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The Dispatch January 22, 2021

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OC Police Talks Summer Tweaks

See Page 4 • Photo by Chris Parypa

Anti-Litter Campaign Discussed

Winter Scenes: It’s a quiet time of the year, but photography is always a treasured art. Above, a racoon is pictured in the surf on Assateague Island last weekend. Below, a reflection scene over a canal is shown in north Ocean City.

Photos by Erik Dowell, above, and Chris Parypa

See Page 14 • Photo by Chris Parypa

Vaccine Waiting Game For Many

See Page 8 • Submitted Photo

Cutest Pet Of The Month The winner of last month’s Cutest Pet of the Month Contest was Emery, a 6-month-old lab owned by David Giusti and Natalie Martelli. See page 32 for this month’s contestants. Submitted Photo


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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January 22, 2021


January 22, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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OC Police Plan Strategic Changes For Downtown Coverage

Page 4

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – Ideas for improving police presence and community relations highlighted a recent meeting between local law enforcement and a downtown neighborhood watch group. Last week, Ocean City Police Department Captain Elton Harmon provided the Ocean City Police Commission with suggestions and requests from the downtown Neighborhood Watch group. Over the years, several Ocean City neighborhoods have established active neighborhood watch groups in an effort to reduce crime and encourage mutual assistance. In short, the goal of the Neighborhood Watch program is to establish relationships among neighbors and protect the neighborhood. To date, Ocean City has established Neighborhood Watch programs at Caine Woods, Edgewater Avenue, Bayshore Drive, Caine Keys II, Little Salisbury, Montego Bay, Sundowner Park and the Boardwalk. Harmon told commission members last week a recent meeting with the Boardwalk watch group highlighted the neighborhood’s concerns. “The meeting kicked off with them giving me 10 suggestions, or proposals or concerns, they had coming out of

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

‘Random Patrol’ Favored Over Recommended Stationary Posts

summer 2020,” he said. Harmon said the downtown group had highlighted the need for additional personnel at the south end of town, as well as a request to add stationary posts for officers along the Boardwalk. He said the police department supported the request for additional officers, but suggested a reduction in the agency’s Boardwalk patrol sectors from four or five blocks to three blocks. “One of the things I would like to do in our plan for 2021 is reduce the size of our foot sector and have consistency within our foot sectors,” he said. “That way our officers who are working those sectors over and over again from night to night, it will encourage them to reengage with community and business owners on a nightly basis.” When asked why the department supported condensed foot patrols over stationary posts on the Boardwalk, Harmon said it was a better enforcement technique. “It’s the theory of random patrol,” he said. “In random patrol, you can’t predict

our movements, which opens up an opportunity for us to locate and catch things we would not normally see. Instead of waiting for it to come to us, we would be roaming.” Harmon said the watch group also requested the police department place K9 units along the Boardwalk, as well as patrol cars at gated access points. He noted, however, that those ideas were dismissed because of liability issues. Harmon told commission members last week the police department and watch group also had lengthy discussions on noise and disorderly conduct. “There was some frustration expressed about not being able to arrest and enforce off what the complainant saw,” he said. “We tried to talk our way through the disorderly conduct laws, onscene arrest and what we can do in law enforcement.” In addition to the group’s many suggestions, Harmon noted the Neighborhood Watch had offered to donate one or two Mule vehicles to the police department. Last year, the Mayor and

January 22, 2021

Council voted down the police commission’s recommendation to purchase the all-terrain vehicles over budget concerns. “We denied that offer because our strategy had changed at that point …,” he said. “Instead of trying to use it as a force multiplier, we were going back more toward trying to saturate the area with personnel.” Mayor Rick Meehan continued to stress the importance of enforcing all town ordinances. He said officers and public safety aides (PSAs) should remain diligent in their patrol efforts. “I really hope the message … is that in all cases when an officer, or PSA or whatever, is walking down the Boardwalk or whatever, those eyes aren’t wearing blinders,” he said. “They are looking at everybody and stopping and talking to people. It doesn’t mean you arrest everybody, but you at least make a point to let them know what the law is. I think that if everybody sees that’s occurring it will make the difference.” Councilman and commission chair Lloyd Martin also highlighted the importance of building relationships with Boardwalk business owners. “Years ago, you walked the Boardwalk and probably knew every shop owner on the Boardwalk …,” he said. “That’s what we lost somewhat. We need the PSAs to know everybody that works in those stores.”


January 22, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 5


Berlin’s Heron Park’s Future Remains In Limbo

Page 6

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 22, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

The Heron Park grounds off Old Ocean City Boulevard in Berlin are pictured in an aerial photo.

File Photo

BERLIN – Berlin’s mayor is expected to recommend the dissolution of the Heron Park Advisory Committee next week. Citing the lack of available funds for the park, Mayor Zack Tyndall said this week he was planning to propose to the town council on Monday that the committee be discontinued. The committee was formed in 2017 to come up with uses and features for the former chicken processing plant property after it was purchased by the town. “I’m hesitant to ask any group to continue working toward something without any funding,” Tyndall said. “I don’t want to waste people’s time.” The roughly 60-acre Heron Park, purchased by the town for $2.5 million in 2016, has drawn criticism from some residents in recent years. Many of them have suggested selling the park or portions of it. While the town applied in the fall for a $500,000 strategic demolition grant, Tyndall said there was still no word from the state on whether the town would be receiving it. “I’d hope we’d hear something this month,” Tyndall said. Going forward, Tyndall said the town needs to find a way to offset the roughly $200,000 in annual debt service associated with the property. While demolition of the large building would make the property more usable, if the grant is not received the town will have to explore other options. “What that looks like I don’t fully know,” Tyndall said. The mayor said that as the committee has noted in the past, the park is made up of two components — the passive nature area and the more commercial section closest to Old Ocean City Boulevard. Tyndall said that while ultimately the town would keep the passive section, all options were being explored for the rest of the property. When asked if anyone had offered to buy any portion of the park, Tyndall said he could not comment one way or the other. He added, however, that the town would consider any offers made. “It’s definitely something on the table if there were fitting uses for that property,” he said. He added that the committee had done a significant amount of work regarding the park property and that the information and recommendations compiled would be preserved for potential future use. Councilman Jack Orris, who served as vice chair of the committee, said he was grateful to committee members for the time they’d devoted to the park. “The committee discussed many options and great ideas for the property and even, with community input through a survey, realigned the long-term vision of the area with the name change,” he said. “It’s a little bittersweet for me to disband the committee; ultimately though, funding obviously limits what can be done at this point. I’m looking forward for a way the ideas and suggestions from the committee and the community can resurrect in another form for the future.”


County To Form Committee To Study Fire, EMS Issues

January 22, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – County officials agreed this week to create a committee to tackle the issue of fire and EMS funding in Worcester County. The Worcester County Commissioners on Tuesday voted unanimously to create a committee to review funding options for the county’s fire and EMS service. Fire companies throughout the county have been struggling in recent years to find the funds to cover the services they provide. “We have to start somewhere,” Commissioner Joe Mitrecic said. Ocean City Fire Chief Richie Bowers approached the commissioners Tuesday on behalf of the county’s various fire companies to talk about what the organizations do and why they need more financial support. Bowers stressed that the companies were speaking as a unified group. “I think it’s important for the county commissioners and (Chief Administrative Officer) Mr. Higgins to understand what is the lay of the land out there,” he said. “You have to understand what you’re making an investment in but you also have to understand what the demand is.” Bowers said that though fire companies had provided service for years,

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

they were now in a transition period as the demand for EMS increased and rapid community growth was underway. He talked about the need for a quick response to fires as the use of synthetic materials increased as well as the intense amount of training required so responders could help during special operations such as water rescues and hazardous material incidents. He said the ongoing pandemic had highlighted how fragile the county’s EMS service was. “The number of EMS incidents countywide has increased, the pandemic requires longer incident out of service time for units on an incident and the service lacks resiliency and capacity to respond to EMS calls,” he said. “The geography of the county and the location of the hospital emergency rooms can significantly and negatively impact response times to the first and second calls in areas. When multiple EMS incidents occur in the county simultaneously large gaps in coverage develop.” Bowers said investments in both equipment and training for responders was critical. He urged the commissioners to form a workgroup to address funding for EMS services, funding for staffing, training, apparatus and facilities, and establish service wide response goals. He also suggested developing a strategic plan for fire and EMS

services. David Fitzgerald, president of the Berlin Fire Company, echoed Bowers’ desire to see county officials work with fire and EMS officials. He said the county had been gracious with its funding in years past and that was not being overlooked. Fitzgerald said fire funding was adequate for now but EMS funding needed to be adjusted. He added that fire companies employed EMS personnel who were cross trained and able to serve as fire responders as well. “That’s stretching that tax dollar,” he said. Fitzgerald said that since the county’s fire and EMS funding formula was initially created in the 1970s, it had become a lot more complex and had now reached the point it needed to be reevaluated. “It’s time to sit down and review the actual cost,” he said. Mitrecic said he wanted to see a committee made up of three commissioners, six fire service representatives and two county staff members. He said the committee faced a difficult task. “This is going to be tough because you’re going to have to find a way to fund this and there’s only one way,” he said. “We all know what that is. We’re going to have to convince the citizenry this is the right thing to do. So I would

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say that anybody that wants to serve on this committee better be ready for that. There is no other way. Property tax dollars only go so far.” Though Commissioner Chip Bertino expressed concern about commissioners serving on the committee and being the ones who would ultimately have to judge a proposed funding plan, Mitrecic said they were the public’s representatives. “I think a few of us should be on there representing the people,” he said. Commissioner Diana Purnell suggested getting a third party, someone unconnected, involved. Mitrecic said that was why he’d suggested including two county employees on the committee. Commissioner Jim Bunting said the committee as proposed could handle the funding issue and a consultant could perhaps be employed later to help with a strategic plan for fire and EMS. The commissioners agreed to create the committee with Commissioner Josh Nordstrom representing the southern end of the county, Bunting representing the northern end and either Mitrecic or Commissioner Ted Elder rounding out the commissioner members. Bowers praised the action. “I believe that’s a great step forward,” he said.


A Waiting Game For Many Seeking COVID-19 Vaccinations

Page 8

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – As COVID-19 vaccine demand continues to outpace supply, Worcester County residents are advised to keep checking the state’s website for available clinics. The Worcester County Health Department has been inundated in recent weeks with queries from people interested in getting vaccinated. Currently Maryland is in Phase 1B of its vaccine program and is set to move to 1C, which makes the vaccine available to ages 6574, on Monday. “As of 1/19/21 we've administered 1,700 COVID-19 vaccines out of 1,900 received (89%),” said Travis Brown, the health department’s public affairs officer. “We've held 12 clinics since 12/28. We have another five clinics scheduled over

the next several days and will continue to schedule new clinics weekly as vaccine is secured.” After initial vaccinations of health care workers, Maryland entered Phase 1B of vaccine rollout, which made it available to those in assisted living, those 75 and older and those employed in education or continuity of government, on Jan. 18. In the days since, however, many local elderly residents have reported difficulty getting signed up to be vaccinated. Brown said the signup had to be done online at www.MarylandVax.org. “If no clinics are showing up, that means that both the appointments and the waiting list for those clinics are full,” said Brown, adding that wait lists were capped at a few hundred people. “We continue to schedule new clinics as vaccine is secured so we encourage residents to check MarylandVax.org daily. If

they need help navigating the website, we recommend asking a friend or family member. If they still need assistance, they can call 667-253-2140 during business hours Monday through Friday to speak with staff.” Because so many of those over 75 are still waiting to be vaccinated, the health department is asking those in the current phase who are comfortable waiting to do so. “While we are currently providing vaccine to anyone in Phase 1B (and Phase 1A), doses are limited,” Brown said. “Our first round of clinics for 1B filled up almost immediately. We know that those who are 75 years old and older are at some of the greatest risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms; everyone in Phase 1A or 1B can register but we’re asking those who are comfortable waiting a few days extra for a vaccine to do so, which will allow more

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of the elderly population an opportunity to receive the vaccine as soon as possible.” In fact, county teachers who signed up for vaccinations this week were discouraged from getting their shots in an email from the health department. The county school system rebutted the email, encouraging teachers to not give up their appointments. The state moves to Phase 1C, which opens vaccine eligibility to those between 65 and 74 and essential workers, on Monday. “Just because we begin a new phase does not mean that we are finished with previous phases,” Brown said. “Clinics will continue to be open to those in Phase 1A and 1B who have not yet received a vaccination. We will continue to run clinics based on vaccine availability and we’re committed to getting doses out to the public as soon as possible. While the state’s phase system overall is designed to prioritize those most at-risk and most vulnerable to COVID-19, we do ask that those comfortable waiting for clinics later this month or in February do so, which gives those most vulnerable an opportunity to get vaccinated with our limited supply first.” And as far as the second shot, Brown says those who have received the first shot should get an email with a link to sign up for their second dose. “Those second dose clinics are initially private, then opened up to registration once those who need their follow-up shot have had a chance to get their spot,” he said. “The date on the back of the card is for 28 days after the initial dose but you can get your second shot within a fourday window of that date. Please bring your vaccination record with you to your second appointment.” Brown said officials are aware there are a lot of questions regarding the vaccine and encourages citizens to monitor www.MarylandVax.org as well as the Worcester County Health Department’s website and social media pages. Residents can also call 667-253-2140 during business hours. At a press conference last week, Gov. Larry Hogan discussed a pilot program with Walmart and Giant pharmacies on administering vaccines to launch on Jan. 25. Ten Walmart locations, including Berlin, will be offering appointment-only vaccinations at the www.covidvax.maryland.gov site. Hogan said as the vaccination supply increases more pharmacies will be included in the distribution effort. Hogan and Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford were among the state officials vaccinated this week as part of the continuity of government plan. “Getting vaccinated is the only way to keep you, your family, your friends, and your community healthy and safe, and it is absolutely critical to preventing more illnesses, more hospitalizations, and more deaths,” said Hogan. “It’s the only way to end the damage to our economy and to bring this pandemic to an end. … A return to a sense of normalcy has been made possible by COVID-19 vaccines, which have been approved by America’s leading medical experts, and which have 95 percent efficacy.”


