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   




Urban Design and Environmental Design are both my inspirations and developing fortes. As a professional, I have envisioned and aimed for the planning and designing of eco-cities, towns, neighborhoods. Regardless of scale, existing infrastructure and modes of transportation, and socioeconomic makeup, I believe every community has the right, potential, and ability to become more sustainable, environmentally-friendly, and healthy by adopting innovative environmental policies and designs.

My Design Principles

VERSATILE

ENVIRONMENTAL

LONG-LASTING

My imagination, creativity, and architectural understanding abound -I see trickles of Nature in every acre of The Transect.


EDUCATION

Rutgers University Masters of City and Regional Planning Urban Design & Environmental Planning

Cornell University Bachelors of Science Industrial and Labor Relations

PUBLICATIONS

Ildefons Cerda: The True Founder of Comprehensive Planning Bloustein Journal of Planning and Public Policy Vol.1 - May 1, 2015

PORTFOLIOS

Architecural/Urban Design https://issuu.com/mdapodaca Art https://apodacarte.carbonmade.com/

LANGUAGES

Fluent in English and Spanish Moderate in Italian Conversational in French

SKILLS

RHINO

PHOTOSHOP

INDESIGN

AUTOCAD

MAXWELL STUDIO

SKETCHUP

G.I.S.

ILLUSTRATOR


Contents Revitalization

1

Multi-Modal

9

New Earth

17

Flood Resiliency

31

Building Nature

49


Revitalization

The Borough of Sayreville, New Jersey


Project Details

Key Design Elements

Mission: Revitalize an area of Sayreville, New Jersey that was dominantly composed of peripheral single-family residential use and large patches of vacant land. Aim: Incorporate new forms of land use and refresh landscaping to increase access, activity, and appeal. MIXED USE

GREEN SPACE

DENSITY

Main Forms of Existing Vacant Land Extensive road system around the site, indicating existing accessibility, infrastructure, utilities, and (zoning-wise) noise

Recreational Spaces Trees

Primary Street Zone

Secondary Street Zone N

THE SITE - Existing Conditions

Patches of Grass N

2


Design Development - Mixed Use

NEW SITE PLAN

The area surrounding the site was characterized mainly by single-family residential use, while the area within the site contained sparse single-family residential plots paired with a dominant amount of vacant land forms. To achieve revitalization (the basis of my design strategy), I found incorporating different types of land use to be a crucial first step toward increasing the area's activity and vibrance.

SINGLE FAMILY 3

MULTI-FAMILY

N

MIXED USE


LAND USE DISTRIBUTION

SAMPLE BLOCKS

N

N

SINGLE FAMILY Residential

MULTI-FAMILY Residential

MIXED USE Residential/Commercial

N

4


Design Development - Green Space Developing a more spread out, extensive green space network was the second step toward achieving revitalization in this Sayreville site. In terms of existing features, the site contained a large patch of bare grass, a trail of trees, and a few baseball fields - all these land features lacked use and essentially became vacant land. With the new site plan added to the context of these existing land features, priority was given to adding green space at both the block scale and street scale.

EXISTING LAND FEATURES WITH NEW SITE PLAN

Varying Tree Types

[Shared Spaces and Street Scape]

N

5

Grass and Shrubs

[Shared Spaces and Street Scape]

N

SAMPLE OF GREEN SPACE DESIGN


Density With public value added through extensive green space and mixed use, density naturally became another relevant factor. The new plan and design strategy aimed to increase the overall density of the area i.e. from the existing single family residential plots to multi-family residential and mixed use structures. The area would grow a larger local population that would be supported by more amenities and services and housing diversity - all, simultaneously, paired with the convenience of walkability and easy access.

DENSITY FORMULA

NEW SITE PLAN - DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

Key Variables

DENSITY CAPACITY BY LAND USE TYPE

A) Population

B) Residential Units N

Low Density Medium Density High Density

Single Family

Multi-Family

6


Complete Design - Illustrative Plan

7

N


Complete Design - Rendering

8


Multi-Modal

Camden, New Jersey


Mission: Use a preset site plan design to build a 3D model of existing and new infrastructure, structures, and street features.

Market St

ng Blvd

Dr Martin Luther Ki

Royden St

676

This Camden project was geared toward visualizing a unique set of designs oriented around two dominant land uses in the area: 1) the Rutgers University college campus and 2) a developing transit center. Additionally, this area was starting a multi-modal initiative that needed to be incorporated in the designs.

