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THE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

Issue 173

I

november 2018

MAGAZINE

MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE

Humble beginnings, Hollywood happenings and harrowing family misfortunes: 2018’s Cary Grant festival delves deeper T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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Cookery doyenne Prue Leith discusses her new book

Miles Kane is back in the city, but solo (image by Lauren Dukoff)

70

Celebrating St Nick’s Market’s 275th (Rebecca Noakes Photography)

Contents

BEER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Andy Hamilton goes back to the origins of the beverage

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16

Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

48

November 2018

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

72

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18

Meet local musician Gary Alesbrook and catch up on Bristol goings-on

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

CHEF PROFILE

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68

Take five with Bar 44’s Tom Maynard (and a small sherry, perhaps...)

INTERVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Melissa Blease meets Bake Off’s Prue Leith

...Reflects on the appointment of the world’s first minister for loneliness

EXPLORE, EAT

BRISTOL UPDATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

Old City has been transformed by exciting start-ups taking advantage of its fascinating, quirky architecture, history and spaces

Bite-sized business and community news from across the city

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72

EDUCATION NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

HEALTH, BEAUTY & WELLBEING

News from local centres of learning

MENTAL HEALTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

THE CULTURE

A Bristol author calls for more flexibility in the education model to cater for the wellbeing of millennials

THEATRE

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30

Expect swingin’ Shakespeare from Bristol Old Vic’s Twelfth Night

WHAT’S ON

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42

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50 52

Autumn offerings and the Gloucester Road gallery upping its game

CINEMA

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34

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24

A look at the local impact of the shattering conflict

FOOD & DRINK NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 |

NOVEMBER 2018

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WILD BRISTOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

PROPERTY

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48

WWI REMEMBRANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

10 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

Venture across the Severn to an outpost of the Roman Empire

News and developments

Scouse-rocker Miles Kane chats to Syd Bird ahead of his Bristol show

Tasty tidings from our local eateries and producers

GREAT OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

Take time to tidy up during this season of change but don’t forget the beauty to be found in the frost-flecked dead and dying

Inspiration for those making a start on the Christmas list

ONE TO ONE

HABITAT

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

FEATURES .......................................................................

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Warning: this month’s column may contain nuts

The return of the Cary Grant festival; our pick of Bristol Film Festival’s immersive seasonal screenings; and Watershed’s take on the Netflix effect

SHOPPING

86

Snippets from the health and beauty sector

Local jazz band Get The Blessing on Bristopia

ARTS & EXHIBITIONS

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The cream of the beauty world’s advent calendar crop

A cross-section of the city’s wide and varied events scene

MUSIC

SHOPPING

ON THE COVER

Cary Grant – celebrated this month as part of Bristol’s biennial festival commemorating the contribution the Horfield lad turned toast of Hollywood made to the golden age of cinema. This year’s events look closely at the formative experiences that helped Archie Leach carefully craft the character he played both on-screen and off

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The evenings are drawing in, but we’ve plenty within these pages to keep you entertained indoors; from Bristol’s crop of film and theatre to gigs and arts (this painting by Jenny Urquhart will feature in Gloucester Rd gallery Room 212’s new bar space later this month)

THIS MONTH WE’LL BE...

Image by Rebecca Noakes Photography

Shopping...

...In 275-year-old St Nick’s Market and joining the snaking lunchtime queues to enjoy its multicultural foodie flavours. We’ll be taking more notice of the area’s historic structures too, now we’ve learnt so much about them (p75)

from the

Warming up...

EDITOR

H

orfield lad turned toast of Hollywood Cary Grant was one of the first to undergo clinical LSD therapy and rumoured to have had over 100 acid trips (quite the prescription) during the height of his fame (a story that resurfaced in local filmmaker Mark Kidel’s 2017 documentary). And did you know Grant’s mum was secretly sequestered away at Glenside for two whole decades? There’s more than meets the eye to the Bristol-born Tinseltown legend – as anyone going along this month’s festival to honour his legacy, but also delve a little deeper, will discover (see p34 for more). With Bristol Film Office currently celebrating its 15th birthday, we’ve a bit of a bumper cinema section actually, kicking off with Cary and the golden age of the silver screen and continuing, in contrast, with Watershed curator Mark Cosgrove’s take on the Netflix effect and the future of film. Then there’s our pick of immersive Bristol Film Festival screenings to have you relishing the indoors. Also marking a milestone is St Nick’s Market – see p72 for info on the 275th anniversary and how the Old City has developed – and, of course, this November means remembrance of the First World War. On p60 Stephen Roberts looks at the local impact of the shattering conflict that shuddered to an end a century ago. Meantime, the season to be sybaritic has started in style on King Street, with Bristol Old Vic and Edinburgh’s The Lyceum having collaborated on a swinging retelling of Shakespeare’s hedonistic Twelfth Night – read about director Wils Wilson’s inspiration on p30, and why the Sixties and Seventies line up so well with the themes of the Elizabethan comedy. In music, Syd Bird chats to Scouse-rocker Miles Kane, back in Bristol soon with his solo stuff (p48), while jazz band Get The Blessing (featuring Portishead’s rhythm section) chat about their Bristol-inspired album. Melissa Blease meets cookery doyenne Prue Leith on p70, as Andy Hamilton talks beer (p66) and one local author reflects on millennial mental health (p82). Within these pages you’ll also find the cream of the beauty world’s advent calendars and Christmas shopping ideas (we’re slipping those steel straws on p24 into the party season purse along with the old lippy); plus the Gloucester Road art gallery upping its game with the launch of a new bar. We’re off to crank up the heating, line up the socks and gloves on the radiator and embrace the shivery mornings – see you in December.

...The vocal chords for the ‘Totally Toto’ musical marathon at The Exchange. On 30 November DJ Michael Savage will play the band’s best-known hit and universal guilty pleasure Africa for five hours straight to raise money for Bristol charity Temwa which works with communities in Malawi

Coveting... Bristol agency Wonderland has collaborated with designer Anthony Burrill on a set of prints whose proceeds will go to Kindly Collective – funding grassroots projects for vulnerable women, children and animals. Available for £100 at Arnolfini during the inaugural Kin festival this month and from wonderlandcomms.com/shop

Welcoming...

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR Editor’s image by Paolo Ferla; ferlapaolo.com

@thebristolmag

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

thebristolmag.co.uk

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NOVEMBER 2018

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No 173

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114-year-old West Country trading ketch Bessie Ellen, which has arrived at Underfall Yard from Porto, carrying Portuguese wine, olive oil and other products. On 3 November the public can get up close to the ship and sample the wines! (See p62)


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5

ZEITGEIST

fab things to do in NOVEMBER

WORM YOUR WAY...

REMEMBER One hundred years ago, on the 11th day, of the 11th month, at the 11th hour, the guns of the Great War fell silent. Armistice was signed and the conflict came to its conclusion after more than four years of fighting. This month, to mark the centenary of the end of the war, the image of a sleeping soldier by artist Leo Jamelli will appear on the side of the Abbey Gatehouse at Bristol Cathedral on 10 November. Projected through the night, he will disappear as the sun rises on the dawn of Remembrance Day, into an eternal sleep alongside his fallen comrades. Regularly the most attended civic remembrance service outside of London, the multi-faith service taking place at The Cenotaph on Colston Avenue will begin at 11am on 11 November.

...Into SWX to see Jacob Anderson this month. You might know him best as gorgeous Grey Worm in Game of Thrones – noble warrior and commander of the Unsullied army of eunuchs – but the Bristol-born actor is also a talented singer-songwriter, rapper and record producer. Jacob, who uses the alias Raleigh Ritchie for his musical projects and cites everyone from Erykah Badu to Bowie, The Smiths to Stevie Wonder among his influences, released his debut album, You’re a Man Now, Boy, in 2016 to very positive reviews. He’s soon on his way back to his home city – you can see him and special guests on 30 November on Nelson Street; tickets £14.50 plus booking fee. • swxbristol.com

LEARN OF BRISTOL’S TINSELTOWN LEGEND Every two years, Hollywood star Cary Grant comes home for the weekend. Well, figuratively – via a three-day festival looking at his life and work. 23 – 25 November sees talks, walks that take in the Horfield boy’s old haunts, and screenings in suitably starry locations such as the planetarium. Enjoy the awardwinning documentary Becoming Cary Grant in which the icon’s mental health challenges and LSD use are explored, in the former Bristol asylum hospital where his mother was hidden from him for 20 years (see also p34). The finale is a full celebration of the golden age of cinema, with bubbly, live music, themed cocktails, vintage fashions and a chance to watch legends of Tinseltown dazzle in Hitchcock’s classic comedy thriller, To Catch a Thief, set on the glamorous French Riviera. Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday

• carycomeshome.co.uk

AFRIKA EYE, CAPTAIN

THE BIG SWITCH

The South West’s biggest celebration of African arts, cinema and culture returns from 4 – 12 November with a wide choice of events, many taking place on the water. Afrika Eye is also a hosting tribute feast at Arnolfini to mark the 100th anniversary of Nelson Mandela’s birth, with African food, conversation, song and arts; plus there’ll be high-energy dance classes, crafts and games going on across the festival. We like the sound of the spoken-word workshop with Bristol wordsmith Edson Burton and singer-songwriter Priscilla Andersohn, drawing inspiration from a cruise around the harbour; you could otherwise opt for songs and stories from South Africa while you sail; or what’s believed to be Bristol’s first ferry film show.

Dare we ask, but do we hear jingle bells? We certainly will do soon as the countdown to Christmas begins. Shop windows will be transformed into festive scenes, fir trees will be going up around the city and all manner of twinkling lights will appear above our heads as we wander down the busy retail streets. BBC Radio Bristol breakfast host Emma Britton will be switching on the Christmas lights in Clifton Village on 7 November (6pm in The Mall Gardens) in support of BBC Radio Bristol Alive Appeal. Enjoy carol singing, grab a mulled wine and explore the independent shops around the village – it’s time to feel the festivities.

16 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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• afrikaeye.org.uk

No 173

Alwyn Enoe in Vanishing Sails


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THE CITY THE BUZZ

My

BRISTOL

Russell Brand is in Bristol this month

Take five with top local trumpet player Gary Alesbrook

I moved to Bristol in the late ’90s, as I was starting as a session musician playing in London and Cardiff too. Playing V Festival with the Super Furry Animals in 1999 was great for me as it really signalled a start to my session career. The local music scene was similar to how it is now; a pool of inspiring musicians with great attitudes. Really open to each other’s ideas. I like that this element has never changed over the years. There is no room for ego in Bristol.

