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FALL 2018 2012

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Davis-Monthan: U.S. Air Force Base of the Year

&

SPECIAL REPORTS: Sun Corridor Inc. Carondelet Health Network Casa de la Luz Hospice

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FALL 2018 • $3.99 • DISPLAY UNTIL 12/31/18


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BizLETTER

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Fall 2018

Volume 10 No. 3

Publisher & Owner

Steven E. Rosenberg Brent G. Mathis

Creative Director Photo: Steven Meckler

United States military operations and the Aerospace/Defense businesses they support have an enormous economic impact on the state of Arizona. Specifically, in Southern Arizona, the annual impact is $8 billion. These combined industries are responsible for creating 76,714 jobs statewide. This data is contained in a new report titled “Economic Impact of Arizona’s Principal Military Operations 2017.” The report states that Arizona’s six military installations and four National Guard facilities are responsible for annually contributing $11.5 billion to the state’s economy. Ted Maxwell, a retired major general and former commander of the Arizona Air National Guard, said no state in the nation can compete with Arizona in terms of military training and readiness. In addition to the bases, Arizona is a top- 10 state for U.S. Defense Department contracts. These recently released economic impact reports and the U.S. Senate’s passage of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 make this a perfect time for BizTucson to provide our readers with in-depth coverage. The bill is named for Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain, who was elected to Congress in 1982 and represented Arizona as a senator since 1986. Sadly, Sen. McCain passed away on Aug. 25th. We bring you a special tribute for him through the experiences of local business leaders. In this edition we report on the continued excellence of the region’s thirdlargest employer – Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. D-M was recently honored as the #1 US Air Force Base in the nation, receiving the Commander-inChief ’s Installation Excellence Award. It’s an unprecedented achievement for D-M, as the base received the same honor just six years ago. In this issue, you’ll meet the new Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Commander and Commander of the 355th Wing, Col. Michael R. Drowley. Southern Arizona is “on the doorstep of greatness – but we have to stay vigilant,” said Joe Snell, president and CEO of Sun Corridor Inc., the region’s economic development organization. Sun Corridor Inc. is the subject of a special report entitled, “Corporate America Chooses Southern Arizona.” The long list of powerhouse corporations includes recent wins like Caterpillar (600

jobs), Amazon (1,500 jobs), Raytheon Missile Systems expansion (2,000 jobs) and more. Read how the region’s leadership is building momentum as national and global corporations are making the move to Southern Arizona. One big opportunity on the horizon is the transformative potential of our airport region to become a large-scale employment center, and a transportation and logistics hub. Celebrating a quarter century of greatness is the University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center. The visionary Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan leads this dynamic research center. Read about exciting discoveries and research projects of the 100+ world-class physicians and researchers, plus what’s on the horizon for future discoveries – which include autoimmune diseases, genomic medicine and developmental behavioral pediatrics. You’ll be inspired by these “Scientists of Steele” as there is not a more noble cause than dedicating your life to discovering treatments and cures to life-threatening childhood diseases. This edition contains a special report on the Carondelet Health Network and an interview with CEO Mark Benz. It’s a compelling update on three very important hospitals in our area and the many dedicated healthcare professionals that contribute to its high standard of excellence in patient care. We also have a special report on Casa de la Luz Hospice, a remarkable organization dedicated to providing compassionate care for more than 20,000 patients over two decades. You’ll meet the inspirational founders Lynette Jaramillo and Agnes Poore and learn about their emphasis on compassion, education and innovation. Steven E. Rosenberg Publisher & Owner BizTucson

Biz

Contributing Editors

Jay Gonzales Donna Kreutz

Contributing Copyeditors

Elena Acoba Diane Luber Dave Petruska

Contributing Technology Director

Mike Serres

Contributing Project & Event Coordinator

Maricela Robles

Contributing Writers

Elena Acoba Lee Allen Rhonda Bodfield April Bourie Rodney Campbell Mary Minor Davis Jay Gonzales Chuck Graham June C. Hussey

Tiffany Kjos Christy Krueger James Marten Mary Martin David Pittman Steve Rivera Valerie Vinyard Romi Carrell Wittman

Contributing Photographers

Damion Alexander Christian Cachola Deanna Dent Amy Haskell Austin Lenhart Isaac D. Martinez Brent G. Mathis

General D. Mills Chris Mooney Brenton Nordyke Jerilyn Quintanilla Angela Ruiz Michael Washburn

Member:

Arizona Builders’ Alliance DM-50 Greater Oro Valley Chamber of Commerce Marana Chamber of Commerce Southern Arizona Leadership Council Sun Corridor Inc. Tucson Advertising Federation Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Tucson Metro Chamber Visit Tucson

BizTucson Phone: 520.299.1005 Subscription Information:

www.BizTucson.com subscriptions@BizTucson.com Advertising information:

Steve Rosenberg 520.299.1005 or 520.907-1012 steve@BizTucson.com BizTucson is published quarterly by Rosenberg Media, LLC. ,Tucson, AZ ©2018 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Opinions expressed in columns or articles do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

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Please send address changes to: BizTucson, 4729 East Sunrise Drive, #505 Tucson, AZ 85718. www.BizTucson.com


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BizCONTENTS

FEATURES

FALL 2018 VOLUME 10 NO. 3

COVER STORY: 108 110 112 114 119 120

102 16

SALUTING THE REGION’S FIVE-STAR INDUSTRY $8 Billion Economic Impact Davis-Monthan Welcomes New Commander Davis-Monthan Honored as #1 US Air Force Base Installations at a Glance Initiative Helps Military Spouses Find Jobs YMCA Military Ball

DEPARTMENTS

4 16 18 22 28 32 93

BizLETTER From the Publisher BizCONSTRUCTION $300 Million Tower $25 Million Trinity Project New Hotel, Apartments Near UA BizTRAVEL Airlines Add Nonstop Flights BizEDUCATION A Bold and Strategic Vision BizVIEWPOINT Q & A with Raytheon’s President

96 102 141 142 144

BizMEDICINE UA Steele Children’s Research Center BizLEADERSHIP Women Who Lead – Kym Adair BizBENEFIT Classic Car Show BizTOURISM Attracting Visitors & Dollars

146 152 154 162

BizCONSTRUCTION New To Market – Going Up BizENTREPRENEUR Whiskey Del Bac BizCUISINE American Eat Co. BizNONPROFIT Team Hoyt Arizona

164 166 189 190

BizTECHNOLOGY PitchVantage BizLAW Mesch Clark Rothschild BizTECHNOLOGY Computer Help for Seniors BizPHILANTHROPY Bank of America Grants

192 195 198

BizMILESTONE The Temp Connection BizHONORS Tucson Hispanic Chamber Awards BizFILM FilmFest Tucson

BizRECREATION 200 DEK Hockey Rink for Youth 202 206 210 212 214 216 218

BizCYCLING New Bike Park & Events BizSALES Sales Guru Jeffrey Gitomer BizMILLENNIALS TENWEST Festival Preview El Rio Vecinos Engage Professionals BizDEVELOPMENT Tech Parks Arizona Developers BizTRIBUTE Sen. John S. McCain BizNONPROFITS Community Foundation of Southern Arizona

SPECIAL REPORTS 33

Sun Corridor Inc. SPECIAL REPORT 2018-2019

BizFINANCE Vantage West’s Expanded HQ www.BizTucson.com

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ABOUT THE COVER SALUTING THE REGION’S FIVE-STAR INDUSTRY 12 BizTucson

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THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Creative Design by Brent G. Mathis Inset Photos by Lance Cpl. Christian Cachola & Chris Mooney

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Carondelet Health Network SPECIAL REPORT 2018

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Casa de la Luz Hospice SPECIAL REPORT 2018

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Spring 2015 > > > BizTucson 69

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Casa de la Luz Hospice Casa de la Luz Hospice

COMPASSION EDUCATION INNOVATION

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BizCONSTRUCTION

$300 Million Tower at Speedway and Campbell IMAGES: COURTESY STUDIO RICK JOY

Retail, Offices, High-End Residences By Rodney Campbell Longtime Tucson developer Richard Shenkarow can almost see the location for his next project from his home near the Arizona Inn. He’s so close he could walk or bike there in a few minutes. He’s banking on Tucsonans and visitors to do the same. Walking, biking or taking public transportation will be the best ways to reach the site once the Speedway Campbell Gateway project opens in about four years. The development at the northwest corner of Camp16 BizTucson

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bell Avenue and Speedway Bouelvard will include restaurants, a grocer, retail, office space and approximately 100 high-end residences. The property currently is occupied by the aging Palm Shadows and Babcock apartments. “Urban development can be found all over the world. This isn’t any different from any major city. But for Tucson, it’s a first,” said Shenkarow, founder and president of Shenkarow Realty Advisors, a boutique commercial real estate

company. “We have cemented over 300 square miles of the desert. We need to find ways to preserve that.” The project’s ground floors will be two stories and open for people looking for a space to hang out or walk through. Four stories of office and retail will be placed above that. A 250-foot tower, set back from the intersection, will include the residences. Shenkarow’s goal is to build a sustainable project that won’t contribute to the www.BizTucson.com


region’s sprawl. The structure will use existing infrastructure – saving taxpayer dollars – and will replace apartments that haven’t kept up with the evolving needs of the student population. “The cost of infrastructure is borne by everybody,” he said. “Sewer systems, repaving the street – it’s enormously costly. We’re using systems in place and improving upon them. We’re not destroying anything. We’re taking down an eyesore.” Only a minimum number of parking spaces will be included on the 2.5-acre footprint. The $300 million project including the 20-story tower is likely to break ground late next year and will have streetcar and bus stops nearby. Plans include bike- and car-sharing options on site. Taking it a step further, businesses there will be encouraged to issue streetcar or bus passes to their employees. “This will be at the forefront of multimodal mixed-use in Tucson,” said Matt Luck, a senior project manager and designer for Rick Joy Architects, which is working on the project. Luck and his family moved to Tucson from Manhattan, so he knows the value of walking to the market or a restaurant. The target audience spans all ages, including recent University of Arizona graduates. According to a report from the Arizona Board of Regents, there was a smaller percentage of UA graduates employed in the state in 2015 than their counterparts at Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University. Projects like this and the ongoing revitalization of downtown Tucson are delivering amenities young professionals want where they live. “Young professionals tell us this project gives them hope that Tucson is headed in the right direction for them,” Luck www.BizTucson.com

said. “This project reflects a lot of their values.” The development plan was approved by the Tucson City Council in late June. Councilmember Steve Kozachik, who represents Ward 6 where Speedway Campbell Gateway will be located, believes even detractors will be supporters once work is complete. Shenkarow and his team spent four years working with neighborhood groups while planning the project. “It was a vote in which I could not satisfy everyone – but my support for the project came after years of public outreach in which the development team incorporated multiple amenities to the project that I suspect will be attractive even to the people who didn’t want to see it passed,” Kozachik wrote in his enewsletter to constituents. Shenkarow conducted several studies to determine the right time and the right project. With Banner – University Medical Center expanding and the university constantly working on new facilities, this was the right opportunity. “The site is surrounded at this point,” he said. “There will be a lot of foot traffic.” Shenkarow said thousands of construction jobs will be created and estimates that around 2,500 permanent jobs will be established when the project opens. “The economic impact is going to be very strong,” he said. Shenkarow compares the project to luxury development Optima Sonora Village in Scottsdale, where apartments and condominium units range from 598 to 1,858 square feet. Residents enjoy a wide array of amenities, including a 24hour fitness center with personal trainers, a pet park and concierge service. While it’s too early to determine unit

sizes and costs at the development, Shenkarow said almost 50 people have called to ask about reserving a residential spot. “This is going to be something that does not exist in Tucson,” he said. In an area bordered by the hospital and research buildings on one side and fast-food restaurants, hotels and student housing on another, Speedway Campbell Gateway should stand out. Unique louvers will create a porous look and shade the windows and public green spaces with arcades that protect visitors and residents from the sun. “The university needs an iconic building that’s sustainable,” Shenkarow said. “That’s what we will deliver. This will establish an exemplary entryway that will help with recruitment and retention. It will attract younger people who graduate and stay in Tucson. This should give a strong platform for the university.” An October 2016 study found that a little more than 6,000 vehicles passed the Campbell/Speedway intersection each hour in the morning and another 6,400 per hour went by in the afternoon. While traffic is driving the project, alternate modes of transportation are the appeal. “We’re not designing it as a site for cars,” Luck said. “We’re interested in people walking to the site. There are so many other options.” But what if there aren’t enough Tucsonans interested in walking or taking the streetcar? Shenkarow has been around long enough to understand risk – which he took while building other successful projects such as Casas Adobes at Oracle and Ina roads. “It’s basically a bet,” Shenkarow said. “But we’re very confident.”

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BizCONSTRUCTION

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$25 Million Trinity Project

Adds Offices, Retail, Apartments Near Streetcar

IMAGES: COURTESY ROB PAULUS ARCHITECTS

By Rodney Campbell Tucson’s Modern Streetcar has been boosting the economy along its route since it started rolling in 2014. The nearly four miles of tracks pass through some of the city’s most vibrant corridors, creating opportunities for jobs, housing and entertainment. That is about to include The Trinity, a mixed-use development project getting ready to go up on land once owned by an iconic church. The Trinity will be located near two streetcar stops near Fourth Avenue and University Boulevard. The first phase will open next year. “This project came about because the Trinity Presbyterian Church had underutilized land and knew the modern streetcar was coming and would run along two sides of their property,” said Randi Dorman of R+R Develop. “They had seen the growth that took place along streetcar lines in other cities and wanted to create financial stability for the church by having someone develop their extra land.” Dorman and Rob Paulus are the married team that owns R+R Develop and are working with Bourn Companies, another local developer, to bring The Trinity to life. The project will include nearly 7,000 square feet of retail space with outdoor dining possibilities, more than 25,000 square feet of modern office space, and 58 high-end apartment units, all on the same block. The project, which is valued between $25 million and $30 million, has two adjacent sites.  The first, where the office building will go, is a parking lot between the church and Time Market on East University Boulevard just east of Fourth Avenue. The second has a building the church no longer uses on part of it, along with parking and a historic duplex. That duplex will be moved to the east to free up the site to build the residential/retail building along Fourth Avenue and Fourth Street. www.BizTucson.com

Ground will be broken on the office building late this year and the first tenants are expected to move in next fall. The residential building will follow but timing hasn’t been finalized. A general contractor has been chosen but contract details need to be finalized. Trinity Presbyterian has envisioned development on the land since 1925. When it put out an RFP in 2011, R+R and Bourn’s proposal was picked and the waiting game began for the best conditions to start work. “We started meeting with the neighborhood early on to find out what they wanted there and ran through  several  options with them over the years,”  Dorman  said. “There were hurdles – construction prices were high and rents were not high enough to create an economically viable project until recently.” Selling the land helps Trinity Presbyterian continue hosting a food pantry and to keep opening its building to groups helping the homeless, people with drug problems and women recently released from prison. The West University Neighborhood Association and Department of Economic Security use the building, and a watercolor class that’s open to the public takes place there. “The development will help Trinity sustain its mission and allow us to continue offering the services we give to the community,” said Bucky Lovejoy, a member of the church’s long-range planning committee. Lovejoy said another advantage of the sale is that the new businesses on the property will pay property taxes. The church is exempt.  Dorman said more than $1.4 billion of public and private investment has taken place in the downtown area over the past decade and “this is a continuation of that economic momentum.”

“This project will have a dramatic economic impact,” she said. “We will bring office tenants and residents who will live, work, play, pay rent and spend money along Fourth Avenue and in the downtown and university areas.” Paulus, an architect in Tucson for more than 20 years, said the project will have a contemporary look that fits with its neighbors. “The buildings will be decidedly modern yet incorporate the proportions and feel of the adjacent historic buildings,” he said. “The design team employed architectural features found in the West University Historic District – from typical window sizes to overhangs and rafter tails – and abstracted them into a modern vocabulary that is of our time period.” R+R and Bourn are hoping the project will be attractive to the young people who leave town after graduating from the University of Arizona to empty nesters, business owners, restaurateurs, residents and anyone looking to be in a nice neighborhood in the middle of everything. “The project fills deep needs on the residential, office and retail fronts,” Dorman said. “With the advent of the streetcar and all the revitalization in the area,  many  people would like to live downtown. The Trinity will be modern, green and well-designed spaces with the convenience of being in the downtown area, without the noise and parking scarcity that often occurs in the core of downtown. “The first floor of the office building has been leased by The El Rio/TMC joint venture, Health on Tucson. This. their second location, will be called Health on University. The first location, Health on Broadway, has been very successful downtown offering full medical services in a convenient and accessible location,” Dorman said. Biz Fall 2018

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IMAGES: COURTESY THE MARSHALL FOUNDATION

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Marshall Foundation Building Hotel, Apartments Location Near University Appeals to Students, Young Professionals By Rodney Campbell Colleges and universities are magnets for their communities. The entertainment, sports and educational opportunities draw more than students – and the best schools are savvy enough to have partners who want to make the campus area attractive to all age groups. The Marshall Foundation has been an important ally for the University of Arizona since 1930. That’s when founder Louise Marshall and her husband, Thomas, created the first private foundation in the state and began purchasing property on and near campus. That land eventually became home to the highly successful Main Gate Square, a collection of shops and restaurants that attracts UA students, as well as tourists and residents. “The UA is part of our universe,” said Marshall Foundation GM Jane McCollum. “We wouldn’t exist without it.” The foundation’s next addition to the campus landscape will be the 14-story Graduate Hotel Tucson & The Collective Apartments at Main Gate, featuring a boutique hotel, apartments, retail, restaurants and public plaza. The properties will be constructed on a parking lot on the east side of the Tucson Marriott University Park at 930 E. Second St. This is the last piece of undeveloped property on campus owned by the Marshall Foundation. Graduate Hotel Tucson will have 165 rooms, a ground-floor bar and café, and a rooftop bar and pool. The Collective will include 238 units, a fitness room, private courtyards, a spa and rooftop pool. The development team expects to break ground by the beginning of November and complete work in July 2020. Siting two hotels next to each other isn’t a worry to the team members, including local developer Tom Warne, who is part owner of the apartments and a consultant on the hotel. McCollum and Warne see the hotel properties working to attract larger conferences than the Marriott draws on its own. When the Graduate opens, there will be more than 400 available rooms in the two hotels, which Warne said is the “critical mass” to draw larger gatherings. “It makes a lot of economic sense for the two hotels to work together,” McCollum said. “We look at it as partnership.” One of the apartment project’s target audiences is recent UA graduates and young people who relocate to

Tucson. The team believes they will be attracted to The Collective Apartments’ location and amenities. The facility will have nearly 6,000 square feet of interior lounge and gathering spaces. “If you have the right type of development, they will want to stay in the core area,” Warne said. “With companies like Raytheon and Caterpillar, young professionals are moving here. This is where they want to be. That’s important for economic development. It has a ripple effect.” Warne and the Marshall Foundation go back many years. He was part of the development team when Main Gate Square got under way in the early 1990s. Warne and longtime UA Senior VP for Business Affairs Joel Valdez worked closely with the foundation to map Main Gate’s future. Valdez approached the Marshall Foundation about the project because the UA was losing students to Arizona State University and Tempe’s attractions. Not much has changed since Valdez and Warne mapped out the concept. “The configuration of the blocks is the same as it was 25 years ago,” Warne said. There are 11 Graduate Hotels across the country, mostly in university towns. Each property pays tribute to its community by using colors, art and furnishings unique to the surrounding area. Count on seeing Wildcat iconography and scenes from the Sonoran Desert. “The hotel will be very UA-centric,” Warne said. “That’s what Graduate Hotels do. They become localized.” The project has even deeper implications. The Marshall Foundation is a private organization that receives income from management of its commercial real-estate assets and gives back 5 percent of the fair-market value of its properties to nonprofits. It supports organizations involved in higher-education projects, scholarships, children and youth programs, arts and cultural organizations and pre-K-12 education. McCollum said the foundation is on track to donate $1.6 million this year thanks in part to this project. It gives out an average of $500,000 in scholarships to the UA each year. “Everything we support is tied back to creating a whole person,” she said. “A young person can’t study if he or she is hungry or has dental issues. We want people to be able to dream and make sure they stay in school.”

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BizBRIEFS

GEICO Brings on Two Corporate Leaders GEICO’s regional office in Tucson has two new employees – VP Michelle Trindade and Assistant VP John Alutto. Trindade will manage insurance operations for seven states – Arizona, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Oregon and Washington. Alutto will oversee GEICO’s underwriting activities in those states. Trindade has worked for GEICO since 1997 at several locations, and has been promoted several times. She’s twice worked at its headquarters in Chevy Chase, Md. She holds master’s degrees in business administration from Southeastern University in Lakeland, Fla., and in innovation from Northeastern University in Boston. Alutto has been with GEICO since 2007 at different sites in Virginia. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business management at Virginia Wesleyan University in Norfolk, Va.

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BizBRIEFS

Tim Bee Former Arizona Senate President Tim Bee is the Arizona Builders Allianceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new director for Southern Arizona. He handles membership services, government advocacy, community and media relations, workforce outreach and education for workforce development. Bee most recently was University of Arizona VP of government and community relations. The ABA advocates for the construction industry and provides education, networking opportunities and business development to its more than 300 member businesses. Biz

Tom Dunn Tom Dunn is now president of Arizona Builders Alliance. Formerly VP of the Southern Arizona branch, Dunn replaces Mark Mintner, who retired after serving as president for 25 years. Mintner was at ABA for a total of 41 years. The group is made up of 300 member companies in the construction and contractor industry. The ABA lobbies on behalf of the industry and engages in training, workforce development, government relations, management education and recruitment of members. Biz 26 BizTucson

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BizTRAVEL

Bonnie Allin, President & CEO, Tucson Airport Authority

Allin with David Hatfield, senior director of air service development and marketing, and Taunya Villicana, vice chair, Tucson Airport Authority

Allegiant, Frontier Add New Flights Airlines Expand Tucson’s Nonstop Service

Listen up, sports fans! The next time you want to watch the Arizona Cardinals beat the Broncos live at the Mile High Stadium, you can get there aboard a new nonstop flight between Tucson and Denver. On top of that you now fly for vacation or business on twice weekly nonstops to Bellingham, Washington and Provo, Utah. Frontier Airlines is introducing flights from its hometown of Denver to and from Tucson with its “Low Fares Done Right” service starting Nov. 7. The new flights will operate four days a week through Feb. 13, 2019, and beyond that date if there is enough demand. Allegiant flights to Bellingham and Provo will operate twice weekly on new Airbus jets starting Nov. 15. “Many of our passengers have been asking for more low-fare options at Tucson International Airport and it has been one of our highest priorities,” said Bonnie Allin, president and CEO of the Tucson Airport Authority, in a media 28 BizTucson

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release. “These new services add more reasons to support your local airport and the economic prosperity it contributes to the region.” Allegiant and Frontier introduced low basic fares starting at $49 and allow passengers to add options, such as boarding first and choosing seats, at additional cost. “If you want the extras they’re available to buy, and you only buy them if you want to,” Taunya Villicana, vice chair of the Tucson Airport Authority, said at an event announcing the Frontier flights. With the addition of Allegiant and Frontier, nine airlines now operate from Tucson International. The others are Alaska, American, Delta, Southwest, Sun Country, United and Via Air. In all, they offer nonstop service to 22 destinations. “When our air service team is out in the community, I cannot tell you how many times they have been asked when

Allegiant would serve TUS, and now we have the answer,” Allin said. This is the first time nonstop flights will operate from Tucson to Bellingham and Provo. “We’re thrilled to add another sunny Southwestern destination to our network,” Drew Wells, Allegiant VP of planning and revenue, said in a media release. The airline is based in Las Vegas. Travelers also can rent cars through Allegiant and book hotel rooms. Frontier is not new to the Tucson scene. The carrier operated here from 1950 to 2012. It has since rebranded itself as an affordable-rate airline. “We are proud to bring our unique brand of ‘Low Fares Done Right’ to Tucson,” said Josh Flyr, VP of network planning and revenue for Frontier Airlines. “Frontier’s new flights to Denver will make air travel more accessible and affordable for everyone in Tucson and the surrounding area.”

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IMAGES: COURTESY OF TTUCSON AIRPORT AUTHORITY

By Tiffany Kjos


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BizEDUCATION

A Bold and Strategic Vision

To Lead the Fourth Industrial Revolution By Dr. Robert C. Robbins, President, University of Arizona

Whether our graduates begin a career or pursue further education, they must be prepared to serve others, solve problems, continue learning and dream big.

Dr. Robert C. Robbins President, University of Arizona –

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Since January, we have been deeply immersed in the University of Arizona strategic planning process. We have engaged with thousands of individuals through town halls, focus groups, surveys, interactive discussions and data sharing that has enabled us to examine and aggregate input. In smaller group settings such as themed campus meetups and committee meetings, we have done deeper dives into big ideas and priority areas that emerged from previous discussions. We have aimed to tie it all to a bold, yet strategic, vision for our future – a vision that refocuses the UA to lead in the Fourth Industrial Revolution and positions our students for success in an ever-changing world. Through this process, I have learned more about this great university than I would have thought possible. I knew people here were passionate, but did not realize how deeply that passion runs. I knew there was vast knowledge in many areas, but did not know that we have some of the top thinkers and creators in areas as diverse as neuroscience, dance and anthropology, to name just a few. I knew our students were top-notch, but did not know how committed they are to using their skills and passion to improve our campus, our community and our world. I knew that our staff members care about doing their jobs well, but did not realize how much they go above and beyond every day to support the UA mission. I have been asked how this process is unique from others the UA has undertaken in the past. My objective was to truly engage as many people as possible on campus and in the larger Wildcat community to formulate a focused plan poised for success – a plan that balances the business of running a large, complex, public university with the importance of a high-quality student experience, innovative research, global impact and meaningful community engagement. This requires paying close attention to our mission and our aspirations, while balancing the reality of execution by nurturing a foundation of excellence, sustainability and agility. To put it simply, how do we make the University of Arizona the best it can be, and sub-

sequently, how does the UA distinctly make the world a better place? The answer begins, and ends, with our students – and we must give them the best Wildcat journey possible. Companies and organizations today need employees who have a blend of leadership skills, communication skills, a collaborative mindset and creative and complex problemsolving abilities. Individuals who are able to think critically to convert information into real intelligence and shared knowledge are highly valued. The strategic plan will adjust our focus and culture to be more student-centric. We will be investing resources and building programs that help all of our students be as successful as possible. Things like redefining general education, strengthening active learning, integrating service opportunities and giving students global experiences will change how our students think, do, learn, make and experience the world. It also will improve our rankings and increase our impact on our state, national and global economies. Whether our graduates begin a career or pursue further education, they must be prepared to serve others, solve problems, continue learning and dream big. In the context of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, true education needs to cultivate important abilities that smart machines don’t have. We must provide the tools and means that allow human skills, human knowledge and human ingenuity to leverage technological and scientific breakthroughs without sacrificing emotional intelligence. This opportunity will form the basis for our strategic plan. I encourage you to visit strategicplan. arizona.edu for the most up-to-date information as the plan refinement continues to unfold in the upcoming months. Thanks to all of you who have lent your voice and time to this process to help ensure our best future. I look forward to sharing the plan with you in detail toward the end of this year and I am excited to take our next steps together.

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SPECIAL REPORT 2018–2019

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE


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SOUTHERN ARIZONA:

‘On the

Doorstep of Greatness’ Sun Corridor Inc. Teams with Region’s Leaders to Build Momentum By June C. Hussey Economic development in Southern Arizona has been an uphill climb for a lot of reasons and a lot of years. However, the region now finds itself in the midst of a multi-year winning streak attracting A-list companies with thousands of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars of economic impact. Today, the focus is on keeping Southern Arizona in play for relocation and expansion by the companies and industries coveted by virtually every region. “I think we’re on the doorstep of greatness – but we have got to stay vigilant,” said Joe Snell, president and CEO of Sun Corridor Inc., the region’s economic development arm that has been knee-deep in the recent success. “We’ve had some success the last few years, but we have more work to do. We’ve got to continue to think very big and bold to propel ourselves to the next level.” Not long ago, Southern Arizona was – more often than not – an underdog in competing for top companies and industries. Few believed that a region dwarfed by powerful economic engines like Phoenix and Denver could ever step through the 36 BizTucson

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door when companies like Caterpillar, Amazon and Raytheon were being courted by seemingly superior competitors. But those who believed in Southern Arizona went to work gathering more believers and before you knew it, small victories became big victories and there was a momentum swing. For the past two years, Southern Arizona – with Sun Corridor Inc. at the forefront – has been building considerable steam, working with the private sector, government and academic institutions to achieve unprecedented gains in regional employment. Helped along by an improving national economy, this past fiscal year marked one of the region’s best years in job growth, capital investment and economic impact since before the recession of 2008. Perseverance and a positive outlook pays, Snell said. But he’s quick to caution civic leaders and residents alike that the work here isn’t done. It will take continued focus for the region to keep pounding at the door of economic prosperity. Southern Arizona’s economic momentum is coming in large part from stalwart business and community leaders like Tucson www.BizTucson.com


BizECONOMY

Electric Power’s David Hutchens, Raytheon Missile Systems’ Taylor Lawrence and entrepreneur Fletcher McCusker, a private business owner who is directing the resurgence of Tucson’s downtown as chair of the Rio Nuevo board. Economic development organizations like Sun Corridor Inc. bring these leaders together specifically to win new business opportunities for the region. And winning them they are. How Economic Development Deals Get Done

Relying on private investment for 75 percent of its funding, Sun Corridor Inc. uses funds to fuel nuts and bolts efforts in recruiting industry to the region. www.BizTucson.com

Strategies and functions include: u

Outbound sales missions and road shows across the nation with site selectors and companies

u Hosting client visits for companies considering Tucson and Southern Arizona for a location u Central analysis of municipal, county and state economic development tools for client projects u Real estate and facility research assistance u Soft Landing Program management u Supply chain assistance u National/international media tours u Relationship-building with site selectors u Relationship-building with real estate and economic development reporters u Email, newsletters, social media and web-based marketing

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BizECONOMY continued from page 37 The recruiting process that has helped land companies like Caterpillar, Hexagon Mining and Amazon in Tucson is long – typically 9 to 12 months – and highly customized and highly organized. For Sun Corridor Inc.’s staff, it often begins when a Request for Proposal is received from a company or its consulting site selector. That triggers the collection of data from jurisdictions, utilities and real estate brokers. If the data matches up to the needs of the employer, a site visit usually results. Sun Corridor Inc. helps facilitate the visit, making introductions to industry peers and others. Along the way, an economic impact study is conducted, incentives are evaluated, negotiations ensue, and board members are engaged in winning the prospect over. Once a company makes its decision, Sun Corridor Inc.’s work is not done. The organization assists in making the announcement and is available to make the company’s transition successful in every way possible – whether it is working with government to ensure necessary services are available for their selected site or, through its Soft Landing Program, providing relocating employees with tools and information about living and working in Southern Arizona, such as housing, schools, healthcare and more. Celebrating Success

For Snell and the team at Sun Corridor Inc., it feels pretty good when they get a “yes” from a company to relocate here. Take the news earlier this year that Amazon was going to build a major distribution center on the southeast side of Tucson. Snell said, “We were thrilled – and I think what it did more than anything was just validate what we do. We’ve been spending a lot of time in the last two years positioning ourselves as a major logistics center, and I think Amazon just verified that. HomeGoods was a big win. But when Amazon came in, it put the cherry on top. “I believe that we have the best economic development team in the country and I say that after doing this in multiple locations. One of our keys is we have very little turnover. We’ve been able to put together a team that has been together for 12, 13 years. And I think that 38 BizTucson

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McCusker, who also is CEO of newly formed UAVenture Capital, agrees that Tucson has seen “unprecedented momentum” and is “on the radar” in several sectors – while the surrounding region also has become “increasingly competitive for corporate relocation.” McCusker affirms that with the region’s recent success, “outsiders are taking notice.” Lawrence, the president at Raytheon Missile Systems which is in the middle of a major expansion, said the improved collaboration is already leading to more success within his own company and should also have a ripple effect throughout the region. “We’re continuing to win new programs in new development areas,” Lawrence said. “The demand for new capabilities is increasing, and we’re winning significantly more than others in these areas.”

“We live in a world where technology continues to shape how we live, work and interact,” Robbins said. “The digital, physical and biological worlds are converging. At the University of Arizona, we aspire to build the next generation of adaptive problem solvers.” Pima College has embarked on a strategy to develop “centers of excellence” in a number of sectors by working closely with business, industry and community partners, said Lisa Brosky, vice chancellor for external relations at PCC. Each center – in applied technology, health professions, public safety and security, the arts and humanities, hospitality, and information technology – will feature the most up-to-date facilities, equipment and curriculum, and provide students with opportunities for handson application of the skills they learn in class. Critical to the success of the centers, Brosky said, is the cooperation and partnership of employers, who participate in employer advisory committees, providing on-the-job learning for students through internships and apprenticeships, and encouraging employees to teach as adjunct instructors to bring real life to the classroom.

Shift to High-Tech Workforce

Infrastructure Remains a Priority

makes a big difference in the production. “We don’t have a big staff, but we have a very dedicated, smart and disciplined team that knows what to do. And sometimes they don’t get enough credit. I couldn’t say enough about them.” ‘On the Radar’

Targeting cluster industries has been at the heart of Sun Corridor Inc.’s economic blueprint from the beginning. Hutchens maintains that the key factor in improving Southern Arizona’s posture in bringing in more high-paying jobs is having the necessary workforce. “Workforce availability and education level are almost always the prime consideration of any business looking to relocate or expand,” Hutchens said, “especially given the higher education and training levels that will be needed as our economy becomes more high-tech.” The University of Arizona and Pima Community College are both key to the region’s economic development strategies in their roles to develop the hightech workforce that bring companies and jobs. One of the first efforts initiated by UA President Dr. Robert C. Robbins after his arrival in June 2017 was to launch a comprehensive strategic planning process to position the university for what Robbins calls the “fourth industrial revolution.”

There remains much work to be done to get through the “doorstep of greatness,” Snell said. “We’ve got to get infrastructure in place. We’ve got to get roads fixed. It’s the #1 issue,” he said. “We’ve got to continue to find ways to attract the labor into the market and train our people – because without skilled talent we will not grow.” Beyond the physical aspects of the region, the collaboration across varying interests that has surfaced over the last several years is what is keeping Southern Arizona’s economic engine on the tracks. “Participation across the entire community spectrum is what gets deals done – we’ve heard that time and time again from businesses,” Hutchens said. “Being able to sit down with our community leaders at the same table, all pulling in the same direction, allows us to be flexible and reactive to businesses’ needs.”

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Total Package

BizECONOMY

The

Region’s Attributes Attract Array of Industries By June C. Hussey As any experienced salesperson will tell you, if you knock on enough doors, eventually one is going to open. The challenge is having something to sell – the total package – once you get the customer’s attention. Southern Arizona has generated significant economic development momentum by putting all the pieces together necessary to attract companies for relocation or expansion like Accelerate Diagnostics, Pharos DX, HomeGoods, Comcast, Caterpillar, ADP, Raytheon Missile Systems, Hexagon Mining, GEICO and Amazon over the last several years. Those companies’ decisions to relocate or expand in Southern Arizona have added 44,560 new jobs with an economic impact of $24.7 billion since 2005, according to Sun Corridor Inc. “I feel like people forget sometimes how many major corporations we have in Tucson – Raytheon, Roche, Honeywell, Texas Instruments, Amazon, HomeGoods, GEICO and Caterpillar,” said Ian McDowell, VP and regional director for Sundt Construction in Tucson. “That is a pretty good resume of companies for a community our size.” While the full brunt of that level of economic impact takes years to materialize, it bodes well for the strategies that have been in place and the track record 40 BizTucson

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the region has established filling the needs of large and highly visible companies. To say nothing of what it does economically for the region. For example, Raytheon Missile Systems’ decision to expand its Tucson operation with about 2,000 jobs, most of them high-paying tech and engineering jobs, is expected to have an economic impact in the billions. With most of those jobs already hired, according to Raytheon officials, that impact is already taking place. The economic growth in the region the past two years doesn’t just happen overnight. Nor does it happen in a vacuum. It takes a talented and nimble organization like Sun Corridor Inc. working together with strong community leaders, sophisticated site selectors and other local and regional entities, to make it happen. Savvy site selectors dig deep to determine if a location is the right match. Sun Corridor Inc. quarterbacks the region’s projects, which include analysis of demographic, industry and real estate data, coordination with jurisdictions and more. Site Selection Process

Site selection is a sophisticated business. According to consultant Dennis J. Donovan, principal at Wadley Donovan Gutshaw Consulting, companies hire

site selectors for their experience, expertise and judgment. They have the siteselection process down to a science and can sift through analytics while their clients stay focused on the day-to-day challenges of running their businesses. From his perspective as a site selector, Donovan cites metro Tucson’s top strengths as:

1. Breadth and depth of talent pool 2. Ability to relocate talent from around the country including California

3. Lower-cost alternative to California 4. University and community college resources 5. Competitive cost of energy 6. Attractive and reasonable cost of living 7.

Excellent logistics including an inland port

8. Proximity to Mexico 9. Moderate taxation (business and personal)

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versity, Northern Arizona University and Pima Community College. Companies also are attracted to the formidable industry presence in aerospace and defense, transportation and logistics, mining, and biotech/healthcare sectors as well as the strategic location in the growing Southwest, real estate fit and cost, a vibrant downtown with continued room for redevelopment, availability of incentives and the increasingly coveted quality of life. “I think we just need to look at the recent experience of Amazon and others and let the site selectors know we are open for business,” said Joe Snell, president and CEO at Sun Corridor Inc. “We can move with tremendous speed. We’re a great location for the logistics industry – and we can supply that workforce very readily and at real reasonable costs. I think they’re starting to figure that out. It’s our job to just make sure we’re continually pushing that message over and over and over to them.” David Hutchens, president and CEO of UNS Energy Corp., Tucson Electric Power and UniSource Energy, believes Southern Arizona is “very competitive” with similar-sized communities for two main reasons. “First, we have a phenomenal resource in the University of Arizona to help provide companies the talent they www.BizTucson.com

need to be successful. Second, our community works well together across government and key businesses to provide new companies with the information and resources they need to be successful here.” As chair of Sun Corridor Inc., Hutchens helps coordinate the vast resources of board members to grow the region through the attraction, growth and retention of high-wage jobs. He said this requires them all to be community ambassadors to help market Southern Arizona and, just as importantly, it requires them to keep a critical eye open for ways to continuously improve the community. Snell emphasizes the vital role industry community leaders play in the recruitment process. “The feedback we’ve gotten from companies is, ‘We really like working with your leaders direct’ because I think that they know that I’m pitching Tucson – but they know it’s a different candidness when it comes from one of their industry peers that tells them the exact same thing,” Snell said. Workforce Talent Is King

While Southern Arizona’s sunny days and star-filled nights may rank high on locals’ reasons for loving life here, Sun Corridor Inc. identifies quality of life as a lesser factor in a site selector’s equa-

tion. On the other hand, workforce talent is king and that’s where size plays to Southern Arizona’s favor. “We’re big enough to have the workforce companies need along with entertainment and leisure options, but small enough to avoid the traffic, environmental issues and higher living costs of larger cities,” Hutchens said. Tucson’s revitalized downtown also is a critical piece that was long missing from the total package of the region. “Our new downtown is a huge part of the chemistry attracting new companies and millennial workers, with much more on the drawing board,” said Fletcher McCusker, a local businessman who also is chair of the Rio Nuevo Board and the recognized instigator of the downtown resurgence. “The developments at The Bridges, UA Tech Park and the new incubator downtown confirm the region’s interest in nurturing startup activity. The innovation and invention at the University of Arizona has created a number of spin-out companies that are now staying in Tucson,” he said. Five-Year Outlook

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BizECONOMY continued from page 41 tation, energy – will lead to bold new growth opportunities within the next five years. He added that the vision of UA President Dr. Robert C. Robbins will be key to the region’s high-tech growth opportunities. The UA, at Robbins’ direction, is undergoing a long-term strategic planning process with workforce development and vision of the “fourth industrial revolution” as critical components of the UA’s future. Business leaders see the region as having the capability and flexibility to make inroads in a wide range of industries. “Our mining sector is reemerging with the presence of Hexagon, Caterpillar and Hudbay,” said Lisa Lovallo, market VP for Cox Communications and a member of Sun Corridor Inc.’s Chairman’s Circle. “We’ve made solid progress in logistics with HomeGoods, Target and Amazon. We have a very strong and growing aerospace sector with Raytheon adding 2,000-plus jobs, and an established call-center sector with GEICO, Citigroup, Comcast and

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C3 paying wages and benefits above minimum requirements. “We have been building infrastructure to support these industries, including $500 million in city road bonds and $100 million in public safety. In addition, telecommunications investments are growing and UNS and TEP are leading in renewables and upgrading the grid.” “We need to continue to build on our success in these sectors,” Lovallo said. “That will take a lot of collaboration between the UA, government and the private sector. We cannot lose our focus.” Invest in Roads, Improve Schools

While the local economy is trending upwards and Sun Corridor Inc. is hyper-aggressively marketing the region’s assets, community leaders like Robert D. Ramirez, president and CEO at Vantage West Credit Union and secretary/treasurer at Sun Corridor Inc., urges peers and fellow citizens to remain focused on two key areas he considers essential to ongoing economic progress – roads and schools. Fortunately, there

has been some progress on both fronts, with high hopes for more ahead. “The governor’s plan to give teachers a 20-percent raise by 2020 is a step in the right direction to help retain and attract quality teachers,” Ramirez said. Also, on Nov. 6, Pima County voters will be given the chance to approve Proposition 463, which would award $430 million in bonds for regional road repairs. “We need to make sure that we are passing bonds to improve our roads and streets,” Lovallo said. No package, however complete, is ever perfect. Every region, including Southern Arizona, always has some work to do. But the region is in perpetual motion thanks to forward-thinking business leaders who invest so much of themselves in the process of continual improvement. “Do we have places we can improve? Certainly,” McDowell said. “There are a host of people in this community who are constantly working to improve it. But I refuse to focus on negatives when there is so much here to celebrate.”