THE SITE - Existing Feature Analysis

N 3rd St

Project Details

N

Major Body of Water

Residential Zone

Extensive Road Network

Recreational Space

Aim: Achieve a structurally accurate and realistic visualization of the Camden area, showing a viable multi-modal college town.

Heavy Development

Light Development

N

10


Visualization: Design Standards In order to begin the 3D modeling and renderings of this site, a preset plan was provided as the foundation and to keep the design aim focused on visualization. Taking existing features, the dominant land uses of a college campus and transit center, and the desired increase in multi-modal incorporation and capacity, I developed a visualization plan oriented around the design of a multimodal college town.

N

THE PRESET SITE PLAN 11


KEY MULTI-MODAL COMPONENTS The multi-modal design was based on the core elements of Complete Streets: pedestrian, automobile, public transportation, and bicycle mobility.

BICYCLE

AUTOMOBILE

PUBLIC TRANSIT

PEDESTRIAN

Multi-Modal Distribution The center of the plan (shown on the right) indicates how the different modes of transportation would be incorporated into the site and where the circulation of each mode would be concentrated the most.

N

12


Visualization: Building the Model Massings of all existing and new (from the preset site plan) streets, blocks, and structures were created to build the physicality of the site and from which to render realistic visuals.

To provide an idea of the scale and detail that went into the 3D model of this Camden site, here are two specific zones that encompass the most pedestrian, bike, auto, and public transit activity. ZONE A ZONE B

ZONE A

13

N

ZONE B


Photorealistic Rendering Sample of Materials and Architectural Style

Illustrative Map of the Site

View of Campus/Transit Center Core: Building Height and Material Development

N

14


New Earth

The Township of Little Ferry, New Jersey


Project Details

THE SITE - Existing Feature Analysis

S River

ve

al A

ri ust Ind ck

sa

en

ck

Ha ve

Ri r

gen ke

npi

Tur

Aim: Create a sustainable, pedestrian-oriented, environmentally-harmonious New Earth (elevated) district of Little Ferry.

Indian Lake

Ber

Mission: Use a new zoning ordinance as a guide to design a flood resistant plan.

St

After being devastated by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and dealing with the fact that 94% of its land mass is within a flood hazard zone, Little Ferry, New Jersey was seeking an innovative form of disaster mitigation planning. By way of phasing, one particular, central area was assigned for a design treatment that could be more widely applied to all of Little Ferry over time.

Sylv

an A

ve

N

Major Body of Water

Residential Use

Green Space

Commercial Use

18


Developing the Plan: Zoning Ordinance Guidelines Little Ferry's new zoning ordinance set high priority around flood resilience particularly in relation to the Hackensack River, its major source of water overload during storms. With flooding in mind, the zoning ordinance set an innovative solution: New Earth development. A New Earth site is, in essence, a new track of land elevated above an existing flood plain. Due to Little Ferry's historical relationship to and value of the Hackensack River, the community wished to apply the New Earth approach in a more harmonious rather than antagonistic way i.e. allowing the Hackensack River to continue flowing naturally while not destroying or endangering Little Ferry.

Sketch Demonstrating Layers and Elevation Inherent to New Earth Design

Land Area Details 59 Acres

9 Parcels

Existing 1 Ground Level 19

50 Buildings 2 Elevation

3 New Ground Level and Structures

N


The images below show both the conceptual and structural layouts of the plans for Little Ferry's New Earth development.

My Assigned Area

1

Neighborhood

Structure Type 1: Tower

Structure Type 2: L-Shaped

2

Structure Type 3: Slab

3 Green Space N

CONCEPTUAL PLAN This plan demonstrates an orientation around green corridors designed purely for pedestrian access and potentially public transportation, such as light rail. There are three distinct neighborhoods (one north, one south, and one central) with a major public plaza and park and smaller residential green spaces.

N

Both the conceptual and structural plans were divided among three designers: myself and two colleagues. My specific contribution is indicated by the highlighted areas in both plans. I was in charge of designing the central neighborhood in the New Earth district, while maintaining cohesion with the other neighborhoods and a district-wide character and architecture.

