The Saltwater Lacrosse Club’s 2026 team, comprised of players from in and out of the resort area, last week traveled to the Aloha Gatorfest Tournament in Baltimore and swept three games to take the tournament championship. The Saltwater Lacrosse won the title game in dramatic fashion over a tough Integrity team. Pictured above, the local girls were all smiles after the championship win. Photo by Jennifer Kauffman

Worcester’s Brice Richins last week signed a national letter of intent to continue his lacrosse career at High Point University in North Carolina. Pictured above is Richins (center) flanked by mom Kim (left) and dad Gary (right).

Submitted photo

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN - Two Worcester Prep varsity lacrosse players last week signed national letters of intent to continue their academic and athletic careers at the next level next year. Last Monday, Worcester Prep senior Brice Richins signed a letter of intent to play lacrosse and continue his academic career next year at High Point University in North Carolina. High Point is a NCAA Division I school that competes in the Southern Conference. Last season, High Point reached the NCAA Division I lacrosse tournament before bowing out against Duke. Richins excels on the lacrosse field at Worcester, but also played varsity soccer and basketball. He was named Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference Player of the Year after the fall soccer season. In addition to his exploits on the playing fields at Worcester, Richins is an excellent student. He holds a spot on the WPS Head of School List

in his upper school years and is a member of the Charles R. Jenkins Chapter National Honor Society, the Spanish National Honor Society and the National Art Honor Society. Worcester Prep varsity lacrosse standout Myranda Beebe also last week signed a national letter of intent to continue her athletic and academic career at Franklin and Marshall College in Pennsylvania. Franklin and Marshall competes in the Division III Centennial Conference and went undefeated last season on its way to another NCAA tournament appearance. Like Richins, Beebe also excelled at varsity soccer and basketball at Worcester. She was named Worcester Prep’s Most Valuable Player for girls’ varsity lacrosse after another remarkable season last year. She earned a spot on the WPS Head of School List throughout her upper school years and is a member of the Charles R. Jenkins Chapter National Honor Society and Spanish National Honor Society.

Worcester’s Myranda Beebe last week signed a national letter of intent to continue her lacrosse career next year at Franklin and Marshall. Pictured above is Beebe (center) with mom Tammy (left) and dad Patrick (right), with Coach Chris Williams standing. Submitted photo


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 57


Property Owners Urged To Register For OCPD Program

Page 58

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – With holiday travel season’s arrival and others in the resort starting to seek warmer climates to ride out the winter, there are countless vacant properties in the resort, but there is a proactive program in place to prevent burglaries. Homeowners and business owners can register their properties with the Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) residential check program. Through the program, OCPD officers will randomly go around at different times of the day to ensure registered properties are secure. During the registration, homeowners provide information about how long they will be away, what interior and exterior

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

lights are on timers, who might be visiting the property, what vehicles might be in the driveway and any other pertinent information. OCPD Deputy Communications Manager Ashley Miller this week explained how the residential check program can prevent burglaries from happening in the first place, and assist in investigations if and when they occur and are reported later. “By signing up for our residential check program, owners can take a proactive step to reduce the possibility of a burglary occurring,” she said. “If a burglary occurred, the residential check logs could be a beneficial tool in the investigation and could help increase the chances that we’ll find a suspect and possibly recover stolen items.” Vacant properties throughout the resort in the winter months provide oppor-

tunities for would-be criminals. Some are intent on clearing vacant properties out of valuables. In other cases, wouldbe criminals are looking for a warm place to crash for a few days. In either case, registering a property with the OCPD’s residential security check program can prevent winter break-ins and ensure properties remain secure while the owners are on vacation or have simply moved away from the winter solitude in the resort to warmer climes. Many resort property owners close up their second homes in Ocean City and winterize them. Unfortunately, some return in the spring or early summer and find their property has been burglarized. The OCPD’s residential check program is an effective way to prevent that from happening in many cases and it’s free and easy to register, according to Miller.

November 26, 2021

“Are you going on vacation for a week or two?” she said. “Do you own a second home in Ocean City that is currently unoccupied? Let us know and we’ll check on it up to five times per week while you’re away. The residential security check program is completely free and gives citizens that leave their homes peace of mind while they are away.” In some cases, local residents come home from prolonged vacations to learn their property has been burglarized, vandalized or otherwise tampered with. In others, those who have second homes in the resort return for the first time in the spring to find the same result. Registering with the residential security check program can prevent that. “In Ocean City, we typically see a spike in reports of burglaries in the late spring and early summer months,” she said. “Officers have reported that during the investigation, it is sometimes determined that the incident occurred over the winter and went unnoticed until the homeowner returned for the summer months.” The OCPD’s residential security check module is used to track residential and commercial addresses that require special monitoring. As OCPD officers patrol Ocean City, their observations and comments for the locations are captured in the department’s CAD system. When a special watch expires, a detailed report can be generated that outlines the frequency of the officer checks and any observations or unique circumstances experienced by officers for a specific address. More importantly, the security check system provides officers with enough information to quickly contact residents about their property in an emergency. In addition to crime-related activity, the residential security check program allows the OCPD to alert homeowners to natural occurrences such as broken pipes or storm damage, for example. The proliferation of social media outlets allows would-be criminals the opportunity to find out who is away and how long they will be gone. Miller advised local residents to be careful about how much information they make public, including pictures of them on social media platforms such as Facebook for example. Beyond that, a handful of common sense tips can prevent resort property owners from becoming victims of crime while they are away from home. “After answering a few simple questions, the homeowner’s information will be added to our database and officers will begin checking on the home multiple times each week,” said Miller. “If the officer sees anything that varies from the information the homeowner provided, they will investigate further and contact the homeowner.” The program is completely free and available to anyone with property within the corporate limits of Ocean City. To sign up, homeowners can visit oceancitymd.gov/police and click on the Residential Checks link on the right side of the webpage.


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

OBITUARIES Tom Helms BERLIN – Tom Helms, affectionately known as Tommy, passed away peacefully with his family by his side on Sunday, Nov. 14th at the age of 70. Tommy grew up in Eureka Springs, Ark., a little town nestled in the Ozark Mountains. The son of Dixie and Wayne Johnson, he was a high school basketball star and as his friends have relayed the life of the party. He went on to attend The University of Arkansas in Fayetteville where he met his first wife, Jayne. Jayne and Tommy raised their children Sara and Andy in TOM HELMS Eureka where they spent many happy years until her passing. Tommy moved to the Eastern Shore of Maryland in 1992. He met his wife Tanya in 2006 and they were married in September of 2014. Tanya was not only his wife but also his best friend. Tommy spent three decades working for Packaging Specialties located in Fayetteville, Ark. He considered his longtime colleagues an extended part of his family. He was loved and respected by many across his organization and across the many organizations he worked with. An outdoorsman, Tommy loved hunting and fishing. His love of hunting began in childhood and continued throughout his life. He held an annual three-week hunting trip affectionately known as “Deer Camp” in Arkansas with his best friends from his youth which spanned 40 years. Tom loved watching his son Andy, captain of the Reel Joy, fish in the many local fishing tournaments in Ocean City. He was his biggest, most supportive fan. He spent many happy days with Tanya outside by their firepit relaxing with their beloved dog, Jinx. He loved cooking for his family and friends and was an expert at smoking anything and everything. He spent many happy days cooking with his daughter, Sara. Tom was a Christian with a love and strong faith in God. His faith was the core that guided how he lived his life. He is survived by his wife, Tanya Knott Helms; his daughter Sara Helms Gray and her husband Doug; his son Andrew Thomas Helms and his wife Jillian; his sister Penny Pollock and her husband Kenny; extended family members Gary and JerriAnn Gray, Helen and Joe Kus; and many other lifetime friends. Services will be held in Eureka Springs, Ark. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Believe in Tomorrow-Children’s house by the Sea, P.O. Box 3627, Ocean City, Md., 21843, or to the Jack Burbage Regional Cancer Care Center, 9707 Healthway Dr., Berlin, Md. 21811. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

