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Blueprint Success for

10 Years Later, Momentum is on the Rise By June C. Hussey Guided by a carefully researched economic blueprint, Southern Arizona’s four-county, asset-rich region has become a hot spot for economic development in the Southwest. Ten years after launching Tucson’s Economic Blueprint, it’s the fall of 2017 and Sun Corridor Inc. President and CEO Joe Snell can make a strong argument that it’s working. In the last several months, the region struck pay dirt with 5,900 new jobs spread among 18 companies, the largest haul since the organization’s inception. Many of those jobs fall into the high-skilled, high-wage category, as targeted by the Economic Blueprint. If you ask Snell, that’s not even the most exciting part. Like a euphoric gold miner grinning ear to ear at a pan of shiny golden flecks, he is certain the best is yet to come. 68 BizTucson

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“Our pipeline is bursting at the seams,” Snell beamed from his seat in Sun Corridor Inc.’s conference room, where policymakers and business leaders leave politics at the door to brainstorm about ways to attract new business. Every step forward is progress. “In March, we hosted 45 site selectors here for the first time ever,” Snell said, pointing out that he’s keeping the pedal to the metal with media trips and road shows. “We have a great story to tell and we need to keep telling it. We can keep the momentum going as long as we keep pushing and earning it,” he said. Bringing the region together

Things weren’t always so rosy. Snell said Southern Arizona’s recent economic windfall is a return on a 10-year investment, the result of a carefully orchestrated and doggedly implemented strategy.

Before being tapped to lead TREO (Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities, later rebranded as Sun Corridor Inc.), Snell ran a similar organization in Denver, where he worked with 52 cities and eight counties to successfully develop significant regional economic projects like the Denver Broncos’ new football stadium and Denver International Airport. Those experiences taught him that big things are possible when communities work together. By no coincidence, Denver today is among the fastest growing cities in the United States, a magnet for millennials and the businesses that employ them. Tucson may never aspire to be an NFL city like Denver or Phoenix, but leaders like Snell have looked to such cities for valuable lessons on how to “get in the game.”

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BizECONOMY

When he first arrived from the Mile High City sporting his big-city goggles in 2005, Snell said his first order of business was to develop a plan to bring together Tucson’s historically fractured community. Polarities, infighting and territorialism would only derail future economic prosperity. So Snell set out to forge good relationships with policy makers and industry leaders throughout the region, asking each one to take ownership in the new effort. A comprehensive industry-targeting study by Harvard University expert Michael Porter led to a strategic plan that would guide Tucson in driving its own destiny. Tucson’s Economic Blueprint was unveiled in 2007, just as an economic recession the size of the Grand Canyon was looming. Southern Arizona weathered that deep and prolonged recession while www.BizTucson.com

Snell and his board at Sun Corridor Inc. fine-tuned the strategy and stayed the course, marketing and selling Tucson and its surrounding environs as a regional magnet for four targeted industries – aerospace and defense, transportation and logistics, alternative energy and natural resources (including mining technology) and biosciences and healthcare. To help support the attraction and expansion of the industries, Sun Corridor Inc. rallied troops and resources around four essential pillars for success – talent acquisition, infrastructure, healthcare and business environment. Snell credits Southern Arizona business and community leaders for coming together and laying the essential groundwork that allows the region to compete today at an elite level.

The power of momentum

The region is on a roll and momentum is building, said Dr. Eric Walk, senior VP for medical and scientific affairs and chief medical officer at Roche Tissue Diagnostics, known locally as Ventana Medical Systems, Inc. Roche Tissue Diagnostics is a global leader and innovator of tissue-based cancer diagnostic solutions, providing more than 250 cancer tests with related instruments to more than 90 countries to improve outcomes for the 14 million people diagnosed with cancer annually. It’s also one of the largest biotech companies in the state, with about 1,300 employees at its Oro Valley headquarters. Contributing to Roche Tissue Diagnostics’ growth, Walk said, are the close proximity to the University of Arizona, a receptive business environment in Oro Valley and Arizona and the momentum continued on page 70 >>> Fall 2017

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continued from page 69 of Southern Arizona’s emerging bioscience and biotech community. The homegrown company’s success is a strong testament to the region’s ability to support the growing biosciences/diagnostics industry. With Roche Tissue Diagnostics’ strong presence and Dr. Eric Walk mentorship role, the number of Senior VP biotech companies is growing. Medical and Scientific Affairs “Companies like Accelerate Chief Medical Officer Diagnostics, HTG Molecular Diagnostics, SalutarisMD and Roche Tissue Diagnostics Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals, together with Roche Tissue Diagnostics and organizations with keeping up the recent economic like TGen (Translational Genomics Redevelopment momentum and making search Institute), have created a critical sure the UA is contributing. mass that I think is key for the Southern “I’m impressed with Tucson and how Arizona biotech community to grow its partnership with the university can even further,” Walk said. continue to do great things,” Robbins said. “We’ve been blessed to have RayIt takes talent theon here. We’re now blessed to have Ask Snell the five most important facCaterpillar here. tors in growing a robust economy and “I’ll be looking for the next one, the he’ll respond, “Talent, talent, talent, talnext one and the next one, and how can ent, talent” – and others will agree. we, as a university, help to partner with “It’s critically important,” said David all the stakeholders and government Hutchens, president and CEO at UNS and the captains of industry to be able Energy Corp., Tucson Electric Power to make Tucson an attractive place for and UniSource Energy Services. Hutchthat next company.” ens also is chairman of the board of Sun Corridor Inc. “Prospective employStrong border partners ers always focus on the quality of our One proponent with a strong voice local workforce, and we’re fortunate to for international trade is Guillermo have a diverse and talented population.” Valencia, chairman of the Greater No“We passionately feel that continuing gales and Santa Cruz County Port Auto grow a more robust, vibrant and inthority. He accepted Snell’s invitation to terconnected talent pool will benefit all join Sun Corridor Inc.’s board because organizations in the region,” Walk said. he believed it was mutually beneficial. “Having a vibrant talent pool not only “I’ve learned that Nogales has to helps us acquire top talent, it also helps partner with like-minded people to pronurture a really dynamic ecosystem of mote our area. We cannot do it alone,” job opportunities, career pathways and Valencia said. “When we get together personal growth.” with other groups and pull the rope Walk added that he’s optimistic about in the same direction, we can get a lot the future of biosciences in Southern more accomplished. Arizona. “Sun Corridor Inc. pools the best re“We have a top-tier, BIO5 Institute at sources of the entire region so we, as a the UA. The UA has expressed a strong group, can market all of our assets tointerest in working with companies in gether to attract business. Whether it’s a transitional medicine sense,” he said. to Tucson or Nogales, it’s a plus for our “We already have a small group of enarea,” said Valencia. thusiastic biotech companies. In addiMajor employers including Target, tion, we are very fortunate to have the HomeGoods and FritoLay have moved Desert Angels, an investor group that distribution centers into the area from has invested more than $41 million Casa Grande to Tucson to Nogales since 2000.” where more than 150 transportation The University of Arizona’s new and logistics providers help them move president, Dr. Robert C. Robbins, who goods up and down the corridor and was hired in April, already is on board throughout the U.S. 70 BizTucson

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“There are a lot of good things happening up and down the Arizona-Mexico trade corridor. There has been $1.8 billion invested in infrastructure on the Mexican side, from Mexico City to Nogales. We’re putting in another $130 million from our port of entry to our interstate. We’re preparing for future growth. We believe there’s a lot of room for growth and, by default, a lot of benefit to Southern Arizona and Mexico.” Valencia describes the Mariposa Port of Entry as “the big engine in Southern Arizona.” It processes 600,000 commercial vehicles and 21 million visitors annually. The port is the direct route between Mexico and the U.S. for nearly all Mexican agricultural products going east, as well as mining exports and imports, auto parts, clothing to be assembled and consumer products heading to Mexico. A total of $30 billion in imports flow into the U.S. and $11 billion in exports into Mexico pass through the port every year, by Valencia’s counts. No other U.S./Mexico border crossing has the capacity to move products like Nogales does – making it a tremendous asset to Southern Arizona, Valencia said. “We’ve worked with every agency on efficiencies,” said Valencia. “We’ve developed expertise, logistics and polished the whole process to make our port efficient, competitive and beneficial to the entire region.” Going for more wins

With advocates like Walk, Robbins and Valencia and more than 70 member organizations backing up Sun Corridor Inc., the region is on a winning streak. If that streak continues, as experts project, Southern Arizona can continue on a track to being one of the most dynamic business centers in North America. “We have reached a core critical mass that poises us to transform Southern Arizona into a real powerhouse of innovation and discovery,” Walk said. “We have all the necessary ingredients.” Robbins added, “We’ve got to work together, because there are going to be disagreements, there are going to be challenges and the only way to solve those is to have meaningful deep relationships, great communication and a shared vision for not only the university, but the entire region and the community.”

