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BizLETTER Banking on Downtown

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Spring 2013

Volume 5 No. 1

Publisher & Owner

Steven E. Rosenberg Brent G. Mathis

Creative Director Photo: Steven Meckler

When “the book” on downtown Tucson’s revitalization is written, there will certainly be some cloudy chapters that we’d all like to forget. But a bright new chapter began Feb. 7 when local news media gathered in Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild’s office for an historic announcement. Joining him were Rio Nuevo District Chairman Fletcher McCusker and Tucson City Manager Richard Miranda. Without fanfare, they announced that the City of Tucson reached an agreement with the Rio Nuevo District board. Lawsuits had been dropped, property ownership assigned, financial obligations agreed upon. Going forward the two formerly “warring factions” would work together for the common goal of rebuilding downtown. As freelance journalist Dan Sorenson writes in this issue, that’s “all under the long-lost rainbow bridge.” A few days later, McCusker addressed the CCIM Commercial Real Estate Industry Forecast. He shared a littleknown fact – that from 2008 to 2013 the combined public and private investment in downtown totaled nearly $800 million, with $90 million more projected for 2014. That’s according to research by the Downtown Tucson Partnership. Downtown is now a hub for commercial real estate and construction activity in Tucson. Michael Keith, CEO of the partnership, contends there is more construction activity in downtown Tucson right now than anywhere in the Western U.S. Really? The BizTucson team took a closer look and found – all Rio-Nuevo cynicism aside – there really is a lot happening downtown. We brought writer/musician and downtown aficionado Sorensen to the table. The former bass guitarist of The Mollies talked to the mayor, McCusker, Keith and others to compile two compelling BizTucson reports. “Burying the Hatchet” tells us how the peace deal was brokered. “Banking on Downtown” highlights 10 reasons for optimism – a far cry from David Letterman’s Top 10 satires. Downtown Tucson is happening. This is an optimistic edition – after all, it is spring. We bring you profiles on our baseball and softball coaches, plus an update on the expanding soccer arena, all by sportswriter Steve Rivera. Eric Swedlund reports that the biosciences industry has increased four-fold over the past decade. And business is booming at B/E Aerospace, which expanded its manufacturing facility by 30 percent and more than doubled its highly skilled workforce.

We also take you to Mission San Xavier Del Bac, a glimmering jewel in the desert. Monica Surfaro Spigelman shares its centuries-old story and a new capital campaign to help preserve this iconic architectural masterpiece for generations to come. Original photography is by our own design guru Brent Mathis. Gabrielle Fimbres shares compelling stories about four dedicated pillars of our community who have not only been successful in business, but also where it really counts – at home. These rolemodel dads have been selected by the Father’s Day Council Tucson as the 2013 Fathers of the Year. We salute Steve Eggen, Tom Firth, Mike Hammond, Jon Volpe – and a U.S. military hero stationed at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base who you’ll read about in the next edition. We also honor an inspirational couple – Rosi and Benjamin Vogel. Proceeds benefit type 1 diabetes research at the University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center. As BizTucson begins its 5th year as the region’s business magazine, we send a special thank you to our loyal readers and to our advertisers, who invest their marketing dollars to reach the top executives in the business community. Special recognition and BIG thanks go to our stellar writers and photographers. It all begins with one terrific trio that is dedicated to excellence and always raising the bar. Thank you to our Creative Director Brent G. Mathis, for his exceptional graphic design, photography and sense of style – and to Contributing Editors Gabrielle Fimbres and Donna Kreutz for their “eagle eyes,” wonderful ideas and unwavering dedication to quality in writing and editing. Thanks also go to wise friends and colleagues – plus heartfelt gratitude to my supportive family and especially, my wife Rebecca. Steven E. Rosenberg Publisher & Owner BizTucson

Contributing Editors

Gabrielle Fimbres Donna Kreutz

Contributing Technology Director

Mike Serres

Contributing Cuisine Writer Edie Jarolim Contributing Writers

Contributing Photographers Carter Allen

Kris Hanning Amy Haskell Brent G. Mathis Chris Mooney Tom Spitz Balfour Walker

Member:

Arizona Builders’ Alliance Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau Tucson Advertising Federation Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Tucson Metro Chamber Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities (TREO)

BizTucson Phone: 520.299.1005 Subscription Information:

www.BizTucson.com subscriptions@BizTucson.com Advertising information:

Steve Rosenberg 520.299.1005 or 520.907-1012 steve@BizTucson.com BizTucson is published quarterly by Rosenberg Media, LLC. ,Tucson, AZ © 2013 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Opinions expressed in columns or articles do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

POSTMASTER:

Biz

Michael Bolchalk Stephanie Collins Mary Minor Davis Pamela Doherty Gabrielle Fimbres Chuck Graham Edie Jarolim Sheryl Kornman Donna Kreutz Christy Krueger David B. Pittman Anna Rasmussen Steve Rivera Dan Sorenson Monica Surfaro Spigelman Eric Swedlund Teya Vitu Valerie Vinyard Romi Carrell Wittman

Please send address changes to: BizTucson, 4729 East Sunrise Drive, #505 Tucson, AZ 85718.


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BizCONTENTS

SPRING 2013 Volume 5 No. 1

FEATURES Cover Story: 64

BizDOWNTOWN Banking on Downtown 10 Reasons for Optimism

72

Burying the Hatchet

DEPARTMENTS 54 96

30

4 26

BizLETTER From the Publisher

30 36

BizEDUCATION Inspiring Young Minds

40

BizSPORTS CEO of Softball

44

National Champ Dedicated to Fundamentals

48

Soccer City

52

BizMEDIA Changing Face of TV News

54

BizRESTORATION Jewel in the Desert

60 76

BizBENEFIT Desert Divas

78 82

BizTECHNOLOGY Wheelchair Lifts, Tie-Down Shelving, Containers Tech Launch Arizona

88

BizBIOSCIENCE Four-Fold Growth in Bioscience

92

BizAEROSPACE Flying High: B/E Aerospace Expands

BizMILESTONE Melodramatic Tale of Success

BizSALES Sales Guru Jeffrey Gitomer

BANKING ON THE REG ION

’S BUS INE

REASONS F

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ERS ARY

98 100

BizTRIBUTE Ad Man Earl Wettstein

104 107 113 118

BizAWARD UA Executive of the Year

BizTOOLKIT Social Networks: Understand Dynamics,Then Succeed

BizHONORS Father of the Year Honorees BizCOUPLE So Full of Hope BizRETAIL Denim Driven

OR OPTIMIS

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$2.99

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UNTIL

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BizMILESTONE Two Decades of Investing in Women

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BizHEALTH Arizona Oncology Foundation

BizCHARITY Acting on Faith

BizFASHION Spanning Generations

BizHONORS 132 Beach, Dail Win Good Scout Awards

DOWNTOWN 4TH AN NIV

BizLEADERSHIP Wagering on Success

SPR FAL ING L 201 201 23

EDI TIO FATH ER N OF THE YEAR HON GLO BAL OREE S POW ERHO USE B/E PRES ERVIN AERO SPAC G MISS E EXPA ION SAN NDS www.BizT XAVI ER DEL BAC ucso n.co

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BizINNOVATION 120 Israel@65

BizHEALTH Forward Vision

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ZIN E

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BizCOMMERCIAL Experts Predict Future BizARTS Contemporary Collections

ABOUT THE COVER Downtown Tucson Created by design guru Brent G. Mathis Photo: www.BalfourWalker.com www.BizTucson.com


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Can we be frank? Why is it so many companies go out of their way to tell you how great their service is? Shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you be the one to decide that?

So this is us not saying it.

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A Joint Approach to Knee, Hip and Shoulder Replacement Surgery by Tiana Velez

An informed buyer is a happy buyer. The same can be said for a patient and their health care. Informed is exactly how the team of the Carondelet Joint Replacement Center at St. Joseph’s Hospital hopes their patients feel throughout their surgery and recovery. The goal is simple: The more patients know about their joint replacement surgery, the more comfortable and ultimately safer they’ll be. Located on the fifth floor of St. Joseph’s, the Carondelet Joint Replacement Center opens this April and features a 30-bed dedicated patient care unit with private rooms and an on-site physical therapy gym with a pool. The emphasis is on a standardized, multi-disciplinary approach to total joint replacement that combines preoperative screening clinics, an educational symposium, and a highly collaborative team of physicians, physical and occupational therapists, nurses, case managers and, especially, the patient. “What we really try to stress is that the person having the surgery is a member of the team,” said Program Coordinator Jamie Wagoner, a licensed physical therapist. “You have a role in your recovery and here’s how you can help yourself.” (Pictured Above) Program Coordinator Jamie Wagoner reviews inpatient and outpatient physical therapy with joint replacement candidates and their caregivers (Pictured Left) Kathleen Flagg extends her new knee, following joint replacement surgery. She is guided by Carondelet Physical Therapy Assistant, Bruce McLaughlin.

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Preparing mentally, physically for surgery The story of the Carondelet Joint Replacement Center at St. Joseph’s Hospital began a few years ago when Dr. Edward Berghausen, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon, approached the hospital about establishing quality standards for orthopedic procedures, particularly joint replacement surgery of the shoulder, hip and knees. Those three areas alone accounted for more than 600 surgeries performed by Berghausen and his colleagues at St. Joseph’s last year. “Standardization also improves the patient experience,” explains fellow orthopedic surgeon and St. Joseph’s Chief of Staff, Dr. George Bradbury. “If we have something that is very predictable, very standardized, patients know what to expect. There are no surprises.” From Dr. Berghausen’s initial discussion emerged the preoperative screening clinic, which evaluates surgical patients before their procedure to determine their medical readiness. Run by Lissa Benson, a Family Nurse Practitioner, with the aid of two registered nurses, the clinic is often the first step in a patient’s progress through the center, particularly those with existing conditions such as diabetes, high cholesterol, hypertension or those who have experienced negative reactions to anesthesia.

tact a specialist on the patient’s behalf and request their surgery be postponed until their condition is stabilized. The goal is not to delay the operation, but to guarantee the individual is healthy enough. “You want to ensure that the patient is going to emerge from their procedure as healthy, if not healthier, than when they went into it,” said Dr. Berghausen. Further, by improving their health and becoming medically optimized for surgery, the greater a patient’s odds are for a faster, smoother recovery.

‘Joint Camp’: No songs, but plenty of lessons Once a patient has cleared the prescreening clinic, it’s off to camp. One of features specific to the Carondelet Joint Replacement Center at St. Joseph’s Hospital is its one-hour informational session known as ”Joint Camp.” Guided by a nurse, occupational therapist, physical therapist, and social worker, patients are given the ins and outs of their joint replacement surgery. A representative from the Continuous Passive Motion (CPM) device also demonstrates how the equipment will be used in their postoperative therapy and recovery.

If the results indicate the need for follow-up care—for example, high blood pressure, cardiac issues or a diabetic ulcer—Benson will con-

Attending Joint Camp, said Wagoner, “gives them an opportunity to learn what they can expect—before, during and after their surgery.”

During a recent afternoon, in the indoor pool room reserved for aquatic physical therapy patients, the smell of chlorine permeates the air and the only sounds come from Physical Therapy Assistant Bruce McLaughlin and his patient, Kathleen Flagg. Flagg is recovering from a recent knee replacement performed by Dr. Timothy Dixon, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in the reconstruction of arthritic and degenerative joints of the hip and knee. The surgery was a first for the nurse, who admitted to being reluctant at having her procedure done at the hospital, but trusted in the decision of her surgeon, Dixon. “I had never had serious surgery of any kind before, so I was a wreck,” she said. Of her experience, she added, “I was very pleasantly surprised. From my admission to my discharge, everybody was so amazing, respectful and kind. My fears were unfounded.” McLaughlin, who has been with the health network for 25 years, believes the benefits of the Carondelet Joint Replacement Center, with its focus on preoperative education, inpatient therapy, and postoperative follow-up care, are straightforward. “The patients know the people [the physicians, the therapists, and the case managers]. The paperwork is all done. It’s a smooth transition from inpatient to outpatient [therapy],” he said. Dixon agrees. “That’s the whole reason for the Joint Center. It’s that everything is optimal. … I think our hallmarks are going to be the therapy, the rehab and the patient’s early return to function. That’s the important part.”

PHOTOS: TOM SPITZ

Patients undergo a two-hour physical, which may include a stress test, an electrocardiogram (EKG), or other various blood tests, depending on the patient’s medical history.

Among the any topics covered: preparing your home for the recovery period; what to expect the day of the surgery; the actual surgical procedure; equipment or assistive devices they’ll need; and scheduling their first outpatient physical therapy appointment.

A smooth transition

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BizMILESTONE

Melodramatic Tale of Success Tony Terry Founder Gaslight Theatre 26 BizTucson

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PHOTO: TOM SPITZ

By Chuck Graham


How many people turn their dreams into a lifetime of success? Not many – but Tony Terry did. Just a college student in the mid-1970s when he saw his first old-time comedy melodrama – in Durango, Colo. – this Tucson native could not wait to create one of those for himself. “My gift is that I’ve always felt if I just worked hard enough,

Terry’s success. He’s running a six-business empire grossing several million dollars annually that isn’t feeling any side effects of the sluggish economy. “The last two years have been our best ever,” he said. Gaslight Theatre is the heart of the operation, which pulses life through Little Anthony’s 1950s-style diner and Grandma

All I ever really wanted to do was make people laugh. –

Tony Terry, Founder, Gaslight Theatre

I could make it work…no matter what it was,” Terry said, now basking in the achievement of 35 successful years as founder, builder and owner of the Gaslight Theatre, 7010 E. Broadway. “He is very driven,” said Becky Gilmour, a Gaslight fan since childhood, and now the theater’s GM. “But Tony doesn’t micromanage. He trusts people to do their jobs.” Back in 1976, Terry’s youthful enthusiasm convinced him to take some local actor friends to Alaska, for the summer. Their plan was to produce an old-time melodrama for the cruise ship tourists who came ashore daily in Skagway. Thanks to a frigid summer – he discovered the name Skagway means “home of the north wind” – the venture was not a financial success. But this University of Arizona pre-med student, with a minor in technical theater, was show-biz bitten. “So then we had all these stage lights I had built out of old one-gallon cans. We also had a crude lighting board. When my brother Tom found an empty space at Trail Dust Town that we could convert into a 100-seat theater, we did it.” Thus in 1977, Tucson’s own Gaslight Theatre was born. Terry has never looked back. “Decades after that, my dad was still asking me when I was going back to med school,” said the selfmade showman. Instead of med school, Terry more than doubled his audience seating in 1980 by relocating the theater out on Tanque Verde Road in a shopping complex that was soon renamed Gaslight Square. After 10 years there, he bought and developed the present Gaslight Theatre and complex of complementary services on Broadway near Kolb. Even with no title by his name, there is no doubting

Tony’s pizza carry-out – plus a catering business, costume rental shop and print shop. “They were businesses that got started out of necessity,” Terry said of his expanding domain. “If I were spending a lot of money on something, like printing menus, tickets and programs, I’d decide how to save money by doing it myself.” For decades, going to the Gaslight Theatre has been a family tradition for many thousands of Tucsonans – especially at Christmas time. Sold-out performances in the 242-seat space are a daily occurrence. Make that several times daily during the holiday season. Another of Terry’s gifts could well be an uncanny sense of the Gaslight’s appeal. Nothing is ever taken for granted. In the years since 9/11, Terry began feeling his audience wanted to escape daily life even more. One big artistic change came in the traditional Christmas shows – which were always heavy on sentiment. He began lightening them up by adding more holiday songs, often from the 1950s. Also for the last few years, at every performance of every continued on page 28 >>>

NOW PLAYING “The Lone Stranger: Hilarity Rides Again” runs through March 31, returning audiences to those thrilling days of yesteryear when a masked man on a white horse accompanied by his loyal sidekick could save the day in less than two hours. Starting April 4, the Gaslight’s favorite action hero is back for more thrills and spills in the musical adventure “Arizona Smith and the Relic of Doom.”

Spring 2013 > > > BizTucson 27


BizMILESTONE continued from page 27 show, all military veterans are asked to stand to be honored. Then after every performance, cast members in their costumes wait at the door to thank people for attending. There is a very clear line of business/ artistic separation between Terry and the “three geniuses” – as he calls his creative team of set designer Tom Benson, writer/director Peter Van Slyke and music director Linda Ackerman. “We all work together with a firm level of trust,” said Terry. “I do have creative input, but they don’t have to take my input. “Even so, we still want to be true to our melodrama origins.” Decades of backstage tinkering with scripts, costumes and outlandish characters have led Terry and his associates to a refined formula combining campy acting, song parodies and corny jokes. This formula is the active ingredient in what all the employees call “the Gaslight experience.” “As an audience member, it’s magic. But as an employee it’s magic, too,” said Gilmour. “For a lot of the employees, this is their first job. “There are so many married couples here who met while they were both working at Gaslight. This really is a big family.” “Tony is a local family guy,” said Rene Cloutier, explaining why she has stayed with these siblings of the stage for 29 years, designing costumes and running the Gaslight Costume Shoppe. That “family” word keeps popping in every conversation about why the staff is so stable. Benson has designed virtually all of the Gaslight shows from the very beginning. Van Slyke was one of Terry’s childhood friends. They were in Boy Scouts together. “We’re all family, really we are,” Carla Childs explained simply. She has been a Gaslight staffer for 25 years. She runs the Gaslight Print Shop. “You can call the growth of this business magical, fortuitous, whatever you care to call it,” Terry said. “All I ever really wanted to do was make people laugh. “But I do have high standards, and everyone here knows my standards. So we start every day with the same expectations.”

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BizEDUCATION

Inspiring

Young Minds Kathleen Perkins 30 BizTucson

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

By Sheryl Kornman


In her blue-framed eyeglasses, leopard-print kitten heels and skinny jeans, Kathleen Perkins may look a bit like a rock star to the 400 children of John B. Wright Elementary School, most of whom live in tired rentals in a poverty pocket in midtown Tucson. This Philadelphia native is a former foster child with a heart of gold. Five years ago, she committed herself to helping the children of John B. Wright to succeed. Perkins said she knows “these kids are going to grow up one way or another,” and she’d like them to grow up knowing people care about them – and that they can do more than just struggle to survive. As a volunteer advocate at the school that she calls “JBW,” this consultant to the European Union who lives in Tucson and travels the world on business has flooded the school with hands-on science and hope. She chose Wright after driving past the school at 4311 E. Linden St. several times and then stopping in for a visit. Principal Maria Marin welcomed her help. “Kathleen thinks like a CEO and I think like an educator/principal,” Marin said. “We respect and learn from each other. Together, and without extra funding and in great spirit, we have made much progress. The kids see us working and laughing and they know good things are happening for them.” As a businesswoman, Perkins sees poverty as a business issue. “A high poverty rate is not a compelling reason to move here and start a company. It is a matter of how a community recognizes it and deals with it.” She asked herself: “What is the poverty reduction plan and how is it working? Where will a third grader today find work in 2025?” Perkins said this volunteer opportunity “just kind of grabbed me. This was not planned.” She was busy enough in her own career and life without this new commitment. The former CEO of a global optical engineering firm, she’s now a photonics industry expert and international business consultant who serves on many scientific boards. And she’s married to a rocket scientist. The effort at Wright works “because we flood and focus, with a great principal and effective teachers,” she said. www.BizTucson.com

She looks at what she can do there from a CEO model: “What’s effective? How do you cut the resistance? You have to stay focused and committed.” Perkins quickly “got tied to the kids” at Wright. “These are children who know how to get along. They see stuff early that they have to deal with. They have backbone. And they really want to know what the middle class looks like.” Perkins said 100 percent of the children qualify for government subsidized lunch. Many live with what the experts call “food insecurity” and irregular access to medical care. There are 28 nationalities represented at the school. Wright’s population is seeded with international refugees relocated from conflict regions to Tucson. Seventy percent are being raised by one adult, not one of them with a college degree. “They live a very fluid and transient home life,” Perkins said. Colleen Niccum, the recently retired director of community and government relations at Raytheon Missile Systems, said Perkins’ commitment to the children at Wright “is such a great example of how one person can drive change. Instead of continuing to drive by the school each day, she took the important step of stopping to see how she could help. “If each of us took that step, we could solve a lot of problems in our community,” Niccum continued. “I am thankful to Kathleen for the inspiration she provides to all of us, and for caring enough to make such a difference for the students at John B. Wright.” Jim Gentile, who recently retired as president of Tucson-based Research Corporation for Science Advancement, volunteered as the school’s chief science officer. Wright also has its own chief technical officer, Ron Carsten, former chief engineer at Raytheon. They helped put together Wright’s STEM Lab, which shows the children the value of learning about science, technology, engineering and math. Perkins raised $60,000 to fund the 18,000-square-foot STEM campus, which includes a vegetable garden in the school’s atrium. The students learn about solar technology and use a rainwater capture system for the garden. “One day, I thought, ‘wouldn’t it continued on page 32 >>> Spring 2013 > > > BizTucson 31


BizEDUCATION

Instead of continuing to drive by the school each day, she took the important step of stopping to see how she could help.