Jack Mistler TROUTMAN, N.C. – John "Jack" Mistler Jr., 82, of Troutman, passed away Friday, November 5, 2021 at his residence, surrounded by his family. He was born March 2, 1939 to the late John Mistler and Evelyn Loomis Mistler. Jack worked as a union carpenter in Manhattan and many other locations all across Long Island for over 45 years. In his

spare time, he enjoyed golfing, horseshoes and cards. He loved visiting Davis Park as well as his winter home in Florida. Jack was known as a skilled carpenter in so many ways and took pride in his work. He was generous with his time and would always lend a helping hand; Jack made many friends along the way. He will be missed. Jack was a member of JACK MISTLER VFW in Statesville, N.C. and AMVETS Post 111 in Patchogue, N.Y. In addition to his parents, John was preceded in death by his beloved wife of 49 years, Frances Mistler; his sisters, Harriet, Barbara and Judy; and his brother, Michael. John is survived by his three children, son David Mistler and wife, Amy of Troutman, N.C., son Russell Mistler and wife, Jeanette of East Patchogue N.Y. and daughter Debra Votta and husband Pat of East Patchogue, N.Y.; eight grandchildren, Jessica, Brittney, Kristen, Molly, Emily, Michael, Jake and Peter; three great grandchildren, Watson, Cole and Giovanna; sisters Carolyn Monroe of Ithaca, N.Y. and Evelyn Piquette of Medford, N.Y.; and aunt, Florence Leitgeb of Medford, N.Y. A private memorial service will take place this summer with close family and friends. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Hospice of Iredell County in Statesville, N.C. and AMVETS Post 111 in Patchogue, N.Y. Carolina Cremation is assisting the Mistler family. Online condolences may be made at www.carolinacremation.com.

Sandra Arlene Keir SALISBURY – Sandra Arlene Keir, age 74, passed away on Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021 at Genesis Nursing and Rehab in Salisbury. Born in Uniontown, Pa., she was the daughter of the late Walter and Mona (Bock) Twardesky. She is survived by her devoed husband, Walter Keir, and three sons, John Keir and his wife Prissy of Damascus, and their children, Christian, Sheyanne, and Cagen. Richard Keir and SANDRA ARLENE KEIR his wife Laurie of Frederick, and their children Sean, Alexis, Amanda, and Shelby and Scott Keir and his wife RaSheeda of Herndon, Va. and their children, Elijah, Rashid, and Sarai. There are six great-grandchildren, Kadence, Anthony Joseph, Sierra, Madison, Kaylee and Mason. Sandy worked for National Geographic at the historical Gaithersburg location as a key punch operator. Key punchers were known as human computers, before computers became “user friendly.” She was a spirited soul, who was proud of her polish ancestry, an avid Steelers fan and a league bowler. The funeral service will be private for the family. In lieu of flowers, a donation in her memory may be sent to: Community Church at Ocean Pines http://www.ccaop.org/. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagrfuneralhome.com.

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Things To Do Every Monday: TOPS Meeting 5-6:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Berlin. Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a support group promoting weight loss and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Call Rose 443-880-8444. Every Friday: Bingo Knights of Columbus will host with doors open at 5 p.m. and bingo beginning promptly at 6:30 p.m. Held at the Columbus Hall at 9901 Coastal Highway, behind St. Luke's Church. Play every game for just $24. Light refreshments available. Call 410524-7994 with any questions.

Every Tuesday: Dancing The Delmarva Hand Dance Club holds dancing at the Selbyville Elks Lodge 2173 from 5:30-9 p.m. delmarvahanddancing.com. Every Wednesday: Bingo Elks Lodge 2645, corner of Sinepuxent Avenue and 138th Street in Ocean City. Has bingo all year. Doors open 4:30 p.m. with first game sharply at 6:30 p.m. Kitchen open for light fare. 410-250-2645.

Nov 26-28: Shopper’s Fair A holiday shopping extravaganza at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center. Nov. 26-27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 28, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Unique handmade merchandise, nautical, candles, photography, florals, jewelry, ceramics. Great gifts & household items. Children’s activities, photos with Santa and nonshopper’s lounge. Free parking, food court, door prizes.

Nov. 26-Dec. 13: Weekend Hours Ocean Breeze Alpacas will be open to the public from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 26 and each Saturday and Sunday until Christmas. Visit and feed alpacas and support a local business by shopping in the farm store.

Nov. 27: Drive Thru Luncheon Drive Thru Church Luncheon from 10 a.m. until sold out at the Powellville UM Church located at 35606 Mount Hermon Road, Powellville. Drive thru luncheon features oyster fritter sandwiches, homemade chicken salad, homemade soups including chili, peas and dumplings and veg. beef. Bake sale items will be available. No pre-orders. Call 410835-8796 or 443-880-8804 for more details. Hunters are welcome.

Dec. 2: Berlin Christmas Parade The 50th Anniversary Berlin Christ-

mas Parade will start at 7 p.m. on Main Street.

Dec. 2, 9: Vaccine Clinics COVID-19 vaccination clinics for ages 5 and older will be held Thursdays from 4-6 p.m. at the Atlantic Health Center.

Dec. 3: Oyster Fritter American Legion Post 123 on Old Ocean City Boulevard will have oyster fritter sandwiches from 2 p.m. until sold out. Cost is $9. Dec. 3: iPad Basics From 10 a.m.-noon at the Ocean Pines library branch questions can be answered how to use or set up iPads. Drop in with questions.

Dec. 4: OC Christmas Parade Beginning at 11 a.m. with an extended route from Old Landing Road to 120th Street in the southbound lanes of Coastal Highway.

Dec. 4: WPS Holiday Bazaar Worcester Preparatory School will host its 50th Annual Holiday Bazaar on a Saturday this year from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at the school’s field house.

Dec. 4: Sports Cards, Memorabilia Show A Legends Sports Show featuring a sports cards and memorabilia show will be held from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Westside Route 50 Shopping Center next to Hooper’s Crab House. An autograph session with Orioles Hall of Famer Al Bumbry will be held from 2-4 p.m. Later a night of sports talk with featured guests Bruce Laird, Ken Singleton, Al Bumbry and Tom Davis will be held with a dinner buffet. For tickets call Wayne Littleton, 410-723-2842, believeintomorrow.org.

Dec. 4: Christmas Bazaar Stevenson United Method Church will host from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. with vendors, a bake table, vegetable beef soup, pulled pork sandwiches, silent auction and white elephant table. Dec. 4: Brass Quintet Concert Freeman Arts Pavilion will host a holiday concert with the University of Delaware Brass Quintet at its office.