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BizTALENT

Train, Retain, Recruit, Reload Talent Acquisition & Retention Drive Economic Growth By Roger Yohem Train and retain. Recruit and reload. Workforce development is the key to success in the incredibly competitive world of economic growth. With Sun Corridor Inc.’s focus on growing economic sectors such as aerospace, biosciences, healthcare, transportation and logistics, and renewable and mining technologies, businesses are challenged to train, retain, recruit and reload talent. Southern Arizona, like all regions across the nation that target these desirable industries, faces fierce competition to fill these needs. “If young people don’t understand the opportunities in Tucson, they get caught up in the hype to move somewhere else for their dream job or career,” said Ian Roark, VP of workforce development at Pima Community College. “The lack of middle-skill workers is a national crisis, not just here.” It’s a labor crisis that is 20 years in the 72 BizTucson

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making. Waves of baby boomers were projected to start retiring in the late2000s, Roark said. The Great Recession crashed that forecast, rocked their world, and erased billions of dollars in retirement savings. That forced too many boomers to work a decade longer than predicted. As they now exit, the economy is growing despite a shortage of trained talent to replace them. “That is our greatest challenge and opportunity,” said Roark. At Pima Community College, students and businesses are “customers.” To meet the needs of students, PCC is pushing career awareness with a focus on the middle-skills gap. The curriculum is geared to create a pathway to “stay-here” job success. To help businesses, program quality and educational capacity (instructors, facilities, equipment) have been re-aligned.

That supports Sun Corridor Inc.’s Economic Blueprint, said David Welsh, COO. “The better-paying, middleskill jobs run the gamut from turning a wrench to assemblers to machinists to clinical technicians.” Similarly, the University of Arizona is working to create a culture of collaboration to prepare students for success. A well-planned “engagement experience” can help students graduate with specific academic and career experience. “Our programs go beyond minimum academics. We want students to do something in the workforce – an internship, research, study abroad – to know what it’s like to work,” said Melissa Vito, UA senior VP for student affairs, enrollment and strategic initiatives. “That’s huge; it quantifies their involvement. Engagement experiences help students distinguish themselves in the workforce.” www.BizTucson.com


u

Melissa Vito Senior VP Student Affairs, Enrollment & Strategic Initiatives University of Arizona

u

u

Sethuraman Panchanathan

Ian Roark

Executive VP & Chief Research & Innovation Officer Arizona State University

The UA embraces an “entrepreneurial spirit” with employers. Different companies require different talent, “so we look at how we can tailor professional development to their specific needs,” Vito said. “If we can help their workers complete degrees or get certified, the businesses see the added value.” Many regions are chasing the same sectors as Southern Arizona. Many colleges across the country are collaborating with businesses to train employees. As a result, many similar workforce programs are being developed. “Differentiation – it’s a challenge. Many things are the same,” Vito said. “Some differentiation occurs because each university has specific advantages based on its academic programs that are well known.” Two key advantages at the UA are its strong science programs and the Eller College of Management. Those are www.BizTucson.com

VP Workforce Development Pima Community College

examples of “signature academic areas that automatically give us differentiation,” Vito said. Going forward, more visionary thinking is needed along with the ability to be even more responsive to the needs of a changing economy. “Instead of preparing students for one particular job in their field, we must prepare them with the skills most in demand in the 21st century – creativity, analytical thinking, problem-solving, teamwork and flexibility,” said Sethuraman Panchanathan, executive VP and chief research and innovation officer at Arizona State University. “Many jobs that exist today didn’t exist 10 to 15 years ago. For example, there were no self-driving car engineers or voice-application developers or university chief innovation officers, for that matter,” he said.

Rapid innovations are changing the landscape of the modern workforce. At ASU, the objective is to produce “master learners,” individuals capable of learning anything when equipped with the skills to adapt to changing economic circumstances. People who are lifelong learners will have better career choices, making for happier and more productive workers and citizens. For companies, investing in lifelong learners promotes problemsolving and innovation in their organizations and their products. “Around 70 percent of our graduates begin their careers in Arizona, contributing to the region’s economy. We’re proud of this, but we can do more,” said Panchanathan. “We must continue to foster learners who are adaptable, continually curious and creative.”

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‘Density’ in Defense and Mining

Southern Arizona Closing in on ‘Hub’ Status for Targeted Sectors By Romi Carrell Wittman and Jay Gonzales Silicon Valley didn’t pop up overnight to become the technology hub of the United States, where innovators like Apple, Google, Facebook and Yahoo make their home. It was a long process to build up that concentration of worldclass technology companies in Northern California. In Tucson, there’s a sense of a similar growing “density” in the target sectors that Sun Corridor Inc. (known then as Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities or TREO) identified 10 years ago in an effort to broaden the region’s economic base. Two of those sectors – aerospace and defense and mining technology – have raised the region’s profile in the last few years through headline-grabbing economic development victories to the point that some high-tech industries are starting to view Tucson as hubs for those sectors. 74 BizTucson

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“People don’t realize that Tucson is the mining hub in the West,” said Helio Samora, CEO of Hexagon Mining, considered a global force in mining technology. Hexagon announced in March that it is expanding its North American office which already was located in Tucson. It is in the process of relocating the office to downtown. “The region has supported mining and mining technology companies for a very long time,” said Ryan Hawes, VP of business development for Guardvant, another Tucson-based company that combines high-tech software solutions with mining to improve safety as well as efficiency. “There is a great base of local talent that has large ties to the mining industry.” Since the middle of last year, Raytheon Missile Systems expanded the region’s aerospace and defense industry profile by deciding to add nearly 2,000

jobs to its operation on Tucson’s south side. And Caterpillar boosted the mining technology sector by moving its Surface Mining & Technology Division here. It is building a new facility downtown. That type of movement in a given sector creates what Greg White, VP of finance and CFO at Raytheon, calls “density of engineering and innovative thought. That means good ideas bouncing off a lot of smart people in close proximity tend to get perfected more quickly. I think between Raytheon, the University of Arizona and other aerospace businesses in the area, we have great density of technical talent in our local area.” While Caterpillar and Hexagon have led the region’s recent charge in mining technology, Raytheon has been Tucson’s flag-bearer in the defense industry for decades. But newcomers like Vector, www.BizTucson.com


C AT E R P I L L A R

u Rio Nuevo unveiled the design for Caterpillar’s Tucson Mining Center, a three-story, 150,000-squarefoot building that will be constructed northeast of Sentinel Peak and west of Interstate 10

HEXAGON MINING

a rocket-building company, and World View, with its high-altitude balloon technology, arrived and relationships are building that strengthen Southern Arizona’s profile in the aerospace and defense sector. “Raytheon is fueled by innovation,” said White, who also is vice chair at Sun Corridor Inc. “The greater the level of local talent the greater our ability to help each other to succeed. We had contracts with World View to do research together within months of them starting up. Once they were here and once we ran into each other and talked to each other, we began doing business with each other.” Ben Cordani, lead human resources manager at Caterpillar, said the selection of Tucson just made good sense. “We wanted to be in mining country, www.BizTucson.com

and Tucson is in the heart of it, with such a rich mining heritage,” he said. Long term, Caterpillar’s success and that of other high-tech companies will depend on continued access to highquality talent to fill the company’s many high-tech jobs. “We’re establishing a strong linkage to educational resources such as the University of Arizona,” Cordani said. Hexagon considered moving to Denver some years ago and Denver pulled out all the stops to encourage the move. “We wanted to stay,” Samora said, “but it had to make sense for the business.” Samora admits that, at first, Denver was winning the race. Then Sun Corridor Inc. stepped up and worked closely with the company to meet its needs. “We needed a more modern building and access to subject-matter experts

in mining,” he said. “The university is known for engineering and it also has a very good computer science degree. We’re a technical company so having that talent here is very good for us.” Samora said that, in the end, Tucson’s diversity, talent and community were the deciding factors. “Everything made sense in the end,” he said. Now he calls the region a “hub,” a term that Sun Corridor Inc., as the local economic development leader, would like to see used on multiple sectors. “I don’t know where Tucson ranks,” White said of the region’s profile as a potential location for aerospace and defense companies, “but I will tell you just having Raytheon with roughly 12,000 people in one location puts it pretty high up there.”