Colleen Niccum, Former Director of Community and Government Relations, Raytheon Missile Systems

continued from page 31 be nice if they had fresh vegetables?’ While I was on business in Belgium, I realized I could email at night and work with executives and Maria (Marin) to make it happen,” she said. A former CEO of Breault Research Organization in Tucson, Perkins is a longtime member of the University of Arizona College of Science Dean’s Board of Advisors and chair of the Business Advisory Board at UA’s Bio5 Institute. She and Gentile were honored recently by the Educational Enrichment Foundation for their volunteer

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work at Wright. Both were recognized, in part, for increasing awareness of the values of humanitarianism. Wright students have learned to ask effective questions and interact with scientists, Perkins said. So far, 35 scientists have visited the school, looked poverty in the eye, she said, and helped inspire the children. The children are now familiar with various college degrees and the Nobel Prize. They also know they can make a living as a solar installer by studying technology. Perkins said not every child will make it on to college, and she wants them to

know they have options. “I don’t want any of them to feel like failures because they don’t go to college. They do need to learn how to do their best work and learn financial literacy and civics.” Recently, some of the children at Wright got a lesson in traditional Russian tea and sweets, thanks to Yakov Sidorin, a Tucson-based, Russian-born engineer and patent attorney with a Ph.D in optical sciences. His Russian mother made the sweets. This was no ordinary tea party for these fourth graders. It was a peek over the fence into the world beyond.

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BizBRIEF

Tomassini Named Senior VP at U.S. Trust Paola Tomassini has joined U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management in Tucson, as senior VP and private client advisor. She has more than 25 years experience in the financial industry. Prior to joining U.S. Trust, Tomassini served in a variety of positions, including division sales manager at Contango Capital Advisors, director of executive banking at National Bank and as a market manager at Bank of America. Tomassini and a team of experts are responsible for delivering multi-generational, planning-based wealth management solutions to high-net-worth individuals and their families, including wealth structuring, investment management, fiduciary, complex credit and private banking capabilities. U.S. Trust serves a variety of clients, from families managing wealth across multiple generations to business owners, entrepreneurs and other creators of first-generation wealth.

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BizSALES

Fifty Shades of Sales Putting Emotion First, Price Second by Jeffrey Gitomer

It seems society is loosening up. The internet, music, movies, book titles, TV and texting have created an “openness revolution” not matched since the ’60s. The recent explosion in popularity (and sales) of the Fifty Shades of Gray trilogy leads me to believe the world of sales needs to loosen up as well. Not THAT kind of loose. Shheeeesh. It’s not that selling is particularly sexy or erotic – but it is definitely emotional. You, the salesperson, enter the sale full of emotion and do your best to transfer your emotion to the prospect – and even capture their emotion. Once there is emotional agreement, the likelihood of a sale is much higher. To understand the concept of Fifty Shades of Sales more fully, be aware that the sale is made emotionally, then justified logically. You make a significant emotional investment in the sale. Your emotions rise and fall with the decisions of other people. Sometimes you score. Sometimes you don’t. Either way, there’s an overflow of emotional energy. Customers are also emotional: • Before they take ownership (need and desire) • As you’re presenting (risk, doubt, caution) • When they take ownership (pride and gratification) • When something goes wrong (fear and anger) Your challenge is to harness prospects’ emotions and create enough positive atmosphere and perceived value for them to purchase from you. GREAT NEWS: Your shades of gray, er sales, are within your control. Here are emotional elements and actions to create a buying atmosphere: • Asking emotional questions about their experience and wisdom • Your passionate, compelling presentation • Your personal, transferrable, consistent enthusiasm • Belief in your heart that the customer is better off having purchased from you • Connecting personally and building meaningful rapport • Understanding the motives of the customer to buy • Making certain that your value message goes beyond price. When value exceeds price, a purchase occurs. • Wowing the customer with your sales and service • Using an emotional video from other customers to endorse your authenticity, quality and value.

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BizSALES continued from page 36 • Reassuring the customer after the purchase • Being genuinely interested in the prospect – a classic Dale Carnegie axiom • Doing more than is expected – a classic Napoleon Hill axiom • Giving value first – a classic Jeffrey Gitomer axiom That’s a sales list of qualities you can sink your teeth into. They create emotional engagement and they can all be mastered over time. TAKE NOTE: You determine your own emotion by spoken and unspoken elements of who you are as a person. Here are the elements you must possess to be the master of your emotional self: • Your internal positive attitude • Your self-confidence • The way you present yourself • The way you speak, both in tone and words • Who you seek to become as a person • How you live your life • How you earn respect • Your reputation with peers, online and in the community • Your love of family • Daily random acts of kindness

The shade of emotion you put into each of these elements will determine the outcome of your sales effort – more than price, insincere communication or closing tactics. BEWARE AND BE AWARE: Closing the sale, finding the

pain and manipulation are not in the shades-of-gray spectrum. They’re black. Customers see right through phony words. PRACTICE SAFE SALES: You got into sales to win, and make

income beyond the safety of a salary. You have to take risks– but don’t risk your ethics or reputation. Your emotional success and your sales are totally up to you. When you combine and master the strategies above, your outcomes will build your security. That’s an emotion you can be at peace with – and bank on.

Biz

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars. Email him at salesman@gitomer.com. © 2013 All Rights Reserved – Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. (704) 333-1112 38 BizTucson

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BizSPORTS

CEO

of Softball

Candrea Inspires On and Off the Field By Steve Rivera To say Mike Candrea has inspired through more than a quarter century of coaching at the University of Arizona would be an injustice – as would calling him just a winner. He’s so much more because he has accomplished so much more. From his first softball players in the mid-1980s to today’s stars, he’s been their guide to greatness and a beacon with the bat. Candrea has prodded and pushed. Convinced and consoled. He has incensed and inspired. It all depends on the moment and the memory. Some parts father figure, other parts philosopher. “Coach was really the first leader I had treat me like an adult,’’ said Debbie Day, Candrea’s first star recruit and the first pitcher to deliver him an NCAA title in 1991. “He didn’t micromanage and make decisions for us all the time. He trusted us to do the right things and we in turn did them,” Day said. “We knew what was right and that he expected us to live up to our responsibilities. It impacted me because I felt so trusted, so believed in, and so much in control of my own performance. Coach kept it fresh, new and very challenging.’’ The result? UA has won eight national titles, and he’s added Olympic Games gold and silver medals to his resume. He’s the winningest active coach and second all-time in victories, becoming the fastest coach to reach 1,300 victories for a career. At the start of this season he stood at 1,310 and is second only to former Fresno State coach Margie Wright (1,457). “Winning 1,300 games in a career is a milestone that should be celebrated 40 BizTucson

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by the program and not just the head coach,” Candrea said. “I have been blessed to have coached many great athletes that have performed due to their passion, character and love for the University of Arizona.” The Arizona State graduate is tried and true Red and Blue. This season is his 28th at UA. He’s also inspiration guided by preparation. Well-accomplished doesn’t begin to describe one of the world’s foremost experts in coaching softball and the art of motivating student-athletes. He knows what motivational buttons to push. If he wasn’t coaching, he’d be teaching – but isn’t that what he does every day? “I’m very process oriented so I enjoy the people side of it,’’ said Candrea, 57. “I also enjoy helping people grow.’’ For Candrea, it’s who he is. It’s what he does. “Coach Candrea is like a second father to me – first and foremost he cares for his players,’’ said former UA star pitcher Jennie Finch, and one of four national Players of the Year Candrea has coached while at UA. “He gets the best out of his players,’’ Finch added. “He exudes confidence in you and expects nothing but 100 percent from you. He gives that daily. I love his consistency, passion, competitiveness, heart, energy, fire, preparedness, love of the game and so much about him. I’m so very blessed and grateful for the opportunity I had to play for him at Arizona and again on Team USA.’’ For Finch, it was like catching lightning in a bottle – twice. For the UA, the journey continues and is expected to grow. As its softball CEO, Candrea sees – expects – im-

provement with his ever-present, eyeon-the-prize outlook. But as he puts it, if you’re not looking at the newest and latest ways to get your team motivated, you’re not looking to get better. Any business leader knows that. It’s about discipline. It’s about being held accountable. He also thinks out of the (batter’s) box. Not too long ago, he used a SWAT analysis, a technique used in business to identify strengths and weaknesses among individuals. More recently, he’s used vision testing and yoga. Anything to get better – and not just as players. “You’re always looking for that edge,’’ he said. “Everyone does a pretty good job of coaching the people with the physical skills. The mental part of the game has grown so much, but if you look at businesses today, they are doing a lot of things in management that we are doing, trying to find what buttons to press to try to make the most out of the people you have. That’s what success is all about.’’ No coach at UA knows more about success than Candrea. None is more decorated. Candrea has: • Won 82 percent of his games • Coached 50 All-Americans • Been named the United States Olympic Committee Coach of the Year in 2004 and honored with the Olympic Shield • Been named a four-time time national Coach of the Year • Been named a 10-time Pac-10 Coach of the Year • Coached four Players of the Year • Coached UA to 21 NCAA College World Series trips

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Mike Candrea Softball Coach University of Arizona

Callista Balko Jennie Finch

Coach Candreaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top Five Leadership Qualities Competency: Be competent at what you teach, and be a student of the game. Try to be innovative and stay ahead of the curve. Be strong enough to make tough decisions.

Communication: Develop the ability to communicate a vision and spread that vision. Integrity: Be a great role model. Encourage balance between family, profession and spiritual connection. Caring: Build relationships around trust and mutual respect. www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

Consistency: Have consistency in how you handle people and react under pressure. Be enthusiastic and passionate about your role, and control your attitude, effort and focus.

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ARIZONA ATHLETICS

Caitlin Lowe

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BizSPORTS continued from page 40 And yet, he wants more, especially after failing to get to the World Series for the last two seasons. The College World Series is where Candrea has made his mark – Super Regionals are just pit stops on the journey. Yet, that’s where Arizona has finished the last two years. “The last two years have been very difficult but through difficult times you feel the urgency to identify the factors that cause those difficulties and regain the passion to change the environment and re-establish the foundations for success,’’ Candrea said. “Recruiting players that fit your program are crucial. And they must not only be good athletes but good people with great character.” It’s about embracing the process – and Arizona hasn’t done that the last couple of years. There wasn’t the passion, he said. “It caught up with us.” Seemingly plenty caught up with Candrea last season. He fell ill in Tempe, and was rushed to the hospital. Chest pains, likely stress-induced. “Last year’s visit to the hospital was a combination of not eating, sleep-

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ing or hydrating well,’’ he said. “All is under control and definitely a wakeup call for finding time to take care of the only body I will receive in my lifetime. I learned my lesson and am feeling better than ever.” And ready for another year and the run for title number nine. “Currently, we are at a point where he has gone back to the drawing board and made some changes within the program and I think you will see this squad back in national contention,” said Erika Barnes, a former UA player and now a UA athletic administrator. “He continues to enjoy the challenge and not reaching the WCWS has only strength-

At the end of the day, I’d like to be able to look in the mirror and like what I see – win, lose or draw. –

UA Softball Coach Mike Candrea

ened that fight.” Failure is not an option. Then again, how is failure and success gauged when 30 to 40 victories are the norm for one of the most respected programs in the country? “The beauty of coach’s leadership is that he is so respected he hardly has to say anything to get his players to follow his direction,’’ said Callista Balko, one of his star players just a handful of years ago. “He’s only vocal when the situation calls for it, which is rarely,’’ she said. “The man has the most intimidating presence that I’ve ever witnessed.” Barnes appreciated the discipline then and appreciates it now, as an athletic administrator. “The respect I had for him as a coach has carried over to the respect I have for him as a leader in our industry, colleague, and especially, as a friend,’’ said Barnes. “Having a balance in your life is something he tries to instill in his athletes and he is a model of that. Having a plan is one of my favorite take-aways from him and I have carried that on into the areas of my life.’’

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BizSPORTS seball

ba ildcat ona W

team.

riz ion A hamp C l a ation letics a Ath 012 N The 2 y of Arizon s Courte

National Champ By Steve Rivera Andy Lopez Baseball Coach University of Arizona 44 BizTucson

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Lopez Dedicated to Fundamentals


Dinner reservations may be a little easier to come by these days for Arizona baseball coach Andy Lopez. Eating the meal might be the difficult part. It comes with the territory when you win a national title in Tucson. Lopez won his first with the Wildcats after the University of Arizona went on an improbable-yet-glorious run to the World Series title last summer. “It’s the most I’ve been recognized in the last 10 years,” Lopez said, of his new-found fame, despite being UA’s coach for 11 years. “I thought I’d get away with it. At Florida, I had a TV show and a radio show so I had to go in the back door at restaurants. Here, nobody knew who the heck I was. It

UCLA in the 1970s. Lopez’s philosophy: “Dedication to fundamentals.” “I want us to reach our potential,” Lopez said. “But first I must see what that potential is. Last year we reached it.” It’s his job to find that magic again. And his ways of teaching are as crisp and clean as his game-day jersey. It’s his style as a leader, altered through the years because of circumstances and situations. “I’m very disciplined and very demanding,” Lopez said. “I have two words I say 10 to 30 times a day: effort and execution. I tell them, ‘We need your best effort. And, if I don’t get their

highest level: Lopez 401 – Advanced Baseball Studies. First days go like this: He tells you congratulations for making the first meeting and the rest is up to you. “I tell them, ‘Your talent has gotten you to this position and in the team meeting and now the game of baseball has gotten faster and more demanding,’” he said. “It takes more discipline and concentration and more effort. It takes more poise and more toughness.” And Lopez is nothing but poise and toughness. It’s how he was raised and where he comes from (San Pedro, Calif.). In fact, toughness was a way of life … or else. It was about loyalty and commitment. “Character traits” as Lo-

I have two words I say 10 to 30 times a day: effort and execution. –

University of Arizona Baseball Coach Andy Lopez

was kind of neat. I kind of liked it,” he laughed. “Don’t get me wrong – I like signing the autographs and such and I do appreciate it.” Such is the life of a champion. Yes, exposure has its price. It was Lopez’s second championship, having won one with Pepperdine University 21 years ago. Humor him because he knows the drill. Life is good for Lopez, UA’s 59-yearold man on the diamond. He’s come off a jewel of a season where the Wildcats defeated two-time defending champion South Carolina to win the school’s first NCAA title since 1986. UA won 11 consecutive games and did not trail at any point while at the World Series in Omaha, outscoring opponents 27-8 in five games. Glorious road indeed. “That’s unheard of,” Lopez said. “We were never behind.” This season, Lopez sees his team not so much as defending champions, but “attacking” champions. Better yet, in Lopez’s mind it would be best to be consistent and fundamentally sound. After all, Lopez is a man who quotes the late, great John Wooden often. The two met while he was a student at www.BizTucson.com

best effort, we will remove them from the field and send them home.” It’s happened every now and again. “They understand the level of effort we demand,” he said. Welcome to college baseball at its

Coach Lopez’s

Five Winning Strategies Arizona baseball coach Andy Lopez focuses on five tenets of success: Faith: Things happen the way they are supposed to happen. Courage: It’s about dealing with fate. You deal with what happens. You must lead your club no matter what. Preparation: You’ve got to be prepared. If you are not prepared, your club will be an example of you. You can’t be sloppy and be exposed. Intensity: Do your best. If you are going to ask your players for their best then you bring your best. Efficiency: You’re old enough to know you don’t have all the answers. Hire good people and ask their opinions. Listen and consider their opinions. Sometimes go with their opinions. It’s not always just your way, it’s about the right way. So find it.

pez called them. “If you weren’t loyal you’d get your butt kicked,” he said. “I was part of the Persuasions and it was all about that. You couldn’t feel sorry for yourself.” The Persuasions – a street club, if you will – weren’t exactly a gang back in the day, but not exactly a “fun bunch,” he said recently. He grew out of it, realizing that if he didn’t, he wouldn’t have a long life. It didn’t hurt to have the prayers from his grandmother to help guide him. And with the help of a strong mom, Connie, and tough father, Art – who has since passed away – he turned into one of college baseball’s all-time best coaches/ leaders. After UA’s run for the title, Lopez was named Coach of the Year for the third time in his career. He received that distinction previously in 1992 after winning the title at Pepperdine and in 1996 when Florida made a deep run. He also became only the second coach to win a Div. I baseball title at two different schools. In his 30-year coaching career, his record is a resounding 1,090-664-7. In his first 11 years at Arizona, he was 403continued on page 46 >>> Spring 2013 > > > BizTucson 45


BizSPORTS continued from page 45 246-1. Lofty numbers to be sure, but they no longer drive him. “I don’t think about the wins and losses,” he said. “When I was younger, I was petrified of the wins and losses. Now I’m more concerned with us having a good effort every day … correcting mistakes, getting tougher and getting more prepared. If I can do that with the guys, the wins and losses take care of themselves.” There was a time when the numbers almost killed him – literally. In 1996, at the age of 42, the team plane had to be diverted to Savannah, Ga., after Gator trainers thought he was having a heart attack on a return flight to the University of Florida. After a day in the hospital, he was back at Florida with a new-found perspective. “I was wound up like a clock,” he said, recalling 1996. “When I did get home after a night in the hospital, I realized this wasn’t worth it. I have a

wife and four kids who are important to me.” That same year, Florida was one of the better teams in the country, finishing with a school-record 50 wins with just 18 losses. It finished third in the country after winning the Southeastern Conference. It was then he decided to concentrate on “teaching and preparing.” His intensity “sneaks in every now and again,” he said. “I won’t lie. When we get into a little bit of a tailspin we have to get this thing going and fixed. Coach John Wooden used to say, ‘the quickest way to get out of a losing streak is to not think about the streak, just go out and play and teach.’ It was the same for winning – just play and teach.” He has served as teacher to his own kids, as well. Lopez and his wife, Linda, are the parents of daughters Kristi and Kerri. They also have two sons, Michael and David, who are both UA students. Michael played four seasons for

the UA baseball program and will serve as a member of the coaching staff this season. David enters his fourth year in the program as an infielder. Obviously, Greg Byrne, Lopez’s boss, likes the coach’s style. “He is a great coach and cares about the young men in his program athletically, academically and socially,” Byrne said. “After the many years of coaching, he still has a tremendous fire in his belly,” Byrne continued. “He and his staff have recruited extremely well in the always-challenging world of college baseball, where you don’t know if the young man you sign will show up on your campus or turn pro out of high school. Most of all, he is a great human being, honest with his student-athletes and humble and grateful for the opportunities he has had.” And willing to sign an autograph or many at a dinner table if anyone asks.

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With 38 home games this season, there are plenty of opportunities to catch the University of Arizona baseball team at Hi Corbett Field. For a complete schedule, go to www.arizonawildcats.com

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

Above: FC Tucson Sponsors – from left – Neb Yonas, GM of Chapman Automotive.; Treena Parvello, Director of Marketing and Public Relations, Desert Diamond Casinos & Entertainment; Marian Abram, Attorney, Karp & Weiss and Kimberly Clements, President, Golden Eagle Distributors Middle: FC Tucson takes on Pali Blues. (Photo courtesy FC Soccer) Left: FC Tucson Owners – from left – Chris Keeney, Jon Pearlman, Rick Schantz and Greg Foster

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Soccer City By Steve Rivera Chris Keeney wants to make sure you know that Tucson is a soccer town. No ifs, ands or buts. In reality, it’s actually more like a sleeping giant and, perhaps, undervalued. “People in Tucson just love the game,” said Keeney, one of four managing partners for FC Tucson, Tucson’s semi-professional venture into higherlevel soccer. “We knew there was a huge fan base for soccer and it’s true. Soccer fans here just want it more and more.” So FC Tucson, Major League Soccer and all involved are giving Southern Arizona what they apparently want – seemingly non-stop soccer from January to late summer. Already, Tucson was able to witness more than 18 games in a month this winter. And not just games but MLS games and international friendlies that were but a pipe dream a few years ago. FC Tucson and its principals are some of the catalysts, benefitting from Southern Arizona’s love for the sport from May to July. Last season, FC Tucson was just good enough to get into the United Soccer League’s Premier Developmental League. FC Tucson was so impressive as a program, it was named the PDL’s Rookie Franchise. “The Rookie of the Year Award was a huge honor but we were already onto bigger ambitions with the FC Tucson SoccerFest,” which took place in January and February, said Keeney, who moved here from Houston to help make it all succeed.