This free performance, which will begin at 3 p.m., will feature a mix of light classics and holiday pops. It will be held on the lawn of the nonprofit’s office, located at the main entrance of the Bayside community. Attendees should bring their own chairs. To register, visit freemanarts.org. Dec. 4: Christmas Concert The Capital Ringers led by Artistic Director Linda Simms, will perform a live free concert at 7 p.m. bringing in the holidays with over 200 bells and hand chimes at the Community Church at Ocean Pines. Dec. 5: Museum Open House Ocean City Lifesaving Station Museum will host a holiday open house, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free admission.

Dec. 5: Symphony Show The Mid-Atlantic Symphony will hold a holiday show at the Ocean City Performing Arts Center at 3 p.m. with doors opening at 2:30 p.m. Proof of vaccine must be shown to attend. Dec. 5: Salisbury Christmas Parade Mountaire Farms presents the 75th Annual event, hosted by the Salisbury Jaycees. Rain date is Sunday, December 12. The event begins at 1 p.m. with local bands, first responders, elected officials and more. The new parade route will start at Poplar Hill Ave. and run west up E. Main Street crossing to W. Main Street and ending at Mill Street.

Dec. 7: Pearl Harbor Day Salisbury University history professor Dr. Dean Kotslowski will talk about Pearl Harbor on the anniversary of the event. 6 p.m. Zoom. Worcesterlibrary.org. Dec. 10: Annual Christmas Concert Stevenson United Methodist Church will host at 6:30 p.m. featuring the church’s handbell choir, praise team and local talent. An offering will be taken for Grace Center for Maternal and Women’s Health.

Dec. 11: The Polar Express Wear your pajamas to see the movie at Flagship Cinemas. Doors open at 9:30 a.m. with movie beginning at 10

Things To Do activities are printed free of charge. To ensure that an event is listed

in a timely manner, please submit information as early as possible, since all items will be listed in advance as space permits. Be sure to include the date, name of event, time, location, address and a contact number. Email to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com; fax to 410-641-0966; or mail to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811.

a.m. Concessions will be open. Suggested donation of $5 at the door to benefit Buckingham Elementary PTA.

Dec. 11: Comic Con Returns Held at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center, the convention features an exciting selection of guests and events sure to be a big hit with attendees. Special guests from the worlds of comics, TV, and more will be on hand to meet guests and sign autographs. Along with meeting guests, attendees will have access to anime screenings throughout the day, informative and entertaining panels, video game tournaments, a costume contest with prizes, and over two hundred booths full of geeky goods and independent content creators. Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission charge of $10 (kids under 9 free with paying adult).

Dec. 11: Tea With Santa Poplar Hill Mansion’s Tea with Santa will be held from 1-4 p.m. Bring your children or grandchildren to have peppermint tea, punch and a bag of cookies and have a visit and picture taken with Santa and Mrs. Claus. See the house fully decorated for the holiday season with the theme of The Polar Express. The event is free, but photos with Santa are $5 per mailing address (photos will be mailed after the event) with all proceeds going towards the preservation of Poplar Hill Mansion. Walk-ins welcome. Dec. 11-12: Santa’s Train Wonderland Delmarva Discovery Museum will present from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Enjoy the train displays and decorations throughout the museum. Photos with Santa, who will arrive on the dock of Cypress Park on Dec. 11 at 1 p.m.

Dec. 27-29: Bus Trip The 50-plus Senior Center in Ocean City at 104 41st Street, is planning an overnight trip to Cape May. Contact Siggy at 410-289-0824 for further information.

Dec. 31: OC NYE Fireworks Promptly at midnight at Northside Park after a walking trail of Winterfest of Lights. Admission fee to Winterfest applies, fireworks free. Jan. 1: New Year’s Day Concert The Ocean City Performing Arts Center will host a brief meet and greet with Ocean City officials followed by a free concert.


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The Dispatch Classifieds $15/Week for Minimum of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available) Deadline for Insertions, Cancellations & Payment is 3pm Tuesday. Pre-Payment is Required. We Accept All Credit Cards.

HELP WANTED JOHNNYS PIZZA: Now Hiring Driver! Apply within at 56th Street or call 410-726-7061 to apply. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– DENTAL HYGIENIST: Family Dental Practice seeking part time Dental Hygienist. Patient oriented, relaxed atmosphere. Please forward resume to dentistryinthepines@gmail.com ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– SMALL ENGINE MECHANIC: Year Round, Competitive Wages. 443-754-1047. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

CARPENTERS & CARPENTERS HELPERS Must have:

Tools, Transportation, Driver’s License Exp. Required! PATTERSON & SONS BUILDERS

Call 410-641-9530 LOOKING EVERWHERE?

Check here first! EXPERIENCED SCREEN PRINTERS Must Have Experience on Automatic Screen Print Machines Please send your credentials to bregan@redsuncustom.com

Excellent Pay Offered

The Dispatch Classified Pages Can Point You in the Right Direction! Help Wanted Rentals, Yard Sales Real Estate & More!

Busy Ocean City Title Company Hiring Clerical Support/Receptionist Staff Person Full Time, Year Round Position. Requires Excellent Communication and Organizational Skills. Email resume to: Helene@Beachsettlements.com CLUBHOUSE ATTENDANTS Beautiful community in Ocean View is seeking part-time year round Attendants to work in our clubhouse and fitness areas. Availability to include days, evenings and weekends. Excellent people skills a must! Some computer skills preferred. A perfect position for individuals looking for extra income. Send resume to: susan.brewer@casinc.biz EOE

FULL-TIME PERSONAL BANKER

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

FRONT DESK ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

FUNERAL ASSOCIATE / GROUNDSKEEPER

A beautiful award winning community in Ocean View, DE is seeking a self-motivated, driven, and goal-oriented administrative assistant. Must be organized and possess excellent verbal and written communication skills and be computer proficient in MS Office and have the ability to learn a variety of software programs. Excellent customer service skills are a requirement of the position. Previous experience in working with HOAs preferred but not required. Full-time, year-round, 40 hours/week. Interested candidates should email resume with salary requirements to: Susan.Brewer@casinc.biz or fax 302-537-4075 EOE

The Burbage Funeral Home located in Berlin, MD is looking for several individuals to join our funeral home staff. Some job duties include assisting funeral directors with funeral services, doing removals both during normal business hours and after hours, and maintaining funeral home grounds. Must be willing to work nights and/or weekends and be on call as needed. Also must be able to lift 100 pounds. A valid driver's license is required.

POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES NOW HIRING TRIM CARPENTER & FOREMAN. We offer paid training, vacation, and personal days, as well as a quality benefits package including health, dental, vision, and life insurance. Wage is BOE from $17-$30/hour. Based in the Berlin/OC area. What we require: -Valid Drivers License -Reliable Form of Contact -Background Check -Ability to Pass a Drug Test -Positive Attitude & Willingness to Learn

HELP WANTED

If you feel that you can fill one of these positions, please call us to set up an interview. We can be reached at 410-251-1096.

POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES

CONSERVATION TECHNICIAN/ MARINA TRAVEL LIFT OPERATOR

Position will be responsible for the daily operation and maintenance of the travel lift and forklifts. Duties will include the operation and maintenance of the marine travel lift, proper boat docking and large forklift operation plus daily supervision of the boatyard staff.

Apply online at delawarestatejobs.com

For further assistance, you may contact us by phone at 302.739.5458 or email at jobs@delaware.gov

Send resume to j.weldon@burbagefuneralhome.com

INDIAN RIVER MARINA IS NOW HIRING! •NIGHTWATCH •BOATYARD •MAINTENANCE

Apply Online at delawarestatejobs.com For additional information, please contact the Marina office at 302.227.3071 AA/EOE

Currently Hiring Manpower For:

Carpenter | Laborer | Painters Stucco & EIFS Mechanics Concrete Work o Experience preferred. o Tools, transportation & valid driver’s license are a plus. o Excellent pay and a competitive benefits package available. Please Apply Online: https://www.allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

Or Contact Our Office at 410-352-9800 Work With the Best Ocean City has to Offer ... We Invite You to be a Part of our Family!

Year Round Positions ~SERVERS ~HOSTESS/HOST ~BUSSER ~BANQUET SERVER ~BANQUET HOUSESTAFF ~CATERING ASSISTANT ~DISHWASHER ~ROOM ATTENDANT ~LAUNDRY ~MAINTENANCE

Farmers Bank of Willards has a full-time Personal Banker position available at our West Ocean City location. Looking for professional and motivated individuals with extraordinary customer service skills. Cash handling experience & excellent computer skills a must. Please send resume to 12641 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD 21842 or email: jennie.rice@fbwbank.com Application cut off is 12-06-2021

FAX RESUME & SALARY REQ. to: 410-723-9109 Online at www.clarionoc.com APPLY IN PERSON Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. CLARION RESORT FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL 10100 COASTAL HWY. OCEAN CITY, MD. 21842

“Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirmative Action Employer”

EOE M/F/D/V

TOP WAGES! EXCELLENT BENEFITS! HOUSING AVAILABLE!


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

November 26, 2021

The Dispatch Classifieds

The Dispatch Legal Notices

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

COMMERCIAL STORAGE WEST OCEAN CITY: 2 car garage with attached work room. 775 sqft. Call 410-7260075. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 1 OfficeRetail and 1 Warehouses. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 206 16TH STREET: 1180SF of retail space available. Very busy location (Layton’s Plaza). Was Hairworks for 38 years. Can be office, retail, or hair salon. Landlord will defer rent and help with buildout. Call 202-641-6166. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

RENTALS

WEEKLY RENTALS Poolfront: $245 Efficiency: $275 2 BR Apartment: $350 3 BR Suite: $425

Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave.

410-289-8581

HOUSING NEEDS SEEKING HOUSING: I am looking for a small apartment in Ocean City, Ocean Pines, or Berlin. Need ASAP. Please call 443-754-7054. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

FOR SALE

READY FOR THE HOLIDAYS? DINING ROOM SET FOR SALE Holiday Dinners just around the Corner! Beautiful solid wood dining set. Table seats 8-10 with two leaves. Lighted China Cabinet with glass shelving. (Chairs not incl’d.) Selling because moved & too big for dining area.

Must see! $575. Berlin. 443-880-8885

ing dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 12, 2021 KELLI J. MEUSEL Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-12, 11-19, 11-26

Second Insertion

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Third Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18901 To all persons interested in the estate of DIANA J. BOWMAN, AKA: DIANA JANE BOWMAN, ESTATE NO. 18901. Notice is given that KELLI J. MEUSEL, 2511 GREEN SPRING AVE EAST, JOPPA, MD 21085, was on, NOVEMBER 02, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of DIANA J. BOWMAN, who died on AUGUST 05, 2021, with a will.

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 2ND day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the follow-

AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000162 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. DAVID F. FERRERA, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No.

C-23-CV-21-000162 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 11:15 AM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

202 202 202 202 202 202 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 204

TIME INTERVAL

39 40 41 43 44 50 4 6 7 8 10 11 13 16 17 36 37 41 42 44 45 48 50 51 1

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000169 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. ROWANTO A. MCKNIGH, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester

County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000169 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 11:30 AM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 303

TIME INTERVAL

9 10 11 12 13 14 16 19 43 44 45 49 52 3 9 12 15 17 19 29 40 42 43 48 12

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids.


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000176 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. TIMESHARE REDEMPTION, LLC , ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Cir-

cuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000176 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 11:45 AM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 304 304 304 304 304 304 304

TIME INTERVAL

13 14 16 17 18 20 22 30 38 39 40 41 42 43 46 49 50 51 1 3 4 6 8 9 10

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids.

Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000180 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. STEVEN C. PHOEBUS ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000180 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 12:00 PM the following timeshare intervals:

CONDO UNIT

304 304 304 304 304 304 304 304 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305

TIME INTERVAL

12 39 40 42 47 49 50 52 3 4 10 11 16 17 36 37 39 42 45 46 47 49 50 51

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 63 Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000181 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. THOMAS PALMER, JR., ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000181 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 12:15 PM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

305 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 307 307 307 307 307 307 307 307 307 307 307

TIME INTERVAL

52 2 14 16 17 21 33 34 38 41 43 46 50 51 1 2 6 8 14 15 18 32 44 46 48

Each time interval being one week per year in the corre-

sponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000182 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff


Page 64

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com vs. QUINTESSA LASHUAN COPELAND, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000182 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 12:45 PM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

307 307 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 309 309 309 309 309 309 309 309

TIME INTERVAL

50 51 4 6 7 9 13 14 16 20 24 36 40 43 44 47 49 2 3 18 19 46 47 48 50

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records.

The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000191 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307

Plaintiff vs. REGINALD W. STALLING, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000191 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 1:00 PM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402

TIME INTERVAL

12 13 16 17 18 31 36 40 45 49 50 51 3 7 8 9 14 15 16 17 18 19 44

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids.

Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18713 To all persons interested in the estate of DONALD VOID PRICE SR, ESTATE NO. 18713. Notice is given that MIRIAM PRICE, 113 E. FEDERAL STREET, SNOW HILL, MD 21863, was on, NOVEMBER 10, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of DONALD VOID PRICE SR, who died on DECEMER 01, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 10TH day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the

November 26, 2021 creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 MIRIAM PRICE Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE MARIANNA BATIE, ESQ. 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 18945 Notice is given that the CHANCERY COURT of SUSSEX COUNTY, DE, appointed KATHRYN ANN KEARNEY, 1512 FLORA COURT, SILVER SPRING, MD 20910, and PATRICIA ANN KEARNEY, 2610 SPENCER ROAD, ROCKVILLE, MD 20815 as the EXECUTORS of the Estate of WILLIAM ROBERT KEARNEY, who died on FEBRUARY 21, 2021, domiciled in DELAWARE, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is N/A. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER COUNTY. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for WORCESTER COUNTY with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred.