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

David Hutchens CHAIR

{

President & CEO UNS Energy Corporation, Tucson Electric Power and UniSource Energy Services

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Our business and community leaders must continue working collaboratively to promote our region. Everyone needs to help tell our story. In addition to our attractive climate and quality of life, Southern Arizona offers a diverse, talented workforce and strong educational opportunities in a location well suited to regional and international trade. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

We need to keep building more awareness among site selectors who help businesses in the expansion and relocation process. Tucson checks all the key boxes for many businesses, particularly hightech and manufacturing employers in search of an educated and accessible workforce. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Collaboration has been the key to our community’s economic development success. Private- and public-sector leaders have worked together with educators and nonprofit groups on numerous projects that have contributed to our economic growth. It wasn’t always this way. But after Tucson missed out on some significant opportunities, a group of key stakeholders committed to working together to put us in a position to attract Caterpillar, the Raytheon Missile Systems’ expansion and other projects that have contributed to our recent success.

It’s critically important. Prospective employers always focus on the quality of our local workforce, and we’re fortunate to have a diverse and talented population. The University of Arizona consistently produces well-qualified job candidates, and our community boasts many excellent primary and secondary education options. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

The energy industry is transforming at a pace that will make it almost unrecognizable just a decade from now. We’re adding storage, intelligence and versatility to our grid to transition to new, cleaner energy resources and provide our customers with more control over how they use energy. This, in turn, will lead to pricing options that reflect these new realities and promote the efficient use of our community’s energy resources.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

Greg White

{

VICE CHAIR VP of Finance & CFO Raytheon Missile Systems

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

We need to keep doing what we are doing. The coalition of government, business leaders and economic development groups has been working together to ensure that companies wanting to relocate to Southern Arizona feel they will succeed. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

It is a combination of governance, a tax-friendly environment and education. Will the families of workers have access to a quality education and resources? Is there a vibrant economic community and talent readily available? And infrastructure – are roads and expansion projects being effectively managed to enable future growth? What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

In my opinion, it is clearly because of the local economic development organizations, government (state, county, and local) and industry working as a team. In the projects I have worked on, the first question has been, “How can I help?”

It is absolutely critical to growth and why investment in our education system is key. It is also important to fully understand what an asset we have in the University of Arizona. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Aerospace and defense looks to be growing at a good clip of 3 to 5 percent, but local companies have a chance to grow at significantly more than that given the particular products they supply. Raytheon Missile Systems’ recent expansion is testament to that growth.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

Robert D. Ramirez

{

SECRETARY/TREASURER President & CEO Vantage West Credit Union

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

There has to be a genuine desire to help our communities grow so that we all flourish. For instance, Vantage West reinvests part of our profits in the community through social responsibility, scholarship and financial literacy initiatives that help uplift people’s lives. Our business success has translated to our ability to provide people with gainful employment, so they are given the means to be productive members of the community. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

There are two key issues that currently impede economic development: one has to do with our roads and the other with our educational system. When prospective employers come to town, the two things that interest them the most have to do with our roads and educational programs for their young families. The best way we can sustain our growth momentum is by focusing on fixing our roads and enhancing our educational system. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

One of the most critical factors for any business is open and honest communication. What I have witnessed this past year is open coomunication between our county, city and business leaders. There is ongoing collaboration in Tucson, and the results speak for themselves.

In order to attract high-wage/high-tech industries to Tucson, we need to have the talent. At Vantage West, we have an ongoing internship program with the University of Arizona Eller College of Management, and the program has been so successful that we have hired several students upon their graduation. These types of programs are a win/win for both the students and prospective employers. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Similar to other industries, the financial industry is facing massive consolidation as well as massive disruption from other players coming into our marketplace. Banking is evolving at a very rapid pace, and our focus is on leveraging technology more than ever to meet the needs of our membership.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

Dennis R. Minano

{

IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR Managing Director, Convergence Mitigation Management Retired VP Public Policy, Chief Environmental Officer General Motors

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

We need to execute on our commitments to our region. We recognize there is a mutuality between the success of our community and the growth in our industry. New building simply does not occur unless we demonstrate we can and will execute on our commitments. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

We need stronger tools to help us draw industries. Incentives are one such tool. Granted, they are not a key deciding factor why companies choose to locate in one community over another, but they are an important consideration. We all need to communicate that we can be trusted. Knowing that we fulfill our commitments lessens the risk for companies considering us. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

It’s difficult to zero in on just one factor. The risk in doing so is we oversimplify what is a sensitive balance of many factors. If I were to pick just one, it would be our ability to work collectively and collaboratively. Success comes through unity of action. Collectively, we understand our assets and have diligently worked together to apply them toward significantly advancing our region’s competitiveness.

Companies and site selectors continually rate talent and skills as the number one reason a community is even considered. Without talent, there is no chance of a company even giving our region a glance. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Economists are already looking to the next downturn. No one is more attuned to economic cycles than those of us who live with them. They are a reality and we are highly confident we can weather future economic cycles because of our foresight and planning. In recent years, we have expanded our core industries, thereby diversifying our local economy. Now our challenge is to think tactically and strategically.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

{

Joe Snell PRESIDENT & CEO Sun Corridor Inc.

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Keep our foot on the gas. We must continue to be aggressive in selling the successes and assets of Southern Arizona. Our team will be in other markets more often this year than we have been in the past. We must continue to be aggressive in removing obstacles and creating a competitive environment. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

Improved air service, improved educational outcomes and repair our roads. We continually hear from site selectors that the lack of key non-stop connections is a potential barrier. A strong educational system leads to advances in talent development. Good roads and infrastructure are key ingredients to remaining competitive. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Sun Corridor Inc.’s decision to expand its reach two years ago. By adding three counties and strengthening relationships in Southern Arizona, Sun Corridor Inc. has the ability to showcase additional assets, which include a greater workforce, cross-border commerce and an expanded regional approach. This culminated in the Site Selectors Guild locating its annual conference in Tucson, an acknowledgement of our economic development acumen.

Talent is critical and the No. 1 reason companies choose to expand or relocate to a new market. It is imperative a community works to diversify its talent pool with an eye toward what existing industry needs. We came to the realization our economy was weighted too heavily toward the growth industry. We have made strides to develop stronger programs for our targeted industries in Southern Arizona. But to remain competitive, we need to train for the skills the companies in our region need. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Southern Arizona continues to grow and with it comes more opportunities. Raytheon Missile Systems announced 1,900 new jobs. Caterpillar moved a division here. Accelerate Diagnostics just received FDA approvals. With these and many other positive announcements, Southern Arizona will achieve more success. Our best times are ahead of us.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Sharon Bronson Chair Pima County Board of Supervisors

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

We need to continue achieving the goals of the Pima County Economic Development Plan, which includes supporting existing major employers, investing in regional transportation infrastructure, building on our economic relationship with Mexico, promoting tourism and increasing foreign investment. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

We need to come together as a state and a region and create the school-to-work pipelines necessary to supply manufacturers, builders, tech and biotech companies with the skilled workforce they need. These are high-wage jobs and there is a gap between available jobs and the skilled workers needed to fill them. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Believe it or not, it was the recession. It knocked the growth train off the tracks and forced the entire region, including the private and public sectors, to come together and start building a new economy not so tightly tied to growth and homebuilding. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Workforce is everything. If growing employers can’t find the employees they need here, but can elsewhere, they’ll leave. Many of the skilled workers in our region are older and approaching retirement age and there aren’t enough young workers entering those professions, like electricians or machinists, to replace them. We need to solve that challenge now. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

If we’re successful in implementing Pima County’s Economic Development Plan, we have a chance to have a bigger, better economy than we ever did when we were riding the growth train and taking 3- to 4-percent annual economic growth for granted. u

Year Established – 1864

u

Population (2016 U.S. Census Bureau estimate) – 1,016,206 u Annual Budget 2017-2018 – $1.27 billion u FTE Employees 2017-2018 – 6,894 Did you know?