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BizECONOMY

21st-Century Convergence Center Airport, Railroad, Interstate Highway By June C. Hussey One of the biggest opportunities looming on the horizon for Southern Arizona is the transformative potential of the airport region to become a largescale employment center as well as a transportation and logistics hub. Yet establishing a bold direction for any community requires a shared vision and consensus among community members and their leaders. Sun Corridor Inc. and the Tucson Airport Authority entered into a formal agreement in April for Sun Corridor Inc. to take the lead in marketing TAA and the airport property as an employment center and transportation hub. The airport already is the landlord for a number of employers, including Raytheon Missile Systems. Lisa Lovallo, a member of Sun Corridor Inc.’s Chairman Circle and an ex44 BizTucson

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ecutive with Cox Communications is on board. “The Sun Corridor Inc./Tucson Airport Authority partnership has the potential to revolutionize our aerospace corridor and logistics footprint.” “The partnership with Sun Corridor Inc. is an opportunity to take advantage of the synergies between TAA’s already strong $7.4 billion annual economic impact and the region’s other successes,” said Bonnie Allin, TAA president and CEO. “From the airport side we have Raytheon Missile Systems, Bombardier Aerospace, Aerovation, Ascent Aviation and others that could be leveraged with the recent arrivals nearby including HomeGoods’ distribution center, Federal Express, Faribault Foods, Target and of course the new Amazon fulfillment center.” Joe Snell, president and CEO of Sun

Corridor Inc., said “I think the continual focus on our key industries that drive us will be important – that’s continuing to work to bring in vertically integrated companies in the mining industry and the biotech arena, and continuing to focus on our spot as an aerospace and defense hub. But some of the bigger opportunities I see in the next 10 years surround the whole Sonoran Corridor and airport employment region.” TAA has also been an active participant in the Arizona Department of Transportation’s work and studies regarding rail. A north-south Union Pacific line runs along the west property line of Tucson International Airport, and TAA has various plans and studies that would connect that line to airport property for future non-aeronautical development. In addition, TAA enjoys www.BizTucson.com


a close relationship with the Port of Tucson, a privately owned, full-service inland port east of the airport that offers unrivaled logistics and warehousing opportunities in the region. In the case of Raytheon Missile Systems, the cooperation it took to move a road and build a buffer zone for the region’s largest private employer to select Tucson for expansion is a prime example of developing creative solutions for needed infrastructure. Raytheon looked at sites in several states when it was looking to expand its missile facility. What it needed in Tucson was space around its existing facility south of Tucson International Airport and it literally needed an adjustment to the map – a new road creating a buffer zone – for Tucson to have a competitive bid. www.BizTucson.com

“The road was a big deal for us,” Raytheon Missile Systems President Taylor Lawrence said at the ribbon cutting for a new facility on the new East Aero Park Boulevard. The result was a winning bid for 2,000 quality jobs, the vast majority of which have already been filled. Positioned for Success

Snell recently returned from Ohio where he met with business and airport leaders to get ideas about how to transform the airport region into a major logistics hub, building on the recent success of HomeGoods, Target and Amazon. “We’re in a nice position to be a convergence center to capture goods and services coming up from Mexico and from the east to west through the nation’s busiest port of Long Beach,” Snell

said. “We’re going to have to look at that and devise a long-term strategy – how to really convert our airport, which is a great airport, from more of a leisure airport to a truly commercial airport. How do we get more air cargo through that region and really capture that? “I see really exploiting and capitalizing on that wonderful asset – but transforming it into much more of an aggressive, inland, commercial port. That’s one of the biggest things I see in our future. I do say, outside the University of Arizona and Raytheon Missile Systems, the airport is a top-three asset for our region. There’s just so much we can do with that whole area.”

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

David G. Hutchens CHAIR President & CEO UNS Energy Corporation Tucson Electric Power UniSource Energy Services

As a business leader and officer of Sun Corridor Inc., what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

Tucson Electric Power’s primary contribution is operating and maintaining a modern energy grid that makes clean, affordable and reliable power available throughout our community. We invest about $400 million annually to maintain and upgrade our system, and we’re expanding our already ambitious wind and solar power portfolio. TEP also is committed to improving the quality of life in our community through philanthropy and volunteer service. We focus on supporting efforts to improve education, protect our environment and support limitedincome families. Our involvement with Sun Corridor allows us to bring together leaders from business and government to collaborate and develop a shared strategic approach to attracting and retaining businesses. These partnerships have been very successful over the past five years. All of these efforts help create a high quality of life here and make Tucson an attractive place for new companies to plant roots and grow. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

We need to stay on the same path that has led to our recent successes. We all share the same vision of growing our economic base, creating good jobs and supporting STEM education and workforce development. Having open communications, transparent agendas and concrete metrics that we all agree upon will help us extend our recent success and achieve additional economic wins for our community.

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

By far, the greatest return on our efforts has come from the collaboration between business and government. Involving and engaging leaders from both the public and private sectors keeps all of us pulling in the same direction with a unified approach to achieving our goals. We’re working to create a stronger, healthier economy by bringing in new business, creating good jobs and promoting workforce development. This improves the overall quality of life for residents and entices others to relocate here. Even in a desert community like ours, a rising tide lifts all boats. 46 BizTucson

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

Robert D. Ramirez SECRETARY/TREASURER President & CEO Vantage West Credit Union

As a business leader and officer of Sun Corridor Inc., what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

As treasurer/secretary for Sun Corridor Inc., my role is to collaborate with fellow board members to provide strategic direction to our CEO Joe Snell. As the president and CEO of Vantage West Credit Union, my role is to ensure we stay true to our mission of igniting collaborative relationships with our members and the communities we serve so we can thrive together. Our mission aligns with economic development efforts in the region, as we share a common goal of thriving communities. As a financial institution, we provide commercial loans, competitive dividends and other resources to local businesses. We also offer practical financial solutions, including generous rewards options and other useful resources, to all our members, so they can thrive. Beyond that, we support local causes, including education, financial literacy, military and economic development to help strengthen our community. Because we are a local financial institution, the revenue we generate stays here so it can be reinvested in the community and the local economy.

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

The key to working and collaborating with our government and business leaders is to fully understand our mission, and the key results we wish to accomplish along with the people and the processes to make it happen. Transparency is key to building and sustaining trust with all our key players within our region. What Tucson is experiencing is a renewed focus on working together and communicating with our city, county and business leaders. There is real synergy in our town and the results are economic development for our region. And lastly, the key to building anything of value starts with trusting who you work with. Trust is built by being consistent and being transparent, understanding everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs and wants and making the right decisions. What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

Our real estate market has experienced a significant improvement over the last five years. With new employers coming into our town and a resurgence in consumer confidence, we have seen a very positive trajectory in new builds as well as resale of existing homes. 48 BizTucson

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

Dennis R. Minano IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

Managing Director, Convergence Mitigation Management Retired VP Public Policy, Chief Environmental Officer General Motors

As a business leader and officer of Sun Corridor Inc., what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

It is essential that those working on growth and employment opportunities strive to maintain the unified vision for economic development in Southern Arizona. The creation of the Sun Corridor Inc. geographic footprint, which presents the assets and strengths of all the counties and cities in Southern Arizona, is a core factor in the decision process companies utilize in making new investment decisions in the region. It demonstrates that we value the success of each other. Secondly, government and business cannot become complacent with the success achieved to date. Recent results are a product of diligence and collaboration. Frankly, it is hard work that cannot be turned on and off, but requires perseverence. Third, there must a relentless focus on the future. All community leaders need to be focusing on the next step that will make the region an even more attractive location to grow. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

Collaboration has been essential and is the single most significant factor in the region’s success. To maintain this success, we all must first be willing to engage with each other in a spirit of mutual respect. Integral to that is considering new approaches that may differ from conventional thinking and a willingness to embrace the possibility of a new idea. Lastly, we must have the fortitude to change course when a new idea is vetted and found to be best for the region.

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

The region’s ability to execute the vision. Great plans do not ensure success unless they can be implemented. The region has been remarkable in this phase of vision and securing projects. Often local government will be the lead and an existing business, academic institution or the state government might be required at different phases of a project. There is no one entity that can deliver the outcome alone. These many entities have shown the capacity to take the lead role when called upon and hand the project off for the next step. Fundamental to this is a realization that no project is identical. They are separate engagements. 50 BizTucson

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

Joe Snell

PRESIDENT & CEO Sun Corridor Inc.

Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

Over the last decade, the most positive thing that I have seen is a changing of our culture. We went from a culture of infighting to an era of cooperation. We’ve seen that cooperation in the last several major relocations, where the government entities came together, put aside jurisdictional differences and worked cooperatively in a very effective manner. That’s been refreshing and I think that will continue. In addition, we’ve gotten much more competitive and I’ll give a shout out to Pima County in particular, which really transformed its economic development culture in the last decade to “let’s just get it done, we’re not going to give any reasons why we can’t.” I think that’s been the most positive aspect of the last few years. There’s nothing more important than industry leaders talking to industry leaders, peer to peer. And in some cases, clients need to talk to the president of the university or talk to government officials who can make desired changes. I don’t think you can replicate going right to the source. It’s been very effective for us. When you sign up for Sun Corridor Inc., it’s a pretty straightforward value proposition. You will become the sales agents and the marketing agents for our region. There’s no better army to do that than the members of Sun Corridor Inc.

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

In the last few years we’ve finally seen some significant momentum. It was a long recession. It really hurt us worse than most and we were slow to come out of recovery. Things are starting to really hum on the economic front. It’s good to see people go back to work and see the dollars flowing through government coffers again. We do need to leverage the Tucson International Airport as an economic driver. We must develop a blueprint to drive industry near and at the airport. And we must protect and improve our product. With the national unemployment rate so low, communities are competing for skilled labor. People with skills hold all the cards and can choose to live where they want. Communities with high quality of life will win this game. It is imperative that we fix our roads and other infrastructure needs if we hope to compete. We also must support our education institutions at all levels.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

Tucson International Airport directly benefits from the momentum as shown in our recent announcements of new airlines and new routes, not to mention 25 consecutive months of year-over-year passenger growth. In return, the Tucson Airport Authority is a significant contributor to the economic prosperity of our region. TAA airports support more than 43,000 jobs and contribute $7.4 billion annually to the economy of the region, according to the Elliott D. Pollack and Company study released in April. The average annual salary, with benefits, of these jobs in 2017 was $81,731. This year we’ve partnered with Sun Corridor Inc. to further grow and enhance our economic impact on the region. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

Open communication. The more we share ideas and information, the better chance we have for successful collaboration. It’s vital for any discussion to start with knowing the facts. What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

The sense of urgency and aggressiveness in the last few years with which all economic development stakeholders are approaching the need for improving the economic health of the region, and therefore the quality of life for everyone in Southern Arizona, has been impressive.

BONNIE ALLIN President & CEO Tucson Airport Authority

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your organization in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

As a member of the Pima County Board of Supervisors, my role is to advocate for the County to engage in the activities within our capabilities to ensure that adequate infrastructure and workforce are in place to facilitate and sustain this growth. It also is the Board’s responsibility to review, approve and fund the action plans as enumerated in the County’s Economic Development Plan. As the regional governmental body, our participation in Sun Corridor Inc. is to advocate for steady, strategic growth and increased disposable income, not only in unincorporated Pima County but also the various jurisdictions throughout Pima County. A win in any Pima County jurisdiction is a win for the region. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

SHARON BRONSON Board of Supervisors, District 3 Pima County

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Recognizing and emphasizing our individual and mutual strengths and learning what industries provide the highest potential chances of success based on those strengths has impacted the success rate of our recruiting efforts. These are exemplified by Sun Corridor Inc.’s target industries. Qualifying opportunities based on these strengths allows the economic development teams in the region to focus strategic plans and recruitment efforts more effectively. www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

For over four years, Pima County has hosted an Economic Development Forum that includes both public and private sector participants, not only from Pima County, but also from Santa Cruz, Cochise and Pinal counties and the Arizona Commerce Authority. The purpose is to facilitate collaboration, discuss strengths and areas needing improvement, explore issues impacting various economic development efforts, and educate all sectors on a wide range of topics. The group continues to grow with over 45 members now participating. As mentioned, this team effort results in a collective benefit as long as new prospects land in one of the jurisdictions or do business with one of the private sector participants. Our most important focus as economic development leaders is for both the public and private sectors to highlight common priorities and work together to achieve solutions. One example is exemplified by SAMP – Southern Arizona Manufacturing Partnership – where governments, schools and the benefitting industry provide materials, equipment and sometimes instructors to educate youth and young adults in the skills associated with manufacturing, especially machining. With a focus on workers in several critical trades, Pima County is working with many construction and contractor organizations as well as schools and nonprofits to achieve the model that has made SAMP such a success.


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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your organization in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

My role is to continue to evolve Arizona State University as a world-class institution that attracts businesses of all kinds and links them to the intellectual capacity of the university to advance and support their growth. ASU graduates more than 23,000 students annually and we are routinely cited as a premier university for recruiting graduates by companies from across the U.S., filling critical workforce needs. Further, we have many comprehensive partnerships with businesses beyond student recruiting. For example, Raytheon recently partnered with our Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering to have a group of students fix a $350,000 robot. Other partners, like Intel, rely on ASU for research in packaging, machine vision, gamification and course development in electrical engineering and computer science. We’re here to help businesses solve challenges they might not be able to on their own. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

Collaborate and partner. That is largely the model we operate on at ASU and one that we need to continue to encourage more broadly. No one entity can solve all problems on its own and generally speaking, no one entity can scale to meet the needs of the community on its own. We need to eradicate the mindset that there’s a competition between Phoenix and Tucson or that we can’t achieve things. These are two unique and different cities and the quicker we get into the habit of looking at the strengths of the region and joining forces to expand, the faster Arizona will become a vibrant destination for business and growth.

MICHAEL CROW President Arizona State University

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The fact that businesses, civic organizations and other groups have come to rally around a statewide educational attainment goal of having 60 percent of our population obtain some type of postsecondary credential by the year 2030. Now, we need to mobilize to achieve that goal. We need everyone in the state working toward this goal and finding innovative ways to connect our residents to higher education. Increasing the educational attainment levels of a state population is the quickest way to grow our economy. The most successful cities and regions from an economic standpoint have highly educated populations.

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PHOTO: DEANNA DENT

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

As the largest private nonprofit employer in the state of Arizona, our goal is to continue to grow and expand to make healthcare more convenient, more accessible and more affordable for our community members. Banner Health’s $1 billion investment to modernize our academic medical centers in Tucson and Phoenix is driving economic development in both these cities. Earlier this year in Tucson, Banner opened a stunning new outpatient facility on North Campbell, and in April we will welcome patients to a new, $420 million tower at Banner–University Medical Center Tucson to replace the aging original hospital. Additionally, the National Institutes for Health grants awarded to Banner Health and University of Arizona for the All of Us Research Program are the largest in Arizona’s history. The program’s goal is to create a health databank that scientists will use to generate new cures and treatments. These research dollars not only contribute to Tucson’s economic development but they will create a healthier future for all of us.

The historic partnership between the UA and Banner Health is a prime example of a public/private collaboration benefiting our community. Our 30-year academic affiliation agreement is the foundation for a new model of academic medicine that supports medical education and research at the UA Colleges of Medicine while ensuring the economic stability of three Banner–University Medical Centers in Tucson and Phoenix, all of them safety-net hospitals for their communities. I would also mention the successful public/private partnership between Banner Health and Pima County. Banner–University Medical Center South is owned by Pima County and operated by Banner Health under a management contract. The hospital and entire Kino health campus is thriving under this arrangement, providing critically important behavioral health services and hospital care to Pima County residents. And for the first time in many years, the county-owned hospital is operating in the black.

LARRY M. GOLDBERG President Banner–University Medicine Division

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What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

We believe the entry of nonprofit Banner Health into Southern Arizona 3½ years ago has improved the region’s healthcare landscape, a key factor for economic development. We are recruiting more primary care providers and adding more ICU beds, two things Tucson needs. www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?


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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

Human capital is the #1 driver of economic development, and area leaders recognize that better-educated workers not only help existing businesses be more productive, innovative, and adaptable, but also will attract new businesses to the region. Education helps promote technological advances and entrepreneurship, while increasing workers’ earnings and productivity. Given this backdrop, Pima Community College’s economic development role is to develop the talent – the human capital – that determines the success of a company, city or nation. We accept the challenge of enhancing the attractiveness of our region to companies that are responsive to the rapid changes crackling through society. These companies, which are positioning themselves to leverage emerging technologies – cloud computing, mobile tech, artificial intelligence, the internet of things – will be the source of the high-paying jobs of tomorrow. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like you need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

Leaders must simultaneously focus on realizing opportunities within their grasp today while preparing for opportunities of the future – admittedly, a task that requires creativity, nimbleness and foresight. The need for speed and adaptability are among the guiding principles behind our Centers of Excellence initiative. A Center of Excellence is a workforce development headquarters for lifelong learning in which incoming students and incumbent workers get exactly the education they need to succeed, because they are training in a state-of-the-art environment to fulfill a curriculum devised through collaboration with industry. Just as important, it’s also a center of thought leadership where experts gather to analyze, discuss and engage with real-time data to better understand and respond to community and business sector needs.

LEE LAMBERT Chancellor & CEO Pima Community College

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As a community-college educator, the most heartening development of the recent past is the growing realization among leaders that economic development means “workforce development.” With strong ties to K-12, industry and the state’s four-year universities, Pima is uniquely situated in the human capital pipeline to have a positive impact. In addition to Centers of Excellence, we are enhancing a program that provides a high school diploma to adults who don’t have one – there are at least 80,000 adults in Pima County without one. This approach provides them with education that combines GED test preparation with industry-approved training in fields with high employee need, such as machining or behavioral health services. www.BizTucson.com

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

As a participant in Sun Corridor Inc., my job is to provide advice and counsel on initiatives that they’re pursuing, and to help them think through what are the most important areas where they can put energy and emphasis. I also need to be a conduit of information so they know what’s going on in our industry, what’s going on in aerospace and defense, and what we see in the future – so they can combine all of our industries into a comprehensive plan for the region. Having a tech base in the community that connects into education, that connects into the community, and that gives back to the community is one of the most important things to help build momentum. I think we’ve done a great job here. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

We need to continue to focus on having a businessfriendly environment and an environment that is conducive to business reinvestment and business growth. We have to connect that back to all the institutions and to the education infrastructure that is needed to give you a pipeline to continue to grow. What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

The alignment between local county, state and federal leaders. Late Sen. John McCain was part of that focus that helped bring people together. I also give Gov. Doug Ducey credit over the last four years in helping to bring the state into alignment, as well as county and city leaders. It feels like everybody has – at least from a business creation and growth standpoint – focused in the same direction. The alignment here is significantly better than it was a while back.

TAYLOR W. LAWRENCE VP, Raytheon Company President, Raytheon Missile Systems

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

COX is proud to be part of the Southern Arizona community. We see our engagement in economic development as a corporate responsibility and one we take very seriously. To help the region grow, we are committed to rapidly expanding our fiber network to meet the growing telecommunication and entertainment needs of businesses and families. COX is investing over $10 billion in upgrading and improving our networks across the U.S. and Southern Arizona is benefiting from that investment. As COX’s representative on the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, I am focused on helping the team sell Southern Arizona to site selectors and companies interested in making Tucson their home. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

Every community is trying to recruit new businesses and grow their existing ones. It’s a street fight. Every city in America wants to say they landed Amazon or Caterpillar or Raytheon. We are winning because we are ALL working together. It’s citizens voting to improve our roads, parks and infrastructure. It’s neighborhood associations doing their part to help keep our city clean. It’s school districts improving academic achievement. It’s our university bringing innovation and young talent to the marketplace. It’s our cyclists, our hikers, our artists and our philanthropists all leaning in to make Southern Arizona a special place. That’s how we get the knock outs.

I think our airport modernization is transformational. Tens of millions of dollars have been invested in making our airport best in class. Our air service options continue to improve, our passenger counts are way up and you can eat an El Charro enchilada waiting to get on your Delta flight. If that’s doesn’t convince you, Tucson Airport Authority is responsible for over $7 billion in economic impact. The partnership with Sun Corridor Inc. and TIA has the potential to bring an even greater impact to our community in the years to come.

LISA LOVALLO Market VP, Southern Arizona Cox Communications

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

I am honored to share my time with two organizations that are contributing immensely to our region’s economic development. As chair of the Rio Nuevo Board of Directors, I have witnessed first-hand the resurgence of our downtown. Not only the growth in food and entertainment but with corporate relocations and now residential development. Rio Nuevo has launched 21 downtown projects with an equal number yet to come. UAVenture Capital launched this year as a growth capital fund dedicated to the commercialization of University of Arizona technology and science. The biggest challenge facing our faculty inventors has been attracting capital to advance a company or discovery. UAVC has invested in four such spinouts in 2018 and will launch Fund II in the fall. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

Face-to-face time has been the primary driver of these partnerships. Our government leaders have never been more accessible and the success of these collaborations is evident. I believe we are all on the same page when it comes to our role in advancing successful partnerships and helping Tucson compete.

FLETCHER McCUSKER

I would say there are two, maybe three things that are driving our success: Our thriving downtown is a case study in turning miles of empty buildings and parking lots into a vibrant urban center. Every great city has a walkable urban environment. Two, the University of Arizona has stepped up big time in economic development, with the launching of The Bridges, a downtown incubator and the improvements at the Tech Park. Tech Launch Arizona has enabled more than 1,000 patents and these new spinout companies are staying in Tucson. Finally, success breeds success. Tucson is on the radar everywhere and now attractive to Fortune 50 companies, to foodies, to millennials, to professional sports. We used to rely on our weather for economic development. This new era is the result of hard work and focus. Great weather is nice but it won’t, alone, attract the new work force to Tucson over Portland, Austin, San Diego, Denver or Seattle.

CEO UAVenture Capital

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your organization in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

We have really good momentum. People forget sometimes how many major corporations we have in Tucson – Raytheon, Roche, Honeywell, Texas Instruments, Amazon, HomeGoods, GEICO – and now we add Caterpillar. That is a pretty good resume of companies for a community our size. I lived in Tucson from the mid ’90s through 2006. I left for 10 years. When I moved back I felt like the city had been transformed. We had all the things I used to love yet added so much more to the mix. I still cannot get over how much downtown has changed. When I left it was a not a place where people went. Now you go downtown on a Tuesday night and there are people walking up and down the street, visiting restaurants or attending concerts. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

I have never seen such a high level of collaboration between government entities. Tucson has a great story to tell in how government and business have aligned. There may be no better example of this alignment than the recent relocation of Caterpillar to Tucson. You have Caterpillar making a temporary residence in a county facility on Congress Street with funding arranged for by Rio Nuevo and a project jointly executed with the City of Tucson. There are people in each of those entities not only participating, but leading this effort. Our community has rallied around projects like this and we should be proud of the collaborative efforts everyone has shown.

I believe one of the Tucson region’s key strengths is the diverse nature of the amenities we have to offer. Hiking and biking trails, great weather and year-round sunshine. Like to eat? We have that too as a City of Gastronomy. Mountains ranges surround us. We have a vibrant university with all the benefits that follow a large-scale college town. With the revitalization of the downtown corridor we have a place where young people can go. There is literally something here for everyone.

IAN McDOWELL VP & Regional Director, Tucson Sundt Construction

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

As a longtime Sun Corridor Inc. member my primary role has been that of advocate. As an entrepreneur and member of CopperPoint Mutual’s board of directors, I’ve been able to leverage my professional experience, business network and corporate position to help publicize the Economic Blueprint, support small business and promote the area. Like most economic regions, when jobs are created everybody wins. It’s no different for CopperPoint, which is why we look to be an advocate for businesses large and small. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

They say nothing succeeds like success, and successful economic development is built on collaboration. I think it’s important to bring together the various organizations and individuals who have achieved a goal to “celebrate the win.” Our objectives for the blueprint are being realized in significant ways. One way to continue that momentum is to reinforce the power of collaboration by commemorating milestones and having some fun along the way. Beyond that, I’d like to focus on attracting new Sun Corridor Inc. members, particularly business owners who have benefitted from the downstream effects of new or expanding companies. What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

It’s hard to list just one factor but I believe our proactive recruiting measures have yielded substantial results. Setting the intention to vigorously pursue potential business locates through the media, site-selector road trips and targeted outreach garnered new leads, new relationships and even national publicity. What’s not to love?

JUDY PATRICK

Board Director CopperPoint Mutual Insurance Company

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

The role of the Industrial Development Authority of the County of Pima, known as Pima IDA, is to recognize projects that meet its statutory framework and provide alternative financing or take an equity position to make the project successful. The Pima IDA is uniquely positioned to nurture public-private partnerships in advancing the economic development efforts of Pima County. Those partnerships are vital in establishing the collective effort and a community-ownership culture in pursuing the economic future of Pima County. As a business leader in the financial community, as well as a Pima IDA board member, I believe my role is to aid in bridging the relationship between the public and private sector – specifically, by communicating with other business leaders about the unique options and assistance the Pima IDA can provide. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

The Pima IDA understands the importance of the public-private partnership. The most important part of that partnership is communicating each parties’ needs, abilities and expectations. The Pima IDA is here to help, just communicate with us about what you need to make your project successful. The Pima IDA can then communicate its options to aid in your success. What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

The most significant factor impacting economic development in Pima County is the increased availability of skilled labor. The development of skilled labor by educational institutions has been improving the economic growth over the past five years. Continuing to produce a skilled labor force, while matching that force to employer needs, will be the impetus of Pima County’s future economic growth.

DIANE QUIHUIS Treasurer, Board of Directors The Industrial Development Authority of the County of Pima 74 BizTucson

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

As leaders of Tucson’s community hospital, we never forget that our patients come first – and by extension, we evaluate every decision we make through the prism of how it impacts the community. Among those impacts, local business leaders have to be cognizant of the role we play as economic engines for this region. At TMC, we invest locally. We also take opportunities to consider how we can work with other industry partners – whether it’s participating in Teachers in Industry, training future physicians, supporting workforce investment efforts or considering how we can help build upon the region’s strengths in biosciences. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

We all know we are stronger when we work together – which is why we’ve worked with other hospitals, Pima County and providers such as El Rio Health to make sure we’re working in alignment to address Southern Arizona’s unique health needs. On a broader scale, it has been heartening to see elected and business leaders coming together around a common vision. We have seen all too often across the country that turf battles cannot happily coexist with prosperous, thriving communities. The fact that we are more focused on success than on who gets credit has worked in our favor as we build a better region. That’s something worth celebrating.

My own path to CEO was three-fold – say yes to opportunity, be fearless and never lose sight of your larger purpose. Similarly, this region has said yes, we can. Most importantly, we have held onto our core values. As a community, we have demonstrated that economic growth can live in a place that celebrates kindness, that is inclusive and that doesn’t leave the vulnerable behind. Our optimism is warranted and I see remarkable things for the future of this region.

JUDY RICH President & CEO TMC HealthCare

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What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your organization in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

The University of Arizona is deeply rooted in Southern Arizona and creates a positive impact through innovation, service to our community, and workforce development. We are a student-centric research university, preparing our students to be master adaptive learners for the Fourth Industrial Revolution economy. To be successful in this endeavor, we must work closely with partners across the state to ensure we are meeting workforce needs and developing opportunities so graduates stay in the region. We want to make sure our students are career-ready, even before they complete their degree. Our graduates go on to work in key sectors like aerospace, education, medicine, health, physical and life sciences research, engineering and other technology disciplines. Our students and alumni in the workforce, and the innovations of our faculty members, are incredible sources of pride when it comes to generating economic development wins. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

The UA is committed to aligning our goals related to student success, research outcomes, and the pursuit of innovation with the needs of Arizona. As we complete and implement our new strategic plan, our success will depend upon the collaboration and participation of every part of the UA with the larger communities we serve, including business and industry. An important part of my role is to ensure that we are seeking out mutually beneficial partnerships that will drive economic, societal, and cultural impact across our state and our region.

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

I haven’t been in Tucson long enough to say for sure, but my sense is that there is a lot of opportunity and good things are on the horizon. I think a lot of the growth and energy here over the past five years can be attributed to a collaborative mentality focused on the collective strengths and success of the region. One of the reasons I was excited to come to the UA was Tucson’s incredible potential to be – for the Southwest – what Silicon Valley is to California. We have the opportunity to drive innovation and commercialization that translate into benefits for humankind and economic opportunity for the people of our region.

www.BizTucson.com

DR. ROBERT C. ROBBINS President University of Arizona

Fall 2018

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

To start, it is an honor for Caterpillar to be mentioned as part of Tucson’s economic success story, and it’s a role we take very seriously. As leaders, the most important thing we can do to strengthen the foundation for continued growth is to show how Tucson plays a role in our global success. When we build strong teams, innovative products and a winning culture among our businesses and educational institutions here, that success will attract others to follow. The Tucson location is an asset we can all leverage as this region continues to establish itself as a global hub for technology, education, innovation and quality of life. There are great things happening here. It’s all of our jobs to get out and spread the word. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

It starts with open and transparent communication among our economic pillars. We need to share our vision for the future and our needs, and then partner to achieve great things. When we collaborate to win, and help each other solve real-world issues, it benefits everyone. For example, Caterpillar is extremely proud of our relationships with the University of Arizona and Pima Community College, and see them as essential partners in developing the best talent and deep expertise in our industry. Our entire team has been impressed with the openness, creativity, ideas and solutions developed each time we’ve brought leaders together to address a need. That sense of common purpose and community is part of what makes Tucson unique and a great place to be.

The positive momentum alone created in the past few years will yield results for the years ahead. Success breeds success, and when you look at how the downtown has evolved and come alive, how the university remains on the cutting edge of technology and research, and how the businesses that choose to call Tucson home are winning in their fields, that message will spread and will attract more success stories.

JEAN SAVAGE VP Caterpillar Surface Mining & Technology Division 78 BizTucson

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www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your business in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

As a Pinal County Supervisor, I have had opportunities to effect change in ways not generally available to corporate business leaders. For example, a key ingredient for expanding local economies is a healthy transportation network. The Pinal County Board of Supervisors took the lead in initiating a major transportation improvement plan. Last November, through the efforts of numerous partners, a Regional Transportation Plan with a 20-year funding strategy was approved by voters. This new transportation network will be a major factor in maintaining the momentum we have established for business attraction. Another example is workforce development. The supervisors re-positioned and re-focused our local workforce development board to concentrate on industries more compatible with our needs and to re-establish partnerships with higher education, business and other agencies capable of ensuring our success. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

We have a multi-prong approach to provide good paying jobs for our county. Our economic development program director and his team collaborate with cities, towns, chambers and economic development groups such as Sun Corridor Inc. We are much stronger and viable for large projects if we work together as a team. Pinal County also supports the diligent efforts of our community college districts (Central Arizona, Maricopa and Pima) to make their curriculum more in-touch with the jobs coming to this area. We already see those efforts paying off with Central Arizona College’s Youth Advanced Technical Academy, which inspired our next generation of workers and entrepreneurs to use their imaginations to create robots that do everything from household chores to baking cookies. Pinal County and Moses Incorporated produced two high-quality videos marketing what the county has to offer to potential locators. Aggressively marketing Pinal County has been worth it because businesses are contacting our Economic Development Program.

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?

Our approach to workforce development has been outstanding at examining, addressing and meeting employer’s needs. A few years ago, Pinal County created its own regional workforce entity which proved to be the spark needed to take us to the next level of economic development. The companies that are here, and who are coming to Pinal County, are targeting future technologies. Attesa will be testing our future vehicles, Lucid will be developing our future vehicles and several energy-centric companies are developing solar and bio-fuel technologies.

ANTHONY SMITH Board of Supervisors, District 4 Pinal County

Fall 2018

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE As a business leader and member of the Sun Corridor Inc. Chairman’s Circle, what do you consider your role and the role of your organization in the region’s economic development efforts to continue generating economic development wins for the region?

The Arizona Commerce Authority is the only economic development organization with a statewide focus. When companies are seeking a location in Arizona, we identify the best options to suit their requirements, regardless of geographic location. As evidenced by projects including Amazon, Caterpillar, AXISCADES, Hexagon Mining, Ernst & Young, Comcast and many others, Southern Arizona is always a serious contender. In fact, since 2015, the ACA has worked with companies that have committed to creating over 13,500 projected new jobs in the region. Cooperation between public and private organizations is obviously a key to economic development success in a region, and the general opinion is that collaboration has improved over the last several years. What do the region’s economic development leaders like yourself need to focus on to keep the collaboration working for the community?

Arizona is known for its highly collaborative economic development approach. When we all work together, companies locating in our state have a streamlined, pleasant experience and we all achieve more as a result. Regardless of where a project locates, it creates a ripple effect throughout the state and benefits our economy as a whole. At the ACA, we’re in regular communication with our southern Arizona partners including Sun Corridor Inc., cities, counties, academia and the existing business community – ensuring everyone is on the same page is critical for effective collaboration. I’m proud to say that we have a strong track record of success in doing so.

SANDRA WATSON President & CEO Arizona Commerce Authority

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These days, it is all about access to talent with the necessary skills. This is a top factor for companies when they are evaluating options for expansion. Fortunately, Arizona is nationally recognized as a top state for talent – the recent CNBC 2018 Best States for Business Rankings placed Arizona among the top 10. The ACA has partnered closely with academia at both the university and community college level in Southern Arizona to ensure we’re shaping the workforce not only for today, but for the future. This has resulted in the creation of partnerships like the Advanced Technologies Corridor, a historic agreement among Pima Community College, Central Arizona College and Maricopa Community Colleges to align on a shared curriculum for training advanced manufacturing talent. Large employers in the region are also creating unique initiatives, such a Caterpillar’s Applied Technology Academy, a partnership with Pima Community College designed to increase engineering capabilities in the region’s workforce. The University of Arizona is, of course, a significant contributor to the talent pool, with over 44,000 students enrolled during the 2017 academic year. Programs at UA focused on crossborder economic development also benefit the region, such as the Tech Park’s Global Advantage Program.

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

What factor that significantly impacts economic development in the region has shown the most improvement in the last five years?


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

David Adame

Mara G. Aspinall

David Adame

Garry Brav

Founded in 1969

Founded 1973

One of the largest nonprofit, community development corporations in the Southwest

Ranked among Tucsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top 10 commercial contractors

Located in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico

45 FTE

President & CEO Chicanos Por La Causa

More than 850 employees Four areas of impact: health and human services, housing, education, economic development 2017 impact: more than 305,000 people

Mara G. Aspinall

Managing Director, BlueStone Venture Partners CEO, Health Catalysts Groups $50 million venture capital fund focused on life sciences investments in the Southwestern states Board of Directors of BCBS of Arizona, Allscripts, Orasure, 3Scan and Castle Biosciences Co-Founder of ASU School of Biomedical Diagnostics, the only school in the world focused entirely on the study of diagnostics

Don Bourn

Don Bourn

CEO BFL Construction Co.

$100 Million in annual revenues In January 2018, BFL Construction Co. Inc. became part of JV Driver Group, an international construction firm headquartered in Canada

Ben Cordani

Lead Human Resources Manager Caterpillar Surface Mining & Technology Division Caterpillar Inc. has been making sustainable progress possible and driving positive change for 90 years as the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines, industrial gas turbines and diesel-electric locomotives

Garry Brav

The Surface Mining & Technology Division hub is located in downtown Tucson, with a new building opening at the base of Sentinel Peak anticipated in early 2019. The Customer Learning and Demonstration Center and the Caterpillar Proving Ground are located 30 miles southwest of Tucson

CEO Bourn Companies Headquartered in Tucson since 1990 Privately held real estate development company specializing in corporate office, retail, and mixed-use properties Completed more than 4 million square feet of projects across the western U.S.

www.BizTucson.com

Ben Cordani

Fall 2018

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Joe Coyle

Marc D. Fleischman

Joe Coyle

Marc D. Fleischman

Management consulting and executive search for the aerospace and healthcare fields

One of the largest locally owned public accounting, business advisory and consulting firms in Arizona with offices in Tucson and Phoenix

Managing Director The Patrick Group

Coyle previously held senior executive positions with Raytheon Missile Systems, Hughes Aircraft, Loral Aerospace and Ford Motor Companies

Jon Dudas

Jon Dudas

Sarah Frost

CEO BeachFleischman

Serves more than 7,000 private enterprises, nonprofit organizations and entrepreneurs in the U.S., Mexico and Canada

Senior VP and Chief of Staff University of Arizona

A “Top 200” largest public accounting firm in the U.S.