“With the additional matches and teams, we’ve been able to expand our fan base to include more area Hispanic fans, visiting Mexicans, transplanted Danes and Canadians and MLS fans from 10 major markets. “Top it off with the national broadcast on NBC Sports, and Tucson will have had an amazing six weeks of soccer spotlight shined our community. This has been a Herculean effort by many passionate, dedicated and talented people and a huge success for our club and the entire region.” FC Tucson owners are committed to making next year’s event even bigger and better. The success of the third year of the Desert Diamond Cup, featuring the Seattle Sounders, New England Revolution, Real Salt Lake and New York Red Bulls, was palpable and will likely have a nice carryover to the start of FC Tucson’s season, which begins in May. “The friendlies and all the soccer that has been played has been a tremendous way to showcase Tucson and to show Major League Soccer that Tucson is the best destination for them because we have a great field complex and the ability to draw fans, creating a great atmosphere,” Keeney said. It’ll help that FC Tucson was instrumental in getting a sixth field at Kino Sports Complex. Field 6 will be part of Pima County’s $2.8 million in improvements, which will include the new 2,150 seat facility that should be ready in November. Numerous improvements will take place throughout the southside com-

plex, once known for baseball but now recognized as the must-be-at destination for all things soccer. Greg Foster, a co-managing partner for FC Tucson, said that in the 18 months since the county’s been involved, soccer in Tucson has gotten a tremendous boost. Case in point:

Tucson has attracted MLS preseason games

• The

Old Pueblo was featured on NBC with the final of the Desert Diamond Cup

Southern Arizona hosted its first international friendly competition

Tucson attracted youth state league and cup games and the popular Fort Lowell Shootout has gotten a boost

“The county’s commitment to soccer and the pace at which they’ve developed these facilities have made this all possible,” Foster said. Ramón Valadez, chairman of the Pima County Board of Supervisors, said the county is “creating an asset not just for people to watch professional soccer but to play amateur soccer, for our children to play.” Supervisor Richard Elías said the improvements show “government moving quickly when a great opportunity knocks on the door.” “By improving these facilities at such a rapid pace, I think we’ve shown our great commitment to our children and our youth and to professional sports,” he said. Keeney said the facility “legitimizes continued on page 51 >>> Spring 2013 > > > BizTucson 49


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continued from page 49 and offers a permanent place for FC Tucson,” and helps it “be an icon in the community and source of pride for the town.” FC Tucson sponsors are happy with the progress of soccer in Tucson. “As Southern Arizona’s entertainment leader, Desert Diamond Casinos & Entertainment is always on the lookout for opportunities to support exciting community events,” said Treena Parvello, Desert Diamond’s director of marketing and public relations. “We saw right away that FC Tucson’s vision was a chance to go beyond simply hosting pro soccer spring training and build a significant community event that would gain national and international attention. “There is a strong and growing enthusiasm for soccer here in Southern Arizona and a real desire for pro sports spring training in Tucson,” she continued. “The Desert Diamond Cup taps into both those needs. The success of the Desert Diamond Cup is helping to turn Tucson into a major soccer hub, to the benefit of the entire region.” Kimberly Clements, president of Golden Eagle Distributors, said the company is pleased to support FC Tucson. “Tucson is bringing soccer to the forefront in our community and it’s exciting to see the enthusiasm from the fans, the players, and the other sponsors,” she said. “Tucson should really get behind this because it’s going to continue to grow and create a lasting economic impact.” Marian Abram is an attorney with Karp & Weiss, an FC Tucson sponsor. “My practice at Karp & Weiss centers on assisting businesses with a wide range of legal matters. On behalf of FC Tucson, I have worked with local government and local, national and international entities to bring professional soccer to Tucson. My work with FC Tucson has been very satisfying because it is an entrepreneurial venture that can provide tangible benefits for our community.” FC Tucson is nothing short of inspirational, said Keith Cooper, owner of AlphaGraphics Palo Verde, and Neb Yonas, GM of Chapman Automotive. Both are sponsors for FC Tucson. They are parents of children playing in youth soccer leagues and see FC Tucson players and the organization as a source of pride for local youth. “The fact that FC Tucson is spearheading soccer in our community is fantastic,” Yonas said. “Our partnership with FC Tucson is consistent with other grass roots soccer partnerships we have in town. We think highly of what they are doing and what they’ve accomplished. “It also gives kids the opportunity to look at a level that’s one step above than what’s been historically available in Tucson,” Yonas continued. “It gives the kids who have the skill and ability an alternative route to professional soccer. It’s a step in the right direction. And it’s great for the kids.” Tucson City Councilman Paul Cunningham, one of the first to start thinking about bringing pro soccer to Kino, said the success of the Desert Diamond Cup “aids in the fiscal solvency of FC Tucson, allowing them to build and grow.” “I like the franchise’s chances of sticking because the market is right, the stadium is right and there is a great soccer culture in Tucson,” Cunningham said. “And by having a top market MLS team that does not compete with the University of Arizona, we have the right setting for ultimately landing Major League Soccer in Tucson.” Biz www.BizTucson.com

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New Soccer Digs Pima County and FC Tucson recently unveiled plans for a 2,000-seat soccer stadium and a sixth soccer field at Kino Sports Complex. The $2.8 million in improvements are expected to be completed by November. These renderings, provided by Pima County, show plans for the construction. Spring 2013 > > > BizTucson 51


The Changing Face of

TV News By Romi Carrell Wittman

PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

Debbie Bush VP & GM KOLD

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Michelle Germano News Director KOLD/KMSB


BizMEDIA Forty-seven hours a week. While that may sound like just another workweek to you and me, it’s the number of hours KOLD-TV and its partners broadcast news programming each week. In case you’re doing the math, that works out to about eightand-a-half hours a day – a mind-boggling amount of news broadcast hours for a local television station affiliate. But there’s more to the story. Those 47 hours a week include not just KOLD news programs, but also those of KMSB and KTTU. Early in 2012, Raycom Media, KOLD’s parent corporation, entered into what’s known as a Shared Services Agreement – or SSA – with Belo Corp., owner of KMSB and KTTU. Under the terms of the agreement, KOLD provides news, marketing and engineering services to KMSB and KTTU, all part of Tucson News Now. The stations maintain independent sales staffs. Though the move was widely seen as controversial at the time, it’s worked out beautifully for the three stations. “It’s been a very successful arrangement,” said Debbie Bush, KOLD’s GM and VP. “It cuts expenses and offers economies of scale. And we still compete with them (for advertising), but it’s a friendly competition.” Michelle Germano, KOLD’s news director added, “There was fear of the SSA at the time, but it’s been really great. We have a big group of creative people to share ideas and resources.” Germano’s not kidding when she says it’s a big group. KOLD hired many of KMSB’s displaced news staff, eventually adding another 20 newsroom employees, making KOLD the largest television newsroom in Southern Arizona, with more than 150 employees. It’s also the most successful. It’s been the ratings leader in news for most of the past five years. While its arrangement with Belo may be seen as unusual, KOLD is known for shaking things up and being progressive. Exhibit A: KOLD’s two top positions are filled by women. The television business, like many others, is still stubbornly male dominated. “It used to be rare (to see female GMs),” Bush said. “But it’s more common to find that now.” Bush acknowledged there’s still a lot of room for improvement. This is one of the reasons she mentors women

coming up in the industry. With more than 30 years experience in broadcast television, Bush literally grew up in the industry. At 18, she started her career as a reporter while studying journalism and mass communications at Kansas State University. She went on to work as a reporter for stations in Cedar Rapids and Wichita before making the move to assistant news director or news director at stations in Topeka, Wichita, Santa Barbara, Pittsburgh, Indianapolis and Kansas City. Prior to coming to KOLD, Bush was GM of WFIE-TV in Evansville, Ind. During her career, she’s won four regional Emmys, as well as Edward R. Murrow and Headliner awards. She’s currently on the board of Arizona Broadcaster’s Association, the Boys and Girls Clubs of Tucson and Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Southern Arizona. She is also a member of Tucson’s Leading Women in Business.

It’s all about getting news where you’re at – whether it’s a PC, a television or your phone. –

Debbie Bush GM & VP, KOLD-TV

Bush was attracted to the opportunity the KOLD VP and GM position presented as well as life in the desert Southwest. “I wanted to come here,” she said with a smile. She’s been with KOLD since 2010. For Germano, having a GM with a news background is invaluable. “She gets it,” Germano said. “The crazy schedules, what it’s like to be a reporter. And that really helps.” Broadcast television is something of a family business for Germano. Her father worked in broadcast sales and, after college, Germano started her own broadcast news career in Houston, eventually working her way up the ladder to news director. Germano admits that producing 47 hours of news each week isn’t easy, and she’s been known to log 70 and 80 hour work weeks. But, she said, tools like so-

cial media help. Viewers often contribute information, photos and video footage for news stories. The station promotes this to its viewers as “See it, Snap it, Send it,” and it has enabled KOLD to cover stories it might otherwise have missed. “There are times we can’t roll a truck to a story and get there in time,” Germano said. “So having that resource in the field is great.” KOLD has been at the forefront of social media and continues to use it to reach its viewers in unprecedented ways. The result is a viewership that is steadfastly loyal. “Our reporters are more accessible than ever before,” Germano said. “And our talent enjoys (social media), too. Especially Chuck and Dan. They’re on Facebook all the time.” She is, of course, referring to the very popular meteorologist Chuck George and anchorman Dan Marries. KOLD also pays close attention to which of its Tucson News Now stories is getting the most traffic on Facebook and Twitter. “A lot of times that tells us what stories we should be covering,” Germano explained. In an era marked by technological advances every six months, KOLD has managed to stay abreast of the latest social media tools and tricks, and it will continue to find new ways to reach viewers. Looking ahead, Germano and Bush both view the web as the future of broadcast news and, more broadly, journalism as we know it. “It’s about making the station available,” Bush said. “It’s all about getting news where you’re at – whether it’s a PC, a television or your phone. We have to use all the tools in our arsenal and Raycom has pushed the edge of the envelope with innovation.” Germano conceded it can be hard to keep up with technology. “I could be around awhile and never learn it all,” she said. She’s quick to add that she enjoys the constant change and evolution. “It’s fun, really, to keep learning all the time.” Bush said it’s an evolution everyone in journalism should embrace. “I remember when they told me I had to write on a computer and I didn’t want to,” Bush said, smiling at the memory. “It’s much better now. I love the world we’re in now. I can’t imagine going back.”

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WATERCOLOR: CHUCK ALBANESE

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BizRESTORATION

Jewel Desert in the

PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Monica Surfaro Spigelman

Surely it is the light that first attracts us to this great house of worship. Light paints a magical scene at Mission San Xavier del Bac, the queen of all the Pimería Alta churches and the finest example of Spanish Mission architecture in the United States. Tourists and Tucsonans alike are inspired by the iconic structure which endures as both a work of art and as a sacred space. Take a look again. Desert skies that are forever in motion whisper endlessly to the centuries-old Mission San Xavier del Bac, where “Bac” originates from the O’odham word W:ak, the name of the native village, which means “where water appears.” Winds, sun, time and political upheaval have carved erosion here. This beloved white church glimmers with timeless beauty but could well have met its match in our relentless desert – were it not for the community that cherishes this jewel and passionately helps to preserve it. “The mission is a national treasure at our doorstep,” said Chuck Albanese, president of Patronato San Xavier, a nonprofit group of community leaders formed in 1978 for the purpose of restoring and preserving the mission with the most minimal intervention. “It’s clear that this place of great meaning needs our vigilance.” White Dove Endures

Known as the serene “White Dove of the Desert,” the mission sits on 14 acres and appears to spring from the earth, welcoming all with wings outwww.BizTucson.com

stretched as it’s approached from the city that grew up around it. Centuries of history and intense devotion illuminate this national historic landmark and living church. Jesuit missionary Eusebio Francisco Kino rode into the valley in 1692, founding the mission soon after this. The padre gave the parish the name of his patron Saint Francisco Xavier, Roman Catholic apostle to the Indies. Kino laid the foundation for his intended church in a location that remains a mystery. His parish church was later built at the current site, which was deemed suitable perhaps because of its proximity to the village and to the “river of the holy cross,” the Santa Cruz. Kino died at another of his missions in Magdalena, Son. in 1711, never seeing his dream of the Bac church realized. Instead, construction finally began in 1756, led by Jesuit Alonzo Espinosa. Through the labor of native converts, the awe-inspiring Bac mission envisioned by Kino was mostly completed by 1797, under the supervision of another missionary order, the Franciscans, who to this day still actively serve the San Xavier Roman Catholic parish. Facing south, the mission is an intricate complex constructed in the form of the Latin cross, with its west tower soaring 83 feet into the immense sky. The shorter east belfry tower was never completed for lack of funds. The elegant, unusual appearance of these continued on page 57 >>> Spring 2013 > > > BizTucson 55


Silver & Turquoise Ball Benefits Mission San Xavier del Bac From 1949 to 1996, the Tucson Festival Society helped preserve the region’s heritage through community events, including a springtime mission celebration in honor of St. Francis Xavier. Although the society is no more, the Silver & Turquoise Ball, led by a group of prominent women leaders and board of hostesses, assumed the tradition of dancing under the stars on a sparkling spring evening on behalf of Tucson’s arts and culture. The first Silver & Turquoise Ball was held in 1950. One hostess was Isabella Greenway, Arizona’s first female congresswoman and founder of the Arizona Inn. When rains threatened Greenway’s pot luck gathering, the event was moved to the Arizona Inn – where it remained to become another important Tucson tradition that supports the mission. In 1993 the Silver and Turquoise Board of Hostesses formed its own nonprofit organization, dedicating all proceeds to the ongoing restoration of Mission San Xavier del Bac. This year’s Ball Chair Jackie Ludwig and her 50-member board of hostesses plan an extraordinary evening to reflect the traditional elegance at the heart of Tucson’s magic. Biz

63rd Annual Silver & Turquoise Ball BenefitTing Mission San Xavier del Bac Saturday, May 4 Arizona Inn $250 per person $500 per couple Reservations required Call (520) 907-0306 56 BizTucson

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BizRESTORATION continued from page 55 towers – combined with the unique masonry-vaulted roof, ornate façade and heavily frescoed interior – show a mix of New Spain and Native American craftsmanship unrivaled in the Southwest. Proactive Patronatos

This shrine of both pilgrimage and tourism became a National Historic Landmark in 1963, even as years of earthquake, lightning strikes, vandalism and well-intentioned conservation efforts were causing serious damage. Earlier restorations by the Diocese of Tucson tried to stave decay with new coats of white plaster – but layers of cement stucco and concrete blocks only seemed to cause fissures and lock in moisture, which penetrated the walls, eating away at the structure and its artworks. Realizing that the need to fix the structural roof problems was urgent, a handful of Patronato Tucsonans rallied the community to obtain funds and begin crisis conservation. Bernard Fontana, an ethnologist with the Arizona State Museum who lived nearby the mission, was a Patronato leader in this process. Art conservator and art historian Gloria Fraser Giffords made initial studies to document conditions and outline recommendations. Emergency restoration to fix water infiltration in the west tower began in 1989, supervised by Patronato member and architect Robert Vint. Morales Restoration and Builders, a local family of contractors that has worked on the San Xavier mission for five generations, joined the team – and employed a traditional technique using layers of lime and sand plaster bound by the juice extracted from prickly pear cactus to stabilize the structure. Then, conservators from New York, Italy, Spain, London and Turkey were contracted to oversee the cleaning and repair of the church’s interior paintings and sculptures. To move the project forward, the Tucson office of Snell & Wilmer law firm stepped in to guarantee the www.BizTucson.com

salaries for the curatorial team. Snell & Wilmer continues to provide financial, in-kind and volunteer leadership assistance. The major interior conservation effort, begun in 1992, also employed local Tohono O’odham conservator apprentices – one of whom, with his wife, still monitors the repairs. The west tower restoration was completed in 2009, protecting the integrity of most of the church structure. This is a multi-million dollar, painstaking restoration project, working inch-by-inch to repair and refinish the historic mission, said Vern Lamplot, executive director of the Patronato. “The Patronato has raised more than $10 million to prevent further deterioration, but there are still problems to address,” he said.

The mission is a national treasure at our doorstep. It’s clear that this place of great meaning needs our vigilance. –

Lori W. Carroll President, Lori Carroll & Associates Publicity Chair, Silver & Turquoise Ball Chuck Albanese President, Patronato San Xavier

Chuck Albanese, President, Patronato San Xavier

Patronato president Albanese said, “Our respect for the integrity of the restoration has led us to blend traditional techniques with the highest standards of modern conservation.” The architect, artist and former University of Arizona dean sees this meticulous process as a happy marriage of highest tech and purest tradition in an unceasing, necessary effort. Restoring a Solitary Gem

The restoration revealed a dazzling array of elaborately decorated wall paintings, statues and Mexican folk baroque details. There are contemporary Native American designs continued on page 58 >>>

Jackie Ludwig Director of Tourism, Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau Chair, Silver & Turquoise Ball Jeff Willis Partner, Snell & Wilmer Member, Patronato San Xavier Spring 2013 > > > BizTucson 57


BizRESTORATION continued from page 57 in the altar cloths. Today the restored altars and flawless finish of the west tower, however, contrast sharply with the crumbling plaster so dramatically visible on the east tower. “We’ve completed one chapter,” Albanese said, “but the mission is a living, breathing church that does not stand still.” He pointed to the low-fired Mexican brickwork and adobe on the east tower, which is slowly dissolving. “Every day that the mid-day sun beats against its surface, more of the church erodes. Substantially more work remains.” To fund improvements for the deteriorating east tower and to continue the interior restoration, the Patronato is making inquiries to raise funds in support of the remaining east tower restoration. “This is a $3 million capital project over three years,” said Barbara Peck, Patronato member and co-chair of an upcoming campaign launch for the mission’s continued restoration. “We are confident we’ll be able to do the work quickly, not closing the church. Approvals are in place. We just need the funding.” Lured by the Light

Peck, a 30-year public relations professional, was immediately drawn to the mission when she moved to Tucson. Born and raised in Santa Barbara, Peck is named for Saint Barbara, whose statue appears on the San Xavier façade, near the massive mesquite doors. “Like everyone, I’ve found my personal connection at San Xavier,” she said. “It’s a very beautiful and holy place where everyone finds meaning.” “The restoration of San Xavier is a work in progress, and that’s why the restoration must continue,” said Jeff Willis, a Snell & Wilmer partner and member of the Patronato. Willis knows about legacy – he stepped in as Snell & Wilmer’s representative when partner Claque Van Slyke, who practiced law in Tucson for 50 years, passed away. “Claque would say the mission’s restoration requires our attention every day,” Willis recalled. “The historical, spiritual and cultural significance is incomparable, and we need to ensure the mission exists for the next generation of 58 BizTucson

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parishioners, our community and the public.” San Xavier’s recovery effort is an ongoing passion for many. Long-time individual supporters include Patronato members Pat and Chuck Pettis, Laura

We need to ensure the mission exists for the next generation of parishioners, our community and the public.

– Jeff Willis Partner, Snell & Wilmer Member, Patronato San Xavier

and Arch Brown, folklorist Jim Griffith and 92-year-old Tucsonan Ann Fallon. Corporate sponsors include The Click Group and Tucson Electric Power. Foundation support includes Southwestern Foundation, the Green and Stocker foundations, the Silver & Turquoise Ball (see sidebar p. 56) and the Robert B. Hansen and O’Reilly family foundations. The support has allowed restoration work on the parish’s original arcade design to continue. Albanese indicated that east tower restoration could begin this fall if funding progresses. “If you think of how many 1770s structures are still standing, there’s no doubt about how priceless this incredible sample of mission architecture is to our community and our country,” said Albanese, who often visits the mission to paint the rich values inspired by the changing light. On one day of painting, the wind stirs, pushing sand spirals up against the mission. Albanese reaches to steady his easel. Beyond him, the sacred site appears in the sandy sunlight more luminous than ever, seeming to shout out centuries of history that are written from yesterday, today, and – if the Patronato has its way – tomorrow.

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BizBENEFIT

Clockwise: Jennifer Hudson, Jordin Sparks, Pia Toscano, Harvey & Jeannine Mason

Divas in the Desert “A Very Glamorous Affair” By Valerie Vinyard A few years ago, 12-year-old Mia Mason started complaining of headaches. A startling diagnosis of ependymoma, a type of brain cancer, soon followed. The volleyball and soccer player underwent surgery and a year of radiation therapy. Now 15, Mia had to regain her ability to walk and still has weakness on her left side, but she’s better. Mia’s mom, Jeannine Mason, wants other families to achieve positive results when battling cancer. To help with that, the University of Arizona graduate will chair Divas in the Desert, an annual gala in Tucson that benefits the American Cancer Society. 60 BizTucson

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This year’s event will take place April 26 and will feature performances by Jennifer Hudson, Jordin Sparks and Pia Toscana. “Having cancer affected our lives so deeply,” said Mason, a 5-foot-11-inch former UA volleyball player. “We kind of feel it’s our mission. When we first were handed this diagnosis, we didn’t know a thing.” She’s quick to note that she’ll have help with the event. A big source of help comes from the Stith family, owners of SavOn Flowers. Jim and Bridget Stith are stewards of Divas in the Desert and have been involved with the event since 1992. Their son, Kalyn, is the chair of underwriting and does logistics, decora-

tions, transportation and food. Mason has known the Stiths for more than 20 years, when they did the flowers for her wedding to former UA basketball player and now Los Angeles-based music magnate Harvey Mason. “Being in the public eye, we’re lucky we could help out,” said Mason, noting that her husband was able to use some of his pull as a writer, producer and performer in Los Angeles. Harvey Mason echoed his wife’s sentiment. “We’ve had a personal involvement and we wanted to give back in a big way and raise some serious money,” he said by phone. “We’d love to raise $1 million,” she www.BizTucson.com


Having cancer affected our lives so deeply. We feel it’s our mission. We’d love to raise $1 million.