STRUCTURAL PLAN This plan lays out the structural composition of the design. Varied structures were combined: attached and detached towers, slabs, and L-shaped buildings. The distances and relation of structures were set specifically to achieve the 0.25 mile walk (10 minutes) and to create enclosed and open spaces. Most structures were designed for mixed use. 20


Detailing the District: The Groves of Spire Village MASTER VISION The long-run vision of this design and New Earth plan for Little Ferry was both locally-and regionally-founded. The design was shaped to allow for the development of a modern garden city with the ultimate evolution into an eco city - sustainability, harmonious residential and commercial activity, plentiful distribution of resources, services, and assets, a strong on-site employment base, modern funtion, and a vast network of green ways rare in current cities. The name for this proposed New Earth district in Little Ferry is The Groves of Spire Village due the available natural vibrancy of its green spaces paired with the efficiencies and benefits of an urban area. 21

KEY DESIGN COMPONENTS

FLOOD MITIGATION

GREEN SPACE

MIXED USE

PED PRIORITY


THE GROVES OF SPIRE VILLAGE

Signature Buildings

PLAN SUMMARY 17 Blocks 60 Buildings 17 Courtyards 3 Large Green Spaces (a.k.a The Groves) Building Area Range: 40,718 - 122,211 square feet

The plan above shows the layout of the buildings, blocks, and street network for the New Earth district.

Elevation: Two Floors of Parking

River Front Old Ground Level 22


Street Charactersitics The Groves of Spire Village contains a very specific street hierarchy, composed of three different types of green ways deplete of auto use. The Strada is the main street, 62 feet in width and broken down in two varations. The Recreational Strada is houses recreational elements (such as parks), large pedestrian paths, lighting, and sections marked with iron archways. The Urban Strada has multiple pedestrian paths, rows of trees, and direct access to residential and commercial activity. The secondary street type, the Strasse, is 62 feet wide with the largest bike route, wide walking space, and street lighting. Lastly, the Riga serves as an alleyway 62 feet wide with spacious sidewalks, a wide pedestrian path in the center, bike lanes, street lighting, and rows of trees. Strada (Primary Street; Major Green Way)

Strasse (Secondary Street)

Riga (Alley Way) N

23


STREET SECTION 1: RECREATIONAL STRADA

STREET SECTION 2: URBAN STRADA

STREET SECTION 3: RIGA 24


River Front Design Little Ferry's historical relationship with the Hackensack River spurred an additional and important component to the overall New Earth design. Although the New Earth elevation would create flood resilience, the design did not neglect the Hackensack River and instead highlighted its natural value to the community and potential for recreational activity. I took on the challenge of developing the river front as its sole designer. The river front design was oriented around three main components: retail use, natural spaces, and recreation. Along the central area of the design would be a stretch of liner buildings filled with light retail and restaurants. The remaining ends would be covered in live green walls. The Hackensack River would be anchored by three piers: one for site-seeing, one for a ferry station, and one for kayak rentals. Walking and bike paths would preserve the existing shoreline. 25

RETAIL USE

NATURE

3D MODEL VIEW

RECREATION


As illustrated and shown by the model (right) and rendering (below), the river front design adapts to the exsiting natural environment along the Hackensack River while cohesively adding structure, character, and infrastructure to the New Earth development. To note, the use of the liner buildings and live green walls served the other purpose of hiding the two levels of parking between the existing ground and the New Earth level.

ADDITIONAL 3D MODEL VIEW

The image to the left is a rendering of the river front design in combination with the New Earth development elevated approximately 30 feet above the existing ground or, in river terms, the Hackesack shoreline.

26


Signature Landmarks The Groves of Spire Village (the New Earth district for Little Ferry) could not be complete without including unique landmarks that would enable a sense of identity and a valuable architectural aesthetic in Little Ferry. The Spire and Green Fell were, therefore, designed as anchors and and assets for the pedestrian, infrastructure, and skyline spaces. The Spire is a classic clock Tower placed in the core of New Earth district. The Spire is the iconic endpoint to the central Strasse. Green Fell is a massive signature tower made of water-toned glass, cross-hatched live green strips, and topped with a crown of live green walls. Green Fell sits at the southernmost point of the district and would afford the best view of the whole area and Hackensack River. The Spire 27

Green Fell


Rendered View of The Spire

Rendered View of Green Fell

28


Final Model and Renderings The Groves of Spire Village and its New Earth foundation will essentially be the first phase of a long-term vision for the Borough of Little Ferry and the Hackensack River. The rendering to the right shows an aerial in perspective view of The Groves of Spire Village. The large amount of green space and the variation in building shape and scale can be immediately noted.