Politics Debate Leads To Stabbing

January 22, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – An ongoing political debate last weekend at a midtown restaurant boiled over into two victims being stabbed. Around 6:35 p.m. last Saturday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a restaurant on 56th Street for a report of an assault on multiple victims involving a knife. Responding officers met with a female and male victim who were assaulted with a knife. They identified the suspect as Timothy Fugate, 59, of Ocean City. The victims explained about a week prior they were at the same restaurant when Fugate allegedly became enraged with them over presidential debates and other political disagreements. According to police reports, Fugate allegedly called the female victim a “Pelosi” fan and threatened to call his “boys.” Last Saturday, tempers allegedly flared again between the couple and Fugate when verbal debates and disagreements escalated into a physical confrontation. Fugate allegedly stood up and tried to punch the male victim, but was restrained by other individuals in the bar. The two victims and Fugate exited the bar and were outside the front entrance when the fight escalated. The female victim reportedly told police Fugate turned to face her and grabbed her upper body with both hands. The female victim told police she was able to briefly get Fugate in a headlock. During the altercation, the female victim sustained a threeto four-inch laceration on her inner thigh, slicing her skin open to expose muscle and tissue in the area of her femoral artery, according to police reports. The female victim also sustained a second laceration of roughly one inch on her left hand during the altercation. The male victim told police he intervened and attempted to separate Fugate and the female victim.

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The male victim told police he allegedly saw Fugate waving a box cutter and witnessed the suspect slashing the female victim with the knife. During the altercation, Fugate allegedly sliced open a three- to fourinch laceration on the male victim’s arm above the elbow, according to police reports. Fugate then fled the scene in a gray Jeep Wrangler, but returned to the scene a short time later and yelled more obscenities at the victims, who were being treated by Ocean City EMS. The male victim was able to take a picture of the Jeep’s license plate. Ocean City Communications checked the registration and confirmed it belonged to Fugate and that he lived on Bering Road. OCPD officers responded to the address and observed the Jeep’s lights turn from on to off with Fugate sitting in the driver’s seat. Fugate exited the vehicle with the keys in his hand, according to police reports. The female victim was brought to the residence and positively identified the suspect. Fugate, who exhibited signs of intoxication, admitted a physical altercation had occurred, but could not provide detailed answers, according to police reports. His speech was slurred and mumbled to the point the investigating officers could not understand his responses, according to police reports. At that point, Fugate was arrested on two counts each of first- and second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and driving under the influence. He refused to submit to field sobriety tests at the time of his arrest and later refused to submit to an alcohol concentration test. A background check revealed at least four prior alcohol-related driving offenses and multiple alcohol restrictions on his driver’s license. Fugate was held initially without bond. However, he was later released on recognizance following a bail review hearing on Tuesday.

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Senator Taking Another Shot At Wade’s Law Legislation

Page 10

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – State Senator Mary Beth Carozza (R-38) has resumed her quest to get legislation passed increasing the penalties for causing life-threatening injuries while operating a vehicle or vessel negligently. Senate Bill 17, or Wade’s Law, would establish the offense of causing a life-threatening injury by motor vehicle or vessel as criminal negligence and would greatly enhance the penalties associated with a conviction. The

current maximum penalty for criminally negligent driving causing a life-threatening injury is a $500 citation. Carozza filed Wade’s Law again this year in advance of the General Assembly session and the bill had its first hearing in the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee on Tuesday. “Current law provides that manslaughter by vehicle by criminally negligent driving is a misdemeanor and subject to a maximum three-year imprisonment and/or a $5,000 fine,” Carozza testified on Tuesday. “Yet, if the victim is maimed, paralyzed or suffers

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some other life-threatening injury, that same criminally-negligent driver is only liable for a $500 fine. Senate Bill 17 provides a more just penalty.” During Tuesday’s hearing, Carozza testified about an incident in Worcester County in February 2016 that served as the catalyst for the legislation. On Feb. 22, 2016, a Stockton man drove through a work zone along a roadway in the south end of Worcester and struck two county roads department employees, killing Scott Tatterson of Pocomoke and critically injuring another, Wade Pusey, of Seaford. The collision left Pusey with several life-threatening injuries from which he has not fully recovered. The driver was ultimately indicted on charges of manslaughter, negligent driving and reckless driving, among others. The driver was later found guilty of negligent driving and reckless endangerment and fined $500 for each conviction. The case revealed a gap in the current law when it comes to prosecuting individuals who cause life-threatening injuries with a vehicle in a criminally negligent manner. The case was brought to Carozza’s attention by the Worcester County State’s Attorney’s Office after it became clear the only offense the driver could by charged with in terms of Pusey’s injuries was a motor

vehicle citation with a maximum penalty of $500. Carozza first introduced Wade’s Law in 2017 as a state delegate, and the legislation passed the full House before dying in the Senate as the session expired. In 2019, Carozza introduced the legislation again and it unanimously passed the Senate but not advance in the House before adjournment that year. Joining Carozza in testifying in support of the bill on Tuesday was Wicomico County Deputy State’s Attorney Bill McDermott, who first brought the issue to Carozza’s attention when he worked in a similar capacity for Worcester County. McDermott emphasized the fact Senate Bill 17 is simply building on an existing law in order to create a more just penalty for criminally negligent driving causing a life-threatening injury. Carozza said she was undaunted by past efforts to get the bill through the state legislature. “Let this be the year that we see Wade’s Law all the way through to final passage,” she said. “My parents always taught me that if you believe in a just cause or action, then you keep working on it, not for yourself, but for people like Wade Pusey and his family. We are completely committed to seeing this through for the sake of future victims.”

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Commissioners Approve Funds To Replace Middle School Roof

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – County officials agreed to fund the replacement of the roof at Stephen Decatur Middle School. On Jan. 5, the Worcester County Commissioners voted unanimously to provide the funding needed to install new shingles on the roof at the middle school. The project is expected to cost $240,000. “Stephen Decatur Middle School is in dire need because of several storms that have torn that roof off,” Superintendent Lou Taylor said. On Aug. 4, the roof at Stephen Decatur Middle was damaged in Hurricane Isaias. The loss of shingles then led to an increase in the leaks inside the school. School officials said that each time shingles have been lost, the school system’s insurance carrier has covered the cost of replacing lost shingles. This time, however, officials were advised that the school’s shingles had reached the end of their useful life. While insurance is providing $48,000 toward the shingles, school system officials proposed using funding set aside for a new HVAC system to cover the rest of the estimated $240,-

January 22, 2021

000 cost. Though the school is set to undergo a substantial $12.6 million renovation in the near future, Taylor said the roof had to be a separate project. “You have asked me off to the side why we couldn’t tie that into the renovation that we’re about to do but the state formula does not allow for us to do that,” Taylor said. Commissioner Chip Bertino made a motion to approve the roof expense but to use fund balance to cover the cost rather than the money set aside for the HVAC. He said the HVAC replacement should go forward as planned. “We’re going to end up paying for it anyway so why not just take care of it now,” Bertino said. The commissioners approved the motion unanimously. Taylor thanked officials and also took the opportunity to introduce Sam Slacum, the school system’s maintenance and operations manager. “He has a wealth of knowledge and I can tell you that he is already through his leadership saving us money on some of the energy costs that we incur each and every year,” Taylor said. “So I think you’ll hear some good results from us moving forward.”


Board Approve Ocean Pines Restaurant License Transfer

January 22, 2021

By CHARLeNe SHARPe

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – The Worcester County Board of License Commissioners approved a license transfer for an Ocean Pines restaurant this week despite concerns about the applicants’ finances. In a hearing that was continued from December, the Worcester County Board of License Commissioners (BLC) approved a request to transfer the beer, wine and liquor license for Whiskers Bar and Grill this week. The approval came after questions regarding the applicants’ connections to Basel Ramadan, a West Ocean City resident who plead guilty in 2019 to a felony charge related to a cigarette trafficking ring. “My concern is we’re not falling for a Sal Ramadan new business under the guise his wife and daughter are running it,” said attorney Dirk Widdowson, representing the nearby Rita’s World of Wine, Beer and Spirits. Though the BLC initially met to consider the request to transfer the Whiskers license from AJK Restaurant Inc. to Ocean Pines Spirits Inc. in December, that hearing was continued in order to give the applicants, Shereen Ramadan and Dina Sbih, a chance to provide additional financial documentation. They provided tax returns and financial statements in advance of Wednesday’s meeting. Attorney Pete Cosby, representing Ramadan and Sbih, said one of the rest-

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aurant’s current employees, Tanya Knott, would be staying on another two to three months in a consultant role to help the bar’s new owners. After a few questions regarding the restaurant’s layout, which BLC members said should not be changed, Widdowson brought up his client’s concerns. He said he didn’t want to see Whiskers changed from a restaurant that had a retail component to a primarily retail operation. Board members assured him that was not under consideration. “We are not approving a retail outlet. We’re approving a restaurant transfer,” said William Esham, BLC chairman. Widdowson also questioned the source of the $125,000 being used to purchase Whiskers. Ramadan said she’d given the current owners a cash loan previously that would reduce the pur-

chase amount and that she was getting a $100,000 bank loan to cover the bulk of the cost. Widdowson read from the state code regarding how an applicant’s license should be denied if they were not fit, made false statements or acted fraudulently in connection with their application. He said the applicants had already violated rules and he was “very concerned” about the financial interests of another person, particularly since the first two checks given to the BLC for the application process were from Basel Salah Ramadan. “I don’t want us to allow someone who is ineligible to hold a license to go through the back door to do what he cannot do through the front door,” Widdowson said. Cosby said his clients understood the

Page 13

rules. “They understand Sal Ramadan cannot be involved in this,” he said. The board, stressing again that Whiskers was a restaurant not a retail store, approved the license transfer 3-0. The board subsequently voted unanimously to approve a license transfer for 56th Street Beer and Wine. When asked about her experience selling beer and wine, the applicant, Zina Sbih, said that though she was 20 years old she had helped out in the store since she was 16. She added that her brother-in-law would provide her with guidance. “He’s 25 years old so he’s way more mature than me,” she said. When a board member asked how the BLC could grant an alcohol license to a minor, the board attorney said the applicant had to be over 18 years old.


'Every Litter Bit Hurts' Campaign Takes Shape In OC

Page 14

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – It was all hands-on deck this week as community stakeholders joined a roundtable discussion on a proposed anti-litter campaign. Last Wednesday, members of the Ocean City Coastal Resources Legislative Committee, or Green Team, teamed up with town staff and community stakeholders to begin developing an aggressive anti-littering campaign for the coming summer season. The virtual meeting – which included representatives from town departments, environmental organizations, the hospitality industry and local schools, to name a few – focused on outreach, enforcement and recognition as part of a multifaceted initiative tentatively called “Every

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Effort Will Focus On Outreach, Education, Prevention, Enforcement

Litter Bit Hurts.” “We all know Ocean City is famous for two things … a clean and safe community,” Mayor Rick Meehan told attendees this week. “And we’ve been challenged on both ends in the last couple of years. I really think it’s something we have to work together to overcome.” Last year, the Green Team began discussing the resort’s growing litter problem after a particularly troublesome summer season. Council Secretary Tony DeLuca, committee liaison, said the

issue was raised after town officials started receiving emails about the amount of trash littering the Boardwalk and side streets. “I’ve never seen so many complaints come from citizens ever about what’s going on, on the Boardwalk, on the side streets, on the trash,” he said. Despite the efforts of the town’s public works department and beach and street cleanup programs, officials said the town continued to experience an extreme amount of trash last year.

January 22, 2021

DeLuca told attendees this week a lot of the blame was placed on the COVID19 pandemic and the proliferation of carryout containers. He also pointed to broken trash cans on side streets, a lack of enforcement, and weeds that trapped litter. To that end, the committee began exploring a recognition-based program that establishes the resort as a no-litter zone. “We have to all really buy into this and take ownership of it and be part of the solution,” Meehan said, “And we have to encourage residents and visitors to do the same. That’s why I think the anti-litter campaign is exactly the right way to go.” In Wednesday’s roundtable discussion, Marketing Coordinator Jenna Knight said the proposed campaign would focus on education, prevention and enforcement. Outreach efforts, she said, could include advertising, social media posts and a new website, which would highlight cleanup events and volunteer opportunities. “I think pushing personal responsibility is super important,” she said. “This can’t be all on public works. This is a team effort.” Several ideas, including the use of social media hashtags and trash can messaging, were pitched to the committee this week. Attendees also stressed the importance of highlighting virtual cleanup events for students and creating programs that allow condominium associations to adopt their blocks. Kathy Phillips of Assateague Coastal Trust also suggested the police department’s parking and meter patrol unit monitor the litter issue. She also encouraged the town to strengthen its litter ordinance and increase its fines. “Community engagement is important, but so is enforcement and data tracking,” she said. Ocean City Police Department Capt. Elton Harmon agreed the agency needed to step up its enforcement efforts. Last year, the department issued a total of seven litter citations. He noted, however, that compliance should be the campaign’s overarching goal. “Just like a traffic ticket, if you think about that we catch maybe 4 or 5% of the speeders, well that doesn’t solve 95% of the problem …,” he said. “So compliance is really the goal, not citing. It’s got to, or it will fail.” When asked if any of the proposed campaign initiatives would need to go before the Mayor and Council, Meehan said most of the ideas would only need the support of the Green Team. “If it comes to something that has a budgeting component to it, that’s something that has to go back to the Mayor and Council,” he said. Attendees this week also established a timeline for developing the campaign and seeking any grant or municipal funds ahead of the summer season. “The ideas are great,” DeLuca said. “But we’ve got to make them happen and we’ve got to make them happen timely and seasonally.”


January 22, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 15


Delegate Testifies ‘The Shield Is No Longer Big Enough’

Page 16

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A bill in the General Assembly adding law enforcement officers to a protected class under hate crimes laws had its first committee hearing this week with stark contrast in attitudes about first responders on display. During last fall’s pop-up rally in Ocean City, Delegate Wayne Hartman witnessed assaults and disrespectful acts toward police officers during a ridealong with resort police officers. Hartman introduced a bill that would protect police officers and other first responders under the state’s hate crimes statute. The legislation, if passed by the General Assembly, would make certain crimes carried out against law enforcement officers and first responders, such as many of the offenses seen during the September pop-up rally, a hate crime with enhanced penalties. During the most egregious portion of the event, law enforcement officers and first responders were pelted with rocks and bottles, had their vehicles and equipment damaged and skirmished with offenders. Under House Bill 286 and Senate Bill 99, for an offense that qualified as a misdemeanor, the penalty could be three years, up to a $3,000 fine or both. If the offenses were considered elevated to felonies, there are two ranges of penalties in the proposed legislation. One

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

class of hate crime would include up to 10 years in jail and a $10,000 fine or both, while the most egregious hate crime defined in the legislation could result in a jail term up to 20 years or a $20,000 fine or both. House Bill 286 had its first hearing in the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday and the testimony reflected divisive attitudes about law enforcement and other first responders. “The purpose of this bill is to add first responders and law enforcement to a protected class under the current hate crimes legislation,” co-sponsor Hartman said. “It’s important to remember first responders cover a wide range of age, race, religion and ethnicity. This bill is aimed at protecting all of them because of the job they do.” Hartman recounted some of the details from his two-day ride-along during the pop-up event in Ocean City. “Multiple times even before law enforcement officers were engaged, they were met with things thrown at them, bottle rockets, fireworks being shot at them, glass being thrown,” he said. “It was a scene you never expect to see in that town.” Hartman talked about the symbolism of a police badge and urged colleagues on the committee to advance the proposed legislation. “The shield is a symbol not of authority, but to protect the individual,” he said.