All the famous faces... ...Are coming to town (as well as Santa, soon enough, of course). Or so it certainly seems at the moment. This month, it’s the turn of comedian, actor, author and podcaster Russell Brand, who’s bringing his theatre show My Life by William Shakespeare to the city for three nights only (19 – 21 November). Hot on the heels of fellow comic Ruby Wax, who graced the Bristol Old Vic stage in October, Russell – who’s also got Netflix comedy special Re:Birth being released at the end of the year – will be at the King Street theatre, taking some life lessons from the Bard in the brand new show which is directed by Ian Rickson. Ian has directed work at the National Theatre, Young Vic, in the West End and Royal Court, where he was artistic director. He also works with PJ Harvey and Kate Tempest on their music and poetry shows. Then, looking ahead to next year, Sir Rod Stewart has been announced to play Ashton Gate Stadium in May, in support of his 30th studio album Blood Red Roses, as well as allgrown-up Nineties boy band Take That – celebrating their 30th anniversary in 2019 and joined by Rick Astley at the football ground. It’s all kicking off... • bristololdvic.org.uk; ashtongatestadium.co.uk

NEWSFLASH Circomedia is to convert the Tankhouse 4 Bottleyard Studios in South Bristol into the UK’s largest circus centre. The facility is scheduled for completion in September 2020 and will bring Bristol up a league to become a genuine international hub for circus, with state-of-the-art facilities on par with centres around the world. Over 130 full-time students will study and train, from BTEC level up to an MA in Directing Circus – a world first. • circomedia.com

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I have been lucky enough to experience so many amazing moments since then. One that springs to mind is headlining Glastonbury on the main stage with Kasabian. That really felt like an incredible moment. This city has a network of great musicians and a handful of venues that support local talent. My inspiration still comes from players in the city. What sets Bristol players apart is the attitude.

...There is no room for ego in Bristol...

is set to be an exciting one, with jazz festivals and gigs around the UK. My taste is music is really eclectic; I tend to jump genres quite a lot, from jazz to hiphop. The last tune I listened to was Chet Baker’s When I Fall In Love. I play a lot with the violinist John Pearce – who’s releasing his debut jazz album. I’ve heard some snippets and it sounds incredible, featuring some great local players. Definitely one to watch out for. I’m going to check out more live theatre in November and December. I went to The Wardrobe Theatre in Old Market a few months ago to see a show and it made me want to see more. For music, I’ll be checking out the usual haunts; The Gallimaufry, The Fringe and The Future Inns. Before starting my session career I wanted to be a writer. I’ve written three screenplays. In the late ’90s I co-wrote a sitcom and we were in talks with Celador who liked it and asked us to write something else. By that time I was playing more gigs so I made a decision to focus my attention there instead. I’d love to get back to writing at some point. n • Follow Gary on Instagram: @garyalesbrook

However, I’ll be honest and say the local music scene has changed for both the better and the worse since I have been an active part of it. The musicians continue to create new sounds and ideas. You’re never at a loss to see and hear incredible people playing their hearts out in all corners of the city. Unfortunately, one thing that has got worse is investment in music, not just in Bristol but around the UK. Without getting too political, I’d like to see more investment in music and the arts in Bristol schools. Giving all kids the opportunity to learn an instrument, if it’s something they want to do, is so important. This summer I played Redfest which I’d never been to before. What makes a great festival, as well as the music, is the people. There was a great vibe and it was really well organised. Over the next few months I am beginning work on my second album in between my commitments as a session player. Next year


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NOVEMBER 2018

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 19


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THE CITY This robot can even twerk, or throw a tantrum when it loses...

BRISTAGRAM Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your Bristol pics using #thebristolmag Vibrant sc en at the new es @decubab ristol

Bots just got soul Stoke Gifford-based tech-startup Reach Robotics, developer of the world’s first real-world gaming robot, has just launched an evolved version bridging high-end robotics and augmented reality for mainstream gaming audiences. Retailing through Apple (£249.99), the customisable MekaMon V2 – brainchild of Reach Robotics’ founding CEO Silas Adekunle – is controlled entirely through your smartphone and can compete against waves of AR enemies and duel other players in multiplayer combat. There’s an entirely new gaming experience, a new battle-mode and rich in-game lore; players can also learn how to code with the Swift Playgrounds app. Seeming more ‘alive’ than ever, the battle-bot’s improvements include lifelike, expressive movement, seen from the unique moment it wakes up to its owner and gives a wave – thanks to cutting-edge robotics. Players can even create their own moves for their “real-life Pokémon” thanks to ‘MekaMotion’ – Bristol Mag minds were blown when we saw it all in action! With a life outside the app, MekaMon react to the world around them; whether they’re angry, bored or happy, players (or ‘Mekapilots’) will know how their robot is feeling. The bots even twerk or stamp their feet depending on their ‘mood’. Clever, clever stuff.

on the Acroyoga ellfest w ild w cranes @

• reachrobotics.com; mekamon.com

Get further Into Film The sixth edition of Into Film Festival, which welcomes half a million pupils and educators each year, takes place this month, offering a free programme of previews, special events and screenings for young people and giving them easy but essential access to the arts at a time when funding is being significantly reduced. The Bristol area is hosting 49 events with a total capacity of over 10,000 from 7 – 23 November. Its programme is unique – from an Axis Animation careers talk at Watershed to a viewing of The Breadwinner followed by a talk with Holly Tarquini, founder of the F-Rating (given to films directed or written by women and/or starring significant women on screen in their own right). The festival supports student needs and interests and has been curated in six strands: mental wellbeing; female empowerment; visions of Europe; ecowarriors and revolutionaries; the animated world; and comedy genius. There are autism-friendly, audiodescribed, subtitled events too, with each curated to engage young minds in a broad range of topics, and screenings supported by actors, directors and producers in Q&A sessions. • intofilm.org/festival

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Into Film ambassador Michael Sheen

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Colston Stre et’s new @downtow n_tacqueria mn hues Beaut autu rthjess from @po

Puddle’s eye view of Park Street from @chil l1983


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THE

B R I S TOL MAGAZINE

ALL THE LONELY PEOPLE

I

n our house there’s usually a radio burbling away somewhere, often two or three. Sometimes you can hear the same programme coming from several different rooms, but not quite in sync. This is, as you can imagine, slightly irritating, although it’s fun knowing what the presenter is going to say next. Often the radio is no more than a gentle flow of sound, but every so often something hooks my attention, such as a phrase I heard for the first time the other day. Somebody or other, a voice was saying, has just been appointed Minister for Loneliness. As these words sank in, the inevitable happened: somewhere in the recesses of my mind, Eleanor Rigby began playing, and it carried on as I listened to the rest of the programme. One of the central arguments put forward was that people in northern Europe and the United States, where self-reliance is seen as a key character trait, tend to be lonelier than people in southern Europe and Latin America, where family and community are considered more important. Various statistics were fired back and forth, and the one that most impressed me was that 30% of people in the UK now live by themselves. Of course I was listening to a radio in another room, over the sound of my inner Beatles tribute band, but I’m fairly sure I heard this right, or at least right-ish. And when you think about it I suppose it isn’t surprising, given how much time and effort we expend on getting our own place. There was no way Ms B was going to share a room in her halls of residence, even though being a new student can be horribly lonely. As we start out in adult life we aspire to be independent and alone, with a key to our own front door, and in old age do our utmost to remain so. Not that living alone necessarily makes you lonely. My grandfather lived by himself in splendid isolation until he was over 90. He was perfectly happy alone and couldn’t stand having people come in to help him. Most of us, though, need some kind of human contact and I hope one of the things the Minister for Loneliness considers is the value of casual everyday interaction. Having a dog guarantees a potentially limitless amount of chit-chat, along with the occasional less enjoyable conversation. “I’m so sorry he bounced on your new dress/burst your football/ate your pizza…” But dog ownership aside, it sometimes seems as though we’re desperate to cut off all contact with one another. Why ask directions when you can use Google Maps? Why listen to a busker when you have your music on your phone? Why strike up a conversation on the train? Why shop? Once, when I was in a particularly busy period, I decided to be modern and efficient and order the supermarket shopping online. Tap tap tap, click click click and hey presto! The next day a man appeared on the doorstep with everything I had requested. Well that was easy, I thought, but as I put the shopping away I felt despondent. Something was missing, but it took a few days to understand what it was. Yes, it was great to have food in the house. Yes, I had saved time and energy. But these things gave me no pleasure. What I enjoyed was the ritual of shopping, with its tricky choices – Cox or Russet? – its moments of inspiration – capers! – and, most importantly, its human encounters. A neighbour’s son who is suddenly six feet tall. The librarian who once let me off a £40 fine (those were the days). And then the chatty bloke at the checkout who has already served hundreds of customers that day but who nevertheless greets me with a smile. “Haven’t seen you in a while – been away?” ■ 22 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Contact us: Editor Tel: Email:

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BRISTOL MAGAZINE Bristol and Exeter House, Lower Approach, Temple Meads, Bristol BS1 6QS Telephone: 0117 974 2800 www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk © MC Publishing Ltd 2018 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bristol Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


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SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

PRESENT & CORRECT From handy contactless payment bracelets and eco-friendly coffee cups to locally blown baubles and artisan chocolate, vinyl, jewellery and other charming tokens of affection: take a look at our Christmas gift guide for a little festive inspiration

1. Bristol Blue Glass Bauble, £17.50 (blow your own for £20), Bristol Blue Glass; bristol-glass.co.uk 2. Reusable stainless steel straws and brush, £10, That Thing; thatthing.co 3. Mini Cruiser skateboard in solid walnut, £285, Amazon Handmade; amazon.co.uk 4. Hill House embellished multi-compartment bag, £239, Radley London; radley.co.uk 5. Jo Gordon brushed colourblock lambswool scarf, hand knitted in Scotland, £127, Movement Boutique; movementboutique.co.uk 6. G&Tea cocktail gift set, £30, Root7; root7.com

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1. Salted Caramel advent calendar, £36 for one person, £60 for two to share, Zara’s Chocolates; zaraschocolates.com 2. bPay Contactless Payment bracelets, Tovi Sorga (left: Spectrum, £55; right: Marina, £75); tovisorga.com 3. Muddled plum festive shower gel bauble, £12, Molton Brown; moltonbrown.co.uk 4. Clay shooting lesson for two, from £130, Lady’s Wood Shooting School; ladyswood.co.uk 5. Floral wreath earrings in gold plated silver, £120, Clifton Rocks; cliftonrocks.co.uk 6. Stripe beanie hat, £39, Peregrine; peregrineclothing.co.uk 7. Raspberry and English rose petal preserve, £8, Flowers & Thorn; flowersandthorn.co.uk 8. How To Raise A Plant, £12.99, Foyles; foyles.co.uk 9. Bamboo coffee cup, £25, Mabboo; mabboo.com

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1. Jessica Russell Flint giant washbag, £75, Movement Boutique; movementboutique.co.uk 2. Drink Drank Drunk game, £22.99; drinkdrankdrunkthegame.com 3. Wacaco Minipresso portable espresso coffee maker, £49.99; thefowndry.com 4. Highgrove Home Farm runny honey, £6.50, Highgrove Gardens; highgrovegardens.com 5. Flower star necklaces in silver and gold plated silver, £105 and £125, Clifton Rocks; cliftonrocks.co.uk 6. Artichoke A5 diary, £9.95, Emma Bridgewater; emmabridgewater.co.uk 7. Happy Holidays spiced pear bath fizzer, £4.95, The Somerset Toiletry Company; thesomersettoiletryco.co.uk 8. Palazzo Empire watch, £1,240, Versace; versace.com 9. Christmas ornament containing scented cologne and body crème, £22, Jo Malone; jomalone.co.uk

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1. Afternoon tea, from £21.95 (other gift packages available) at Berwick Lodge; berwicklodge.co.uk 2. Limited edition ginettone by Gin Mare, £22; harveynichols.com 3. Organic and vegan Crémant d'Alsace Blanc de Noir brut, £14, Nfizz; nfizz.co.uk 4. Winter indulgence botanical candle, £85, The White Company; thewhitecompany.com 5. Massage gift vouchers, available from £5, Loop Massage, Unit 10 Cargo 2, Wapping Wharf; loopmassage.com 6. 18ct white gold morganite pendant necklace featuring a 10.08ct pink morganite, Nicholas Wylde; nicholaswylde.com 7. Late Night Tales, Agnes Obel, £20; friendlyrecords.com 8. Dreamer print walker umbrella with wooden handle, £250, Paul Smith; paulsmith.com 9. Rose tea, £9, Flowers & Thorn; flowersandthorn.co.uk

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RIVER Vs. OCEAN CRUISING: WHICH ONE TO CHOOSE? Thornton’s Travel helps you find the perfect cruise holiday

Discover the distant shores of Sri Lanka on an Ocean Cruise

W

hile an ocean cruise is just the ticket for many people, for a first-time cruiser it’s good to consider whether that is the right option for you. River cruises are growing in popularity and hold many delights that set them apart from your traditional ocean cruise. The possibilities really are endless, and by narrowing down whether to go for a river cruise or an ocean cruise you’ll be much better served to ensure that your next cruising experience is the best that it can be.