Illustrative Rendering of the Recreational Strasse

29

The Groves of Spire Village was designed to ensure the preservation of Little Ferry's historical, cultural, social, economic, and environmental makeup presently and the cultivation of versatility, innovation, and environmental sustainablility in the future.


Illustrative Rendering of the Whole Site

Illustrative Rendering of the Largest Green Plaza

City Scape View of The Groves of Spire Village 30


Water Resiliency

The City of Miami Beach, Florida


THE SITE

Project Details The City of Miami Beach, Florida, in partnership with AECOM, was developing a strategy to address a key vulnerability inherent to the state: flooding from sea level rise. Sea level rise is an environmental challenge that is becoming more and more prevalent, which means cities are finding a greater demand for both adaptive and mitigative methods. The City and AECOM tasked us (Rutgers) with identifying target areas and creating a series of water resilient solutions. Mission: Design a variety of solutions effective against sea level rise flooding and specific to the target areas of North Beach and Mid-Beach.

Street Network

Target Region Target Areas

Aim: Create innovative design typologies composed of both natural and engineered mechanisms and allow for both adaptive and mitigative implementation.

N

The 3D image to the left shows the target areas extruded to present building height. Block layout and density are also highlighted in this image.

32


Scale of Challenge - High Risk Analysis Due to time constraints and as part of a phasing process, designing for areas of highest sea level rise risk took priority - short-term precedence with long-term application and durability. One studio group carried out G.I.S. analysis at the geographical level, while a design group (which I led) honed in at finer scales, examining details regarding infrastructure, land use patterns/zoning, street and block layout, green space distribution, density and scale, and general development capacity. All of this site analysis identified specific areas within Miami Beach that would be the most devastated by sea level rise.

The visualization to the right displays graphically the levels of analysis used to inform the studio of Miami Beach's most vulnerable areas and, accordingly, the final design solutions and recommendations. 33


N

Geography and History

N

Density and Land Use

N

Infrastructure and Circulation 34


Street Sections - Crucial Existing Conditions Analysis of the streets via real-time, satelitte images, such as from Google Earth, and technical sections showing the dimensions of key components, such as sidewalks, car lanes, and planters, was crucial in the development of design solutions that could be feasibly built and used. The images below and on the next page demonstrate how streets were selected within the high risk areas, analyzed from real-time images, and then digitally drafted into sections. I was tasked specifically with drafting street sections for North Beach and Mid Beach - the visuals here, however, provide a sample of my street analysis for North Beach.

Sample Streets in High-Risk Areas (Google Earth Images)

Dickens Ave. - North Beach

37

N

75th St. - North Beach


I drafted the street sections below from key areas in North Beach where we identified high levels of sea level rise. These streets include: 79th St., Dickens Ave., and Indian Creek Dr.

38


Design Strategy

Flood Resiliency Green Infrastructure

Grey Infrastructure

Mitigative and Adaptive Solutions

Mangroves Permeable Planters Land Moats 39

Canals Green Roofs/Walls Embankments


Design Solutions and Typologies The designs I contributed to the overall effort to assist the City of Miami Beach and AECOM with sea level rise were oriented heavily around green infrastructure and the mangrove tree native to the state. Mangrove Piers, Land Moats, Mangrove Nursuries, Permeable Planters, Embankments, Canals, and Green Roof Systems were my design typologies and, thereby, design solutions.

Land Moats

Green Roofs and Walls

SEA LEVEL RISE SOLUTIONS

Mangrove Nurseries and Canals

Mangrove Piers 40


North Beach - Design Typologies I. MANGROVE PIERS; LAND MOATS; GREEN ROOFS AND WALLS North-South Application: Abbott Ave. - Tatum Waterway Dr. East-West Application: 79th St. - 75th St.

Source of Flooding

Mangrove Pier

Land Moat

Green Roof

N

Map of North Beach Design Typologies and Design Distribution 41


The image to the left shows a model of the Mangrove Piers and Land Moats.

This image shows an aerial axonometric section of the Mangrove Piers and their strategic distribution along Tatum Waterway.

GREEN ROOFS

LAND MOATS

The rendering above comprehensively shows the application of all the design typologies proposed for North Beach: Mangove Piers, Land Moats, Green Roofs, Green Walls, and Green Connectors bridging Green Roofs. The combination of these proposed green elements emphasize my design aim to use the high water absorbancy capacity of plants while creating a healthier atmosphere and recreational environment for residents of Miami Beach.