Pima County is one of the oldest continuously inhabited areas of the United States. Native Americans have lived in this region from prehistoric times to the present. 86 BizTucson

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Michael Crow President Arizona State University

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

The way that we will accelerate momentum is to ensure there is a deep level of cooperation and dynamic energy between metropolitan Tucson and Phoenix with a projected plan for the Sun Corridor that positions the region and Arizona as a can-do, cansolve, can-happen place that is great for business, families and education. We need strong alliances between major financial, educational, entrepreneurial and investment institutions with the major cities positioned as development sites. The ultimate manifestation of the Sun Corridor would come through a greatly enhanced I-10 connection between Tucson and Phoenix. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

Two priority areas – the first and most significant being educational attainment and workforce development. Tucson must continue to build a highly adaptive workforce at scale from the diverse communities that make up the region. The second is the speed of business and engagement. We need to accelerate the way in which business decisions are made, partnerships are developed, and customizable educational programs are deployed. The rate of change in our economy is moving too fast to not accelerate on all of these fronts. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

The outlook is fantastic. We know that we have to step up to enhance all outcomes by working in partnership with the K-12 sector to graduate 90 to 100 percent of students with world-class high school degrees and move to 60 percent of the population having some type of postsecondary certificate or degree to have a highly adaptive workforce for the future economy. And we have to take whatever steps necessary to make this happen, including revamping our systems. It’s either innovate or fail. About ASU u u u u u u u

Year established – 1885 Number of students – 71,946 in 2016 Number of employees – 16,800 Economic impact of $3.6 billion in Arizona in FY 2016 47,650 jobs created by ASU spending and investment 75 startup companies launched since 2003 More than 200,000 ASU grads work in Arizona with aggregate earnings of $11.4 billion, contributing $820 million in taxes

Did you know?

ASU was ranked first in the nation for innovation by U.S. News & World Report in 2016 and 2017.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Lee Lambert Chancellor & CEO Pima Community College

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Community leaders must recognize that human capital is now the number one driver for economic development. The University of Arizona’s wonderful MAP AZ Dashboard illustrates that educational attainment can be tied to nearly every leading economic indicator. Arizona must continue to support and reinforce workforce training and education because better educated workers will not only help existing businesses be more productive, innovative and adaptable, but will attract more new businesses to the state. Only about 39 percent of Pima County residents over 25 years old have an associate’s degree or higher, according to the UA MAP Dashboard. That’s why Pima Community College has committed to align itself with the statewide Achieve 60 AZ Initiative, which sets the goal of ensuring that 60 percent of Arizonans have a college certificate or degree by 2030. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Availability of skilled human talent has become the number one global currency in 21st century economies. By investing in that talent, PCC produces graduates who are productive citizens, creative and collaborative workers, and who have the skills and knowledge necessary to compete in an increasingly knowledge-based global society. One way we are doing this is by working to ensure that our training and curriculum is consistent with national and industrywide standards. One strategy PCC has employed is to join with Central Arizona College and Maricopa Community Colleges in offering a joint uniform advanced-manufacturing curriculum, with the help of private companies, including Boeing and Raytheon. In working with companies whose reach spans the North American continent, we are ensuring that our graduates can meet the needs of industry anywhere and everywhere. About PCC u

Year established – 1966 – Ballot initiative approved to form a junior college district. First classes held in 1969. u Number of employees – 1,376 FTE in FY 2016-17 u Enrollment – Approximately 43,000 in FY 2015-16 u Annual revenues – $194.3 million in FY 2013-14 u Total payroll – $122.1 million in FY 2013-14 u

PCC is one of the 25 most affordable two-year colleges in the nation, according to the U.S. Department of Education u PCC is approved to offer online classes in 28 states

Did you know?

More than 10,000 students earned diplomas or certificates from PCC in the past three years.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Lisa Lovallo Market Vice President, Southern Arizona Cox Communications

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

The excellent cooperation and alignment between our local governments and the business community needs to remain strong. To keep Southern Arizona’s momentum going, we need to continue to work together to solve problems that impact job growth and economic prosperity across our region. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

I would like the University of Arizona to accelerate its economic development efforts in Southern Arizona. The UA is the heart of Tucson, and our success as a community is inextricably linked to its goals and outcomes. This is a big responsibility for our university and a great opportunity for it as well. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Consumers and businesses will be bombarded with advancements in technology over the next decade. The “internet of things” has arrived and homes and offices will never be the same. In Tucson, companies like Cox are building modern networks that will be able to provide unlimited capacity and possibility. About Cox Communications

Year established – 1962 u Year established in Arizona –1995 u Number of employees – Approximately 18,000 nationwide u Cox is the third largest private for-profit employer in Arizona u According to a recent study, Cox Communications has contributed more than $1 billion to the Arizona economy u Cox also is committed to supporting the communities in which we live and do business. Cox employees performed more than 3,500 hours of hands-on volunteer service in Southern Arizona last year. Cox and its employees also support hundreds of worthy organizations each year through Cox Charities. In 2016, Cox Charities awarded more than $104,000 in grants to 22 local nonprofits in Southern Arizona. Did you know?

Cox Enterprises was founded in Dayton, Ohio, in 1898 by former schoolteacher and news reporter James M. Cox. Today Cox is still family-owned and family-run. Three generations of Cox family members are involved in the business today.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Fletcher McCusker CEO Sinfonia HealthCare Corporation

If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

Better collaboration. Our recent successes were due to multijurisdictional collaborations. However, it could be better. Pima County, the City of Tucson and the University of Arizona need to be joined at the hip regarding the creation of an innovation economy. Where? What incentives can we offer? Is the focus downtown, The Bridges, Tech Park Arizona or the Sonoran Corridor? How do we attract and retain millennials? Organizations like Southern Arizona Leadership Council, Sun Corridor Inc., Startup Tucson, Tech Launch Arizona and the multiple Chambers of Commerce need a coordinated effort toward primary employment, reducing our job shortage, creating incentives for relocating companies and telling our story. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Success breeds success. Caterpillar has been a huge catalyst. We have also recently relocated Hexagon Mining downtown and we are seeing a number of mining companies now interested in Tucson. Combine that with Raytheon Missile Systems, HomeGoods, World View, Comcast, Vector Space, ADP and others, Tucson is on the radar. Our low cost of living combined with our outdoor reputation has fared well against competitive cities. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

We don’t do nearly enough to attract talent to Tucson. The region’s employers should come together with a traveling job fair, especially in the winter back East. Nurses, engineers, teachers and law enforcement have severe shortages. Our academic institutions can and should partner with employers and offer students an employment track and a degree track. Economists estimate we need to fill 125,000 bachelor-level jobs by 2020. About Sinfonia and its related divisions

Year established – 2013 u Number of employees – 1,175 u Annual revenues – About $70 million u Sinfonia provides primary medical care with behavioral health treatment Did you know?

McCusker is the chairman of the board of the Rio Nuevo Multipurpose Facilities District, which was approved by Tucson voters in 1999 to invest state tax dollars in public and public/private projects to create a vibrant Tucson core. For every dollar the board invests, the community reaps $10 of construction activity with projects like the AC Hotel Tucson by Marriott, the Tucson Convention Center Arena, City Park and Caterpillar. 94 BizTucson

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Judy Patrick Board Director CopperPoint Mutual Insurance Companies

If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

You only get one chance to make a great first impression with site selectors. The Blueprint Update noted the competitive edge strong infrastructure provides. My magic wand would enhance roads so the city is easy to navigate and attractive. It’s about “curb appeal.” If we don’t have that, prospects may never return to discover all we have. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

We’re speaking with a united voice. When businesses and elected officials came together in support of the Blueprint, it was momentous. By aligning our efforts we’ve landed great anchor companies. Now, we need to build on that to attract their suppliers. Retention is critical, too. After attracting a new business, we need to nurture the relationship while focusing on continuous improvement and quality of life. Also, the more we can cultivate and sustain local entrepreneurs, the easier it is to retain them. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Talent entails: 1) workforce training, 2) education and 3) retaining young people. We have strong workforce programs and great educational institutions and a new University of Arizona president committed to help. We also have a new workforce development officer hired by Pima Community College to reach out to industry to better meet their needs. If we build a community that supports the workforce and boasts the features young people desire, I believe we can make significant progress in this area. About CopperPoint u

CopperPoint provides workers’ compensation insurance coverage to more than 12,000 businesses and their employees. u CopperPoint is funded entirely by employer premiums and investment dollars. u Recognized by Local First Arizona, CopperPoint is credited with injecting more than $500 million into Arizona’s economy through its buy-local practices. u In 2016, CopperPoint paid providers $111,472,939 for medical benefits of injured workers. Did you know?