RIVER VS. OCEAN CRUISE

RIVER CRUISE: SAILING THE DANUBE

7 September 2019 | 10 nights | Sails from Hirsova to Budapest | From £2,199 pp On this beautiful 10-night cruise you will pass the point where the Danube meets the Black Sea, sailing through Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia and Hungary. You’ll witness unforgettable sights such as the Iron Gates gorge, all the while taking in historic city landmarks and scenic national parks. With our exclusive deal you’ll also receive an onboard drinks package to enjoy as you cruise.

RIVER CRUISE: ROMANTIC RHINE & MOSELLE MARVELS

River cruise

27th June 2019 | 7 nights | Sails from Basel to Düsseldorf | From £1,499 pp Take in highlights from three captivating European countries. Starting from Basel in Switzerland and sailing through France and then Germany, you’ll get a taste of stunning mountain scenery as well as historic towns and cities. Book now to get all this including an exclusive drinks package within the price.

 Smaller ships mean that you can reach smaller destinations that aren’t possible in an ocean liner.  River cruise itineraries are port-intensive, stopping off at new destinations every day so you can see more.  With port stop-offs, you’ll get more time with your day excursions and overnight stays, giving you more opportunity to explore.  Concerned about seasickness? On a river cruise you’ll get less, if any, full sea days, so you can have regular breaks if you’re feeling woozy!  The low-key entertainment options are perfect if you want more relaxed vibes on your cruise.

OCEAN CRUISE: SINGAPORE, BALI & BURMA

23 January 2020 | 14 nights | Sails from Benoa | From £2,999 pp This 2 week Asian adventure will take you through ancient spiritual sites, idyllic islands and bustling cities. The unique itinerary takes you from Bali, to Singapore, Thailand, Myanmar and Sri Lanka, giving you a vibrant insight into this unforgettable area of the world. You’ll even receive a drinks package by ordering with us, so you can enjoy your cruise in style.

OCEAN CRUISE: SOUTH AMERICAN EXPLORATION 6th January 2020 | 70 nights | Sails from Southampton | From £6,999 pp Aboard the Balmoral, you’ll get an unforgettable in-depth exploration of the wonders of South America. With highlights from Rio de Janeiro to the Panama Canal, the countless landmarks and astonishing natural beauty will be sure to take your breath away. Book with us to get an exclusive deal of either £200 for your car parking, £200 towards your transport, or an onboard spend of £200!

Ocean cruise Fred. Olsen are well known in the industry for creating award-winning itineraries that allow you to explore your destination in ways that wouldn’t be possible with other cruise companies or larger cruise lines, and by booking with us we can offer some exclusive deals to make your trip one to remember.

 With an ocean cruise, you’ve got a bigger scope of destinations. The world is your oyster!  Ocean liners are much bigger than river cruise ships, and have a much wider range of cabin options.  An ocean cruise is perfect for those who love making friends! You’ll meet lots of new like-minded people, with many opportunities for socialising.  Looking for an adventure? On an ocean cruise you can go on trips ranging from a fortnight to three months.  Ocean cruises are well known for their entertainment options. There truly is something for everyone, allowing you to try new things and stay active onboard.

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We’ve chosen some of our favourite cruises in 2019 and 2020 that are perfect, whether you’re looking for a compact 2 week trip in the sun or a longer journey to exotic destinations. If you would like more information and help with choosing your bespoke river or ocean cruise experience, get in touch with our knowledgeable team using the form below and we’ll help you find the perfect cruise holiday.

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To book these special prices please QUOTE: BRS01

Thornton’s Travel T: 0117 925 4444 E: cruise@thorntonstravel.co.uk W: www.thorntonstravel.co.uk blog: https://www.thorntonscruiseworld. co.uk/blog/river-vs-ocean-cruise/


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Photography by Mihaela Bodlovic

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BOLD AS LOVE: Ana started with the vibrant, colourful, Summer of Love-inspired costumes first and then designed the set – an abandoned mansion created after the production team found and examined some amazing old photographs of Andy Warhol’s famous Factory parties. Some are more obvious than others, says Ana, but can you guess which characters have been influenced by which rock stars?


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SWINGIN’ SHAKESPEARE The Lyceum’s latest creation to arrive at Bristol Old Vic is a melting pot of Sixties and Seventies-esque, Warhol-tinged colour, passion, indulgent psychedelia and debauchery that the Bard would be proud of – a perfect pre-festive treat

T

he season to be sybaritic has kicked off in style on King Street, where a “hedonistic house party” (The Guardian) is being hosted by director Wils Wilson and co at the city’s newly revamped theatre until 17 November. The theatre-maker’s take on Twelfth Night has been inspired by 20th-century pop culture’s most decadent decades and all of Bristol is invited to indulge in the magical, raucous revelry with Sebastian, Orsino, Viola and the rest. If the idea of “Shakespeare on steroids” (fave sound bite from audiences so far) rings your bell, and a vibrant classic-meetscontemporary score by Welsh Music Prize winner Meilyr Jones, here’s more from Wils and the big, bohemian production’s designer Ana Inés Jabares-Pita... What was the thinking behind the 1960s setting? Wils: I would rather describe it as inspired by that era, than set in that particular period. Some plays are written realistically and need to be very precise in terms of time in every detail of the design, behaviour, conventions and manners, but Shakespeare was not writing in a realistic genre. His plays are emotionally true and grounded in an incredible instinctive understanding of human relationships and behaviour, and he turns a very piercing eye on how people live together, how we treat each other. The late ’60s were inspirational to me because this was a time when hedonism was celebrated, when the strict codes of dress and behaviour of the ’50s were being challenged in mainstream society. Boundaries were being pushed and the performance of gender was suddenly under debate. People complained they couldn’t tell if young people were male or female as hair and fashion transformed. Also, music was central to everything. In the play you can feel the same energy, a similar spirit of experimentation, where you can ‘play’ at being someone or something else, and by doing that you can surprise yourself and find out a bit more about who you really are. How are the play’s key themes tied into the Summer of Love period? Ana: The main theme for us was gender fluidity and identity and the relations between characters. The idea came from some amazing pictures we found from Andy Warhol Factory parties. It was amazing to see the mixture of exceptional characters sharing a space in an abandoned warehouse, partying for hours. This inspired us to create a space where people were free to be who they were and, at the same time, change and experiment. In our party, everything is allowed! We still relate to each other in similar ways, and luckily there is more openness and awareness nowadays about gender fluidity and identity, that is why Twelfth Night feels absolutely contemporary. How has this production addressed these themes, such as the use of female actors in male roles, changing Sir Toby to Lady Tobi etc? Wils: Another important inspiration for me was the current revolution in mainstream society which is giving many young people in particular the opportunity to explore gender, sexuality and identity in new ways. Just like in the play, it seems to me that the younger generation has a lot to teach the older generations. I always knew I wanted to complicate the final ‘line-up’ of couples at the end. In the original, the exploration of gender and sexuality stops when the Twelfth Night party is over, but

in the world we have created, I hope a rich complexity is part of the final picture and continues into the future. How did the traditional concept of the Twelfth Night of Christmas influence the party feel of this production? Ana: Until I did some research I wasn’t aware that Twelfth Night was what we call in Spanish ‘Noche de Reyes’. In Spain it is still a very important date, and depending on how your family celebrates, it is more important than Christmas Day; it’s also when we exchange presents, or the three wise men and their camels leave them for us next to the fireplace... In this show the party has been going on for days. As far as I understand, this period of time was also a time for excess, hard drinking and lusty pursuits for Elizabethans. Why is the play set in a dilapidated house? Ana: When I design usually I start from the set, but interestingly enough this time what was clearer were the characters and costumes. Finding the right space was a little more complicated to approach. The images we found of 1970s afterparties seemed to be in abandoned houses – you could see the sofas were old and the tables improvised with pallets. That is how we got to the idea of an old mansion taken over by artists. Since nature is so important in Shakespeare’s plays, I felt that it was right to set it in the middle of a forest – quite isolated – and also enjoyed the idea of it being taken over by nature over the years. “And thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges...”

...In the Sixties, boundaries were being pushed and the performance of gender was suddenly under debate...

How would you describe the role of music in the play? Wils: Music does not have a single role in the play. It is a ‘simple truth’ as Feste says, a reminder of a time when life seemed simpler and more connected to the natural world. (Even the Elizabethans looked back to the ‘good old days’!) It brings people together in good times, for dancing and celebration of being alive but also to forget death in hedonistic oblivion. It’s also a form of rebellion and anger for Lady Tobi against Malvolio’s strict house rules. It is an expression of emotion for Orsino and a comfort to his unhappy and restless mind. It is a way to grieve and remember. Much of the music in this production was ‘written into’ the play by Shakespeare (he even provides lyrics to Feste’s songs) and we have also explored new moments through music as well. Meilyr, the composer, and I talked a lot about the play and he brought lots of ideas into rehearsals. He worked very closely with Dylan Read, who plays Feste, on the songs, trying out different ideas and THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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instrumentation. Meilyr’s music is a beautiful and unusual combination of pop and classical feels; it is layered and detailed and also very accessible with great melodies. Are there any particularly unusual instruments featured? Wils: Meilyr loves unusual instruments so there is an incredibly wide variety in the production, some of which of I have never seen before, like pipes recycled from an old organ and some percussion made especially for the show by an amazing instrument maker called Giles Leaman. We also use drum kit and guitars for the more poppy moments, there is a zither and dulcimer which gives a very Elizabethan feel to Orsino’s palace, and one song has lots of hand-held percussion which feels ancient and almost ritualistic. It is a real musical feast and we have so many talented musicians in the acting company – everyone sings and plays.

What can audiences expect from Malvolio’s costume in the famous yellow stockings scene? Ana: I think it is better to leave the audience to guess which character has been inspired by which rock star; but some of them are quite obvious. The designs for Malvolio’s costumes came from a close collaboration between Christopher Green, Wils and myself. It needed to be a drastic change and over the top without being ridiculous and still have coherence with the rest of the costumes. How does this production coincide with Bristol Old Vic’s theme for the year – #YearOfChange? Wils: It really is a play about transformations. Every character goes through change – most of it happy, some of it extremely painful. Everyone is changed by the end of the play, and I hope the audience will be too.

