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MCYC Training Programme

Managing Challenging Behaviour and Social and Emotional difficulties

Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


Group Activity • Make a spidergram of the challenges you have, or may encounter, at MCYC and your concerns.

Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


Behaviour and concerns at MCYC


Before we begin... • Don’t worry! • 99% of children who attend MCYC will not provide any challenges. • Of the small minority that do provide challenges, they will most likely be minor issues. • We need to be aware of the range of specific behaviour, learning, social and emotional difficulties that children have.

Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


Two groups • Children with specific behavioural, social or emotional difficulties. – ADHD, ASD and other specific difficulties

• Children who cause disruption and general misbehaviour. – Talking during group time, name calling, not following instructions, general messing around

Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


ADHD • What is it? – Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder. – It is the most common behaviour disorder in children and affects up to 9% of children. – Often children with ADHD have other difficulties.

• How does it affect children? – Short attention span – Distracted easily – Constantly restless. Joel Fraser

Challenging Behaviour

2012


ADHD • How is ADHD treated? – ADHD can be treated using medications and children with ADHD will bring these to MCYC. – ADHD is also treated with therapy in school and at home. – Children with ADHD often need boundaries and to know what is expected of them.

Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


ADHD • What can we do at MCYC? – We must cater for children with ADHD. – Children with ADHD should be given more space, time and tolerance. – They should know their boundaries at camp. – Their day should be structured and this should be discussed with them. – Lots of praise is needed, even for small progress, and especially in group times. – Problems should be discussed – but give them time and space first.


ADHD • Remember... – Children with ADHD struggle to focus and are very restless. – This is their ADHD and not deliberate misbehaviour – be patient! – Give them space, time and tolerance however, make sure you set clear expectations – Give plenty of positive praise for good behaviour. – A discussion is far more use than shouting – which will often lead to confusion.


ASDs • What are they? – ASDs are Autistic Spectrum Disorders. They are very complex and wide ranging. – Often children may be on the Autistic Spectrum but without a specific disorder. – Every child is different and their disorder often very complex. Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


ASDs – There is evidence to suggest children with ASD sense things in different ways – ASDs can affect children of all abilities. – Often children with an ASD have other disorders. – We need to enable children to live with and manage their ASD and not try to ‘cure’ them.

Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


ASDs • An ASD will impair a child's ability to: – understand and use non-verbal and verbal communication – understand social behaviour which affects their ability to interact with children and adults – think and behave flexibly – which may be shown in restricted, obsessional or repetitive activities.


ASDs • Communication – Children with an ASD often find it difficult to express themselves using verbal and non-verbal communication. – They should be given time to express themselves to avoid frustration – Be clear to avoid confusion. Sarcasm and dry humour should be avoided. – Unusual eye contact. This can range from none at all to very intense. It is not rude.


ASDs • Social understanding and social behaviour: – Children with ASDs have difficulty in understanding the social behaviour of others and behaving in socially appropriate ways. – Children with ASDs often think and interpret language literally, with no understanding of social context. – People’s opinions will not have much, if any, influence. – They have great difficulty in understanding games, play and other people; leaving them confused.


ASDs • Due to not being able to understand and interpret situations, children with an ASD often lash out in confusion and frustration. • This is not naughty behaviour, being rude or lazy - it is the result of complex underlying problems – be understanding! • This can be illustrated with the iceberg analysis.

Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


ASDs • What can we do at MCYC? – Structure is very important, help them plan their day. – They need a routine at camp – flexibility is rarely an option. – Work with them to help them manage their day.

Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


ASDs • Thinking and behaving flexibly – Have difficulty adapting to new situations – Will tend to focus on one thing intensely, often becoming obsessive. – Find it difficult to interact with other children but will work alongside. – Will form their own views which are usually strict. – In group times especially, this must be given plenty of consideration.


ASDs • Remember... – ASDs are complex – Every child with an ASD is different – Work with them, do not try to force them to do what you think is best – Be very flexible and understanding. – Think of the iceberg analysis

Questions?


General Behavioural Problems

“My school is a model of discipline! Use the rod, beat the child, that's my motto.� Agatha Trunchbull, Matilda

Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


Preventing low level problems • Low level problems are normally most disruptive. • You are the key – Don't be soft, but don't be Miss Trunchbull! – They are on holiday, they are allowed to have fun! – Children will respect you for being fair. – Set your boundaries and stick to them. Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


Preventing low level problems • Build a good rapport with your campers! • Children like to know what is expected and where the line is. • Don’t be cheap. • Remember MCYC’s mission - to enable young people to experience God.

• Remember... – Misbehaviour is rare at MCYC and is more likely to be over excitement! Relax!


Higher level disruption • Higher level disruption can be easier to deal with in most cases. It helps to... – Pull the child to one side, they won’t want an audience. – Stay calm and discuss what has happened. – Remember to be fair but firm. – Listen first! – Try to come to a mutual decision e.g. go and apologise to the other camper. – Go to the admin team if a resolution isn't found.


Serious misbehaviour • Serious misbehaviour is highly unlikely • It must be reported to a member of the admin team immediately. • Assistant directors will deal with serious misbehaviour. • This will be reported to the director if needed. • In extremely serious cases the director may inform the Chair of the MCYC Council who may call a meeting of the executive committee.


Serious Misbehaviour • If you see something serious happening at camp e.g. vandalism, fighting, theft, abuse, drugs or alcohol, sexual matters etc. You must... – Act immediately – Assess the situation and call for help when able, ask campers to fetch additional leaders – Parties involved should be taken to the directors office and a member of the admin team informed. – Serious incidents should be put into writing ASAP.


Dealing with fights • If you see a fight break out... – Call across immediately – Shout for additional leaders, or ask campers to get help – Assess the situation as you approach – You have a duty of care to protect children at MCYC – You are allowed to physically intervene if you believe a child can harm themselves or others


Dealing with fights • Physical restraint... – As you approach assess which child is the most violent – Aim to grab this child’s arms, preferably from behind – Watch your legs! – Try not to get between children unless absolutely necessary

• Parties involved should be taken to the directors office. • Incident put into writing


Dos and Don’ts • Do... – Be firm but fair – Set boundaries – Stay calm – Listen – Consider outside factors (home, emotional problems etc) – Tell campers the consequences e.g. You may be sent home, you will be reported to the director, your church will receive a letter about this.


Dos and Don’ts • Do not... – Ignore misbehaviour – Be too soft or too harsh – Become angry (raising your voice should be an act!) – Jump to conclusions – Be harsh for the amusement of others – Make threats or take things into your own hands e.g. You’re going home, you will be banned from MCYC, I’ll put you in a tent on your own.


Relationships • Make an assessment of the situation and report it to the admin team • We must be sensitive to other campers • The admin team will most likely deal with any issues with a quiet word • Remember the rules about boys and girls in chalets and tents Challenging Behaviour

Joel Fraser

2012


Remember • Most children at MCYC will not provide you with any challenge. • We must cater for children with an ASD or ADHD and ensure they fully enjoy the MCYC experience. • Behaviour at camp is extremely good but we must be prepared • The admin team are there to help you - do not worry! Questions?


Training Sessions Challenging Behaviour2012v1