Jeannine Mason, Co-Chair American Cancer Society 2013 Gala –

added. Harvey Mason has been working with Jennifer Hudson from the beginning of her career, including doing the movie “Dreamgirls.” Because of that, he was able to tap Hudson for the Tucson event. Unique auction items at the event include a gold record signed by Hudson, a day in Los Angeles with Harvey Mason, and a Grammy Awards package. The Masons wanted the Divas’ auction items to reflect more experiences rather than just items. “We were given a blank slate,” Mason said. “We’re making it a very glamorous affair. It’s more like you’re going to a club.” Though the Masons live mostly in Los Angeles, they maintain a home in Tucson and come back about once a month. Biz

“Divas in the Desert” American Cancer Society 2013 Gala Friday, April 26 Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa 6:30 p.m. Cocktails & Silent Auction 8:30 p.m. Dinner, Live Auction & Performances $250 per person. Black tie. www.divasinthedesert.com

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

BizCHARITY

From left: Jeff Christensen, Tucson Board Chair, American Heart Association and American Stroke Association; Jack Clements, Chair, 2013 Heart Walk; Cardiologist Salvatore J. Tirrito and Brittany Starace, Heart Walk Director.

Healing Hearts

Tucson Heart Walk Raises Research Funds By Sheryl Kornman The American Heart Association’s Tucson Heart Walk is not only a celebration of life by heart disease survivors and a fundraiser for research, it is an opportunity to learn more about preventing heart disease, the No. 1 killer of Americans. In North America, many more women die from heart disease each year than cancer, said Brittany Starace, Tucson Heart Walk director. The April 20 Heart Walk raises money for heart disease research, and 100 percent of what is raised in Tucson “comes back to the community in AHA grants,” Starace said. “We just gave the University of Arizona $1.3 million for research. We’re so fortunate that UA is one of the main heart disease research centers,” Starace said.

The walk begins with a warm-up at Reid Park at 8:30 a.m., and offers two routes: a 2-mile walk for stroke survivors, their friends and families and others not able to walk briskly, as well as a 3-mile route for those who can walk at a quicker pace. Jack Clements, owner of The Clements Agency in Tucson, is chair of the 2013 Tucson Heart Walk. He is a successful businessman and heart disease survivor. “Heart disease and stroke are very personal to me,” Clements said. “It runs in our family. “I had a heart attack at age 46,” he continued. “My maternal grandparents died from stroke. My paternal grandparents died from heart disease as did my dad. My sons are exposed to some pretty bad family history. I do not want

American Heart Association 2013 Tucson Heart Walk Saturday, April 20, 8:30 a.m. Reid Park, near the 22nd Street and Country Club Road entrance No entry fee. Prizes are awarded to participants who raise $100 or more. www.tucsonheartwalk.org 62 BizTucson

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them to be affected.” Clements said our nation “needs to address heart disease and stroke and the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association are leading the charge in that effort. The Heart Walk is an important component of the campaign to increase awareness. “Sure, we raise money for research, but awareness is huge,” Clements said. “We have to change our lifestyles. Hopefully the Heart Walk can help us drive that point home.” Families, businesses and community groups can create their own walking teams, and walkers are invited to bring their dogs. Starace said vendor booths will be open throughout the event and free blood pressure checks will be offered. A Kid Zone will feature fun for children.

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Haile Thomas, a sixth-grade student at St. Gregory College Preparatory School who is making a name for herself when it comes to anti-obesity programs, will demonstrate healthy eating options at the Heart Walk Kid Zone. Haile, host of the online healthy cooking show Kids Can Cook and a founder of The HAPPY Organization, has shared her recipes with Michelle Obama and been a guest of the First Lady at the White House. In January, she spoke at the Clinton Foundation’s Health Matters: Activating Wellness in Every Generation Conference.

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Tucson Museum of Art

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

Pennington Street Garage

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

George Hanson Tucson Symphony Orchestra

Fourth Avenue Underpass

Old Pueblo Grand Prix

PHOTO: BALF WALKER

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

UA Downtown

Jenny Rice & Kade Mislinski Playground & Hub

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

BizHEALTH

Forward Vision By Christy Krueger A move from Williamsburg, Va., to Tucson was a nobrainer for ophthalmologist Timothy Hodges and optometrist Angela Hodges once they heard what came with the deal. The two had met years before at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., married, and went into private practice – separately. “We’d always thought about moving West,” said Timothy Hodges, who earned his medical degree from Ohio State University and completed his residency training at Walter Reed. He’s certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology. “We looked into Washington and California. One trip we made it to Arizona and when we went back to Virginia, I said, ‘why are we living here?’ My wife saw an ad in a trade magazine for a practice for sale in Tucson and she called him –Dr. Fred Grimm. He’d built a great practice and had a freestanding ambulatory surgical center – one of the first in Tucson. The idea to come here and buy an established practice with an ambulatory center was quite 76 BizTucson

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appealing.” The entire purchasing process took a brief three months, and in June 2003, Timothy and Angela were working – together this time – in their own practice, which they renamed Hodges Eye Care and Surgical Center. Grimm had been offering refractive surgery to his patients. Hodges decided to add laser vision correction surgery. “I did LASIK surgery in Virginia and thought it was important we build a laser center in our office,” he said. LASIK stands for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis. During the procedure a flap is made in the cornea. The laser is used for reshaping. Then the flap is repositioned, he explained. Before LASIK, the most common type of refractive surgery was photorefractive keratectomy, Hodges said. “Today PRK is seldom performed because LASIK provides better vision faster with much less discomfort.” One advantage the couple had in moving to Tucson was that there were not a lot of ophthalmologists here

Optometrist Angela Hodges and Ophthalmologist Timothy Hodges


performing laser surgeries, Hodges said. What’s more unique about their business is it’s one of only a few here that has its own surgery center. “This may be the only solo in town. It’s good and bad. I like it being just me. But when it’s time to pay the bills, it would be nice if there were others to share the cost. Yet there are logistical challenges to bringing in other doctors,” Hodges added. While he’s seeing patients and spending time in surgery, Angela handles the optometry and administrative sides of the business. She holds a doctor of optometry degree. Her expertise is in primary eye care, including diagnosis and treatment of eye disorders and contact lens fittings. She initially practiced as an Army Captain at Walter Reed. “My wife is a better business person,” said Hodges. He believes it’s quite unusual for husband and wife specialists to own a practice together, but they have the same challenges any spouses would when working together – such as separating their work and personal lives when they go home. “We’ve learned over the last 10 years,” Hodges said. “We don’t have a lot of time during the day to talk to each other, so we have to talk at home – but we’ve developed rules for when is the best time to talk about it.” They make decisions together by “enthusiastic agreement.” The partners actually run two businesses out of their facility – the clinical side, where they see patients – and the surgical center. Separate books are kept for each because they feel it’s easier to track the two businesses Two to three times a month Hodges takes a team of four to work at a clinic in Douglas, seeing 30 to 40 patients in a morning – generally for cataracts, glaucoma and diabetes.

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Those needing surgery come to Tucson, he said. “Douglas is an underserved community. It’s economically depressed. Most people are very poor – but they are some of the most appreciative people I’ve ever met.” Hodges, a licensed pilot, used to fly his team the quick 25 minutes from Tucson to Douglas. But he sold his plane after the first of the year, so they’re back to making the trip by car. In Tucson, about one-third of Hodges’ business is from established patients, one-third from word of mouth and the final third is from referrals by optometrists. This, he feels, is another unique quality about the practice. “I have a good perspective of optometrists – I’ve been married to one for over 20 years. I’m optometrist friendly,” he said, noting this is not the case for many ophthalmologists. “Optometrists provided primary eye care in the Army. They’d diagnose and then refer patients to me. I thought it was a good system. It’s made our practice more successful,” he said. The most rewarding part of his job is curing severe vision problems. “Making people see is amazing. It never gets old. I’ve been doing cataract surgery for over 20 years. To take someone whose vision is blurry and they can see again – it’s pretty neat.” Even in less severe cases – such as patients who undergo LASIK surgery – the rewards are high for Hodges. “After wearing glasses or contacts, a patient may say, ‘I woke up and I saw the clock.’ To be able to see without glasses or contacts can change someone’s world. I’ve done 10,000-plus surgeries and I’m happy I have a job I love to do.”

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PHOTO: CARTER ALLEN

BizTECHNOLOGY

Howard Stewart President & CEO AGM Container Controls

Revenues Soar Wheelchair Lifts, Tie-Down Shelving, Containers By Teya Vitu AGM Container Controls has tripled its annual revenue from $5 million to $17 million since Howard Stewart became the president and CEO of the family company in 2000. Part of that stems from President George W. Bush ramping up defense spending â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which makes up about 65 78 BizTucson

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percent of AGMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business. But more likely, the greater reason stems from the business ethic Stewart instills in his 110 employees, each of whom he knows by name and years of service. He can even rattle off the percentage of the Employee Stock Ownership Plan held by a given employee.

He takes this employee ownership seriously and literally. Each quarter, Stewart posts for all to see in neon colors a company status report that details profits, product sales figures, who is requesting quotes for AGM products, and what the design and manufacturing engineers are working on. www.BizTucson.com


“We want our employees to think like and act like owners,” Stewart said. “I don’t believe in holding information at the top. I believe information needs to be as widely disseminated as possible to positively affect decision making at all levels of the company.” The name is AGM Container Controls, but AGM has quirkily diversified beyond devices that control and monitor moisture, pressure and vacuum changes or shock and vibration in containers. The company also designs and builds deluxe Ascension Wheelchair Lifts, prominently found at Disneyland and the New York City Department of Education; tie-down shelves found on all U.S. aircraft carriers and about 17 of 22 Navy cruisers; and missile desiccators that keep missile guidance systems from corroding. AGM purchasing manager Shelly Hurley is one of many AGM employees who started at the bottom and worked their way up. She joined the company in 1985 as a production employee paid the company’s minimum wage. “When we went to the ESOP, we had the ability to impact the company in a whole different manner,” Hurley said. “We are more aware of our individual roles and how we contribute to the overall prosperity of our company.” Stewart recognized older and younger generations have different ideas of what makes a business a great place to work. The older folks embrace traditional benefits, while the increasingly younger employees crave lifestyle benefits. Stewart has converted an outdoor patio into an enclosed gym. AGM has an Aeroball trampoline basketball setup for four continued on page 80 >>>

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AGM Container Controls’ Prominent Product Lines • Breather valves control the pressure or vacuum on a container so you can use lighter containers made of aluminum or fiberglass instead of steel to transport and store missiles and engines. • Missile desiccators remove moisture from missile camera systems and guidance systems. • Ascension Wheelchair Lifts are the only major wheelchair lifts where you can board at floor level without riding up a ramp. CEO Howard Stewart describes them as “the world’s premiere wheelchair lift.” They are found at Disneyland in Anaheim, Radio City Music Hall, McCormick Place in Chicago and New York City’s school system. • Tie-down shelving and tie-down straps hold communications, electronics or other vital military gear in place on Navy ships or in military bunkers.

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BizTECHNOLOGY continued from page 79 players, and there is a ping pong table. Stewart’s approach has been recognized nationally with the Best Small Company in America award from the the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and locally with the Wells Fargo Copper Cactus Award for Best Place to Work. AGM has had no layoffs in 20 years, and Stewart has even formalized his no-layoff philosophy with a 13-point plan. AGM Container Control moisture devices primarily focus on military containers carrying missiles or engines. Breather valves have been AGM’s topselling product every year, except 2006, since Stewart’s parents Roger and Joyce Stewart founded the company in 1970. These valves control pressure or vacuum in containers holding missiles or engines. The same containers may also carry AGM humidity indicators and container desiccators. Missile desiccators joined the AGM production line in the 1980s. In layman’s terms, these are anti-fogging devices for cameras in missiles. “When you’re watching CNN or Fox,” Stewart said, “and you’re seeing a missile heading toward a target, you wouldn’t be able to see that target without AGM’s missile desiccators, which wick away the moisture from the camera. Otherwise, it would fog over like an iced tea glass. We’re on virtually every missile system in the U.S. and Europe.” AGM was in the right place at the right time to tap into the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act when it diversified into wheelchair lifts in 1994. Howard Stewart recalls someone came to them with the idea to improve the line of sight in theaters, and the AGM crew evolved that into the Ascension Wheelchair Lift, a deluxe product that comes with a 20-year warranty. The first generation of lifts enabled wheelchair access to stages. Today, there are all sorts of uses for the 1,200 wheelchair lifts AGM now has in service, including churches, hotels and schools. The wheelchair lifts account for 12 to 18 percent of the company’s revenue. “The other super cool thing we do is tie-down shelving,” Stewart said. “These hold electronics gear and communications systems in place on ships so those things don’t become projectiles continued on page 81 >>> 80 BizTucson

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continued from page 80 in the event the ship is hit by a missile, torpedo or when the ship hits a mine. “When the USS Cole got hit in Yemen in 2000, they didn’t have our shelving on board. Seventeen sailors got killed. They believe if they had our product on board, they would have lost only two sailors.” Howard Stewart grew up at AGM, which was launched when his parents were asked to spin off a small section of Arizona Gear Manufacturing that involved controller devices for containers and tie-down straps. They first called the new company AGM Cargo Ties until 1978, when it assumed the present name. “I started in shipping – building breather valves and making tie-down straps. I was 12. I was paid $1 per hour and enough people thought I was overpaid,” Stewart said. He worked part time at AGM from age 12 to 24, but after college went off on his own. He did stints with the Christian Science Monitor and as a Peace Corps volunteer in Africa, where he contracted blackwater fever. He returned to Tucson and owned Stewart’s Ice Cream for several years at the corner of Speedway and Campbell, where the University of Arizona sign is now. Stewart said it was the busiest ice cream shop in the Southwest. The Speedway widening leveled the ice cream shop. Stewart now needed a job. AGM had an opening in the purchasing department, so he returned to AGM in 1989. “My parents didn’t see me as a viable successor. It had to be pointed out by my aunt that I had potential,” Stewart said. In the 1990s, he took on sales and marketing for packaged desiccants, increasing sales from $15,000 to $1.5 million, and then the wheelchair lifts. He started writing the quarterly status report while serving as marketing VP. In 1997, Stewart became executive VP and has essentially run the company since then, officially taking on the chief executive mantle in 2000. Stewart’s hallmark has been empowering employees. “I believe in openly sharing information with employees and delegating responsibilities,” he said. “I am a strong advocate for employee ownership.”

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

BizTECHNOLOGY

David N. Allen Executive Director Tech Launch Arizona

Commercializing UA Research By Eric Swedlund

The University of Arizona is transforming the way new discoveries and inventions are commercialized – and leading the effort is the man who accomplished the same feat in Colorado. David N. Allen is the inaugural executive director of Tech Launch Arizona, a center formed with the mission to move the university’s admittedly poor 82 BizTucson

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performance in technology transfer to be among the best in the country. “All universities in the U.S. have tech commercialization operations – and our objective is to build one of the best,” said Allen. “But it’s not going to be defined necessarily that way. It’s going to be defined by the amount of engagement that we have with faculty. If

we have the right kind of engagement with the faculty and the right kind of engagement with the community, we will get to the outcomes that are important.” At the University of Colorado, Allen led a Technology Transfer Office that received 2,120 invention disclosures, filed 1,420 patents and executed 325


exclusive licenses and options over the past 10 years. During this period, 93 companies have been started based on UC intellectual property. In the same time, the University of Arizona spun out just 48 companies. “I think everybody felt the university could be doing more spin-out activity,” said Leonard M. Jessup, dean of the UA Eller College of Management. “It was just a missed opportunity here – given the scale and scope of funded research that goes on year in and year out.” Jessup chaired the search committee that selected Allen and also chairs the Tech Launch Arizona advisory board. He said he has high hopes for this new era of technology transfer at the UA – one that can help boost the Tucson region’s effort to develop a more innovation-based economy. “We have one of the best and biggest innovation engines in the country right here in Tucson and a pretty good environment for businesses to launch and grow,” he said. “This is a good opportunity and a perfect time for it to happen.” Tech Launch Arizona was developed “at a time when the university and the City of Tucson and the State of Arizona needed it most – during the downturn. It was a way to help not only the university, but the region, by putting more companies based on science and engineering out into the community,” he said. “Everybody knew that it could happen.” Jessup said that during the search, the committee considered candidates from universities as well as the private sector, but from the outset valued the type of experience Allen had at Colorado and his work in technology development and commercialization at Ohio State University and Ohio University before that. “One of many attractive things about David was that he had come to Colorado a decade ago when they were at about the same position we are in now, and over that decade, had built out some very respectable revenues. More to the point – of the companies that had been created over that time, many stuck in that corridor between Denver and Boulder,” Jessup said. “Many of us saw that outcome that he’d already achieved and thought if we could look back 10 years from now and see the same thing happen here, it www.BizTucson.com

would be a success.” Tech Launch Arizona was established in November of 2011 to consolidate efforts around moving knowledge and inventions to market. Allen came on board in September of 2012. The first awards to faculty with promising inventions and discoveries were announced November 2012. In February Doug Hockstad was named director of the revitalized Office of Technology Transfer after serving 11 years as associate director of software and engineering licensing at the University of Michigan’s Office of Technology Transfer. Allen said UM is an excellent example of a university that did a total turnaround in technology transfer. “Doug was a high-level participant there from the beginning,” he said. Technology transfer at the UA can only improve if it happens “more deliberately, more predictably and more effectively,” said Sherry Hoskinson, director of commercialization networks and operations for Tech Launch Arizona and former director of the UA McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship. “Although the University of Arizona has a very rich and robust history and reputation in research and scientific discovery, and presumably technological innovation, it has been institutionally less focused on how to actually bring that innovation to the marketplace,” she said. “TLA is the coming of age of a growing and changing thought process for a very big and complex institution to shift and reprioritize so those things can actually happen.” TLA’s effectiveness will depend largely on whether the faculty sees this shift as a beneficial service rather than a mandate. “The incentives, measures and metrics for faculty have not been targeted toward commercializing and licensing type activities,” Hoskinson said. “They’ve been focused on the academic value of their work. It’s not like a company where the employees follow the company’s new vision. It’s important that this is not clubbing faculty members over the head and dragging them to the commercialization table – but making it so that it fits and advances the values that are important to them.” Since he arrived in early September, Allen has met widely with faculty as continued on page 84 >>>

19 UA Projects Receive $700,000 Nineteen University of Arizona research projects received inaugural awards from Tech Launch Arizona to help move promising inventions and discoveries closer to commercialization. The awards ranged from $10,000 to $40,000 and total more than $700,000. The Proof of Concept awards help address the technological and commercial hurdles faced when bringing a new concept to market. “This money often means the difference between a promising technology with important social benefits moving closer to commercialization – or being shelved,” said David N. Allen, TLA executive director. “This money is generally very difficult to access. This is an important investment.” There were 46 applications submitted representing a wide spectrum of research in engineering, optical sciences, biotechoogy, medicine and other disciplines. Many were collaborations. In all, 33 UA departments were represented. “Every proposal had significant merit,” said Sherry Hoskinson, TLA director of commercialization networks and operations. After TLA staff review, selected principal investigators presented their proposals to an external review panel of 14 who contributed their expertise and insights – not just to rate the proposals for funding, but to help achieve a deeper understanding of the potential of these technologies. TLA will continue to work with all these applicant researchers to develop and advance their inventions – whether funding was received in this round or not, Hoskinson said.

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continued from page 83 well as members of the business community in Tucson, listening to what they need as much as informing them about TLA. “Faculty want impact from their work,” Allen said. “Today that usually means publication and their work with students. Going ahead, impact will mean people using their products and services in the marketplace. “The epitome of this is a doctor who has been working in a clinical environmental and created an intervention for a disease through a drug that is now the standard of care. It’s hard to believe there’s anything more rewarding than that,” he said. “That same analogy can play itself out over all kinds of different environments across the university – whether it’s environmental impact or social impact or just improving the quality of life.” Hoskinson said she’s gratified by reactions from both faculty members and entrepreneurs in Tucson who are already supporting Allen’s leadership and the TLA’s goals. “The process of pursing patents and a commercial outcome for their work is ambiguous at best. It can be intimidating – and they’d rather focus on what they know how to do very well. It’s a distraction at best – and that’s if they’ve had neutral or good experience in the past,” she said. “He took away the gray cloud for people in a very few short weeks. I’ve been able to connect with faculty since there’s been a Tech Launch Arizona and they feel really good about this. They’re more in the game and more willing to have their work looked at and explored for commercial opportunities. There’s clarity and confidence and they’re more interested in being a part of the discussion.” TLA is structured to remove the limitations that had hampered the university’s tech transfer efforts in the past. “For the most part, rich and very effective commercialization and licensing outcomes haven’t necessarily been the job of any one person or area,” Hoskinson said. “The Office of Technology Transfer, as it was formed under a very research-intensive environment, was never quite positioned to do what it needed to do. It was more licensing and 84 BizTucson

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an IP manager. So other areas of the university reached out and tried to connect to one another to create more of a supply chain – but it really was an add on to what most people did. Access and authority to make those things happen was really based on what different units could patch together.” Now these activities are centralized. One goal is to position TLA as a continuation of the research process – not as independent or different from the research process. “It can exist in addition to, not instead of,” Allen said. “What we want is for the Tech Launch Arizona strategic plan to be woven into the fabric of the university’s strategic plan – so it has continuity and can build as the university builds.” Tech Launch Arizona won’t be creating a cookie-cutter format for commercialization, but working on a case-bycase basis, tailoring what his office can offer specifically to each individual.