• bristololdvic.org.uk

...Music brings people together in good times, for dancing and celebration, but also to forget death in hedonistic oblivion... Tell us more about those fabulous costumes... Ana: Creating them has been lots of fun! There is a wonderful costume department at The Lyceum and we all love sequins, shiny patterned fabrics and rock and roll! Although the inspiration started with the ’60s, we moved forward in time to when parties were slightly wilder and costumes were too. The ’70s and early ’80s would allow us a more vibrant palette and we could have more fun with fabrics too. Also there are so many super interesting pop and rock icons to take inspiration from: Grace Jones, David Bowie, Diana Ross, Mick Jagger, Debbie Harry, Elton John, Freddy Mercury. The list is very long if you see the costume research...

In the Sixties, music was central to everything. In the production you can feel the same spirit of experimentation

SEASON TO BE JOLLY: The arrival of The Lyceum/Bristol Old Vic collaboration is perfectly timed pre-festive fun

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Being able to tie events to significant local locations certainly adds a special quality to the festival; Charlotte feels a frisson, watching the films and knowing Cary got his spectacles from an optician on the Centre in Bristol and that Alfred Hitchcock ordered wines from Avery’s

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MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE This year’s Cary Grant Comes Home For The Weekend seeks to showcase the brilliance and range of the actor’s performances – from the screwball comedies with which he made his name in the 1930s and early 1940s to his four Hitchcock collaborations – and his enduring love of Bristol. Festival director Charlotte Crofts sets out the attractions...

F

ilm critic David Thompson once described Cary Grant as the “best and most important actor in the history of cinema” but today he’s often dismissed as eye-candy – a good looking leading man who is not even acting at all, just being ‘Cary Grant’. But of course, he wasn’t ever wholly Cary Grant; beginning, as many of us know, as Archibald Leach, born in Horfield in 1904 into circumstances which may have given him early insight into the deceits, identity faking and reinvention which helped him to create the Cary Grant character he played both on and off screen for the rest of his life. One goal of this year’s festival, then, is to underscore how the Bristol beginnings of Archie Leach impacted on him and his later persona, while another is a celebration of Cary Grant as a skilled and adaptable actor – one not claimed often or fully enough in the UK as British because he made his name in Hollywood. The festival opens on Friday 23 November with a screening of the award-winning documentary Becoming Cary Grant at UWE’s Glenside Campus – previously Bristol Lunatic Asylum, where the actor’s mother Elsie Kingdon Leach spent around 20 years without his knowledge. It examines Cary Grant’s life through his LSD therapy sessions, using

actor Paul McGann, IMDb founder Col Needham and broadcaster/author Matthew Sweet. Sometimes I think I suspect I started Cary Comes Home simply so I could watch his films as they were meant to be seen – on the big screen, with an audience. North by Northwest (at the Planetarium on Saturday 24 November) is both scarier and funnier when seen up large with other people. And it’s got to cause a frisson, watching this and the other Hitchcock/Grant collaborations that we’re showing (Suspicion, Notorious and To Catch A Thief) knowing that Cary got his spectacles from an optician on the Centre and that Alfred Hitchcock ordered wines from Avery’s. Being able to tie events to significant locations adds a special quality to the festival – and means new information about Cary Grant’s local links is still coming to light. For example, when we first ran the Looking for Archie walking tour of Cary Grant’s Bristol, we united two branches of Elsie Kingdon’s family who’d never met before, and learned that Cary Grant used to get his hair cut at a barber’s in Westbury-on-Trym. In all, the programme offers 10 different ways to connect with Cary Grant and the Golden Age of Hollywood and we very much hope Bristol will join us in celebrating and saluting the local lad who became the toast of Tinseltown, yet never forgot where it all began.

...The actor’s mother spent around 20 years at Bristol Lunatic Asylum, without his knowledge...

Cary enjoyed a six decade-spanning career as a Hollywood film star and style icon that earned him numerous accolades, including a special Oscar; the title of world’s best dressed man and a place on a US postage stamp; connected him to many of the best-known figures of the 20th century (among them, Mae West, Elvis, Sinatra, Sophia Loren, Louis Mountbatten, Ronald Reagan and the Kennedys) and made him a millionaire many times over. But he always remembered the city of his birth, a place to which he returned time and time again...

them as a lens through which to explore the childhood trauma of losing his mother and its effect on his five marriages and his mental health. Although he probably didn’t know it, the disappearance of his mother from his life was, perhaps, his first encounter with deception and assumed identity. She wasn’t dead; he wasn’t a motherless child. Elsie was alive but unspoken about in an institution. This conjures all sorts of questions. Why was she hidden away? How was it that it took more than 20 years for her son to find her again? What anxieties did the actor hide behind his debonair front? A walking tour and an afternoon tea plus talks at the Avon Gorge Hotel (née Grand Spa) on Saturday 24 November take in Bristol places with happier associations but sometimes with the same undercurrent of role playing. It was as a backstage Hippodrome ‘gofer’, for instance, that Archie discovered theatre – once forging a letter and faking his age in an effort to join a touring troupe of knockabout comedians. And what leap of reinvention did it take to be a fêted guest in the exclusive Gorge hotel, way beyond the means of Archie Leach or his family? The festival’s main attractions, of course, are the films – a mix of thrillers and comedies all introduced by expert fans, among them the

A star is born: Horfield to Hollywood timeline

1904: A boy is born on 18 January at 15 Hughenden Road, Horfield, and named Archibald Alexander Leach. He’s the second but only surviving child of Elsie Maria and Elias James Leach, his older brother having died in infancy. Elsie suffers deep depression after the death of her first-born and is considered over-protective of her new baby. By contrast, Archie’s father, a tailors’ presser, is rumoured to be a drinker and womaniser, possibly with illegitimate off-spring. 1908: Young Archie starts at Bishop Road Primary, Bishopston, later moving on briefly to North Street Wesleyan Primary, Stokes Croft and then Fairfield Grammar School. At Fairfield, he meets the teacher who will eventually take him on a life-changing trip into central Bristol. 1915: Archie, aged 11, is told that his mother has gone away on holiday and, later, that she is dead. In fact, Elsie has been committed. 1917: A part-time Fairfield science teacher takes Archie to see the lighting system he’s just installed at the newly opened Bristol Hippodrome. Archie is captivated and begins working at the theatre after school. There, he meets Bob Pender who runs a travelling troupe of THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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knockabout comedians and decides that’s the life he wants. He forges a letter from his father permitting him to join the troupe but is rumbled and brought back to Bristol. But the dream persists and, at 14, Archie becomes a Pender boy officially. 1920: At 16, Archie travels with the Pender company to the USA for what turns out to be a two-year tour. When the tour ends, Archie chooses to stay in the States and his name soon starts appearing on vaudeville bills and in the cast lists of Broadway plays and musicals. 1931: With these credits on his CV, Archie heads for Hollywood and is signed by Paramount Pictures. But the studio insists on a change of name. Archie’s first suggestion is Cary Lockwood – a character he’d played on Broadway – but the studio asks for a different surname: enter, Cary Grant. Later, his birth name will crop up in the dialogue of His Girl Friday and on a gravestone in Arsenic and Old Lace.

...He may have become a British spy reporting on Nazi sympathisers in Hollywood and perhaps recruited by Noël Coward and Ian Fleming...

1932: Cary Grant gets his first major screen credit as co-star to Marlene Dietrich in Blonde Venus. His performance is enjoyed by Mae West who casts him in her 1933 film She Done Him Wrong. The film is a boxoffice smash, gets nominated for an Academy Award and sets Cary Grant on his way to becoming a Hollywood favourite. It also attaches him to one of Hollywood’s best-known misquotes; Mae West’s invitation: “Why don’t you come up sometime and see me?” 1935: Archie’s father Elias dies in Bristol and the lie that has held since 1914 is shattered when Archie discovers that his mother remains alive in a local hospital for the mentally ill. A reunion swiftly follows; Archie arranges for his mother’s release and when she declines to join him in the States, he buys her a house in Westbury Park and visits her often from then until her death in 1973, aged 96. 1939: Following the outbreak of the Second World War, Archie tries to join the British Navy but is ruled too old. He may, however, have become a British spy – possibly reporting on Nazi sympathisers in Hollywood and perhaps recruited by his friends Noël Coward and/or Ian Fleming, both of whom did work for the British Intelligence service. 1942: Archie becomes a US citizen and adopts Cary Grant as his legal name. He marries one of the world’s richest women, Barbara Hutton, earning the couple the nickname ‘Cash & Cary’. Hutton is the second of his five eventual wives; Grant the fourth of her eight husbands! 1947: King George VI presents Cary with the King’s Medal for services to the British war effort and for his

Grant appearing in Arsenic and Old Lace; in which you can see his birth name pop up, symbolically, on a gravestone

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gifts to war relief funds. Grant’s donations include his entire earnings from The Philadephia Story. 1962: After his performance in Notorious reportedly inspires Ian Fleming to create his debonair spy James Bond, Grant is the first actor asked to portray 007 on screen. But he turns the role down, saying he is too old to commit, as required, to a series. The Bond films franchise goes on to exceed all expectations and by coincidence benefits at least three other former Bristol residents: the locally trained actors Caroline Bliss, Samantha Bond and Naomie Harris who all appear in different Bond films as Miss Moneypenny. 1965: Now aged 61, and with more than 70 film credits, Grant gains his fourth wife: 28-year-old Dyan Cannon (later to earn an Oscar nomination for her role in Bob & Carol, Ted & Alice) and brings her to Bristol on honeymoon, staying at what is now the Bristol Royal Marriot Hotel, College Green. In 1966, Cannon makes Grant a father for the first and only time when she gives birth to a daughter, Jennifer. Grant then announces his retirement from film to concentrate on parenthood. Fan sites claim that a photo on a desk in his farewell film Walk, Don’t Run is of Grant’s own parents, Elsie and Elias Leach. 1966: Luxury goods and cosmetics firm Faberge appoints Grant as a director and brand ambassador, with access to the company’s private jet which Grant uses to drop in on his mum and visit favourite places around Bristol. His Faberge work keeps him in the public eye, as does support for various good causes and attendances at high-profile funerals including that of his long-time friend Princess Grace of Monaco. 1970: After decades of failing to bestow a main prize on Grant’s many nominated films and roles, the American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences finally gives Grant a special Oscar for ‘his mastery of the art of screen acting’. 1974: Arriving in a British-style double-decker bus, Grant unveils a plaque in New York’s Bristol Basin commemorating that the foundations of the city’s East River Drive are built from the remnants of buildings destroyed in WWII bombing raids on Bristol – the Bristol Blitz – which were later taken to New York as ballast for ships. A duplicate plaque stands near the Bristol Harbourmaster’s office. 1986: Grant embarks on an international tour of a one-man show. Would it have come to Bristol; perhaps to the Hippodrome? No-one will ever know because just before the show’s 37th performance, in Iowa on 29 November, the 82-year-old suffers a cerebral haemorrhage and dies. 2001: A life-size bronze statue of Grant, by Graham Ibbeson, is unveiled in Millennium Square by Grant’s fifth wife and widow, Barbara. 2014: The first Cary Grant Comes Home festival takes place, attracting visitors from as far as Australia and the USA. It is now a biennial event. • With thanks to sources: BBC, carygrant.net, commanderbond.net, IMDb, New York Times, oscars.org, Wikipedia, Yahoo, Bristol Post. Visit carycomeshome.co.uk for details of this year’s festival events.