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 KATHRYN ANN KEARNEY Foreign Personal Representative PATRICIA ANN KEARNEY Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion GETZ LAW OFFICE, LLC LISA KUNITZ GETZ, ESQ. 26 S. MAIN STREET BEL AIR, MD 21014 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 18977 Notice is given that the COMMON PLEASE COURT of LEHIGH COUNTY, PA, appointed CHRISTOPHER P GAYLOR, 12822 FORESTVIEW COURT, SYKESVILLE, MD 21784 as the EXECUTOR of the Estate of DONALD H GAYLOR, who died on APRIL 08, 2021, domiciled in PENNSYLVANIA, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is N/A. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER COUNTY. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for WORCESTER COUNTY with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 CHRISTOPHER P GAYLOR Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion BRIAN P. COSBY, ESQ. P.O. BOX 600 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18979 To all persons interested in the estate of EVA N BUNTING, ESTATE NO. 18979. Notice is given that DAVID W BAKER ESQ, P.O. BOX 551, GEORGETOWN, DE 19947, was on, NOVEMBER 12, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of EVA N BUNTING, who died on AUGUST 10, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 12TH day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch

Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 DAVID W BAKER ESQ Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

First Insertion ALBERT J.A. YOUNG, ESQ. BROWN, BROWN & YOUNG, P.A. 200 S. MAIN STREET BEL AIR, MD 21014 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 23885 Notice is given that the REGISTER OF WILLS COURT of NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DE, appointed JAMES R. DEARWORTH, JR., 528 MOUNTAIN VIEW ROAD, NAZARETH, PA 18064, and JOHN W. DEARWORTH, 33 S. FORD AVENUE, WILMINGTON, DE 19805, as the EXECUTORS of the Estate of JAMES R. DEARWORTH, who died on OCTOBER 30, 2020, domiciled in DELAWARE, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is ALBERT J.A. YOUNG, whose address is 200 S. MAIN STREET, BEL AIR, MD 21014. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: CECIL COUNTY AND WORCESTER COUNTY. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for WORCESTER COUNTY with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the

creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 26, 2021 JAMES R. DEARWORTH, JR. Foreign Personal Representative JOHN W. DEARWORTH Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-26, 12-03, 12-10

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(2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter.

(2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter.

(2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter.

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch

Date of Publication NOVEMBER 26, 2021

Date of Publication NOVEMBER 26, 2021

Date of Publication NOVEMBER 26, 2021

JULLION M. CUFFEE JR. Personal Representative

JULLION M. CUFFEE JR. Personal Representative

JULLION M. CUFFEE JR. Personal Representative

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 11-26

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 11-26

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 11-26

First Insertion

First Insertion

First Insertion

First Insertion

ARLETTE K. BRIGHT, ESQ. THE LAW OFFICES OF ARLETTE K. BRIGHT, PC 1002 EASTERN SHORE DRIVE, #B SALISBURY, MD 21804

ARLETTE K. BRIGHT, ESQ. THE LAW OFFICES OF ARLETTE K. BRIGHT, PC 1002 EASTERN SHORE DRIVE, #B SALISBURY, MD 21804

ARLETTE K. BRIGHT, ESQ. THE LAW OFFICES OF ARLETTE K. BRIGHT, PC 1002 EASTERN SHORE DRIVE, #B SALISBURY, MD 21804

SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18896

SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18734

SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18735

SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18989

To all persons interested in the estate of JULLION M. CUFFEE. ESTATE NO. 18734. Notice is given that JULLION M. CUFFEE JR., 31063 MOLLYFIELD ROAD, DAGSBORO, DE 19939 was on NOVEMBER 18, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of JULLION M. CUFFEE, who died on DECEMBER 04, 2014 without a will.

To all persons interested in the estate of ANGEL A. WILLIAMS. ESTATE NO. 18735. Notice is given that JULLION M. CUFFEE JR., 31063 MOLLYFIELD ROAD, DAGSBORO, DE 19939 was on NOVEMBER 18, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of ANGEL A. WILLIAMS, who died on JANUARY 26, 2011 without a will.

To all persons interested in the estate of LAWRENCE WILLIAMS. ESTATE NO. 18989. Notice is given that JULLION M. CUFFEE JR., 31063 MOLLYFIELD ROAD, DAGSBORO, DE 19939 was on NOVEMBER 18, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of LAWRENCE WILLIAMS, who died on AUGUST 11, 1998 without a will.

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice.

All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice.

All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice.

All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or

To all persons interested in the estate of SAMUEL JEROME CAIN. ESTATE NO. 18896. Notice is given that ANTHONY JEROME CAIN, 701 DEER PARK ROAD, WESTMINSTER, MD 21157 was on NOVEMBER 15, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of SAMUEL JEROME CAIN, who died on JANUARY 19, 2020 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the


Page 66

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 26, 2021

A copy of this notice must be published one time in a newspaper of general circulation in the county at least fifteen (15) days before the deadline to file an objection. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 26, 2021 SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, MD

Do You Know 6,500+ People Receive The Dispatch’s Daily Buzz Every Day? Sign Up At www.mdcoastdispatch.com And Get Local News As It Happens!

ANTHONY JEROME CAIN Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 11-26

First Insertion

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CIVIL CASE NO. C23-FM-21-000277 IN THE MATTER OF: ELIZABETH GRAY FLEMING

FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO: ELIZABETH LOUISE GRAY NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION (ADULT) (MD. RULE 15-901)

The above petitioner has filed a Petition for Change of Name. They seek to change their name from ELIZABETH GRAY FLEMING to ELIZABETH LOUISE GRAY.

The petitioner is seeking a name change because: HER CHILDREN FROM HER MARRIAGE ARE NOW ADULTS, AND IT IS PETITIONER’S DESIRE TO CHANGE HER NAME BACK TO HER BIRTH NAME. PETITIONER’S DIVORCE WAS FILED ON JANUARY 26, 2005.

Any person may file an objection to the Petition for Change of Name on or before JANUARY 03, 2022. The objection must be supported by an affidavit (written statement confirmed by oath or affirmation) and served on the Petitioner (Md. Rule 1-321). If no timely objection is filed, the court may issue a judgement or grant the name change.

Room 104 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 11-26

First Insertion B. RANDALL COATES, ESQ. COATES, COATES, & COATES 204 WEST GREEN STREET PO BOX 293 SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE OF

APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18984 To all persons interested in the estate of MARGARET JEAN TINDLEY, ESTATE NO. 18984. Notice is given that KIMBERLY ANN ROLLEY, 6608 PITCH PINE DRIVE, SNOW HILL, MD 21863, was on, NOVEMBER 16, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARGARET JEAN TINDLEY, who died on OCTOBER 06, 2021, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file

November 26, 2021 their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 16TH day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unen-

forceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 26, 2021 KIMBERLY ANN ROLLEY Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-26, 12-03, 12-10

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Taylor House Museum Offering Candlelight Tours, Open House

November 26, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Candlelight tours and a holiday open house will give the community the chance to experience the Calvin B. Taylor House Museum in the coming weeks. The museum, located on Main Street, will be open for candlelight tours this Friday and will host an open house Dec. 4. “It’s an opportunity for people who love the museum to see it and it’s also an opportunity for those who have never been,” said Melissa Reid, president of the museum board. The museum is set to have a busy few weeks following Thanksgiving. On Friday, during the town’s Ice Ice Berlin event, the museum will be open for selfguided candlelight tours from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Though docents have led the tours in years past, this year the museum will provide guests a tour booklet so they can peruse the museum on their own. “It’s a way for people to enjoy it at their own pace,” Reid said. Meanwhile, the museum will have a booth selling hot chocolate a few blocks south during Ice Ice Berlin. “If you buy hot chocolate there during the tree lighting you’ll be supporting the museum,” Reid said. About a week later, the Taylor House will host a day of family fun. On Saturday, Dec. 4, from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., children and their parents are invited to the museum for storytelling, to taste traditional wassail and gingerbread and make crafts. That evening, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., the Taylor House will host a