UA Technology Transfer Statistics FY 2003 – FY 2012 Invention Disclosures – 1,156 U.S. Patent Applications – 1,143 U.S. Patents Issued – 148 Licenses/Options – 415 Startup Companies – 48 Royalty Income – $10,140,180 Source: Tech Launch Arizona

“Faculty are the inventors, the creators of these new technologies. They’ve worked at the bench for decades in a very competitive environment and if it’s going to move forward they have to be a participant. We cannot divorce them from their ideas if we’re going to take even step one. It’s all about service to those faculty,” Allen said. From the first discussions with professors through the patent process to proof-of-concept grants and an evaluation of the market potential to securing outside investment, Allen said TLA will bring in “more than 50 elements of change” from the current structure, with new policies, procedures and improved relationships. “We want to open up this black box and be very transparent about the pro-

cess – the inputs and outcomes – and really give people an opportunity to make decisions about how much they want to participate,” he said. For example, Allen said, “If we go to the patent literature and find that the idea is already patented, then we can say ‘how can your work be different from this work?’ We don’t want to be turning people off who have a lot of energy. We want to work with them to channel that energy in ways that create novel products and services that can be patented and receive significant investment dollars.” Allen cautions against expecting results too soon. New technologies typically take a minimum of four years before they appear as a product, needing investment of at least a couple million dollars. For high-impact products like new pharmaceutical drugs, that development phase can stretch to more than a decade and require hundreds of millions of dollars. “Getting that patent right with defensible claims that are broad enough to cover what we want to create as a product is absolutely essential. We’re going to make some major changes in the way we do that kind of work. We’re going to be much more engaged with patent attorneys earlier in the process and continuing through the process,” Allen said. “We’re going to be leaning forward and putting a lot more technology in play because we have the resources that hadn’t been heretofore available.” Ann Weaver Hart, who began her UA presidency a little over two months before Allen started, said Tech Launch Arizona has a difficult task – but one that is essential to the university. “The future for great universities like the University of Arizona is going to be increasingly interdependent with the application of the knowledge that is generated here to human existence and life,” she said. “Different people are really good at different things. We will need as an institution to be more open to many ways of doing things, embracing the entrepreneurial spirit that is exemplified by someone who sees a great idea and immediately starts thinking about what to do with it – a really great combination of knowledge and life. Tech Launch is huge for us.’’

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Celebrating Innovation

BizTECHNOLOGY

By Eric Swedlund

The 10th annual University of Arizona’s Innovation Day on March 28 is a milestone celebrating the intersection of innovation and entrepreneurship. Displaying some of the best ideas generated in university labs and classrooms, Innovation Day honors outstanding faculty and student innovators and entrepreneurs, showcases cutting-edge research and offers students a trade-show environment to pitch their own ideas. “Innovation Day has helped create a culture of entrepreneurship at the University of Arizona,” said Bruce A. Wright, UA Associate VP for University Research Parks. “It provides early stage student and faculty entrepreneurs with role models and incentives to continue their efforts.” Innovation Day is an excellent opportunity for businesses, entrepreneurs, policy makers and community members to learn how the university’s top minds are driving innovation into the marketplace, Wright said. The daylong event includes several sessions:

• UA at the Leading Edge, featuring short video clips of research advances

Technology Innovation Awards luncheon, honoring top faculty and student achievements

Innovation Showcase, a trade-show-environment opportunity for student companies from the McGuire Entrepreneurship program, plus start-up companies from the Arizona Center for Innovation, to make their pitches. Select companies receive awards.

The Innovation Day awards spotlight achievements in taking original ideas from the laboratory to the marketplace. The Technology Innovation Awards honor up to two university researchers each year whose research findings have been commercialized. Winners receive a $10,000 grant to spur further research. One Student Innovation Award is presented, which includes a $1,000 scholarship. UA at the Leading Edge awards – up to five – go to UA faculty or research projects that show potential for commercial applications. “Since its inauguration in 2004, Innovation Day has grown in size and stature to become one of Tucson’s signature community events,” Wright said. “Attended by hundreds of University and community members, this event is a highly visible celebration of successful commercialization of UA technologies.” Biz

10th Annual UA Innovation Day Thursday, March 28 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Student Union Memorial Center

Event fee (includes entry to all events, lunch & garage parking) Community members – $40 UA faculty and staff – $30 UA students – $20 Details at www.innovation.arizona.edu Spring 2013 > > > BizTucson 85


BizBRIEF

MTCVB Names Marketing Director Tim Vimmerstedt has joined the Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau as director of marketing. His responsibilities include managing day-to-day operations of the marketing department and in-house advertising efforts, overseeing seasonal promotional campaigns for various audiences in Tucson’s target markets and assisting in the development and execution of MTCVB’s marketing and media plans. “Tim’s knowledge of the Tucson region, his connections and relationships with key stakeholders and his experience in overseeing operations that include sales, marketing and public relations as well as community affairs for several area attractions will be valuable assets to our organization,” said Allison Cooper, VP of Marketing for MTCVB. Vimmerstedt most recently served as the director of operations and community affairs for Pima Air & Space Museum. His experience in tourism spans more than 20 years and includes roles within the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Old Tucson, Biosphere 2, Rawhide and the Agro Land and Cattle Company. MTCVB is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the Tucson area as a convention, visitor and film production destination.

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BizBIOSCIENCE

Four-Fold Growth in Bioscience Yet Challenges Lie Ahead By Eric Swedlund In the decade since the launch of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap, the state has added jobs in that sector at nearly four times the national average – carrying double-digit growth even through the recession. “Ten years ago, Tucson had a few shining stars and visionary leaders who helped the Flinn Foundation see the potential of what could happen – not only in Tucson, but across the state,” said Ron Shoopman, vice chair of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee. “The roadmap was a turning point in putting together a concerted, statewide effort. Arizona has moved from a spectator in the biosciences to a full-fledged player ready to get on the field at an international level.” Industry leaders and policy makers point to the cooperative effort that emerged from the roadmap, as well as a dedicated effort to capitalize on existing strengths, for such a strong performance statewide. A 10-year performance analysis of the bioscience sector showed that Arizona’s bioscience jobs increased by 45 percent from 2002 to 2011 – while the national growth rate over the same time frame was just 12 percent. “After 10 years, Arizona has carved a niche in the highly lucrative and competitive biosciences field,” said Martin Shultz, chair of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee. “We’re one of the nation’s top emerging bio88 BizTucson

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science states, and our growth in highwage jobs continued during both good economic times and bad.” The Bioscience Roadmap launched in 2002, commissioned by the Flinn Foundation, which committed 10 years of funding to the project. The goal of the long-range plan was to make the state’s bioscience sector competitive not only nationally, but globally. The roadmap set forth 19 specific, measurable recommendations. The recent analysis reported the progress on each one – with substantial progress made on nine of them. “Arizona’s bioscience sector continues to significantly out perform the

Arizona has moved from a spectator in the biosciences to a full-fledged player ready to get on the field at an international level.

– Ron Shoopman, Vice Chair Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee

nation in terms of job and establishment growth, and has made impressive gains in building a more concentrated industry base,” said Walter Plosila, senior advisor to the Battelle Technology Partnership Practice. “However, more attention must be paid to academic research performance and venture capital investment to continue the trend in years to come.” Plosila, who conducted the review, said part of the reason for success is that the roadmap called on a very broad effort, spread across the state. “This is something every region of the state can take part in,” he said. Schultz said pursuing the roadmap has been a process of “knitting ourselves together” for Arizonans – an about face from the historically debilitating intense competition that pitted entities around the state against one another. “We divided ourselves unreasonably,” he said. “To me, the fabric of Arizona has changed right in front of our eyes. We celebrate the tremendous growth that has occurred from Flagstaff to Tucson. But we’ve got our work cut out for us to continue the momentum and meet the challenges ahead.” One of the challenges Plosila laid out is attracting a greater share of increasingly competitive federal research dollars. The state received $174 million in National Institutes of Health funding in 2012 – 19 percent more than in 2002 – yet still a drop of $10 million from 2011. continued on page 90 >>> www.BizTucson.com


Photos: BalfourWalker.com

Ray Jacolik Product Development Specialist MSDx

PHOTO: JOHN SARTIN

University of Arizona BIO5 and Medical Research Building

PHOTOS: COURTESY BIO5 INSTITUTE

Microscope Close Up

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Student in Goodrum Lab

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BizBIOSCIENCE continued from page 88 Compared to the rest of the nation, Arizona is not making sufficient gains in its share of NIH funding. To be among the top states in terms of NIH funding, Arizona needs to be 25 percent ahead of the average, Plosila explained. The state receives 0.7 percent of NIH funding, yet has 2.09 percent of the country’s population. Hospitals continue to be the largest source of Arizona’s bioscience jobs, but the state’s non-hospital subsectors grew 14 percent in 2011 alone. The largest non-hospital subsector remains research, testing and medical laboratories. This group employs about 8,900 workers across 466 firms, a growth of 60 percent since 2002. T.J. Johnson of HTG Molecular Diagnostics said when he moved to Arizona 10 years ago to join the team at Ventana Medical Systems, he didn’t know about the roadmap and that the industry at the time felt more like “white-water rafting.” Since then Johnson said he’s seen an “amazing amount of activity and discoveries related to personalized health care.” He spoke at the annual progress report luncheon in Tucson in February. “It’s almost inconceivable for even those of us who are in it to think of what’s possible,” said Johnson, co-chair for the Bioscience Leadership Council of Southern Arizona. “We need to participate in this because that’s going to drive our society for decades to come.” Johnson said he supports the effort to strengthen educational programs at all levels to form a stronger base for the future, but there remains the need to attract a quality work force immediately. “I need talent now and I’m not willing to take on a middle-school student to run a diagnostic lab,” he said. The dark spot in the progress remains the difficulty in raising capital for growth and expansion, especially at the local level, Johnson said. In raising the funds his company has needed, Johnson had to look outside Tucson – to Boston, San Francisco and even Copenhagen. But success in raising capital comes with the added bonus of making it easier to attract talented workers, he added. Experienced workers – those ready to step into crucial leadership roles in emerging companies – are savvy enough to notice the promise in companies that attract financing. Pointing to the reported 68 percent drop in venture capital from 2011 to 2012, Jeff Jacob of Tucson’s Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals echoed Johnson’s concerns from the industry perspective. Jacob said he faced down the “buzz saw of reality” in launching a company to market. “We’re too small to compare to Boston and San Francisco. We’re one and we have to act that way. You have to be creative, resourceful and not give up,” he said. “Sadly, over the last four to five years I’ve seen the venture capital community become just the capital community as risk adversity reigns. We have a great base of life-science industry and we need to leverage that more.”

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BizMANUFACTURING Doug Rasmussen VP & GM B/E Aerospace

Flying High B/E Aerospace Expands to Meet Global Demand

Thai Airways (Thailand)

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Etihad (Abu Dhabi, U.A.E.)

PHOTOS: COURTESY B/E AEROSPACE

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

By Romi Carrell Wittman


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a business tool and a health issue for people who regularly travel internationally.” It’s a business tool that doesn’t come cheap, however. A super-firstclass roundtrip flight from Los Angeles to Dubai on Emirates Airlines A380 will set you back anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000. U.S.-based carriers, however, have yet to cotton to the idea of super-firstclass suites on their international flights. “They have a different philosophy,” said Kent Kroener, B/E’s VP of product development. “But they’re catching up to their international competition.” Headquartered in Wellington, Fla., B/E has offices around the globe. B/E manufactures or distributes virtually every item you might find on an airplane – everything from the tiniest fasteners and screws to big-ticket items like lavatories and galleys. The company even has a division dedicated to reconfiguring the layouts of older airplanes, like the airline equivalent of “Extreme Home Makeover.” The company got its start in 1987 and, after a series of acquisitions, grew to more than $3 billion in revenue across its three primary business segments – consumables, commercial aircraft and business jet, which includes the super-first-class suites. Rasmussen himself joined B/E Aerospace when B/E acquired Bomhoff, the business jet cabinetry manufacturer, which he helped start in Tucson. The concept of super-first-class luxury was born in 1999 when Swiss Air was looking to upgrade its first-class accommodations. The market took off with the introduction of the Airbus A380. “It gives airlines the flexibility to really do a lot more with the real estate on the airplane,” Kroener said. “It’s the largest jet and it was an opportunity for airlines to introduce new flagship products.” Emirates and Qantas launched their super-first-class products in 2004 and were among B/E’s first major customers. “We were able to integrate what used to be a side table and an ottoman and turn that into a full environment,” Kroener said. Each airline customizes its superfirst-class offering to fit its clientele and needs, meaning B/E has to stay on its toes to keep up with demand and customer needs. “The ultimate goal would be to make continued on page 94 >>>

PHOTO: COURTESY B/E AEROSPACE

Despite a brutal and prolonged downturn in the economy, super-firstclass commercial airline cabins are a hot commodity – and these mega-million-dollar luxuries are manufactured right here in Tucson. Unprecedented growth in this uberluxury market is creating high-skilled jobs and boosting this region’s economic growth. B/E Aerospace in Tucson currently employs more than 600 and has a substantial number of job openings. The business has grown so rapidly that B/E recently completed a multi-milliondollar expansion of its facility on South Pantano Road from 91,384 to 125,596 square feet. That footprint includes both office and production space. The flight of this local division of a global powerhouse was turbulent early in its history – but recovered quickly with the advent of the Airbus A380. The staff expanded dramatically to more than 400 by 2010. The business has been flying high ever since. Despite its relative anonymity here in Tucson, B/E dominates the global super-first-class cabin market. In 2011 it scored three super-first-class cabin contracts totaling more than $125 million. The company reported a 26-percent increase in earnings per share for 2012 and forecasts for 2013 are very strong. “Over the last 18 months, we’ve seen the number of engineers double, and the manufacturing personnel increase by 50 percent,” said Doug Rasmussen, VP and GM. “There are still many positions open.” Skilled disciplines include engineering, design and certification, fabrication, carpentry, electrical, metal, sheet metal and painting. Rasmussen said there is a clear business reason for this phenomenal growth. He points to the increased number of long-haul flights that simply didn’t exist just a few years ago. “Emirates now flies direct to Los Angeles, Dallas, New York,” he said. “We’re seeing more long-haul flights originating out of the ‘BRIC’ countries, too – Brazil, Russia, India and China.” These long, grueling flights have created a demand for more luxurious accommodations, something beyond what even first class can offer. Rasmussen said this can be a sound business decision for long-distance frequent fliers. “If you’re a business executive that frequently flies overseas, these suites enable you to work for six hours, then get almost a full night’s sleep,” he said. “It’s

British Airways

Elite Suites Bring Glamor Back to Flying By Romi Carrell Wittman Flying in a super-first-class suite feels a little bit like stepping back in time – but with every modern convenience. First, you’re struck by the beautiful champagne hues and art deco feel of the suite’s design. The suite, with burled wood-toned panels edged with gold, is reminiscent of a luxury train car from the 1930s or a high-end, albeit miniaturized, hotel room. Then you really settle in, sitting back in your seat, taking full advantage of your own private mini-bar and vanity – complete with luxury toiletries including topnotch skin care products. Using the touch screen controls located conveniently at your fingertips, you can access all the functions of the suite, from the ambient lighting to your own personal 32” flatscreen television. Charging stations let you power up your phone or tablet. You can prop your feet up on your very own ottoman, or raise it to create a second seat so you can invite a friend over for “buddy dining.” And, if you find yourself getting tired – and who wouldn’t on a 17-hour international flight? – you can recline your seat and ottoman into a perfectly flat bed. Unlike typical airline seats which recline and rise with a hard jolt, super-first-class seats are raised and lowered electronically so that they ease into position. All you need to do now is close your privacy screens and drift off to sleep, happy in the thought that, when you awake, you will have arrived at your destination, halfway around the world. For those of us whose typical airline experience consists of short, crowded hops on domestic flights, the above scenario sounds like a fantasy. After all, these suites make even regular first-class accommodations seem downright cramped, dowdy and uncomfortable. But these suites are most assuredly not a fantasy. These elite suites are among B/E Aerospace’s fastest growing business segments.

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PHOTOS: COURTESY B/E AEROSPACE

BizMANUFACTURING

Jet Airways (India)

Emirates (Dubai, U.A.E.)

continued from page 93 the passenger forget they’re on an airplane, and rather consider themselves in a comfortable place to relax, work, lounge, dine and sleep – which is hosted by the airline,” he said. The components of these high-end suites are manufactured at B/E’s facilities in Tucson and in Miami. Seats are manufactured in Miami, then shipped to Tucson for integration with the full suite. The company is recruiting nationally to fill open engineering positions here while fostering a closer relationship with the University of Arizona to bridge its employment gap. “Over the last 12

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months, we’ve developed a deeper relationship with Dean (Jeff) Goldberg of the (UA) College of Engineering,” said Rasmussen. B/E hopes this relationship will aid in finding talent skilled to fill its open mechanical and electrical engineering positions. B/E also utilizes a maquiladora in Nogales, Son., for the manufacture of some items. “The maquiladora is owned independently and it has about 450 personnel,” he said, more than double the number from 18 months ago. Kroener believes B/E will continue to be the market leader of the super-first-

SWISS International Airlines Ltd

class segment. “B/E provides the highest-quality, first-class products with high product reliability and design integrity,” he said. That, combined with B/E’s history in this market segment, will enable it to remain the market leader, he said. With the introduction of the new aircraft types – the Airbus A350 and the Boeing 787 – the demand for super-firstclass suites will only increase. “We need to manage the ramp-up well,” added Rasmussen. “It’s all about creating a product that helps the airlines meet their revenue and passenger goals.”

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Robert D. Ramirez CEO Vantage West Credit Union

Wagering on

Success PHOTO: CARTER ALLEN

By Romi Carrell Wittman

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BizLEADERSHIP Vantage West Credit Union CEO Robert D. Ramirez began his credit union career on a wager of sorts. He bet his boss he could turn around the company in three months. And he did. The story begins in 1985. Ramirez, who was working for a local construction firm, had recently passed the CPA exam and was looking for more responsibility and a bump in salary. When he approached management about his wishes, his bosses told him to get an engineering degree. Ramirez didn’t relish the thought of going back to school to earn another degree, so he looked for other opportunities. DM Federal Credit Union – DMFCU – was hiring. Ramirez was hired as the assistant controller. It was a pay cut, but, as Ramirez said, “sometimes you have to take a step backward to move forward.” He held that position for 30 minutes. On his first day, Ramirez waited for his new boss, the CFO, to show up. When he finally arrived, he dropped his set of keys on the table and announced to Ramirez, “I’ve resigned. Good luck.” And with that, Ramirez became acting CFO. Fast forward six months. DMFCU was still looking for its next CFO when a group of federal examiners came in for their annual exam of the credit union. It did not go well. DMFCU received a less than desirable rating. “I told the CEO, ‘Give me three months and I’ll get you an exceptional rating,’ ” Ramirez recalled. “And he told me if I did, he’d double my salary and make me the CFO.” Ramirez delivered and so did his boss. He held the CFO position for 14 years, eventually working his way up to CEO. DMFCU eventually became Vantage West Credit Union. Today Vantage West is Southern Arizona’s largest credit union, with 15 branches in Arizona, 118,000 members and $1.1 billion in assets. This story reveals a lot about Ramirez – his drive, his dedication to work and his ability to roll with the punches. What it doesn’t reveal is Ramirez’ humor, his dedication to his family or his commitment to the community. Ramirez, 58, has been CEO of Vantage West Credit Union for 13 years and he says he’s having a blast. That much is evident by the awards he and the credit union have received. In the most recent honor, a panel of www.BizTucson.com

employee benefits experts named Vantage West as one of the 2012 winners of The Principal 10 Best Companies for Employee Financial Security in the nation, through Principal Financial Group. Like other credit unions, Vantage West experienced tough times in 2008. Instead of cutting benefits, Ramirez said he focused on growing revenues by taking care of employees. “My goal was to enhance the member value proposition by keeping employees motivated and well compensated with salary and benefits,” he has said. “I told employees, ‘If you take care of members, I will take care of you. I won’t touch your salaries and benefits.’ They kept their promise, and I kept mine. We were profitable by 2009, and we’ve been profitable ever since.”

He wants to help build a better Tucson.