North by Northwest, 1959. The circumstances Archie was born into informed the character he played on-screen and off. What anxieties did he hide behind his debonair front?

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Starring in His Girl Friday. The festival uses Grant’s LSD therapy sessions as a lens through which to explore his childhood trauma and its effect on his marriages and mental health


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FILM FESTIVAL Enjoy gorgeous animated adventure The Polar Express at The Passenger Shed

IN PURSUIT OF

POPCORN A few fun Bristol Film Festival events to attend before 2018 draws to a close

Bristol Museum & Art Gallery On 2 November, Bristol Film Festival is hosting a night of immersive circus-themed screenings to coincide with the city museum’s current clown-based exhibitions. There’ll be live performers, an opportunity to sing along with smash hit The Greatest Showman (8pm) and a midnight movie in the shape of horror success IT, based on Stephen King’s novel (doors 10.20pm). Enter the museum after hours and be drawn into the magic in the awesome main hall.

Showtime: clowning around

Prepare your best Prime Minister moves à la Hugh Grant

The Station The fun continues with a Wickwar Wessex collaboration in the atmospheric former fire station on Silver Street. Enjoy Shaun Of The Dead zombie mayhem from 6.30pm on 8 November and a flight of flagship ales (plus bar snacks) to drink with the movie. The brewers will talk you through the tasting – just fetch your cricket bat, grab a lovingly crafted local beer and wait for all of this to blow over…

Rom-zom-com with aplomb

SS Great Britain To celebrate the 21st anniversary of the UK premiere of Titanic, the Festival is partnering with SS Great Britain on 18 November for a blacktie soirée on board the ship, bringing Kate, Leo and the crew thematically to life like never before. Guests will step aboard Brunel’s historic vessel, be greeted by the captain and serenaded on the Promenade Deck with live music from the Brunel Quartet during the drinks reception, before supper commences and the epic romance unfolds in the First Class Dining Saloon. Doors 5.30pm, tickets £37.50.

Shipshape and seaworthy (so we hope)

Passenger Shed The event pros at Hype have climbed on board with the festival to create – come on, in the sing-song voice of Gene Wilder – a world of pure imagination. Present your ticket at the gate, grab your free popcorn (if you’re a kid) and find the Passenger Shed transformed into ‘Wonkyland’. The fully-themed space will be showing festive and family classics including gorgeous animated adventure The Polar Express (23 December, 10am), Home Alone (3.15pm) and, later the same evening (6.30pm) Love Actually – prepare your best Prime Minister moves for the modern classic. On 27 December there’s a Frozen sing-along (11am) and 30 December offers up Charlie & The Chocolate Factory (11am) and When Harry Met Sally (6.30pm).

Winter Wonkyland

• bristolfilmfestival.com

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How about a New Year’s Eve-Eve viewing of When Harry Met Sally? Watch Kate, Leo and co on board the SSGB

See Charlie & The Chocolate Factory on 30 December


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FUTURE OF FILM

THE NETFLIX EFFECT With more films bypassing cinema release and going straight to streaming on demand, are we missing opportunities to promote, profile and discover the next generation of great films and filmmakers? What is the role of cinemas in championing film culture? Watershed curator Mark Cosgrove reflects on its changing nature and the value of cinema

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inemas play a crucial role in connecting audiences with film culture. Showing a film in the cinema creates mutual benefits of profile, presence, audiences and awards glories – we know films can generate ideas and debates as well as deliver box-office revenue to the industry, but only if they are seen on scale and shared on scale. If you were asked to name some of the films which redefined British film culture in the dark, audience-dwindling days of the 1980s, you might include Distant Voices, Still Lives; Rita, Sue and Bob Too; Angel or The Draughtsman’s Contract. The list would almost certainly include My Beautiful Laundrette which not only brought new representations and talent into our collective national consciousness but also audiences into cinemas. What also connects these diverse, distinctive films is that they were commissioned or cofinanced by the then new broadcaster Channel 4. Initially, this wasn’t a straightforward relationship between benevolent broadcaster and openly supportive cinemas. The broadcaster had paid for these films for broadcast on their new channel. Why should they be making them available for cinemas to exploit? The evidence is now there: not only did these films redefine the cultural landscape and what British films could be, but their success in cinemas led to the creation of FilmFour and a more direct productive relationship between a broadcaster and cinema which delivered those mutual benefits of profile, presence, awards glories. Does anyone remember P’tang, Yang, Kipperbang? A wonderful film screened on the second day of Channel 4’s transmission in 1982 which never had any cinema release. Does the film canon have a place for it? I think not. Spool forward nearly 40 years to 2018 and to Gravity director Alfonso Cuaron’s new movie Roma, which won the top prize at the Venice Film Festival. It is a Netflix-financed film and if it bypasses a meaningful cinema release, will it have the lasting impact of any of those films listed above? The relationship between films being available in cinemas and film culture is inestimable, as Channel 4 quickly discovered and as its filmmaking arm FilmFour brilliantly demonstrates. Think Trainspotting and East is East through to 12 Years A Slave and You Were Never Really Here – films that have generated profile and presence through cinema release, reviews and awards. So it is a shame to see directors of the cinematic stature of Greengrass,

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Alfonso Cuarón and the Coen brothers with new work hanging in the balance as to whether it will be seen widely in cinemas. But, Netflix depart from the outmoded cinema release system where films are exclusive to cinemas before they are available on other platforms, whether DVD or streaming, don’t they? Isn’t that why they are hailed as disruptors? Their films have already got profile and praise following Venice Film Festival. If true to form, their films will get into cinemas for a limited period (usually in London) which coincidentally makes them eligible for BAFTAs. Some say cynical, some say disruptive – whichever, it is still a shame that audiences and filmmakers are denied the value of the cinematic, and our wider film culture feels somehow diminished by it all. Will 2018 Netflix sci-fi horror Annihilation be remembered and revered as much as the 2016 sci-fi flick Arrival? Yes, cinemas have got their own historic practices: windows – the gap between a film’s cinema release and its availability on other platforms – are an analogue solution to a digital problem. True, disruption would be making the film available on all platforms simultaneously. It would then be up to the various venues, platforms, programmers, schedulers and curators to attract audiences. The fragmented results, though, may not best serve the films, filmmakers and wider talent. Time and time again we see they are best served by a strategic relationship between cinema and other platforms – the buzz of cinema release driving profile, audiences and the film’s commercial lifespan, from box office to pay-per-view to DVD sales (and beyond; the re-issue and restoration market is growing). What the spotlight on Netflix films at Venice and their subsequent availability (or lack thereof) in cinemas reveals is that the film value chain is indeed being disrupted. If our focus is a film culture which has long-term impact and meaning for all elements of that chain then cinema exhibition has a key role to play; as demonstrated by the success of those early Channel 4 films and by the media noise, public presence and financial prospects generated for recent films like BlacKkKlansman and Cold War or anticipated for Widows, First Man and Peterloo. It is the cinematic experience which not only drives demand but also make these filmmakers and their films an essential part of the wider national and international film culture. n • watershed.co.uk


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LOCAL | EVENTS

WHAT’S ON IN NOVEMBER English National Ballet’s Swan Lake at Bristol Hippodrome

Christmas shopping at Highgrove

Paul Lewis: Josep Molina & Harmonia Mundi; English National Ballet: ASH

Paul Lewis closes Bristol Keyboard Festival at St George’s Bristol

Tree Aid charity dinner 3 November, 7pm, The Bristol Hotel, Princes Street, Bristol A charity dinner-dance to raise funds for Bristol-based charity Tree Aid. Includes a champagne reception and three-course meal and wine. Then dance the night away to cover band Smack the 80s. £70; treeaid.org.uk

Jersey Boys 30 October – 17 November, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome This smash-hit musical, about four boys from the wrong side of the tracks who went on to become one of the most successful bands in pop history, has won 57 major awards worldwide, including the Olivier Award for Best New Musical. Jersey Boys is packed with hits by Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons including Beggin’, Sherry, Walk Like A Man and Working My Way Back To You. £18-£65; atgtickets.com/bristol Cinema in the Cathedral: J’Accuse (1919) 1 November, doors 6pm, Bristol Cathedral Abel Gance’s epic war film, J’Accuse, turns 99 this year. Released in 1919, the film includes real battlefields of the First World War on screen and depicts the tragedy and horror of war. This special screening marks the start of 11 days of First World War centenary commemorations at Bristol Cathedral, culminating in a Requiem Eucharist at 5.30pm on 11 November, 100 years to the day since the armistice. £12/£14; bristol-cathedral.co.uk Frankenstein: Red Rope Theatre Company 2 – 11 November, 7pm (plus 9pm Fri – Sun), Anglican Chapel, Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bath Road Hear a tale that’s been told for over 200 years. A story of creation, rejection, love and disaster. Adapted by award-winning writer Matt Grinter from the chilling gothic novel by Mary Shelley, and presented by Red Rope Theatre. In an attempt to defy death, Frankenstein creates a creature, a monster that is both childlike in its innocence but repulsive in its form. Horror stricken, he drives out the bewildered monster into an unforgiving world where it is met with cruelty and pain wherever it goes. 16+. £12/£14; arnosvale.org.uk, redropetheatre.co.uk 42 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Bristol Ensemble: Viva Vivaldi 3 November, 7.30pm, Trinity-Henleaze URC, Henleaze, Bristol A feast of sparkling concertos for violin, oboe, cello, flute and bassoon by the Venetian master composer Antonio Vivaldi. £5/£16.50, from Opus 13 music shop and online; henleazeconcertsociety.org.uk Clifton Village Christmas lights switch on 7 November, 6pm, The Mall Gardens Join the carol singing before the Christmas lights are switched on around Clifton Village by BBC Radio Bristol breakfast host Emma Britton. This year the switch on is in support of BBC Radio Bristol Alive Appeal, which provides meaningful engagement for vulnerable older people and training for those who support them. Bristol Keyboard Festival: Paul Lewis – Haydn, Beethoven & Brahms III 7 November, 7.30pm, St George’s Bristol Paul Lewis, the musician who selected St George’s new Steinway Concert D Grand piano, brings St George’s inaugural Bristol Keyboard Festival to a rousing close with a programme featuring Haydn, Brahms and Beethoven. £5-£30; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk 30th anniversary screening of Beetlejuice 7 November, 7.30pm, Curzon Cinema & Arts, Clevedon A critical and commercial success on its release in 1988, Beetlejuice jumps between the bizarre, the beguiling and the brilliant with No 173

star turns from Alec Baldwin, Geena Davis and Winona Ryder, directed by the kooky king Tim Burton. £5.50–£7.80; curzon.org.uk Sarah Guppy: The Bridge, The Bed, The Truth, 6 & 7 November, 8.30pm, Hen & Chicken, Bedminster and 8 & 9 November, 4pm and 6.30pm, The Create Centre, Hotwells Delve into the mysterious life and times of Sarah Guppy, the adopted Bristolian, prolific inventor and designer with a truly remarkable past, in an all-new one-woman show. Born in 1770, in a time where female inventors were a rarity, Guppy was a trailblazer in her midtwenties. Patenting a method for erecting bridges and railroads without arches, her engineering knowledge and expertise led to her forming close relations with the Brunel family and Guppy soon became mentor to a young Isambard Kindgom Brunel. £10; showofstrength.org.uk An evening with Jamie Hull 8 November, 7pm, Redland Hall, Redmaids’ High School, Westbury Road, Bristol Redmaids’ High School’s Remembrance Day commemoration will be marked by the extraordinary story of former UK Special Forces reserve Jamie Hull, who sustained third-degree burns to more than half his body after his plane crashed while on a solo training flight. He has since climbed Mount Kilimanjaro, run the London Marathon and taken part in Prince Harry’s Invictus Games. £5, proceeds to the SAS Regimental Association and the Royal British Legion. The Battle of the Ancre: historic film with live music, 9 November, 7.30pm, Redland Hall, Redmaids’ High School A live performance of poignant music specially composed by Laura Rossi – accompanying a screening of the historic film The Battle of the Ancre and the Advance of