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

cocktail reception. Guests will be offered wine and small bites by Baked Dessert Café as they enjoy live music from two Salisbury University performers and explore the museum. Reid said the reception was being held instead of the classical Christmas concert the museum did in years past. She said organizers were still a little leery of setting up a formal concert style event due to COVID-19 but wanted people to be able to enjoy the museum. “The house looks really beautiful at Christmas,” she said. “We wanted to welcome people but not in such a formal way.” Both of the Dec. 4 events are free. Whether community members plan to attend one of the Taylor House’s holiday events or not they are invited to support the museum on Giving Tuesday. On Nov. 30, the Tuesday following Thanksgiving, the museum will once again be participating in the Shore Gives More Campaign that supports local nonprofits through a day of online giving. Those interested should donate at www.shoregivesmore.org/taylorhousemuseum between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. on Nov. 30. “If we get the most donors during our hour the museum gets an extra $1,000,” Reid said. She noted that money raised would help the museum continue its mission of sharing the history of Berlin. Specifically, donations will help with two new exhibits – one on the Rev. Dr. Charles Albert Tindley and one on Briddletown – that are planned for 2022. “It’s not just to keep the lights on,” she said. “It’s so we can keep updating our exhibits and telling the stories of Berlin.”

Welfare Check Leads To Search Effort, Ends With Happy Ending

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

SNOW HILL – An incident involving a potentially missing kayaker in Snow Hill last weekend had a happy ending when the man was located unharmed. Around 8:30 p.m. last Friday, a call was received by Worcester Central for a welfare check complaint in the area of Red House Road. The caller reported a vehicle had been parked on the side of the roadway for several hours and the rack on top of the vehicle was without its kayak. The caller was concerned about the kayaker’s safety as it was well after sunset. The call resulted in a multi-agency response and a search of the area to no avail. Efforts to contact a family member at the home address of the vehicle owner was also unsuccessful and the

search was suspended, according to a press release from the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office. Last Saturday morning, search efforts resumed, and the kayaker was ultimately located. His planned kayak adventure reportedly involved an overnight stay in a tent he had recently bought. He was reportedly in perfect health and returned safely without incident. The search was an example of a coordinated effort involving multiple agencies, which had a positive outcome. Participating in the search efforts were the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, Worcester County Emergency Services, Maryland Natural Resource Police, Maryland State Police Aviation, the Snow Hill Volunteer Fire Company, the Pocomoke Volunteer Fire Company and the Stockton Volunteer Fire Company.

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Some Reasons To Be Thankful This Year The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 WEBSITES: www.mdcoastdispatch.com www.facebook.com/thedispatchoc J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

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The Maryland Coast Dispatch (USPS #015125) is an official and legal newspaper for Worcester County. Periodical postage paid at Berlin, Maryland, and additional mailing offices. The Maryland Coast Dispatch, 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, Md. 21811, is published weekly on Friday mornings, 52 weeks a year. Subscription rates are $75 per year, $55 for six months. POSTMASTER: Please send change of address to Maryland Coast Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Maryland Coast Dispatch offices are located at Route 346 and Graham Avenue, Berlin, Maryland.

November 26, 2021

How We See It

It’s healthy for all to take a few moments over the weekend to reflect on what brings us gratitude. Among the things, in no particular order, we are thankful for this time of year are the following: • Schools being open for in-person learning. Though students and teachers must wear facial coverings at all times, nearly all local schools have been functioning on a normal schedule for the first time since early 2020. The pandemic confirmed this is not to be assumed. A typical day may look different today, but students, teachers and administrators have proven to be flexible and adaptable in what continues to be unusual times on some levels. • Continued trends toward normalcy, as nearly all special events have returned. Next week is a perfect example, as Berlin and Ocean City host their annual Christmas parades. These events were not held last year as crowding concerns led to their early cancellation. One year ago, these seemed like responsible decisions. The traditional holiday events being welcomed back this year and excitement surrounding their return serves as a confirmation of progress from a reality and perception standpoint. • Elected officials seeing things differently. In all the primary elected boards we cover, like Ocean City, Worcester County, Berlin and Ocean Pines, there are profound philosophical ideologies and political approaches on display each week. It’s

a good thing to report on the disparate opinions. Spirited dialogue often leads to compromises on controversial matters, and the process to find these middle grounds is often beneficial to all. • Active and engaged citizens. The best example is in Berlin where the community is more enlightened and involved than ever before. The major property tax increase from a few years ago sparked the community resurgence in current affairs, serving as evidence a positive can often have its roots in a negative. Today, Berlin’s citizens are engaged on a variety of issues, especially on social media. Proposed large-scale residential developments typically draw the most ire. It’s understandable for concerns to surface when perceived threats to existing qualities of life are discussed. Asking questions is always a good thing. • A host of talented photographers – led by our staff photographer Chris Parypa – who routinely provide us with highquality pictures. Having the choice each week of tremendous pictures around our local region is a treat and offers an opportunity to spotlight our natural beauty as well as current events. • Coronavirus numbers heading down while vaccination totals head up. It’s critical to document progress, reflecting on where we have been compared to where we are now. The fact is COVID-19 is here to stay and positive cases are inevitable. Vaccination does not prevent infection, but the science is clear – getting immu-

nized reduces the severity of the symptoms as well as the spread to the more vulnerable. Vaccination supplies are plentiful, and availability is now widespread. This was not always the case. We have come a long way in a short period of time. • Continued discussions on masking in schools. The Maryland Board of Education is expected to convene next month to revisit its mask mandate in schools. We expect the requirement to continue, as the revised protocols recently released by state health officials largely hinge on masking. For example, close contact quarantine time requirements have been reduced for the asymptomatic, but they are contingent upon masking. Until vaccination trumps masks as the critical piece, we predict they are here to stay in schools. We hope increasing vaccination rates among all school aged children will lead to an easing of mask importance. Until then, it should be reviewed monthly. We look forward to the day when masks are not required. • Living in the land of amazing sunrises and sunsets, no two of which are ever the same. • All who make this publication possible – our staff members and contractors who create and distribute this product, dedicated readers and critical advertisers. Each critical leg of this tripod of support is dependent on the other. We do not take anything for granted. It’s our lesson from the pandemic.