– Mike Varney, President Tucson Metro Chamber Vantage West also won a workplace excellence award in 2006, and Ramirez was named the Eller College Associate of the Year in 2005. He was named the 2009 Business Man of the Year by Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and 2010 Father of Year by Father’s Day Council Tucson in recognition of his work to raise funds to fight type 1 diabetes. “My mother died from complications of diabetes,” he said. “We (her children) didn’t even know she had it because she kept it a secret.” Ramirez said many members of his family have the disease, and finding a cure is something of a mission for him. Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan, head of the University of Arizona Department of Pediatrics and director of Steele Children’s Research Center said, “Bob has generously lent his time and talents to raise awareness of type 1 diabetes and the Steele Center. We are lucky to have Bob in our community, and I am proud to count him as a friend.” Mike Varney, president of the Tucson Metro Chamber, said of Ramirez, “he has a tremendously high level of

issue awareness in our community. He is engaged and energetic. He wants to help build a better Tucson.” Said Lea Marquez Peterson, president of Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, “The Tucson region is blessed to have a business leader like Bob Ramirez.” Born and raised in Nogales, Ramirez said his parents taught him to give back. It’s a philosophy he has built into the culture of Vantage West. “Financial literacy is really our big focus,” he said. He points to the financial crisis of 2008 as evidence that many people are not financially literate. “People didn’t have the foundation, the education, and they got themselves in a bad situation,” he said, referring to the sub-prime mortgage crisis in which people were qualified for mortgages they could not afford. Ramirez focuses on helping members become financially literate in order to generate “good profits” for the credit union as opposed to “bad profits.” Good profits come from financial products that benefit both the credit union and the member. For example, interest income earned on a first mortgage loan generates good profit because it helps both the credit union and the member, as opposed to a late fee on a mortgage that generates bad profit because it is at the expense of the member. Vantage West also gives to numerous charities across Southern Arizona. It’s a tradition that started in the midst of the 2008 financial crisis. Vantage West lost more than $10 million that year, but remained financially viable. Ramirez and the board of directors made the decision to cut the annual employee appreciation party, and instead donate half of the money that would have been spent on the party to 10 local charities. The annual party has since been reinstated, but the annual giving has also continued. Vantage West is also at the cutting edge of technology. The company is looking at opening a teller-less branch at First and Wetmore in the near future. Members will be able to do their banking at kiosks, a move that will lower costs and offer more convenience. “Technology helps us to lower costs which enables us to lower costs to our members,” Ramirez explained. “We want to leverage technology so we can help our members.”

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PHOTO: COURTESY MICHAEL BOLCHAK

BizTRIBUTE

Ad Man Earl Wettstein Resilient, Quirky, Irrepressible and Forever Young By Michael Bolchalk

There are so many positive dimensions to the life of Earl Wettstein that I hardly know where to begin. For nearly two generations no one had more of an impact on the Tucson advertising scene than Earl Wettstein. He and Jack Trustman founded Wettstein and Trustman Advertising in 1964. Don Shellie, a popular columnist at the Tucson Citizen at the time, announced the formation of this new advertising agency. In classic Wettstein fashion he declared that his new company would not accept any cigarette advertising. It made no difference whatsoever that all of the cigarette advertising business resided exclusively in New York City. The partnership between Wettstein and Trustman lasted about two years. Yet they remained friends as Jack went on to a long career of his own. 98 BizTucson

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Earl’s inspiration came from his endless search for the BIG IDEA. That included finding the right words and graphics to deliver the advertising message. He had a sign in our office that read: It’s not creative unless it sells. And he lived it. Some of his award-winning work included the Metropolitan Tucson Convention and Visitors Bureau, I’d Rather Be In Tucson; El Campo Tires and Services, The Buck Stretchers, and Catalina Savings and Loan, Move Your Money to the Mountains. You could not keep a lid on his creativity nor could you constrain his enthusiasm for an idea or a project. He had an eye for creative talent and believed in surrounding himself with the best people and associating with the best people. He also helped a variety of young, talented local entrepreneurs get their start by using their creative services. He also encouraged young people. He welcomed college students to become interns at our company and willingly shared his knowledge with them. Earl had a great fondness for our community. His probono work included University of Arizona Museum of Art, Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum and Tucson Unified School District, among many others. He also believed in giving back to our advertising industry. In the ’70s he was a driving force to rejuvenate the Tucson Ad Club (now known as the Ad Fed) and he originated the annual ADDY Awards competition in 1981. You could not put a lid on Earl’s creative energy. He was always moving forward. Never standing still. He was the selfproclaimed Ad Man and he more than lived up to that handle. Resilient, quirky, irrepressible and forever young. This was the Earl Robert Wettstein that I knew. Earl Wettstein died Jan. 8, 2013 at the age of 81. He and Michael Bolchalk co-owned an advertising and public relations agency for many years. Bolchalk also is co-founder of Bolchalk-Frey Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations.

Biz

Putting Tucson on the Map Earl Wettstein literally helped put Tucson on the map. In the mid ’80s he successfully lobbied Don Hatfield, publisher of the Tucson Citizen at the time, to convince the Citizen’s owner Gannett to get Tucson listed on the USA Today weather page.

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BizTOOLKIT Creating Your Brand with Your Customer Brand communities tend to develop even in the absence of marketer efforts to produce or control them. That’s the bad news – and it’s not really bad. The good news is that there is much you can do to encourage these activities.

Hope Jensen Schau, Associate Dean Eller MBA Programs, University of Arizona

Social Networks

Understand the Dynamics, Then Succeed By Hope Jensen Schau While social media platforms are relatively new, the underlying dynamics are not. People throughout time have communicated with like-minded others – and people have always spread opinions via word of mouth. The difference is that social media technologies enable us to more easily find like-minded others. Using platforms like Facebook and Pinterest, people can interact with one another to solve grocery needs within their household, choose local businesses, gain shopping insights, stay connected to friends and family, entertain one another with games and keep up with popular culture. 100 BizTucson

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So while content on social media can “trend,” social media itself is not a trend. People are social. They share by nature. These technologies just make it easier to share and easier to map and analyze the sharing. Marketers might be tempted to believe that social media is all about Facebook, but despite its dominance, there are a daunting array of social media platforms. Think of it like properties in the game Monopoly – the object of the game is to build on the properties that allow you to maintain a monopoly of time and market activity of a given set of users. No one platform is ideal for reaching continued on page 102 >>>

• My place or yours? Offer or support a gathering location and make it easy for your consumers to find each other. Put out the proverbial milk and cookies to make them feel at home. • Share the brand Encourage your customers to create the brand meaning by welcoming their contributions. • Making mountains out of milestones Identify common milestones in your brand community and encourage your customers to share their milestone celebrations. • For the record Encourage the tendency to document and share, even if it means relinquishing some control of the brand conversation. An Apple fan might explain her editing technique for an iPod tribute video, which other consumers modify by adding their own stories. • Study, study, study A little data can go a long way toward identifying opportunities for you to get involved with your brand community. Step back and take a look before you jump in. www.BizTucson.com


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BizTOOLKIT continued from page 100 all people. A firm with a given target market will need a cocktail of social platforms and a bevy of engagement tactics. Each platform allows for a different engagement pattern. For example – Facebook is good for exposure, but Twitter allows for increased corporate responsiveness. Tumblr is good for generating traffic that is already on the Tumblr site. But if we are only chasing the latest apps and trends, we will lack the ability to nimbly maneuver when new platforms and apps appear. In essence, we should not get overly invested in any one tactic – but learn the underlying theories of engagement that guide consumer behavior and usage. In The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith discussed the market phenomenon of supply and demand finding equilibrium through what he termed an invisible hand. The truth is that equilibrium is based on negotiation, conversation, collaboration. With technologies that are able to capture discussions in real time and across time, the once invisible collaboration is made visible. We can see the hands involved as they create the discourse. We can track the collaboration with some precision. The new game is to harness social media and its data to create more effective, more efficient markets. We can do this by better tracking and instigating word-of-mouth. We have only begun to tap the potential in the social media data. We are making baby steps on unveiling the visibility of the hand. There is much left to decode, unlock and use. If you find yourself overwhelmed by the rate of apparent change in social media, remind yourself – social media aren’t disruptive technologies. They enable consumers to behave as they already do – on a much larger scale. The resulting data is going to allow for mining deeper knowledge of consumer perception, and ultimately, create value.

Biz Hope Jensen Schau is associate dean of the University of Arizona’s Eller MBA Programs and an associate professor of marketing. In addition to social media marketing, she researches brand communities, including the one driven by the very passionate fans of the Twilight series. 102 BizTucson

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BizAWARD

Larry Baer President & CEO San Francisco Giants

Giant’s CEO Named UA Executive of Year By Romi Carrell Wittman Larry Baer, president and CEO of the San Francisco Giants, will be honored April 19 as the 2013 University of Arizona Executive of the Year. “It‘s our pleasure to honor Larry as this year’s Executive of the Year – not only because of the success that he and his team at the San Francisco Giants have had on and off the field – but also because Larry is an exceptional, giving person who devotes much of his life to helping others,” said Len Jessup, Dean of the UA Eller College. 104 BizTucson

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The Executive of the Year Award honors individuals who exemplify executive qualities in private enterprise and public service. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the award, established in 1983 by the Eller College of Management National Board of Advisors. Last year, former U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates was honored. Larry Baer has had a storied career in Major League Baseball. He started with the ball club in 1980 as marketing director. He left in 1983 to attend

Harvard Business School, but eventually returned to the club in 1992, where he quickly rose through its ranks. He was named team president in 2008 and CEO in 2012. Later that year, the Giants won their second World Series Championship in three years. Baer serves as the club’s “control” person on all Giants, Major League Baseball and industry issues, and is responsible for the overall day-to-day functioning of the Giants organization. Baer serves on the Board of Major www.BizTucson.com


Larry is an exceptional, giving person who devotes much of his life to helping others. –

Len Jessup, Dean UA Eller College

League Baseball Enterprises, which oversees national television and radio contract negotiations, national sponsorship and licensing programs as well as the overall marketing of the industry. He is a new member of the Eller College National Board of Advisors. Baer is also active in his community. He is a member of the Board of Directors of KQED Public Media for Northern California, the San Francisco Committee on Jobs, the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, the Bay Area Council and Comcast Sportsnet Bay Area. “Larry has graciously taken a lot of time out of his schedule to offer his sage advice here in Tucson and in San Francisco with students in Eller’s growing, successful sports management program,” Jessup said.

Biz

UA Executive of the Year Award Honoring Larry Baer

Friday, April 19 11:30 a.m. Registration 12:00 p.m. Lunch Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa Individual tickets $80 Tables of 10 $800 (520) 621-0053 or eoy@eller.arizona.edu

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BizBENEFIT

2013 Fathers of theYear Topping $3 Million for Diabetes Research By Gabrielle Fimbres In 1998, Father’s Day Council Tucson committed to funding research for type 1 diabetes through Steele Children’s Research Center. Talk about putting your money where your mouth is. Since then, the council has raised $2.8 million for research and improved treatment for type 1 diabetes. “Without Father’s Day Council, you might as well shut down the place,” said Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan, director of the Steele center and head of pediatrics at the University of Arizona, and physician-in-chief at Diamond Children’s Medical Center. Ghishan was recently awarded the prestigious 2014 Horace W. Davenport Distinguished Lectureship. FDC is aiming to raise an additional $300,000 this year through the Father of the Year Awards Gala Dinner & Silent Auction on June 14 at Loews Ventana Canyon. Honored as 2013 Fathers of the Year are Steve Eggen, Tom Firth, Mike Hammond and Jon Volpe. A military hero also will be honored. (See box below.) Ghishan said FDC funding aided in the recent recruitment of pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Cindy Chin. Funds also are used to investigate early detection and strategies to delay the onset of this autoimmune disease. UA pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Chetanbabu Patel is overseeing research projects – including TrialNet,

a study taking place around the globe involving children and adults with a genetic link to type 1 diabetes. Their blood is drawn to determine if they have antibodies that put them at risk for developing the disease. While the genetic link is small – about 4 percent of siblings of children with the disease will develop it – it offers patients insight, Patel said. Blood samples of those with the positive screen are part of a global repository that could lead to early detection and an ability to delay the onset of the disease. The UA is also involved in Pathway to Prevention, which gives oral insulin to people with the antibodies. The study examines whether lower doses of insulin can delay the onset or decrease the risk of getting the disease. “It’s a much more complex disease than people realized,” Patel said. “But if we get good at detecting who will get it and slow it down – that’s a great step.” Lee Shaw, chair of the council’s executive board, said the ultimate goal is to find a cure. “That is the big quest – but we know it takes money to do that,” said Shaw, whose daughter, Olivia, 15, was diagnosed as a toddler. “Our goal in the short term is to provide a better center for care with more doctors. When Olivia was diagnosed in 1999 there was only one pediatric endocrinologist in town.

Honoring a Military Hero Father’s Day Council Tucson will honor a military hero at the June 14 Father of the Year Awards Gala. “Some of the more remarkable fathers in Southern Arizona serve our country in the United States Air Force,” said David Sitton, a founding member of Father’s Day Council Tucson and a board member of DM-50. “They deploy oftentimes leaving

families behind for months and – in rare cases – years,” Sitton continued. “We ask so much of them and their families that it’s appropriate that we extend our respect to their community.” Father’s Day Council Tucson is observing protocol and working with Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in the selection of the honoree. Look for a profile of this dad in the Summer 2013 issue of BizTucson.

Today there are five.” FDC funding resulted in a fellowship program, increasing the number of trained pediatric endocrinologists. The council also provides funding for education, equipment and technology. “When you are first diagnosed as a family, it’s scary,” Shaw said. “Your child is diagnosed with a life-threatening, chronic disease for which there is no cure.” Education and support empowers families and patients to take control. Lori Stratton, director of development at the Steele center, said many of the good things happening regarding type 1 diabetes there are because of fundraising efforts by FDC. “They have raised so much money and so much awareness as the number of children living with type 1 diabetes in our community has skyrocketed,” Stratton said. Her daughter, Saylor, was diagnosed at age 2. “Research isn’t quick and it’s not overnight. But steady improvements can be made that impact how Saylor will be able to live her life on a daily basis. “Type 1 diabetes is a 24-hour, nonstop exhausting disease that does not go away,” Stratton said. “The work we are doing is making people healthier while working towards a cure.”

Biz

Father’s Day Council TUCSON

Tucson Father of the Year Awards GALA DINNER & SILENT AUCTION Benefitting the UA Steele Children’s Research Center Friday, June 14 at Loews Ventana Canyon Cocktails at 5:30 p.m. Dinner at 7 p.m. $175 per person, $1,750 for table of 10 Tickets at www.fdctucson.org Or contact Laura Hopkins at (520) 626-9618 or hopkins@peds.arizona.edu Spring 2013

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2013 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

Steve Eggen Weekends Dedicated to Family

Steve Eggen

Retired CFO Raytheon Missile Systems

Steve Eggen witnessed the devastation of type 1 diabetes as a child, when his great aunt died of complications from the disease. “I saw what diabetes can do,” said Eggen, who recently retired from Raytheon Missile Systems as CFO. He is honored to be selected as a Father of the Year by Father’s Day Council Tucson, and to raise money for a cure and improved treatment for type 1 diabetes.

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Photo: BalfourWalker.com

By Gabrielle Fimbres


2013 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

BizHONORS

Tom Firth Unbelievable Blessing

Photo: BalfourWalker.com

By Gabrielle Fimbres

The hospitality business got into Tom Firth’s blood at a young age. He worked banquet setup in high school, cooked for 2,000 in the Navy and went on to open 14 restaurants in Arizona. Throughout his career, Firth has kept his wife and sons at the center of his existence. “The thing I am the most proud of is I have been able to raise my family and stay married and be in the business.”

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Tom Firth

Managing Partner Hacienda del Sol Guest Ranch Resort Co-Owner, Zona 78 Spring 2013

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2013 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

Mike Hammond Sold on Family

Mike Hammond

President & CEO Cushman & Wakefield PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services

Mike Hammond has called Tucson home for nearly 40 years. Taking care of family, business and community is his mission. “This community is home – and we try to take care of our people here,” said Hammond, president and CEO of Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services. Hammond is a 2013 Father’s Day Council Tucson Father of the Year. He is proud to raise funds for type 1 diabetes. “I have relatives with this terrible disease,” he said. continued on page 115 >>>

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By Gabrielle Fimbres


2013 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

BizHONORS

Jon Volpe Making Dreams Come True

Photo: BalfourWalker.com

By Gabrielle Fimbres

Jon Volpe’s main goal in life is being the best husband, father and provider he can be. Volpe, chairman and CEO of Nova Home Loans and a 2013 Father’s Day Council Tucson Father of the Year, was a child when his family moved to Tucson. His parents soon divorced, and his mother worked a double shift as a waitress. His father moved out of town and he saw him every other weekend. Volpe and his older brother were left to fend for themselves. “I would walk home

Jon Volpe

Chairman & CEO Nova Home Loans

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BizCOUPLE

Rosi and Benjamin Vogel

So Full of Hope By Gabrielle Fimbres

Like it was yesterday, Benjamin and Rosi Vogel recount the day their youngest child – their baby – was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Daniel, 2, had been sleepy and sick. A trip to the pediatrician resulted in an emergency ambulance ride to University of Arizona Medical Center, where he would spend nearly a week. Those were dark days, with so many questions. They knew their lives had changed forever. “That day was the saddest day of our lives,” Rosi recalled. But the Vogels faced the disease head on. They survived and thrived. When their older son Jonathan was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 8, they knew they could handle whatever came their way. The day he was diagnosed, Jonathan headed off to Little League. Living with type 1 diabetes has not been easy, but the Vogels are determined to give their kids and all kids with the disease the healthiest life possible. www.BizTucson.com

Today, Jonathan, 16, plays French horn and electric guitar. He is in the Catalina Foothills High School marching band and plays in a jazz group. Daniel, 13, is a student at Orange Grove Middle School, where he plays French horn and sculpts. Jonathan wants to be an engineer and Daniel an artist. Together, they hope to become automobile designers. “That is their dream – to own their own automobile company,” said their dad, owner of Benjamin Vogel, Architect. The boys have traveled to Washington, D.C. with JDRF (formerly known as Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) speaking with lawmakers about the importance of funding research. A few years ago, Jonathan raised $30,000 for research when he told his story to a packed ballroom at the Father’s Day Council Tucson Father of the Year Awards gala. “My kids learned to advocate,” said their mom, who is a managing partner in the architecture firm and campaign coordinator at the Jewish Federation of

Southern Arizona. She serves as a mentor to other families living with type 1 diabetes. “I have had people call me at 2 in the morning,” Rosi said. “I pay it forward.” Ben has been involved in Father’s Day Council, which provides funding for research, improved treatments and support services for type 1 diabetes at Steele Children’s Research Center. “You take something that feels like a tragedy and turn it into a focus,” he said. The Vogels are proud of their boys and their accomplishments. Daniel recently became a bar mitzvah. The day was full of emotion, one that brought great joy – but also memories of the diagnosis long ago. “That was the saddest day of my life,” Rosi said. “But the day of the bar mitzvah was one of the happiest of my life – so full of hope.”

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BizHONORS STEVE EGGEN continued from page 108 “As a parent, the focus is on how we raise our kids to be successful – because they are the future,” Eggen said. “One of the things we want to do is eradicate those things that impact them, like diabetes. We can impact that with our time and contributions.” Eggen and his wife, Susan, have been married for 36 years. They are parents of daughter, Kelly Hill, 33, and son Michael Eggen, 31. They are head-overheels over their 20-month-old grandson Kellan, who lives in San Diego. “We FaceTime with him,” Eggen said. “He kisses the iPad.” The Eggens are dug into Tucson. Eggen graduated from high school in San Diego and went on to get a degree in economics and an MBA from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. The family moved here with Raytheon in 1993. “Tucson has its own ambiance and we learned to love the desert,” Eggen said. Over the years, Eggen worked hard to balance his commitment to family,

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career and community. “To me, family was number one. The best thing I have going for me is Susan, my wife, who is a great team player.” Eggen did everything in his power to not miss the events that were important to his family. “I worked hard all week – but weekends were dedicated to family. I knew I couldn’t be the baseball or softball or soccer coach, but I would be the assistant coach. It was a lot of fun.” The Eggens also became involved in the community. “Susan helped transition people moving here with Raytheon, and she got very involved in Assistance League of Tucson.” Eggen is spending his retirement with a little golf, a little travel and a lot of volunteerism. He has brought his experience in finance to the boards of El Rio Community Health Center and Carondelet Health Network. He serves as chair of Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities. “I’m a firm believer that you can’t just complain about things – you have to be actively involved,” Eggen said. “I want children to have a place here where they feel comfortable, they are

safe and they have opportunity – so we can help grow this region. You do that by your actions.” Biz TOM FIRTH continued from page 109 Firth, managing partner at Hacienda del Sol Guest Ranch Resort and coowner of Zona 78, is a 2013 Father’s Day Council Tucson Father of the Year. He and his wife, Susan, have been married for 36 years. They are parents of Matthew, 31, who is in commercial real estate in California, and Brennan, 29, who is a winemaker in Argentina with his own label. Their granddaughter, Indigo, lives in Argentina. “We are very proud to have raised two independent, civic-minded kids,” Firth said. After military service, Firth studied hospitality management and culinary arts in California and later received a bachelor’s in business administration. He worked in Bay Area restaurants, where he honed his culinary skills. He and his wife moved to Phoenix, where he was sous-chef at the Arizona

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Biltmore and other establishments before opening Buster’s Restaurant in Flagstaff in 1983. The Firths journeyed to Tucson in 1985, where he opened Keaton’s Restaurant in Foothills Mall. At one point, Keaton’s was one of only five tenants, but it was popular, known for its seafood and diverse menu. He went on to open Buddy’s Grill as well as a restaurant at the ArizonaSonora Desert Museum, among others. Susan worked part-time as a teacher, allowing her to be home with the boys. “It was an unbelievable blessing,” Firth said. “She really carried the ball.” She has been involved in the business end of the restaurants and opened the Hacienda del Sol gift shop. While putting in long hours, Firth worked his schedule to be with his family. “I would leave in the afternoons when the kids had a soccer game or tee ball,” he recalled. He has been involved in Casas Adobes Rotary Club since 1989. “Rotary has been a blessing for our family. We have had three exchange students over the years and they became part of our

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family.” He is on the board of Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau, and through his businesses, he supports dozens of Tucson nonprofits. Firth is excited to raise funds for type 1 diabetes research through Father’s Day Council. “Without research, we are not going to find a cure for such a debilitating illness,” he said. Biz MIKE HAMMOND continued from page 110 Hammond, one of 10 children in an Irish Catholic family, was born in Panama. The military family crisscrossed the country during his childhood. He received a degree in forestry at the University of Washington, and was drafted into the Army. Following his military service, Hammond and his wife of 41 years, Leslie, spent six years in Europe. “We planned to stay just long enough to bicycle through Spain,” Hammond recalled. He got a job selling insurance to Americans living overseas, including a six-month stint in Tehran, Iran. “I found out I had a knack for selling in-

surance,” he said. When they were expecting their first child, the Hammonds moved back to the United States and settled in Tucson. In 1978, Hammond made the switch from insurance to commercial real estate, and went out on his own in 1985, opening PICOR. As his business grew, so did his family. He and Leslie are parents of Reneé Gregg, 36, Paul Hammond, 30, and Matthew Hammond, 26. They have one granddaughter, Morgan, and one grandson, Rayder. Under Hammond’s direction, PICOR has incorporated in northern Mexico. “I am passionate about Mexico. I think I was a Mexican in my previous life.” He helps U.S. companies expand into Mexico, and aids Mexican companies in setting up operations here. He is a devout student of Spanish. Hammond is actively involved in the Tucson community. He chairs the Southern Arizona Leadership Council and is on the board of Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities. He chairs the Business Development Finance Corp. continued on page 116 >>>

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BizHONORS continued from page 115 and the Community Finance Corp. He’s involved in American Red Cross, DM-50 and other organizations. “I sleep better at night when I give back to the community,” Hammond said. When his kids were little, Hammond coached Little League. Along with his wife, Leslie, he has made family the priority. “My wife gets full credit,” Hammond said. “She truly allowed me to go out and do my job. There is no way I could have accomplished everything I did without the ability to know that everything was being taken care of at home.”