“Unfortunately, the shield is no longer big enough. At some point, we’re all going to need the assistance of a first responder. I’d like you to remember that when you think of the first responders that protect our communities.” Ocean City Police Chief Ross Buzzuro testified in favor of the bill and spoke broadly about the recent changes in attitude toward law enforcement. “Today, the job of a law enforcement officer, whether in Maryland or throughout the United States, is becoming increasingly difficult, challenging and dangerous,” he said. “While this phenomenon continues, the current protections afforded to police officers are becoming less effective and seen by many as a non-deterrent.” Buzzuro said negative attitudes about law enforcement have spiked recently. “Throughout my career, which is now in its fourth decade, I have never experienced a period in time when the sentiment towards our revered and noble profession was this negative,” he said. “The sentiment goes beyond policing philosophies and has increasingly moved directly towards police officers in general whether they are on or off-duty. In uniform or plain clothes.” Buzzuro then presented some statistics about an increase in assaults against his charges in Ocean City in recent years. Despite being a relatively

January 22, 2021

peaceful resort community, assaults against law enforcement officers has increased by 50% in recent years, from 74 in 2018 to 113 in 2019 and 165 in 2020. “Recently, throughout the summer months of 2020, the Ocean City Police Department witnessed first-hand and fell victim to arguably the worst summer in the resort’s history as routine and ordinary interactions with citizens became hostile and at times violent with momentum that seemed to never waiver but continued to accelerate all summer long,” he said. The chief also outlined some of the violence against law enforcement during the fall pop-up event. “As we entered the fall of 2020, the town of Ocean City experienced the effects of an unwelcomed and unsanctioned event, known as the pop-up rally bringing thousands upon thousands of visitors,” he said. “Over a period of several days we experienced a prolonged and virtual ongoing clash with visitors of this event. Although, we had planned ahead and had a large law enforcement presence to safeguard and protect our community, we became subjects to an unwavering onslaught of non-compliance, menacing and violent behavior.” Buzzuro urged the committee to advance the legislation. “This particular bill and its passage is SEE NEXT PAGE


… Hearing Held On Hate Crimes Bill

January 22, 2021

extremely important and will serve as a vital safeguarding measure for first responders as they carry out their respective duties,” he said. “Furthermore, it will serve with a degree of confidence that any individual or individuals determined to cause harm to our first responders will face serious consequences for their actions.” House Bill 286 was not without at least one detractor. Anti-Defamation League Senior Associate Regional Director Meredith Weisel testified against the proposed legislation on behalf of the organization. “We strongly oppose this legislation,” she said. “We do not support adding any first responders or law enforcement officers to hate crimes laws. Adding law enforcement or any other vocation weakens the intent of hate crimes bills.” Weisel said law enforcement officers and first responders were already protected under existing state laws. “In Maryland, an assault against a police officer is a very serious crime already,” she said. “It comes with a much more severe penalty than an assault against a civilian. Bills like House Bill 286 have unintended consequences. Adding law enforcement and first responders to a protected class under hate crimes is unnecessary.” Delegate Susan McComas (R-34B) said recent attacks against police officers represented a serious issue. “They wear a uniform,” she said. “People are being shot because of what they’re wearing. It doesn’t matter if they are black or white or what their gender or religion is. Why do you oppose this so vehemently? This is a serious problem.” Weisel explained the reasoning behind the Anti-Defamation League’s opposition to the bill. “Hate crimes were established for those with immutable characteristics,” she said. “It’s something you cannot change. To say a police officer needs protecting because they are in a uniform is the same as saying a doctor or a nurse needs protecting because they wear a uniform. A police officer being assaulted, yes, that’s sad, but it’s not a hate crime.” Weisel said hate crimes are intended to protect certain classes of citizens because of innate and unchangeable characteristics who they are and not what they do for a living. For example, those protected classes include race, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, country of origin, those with disabilities and the homeless, for example. However, Delegate Mike Griffin (R35B) pointed out some of those characteristics can be changed. “You talk about characteristics that cannot be changed and you mention religion,” he said. “I’m a religious person myself, but I do have the ability to change to a different religion, or not be religious at all.”

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Resort Committee Discusses Bike Angelo Russo Repair Stations At Boardwalk Ends The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 22, 2021

In Loving Memory Of

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

January 22, 1975 To August 20, 2003

A Birthday Wish

I know this day belongs to you For upon this day you were born But being apart on your special day Leaves my heart shattered and torn I wanted to give you a special gift One that would surely last Something to put a song in my heart And dry away the tears I thought perhaps balloons or flowers To put upon your grave But I knew that eventually They would just wither away I thought about it long and hard What gift would surely last Something that you’ve never had On your birthday in the past I realized that such a gift Couldn’t come close to compare To the grand celebration That you must be having up there

So I’m sending you a birthday wish From the bottom of my heart To give me strength and courage Every day that we’re apart I know you’re happy in Heaven with no sorrow, tears or pain But sometimes I’m so lonesome My tears fall like rain So on your special day My wish I send to you Is someday I’ll be with you When my chores on earth are through And as I tarry on through the years Hold my wish close to your heart For God will come and take me home As long as I do my part For now I must travel through life alone For He isn’t ready for me yet But what a glorious reunion we’ll have When your smiling face I see So on your birthday this year My wish I send to you Keep looking for me, don’t give up For someday I’ll be there, too

Mom, Dad, Lisa, Tony, Tina, Chelsea And Jeffrey

OCEAN CITY – An idea to have the town install bike repair stations on the Boardwalk was discussed at length during a recent resort committee meeting. Last week, members of the Ocean City Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee began exploring the idea of installing bicycle repair stations on the north and south ends of the Boardwalk. Council Secretary Tony DeLuca, committee liaison, told members the proposed project – introduced by committee member and local bike shop owner Joe Marx – should be included in the committee’s list of goals for the coming year. “I don’t know what approval we need,” he said. “We probably need public works approval, we probably need planning and zoning, we probably need the city council. We’re going to need approval to do it, but it’s just an idea.” Last month, Marx suggested to committee members that the town provide bike stations on the Boardwalk to repair flat tires. In last week’s meeting, he agreed to explore cost estimates for installing two stations. “It’s about eight inches in diameter and bolts to the ground to a piece of concrete,” he explained. “It’s just a manual pump, but it looks very commercial.” When asked for his input, Public Works Director Hal Adkins said he had no objections to the proposed stations. “I just want to make sure we position or mount them where they’re not in the way of the turning radius of the trams …

,” he said. Ocean City Police Department Sgt. Allen Hawk, committee vice president, also suggested the stations be placed near City Watch surveillance cameras. DeLuca agreed. “We definitely want to get it out of traffic,” he said, “and we definitely have to find out where the cameras are.” Adkins added that the stations would also require signage. “If the engineering department could survey or identify locations, I have no issue whatsoever mounting them and making sure they are not going to impact any operation up there,” he said. “I know we’re going to have to do something in the way of signage, not only to identify it to the public … but it’s very low in elevation. It could be a tripping issue if you are not looking at it.” Committee President Paul Mauser, Ocean City’s engineering manager, told members last week his department could begin exploring locations at both ends of the Boardwalk. “Who’s going to pay for it?” he asked. “Is that something that can come out of public works?” Adkins noted it would depend on the cost of the stations. “I can’t answer that until you tell me what it costs …,” he said. “I would think if the chairman of the bike committee elevates it to the council level and during the discussion of the minutes there’s buy-in, it shouldn’t be a problem.” DeLuca agreed. “But we’re going to need their approval,” he said.

Outdoor Dining Plans Approved BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – The construction of an outside dining area will move forward at a Fenwick Island restaurant with approval from the town’s building committee. Last Friday, the Fenwick Island Building Committee voted to approve a building permit for the construction of a 700square-foot outdoor dining area at Warren’s Station Restaurant, located on Coastal Highway. Building Official Pat Schuchman told committee members last week the restaurant’s owner had applied for a permit that included the installation of a concrete pad and picket fence on the northfacing side of the facility. “The total square footage of the restaurant is 2,740 square feet,” she said. “The required parking spaces for that size of restaurant is 28 spaces. The total number of spaces prior to construction are 70 parking spaces, and after the concrete pad and outdoor seating area are constructed there will be 63 available parking spaces.”

Committee member Reid Tingle said he had no objection to the request. “It’s very similar to what they did with operating outdoor seating this past summer,” he said. “Did we have any complaints or issues?” Town Manager Terry Tieman replied that the town had no issues with any outdoor service areas over the summer. Councilman and committee member Bill Weistling agreed. “I checked with Chief Devlin about a month ago, and he said there were no complaints,” he added. Schuchman said the restaurant would construct the outside dining area in the same location it used for outdoor seating last year. She added that the proposed outdoor dining area had restrictions on live and recorded music, lighting and hours of operation in accordance with the town code. With no further discussion, the committee voted 2-0 to approve the building permit for Warren’s Station. Committee member Jesse Shepard recused himself from the meeting. “I reviewed the plans,” Tingle said. “Everything looks good to me.”


January 22, 2021

Stolen Car Arrest OCEAN CITY – A Salisbury man was arrested on motor vehicle theft charges last week after the car he was driving in Ocean City pinged as stolen on a stationary license plate reader on the Route 50 Bridge. Around 4:30 p.m. last Thursday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer responded to the area of 12th Street and Philadelphia Avenue for a reported stolen vehicle after a stationary license plate reader (LPR) monitoring the bridge pinged on a white Honda Accord with Delaware tags that had been reported stolen. The OCPD officer located the vehicle and initiated a traffic stop. The front seat passenger was identified as Jonathan Palmer, 20, of Salisbury. A female was in the driver’s seat at the time of the stop. Palmer reportedly told police he had just picked up the female and she had no affiliation with the vehicle. When informed the vehicle had been reported stolen, Palmer told police he obtained the vehicle through a private transaction with another individual, according to police reports. Palmer reportedly told police he traded a Ford Crown Victoria to the other man in exchange for the Honda Accord and that transaction had been completed within the last three to five days. Palmer told police the other man had not provided any title or paperwork for the Accord, nor had he attempted to get the vehicle registered in his name. The OCPD officer contacted the Delaware State Police, who confirmed the vehicle was still reported as stolen. The DSP also contacted the vehicle’s registered owner, who had no knowledge of any transaction and did not know Palmer or the other man allegedly involved in the transaction. Palmer was arrested and charged with motor vehicle theft.

Unruly, Unwanted Hotel Guest OCEAN CITY – A local woman was arrested last week for allegedly causing a disturbance at a downtown hotel and later scrapping with police officers trying to detain her. Last Wednesday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was dispatched to a hotel at 21st Street for a reported trespasser. Dispatchers advised a woman who was not a guest at the hotel was standing in the men’s room. The officer arrived and made contact

Cops & Courts The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

with the suspect, later identified as Emily Gore, 30, of Ocean City, who appeared to be under the influence, according to police reports. Gore was reportedly trying to enter an elevator, but the doors were not open. The officer located the caller, who confirmed Gore was the individual about whom he had called police. The officer interviewed Gore and asked if she needed help, according to police reports. Gore first told police she was staying in a room on the third floor, but then said she was not a guest at the hotel, according to police reports. The caller told police he knew Gore from an earlier encounter in the night during which he called 911. He explained Gore had been a nuisance at the hotel multiple times during the day that required either a police or EMS response and that he expected her to continue to cause issues. The hotel staffer issued a trespass warning to Gore and she mocked him for doing it, according to police reports. The OCPD officer told Gore she needed to leave the property because she was no longer welcome. At that point, Gore became upset and told police she needed her phone. The officers could not locate her phone and she was told to leave but refused to exit the premises, according to police reports. Gore was placed under arrest for trespassing at that point. During a search by a female officer incident to the arrest, Gore allegedly kicked one officer in the shins four times and kneed him in the genitals, according to police reports. She also reportedly kicked the female officer who was searching her in the shins. Once at the booking facility, Gore refused to leave the transport vehicle and had to be carried inside by officers, according to police reports. During booking

Gore kicked other booking officers. She was charged with trespassing and multiple counts of second-degree assault.

Uptown Hotel Assault Arrest OCEAN CITY – A local woman was arrested for second-degree assault last weekend after an alleged confrontation at an uptown hotel. Around 2:10 a.m. last Friday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer responded to a 911 call hang-up at an uptown hotel on 112th Street. Communications advised hearing someone yell “get off me” prior to the hang-up. The officer arrived and met with a male individual who told police, “I just got my [expletive deleted] beat,” according to police reports. The victim reportedly then changed his story and told police he fell in the parking lot. The victim had scratches on his nose, left cheek and behind his ear, according to police reports. He also said, without being prompted, “She didn’t do anything wrong,” according to police reports. OCPD officers went to a room on the second floor of the hotel and located a female suspect identified as Jamie Fitzsimmons, 38, of Ocean City. Fitzsimmons reportedly invited the officers into the room, which was in disarray with food including lettuce on the floor, the bed and the walls. Fitzsimmons reportedly told the officers, “yeah, we got into it a little.” Fitzsimmons reportedly told police she and the male victim had been fighting and throwing things around the room, but there had been no physical altercation. When asked how the room became in a state of disarray, she repeatedly said “salad” multiple times according to police reports. Based on the injuries to the victim and the testimony, Fitzsimmons was arrested and charged

Page 19 with second-degree assault.

Jail For Disorderly Conduct OCEAN CITY – An Ocean City man arrested in November after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend at an uptown residence pleaded guilty last week to disorderly conduct and was sentenced to 60 days. Around 7:55 p.m. on Nov. 4, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was dispatched to a residence on East Biscayne Drive for a reported domestic assault that had already occurred. Upon arrival, the officer observed a male and a female arguing on Pacific Avenue. The male was later identified as George Ruark, 37, of Ocean City. The officer reportedly told Ruark and the female to sit on the curb. According to police reports, while the officer was waiting for additional units, Ruark refused to listen to his commands and stood and walked toward the female at a fast pace. At that point, Ruark was detained in handcuffs. The victim told the officer she was lying on the couch inside the unit when Ruark returned home, reportedly in an intoxicated condition. The victim reportedly told police Ruark placed both of his hands on her face and pushed her face down while she was on the couch. The victim told the officer the only way she could get Ruark off of her was by biting his finger, according to police reports. The victim reportedly had a red mark under her left eye on her cheekbone consistent with her version of the assault. The victim reportedly told police Ruark hit her multiple times in the back of her head during the struggle. According to police reports, first Ruark said nothing had happened. Then, he reportedly changed his story and told officers the victim had bitten him and assaulted him by punching him several times. According to police reports, Ruark kept telling officers different versions of the events as if he was trying to get the victim in trouble. Ruark then told police he was on Suboxone and was going through withdrawal. He also told police he had consumed “molly” and that his neck hurt. According to police reports, Ruark kept adding reasons why he needed medical assistance. The officer ultimately determined through the investigation Ruark was the primary aggressor and he was arrested. Last week, he pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct and was sentenced to 60 days.