Letters To The Editor Bike Path Opposition Editor: I would like to go on record as being 100% opposed to using the condo row easement for a projected bike path. My family has been owners on condo row since 1972 and I’m sickened to think someone is even suggesting to alter this pristine landscape. My wife and I are both daily bike riders in Ocean City and see absolutely no benefit to the community as a whole. We use the bus/bike lane without any issues heading both north and south on Coastal Hwy. The bike path will be an eyesore for the tens of thousands of owners and renters as well as a safety hazard for beach goers tying to cross over the path. Beachgoers will now be at risk of getting run over by bikes, skate boards, scooters etc. Children will no longer to be able to safely walk down to the beach. The path will also disrupt the wild life that lives in the dunes. In the dunes in front of our building we have had a fox den for years. They use that sandy path to navigate their environment. I could go on and on with the negatives about this project. Trash from the users. Light pollution at night if lights are

added. Noise pollution. Security issues. Safety issues for thousands of beachgoers. Impact on the environment. Tax dollars now going to build, maintain and cleanup. Adverse impact of property values along condo row. We already have a bus/bike path in place on Coastal Highway. Let's try enforcing the rules of the bike lane. Years ago if you drove more than one block in the bike lane and didn’t turn the driver was pulled over. This option actually cost nothing and could actually generate revenue in the form of tickets. This path does nothing for the 50% of bike traffic that travels south on the bayside. Tens of thousands of people own and rent on condo row for the environment it offers generating millions in revenue and taxes. There is not one person who I have talked to wants this path. Honestly most had no idea this was even being proposed and were outraged when I informed them. Let’s not ruin a way of life because a few people thought a path was a good idea. Stop the bike path. Robert and Norma Claro Ocean City

OC Project Concerns Editor: As an owner at the Sea Mist community, located directly across Baltimore Avenue from the proposed Margaritaville development, I am writing to you to express my concerns for this massive project. Yes, it is an upgrade, but the scale and magnitude of this project does not fit in with the size and location of the site they want to build it on. A project similar to the Beach Plaza Hotel and surrounding properties would be a welcome upgrade to the block between 13th and 14th Street on the Boardwalk. Our community is very concerned with the magnitude of this project and what negative impacts a project of this size will have on the surrounding communities and negative impact on this Boardwalk region of Ocean City. It simply doesn’t fit. I have many concerns: • night time light pollution • day time shadow pollution • noise pollution due to the increased size • concerns with lack of adequate parking within its footprint for the guests and workers SEE NEXT PAGE


November 26, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Letters To The Editor • no plans for remote parking for the 80 +/- proposed number of workers per shift • large increase in the number of patrons and workers from the previous use • loss of the parking lot that was used for many daytime visitors and guests • street parking being taken from the longtime residents and guests that frequent this part of Ocean City • potential negative stormwater management impacts to an already stressed area • Ingress and more importantly egress of the guests and visitors onto Baltimore Avenue after events visiting the proposed use of the project • 265 proposed rooms, at least 80+ more rooms than the largest of the current hotels in the area • Height of the building, this project will dwarf the other buildings within a few blocks of the site Ocean City is known for being a family-oriented vacation spot. The boardwalk has always been a big part of that family fun. In recent news, late night partying has become an issue in some areas of the boardwalk. In consideration of the size and intended use of Margaritaville as a large party venue, I worry about how that will affect night time on the boards near Sea Mist and potential pedestrian use of Sea Mist property as a cut through, and other unsavory uses which we already deal with. Margaritaville’s size and intent of use, negatively and dramatically changes this part of Ocean City. We understand there are other proposed developments that better fit the use of this site, please pick one of those proposals for the sake of Ocean City and the surrounding areas. If Margaritaville wants to be in Ocean City, they should find a site appropriate for the intended use, not downtown in the historic district of this great vacation town. Robert L. Moore Ocean City

NFL Vs. NIH Editor: It’s game time. Sunday night football — tailgating and screaming fans. It’s NFL vs. NIH. Wait. What? Who’s playing? The National Football League against the National Institute of Health. Well, at least in salaries. More than 375,000 people died in 2020 due to COVID-19 in the United States alone according to the CDC. What this means is that it would take around five and a half NFL football stadiums at full capacity to hold this many dead people. That’s an astonishing number. During the same year, this strange, complicated, and unpredictable virus swept the nation and brought stadiums and football games to a halt. We once

thought almost nothing could stop a football game. Well, COVID-19 did stop football, but it didn’t stop the NIH scientists, so they put their game faces on and tackled this virus. It typically takes between ten and fifteen years to develop a vaccine. Utilizing hard work and expertise, teams of researchers, scientists, and doctors across the world worked day and night to develop a vaccine to stop the deadly coronavirus. They accomplished the task in less than a year. As written on their website, the NIH’s mission is “to seek fundamental knowledge about nature and behavior of living systems and the application of that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce illness and disability.” NIH employees are thus crucial to our everyday lives, as they provide the necessary means for everyone in the nation to lead safe and healthy lives. These clearly important members of society must be compensated greatly for all that they do, right? Well, research scientists employed by NIH are paid an average of $97,000 per year. This is a fine salary, and one that can lead to a comfortable life. It is interesting; however, to consider the salary difference between the average NIH employee with that of other professions that have a far lesser impact on public health. Let’s compare NIH to the NFL. The NFL provides sports fans across the country with entertainment. Watching the tackles, touchdowns, and amazing plays provides entertainment for sports junkies and less enthusiastic fans alike. Watching NFL games is entertaining, exciting, and enjoyable for viewers and spectators whether the game is being watched in the family room or in the stadium seats. The NFL’s football players who provide this service are highly trained professionals and are paid accordingly— an average annual salary of $860,000. A football player in the NFL makes more than ten times the amount of an NIH scientist. Something just doesn’t sit right with this picture. Clearly, there is a great entertainment value provided by the NFL. But is that value 10 times greater than the lifesaving value provided by the research scientists at the NIH? Our society seems to think so. How is it that we put a higher value on family entertainment than on family health? When will society begin to see the value of The NIH’s goal is to save lives and without the employees of the NIH to do so, one may not even be alive to enjoy the football games provided by the NFL, so whose salary should be higher? Who should really win the final game? Madison Denion (The writer is a Communications major at McDaniel College).

TO OUR READERS: The Dispatch welcomes any and all letters from our readers. All letters are encouraged typed, but not required, and we reserve the right to edit each letter for clarity, accuracy and brevity. Letters should include writer’s name, address and day and evening telephone numbers. If we are unable to reach the writer, we will have to withhold the letter. Due to space restraints, letters under 500 words in length will be given top priority. Letters can be mailed to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811, emailed to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com or faxed to 410-641-0966.