Biz

JON VOLPE continued from page 111 to an empty single-wide trailer. My mom would leave instructions taped to the oven on how long to heat up my dinner.” Growing up, he had tremendous teachers and coaches who served as father figures for him, as well as friends and mentors at the Boys & Girls Clubs

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of Tucson, where he did homework, played sports and learned to cook and sew. “I was fortunate that the community cared about me,” he said. Volpe graduated from Amphitheater High School, where he played football, wrestled, ran track and was an outstanding student. He enrolled at Stanford University with a football scholarship and received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in industrial engineering. Remembering his family’s past financial struggles, Volpe saw football as a way out of poverty. “I would watch the Pittsburgh Steelers on television and they were like superstars. Playing running back for the Steelers would be a great way to get out of the financial rut we were in.” At Stanford, he led the Pac-10 in rushing, but after a coaching change, he was benched his senior year. “My dream of playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers seemed to fade away.” Volpe was Rookie of the Year in the Canadian Football League and in 1994,

he signed as a free agent with the Steelers. “My dream finally did come true – but I suffered a career-ending injury.” Back in Tucson, Volpe ran into Ray Desmond, a family friend who was president and founder of Nova. With Desmond’s encouragement, he joined the company in 1995 – but first Volpe went to his supportive wife, Heather. “I knew if I put in the hours, I could be successful as a loan officer and would be able to provide a good living for my wife and the future children that we would have. I wanted my wife to be able to stay at home and raise our children. I wanted to be present in their every day life. I never wanted them to need something that I could not provide.” Volpe is proud of his kids, Kaylie, 16, and Trevor, 14. The family volunteers together, serving Thanksgiving dinner at the Boys & Girls Clubs and delivering Christmas gifts at Miracle en el Barrio. He is excited to raise funds for type 1 diabetes research. “There is no vacation from this horrific disease. I am hopeful a cure will be found.”

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BizRETAIL

Ted & Tamara Greve Owners, Loop Jean Company

Denim Driven By Christy Krueger Top-of-the-line denim commands such a large portion of the clothing market these days that specialty shops focusing on this category of jeans are popping up all over the country. In Tucson, the premier store serving high-end, jean-loving customers is Loop Jean Company located in Casas Adobes Plaza. Politicians, musicians, authors, grandparents and teenagers all shop at the northwest side store. “We sell to 16-year-old boys and girls and 80-year-old men and women every day – but 30 to 60 is our sweet spot,” said Ted Greve, who owns the store with his wife, Tamara Greve. The couple came to Tucson eight years ago from Newport Beach, Calif., where they owned a contemporary Westernwear store. Although Ted grew up in Tucson and knew it would be a great place to live, he practically had to drag his wife here for a visit. Once here, she was sold. “Premium denim is defined by designers as the best quality denim – typically from Japan or Italy – regardless of where the jeans are actually made,” Ted Greve explained. 118 BizTucson

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“We’re denim driven and carry 40 brands, each of which provides four to eight different fits. In addition, when we hem our jeans we do it properly by salvaging the original hem with all of its original character – and, of course, at no charge.” While they currently quote 48 to 72 hours to turn around alterations, Loop is in the process of installing a complete alterations service in-house. This will reduce the turnaround time to 30 to 60 minutes, making it more convenient for clients. Recently, the couple took a big step in expanding the store’s product line. “As part of our expansion, we added an in-store Robert Graham Shop – one of only two in Arizona,” he said. “It allows us to sell the most sought-after men’s sportswear line in the country.” Loop’s extensive collection of Robert Graham includes not only signature shirts but also Robert Graham blazers, jeans, khakis, socks and belts – with more categories on the way. “For the grand opening Dec. 1, the president from New www.BizTucson.com


York was here, with several Robert Graham vice presidents,” Greve noted. Ten percent of sales that day went to Angel Charity for Children. “The opening was over-the-top successful,” he said. “The clientele had a great time. It turned out to be our single best sales day, which helped us end up with our best year since opening five years ago.” A denim drive benefiting Youth On Their Own also was held for one week in January. “Every pair brought in allowed a 20 percent discount on a new pair of jeans. People were bringing in one to 15 pairs,” Greve said. The ultimate goal was to collect 100 pairs of jeans. Before the end of the week, more than 200 pairs had been donated. One of the biggest challenges the two have faced with the business is keeping their commitment to stay debt free while growing. “While we work hard at our business, we realize we’re very lucky. We’ve managed to grow every year by double digits,” he said. One downside is not having any free time, working seven days a week since opening. In January, with a dependable staff

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of four, he and Tamara decided to start taking off one day a week. Many clothing stores draw shoppers from a few miles away – but Loop Jean Company attracts customers from Green Valley, Sierra Vista and even the Phoenix area. Snowbirds and travelers from all over the world stop in every year when they return to Tucson. As a result, the Greves focus on this group by advertising in publications available at the resorts, and consistently running television commercials. “Business owners are always trying to distinguish themselves from the competition in the most positive way possible. At Loop Jean Company we begin this effort by offering one of the widest selections of premium jeans in the country. This is backed by our complimentary fitting service,” Greve said. “We typically spend 30 to 45 minutes with a first-time client in an effort to identify the most flattering fit possible. Only after that do we begin to focus on color and wash. We finish up the process by hemming properly to the perfect length. Our goal every day is to exceed our clientele’s expectations in selection, quality and service.”

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Photos courtesy of Israel@65

BizINNOVATION

Top row from left – Israeli innovations include a miniature camera in a pill, smart-drip and micro-irrigation, Microsoft operating systems, Intel wireless processors and cell phone technology. Bottom row from left – Plus a revolutionary solar power plant, the Powermat that embeds a power grid almost anywhere, the world’s first solar window, the Disk-on-Key data storage device and world’s first gas-turbine solar thermal power station.

Israel@65

Celebrates Innovation By Eric Swedlund Tucson’s Israel@65 Festival will feature fun, food, games, music and a whole lot of technological innovations. “It’s nice to have fun and music and great food – but we really want the takeaway to be educating the community about the technological innovations and the incredible contributions that this small country is making to the world,” said Jeffrey Artzi, festival chair. The festival takes place April 21, from noon to 6 p.m. at the Tucson Jewish Community Center. The celebration of Israel’s 65 years of independence is open to the public. This year’s theme is “Israel’s Incredible Innovations,” and the event will offer exhibits and speakers in a special pavilion. Not only is Israel a hotbed of technology and entrepreneurial activity, but the country’s most prominent fields – 120 BizTucson

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high-tech computing, agriculture, medicine and green energy – align well with Tucson’s areas of expertise. “Over the last 65 years, Israel has really made some very significant contributions to the world – some are saving lives every day, some we’re using every day and we don’t even know it – like flash drives and video technology,” Artzi said. Guy Gelbart, director of the Weintraub Israel Center in Tucson, said Israel is “considered the second Silicon Valley in terms of companies and innovation.” Part of the aim of the Innovation Pavilion at the festival is educating the public about Israel’s high-tech strengths, an effort that could spur new connections. “We want to create an area within the festival where business people can

get together and hear about new technology and through intermingling and talking, we hope new initiatives will come out,” Gelbart said. “Someone who might be a venture capitalist or a businessman can come with his family and spend time making his connections and learning about technology coming out of Israel. It’s a combination of a fun family event and a business opportunity.” Artzi said this year’s theme expands on the 60th festival, which included a technology pavilion with Israeli and Arizona companies, representatives from the University of Arizona Science and Technology Park, angel investors and venture capitalists and elected officials. “We were really just dipping our toe in the water at the 60th,” Artzi said. The exhibit will include examples www.BizTucson.com


of Arizona and Israeli companies that have collaborated in areas of irrigation and agricultural technologies as well as green energy. This year’s festival also drew inspiration from “Start-up Nation: The Story of Israel’s Economic Miracle,” by Dan Senor and Saul Singer. Published in the United States in 2011, the book compares Israel as a country to a business start up, presenting it as scrappy entrepreneurial success story. It tackles one central question: ���How is it that Israel – a country of 7.1 million, only 60 years old, surrounded by enemies, in a constant state of war since its founding, with no natural resources – produces more start-up companies than large, peaceful and stable nations like Japan, China, India, Korea, Canada, and the UK?” Per capita, Israel produces more scientific papers than any other nation and attracts more than twice as much venture capital investment as the U.S. and 30 times more than Europe. Israel has more startup companies than any other country in the world except the U.S. The country’s high-tech workforce has attracted top technology companies, including Microsoft, Intel, IBM, Motorola and Google. Technologies that include voicemail, instant messenger and ingestible video for medical imaging have sprung from innovations in Israel, and can give a new understanding of the country’s character, Gelbart said. “Most people connect Judaism with religion, but Israel is a very secular and modern state and many Americans don’t know that,” he said. “They’re on the leading edge of technology in the world.” Biz

Israel@65: Israel’s Incredible Innovations Sunday, April 21, noon to 6 p.m. Tucson Jewish Community Center 3800 E. River Road $5 per person – includes raffle ticket Children 5 and under free www.israelfestivaltucson.org www.BizTucson.com

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PHOTO: KRIS HANNING

BizMILESTONE

Maura Grogan Honoree Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona

Laura Penny Executive Director Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona

Celebrating Two Decades of

Investing in Women By Sheryl Kornman The Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona is celebrating its 20th anniversary of grant making, marking the accomplishments of women helped by the nonprofit agency as well as recognizing business relationships that aid women in becoming economically selfsufficient. “We believe that investing in women is an economic development strategy because when women are economically self-sufficient, families are economically secure, and when families are economically secure, the community thrives,” said Executive Director Laura Penny. The organization’s accomplishments will be celebrated at the annual luncheon April 17. “By helping women achieve economic self-sufficiency, we are trying to get at the root cause of some of the social issues our community faces, instead of dealing with the symptoms,” Penny said. “We know poverty is often gen122 BizTucson

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erational and that’s one of the reasons we’re interested in working with moms and daughters.” In its most recent research report on its work, Penny said the Women’s Foundation learned that the relationships formed with businesses that support the Women’s Foundation “are as important as the funding we receive from them.” Businesses can witness how their gifts are used to help local women move forward in life in the form of exhibits at the Grantee Expo prior to the luncheon at the Tucson Convention Center. Business executives meet some of the grantees, and awareness is raised as to the issues related to women and economic self-sufficiency. “The exhibits demonstrate what the women grantees accomplished with a gift from the foundation,” Penny said. “It is so crucial for us to get the word out to corporations about what we do and why we exist,” she said. “The men

and women who own the businesses who sponsor us are well connected and for them to open doors for us has been very, very helpful.” Honored at this year’s luncheon is Maura Grogan, a former investment banker turned consultant. She served on the senior management team at Bio5 Institute and Critical Path Institute. Grogan served on the Women’s Foundation board during a crucial time in the agency’s growth, serving as board chair from 2007 to 2009. “We were well served by her expertise in organizational improvement, strategic thinking, finance, research, fundraising and marketing,” Penny said. In its early years, the Women’s Foundation funded programs and services that helped women and children who were abused or victimized. But in 2007, “we shifted funding priorities to economic self-sufficiency,” Penny said. “One of the reasons women often www.BizTucson.com


stay in violent relationships is they are financially dependent on their abuser. Finances are one way abusers control (women),” she said. The shift in priorities has been successful and the entities funded by the foundation have helped many hundreds of women move up in their lives. “We fund organizations, not individuals,” Penny pointed out. “There are dozens of nonprofits in Tucson that are doing exemplary work and we are proud to partner with them.” Primavera Foundation, for example, helps educate women about debt reduction and asset building. It also works with their elementary-age children on budgeting. Southern Arizona Legal Aid helps women with child support and spousal maintenance issues. And Planned Parenthood helps women deciding when or whether to have children. “It’s one of the most important decisions women can make,” Penny said. The foundation also funds Literacy Connects, which helps women in a Sunnyside neighborhood study for gen-

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eral educational development, or GED. A woman who asked to be named only as R.L. is one of the foundation’s success stories. She was working in an administrative position when her life began to fall apart as a result of domestic abuse. “I knew it was escalating and

Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona 20th Anniversary Luncheon Wednesday, April 17 11 a.m. to noon – Registration & Grantee Expo Noon to 1:15 p.m. – Luncheon Tucson Convention Center Grand Ballroom, 260 S. Church Ave. $60 per person $600 table of 10 (520) 622-8886 or www.womengiving.org

would become physical so I walked out with my son, who was in elementary school, and stayed with a friend,” she said recently. She obtained a restraining order and then a divorce. A program then supported by the Women’s Foundation offered equine therapy for female victims of domestic abuse. R.L. said it helped her learn how to set boundaries and how to communicate. “If you are not totally present, the horse won’t do what you want them to do. It’s a form of therapy that gets right to the heart of the matter in minutes. It was eye-opening.” She continued to work full time through it all, supporting herself and her son. At the Women’s Foundation annual luncheon a few years ago she gave a speech to about 500 business people and community leaders, sharing with them how her life had changed. “I had never done that in my life,” she said. “Now, I’m a member of Toastmasters. I’m a big supporter of the Women’s Foundation and what they do.” Biz

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Bonnie Kampa Executive Director Interfaith Community Services

PHOTO: CARTER ALLEN

BizCHARITY

Acting on Faith By Stephanie Collins Rev. Barbara Anderson had a vision nearly 30 years ago of creating an organization that would foster cooperation among different faiths and numerous congregations in Tucson. That vision resulted in Interfaith Community Services, a nonprofit organization that brings together 73 faith communities and hundreds of volunteers and community partners to provide critically needed services to seniors, people with disabilities and families in financial crisis. 124 BizTucson

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Executive Director Bonnie Kampa said the interfaith aspect is still very important today. “All faiths have an element of giving back,” Kampa said, adding that ICS has a mission of “filling gaps in basic services’’ for Pima County residents in need. ICS works closely with the Tucson business community to accomplish these goals. Tucson Electric Power is a major corporate partner providing support for ICS programs, services and events.

Partners Northwest Medical Center and Oro Valley Hospital help drive the agency’s Mobile Meals program, providing nutrition to frail and low-income seniors, as well as disabled and convalescing adults who cannot cook for themselves. Nutrition specialists from the hospitals help provide meals that are nutritious and customized for specific needs. University of Arizona Medical Center, another corporate partner, refers recently discharged patients to ICS for www.BizTucson.com


Mobile Meals. These patients often become recipients of other ICS services, including the ICS Food Bank located at its main office on Ina Road. Every day, as many as 200 hungry neighbors turn to the ICS Food Bank for help. The organization opened its new 2,700-square-foot facility in 2011, and distributes about 2,000 emergency food boxes each month. The ICS Food Bank prevents children and elderly from going hungry. According to the 2011 U.S. Census, 25.3 percent of Tucsonans – many of them families with children – live at or below the federal poverty level. Other resources include the Planned Giving Advisory Council Member Directory and Guide to Legacy Giving. The pamphlet includes an index of experts in estate planning, accounting and wealth management fields. “Partnerships are central to our mission at ICS,” Kampa said. “From providing financial help to sponsoring an event or hosting a food and diaper drive, partners help us conserve costs and maximize our services in so many ways.” The agency created a community advisory board made up of executives and community leaders with the purpose of expanding the reach of ICS and keeping in touch with the community’s needs. “We operate as a true live business,” said Board President Steve Pollyea. “Business leaders are woven through the whole structure.” He believes the board’s focus on strategic planning is a key to success and “gives us the discipline to achieve our goals.” Every year, about 25,000 people – including 600 seniors – are helped by ICS. With 88 cents of every dollar donated going to services, ICS remains financially transparent, Pollyea said. He believes that not only does ICS benefit from the contributions of Tucson business leaders, but local businesses benefit from building a stronger community through ICS. Charity Navigator has given ICS its top rating of 4 stars for three years running. The organization rates charities and non-profits on financial performance, accountability and transparency. Development Director Deborah Carr said that the agency’s 638 volunteers “set a tone of cooperation and love to everyone who comes through the doors.” Pollyea and other board members believe strongly in the mission, and are also volunteers. Volunteer Sandy Kohlmann, a retired dental hygienist instructor works in the ICS Resource Center, coaching people on resume writing and job seeking. “I appreciate ICS’s mission to help people who want to help themselves,” Kohlmann said. As she saw the economy worsen, Kohlmann became aware of the high level of unemployment and the need for assistance. She helps Tucsonans “identify a change of career, a change of direction,” and sees her most important role as one of offering encouragement. “There are so many opportunities at ICS for all kinds of skills, and there is something for everyone to do as a volunteer,” she said.

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Arizona Oncology Foundation

Offers New Support for Cancer Patients By Dan Sorenson to face staggering medical costs – or smaller ones that nibble away at their quality of life because they forgo treatment that would help them. Now there’s a new source for services and assistance – the Arizona Oncology Foundation. Patient assistance ranges from costfree programs such as support groups and providing wigs for patients who’ve lost their hair during chemotherapy, to reduced-cost acupuncture, massage and nutrition consultation. The nonprofit organization, founded in 2010, sometimes even provides counseling services to patients’ families. Croghan is a radiation oncologist

From left - Dr. Joseph Bucema, President Elect, Arizona Oncology Foundation Dr. Marilyn Croghan, President, Arizona Oncology Foundation Jackie Katanik, District Manager, Safeway

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with Arizona Oncology Associates and president of this new nonprofit patientsupport organization. The foundation was set up by Croghan and partners in the oncology practice to provide integrative services that promote health and healing for patients and their families throughout their cancer journey. The foundation is a bare-bones operation, Croghan said. The idea was to minimize the infrastructure, with only two full-time employees, and office and therapy space donated by physicians. The therapists and other service providers are contractors and typically work for half what their hourly fees would be in private practice.

PHOTOS: AMY HASKELL

Sometimes winning the battle against cancer isn’t really the end of the struggle. “Sometimes it is as hard surviving cancer” as it is to fight through surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, according to Dr. Marilyn K. Croghan. Patients worry “Will it come back? What should I do to keep it from coming back?” Beyond that, Croghan said, a common burden experienced by cancer patients has nothing at all to do with recovery, remission and recurrence. “There are patients whose insurance falls short – or they don’t have insurance at all.” Some patients survive the battle only


BizHEALTH Rather than “reinvent the wheel,” Croghan said the foundation partnered with established Tucson organizations – both businesses and nonprofits – to provide services for patients. They range from American Sewing Guild’s Tucson chapter and Unique Fashions to the Laura B. Carrillo Breast Cancer Foundation, Hope Has a Name Fund and University of Arizona Medical Center North Campus to the Loft Cinema, UA Music and Medicine Club, Cakes for Causes and Lineweaver Elementary School fourth graders.

to the organization that treated us.” Although Poppe had insurance that covered much of the medical costs of her treatment, including surgery, she said some of the post-op services were not adequately covered. “I definitely see the need,” Poppe said of the foundation. In particular, she needed treatments for lymphodema following her bilateral mastectomy and

It looks like they are going to use this money to ease their patients’ suffering. You can’t argue with that.