Assateague Superintendent Commends Staff Members

Page 20

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 22, 2021

work and innovative solutions to the unique challenges of the 2020 season made a significant, positive difference to the Assateague Island National Seashore experience.

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

Public Schools Will Skip Finals

MANAGING EDITOR

ASSATEAGUE – The Assateague Island National Seashore this week announced the recipients of two Superintendent’s Awards for 2020 in a year marked by unique challenges on the barrier island. Kelly Taylor, Assateague Island National Seashore’s District Supervisor for Interpretation and Education was recognized for her outstanding service during the 2020 season. The second Superintendent’s Award went to Logan Tucker, a law enforcement ranger in the Maryland district on Assateague. “Through a year which included an extended shutdown due to COVID-19, budget uncertainties, our inability to hire a full complement of seasonal staff, a phased COVID-19 reopening, operating during pandemic and record visitation, Kelly and Logan demonstrated outstanding leadership and dedication,” said Assateague Island National Seashore (AINS) Superintendent Hugh Hawthorne. “Both rangers assisted other park departments in accomplishing goals, offering solutions to the unique

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

Logan Tucker and Kelly Taylor of Assateague Island National Seashore received awards based on their service last year. Submitted Photo

problems of 2020 and going above and beyond.” Taylor was recognized for her outstanding service during the 2020 season. With visitor centers closed for much of the year, all ranger-led programming was cancelled and staffing levels were kept at a minimum. Taylor and her interpretive staff redirected their work efforts to support the campground and entrance station operations.

Tucker assumed tasks and responsibilities that supported all other divisions in the park. His high-quality enforcement, public safety and emergency services protected park visitors and island resources during a challenging and difficult season. According to Hawthorne, Taylor and Tucker demonstrated initiatives far surpassing their routine duties, which is why there were the recipients of the Superintendent’s Awards. Their hard

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January 22, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 21

Surprise Visit:

In honor of Veterans Day in November, Melanie Coleman’s first grade class at Ocean City Elementary sent thank you letters to her cousin, Wilbur Scott Oles, and his Marine squadron. Oles is the Lieutenant Colonel of VMM-163 Evil Eyes at Miramar Military Base in San Diego, Calif. Her class recently had a surprise visit from him during a class Zoom. He personally thanked the students for their Veterans Day cards. He told the class he distributed the letters to his squadron and they have them hanging all around their building. He also shared information on the osprey he flies and even showed them the landing pad with all the aircraft. Students asked many great questions and enjoyed his company. Submitted Photo

Bike Strategic Plan Consultant Sought BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – The town will start seeking a consultant to develop a bike strategic plan. Last week, Ocean City Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee (BPAC) President Paul Mauser presented members with an update on the development of a bike strategic plan. Mauser said the selection of an engineering firm to complete the plan will take place in the coming months, following a four-week bidding process. “We’ll have a four-week bid and by the time we open bids we’ll have a selection committee and issue a notice to proceed,” he said. “We’re planning March 15 as actually starting up with this project. So we’re in motion and looking pretty good.” Last year, the town received $79,700 through the Maryland Department of Transportation (MDOT) Bikeways Program to hire a consultant for the development of a strategic plan that will be used to further Ocean City’s bicycle network. In recent years, the resort has embarked on a multi-phased initiative to install a continuous bike path from one end of town to another without using Coastal Highway. With the help of a strategic plan, Mauser said, the town will have designs and cost estimates for several proposed biking corridors, including 94th Street, 146th Street, town alleys from 27th to 62nd streets and 62nd to 94th streets, and a 10-foot construction easement west of the dunes from 94th to 118th streets. “As far as the strategic plan goes, that is oriented such that it has to be actionable,” he said. “And it has to be eval-

uating and providing plans and cost estimates for corridors in town. It’s not for wayfinding and projects like that, it’s for practical development plans.” Last month, BPAC members concluded their review of a Request for Proposal (RFP) document seeking engineering services for the development of the bike strategic plan. Mauser told the committee this week the RFP was approved by MDOT Bikeways, allowing the town to move forward in the bidding process. “The fee is set in stone. It’s public knowledge. It was $79,700 …,” he said. “We’re going strictly based off experience and project approach. We’ll be able to select who we feel is the best consultant from those applications.” Public Works Director Hal Adkins questioned if the town would need to improve its public outreach efforts for the strategic plan. He noted the public should be aware of the proposed bicycle routes. Mauser said the scope of work for developing the strategic plan included a public opinion poll and meetings with the town council and BPAC. However, he noted the challenges of gaining support for the proposed 10-foot construction easement. “We’re very aware that there’s going to be the potential for significant opposition to putting the bike route east of condo row,” he replied. “I think there’s going to be a lot of support, but there’s potential for people who don’t want it there. Council will be the ones making the decision.” Council Secretary Tony DeLuca said the town could have buy-in from the public if it tested a bike path along an oceanfront block. “If we tested a block of the 10-foot easement it might sell itself …,” he said.

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Armed Robber In Summer Boardwalk Incident Sentenced

Page 22

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

SNOW HILL – One of four suspects charged in a gunpoint robbery on the Boardwalk last summer pleaded guilty to three counts of second-degree assault and was sentenced to a total of 12 years, all but five or which were suspended. James Watson, 17, of Alexandria, Va., last Thursday pleaded guilty to three counts of second-degree assault for his role in the Aug. 26 incident. He was sentenced to 12 years, including 10 for one count and one year each for the other two counts. All but five years of which were suspended. He was also placed on supervised probation for three years upon his release. Around 2:15 a.m. on Aug. 26, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer on bicycle patrol was dispatched to the area of 12th Street and the Boardwalk for a reported assault with gun. As the bicycle officer made his way to the scene, the officer observed a suspect matching the description provided by Ocean City Com-

Shotgun Used In Late-Night Holdup

munications running west toward Baltimore Avenue. The officer detained the suspect, later identified Watson, 17. OCPD officers viewed the City Watch video footage of the incident and observed Watson walking down the Boardwalk carrying a shotgun. The officer who first detained Watson reported never seeing Watson in possession of the shotgun, but witnesses told police Watson handed the weapon to a friend, who went back to their vehicle. OCPD officers interviewed the female victim, who reportedly told police Watson had robbed her and her 10-year-old niece. The victim told police Watson held her 10-year-old niece at gunpoint and demanded her cell phone, according to police reports. The victim told police she grabbed the cell phone from her niece and told the child to run away, according to police

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reports. The victim reportedly told officers she attempted to call the police, but Watson’s friend, later identified as Joshua Benitez, 17, of Lorton, Va., grabbed the phone from her and physically assaulted her. The victim told police Watson handed the shotgun to another friend, later identified as Alexis Cabrera, 17, of Lorton, Va. The witness told police Watson then attempted to rob her of her wallet, but she was able to get away. According to City Watch footage, Watson enters the screen frame carrying the black shotgun by his side and physically assaulted a male victim by striking him in the face, according to police reports. Watson then allegedly handed the shotgun to Cabrera and continued to argue with the victim. The footage also revealed Benitez assaulting the female victim and taking the cell phone.

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According to police reports, another male victim, possibly the female victim’s boyfriend, attempted to run after Benitez. Watson chased the male victim and struck and kicked him all in the same motion. One witness reportedly told police they heard the pumping and wracking the shotgun. After Watson handed the shotgun to Cabrera, he ran from the Boardwalk, which is when he was first encountered by the bicycle officer responding to the scene. According to witnesses, Cabrera, Benitez and a third suspect, later identified as Micah Younger, 18, of Manassas, Va., left the area with the shotgun in a silver Honda. A short time later, Maryland State Police located the suspect vehicle in West Ocean City and initiated a traffic stop. Inside the vehicle were Cabrera, Younger and Benitez. The MSP trooper also observed the shotgun in plain view in the vehicle. OCPD officers brought one of the victims to the traffic stop and the victim positively identified Younger, Cabrera and Benitez. In summary, the initial officer learned Watson, Cabrera, Benitez and Younger were all involved in the armed robbery and the various assaults during the incident captured on City Watch. The investigation revealed the shotgun was held by each of the suspects as they passed it around during the incident, according to police reports. The investigation revealed all four suspects were allegedly engaged actively in the various assaults and armed robbery. Watson, Cabrera, Benitez and Younger were each charged with armed robbery and multiple counts of first- and second-degree assault. Last week, Cabrera had all of the charges against him placed on the stet, or inactive, docket. In November, Younger had the armed robbery and first-degree assault charges against him dismissed. He still faces three counts of seconddegree assault with a trial date tentatively set for February. Benitez has a juvenile waiver hearing tentatively set for Feb. 1.

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Spray Irrigation Project Weighed

January 22, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 23

Golf Course Replacement System Eyed

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Worcester County continues to evaluate the possibility of spray irrigation at the Ocean Pines Golf Course. The Worcester County Commissioners last week voted unanimously to hire a Frederick company to handle the evaluation of irrigation system replacement at the Ocean Pines Golf Course. Since last year, county officials have been exploring the possibility of using effluent from the Ocean Pines Wastewater Treatment Plant to irrigate the golf course. “I think this is a great project,” Commissioner Jim Bunting said. John Ross, the county’s deputy director of public works, told the commissioners his department had solicited bids from vendors who designed golf course irrigation systems. After reviewing the bids, he recommended the county hire Hydro Designs Inc. out of Frederick at a cost of $8,800. The county had $25,000 budgeted for the work. “Prices came in relatively reasonable in my mind,” Ross said. He added that Hydro Designs had done other projects on the Eastern Shore, including work at Glen Riddle Golf Club, and that staff had interviewed company representatives.

“Our recommendation is to select them to do the evaluation of the golf course for application of wastewater,” Ross said. When asked how the cost of a new irrigation system would be covered, Ross said that had not yet been determined. He added, however, that the Ocean Pines Association would be responsible in one way or another. He said the cost could be added to water and sewer bills, to the association’s annual assessment or even to rates at the golf course. “That has not been anything that’s been determined at this particular point,” he said. Commissioner Chip Bertino stressed that countywide, taxpayers as a whole would not foot the cost. “The rest of the county would not be paying for this,” he said. “I wanted to make sure of that.” Ross said the county might also want to look at a new irrigation system as a potential environmental project, as it might be eligible for some grant funding in that regard. “It’s an improvement to one of the assets of the Ocean Pines Association but it’s also an environmental project because we’re going to reduce the need to pull water out of the aquifer, we’re going to reduce the amount of nutrients going into the river,” Ross said.

Berlin Approves Police Changes BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Town leaders approved changes related to use of force in the Berlin Police Department’s general orders this month. The Berlin Town Council on Jan. 11 voted unanimously to approve a couple mandated changes to the police general order related to use of force. Police Chief Arnold Downing said the amendments had to be made if the department was to remain eligible for certain funds. “If they were not put in we would actually have lost federal discretionary funds after Jan. 31,” Downing said. Downing told the council there were two changes being proposed to the general order pertaining to use of force Monday. The first would be the addition of language that said that all federal, state and local laws will be followed. The second change related to chokeholds. The proposed change includes language that prohibits chokeholds except for when they’re used following established guidelines. Downing said that going forward, his department would be reviewing its overall use of force policy with its insurance carrier and its law enforcement representative. He added that state officials

could mandate changes as well. Council members didn’t question the amendments Downing outlined but did question the language in the general order relating to the use of pepper spray and electronic control devices (such as Tasers). Councilman Jay Knerr said the criteria for both appeared very similar. Downing said that not all officers had both pepper spray and electronic control devices. He said the officer had to be trained with either option to carry it and even then often just chose one or the other. “You have to look at it as a discretionary type thing,” he said. “A lot of times we use Mace more for crowds instead of individuals.” He added that whatever the tool, the officer had to have been trained with it before he or she could carry it. Once they are trained, their preference often decides which they carry. “If you try to put on everything that is available to you you’d be walking around with 102 pounds worth of equipment,” Downing said. “Preference is going to be a big part of it. Most of our officers do not carry Mace on a regular basis.” The council voted unanimously to approve the amendments to the general order regarding use of force.

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Berlin Cited For Meetings Violations

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

January 22, 2021

BERLIN – The Maryland Open Meetings Compliance Board found that the Town of Berlin violated the Open Meetings Act at two November closed session meetings. On Jan. 20, the Open Meetings Compliance Board (OMCB) issued an opinion regarding various violations of the Open Meetings Act related to closed session meetings on Nov. 16 and 23. The board’s review of town council practices stemmed from a complaint filed by resident Jason Walter. Though he cited the specific November meeting dates, Walter said the town’s closed meeting practices were an ongoing problem. “While we do not address whether any other such violations have in fact occurred, we encourage the council in the conduct of future meetings to comply with the procedures set forth in the Act…,” the OMCB opinion reads. “These procedures are designed to ensure public bodies will conduct public business in secrecy only when there is a genuine need for secrecy, and, even when there is such a need, to ensure that the public is made aware of that need, and is meaningfully informed after the fact about the actions the public body has taken.” The six-page OMCB opinion cited violations of the pre-meeting notice and agenda requirements, the requirements for properly closing a session, the requirement that the closed-session discussion be limited to matters within the exception claimed and the requirement of a closed-session summary in the minutes of the next open session meeting. The opinion points out that when scheduling a closed session meeting, the council should issue an agenda advising that an open meeting will be held where a vote to go into closed session will be taken. Walter’s complaint alleged that the Nov. 16 meeting—a special executive session to discuss public secu-

rity – was closed from beginning to end. The OMCB opinion said the town did not dispute that the vote to close the meeting was taken in closed session, out of public view. “This nonpublic closure vote violated the Act…,” the opinion reads. The opinion goes on to state that a closing statement was not made available to the public in an open session prior to the meeting closure. “…because the vote to close was taken in closed session, members of the public were deprived of the opportunity to object to the closure, which violates the Act,” the opinion reads. Another issue addressed in the opinion is the fact that the council, in its Nov. 16 closed session, discussed topics other than those stipulated in its closing statement. “Here the confidential meeting minutes the council submitted to the board indicate that the council discussed a number of topics at the November 16 meeting extending beyond matters that would threaten public safety if discussed publicly,” the opinion reads. “As the text of the Act indicates, closure is not allowed simply because the discussion relates to safety or security matters; rather, the body must ‘determine’ that the issues are sensitive enough that an open discussion would itself imperil the public.” In an interview Wednesday, Walter said he submitted the complaint because, despite the assertions of some prior council members, he didn’t believe the town operated as transparently as it should. “It was an ongoing issue,” he said. “The incoming administration promised to change things and staff seemed to continue the status quo.” When asked for a comment on Wednesday, Mayor Zack Tyndall said he’d address the opinion next week. “I received the report today and will be issuing a public statement during the council meeting on Monday night,” he said.