The model to the right shows a new parking structure added to the bottom right corner to enable the application of green roofs and walls. This parking structure served as the cornerstone to the Green Roof and Green Wall design. Model of the Green Roofs and Walls

Model of the Mangrove Piers 42


Mid-Beach - Design Typologies II. MANGROVE NURSERIES; LAND MOATS; CANALS; EMBANKMENTS; PERMEABLE PLANTERS North-South Application: Collins Ave. - Indian Creek Dr. East-West Application: 41st St. - 28th St. MANGROVE NURSERY

The map below shows the design typologies applied to the area of Mid-Beach and how these designs were distributed specifically to create larger-scale systems focused on eco elements.

Source of Flooding

LAND MOAT EMBANKMENT

Canal/Nursery

Mangrove Forest

N

45

Land Moat/Planter


The model to the left shows an angled aerial view of all the design typologies I proposed for Mid-Beach.

The second model to the left displays a closer look at the Permeable Planters.

The model below shows the Mangrove Nursuries, Canals, Land Moats, and Embankment and how, jointly, they have the potential to produce a larger anti-flooding design via connectivity. Whereas the Land Moats featured in this model are sparsely distributed, the final design contained Land Moats lining the entire extent of the Embankment. The water edge shown runs parallel to Indian Creek Drive.

The aerial view of the model above shows the extensive application of all the design typologies proposed for MidBeach. The Permeable Planters would follow the full extent of the existing sidewalk down Indian Creek Drive; the Canals and Mangrove Nurseries would run along the other side of Indian Creek Drive to meet with the Land Moat covered Embankment located along the water edge.

The technical section to the right shows the engineering and green elements behind the large design solution I proposed for Mid-Beach along Indian Creek Drive. This design system utilized (as read from left to right in the section) a permeable planter, a set of water canals containing mangrove nursuries, a natural embankment made of land moats, and a shoreline covered in mangroves trees. Model of the Mangrove Nurseries and Canals. 46


Building Nature

The Ecoscape - Independent Study


Abstract With concepts of the Eco City, a city characterized by an exemplary integration of natural elements, at the forefront of current urban development, the question of how exactly to harmonize the natural and built environments is unavoidable and, in fact, inherent to achieving any form of naturalized city. A major area of conflict between the natural and built environments is the isolation of natural green spaces. Two areas of forest land may have a suburb separating them, while two pocket parks may have a sea of pavement and buildings forming the distance between them. Examples of isolated natural and green spaces abound. Therefore, the need for connectivity is crucial in creating an effective reintroduction of the natural environment into the built environment and in maintaining the biodiversity that depends on consistent, uninterrupted habitat development. Green corridors, as supported and encouraged by this proposal, are key to achieving natural and built environment connectivity.

50


Aim and Vision Utilizing the green corridor as a cornerstone, this study will take a conceptual urban environment with a surrounding area representative of the natural environment and will propose an intricately designed green corridor treatment aimed toward both wildlife and public benefit. This green corridor treatment will, more specficially, consist of a holistic design composed of two subsystems. The first subsystem will be referred to as the Wildlife Corridor, where the connectivity of one natural space to another will be geared toward enabling habitat growth, sustaining biodiversity, and reinforcing natural mobility without interference from built-environment dangers e.g. highways. The Wildlife Corridor will be applied to the natural area surrounding the conceptual urban environment. The second subsystem will be the Green Roof Corridor, where the presence of naure will be strengthened in the built environment via effective integration - green roofs will be applied to carefully selected buildings within the conceptual urban environment. These green roofs have the potential to generate several benefits, such as cleaning air of carbon dioxide, reducing the Urban Heat Island Effect, and increasing the permeability of surfaces. Together these two subsystems will produce one large, self-sustaining design and approach that will henceforth be termed The Ecoscape. 51


The Transect Influence The Ecoscape will seek to reimagine the Transect, meaning the current structure of the Transect will act as both a guide and a foundation for this proposed green corridor system. If one were to think of The Ecoscape as the Transect, Nature would be both the spine and boundaries, connecting T1 to T6, as opposed to the road (a built-environment component). In addition, instead of having lateral connectivity from T1 to T6, The Ecoscape will have various points of perpendicular connectivity crossing the natural spine. The image to the right shows the traditional Transect (as provided by The Center for Applied Transect Studies). As noted above, the Transect shows connectivity via gray infrastructure and a pattern of decreasing natural elements. The image to the left shows The Ecoscape as a Transect model. The light green path that passes from N1 to N2 shows the natural spine that spreads green space. 52