CopperPoint employees volunteered 5,835 hours of their time in 2016 with more than 50 percent of employees recording volunteer hours.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Judy Rich President & CEO TMC HealthCare

If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

I would like to see Tucson be proud of being Tucson, to recognize that we are stronger together and that while we certainly have opportunities to become better, there are good people all over the region working hard for the good of our broader community. I would also encourage the region to recognize that when we lift up the most vulnerable among us, all of us will be more successful. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Our strong university and higher-education system has served as a driver for the growth of the high-tech sector. And, importantly, our city and county governments have made it attractive to launch innovative businesses that are outgrowths of those academic institutions. Additionally, there has been greater emphasis placed on developing programs to create a trained workforce that is ready for those high-tech jobs. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

I see exponential growth in our future. The attitude that has taken hold here is one of optimism and a renewed confidence that we lost during the recession. Success breeds success. In my industry, the next 10 years, like the previous 10 years, will be one in which we will be challenged to innovate so that we can continue to serve our community. Tucson Medical Center is fortunate to be in a community that is supportive, growing and collaborative. About TMC

Licensed at 600+ beds, TMC had 3,700 employees and a payroll of nearly $220 million last year u TMC is Southern Arizona’s largest hospital, delivers the most babies and sees the most patients in an emergency. It is the only locally governed, nonprofit community hospital in the region. u In 2016 TMC invested $58 million – nearly 12 percent of net revenues – into community benefit efforts, including charity care, investment in AHCCCS services and outreach. u TMC spent $245 million in capital improvements over the past five years. Did you know?

TMC worked with El Rio Community Health Center to open HealthOn Broadway, at 1 W. Broadway, in April 2017. HealthOn Broadway provides primary care, health education and wellness coaching to any community member. It will be staffed to accommodate up to 7,000 patient visits per year.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Dr. Robert C. Robbins President University of Arizona

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Create an environment that encourages innovation to build successful businesses and careers right here in Southern Arizona. The university must leverage its research enterprise to contribute to the innovation ecosystem. This means continuing robust commercialization efforts with Tech Launch Arizona, but it also means continuing to grow the impact of research on the student experience at the UA, which is crucial for a talented and innovative workforce in Southern Arizona’s areas of strength and opportunity. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Incredibly important. If the state and our region are to compete on the global stage, we need to prepare students for careers that don’t yet exist. We need to teach them to be adaptive thinkers and leaders who can take on new challenges and opportunities that arise over the course of the next century. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Tucson’s urban revitalization has begun to make our home a destination for businesses and talented entrepreneurs. The demand for an innovative workforce means as the UA’s enrollment grows from 43,625 (34,072 undergraduate) in fall 2016 towards our Arizona Board of Regents goal of 50,466 undergraduates by 2025, the quality and cost effectiveness of the student experience must remain among the world’s very best. We must collaborate with K-12 and community colleges, businesses and communities to create access and opportunity in the talent areas that will create a bright future.

u u u u u

u

u

Year established – 1885 Number of employees – 15,000 Total funds – $2.5 billion (FY 2017) Annual economic impact – $8.3 billion The National Science Foundation ranks the University of Arizona No. 1 in physical sciences research and No. 21 overall in research funding among U.S. public institutions. The first total artificial heart to win FDA approval was developed at the UA. The UA has been a part of every NASA planetary exploration mission.

Did you know?

The University of Arizona was founded in 1885, 27 years before Arizona became a state.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Jean Savage Vice President Caterpillar Surface Mining & Technology Division

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

We need to get out and spread the good news about what Tucson has to offer. Having just announced our expansion here a little over a year ago, we’ve seen first-hand how this community is able to compete and win around the world. Tucson has tremendous and unique strengths, strong employers, a great work-life balance culture and is developing into a cutting-edge innovation incubator. As a community, we need to acknowledge our successes, but not rest on them. Let’s continue to show prospective companies how Tucson can be part of their long-term success. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

It’s essential that Tucson grow our commitment and ability to prepare both the current and next generation of workers. It starts early in a child’s life when parents, schools and community organizations open the doors of opportunity and expose them to the potential each of them holds. It continues on through our high schools, colleges and universities. And then once someone hits the workforce, it can’t stop. We need to always ask what can be done to keep employees growing so that our workforce is globally competitive. It all requires a partnership between the community and our employers. And as we grow our presence here, we are committed to continuing our partnership with organizations like the University of Arizona, the United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona and others to ensure we provide opportunities throughout the learning cycle to everyone.

u

u u u

The Caterpillar Tractor Co. was formed in a merger in 1925 and reorganized as Caterpillar Inc. in 1986. Caterpillar is the world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines, industrial gas turbines and diesel-electric locomotives. It announced in January that it is moving its headquarters from Peoria, Illinois to Chicago. Sales and revenues – $38.5 billion in 2016 Employees – 95,400 in 2016 Its Tucson Proving Ground and Tinaja Hills Demonstration Center in Southern Arizona have a workforce of approximately 300 people. Did you know?

Caterpillar plans to employ about 600 engineers, product development and support personnel at its 150,000-squarefoot Tucson Mining Center, which is being constructed west of Interstate 10 and northeast of Sentinel Peak. It is scheduled to open in the first quarter of 2019.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Anthony Smith Supervisor Pinal County Board of Supervisors

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Workforce development is key to keeping employers interested in locating here. We want to give our future workforce the skills and education they need to be able to obtain these jobs and work in the communities in which they live. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Pinal County’s Board of Supervisors developed and adopted a Strategic Plan in 2014 that addressed our economic development efforts. Our efforts have been successful for not only the county, but our neighboring communities. Our latest Strategic Plan further accentuates our economic development efforts and continues the cooperation between the county and our communities.

The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Arizona@Work Pinal County has been and will be a key to bringing employers and potential workers together in order to make sure we have an adequate workforce. Central Arizona College is also tailoring its classes to meet employers’ needs. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

With our recent success in bringing Attesa, Lucid Motors and Dreamport Villages to Pinal County, we expect the multiplier effect to expand in bringing like industries to the area. Transportation will be a key component in keeping commerce flowing within Pinal County. The Regional Transportation Authority is expected to answer many of the needs we have when it comes to transportation not only for commerce, but our citizens as well. About Pinal County u

Year established – 1875 Estimated population – 418,500 u County seat – Florence u Estimated annual growth rate – 2 percent u Number of employees – 2,005 (budgeted for FY 2017-2018) u

Annual revenues – $408 million (budgeted for FY 2017-2018)

Did you know?

In the latest Pinal County Citizen Satisfaction Survey, more than 80 percent of those responding said they support the strategic direction of the county.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Sandra Watson President & CEO Arizona Commerce Authority

What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Since taking office, Gov. Doug Ducey has remained focused on making Arizona the best state in the nation for doing business. This effort has included keeping taxes low, regulation light, and ensuring Arizona State government has a “customer-first” mentality toward the people and businesses it serves. As a result, Arizona’s operating environment is recognized as one of the most competitive in the United States, and we continue to win significant economic development projects. Industry leaders including Raytheon Missile Systems, Caterpillar, ADP, Comcast, Ascensus and Vector are all scaling their success and creating new highwage jobs in Southern Arizona. What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Continuing to demonstrate that Arizona’s unique value proposition resonates with the world’s leading companies will accelerate our already impressive economic development momentum. When industry giants like Caterpillar, Raytheon and others choose to grow in our state, it sends a signal to other businesses that Arizona is a prime location for expansion. It is critical to proudly and consistently communicate Arizona’s successes, strengths and the many advantages it offers to businesses. In addition, we must ensure that Arizona’s pro-business climate remains the best in the nation and our talent is prepared to meet the needs of growing employers. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Workforce skills are a key element in any corporate expansion decision. Employers must have confidence that a region or community offers a strong pipeline of available talent with the skills they need to support their growth. Arizona is nationally recognized as a top state for workforce quality and availability, which has been a key contributor to our success. About ACA Five-year goals 2013 – 2017 u

Projected jobs – 75,000. Actual – 116,000. u Projected capital investment – $6 billion. Actual – 9.5 billion. u

Projected average wages – $53,803. Actual – $52,577.