Founded in 1885, this land-grant university has more than 44,000 students and ranks among the top 25 public research universities with $622 million of research activity annually

Sarah Frost

The UA has an annual economic impact of $4.3 billion

Michael Eastman

VP – Customer Service Strategy and Operations Tucson National Center of Excellence Comcast The new center houses more than 1,100 employees, providing support for residential products and services At least 15 percent of these positions are being filled by reservists, veterans and their spouses or domestic partners

Interim CEO Banner – University Medical Center Tucson Campus Banner – University Medical Center South Campus Nonprofit health system in Tucson making the highest level of care accessible for Arizona residents Creation of a partnership between the University of Arizona and Banner allows for aligned leadership of academic research and clinical care delivery in Tucson and throughout the state Nearly 7,000 employees providing exceptional patient care, teaching future health care professionals and conducting groundbreaking research Over $500 million in new construction, including a 280,000 square foot outpatient complex and 9-story tower open for patients April 2019

Guy Gunther

General Manager, Central Region Consumer Markets CenturyLink

Michael Eastman

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CenturyLink is the second largest U.S. communications provider to global enterprise customers with customers in more than 60 countries

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Guy Gunther

Lawrence M. Hecker

Mary Jacobs

The company offers high-speed broadband, video and voice solutions to residential customers, and data systems management, analytics, managed security services, hosting, cloud and IT consulting services to businesses of all sizes Proudly serving Arizona since 1881 with many employees living and working in Tucson and throughout Southern Arizona

Lawrence M. Hecker Managing Member Hecker, PLLC

Of Counsel, Sun Corridor Inc. 46 years practicing law in Tucson Best Lawyers in America, Corporate Law, Business Organizations (including LLCs and Partnerships), Corporate Governance Law and Venture Capital Law, 1993 - 2019

Nancy Johnson

Mary Jacobs

Tom Kearney

Incorporated 1974

A world leader and innovator of tissuebased cancer diagnostic solutions

Town Manager Town of Oro Valley Population: 43,565

Head of IT Roche Tissue Diagnostics

Home to global bioscience and high-tech companies

Provides 250+ cancer tests with related instruments globally to improve outcomes for the 14 million people diagnosed with cancer annually

Nancy Johnson

Bill Kelley

Founded in 1970 as a neighborhood health center and currently providing medical, dental and behavioral health for more than 103,000 individuals

Founded 1988

Median household income: $74,480

CEO El Rio Health

14 Tucson locations with more than 1,200 employees

CFO Diamond Ventures Privately held company specializing in real estate development and private equity investments 2 million+ square feet of developed industrial, office and retail projects 20,000+ acres of developed and planned residential projects

www.BizTucson.com

Tom Kearney

Bill Kelley

Fall 2018

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Dr. Clinton Kuntz

Clint Mabie

Dr. Clinton Kuntz

Clint Mabie

Arizona’s oldest community health center, founded in 1957

CFSA was created in 1980 to help connect individuals, families and businesses to the causes they care about by serving as a vital link between philanthropy and the community’s needs

Doctor of Behavioral Health CEO MHC Healthcare

First nonprofit community health center in Arizona to integrate medical and behavioral healthcare into one facility (integrated healthcare model) Currently serves Marana and greater Tucson region Most services provided under one roof – primary care, behavioral health, dental, radiology, lab, pharmacy, urgent care, women’s health/OBGYN and WIC

Steve Lace

Senior VP Southwest Region Wells Fargo Middle Market Banking

The service was suspended during the Civil War Wells Fargo returned to Arizona in 1877 with five offices – including Phoenix and Tucson

Tucson New Car Dealers Association established 1947

Today Wells Fargo is the fourth largest corporate employer in Arizona

Organized by dealers to offer support for economic development and transportation initiatives

In 2017, Wells Fargo served its customers and communities through more than $6.9 million in Arizona nonprofits and schools through corporate and foundation giving more than 113,000 volunteer hours contributed by team members, equal to more than $2.7 million at the rate of $24.12 per volunteer hour

Established 1963

Fall 2018

Xavier Manrique

Steve Lace

COO GLHN Architects & Engineers

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To date, CFSA and its donors have awarded more than $175 million to regional nonprofits and educational institutions

In 2008 Wells Fargo celebrated its 150th anniversary in Arizona, dating from October 1858, when the Overland Mail first came to the state

Robert Lamb

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President & CEO Community Foundation for Southern Arizona

14 health centers in the MHC Healthcare family serving more than 50,000 patients a year, employing more than 545 employees Past President Tucson New Car Dealers Association VP Royal Automotive Group & Lexus of Tucson

Robert Lamb

Xavier Manrique

Employee-owned, offering services in architecture and mechanical, electrical, civil and technology engineering

Edmund Marquez

60+ employees with offices in Tucson and Phoenix

Founded agency in 1996 and now owns and operates three Allstate agencies, the largest Allstate group in Southern Arizona

Agency Principal Edmund Marquez Allstate Agencies

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Edmund Marquez

Appointed by Gov. Doug Ducey to serve on the board of the Rio Nuevo Multipurpose Facilities District Vice Chair, United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona Chair, Pima Community College Foundation Received 2004 Businessman of the Year from the Tucson Hispanic Chamber Received 2016 Father of the Year award by the Father’s Day Council

Enrique J. Marroquin President, Hunt Mexico Senior VP, Hunt Power

Hunt Mexico and Hunt Power are part of Hunt Consolidated a diversified holding company for a privately owned group of entities based in Dallas, Texas. The areas of activity of the different Hunt companies include oil and gas exploration and production, refining, LNG, power, real estate, investments, ranching and infrastructure Hunt Power develops and invests in entrepreneurial electric and gas utility opportunities, including traditional regulated assets as well as renewable and alternative energy markets Hunt Mexico seeks investment opportunities in which it can bring strategic value in addition to its capital. Its main areas of focus are hydrocarbon exploration and production, power infrastructure, power marketing and energy management resource management opportunities in Mexico

Kelle Maslyn

Executive Director of Community Relations ASU Tucson Arizona State University continues to earn national recognition as a top university for graduate employability, is #1

www.BizTucson.com

Enrique J. Marroquin

Kelle Maslyn

in the U.S. for innovation three years in a row, #1 fastest-growing research university, #10 in the U.S. for total research expenditures This is where Nobel laureates and Pulitzer Prize winners teach master learners This is where nationally ranked and internationally ranked programs prepare next-generation innovators to thrive while advancing pioneering research, strategic partnerships, entrepreneurship and economic development ASU’s nationally ranked programs inspire the top-qualified graduates and have positioned the university as a “top-tier” recruiting and hiring institution by more than 50 of the country’s top corporations, according to professional recruiters and rankings services around the world

Omar Mireles

Omar Mireles President HSL Properties

Founded 1975 Owns and operates 38 apartment communities in Arizona, including 31 in the Tucson metro area, totaling more than 10,000 apartment homes Owns and operates hotels and resorts, including the Hilton Tucson El Conquistador Resort and The Ritz Carlton, Dove Mountain

Mark Mistler

CEO – Tucson & Southern Arizona BBVA Compass Company ranks among the top 25 largest U.S. banks, with 672 branches and 15 Southern Arizona branches Benefits Southern Arizona charitable organizations through employee volunteerism and financial contributions

Mark Mistler

Fall 2018

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Farhad Moghimi

Ricardo Pineda Albarran

Farhad Moghimi

Executive Director Pima Association of Governments/ Regional Transportation Authority Coordinates regional planning efforts to enhance mobility, sustainability, livability and economic vitality of the region Programs federal, state, regional and local funding for all regional transportation investments Manages the locally funded RTA and its 20-year, $2.1 billion regional transportation plan

Tom Murphy

Mayor Town of Sahuarita

Tom Murphy

Population – 30,225 Median Household Income – $73,579 Full-time-equivalent employees – 129 Incorporated in 1994, Sahuarita is the fifth youngest town in the state. The town’s focus on economic development is embodied in Sahuarita Advanced Manufacturing and Technology Center, a project that will allow the expansion of two, high-tech area firms (Hydronalix and Control Vision) and offer opportunities to other firms seeking relocation or expansion. Regionally known for its great schools, pristine neighborhoods, highly-educated population and strong community spirit, Sahuarita is one of Sun Corridor Inc.’s emerging leaders

Charles P. Potucek

Steve Odenkirk

Executive VP, Southern Regional Manager Alliance Bank of Arizona, a division of Western Alliance Bank. Member FDIC Founded in 2003, Alliance Bank of Arizona offers a full spectrum of loan, deposit and treasury management capabilities, plus superior service to meet the needs of local businesses Alliance Bank of Arizona is a division of Western Alliance Bank, one of the country’s top-performing banking companies Western Alliance ranks #2 on the Forbes 2018 “Best Banks in America” list

Ricardo Pineda Albarran Consul of Mexico Consulate of Mexico in Tucson Established in 1882 The official representation of the Mexican government in Pima and Pinal counties Promotes stronger ties between Mexico and the Sun Corridor region Fosters trade and investments across the border

Charles P. Potucek City Manager City of Sierra Vista

Population – 43,888 Home of Fort Huachuca, largest military installation in Arizona Member of the Great American Defense Communities Class of 2017

Steve Odenkirk

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Barbi Reuter

Walter Richter

Barbi Reuter

Adriana Kong Romero

Tucson-based, founded 1985

Bank of America through its commitment to our community has invested more than $1.5 million in grants and matching gifts to local nonprofits over the past five years

President / Principal Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services Leading independently owned, fullservice commercial real estate company Licensed in Southern Arizona and Sonora, Mexico

Walter Richter

Public Affairs Administrator Southwest Gas Corporation

Founded in 1931, Southwest Gas serves more than 2 million residential, commercial and industrial customers in parts of Arizona, Nevada and California

Randy Rogers

CEO Tucson Association of REALTORS®

Senior VP Tucson Market President Bank of America

Last year, Bank of America employees volunteered more than 3,500 hours in service to our community and provided more than $238 million in loans to Tucson businesses

Steven E. Rosenberg Publisher & Owner BizTucson

Founded in Spring 2009, BizTucson is the region’s premiere business magazine

Advocates for homeownership and property rights issues

BizTucson provides in-depth coverage of the region’s business news, including economic development, university research, technology, the arts, education, tourism, defense, bioscience, hospitality and nonprofits

Invests in the community through membership engagement in the Tucson REALTORS® Charitable Foundation

Produced quarterly in print and online, the magazine has received national awards

Represents more than 6,000 members and is the largest trade association in Southern Arizona

Randy Rogers

Adriana Kong Romero

Steven E. Rosenberg

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2018

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jonathan Rothschild

Kevin Stockton

Jonathan Rothschild

David Smallhouse

Since taking office, the mayor helped settle the long-standing Rio Nuevo dispute, opening a new era of downtown redevelopment

Real estate, private equity and venture capital investments

Mayor City of Tucson

He codified and increased incentives for Tucson businesses and he led efforts to invest in Tucsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roads and police and fire departments, making for better streets and a safer city

Keri Lazarus Silvyn

Introduced program initiatives such as: Community Schools, supporting college and career readiness; Help for Homebuyers, providing down payment and other assistance; Steps to Success, re-enrolling dropouts in high school; and 10,000 Trees, adding shade and beauty to our city These programs are just a few examples of how Mayor Rothschild works to engage the community in creating a better Tucson

Keri Lazarus Silvyn Partner/Owner Lazarus, Silvyn & Bangs

Lazarus, Silvyn & Bangs is Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preeminent land-use law firm, serving all of Arizona from its offices in Phoenix and Tucson Lazarus, Silvyn & Bangs specializes in zoning, land use, entitlements, negotiating development agreements, and assisting with all aspects of project approvals in jurisdictions throughout the state Lazarus, Silvyn & Bangs also represents local jurisdictions to assist in drafting land use codes and ordinances

David Smallhouse

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James Stover

Silvyn has been appointed to the Arizona State Land Board of Appeals by Gov. Doug Ducey and serves on the Tucson Airport Authority Board of Directors

Managing Director Miramar Ventures

Active investor in angel and early-stage ventures, many with close ties to the University of Arizona and Desert Angels of Southern Arizona

Kevin Stockton

Market CEO Northwest Healthcare Northwest Healthcare includes Northwest Medical Center, Oro Valley Hospital, Northwest Allied Physicians, Northwest Cardiology, Northwest Urgent Care and Northwest Emergency Centers Northwest has also announced it will build a new hospital in Sahuarita in late 2019 Caring for patients throughout Tucson and surrounding areas, Northwest Healthcare is dedicated to offering a variety of convenient access points such as urgent care, free-standing emergency centers, and primary and specialty care clinics With online check-in for the emergency room and urgent care, and online scheduling for primary care appointments, Northwest Healthcare is making it easy for patients to access healthcare when and where they need it

James V. Stover

Medicaid President Arizona Complete Health (Formerly Health Net of Arizona and Cenpatico Integrated Care) Serving about 250,000 Arizonans across 10 counties through Medicare Advantage, Marketplace and Medicaid by using a whole health, communitybased local approach to healthcare

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Guillermo Valencia

Robert E. Walkup

Offices in Tucson, Tempe, Yuma, Casa Grande, Sierra Vista

Matt Wandoloski

Subsidiary of Centene, a Fortune 500 company, a diversified, multi-national healthcare enterprise that provides a portfolio of services to government-sponsored healthcare programs, focusing on under-insured and uninsured individuals

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona is committed to helping Arizonans get healthier faster and stay healthier longer

Nearly 2,000 total employees statewide, with emphasis on supporting diversity and inclusion

Guillermo Valencia

Chairman Greater Nogales and Santa Cruz County Port Authority Founded in December 2004, the Port Authority brings together the key stakeholders from the Ambos Nogales area to address issues that impact ports of entry Works with local, state, federal and international partners to improve Arizona’s largest port facilities, streamline the crossing process at the Nogales ports of entry and to enhance economic development in the Nogales-Santa Cruz County region Mariposa Port of Entry in Nogales processes 600,000 commercial vehicles annually which equates to $30 billion in imports into the U.S. and $11 billion in exports into Mexico

Robert E. Walkup

Honorary Consul South Korea in Arizona Sworn in July 2013 Provides efforts to protect overseas Korean nationals residing in Arizona Liaison for the promotion of trade, economic, cultural, scientific and educational relations Facilitates commercial transactions and/ or introduction of foreign capital

www.BizTucson.com

Matt Wandoloski

VP of Corporate Strategy and Analytics Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

With a focus on connecting people with the care they need, BCBSAZ offers health insurance and related services to nearly 1.5 million customers BCBSAZ, a not-for-profit company, is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association The company employs nearly 1,500 people in its Phoenix, Chandler, Flagstaff and Tucson offices Through advanced clinical programs and community outreach, BCBSAZ is moving health forward

Joshua Weiss

Joshua Weiss President & CEO Hexagon Mining

Headquartered in Tucson, Arizona, with offices worldwide, Hexagon Mining is shaping smart change by helping to connect all parts of a mine with technologies that make sense of data in real time Develops products and programs that connect surveying, design, fleet management, production optimization, and collision avoidance for mining companies and operations worldwide

Steven G. Zylstra

President & CEO Arizona Technology Council Established 2002, Arizona’s premier trade association, for science & technology companies Sponsors events, resources and educational forums, to grow Arizona’s technology industry

Steven G. Zylstra

Fall 2018

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BUSINESS ATTRACTION & EXPANSION FY 2017-2018 Amazon Project Type: Attraction Industry Sector: Distribution Center Number of Direct New Jobs: 1,500 Amazon has selected Tucson/Pima County as the site for a new, high-tech distribution center, which will be located at the Port of Tucson. The company will be adding 1,500 jobs in one of the largest buildings ever built in the Tucson area, with a capital expenditure of $145 million. The new 855,000 square-foot facility will allow Amazon to scale up its operations in Southern Arizona and continue its rapid global expansion. The economic impact will be $600 million added to the regional economy over the next five years. Arconic Fastening Systems Project Type: Expansion Industry Sector: Aerospace & Defense Number of Direct New Jobs: 70 Arconic holds the #1 global position in aerospace fastening systems, and is the North American leader in commercial transportation fasteners. Arconic’s hightech, multi-material fastening systems are found nose-to-tail on aircraft and aero engines. The Tucson expansion represents an addition of a new product line. Atlas Copco Project Type: Expansion Industry Sector: Renewable & Mining Technology/Manufacturing Number of Direct New Jobs: 20 Atlas Copco is a world-leading provider of products and service solutions focused on productivity, energy-efficiency, safety and ergonomics. The company focuses on aftersales service and rental of equipment for surface and underground rock excavation, exploration drilling, rock reinforcement, ground engineering, water well, and oil and gas drilling. Atlas Copco is expected to hire 20 new employees within the next year and plans to invest $6 million in capital expenditures. Burns McDonnell Project Type: Attraction Industry Sector: Advanced Business Services Number of Direct New Jobs: 20 Burns McDonnell is a full-service engineering, architecture, construction, environmental and consulting solutions firm that is expanding its operations into Tucson. Burns McDonnell plans to open a new office in Tucson with positions that include engineers, architects and other construction professionals involved in the planning, design, permitting and con90 BizTucson

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struction of facilities. The company plans to invest $500,000 in capital expenditures with an economic impact of more than $25 million in five years. Citi Tucson Project Type: Expansion Industry Sector: Back Office – Call Center (Enterprise) Number of Direct New Jobs: 639 Citigroup, the leading global bank, has approximately 200 million customer accounts and does business in more than 160 countries and jurisdictions. Citi provides consumers, corporations, governments and institutions with a broad range of financial products and services, including consumer banking and credit, corporate and investment banking, securities brokerage, transaction services, and wealth management. The company will be adding 639 new positions to support new contracts and plans to invest $5 million in capital expenditures.

The 2017-2018 fiscal year marked one of Sun Corridor Inc.’s best years in job growth, capital investment and economic impact since the recession of 2008-10. • Successful Projects 11 • Projected Direct New Jobs 3,595 • Projected Capital Investment $244.7 million • Economic and Fiscal Impact $2.4 billion Convergys Project Type: Expansion Industry Sector: Call Center Number of Direct New Jobs: 150 Convergys is a third-party call center supporting clients such as Walgreens The company is expected to hire 150 new employees within the next year with an economic impact of $63 million over the next five years. GEICO Project Type: Expansion Industry Sector: Advanced Business Services Number of Direct New Jobs: 861 GEICO is the second-largest private passenger automobile insurance company in the U.S. and is a leading employer in Tucson with 2,100 employees. Bourn

Companies is purchasing, rezoning and developing approximately 115 acres at The Bridges and GEICO will be the first corporate employer to locate in the development. With this move, the company plans to add 861 jobs over time. Kelpac Medical Project Type: Expansion Industry Sector: Bio Health/ Manufacturing Number of Direct New Jobs: 32 Kelpac Medical, a medical device manufacturing company, is expanding its operations in Nogales, Arizona. Kelpac makes a variety of extruded plastic tubing for the medical industry. Mister Car Wash Project Type: Expansion Industry Sector: Advanced Business Services - HQ Number of Direct New Jobs: 47 Mister Car Wash is expanding its Tucsonbased headquarters. The company operates 244 car washes and 33 lube centers in 21 states. It operates 15 car washes in Pima County which employ 615 people. Mister Car Wash is expected to hire 47 new employees within the next year and plans to invest $6 million in capital expenditures. Northwest Healthcare Project Type: Expansion Industry Sector: Healthcare Number of Direct New Jobs: 156 Northwest Healthcare announced a new 18-bed hospital and expanded medical services on the southeast corner of I-19 and Sahuarita Road. This new facility and related physician offices/services will add 156 high-wage jobs in the Town of Sahuarita. The economic impact will be $165 million added to the regional economy over the next five years. TuSimple Project Type: Attraction Industry Sector: Transportation & Logistics Number of Direct New Jobs: 100 TuSimple, an autonomous commercial vehicle technology company based in China, has opened a new facility in Tucson. The company projects to hire 100 people within a five-year time period. The majority of those hired will be advanced engineering positions, in addition to truck drivers and operators. TuSimple also projects to invest $15 million in capital expenditures bringing its economic impact to $81.7 million over five years.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. INVESTORS & STAFF

Sun Corridor Inc. Investors Alliance Bank of Arizona Arizona Commerce Authority Arizona Complete Health Arizona State University Arizona Technology Council Bank of America Banner University Medicine BBVA Compass Bank BeachFleischman BFL Construction BizTucson Blue Cross® Blue Shield® of Arizona Bluespan Wireless Bourn Companies Business Development Finance Corporation

Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services

Pinal County

Diamond Ventures

Rancho Sahuarita

DPR Construction

Raytheon Missile Systems

Edmund Marquez Allstate Agency

Republic of Korea in Tucson

El Rio Health

Russ Lyon Sotheby’s

FreePort McMoRan

SAHBA

GEICO

Southwest Gas

GLHN Architects & Engineers

Sundt Companies

Greater Nogales and Santa Cruz County Port Authority

Town of Oro Valley

Hacienda Del Sol Resort Health Catalysts/ GenePeeks Hecker PLLC Hexagon Mining

Port of Tucson

Tucson Association of REALTORS®

UAVenture Capital

CBRE

Industrial Development Authority of Pima County

University of Arizona

City of Sierra Vista City of Tucson The Clements Agency Comcast Community Foundation for Southern Arizona Concord General Contracting Consulate of Mexico in Tucson CopperPoint Mutual Insurance Company

Lloyd Construction Long Realty MHC Healthcare Miramar Ventures Nextrio Northwest Healthcare Nova Home Loans The Patrick Group Pima Association of Governments/Regional Transportation Authority

COX Communications

Pima Community College

Crest Insurance

Pima County

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5

6

7

8

Tucson Airport Authority

Hunt Mexico

Lazarus, Silvyn and Bangs

4

Trico Electric Cooperative

HSL Properties

Chicanos Por La Causa

3

Town of Sahuarita

Caterpillar, Surface Mining & Technology Division

CenturyLink

2

TMC Healthcare

Tucson New Car Dealers Association/Royal Automotive Group and Lexus of Tucson

Hilton El Conquistador

1

9

UNS Energy Corp, Tucson Electric Power & UniSource Energy Services

1. Cathy Casper, Senior VP

Vantage West Credit Union

2. Sydney Chong Marketing Coordinator

Ventana Medical Systems Venture West Visit Tucson Wells Fargo Bank West Press Westland Resources

3. Susan Dumon VP, Economic Development 4. Daniela Gallagher VP, Economic Development 5. Danielle Gonzalez, Administrative Receptionist 6. Skye Mendonca Corporate Administrator 7. Laura Shaw, Senior VP 8. Joe Snell, President & CEO 9. David Welsh, Executive VP

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BizVIEWPOINT

Q&A with Taylor W. Lawrence President, Raytheon Missile Systems By Jay Gonzales There’s a special place in the heart of a community for a company that is at the top of the list of the region’s largest private employers; for a company where generations of families have been part of its history; and for a company that has resisted efforts to be lured away to stay in a community where it has thrived. Taylor W. Lawrence has been at the helm at Raytheon Missile Systems for the last 10 years as its president. He holds a doctorate in applied physics from Stanford University, along with a master’s degree in applied physics also from Stanford and a bachelor’s degree in physics from the California Institute of Technology. His education alone certainly justifies why he’s the leader of a massive, high-tech business like Raytheon Missile Systems. But it’s his understanding of the people in

Q:

What is the status of the expansion that was supposed to entail about 2,000 jobs and $500 million in investment over a five-year period?

I think that’s all being managed. I think they’re doing a great job, and I would say today, the alignment is so much better than when I got here a decade ago.

A:

Q:

On the buildings we’re on schedule and in the hirings we’re ahead of schedule. It’s probably about as fast a pace as we can manage. We’re hiring thousands every year. This year alone, we’ll have a net increase in population of 750 by the end of the year, and that goes against about 1,000 last year. Our commitment was to add 2,000 in five years and we’re almost there in about 2½ years. I think we’re going see even more growth opportunity in the years to come.

Q:

PHOTO:BRENT G. MATHIS

his company and in the community that resonates when the conversation turns to Raytheon’s role in the region. It was an economic development victory of epic proportions for the region two years ago when Raytheon announced a massive expansion in Tucson. It continues to be hailed as a sign that times are changing for the region with good jobs coming in, coupled with a thriving downtown and a highereducation pipeline that is in lockstep with business and community leaders. Lawrence sat down with BizTucson in late August to discuss a number of economic development issues in Tucson, Raytheon’s role as a business and community leader, and to provide an update on how the expansion is progressing.

What are some of the critical issues that need to be addressed or are being addressed to ensure that Raytheon has the support it needs to achieve its expansion goals? Are the needs being met?

A:

We’re growing, and we want to see other industries come into town. So whether it’s roads or basic services and education, all that has to grow, too. You can’t just have one sector of the industry grow and not have the rest of the community grow along with it. In talking with county leaders and city leaders, www.BizTucson.com

How will the process of getting the needed buffer zone, including moving what is now Aerospace Parkway, help as Raytheon thinks about more expansion and as other companies see what you were able to get done?

A:

If you look at it from an agility standpoint, we probably could improve on that. And it would be a multiplicative factor because as other companies and industries come in, they’d like to

have stuff done more quickly. We have a good learning curve and we’ve been through it and we’ve pushed it in a pretty good direction. Let’s learn from that and figure out how to do it on a more expedited timescale.

Q:

It’s been stated over and over that the state’s universities and community colleges have a massive responsibility to produce the educated workforce in a community that is trying to build a broad, high-tech industry. What happens if the university and community colleges can’t keep up?

A:

My advice and request to the state is to keep the university system healthy. That’s another vibrant part of the underlying infrastructure. If you let your research universities wither, a lot of stuff withers with it. If you look at the big corridors of high-tech in this country, they are almost all centered around great universities. We’ve got to make sure we keep that here in Arizona. The research universities are a vital, vital part of the infrastructure. There’s some that say, “Let the universities fend for themselves.” I think that would be a mistake when it comes to trying to make sure we have the right environment for business growth and economic growth.

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BizVIEWPOINT continued from page 93

Q:

Raytheon, which began in Tucson as Hughes Aircraft, has been here since 1951. Does the company have any sense of responsibility for where this community is, and what it is going to be going forward?

A:

We are an integral part of the community and now that we’re at around 12,000 people and the largest employer in Southern Arizona, the community means a lot to us. You feel some responsibility to make sure that the community is benefiting from the fact that we’re here. We have generations of people that have worked here and retired here. Their kids worked here and have retired here. And their kids are working here now.

Q:

Assuming the community as a whole stays on track in terms of collaboration, infrastructure, higher education – the factors that are helping companies like Raytheon thrive and expand – what is Raytheon Missile Systems going look like in Tucson 10 years from now?

A:

I think we’re bigger and healthier, producing the most incredibly high-tech systems for our customers in a completely new generation with a lot of new technologies built in. That’s the vector that we’re currently on and, barring changes in terms of budgets and things like that and the world’s situation, I think that’s where we’ll be. It feels like there are a lot more industries coming to Tucson, which is good because then that builds a bigger fabric that can help lift the infrastructure as well. I’m cheering for the success of World View and Vector Space Systems and all these other companies coming in because that’s a great thing for the fabric of the community, and we’ll all grow together. We’re recruiting and training people in the highest tech jobs in aerospace and defense. We’re the best in our business and we’re the biggest in our business, so it’s an exciting time to be part of this community and part of Raytheon Missile Systems.

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What Inspires the Scientists of Steele Our bold vision is to: Be a national research and thought leader, recognized for our innovation and forwardthinking approach. Our dream is to: Improve the lives of children and families. Make children healthier by seeking breakthroughs. Train future scientists and pediatricians. Solve each childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health issue one child at a time. Our plan is to: Expand our rigorous programs through basic, translational and clinical research in autoimmune disorders, genomics and developmental pediatrics. Build on our extraordinary and powerful team of world-class scientists, educators and clinicians. Expand our opportunities for growth and greater impact through state-of-the-art facilities with collaborative teaching and learning environments.

From left

Dr. Emmanuel Katsanis, Dr. Michael Daines, Dr. Yi Zeng, Hua Xu, Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan, Melissa Halpern, Dr. Sydney Rice, Pawel Kiela 96 BizTucson

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BizMEDICINE

Small But Mighty Jewel in the Desert

UA Steele Children’s Research Center Now 25 Twenty-five years after commencing research, training and treatment, the University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center has become a true jewel in the desert. The state’s only children’s health research center currently has 70 residents and 82 faculty members. Though its important work may be largely unknown or underappreciated by Tucsonans who are fortunate to have their health, the UA Steele Center is truly a beacon of hope for families with ill children. They come from around the city, state, nation and the world. Scientists also flock here from as far away as Poland, Brazil and other points around the globe to be a part of cutting-edge pediatric research. One beneficiary of this center for excellence and its multidisciplinary approach is young PJ Calihan. By the time he was 1 year old, Phoenix-area specialists were unable to determine the cause of his chronic symptoms – vomiting, choking and not eating. Finally he was referred to Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan, director of the UA Steele Center within the UA College of Medicine-Tucson since 1995. PJ was diagnosed with hiatal hernia and an aerodigestive disorder known as eosinophilic gastroenteritis, a complex disorder involving the airways, lungs and digestive tracts. It’s caused by food allergies and airborne allergens. Treated by a team led by Ghishan, PJ began medications and an elimination diet. Now a thriving 5-year-old, PJ plays soccer and does karate and gymnastics. He is just one of countless examples of patients helped by the UA Steele Center physician-scientists. Relative to larger, longer-established children’s research centers, such as www.BizTucson.com

those at Duke, Harvard and Vanderbilt universities, the UA Steele Center is small but mighty, much like the patients treated by its physician-scientists and its dynamic director. Ghishan came to lead the Steele Center and the UA Department of Pediatrics after 16 years at Vanderbilt. He never thought he would ever leave Nashville, Tennessee, but he was not satisfied to be the #2 person as vice chairman of pediatrics there. He wanted to build his own department. So he started looking around and ultimately decided to bring his vision, drive and passion to Tucson to build a world-class

At this stage, my vision is how to provide state-of-theart care. I developed a multidisciplinary approach to clinical problems. The beauty is this: You do the clinical work and you translate from research to patient and vice versa. Bed to bench and bench to bed, that’s our model.

Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan, Director University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center & Physician-in-Chief, Diamond Children’s Medical Center –

program here. And build it he did. Now ranked in the top 20 percent of pediatric research institutions in spite of its relatively small size, the UA Steele Center even outranked Vanderbilt one year based on National Institutes of Health grants – a fact that Ghishan was quick to point out, with a wink and a nod, to his friends back in Nashville. “The Steele Children’s Research Center is an incredible facility and over the past 25 years it has been a source for some of the University of Arizona’s greatest impact in our region and beyond,” said UA President Dr. Robert C. Robbins. “Under Dr. Fayez  Ghishan’s leadership, the Steele Center’s dedication to improving children’s health through research has grown stronger than ever. I am so proud the Steele Center has reached this milestone and I can’t wait to see what it will accomplish in the future.” Ghishan was raised in Jordan, started medical school in Turkey at age 16 and received pediatric training in London. When he arrived in Tucson, Ghishan set out to create centers of excellence, of which there are now many. He not only directs the children’s research center. He also serves as physician-in-chief at Diamond Children’s Medical Center and is a member of the College of Medicine faculty as a professor in both pediatrics and physiology. He is the Alan and Janice Levin Family Endowed Professor of Pediatrics and holds the Horace W. Steele Endowed Chair in Pediatric Research. Last year he received the prestigious Eugene G. Sander Endowed Faculty Fundraising Award from the UA Foundation. Johncontinued on page 99 >>> Fall 2018

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PHOTO: COURTESY THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA STEELE CHILDREN’S RESEARCH CENTER

By June C. Hussey


1986

Arizona Board of Regents approves Children’s Research Center as a separate administrative unit and approves a onestory facility.

1987

Hua Xu and Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan PJ Calihan

Louise Thomas named first chair of the CRC advisory board. Thomas played a pivotal role in the creation of the UA children’s research center.

1988

Arizona Board of Regents approves expansion of the center to four stories.

1989

Anderson, DeBartolo, Pan selected as architects, Sundt Corporation chosen as construction manager and Carnes Construction selected to build the university’s children’s research center.

1990

Angel Charity for Children selects the Steele Memorial Children’s Research Center as its beneficiary, donating $783,000 toward the building project.

ION THE REG

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24 201 L 201 ING FAL SPR

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Ghishan (center) Dr. Fayez K. world-class of leads a team physicians at and researchers Arizona Steele of The University Research Center Children’s

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1992

The Steele Memorial Children’s Research Center opens. Dedication ceremony is led by UA President Manuel Pacheco and UA College of Medicine Dean Dr. Jim Dalen.

1994

S TE V E N

M E C K LE R

Dr. Sydney Rice & Dr. Emmanuel Katsanis

14 UNTIL 06/30/ • DISPLAY • $2.99 SPRING 2014

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Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation provides funding for research on Niemann-Pick Type C disease at the center. This was the first lab in the country funded by the Parseghian Foundation. Father’s Day Council Tucson hosts its first Father of the Year Awards Gala to raise money for type 1 diabetes research.

1995

Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan appointed director of the Steele Memorial Children’s Research Center. Ghishan came from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, where he was professor and vice chairman of pediatrics/ research and director of the Division of Gastroenterology and the Clinical Nutrition Research Center.

1996

The Steele Memorial Children’s Research Center receives $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development to study growth factors in human breast milk.

1997

The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Disease choose the Steele Memorial Children’s Research Center as one of the seven sites in the nation to study asthma among low-income children. The grant represents collaboration among the Arizona Respiratory Center, the UA Department of Pediatrics and pediatricians in the community.

1998

The UA establishes the first pediatric center in the nation to research alternative therapies in pediatrics. This effort is funded by a $5 million grant from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and is a collaboration with the UA Program in Integrative Medicine (now the UA Center for Integrative Medicine).

1999

Jerry and Kathy Zillman establish Tee Up For Tots to raise money for pediatric cancer research and to help families of cancer patients. They fund the

Courtney Page Zillman Fellows in Pediatric Cancer Research in memory of their daughter, Courtney, who died from neuroblastoma at the age of 4. Tee Up For Tots raises $50,000 with its inaugural golf tournament.

2000

The Phoenix Women’s Board hosts its first event, the “Children Helping Children” Fashion Show and Luncheon. The board adopts a nickname: PANDA – People Acting Now Discover Answers. Funds raised enable the center to purchase an AutoGen Robot, used to prepare and purify DNA to define genetic origins of disease.

2001

Angel Charity for Children pledges $750,000 to create the Angel Wing for Children with Diabetes, providing research space and new clinical space.

2003

The Steele Foundation, led by the foundation’s President Dan Cracchiolo, donates funds to create the Horace W. Steele Endowed Chair in Pediatric Research. The Raise a Racquet for Kids tennis event fundraiser raises funds for the pediatric cancer Phase 1 clinical trial for a novel anticancer drug whose mechanism of action was discovered by former Steele Center researcher Dr. Luke Whitesell. The clinical trial was led by pediatric oncologist Dr. Rochelle Bagatell. Raise a Racquet for Kids was established by former tennis pro turned pediatric cancer researcher, Anne Fritz.

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BizMEDICINE Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan awarded the prestigious 2004 Shwachman Award. This award honors a physicianscientist who has made major, life-long scientific or educational contributions to the field of pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition in North America.

2005

PANDA nears $1 million in donated funds to the Steele Center; establishes a White Coat Fund to recruit and retain promising young researchers and clinician-scientists.

2010

Diamond Children’s Medical Center opens. Steele Center Director Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan, the Steele Center advisory board, department faculty members and others worked many years to make this dream a reality. Steele Center family auxiliary, Kids of Steele is formed. Kids of Steele is dedicated to teaching children the importance of community service while raising awareness and funds for the Steele Center through familyfriendly events.

2013

University Medical Center, in collaboration with the UA Steele Center, announces plans to build Tucson’s first children’s academic medical center — Diamond Children’s Medical Center. Joan and Donald Diamond make a $15 million lead gift.

15th annual Tee Up For Tots golf tournament funds pediatric cancer research in the area of cancer immunotherapy, led by pediatric oncologist Dr. Emmanuel Katsanis. Over the past 15 years, Tee Up For Tots has raised more than $600,000 for pediatric cancer research at the Steele Center.

2008

2014

2007

Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan receives second prestigious NIH MERIT award for $2.5 million, extends his NIH grant, “Development of Intestinal Transport of Calcium and Phosphate,” for an additional 10 years. Father’s Day Council Tucson commits to raise $1 million to establish the Father’s Day Council Tucson Endowed Chair for Type 1 Diabetes.

2009

With an NIH-funded grant, Steele Center researchers Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan and Pawel Kiela show that curcumin may be a viable supplement to treat inflammatory bowel disease. www.BizTucson.com

Vijay Radhakrishnan, Pawel Kiela and Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan discover that curcumin (the medicinal agent found in turmeric) can block the metastasis of colon cancer. The UA Steele Center opens in Phoenix, thanks to support from the Arizona Elks Major Projects and PANDA (People Acting Now Discover Answers). The new facility provides clinical research space, exam rooms and meeting space. 20th annual Father’s Day Council Tucson Fathers of the Year Awards Dinner and Gala raises $205,000. Over the

past 20 years, FDC Tucson has raised nearly $3.3 million for type 1 diabetes research, clinical programs, recruitment and the Father’s Day Council Tucson Endowed Chair for Type 1 Diabetes.

2016

Since adopting the UA Steele Center in 1992 as a “major project,” the Arizona Elks Major Projects have raised about $6.3 million for the UA Steele Center’s research, endowments, education and clinical space renovation. Since the first “Children Helping Children” Fashion Show and Luncheon (in 2000), PANDA has donated nearly $8 million to support UA Steele Center research projects and clinical programs.

2017

Hua Xu and Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan receive a 5-year, $1.9 million NIH grant to expand their research into the sodium hydrogen exchanger, NHE8.

2018

To date the Fathers Day Council Tucson has raised $4.1 million for the UA Steele Children’s Research Center. That includes $2 million to fund the Father’s Day Council Tucson Endowed Chair in Type 1 Diabetes. Source: University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center

continued from page 97 Paul Roczniak, president and CEO of the foundation, said at the time, “Dr. Ghishan is a shining example of a fundraiser, a physician and a university leader.” Ghishan recalled, “When I arrived at the UA Steele Center in 1995, I had big dreams – dreams to make the center Arizona’s beacon of science devoted to improving children’s health through research. It’s hard to imagine now, but back then, there was no pediatric basic science research being conducted in Arizona. “My first tasks were to secure the necessary state-of-the-art research equipment and recruit the best physicians, scientists and physician-scientists to advance our knowledge in pediatric health. As I look back over the last 25 years, I’m simply amazed at what we’ve accomplished.” One project Ghishan is particularly proud of is the PANDA Children’s Aerodigestive Disorders Center. (PANDA stands for People Acting Now Discover Answers.) Ghishan eagerly explained its significance. “Tucson is a hub for allergies. I started seeing a lot of patients for this. They would tell me ‘I’m going to Cincinnati Children’s because they specialize in aerodigestive diseases.’ So we built an Aerodigestive Disorders Center, a center of excellence for eosinophilic esophagitis, and I stole people from Cincinnati Children’s and brought them here. “Drs. Cori Daines and Michael Daines are the best pediatric pulmonologist and the best allergist and immunologist that understand this disease. So now when a patient comes in and says, ‘I’m going to Cincinnati,’ I say, ‘I brought Cincinnati to you.’ “So now I have the best center in the state of Arizona, where we sit together with the patient, a gastroenterologist, allergist, immunologist, pulmonary doctor, nurses and so forth; we all sit together and see the patient and we do testing.” Ghishan spoke passionately about his work as a scientist, a mentor and a doctor. “We have made major strides in education, research and clinical care. At this stage, my vision is how to provide stateof-the-art care. I developed a multidisciplinary approach to clinical problems. The beauty is this: You do the clinical work and you translate from research to patient and vice versa. Bedside to bench and bench to bedside, that’s our model.” “We have made major discoveries continued on page 100 >>> Fall 2018

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2004


BizMEDICINE

2017 PANDA Event

continued from page 99 throughout the past 25 years,” Ghishan said. His excitement grew when he explained the science behind them. “I have just patented a drug with Eugene A. Mash Jr. of the Chemistry Department for ulcerative colitis. It’s really a beautiful model. We had the idea to remove the fatty acid from the backbone of olestra and replace it with aspirin. This is the only available liquid form of aspirin that opens up in the lower GI tract to reduce the inflammation. We also looked at utilizing curcumin for inflammatory bowel disease. It’s purified from turmeric. “We have so many projects going on. We raise money and invest the money. I just got a grant to sequence gut DNA and figure out if you are in a dysbiotic state. To have a healthy microbiome is very important to your health. You have 10 to the 12th power of bacteria in your GI tract – 2.2 pounds. We have 23,000 genes, but we have 2.3 million bacterial genes. So we are almost 10 percent human and 90 percent bacteria. You live in harmony with the bacteria. If you have dysbiosis, then you have a disease.” The UA Steele Center dates back to Oct. 26, 1992 when it opened within the UA College of Medicine – Tucson. Before the emergence of the UA Steele Center, no institution in Arizona had been conducting pediatric scientific research. To fill this void, in 1986, the Arizona Board of Regents approved a children’s research center. An advisory board was formed and Louise Thomas, founder of Angel Charity for Children, stepped up as chair to lead a $7 million capital campaign. An initial significant gift from Joan and Donald Diamond kicked things off, followed by a gift from the Steele Foundation, in honor of Phoenix businessman Horace Steele. The cavalcade of support for the UA Steele Center that followed has never stopped nor has the need for it. Through generous philanthropic efforts of groups like Angel Charity, the Arizona Elks and the Phoenix Women’s Board of the Steele Children’s Research Center (known as PANDA), along with grassroots fundraising walks, runs, golf and tennis tournaments, $55 million dollars has been raised. This sum, along with about $125 million in research grants, has been invested to train more than 100 future researchers, operate 27 research labs, establish clinical 100 BizTucson

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services and centers of excellence including type 1 diabetes, aerodigestive disorders and children’s post-infectious autoimmune encephalopathies (CPAE). When the Steele Center and Banner – University Medical Center Tucson (formerly UMC) opened Diamond Children’s Medical Center in 2010, patients benefited from 116 patient rooms, each with a mountain view and three beds, one for the patient and two for overnight visitors. “The PANDA supporters in Phoenix are devoted to raising money for Steele Children’s Research Center and the PANDA Children’s Aerodigestve Disorders Center,” Ghishan said. “For 19 years they’ve presented a fundraising fashion show. This year, young kids were the models in the ‘Children Helping Children’ fashion show that set a record, raising $3 million. “It’s research that moves medicine forward. At the UA Steele Center we ask big questions that lead to bold discoveries. This is how we develop new treatments and cures for our children. This is the only research center dedicated to pediatrics in the state of Arizona. It’s a separate research center where we train scientists and we make discoveries. “The future is going to be dictated by science.”