Conceptualizing The Ecoscape Before creating the specifics of The Ecoscape design, a sample environmental and urban area was required as the base and foundation. I found th use of an existing location, Downtown New Brunswick, New Jersey, to be an ideal candidate with its neighboring natural spaces and lack of green space within its core. Although most of my base map was derived from the actual site, modifications were made for clearer demonstration. Aerial of Present Downtown New Brunswick, New Jersey

N

Boundary of Sample Area

N

The Ecoscape Base Map 53

Major Existing Green/Natural Spaces


Designing The Ecoscape Design Components of the Ecoscape

Green Roofs

Wildlife Bridges

Green Walls/ Bridges

Targeting rainwater capture, drainage, the Heat Island Effect, carbon capture, public health, and habitat.

Targeting habitat connection and development, wildlife preservation, and natural resource protection.

Targeting rainwater capture, drainage, the Heat Island Effect, carbon capture, public health, and habitat.

N

FOREST

SHRUB

GRASSLAND

BEES BUTTERFLIES BEES AND BUTTERFLIES

DEER AND RABBITS DEER AND COYOTES RABBITS, COYOTES, AND DEER

Urban Habitat Section This section pertains to the Green Roof Corridor design and shows the wildlife that would benefit from an extensive green roof application in an urban area.

Natural Habitat Section This section pertains to the Wildlife Corridor design and shows the wildlife that would experience greater habitat connectivity from the use of a wildlife bridge or crossing.

54


Ecoscape Subsystem 1: The Wildlife Corridor The Willife Corridor (highlighted with hoof prints in the map) represents the Ecoscape subsystem targeting wildlife sustainability i.e. enabling wildlife species to access different habitats and to protect themselves from encounters with vehicles, which, likwise, also protects people from collisions.

Location of the Wildlife Corridor

Fewer Fatalities

N 55

Wildlife Preservation


Wildlife Habitat Section

Existing Habitats and Wildlife Species Pre-Ecoscape Treatment

Grasslands

Shrubs Deer

Rabbits

Wildlife Species Section

Coyotes

Forest

N

A crucial starting point with determining where to locate the Wildlife Corridor is to study the existing geography and wildlife species in the natural environment being treated. The map above displays the analysis of both habitat and wildlife species types. Once this analysis was complete, I was able to design the most effective solution in the Wildlife Corridor, the Wildlife Bridge.

FOREST

SHRUB

GRASSLAND

DEER AND RABBITS DEER AND COYOTES

RABBITS, COYOTES, AND DEER

56


Wildlife Bridge: Structural Composition and Visualization

Landscape

Bridge

57


58


Ecoscape Subsystem 2: The Green Roof Corridor The Green Corridor (highlighted in the light green building footprints) represents the Ecoscape subsystem targeting urban public health issues, such as pollution and the Heat Island Effect, while also introducing habitat development for wildlife. Within the conceptual urban environment in the map, the buildings selected to comprise the Green Corridor shared key characteristics ranging from scale to proximity to grey or green infrastructure.

Location of the Green Roof Corridor

N 59


Typical Urban Conditions Pre-Ecoscape Existing Natural and Green Spaces Pre-Ecoscape Treatment

Relevant species are isolated due to lack of habitat in the urban environment

Butterflies

Dominantly built elements and impermeable surfaces

Few natural and green spaces within the urban core

As with the Wildlife Corridor, the Green Corridor treatment first required analysis of the urban area and existing conditions regarding infrastructure, building types, green spaces and planters, and present effects on the urban population as well as wildlife species that contain nearby habitats or natural resources. The map to the left displays key points of analysis regarding the conceptual urban area before the Ecoscape and that helped to determine the design solutions for the Green Corridor subsystem: Green Roofs, Green Walls, and Green Bridges.

Bees

N 60


Green Roof: Structural Composition and Materials Plants Growing Medium Filter Fabric Drainage Insulation Waterproof Membrane

Contextual Section

Protection Board Roof Deck

Structure

High Eco Footprint 61


Green Roof Water System On average, a green roof absorbs 70 to 90% of precipitation during summer months and 25 to 40% of precipitation during winter months - According to the Green Roofs for Healthy Cities Organization

Water flows down to the drainage layer where it flows out from the system.