Did you know?

According to the ACA, Arizona ranks seventh lowest in the country in average workers-compensation costs, sixth lowest in property taxes, and second lowest in unemployment insurance tax.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

David Adame

Bonnie Allin

David Adame

Mara G. Aspinall

Founded in 1969

Venture capital investor and adviser in health information technologies and diagnostic companies

President & CEO Chicanos Por La Causa One of the largest non-profit, community development corporations in the Southwest Located in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico More than 850 employees Four areas of impact: health and human services, housing, education and economic development 2016 impact: more than 260,000 people

President & CEO Health Catalysts

Executive Chairman GenePeeks Computational genomics company

Don Bourn

CEO Bourn Companies Headquartered in Tucson since 1990

Bonnie Allin

Privately held real estate development company specializing in corporate office, retail, and mixed-use properties

President & CEO Tucson Airport Authority

Completed more than 4 million square feet of projects across the western U.S.

Established 1948

Garry Brav

Operates Tucson International Airport (TUS) and Ryan Airfield (RYN) TUS – $3.2 billion economic impact, supporting 35,000 jobs and more than 100 tenants; all major airlines serving 18 nonstop destinations RYN – general aviation reliever airport with Federal Aviation Administration contract control tower and base to 300 aircraft and 30 tenants

Mara G. Aspinall

Don Bourn

President & CEO BFL Construction Founded 1973 Ranked among Tucson’s top 10 commercial contractors $90 Million in annual revenues 40 FTE

Garry Brav

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jacqueline Bucher

Ben Cordani

Jacqueline Bucher

VP, Head of Communications, Roche Molecular Solutions Head of Marketing and Corporate Communications, Roche Tissue Diagnostics/ Ventana Medical Systems, Inc. A world leader and innovator of tissuebased cancer diagnostic solutions Provides 250+ cancer tests with related instruments to 90+ countries to improve outcomes for the 14 million people diagnosed with cancer annually

Ben Cordani

Lead Human Resources Manager Caterpillar Surface Mining & Technology Division

Chris Denzin

Caterpillar Inc. has been making sustainable progress possible and driving positive change for 90 years as the world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines, industrial gas turbines and diesel-electric locomotives The Surface Mining & Technology Division hub is located in downtown Tucson, with a new building opening at the base of Sentinel Peak anticipated in early 2019. The Customer Learning and Demonstration Center and the Caterpillar Proving Ground are located 30 miles southwest of Tucson

Joe Coyle

Joe Coyle

Managing Director The Patrick Group Management consulting and executive search for the aerospace and healthcare fields Coyle previously held positions with Raytheon Missile Systems, Hughes Aircraft, Loral Aerospace and Ford Motor Companies

Chris Denzin

VP of Operations for Arizona CenturyLink Offers network and data systems management, big data analytics, managed security services, hosting, cloud and IT consulting services The company provides broadband, voice, video, advanced data and managed network service over a robust 265,000-route-mile U.S. fiber network and a 360,000-route-mile international transport network Proudly servicing Arizona since 1881

Tom Dickson

CEO Banner – University Medical Center Tucson Banner – University Medical Center South Banner – UMC Tucson, 2016 3,539 employees 22,006 inpatient admissions Banner – UMC South, 2016 928 employees 7,365 inpatient admissions

Tom Dickson

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jon Dudas

Michael Eastman

Jon Dudas

Michael Hammond

Founded in 1885, this land-grant university has more than 43,000 students and ranks among the top 25 among public universities with research activities of more than $60 million annually

Founded 1985

Senior VP and Secretary of the University University of Arizona

The UA has an annual economic impact of $8.3 billion

Michael Eastman

Vice President - Customer Service Strategy and Operations Tucson National Center of Excellence Comcast The new center houses more than 1,100 employees, providing support for residential products and services

Marc D. Fleischman

CEO Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services Leading independently owned, full-service commercial real estate company Licensed in Southern Arizona and Sonora, Mexico

Lawrence M. Hecker Managing Member Hecker PLLC

(Of counsel, Sun Corridor Inc.) 41 years practicing law in Tucson Best Lawyers in America, Corporate Law, 1993-2017

Michael Hammond

At least 15 percent of these positions are being filled by reservists, veterans and their spouses or domestic partners

Marc D. Fleischman CEO BeachFleischman

One of the largest locally owned public accounting, business advisory and consulting firms in Arizona with offices in Tucson and Phoenix Serves more than 6,000 private enterprises, nonprofit organizations and entrepreneurs in the U.S., Mexico and Canada A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top 200â&#x20AC;? largest public accounting firm in the U.S.

Lawrence M. Hecker

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Nancy Johnson

Bill Kelley

Nancy Johnson

Robert Lamb

Founded in 1970 as a neighborhood health center and currently provides medical, dental and behavioral healthcare for more than 96,000 individuals

Established 1963

11 healthcare campuses in Tucson with more than 1,100 employees

60+ employees with offices in Tucson and Phoenix

CEO El Rio Health

Bill Kelley

CFO Diamond Ventures Founded 1988

Robert Lamb

Steve Lace

Privately held company specializing in real estate development and private equity investments 2 million+ square feet of developed industrial, office and retail projects

COO GLHN Architects & Engineers Employee-owned, offering services in architecture and mechanical, electrical, civil and technology engineering

Clint Mabie

President & CEO Community Foundation for Southern Arizona Connects individuals, families and businesses to causes they care about $150+ million granted to the community by the foundation and its family of donors since 1980

20,000+ acres of developed and planned residential projects

Steve Lace

Past President Tucson New Car Dealers Association VP Royal Automotive Group & Lexus of Tucson Tucson New Car Dealers Association established 1947 Organized by dealers to offer support for economic development and transportation initiatives

Clint Mabie

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Xavier Manrique

Xavier Manrique

Senior VP Arizona Regional Middle Market Banking Office Wells Fargo Bank In 2016, Wells Fargo contributed more than $400,000 to Southern Arizona nonprofits, and team members volunteered 4,047 hours In August 2017, Wells Fargo Middle Market Banking expanded with the addition of three talented bankers dedicated to Southern Arizona serving customers greater than $20 million in sales Launched Diverse Segments program in June 2017 with Hispanic Business Initiative in Arizona

Edmund Marquez

Arizona State University continues to earn national recognition as a top university for graduate employability, inspiring master learners prepared with the knowledge and skills necessary to excel and achieve in today’s changing workplace ASU is in the Top 10 for graduate employability, No. 1 in the U.S. for innovation two years in a row, No. 1 fastest growing research university, No. 10 in the U.S. for total research expenditures

Ian McDowell

Vice President and Regional Director, Tucson Sundt Companies 100-percent employee-owned with revenues of approaching $1 billion

Edmund Marquez

Won more Associated General Contractors Build America awards than any other U.S. contractor

Founded agency in 1996 and now owns and operates three Allstate agencies, the largest Allstate group in Southern Arizona

Frances Merryman

Appointed by Governor Ducey to serve on the board of the Rio Nuevo Multipurpose Facilities District

Dedicated community volunteer and advocate

Agency Principal Edmund Marquez Allstate Agencies

Campaign Chairman for the United Way of Southern Arizona Received 2004 Businessman of the Year from the Tucson Hispanic Chamber Received 2016 Father of the Year award by the Father’s Day Council

Kelle Maslyn

Director of Community Engagement, Tucson Arizona State University Office of Government & Community Engagement

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Kelle Maslyn

Ian McDowell

Vice President Wealth Strategies Group The Northern Trust Company

Past President of the Breakfast Club of Tucson and a member of Tucson’s Leading Women in Business, Women Impacting Tucson and TIEMPO Member of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council, Southern Arizona Estate Planning Council, Tucson Airport Authority, Financial Executives & Affiliates of Tucson, University of Arizona School of Dance Advisory Board, Art of the American West Patrons of the Tucson Museum of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art and the Mountain Oyster Club

Frances Merryman

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Omar Mireles

Mark Mistler

Omar Mireles

Tom Murphy

Founded 1975

Population – 29,080

Owns and operates 38 apartment communities in Arizona, including 31 in the Tucson metro area, totaling more than 10,000 apartment homes

Median household income – $69,425

President HSL Properties

Owns and operates hotels and resorts, including the Hilton Tucson El Conquistador Resort and The Ritz Carlton, Dove Mountain