Biz

Future Discoveries The UA Steele Children’s Research Center will focus on three major areas over the next 10 years. Steele’s Director Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan explained why. 1. Autoimmune diseases. “Why? Because there are more than 100 of them and 25 million people, mostly children, have them.” Moreover, some, including lupus and multiple sclerosis, are more common in women than men, and that’s puzzling and intriguing to researchers at the UA Steele Center. “One of my brilliant grad students, asked, ‘What happens to our gut microbiome when we take antibiotics? Is there a difference for men and women?’ We did the research and found out that yes, there is a difference.” 2. Genomic medicine. “Every disease has genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. If you are born by C-section, you inherit the hospital’s microbiome, not your mother’s. We look at whole genome sequencing, then we look at your microbiome and find out what exactly is causing your disease. That is the future.” 3. Developmental behavioral pediatrics. “We are the first in the state of Arizona to establish a fellowship to train developmental behavioral pediatricians. In autism, there is a brain/gut interaction. We want to determine what role diet plays.” www.BizTucson.com

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BizLEADERSHIP

Bowl Names New Executive Director

Kym Adair’s Mission: Sell Out NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl

Kym Adair has loved watching football since she was a little girl, sitting alongside her father, James, rooting for the Minnesota Vikings. Her love for the game has never waned, although these days her vested interested is in the teams participating in the fourth NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl now that she is the new executive director. The game is set for Dec. 29 at Arizona Stadium. She replaces Alan Young, who decided to retire this summer but will continue to help in an advisory role. Arizona Bowl Chair Ali Farhang didn’t have to look to far in finding Young’s replacement, given Adair has been associated with the bowl since Day 2 of its existence working on the executive committee for the game when she was – yes, was – a senior VP at NOVA Home Loans. “We are incredibly excited and grateful to have Kym as our executive director,” Farhang said. “She’s extremely intelligent, possesses boundless energy and is a passionate advocate of the NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl and our community.” She also is now only the second female executive director among the 40 bowl games – joining the Independence Bowl’s Missy Setters. “I don’t feel any pressure about being one of two women in this position,” Adair said. “It’s never been about being a woman. It’s about who is the right person for the job.” Clearly, Adair, 42, gets it. She gets the importance of the bowl to a community’s visibility, and she gets it because 102 BizTucson

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THE NOVA HOME LOANS ARIZONA BOWL Saturday, December 29, 11:15 a.m Arizona Stadium. Television: CBS Sports Network Heroes Tribute Program Platinum Tribute Program ($10,000) 300 donated tickets to local Heroes in the South End Zone 8 $125 Stadium Club game tickets (includes food and beverage) 8 Passes to the VIP Party in the Desert Diamond Casino Tailgate Festival 2 VIP Parking Passes Full-Page ad in the official game program Commemorative NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl Football Gold Tribute Program ($5,000) 150 donated tickets to local Heroes in the South End Zone Silver Tribute Program ($2,500) 75 donated tickets to local Heroes in the South End Zone ALL Heroes Tribute Program Sponsors will receive the following: • Logo will appear on the videoboard as a part of the Heroes Tribute Program Pre-Game Ceremonies • Logo will appear on the video board in-game promoting the Heroes Tribute Program • 1 position in both end zones LED rotation during the game • Logo rotation on Stadium Quad-Vision • Logo and link on Heroes Tribute Program page of the NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl website • Name recognition on the Heroes Tribute Program page in the official game program In support of our great Southern Arizona Heroes, custom packages are available upon request. All of the packages above can be modified.

of the good it does for local nonprofits. “My strengths are that I’m going to run this bowl as a business,” she said. “At NOVA, I managed 40 people in my department so running it like a business is very important to me – meeting our goals and financial obligations, staying true to budget and being fiscally responsible.” Then, without missing a beat, she said, “I’m aware and know that every football team needs a cheerleader. When I am passionate about something, I wrap my arms around it and build it up and get people excited about it. I’m going to get people who are already excited about the bowl even more excited about it. “And I can find people who know nothing about the bowl game and get them excited about it.” Adair has that type of flair. “Kym is driven, energetic, focused, strategic and smart,” said Mark Irvin, a co-founder of the bowl. “She is able to accomplish more in a day than most others do in a week.” She also knows it’ll take a T-E-A-M to do it. It’s a simple acronym for tourism, economic development, athletes and money for charities – all of which are important to the success of the game. It all comes down to bringing in fans from their respective teams, the money they bring to Southern Arizona, the athletes that participate in the event (including the good time they have in addition to the game) and the money the continued on page 104 >>> www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Steve Rivera


WOMEN WHO LEAD

Kym Adair

Executive Director NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl

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continued from page 102 bowl distributes. “If we can excel in all those areas, we have success in the bowl,” Adair said. She’ll be tasked to lead a team to handle all that and more, including selling more sponsorships and more seats. Her mission is simple – “to sell out Arizona Stadium.” Game officials did a heck of a job of that last year as 39,132 fans showed up for what turned out to be one of the more exciting bowl games of the season. New Mexico State brought in thousands

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of fans and Utah State did its part, too. According to bowl officials, 30,000 outof-town fans came in and generated $33 million to the local economy. Officials ranked it as the eighth best bowl in 2017. “No question we were excited about what happened last year because the turnout was terrific,” she said. “We were emboldened. But we’re still pushing forward. We want it sold out. We want the upper deck full. We don’t want to see flags up there” covering up empty seats.” Part of that plan continues to be the

Heroes Tribute program, where sponsors help provide free tickets to first responders, military personnel and teachers. Another way Adair and her team will attack the upper deck is by providing tickets to several school districts at discounted prices, so they can sell them at regular price to help raise money for their schools. “They can use them (to help pay for) school lunches, technology for their schools and such,” she said. “It allows us to continue to help give back to the community. And it will help us fill the

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stadium.” There will be no complacency, she said. There is no time for that, she added, with “every year being better than the last one.” That success “can’t depend on who is playing,” Adair said. “It has to depend on this community embracing of this event. That’s important to us. This is a football game inside a week of terrific festivities and a year of celebration. “We want people who love football to come to the game and we want people who love music to come to the parties. We want family-friendly people to come

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and have a good time.” Now, she’s hitting the ground running – but with a slight advantage given she’s been part of the bowl from the beginning and has helped it grow every year. Still, with just a few months before the big game, she knows it’ll be constant work until the game is over. “I feel like I’m sort of coming in with one arm tied behind my back because we’re just a few months away,” she said. “There’s a lot to do.” And it’s more than just this year’s game. Adair said they are already looking ahead to the next contracts, given

bowl games are looked at in six-year segments. “It’s been really exciting to jump in and start working on those negotiations for the future – and it’s going to be awesome.” And her dad knows she will be awesome on the role. “I’m so proud of my daughter,” James said. “Ever since she was a little girl, anytime she entered a room, I’d announce, ‘Here comes the next Governor of the State of Arizona.’ She’d just laugh but I knew she would do something with her life.” Biz

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PHOTOS: COURTESY NOVA HOME LOANS ARIZONA BOWL

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BizBRIEF

Linkages to Honor Employers Who Help the Disabled Linkages, the nonprofit organization that finds jobs for people with disabilities, will honor an employer, employee and employment specialist at its annual Building Bridges Awards luncheon. Automotive dealer Jim Click Jr. founded Linkages in 1996 as a way to give people with disabilities, including wounded military veterans, opportunities for employment. It has developed partnerships with more than 170 service providers and 260 employers. Last year these partner businesses hired 468 people who sought jobs through the program. This year that number will be about the same. Linkages’ work has garnered national attention for Tucson. At last year’s Building Bridges Awards luncheon, Linkages Executive Director Hailey Thoman said, “I see a Tucson that is so inclusive that other cities look to us for

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best practices. The reason? Businesses.” The awards luncheon celebrates individuals and businesses in Pima County for their demonstrated leadership in serving the disability community. They are selected from community nominations in three categories:

Employee of the Year: An individual with a disability who works competitively

11TH ANNUAL BUILDING BRIDGES AWARDS LUNCHEON Wednesday, November 14, 11:45 a.m. JW Marriott Star Pass Resort & Spa, 3800 W. Starr Pass Blvd. Tickets: $60. Purchase at www.linkagesarizona.org Contact: (520) 792-3500

Employer of the Year: A business that not only hires people with disabilities, but strives to create an inclusive work culture • Employment Specialist of the Year: An agency staff person who has worked diligently to help people with disabilities advocate for themselves in their pursuit of employment Employers can participate by posting job opportunities and searching through the profiles of job seekers posted on the Linkages website. They can participate in several job fair events listed on the website, where they also can find agencies that will help them find people to employ.

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF ARIZONA AIR NATIONAL GUARD, 162ND FIGHTER WING

PHOTO: LANCE CPL. CHRISTIAN CACHOLA

Military’s Economic Impact Southern Arizona Reaps $8 Billion Annually By David Pittman United States military operations have long been an enormous economic driver in Arizona, and a recently released study shows the military’s importance to the state economy continues to expand – particularly in Southern Arizona. The report, titled the “Economic Impact of Arizona’s Principal Military Operations 2017,” concluded that the state’s six military installations and four National Guard facilities are responsible for contributing $11.5 billion to the statewide economy annually, which is nearly a 26-percent increase from a similar study released in 2008. The study “reinforces just how important Arizona’s military bases are – not only to our national security, but to local communities throughout our state,” said Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey. “We will continue to make preserving these installations a top priority.” About 70 percent of the statewide economic impact from military installations – or nearly $8 billion – was produced by Southern Arizona’s six largest military operations. In fact, among the state’s military installations, Sierra Vista’s Fort Huachuca had the highest economic output of $2.86 billion, narrowly surpassing Tucson’s Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, which boasted an economic impact of $2.6 billion. Glendale’s Luke Air Force Base was third at $2.4 billion. According to the report, all three of those military installations would make the list of Arizona’s 10 largest private 108 BizTucson

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employers, if permitted in such a rank-

By ing. David B. Pittman

“These exceptional numbers underscore the vital importance of our military assets to our area’s and state’s economy, as well as to our national security,” said Amber Smith, president of the Southern Arizona Defense Alliance and president and CEO of the Tucson Economic Impact of Military Industry 1. Sierra Vista’s Fort Huachuca – $2.86 billion 2. Tucson’s Davis-Monthan Air Force Base – $2.6 billion 3. Glendale’s Luke Air force Base – $2.4 billion 4. Yuma Army Proving Ground – $1.12 billion 5. The Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma – $877.6 million 6. The Army National Guard Papago Park Military Reservation – $484.2 million 7. The 162nd Air National Guard Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport – $383.6 million 8. Western Army National Guard Aviation Training Site in Marana –$147.4 million 9. The 161st Air National Guard Refueling Wing in Phoenix – $121.9 million 10. The U.S. Naval Observatory in Flagstaff – $8.7 million

Metro Chamber. “We’re proud to see Southern Arizona leading this sector.” Arizona’s military industry – including the principal military operations and the businesses they support – is responsible for creating or supporting 76,714 jobs. “The military is a key employer in Southern Arizona and a critical component of the aerospace and defense industry,” said Joe Snell, president and CEO of Sun Corridor Inc. “Many people don’t know that Tucson and Southern Arizona enjoy the fifth-highest concentration of aerospace and defense employees in the country. That’s a big deal.” Of the 10 major installations considered in the study, eight of them (including installations operated by the Marines and Army) have flying operations. Clearly, three things provide Arizona an advantage as a site for military air bases: Vast available airspace. Dry, sunny weather. And strong public support. “Since I’ve been elected, which is the last 6½ years, the government agencies – the city and the county particularly – have a renewed appreciation for the importance of the base and the importance of supporting all missions to the base,” said Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild at a meeting discussing Davis-Monthan. “The city and the county have passed resolutions to that effect – that whatever missions the base wants to bring here, we’re supportive because we know and trust that the Air Force is going to do the right thing by our counwww.BizTucson.com


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PHOTO: LANCE CPL. CHRISTIAN CACHOLA

These exceptional numbers underscore the vital importance of our military assets to our area’s and state’s economy. –

try and by our community.” The 61-page report was commissioned by the Arizona Commerce Authority in 2014 and prepared by The Maguire Company, a highly respected economic analysis and public-policy consulting firm located in Phoenix. The study, which utilized 2014 data, was published and released by the Governor’s Office last November. A primary reason for conducting the newest economic analysis of Arizona’s major military operations was to provide an update of similar studies released in 2002 and 2008, also compiled by The Maguire Company. “Aerospace and defense is a key contributor to the strength of Arizona’s economy, with more than 54,000 people employed across 1,200 companies and an $11.2 billion economic impact in 2017,” said Sandra Watson, president and CEO of the Arizona Commerce Authority. “At the ACA we are not only working to grow traditional aerospace and defense sectors, but we are also focused on promoting our state as the ideal environment for the development of emerging aerospace technologies, such

Ted Maxwell

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Amber Smith

Amber Smith, President, Southern Arizona Defense Alliance President & CEO, Tucson Metro Chamber as unmanned aircraft systems.” Edward “Ted” Maxwell – a retired major general and former commander of the Arizona Air National Guard – is now president and CEO of SALC. He said no state in the nation can compete with Arizona in terms of military training and readiness. “The diversity and breadth of military operations based in Arizona – coupled with the tremendous airspace, ranges, installations, great weather and exceptional support from our communities – offer the American warfighter the best of all worlds for training,” he said. In addition to the bases, Arizona is a top-10 state for Defense Department contracts. Raytheon Missile Systems in Tucson is the world’s largest missile maker and Arizona’s largest private government contractor. Other large aerospace and defense contractors operating in the state include Boeing, Honeywell, General Dynamics, Orbital Sciences, Northrup Grumman, Bombardier, Sargent and Marana Aerospace Solutions. Raytheon was the subject of a study

Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey

released late last year by the Seidman Research Institute at Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business. The study reported that Raytheon, all by itself, contributes $2.1 billion annually to the Arizona economy. With a local workforce of about 13,000 workers, Raytheon is Southern Arizona’s largest employer and has a yearly payroll well over $1 billion. Raytheon provides more than $100 million annually to its more than 500 suppliers throughout the state. “Through our continued and ongoing engagement with our men and women who serve, we are able to bring awareness and bridge our Tucson community to help raise awareness of local goods, local tourist spots, and jobs for our spouses and for after retirement, all economic drivers,” said Ellen Jimenez, chair of the Tucson Metro Chamber Military Affairs Committee. “It’s extremely rewarding to see our military, families, spouses and business all win – in the end Tucson wins, Arizona wins, our military families win.”

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Sandra Watson

Joe Snell

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Davis-Monthan Welcomes New Commander

Col. Michael R. Drowley Succeeds Col. Scott C. Campbell at Top Air Force Base By David Pittman Col. Michael R. Drowley is the new commander of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. Drowley, who served the past year as chief of staff at the headquarters of the United States Air Forces Central Command at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, also now commands the 355th Fighter Wing, which is the host unit at D-M responsible for training A-10 pilots. Drowley succeeds Col. Scott C. Campbell, who was commander of Davis-Monthan and the 355th Fighter Wing for the past two years. The June 29 ceremony inside a base hangar was attended by hundreds of D-M service men and women, and a contingent of dignitaries, elected officials and business groups that support the base and its airmen. During the change-of-command event, which celebrated long-standing military tradition, the organizational flag of the 355th Fighter Wing was passed from Campbell to Drowley. In his remarks, Drowley said Campbell “leaves 16-sized boots in his wake that are impossible to fill and a bar that is unachievable.” Drowley’s comments weren’t all that hyperbolic. Campbell received the Air Force’s prestigious Legion of Merit Award at the ceremony for his exemplary performance commanding D-M and the 355th Wing. In responding to a severe Air Force pilot shortage, under Campbell D-M trained and graduated more than 175 pilots and led the mobilization of a 12-jet squadron of A-10s that delivered 1,335 strikes in “the historic assault on Mosul, Iraq” that obliterated an Islamic State stronghold, according to a citation accompanying the award. 110 BizTucson

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“Col. Campbell’s leadership drove the (355th Fighter) Wing to excellence, as evidenced by its winning more than 80 industry, Numbered Air Force, Major Command and Air Force-level awards during his tenure, culminating in D-M winning the 2018 Commander-in-Chief ’s Installation Excellence Award,” the citation concluded. It is the second time in six years D-M has received the award as the best base in the U.S. Air Force. Campbell and his wife, Col. Kim Campbell, who formerly served as commander of the 612th Theater Operations Group and the 474th Air Expedition Group at D-M, are now serving at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo., as vice commandant of cadets and as a faculty member teaching military strategic studies, respectively. Drowley, like the Campbells, is a highly decorated officer and experienced pilot. He has more than 2,200 hours flying in the A-10, including more than 200 hours in combat. He formerly served as the commandant of the U.S. Air Force Weapons School at Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas, and on the staffs of the Air Force Academy and the U.S. Secretary of Defense. Campbell had high praise for his successor. “I have known Col. Drowley for 20 years now and I can tell you he’s an exceptional leader,” he said. “There is no one better equipped to lead the 355th Fighter Wing and Davis-Monthan Air Force Base.”

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

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Col. Michael R. Drowley

Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Commander & Commander of the 355th Fighter Wing

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PHOTO:CHRIS MOONEY

From left – Lt. Gen. Mark D. Kelly, commander of the 12th Air Force, Air Forces Southern; Col. Scott C. Campbell, outgoing commander Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and the 355th Fighter Wing; Col. Michael R. Drowley new commander of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and the 355th Fighter Wing.

Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Best in U.S. Second Award in Six Years By David Pittmann In his last remarks as commander of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and the 355th Fighter Wing, Col. Scott C. Campbell delivered a message: When the Tucson community and D-M work together – the sky’s the limit. Campbell credited the base’s partnership with the community and the hard work of D-M airmen as the biggest factors in D-M receiving the prestigious 2018 Commander-in-Chief ’s Installation Excellence Award, its second such citation in six years. Campbell said the team visiting the base to accumulate the information needed to determine the winner of the honor signifying the best base in the U.S. Air Force “was blown away by the partnership in action, not just in name” between the community and D-M. “They saw our county leaders pledging support for large public works dollars for the entrance gate on South Wilmot Road, and they heard about the city rallying local businesses to support 112 BizTucson

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our military-spouse employment initiative,” he said. “They saw senior leaders of Tucson Electric Power briefing our people regarding energy efficiency. They learned of Gov. Ducey’s efforts to make Arizona the most military-friendly state through reciprocity in licensing. “They heard about our linguists receiving language training at the University of Arizona, which raised their scores while saving taxpayer dollars. And they saw our support groups – DM50, Desert Thunder Squadron, Southern Arizona Defense Alliance and the Tucson Metro Chamber – who were all there.” Campbell said the cooperative effort was “a two-way street” as D-M airmen did their part to assist those on the other side of base fencing. “We’ve provided training to all the local fire departments at our world-class training facility,” he said. “Our explosive experts were routinely out responding to calls all over Southern Arizona

to prevent potentially hazardous explosions. Our rescue forces were pressing out across the Southeast U.S. providing disaster response - while our 214th attack group partners were supporting wildfire fighting across the West. “If the state of the union is measured between D-M and our local community, I can tell you the state of the union is strong,” Campbell said during the June 29 Change of Command Ceremony at the base. “I’m proud to have seen this installation grow and improve over the past two years. This base will continue to prosper far into the future.” Col. Michael R. Drowley, who succeeded Campbell as commander of D-M and the 355th Fighter Wing, pledged to continue the partnership that Campbell and his predecessors have built with the community. “The synergy between the county, the city and the state is phenomenal and I look forward to working with all of them as a team,” Drowley said. Biz www.BizTucson.com


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PHOTO: AIRMAN JERILYN QUINTANILLA

PHOTO: AIRMAN 1ST CLASS MICHAEL WASHBURN

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Southern Arizona’s Military

By David B. Pit

By David Pittman

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Davis-Monthan Air Force Base

Tucson has been the home of DavisMonthan Air Force Base for more than 60 years. The base is one of the largest Air Combat Command Installations in the U.S. Air Force and a leading economic driver for Tucson and Southern Arizona. D-M directly employs 7,906 military and 3,703 civilian personnel. The installation consists of more than 10,000 acres, 448 buildings, 1,256 homes and a 13,643-foot runway. According to the “Economic Impact of Arizona’s Principal Military Operations” – a report commissioned by the state of Arizona and released late last year – D-M has an annual statewide economic impact of $2.6 billion, largest among the state’s Air Force bases and a close second to Fort Huachuca among all military facilities in Arizona. “Davis-Monthan is one of the country’s key military installations, which is why it was named the best base in 114 BizTucson

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the U.S. Air Force in 2012 and 2018,” said Bryan Foulk, president of DM50, a Tucson business group that supports the base and the airmen serving there. “The economic impact only provides a dollar amount as to how much the base supports Tucson and Arizona. What is not referenced is the 68,000 volunteer hours contributed by the airmen and their families to metro Tucson,” Foulk said. “The level of volunteerism and partnership between the base and the community is just as profound as the economic impact. D-M is truly Tucson’s treasure and America’s asset.” The primary mission at D-M – which is conducted by the 355th Fighter Wing, the host unit at the base – is to provide combat-ready A-10 ground-attack jets to the U.S. and its allies worldwide and to train A-10 pilots. The 355th Fighter Wing is composed of four groups – the 355th Operations Group, the 355th Maintenance Group, the 355th Mission Support Group and the 355th Medical Group.

D-M is a diverse base and is home to many significant military groups, among them are:

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The 12th Air Force Headquarters

is a powerful military organization and a tenant at D-M. The 12th Air Force is responsible for the combat readiness of seven active-duty fighter and bomber wings that include 430 aircraft and more than 33,000 active-duty military and civilian personnel. It also oversees four Air Force Reserve wings and 13 Air National Guard wings, adding another 18,800 people and 260 aircraft. Furthermore, it serves as the air component to U.S. Southern Command – the Unified Command responsible for Central America, South America and the Caribbean. And the 12th Air Force maintains a worldwide deployable Air Operations Center, providing continuous intelligence to Joint Forces air commanders that allow them the ability to design and execute an air campaign. www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: SPC. BRENTON NORDYKE

PHOTO: STAFF SGT. ANGELA RUIZ

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Installations at a Glance

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The 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group

operates “the boneyard,” the nation’s sole aircraft storage area for excess military and government aircraft. It has grown to include more than 4,400 aircraft and 13 aerospace vehicles from the U.S. military and NASA. The 309th also provides parts reclamation and restoration, as well as limited aircraft overhaul services and aircraft disposal. Other missions at D-M are performed by the 55th Electronic Combat Group, the 563rd Rescue Group, the 162nd Air National Guard Alert Detachment, the 25th Operational Weather Squadron, the 924th Fighter Group, and 943rd Rescue Group.

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Fort Huachuca

Fort Huachuca is home to a wideranging mission that includes training for military intelligence and Unmanned Aircraft System soldiers. Arizona’s oldest military installation, Fort Huachuca dates back to the Indian Wars 141 years ago. According to the statewide study on the economic impact of Arizona’s largest military operations, the U.S. intelligence stronghold of Fort Huachuca had the greatest impact on the state economy at $2.86 billion. The study was prepared by The Maguire Company of Phoenix. Fort Huachuca, a U.S. Army installation, is Cochise County’s leading employer. Kevin Peterson, president of Fort Huachuca 50, a support group for the

installation, called the fort an “economic engine for Cochise County.” He said the “unique missions” conducted at Fort Huachuca ensure it will long continue to be a “driving force” in the state’s economy. Located 15 miles from the Mexican border in Sierra Vista, Fort Huachuca’s training missions draw 10,000 students annually. Because of the ideal terrain and topography of Southeast Arizona, Fort Huachuca is the primary location for both developmental testing of all U.S. Army communication electronics systems and all of its intelligence electronic warfare systems. In 1967, the city of Sierra Vista annexed Fort Huachuca. Libby Army Airfield, which shares a runway with Sierra Vista Municipal Airport, is located at Fort Huachuca. continued on page 116 >>>

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PHOTO: CPL. ISAAC D. MARTINEZ

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ARIZONA AIR NATIONAL GUARD, 162ND FIGHTER WING

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Yuma Army Proving Ground & Marine Corps Air Station

The proving ground is Yuma County’s largest single employer of civilians and is considered the nation’s primary hightech work place. Two Yuma military installations had the fourth and fifth largest economic impact among Arizona’s largest military operations, according to the study. The U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground was found to have an annual economic impact of $1.12 billion, while the impact of the Marine Corps Air Station Yuma was $877.6 million. “Yuma is very fortunate to have two military installations,” said Julie Engle, president of Yuma 50. “We’re proud to see them ranking in the top five statewide and as key components of the state’s economy.” The proving ground is Yuma County’s largest single employer of civilians and is considered the nation’s primary hightech work place. It is located adjacent to the Colorado River, 25 miles north of Yuma. Yuma Proving Ground, which consists of 1,300 square miles, is one of the largest military installations in the western world. The proving ground’s test and development facilities are capable of testing nearly everything in the Army’s combat arsenal, from battle tanks and artillery systems to unmanned aircraft, cargo and personnel parachute systems, and technologies that defeat roadside bombs. “The focus of the between 60 and 100 tests conducted at YPG each week ensures that weapon systems and munitions provided to American forces work reliably, safely, without fail, and in all weather conditions,” said the state report. The mission of the Marine Corps Air Station Yuma is to provide aviation ranges, support facilities and services that enable its tenants – which include other Marine Corps Commands, visiting military and interagency forces – to enhance their mission capability and combat readiness. MCAS is the Marine Corps’ premier aviation training base. It is also the busiest airfield in the Marine Corps and the sixth busiest in the Navy. Yuma International Airport also utilizes MCAS airfields and taxiways, making MCAS the Marine Corps’ only shared-use facility.

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Arizona Air National Guard 162nd Fighter Wing

The 162nd is considered “the face of the U.S. Air Force around the world” because it has trained pilots from more than 25 countries. The 162nd Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport is the Air National Guard’s premier F-16 fighter pilot training unit and the second largest Air National Guard Wing in the nation. With an annual statewide economic impact of $383.6 million, the 162nd Fighter Wing ranks seventh among Arizona’s top military operations. The 162nd Wing has more than 47 years of experience in fighter training and more than 27 years of experience in training military pilots from countries that are U.S. allies. “This report shows the tremendous impact Reserve and especially National Guard units have on Arizona’s economy,” said Robert Medler, president of the 162nd Air Guardians and VP of public affairs for the Tucson Metro Chamber. “These citizen soldiers and airmen of Arizona are woven into the fabric of our state and we should do all we can to support them.” Training pilots from more than 25 countries, the 162nd has extended the worldwide reach of the U.S. Air Force by developing strategic partnerships and strong international relationships. Yet training U.S. and foreign pilots is only one of four primary missions performed by the 162nd Wing. It also operates:

• A Homeland Defense detachment at D-M that includes

fully loaded F-16s and the pilots to fly them who are ready to react to any threat or emergency 24/7 – be it military attack, an act of terrorism or a lost airliner – at a moment’s notice.

• The Total Force Training Center, also at D-M, provides support for allied flying units from around the world to train in the optimal weather and ample air ranges of Southern Arizona.

• The 214th Reconnaissance Group, at D-M and Fort Hua-

chuca. The detachment at D-M flies unmanned aerial vehicles – or drones – in daily combat missions in the Middle East via satellite, providing troops on the ground with intelwww.BizTucson.com


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PHOTO: CPL. ISAAC D. MARTINEZ

ligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. The detachment at Fort Huachuca trains launch and recovery teams that work on the ground to get drone aircraft up and down successfully. Major advancements have been underway in the drone programs at both D-M and Fort Huachuca. The old MQ-1 Predator drone aircraft is being phased out and replaced by the MQ-9 Reaper, which is larger and more powerful than its predecessor. “We’ve been going through a lot of changes, computer software adjustments and other internal matters,” said Brig. Gen. Andrew J. MacDonald, commander of the 162nd Wing. “We’ve been going through this for almost a year now and we’re almost done. We will start combat operations again, probably around October, with the MQ-9 Reaper. “In addition to that, we also have the actual airplane at Fort Huachuca, which not every unit has,” MacDonald said. “No kidding, we have two MQ-9s down at Fort Huachuca and we’re learning to take off and land those aircraft.”

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Western Army National Guard Aviation Training Site

The WAATS mission is to improve the overall aviation readiness of active duty and reserve guardsmen, as well as pilots from partner nations. Silverbell Army Heliport is located in Marana at the Pinal Airpark and is home to the Western Army Aviation Training Site, which is managed by the Arizona Army National Guard. WAATS has an annual statewide economic impact of $147.4 million, the eighth largest among military operations in Arizona. The airpark is a central focus of Pinal County’s economic development activities. The facility, which encompasses 725 acres, specializes in training pilots to fly Apache and Longbow attack helicopters over a 3,600-square-mile area. WAATS utilizes a variety of flight training simulator modules as well as helicopter emergency procedure training. Two-thirds of the training area has been approved for tactical landing zones and has eight commercial-instrumented airports within its boundaries. (Photo courtesy of Western Army Aviation Training Site) Biz www.BizTucson.com

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BizMILITARY

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Participating Employers Architecture and Engineering Swaim Associates

Initiative Helps Military Spouses Find Employment DM50 Making Connections with Employers

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Education Arizona Education Employment Board Tucson Unified School District Vail School District Financial Services Bank of America Commerce Bank of Arizona National Bank of Arizona NOVA Home Loans Sunstreet Mortgage Vantage West Credit Union Western Alliance Bank Government City of Tucson Pima County One Stop

By David Pittmann Spouses of active-duty service members are getting help finding jobs through an initiative aimed at easing the transition for families of personnel assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. The DM50, a local business group that advocates for the base on a variety of issues, has established the Military Spouse Employment Initiative which is finding opportunities for spouses who want or need to work in the Tucson area. “Employment opportunities for the spouses of D-M airmen is a critical part of overall military readiness and contributes greatly to the quality of life for the airmen,” said Bryan Foulk, president of DM50. “Military spouses have proven to be excellent employees – bringing commitment, discipline and focus to their chosen fields and professions.” The Military Spouse Employment Initiative can be accessed at DM50’s website, www.dm50.org. It allows military spouses from all parts of the country who are moving to D-M and Southern Arizona the opportunity to begin their employment search, or schedule job interviews, even before arriving in Tucson. Nearly 40 major public and private sector employers throughout Tucson are part of the initiative and have posted job listings

Construction and Development Concord General Contracting Lloyd Construction Sundt Construction

and contact information on the website. Foulk said DM50 has also worked with Gov. Doug Ducey to make it easier, faster and cheaper for those moving to Arizona from other states to transfer occupational licenses from state to state. “Some military spouses have experienced horror stories in the past,” Foulk said. “One of the worst involved the wife of a command sergeant. She was a respiratory therapist and she had an extremely hard time getting her occupational license. After a year going through red tape, she stopped trying to get the license and took a job in another field. She felt it was no longer worth it to pay for the license because she and her husband were more than halfway through his two-year tour of duty at D-M.” Ducey issued an executive order to state government agencies effective July 1 requiring regulatory boards to undertake a comprehensive review of their processes, fees and training requirements in order to eliminate unwarranted regulatory burdens and administrative delays. He also ordered state agencies “to review rules related to license reciprocity and identify opportunities to decrease burdens for qualified professionals who relocate to Arizona.”

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Human Resources Remedy Intelligent Staffing Staff Matters Legal DeConcini McDonald Yetwin & Lacy Rusing Lopez & Lizardi Major Employers Caterpillar Comcast Raytheon Missile Systems Sargent Aerospace & Defense Southwest Gas Tucson Airport Authority Tucson Electric Power/UniSource Energy Manufacturing and Mining CAID Industries Marketing/Media AIGA American Advertising Federation Tucson American Marketing Association Tucson Chapter Public Relations Society of America, Southern Arizona Chapter Medical Banner Health Carondelet Health Network Community Bridges Southern Arizona VA Medical Center Tucson Medical Center To learn more about the Military Spouse Employment Initiative, contact Chuck Durham, administrator for DM50, at chuckdurham@dm50.org or (520) 349-7302.

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The YMCA of Southern Arizona offers special camps for military kids at the Triangle Y Ranch and Retreat Center in Oracle.

PHOTO: GENERAL D. MILLS

BizHONORS

2018 Council of Heroes Honorees 1) Richard Fimbres Tucson City Council

Honoring Our Heroes 2018 YMCA Military Ball

Chances are you’re familiar with the YMCA, known as “the Y.” Communityfocused programs have long been its mainstay in towns across the United States and throughout the world. Yet, you may not know that the Y has been a leader in support of military members and their families for more than 150 years. “The Y has supported military families since before the Civil War,” said Kurtis Dawson, president and CEO of the YMCA of Southern Arizona. “We’re continuing that long tradition.” On Nov. 10, the YMCA will honor those who have served, and are currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces at the 2018 YMCA Community Military Ball where local community leaders representing the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard will be recognized as this year’s YMCA Council of Heroes. Proceeds from the black-tie event at the Tucson Convention Center Grand Ballroom will provide scholarships and support military families’ participation in YMCA programs. This year, in addition to active-duty service members from throughout Southern Arizona, our community’s Korean War veterans, WWII veterans and Holocaust survivors are confirmed to attend as honored guests. Priscilla Storm, VP of Diamond Ventures, founded the event in 2016, which is held every other year to coordinate with DM50 and Davis-Monthan Air Force Base events. Maj. General John A. Almquist Jr. (Ret.) and Edward P. “Ted” Maxwell (Ret.), will be the event masters of ceremony. U.S. Marine Corps Lt. General Robert B. Johnston (Ret.) will be the keynote speaker. U.S. Army Reserve

Col. Bonnie Koppell will provide the invocation and WWII tribute remarks. The evening will include music performances by Maj. Rodney Glassman, USAF JAG Corps Reserve, Tucson Pipes and Drums, the University of Arizona Jazz Ensemble, trumpeter Michael Finkelstein, and the George Howard Band. Included with this year’s event will be the “YMCA Tribute to Southern Arizona’s Military Families,” a tribute book that will feature the Council of Heroes, information about southern Arizona’s military community, the YMCA and other local organizations that support military families. “It’s a great opportunity for businesses and individuals to show support for our local military service members, recognize our Council of Heroes, our veterans or a family member that has served,” Storm said. “If you love your life today, it’s possible because of the sacrifices made by our country’s military service members and their families. The YMCA was the early leader in caring for our soldiers.” Storm said. “The YMCA Community Military Ball is a way to celebrate that legacy and meet a real need in our community.” Stephanie Horne, chief development officer for the YMCA of Southern Arizona, said, “Because of the success of the 2016 YMCA Community Military Ball in increasing funds dedicated to military families, the Y has been able to provide discounted memberships, childcare, fitness and training programs, as well as camp scholarships. We are looking forward to making this year’s ball an evening you won’t want to miss.”

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Most people know Richard Fimbres for his work on the Tucson City Council. Before that he had a distinguished military career in the U.S. Army. He served as a military policeman in the Vietnam era. He was instrumental in the construction of a World War II memorial in Armory Park. 2) Michael Eastman VP, Comcast

Michael Eastman describes his time in the Army as both fun and intense. It taught him “how to deal with racism and bigotry – and most importantly my self-worth,” he said. Eastman says he’s honored to be recognized among other veterans. “The YMCA has been such a great anchor in our community. It’s humbling to be recognized by an organization that defines community support and service,” he said. As a Council of Heroes honoree, he hopes to highlight the challenges facing veterans, specifically homeless vets and those in need of healthcare. 3) David Hutchens

CEO, Tucson Electric Power, UNS Energy Corp., UniSource Energy Services

David Hutchen’s military service began as an undergraduate at the University of Arizona in the Navy ROTC unit. He was commissioned on graduation day and spent five years as a nuclear submarine officer. Hutchens would like to use his service on the Council of Heroes to draw attention to the sacrifices military members make for our nation. In addition, he’d like to see a better way for veterans to transition www.BizTucson.com


4) Tony Penn

President & CEO, United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona

Tony Penn began serving in the Air Force right out of college. “It gave me a level of discipline that has served me well,” he said. “It was the first time I saw what I might be able to do with my career. It increased my ambition.” Penn said he’s honored to be named to the Council of Heroes, and excited about the opportunity to raise money for a great cause. “Military service meant a lot to me as a young man and I’m excited to share that message,” he said. 5) Lt. Gen. Eugene ‘Gene’ Santarelli Retired U.S. Air Force

Retired Lt. Gen. Gene Santarelli served more than 32 years in the U.S. Air Force, a career that took him around the world as a pilot and in command positions. Santarelli said he learned many valuable lessons in the service – like hard work as well as integrity, which he describes as doing what’s right even when no one is watching. “Our military and veterans have been part of the Tucson community for more than 75 years. They’ve been some of the most committed citizens to improving our neighborhoods,” Santarelli said. He plans to “continue to highlight how important our military and veterans are to the Tucson community and the contributions they continue to make to improving Tucson life.” www.BizTucson.com

6) Melvin ‘Butch’ Morgan President, Vietnam Veterans of America, Tucson Chapter 106

Butch Morgan served as a Marine for more than 40 years. Morgan is passionate about the military and helping servicemen and women. “There’s a lot of homelessness among veterans,” he said. “My goal is to reach out and help those needing help.” 7) JoAnna Mendoza

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Office of Congressman Tom O’Halleran

JoAnna Mendoza recently retired from the Marines and said she’s still getting used to civilian life. “Old habits die hard,” she said. Since leaving the military, she’s worked in Congressman Tom O’Halleran’s Casa Grande office to help other veterans successfully transition when they leave the military. She also works to address veteran homelessness, particularly homelessness among female veterans. “That’s not as highly recognized,” she said. “I want to bring visibility to this – particularly those in rural areas.” 8) Jessica Christo

Former U.S. Coast Guard, Student at Northern Arizona University

A former Coast Guardsman, Jessica Christo says she was shocked and honored to be named to the 2018 Council of Heroes. She’s currently attending Northern Arizona University and working at Diamond Children’s Hospital. “I enlisted when I was just 20 years old,” she said. “It helped me grow up. It gave me discipline and a work ethic.” Christo hopes to reenlist after she completes her education and give back by serving as a nurse. “The Coast Guard has great opportunities for nurses,” she said.