Rosemary Poppe, Patient & Volunteer

Rosemary Poppe, Patient & Volunteer knows cancer treatment from both sides – the Arizona Oncology medical practice and the nonprofit foundation for patient assistance. She’s a 66-yearold breast cancer survivor, five years removed from a bilateral mastectomy. She’s also an Arizona Oncology Foundation volunteer, connecting patients with services. “I lost a sister to breast cancer. And both of us were treated by Arizona Oncology physicians,” Poppe said. “I thought when I felt better I would give

Nancy Keane, Director of Public Affairs and Government Relations Safeway of Arizona

removal of lymph nodes. “Lymphodema, an accumulation of subcutaneous fluids is painful and uncomfortable, and many times disfiguring,” she said. What’s needed is a labor-intensive manual massage to remove the fluid. “I need a manual drainage every couple of weeks” – yet her insurance coverage limits treatments to 12 a year. The Arizona Oncology Foundation provides hour-long sessions for $35, which is less than her insurance plan’s co-pay, Poppe said. Cathy Adelman, Acupuncturist

Acupuncturist Cathy Adelman is a registered nurse and former hospice nurse who now works with Arizona Oncology Foundation to provide acupuncture therapy to cancer patients. She also has a private practice. “We treat cancer patients throughout their health care continuum,” Adelman said. “We manage the side effects of chemo and radiation – insomnia, nausea, diarrhea, anxiety, post-op pain. And after treatment, we say it’s a good time to treat the lingering impact” of these and other side effects “like hot flashes – a lot of breast cancer patients continued on page 128 >>>

From left: Margaret Hoeft, Board Member Dawn Rataczak, Foundation Program Coordinator Katherine Wickstrom, Integrative Therapist for Reflexology www.BizTucson.com

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BizHEALTH continued from page 127 experience that,” she said, “also numbness and tingling in the hands and feet as a result of chemo therapy.” Adelman’s use of acupuncture is broad, sometimes even beyond the specific cancer patient. “I had a patient who had breast cancer. I asked her if I could help her quit smoking.” Adelman also is a certified smoking cessation therapist. “We know that with breast cancer patients who continue to smoke after treatment, their risk of cancer coming back is two to three times greater” than those who quit. Then Adelman learned that the woman lived with her son and husband, both smokers. “The only way she could do it was if they all quit smoking. They were skeptical. I treated all three of them.” Sixteen months later all three were still non-smokers. Mary Marian, Clinical Dietician

There’s more to cancer patient nutrition than advising patients to eat lots of green, leafy vegetables and lay off the bacon. They can face a variety of nutritional challenges, often varying greatly between patients stricken with otherwise identical types of cancer, said clinical dietician Mary Marian. She has a private practice and teaches at the University of Arizona. “You can’t hand them a sheet of paper and say ‘do this,’” she said. One patient may “be having a terrible time trying to eat, to keep anything down. There are studies that show if a person is not eating and malnourished, they don’t do as well in treatment. And women undergoing treatment for breast cancer may gain weight, and that’s not good either.” She said good nutrition advice isn’t just for patients who have been successfully treated and are expecting long-term survival. “There is mounting evidence that if you have a healthy body weight and maintain nutrition, you have a better quality of life” – whether you’re in early stage, recovery or end stage. “If you have a positive attitude and have the energy and stamina to do that – even if you don’t feel great – you’ll have a better quality of life than the person who does nothing. What I’ve found out from people is you can’t tell how long they’re going to live.” Contributions Sought

As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, Croghan said the foundation is seeking more support from the community to help continue the foundation’s mission. Safeway of Arizona is one of the latest donors, giving $35,000 from the grocer’s statewide charitable fund. Nancy Keane, Safeway’s director of public affairs and government relations for Arizona, said the foundation was a good fit for Safeway, which raises money specifically for cancer every October. She said Safeway distributes roughly $6 million in charitable contributions statewide annually. “It looks like they are going to use this money to ease their patients’ suffering. You can’t argue with that,” Keane said.

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BizBRIEF

Gelfand Named Director of Sales & Marketing at The Westin La Paloma James M. Gelfand is the new director of sales and marketing at The Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa. He will direct group and leisure sales teams and programs, catering and convention services. Prior to joining La Paloma, Gelfand served as director of sales and marketing at Turnberry Isle Miami and The Westin Copley Place, where he was influential in the property’s transition to becoming a part of Starwood Hotels of Boston’s Metro Market Sales Force. During his 11 years of service with Starwood Resorts and Hotels, he served as director of sales at The Westin Diplomat Resort and Spa and the Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort in Florida. He also held the position of VP of sales, marketing and revenue management at PGA National Resort and Spa. A graduate of the Georgia State University Hotel/Restaurant and Travel Management program, Gelfand was named a Starwood Most Valuable Sales Partner. “We are thrilled to welcome James to The Westin La Paloma team during this time of so many exciting changes resulting from our resort-wide rejuvenation journey,” said Jonathan Litvack, La Paloma’s GM. “He has a track record for creatively driving sales and experience delivery programs that exceed corporate and client expectations,” Litvack continued. “He will fulfill a valuable role in our mission to deliver the ultimate upscale experience to group and leisure guests.” The Westin La Paloma has received the top rating for Westin properties in meeting planner satisfaction six of the last eight years. The property, on 250 acres, is undergoing a $30 million resort-wide rejuvenation. The AAA Four Diamond property offers 60,000 square feet of meeting space, a 27hole Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course, Red Door Spa, five pools, 10 championship tennis courts and several restaurants.

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Photos: BalfourWalker.com

BizFASHION

Ann Carroll Owner, Mills-Touché

Spanning Generations By Pamela Doherty A second-generation retailer of fine apparel, Ann Carroll continues the business her father Albert Touché and his partner Carl Mills started before she was born. Carroll operates the Mills-Touché women’s boutique in the Crossroads Festival shopping plaza at Grant and Swan Roads. As a teenager, Carroll occasionally helped out at her father’s store in Tucson, but she went on to college to pursue a degree in psychology, having no intention of making a career out of the family business. When a manager quit unexpectedly shortly after she graduated, Carroll stepped in to assist and work by her father’s side. “I ended up staying, and I have loved it ever since,” said Carroll, who is proud to follow in her father’s footsteps. The first Mills-Touché store opened in Tucson in the late 130 BizTucson

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1950s in Broadway Village, which was a unique location at a time when most trade was based downtown. According to Carroll, Mills and Touché pooled their money to come up with the $10,000 they needed to get their business – then a men’s store – off the ground. In 1960 they moved to El Con Mall and added women’s fashion to the mix. Mills-Touché eventually added stores at the Arizona Biltmore Hotel in Phoenix, the Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa in Tucson and The Phoenician resort in Scottsdale. The company also opened four outlet stores across the state. Eventually, Touché consolidated his business and once again focused on the local market. Carroll worked with her dad until he retired in his mid-70s, www.BizTucson.com


turning the business over to her 10 years ago. Today Carroll’s mother lends a hand at the store several hours a week. “My father taught me that the key to success is a focus on service. He would go out of his way for people, and treated them as he would want to be treated,” Carroll said. Carroll has taken her father’s timeless advice to heart. She offers in-house tailoring and complimentary gift wrapping. Carroll will personally deliver special orders to customers’ homes, and she sometimes buys merchandise with particular clients in mind. Carroll’s store features clothing suitable to the local climate and culture – what she describes as a classic yet casual style. Mills-Touché also sells a unique line of ranch wear. “Nothing here is mass produced,” she said. Like other small retailers, Carroll’s business has slowed during the last four years, but customers – women ages 35 to 80 years old – have remained loyal. “Unfortunately, several of my contemporaries did not survive the recession,” Carroll said.

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After 27 years in the business, Carroll has lived through the expansion and contractions of economic cycles and says her experience has enabled her to remain patient and calm. She also adjusted her buying strategy – scaling back on the volume of inventory while buying more frequently to ensure that merchandise moves quickly. Carroll said it is highly unlikely that any of her three children will want to take over the business someday – but she and her parents are at peace with that. “I will keep running the store as long as it is profitable and enjoyable. After that, who knows?” she said. In addition to managing her long-standing business, Carroll is active with several local charities, including Tucson Hebrew Academy. She can also be found out in the community supporting the endeavors of her husband, Pima County Supervisor Ray Carroll.

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Photo: BalfourWalker.com

PHOTO: CARTER ALLEN

BizHONORS

Bruce D. Beach Honoree

Shirley Dail Honoree

Beach, Dail Win Good Scout Awards By David B. Pittman The winners of the 2013 Tucson Construction Industry Good Scout Awards have two things in common – neither is a contractor and both have had longtime positive influences on their community and the local construction industry. Bruce D. Beach, chairman and CEO of Southern Arizona’s largest locally owned public accounting and consulting firm, will receive the 14th annual Good Scout Award at a May 10 luncheon. Shirley Dail, owner/operator of Shirley’s Plan Service, who has been described as “a leading lady” in the Tucson building industry, will be honored with the Good Scout Lifetime Achievement Award. Proceeds from the event will support Boy Scout programs in Southern Arizona. Shirley Dail Dail is only the second person to be honored with a Good Scout Lifetime Achievement Award. The inaugural award was given last year to Peter Herder, chairman of the Herder Companies. 132 BizTucson

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Dail is described as a pioneer in Tucson construction because when she began working in 1963 for The Builder’s Club, a plan service, very few women were working in the industry. She and her husband, former masonry contractor Bud Dail, were married in 1965. The couple has four children, five grandchildren and three great grandchildren. In 1966, Dail was a founding member of the Tucson Chapter of the National Association of Women in Construction. She currently serves as VP of the chapter, which created the Shirley Dail Endowment Fund at the UA. Dail worked in the plan service business for almost 20 years before she and her husband started Shirley’s Plan Service in 1982 with the help of architects, general contractors and subcontractors. “Shirley Dail is a leading lady in the Tucson construction industry,” said Tom Kittle, president of Kittle Design and Construction and chair of the Good Scout award committee. “Shirley’s Plan Service is a clearinghouse for owners and architects to distribute plans to general contractors, subcontractors and suppliers. As a re-

sult, Shirley knows virtually everyone and everything that is going on in Tucson area construction. She works so hard and has done so for decades. She is an integral part of the local construction industry.” Dail is appreciative of the award, saying she has the greatest respect for contractors in the community. “As far as I’m concerned, it’s better than being president of the United States.” Dail is a member of ABA, ACT, the American Society of Professional Estimators and the Construction Specifications Institute. She has been involved in charities including Those Who Care and Brewster Center. Bruce D. Beach BeachFleischman provides accounting and business consulting services to companies in virtually every industry. However, in naming the various industries it serves on its website, the construction industry tops the list, with good reason. In 1980, with just three clients, Beach and Marc Fleischman founded the company in an old metal warehouse that served as an office and parking gawww.BizTucson.com


rage. Of those original clients, two were construction firms, and BeachFleischman continues to cater to the construction industry today. Beach said construction companies face tight timetables on building projects as well as unique issues – such as dealing with work in progress, maximizing bonding capacity and meeting strict regulatory reporting requirements. He said BeachFleischman helps clients handle key business issues so they can concentrate on what they do best – building. “Receiving this award is a significant honor,” Beach said. “It comes from an industry that is close to my heart. The construction industry is filled with salt-of-the-earth people who work hard and get things done. I have nothing but respect both for the construction industry and the Boy Scouts, which is an outstanding and worthwhile organization.” BeachFleischman is a participating member of many construction industry organizations, including the Construction Financial Management Association, Arizona Builders’ Alliance, Alliance of Construction Trades, Tucson Underground Contractors Association and Southern Arizona Homebuilders Association. “BeachFleischman is the go-to CPA firm because they have experts in every aspect of the construction industry,” said Angie Ziegler, co-owner of General Air Control and a member of the Good Scout award committee. “Bruce’s community endeavors are endless. He is very committed in giving back to the community that has made him so successful.” Beach was Tucson Metro Chamber’s Man of the Year in 2010 and won Wells Fargo’s Copper Cactus Award for Small Business Leader of the Year in 2009. He was born in California and has spent the last 60 years in Tucson. He graduated from Salpointe Catholic High School and received a bachelor’s degree and an MBA from the University of Arizona. He married his wife, Julie, in 1971. The couple has two children and three grandchildren. He is a member of the board and past chair of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council. He is also past chair of the Carondelet Foundation, the YMCA, United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona and Child & Family Resources, among other organizations. He is a founder of Tucson Festival of Books. Biz

Good Scout Award Luncheon & Fundraiser hosted by the Catalina Council, Boy Scouts of America Friday, May 10, Noon Holiday Inn Palo Verde $95 per person $850 for table of 10 Tickets and information: Kim Brown, 750-0385, ext. 25 or kim@catalinacouncil.org

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Photo: BalfourWalker.com

BizCOMMERCIAL

CCIM winners – from left – Bob DeLaney, Jim Marian, Laurie Weber, James P. Robertson, Jr., David Volk and Dave Hammack.

Experts Predict Future for Commercial Real Estate By Sheryl Kornman There was no crystal ball on the table when the Southern Arizona CCIM chapter’s experts put together their predictions for commercial real estate in 2013. The experts were winners of the chapter’s 2012 annual forecast competition, and these top market specialists drew on their expertise in key facets of commercial real estate to give others a look at what they see ahead as an economic upswing slowly takes hold here. CCIM stands for certified commercial investment member, a designation received after completing the CCIM curriculum. Industrial expert Bob DeLaney, a VP at CBRE commercial real estate services, told more than 500 attendees at CCIM’s annual forecast event in February that professionals doing business in the Tucson region should take a look at California, Phoenix and Mexico – where business is growing faster than it is here. “Southern California is a big pond to fish in. There are 1.8 billion square feet of industrial space in Southern California,” said DeLaney, winner of the industrial category. “Phoenix is improving,” he said, and “Mexico is projected to grow at 6 per cent this year.” DeLaney said there are 18 million square feet of manufacturing space in 134 BizTucson

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maquiladoras just south of the border. Tucson has 34 million square feet of industrial space, not including government buildings, with much of it near the Tucson International Airport. However, “rents are flat, there is no spec construction and the airport (site) has 18 percent vacancy rates.” Mining and engineering had significant activity last year, he said, and there is a halo effect for businesses tied into the industrial sector. Overall, he said, “Demand is thin. Love the girl you’re with. The government real estate spigot is off and tenants are making longer-term leasing agreements. Brokers will have to work harder to make money. The gap between market rents and rents from new buildings will continue to narrow.” Winner in the land category, Jim Marian, of Chapman Lindsey Commercial Real Estate, said the northwest residential marketplace and University of Arizona campus area are doing well in 2013. “Oro Valley (building) permits increased 400 percent,” Marian said. Marana permits increased by 60 percent last year, he said. Instead of the 100-plus transactions that took place annually, Marian said the total number of land transactions in 2012 was 62 – and for the first time in three years, there was a land transaction in excess

of $10 million. Permits also are over 1,000 for multifamily housing for the second year in a row. Half of that is for student housing near the university. Total residential land sales in 2012 increased from $54 million in 2011 to more than $117 million in 2012, he said. The biggest deals of the year include projects in Rancho Vistoso, Marana and a student housing project at 22nd and Park. Marian said the market will continue to improve in 2013, with increases in single-family and multi-family permits, and at least one master-planned retirement community in Marana. However, the supply of fully improved lots will continue to decrease in 2013, he said, because today’s investor and homebuilder will only improve lots if the demand in there. Thousands of plats are sitting idle in locations where nobody wants to build, Marian said. Much of the desired areas are already built out. Even so, there will be a substantial increase in lot construction in the second half of the year, Marian said. He forecasts total residential permits at 4,100 for the year. Laurie Weber, of Larsen Baker, is CCIM’s finance forecast winner. She said investor confidence grew in 2012 and borrowers benefitted from the stacontinued on page 136 >>>


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BizCOMMERCIAL continued from page 134 bility of the 10-year Treasury note. While 2012 was “an excellent year to finance acquisitions or refinance existing properties, commercial and residential,” she predicts 2013 “will be nearly as good.” She predicts “slight increases” in the 10-year Treasury yield with 2013 ending between 2.3 percent and 2.4 percent. In multi-family housing, James Robertson of Realty Executives Tucson Elite is the 2012 forecast winner. He predicts a multi-family vacancy rate at the end of 2013 at 10.75 percent. At the end of 2012, the vacancy rate was 9.91 percent. “Phoenix is seeing a healthy recovery in the multi-family sector,” he said, and the velocity of multi-family foreclosures is slowing. He sees the market here as “approaching recovery,” and investors may see that “it makes economic sense to build new.” Robertson said some multi-family property owners in 2013 will reduce maintenance spending on already distressed multi-family properties and their marketability will continue to de-

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teriorate. Also, the “obvious increasing average age of Tucson’s apartment inventory is causing obsolescence. The balance of Tucson’s apartment inventory is not aging gracefully.” He predicts that the UA’s “micro housing economy will shake up multifamily occupancy” in Tucson in 2013. Overall, a lack of employment opportunities will continue to affect the vacancy rate, as will individuals coming out of mortgage foreclosure who may return to the home buyer market. David Volk, a VP at CBRE, won the office category. In 2013, he sees “a slight recovery coming” in Tucson office vacancy rates. “Most big leases were signed in 20052007. Typically these are five-year leases and going forward, they should have burned off and we will see the end of our shadow inventory.” Volk said national companies have not been active recently and local companies “are still hurting, not coming out to sign new five-year leases. There’s not a lot of activity in that sector. National tenants are driving demand. Tenants want new space at the lowest rate possible.”

He said out-of-state companies are looking for short-term leases and overall in 2013, Volk forecasts a “slight improvement in the marketplace” with a vacancy rate in office at 11.9 percent. “Any improvement will take a long time to materialize.” The newest buildings here have the lowest vacancy rates, Volk said. Retail winner David Hammock, of Volk Company, said retail in 2013 is “moving in the right direction.” Last year was “a great year for anchor space.” Businesses including Stein Mart at Broadway and Craycroft, Walmart Neighborhood Markets around town, Whole Foods at River and Craycroft and the fast-food burger and pharmacy categories are active, he said. “We finished the year (2012) strong with an 8.2 percent vacancy rate,” Hammock said. He predicts 2013 will end with a vacancy rate of 7.85. “It’s still a little ways out for new development,” he said. The 2012 winner for appraisal was Gordon Wicker, president of Quality Valuation. Wicker specializes in the appraisal of industrial, office, retail and land, as well as specialty properties.

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PHOTO: KRIS HANNING

BizART

From left: Lucine Dirtadian & Ursula Rodgers Owners, Skyline Gallery

Vibrant Contemporary Creations By Anna Rasmussen Lucine Dirtadian and Ursula Rodgers opened Skyline Gallery seven years ago with a specific objective – to create a gallery experience that did not feel “too high end or cold.” “Most importantly, we just want people to have the opportunity to see really beautiful art,” Dirtadian said. Skyline Gallery has a relaxed yet vibrant feel. The walls are lined with bright and colorful glass art, contemporary paintings, pottery and unique woodwork. Friends since college, Dirtadian and Rodgers each received a fine arts bachelor’s degree in metalsmithing from the University of Arizona. Dirtadian also is a graduate of the Gemological Institute of America and Rodgers has a master’s in art education. In 1989 they combined their background in art, metal work and gemology to form a custom jewelry business – Four Hands Images. They have now expanded Four Hands Images with hand-picked art selections to create what is now Skyline Gallery. 138 BizTucson

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“We realized that Tucson didn’t have a space that was only contemporary North American art. We also wanted an emphasis on custom jewelry. We’ve created something unique.” Dirtadian and Rodgers describe the style of the gallery as being contemporary, timeless and one of a kind. Some of the most popular features are the jewelry of Alex Sepkus, the woodwork of Colin Schleeh and pieces by local artist Melinda Curtin. The two partners are the gallery’s sole employees and work to develop personal relationships with their clients and artists. Gallery regulars will simply come to enjoy the space and talk. Part of what makes the gallery so personal is that Dirtadian and Rodgers selected each piece themselves, instead of using a buyer. “We love all of what we do – but best is buying the art, working with artists, bringing the art in and merchandising it,” they explained. “We are passionate about the pieces we choose.”

They do not exhibit items on consignment, but instead purchase the art from the artists or collection. “We understand that artists need to get paid for their work. We’ve been on both sides of the door. This way we can purchase what we like and help an artist continue to be an artist,” said Dirtadian. Their marketing strategy includes running advertisements with local newspapers, visitor guides and through radio promotions. They agree that “the pieces advertise themselves. When someone leaves here with a piece of jewelry saying ‘I feel beautiful, that was a great experience’ – that’s the best advertisement we could ask for.” Dirtadian and Rodgers have high expectations for the future of the gallery, hoping it will continue to expand and represent a greater scope of artists. “People come into our gallery looking for something unique, affordable and one of a kind,” said Rodgers. “That’s what they are going to find.”

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BizTucson Magazine Spring 2013 Issue