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EDITOR’S PICK... THE LORD OF THE RINGS MARATHON 10 NOVEMBER, 12PM–12AM, CURZON CINEMA & ARTS, CLEVEDON

Bringing the fantasy genre into the mainstream in the early 2000s Peter Jackson's film adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's beloved novels not only inspired a world of wonder in hearts and imaginations across generations, but provided a blueprint for blockbuster film of the 21st century with its commercial and artistic success. 17 years after the release of The Fellowship of the Ring, Curzon brings you the chance to watch all three extended editions of Jackson’s adventurous epic – The Lord of the Rings – one after another, on the big screen, in all its glory. Don’t worry, there will be intervals to stretch those legs. Dressing up very much encouraged. £9–£12; curzon.org.uk

the Tanks with a short talk by the composer. £5/£20, from Opus 13 music shop and online; bristolensemble.com The Bristol Festival of Remembrance 10 November, 7.30pm, Bristol Cathedral Bristol Cathedral and Royal British Legion bring together musical talent from across the region with orchestral pieces, choral works, readings and a performance by local children to mark the centenary of the end of the First World War. There will be a poignant performance of Karl Jenkins’ The Peacemakers, and the guest speaker is humanitarian and author Terry Waite CBE. £15-£37.50; bristol-cathedral.co.uk

Finzi, Vaughan Williams and Howard Goodall, 10 November, 7.30pm, St George’s Bristol To mark the centenary of the First World War Armistice, Bath Camerata and the Bristol Ensemble perform a poignant programme of music by British composers, including Gerald Finzi’s God is Gone up and Howard Goodall’s Eternal Light: A Requiem. £10-£26; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk Pasetti & Boote dinner 16 November, 6.30pm, The Forge, Colston Yard Pasetti & Boote are back at The Forge to celebrate the launch of their newly named

events company with a tasty and playful menu. This evening’s menu will feature entirely vegetarian dishes such as squash ravioli and baked celeriac. £45, includes welcome drink; conferize.com Christmas Shopping at Highgrove 17 November – 16 December, opening times vary, The Royal Gardens at Highgrove, Doughton, Gloucestershire Christmas shopping doesn’t get better than this at The Prince of Wales’ Highgrove. Stocked with unique gift ideas including decorations and stationery, seasonal food and drink, home accessories and luxury clothing, you’ll find everything you need for the perfect Continued on page 44

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Comedian Rosie Jones at Tobacco Factory Theatres

Jersey Boys: Brinkhoff & Mögenburg

Pasetti & Boote present dinner at The Forge

Jersey Boys at Bristol Hippodrome

Christmas. There are three unique experiences to choose from including morning shopping with a complimentary mimosa, afternoon shopping with champagne and lunch, and a festive cream tea option. Pre-booked tickets only; highgrovegardens.com Disco Boots: Night Skating 17 November – 7 January, 6–8pm slots, The We The Curious Ice Rink, Millennium Square Dust off your disco moves, and prepare to dance as the ice rink in Millennium Square becomes this winter’s coolest dance floor. Take a twirl on the rink, soak up the alpine atmosphere in the après bar and enjoy views of the city on the SkyView Wheel. From £6.95; wethecurious.org Sing for Joy 17 November, 7.30pm, St Mary Redcliffe Church, Bristol An evening of exhilarating choral music performed by Bristol Phoenix Choir with the Bristol Cathedral Consort. The programme includes Handel’s Let Thy Hand Be Strengthened, Tippet’s Five Spirituals and Tavener’s Song for Athene, plus much more. Tickets £5/£12.50, from Opus 13, St Michael’s Hill, Bristol. Tel: 0117 9230164 or 07931 812625; bristolphoenixchoir.org.uk

SS Great Britain to create the most immersive film screening yet: a black-tie evening to celebrate the 21st anniversary of the UK premiere of Titanic. Be greeted by the captain as you step on board and be serenaded with live music and welcome drinks. The iconic film will be screened in the First Class Dining Saloon, and the screening includes an interval on the Promenade Deck with light supper. £37.50; bristolfilmfestival.com Glories of Byzantium 18 November, 6pm, St George’s Bristol Exultate Singers presents an intriguing programme of choral music influenced by Greek sacred and secular culture and traditions featuring works by Kassiani, John Tavener and Solfa Carlile. £12-£20; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk After-Hours Cemetery Tour 18 November, 7.30–9pm, Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bath Road, Bristol Explore the ethereal beauty of Bristol’s “Necropolis” with this after-hours tour. Find out about Victorian funeral traditions, learn about burial practices and hear stories from beyond the grave. You’ll travel along paths overhung with creeping branches, descend into the mortuary crypt and listen out for things that go bump in the night. £10; arnosvale.org.uk

The Bristol Animal Rescue Centre Christmas Fair 18 November, 10am – 3.30pm, The Barn, Bristol Animal Rescue Centre, St Philips, Bristol Get into the festive spirit all while helping to raise funds for local animals in need. There will be games, gifts, cards and crafts, mulled wine, hot food and, of course, mince pies on offer. Plus there will be a kids’ corner, festive face painting, and Santa’s grotto. £1.50 adults, £1 kids; bristolarc.org.uk Titanic screening 18 November, doors 5.30pm, film 6.30pm, SS Great Britain, Bristol Bristol Film Festival has teamed up with

Adam Hills’ Best Foot Forward 18 November, 8pm, Bristol Old Vic Join comedian and host of Channel 4’s The Last Leg, Adam Hills, as he reads selected chapters from his best-selling autobiography Best Foot Forward, a hilarious and honest collection of stories, thoughts, and tales of a life in comedy. £16; bristololdvic.org.uk Russell Brand: My Life by William Shakespeare 19–21 November, 7.30pm, Bristol Old Vic Comedian and actor Russell Brand takes some life lessons from William Shakespeare in a brand new theatre show, directed by Ian Rickson, whose work has featured at the

National Theatre, Young Vic and the West End. From £23.50; bristololdvic.org.uk After Hours 22 November, 6.30–10pm, We The Curious Check out the science centre after all the kids have gone home at this special late opening just for adults. Get involved in the fun activities and visit the UK’s first 3D planetarium, all with a drink in hand. 18+. £7.95/£8.95; wethecurious.org Rosie Jones: Fifteen Minutes 23 November, 7.30pm, Tobacco Factory Theatres Rosie Jones is a comedian with a penchant for being mischievous. Her cerebral palsy doesn’t slow her down in the slightest. Having starred on 8 Out of 10 Cats and Silent Witness, Rosie was a finalist for the Leicester Mercury Comedian of the Year 2018 and awarded the Amused Moose Comedy’s National New Comic Award 2017. £12; tobaccofactorytheatres.com St Peter’s Hospice Christmas Market 24 November, 10am–3pm, Bristol City Hall, College Green With homemade cakes, chutneys and handcrafted chocolates, gifts from artists and makers from across Bristol, this market will help raise vital funds for Bristol’s only adult hospice – St Peter’s Hospice. There will be more than 40 stalls on show, so this is the perfect time to pick up a Christmas present for someone special. £1 entry for adults, children free; stpetershospice.org.uk A Night at the Opera 24 November, 8pm, Clifton Cathedral From brilliant Beethoven to Bizet, from Verdi to Wagner – hear some of the greatest overtures, arias and choruses ever composed, and experience the operatic story as never before. Bristol Symphony Orchestra and City of Bristol Choir combined will make up almost 200 performers on the night. Advance tickets £20/£10; bristolsymphonyorchestra.com Continued on page 46

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Sarah Guppy: The Bridge, The Bed, The Truth

Murder She Didn’t Write at Theatre Tropicana

playground to tell the charmingly irreverent story of The Borrowers, based on the muchloved novel by Mary Norton. Below the floorboards of a large house in Bristol, we are plunged into the quirky, wonky, miniature world of young Arrietty and her family of Borrowers. Making use of anything and everything they find ‘upstairs’, from cotton buds to crisp packets, the Borrowers are the original up-cyclers. From £12; tobaccofactorytheatres.com

Colston Hall Presents Chris Wood 25 November, 8pm, Bristol Folk House, Park Street, Bristol Self-taught musician and six-time BBC Folk Award winner Chris Wood is a storyteller like no other. Weaving together potent images of broken hoovers, climate change and cook-in sauce, Chris’ compelling lyrics tell modern-day parables for today’s England. £16; colstonhall.org English National Ballet’s Swan Lake 27 November – 1 December, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome The English National Ballet brings the timeless classic Swan Lake to Bristol. Choregraphed by Derek Deane, this production features some of the most iconic scenes in ballet with Tchaikovsky’s glorious score performed live by English National Ballet Philharmonic. From £13.90; atgtickets.com/bristol

PLANNING AHEAD The Makers Market Christmas Pop Up 1 – 24 December, 10am–8pm (11am–4pm on Sundays), The Island, Bridewell Street, Bristol Bristol’s creatives never stop surprising us. And now you can see them for yourself at this pop-up market with showcases from 70 local artists, designers and makers. On 4 December join the Meet The Makers Party from 6pm where there will be refreshments, a DJ and lots of festivities; bristolbazaar.co.uk

Murder She Didn’t Write: Degrees of Error 29 November, 7.30pm, Theatre Tropicana, Marine Parade, Weston-super-Mare Move over, Sherlock! You become Agatha Christie in this improvised comedy as a murder-mystery play is created based entirely on audience suggestions with a festive flavour. So take up your magnifying glasses before an evening of murder, mayhem and making it up on the spot. 12+. £10; thetheatreorchard.org.uk

Bristol Concert Orchestra and Eloisa-Fleur Thom 1 December, 7.30pm, St George’s Bristol At this concert Engelbert Humperdinck’s charming overture to Hansel and Gretel leaves a tantalising trail of breadcrumbs towards the two musical masterpieces to follow: Mendelssohn’s hugely popular Violin Concerto – with violinist Eloisa-Fleur Thom – and Mahler’s First Symphony. £8-£15; bristolconcertorchestra.org.uk