Biz

2018 YMCA MILITARY BALL Saturday, November 10, 2018 Private Reception 5:00 - 6:00 p.m. General Reception 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. Program & Dinner 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Dancing 8:30 - 10:30 p.m. Tucson Convention Center Tickets $150 per person Contact Stephanie Horne at (520) 623-5511, ext. 257 or stephanieh@tucsonymca.org. https://tucsonymca.org/events/militaryball/

PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

to service in the private sector. “I know this from personal experience as I tried to figure out how an aerospace engineer whose only experience was running nuclear power plants and shooting ballistic missiles and torpedoes would find a job outside the military,” he said.


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SPECIAL REPORT 2018

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THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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BizHEALTHCARE

The New

Carondelet Redefining the Healthcare Network

PHOTOS: COURTESY CARONDELET HEALTH NETWORK

By Mary Minor Davis In its 135-year history in Southern Arizona, Carondelet Health Network has built a legacy of providing compassionate care at its three hospitals serving Tucson and Southern Arizona. While the network has undergone significant changes over the years, it has thrived and continued to evolve with a dedication to innovation and cuttingedge treatments for patients who put their trust and faith in the hands of Carondelet caregivers. “It’s a very bright future for the Carondelet Health Network,” said Mark Benz, CEO for the network which encompasses St. Mary’s and St. Joseph’s hospitals in Tucson and Holy Cross Hospital in Nogales. “We are placing emphasis on evidence-based best practices as well as a discipline of laser focus on patient safety and quality, developing resources to build a very 124 BizTucson

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comprehensive network of care.” Through all the innovation and the changing healthcare environment, Carondelet has maintained its Catholic identity through an ongoing relationship with the Diocese of Tucson, making it the only sanctioned Catholic healthcare system in the region. Carondelet Health Network’s culture is reflected in a passion for healing and innovation. A recent rebranding introduced a new logo signified by compassionate hands upholding personalized service and healthcare excellence. A flame reflects the passion for combining leading technology with advanced healing to serve the community and the people within it. Carondelet now operates under a joint venture formed in 2015 between Tenet Healthcare, Dignity Health and Ascension, with Tenet serving as the ADVERTORIAL

operator. Support and investment from Tenet have resulted in a transformation of the way Carondelet provides quality healthcare across its three hospitals, the Carondelet Medical Group, three ambulatory surgery centers and its new microhospital in Marana. Over the past few years, Carondelet has invested in infrastructure, staffing, technology and education for both staff and the community. The hospitals are attracting well-known, respected physicians in many specialties and talented nurses and other clinical staff. “Physicians are taking notice and inquiring about opportunities to practice at Carondelet hospitals and bringing enhanced capabilities for the benefit of our Southern Arizona residents,” Benz said. Carondelet’s investment also means it is bringing a new type of facility to www.BizTucson.com


the booming Marana area. In 2019, Carondelet will open a microhospital at Interstate 10 and Cortaro Farms Road in Marana. “Medical care continues to evolve with a consumer focus and this is a new model for bringing healthcare services into the community,” said Benz. When the new Carondelet Marana microhospital opens, it will include a 14-bed emergency department, two operating rooms and eight inpatient rooms, along with additional services. “The Marana facility will offer a patient-friendly design with emergency and acute care services in an efficient, convenient location,” Benz said. “It’s designed to provide close integration with our other facilities for patients who may require more complex care. “Our goal is providing an integrated www.BizTucson.com

system of care closer to home for those who choose Carondelet Health Network for their care. We want to be able to provide the right care, at the right time, at the right place.” Even under the Affordable Care Act consumers were subjected to increased pressure through higher deductibles and copays making the philosophy of right care, at the right time, at the right place more important than ever. “This is why evidence-based care, providing value for our patients, and educating our community on preventive care is so important to us as caregivers today,” said Benz. “We want to help individuals proactively manage their health, while providing the highest-quality care and service that patients expect when they use Carondelet services.”

By the Numbers 450,000 patients served annually More than 3,400 employees, 900 medical staff and 250 volunteers More than $5.2 million invested back into the community 70 community events sponsored 10,000 people reached through free education, support groups, health fairs and screenings Source: Carondelet Healthcare Network Branding Guide, 2017

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New Carondelet Brand Represents Leadership in Healthcare

The vision of the Carondelet Health Network is a culture united in a passion for healing and innovation. These two passions provide the framework for our new logo. The hands signify our compassion and dedication to personalized service and healthcare excellence. The flame signifies our passion for combining cutting-edge technology with advanced healing to serve our community and the people within it. This new logo is not just a mark – it is a representation of our leadership in all aspects of healthcare. Carondelet Health Network Identity The Carondelet Health Network has evolved in recent years into one of Southern Arizona’s largest, most integrated Catholic healthcare systems, offering access to many specialized services at multiple locations. Our new brand is designed to better represent this modern, technologically advanced healthcare system that we have grown into, while still celebrating our 135-year tradition of providing compassionate, personalized care. Our name will remain the same to honor our history dating back to the Sisters of Carondelet of St. Joseph’s, but our mark reinforces our position as a leading provider in healthcare in Southern Arizona. Our message to strengthen the Carondelet Health Network name and our conversation will evolve to communicate who we are today. This new identity is based on research conducted both internally as well as in the community. The new image underpins our message to the community that the Carondelet Health Network is a modern, advanced system of care – committed to our patients. This is more than a cosmetic rebrand of logos and signage. It reflects a fundamental repositioning and strategic approach to how the community will see and understand our brand. It is also part of an overarching strategy to bring our strong, expansive network together.

We are placing emphasis on evidence-based best practices as well as a discipline of laser focus on patient safety and quality, developing resources to build a very comprehensive network of care. – Mark Benz, CEO Carondelet Health Network

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Carondelet serves more than 450,000 patients each year. Health education and screenings – important community benefits consistent with Carondelet’s mission – are regularly offered across the network. Hundreds of educational events, screenings and presentations have been held over the years that provided thousands of community members the opportunity to be proactive in taking charge of their health. “Regular physician visits, education and having a community that actively engages with preventative care is absolutely necessary so that people don’t get sick from things that can be prevented,” Benz said. Carondelet is also building interest in healthcare professions by engaging students as they are coming to an age where they are looking at career options. Carondelet works with several high schools, including University High School and San Miguel High School, both in Tucson, providing internships where students can learn about all of the potential careers in healthcare. Holy Cross works with schools in Nogales and Rio Rico, as well as Cochise College, which educates nearly 70 percent of Holy Cross’s nursing staff in its program. With the strengthened resources now available to the Carondelet network, there has been expansion in the existing hospital programs and specialized services as well as the addition of greater technology, more treatment centers and expansion of services within departments. “We are fortunate that we’ve been able to take advantage of resources that were not previously available for the hospitals and network to make these investments that are so important to our success and the health of our patients,” said Benz.

Source: Carondelet Healthcare Network Branding Guide, 2017

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BizHEALTHCARE These are just some of the recent investments and advancements made at Carondelet: St. Joseph’s Hospital

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Expansion and continued development of the Carondelet Neurological Institute Upgraded cardiac catheterization labs Added electrophysiology lab and services Advanced technology and resources for critical care and emergency room services New Level II trauma program to open in 2019 Women & Infants program expansion including midwifery and natural birthing

St. Mary’s Hospital

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Expansion of the Carondelet Heart and Vascular Institute Addition of an accredited Surgical Weight Loss Center Women’s Services expansion of gynecological and gynecological oncology services Breast Center advancement with 3D mammogram technology and the first in Southern Arizona to earn accreditation from National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers Expansion of surgical robotics program for total and partial knee replacement

Carondelet St. Joseph’s Hospital

Holy Cross Hospital

Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital

For Holy Cross, the future holds great promise for patients in the southeast corner of the state. “The infrastructure investments Carondelet is making means greater integration into the network and greater access to quality care for residents of Nogales and throughout Southern Arizona,” said hospital CEO Debra Knapheide. Benz also envisions great opportunity in the coming years. “I see us increasingly integrated across the network, working together to make sure we have complete services for our community,” he said. “I see us continuing to implement improved technology to provide the best inpatient services and care.” Carondelet’s commitment to quality and service were recognized as St. Joseph’s Hospital and St. Mary’s Hospitals were the only hospitals in greater Tucson to receive an “A grade” for quality and patient safety in the Leapfrog Group’s Spring 2018 hospital safety report card. “I’m extremely proud of the hard work our associates do every day to meet these high standards,” said Benz. “Our new tagline, ‘Our Specialty is You,’ is important more now than ever.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

PHOTOS: COURTESY CARONDELET HEALTH NETWORK

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Recognized for its Excellence in Collaborative Emergency Services by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy Implementation of the only inpatient rehabilitation program in Santa Cruz County Recognized for providing advanced breast imaging technology and expanding services for women across Santa Cruz County

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For me, healthcare is not a job, it’s not a career – it’s a calling. We’re privileged to make a difference in the lives of others.

Mark Benz, CEO Carondelet Health Network

PHOTO: TOM SPITZ

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BizHEALTHCARE

Benz Returns to Roots ‘It’s a Calling’ for Carondelet CEO By Mary Minor Davis Mark Benz knows the halls of St. Mary’s Hospital very well. When he was a young boy, the Phoenix native would board a Greyhound bus to Tucson with his grandmother to visit his great-aunt, Sister Theresa Joseph, who served her ministry at St. Mary’s Hospital from 1903 until she passed away in 1968. The convent on the hospital campus was “very hot,” Benz said, recalling days when he would run through the halls of the hospital. Today, he walks the halls as CEO of Carondelet Health Network which operates St. Mary’s and St. Joseph’s hospitals in Tucson and Holy Cross Hospital in Nogales. Raised by a single mom with four children – Benz was just eight years old when his father died of lung cancer – Benz said he learned that hard work was the key to success, developing an “attitude of gratitude.” It paid off for him early on when, after graduating from high school, he was named crisis center director of Terros Health, a behavioral health and chemical treatment center founded in 1969 by young people who saw there was a need for substance abuse treatment. Today, Terros has grown to more than 1,100 providers serving the Phoenix, Tucson, Flagstaff and Kingman areas, according to the organization’s website. Terros helped Benz work his way through college, earning both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in social work. “Organizational development and healthcare were my real interests then,” he said. “I worked my way in through behavioral healthcare at a time when mental illness was becoming less stigmatized.” After a stint as a unit director of the Maricopa Medical Center’s psychiatric annex, Benz landed his first job as a www.BizTucson.com

CEO for the Charter Medical Group. He was 30 years old. Positions and companies took him to Philadelphia, Atlanta and St. Louis. He joined Tenet Healthcare Corporation in Hickory, North Carolina, and returned to Arizona in 2015 when Tenet was acquiring majority ownership of Carondelet. Benz was named CEO of St. Joseph’s, and then in February was named CEO of the network. “For me, healthcare is not a job, it’s not a career – it’s a calling,” Benz said. “We’re privileged to make a difference in the lives of others.” In the last three years, Benz said, Carondelet has quickly stopped the hemorrhaging of a financially challenged organization. Buoyed by the investment from Tenet, Carondelet is reinvesting in staff and infrastructure and is now positioning itself to provide healthcare for the future. “Our priority is to provide the highest level of patient safety, quality care and experience,” Benz said. “We’ve made marked improvements in quality metrics, and we continue to benchmark against health systems nationally.” Benz said Carondelet is focusing on investments in high-acuity procedures in areas such as neurological, orthopedic, cardiovascular and women’s and infants’ services. The health system also is expanding its footprint throughout the community with ambulatory surgical centers, medical and specialty practices, urgent care centers and microhospitals to ensure they are meeting the evolving needs of the community. “We know in five years, more and more procedures are going to be performed at ambulatory or outpatient centers,” he said. Carondelet is dedicated to what Benz calls “patient-centric care,” he said.

“It’s a very prescriptive practice.” Examples of how nurses care for patients in the hospital include rounding on patients every hour, answering patient call bells in a timely fashion, including patients in shift changes so they can ask questions, and communicating daily care and activities on a board in the patients’ room to ensure that they are able to be involved in their care and treatment options. Senior leadership also rounds on patients to ensure they are receiving the best care possible. “Carondelet has reinvested its earnings back into competitive wages for bedside staff, capital improvements and expanding services,” said Dr. Joseph Chambers, chief of staff and chair of the Medical Executive Committee at St. Joseph’s Hospital. “From the physician perspective, it has realigned the focus on providing the best healthcare to our patients and community.” Patients also want more accessible and convenient care closer to home. Carondelet expanded its physician network with 125 medical providers located at 14 locations. Recently, the health system broke ground for a neighborhood hospital in Marana. Dr. James Metcalfe Gillard, chief of staff at St. Mary’s, said he’s been pleased with the way Tenet works hard to keep with the spirit of Catholic community hospitals while opening new sites to provide more care to the community. “St. Mary’s has deep roots in the community,” he said. “We’ve got such a rich history here, and we’re very excited about the future, about providing healthcare services throughout the community,” Benz said. “I’ve got the best job in the world.”

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Carondelet Investment in Standards & Quality Care

Construction Underway on Carondelet Marana Microhospital

IMAGE: COURTESY CARONDELET HEALTH NETWORK

ER, Operating Rooms and Inpatient Services Construction is underway on a new Carondelet Health Network microhospital in Marana. A groundbreaking ceremony was held in July for the facility, which is expected to open in Spring 2019. The microhospital will focus on providing emergency care and less complex inpatient procedures as part of Carondelet’s continuum of care. Nearly 100 community members, first responders, business leaders and hospital staff attended the groundbreaking. Speakers included Carondelet CEO Mark Benz, Marana Vice Mayor Jon Post and Monsignor Jeremiah McCarthy. Carondelet’s Marana microhospital is expected to offer quality jobs in STEM fields with approximately 50 full-time equivalent clinical and support staff positions. Located at Interstate 10 and Cortaro Farms Road, the 32,500-square-foot microhospital will include a 14-bed emergency room, two operating rooms and eight inpatient rooms. The facility will also include a laboratory and diagnostic imaging services such as X-ray, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound. The healthcare industry is ever-changing, and Carondelet Health Network continuously evaluates new ways to meet the needs of its patients, said CEO Mark Benz. “We recognize that the community is looking for healthcare that is convenient, accessible and provides high-quality, patient-centered care. The Marana microhospital embodies this mission and we are so proud to be able to break ground in Marana,” he said. “The Marana facility will offer a patient-friendly design with emergency and acute care services in an efficient, convenient location,” Benz said. “It’s designed to provide close integration with our other facilities for patients who may require more complex care. “Our goal is providing an integrated system of care closer to home for those who choose Carondelet Health Network for their care. We want to be able to provide the right care, at the right time, at the right place.” Source: Carondelet Health Network 130 BizTucson

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Carondelet’s investment in the network has led to leading certifications, establishing these services as exceeding industry standards.

St. Joseph’s Hospital

Recognized by U.S. News & World Report as Best Regional Hospital, 2017 Cardiovascular Accredited by the Society for Cardiovascular Care as Chest Pain Center Neurosciences Certified through The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center and Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation Center Received the highest stroke performance achievement awards from the American Heart/American Stroke Association’s Get with the Guidelines® Orthopedics First in the nation to receive Joint Commission certification for all four joint replacement procedures – knee, hip, ankle and shoulder

St. Mary’s Hospital

Cardiovascular Accredited by the Society for Cardiovascular Care as Chest Pain Center Bariatrics Accredited by the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP) of the American College of Surgeons and American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Breast Imaging and Surgery First breast center in Southern Arizona to earn accreditation from National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) Neurosciences Certified through Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center and Stroke Rehabilitation Center Orthopedics Performed one of the first robotic-assisted Total Knee Replacements in Tucson

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BizHEALTHCARE

Expanding Healthcare Excellence Institutes Excel in Technology, Impact More Lives By Mary Minor Davis and Jay Gonzales

It’s a point of emphasis in the Carondelet Health Network that its Tucson hospitals are no longer known as just the Catholic hospitals. They are bringing advanced technology and innovative treatments to patients and are leading the way with healthcare excellence. “We’re just so much more than the hospital we were,” said Mark Benz, CEO of the network that includes St. Mary’s Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital in Tucson and Holy Cross Hospital in Nogales. Over the years, Carondelet has seen ever-changing healthcare trends, changes in ownership and financial challenges that threatened the survival of the hospitals. Through all of this, the network has risen above the fray and reinvented itself. Today, under the majority ownership and direction of Tenet Healthcare, Carondelet is positioning itself to take the lead in advancing some of the best practices in medicine. The Centers for Excellence at St. Joseph’s and St. Mary’s hospitals are setting new standards in heart, ortho, vascular and neurological treatment. These award-winning programs provide advanced programs with the latest technologies that allow more patients to www.BizTucson.com

receive excellent care right in their own community. Patients who go to one hospital for treatment can be assured the entire network is ready to get them on the road

You can see the life-changing effects unfold right before your eyes, and that takes a team effort to achieve.

– Dr. Eric Sipos Medical Director Neurological Institute St. Joseph’s Hospital

back to better health. Walking in the door at St. Mary’s means the advanced technology at St. Joseph’s can be part of the treatment if that’s where the best technology resides. Heart & Vascular Institute, St. Mary’s Hospital

When it comes to fixing a heart problem, Carondelet Health Network has

built a team at its Heart & Vascular Institute at St. Mary’s Hospital that covers the bases. “Medicine is a team sport,” said Dr. Craig Hoover, an interventional cardiologist on the Carondelet medical staff. “In the last couple of years, we have put a lot of effort into our team approach because it’s not just me, it’s not just the machine. “It’s the fact that the nurses do the explanation. They recognize if there are problems after a procedure. After you have heart surgery, the surgeon is not always going to be in the room. But we have intensive-care specialists making rounds in the ICU, and trained nurses, so people move through the system appropriately and don’t just stagnate. If there are any concerns, they get flagged early while they’re little problems.” Along with that, the institute continues to invest in the latest technology – in staff, training and equipment – to benefit the hospital’s patients. “The Carondelet system has always had this sense of outreach and community service. That didn’t go away,” Hoover said. “The history and the local input is really community-focused in continued on page 132 >>> Fall 2018

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continued from page 131 Tucson.” What has evolved is how local patients can get some of the best heart and vascular care in Tucson. Carondelet owned the former Tucson Heart Hospital on Stone Avenue and River Road and moved it to the St. Mary’s campus in 2012. The move formed the foundation for what is now the Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute and its use of stateof-the-art technology and approach to care. Equipment and facilities were upgraded and investment from Tenet Healthcare continues. For example, the institute built what Hoover called a “hybrid” operating room where surgical teams and interventional cardiology teams work sideby-side on a patient who might need both types of care. “One of the themes in modern cardiovascular medicine is this hybridization, if you will,” Hoover said. “It’s not either surgery or interventional cardiology. Sometimes it’s a little of both and you need a space to do that.” Dr. Monty Morales, a cardiologist, has been practicing at St. Mary’s for 25 years and is chief of the Department of Cardiology. He said his goal is to implement a full structural cardiology program, where traditional surgeries that once required opening the chest cavity can now be done through minimally invasive or alternative practices. Morales said there are three components to implementing a structural cardiac program: “You’ve got to have the doctors – we do; you’ve got to have the hospital’s support – we do; and you’ve got to have the procedures – which we have.” Dr. Talal Moukabary, a specialized cardiologist called an electrophysiologist, an expert in rhythm abnormalities in the heart, treats patients with the most innovative tools. “He’s the guy who will take care of these complex rhythm abnormalities,” Hoover said. “There are not a lot of them in town. Atrial fibrillation is a common problem that is sometimes difficult to control with medications. He can go in and modify areas of the heart so the atrial fibrillation goes away.” continued on page 134 >>>

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PHOTOS: COURTESY CARONDELET HEALTH NETWORK

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Joint Technology in High Demand

Carondelet Advances Robotics for Replacements By Mary Minor Davis If you need an aching joint replaced Carondelet Health Network will put advanced technology to work. St. Mary’s and St. Joseph’s hospitals have invested in robotics for more precise and longer-lasting partial or total replacements so patients can reduce or eliminate the joint pain preventing them from leading more active lives. The American Joint Replacement Registry recently released its most comprehensive report on joint replacements, examining procedures and other data from 2012 to 2016. With 4,755 surgeons from more than 650 institutions reporting, the data showed total hip and knee replacements rose from 45,500 in 2012 to an astounding 860,000 in 2016. Estimates are that joint replacements will quadruple by 2030. This is no surprise to the physicians at Carondelet Joint Replacement Center at St. Joseph’s Hospital and The Orthopedic Center at St. Mary’s Hospital. Both hospitals have been committed to enhancing lines of service and bringing in the latest technology to address increasing demand in the community. “Certainly, the aging population is a factor,” said Dr. George Bradbury, medical director of the Carondelet Joint Replacement Center. “Other health factors can be obesity or injuries and physical work demands that can cause arthritis.” St. Joseph’s was the first hospital in the nation to receive Gold Seal accreditation by The Joint Commission for all four joint programs – knee, hip, ankle and shoulder. The Joint Commission is an independent, not-for-profit organization that accredits and certifies healthcare organizations and programs in the United States. St. Joseph’s has been recertified each year since then and, in 2017, U.S. News & World Report recognized the center as highly performing in knee and hip rewww.BizTucson.com

placement. Bradbury credited Carondelet’s efforts to operate its joint programs through the centers-of-excellence model – with consistent approaches in patient care – for that success. “Institutions that work with a coordinated approach tend to have better patient outcomes,” he said. “We recognize that each patient is unique, but if we are consistent in how we approach patients, we know we can provide quality care.” St. Mary’s is one of the first hospitals in Tucson to offer robotic technology for total joint replacement. “Total joint replacement technology has really made a lot of progress in the last five years,” said Dr. Bradley Norris, an orthopedic surgeon affiliated with St. Mary’s Orthopedic Center. “We’ve gone from partial to total replacement in just the last two to three years. It’s been a pretty exciting transition.” Norris said the patient outcomes with robotics-assisted joint replacement include more precise placement that can ultimately lead to longer life for the new joint. “The research is still out, but the average life of traditional joint replacement is 25 to 30 years. We’re pushing that to 30 years,” Norris said. He said keeping up with technology is one of the ways that Carondelet has remained competitive and on the cutting edge of innovative patient care. “It’s important that when we can, we need to push the envelope in technology, in service to our patients,” he said. Bradbury agreed and said that it also is important to ensure that Carondelet provides service in a way that is meaningful and appropriate for patients. “The biggest advances in joint replacement have been in the delivery of the technology,” he said.

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BizHEALTHCARE continued from page 132 “We are one of the places in town that’s really comprehensive with inpatient to outpatient services,” Hoover said. “Whether hospital-based or outpatient, the objective is long-term attention to care. For people with chronic heart failure, I think we do a good job at managing those things.” Morales agreed. “Medicine is always changing, especially in cardiology since heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in this country,” he said. “There are a lot of great cardiologists here. One of the things we want to make sure at St. Mary’s is that we’re doing everything with a patient-centered focus and that we’re doing it well.” The Neurological Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital

There is much ado about some of the latest developments in spine, stroke and neurology care that are leading to better patient outcomes and saving more lives. Dr. Eric Sipos, chief of neurosciences at St. Joseph’s Hospital and medical director of the Carondelet Neurological

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Institute, eagerly outlined how the institute is able to respond to these changes thanks to the use of advanced technology and new research on stroke response. “We’ve been developing our spine services to meet the community’s needs since our inception,” he said. “Our patients demand a comprehensive spine program that includes inpatient and outpatient treatments that include both surgical as well as minimally invasive procedures.” Sipos noted the military, seniors and the continuing aging population as well as younger people with spinal injuries are the drivers of an advanced spinal program. Under the new Tenet ownership, Sipos said, St. Joseph’s and the institute have been able to invest in advanced technology and specialty care. Recently they added a surgeon who specializes in adult deformity of the spine and expanded both their in-house and outpatient rehabilitation services. Newer technology allows specialists to perform more procedures, which in turn allows them to help more people. Another boost is in the neuro-oncology area where advanced technology has simplified the institute’s ability to treat

cancers and benign tumors that are metastases from other cancers, including outpatient stereotactic radiosurgery. “For example, let’s say a patient has multiple metastases in several lobes of the brain,” Sipos explained. “We can use a laser-guided focus with a threedimensional target to hit the tumor without affecting other areas around it at treatment levels that could not otherwise be tolerated.” Another major breakthrough has been in how they’ve traditionally held the patient’s head still for treatment. Where once they had to literally use pins to hold the head to a frame, Sipos said they now can use a face mask without ever breaking skin. “This allows us to treat a lot more people safely and with the same accuracy,” he said. “That’s been huge for brain tumor patients.” Another important focus area for the institute has been in stroke and vascular care. Sipos said landmark research that has extended the window of time between when a stroke occurs and the response time for “measurable levels of improvement.” “It used to be that the window of

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Critical Access at the Border

time when treatment would work was much more narrow,” he said. “Numerically, this dramatically increases the number of lives that we can positively impact. It’s the biggest news in the last year or two.” The term “door-to-needle” applies to the amount of time that it takes to get a stroke victim to treatment. Sipos said the team at St. Joseph’s has worked to not only meet the guidelines established for measurable levels of improvement, they are setting new standards. “We’ve set response times envied by our hospital peers around the country. You can see the life-changing effects unfold right before your eyes, and that takes a team effort to achieve.” St. Joseph’s average response time is 36 minutes compared to the Arizona “all hospital” average of 45 minutes, according to data which is tracked by the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke program. A “Brain Attack Team” responds to every potential stroke patient for rapid assessment and diagnosis. St. Joseph’s Hospital is also certified as a Primary Stroke Center by The Joint Commission. “It’s nice to bring that to the Tucson community,” he said, adding, “Certification is not the goal. The goal is putting all of the elements in place that meet or exceed certification standards.”

Holy Cross Hospital Provides Care through Innovation & Collaboration By Mary Minor Davis As the critical-access hospital in the border city of Nogales, Holy Cross Hospital bears the primary responsibility for providing care to the approximately 21,000 residents in the area. With only 25 beds, the hospital must rely on innovation and collaboration, both within the Carondelet Health Network and with partnerships in the Nogales community. They must be doing something right. Holy Cross is the leader in patient satisfaction in the Carondelet network and across the Tenet Healthcare network. “We’ve really put a lot of emphasis on the health of the community,” said Dr. Tanya Henry, chief of staff at Holy Cross. “We’re focused on providing good, safe, quality care in the best way possible.”

PHOTO: COURTESY CARONDELET HEALTH NETWORK

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One way that Holy Cross achieves this is through its partnership with the Community Healthcare Integrated Paramedicine Program (CHIPP). The hospital works with emergency medical services in Nogales to address the needs of individuals who frequently use the 911 system and with the hospital emergency room to assess why these patients are returning and try to be more proactive in their treatment to reduce those ER visits. “For example, we had an elderly woman who kept coming to the ER because of falls,” Henry said. “We sent the EMS team to evaluate her home and discovered that she has difficulty seeing, and when she’d get up at night to use the restroom, it was very dark and she had no handrails. So, we installed rails and improved the lighting for her.”

In 2017, Holy Cross was recognized by the National Rural Health Resource Center for its work with CHIPP, receiving the Critical Access Hospital Recognition certificate. The hospital was one of only four in the nation to receive the honor. Henry said the hospital also focuses on providing education to the community on key health issues. Childhood obesity and pre-diabetes are on the rise and have become focuses for its education and outreach. Efforts to provide for the health of the Nogales community also have been bolstered by the Affordable Care Act, especially the Medicaid expansion. “When people have insurance, they use it,” Henry said. “They tend to engage in well-child visits and preventive care.” Henry said she worries that if the ACA goes away, the health of the community will suffer. With the injection of resources from Carondelet network operator Tenet Healthcare, Henry said that Holy Cross also has been able to improve facilities and add new technology such as 3D mammography. Holy Cross also was able to hire a full-time general surgeon, providing more surgical options and wound-care management. “Tenet has really recognized our efforts and has provided financial resources to maintain higher standards and offer quality patient care,” she said. “They’ve really engaged with us. Now we need to make sure the community knows what a gem they have for their healthcare needs.”

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BizHEALTHCARE

Setting

New Standards

Healthy Women Across Generations By Mary Minor Davis Carondelet has always focused on providing quality and compassionate care to women of all ages and expectant mothers. As advances in delivery of services and technology have accelerated, the health network has been able to adapt in stride. With the added resources in recent years, Carondelet has been able to add to its neonatal arsenal and expand women’s care to a historically underserved part of the community. St. Joseph’s Women and Infant Services Center

Teresa Anzar knows a thing or two about moms and babies. After all, the director of Women and Infant Services at St. Joseph’s Hospital has dedicated her 27-year career to the field. “I have only ever worked obstetrics,” she said. “My passion is to make sure that every family has the best outcome and is able to enjoy parenthood.” Each month, the team at Carondelet St. Joseph’s Hospital Women and Infant Services helps new families bring about 200 babies into the world. As the head of one of Carondelet’s leading services – St. Joseph’s was voted Best Birthing 136 BizTucson

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Center for two years running by local newspaper readers – Anzar is excited to be a part of the network’s expansion in obstetrics and the integration with the other Carondelet hospitals. “Healthcare today is so fragmented,” she said. “Our goal is to defragment that care and do everything we can to keep mom and baby together, and deliver in the right place.” Anzar said St. Joseph’s and Holy Cross Hospital in Nogales, which also is part of the Carondelet network, work closely to make sure that happens. St. Joseph’s has a comprehensive obstetrics program with perinatology services, including a Level II EQ Neonatal ICU nursery. It also offers a midwifery program with alternative birthing options. “We can offer a combination of birthing experiences,” Anzar said. “Some women want the midwife, but may be a high-risk. They can have that experience in the hospital and have access to support nearby should something go wrong. Different choices do not have to be mutually exclusive.” As women choose to have children later in life, Anzar said those moms-to-

be must be monitored differently. “With older moms come other conditions at a higher rate, such as hypertension and diabetes. How do you approach their care differently?” Anzar said St. Joseph’s is revamping its entire education program, starting with educating moms-to-be on the importance of getting healthy before they conceive all the way to maintaining education and connections long after mom and baby go home. “We know that if moms go into a pregnancy healthy, it can lead to a healthy pregnancy that will benefit generations down the road,” she said. “We also don’t want to stop at birth. We’ve created a number of programs that provide continued education and support for new moms after they leave the hospital.” When it comes to high-risk pregnancy, Anzar said the facilities at St. Joseph’s offer one of the best approaches she’s seen. “We are one of the only intensive care units that has private neonatal rooms for moms and sleeping couches for dad and/or grandparents to enwww.BizTucson.com


Women’s Care

courage them to stay by the bedside,” she said. Other elements of the neonatal experience include providing tours of the neonatal unit prior to birth to reduce anxiety, a Serenity Garden that allows parents to take a break from all of the “bells and dinging” of the neonatal equipment, and weekly tea time with other moms of neonatal babies that helps anxious parents connect with one another. Anzar said the real difference at St. Joseph’s is the connection that moms and dads make with their caregivers. “Fancy rooms are great, but a positive birth experience is really about the connection and how well patients connect with their caregivers in the hospital,” she said. “When the public keeps ranking us No. 1, that says a lot. We excel at integrating mom’s birth plan with the services and technology we have, and the small-community feel that we’ve created here makes parents comfortable. “If we continue to focus on better outcomes, empowerment for women over their pregnancy through better education, and connecting with our www.BizTucson.com

patients, we’ll continue to make a difference.” St. Mary’s Women’s Center

As part of Carondelet’s commitment to advancing patient care in the community, it recently expanded surgical services at its Women’s Care Center at St. Mary’s Hospital, offering extended gynecological services and surgical opportunities not seen before on Tucson’s westside. Dr. Robert Samuelson, director of Women’s Services, said the center is now able to offer minimally invasive procedures, including robotics and laparoscopic surgeries for cancers and endometrial conditions as well as the management of incontinence. He and his partner, Dr. Arpit Dave (pronounced dah-vay), both completed fellowships in the practice of minimally invasive procedures from the Mayo Clinic. “The integration has been pretty seamless,” Samuelson said. “St. Mary’s surgical infrastructure was already in place with the Da Vinci robotic technology. It was really just a matter of additional training for the nursing staff, and that was minimal.”

The expansion enhances the center’s already extensive list of women’s healthcare, including menopause issues and digital mammography. In 2017, the Breast Center was named one of America’s Best Breast Centers by the Women’s Choice Award. The award signifies that St. Mary’s Hospital is in the top 7 percent of 4,789 U.S. hospitals offering breast-care services. Samuelson said patients often sought care in the emergency room – and then subsequently through follow-up treatments and surgery specialists – throughout Tucson. Now they can find that care closer to home. “I like being in an area that historically has been underserved,” Samuelson said. “The community is really embracing the addition of these services because people like to receive care as close to home as they can. “They like these services in their own neighborhood. Many women’s health issues can include multiple problems. St. Mary’s is really now able to offer the total package for women.”

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PHOTO: COURTESY CARONDELET HEALTH NETWORK

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BizBRIEF

Moore Named to Top UA Marketing and Communications Role Steve Moore

A top marketing strategist joined the University of Arizona last summer as its senior VP and chief marketing and communications officer. Steve Moore, whose first marketing job was at Coca-Cola, comes to the UA from Texas A&M University and Texas A&M’s system, which includes 11 universities, a law school, a health sciences center and seven state agencies. He was the first chief marketing officer at Texas A&M University and was vice chancellor of  marketing and communications for the Texas A&M System. Moore also served as VP of communications, marketing, public relations and public affairs at  the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Under his guidance, Texas A&M joined the Southeastern Conference in athletics. His new job at the UA will

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By Tiffany Kjos start with developing and implementing its brand. “Steve has just the right mix of experience and offers a unique perspective on branding,” UA President Robert C. Robbins said in a news release. “He shares my appreciation for the university and its students, research impacts and facilities. He is a natural collaborator who will work with teams across campus to increase brand awareness and align messaging with our forthcoming strategic plan.” While at Coca-Cola, Moore launched the company’s first sponsorship of a NASCAR team. It was, in short, a big deal, and continues to be today. In February Coca-Cola celebrated a 20-yearmilestone of the sponsorship “It’s quite an accomplishment,” Ben Reiling, director, motor sports, Coca-

Cola North America, said in an online new release. “To have a platform that has lasted this long is impressive. It started 20 years ago and has maintained a distinct presence in NASCAR. Its longevity says a lot of about how it was formed, how it’s been managed and how it’s been a part of our strategy.” Moore was in charge of an assessment project that led Texas A&M to join the Southeastern Conference — another huge undertaking. The college had been in the Southwest Conference for 82 years, moved to the Big 12, then landed in the SEC. Moore has had international success as well. At the sports marketing agency IMG, he was a leader in the $800 million redevelopment of Wembley Stadium in London.

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BizBENEFIT

More Than A Car Show 12 Years Total $1 Million for Nonprofits

PHOTOS: COURTESY TUCSON CLASSIC CAR SHOW

By Mary Martin Some of our best memories involve cars – like our first car, our favorite car or the car we’ve always dreamed of owning. One such memory comes back to life this fall at the Tucson Classics Car Show. John Nicholson served in the Navy and was stationed at Norfolk, Virginia, in September 1967 when he bought the car of his dreams. He owned that 1967 Chevrolet Corvair convertible for more than 40 years. Since then, the car has had two other owners. But on Oct. 20, John and his wife will be reunited with the car, completely restored to its original beauty by Jay Parke and his wife, Lisa. Parke said the freshly painted car, which will be on display at the show, “looks incredible. The paint is like a mirror and the body is perfectly straight. The nearly three months in the shop is paying off.” The Parkes restored the car over the last two years. “She worked on the engine, helped with the cosmetics and kept me from going berserk when I could not start the car for about two months last year,” Jay said of his wife. Memories are made at the Tucson Classics Car Show presented for the past 12 years by the Rotary Club of Tucson. More than 400 classic cars will be showcased. Visitors to the show can stroll the grassy campus of The Gregory School at 3231 N. Craycroft Road and browse through aisles of cars from the ’20s, ’30s,’40s, ’50s, ’60s and ’70s while listening to hit songs from those decades. The event also includes a food court, related car vendors, displays from www.BizTucson.com

nonprofit beneficiaries and musical entertainment all day long. The Tucson Classics Car Show is more than just a car show – it’s an event bringing together more than 480 Rotary and community volunteers to fill over 770 event-day job slots. Tucson charity organizations – 21 this year – joined with Rotarians in selling tickets. The charities keep a portion of the proceeds from their sales for their own projects. One hundred percent of the net proceeds benefit local charities. Over the years, the Rotary Club of Tucson has raised more than $1 million for local charities through the Tucson Classics Car Show and helped countless nonprofit agencies support their goals. Admission is $5. Children under 18 get in free with a paid adult. The primary beneficiary of the proceeds this year is Make Way for Books, whose mission is to work with children

12TH ANNUAL TUCSON CLASSICS CAR SHOW Sponsored by WeBuyHouses.com Saturday, Oct. 20, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Gregory School, 3231 N. Craycroft Road Tickets are $5, which includes an entry into the raffle No cost for children under 18 with a paid adult. Purchase tickets from a Rotary Club member or online at www.rotarytccs.com

birth to age 5 and their families to increase children’s readiness to enter school. Other beneficiaries are:

The Southern Arizona Research, Science and Engineering Foundation – known as SARSEF – creating the next generation of critical thinkers and problem solvers through real-life science and engineering projects • Wright Flight, motivating students to achieve higher goals in academics and personal behavior by earning the opportunity to learn to fly an airplane • Interfaith Community Services, focusing on low-income single mothers to help them secure housing, utilities and food, followed by a stabilization program and job resource center • Job Path, providing opportunities for motivated, impoverished individuals to achieve financial independence through improved education and job training in local, high-demand careers The $5 admission ticket includes entry into a raffle. First prize is a 2005 C-6 Corvette convertible or $15,000 in cash. Secondary raffle prizes include a $3,000 shopping spree at Sam Levitz Furniture, $2,000 in airline tickets from Wellspring Financial Partners, $1,500 in appliances or furniture from Tucson Appliance and Furniture Company, and a $500 car-care gift certificate toward a set of Cooper Tires from Jack Furrier Tire and Auto Care.

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BizTOURISM

Telling Tucson’s Story Visit Tucson Efforts Attract Visitors and Dollars to Tucson

PHOTOS: COURTESY VISIT TUCSON

By Romi Carrell Wittman Visit Tucson CEO Brent DeRaad ticked off a number of significant milestones at the organization’s 2018 annual meeting held in late June at the Hilton El Conquistador in Oro Valley. Addressing a sold-out crowd, DeRaad recounted Visit Tucson’s many achievements, including the fact that Tucson continues to get national play as a great travel destination. The proof is in the numbers – in 2017, Tucson was among the nation’s leaders, showing a 12-percent growth in hotel revenue over the previous year. Even better, 2018 is on track to top that number. Given that Tucson, like other destinations, faces increasingly intense competition to attract visitors and their travel

dollars, the achievement becomes even more impressive. “I see it as a culmination of great work done by our sales, marketing, communications, Mexico marketing, sports, film and travel industry sales teams, along with the outstanding products and services delivered by local establishments,” DeRaad said. DeRaad is also pleased with the exposure Visit Tucson has been able to garner for Tucson. “Three years ago, we generated $5.4 million in travel media coverage for the region. In the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2018, our efforts generated $33 million in coverage in outlets throughout the world,” he said. That’s a six-fold increase.