OCEAN CITY – The Art League of Ocean City is inviting artists from everywhere to participate in their virtual “Love, Love, Love” art exhibition online, Feb. 5-27. The deadline for entries is Feb. 1. The Art League is asking artists to explore the question: What does love look like to you? “This special online exhibit will bring together expressions of love in its many forms: romantic love, self love, love of a parent or child, love for your neighbor,” Rina Thaler, executive director of the Art League, said. “In a time when we’re so divided, we’re hoping to visually show our love for each other and how love can bring us together. This is also a great opportunity for artists to

have their work shown to a broader audience.” The exhibit is open to all 18 years or older, and images of all media will be accepted. Cash prizes from $75 to $150 will be awarded. The submitted artwork will be featured on the Art League’s website and social media during February. Winners will be invited to participate in the “Best of 2021” show in December 2021. Angela Herbert-Hodges of Salisbury will judge the entries and select the winners. A multi-talented artist, Hodges is a contemporary watercolorist who has had solo shows in New York City and Washington, D.C. She is also a Cordon Bleu Chef and coaches at the Salisbury Fencing Club.

STAFF WRITER

Online Art Exhibition Announced


January 22, 2021

Art Show Winners:

Several Worcester Preparatory School art students placed in the “2020 Eastern Shore Classic Dog Shows Art Contest," which connects student and canine through artistic expression. Lower School students from Rebecca Tittermary’s class captured first place in every grade level. Middle/Upper School students in George Zaiser’s art classes placed in most age categories in addition to senior Hannah Perdue capturing the overall Best In Show top honor. Winners were selected based on their interpretation of “Dogs, Our Best Friend” by a panel of judges. Pictured above with their recognized works are sixth graders Akum Kang and Haven Harrison; seventh graders Sydney Todorov, Kobe Bouzaglo, Hailey Bushnell, Sydney Mize and Caitlin Shimko; eighth graders Angeline Todorov, Sydney Tingle and Jayden Scopp; 10th graders Ava Wilsey, Jenna Hess, Luke Loeser and Cayden Wallace; 11th grader Hannah Brasure; and 12th grader Hannah Perdue. At right, are lower school award winners kindergartners Isla Pippin and Eric Thomas; first graders Jack Parks, Nora Rafinski, Tobi Blaska, Madelyn Tull and Brooke Arnold; second graders Gavin Dennis, Suri Thomas, Tejal Pillai, Allie Kuon and Remy Hertrichl third graders Lilly White and Raia Gorfinkell; fourth graders Vivian Spraul and Sam Metz; fifth graders Harper Hertrich, Ryan Shipp, Elena Gjoni, Ruya Kucuk and Ellie Phillips. Below, eighth grader Angeline Todorov’s (High Award of Merit) and senior Hannah Perdue’s (Best in Show) are pictured. Submitted Photos

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 25


Page 26

Julie Ann Schmidt BISHOPVILLE – Julie Ann Schmidt, age 56 of Bishopville, passed away on Jan. 12, 2021. Born on Nov. 17, 1964, she was the daughter of the late J. Bernard and Ann Schmidt. Julie, who was born and grew up in Harrisburg, Pa., graduated from Harrisburg Academy in 1982. She attended Southern Seminary College in Buena Vista, Va. where she studied Equine Science & Management and was a member of the 1983 and 1984 IHSA National Champion Equestrian Teams. In the late 1980’s, Julie moved to Ocean City where she started a decades long career in real estate, most notably, a JULIE ANN 25-year career with O’SCHMIDT Conor, Piper and Flynn/Coldwell Banker. Julie loved everything about beach life and lived it to the fullest. She is survived by her fiancée Kevin Wagner and his three sons, Derek, Andrew and Brendan; her brothers, J. Bernard Schmidt Jr. of Harrisburg, Pa. and Steven Schmidt of Boyds, Md. and her nieces, nephews and cousins who all have the fondest memories of the fun beach times “Aunt Julie” arranged when they came to visit. A memorial for Julie will be held in Ocean City at a date to be determined. Her remains will be buried in the Schmidt family plot in Harrisburg, Pa. In lieu

Winter Sunset Sky:

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Obituaries

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

of flowers, the family asks that contributions be made to The Worcester County Humane Society IncorporatedMemorial Donations (networkforgood.com)

Phyllis J. Groves OCEAN PINES – Phyllis J. Groves, age 83, passed away peacefully on Monday, Jan. 11, 2021. She was born and raised in Washington, D.C. and was a very proud Washingtonian. She earned a bachelor’s degree in History and Political Science at Michigan State University and George Washington University. Dur- PHYLLIS J. GROVES ing her time at George Washington University, she studied abroad for a year at the London School of Economics. In her younger years, she worked on Capitol Hill for Congressmen John Blatnik from Minnesota and Senator Al Gore Sr. from Tennessee, among others. Phyllis also worked in the SpanishPortuguese Department at Georgetown University for over 25 years and volunteered at the Smithsonian Museum

January 22, 2021 ily, please visit www.easternshorecremation.com.

Frieda L. Pawlukewicz

upon retiring. She traveled throughout the United States and overseas, with highlights in Sri Lanka and the Galapagos Islands. Her passions included books, pottery, jewelry, elephants, traveling and Indian cuisine. For the last three years she lived at The Woodlands and Catered Living in Ocean Pines. She loved living so close to the beach where she enjoyed seeing the horses at Assateague Island and all the families on vacation in Ocean City. She was preceded in death by her husband of over 38 years, Paul A. Groves. She is survived by her two sons, David A. of Savage, Minn. and Gareth N. of Ocean City, their wives Amy E. and Ashley M., and her grandsons Harper H. and Maverick L. Cremation followed her death. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, services will be held privately for the family. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in her name made to The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee or the Southern Poverty Law Center in Alabama. Arrangements are in the care of Eastern Shore Cremation and Funeral Service, 504 Franklin Avenue, Berlin, Md. 21811. To send condolences to the fam-

OCEAN CITY – Frieda L. Pawlukewicz (nee Ziemski) was born in Nanticoke, Pa. in 1933, to John and Frieda Ziemski. She died on Monday, Jan. 18, 2021. She resided in the Scranton, Pa. area, until her elementary school years when the family moved to Newark, N.J. She graduated from Girls Vocational and Technical High School, majoring in Beauty Culture. She worked as a hairdresser most of her life, and part FRIEDA L. time when she secured PAWLUKEWICZ a position in the Credit Department at Raritan Bay Medical Center, Perth Amboy, N.J. She had moved to Perth Amboy, in the early 1960's with her husband Herbert, of 65 years, who predeceased her in 2019. They raised a family until their retirement, then moving to Ocean City, a town they had frequented for decades. Frieda was a member of VFW Post 663, Ladies Auxiliary; St. Stephen's Roman Catholic Church and she coordinated summer trips to New Jersey State Parks for city youth. In Ocean City, she was a member of The Polish Club, Caine Woods Association, AARP, Bingo Club, Water Babies and St. Luke Church. She is survived by her daughter, Justine Pawlukewicz; son Michael Pawlukewicz; grandchildren Frank Crespo Jr. and Jennifer (Crespo) El Bakouri (Ahmed); greatgrandchildren Zoey and Amal; a sister, D. Marion Chigos; and several nieces and nephews. A daughter, Jane Crespo, predeceased her as well as siblings Henry, Lawrence, Dorothy and Jane Ziemski, Silvia Gembarski, Deloris Piet and Geraldine Kryston. She was interned at the Gates of Heaven, Dagsboro, Del. In lieu of gifts/flowers, please donate to The Polish American Club, Columbus Hall, 9901 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842.

John William D’Amato Motorists traveling west over the Route 90 bridge were treated to a lovely sunset sky

Photo by Chris Parypa

OCEAN PINES – John William D’Amato, age 72, died Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021 at Gull Creek Assisted Living in Berlin. SEE NEXT PAGE


... Obituaries

January 22, 2021

Born in Washington, DC he was the son of the late Frederick Salvadore D’Amato and Ruth Moore D’Amato Driggers. He is survived by his wife, Antoinette “Toni” D’Amato, and daughter, Patricia “Tricia” Anne McCloud and her husband John McCloud, of Glen Burnie and their late son, James Nicholas D’AmJOHN WILLIAM ato. There is one grandD’AMATO daughter, Tiffany Anne McCloud. Mr. D’Amato had been Vice President Printing at Senoda, Inc before retiring to Ocean Pines. He enjoyed golfing, boating, and traveling. Cremation followed his death. No formal services are planned at this time. A donation in his memory may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 1850 York Rd, suite D, Timonium, Md. 21093. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com

Kenneth L. Jennings OCEAN CITY – Kenneth L. Jennings of Middle River passed away on Jan. 8, 2021. Born in North Wilkesboro, N.C. on Jan. 11, 1950 to the late James and Virginia Dare Jennings, Ken was raised in Baltimore County alongside beloved brothers Gary and Bill. Upon graduation from Overlea High School in 1968, he enlisted with the Maryland Air National Guard and proudly served for six years. Ken also worked many years KENNETH L. for the family business, JENNINGS Jim Jennings Transmissions, in Essex and eventually used his artistic talents to become a private contractor specializing in custom cabinetry and finishing work. He was also a secondary homeowner in Ocean City. In addition to his brothers, Ken is survived by his daughters, Megan Gsvind and her husband Robbie, Stephanie Cassedy and her husband Earl, grandchildren Hayley and Ryan Cassedy and soon to be baby girl Gsvind. Also surviving are his sister-in-law Joyce, many nieces, nephews, great-nieces, greatnephews and cousins. A celebration of life will be planned for a later date.

Deborah Alberta Messina BERLIN – Deborah Alberta Messina, age 72, died on Sunday, Jan. 17, 2021 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. Born in Baltimore City, she was the daughter of the late Frank and Alberta (Frapp) Zentz. She is survived by her husband, Donald Messina, and his children, Don, Jr., Deborah, Tina, and Dawn. Deborah had worked for 30 years as a social worker for the State of Maryland. After retiring, she and her husband lived out their dream of traveling. They visited Disney World every year for 25 years and cruised the Caribbean and Hawaii many times over. She also had a

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch unique hobby of reading palms which had been taught to her as a young girl by her aunt. She had quite a following, going by the name, “Princess Deborah”. An Episcopalian, she and her husband attended Holy Trinity Episcopal Church near Berlin. Cremation followed her death. A celebration of life will be announced at a later date. A donation in her memory may be made to: Worcester County Humane Society, P.O. Box 48, Berlin, Md. 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

Susan Withers Monigle OCEAN PINES – Susan Withers Monigle, age 87, died Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. Born in Washington DC, she was the daughter of the late Paul Gresham Withers and Georgia Carney Withers. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Arthur Thomas Monigle; grandson Robert Hall Ballard III; and two

brothers, Paul George and Eugene Floyd Withers. She is survived by her family, daughter Linda Monigle Guerrieri and her husband, Michael, of Ocean City, and her daughter Susan Monigle Villanova and her husband, Vic, of Harvey, La. Also surviving are her two grandsons, Patrick Arthur Ballard (and his wife Melissa) and Michael Shaw Guerrieri, Jr., who she loved dearly and brought her much joy. She leaves behind many beloved nieces, nephews and God children. Susan attended McKinley High School and SUSAN treasured her friends WITHERS and sorority sisters there MONIGLE throughout her life. She attended the University of Maryland and was a member of Kappa Delta Sorority. It was there that she met her husband Art. They both enjoyed the Terrapin Club and became lifetime members of The U of MD Alumni Association. Church was always an im-

Page 27 portant part of Susan's life. If she wasn't in town she "visited" churches where ever she went. She had been a member of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Salisbury and became a member of St. Paul's by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Ocean City in 1985. She served on the Alter Guild and was involved in many church activities. Susan had many dear friends on the Eastern Shore and enjoyed their friendships. She lived her whole life secure in the knowledge and love of God and her family. She was a much beloved wife, mother and grandmother. Interment will be in the St. Paul’s bythe-Sea columbarium. A service to celebrate Susan's life will be determined in the future. In lieu of flowers, a donation in her memory may be made to St. Paul’s-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church, 302 N. Baltimore Ave, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.