A Christmas Carol 29 November – 13 January, times vary, Bristol Old Vic Bah humbug! Told in true Bristol Old Vic style, Tom Morris (The Grinning Man) joins forces with Lee Lyford and Gwyneth Herbert (The Snow Queen) to present another festive feast for all the family – an enchanting new adaptation of Charles Dickens’ timeless tale, A Christmas Carol. Ages 7+. From £7.50; bristololdvic.org.uk

Bristol Cabot Choir Christmas Concert 10 December, 7.30pm, Bristol Cathedral Bristol Cabot Choir’s annual Christmas concert features highlights from Handel’s inspiring Messiah, followed by Eric Whitacre’s luminous Lux Aurumque, and carols by the choir, soloists – there’s even chance for some audience participation. In support of Bristol Age Concern. £5-£15; opus13.co.uk

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Comprising 10 singers and a nine-piece band, the LAGC returns for this special performance as they prepare for their upcoming US tour. It also follows their sell-out concert in at St George’s Bristol earlier this year. The performance will include all the songs from the fabulous Graceland album and more. £25; ticketmaster.co.uk Bristol Choral Society 15 December, 7.30pm, Clifton Cathedral, In the run-up to Christmas, Bristol Choral Society will be joined by Bristol Ensemble, and conducted by Hilary Campbell, to perform Handel’s glorious Messiah. £10.50-£26.50; bristolchoral.co.uk The Snowman and The Bear 22 December, 3.30pm, The Forum, Bath Take a trip to the North Pole, see the Northern Lights, meet Father Christmas and maybe have a dance with a snowman or two as Bath Philharmonia performs Howard Blake’s scores live to Raymond Briggs’ amazing animations of The Snowman and The Bear. £14/£22; bathphil.co.uk James Nunn: new work, prints and drawings Until 3 January, Society Café, Harbourside, Bristol James Nunn has been designing and illustrating books for more than 15 years. Drawing is his first love, whether with pencil, charcoal or ink – in fact, anything that makes a mark on a surface. His new exhibition features a range of large animal and bird drawings and lino prints; jamesnunn.co.uk The Big-Hearted Valentine’s Ball 9 February, 6.30pm, Apex City of Bath Hotel, James Street West, Bath A charity black-tie dinner and ball to raise funds for a fibre optic laryngoscope to be used for treating heart patients at the NHS Bristol Heart Institute. Entertainment includes closeup magic from Peter Baffles and live music and the host is comedian Tank Sherman. Tickets £75, includes drinks reception and three-course dinner. Main sponsors Bugler Coaches, tel: 01225 44422. n


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MUSIC

Now he’s a little older, Miles feels more comfortable in himself than ever before

COUP DE KANE Last seen in Bristol singing beside the shimmering harbour in summertime, one cheeky half of The Last Shadow Puppets is back for more, this time with his new solo record. Syd Bird chats to him ahead of his O2 Academy gig Photography by Lauren Dukoff

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waggering Scouser and indie poster-boy known best as Alex Turner’s boisterous stage comrade, Miles Kane has released three solo records to date. Having played his part in the Noughties’ indie revival, fronting his band The Rascals, it was working alongside Arctic Monkeys and collaborating with their frontman in critically acclaimed band The Last Shadow Puppets that really propelled him into public consciousness. These days, he’s based in LA, rubbing shoulders with the likes of Lana Del Rey while working with mates such as Jamie T, from back home. We borrowed him briefly for a natter about his new record, his upcoming show in Bristol and halcyon nights aboard the good ship Thekla... What can you tell us about your new album? It’s an upbeat record that is very personal lyrically. It’s got moments of glam punk, emotions. It does feel slightly more emotive than the albums before it... Well it is. That is the truth. It felt natural to do that on this record. I really wanted to express my feelings at that time in my life. I don’t know if that’s because I’m older now and I feel more comfortable in myself than I probably ever have done. I’m a very open and honest person so I don’t have a problem expressing how I feel – whether that be in music or life. I like to just say it how it is.

It’s called Coup De Grace – meaning ‘the final blow’ or ‘stroke of mercy’ – is there something you’re killing off in this record? I have this love for wrestling – I don’t know if you saw the video I did for Cry On My Guitar, with me and this wrestler fighting, but we became friends. He’s finishing a movie called The Coup de Grace and as I was writing this record I started singing that lyric over the song, thinking “Oh I’ll change the lyrics later” but it sounded really cool. I didn’t know what it meant, actually, at the time and when I looked it up it felt kind of fitting. And then once all these songs were written, the meaning of it worked, with all those sort of emotions and feelings and everything that had gone on up until that point. Everything was distilled into that one phrase? Yeah, it was kind of a happy accident I guess, that title. It seemed right and I couldn’t change it.

comfortable in myself maybe. The gigs are my favourite things to do in all this and when we get on stage (I’ve got an amazing band as well) it’s electric. It’s so entertaining and energetic, there’s nothing that can touch you when you’re in that groove… Each night is different and you let it build into this sort of explosion. That feeling is like no other feeling in the world. And I think we do that really well, dare I say it! I think it’s going to be a nice way to round off this year with a bang. You were great at Summer Series – is Bristol a city you’ve played a lot? Loads – I’ve always loved playing it. From day one it’s been decent for us. So I can’t wait to get there again. Is there an indie bar on a boat in Bristol? I just remember, years ago, having a mad night on a boat. Thekla, that’s what it’s called – that’s right! That’s the one! That’s going back years now but that’s what comes to mind. What’s next? We’re dropping something new in a couple of weeks, which will be a nice surprise for the tour, and then we’re back over to Europe – we may go to America – and then some festivals. We’ll just keep writing and get some new music out. Finally: some good old-fashioned, quick-fire questions à la Smash Hits... Blue Planet or Top Gear? Blue Planet. Halloween or Christmas? Christmas. Most played song on your iPod? Candi Staton – Nights On Broadway. If you hadn’t become a rock star what was plan B? Chef in a restaurant. Favourite Bowie track? Soul Love. ■ • Miles Kane plays O2 Academy Bristol on 3 December

Was it an easy record to write? It was… The light, or whatever, came when me and Jamie T got together to write last January. There were loads of half-written songs from over the years that, up until then, I hadn’t got into a position to finish. I was playing Jamie all the demos and the two that really stuck out to him were Silverscreen, which is on the record, and Coup De Grace, the tune we just chatted about, and he said “this is the kind of record you should make”. Then we started writing. I love it when you’re just chatting about how you’re feeling and putting it into songs; it’s a beautiful thing. It’s so nice to be with one of your best mates every day. We’d just sit on the sofa in my little apartment and make some demos; it was really enjoyable. And when we’d go home we’d be listening to the demos and I’d say; “Are you singing into the mirror listening to the demo?” and he was, and we’d just be buzzing off these tunes. You also collaborated with Lana Del Rey – how was that? Just on the one song, Loaded – there were other songs that we wrote but that one made the album. It had sort of been on the backburner. She was at one of Jamie’s gigs and asked what I was up to that week; I told her me and J were going to be writing and she said she’d love to hear what we did. We’d started writing Loaded and had the verses when she said “can I try something on the chorus?” and started doing quite a Lana melody. When she started singing the words we were like “wow this chorus is mindblowing!” Sounds like a special afternoon. What can fans expect of this show? This year has been phenomenal. I’ve absolutely loved everything about it, doing the record and every gig. It’s been really positive and it feels different. I think it goes back to being a bit older and feeling

Miles was inspired by his love of wrestling while writing the record among the bright lights of Los Angeles, where he’s now based

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MUSIC

#BLESSED Between them, these musicians have been a big part of the Bristol music scene over the past couple of decades and their latest album aims to share their experiences of the city

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ward-winning local jazz band Get The Blessing were formed in 2000 by Jim Barr and Clive Deamer – the bassist and drummer from Portishead – who bonded with saxophonist Jake McMurchie and trumpet player Pete Judge over their appreciation of American jazz musician Ornette Coleman. The rhythm section soon teamed up with the boys on brass and eight albums later, they’re all about bringing more of Bristol to the world. We wholeheartedly applaud...

TBM: So how does the new album Bristopolis relate to Bristol? Jake: To a certain extent everything we do relates to Bristol – it’s been our home for many years and was the birthplace of the band. Since we won the award for our first album (the BBC Jazz Awards' Album of the Year in 2008) we’ve had an international profile, regularly touring the UK, Europe and occasionally further afield too. It’s hard for bands outside London to get that kind of foothold – we’ve been very lucky – but it means that the “outsiderness” of being based in the West Country has been an asset for us. We’ve explored this much more keenly in the past couple of years. The Bristol Jazz and Blues festival commissioned us to work with brilliant local filmmaker and video-artist John Minton and use footage from the Bristol Archive to create a film for which we wrote the soundtrack. The album xxxx was developing at the same time (there’s some overlap in the music) so we had images of Bristol at the forefront as we thought about this album too. Pete: GTB was definitely born and brought up in Bristol, though we’re still all children musically speaking (and proud of it). It’s hard to imagine another city putting these four people in the same room together and letting them just get on with it. Our new album pays tribute to our home by careering around its one-way system (not necessarily in the correct direction of travel), darting into its hidden alleyways for nefarious purposes and occasionally stopping to take in the dizzying vistas of sprawling buildings and distant hilltops. What is inspiring you about Bristol right now? Jake: Its dynamism and creativity. I’ve always felt Bristol punches way above its weight. Its relatively small size means the ebb and flow of interest in the arts can be more pronounced but I think Bristol is experiencing a major boom in terms of the diversity of its output, especially in jazz, experimental music and other art forms. Pete: All the little independent, pocket-size, under-the-radar 50 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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happenings and hubs. And I’ve always loved the fact that you can see the surrounding hills wherever you are in the city, and that the light always has more than a hint of water about it. Which local acts do you rate? Jake: I’ve recently joined a hip-hop-meets-experimental-improv band called Jade, run by the amazing trumpet player Nick Malcolm, which is getting me very excited. But I also love minimalist-nu-folk trio Three Cane Whale, Thought Forms, Beak, Eyebrow, Yama Warashi, The Brackish, The Evil Usses, Run Logan Run, Domestic Sound Cupboard and much of the new experimental scene which seems to revolve around cornettist Harry Furniss. There’s a lot going on. Pete: Also, This Is the Kit (are they a local act? Let’s say yes, as they’re brilliant), Modulus III, Spiro, Spindle Ensemble, Solarference, Rock Of Eye, Goan Dogs, Hippo, anything with Paul Bradley or Neil Smith in it, The Jellilalas, Sefrial... Where are you eating and drinking? Jake: Mostly at the kitchen table. But on the rare occasions I go out to eat, I love my local tapas bar Mesa, and Gambas in town is amazing. There seem to be fewer and fewer decent pubs in Bristol/the world. I’ve been seen in the Port of Call off Whiteladies Road more than once, and there’s always the Hillgrove Porter Stores. Pete: Kitchen tables are best. Also Souk Kitchen, Dela (Jim’s studio’s high-end Scandi tuck shop), El Rincon and The Hare (North Street’s beverage bookends). Favourite live venue? Jake: I wish the Arnolfini would open its doors to live music in a meaningful way again. I saw so many amazing gigs there in the ’80s and ’90s, but there seems to be very little in the performance space these days. The Wardrobe Theatre (where we launched the album) is a great, intimate, seated venue. The Exchange is always good for the other end of that spectrum (and only a minute’s walk away). The Fringe is a great jazz club and promotes all sorts of other music too. We are lucky to have so many good small venues. Pete: Not to mention Crofter’s Rights. St George’s is beautiful and I’m looking forward to seeing their second smaller space. Also Bristol’s tiniest, bestest venue, the tapas Tardis itself: El Rincon. n • gettheblessing.com


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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Más Morena, SPACE Gallery at 6 West Street, Old Market, 5 – 11 November The 2018 return of Afrika Eye – the South West’s biggest celebration of African arts, cinema and culture – will see an expanded edition this month, including a 100th birthday tribute feast for Nelson Mandela, a film screening aboard a Bristol harbour ferry and the first fruits of a pioneering Bristol/Senegal creative exchange. Also part of this year’s programme is Más Morena – an exhibition of remarkable photographs featuring the Senegalese women of Gorée Island, taken by the renowned Spanish photographer Javier Hirschfeld. The photographs were all shot on the site of one of the earliest European settlements in Western Africa. Javier Hirschfeld draws on aspects of everyday life in Senegal and explores connections with images from the Andalusian romantic paintings of Julio Romero de Torres to bring audiences this series of powerful portraits. This show will provide a rare opportunity to see this compelling collection.