Russ Bond, GM of the JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort and Spa and chairman of the Visit Tucson board, said in a video shown at the annual meeting, “Tucson is finally getting recognized. Lots of third-party endorsements – Travel + Leisure, USA Today, UNESCO City of Gastronomy. All of those things are helping with our credibility and bringing visitors to our front door.” DeRaad said that as a nonprofit destination-marketing organization, he considers branding to be the organization’s most important goal. To that end, this past year Visit Tucson restructured its staff, creating a more efficient team. “We integrated our marketing and communications teams, which allows us

Left – Visit Tucson staff includes from left – Brent DeRaad, President & CEO; Graeme Hughes, VP of Sales; Vanessa Bechtol, Senior Director of Community Partnerships; Mary Rittmann, Senior Director of PR & Communications; Lee McLaughlin, Senior Director of Marketing. Right – Felipe Garcia, Vanessa Bechtol, Matthew Luhn (special guest speaker and one of the original story creators at Pixar Animation Studios, shared his magic for developing great stories and building strong brands) and Brent DeRaad 142 BizTucson

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to augment our travel advertising with messages about our outstanding cuisine and beautiful Sonoran Desert vistas perfect for cycling, hiking and exploring,” he said. The changes are making a difference. For the cities and towns that invest in Visit Tucson, there is a healthy return on investment. Tucson City Council member Shirley Scott said, “It’s important for people to know that if you locally invest in this area, every dollar you invest will yield a $24 return. That’s a great investment.” Looking ahead, Visit Tucson has several important initiatives either planned or already underway. At the top of the list is a 10-year tourism master plan which Visit Tucson plans to unveil in mid-2019. The plan will focus on travel-related product and service development, along with identifying the new technologies needed to enhance travel marketing efforts. Their expenditures will determine the plan’s success, DeRaad said.

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“We’ll look at generating new flights and events that attract visitors, improving the visitor experience and, ultimately, growing the number of visitors to our region,” DeRaad said. Over the past three years, DeRaad said, Tucson has had a nice run with regard to the growing number of visitors and increases in visitor spending. While he conceded that part of that success

By the Numbers 2017-2018 Year in Review • $32 million in travel coverage • 600,000+ social media engagements • $9 million film/TV direct spending • $400,000 Mexico marketing investment • $9 million in film/TV direct spending

can be attributed to a growing economy with strong domestic consumer confidence, Visit Tucson’s successful marketing efforts are evident. There will be a plateau in growth at some point. “We’re now seeing visitor and lodging revenue growth plateau in many top western U.S. cities because of slowing domestic growth and reductions in international travel,” he said. “We believe Tucson’s visitor growth will continue for another year or two before it plateaus.” Still, DeRaad is bullish on the future. “We plan to continue marketing our revitalized downtown, unique culture, cycling, hiking and other outdoor activities – and our outstanding local cuisine,” he said. “It’s essential that we generate awareness among targeted travelers that Tucson and Southern Arizona are outstanding places to live, work, play and visit.”

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• 180,000 meeting room nights • 45,000 sports room nights

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

PHOTOS: TOM REICH / TRPHOTOART


BizFINANCE

Vantage West Doubles Size of Corporate Headquarters To Meet Changing Consumer Demands By Jim Marten Vantage West opened a new 35,000-square-foot expansion in late June. The three-level facility is located next to, and conjoins the Vantage West corporate office – and rivals it in size. “Tucson is the corporate home of Vantage West, and as we looked to expand our back-office capabilities, doing so in Tucson made perfect sense,” said Andrew Downin, VP of marketing and communications for the credit union. “Vantage West has seen tremendous growth in the past several years and the time was right to expand now. We’ve been here for 63 years and we are committed to Tucson.” Why expand now?

Southern Arizona is barely beyond a slow economic recovery, which may lead some to question if the timing was right for a sizable expansion. Downin explained why credit unions have had a different experience and a significant advantage in today’s economy. “Consumers – and especially younger consumers – are interested in where their money goes and want to do business with companies that align with their personal philosophies.” According to Downin, the growing millennial demographic has specific expectations. “Credit unions are notfor-profit banking cooperatives that put their members’ interests first – above profit generation – and that purpose is especially appealing today.” Staying ahead of the curve also means recognizing shifting service needs and preferences. “The new facility will give us more space to support our growing lending operations,” he said, “as well as help position our technowww.BizTucson.com

logical capabilities to meet the rapidly changing demands of consumers to access their accounts through increasingly automated means.” What’s inside?

An expansive, multi-room training center encompasses the entire first floor. Each area is equipped with dryerase boards, large monitors, cameras, projection equipment and numerous tech outlets.

By the Numbers Assets – $1.9 billion Members – 150,000 Locations – 17 locations across Arizona (Pima, Maricopa, Pinal and Cochise counties) Size – Largest credit union in Southern Arizona, third largest in Arizona

Despite the sprawling areas and supporting features, the take-away was rather unique. Portions of the training classrooms were built to mimic Vantage West locations – a virtual branch providing new hires with the most realistic preparation. “These facilities will help build stronger knowledge and confidence for new employees, but also show that we value investing in them,” said Cynthia Miller, Vantage West public relations and communications coordinator. The third floor features a new and consolidated lending center bathed in natural light from angled skylights.

Sizable, north-facing windows provide a striking view of the Santa Catalina Mountains. The new building was designed by Swaim Associates Architects and built by BFL Construction. Here professionals communicate directly with Vantage West locations regarding business, indirect, mortgage and other loan services. According to Vantage West officials, the consolidated area will streamline processes, expediting appraisals and transactions. Top tech

The new building houses a sophisticated technology center with redundant and dual-power capabilities, the latest network lines and other advanced IT components. This helped attain the vaunted “Tier 3” industry status. “The advancements provide the security and timely operation our members expect and rely on,” said Steve Mott, Vantage West senior VP of technology. “This was a long time coming because we put a great deal of thought and preparation into this project,” Mott said as he led group after group on brief tours during the ribbon-cutting event. A Vantage West employee of nearly 40 years, Mott reflected on the credit union’s commitment to the Tucson community through years of sustained growth – and how this expansion provides even greater service for the credit union’s 150,000 members. Mott’s thoughts were echoed later in the evening by Vantage West President and CEO Robert D. Ramirez. “We take care of employees and, in turn, they take great care of our members – that’s our success story.”

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BizCONSTRUCTION

N E W

T O

M A R K E T

Project: Inspired Fitness Location: 15 E. Pennington St. Owner: Jen Dahar and Amanda Boysun, Inspired Fitness Contractor: G2 Contracting Architect: SBBL Architecture Completion Date: April 2018 Construction Cost: N/A Project Description: This project is a 1,388-square-foot tenant improvement for a new fitness facility located on the first floor of the Pioneer Building.

Project: Sinfonia Location: 100 N. Stone Ave. Owner: Holualoa Pioneer Contractor: MW Morrissey Construction Architect: Engberg Anderson Architects Completion Date: July 2018 Construction Cost: $897,743 Project Description: This historic preservation project includes restoring the ceiling panels and chandeliers and rebuilding the mezzanine and balcony.

Project: Hillenbrand Softball Stadium Renovations Location: Warren Avenue and Second Street Owner: University of Arizona Contractor: Concord General Contracting Architect: Swaim Associates Architects Completion Date: February 2019 Construction Cost: Estimated $8.4 million Project Description: Renovation includes removing and replacing grandstands, seating and entry area, plus building new dugouts, restrooms, concessions, shade canopies, elevator, press box, suites and loge seating.

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BizCONSTRUCTION

N E W

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M A R K E T

Project: OVP Arbys #8673 Location: 10115 E. Old Vail Road Owner: Irish Beef Contractor: MW Morrissey Construction Architect: A23 Studios Completion Date: June 2018 Construction Cost: Estimated $700,000 Project Description: This is new restaurant construction with 2,109 total square feet of space.

Project: Modern Studios Location: 8020 N. Business Park Drive Owner: Modern Productions Contractor: MW Morrissey Construction Architect: WSM Architects Completion Date: October 2018 Construction Cost: Estimated $840,000 Project Description: Tenant improvements include renovation and modification of the office interior of an existing building and shell space for a future motion picture/television and filming studio.

Project: Ten55 Brewery Location: 110 E. Congress St. Owner: Ten55 Brewpub and Sausage House Contractor: MW Morrissey Construction Architect: FORS Architecture + Interiors Completion Date: July 2018 Construction Cost: Estimated $462,000 Project Description: This is a downtown tenant improvement of an existing bar with 24,000 square feet.

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BizHOSPITALITY

Casino Del Sol Plans New Hotel By Lee Allen Members of Tucson’s Pascua Yaqui Tribe accepted the “build it and they will come” suggestion and broke ground for another hotel to be built near their initial 215-room Casino Del Sol Resort hotel, a Forbes Four-Star and AAA Four Diamond facility on Valencia Road. With a nearly 100 percent occupancy rate – selling out 362 days a year – the tribal council decided to add a new 151room hotel with more family-friendly amenities. “The overwhelming support we’ve received since we opened the initial resort has resulted in unmet demand and this project will allow us to meet the need for more rooms as well as better serve our meeting and convention clientele,” Kimberly Van Amburg, Casino Del Sol CEO, said at the formal groundbreaking July 12. Pointing with pride at the genesis for the expansion, Tribal Chairman Rob-

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ert Valencia said, “We’re focused on pursuing economic development opportunities wherever they might prove beneficial to members of our tribe. This expansion project will provide additional jobs for our members and will enhance the overall gaming and entertainment experiences to be found at Casino Del Sol.” “This project has been in the making for more than two years and it’s nice to finally get ground broken,” Van Amburg said. “The hotel – more than 93,000-square-feet covering six floors – will be built on nearly 2.2 acres adjacent to the north side of the casino itself. The new lodging will include meeting rooms, an arcade, lounge area and fitness center. The hotel itself will have its own pool with a pool deck designed with families in mind – a fun pool slide for all age groups and a pool bar for adults.” The current Casino Del Sol con-

ference center will get a nearly 10,000-square-foot expansion to complement existing space while the tribe’s nearby sister facility and very first gaming facility, Casino of the Sun, will add an 11,000-square-foot event center for meetings and entertainment. “Welcome to the next phase of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe,” said Valencia as he looked over his shoulder at the existing casino and hotel. “Years ago, who would have thought we’d have something like this going on – and we’re now poised to do it again. The tribe is grateful that 24 years of running our enterprises have brought us to this point where we can expand our hospitality offerings, create more jobs and positively impact our people.” Smaller phases of the project should be done by early first quarter 2019 with the hotel itself ready to open for business by the end of that year.

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BizBRIEF

Reid Clark

Joe Snapp

Jason Grabosch

Foothills Bank Opens in Tucson An Arizona-founded commercial bank is expanding to Tucson, headed by a trio of bankers who have strong local ties and decades of experience in the industry here. Foothills Bank was borne in 1997 in Yuma and continues operations there, as well as in Casa Grande, Prescott and Prescott Valley, among other locations. “It’s a strategic move into a market that hasn’t had a new banking option for a long time. Tucson’s business demographics fit well within our community bank culture, and the reception we’ve received thus far has been wonderful,” Mary Lynn Lenz, Foothills Bank’s CEO, said in a news release.

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In 2017, Foothills Bank became a division of Glacier Bank, which has assets of nearly $12 billion. Foothills Bank, which has its own board of directors, moved to Tucson to tap into a need it saw for community banking. Reid Clark, a native Tucsonan and UA alumnus, is Foothills Bank’s regional president. “With an impressive Arizona footprint and deep roots, Foothills Bank is able to provide the outstanding customer service expected from a community bank while having the capital to provide loans and products on a large scale,” Clark said.

Many Tucsonans also will recognize Joe Snapp and Jason Grabosch, both of whom are senior VPs at Foothills Bank. Snapp has worked in banking in Tucson for 16 years and in the industry for 22 years. Grabosch is a Tucson native and former UA baseball player who has 24 years of experience in commercial banking. “We couldn’t be more pleased to have such great talent in Joe and Jason. Both are well-established Tucson bankers, and their local market expertise will be invaluable as Tucson’s businesses grow and need financing,” Clark said. Foothills Bank’s Tucson branch is at 4713 E. Camp Lowell Drive. Biz

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PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

Stephen H. Paul & Dale Riggins

Hamilton Distillers

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BizENTREPRENEUR

Sippin’ Whiskey Del Bac ‘Making Good Juice Out of Tucson’ By Lee Allen A recent New York Times Magazine treatise on “sipping whiskies” lauded the elegance of single-malts and their variety of bouquets – smoke, peat, citrus – along with their spectrum of flavors, an indication of whiskey’s rise as a trendy spirit of choice. While that story was written prior to the discovery of Whiskey Del Bac, Tucson’s recently introduced Sonoran Desert single-malt, the local company producing it – Hamilton Distillers – is making its mark nationally and soon hopes to go international. Playboy magazine called Whiskey Del Bac “Arizona’s best spirit,” and it is one that has captured a mantle full of gold, silver and bronze honors from those inthe-know like the American Craft Spirits Association and the American Distillers Institute. Whiskey Del Bac also has been featured in Esquire, Forbes, Food & Wine, USA Today and Travel and Leisure magazines. Unlike traditional whiskey, this one is malted over mesquite instead of peat. “This is the only distillery in the U.S. smoking with mesquite and malting barley in-house,” said Dale Riggins, certified sommelier, beverage program consultant, brand manager and the face of the company in all its markets. “We’re in 20 states now, hopefully launching in Hong Kong and Canada in January, with Mexico and Japan on the agenda by the end of 2019. We’re conquering the world – and it’s been pretty crazy for the seven of us doing it all. The mescal craze of a decade ago has died down, replaced by a whiskey craze and we’re kind of halfway between mescal and whiskey. We take flavors from both sides that, despite their uniqueness, blend extremely well and that’s new. www.BizTucson.com

“It took skill, incredible moxie and a lot of luck to get where we are so quickly, but we’re in the right place at the right time with the right product.” Owner Stephen Paul said, “Our first four years have been awesome. We’re winning major awards, have had great press and are consistently listed in the top 10 craft whiskey producers in the country. Sales have increased by 40 percent year-to-date over last year and we’ve ramped up production to be ready for significant growth.” That production is humming, averaging 280 12-pack cases per month – nearly double last year’s output that totaled 1,900 cases for the year. “Velvet mesquite is the key that makes the difference in our product before our distillers put a finesse on it that nobody else can do. We’re a whiskey distillery making good juice out of Tucson,” Riggins said. And while current growing technology has led Hamilton to purchase their high-starch barley out of state (Colorado), they’re trying to get the needed quality in-state with a two-row varietal test plot currently underway in Coolidge. Most everything else is local. The mesquite comes from local firewood companies who cut it in the Reddington Pass area. “The great thing about mesquite is it grows quickly, so these bosques regenerate themselves, they’re very sustainable,” Riggins said.

While the distilling process may involve some company secrets, “we’re open about our recipe,” Riggins said. “One hundred percent barley – nothing else. We are one of only 13 distilleries worldwide that malt and distill 100 percent of their barley with nothing outsourced and that is not industry standard. “Unless it says, ‘distilled in’ or ‘distilled by’ the company on the bottle, 80 percent of this country’s distillates are sourced and bottled by a third party, not actually manufactured in their listed place of origin.” Asked about gross revenue, Riggins does good public relations: “We’re a young distillery, with a large capital investment and product on the market just since 2013. It takes a while before you’re in the black, but the ship is in full sail and we’re getting close.” Close enough in fact to attract buyout attention among the six major world distributors. “People are already recognizing us as a quality product built by burning mesquite in the desert and we’re a good target for buyout,” Riggins said. “That said, we want to keep our business and our product local, continuing to do what we do, and do it here.” Remember that Riggins is involved in sales, but her marketing spiel resonates – “Because we love Tucson so much, we’re trying to create a product that tastes like a memory of home, like walking through the barrio at Christmas time and smelling mesquite burning in the chimeneas. No matter where you are in the world, that brings Tucson to mind.”

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BizCUISINE

AMERICAN EAT CO. A Sassy Venture 10 Tucson Eateries Under One Roof

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FOOD PHOTOS: COURTESY AMERICAN EAT CO.

If “made from scratch” is truly the end-all in cooking, then three local business partners appear to have hit on something huge with an eatery that is generating big buzz for its unique approach to dining. The partners – Jesús Bonillas Jr., Rubén Cázarez and Guillermo Gallegos – created and built American Eat Co. & Market, taking the shell of a historic, family-owned meat market and creating a stand-alone food hall with a vibe that says Seattle, Portland, San Francisco or even the trendy joints now populating resurgent downtown Tucson. While it’s a concept that can be found in other cities, the partners conjured the idea from scratch, unaware they had hit on a sassy venture that has been successful elsewhere. The idea came to them once they were convinced by a friend that the former American Meat Market building at 1439 S. Fourth Ave. was a bargain and worth taking a shot at building a business. The building sits a half block inside the Tucson city limits at the north edge of the city of South Tucson. The partners, who all grew up on Tucson’s west and south sides attending Cholla, Tucson and Sunnyside high schools, had been in business together at The Common Group, which they started by buying and selling houses – commonly known as “flipping.” They had transitioned into buying, redeveloping and leasing small commercial properties – all on the west and south sides, where they still live – when American Eat Co. came into focus. It took some convincing by a persistent real estate agent to even get the partners to consider the property, Gallegos said. He called their attention to it a couple of times before they began to take a serious look at it. “We kind of brushed it off and then he came back a few months later, and it was still available,” Gallegos said. “He’s like, ‘Hey, I seriously think you guys should look at it.’ So that’s when we started doing some serious brainstorming. If we were to do something here, what do you do?” continued on page 156 >>>

PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Jay Gonzales

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Jesús Bonillas Jr. Guillermo Gallegos & Rubén Cázarez Partners American Eat Co. & Market

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PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Carla Andoniadis, owner of Opa! continued from page 154 Bonillas said, “We were going to do traditional retail in front and a commissary kitchen for food trucks in the back because it had such a large kitchen. It had everything, and we were going to use that infrastructure.” The concept of a common kitchen for food trucks then became an idea to have space for food trucks to park on the property and create a place for diners to sit and eat in the building. “That evolved into a full-fledged food court,” Bonillas said. “Over the course of about two months, we had the concept down to what we’re going to do.” By the time The Common Group closed on the purchase of the property, the concept was set, including the look and feel of the dining area. The inside was gutted and renovated. It had been a meat market for more than 60 years and needed a lot of work. Touches, like exposing the metal framing in the ceiling, wood accents, refurbishing the concrete floor, artsy lighting, all add to a feel that when a customer walks in the door, they’ve been transported to a trendy food spot that you don’t generally find in the area. “We wanted to bring this old building that has so much history here in Tucson and has been here forever and is special – especially to South Tucson – bring it back to life in the way that that’s going to pay homage to what it was before, starting with the name,” Gallegos said. “As we began working here, it became clear to us pretty quickly how special this building – and the business that was here before us – were to this community. We had people dropping in on a daily basis telling stories about the meat market, of them coming with their mom and with their nana (Spanish for grandmother). It was amazing to 156 BizTucson

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BizCUISINE hear those stories.” The end result at American Eat Co. is not unlike a standard mall food court from an operational standpoint. The Common Group owns the building and two businesses, while leasing space to eight others in the 8,000-squarefoot building for a total of 10 choices for a meal, drink or dessert. There are about 70 employees total with each of the restaurants having four to eight employees. Twenty are employees of The Common Group to do the cleaning, busing and dishwashing, one of the expenses that is shared among the restaurants. What separates American Eat Co. from the standard mall food court is the quality and uniqueness of the menu choices. There’s not a McDonald’s or Starbucks or Sbarro anywhere to be found. Instead, every eatery is a Tucson business, some that have been around Tucson for years such as the Greek restaurant Opa! and Upper Crust Pizza, a university-area staple. Others are brand new, like Dumb Fish, which is owned by the partners. Dumb Fish serves poke, cuisine that is described as “sushi in a bowl,” and is making headway as a trendy fare everywhere. If you want Mexican, it’s there at Avenues, described by the owners as “Chicano comfort food” with street tacos and the like. There’s barbecue at AZ Rib House, burger sliders at The Bite and ice cream at Isabella’s. Café con Leche and the Market Bar, the former owned by the partners, are spots to just gather and get a cup of coffee or a cocktail or beer. And for good measure, longtime southside butcher Dos Amigos has a small meat market that is becoming ever more popular now that Friday and Saturday nights are “steak nights.” Dos Amigos will not only sell you a prime steak or chorizo in three grades of spiciness, on Friday and Saturdays starting at 6 p.m., they will cook the steak – ribeyes, T-bones, New York strips – for you over mesquite on a grill in the kitchen and serve it complete with a baked potato and bread. Taking it a step further, Dos Amigos serves menudo on Saturday and Sunday mornings. The butcher, Andy Arias, is now a “restaurateur” as well, Bonillas said. Arias owns Dos Amigos with Yesenia Fimbres. “And he loves it. It’s a different interaction with his customer especially when he can feed them and hear the amazing feedback.” The coffee bar opens at 7 a.m. The restaurants start serving at 11 a.m. Closing time varies by vendor, generally 9 p.m. on weekdays and 10 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Rounding up the restaurants for American Eat Co. had the non-negotiable requirement that they be local. Through various business connections, the partners put out the word about what they were doing. They held a number of open houses with conceptual drawings of the space starting in November 2016. While interest was immediate, through their experience in their prior redevelopment work, which purposely continued on page 158 >>> www.BizTucson.com

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BizCUISINE continued from page 157 focuses on the south side, the partners knew there were going to be challenges in attracting established businesses to their venture. Fourth Avenue into South Tucson is a corridor of Tucson’s best Mexican restaurants, yet an unfortunate stigma remains about doing business on the south side, Gallegos said. “We recognize that this side of town is severely underserved from a retail standpoint and a restaurant standpoint,” Gallegos said. “When we were growing up and we wanted to go to Olive Garden and Red Lobster, we had to drive north or east. We never had any of that stuff on this side of town. “There are lot of needs and services that are lacking on the south and west sides, and we thought we were in a position to change that and decided to take it on.” The business to flip houses was launched in 2010 with the backing of trusting investors, Bonillas said. Each successful project added financial resources to work with until the partners got into redeveloping distressed commercial properties to speed up their business growth to the point of having the capability to develop American Eat Co. Carla Andoniadis, owner of Opa!, didn’t need a lot of convincing to take a spot in the food court. The original Opa! at 2990 N. Campbell Ave. closed earlier this year as the restaurant moved into American Eat Co. But Andoniadis said she had her eye on a southside location long before. “I saw the value of coming to the southside about seven, eight years ago just based on being observant of who our clients were,” she said. “People would come from the southside all the time without the coupons. “I just felt that it was a shame that more restaurants didn’t go to the southside. I’m not sure why. Maybe they were afraid. But I definitely saw the value immediately and I was so happy to be a part of it. It was a perfect match.” In its short existence – American Eat Co. opened in late March – Cázarez said he has seen it become more than a place to have a quality yet informal meal with something for everyone in a group. It’s become a community gathering point. It’s not unusual to grab a seat at one of the long benches or a high-top table and find yourself next to an old friend, or maybe make a new one. “This is a place where the community can come and congregate,” Cázarez said. “It’s not sectional seating like in a restaurant. Your party can merge into the party next to you. You get to know and talk to your community members and enjoy a meal with them.” “It’s an icon of a destination already,” Andoniadis said. “They built on the success of the business that was here prior. I’ve mentioned this to them before – what Memo (Guillermo) and Jesús and Rubén have built here will outlive them. How they reinvested and where they came from – this is beautiful.”

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BizBRIEF

Kevin Cutter

Bank of Tucson Acquired by Pacific Premier Bank Former Bank of Tucson customers will see system changes this fall as Pacific Premier Bank completes its conversion of Grandpoint Capital, Inc. Local customers will see their accounts and services folded into Pacific Premier starting in October. Pacific Premiere Bancorp, Inc., the holding company of Pacific Premier Bank headquartered in Irvine, California, announced in July that it bought Grandpoint, which was headquartered in Los Angeles. Grandpoint owned the two branches of Bank of Tucson, as well as The Biltmore Bank of Arizona in Phoenix, six Grandpoint Bank locations in California’s Los Angeles and Orange counties, and five Regents Bank locations in San Diego County, California, and Vancouver, Washington. They join 33 Pacific Premier locations across the Southern and Central Coast areas of California as well as Las Vegas. The two Bank of Tucson branches are managed by Kevin Cutter, executive VP and regional president of an area covering Arizona and Nevada. “I am excited to be a part of the Tucson community, where my daughter attends the University of Arizona,” Cutter said, “and look forward to continuing Bank of Tucson’s fine tradition of taking care of the local business community.” He has been with Pacific Premier since October 2017, when he was executive VP and regional president of commercial banking for Los Angeles County. He has worked his way through the banking industry since 1992 with positions at City National Bank, Citizens Business Bank, AIB and Bank of America. With the acquisition of Grandpoint, Pacific Premier’s total assets are approximately $11.6 billion. Total outstanding loans are approximately $8.6 billion and total deposits are approximately $8.8 billion. Pacific Premier offers a diverse range of lending products including commercial loans, commercial real estate, construction and SBA loans, as well as specialty banking products for homeowners’ associations and franchise lending nationwide. Biz www.BizTucson.com

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BizBRIEF

Top-Rated Hughes Federal Credit Union Opens Branch Near Vail By Elena Acoba Hughes Federal Credit Union, which recently earned a top ranking from Forbes magazine, is expanding with a new branch to serve customers in Vail. The member-run financial institution opens its eighth branch this fall at 9036 S. Houghton Road. Customers of the new branch near Old Vail Road in the Houghton Town Center will find easier access to all Hughes Federal Credit Union services with a convenient branch location, and with the services available inside. A high-tech table in the lobby will give customers online access to information about the credit union’s latest products and services, including refinancing a home and opening a checking account. Customers can select the information they need and print it out on demand. A full staff personally handles banking services such as issuing debit cards, opening checking and savings accounts and providing auto and other loans and mortgages. Other services at the new location include help with financial planning, access to safe deposit boxes, 24-hour access to ATMs and shared branches convenience. As part of Hughes’ commitment to support the community, the branch will feature a mural by Tucson artist Diana Madaras. “Finger Rock,” done in

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Madaras’ signature vibrant colors, celebrates the Sonoran Desert and complements the views of the Rincon Mountains seen from inside the airy, sunny branch building. The expansion furthers locally owned Hughes’ reputation for customer service, recognized in the first-ever Forbes magazine Best-In-State Banks and Credit Unions list, published last summer. The credit union was cited as the best among the 132 credit unions in Arizona, Colorado and Wyoming that are members of the Mountain West Credit Union Association. It takes its place among the 2.4 percent of financial institutions in the United States to get the Best-In-State designation. “This validates our dedication to making a positive difference in the financial lives of our members through best-in-class products, services and customer care and the leadership of our volunteer board of directors,” said President and GM Robert J. Swick. Forbes’ partner, Statista, surveyed 25,000 customers nationwide. Customers ranked 124 banks and 145 credit unions on trust, terms and conditions, branch services, digital services and financial advice. The research found that member-owned financial institutions like

Hughes, which scored 87.6 in customer satisfaction, have higher ratings than traditional banks. “With the proliferation of online banks, it is even more important for local banks to demonstrate their advantages in regards to customer service, accessibility and financial advice,” Forbes’ Kurt Badenhausen said in announcing the survey results. As a citizen of the community, the credit union supports and sponsors more than 30 University of Arizona sports teams and other UA programs, and sponsors a scholarship program, now in its 14th year. “Hughes Federal Credit Union’s mission is to make a positive difference in the financial lives of our members and to give back to the communities we serve,” said Kellie Terhune Neely, the credit union’s VP of marketing. Hughes has been in business here for 66 years, founded for employees of then Hughes Aircraft Co. Since 1991 it has accepted as members anyone who lives, works, attends school or worships in Tucson. Today it has 125,000 members and $1.2 billion in assets. It has a five-star “superior” rating from BauerFinancial, which measures the health of financial institutions.

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BizNONPROFIT

Left photo – Steve and Denise King pushing Lucas King; Right photo – Jorge Encisco pushing Alex Jr. with A.J. Bruce.

‘Who’s Pushing Who?’

Local Nonprofit Helps Special-Needs Athletes Cross Finish Line Lucas King is all smiles when he’s racing. For the 11-year-old, it’s one of the few times he can let go of his disability and enjoy the thrill of competition and being an athlete. Lucas, who was born in 2007, experienced a traumatic birth with oxygen deprivation that led to cerebral palsy in all four limbs. Though he cannot walk or talk, his joy is evident when he’s racing as part of Team Hoyt Arizona, an assisted-athlete program that competes in dozens of road races throughout Arizona, pairing special-needs athletes with runners who push them. Founded by Lucas’s parents, Steve and Denise King, Team Hoyt Arizona – whose motto is “Who’s Pushing Who?” – was inspired by the legendary fatherson team of Dick and Rick Hoyt. The 162 BizTucson

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Hoyts have raced in more than 30 Boston Marathons as well as a host of other events, including six Ironman triathlons. Born in 1962, Rick Hoyt also had experienced oxygen deprivation at birth, leading to spastic quadriplegia and cerebral palsy. When Rick was 15, he told his father he wanted to participate in a benefit run for a classmate. Though he’d never competed in a running event, Dick agreed to push Rick in the race in his wheelchair. The pair finished second to last. Afterward, Rick told his father that when he was running it felt like his disability disappeared. That was the moment Team Hoyt was born. Since then, father and son have competed in thousands of races and they’ve been featured in Sports Illustrated as well as Real Sports on HBO. A bronze statue

of the pair stands at the beginning of the Boston Marathon route and they’ve been honored with an ESPY Award. As the Kings searched for ways to help Lucas move beyond his disability and live the fullest life possible, they were inspired by Hoyts. Steve says discovering the Team Hoyt Foundation was a game changer for his family. The Kings – Steve, Denise, Lucas and 6-year-old daughter Emerson – travel to Boston each summer to run in the Holland Elementary 5K with the Hoyts and other assisted athletes. “When Lucas was born, we couldn’t take him outside. He was connected to tubes and machines and he was very fragile,” said Steve. “We were searching for ways to be active and get him outside.” In November 2010, when Lucas www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TEAM HOYT

By Romi Carrell Wittman


was 3, the Kings entered the Susan G. Komen race. Steve pushed Lucas in a baby jogger. “Lucas loved it. He loved the wind, the bumps, the sun. Just the sensory things he hadn’t experienced,” Steve said. “We got to be outside and to complete the race as a family.” After that experience, the Kings, who had reached out to the Hoyts, founded Team Hoyt Arizona. The nonprofit is one of nine chapters of Team Hoyt across the United States and Canada. “We want to share the passion and joy of competition with any person with a physical or cognitive disability,” Denise said. Being a part of the Team Hoyt Arizona community has made a huge difference in the lives of the disabled athletes and their families. Trish Smith is the mother of Katie, a 16-year-old who has severe quadriplegia cerebral palsy. “Being a part of Team Hoyt Arizona helps Katie take part in running events like any other teenager,” Smith said. “The support of Team Hoyt Arizona provides the opportunity to participate in these events as a family.”

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Looking ahead, Team Hoyt Arizona has several ambitious goals – including increased participation in races, adding more races to the racing calendar as

TEAM HOYT ARIZONA PRESENTS AN INSPIRATIONAL EVENING WITH DICK HOYT Friday, November 9 Hilton El Conquistador Resort 10000 N. Oracle Road Cocktail Reception – 6:00 pm Silent Auction – 6:00 to 8:00pm Dinner & Presentation – 7:00 to 9:00 pm Sponsorships – $1,000 to $10,000 Donate a table – $750 Individual tickets – $125 Contact Steve King steve@teamhoytarizona.com (520) 468-1958 or Denise King denise@teamhoytarizona.com (520) 548-2408

well as raising awareness of the need for inclusion. The organization also continually fundraises to purchase additional specialized chairs so that more assisted athletes can compete in events. Each chair cost upwards of $4,000, because of the special cushioning, reinforced frames, shock absorbers and other features necessary to keep the athletes comfortable and safe. Team Hoyt Arizona has chairs to accommodate different ages, from small children to adults. On Nov. 9, Team Hoyt Arizona is hosting a fundraising event here in Tucson. Dick Hoyt, who travels around the country as a motivational speaker, will be the keynote speaker. Details are pending. For racing, tickets and/or sponsorship information, visit teamhoytarizona.com or email denise@ teamhoytarizona.com or steve@teamhoytarizona.com. “We’re building a positive, inclusive community,” said Denise. “Team Hoyt Arizona welcomes everyone.”

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BizTECHNOLOGY

Pitch Perfect

Software Helps Public Speakers Hone Their Craft By James Marten For many, public speaking conjures intense anxieties. The jitters and angst can be overwhelming, and suggestions from others often accentuate apprehension. Field experts and coaches are few, expensive and on tight schedules, making it very hard to provide personalized feedback to each trainee. Enter PitchVantage, a first-of-its-kind software allowing users to practice their delivery in front of a simulated audience and receive instant automated feedback on 10 oratory elements, from verbal pitch to word choice. Optimized for laptops, the PitchVantage software records video and audio of a practice presentation. The speaker presents to a virtual audience that reacts in real-time to speaker’s delivery. The program’s proprietary technology delivers instant analysis – providing graphs, measures and an overall score. Users can record several videos, compare performances and review a multitude of public speaking tutorials, which further explain the significance of presentation elements and how to improve them. Established in 2015, PitchVantage grew out of a business project at the University of Arizona’s McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship. Two MBA students, Anindya Gupta and Yegor Makhiboroda, conducted extensive

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market research evidencing strong demand for ongoing, public-speaking training. They work out of Connect Coworking downtown. “Companies and universities showed interest in a solution that provides a continuous learning opportunity for their students by practice, assessment and reinforcement of learned skills – rather than just a one-time training,” said Gupta, PitchVantage founder and CEO. “Up to 90 percent of learned skills can atrophy within one year without reinforcement. It made sense to have a digital program that could be used over time.” Gupta said the PitchVantage team sought talented developers to assist in product creation and ensure the efficacy of the burgeoning endeavor. “We recognized creating a successful product required proficiency in multi-disciplinary skills – from natural language processing and gamification to speech and hearing sciences. While we recruited nationally, many of the needed skills were available right here at the University of Arizona.” The founders identified several UA faculty with the needed expertise in linguistics, speech and hearing. “The program is meant to assess the engagement of the speaker,” said Brad Story, associate dean of the UA department of speech, language and hearing

sciences, and an adviser to the PitchVantage team. “The software recognizes and measures key vocal aspects, which can help the speaker improve their presentation skills.” Another PitchVantage adviser from UA cited an additional element contributing to the software’s success. “The team has integrated the feedback from several experts, rather than providing an individual expert’s opinion,” said Mihai Surdeanu, who leads the UA Computer Language Understanding Lab. “The users know exactly where they stand in comparison with other speeches that were deemed of high quality.” After creating the unique software, PitchVantage founders then took methodical steps, developing prototypes that were evaluated by focus groups and public speaking experts. Gupta said the company was wellprepared to launch after a lengthy and thorough development, which he said was necessary to build a quality product and gain the confidence of investors. Ultimately, PitchVantage is designed to help speakers maximize their communication skills, and in today’s world that means it needs to be easily accessible and quick. “The tool is always available and is fast,” Surdeanu said. “It can be used anytime and anywhere.”

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Screen shots from PitchVantage


PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Yegor Makhiboroda & Anindya Gupta Co-Founders, PitchVantage

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The attorneys at Mesch Clark Rothschild, from row, left to right, Susan N. Goodman, Gary J. Cohen, the late Lowell Rothschild, Isaac D. Rothschild, Thom K. Cope, Douglas H. Clark, Jr. , Frederick J. Petersen, Michael J. Crawford Back row, left to right, Paul A. Loucks, J. Emery Barker, Nathan S. Rothschild, Kristen L. Wendler, Patrick J. Lopez. Michael W. McGrath, Alex Winkelman, Jeff J. Coe, Richard Davis, Sara C. Derrick, David J. Hindman, Melvin C. Cohen Bottom Left – Left to right, Patrick J. Lopez, Melvin C. Cohen, J. Emery Barker and Paul A Loucks discuss a case. Bottom Right – From left, Douglas H. Clark, Jr., the late Lowell Rothschild, J. Emery Barker and Richard Davis plant the first of 60 trees at Himmel Park to celebrate the firm’s 60th anniversary.

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Mesch Clark Rothschild at 60 Years Enduring Passion for Law and Community

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MESCH CLARK ROTHSCHILD

By Rhonda Bodfield

When Mesch Clark Rothschild celebrated its milestone of 60 years of service last year, it was a sweet moment for veteran attorney Michael McGrath. Recruited to the heralded firm nearly 30 years ago, he watched many of the venerable attorneys who had recruited him to the firm either retire or pass away over the years. Most recently, he said goodbye in December to the late Lowell Rothschild, a legal force of nature who co-founded the firm in 1957, along with John Mesch, Norval Jasper and Alfredo Marquez. But he is not merely seeing legacy and tradition in the rear-view mirror, he sees potential unfurling in the coming years ahead. “Sixty years, as significant as it is, is still just longevity,” said McGrath, a commercial lawyer. “But having as bright a future as we have is what’s exciting to me. One of our business models has always been to develop generations of lawyers to perpetuate the firm.” Succession planning means attorneys who will grow with their clients over the years, establishing longevity in relationships and building institutional memory. “It was nice to stop and recognize we had achieved six decades with a tradition that has been market-tested, proven and sustainable. But it’s really a satisfying experience to see the outstanding young lawyers poised to take over in the future.” www.BizTucson.com

Talk to attorneys at the firm and there is agreement that some traits have held steady through the years – hard work, uncompromising ethics, a strong bench of trial lawyers, a sense of community service. The practice has a deep focus on representing small, medium and large businesses looking for financing and investment on the capital market, or seeking assistance in restructuring. “We’re very busy these days because of the activity in our community, helping contractors, subcontractors, developers and bonding companies get construction projects funded and accomplished,” McGrath said. When McGrath first walked through the doors, the staff numbers were 40 percent smaller than today’s count of 19 attorneys and all but three of them partners. There are now four generations of practicing attorneys, instead of two. The commercial law group has flourished, as has the practice in real estate, labor, personal injury and agricultural/ farming law. Reputation management and technology are growing areas as well, now that every text message and email are potentially discoverable. Echoes from the firm’s founding six decades ago continue to feed the contemporary firm. The founders – all excluded from the established firms for one reason or an-

other, from religion to ethnic origin or lifestyle choices – determined they were going to not only start their own firm, but they would serve those areas that the other law firms wouldn’t. “We still focus on serving communities we’re passionate about, and that includes the underserved,” said Isaac Rothschild, a bankruptcy attorney who had the good fortune to practice law at the firm with his grandfather, Lowell, his father, Jonathan, and his brother, Nathan. The result has been a fundamental, three-pronged approach to the practice of law at the firm: • The scholarship aspect and mastery of the craft • Work ethic • Community involvement and support of philanthropic organizations.

McGrath, for example, feeds his soul through his work with the Rialto Theatre and his service as past president of the Tucson Conquistadores. Isaac serves as the chair of the Jewish Community Center and supports artistic causes. The firm’s culture is one of its biggest recruiting tools. When Jodi Henderson was deciding whether to come on as the administrator of the firm last year, she weighed two simultaneous offers. She wrote out her continued on page 168 >>> Fall 2018

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pro and con list. “It came down to the firm’s belief in giving back to the community – that’s truly what made the difference for me. The culture here is that you’re encouraged to find something that speaks to your heart and they’ll give you the tools and flexibility to get involved,” said Henderson. She leaves work early when she’s needed to help teach community literacy programs at an eastside library branch. The firm is also fiercely local, hiring law students almost exclusively from the University of Arizona, and largely hiring attorneys from within its rank of law clerks. “Where my grandfather and his colleagues were starting a place to work because they couldn’t be hired, we’ve tried to create a destination law firm that balances work life and the ability to serve the community through the resources of a law firm,” Isaac Rothschild said. “That’s part of the evolution we’ve had.” Sara Derrick, part of the transactional law group, is one of those homegrown attorneys, joining the firm as a

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One of our business models has always been to develop generations of lawyers to perpetuate the firm.