Technology Planning For The Unexpected In Year Ahead IN DEPTH WITH SAM CARD

Page 28

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SAM CARD

SPECIAL TO THE DISPATCH

BERLIN – It’s 2021 and we are in the position to prepare for a fundamentally different economy and society that was created in the last nine months of 2020. The pandemic definitely created a whirlwind across the country including a shockwave through IT departments everywhere. To gain perspective on what we can expect for 2021, we should take a look at a recap of results from 2020. As projected, one gigantic takeaway was: Technology played a key role for organizations as they sought to operate amid wildly unfamiliar conditions. The majority of IT budgets were spent in the beginning of 2020 purchasing hardware, like laptops, to migrate their employees to a remote work environment. For most, 2021 is projected to be a more stable state with much of the emergency spending to equip a work-fromhome workforce pretty much over. But

just because the emergency hardware spending is over doesn't mean that technology spending will be cut. What we can expect moving forward into this new year is a need to acquire the tools to sustain the future state of IT with a large portion of the workforce remaining remote when things “go back to normal.” The biggest hurdle continues to be managing the high degree of un- SAM CARD certainty. Many IT execs said they believe that they are unable to accurately forecast for long-term planning decisions, stating that it could be 3 months to a year before forecasting accurately will be possible. With that being said, there are no arguments that the projected top three key tech priorities are expected to be: security and privacy, customer experience and engagement, and infrastructure and cloud technology. Security, Privacy: The pandemic has led to an even more dramatic rise in cy-

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bersecurity attacks on organizations. Phishing and ransomware attacks are aimed at stressed and distracted employees who may be vulnerable to news about the pandemic or lured by a spoofed offer from a “trusted” brand. For instance, the updated edition of the TechTarget/Computer Weekly IT Priorities 2020 survey found that the most widespread IT projects all related to security and data protection, with user security training, governance, risk and compliance tools, and multifactor authentication the top current projects. Customer Experience, Engagement: In the rush toward digital transformation, keep the user experience in mind at all times. Performing massive migrations of complex line-of-business applications to the cloud may make sense on paper. Yet, if employees or customers experience new or different frictions, productivity or revenue may suffer, slowing or offsetting the benefits you seek. Take time to carefully plan out large projects. Infrastructure, Cloud Technology: It

HERE’S MY CARD

has been estimated that almost one billion people worked from home at some point in 2020. This has led to demand for IT products and services to support remote workers. This has also led to Windows 10 migration also in the top IT projects for 2021, but IT professionals regard unified communications as the top priority. The massive migration of employees to work from home has accelerated the digital transformation efforts of most companies by moving their infrastructure and business applications to the cloud. If businesses are to thrive in the new normal, they need to be agile, resilient to unforeseen events and adapt to change rapidly. What we all have learned this past year should serve us all well as we plan our 2021 IT budgets. Long-term objectives have been reprioritized, meaning some have been accelerated while others remain on hold or only given life-support funding. (The writer can be reached at SCard@cards-tech.com. To learn more about Cards Technology, visit www.cards-tech.com.) ROOFING

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Debt’s Global Economic Impact Wealth Of Knowledge

January 22, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY KRISTIN COANE

SPECIAL TO THE DISPATCH

BERLIN – The national debt is a measurement of how much the federal government owes creditors, most commonly depicted as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP). A high debt-to-GDP ratio is considered viable when the economy is expanding, because that growth allows the government to generate higher tax revenues to help pay down the debt. However, it’s not good when the economy is in decline, which is the current status not only in the U.S., but in many countries throughout the world. KRISTIN COANE For context, the stimulus efforts and tax cuts that allowed the U.S. to emerge from the Great Recession significantly increased the national public debt. In 2010, the debt ratio was 52% of GDP, but by the end of 2019, it had risen to 79%, the largest increase in any decade since the post-WWII 1940s. But now, according to the Congressional Budget Office, the U.S. debt ratio is estimated to reach 98% by the end of the year.

At the recent Bloomberg New Economy Forum, there were calls for more government stimulus to boost consumer spending and keep the economy running, and not just in the U.S. European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde warned stimulus needs to continue playing a role until the virus is contained. Like many countries across the globe, Southeast Asia took a hit during the second quarter, rebounded in the third and braced for increased outbreaks the final

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HERE’S MY CARD

Page 29

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Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 WEBSITES: www.mdcoastdispatch.com www.facebook.com/thedispatchoc J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

NEWS DEPARTMENT SHAWN J. SOPER Managing Editor ssoper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHARLENE SHARPE Staff Writer/Copy Editor csharpe@mdcoastdispatch.com BETHANY HOOPER Staff Writer bhooper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHRIS PARYPA Photographer

SALES DEPARTMENT TERRI FRENCH Account Executive Entertainment Editor terri@mdcoastdispatch.com JEANETTE DESKIEWICZ Account Executive jeanette@mdcoastdispatch.com

ART DEPARTMENT COLE GIBSON Art Director cole@mdcoastdispatch.com DAVID HOOKS Graphic Artist/Webmaster dhooks@mdcoastdispatch.com

BUSINESS OFFICE Bookkeeper/Classifieds Manager classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com

The Maryland Coast Dispatch (USPS #015125) is an official and legal newspaper for Worcester County. Periodical postage paid at Berlin, Maryland, and additional mailing offices. The Maryland Coast Dispatch, 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, Md. 21811, is published weekly on Friday mornings, 52 weeks a year. Subscription rates are $75 per year, $55 for six months. POSTMASTER: Please send change of address to Maryland Coast Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Maryland Coast Dispatch offices are located at Route 346 and Graham Avenue, Berlin, Maryland.

Committee Approach On Fire/EMS Issues Wise The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 22, 2021

HOW WE SEE IT

Creating a committee to study the complex issues surrounding fire department funding in Worcester County is an appropriate direction. Though they face similar issues, mostly centered around funding, the needs and concerns of the various fire departments in Worcester County vary by their response areas. Forming a committee of commissioners, fire service leaders and county staff to dive into the unique intricacies and offer recommendations to the entire group of commissioners is a prudent plan. It’s going to take time for this workgroup to come to a consensus on a plan to address concerns over equitable fire/EMS funding, ensuring safe and adequate response times and all the variables associated with protecting the community during a pandemic. A common theme throughout the committee’s work will be funding. The individual departments need more to continue providing fire/EMS service for their response areas. They are going to need the county’s help as well as their municipalities. How much money

is needed depends on the department, but the committee is inevitably going to be required to put a dollar figure on the improvements they hope the county will approve. In what will surely be a tight budget process this spring, funding will be a huge unknown. The fire companies need more money due to reduced volunteers, the pausing of most community fundraising opportunities, limited manpower due to budget constraints, increased call volumes and rising expenses associated with the pandemic. The money will most likely have to come from a new funding source, such as an emergency services fee or what is commonly known as a fire tax in some jurisdictions. Much of the committee’s discussion should deal with funding. The issues are well documented. How to address them is the dilemma facing this committee. A fire tax is a good starting point for the committee. In some areas, a fire tax computation is derived off property value. It’s going to be a difficult proposition because now – a time of econom-

ic uncertainty for most middle-class individuals – is not the time to ask for more from property owners. However, these are long-standing issues involving public safety in need of attention. A plan is needed, even if it features non-accomplishable goals in 2021. County Commission President Joe Mitrecic had it right when he called the situation a difficult one with an unpopular solution nobody wants to talk openly about. “This is going to be tough because you’re going to have to find a way to fund this and there’s only one way,” he said. “We all know what that is. We’re going to have to convince the citizenry this is the right thing to do. So I would say that anybody that wants to serve on this committee better be ready for that. There is no other way. Property tax dollars only go so far.” There is much work ahead, but the committee approach is a solid one with recommendations issued from the experts for the elected officials to consider in time. We would expect this to be a long-term process with no easy fixes for this budget year.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Remembering Mr. Smack Editor: It was with considerable sadness that I read of the passing of John Dale Smack, Jr. I was Town Attorney for Berlin during the time in which Mr. Smack served on the Berlin Council, from 1980 to 1988. As has been noted, Mr. Smack was the first African-American to serve on Berlin’s Council. During his two terms in office, Mr. Smack served with dignity and dedication to service for all of Berlin’s citizens. If memory serves me correctly, in those pre-District days where all council members were elected at-large by all town voters, Mr. Smack at least once garnered more votes than any other member. His service to the town and his outstanding contribution to the wellbeing of its citizens should be memorialized, and I try to shed some lights on his service in this modest tribute. He is a community leader who will be sorely missed. Joseph E. Moore Berlin

Clinic Well Managed Editor: A lot of people in the phase 1B over 75 age group were not aware that they would be able to receive the first COVID vaccine shots in the entire state of Maryland when Atlantic General Hospital offered that opportunity on Saturday, Jan. 16. No doubt the news was confusing to many when first released to the press on Monday after-

noon but by Tuesday morning the slots were filled. Most of the proactive information I saw was disseminated on OceanPinesForum.com operated by Joe Reynolds which enabled many to sign up on Monday evening. My wife and I were concerned, especially after seeing long lines in other areas of the country, how AGH would handle the hundreds of people signed up for their Saturday clinic at the Barrett building in Berlin. Would we be driving into an unorganized mess? That fear proved to be unfounded as we drove into Healthway Drive and were met by AGH volunteers. The operation would have made the military proud. As we drove in from the street, your vaccination time was checked. If early, you were directed to the parking lot across the street at the new cancer center. About 10 minutes prior to your shot time you were released and drove across street to Barrett parking lot and directed to come into the building five minutes prior to your shot time. Volunteers roamed the lot to coordinate arrivals and answer any questions. Inside you were quickly processed after showing ID and moved into the room where shots were given at multiple stations. After the shot was given, you were moved down the line to wait for 15 minutes to check for any adverse reaction then released out the side door. Nurses and staff were pleasant, impressive and amazingly efficient. I understand more than 700 shots may have been given that day. Kudos to AGH for being

proactive in getting these shots out ahead of everyone else and for their staff who made sure it was a success. They should be a model for every other operation in the state. Jack Barnes Berlin

Historical Ignorance Appalling Editor: The other day as I helped a Walmart employee load groceries into my car Dr. King was on my mind. I'm white, the employee was black, and so I said to her she should be getting hazard pay during the pandemic since she's an "essential worker." This was on Dr. King's Birthday, and I said to her "You know why they shot Dr. King?" She said she didn't. I said, "Because his next work was going to be in organizing the poor: he'd gotten the Voter's Rights and Civil Rights Bills passed through Congress, but his next march on Washington was for the poor." "Do you know where he was when he got shot?" She said "No." So I told her he was in Memphis because garbagemen were on strike. Garbagemen, another essential worker. I told her he was there because two garbagemen had been killed; it was raining one day, and the white garbagemen refused to let them inside. The two men climbed into the back of a garbage truck, and when the rain shorted the motor, the compactor came down and SEE NEXT PAGE


January 22, 2021

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR crushed them. So Dr. King went to Memphis to support the garbagemen. I was disappointed that this young, black girl was unaware of these very important historical facts. But I'm more disappointed in her teachers. I'm a teacher. I'm disappointed in our American education system. I see where we fail to get into depth when teaching history, when the most some kids know about Native Americans is the first Thanksgiving or the only speech they know of Dr. King's is "I Have a Dream." Yeah, we're getting rid of one bad hombre in the White House. But it sure didn't start with him. And they don't end it. If we don't pressure them, the same kind of stupid history just repeats itself. We the people. Happy Dr. King Day. Robert Carr Willards

A Call To All ‘Patriots’ Editor: On Jan. 6, 2021, I was watching the Electoral College vote count live on television when the tragic events at The Capitol took place. I watched in horror and sadness as rioting hooligans overpowered members of law enforcement and occupied the heart of American government. I immediately wanted to share my views with friends and family, but I purposely waited so that I could better comprehend the totality of the incident. It is now a week later, and we know that five people are dead. One officer committed suicide, and another has died from injuries suffered as a result of having his head bashed in by a fire extinguisher. The fact that our Capitol was overrun by insurrectionists, should offend each and every American. It amazes me that so many people can justify the behavior of those who were participating in the riots. I hear claims of “Patriotism” and comparisons to BLM activities as justification for the siege of the Capitol. I could not disagree more. We have all come to learn about Richard Barnett. He is the Arkansan who proudly occupied House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office and stole her mail. His famously, shirtless and vulgar interviews on local news stations defending his actions are epic. He is on video stating, “I sat down here in my desk. I’m a taxpayer. I’m a patriot. That ain’t her desk – we loaned her that desk. And she ain’t appreciating the desk, so I thought I would sit down and appreciate the desk.” I personally think that Mr. Barnett is a crazy and scary individual and one who has a warped view of life. However, I appreciate him for stepping up to the plate and stating what is really on his mind. We have learned about Mr. Barnett and the QAnon Shaman who thinks it is Patriotic to wear animal pelts and horns and face paint and create havoc on our Democracy. These types of people are relatively easy to identify as crack pots. While mentally unhinged, at least they stand by their

Between The Lines

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

views. Why is it that so many “Patriots” that occupied The Capitol on that horrific day remain silent and in hiding? When identified and taken into custody by Law Enforcement some of these criminals had offered a wide array of excuses for their bad behavior. I heard “we did not know we could not enter The Capitol, we just walked through an open door.” “I just found the zip strips on the floor and I was holding them to give to a Police Officer”. What nonsense. These “Patriots” have shown their true character. They are nothing but cowards. I call on each and every person who entered The Capitol to step forward and identify themselves to law enforcement as the insurrectionists they are. If they truly believe their cause and actions are just they should have no problem in publicly standing up for their beliefs. Those choosing to hide behind a mask are not only cowards, but their hiding is quite akin to those who used to don a white hood and engage in similar acts of racist hatred a century ago. M. Scott Chismar Crofton and Ocean City

Abandon Tax Talk Editor: The Ocean City Council is once again talking about raising taxes. At the same time, for the fourth year in a row, they've funded Bruce Bereano. Mr. Bereano has a felony conviction due to his mishandling of money. As an Ocean City taxpayer, I'd very much like to see unnecessary expenses like the funding of Mr. Bereano ended before talk of raising room taxes. Doug Miller, Ocean City and Jessup

AGH Applauded Editor: Thank you to Atlantic General Hospital employees for all their dedication and compassion that they showed our grandfather, Harold Artrip, who tragically passed away on Jan. 3, 2021. We specifically want to thank all the nurses and doctors on the 2-North floor for their immediate diagnosis and kindness. You will always be remembered for all that you did for our pops with love. The Artrip Family

To Our Readers: The Dispatch welcomes any and all letters from our readers. All letters are encouraged typed, but not required, and we reserve the right to edit each letter for clarity, accuracy and brevity. Letters should include writer’s name, address and day and evening telephone numbers. If we are unable to reach the writer, we will have to withhold the letter. Due to space restraints, letters under 500 words in length will be given top priority. Letters can be mailed to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811, emailed to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com or faxed to 410-641-0966.