62


Natural Habit Component to the Green Roof

BEES BUTTERFLIES

BEES AND BUTTERFLIES

Wildlife Habitat Section

63

Wildlife Species Section


Sun and Shadow Studies for Effective Green Roof Location In order to locate green roofs in the most effective areas, sun and shadow pattern studies are essential. Plant life is closely oriented around sun exposure (i.e. photosynthesis); accordingly, green roofs must be designed and placed where plants can obtain the optimum amount of sunlight. The studies below were taken in real-time during the Summer Solstice (June 21) in a 3D model of the conceptual urban area. The Summer Solstice provides the best sun and shadow patterns because the sun is at its northermost point, meaning more sun availability, more shading, and higher temperatures. The images below show three different times in a single day: 8 AM, 1 PM, and 4 PM.

EAST

WEST

8 AM

1 PM

N

4 PM

N

N

64


Green Roof Design: Bridges Versus Walls In an attempt to explore other variations of the standard green roof, I developed a design concept I termed a green roof bridge. The design intent behind a green roof bridge is to create connectivity between green roofs, thereby maximizing their environmental advantages and allowing for increased space and area for growth and development over time.

Location of the Green Roof Bridge

The green roof bridge is also based on the notion of creating vertical topography and landscaping, eventually leading to several layers of urban recreation and habitat.

N 65


Testing Green Roof Bridge and Wall Scenarios I created 3D modeling within the conceptual urban area to capture real-time sunlight exposure and shading of the standard green roof versus the green roof bridge design. As demonstrated in the images below, an immediate difference between the two green roofs can be easily seen - the green roof bridge is composed of a larger, solid plane that provides too much coverage and increased shading to an already shaded area. Due to the not so ideal results of the preliminary design variation of the green roof bridge, I considered a compromise or hybrid of sorts between the standard green roof and the green roof bridge concept. Less Coverage

Scenario 1: Standard Green Roof Coverage

More Coverage

Scenario 2: Green Roof Bridge Coverage 66


The Compromise: Ideal Green Roof Design Due to the more obvious limitations inherent to the green roof bridge design, the compromise might be a simpler form of the green roof bridge: green roofs combined with green walls. Green roofs combined with green walls result in connectivity between plants, add landscaping, habitat, and recreation, do not excessively increase existing shading, and keep valuable building views unobstructed.

Scenario 3: Hybrid Composed of Standard Green Roof and Green Wall Coverage

Bridge Concept 67

Natural Connectivity

Roof

Walls


Removes pollutants and greenhouse gases from the local air

The diagram to the right summarizes the main environmental benefits of green roofs.

Reduces cumulative surface temperture of the area

Potential to retain 70 to 90% of precipitation during the summer

Plant Life

Habitat

Temperature

Water

Provides habitat to wildlife species such as bees and butterflies

Reduced runoff gets directed to nearby green space where it can get absorbed and filtered (lightening pressure on the drainage system)

68


Overall Findings: The Ecoscape and its Two Subsystems WILDLIFE CORRIDOR The Wildlife Corridor centers around animal and human benefits. The Wildlife Corridor's wildlife bridge design mitigates the fragmentation and isolation of habitats and their wildlife species. Wildlife bridges ensure the safe migration and natural development of wildlife species and more diversified habitat types. Additionally, humans driving on highways will encounter fewer to no animal-human collisions, which means less of a financial burden from these clashes as well. GREEN ROOF CORRIDOR The Green Roof Corridor contains environmental and social benefits. Environmentally, green roofs in the urban context clean the air of carbon emissions, decrease surface temperatures, absorb precipitation and slow down runoff, and provide habitat for urban species such as bees and butterflies. Socially, the Green Roof Corridor contributes to Climate Change mitigation and increased public health.

Green Roofs

Wildlife Bridges

Natural 69

Green Walls/ Bridges

Connectivity

Natural


Visualization of Positive Ecoscape Effects Over Time Given Starting Point

Given Ending Point

Gray Infrastructure Green Infrastructure Water Absorption High Temperatures Air Pollution

Over Time

Gray

Changes in Composition Geared Toward Nature

Green 70

OFFICIAL PORTFOLIO_Urban Design  
OFFICIAL PORTFOLIO_Urban Design  
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