– Michael McGrath Partner, Mesch Clark Rothschild

second-year law clerk. “I researched local Tucson firms and I was drawn to the diversity, experience and reputation of the firm,” she said, adding that her in-laws were clients of Jonathan Rothschild in the years before he was called to serve as Tucson’s mayor. He would end up serving as her mentor. Derrick said she was impressed by the breadth of knowledge of the firm’s attorneys, as well as their accessibility and the opportunities she was granted. “I was entrusted with a lot of responsibility as a new lawyer – something that

doesn’t always happen in law firms,” she said. Isaac Rothschild, who specializes in business reorganization, has absorbed different guidance from each of his mentors. Empathy. Treating each case as an individual, even if the legal arguments might seem similar. “Court decisions truly can be some of the biggest things that can happen in a person’s life, whether it’s personal or professional, and each problem requires its own unique solution.” By the time he was in his second year of law school, he realized he wanted to join the firm. His friends at larger firms typically had short tenures – roughly one in 10 were at the firm they started with after five years – and almost always only if they had been fortunate enough to land a mentor. “Here, I had an entire law firm eager to be my mentor. When we hire an attorney, it is our hope that every single one becomes a partner and we start investing in them right away – because they will be the future of this law firm and leaders in our community.”

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SPECIAL REPORT 2018

THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Casa de la Luz Hospice

COMPASSION EDUCATION INNOVATION


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Casa de la Luz Hospice:

More Than a

Place

A Mission of Education Hospice is an often-misunderstood practice in this country. While 1.65 million Americans benefit from hospice each year, many don’t understand what it is or where it’s practiced until they or a family member becomes a hospice patient. Casa de la Luz Hospice, the largest hospice provider in Southern Arizona, is celebrating its 20th year in business and is on a mission to educate the community that hospice is compassionate care for end-of-life patients. It’s not necessarily a place as it is a collection of professionals offering multi-disciplinary and integrative care to the patients and their families. Most patients are cared for inplace – at their home or their assistedliving facility – and patient comfort and dignity are given highest priority. 172 BizTucson

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Dr. James Nicolai, medical director at Casa de la Luz, said it’s critical for the medical industry and for patients and their families to understand exactly what the term “hospice” means. “Part of what we’re doing in the community is educating on the need for hospice and its importance. We’re passionate to relay this to folks,” he said. “Ninety-seven percent of all hospice patients stay at home. Having the choice is huge.” Founded by Lynette Jaramillo, now the CEO, and Chief Clinical Officer Anges Poore, Casa de la Luz has helped end-of-life patients and their families since 1998. Casa de la Luz is Spanish for “house of light.” Jaramillo said that to her, the name means “we’ll bring light to people’s homes or where they are at

end of life. Many search for faith at end of life.” The name also was inspired by an experience her son had while sitting with his dying grandfather. Her son saw a light coming through the window just as his grandfather passed away. The partners started out with a sevenyear plan and have grown the company steadily since. They currently have a workforce of about 275 and on average maintain 110 active volunteers. In April 2018, the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization recognized Casa de la Luz for its increased professional and organizational capacity to provide quality end-of-life services to veterans and their families. Casa organizes an awards ceremony, given while the patients are still alive, and the www.BizTucson.com


BizHEALTHCARE

donation of a blanket specific to their military branch of service. Casa also is active in numerous local organizations and has won awards from the Tucson Metro Chamber, Society for Human Resource Management and others. Jaramillo and Poore credit their longevity in the business to always putting patients and their families first, offering them the best possible care and remembering that while they and their staff deal with end-of-life situations on a daily basis, for the patients it’s their one and only time. This is clearly illustrated in Bob Sagar’s story about his experience with Casa. He faced a number of challenges earlier this year with his wife, Judi, who suffered from multiple sclerosis. The first www.BizTucson.com

Part of what we’re doing in the community is educating on the need for hospice and its importance. We’re passionate to relay this to folks. – Dr.

James Nicolai Medical Director Casa de la Luz Hospice

By Christy Krueger

challenge was convincing her to accept hospice, which she eventually did. “Judi loved the gals who took care of her,” Bob said. “The quality of individuals who helped her were the most caring I’ve met. They were always respectful of Judi’s needs.” On March 1, Sagar ended up in the hospital after falling on some stairs and fracturing his back. Since he couldn’t be home for Judi between the hospice caregiver visits, he placed her in Casa’s respite care. By March 12, Judi was failing and arrangements were made to transport Sagar for a last visit; his wife passed away two days later. “I don’t know what I would have done without Casa,” Sagar said. “They were great. What you don’t learn from continued on page 174 >>> Fall 2018

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PHOTOS: COURTESY CASA DE LA LUZ

and Compassion


BizHEALTHCARE continued from page 173 the doctors or the hospital is that this help is available and Medicare pays for it all – it didn’t cost us a penny. It was kind of an amazing experience.” Casa is able to offer a number of treatment options to its patients. Some are widely used in hospice, others are more unique, such as Casa’s agitation program. Poore, who is a registered nurse and handles the clinical end of the business, explained that agitation in the hospice realm is often part of dementia and being elderly. “They get anxious and it can be hard to manage at home and sometimes in facilities. We use a variety of tools. A weighted blanket makes them feel secure and we use things to keep their hands occupied. We help them be more relaxed.” Pet therapy and music therapy are also used with success. Many wonder how hospice care is initiated, what the process involves and how patients pay for it. Anyone can make a referral for hospice services, which initiates an evaluation from a nurse. Then, two doctors must certify that the patient has six months or less

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to live. They generally are the patient’s doctor and a hospice doctor. The patient has to agree to discontinue any aggressive treatment. “The benefits are defined by Medicare, and most insurance companies follow it,” Jaramillo said. Medicare sets the payment rate, and there is a wage index by state or county. “Medicare pays us a per-diem amount.” What’s interesting, she added, is that Medicare pays more at end of life than for health maintenance. “Hospice saves money, gives better care and is cost effective for what you get.” Sometimes a patient comes along who needs hospice care, but doesn’t have insurance and can’t pay. “We still take them,” Jaramillo said. “We budget 2 percent of our income to cover this. We call it community service.” Casa de la Luz utilizes a multi-disciplinary approach to care, and each patient is considered individually as to the patient’s needs and wants. “The team,” said Poore, “may include home health aides, social workers, RNs, MDs and volunteers from the companion program.” Casa also employs music thera-

pists and chaplains. “Social workers help with funeral planning. About 38 percent die within the first seven days. That doesn’t give the team a lot of time,” Jaramillo said. For Casa, the average length of hospice services is 66 days. Bereavement programs for the families are an important part of Casa’s service, and it’s a Medicare requirement. “It’s mandated by the federal government to do it for 12 months. We do it for 13 months,” Jaramillo explained. “It could be ongoing counseling, there are support groups and one-on-one.” A valuable part of the bereavement process is a quarterly memorial service for families of loved ones who have passed in the previous three months. Employees of Casa also have access to bereavement support. “We have an EAP, employee assistance program,” Jaramillo said. “It’s hard to be open with someone you work with.” She encourages staff to be involved in the community so they have balance in their lives. And Casa has a quarterly employee recognition ceremony. “We call them angels.” Biz

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PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

WOMEN WHO LEAD

Agnes Poore and Lynette Jaramillo Co-Founders, Casa de la Luz Hospice

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Founders’ ‘Wildest Dream’ Leap of Faith Leads to Business Success By Christy Krueger When the home health company that Agnes Poore and Lynette Jaramillo worked for in the 1990s was sold, it gave them the opportunity to take a leap of faith and start their own business. Jaramillo began by reading a book about achieving dreams, a book that motivated her to step beyond her doubts. “Casa is my wildest dream,” she said. “I followed the steps in that book. We got a small business loan. Now it’s gone beyond my wildest dream. It’s our legacy.” Jaramillo needed a partner and Poore was the logical choice. They planned, set objectives and made financial arrangements. Since both expected a two-year start-up period before being in the black, it was important that their husbands go for the idea. And they did. While Jaramillo and Poore ran the business, the husbands served as volunteers. Poore joked that she and her partner know more about each other’s family finances than their husbands know about their own. Right from the start, the entrepreneurs knew they wanted Casa de la Luz to be a for-profit hospice. While Medicare pays nonprofit and for-profit hospices the same and it mandates the same regulations, there were a variety of reasons to go the private route. Said Jaramillo, “I believe in free enterprise. I believe we can do a better job. We can make decisions on a per-patient basis. And I didn’t want to answer to a board – just me and my partner to make decisions.” www.BizTucson.com

Poore and Jaramillo set a goal of caring for 100 to 125 patients at any given time. “When we reached 40, we celebrated,” Jaramillo said. “We had slow, steady growth for 20 years. We’ve taken care of over 20,000 patients in our community. “All patients got the care they deserved. We have unique facilities not offered otherwise.”

We’ve taken care of over 20,000 patients in our community. All got the care they deserved.

– Lynette Jaramillo Co-Founder and CEO Casa de la Luz Hospice

To some extent, Medicare regulations had a hand in Casa’s growth. “Hospice started as a volunteer movement,” Jaramillo said. “Years later, Medicare started paying for it.” Poore pointed out that after starting the business, Medicare began adding new rules, requirements and reporting. During their seventh year in business, in order to keep up, it became necessary to automate. This, in turn, gave them the ability to handle additional patients. And with Medicare’s increasing involve-

ment with hospice, more people became familiar with the concept. “There are some benefits to regulation,” Poore said. “Hospice should grow.” Dr. Suresh Katakkar, a semi-retired oncologist and Casa’s first referring physician, shares the hospice philosophy and hopes awareness of its mission continues to spread. “Casa is complete care – spiritual, they’re with you all the way. The nurses are absolutely proficient, not just in taking care of the patient, but in all aspects of the person. That’s how I took care of my patients – from diagnosis to death or recovery. That’s what hospice does. Casa hires people who come to talk to you; it’s very important. Many patients are afraid, so you need psycho-social support. I can see that what I was practicing, Casa de la Luz is practicing.” He also has personal experience with Casa. Katakkar’s wife was a patient 10 years ago and he became a patient in 2017 when he almost died of a spontaneous subdural hematoma. “I was in hospice three weeks and they gave me excellent service.” As more of the population understands the hospice process and the baby-boom generation ages, Casa’s staff expects a tidal wave of change. “In the next five to seven years, there will be huge growth and those people want to be in control of their world at end of life,” Jaramillo said.

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PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Casa Hospice at The Fountains inpatient unit

Kanmar Place, residential hospice home

Dr. James Nicolai

Medical Director, Casa de la Luz Hospice

Casa Hospice at The Hacienda inpatient unit

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Facilities Offer ‘Cozy’ Setting for Hospice

Options for Care Outside the Home

PHOTOS: COURTESY CASA DE LA LUZ

By Christy Krueger

Casa de la Luz started in 1998 as a hospice that offered care in the home setting – including assisted living and nursing facilities if that’s where the patient was living. Not long after launching the business, founders Agnes Poore and Lynette Jaramillo realized there was also a need for Casa de la Luz to have its own facilities as an option for patients. Three years later they purchased a house on Tucson’s northwest side that became Kanmar Place, the first of three Casa de la Luz facilities. Residents at Kanmar are given routine homecare, Poore said, in addition to hospice treatments. “Longterm care insurance may pay for room and board, and Medicare pays the rest,” she said. Piper Frithsen, a registered nurse and the administrator at Casa de la Luz, described the five-bedroom Kanmar Place as a cozy, home-like setting for patients. “We provide holistic care. It feels like home – calm and serene. It’s a place of peace for me.” And it’s the only one of its kind in Southern Arizona. Since opening Kanmar Place, Casa has added two inpatient acute care units, both located on Watermark Retirement Communities campuses. Casa Hospice at The Fountains, adjacent to Northwest Medical Center, opened in 2004 with nine beds. Casa Hospice at www.BizTucson.com

The Hacienda, near River Road and Campbell Avenue, opened in 2017 with 12 beds. “It’s like intensive care for hospice patients,” said Dr. James Nicolai, Casa’s medical director.

My mother stayed at Kanmar Place for the last month of her life. It’s a very pleasant home – peaceful, nice view outside. – Dr.

John Z. Carter, Physician

Also offered at both inpatient units is respite care, where hospice patients who are living at home can stay for up to five days to give family members a break. From 2017 to 2018, Casa’s respite days increased 164 percent due to the opening of Casa Hospice at The Hacienda. Whether patients are at home or in one of Casa’s facilities, the hospice care

follows the same integrative, multi-disciplinary approach. Nicolai said he is a strong believer in the methodology. He comes from a background of integrative medicine and wellness practices, including his work at Miraval Arizona resort and spa and the University of Arizona. Hospice was a natural transition for him. “One of the focuses I’ve had as a physician is healing, and I was part of the integrative medicine program at UA with Dr. Andrew Weil,” he said. That included the study of hospice and spirituality in medicine. “It’s seeing people as more than just bodies. Hospice has to do that at the end of life. I found the idea is very much a part of what hospice is, combining traditional and alternative medicine and using what works.” Some of the alternative practices used at Casa, Nicolai said, include music therapy, pet therapy, herbal supplements and healing touch. “We’re open to effectiveness when it leads to comfort – one of our highest M.O.s.” Frithsen came to Casa from a hospital nursing background. “After 23 years in acute care, I almost forgot why I went into healthcare,” she said. “Hospice is holistically about the patient. In end-oflife care you feel like you’re really making a difference.” Both Nicolai and Frithsen have obcontinued on page 180 >>> Fall 2018

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Administrator, Casa de la Luz Hospice

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PHOTOS: COURTESY CASA DE LA LUZ

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Piper Frithsen

continued from page 179 served the difficulties many healthcare providers have with end-of-life discussions and the concept of discontinuing aggressive treatments. Therefore, they go into the community and offer presentations on the hospice care process and suggestions on how to start the end-of-life conversation with patients. “Hospice isn’t a failure of the treatment plan or physician; it’s progression of life, a continuum,” Frithsen said. Dr. John Z. Carter is a local family medicine and geriatrics physician who understands the value of hospice and is on board with Casa’s mission. “They are very patient and family-oriented, and I like their end-of-life philosophy of doing what is best for the patient. That’s foremost for me,” he stated. He personally experienced hospice twice – his mother and brother were Casa patients. “My mother stayed at Kanmar Place for the last month of her life,” he said. “It’s a very pleasant home – peaceful, nice view outside.” Carter’s brother, a Tucson neurosurgeon, passed away in 2010 in Casa hospice care. “So I’ve been at the other end of the spectrum.” From a physician’s standpoint, Carter is appreciative of Casa’s availability. “If I meet with a patient Friday afternoon and we’re thinking of hospice, I can call and on Saturday morning someone is at the house enrolling them in the program. The nursing staff is very accommodating.”


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PHOTOS: COURTESY CASA DE LA LUZ

BizHEALTHCARE

Dr. David Jaskar

Doctor Set and Lived High Standards at Casa de la Luz By April Bourie Editor’s Note: Dr. David Jaskar passed away shortly after the interview for this story. BizTucson appreciates Dr. Jaskar for providing his viewpoint on hospice care as a practitioner and a patient. We offer our sincere condolences to the family. Contracting polio at age 12 solidified Dr. David Jaskar’s decision to become a medical doctor. “He was a real jock and could have pursued those interests,” his wife, Maria, said. “The experience really increased his interest in medicine.” Years later, Jaskar went on to become Casa de la Luz’s first medical director where he set the organization’s high standards of allowing patients to die with dignity. He died while in hospice care from Casa de la Luz. “When people are ill, they want caring, understanding and empathy,” Jaskar said. “Caretakers must be humble and provide for their patients’ comfort and spiritual needs.” To that end, Casa de la Luz has a holistic team of caregivers, including nurses, social workers and chaplains, who provide for their hospice patients’ needs. Jaskar started out as a pharmacist, then earned his medical degree at the University of Wisconsin in 1971. He went into private practice, specializing in rheumatology, which led him to attend a rheumatology conference in 182 BizTucson

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Tucson. He quickly fell in love with the area and decided to move here, obtaining a fellowship in rheumatology at the University of Arizona. It led him to increase his medical reach into the field of geriatrics. In 1987, he was urged by Dr. Alan Crosby, a colleague at the Southern Arizona Veterans Administration, to apply for the medical director position at the VA. “I had other choices at the time, but I am so glad that I went there,” Jaskar said. Then, in 1991, he started an award-winning hospice and palliative care unit at the VA. In 1998, when Lynette Jaramillo and Agnes Poore started Casa de la Luz, they attended the Arizona Geriatrics Conference in Phoenix and heard a presentation by leading palliative care physician and author Dr. Ira Byock. “We immediately bought his book ‘Dying Well’ and read it cover to cover,” Poore said. “I wrote to him because it was clear that we needed a medical director that shared his passion and values regarding end of life. I asked if he could help us find someone like him.” Byock didn’t know anyone in Tucson, but suggested Dr. Paul Rousseau, the medical director at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Phoenix. Poore and Jaramillo explained

to Rousseau their desire to find the right medical director for their new hospice organization. Although he was interested, he was not able to leave his position in Phoenix and recommended Jaskar. “We found out that he was one of only two hospice and palliative care certified doctors in Tucson. We arranged to meet Dr. Jaskar at the VA on Rodeo Day in 1999,” said Poore. “I remember it vividly because Dr. Alan Crosby, whom Dr. Jaskar shared an office with, was wearing cowboy boots, and he only did that on Rodeo Day.” After the meeting, Jaskar agreed to become Casa’s first medical director while continuing his position at the VA. “Dr. Jaskar was the first person we hired. He took a huge leap of faith with us,” said Poore. In addition to serving as medical director at Casa and the VA, Jaskar educated the community about hospice as a presenter and Bioethics Committee chairman for the Pima County Medical Society. “There’s so much people can give if they choose to do so,” he said. “It doesn’t disturb me to be a patient here. The collaborative team approach is good, and they take great care of me.”

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Artwork Integral to Hospice Message Calendars Spread Throughout Community By April Bourie Bettina Mills creates artwork that is colorful and uplifting and conveys a positive image of everyday things. Her work is influenced by Diego Rivera and Mexican heritage. Mills’ paintings – a dozen of them – can be found hanging in Casa de la Luz Hospice facilities and offices, but it is the images she creates each year for the company’s calendar that makes an impact on the Tucson community. “We get requests every year for our calendars, which we distribute regularly to Casa business partners and referral sources,” said Meredith Ford, communications manager at Casa de la Luz. “We also provide them to anyone who would like one. In addition to Bettina’s attractive artwork, we layer messages about hospice throughout the calendar. It’s an inviting way to share what we do.” Mills’ family told her at age 10 that she should be an artist. “I drew all day long, and my father and grandfather were artists, so they told me that’s what I should do when I grow up,” she said. Born in Germany, she was 13 when her family moved to Tucson where she eventually got her bachelor’s degree in graphic design and illustration at the University of Arizona. Today, she is a freelance artist, work184 BizTucson

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ing in acrylics, watercolors, colored pencil and scratchboard, a reverse process where the paper is inked and the artist scrapes out highlights to create an image. Mills first designed graphics for the company. Now the calendar is the main project she creates for them, although she also does occasional small projects on the side. “My calendar artwork has evolved into its own style,” Mills said. The images in the calendar are original acrylic paintings on canvas that reflect the season when appropriate. She also has featured her own rescue dog, a heeler mix named Nikolai, in some of the images. It takes approximately one year to create the calendar, Mills explained. She sketches from December through March. Painting begins after that, usually completed by September. Layout begins in October, followed by printing in time to distribute the calendars for the holiday season. This year, the timeline is moved up a bit to be ready for Casa de la Luz’s 20th anniversary celebration on Nov. 9. The calendar is a creative way to promote Casa de la Luz’s services, but it also provides a benefit to Mills. “It is therapeutic for me to paint the images for the calendar. It’s good for the soul and gives me inner peace.”

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Susan Villarreal & Julie Evans Casa de la Luz Foundation

Foundation Supports Those in Need Families’ Way of Saying ‘Thanks’ By April Bourie The Casa de la Luz Foundation was created to solve a financial or emotional need of hospice patients and family members.

Perspectives,” “Dealing with Grief in the Practice of Caregiving,” and “History, Evolution and Present-Day Celebrations of Day of the Dead.”

Two years after Lynette Jaramillo and Agnes Poore formed Casa de la Luz Hospice, the foundation was borne from families who appreciated the care given to their dying loved ones.

Services provided by the foundation focus on making hospice patients and their families as comfortable as possible. It can be basic, such as providing money for housing and utility bills, or more involved, like the time the foundation arranged for a homebound patient to visit Tohono Chul Park just so she could get out of the house, said Susan Villarreal, the foundation’s board president.

“Patients’ families wanted to give them money to help others in hospice as thanks for taking such good care of their family members,” said Julie Evans, executive director of the Casa de la Luz Foundation. “So they decided to create the foundation.” The purpose of the charitable organization is to educate the Tucson community about hospice services and to supplement services provided to patients of limited means and their families, no matter who is providing their hospice care. A guide called “Five Wishes” is an educational tool provided by the foundation to help people determine their end-of-life medical care preferences, as well as who they want with them and what comfort measures should be provided. “By the time people arrive at the end of life, it may be too late to make these decisions,” Evans said.

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Another of the foundation’s educational programs is the annual End of Life Conference, which this year will be held Nov. 2 at the Westin La Paloma. A variety of sessions will be presented, including “Food, Grief and Death: Cross-Cultural

Items are also provided to soothe agitated patients, including stuffed animals, games or weighted blankets. Free bereavement books and journals are distributed throughout the community for those grieving the loss of a loved one, and referrals to grief support groups organized by Casa de la Luz Hospice are provided. All of the foundation’s programs are funded by donations which are usually made in memory of loved ones who were previously in hospice. Bereavement group participants often donate to thank the foundation for its support. Donations are accepted on the foundation’s website, www.casafoundation.org. “When the foundation was formed, Agnes and Lynette saw that people with limited incomes were going without,” Evans said. “Our hope is that we will grow to support a multitude of hospice patients, no matter where they are receiving hospice services.” Fall 2018 > > > BizTucson 185

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BizTECHNOLOGY

Computer Consults for Seniors

Comcast’s Teeniors Program Offers One-on-One Help By Tiffany Kjos Comcast is funding a pilot program in Tucson that pairs teenagers with older adults to solve all sorts of technical mysteries – such as how to talk on the phone and text simultaneously, how to use apps and how to thwart cyber criminals. The program, called Teeniors, originated in Albuquerque, N.M., and is being offered for free at the Northwest YMCA Pima County Community Center and Adult Centers. “We are excited about being the pilot here in Tucson for the Teeniors program,” said Anthony Wright, executive director of the Northwest YMCA. “Beyond the technology side of it, this also gives us an opportunity to bridge the gap between populations.” The program gives participants young and old the chance to view the other as leaders, Wright said. “Our teens can establish some leadership skills, plus patience in dealing with a different generation of folks. We are one of the few organizations that serve both teens and seniors,” said Wright. He noted the public’s perception that seniors don’t use the internet is incorrect. Many are using computers. “You’d be surprised how they use it to stay in touch” with family and friends. In addition to the Teeniors program, Comcast, which serves Tucson, Oro Valley, Marana and the Pascua Yaqui Tribe, is paying for thousands of free brochures and booklets about online safety, plus a series of public information announcements and a video accessible online. Internet safety is part of the Teeniors program. They may be years apart in age, but teens and seniors have the same

tendency to give out too much information online and be lured into sketchy schemes. “They’re both really trusting and have the willingness to share some information that should be kept private – personal information, Social Security numbers, addresses and financial information,” said Comcast’s Deneiva Knight, external affairs manager for Comcast’s Mountain West Region, who has also worked at the YMCA. Seniors were victims of scams totaling about $342 million nationwide last year alone, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Some seniors see stats like that and don’t want to get near a computer. Teeniors aims to educate participants so they’re no longer afraid of the internet or computers. One of the dozen Teeniors trainers is Palia Santoro, 18, a senior at Ironwood Ridge High School. “This gives us an opportunity to get more work experience and to have something to put on our résumés,” she said. “It gives experience for different volunteering.” Plus, Santoro said, it’s fun working with the seniors and teaching about technology, something with which she’s very comfortable. The first Teeniors workshop here was in June. Ten workshops are being offered through spring 2019. The sessions aren’t formatted as a course with lectures. Instead seniors have an open invitation to stop by and get one-on-one help about specific tasks and uses of technology. “They come in and ask ‘How do I use this in settings?’ or ‘How to I delete this email?’” Santoro said. “They

really don’t know how to install apps. A couple of ladies didn’t know how to answer their phones when another app was running.” Trish Lopez founded Teeniors in Albuquerque three years ago after watching her mother struggling with technology issues. Comcast reached out to her, Lopez said, and she’s thrilled to have Teeniors offered for the first time outside of New Mexico. The program is very much about empowering seniors. For example, during Teeniors programs the seniors hold whatever device they’re working on, instead of watching someone else at the controls. “It’s their fingers on the keyboard,” Lopez said. Wright would like to continue and grow the program at the YMCA. “We’re hoping to potentially expand this from just one branch location in our system to multiple locations,” he said. “We want to create some sustainability and some fundraisers around it.” But first, he said, “We want to make sure we have some solid outcomes we can articulate or present to potential funders, or Comcast, that this is what has been accomplished through the project.” Kimberly Smythe, 55 and a member of the Northwest YMCA, knows plenty about using computers but has gone to Teeniors sessions to find out more about various applications. “Every time I come I learn a little bit more about different applications you can install and how to use them,” she said. “It’s a wonderful program.”

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Find out more about internet safety and other technical information, including a schedule of upcoming Teeniors workshops, at Comcast’s Internet Essentials Learning Portal, www.InternetEssentials.com/Learning. www.BizTucson.com

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BizPHILANTHROPY

Bank of America grant recipients display projects summaries funded.

Bank of America Awards $240,000 in Grants A Tucson-born nonprofit that delivers food to the homebound and an agency that helps homeless kids stay in school are among the 19 recipients of grants totaling $240,000 from Bank of America. Other beneficiaries include nonprofits that help people who seek good jobs, that revitalize neighborhoods and that provide basic needs such as food and shelter. One recipient, Mobile Meals of Southern Arizona, has had Bank of America grants in prior years. That consistent support is important to the agency, which has only five paid staff members. “It means a lot to nonprofits when funders building a relationship understand some of the complex issues that nonprofits are trying to address. Things like senior hunger can’t be solved in one year,” said Tamara McKinney, executive director of the Mobile Meals, which was founded in Tucson 48 years ago. That agency received $10,000, which can be stretched a long way compared to other options for seniors. “We can provide two meals a day five days a week for the entire year for less than it costs to have someone in an assisted-living facility,” McKinney said. Mobile Meals is often confused with Meals on Wheels, which is federally funded, she said. “We don’t have the limits that Meals on Wheels does in terms of age,” she said. That means if someone is 59 years old and for health reasons is unable to prepare their own meals, Mobile Meals can take them on as a client. Another grant recipient, Youth On 190 BizTucson

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Their Own, focuses on people at the other end of the age spectrum. YOTO works with children and teenagers who by no fault of their own are homeless. The nonprofit helps them get housing, food and clothing, plus provides them a stipend – all so they can finish school. “The monthly stipend is often the only thing between staying in school or being forced to drop out because they need to support themselves,” Nicola Hartmann, These nonprofits received grants from Bank of America: u B’nai B’rith Covenant House of Tucson Arizona u Earn to Learn u Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona u Interfaith Community Services u Jobpath u Literacy Connects u Mobile Meals of Southern Arizona u Old Pueblo Community Services u Our Family Services u Tucson Center for Women and Children u United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona u Youth on Their Own

YOTO’s CEO, said in a press release. The nonprofit received $12,500. “This grant enables us to make a difference in the lives of more homeless youth in our community,” Hartmann said. Last school year YOTO helped more than 1,700 homeless students in grades 6-12. The grant will allow the nonprofit to hire more people for its Student Living Expense Program. More than 5,600 school-age children and teenagers in Pima County are homeless, according to Hartmann. Other recipients include JobPath that helps people find employment, while another nonprofit, Interfaith Community Services, backs families in financial distress. Adriana Kong Romero, Bank of America’s Tucson market president, is well aware that local nonprofits provide critical care. “So many of us are just one life event away from needing to depend on basic-needs services such as food banks or emergency shelters,” Romero said. Nonprofits not only help people in need, they have a significant effect on the fiscal health of communities as a whole, according to a study done by Arizona State University’s Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation. “The Arizona Nonprofits: Economic Power, Positive Impact Report” analyzed nonprofits statewide and found that in Pima County they create 63,300 jobs and generate $3.2 billion in wages and salaries. One in 16 Arizonans works for a nonprofit, making this sector the state’s fifthlargest private employer. Biz www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS COURTESY BANK OF AMERICA

By Tiffany Kjos


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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

BizMILESTONE

Ellie Patterson & Cindy Dhuey Co-Founders, The Temp Connection

Matching Bosses with Workers

The Temp Connection Celebrates 25 Years in Business By Tiffany Kjos It’s likely a hiring manager is rarely enthusiastic about hiring a new receptionist to replace the indispensable one that’s leaving. For 25 years, The Temp Connection has come to the rescue for companies finding themselves with a staffing need. Recruiting, interviewing, testing, vetting – “We do all of that,” said Cindy Dhuey, co-founder of the women-owned staffing services company that this year is celebrating a quarter-century in business. Dhuey and co-founder Ellie Patterson fill jobs on a temporary and temp-to-hire basis, often right away. That means quickly aligning an employee’s skills with those an employer requires. A huge component is making sure workers are a good fit – and that’s no cliché. 192 BizTucson

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“We sit down and get to know them so we feel comfortable sending them out,” Patterson said of the employees the agency places. The Temp Connection staffers also know their business clients well, so they can provide a worker who’s just right for the job. The partners met when Patterson and the staffing agency for which she worked were moving into the building where Dhuey worked for a financial services firm. Dhuey was in a bind because she needed a receptionist. Patterson was right there. “Cindy was my first client, and then we became friends,” Patterson said. Patterson ended up asking Dhuey if she’d like to go into business together. They researched various industries, includwww.BizTucson.com


They treat their staff like family. They are kind and giving, and I’ve never known them to not do the right thing. – Jennifer Delanie Operations Manager The Temp Connection

ing travel agencies and franchises, but weren’t happy with those options. They hit upon a staffing company, along with a third partner, who has since left. The trio had a business plan, operating agreement and an attorney when they launched the business. When looking for a loan, they were turned down by two large banks – likely, the women surmise, because the banks didn’t want to fund a woman-owned business. National Bank ended up backing them. Patterson and Dhuey do have an end game plan, but right now they’re happy to have survived and thrived – one of few staffing agencies that stayed afloat during the Great Recession. Patterson has this advice for would-be business owners: “Spend time researching. Is it viable? Will it be here in five years? And be flexible. Don’t be a Blackberry.” In the last quarter-century the company has worked with more than 3,000 clients and 22,000 employees. Dozens of them showed up at The Temp Connection’s 25th anniversary celebration in May at Vero Amore, a restaurant in Plaza Palomino at North Swan and East Fort Lowell roads. As they enjoyed hors d’oeuvres and libations, it was easy to find a few folks willing to explain why The Temp Connection’s staffers and clients stick around. Gail Craig-Jager is the financial and human resources administrator at Research Corporation for Science Advancement. Since 2012 she’s turned to The Temp Connection when she’s looking for a new employee, often in accounting or administration, and usually on a temp-for-hire basis. “They’re local, they’re friendly, you talk with the same person” every time, Craig-Jager said. “They do a great job of screening people.” Jennifer Delaney is operations manager at The Temp Connection’s seven-person office. “Cindy and Ellie are wonderful ladies and mentors,” said Delaney, who’s been with The Temp Connection 10 years. “They really make me want to be better and work harder for them. They treat their staff like family,” Delaney said. “They are kind and giving, and I’ve never known them to not do the right thing.”

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BizHONORS

Hispanic Business Leaders of the Year By Lee Allen

Time to party again – es el tiempo por Noche de Éxitos – the annual Night of Success Gala presented by the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. The traditionally sold-out event, slated this year for Oct. 20, has been a yearly highlight since its inception in 1998 – when Bill Valenzuela of Valenzuela Dry Wall put down his sheetrock and Carlotta Flores of El Charro Café stopped making chimichangas long enough to be honored as Tucson’s first Hispanic Business Man and Woman of the Year. Since then, a litany of Hispanic leaders have followed in their footsteps celebrating the accomplishments of the business community and bi-national/ bi-cultural programs in Southern Arizona and Mexico. With offices in Tucson and Hermosillo, Mexico, the Hispanic Chamber looks on both sides of the border for those who exemplify leadership in the international business world that adds value to Southern Arizona by proac-

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tively supporting a growing bi-national economy. This year’s accolades go to IBM’s Calline Sanchez and ASARCO’s Manuel Ramos. Like previous honorees, they are recognized as “incredible leaders who serve as role models for business owners throughout the region,” said Lea Marquez Peterson, Hispanic Chamber president and CEO since 2009. “It is our honor to recognize them as they join a very prestigious alumni group of Hispanic Business Men and Women of the Year.”

NOCHE DE ÉXITOS GALA & BI-NATIONAL BUSINESS AWARDS Presented by Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Saturday, Oct. 20, Casino del Sol Resort 6 p.m. to 11:45 p.m. $150 per person, $1,500 for table of 10 Sponsorship opportunities available. Contact Lydia Aranda (520) 620-0005

Also this year, Edith VillalobosZamora, owner of EmV Design Build, will receive the chamber’s first Rising Star Entrepreneur award. The interior designer and general contractor said, “Goals are dreams with deadlines – and there’s no limit to them. You just figure out what you want, focus on that ultimate destination, and give yourself stepping stones along the way to achieve the end result. If it’s a dream and I want it, I’ll figure out a way to go get it.” She’s not alone in those dreams and accomplishments. Owners and managers of Hispanic businesses are more and more frequently receiving all kinds of awards. According to the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Latino entrepreneurs have been starting businesses at a pace 15 times the national average over the last decade with more than 4 million Hispanic-owned firms throughout America, now representing in excess of $660 billion in revenue.

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Manuel Ramos

2018 Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Business Man of the Year

PHOTO: COURTESY TUCSON HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

BizHONORS

By Lee Allen Manuel Ramos, president and COO of ASARCO, is a veteran of the metals and mining industry who began at the lead smelter in Chihuahua in 1974. He’s held a number of titles on his way up the ASARCO career ladder, and is adding one as the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s Business Man of the Year for 2018. When Grupo Mexico acquired ASARCO in 1999, Ramos was manager of the copper refinery in La Caridad, Sonora. He rose to VP of lead and specialty metals, then was elevated to VP of metallurgical plants. In 2009, he was named president and COO responsible for several mines, smelters and refineries. Along the way he found time to obtain a bachelor’s degree plus two master’s degrees – one in business administration, the other in human resources. An active outdoorsman, hiker and cyclist, Ramos has ascended as high as 196 BizTucson

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18,493 feet into the clouds and finished the 109-mile-distance of El Tour de Tucson in less than 5 hours. Yet those accomplishments pale in light of the latest honor, which came as a surprise when a committee showed up with balloons and flowers. “I thought these people were coming back from a party somewhere until I discovered that the party was in my honor,” he said. “I started 44 years ago and have worked my way all the way up the ladder – but it takes a team to be successful. If somebody tells you, ‘I did it by myself,’ that’s not true. You need to surround yourself with good people and let them get to work. Everyone in our company is a worker, we just have different responsibilities – but we’re all in the same boat to make things better through teamwork.” Ramos helped lead ASARCO from bankruptcy and into profitability, increasing operational productivity and

maximizing property potential – all while emphasizing safety and environmental compliance efforts. “Do it right. Do it safe,” he said. For those who might aspire to follow in his footsteps, he said, “challenge yourself each time to do things better. Don’t just do the job, do it better than necessary. And then remember the key to success comes from working hard. Surround yourself with good people, but challenge yourself to work hard. Luck plays a part too. But with or without luck, hard work is still the key to being successful. “Receiving this recognition validates my theory of consistently working hard and it is an honor not only for me and my ethos, but for the members of the team that I surround myself with.”

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PHOTO: COURTESY TUCSON HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

BizHONORS

Calline Sanchez

2018 Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Business Woman of the Year By Lee Allen

Calline Sanchez was featured in BizTucson’s Winter 2018 edition as a STEM superstar, IBM’s VP of the enterprise storage division, and leader of a team of engineers and scientists around the globe. Sanchez can now add yet another honor to her already-impressive resume that includes two bachelor’s degrees and an MBA. Her professor father set her on the path of success when he bought her a coding compiler when she was in elementary school. She went on to earn three college degrees – bachelor’s in communication and information technology and an MBA from the University of Arizona. Sanchez began her career at Sandia National Laboratories – where her grandfather once worked – as a coder and database developer. She joined IBM at its Armonk headquarters in New York 20 years ago as a fast-tracker. She traveled to more than 25 countries before arriving in Tucson in 2009, calling it “the Silicon Desert.” Today, at age www.BizTucson.com

41 and still climbing the career ladder, she sees the company known as Big Blue “a big candy store” with lots of opportunities. While completing a recent 12-hour work day that began at 4:30 a.m., she said, “Years ago, I saw a magazine listing the 50 most powerful women in businesses – and that became the No. 1 goal on my Top-10 list – to eventually become a member of that group by sticking to the value system I learned as a child. First, be authentic. Be yourself, be real, and be able to convince others what we can accomplish together. Second, be forthright in every situation. And third, build in a trust factor in all relationships where your word is your bond. “I am myself in all things I do, forthright in every situation I encounter. In many cases, I am my own worst enemy because I’m always comparing yesterday with today, wondering if I could have done things better, shown more empathy. I question everything I do try-

ing to figure out if I can do it better. As a leader, it’s my goal to establish a level of trust with those around me and to set the example.” In fact, she was doing so – discussing leadership decisions with her corporate boss when the awards committee showed up to present the honor acknowledging her hard work, long hours and dedication to doing things right. “Our Tucson Hispanic Chamber is pleased to honor Calline Sanchez as our 2018 Hispanic Business Woman of the Year! “She is considered one of IBM’s thought leaders and has achieved great success in her role as VP of IBM Enterprise Storage based in Tucson. Calline was selected for this honor because of her passion in engaging her company’s employees in the community and for the role model she provides to Latinas throughout the region,” said Lea Marquez-Peterson, president and CEO, Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Biz Fall 2018

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BizFILM

From left – Little Pink House, Lords of Dogtown

Year Three for Film Fest Tucson Featuring Movies That ‘Tell A Good Story’

It’s time for the third annual Film Fest Tucson, Oct. 11-13, now making a larger footprint downtown with additional venues and more screens. This may be the youngest of the city’s many cinema celebrations, but it keeps growing and has always finished in the black. “We achieved break-even finances for the second year running,” said Herb Stratford, founder and festival director. “We’ve added more screens at the new AC Hotel Tucson Downtown, are holding a Saturday evening event at the Fox Tucson Theatre and have collaborations with several other nonprofit organizations. “The main thing we want to do is present quality films that aren’t mainstream – unique films that will start conversations.” While elements of the program were still being finalized at press time, nine new feature-length narratives are already booked, along with 16 documentaries – four of them to be shown in the popular free outdoor evenings on a 30-foot inflatable screen adjacent to the Scottish Rite Cathedral. Adding more Hollywood glitz to the weekend is a Saturday night spotlight tribute program at the Fox Theatre to honor Director Catherine Hardwicke, as well as several additional actresses, Haley Lu Richardson and Sophia Mitri Schloss. Hardwicke’s film résumé includes working a crew spot on three pictures shot in Arizona: “Tombstone,” “Tank Girl” and “Three Kings.” At Film Fest Tucson Hardwicke will 198 BizTucson

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introduce and screen one of the most popular movies she directed, “Lords of Dogtown” (2005). Other films she helmed include “Thirteen,” “Twilight” and “Red Riding Hood.” “She is one of only a few female directors of action films,” said Stratford, adding that while Hardwicke is here she will lead a master class in directing. Other industry professionals appearing on festival panels include directors from several of the films and Chris Gore, writer, film critic and founder of Film Threat magazine. “One thing I’ve learned from doing these three festivals is that there definitely is an audience for the films we want to present,” Stratford said. “Tucson’s other film festivals are more aimed at niche audiences – the Jewish Film Festival, Tucson Cine Mexico, a couple of horror film fests. “We’re trying to build Film Fest Tucson as a destination festival with wide appeal. There are always so many more films being made than what audiences get to see at the mall theaters. We want to connect Tucson with films they won’t have a chance to see anywhere else. “But the bottom line for the festival is to pick movies that tell a good story – even the documentaries,” he said. “Once a film hooks me, I start thinking of a local collaboration I can encourage.” This year the Nathaniel Kahn documentary “The Price of Everything” examines how the actual price tag for a piece of art is determined. It’s described

in the Internet Movie Database as “having unprecedented access to pivotal artists and the white-hot market surrounding them, this film dives deep into the contemporary art world, holding a funhouse mirror up to our values and our times – where everything can be bought and sold.” Stratford is presenting “The Price of Everything” as a collaboration with the Tucson Museum of Art. Another quixotic view from the art world is found in “Beuys,” being screened as a collaboration with Tucson’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Joseph Beuys was a German conceptual artist and activist popular in the 1960s and 1970s in both Europe and the United States. Most notably, he found meaning in the so-called “happenings” in groups that produced art out of pure emotion. According to Wikipedia, Beuys is “widely regarded as one of the most influential artists of the second half of the 20th century.” “I never stop looking all year long for new films I can show – staying in touch with filmmakers, learning about their upcoming projects,” said Stratford. All of the festival’s feature-length narrative films and documentaries are recent releases seeking new audiences. Still to be announced for this year’s fest are similar films connected to the worlds of fashion, architecture and jazz – topics this film festival always explores. For current news about the festival visit filmfesttucson.com.