Mark Mistler

CEO Southern Arizona BBVA Compass

Tom Murphy

Farhad Moghimi

Company ranks among the top 25 largest U.S. banks, with 672 branches and 19 Southern Arizona branches Benefits Southern Arizona charitable organizations through employee volunteerism and financial contributions

Farhad Moghimi

Executive Director Pima Association of Governments/ Regional Transportation Authority Coordinates regional planning efforts to enhance mobility, sustainability, livability and economic vitality of the region Programs federal, state, regional and local funding for all regional transportation investments Manages the locally funded RTA and its 20-year, $2.1 billion regional transportation plan

Mayor Town of Sahuarita

Full-time-equivalent employees – 140

Steve Odenkirk

Executive VP Southern Arizona Regional Manager Alliance Bank of Arizona, a division of Western Alliance Bank. Member FDIC Founded in 2003, Alliance Bank of Arizona offers a full spectrum of deposit, lending, treasury management, international banking and online banking products and services, plus superior service to meet the needs of local businesses One of the country’s top-performing banking companies, Western Alliance, of which Alliance Bank is a division, ranks #4 on the Forbes 2017 “Best Banks in America” list

Tony Penn

President & CEO United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona Now in its 95th year locally, United Way fights for quality education, financial stability and healthy communities for every person in Tucson and Southern Arizona Impacting more than 100,000 lives annually, United Way is building a thriving community by uniting people, ideas and resources

Steve Odenkirk

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Tony Penn

Ricardo Pineda Albarran

Charles P. Potucek

Walter Richter

Randy Rogers

Ricardo Pineda Albarran Consul of Mexico Consulate of Mexico in Tucson Established in 1882 The official representation of the Mexican government in Pima and Pinal counties Promotes stronger ties between Mexico and the Sun Corridor region Fosters trade and investments across the border

Charles P. Potucek City Manager City of Sierra Vista

Population – 43,888 Home of Fort Huachuca, largest military installation in Arizona Member of the Great American Defense Communities Class of 2017

Walter Richter

Public Affairs Administrator Southwest Gas Founded 1931 in California Investor-owned utility 1.9 million residential, commercial and industrial customers in parts of Arizona, Nevada and California

Randy Rogers

CEO Tucson Association of REALTORS®

Adriana Kong Romero Senior VP Tucson Market President Bank of America

In 2016, Bank of America provided $208 million in business loans to Tucson companies, $389,419 in grants and matching gifts to local nonprofits Bank of America employees also delivered 3,144 volunteer hours to the community

Represents over 5,100 members and is the largest trade association in Southern Arizona Advocates for homeownership and property rights issues Invests in the community through membership engagement in the Tucson REALTORS® Charitable Foundation

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Adriana Kong Romero

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jonathan Rothschild

Jennifer Ruby

Jonathan Rothschild

David Smallhouse

Incorporated 1877

Real estate, private equity and venture capital investments

Mayor City of Tucson

Population â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 520,116 236 square miles Median family income â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $46,706

Jennifer Ruby

General Manager Walton Development & Management Advisory board member of Urban Land Institute Arizona. ULI is the oldest and largest network of cross-disciplinary real estate and land use experts in the world

David Smallhouse

Keri Lazarus Silvyn

Walton Development & Management is a division of Walton Multinational, privately owned real estate investment and development group concentrating on the research, acquisition, administration, planning and development of strategically located land in major North American growth corridors

Keri Lazarus Silvyn

Partner/Owner Lazarus, Silvyn & Bangs, PC Land use law firm that helps communities and developers grow responsibly across Arizona

Managing Director Miramar Ventures

Active investor in angel and early-stage ventures, many with close ties to the University of Arizona and Desert Angels of Southern Arizona

Kevin Stockton

Market CEO Northwest Healthcare Northwest Healthcare includes Northwest Medical Center, Oro Valley Hospital, Northwest Allied Physicians, Northwest Cardiology, Northwest Urgent Care and Northwest Emergency Centers Caring for patients throughout Tucson and surrounding areas, Northwest Healthcare is dedicated to offering a variety of convenient access points such as urgent care, free-standing emergency centers, and primary and specialty care clinics. With online check-in for the emergency room and urgent care, and online scheduling for primary care appointments, Northwest Healthcare is making it easy for patients to access healthcare when and where they need it

Lawyers in the firm practicing zoning, planning and land use law in Arizona for 40 years

Kevin Stockton

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Guillermo Valencia

Guillermo Valencia

Chairman Greater Nogales and Santa Cruz County Port Authority Founded in December 2004, the Port Authority brings together the key stakeholders from the Ambos Nogales area to address issues that impact ports of entry Works with local, state, federal and international partners to improve Arizona’s largest port facilities, streamline the crossing process at the Nogales ports of entry and to enhance economic development in the Nogales-Santa Cruz County region Mariposa Port of Entry in Nogales processes 600,000 commercial vehicles annually which equates to $30 billion in imports into the U.S. and $11 billion in exports into Mexico

Robert E. Walkup

Honorary Consul South Korea in Arizona Sworn in July 2013 Provides efforts to protect overseas Korean nationals residing in Arizona Liaison for the promotion of trade, economic, cultural, scientific and educational relations Facilitates commercial transactions and/ or introduction of foreign capital

Robert E. Walkup

Matt Wandoloski

Matt Wandoloski

VP of Corporate Strategy and Analytics Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona Founded 1939 1.5 million customers Offices in Tucson, Phoenix, Chandler and Flagstaff 1,500 employees statewide

Joshua Weiss

Executive Vice President Shared Services, Finance Hexagon Mining Headquartered in Tucson, Arizona, with offices worldwide, Hexagon Mining is shaping smart change by helping to connect all parts of a mine with technologies that make sense of data in real time

Joshua Weiss

Develops products and programs that connect surveying, design, fleet management, production optimization, and collision avoidance for mining companies and operations worldwide

Steven G. Zylstra

President & CEO Arizona Technology Council Established 2002 Arizona’s premier trade association for science & technology companies Events, resources & educational forums to grow Arizona’s technology industry

Steven G. Zylstra

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Photo:BalfourWalker.com

BizTECHNOLOGY

The ribbon is cut on the new facility for TuSimple on Aug. 21. Participating, from left, Sun Corridor Inc.’s Daniela Gallagher, VP of Economic Development, and Joe Snell, President and CEO, Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild, TuSimple Chief Technology Officer and co-founder Xiaodi Hou, Sharon Bronson, chair of the Pima County Board of Supervisors, and David Hutchens, chairman of the board of Sun Corridor Inc. and president and CEO of UNS Energy Corporation, Tucson Electric Power and UniSource Energy Services

TuSimple to Invest $15 Million in Tucson Facility Driverless Trucks Headed to Interstate 10 By Jay Gonzales By the end of this year, motorists making the drive on Interstate 10 between Tucson and Phoenix might see empty driver’s seats on large trucks making the same drive if a company that is new to Tucson meets its stated goal. TuSimple, a China-based company that is developing a driverless truck, dedicated its new research and development facility at 2551 N. Dragoon St. on Aug. 21, surrounded by local business, political, education and economic development leaders who heralded the company’s arrival as another win in the region’s efforts to attract high-tech and high-wage jobs. “By the end of this year, we want to achieve our first milestone of having five trucks driving from Tucson to Phoenix in the first pilot operation of fully loaded trucks carrying goods from one place to another without human intervention,” said Xiaodi Hou, TuSimple’s chief technology officer and co-founder. “By the end of next year, we plan to have a fleet of 25 trucks driving in any 118 BizTucson

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weather conditions, back and forth between Tucson and Phoenix every day.” TuSimple, which maintains its Beijing location and a facility in San Diego, has leased 6,865 square feet of warehouse and office space in Tucson, where it will engineer and test its autonomous trucking technology. The company projects to invest $15 million in capital expenditures, bringing its economic impact to $81.7 million over five years, according to a statement from Sun Corridor Inc. In addition to the 100 primarily engineering jobs to be hired by TuSimple over the next five years, the company’s move to Tucson is an even bigger win because of the added value of bringing in foreign investment, said David Hutchens, president and CEO of UNS Energy Corp., Tucson Electric Power & Unisource Energy Services, and chairman of the board of Sun Corridor Inc. “It’s bringing in that foreign investment and shipping out technology,” Hutchens said at the dedication. “That is the exact inflow and outflow of dol-

lars that you want – investing in our community with those outside dollars and selling those products outside. That is the perfect economic development model.” “This was a very competitive process and the winning city had to demonstrate that we have, first, a very capable, high-tech workforce that could meet the needs of this 21st-century company,” said Joe Snell, president and CEO of Sun Corridor Inc. “The second thing that we had was the right regulatory environment. Third, we had the infrastructure needed to support this R&D facility.” TuSimple is one of Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Research Center corporate internship partners, and attracts graduates from top universities around the world, according to the announcement released by Sun Corridor Inc. Those interested in employment opportunities with TuSimple can apply and learn more about the company at its website, www.tusimple.ai. Biz www.BizTucson.com