Page 31

By Publisher/Editor Steve Green

Guilt is a powerful thing, and it was a shame to see the local health department try to use it to discourage people under the age of 75 from getting COVID-19 vaccinations once they were signed up. Anyone under the age of 75 who were signed up for vaccinations received an email from the local health department Saturday requesting they reconsider getting the shot. Educators were among those who received the email. Teachers were surprised to receive the request to reconsider after being encouraged by the school system to sign up for their vaccinations as quickly as possible. The email from the health department read, “At this time, due to an overwhelming demand and limited vaccine supply, we are asking those in the Phase 1B eligibility who are under the age of 75 to consider postponing vaccination and cancelling their appointment time … Your appointment time will be given to someone over the age of 75 years old from the waiting list. Once vaccine supply increases, additional clinics will be scheduled.” In response, a message from Worcester County Public Schools Chief Operating and Academic Officer Annette Wallace was distributed to local principals to share with their teachers. It essentially said ignore the health department’s email. “There is an email circulating from the Health Department asking people to consider cancelling their appointment and giving it to someone 75 and older. Please reassure your teachers that they are eligible and if they have chosen to sign up please encourage them to keep their appointments. The Governor and state health officials deemed educators as people who should be vaccinated next. We want to honor those orders and protect our teachers so please do not encourage them to cancel,” Wallace wrote in an email forwarded to many teachers. “There is a steady stream of vaccine supply entering the county weekly, so those in 1B will continue to have access in coming weeks. We do not recommend cancelling scheduled appointments as there are vaccinations allocated for all the scheduled clinics. …” It’s unknown if any teachers actually did give up their spots for others, but the union representing them, Worcester County Teachers Association, also advised teachers to take advantage of the opportunity to receive the vaccinations. At one time, teachers were not included in phase 1B and it was thought it would be spring before it was their turn. “… As employees and students return to school, it is absolutely imperative that everyone diligently adheres to all safety protocols,” the letter from WCTA Executive Board Everette Evansky read. “Additionally, we encourage WCPS employees to take advantage of the vaccines offered through Worcester County Health Department. We remind everyone in school and the community to wear masks, maintain distance, wash your hands often, stay home when sick and see a doctor when experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19.” It’s becoming increasingly difficult to stay positive and patient about the vaccination situation. There is simply not enough supply currently to meet even a small percentage of the demand. Clinics open and within minutes are full. For instance, after a random check of the website, I was able to sign my mom up for the phase 1C vaccination in Snow Hill Thursday morning. Within three minutes, as I tried to sign up my father-in-law, all slots were filled, and a waiting list was created. These predicaments have routinely heard for many across the country. A nice new positive is the fact the health department is now encouraging people to sign up for the wait list because it means something now. In the past, the wait list was only for the specific clinic if there was a cancellation. A message on the health department’s Facebook page yesterday explained, “Once you are on our waiting list please keep an eye on your email, our staff will be reaching out as spots become available.” This provides some hope for those who fall within the included phases but have been able to secure a spot. Most seniors are not tech savvy enough to check a website multiple times every day and sign up for the clinics as soon as they are posted. It’s especially frustrating because they see a clinic open initially but the signup process takes them too long, and they lose the opportunity. It’s the third week of January and this was when the consequences of holiday get-togethers and travel were expected to bring a surge in coronavirus cases. There is good news and bad news on the front. According to the numbers, the good news is a post-holiday surge never directly materialized, but the flip side is the key metrics remain higher today than they have been since the spring. For example, for Worcester County, the daily positivity percentage was 11.78% for Wednesday, Jan. 20. The metric has been hovering around between 11% and 12% for the last week after reaching a high of 16.2% on Jan. 3. According to the state’s dashboard, excluding this month, the daily positivity percentage was last above the 11% mark on May 26. Worcester’s positivity percentage as well as the seven-day moving average case rate per 100,000 each remain well above the state average. As far as regional comparison, Worcester’s metrics are also higher than Wicomico and Somerset counties.


THE DISPATCH’S PETS OF THE MONTH

Page 32

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Pet’s Name: Rico Pet’s Age/Breed: 4-year-old French bulldog Pet’s Owner: Daniella Celia

Pet’s Name: Auggie Pet’s Age/Breed: 8-year-old maltese mix Pet’s Owner: Donna Frederick

January 22, 2021

Pet’s Name: Reba Pet’s Age/Breed: 7-month-old yellow lab Pet’s Owners: Maryann & Marty Kelly

Pet’s Name: Princess Peach Pet’s Age/Breed: 1-year-old pug Pet’s Owner: Leah Dotter

EDITOR

STEVE GREEN The Dispatch presents the latest edition of its Pets of the Month Contest. Each month one special animal, or two, in some cases, is picked as the cutest photo of the bunch through a private vote of our staff. Here we present this month’s pets, submitted by our readers. On the front page is last month’s winning entry, Emery, owned by David Giusti and Natalie Martelli. Those interested in participating in future months’ contests are invited to send their lovable pet photo to us at editor@mdcoastdispatch.com (preferred) or to P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 or drop it off at our office in Berlin at 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Please be sure it’s a high-quality photo suitable for reproduction and to include your mailing address, the pet’s name, age and breed and the owner’s first and last name. The next series will appear in this space on Feb. 19.

ADOPT A PET FROM THE SHELTER Pet’s Name: Marlin & Mahi Pet’s Age/Breed: 8-week-old kittens Pet’s Owner: Regan Bunting

Pet’s Name: Jack Pet’s Age/Breed: 14-year-old golden retriever Pet’s Owner: Sarah Cooley

These Loving Animals, Sponsored Each Month By Local Businesses, Are Available For Adoption At The Ocean City Humane Society: 410-213-0146. To Sponsor A Pet, Call 410-641-4561 • Annually, 10% Of The Proceeds From This Page Are Donated To The Shelter The Humane Society Desperately Needs Volunteers To Help Care For The Cats And Dogs. Any Amount Of Time You Can Spare Will Be Appreciated.

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Bank Of Ocean City Ocean Pines 410-208-9380

Taylor Bank Main Street, Berlin, Md. 410-641-1700

Casual Designs Rte. 54, Fenwick 302-436-8224 Rte. 50, Berlin 410-629-1717

Shore Results Realty Kim McGuigan, Broker, OC 443-992-4990

RUDY

ADELE

WAXIMUS

EDGE

SOFIA

Hooters of Ocean City Ocean City www.hootersofoc.com

The Shark Restaurant 12429 Sunset Ave., WOC 410-213-0294

The Dough Roller Five Locations In Ocean City

Maryland Title Service 11500 Coastal Hwy., Suite 7, OC 410-723-2000

Elliott’s Hardware Rte. 611, West Ocean City 410-213-1088


The Dispatch Classifieds

January 22, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

$15/Week For Minimum Of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available)

HELP WANTED CLEANER: Individual wanted to clean 2BR/2BA OC condo on Saturdays March-Dec. Interested individuals please contact Delana at 717-309-2388. References req’d. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– MAINTENANCE: F/T, Y/R, 32-40 hours/week. Dependable. Handyman with good skills. Must have transportation/tools. Send resume to fred@paradiseoc.com –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

We have an opening for an Automotive Maryland State Inspector at our Ocean Pines Goodyear. EXCELLENT PAY & BENEFITS! Please Call 302-344-9846 Upcoming Yard Sale? The Dispatch is the BEST way to get the word out! Print & Online

BOOKKEEPING ASSISTANT Busy bookkeeping office is now hiring for an assistant to help with miscellaneous clerical work and vehicle registration/DMV work. We are a large automotive business with parts stores, service centers & used car dealership. Quickbooks experience a plus, Excel is a must. This is not a remote position. Location is in the Ocean View / Bethany Beach area. Call 302-228-2353

PUT YOUR LOGO IN COLOR FOR JUST $10

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811

Deadline For Insertions, Cancellations And Payment Is 3 p.m. Tuesday. Pre-Payment Is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard.

MARYLAND STATE INSPECTOR

Page 33

AUTOMOTIVE - GREAT OPPORTUNITIES! Large automotive center with auto parts/marine stores, service centers and used car dealership, is now hiring for: - PARTS ASSOCIATES We offer EXCELLENT PAY & BENEFITS!

Call 302-539-8686 ext. 3014

Currently hiring manpower for

•STUCCO & EIFS MECHANICS •CARPENTERS •CONCRETE BLOCK •COATINGS SPECIALISTS •FLAT CONCRETE •CONCRETE REPAIRS •PT WELDER •COMMERCIAL CAULKING •WINDOW & DOOR INSTALLERS •WAREHOUSE HELP (DRIVER’S LICENSE REQ’D) Experience Preferred. Tools, transportation & a valid driver’s license are a plus. Competitive benefit package available. Please apply in person at 11935 Hammer Rd, Bishopville, MD, or apply online: http://allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES NOW HIRING PLUMBERS, CARPENTERS, AND HELPERS. We offer paid training, vacation, and personal days, as well as a quality benefits package including health, dental, vision, and life insurance. Wage is BOE from $12-$30/hour. Based in the Berlin/OC area. What we require: -Min. 4 Years Experience -Valid Drivers License -Reliable Form of Contact -Background Check -Ability to Pass a Drug Test -Positive Attitude -Willingness to Learn If you feel that you can fill one of these positions, please call us to set up an interview. We can be reach at 410-251-1096.

POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES

RENTALS

ROOMMATES

WINTER RENTAL: 26th St., Bayside, 2BR, 1BA condo. Clean and Cozy. Furnished. Non smoking. $700 per mo + elect. & sec. dep. Water incl. Call 443-373-5638. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

SEEKING ROOMMATE: Downtown OC, 1st. St. Private BR, Shared BA & Kitchen. Family atmosphere. Refs req’d. $150/week + $150 sec. dep. includes utils. Lv. msg. 443-754-5667. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

WEEKLY RENTALS Poolfront Room $215. Efficiency Room $245. 2 BR Apartment $350. 3 BR Suite $400.

Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave.

410-289-8581

HOUSING NEEDED GOLDEN SANDS CONDO: Individual looking to rent a condo in Golden Sands building for long term basis. If you have one available, please call 410-812-5273 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

COMMERCIAL FOR LEASE: Retail Banking Center with drive thru. Contact Brian Gamm. 443-880-2225. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 1 OfficeRetail and 1 Warehouses. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– UPSCALE MIDTOWN OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT: 2,130 sq.ft. No CAM fees. 443-880-2225.

SERVICES Ceja’s Landscaping & More!

•YARD MAINTENANCE •PAINTING •POWER WASHING 410-251-3425 410-202-2545

The Dispatch

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Legal Notices

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

THIRD INSERTION WILLIAM E. ESHAM III ESQ AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, PA 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 200 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18536 To all persons interested in the estate of ROBERT F BELTER, ESTATE NO. 18536. Notice is given that DEBORAH RITZ, 11 HENRYS MILL DRIVE, BERLIN, MD 21811 was on, DECEMBER 28, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ROBERT F BELTER, who died on AUGUST 17, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or be-

fore the 28th day of JUNE, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 08, 2021


The Dispatch

Page 34

LEGAL RATES

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Legal Notices

Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. DEBORAH RITZ Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-08, 01-15, 01-22

THIRD INSERTION

B. RANDALL COATES ESQ COATES, COATES, & COATES 204 WEST GREEN STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18537 To all persons interested in the estate of MARY LUCILLE HUDSON BROWN, ESTATE NO. 18537. Notice is given that KENNETH W BROWN, 207 IRONSHIRE STREET, SNOW HILL, MD 21863 was on, DECEMBER 29, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARY LUCILLE HUDSON BROWN, who died on DECEMBER 21, 2020, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 29th day of JUNE, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

tor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 08, 2021 KENNETH W BROWN Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-08, 01-15, 01-22

THIRD INSERTION

MARIANNA BATIE ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18540 To all persons interested in the estate of ANITA LOUISE COOLIDGE, ESTATE NO. 18540. Notice is given that SHEILA RAE COLMAN, 26294 CREEKWOOD CIRCLE, LONG NECK, DE 19966 was on, DECEMBER 30, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ANITA LOUISE COOLIDGE, who died on NOVEMBER 26, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 30th day of JUNE, 2021.

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the credi-

Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the follow-

ing dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 08, 2021 SHEILA RAE COLMAN Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-08, 01-15, 01-22

THIRD INSERTION

JAMES H. PORTER JR, ESQ 111 VINE STREET POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18541 To all persons interested in the estate of HARRY CARROLL WILLIAMS, ESTATE NO. 18541. Notice is given that AUDREY G. WILLIAMS, 2240 BY-PASS ROAD, POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 was on, JANUARY 04, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of HARRY CARROLL WILLIAMS, who died on SEPTEMBER 06, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any ob-

January 22, 2021

jection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 4th day of JULY, 2021.

21842.

Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates:

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.

(2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred.

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 08, 2021 AUDREY G. WILLIAMS Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-08, 01-15, 01-22

SECOND INSERTION

AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, PA WILLIAM E. ESHAM III ESQ 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 200 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 18542 Notice is given that the CIRCUIT COURT of ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA, appointed HELEN M BURNS AKA HELEN G BURNS, 517 OAK HARBOUR COURT, JUNO BEACH, FL 33408, and STEVEN A WYNKOOP, 5620 8TH ROAD NORTH, ARLINGTON, VA 22205 and WILLIAM A WYNKOOP, 7107 VELLEX LAND, ANNANDALE, VA 22003, as the EXECUTORS of the Estate of CHRIS T SARRIS, who died on OCTOBER 1, 2020, domiciled in VIRGINIA, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is WILLIAM E ESHAM III, whose address is 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 200, OCEAN CITY, MD

At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER.

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 HELEN M BURNS Foreign Personal Representative STEVEN A WYNKOOP Foreign Personal Representative WILLIAM A WYNKOOP Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

SECOND INSERTION

VICTOR H LAWS ESQ LAWS, INSLEY & BENSON, P.A. 209 E. MAIN STREET P.O. BOX 75 SALISBURY, MD 21803-0075 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18457 To all persons interested in the estate of ELAINE WAUGH, ESTATE NO. 18457. Notice is given that MARILYN HUGHES, 3425 JENNINGS CHAPEL ROAD, WOODBINE, MD 21797 and RONALD C. WAUGH, 5 HARLAN TRACE, BERLIN, MD 21811 was on, JANUARY 05, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ELAINE WAUGH, who died on AUGUST 23, 2020, with a will. Further information can be

obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 5th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 MARILYN HUGHES Personal Representative RONALD C. WAUGH Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

SECOND INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000232 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. ALEXIS FITZPATRICK, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit


The Dispatch

January 22, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Legal Notices

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 14th day of January, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of February 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of February, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare

Price

Wk 20, #Be31 Wk 23, #Bu47 Wk 49, #Cb54 Wk 34, #Bv48 Wk 30, #Ak11 Wk 03, #Bz52 Wk 48, #As19 Wk 01, #Cb54 Wk 18, #Bu47 Wk 44, #Bj36 Wk 41, #Be31 Wk 24, #Bv48 Wk 23, #Aa1 Wk 31, #As19 Wk 26, #Aq17 Wk 30, #Bo41 Wk 22, #Aq17 Wk 13, #Bz52 Wk 45, #Be31 Wk 18, #Cb54

$1000.00 $1100.00 $50.00 $1100.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $1100.00 $1000.00 $1100.00 $1000.00 $1100.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

SECOND INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000252 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs.