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Between The Lines by Publisher/Editor Steve Green A sports book could be up and running at Ocean Downs Casino soon after the new year. Gov. Larry Hogan said last week he was optimistic about “getting sports betting underway as quickly as possible in time for the NFL playoffs and the Super Bowl.” Approximately 67% of Marylanders supported a referendum in 2020 to allow existing casinos to add sports wagering to their offerings. Ocean Downs Casino General Manager Bobbi Sample said meeting those goals was possible. Super Bowl LVI will be held Feb. 13 with the NFL playoffs beginning about a month before the big game. “Ocean Downs has already started preparing for sports wagering, as have the other four licensees,” she said. “John Martin, director of the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency, has estimated that implementation would take approximately 30 to 45 days from the time that SWARC awarded the licenses. That would fall within the timeframe that the governor has targeted.” Sample reported the casino’s “gaming floor has been reconfigured and our sports wagering kiosks are being put in place on our existing gaming floor near Poseiden’s Pub and table games area. We will continue to work through all of the requirements of the MLGCA so that we can meet the desired timeline.” After lots of discussion during a meeting this week at City Hall, Ocean City Planning Commissioner Palmer Gillis asked what everyone wanted to know near the end of this week’s review of the 13-story, 265-room Margaritaville project proposed for the old Beach Plaza site. He inquired how the commission as a whole felt about the project and whether a favorable recommendation for a planned overlay district (POD) would be given to the Mayor and Council. The commission’s recommendation carries some weight, but the council has in years past not sided with planners. Gillis asked, “I read through the letters from the neighbors and I’ve listened to this panel say this project is too massive. I guess what I’d like to understand if I can, is it five units too many? Fifty-five units too many?” The informal polling of the commission found at least four were supportive of granting the POD, which is needed for the project to move forward. The commission has seemed to initially support the project during the review process. In the end, the commission did not Tuesday take a vote on its recommendation to the council, waiting instead to hear how the council voted on a request on an alley matter next week. The section of Washington Lane that bisects the property is critical for the project. The city must convey the alley to the developer, who would then return it to the city as a public easement, to meet the 90,000-square-foot minimum for a POD. The council has seemed amenable to conveyances of this sort in the past. Hugh Cropper, the attorney representing the developers, is optimistic the commission will advance the project to the council with a favorable recommendation at its Dec. 14 meeting. He said the density of the project was permitted by code and the development fit with the resort’s comprehensive plan. “Planned overlay districts are encouraged by the comprehensive plan — not just permitted — to promote mixed use unified development for larger parcels,” he said. “Ocean City is looking for destinations. Margaritaville fits it perfectly.” Though it’s been needed for some time, it was surprising to learn the Route 113 and Old Ocean City Boulevard intersection will soon be reconstructed with a crosswalk. The issue has not been well received in the past by the state. It now sounds like the new intersection design will mirror the look of the intersection at the corner of Bay Street and Route 113 a little south. The construction of the Bay Street crosswalk occurred after a fatal accident at the intersection claimed the life of a young kid. It’s a relief it didn’t take a death to bring about the new intersection at Old Ocean City Boulevard. The loss of life is what some folks in Berlin want to avoid with the intersection of Main Street and Route 50 on the other side of town. When the matter was broached on the We Heart Berlin Facebook page, there was no consensus as to whether a stoplight should be added. Some agreed with the resident’s post a stop light was a most to save lives, while others disagreed and encouraged those concerned to choose another option to enter and leave town. These sorts of discussions have been occurring for 25 years about this intersection. The same conclusion has always been reached – traffic volume does not merit a light according to the State Highway Administration. Berlin Planning Director Dave Engelhart reiterated as much last month, saying, “We have had meetings with SHA and they have said there will never be a red light there.” SHA Assistant Media Relations Manager Shanteé Felix put it a little milder, saying, ““MDOT SHA has received customer concerns about the US 50/MD 818 intersection and we are continuing to evaluate the traffic circulation to determine the best path forward. As development in this area expands, the district office will monitor the impacts and determine what mitigative measures will be necessary to maintain the state’s standard levels of safety and mobility.” My take on the issue is it will take something significant – the 172-unit townhome community proposed nearby would be an example – near the intersection for the state to change its mind about a stoplight.


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

I

Puzzle Answers

The Adventures of Fatherhood

by Steve Green

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t was a super busy week at the paper on a short holiday week. Therefore, I am sharing an outstanding article a reader sent in response to last week’s column about my family’s adoption journey. The article, headlined ‘What The Books Didn’t Tell Us,’ was written by Matt Forck and available at adoptivefamilies.com. Many years ago, my wife and I reached a crossroad in our quest to become parents. Stephanie, a teacher, and I, a utility worker, had to choose between reaching for the top rung of the fertility ladder or taking a different path, adoption. … the period of contemplation left us both thinking adoption was best. I left for work the next morning, happy with our choice but wondering, where do we go from here? When I returned home that even-ing, my question was answered. My wife had every adoption book from our local library scattered on the living room floor. We spent July reading and discussing, thinking, praying, and hoping. We took notes and talked. We laughed and cried. Above all, we learned. Although it seems like yesterday, it was years ago. As I write this, our beautiful daughter, Natalie Faith, slumbers. I have a different perspective on adoption now. I think the books had merit. They helped us to understand the different types of adoption. They covered the laws, what to expect from agencies, the average wait times for an infant, and the average expenses. But for all they offered, some things weren’t covered, so I want to share my newfound expertise. It is better for people to think you an idiot than to open your mouth and remove all doubt. Waiting for your child or being a parent to an adopted child sometimes spawns questions or comments that are somewhat reflective of this old saying. It really starts when you tell people you are adopting. Everyone knew we were in the proc-

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ess because we told them, via a mass mailing. (We did this in case someone knew someone who could help us.) But as we waited, we were asked many questions. “How is the adoption going?” “Have you heard anything?” “How much longer?” These are sensitive probes in an emotional time. Books mentioned that there would be such comments but never talked about how they would make us feel. The pre-placement questions were discreet compared to the post-adoption comments we have heard. The one that wins the idiot prize referred to my daughter’s darker-toned skin. We were asked, “Is she part something else?” My wife replied, “No, she’s all human.” I have become intensely protective of my daughter, so such statements yank my heartstrings. If books offered advice on coping with things people say, it should read, “Most people ask because they care or are trying to make conversation. Those not in this category are idiots.” Like it or not, each child comes with a birth mom. The books we read did nothing to prepare us for the reality of birth moms. Books centered on how to find a birth mom and what to talk about once one was located. As we began a domestic independent adoption, I envisioned a sensible 16-year-old high school homecoming queen finding herself accidentally pregnant by the quarterback. She, of course, wants to place the child so she can accept her scholarship to an Ivy League school as a pre-med major. This scenario is what I wanted. I was afraid of other, riskier situations. I have had relationships with two birth moms now (our first situation fell through), and there are remarkable similarities between them. Both were from abusive homes. Both had been through the court system as juveniles. Drug and alcohol issues affected their families as well as them. Both were from poor

homes. … I think these women were more typical than was the homecoming queen in my dream. These realities were hard to swallow; they scared me to death. I spent endless time worrying about genetics versus environment. I worried about the child’s health. The burden was so heavy that I visited a counselor and a priest. There is one more thing the mothers had in common, and that is love. Each birth mom loved her baby immeasurably. The first expressed her love by choosing to parent her child. The second, our birth mom, told us repeatedly that she did not want Natalie to think that she was “bad” for not raising her. She wanted her to know that she loved her and wanted to raise her. But she knew what kind of life that meant for a child, and she didn’t want that for her baby. … There is no larger part to the adoption story than faith, and not one book talked about it. From the beginning of our road to parenthood, we have attended a local adoptive parents group. Whether a couple is anguishing in the waiting stage or is raising three beautiful children, in either case we often hear faith-filled statements. “God has a plan for us.” “Our baby will be with us soon.” “Our son was meant for our family.” I relied on faith through this process. I was often scared. I thought of stopping, but I kept telling myself, this will be all right. God wouldn’t give me more than I could handle. … Many people have told my wife and I that our daughter is lucky to have us, that we are doing a good thing. Really, it is Natalie that has saved us. I think all parents with adopted children would say the same. (The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

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November 26, 2021