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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BUSINESS ATTRACTION & EXPANSION FY 2016-2017 AAA of Arizona AAA is adding 97 employees at its Tucson facility. Capital expenditure is $1.6 million, resulting in a $50 million economic impact to the region. Arcadia Custom Arcadia Custom is a high-end window and door manufacturer located on Tucson’s southeast side. The company recently purchased its facility and plans to add 150 jobs. Capital expenditure is $6.2 million, resulting in an $80.4 million economic impact. Ascensus Ascensus, the nation’s largest independent retirement and college savings services provider, opened a new office location in Tucson earlier this year. The company is adding 192 employees at its Tucson facility and capital investment is nearly $8 million. Ascensus’ expansion will have a projected economic impact of more than $200 million for Tucson and its surrounding communities. Bayview Asset Management, LLC Bayview Asset Management, a nationwide investment and mortgage finance company, is expanding its operations in Tucson. Bayview plans to hire an additional 375 people in key financial roles. Capital investment is $300,000, resulting in an estimated economic impact of $552 million for Tucson and its surrounding communities. Bombardier Aerospace Bombardier is adding 27 employees at its Tucson airport facility due to a steady growth in work orders. Capital expenditure is $3.5 million, resulting in a $17.4 million economic impact to the region. Creative Machines Creative Machines is a group of visionary artists, engineers and fabricators doing world-class work and whose abilities span exhibition design, ball machine sculptures, and monumental public art. Creative Machines is adding 20 employees at its Tucson facility. Capital expenditure is $2.1 million, resulting in a $35 million economic impact to the region. Ernst & Young Ernst & Young is a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services. The company has opened a national executive support center in Tucson. The new center will create 125 jobs in the area with a focus on executive administrative support, creative graphics and digital services. Capital investment is $1 million, resulting in a projected economic impact of more than $125 million to the region. Global Equity Finance Global Equity Finance has a unique business model of banking and brokering loans that allows the company 120 BizTucson

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to focus on finding the best loan and the best rates for its clients. The company is expected to hire 82 new employees, resulting in a $96 million economic impact to the region. HD Petroleum HD Petroleum has developed a smallscale waste oil micro-refinery, providing a profitable and sustainable solution for the processing of waste oil. The company is adding 20 new jobs to its Tucson facility. Capital investment is $8 million, with a projected economic impact of more than $27 million for Tucson and its surrounding communities. Hexagon Mining Hexagon Mining, an information technology provider of planning, operations and safety solutions for the mining industry, is relocating and expanding its Tucson-based North American headquarters to downtown. Hexagon Mining employs 140 people in Tucson and plans to add 119 jobs over the next five years. Capital investment is more than $2 million, resulting in an economic impact of $224 million for Tucson and its surrounding communities.

The most successful year for Sun Corridor Inc. in more than a decade • 18 successful projects • 5,964 projected new jobs (direct) • 4,798 new jobs in targeted industries • $1.5 billion projected capital investment • $12.2 billion economic and fiscal impact Hexcel Hexcel is an aerospace company that manufactures products for commercial aircraft structures and interiors, defense aircraft, helicopters and various industrial applications. Hexcel will invest in new facilities, machinery and equipment, while adding 146 positions in engineering, production and management. Capital investment over the next four years at its growing Casa Grande facility is projected to be $85 million. Innovation Manufacturing Solutions Innovative Manufacturing Solutions is a high-volume precision manufacturer located in Tucson. Its customers include aerospace, defense and military all the way to semiconductor laser corporations. The company is adding 65 new jobs to its facility. Capital investment is $1 million, resulting in an economic impact of $80 million for Tucson and the surrounding communities.

Lucid Motors Lucid Motors has selected Casa Grande/ Pinal County as the site for its new electric car manufacturing facility, with 2,213 new jobs and a $700 million capital investment. This is Arizona’s first auto manufacturing operation and Mexico will play a major role in its supply chain. The project represents a $1.7 billion economic impact to Arizona. Mainstreet Mainstreet offers a unique design concept in healthcare for the growing senior population. The company is expected to hire 63 new employees, resulting in a $41 million economic impact to the region. Monsanto Monsanto is a sustainable agriculture company, which delivers agricultural products that support farmers around the world. Monsanto intends to grow corn for research at its new facility near Marana. The company will create 60 new jobs at its facility. Capital investment is more than $91 million, resulting in an economic impact of nearly $290 million to the region. Northwest Medical Center Northwest Medical Center is a community healthcare provider serving the greater Tucson area and its residents with routine and emergency medical care, diagnostic and preventive screenings, surgical care and care for chronic conditions. Northwest Medical Center plans to open a new, free-standing emergency department which will enable the hospital to expand emergency services to Marana, creating 25 new high-paying jobs, and enhancing the quality of health care for the residents of Pima County. Capital investment is more than $8 million, resulting in an economic impact of nearly $20 million for the region. Raytheon Missile Systems Raytheon Missile Systems, Southern Arizona’s largest private employer, has selected Tucson/Pima County as the site for significant expansion. The expansion represents the addition of nearly 2,000 new high-skilled, high-wage jobs and will result in several billion dollars being added to the regional economy over the next few years. Vector Vector, a micro-satellite space launch company, is locating its manufacturing facility in the Pima County Aerospace Research Campus and adding 200 highwage jobs in Southern Arizona. The company’s expansion is expected to have an estimated $272 million economic impact on the local economy over five years.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. INVESTORS & STAFF

Sun Corridor Inc. Investors CopperPoint Mutual Insurance Company

Adecco Allstaff Services

Cox Communications

Alliance Bank of Arizona Arizona Commerce Authority

Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services

Arizona State University

Diamond Ventures

Bank of America

DLR Group

Banner University Medical Center, Tucson and South Campuses

DPR Construction

BBVA Compass Bank

GEICO

BeachFleischman

GLHN Architects & Engineers

El Rio Health

BFL Construction

Hecker PLLC

Bill’s Home Service

Hexagon Mining

Port of Tucson Randstad Staffing Raytheon Missile Systems

Sundt Companies

Tucson Airport Authority

Bourn Companies

Lloyd Construction

Business Development Finance Corp.

Long Companies

Northwest Healthcare

Chicanos Por La Causa

Nova Home Loans

City of Sierra Vista City of Tucson

Pima Association of Governments/Regional Transportation Authority

The Clements Agency

Pima Community College

Comcast

Pima County

Concord General Contracting

Pinal County

8

9

10

Tucson Association of REALTORS®/MLS

UNS Energy Corporation, Tucson Electric Power & UniSource Energy Services

CenturyLink

7

Trico Electric Cooperative

Lazarus, Silvyn and Bangs

The Northern Trust Company

6

Town of Sahuarita

Bluespan Wireless

CBRE

5

TMC HealthCare

The University of Arizona

Caterpillar

4

Southwest Gas

HSL Properties

Miramar Ventures

3

Sinfonia HealthCare

Tucson New Car Dealers Association

Blue Cross® Blue Shield® of Arizona

2

SAHBA

Hilton El Conquistador

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Vantage West Credit Union Roche Tissue Diagnostics/ Ventana Medical Systems, Inc. Venture West Walton Development & Management (USA)

1. Joe Snell, President & CEO 2. David Welsh, COO 3. Laura Shaw, CMO

Wells Fargo Bank

4. Cathy Casper, CFO

Westland Resources

5. Susan Dumon VP, Economic Development 6. Daniela Gallagher VP, Economic Development 7. Michael Guymon Director of Marketing 8. Courtney Pulitzer Executive Assistant to the President & CEO 9. Skye Mendonca Corporate Administrative Assistant 10. Steve Eggen Special Project Advisor

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