RALPH CRIPPS, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 12th day of January, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of February 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of February, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare

Price

Wk 13, #Ak11 Wk 20, #Ak11 Wk 40, #Ak11 Wk 41, #Ak11 Wk 44, #Ak11 Wk 11, #Aq17 Wk 36, #Aq17 Wk 50, #Aq17 Wk 13, #Ar18 Wk 41, #Ar18 Wk 47, #Ar18 Wk 50, #Ar18 Wk 06, #As19 Wk 09, #As19 Wk 11, #As19 Wk 12, #As19 Wk 42, #As19 Wk 46, #As19 Wk 47, #As19 Wk 08, #Ba27 Wk 09, #Ba27 Wk 41, #Ba27 Wk 10, #Bi35 Wk 17, #Bi35

$50.00 $1000.00 $1000.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

SECOND INSERTION

VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. ANTHONY FRISBY, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 14th day of January, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of February 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of February, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare

Price

Wk 04, #Bf32 Wk 08, #Aj10 Wk 43, #Bc29 Wk 22, #Aj10 Wk 32, #Am13 Wk 04, #Bc29 Wk 08, #Bc29 Wk 16, #Bf32 Wk 13, #Ad4 Wk 44, #Bc29 Wk 49, #Bq43 Wk 47, #Bq43 Wk 07, #Bq43 Wk 07, #Bf32 Wk 03, #Bq43 Wk 01, #Bf32 Wk 24, #Bg33 Wk 12, #Bb28 Wk 16, #Ag7 Wk 51, #Am13 Wk 21, #Bg33 Wk 47, #Am13 Wk 48, #Am13

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $1100.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

SECOND INSERTION

RAYMOND D. COATES JR, ESQ COATES, COATES, & COATES, P.A. 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 300 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18554

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000239

To all persons interested in the estate of THERESE NICETAS SMITH VEZZA, ESTATE NO. 18554. Notice is given that CATHERINE

MARY VEZZA, 130 N 8TH STREET, COLUMBIA, PA 17512 was on, JANUARY 11, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of THERESE NICETAS SMITH VEZZA, who died on DECEMBER 3, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 11th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 CATHERINE MARY VEZZA Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

SECOND INSERTION

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18547 To all persons interested in the estate of BRENDA REVELS, ESTATE NO. 18547. Notice is given that CEAIRA M. REVELS, 706 NINTH STREET, POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 was on, JANUARY 08, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of BRENDA REVELS, who died on JANUARY 11, 2020, without a will.

Page 35 Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 8th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 CEAIRA M. REVELS Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

SECOND INSERTION

B. RANDALL COATES ESQ COATES, COATES, & COATES 204 WEST GREEN STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18546 To all persons interested in the estate of BETTY LOU PUSEY HITCH, ESTATE NO. 18546. Notice is given that MICHAEL C. HITCH SR., 3603 SAND ROAD, SNOW HILL, MD 21863 was on, JANUARY 07, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of BETTY LOU PUSEY HITCH, who died on OCTOBER 31, 2020, with a will. Further information can be

obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 7th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 MICHAEL C. HITCH SR. Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

FIRST INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000250 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. STANLEY KROL, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 13th day of January, 2021, that the fore-


The Dispatch

Page 36

LEGAL RATES

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Legal Notices

Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. closure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of February 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of February, 2021.

(or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 11th day of JULY, 2021.

21842 was on, JANUARY 11, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JAMES A. BUTLER SR, who died on SEPTEMBER 24, 2018 with a will.

Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Price Timeshare

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

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$50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $1000.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 22, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 01-22, 01-29, 02-05

FIRST INSERTION

MARIANNA BATIE ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18432 To all persons interested in the estate of JAMES ALLEN BUTLER JR, ESTATE NO. 18432. Notice is given that WILLIAM C HUDSON, 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HWY STE 111, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 was on, JANUARY 11, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JAMES ALLEN BUTLER JR, who died on AUGUST 10, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 22, 2021 WILLIAM C HUDSON Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-22, 01-29, 02-05

FIRST INSERTION

MARIANNA BATIE ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18438 To all persons interested in the estate of JAMES A. BUTLER SR, ESTATE NO. 18438. Notice is given that WILLIAM C HUDSON, 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HWY STE 111, OCEAN CITY, MD

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 11th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 22, 2021 WILLIAM C HUDSON Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-22, 01-29, 02-05

FIRST INSERTION

MARIANNA BATIE ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112

January 22, 2021

OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

BALTIMORE, MD 21236

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18556

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18538

To all persons interested in the estate of MARGARET HILLMAN BUTLER AKA MARGARET WILSON BUTLER, ESTATE NO. 18556. Notice is given that WILLIAM C HUDSON, 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HWY STE 111, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 was on, JANUARY 11, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARGARET HILLMAN BUTLER, who died on NOVEMBER 16, 2020, with a will.

To all persons interested in the estate of MELISSA ANNE WILLIAMS AKA MELISSA A WILLIAMS, ESTATE NO. 18538. Notice is given that DARYL BRUCE DIETLE, 3800 MILLER ROAD, KINGSVILLE, MD 21087 was on, JANUARY 12, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MELISSA ANNE WILLIAMS, who died on DECEMBER 1, 2020, with a will.

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 11th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 22, 2021

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 12th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 22, 2021

WILLIAM C HUDSON Personal Representative

DARYL BRUCE DIETLE Personal Representative

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-22, 01-29, 02-05

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-22, 01-29, 02-05

FIRST INSERTION

DOUGLAS C. LAUENSTEIN ESQ. 8900 BELAIR ROAD

FIRST INSERTION

JAMES A. LIST, ESQ. THE LAW OFFICES OF JAMES A. LIST

5700 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 100 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18559 To all persons interested in the estate of KERRY JOSEPH KULHA, ESTATE NO. 18559. Notice is given that JOSEPH ANTHONY KULHA, 6862 TWELVE OAKS DRIVE, HEBRON, MD 21830 and JENNIFER LYNN LARKIN, 9 GRAND PORT ROAD, BERLIN, MD 21811 was on, JANUARY 13, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of KERRY JOSEPH KULHA, who died on DECEMBER 31, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 13th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 22, 2021 JOSEPH ANTHONY KULHA Personal Representative JENNIFER LYNN LARKIN Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-22, 01-29, 02-05


Ocean City Sent 37 Officers To Serve On Inauguration Day

January 22, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – When Joe Biden was officially sworn in as the 46th president of the United States at midday on Wednesday, a large contingent of Ocean City Police Department officers was on hand to help provide security. The Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) sent a contingent of 37 police officers, led by Lieutenants Dennis Eade and Scott Harner, to the 59th inauguration this week to serve as a supplemental uniformed presence. The OCPD officers were stationed along Pennsylvania Avenue, ironically near the Trump International Hotel. This week’s trip continued a longstanding tradition for the OCPD and other law enforcement agencies across the Lower Shore of sending officers to assist with security at presidential inaugurations. An OCPD contingent was also on hand for President Donald Trump’s inauguration in January 2017. Worcester County Sheriff Matt Crisafulli also confirmed this week his department sent a contingent to Washington, D.C. this week for the inauguration, although the size of the contingent and how they were deployed was not made public. While the OCPD and other local law enforcement agencies have been sending delegations to presidential inaugurations for decades to assist with security, this year was a little different. In the ramp-up to Wednesday’s inauguration, National Guard troops poured into Washington and encamped in the Capitol. Barriers were erected, and security was heightened throughout the city in anticipation of protests, which, for the most part, never came. In a unique twist for the OCPD, the local contingent connected with law enforcement officers from Sacramento, Calif. Local residents and long-time visitors are surely familiar with an overhead road sign at the foot of the Route 50 bridge that marks the mileage to Sacramento, which is at the opposite end of Route 50, at 3,073 miles. A similar sign exists at the opposite end of Route 50 in Sacramento marking 3,073 miles to Ocean City, Maryland. Officers from both departments posed for a picture with their respective patches with the Capitol dome in the background. OCPD Deputy Communications Director Ashley Miller said after the inauguration sending the town’s police officers to the event continued a

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long-standing tradition for the department. “It is an honor and tradition to send personnel to each inauguration,” she said. “Our officers are able to connect to fell law enforcement personnel from across the country during the week. A perfect example of that was getting to meet a fellow law enforcement officer from Sacramento, California. We were able to get a photo of the two officers standing together to show the two ends of U.S. Route 50 coming together to stand side by side during this historical event.”

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An Ocean City police officer and Sacramento, Calif. officer pose for a picture of their patches on inauguration day. Ocean City is located at the easternmost point on Route 50 while Sacramento is situated at the western limit. Submitted Photo


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Puzzle Answers

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The Adventures Of Fatherhood By STEVE GREEN

eckett had mid-term exams this week to wrap up the semester. Therefore, I’m exhausted. I have not studied so much since college. Since it has become painfully evident our guy doesn’t really grasp the concept of studying yet, I set out on a mission last week to invest some time with him, teaching him how to prepare for these major tests on his own. Beckett has the mindset of wanting to do well in school. He’s a competitive type and wants to get good grades. As he is getting older and school is becoming more comprehensive, he is learning an important lesson. He will not succeed at his school without hard work. School has typically come easy to him. He has never had to truly work hard at his studies. The exception being for projects and papers. In the past, he has been able to listen in class and retain enough to get through with good grades on tests and quizzes. He’s now in seventh grade. There is simply too much material to retain for a mid-term exam over the course of four months to not put in time studying. Last year was his first year of midterms, which count for 10% of his semester grade. His grades were disappointing. He didn’t put in the work. We took his word when he said, “I got it,” and did not help him study. He didn’t have finals because of the pandemic. This year’s mid-terms I set out to focus on showing him how to study so he could be more independent moving forward. There were some stumbles right out of the gate last Saturday. Rather than utilize some of the tactics I was throwing his way to prepare for the test, such as rewriting and organizing his notes and study guides, he wanted me to immediately quiz him based on previous tests in the subjects. We decided to focus on science since it was his first ex-

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am and challenging because of the amount of content and terms about the atmosphere, weather and national disasters. Rather than argue, I said I would quiz him, hoping he would stumble through the questions. I estimate he got about 75% of the answers correct initially. It was a good starting point so show what he knew and where he needed work. It expedited the effort, and we followed that process for the other subjects. I gave him credit for the good idea. He never let me forget it during our 15 hours of studying over several days. Helping him study for these tests was both enjoyable and exhausting. I was able to learn what study methods will work for him and what will not. Studying for him might have to incorporate standing on his skateboard, firing darts across the room, shooting hoops in his room, listening to music and interruptions every now and again with hopes Patrick Mahomes is going to be alright, questions about Trump’s hair and statements about how I should leave the Christmas light up all year to save time. Some other topics covered in between study questions involved changes associated with puberty, Joe Biden’s family background, whether we could go to the Super Bowl and if something happened to his mom and me years from now whether he would be responsible for taking care of his little brother as an adult. These were not exactly light topics to disregard. Instead of ignoring his queries, I told him let’s talk about it after we study instead of you going outside skateboarding. I’m still waiting for those chats. What I have gleaned from these hours of working with him on his tests is he can stay focused despite all these other aspects going on around him. He’s different than me in that way. It was a test for me to stay on task be-

cause I typically work in silence to keep focused. It’s almost as if peace and calm don’t work for him. He needs multiple things going on and his mind wandering to maintain concentration. It could be a sign of the times with his generation. I also learned he has an incredible ability to retain information when he must. It’s simply a matter of desire with him. It’s an incredible gift to be able to memorize the way he can. It should serve him well in the future. When he left school the morning of his history exam, he could tell me anything and everything he knew about the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments and the years they were enacted. He also could list the various compromises over slavery and the importance of each. On the day of his science exam, he knew the Scientific Method inside and out, the three ways heat is transferred and examples of each, the four different types of weather fronts and the components of the water cycle. On English exam day, he was well versed on every synonym and antonym for his 70 vocabulary words and knew the differences well between all the jurors in “12 Angry Men.” He also knew how to identify a participle in sentences and fix common grammar mistakes. When it came to math and his prealgebra exam, he showed me how to write a linear equation in slope-intercept form as opposed to an equation in point-slope form. I admit to being quite lost as to how to help him on the pre-algebra, but I was able to let him know when his handwriting was not neat enough for the teacher to read. When he came home each day, he felt good about the exams. Here’s to hoping his (our) hard work paid off. (The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

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January 22, 2021

Horoscopes

ARIES (March 21 to April 19): Guess what, Lamb? You're about to experience a new perspective on a situation you long regarded quite differently. What you learn could open more opportunities later. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): The Bold Bovine is tempted to charge into a new venture. But it might be best to take things one step at a time so that you know just where you are at any given point. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): It's a good time to go on that fun getaway you've been planning. You'll return refreshed, ready and, yes, even eager to tackle the new challenge that awaits you. CANCER (June 21 to July 22): The Moon Child loves to fantasize about magical happenings in the early part of the week. But the sensible Crab gets down to serious business by week's end. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): What goes around comes around for those lucky Leos and Leonas whose acts of generosity could be repaid with opportunities to expand into new and exciting areas of interest. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): Your concern about your job responsibilities is commendable. But you need to take some quiet time to share with someone who has really missed being with you. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): As-

OCEAN CITY vanishing

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pects favor getting out and meeting new people. And as a bonus, you could find that some of your newly made friends could offer important business contacts. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): You might take pride in wanting to do everything yourself. But now's a good time to ask family members to help with a demanding personal situation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): Pay more attention to the possibilities in that workplace change. It could show the way to make that long-sought turn on your career path. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): Your need to succeed might overwhelm obligations to your loved ones. Ease up on that workload and into some well-deserved time with family and friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): Love rules for amorous Aquarians who can make good use of their ability to communicate feelings. Don't be surprised if they're reciprocated in kind. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): Fishing for compliments? No doubt, you probably earned them. But it's best to let others believe they were the ones who uncovered the treasure you really are. BORN THIS WEEK: Your good works flow from an open, generous heart. Nothing makes you happier than to see others happy as well. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

Things I Like ...

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WITH BUNK MANN

Built by Ethel and Harry Kelley (parents of future Mayor Harry W. Kelley Jr.) and Minnie and John Lynch on the corner of 11th Street and the Boardwalk in 1927, the Royalton was once one of Ocean City’s premier hotels. The Lynch family would soon sell their interest to the Kelleys and open their iconic Commander Hotel in 1930. Mrs. Kelley’s famous sticky buns made the Royalton’s dining room a favorite spot for both locals and tourists and 11th Street was one of the most popular beach locations. In 1949, a third building – a 21-room addition – would be added to the northern side. This building still exists and today houses the Bad Ass Café and the Brass Balls Saloon. In 2011 the aging Royalton began a major renovation but was later discovered to have an unsafe foundation. It was demolished in 2017 and today the Monte Carlo Boardwalk Hotel occupies the former site. To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishinPhoto courtesy Connie Kelley Collins from 1949 era goc.com.

The Dispatch Crossword Puzzle

By Steve Green

Being able to do outside yard work in January That my wife is an overachiever When a backup quarterback comes in and does well Feeling organized (even if it’s a stretch) Reading an article about a subject I know nothing about Bread that does not overwhelm a sandwich My son’s light eyes Catching up with a friend Kids giggling in the distance Watching a project’s progress Sending an unwanted call to voicemail ANSWERS ON PAGE 38


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January 22, 2021

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