Biz www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF FILM FEST TUCSON

By Chuck Graham


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RINK PHOTOS: WILLIAM J. DAWSON MEMORIAL DEK HOCKEY RINK

BizRECREATION

Pictured top left – Bob Hoffman, President, Tucson Roadrunners. Foursome from left – Noah Pierce, Sundt Construction intern; Kimberly Hoidel, Sundt Construction; Brody Slaugenhoup, Sundt Construction intern; David Ollanik, Sundt Construction. Next to foursome is Debbie Wagner, President & CEO, Boys & Girls Clubs of Tucson. Far right is Mark Irwin, Vice Chair & Secretary, Rio Nuevo Board.

DEK Hockey Rink for Youth Unveiled

Community Pulls Together, Raises $250,000 Call it happenstance or serendipity but when Mark Irvin spent time at Luke Air Force Base not long ago, he happened to see a DEK hockey rink. Irvin, being curious, asked, “What’s up?” Next thing you know – as he put it – “I want one of those things in Tucson.” And voilà – it became a reality. It now sits between Doolen Middle School and the Frank & Edith Morton ClubhouseBoys & Girls Club of Tucson in the heart of the city near Grant and Country Club roads. Its formal name is the William J. Dawson Memorial DEK Hockey Rink 200 BizTucson

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– after the beloved man who was the club’s executive director for 30 years in Tucson. “I had to figure out who was going to help me finish the project, grade the site, pour the pad and who would help construct the thing,” said Irvin. “This is something that just wouldn’t pop up.” As usual, Tucson stepped up as nearly 20 organizations and hundreds of man hours came together for the rink that was built in record time. “Nobody said no,” said Irvin, vice chair and secretary of the Rio Nuevo Board and owner of Mark Irvin Commercial Real Estate Services. “When we

went and asked for the help everybody said, ‘Yes.’ ” The total cost of the project was $250,000. It’s a rink 65 feet by 130 feet that’s so cool looking and refreshing that dragonflies want to be there because they think the cool, blue bottom is water. Players don’t need skates or ice to play given the playing surface. The venue can be used for playing basketball and volleyball as well. Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild proclaimed: “Hockey in the desert? No problem. “This is an example of good corporate citizenship,” he added. “On behalf www.BizTucson.com

EVENT PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Steve Rivera


of the students at Doolen, their parents and the entire community, I want to thank the Tucson Roadrunners and all the other organizations that made this hockey rink happen. It may be the hottest day of the year (for its unveiling), but thanks to these folks, that doesn’t mean you can’t play hockey here in Tucson.” Sundt Construction donated its services to lead the project partnering with other contractors including Hardrock Concrete, Concord Construction, CEMEX, Sunstate Equipment, Harvey’s Trucking and Penhall Company to clear the field and building the foundation for the rink. DEK Hockey, the manufacturer of the rink, delivered the rink and volunteers assembled it. “We appreciate the opportunity to help out an organization like the Boys & Girls Club of Tucson,” said Ian McDowell, regional director for Sundt’s southwest district. “They provide a unique service to the Tucson community. I had the opportunity to meet a couple of the kids from the Boys & Girls Club recently. They’re an impressive bunch of kids who deserve something cool on their campus like an outdoor hockey rink.”

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I had to figure out who was going to help me finish the project, grade the site, pour the pad and who would help construct the thing.

– Mark Irvin Owner, Mark Irvin Commercial Real Estate Services

The interest in hockey is increasing in Tucson. The presence of the Tucson Roadrunners has helped. Ahron Cohen, president and CEO of the Arizona Coyotes, Roadrunners’ NHL parent club, said they are committed to “growing the game of hockey in our state” and hinted there might be more DEK rinks in Tucson in the future. Roadrunners President Bob Hoffman said the popularity of hockey has increased in the two years the Roadrun-

ners have been in Tucson. “We are very encouraged by the tremendous support that we’ve received from our fans and corporate partners.” He called it the “next step” in the process of trying to be part of the community “and this is one of the avenues that gets our sport out there where they will learn some of the finer points of hockey – teamwork, sportsmanship and being coached. This takes it to the next level.” Hoffman said the three DEK rinks in Phoenix have had a positive impact there and are being used regularly. “There’s constant activity,” Hoffman said. He anticipates that to be the case here and at the new DEK rink – including having some Roadrunners players get involved with clinics and tournaments at the new venue. After watching the Roadrunners play, Hoffman said, “This is the next step. Kids ask their parents ‘How can we play hockey?’ We know the answer has been challenging with little opportunity – but now hopefully we can put some (more of these) all round and they can have the opportunity.”

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BizCYCLING

CYCLING UPDATE:

New Bike Park, El Tour de Tucson, Mt. Lemmon Gravel Grinder By Romi Carrell Wittman A new 100-acre mountain biking park with miles of bike trails as well as dirt jump tracks for both kids and adults is coming to town. This will certainly burnish Tucson’s already shining reputation as Cycling City. The Hundred Acre Wood Community Bike Park will be centrally located at Golf Links Road and Alvernon Way. Riders of all ages and ability levels will be able to learn to ride on mountainbike-specific trails and progressively develop their skills in a safe and wellsigned environment. “Adding a bike park to the more than 400 miles of rideable trail we have in Pima County will truly make Tucson one of the best places to live and ride in the U.S.,” said Evan Pilling, executive director of the Sonoran Desert Mountain Bicyclists. The project got the final green light in July, when the Tucson City Council approved the Hundred Acre Wood Master Plan. A lease agreement with Davis-Monthan Air Force Base gives the city the authority to operate and maintain the park. The total cost for the project is roughly $2.5 million, and upon completion will include a new entrance from Golf Links Road, a paved parking lot, ramadas and dusk-til-dawn lighting. The park will be constructed in phases, with initial site cleanup and trail clearing slated for this fall and winter. SDMB is currently fundraising to fully cover construction costs. The site of the future park has been effectively unusable since Golf Links Road was constructed some 20 years ago. The location was identified about 10 years ago – yet it took the collaboration of several groups to get the project off the ground. Sonoran Desert Moun202 BizTucson

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tain Bicyclists worked with the city of Tucson to create the master plan. Financial support from Tucson Medical Center, Carondolet, Banner–University Medical Center and the International Mountain Bicycling Association made the master plan possible. “Hundred Acre Wood will help meet growing demand for a bike park that is centrally located and open to all skill levels,” Pilling said. Existing parks are

Adding a bike park to the more than 400 miles of rideable trail we have in Pima County will truly make Tucson one of the best places to live and ride in the U.S.

– Evan Pilling Executive Director Sonoran Desert Mountain Bicyclists

located on the outskirts of town and are geared toward experienced riders. “The Hundred Acre Wood will provide an important entry point to the sport,” Piling said. “The bike park is sited in the geographic center of Tucson, and is adjacent to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and several historically underserved neighborhoods. It is truly a win for the entire Tucson community.”

Get Your Ride On – Mount Lemmon Gravel Grinder, Oct. 27

Itching for an off-road biking adventure? The Mount Lemmon Gravel Grinder may be just the ticket. The race, which is in its third year, takes place on one of Arizona’s most iconic gravel roads – the “Control Road” that runs down the backside of the Catalina Mountains. The road, which connects the village of Summerhaven on Mount Lemmon to the town of Oracle, was built in 1920 and is known not only for the sweeping views it offers, but also its extremely steep and narrow passage. Translation: It’s scary – even in a truck. Yet event organizer Jim McCarrell said that, on a bike, the road isn’t at all scary. “You can maneuver better on a bike than in a truck,” he said. “And the views of the San Pedro River Valley are just incredible.” The Control Road, aka the real Mount Lemmon highway, was actually the original way to get to Summerhaven from Tucson. It was also the only way to get to Mount Lemmon until the Catalina Highway was built many years later. It gets its unique name from the fact that, because of the narrow road, two lanes of traffic couldn’t be safely accommodated. So a schedule of sorts was developed to control the flow of traffic – with certain times designated for traveling to Mount Lemmon and other times designated for descending from the mountain. McCarrell says riding on the Control Road is a backcountry experience with an urban setting just over the ridge. “If the Catalina Mountains are a fence, you’re in Tucson’s backyard,” he said. An avid cycler, McCarrell was an outdoor adventure manager at Miraval www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: DAMION ALEXANDER

Hundred Acre Wood Community Bike Park

Get Your Ride On – El Tour de Tucson, Nov.17

You can tell Thanksgiving is coming up when you see more and more cyclists training along Tucson’s streets and miles of bike paths. Founded in 1983 as a small, charity fundraising event, El Tour de Tucson has grown to become long-standing tradition in the Old Pueblo. The annual Saturday-beforeThanksgiving event has gained worldwide attention, attracting cyclists from all over the globe. This year’s event is on track to exceed its cumulative fundraising goal of $100 million this year. An estimated 9,000 riders will race on 102-, 75-, 52- and 26-mile courses. There are also Fun Rides of 10, 4, 1 and a quarter-mile – for those who want to take part, but aren’t necessarily game for the longer courses. All rides conclude at Armory Park downtown near the Children’s Museum Tucson. Riders and their friends and family are encouraged to stay after the race for the El Tour Downtown Fiesta. The Easterseals Blake Foundation is the primary beneficiary of this year’s El Tour de Tucson event. Other nonprofits also participate and raise funds as supporting beneficiaries.

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El Tour de Tucson

Mount Lemmon Gravel Grinder Fall 2018

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PHOTO: DAMION ALEXANDER

Arizona Resort & Spa for many years. Later, after becoming a stay-at-home dad, he was looking for something to do. After successfully organizing some cycling events, friends encouraged him to stage a race on the Control Road. And so the Mount Lemmon Gravel Grinder was born. This year’s event takes place on the last Saturday of October and features three races – 60, 50 and 40 miles – as well as dozens of activities for friends and family. “I have two kids – I look for events that will have something for the kids to do during the race,” McCarrell said. “Mr. Nature is coming out to perform, there’s a kids’ race and REI is bringing yard games.” McCarrell expects the event to top last year, when 188 riders took part. “Mount Lemmon is known worldwide as a cyclist destination,” he said. “People don’t even know the Control Road is back there. It’s a really amazing experience to ride it.”

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BizBRIEFS 2018 Pima Federal Golf Classic Volunteer Staff at the Golf Club at Dove Mountain

Pima Federal Credit Union Tees Up for Teachers

Nearly 95 percent of teachers nationwide shell out their own money for school supplies, spending on average $480 a year. And teachers in the poorest districts pay the most. Pima Federal Credit Union is doing its part to address this need through an annual golf event that this year brought in $50,000, which will go directly to local teachers. The funds are distributed via $50 gift cards to teachers who request one. The Pima Federal Golf Classic partners with the nonprofit Tucson Values Teachers to provide the cards. An arm of TVT, Tucson Supplies Teachers, is working to stretch that donation by raising money to match the $50,000 from Pima Federal.

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Pima Federal Credit Union is the largest supporter of the Tucson Supplies Teachers supply drive, said Katie Rogerson, Tucson Values Teachers’ COO. “The supply drive is a great way for our community to show support and appreciation for teachers, and we’re grateful for Pima Federal taking the lead,” Rogerson said. “As a credit union founded by teachers, Pima Federal understands the critical role of teachers in the success of students and our future.”   A group of teachers cobbled together $84 in 1951 to found the credit union. Today it has a main office on North Oracle Road and eight financial center locations. “The Pima Federal Golf Classic is

a great annual event that brings our business partners, staff and community together to help our teachers purchase supplies for their classrooms, which ultimately contributes to the success of our kids’ education,” said Angi Griffin, Pima Federal’s chief marketing officer. The golf outing has raised $367,000 since it started, with help from sponsors, golfers, media partners and the community. “We love that we can host an event that is so much fun for participants while embodying the essence of the credit union philosophy of people helping people,” Griffin said.     Teachers may request a gift card at www.tucsonvaluesteachers.org.

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Robyn Frey

Kerry Stratford

Steven Meckler

Alexis Favis

Tucson Advertising Federation Presents Awards

Robin Frey and Kerry Stratford joined the Tucson Advertising Federation Educational Foundation’s Hall of Fame during a September presentation. Frey, president and creative director of FReY Creative Marketing, and Stratford, president and chief creative officer of The Caliber Group, were honored at Hall of Achievement Awards festivities by the nonprofit arm of the Tucson Advertising Federation. Photographer Steven Meckler earned the Silver Medal for outstanding contributions to the advertising industry. Alexis Favis, a senior account manager with Madden Media, was given the Next Generation Award. After earning her fine arts degree, Frey moved Tucson and eventually joined Wettstein Advertising. She remained through several ownership and name changes before taking over the

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54-year-old company this year. Frey serves on 390th Memorial Museum board and is a member of the Southern Arizona Home Builders Association, Local First Arizona, Public Relations Society of America and the Rotary Club of Tucson. She was given AdFed’s Phyllis Ehlinger Women of Excellence Award. Tucson native Stratford, a University of Arizona fine arts graduate, opened a graphic design business before joining Boelts Bros. Design. In 2007, she and Linda Welter merged businesses to form The Caliber Group. Stratford’s companies have provided pro bono services to dozens of nonprofits. She’s earned leadership awards from Arizona Forward, the Arizona Small Business Association and Greater Tucson Leadership. She was named the

foundation’s 2009 Advertising Professional of the Year. Meckler has spent 25 years photographing commercial and editorial subjects. He’s published two books and taught photography to community college and high school students. His AdFed service includes board membership and a 20-year supporter of its awards competition. He’s received an Advertising Professional of the Year Award and is a 2014 foundation Hall of Fame inductee. Favis develops omnichannel marketing programs for tourism marketing groups. She is a board member and past president of AD2, the AdFed affiliate for young professionals. Her award recognizes advertising leadership for those younger than 40.

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BizSALES

Friends Make the Best Customers By Jeffrey Gitomer

Your mom said it best. As a child, when you were fighting or arguing with a sibling or friend, your mom would say, “Billy, you know better than that! Now you make friends with Johnny.” Your mother never told you to use the alternativeof-choice close or the sharp-angle close on Johnny. She just said make friends. That may have been one of the most powerful sales lessons you ever got. It is estimated that more than 50 percent of sales are made because of friendship. In the South it’s called “the good-old-boy network.” In the North they say it’s “Who you know,” but it’s really just friendship selling. If you think you’re going to get the sale because you have the best product, best service or best price, dream on, Bubba. You’re not even half right. If 50 percent of sales are made on a friendly basis, and you haven’t made friends with the prospect (or customer), you’re missing 50 percent of your market. Friends don’t need to sell friends using sales techniques. Think about it: You don’t need sales techniques when you ask a friend out or ask for a favor – you just ask. You don’t need more sales techniques. You need more friends. This does not eliminate your need to be a master salesman. You must know sales techniques to get the other half of the market, and sometimes even your friends need to be sold. So keep listening to those tapes in your car. Now think about your best customers. How did they get that way? Don’t you have great relationships with them? If you’re friends with your best customer, it will often eliminate the need for price checking, price negotiating and deliverytime demands. You can even occasionally give bad service and still keep the customer. There’s another huge bonus to being friends – competition is virtually eliminated. Your best competitor couldn’t blast you away from a customer who is also a friend. 206 BizTucson

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Most salespeople think that unless they are calling a customer to sell something that it’s a wasted call. Nothing could be further from the truth. How do you start? Slowly. It takes time to develop a relationship. It takes time to build a friendship. If you are reading this and thinking “I don’t have time for this relationship stuff, I’m too busy making sales” – find a new profession, this one won’t last long. Here are a few places to meet or take your customer. A different venue than the office will begin building friendships and relationships:

A ballgame

The theater

A concert

A gallery crawl

A Chamber after-hours event

A community help project

A breakfast, a lunch, a dinner

A seminar given by your company.

Having moved from the North to the South has helped me understand the value of business friends. They are much easier to establish in the South. I’m often in conversations where someone is lamenting the fact they can’t get into or around the so-called the good-old-boy network. That is the biggest bunch of baloney and lamest sales excuse I’ve heard. All the salesperson is saying is that he has failed to establish a relationship or make a friend AND SOMEONE ELSE HAS! Biz

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of 12 best-selling books, including “The Sales Bible” and “The Little Red Book of Selling” and “The Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude.” His real-world ideas and content are also available as online courses at www.GitomerLearningAcademy. com. For information about training and seminars visit www.Gitomer. com or www.GitomerCertifiedAdvisors.com, or email Jeffrey personally at salesman@gitomer.com. © 2018 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from GitGo, LLC, Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. (704) 333-1112

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BizBRIEFS

Michael Guymon Native Tucsonan and University of Arizona alumnus Michael S. Guymon is the Tucson Metro Chamber’s newest VP. He will manage local public policy and workforce development and attraction programs. For the past 10 years, Guymon was VP of regional partnerships at Sun Corridor Inc. Before that he was director of the Metropolitan Pima Alliance. He also has worked as a political consultant, chief of staff for City Council Member Fred Ronstadt and assistant VP at the chamber. Biz

Gustavo Corte There’s a new face at RBC Wealth Management – Gustavo Corte, a graduate of the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. He has four years of experience as a financial adviser. ”What made this company desirable to me is the reputation it has among other financial services firms in Tucson,” Corte said. “This office in particular is very active in giving back to the community, both at a corporate level and at a personal level.”

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PHOTOS COURTESY TENWEST

BizMILLENNIALS

From beer gardens to interactive panel sessions, TENWEST seeks to engage all.

TENWEST Festival Focus on Collaboration & Social Impact By Lee Allen Traditionally we save our “thanks” for Thanksgiving, yet we have much to be grateful for during the month of October – when we pay homage to things like cheese, chiles, corn and apples, as well as celebrating Bullying Prevention and Bat Appreciation month in the calendar’s 10th cycle. For Tucson, the month means one of the city’s larger annual outings – the TENWEST Festival – now a 10-day celebration of science, technology, collaboration, innovation and impact that draws thousands downtown and elsewhere. “Startup Tucson has worked to develop the TENWEST Festival into a community impact model,” said Dre Voelkel, programs and events director for Startup Tucson, which created the event in 2015 as part of its mission to drive economic development in Southern Arizona. 210 BizTucson

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“Part of our mission is to grow a strong, vibrant startup ecosystem of local companies, entrepreneurs and talent,” she said. “Cities that have built great startup communities all have one thing in common and that is a supportive culture that startups love to be a part of,” said Liz Pocock, Startup Tucson’s interim CEO and former COO. She also was last year’s festival director. “Tucson’s first step in achieving the caliber of startup community like you’ll find in Austin or Seattle or Boulder began with the first TENWEST Festival. It’s exciting to keep growing the festival by expanding on the partner model that worked so well for us last year,” she said. “It’s all about collaboration and social impact moving forward – more diverse and innovative content for attendees to engage with and highlighting what’s great in, and for, Tucson.”

One of the festival founders, Greg Teesdale, has said the whole concept began with “a sheet of paper and half a dozen people in a room. All we had was an idea that needed to be developed.” They began developing the event as “an opportunity to discover what the next Tucson will look like.” Specific definitions are hard to come by, though Pocock tries it this way – “TENWEST Festival is a celebration of all the things that unite us as a city and offers something for everyone – from music to technology to art, film, food and in-depth thoughtful content about social impact and sustainability. “The uniting vision and message is that Tucson is a fantastic, unique place – and all of us want to be a part of preserving it and moving it into an economically vibrant future. We come at it from different angles, but we’re all on the same page about it – sharing the www.BizTucson.com


Sharing ideas and experiences, TENWEST is a celebration of innovation and culture.

Returns Oct. 12-21 common goal of seeing Tucson remain the colorful, quirky, gritty, exceptional town we love.” In excess of 5,000 people turned out for last fall’s presentation to listen and learn, taking advantage of more than 60 unique talks, workshops and panels throughout the week. This year’s event, Oct. 12-21, takes place in multiple locations including downtown, the Tucson Convention Center and the University of Arizona Student Union. Organizers anticipate between 6,000 and 7,000 participants. “In addition to 10 unique partner events and sessions with experts discussing cutting-edge techniques and developments, an inaugural FUSE event block party will showcase local music and its makers,” Voelkel said. Among the more tantalizing marketing ploys designed to attract new festival goers is this inducement posted on the www.BizTucson.com

TENWEST website: “Imagine crossing paths with something you’ve never seen before, the awe and intrigue you might experience. Or crossing paths with someone different from you, the things you might learn from one another.” TENWEST created different paths – art, technology, entrepreneurship, communities – to provide anchor points to facilitate discovery for festival-goers. Fletcher McCusker, chair of the Rio Nuevo board of directors, serves as chairman of the board of Startup Tucson, which oversees the festival. “It’s definitely evolving,” he said. “It was initially developed to pattern Austin’s South by Southwest, but we already have one of those, so it’s moving to something more Tucson-centered – focusing on invention, innovation, startup companies and networking – and designed to attract a millennial audience. You’ll see less music and more world-

class speakers and technical events as we go forward. I personally call it a celebration of invention with its own Tucson kind of flavor.” Schedules were still being formulated at press time, but will include 2nd Saturday Downtown, specific focus on things like Social Impact, Idea Funding, Coffee with Community Catalysts and the United Way Day of Caring, mixed in with numerous lectures and workshops, a Film Fest, and the TENWEST Beer Garden for networking. The event is supported by a host of community sponsors, including title sponsors Arizona Commerce Authority and the University of Arizona. Log on to www.TENWEST.com/schedule for updated information including times and locations. Fall 2018

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

El Rio Vecinos executive team from left â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ryan Maese, Treasurer; Sarah Davis, President; Josh Plicht, VP; Bobby Bakos, Event Co-Chair; Shaima Namazifard, Secretary. Not pictured, Alexis Chavez, Event Co-Chair.

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BizMILLENNIALS

El Rio Vecinos Engage Young Professionals Bow Tie Block Party Has Raised $356,455 By Christy Krueger El Rio Health was created in 1970 as a small neighborhood health center designed to serve southside and westside residents who had little or no access to quality healthcare. Local neighborhood associations supported the plan, and University of Arizona and Pima County helped get it off the ground. The organization has grown and thrived, and now has engaged Tucson’s young professionals as a force in fundraising to provide healthcare services for those need. The mastermind was Dan Chambers, who had recently retired from real estate and was ready to pursue an idea he’d been chewing on for years. He wanted to mentor young Tucson professionals to develop fundraising skills. Chambers felt having more of a connection to the community and to their peers would help keep them in Tucson. “I saw what a good organization could do,” he said. “If you have young people – that’s our treasure and we need to keep them.” Chambers approached El Rio Foundation, the fundraising arm for El Rio Health Center, and Brenda Goldsmith, the foundation’s executive director. She recognized it as a significant opportunity – because El Rio has 106,000 patients, more than 10,000 of them without insurance, and every dollar helps. Chambers joined the foundation’s board of directors and got to work recruiting. “We networked out into community businesses and asked them who do you have in your company that could fit,” Goldsmith said. Membership requirements include being 25 to 39 years of age, having a college degree plus two years in their field – or no college but six www.BizTucson.com

years of work experience in one area. They came up with a founding group of 12 – which later grew to 40 – who set out to write bylaws, determine what type of fundraisers they would have and decide on a name. After looking at the history of El Rio, the group appropriately agreed to be called Vecinos – Spanish for neighbors. As far as a fundraiser, they were divided. Some wanted a block-party type of event and others wanted a bow-tie affair. They decided to merge the two ideas and the Bow Tie Block Party concept was launched, the first one taking place in 2014. Sarah Davis, this year’s president, has been with the group for five years. During that period, she said, awareness of Vecinos has increased tremendously, and now young professionals are knocking at the door to join. “Interest has grown, more so in the fifth year. We have a waiting list and we get feedback from people who went to the block party,” Davis said. “We have a very diverse membership. Several Vecinos were represented at last year’s 40 Under 40 Awards.” Josh Plicht, Vecinos 2018 VP-elect, was drawn into the organization for several reasons and has been personally rewarded in many ways. His first exposure was through his mother, who worked at El Rio Health. “I came in for a primary care provider at the clinic and I was impressed by the compassion of the group.” Then Chambers encouraged him to join Vecinos and attend socials. “It was the best advice – I’m glad I did. This is one of the most fulfilling things I’ve done. It is truly special.” Each year Vecinos members hold a retreat to select the specific El Rio pro-

gram that will benefit from the fundraising party. Bobby Bakos, who was Vecinos rookie of the year in 2017 and co-chairs this year’s party with Alexis Chavez, explained the process. “We are presented with options. The topics are given ahead of the retreat so we can do due diligence.” For 2018, as in the past four years, the group selected El Rio’s pediatric dental program to be the beneficiary of the Vecinos fundraiser. The Bow Tie Block Party has nearly reached its attendance goal of 1,000 each year, and the Vecinos hope to sell out the 2018 party, which takes place Sept. 22 at the Tucson Scottish Rite Cathedral downtown. Having major sponsors including the Chris Lawler team at NOVA Home Loans and Mercy Care, plus in-kind vendor donations, helps direct more funds to El Rio – to date totaling $356,455. “The mayor says it’s one of his favorite charity events,” Goldsmith said. “It’s engaging, very high energy and fun. You must be 21 to attend, but it is multigenerational.” Bakos added, “There’s something for everyone. It’s very diverse. It’s rare that at the same party I’ll have my younger friends and my parents.” The indoor/ outdoor event includes bands, DJs, contests, dancing, local breweries and local restaurants. Vecinos members remain passionate about El Rio Health and giving their time to such an important community organization. As Plicht said, “One out of 10 Tucsonans go to El Rio, and the caliber of people is the best representatives of Tucson healthcare.”

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BizDEVELOPMENT

Tech Parks Arizona Selects Developers Two Mixed-Use Tech Park Sites: The Village and The Bridges

Tech Parks Arizona recently announced the Bourn Companies as developer of The Village at the Rita Road campus and The Boyer Company as developer of the Innovation and Technology Complex at Tech Park at The Bridges on Kino Parkway. The Village is being built to attract more millennials to work at the UA Tech Park at Rita Road and to provide new dining, retail and hotel options for southeast Tucson. “We’ve seen an increase in the number of millennials working in the tech industry recently,” said Bruce Wright, UA associate VP of Tech Parks Arizona. “They put new demands on their workplace as they want to live close by and have access to recreation, dining and social activities where they work.” The Village will be developed at the west end of the UA Tech Park on a 175-acre site near Kolb Road and Science Park Drive. It will include commercial, retail, residential and hotel developments, walking and biking paths, and open spaces for both Tech Park employees and the surrounding community to enjoy. The project is in the master-plan design phase, although 214 BizTucson

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the final plan will evolve to meet market demand, said Don Bourn, founder and CEO of Bourn Companies. To create the master plan, current employees were surveyed to determine their preferences for what to include. The next step will be to conduct a joint market analysis to understand what’s needed in the area. “We don’t want to compete with Houghton Town Center or any of the other nearby retail developments,” said Wright. “We also need to look at residential offerings to determine the right mix of hotels, apartments, single-family stand-alone rental complexes and single-family homes to build.” Both Wright and Bourn said focus groups or town-hall meetings could also be held in the future to obtain community input. “We are excited to work on this project because it is an opportunity to do a large-scale, mixed-use development that can create a real node in southeast Tucson,” Bourn said. The Bridges at Kino Parkway and Interstate 10 is another location that has the potential to become a popular node of mixed-used development. Costco and Walmart are already on www.BizTucson.com

IMAGES: COURTESY OF TECH PARKS ARIZONA

By April Bourie


location, and Geico recently announced that it would build a 200,000-square-foot office there for its regional customerservice operations. The Boyer Company is in charge of developing the Innovation and Technology Complex at the UA Tech Park at The Bridges, providing a total of 300,000 square feet of office and lab space. Tech Launch Arizona – the UA’s program that launches new technologies and inventions into the marketplace – will occupy a portion of the first building. Space also will be available for other technology companies to enhance Tech Launch Arizona’s ability to coordinate with those companies when introducing new technologies to the market. The idea is to create an “innovation district” in the center of Tucson, Wright said. “If you listen to Dr. Robert Robbins’ vision for the UA, he’s trying to link the university to more technology-based businesses. This means we are taking more faculty and student creations to the market, which is a very interactive public process. The Bridges is a great place to locate TLA to better connect it to the community and provide for that technology collaboration.” In addition to the ITC, a “technology precinct” will include a full-service hotel and conference center, a parking structure and 400,000 square feet of additional office and lab space. It also will feature an outdoor plaza and public space for employees and the surrounding community. Beyond that, Bourn Companies will be developing residential and commercial offerings on an additional 112 acres at The Bridges. The Boyer Company has already been holding discussions with businesses interested in relocating to The Bridges to determine the appropriate ratio of classroom, lab and office space. “We have worked with the UA on past development projects in the Phoenix area and we were encouraged by their commitment to The Bridges,” said Matt Jensen, a partner in The Boyer Company. “We are also excited about working with the Bourn Companies at The Bridges to make it a known entity that provides workspace, residential, retail, dining and hotel opportunities.” “We want to create a site where people can live, learn, work, play and stay,” Wright said.

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John McCain – ‘Bigger Than Life’ An Inspiring Force

Whether you agreed with him or not, was a hallmark from him. He wasn’t gopeople respected U.S. Sen. John Mcing to go along because of ideology or Cain because he was a man of integparty, but because it was something of rity. You honored him for his sacrifice, high value for the country,” Shoopman his dedication to duty and wished you said. could be more like him. Jim Click, one of Tucson’s most That’s how local leaders remember prominent businessman, was a longtime the war hero who carved out a political supporter of McCain’s political career career that knitted individualism with dating to his first run for Congress in collaboration and who became synon1982. Click met McCain at President ymous with his adopted state until his Ronald Reagan’s 1980 inauguration death in August, just shy of his 82nd when he was introduced by businessbirthday. man Steve Dart, Arizona Board of who ultimately was Regents Chairman one of McCain’s Ron Shoopman pallbearers. first met McCain “Steve said he while serving as the had a young man Wing Commander who’s in the Navy, of the 162nd Fightand he wanted me er Wing. Shoopto meet with him man, who would because he wanted later go on to lead to move to Phoethe Southern Arinix when he got zona Leadership out,” Click recalled. Council before his “That Tuesday, the recent retirement, day after Reagan said McCain was a became president, staunch supporter we met for breakof the military. fast. I was extremely That didn’t mean impressed.” his support came McCain did move easily. to Phoenix and he During McCain’s – David Hutchens, President & CEO ran for Congress the UniSource Energy Services & travels, internationfollowing year, getal leaders praised ting Click’s support Tucson Electric Power Tucson for the that year, again in training their military pilots received at 1984, and in his runs for Senate and up Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and its until he ran for president the first time welcome of different cultures. “It made in 2000. him a fan and he became a great ally “He came to see me in 2000 to ask in Congress. That respect was not freely if I would help him run for president,” given from him – we earned it – but that Click said. Unfortunately, he had to tell

He was built up in my mind as bigger than life and then when you meet him in person, you realize that he is bigger than life – but he was also a nice guy and a humble guy.

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

By Rhonda Bodfield

McCain he was already committed to George W. Bush who would go on to become president. “I can’t say he was pleased.” But the strong friendship between the two endured, and Click helped McCain in his 2008 bid for the presidency. “I loved his commitment to our country and his tenacity. He was a bulldog, loyal, outspoken,” Click said. “I agree with everybody who said we lost a champion of the United States Senate and the way it should operate.” McCain’s courage was a thread remembered by Don Diamond, who was close to McCain for 40 years. “His charm, character, tenaciousness showed through every day that I had the pleasure of being with him,” Diamond said. “To me, he was the very best a friend can have.” David Hutchens, president and CEO of UniSource Energy Services and Tucson Electric Power, remembers the first time he heard the name John McCain. www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: DAVID SANDERS

BizTRIBUTE

Clockwise from top – Jim Click and Sen. McCain, Amber Smith and Sen. McCain, Sen. McCain with Dave Hutchens

He was a freshman in college at the UA in 1984, watching a training film with his Navy ROTC unit about the disaster on the U.S.S. Forrestal. “I can still picture this clear as day. It was a scary film and there were a lot of lessons learned, and as the movie is going on, we see this guy jumping off the nose of the airplane and running through flames,” said Hutchens. The instructor paused to tell the class that the man was then-Congressman John McCain and told the story of his subsequent capture and torture. “I was struck by his life of service,” Hutchens said. Later, Hutchens, in his professional capacity, would meet the senator – and the man who was a hero to an 18-yearold college student was still a hero. “He was built up in my mind as bigger than life and then when you meet him in person, you realize that he is bigger than life – but he was also a nice guy and a humble guy.” www.BizTucson.com

Hutchens said McCain’s influence had an immeasurable impact on Southern Arizona, including its military missions and economic development efforts. But he was also struck by the senator’s energy. He tells one story of the frightful logistics of trying to get on the senator’s Washington D.C. calendar. McCain told his staff to pull together a meeting at 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 a.m. Arizona time. Hutchens and colleagues were there with bleary eyes, downing coffee. “And here comes the senator, springing down the hallway. The amount of energy he had was unbelievable. I’m a fast walker, but he took it to another level.” “He is going to be incredibly missed,” said Taylor Lawrence, president of Raytheon Missile Systems. “The nation’s going to miss him. The world’s going to miss him because he was a very unique force, pulling people together to get things done.”

One of those “things,” Lawrence said, was being instrumental in getting Raytheon a needed buffer zone from Tucson International Airport – including getting a road moved – that ultimately opened the door for the company to make a major expansion with 2,000 more jobs, about $500 million in investment and billions of dollars in economic impact. Lawrence said in his 10 years as president at Raytheon Missile Systems, he was able to forge a business as well as personal friendship with McCain. Photos and letters of Lawrence with the late senator are proudly on display in his office reflecting years of McCain’s recognition of Raytheon’s and Lawrence’s place in the business community. “He always had an interesting way of looking at the world,” Lawrence said. “He was so optimistic about everything, about where this country could play a role in making the world a better place. I’ll miss that. I’ll miss his strength and his view that you can always get something done if you work hard enough.” UA President Robert C. Robbins recalled the 2005 UA commencement ceremony when Sen. McCain challenged students to serve a cause greater than self-interest. “Through a higher standard of service rooted in honor, courage and commitment, he inspires us to reach across national boundaries and philosophical differences to learn from and care for each other.” That’s a lesson Tucson Metro Chamber President Amber Smith learned as a young intern-turned-staffer working in the senator’s office right out of college during the President Bill Clinton era. She learned to appreciate McCain’s sense of humor and his humility, but it was his work bridging differences that stuck with her. “He was an influence in those formative years because he wasn’t afraid to push against those party lines to bring the best parts of an issue together on what were really critical national concerns, such as immigration and voter issues,” she said. “Those were big lessons to learn at 19 or 20 – his willingness to work for the people and to look at an issue pragmatically – instead of just walking a party line. That has resonated with me throughout my career.”

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BizNONPROFITS

Where Nonprofits Come Together Foundation Provides Space for Collaboration A local nonprofit is putting dollars and effort into a concept that’s new to Tucson and taking shape in the heart of midtown. The Community Foundation for Southern Arizona bought and is renovating a three-building campus that will serve as its headquarters and a place where nonprofits can meet, host events and even rent office space. Such shared spaces are popping up all over the nation, with the idea that proximity naturally leads to partnerships, said Clint Mabie, CEO at the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona. “We looked at how can we be a community convener and collaborator and really create that space for the nonprofit community – and that’s where the idea for the campus was born,” he said. “In the end it’s creating that place in Tucson where all nonprofits can come to learn from each other.” Through a capital campaign, the foundation has raised $3.2 million of its $4 million target to buy and revamp the 1970s-era structure northwest of the iconic 5151 E. Broadway building. “Having a physical hub – where multiple nonprofits can share space and resources and get access to technical assistance and capacity-building expertise – is something that we’ve talked about in our sector for a long time,” said Lau-

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ra Alexander, principal and co-owner of Alexander | Carrillo Consulting. “I think it’s really great that the Community Foundation has stepped up to take a leadership role to make that happen.” The campus includes a handful of 1,000-square-foot offices that will be outfitted with furniture, printers and Wi-Fi, available for rent on a month-tomonth basis. Other offices will be available on three- to five-year leases. The campus is expected to be ready for occupancy in late fall. Dozens of nonprofits have expressed interest in the space, said Mark Montoya, the foundation’s VP of operations, who is in charge of the project. “People are excited about the location and what we’d like to accomplish through collaboration,” Montoya said. “Nonprofit centers have been opened up across the nation, but we haven’t really seen that in Tucson yet.” The Community Foundation’s concept is based on information gleaned from The Nonprofit Centers Network, a Denver-based enterprise that works with nonprofits all around the country. Organizations that share space have increased awareness and credibility, higher visibility to funders and improvements in effectiveness and efficiency, Montoya said, citing research by The Nonprofit Centers Network.

Fors Architecture + Interiors designed the campus. The company also designed Connect Coworking, a multiuse building downtown. “Some of the nonprofit centers in Tucson have leased space, but they don’t have the co-working areas. We’re really taking those two ideas and meshing them together,” Montoya said. In Pima County alone there are more than 3,700 registered nonprofits, according to “Arizona Nonprofits: Economic Power, Positive Impact,” a report by Arizona State University’s Seidman Institute. Communities rely heavily on philanthropic groups, said Alexander, so keeping nonprofits fiscally healthy is extremely important. “A lot of our nonprofits are very strong and have a lot of capacity – and then there are those that are much smaller and fall in the $500,000 to $2 million range where they need a lot of additional support and professional help,” she said. “With the trend toward reduction in local, state and national government funding for social services and the arts – everything that our nonprofit sector does – we have to have ways for these organizations to build their capital, raise more money and not be dependent on government funds.”

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IMAGES: COURTESY FORS ARCHITECTURE+INTERIORS

By Tiffany Kjos


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BizTucson Fall 2018  

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The Region's Business Magazine

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