• afrikaeye.org.uk

Mats Rydstern, Lime Tree Gallery, until 13 November

See beautiful work by Mats Rydstern at Lime Tree Gallery

A much anticipated return to Bristol of the talented Swedish painter, Mats Rydstern. Mats is featured in many important collections in his homeland, and has become very sought after in the UK, since Lime Tree Gallery first featured his work in 2007. Lime Tree is Rydstern’s sole representation outside his native country and his very fine still-life and landscape work is deservedly popular and widely collected. His last UK show, in 2015, was hugely popular. His still-life work has an identifiable Scandinavian sparseness, while his Roaring Ketan by Jon J. West landscapes follow a broader European tradition. Both are distinguished by brilliant treatment of light and an unusual ability to capture stillness. From 29 November the gallery is then hosting its regular, wide-ranging Christmas exhibition. • limetreegallery.com

The Temporary Gallery, Cadbury House, 15 November Peruse affordable artworks – starting at £30 – from 11 Bristol artists. This event (8pm – 10pm) in Congresbury will be a social occasion for meeting up with friends, immersing yourself in art and talking to the artists to find out why and how they create their artwork. Three specially commissioned artworks will be up for auction and 20 per cent of the sold price will be donated to CLIC Sargent. The first 100 arrivals will receive a complimentary welcome drink. Featured artists include Maggie Cousins, Alex Davis, Anna Duckworth, Veronia Gayle, Lewis Grimwood, Ann Kelson, Lloyd Lewis, Sophie Mills-Thomas, Neil Roberts, Andrew and Helen Stevens and J.West. • fillthatspace.uk/november-exhibition

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EXHIBITIONS Enjoy engaging scenes by print artist Katsushika Hokusai as part of the collection

Masters of Japanese Prints: Bristol Museum & Art Gallery, until 6 January Bristol Museum has a collection of some 500 ‘floating world pictures’ (ukiyo-e) which celebrate the pleasures of life in Japan. This show will explore the radical developments in landscape prints made by two of Japan’s best-loved artists – Katsushika Hokusai and Utagawa Hiroshige – who developed a dynamic new genre of landscape prints. See how Hokusai exploited a growing interest in Japanese landscape and how he experimented with newly available Prussian Blue dye to develop a striking new colour palette. Encouraged by Hokusai’s success, Hiroshige developed his own landscape series which portrayed views along the route between the cities of Kyoto and Edo (today’s Tokyo). • bristolmuseums.org.uk

Clowns: The Eggshibition, Bristol Museum & Art Gallery, until 6 January

Contemporary Native American artists’ expressions of their individual connections to the natural world. Pacific Northwest Coast artist Preston Singletary immortalises regional fauna in traditional Tlingit formline serigraphs; the black and white photography of Eugene Tapahe sees iconic North American wildlife in its natural habitat; and in contrast, Chickasaw artist Billy Hensley celebrates with richly coloured, patterned canvases. The paintings of Nocona Burgess and Del Curfman honour the relationship between the horse and the tribes of the Great Plains, and pay homage to the cultural importance of raven and crow. In subtle hues of grey and white George Alexander and Micah Wesley acknowledge the role of birds as spiritual messengers; while vibrant paintings of Yatika Star Fields and Tony Tiger highlight the fragility of the natural world through abstracted butterfly imagery. This exhibition calls us to be mindful of our fellow creatures, to learn from them, respect them and to understand that their survival is inextricably linked to our own.

162 colourful characters have taken up residence in Bristol Museum & Art Gallery for an exhibition exploring the history of clowning. Celebrating 250 years of circus, this family show features original costume, fascinating archives and intriguing ‘clown eggs’. Clowns International – the oldest clowning organisation in the world – has been painting the faces of its members on eggs for over 70 years. Each is a record of a clown’s identity, preserving the unwritten rule that no clown should copy another’s look. Although not legally binding, the eggs act as a sort of copyright so every clown is unique. Explore the origins of clowning and the personal, hilarious, often bizarre stories of the people beneath the colourful exterior, plus find a clown car, circus props, archive photos, a kids’ trail, dressing-up and even an invisible dog.

• rainmakerart.co.uk

• bristolmuseums.org.uk

Déix Booch (Wolf Brothers) by Preston Singletary

Winter exhibition, Rainmaker Gallery, 1 November – 28 February

● Benoît Maire: Thebes, Spike Island, until 9 December French visual artist and philosopher Benoît Maire’s first solo exhibition features more than 90 works ranging from paintings and sculptures to furniture, everyday objects and films that explore philosopher and sociologist François Lyotard’s concept of the ‘differend’ – a notion based on the insurmountable conflict between saying and seeing. Benoît takes inspiration from a range of disciplines including geometry, sociology and mythology, and a recurring theme in this exhibition is the question of the origin of humankind and the objects we produce. • spikeisland.org.uk

● Abigail McDougall preview, Coldharbour Framery & Gallery, 2 November (and Christmas open evening, 30 November) November kicks off at Coldharbour with with an eagerly awaited solo show from Abigail McDougall’s new originals ‘Reflections of Bristol’ and ends with the annual Christmas open evening, offering the chance to meet many of the artists whose work is on show. At this time of year the gallery is full of woodland scenes and fiery autumn colours, and not only is it packed full of paintings and prints by mainly local artists, but there’s also a wide variety of sculpture, ceramics and unique decorative pieces – perfect if you are searching for individual gifts this Christmas. • coldharbourgallery.co.uk

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Mats Rydstern Solo Exhibition: Oct 27 - Nov 13 Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol BS8 4UB

Tel 0117 929 2527 • www.limetreegallery.com

Commission a portrait in oils Robert Highton 07939 224598; rhighton@mail.com; robhightonart.com

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ART

RAISING THE BAR Shop for original objects of desire at the Gloucester Road gallery upping its visitor offering with a cool new watering hole and events space to boot

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he ever-popular North Bristol Art Trail takes place this month over the weekend of 24 November. Last year it coincided with a series of giant art banners that appeared along Gloucester Road, if you remember, and this year’s ties in, excitingly, with the launch of Alchemy 198, a new European-style cafe/bar that will also be one of the venues on the trail. The annual arts event offers an unhurried opportunity to buy original artwork – from paintings and prints to stone sculptures and jewellery – with myriad lovely objects of desire in between. North Bristol Artists look forward to the weekend as a chance to show off whatever they have been creating throughout the year and, of course, the timing is ideal for inspiring visitors to buy handmade gifts and designs for loved ones ahead of Christmas. Trail-goers can visit the artists –some of whom are recognised at regional and national levels for their arts and crafts – in their own homes and studios, often bumping into friendly faces while soaking up the atmosphere of streets bustling with art lovers. It’s all about creating a network of like-minded people passionate about sharing their work directly with the public. Well-known Bristol artist Jenny Urquhart will be one of the

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Moonlight In The Gorge by Jenny Urquhart

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artists exhibiting at Alchemy 198 along with jewellery designer Katie Johnston and Sarah Thorp. Sarah owns Room 212 – a yearround gallery featuring Bristol artists including the NBA members on her roster – and her sons are running the new bar. There she will be curating exhibitions and events from the likes of 212 Productions artists (in December) and street photography by Colin Moody in January. Other North Bristol Artists will have work on permanent display at the bar, including Toni Burrows’ mosaics and original artwork by Jenny McGee, Maita Robinson and Huw Richards Evans. Expect talks, yoga, comedy nights and supper clubs – we know we don’t want to miss the 13 December dinner with local writer Lia Leendertz (author of bestseller The Alamanac) and Demuths Cookery School teacher Anna Shepherd – all against a backdrop of beautiful artwork. Like many venues on the trail, Alchemy 198 will host a preview evening on 23 November and all are welcome – what better way to start off a weekend of art and creativity than with a decent glass of red, chatting to local artists? n • For more info, visit northbristolartists.org.uk; room212.co.uk; alchemy198.co.uk


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he Victorian Gothic estate of Tyntesfield, near Bristol, has been in the care of conservation charity the National Trust since 2002. It was once home to the Gibbs family, who lived on the estate from 1844 to 2001. Lawrences’ proximity to this wonderful house, means that the name Gibbs is well known to their specialists. So, imagine his delight when Neil Grenyer, Lawrences’ furniture specialist, noticed that one of the items he was cataloguing had an original label from 1926 indicating that Antony Hubert Gibbs was the maker. “The objects we had been given to sell came from the Gibbs family, but I had not realised that they had also been MADE by a Gibbs” he commented. Antony Hubert and his father before him, also called Antony, had been very accomplished ornamental wood turners and by a fortunate coincidence, Tyntesfield has recently acquired the original Holtzappfel lathe used by both father and son. “We couldn’t believe our luck that so soon after taking delivery of the lathe, we now had the chance to acquire some of the items made on it,” explained Susan Hayward, Curator at Tyntesfield, when she accepted delivery from Helen Carless, Lawrences Managing Director. “It is very satisfying for an auctioneer to see lots go to the place where they most belong, and we are delighted that Tyntesfield was able to secure the items in our sale. After almost one hundred years, they have gone home” said Helen Carless Do you have a rare treasure? Why not find out by taking advantage of Lawrences Free Valuations, held throughout the South West including Bristol and Bath. For more information on valuations contact andy.sagar@lawrences.co.uk or phone 01460 73041 Tyntesfield is open to visit every day apart from Christmas Day, for more information visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield

The Linen Yard, South Street, Crewkerne, Somerset TA18 8AB T 01460 73041

lawrences.co.uk

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REMEMBRANCE

BRISTOL’S WAR Stephen Roberts investigates the local impact of the shattering conflict that shuddered to its end a century ago this month

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fter more than four years of bloodshed, the guns fell silent at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. It was 11 November 1918, 100 years ago, and the First World War was finally over after more than 1,500 days of attrition. What did the conflict’s prosecution and its end mean, however, to the city of Bristol? When war broke out in July 1914, Bristol was relatively prosperous, with a population of more than 350,000 and an economy based around its port and other thriving industries. The initial call to arms was answered by the city’s men – mostly the young and unattached – who enthusiastically volunteered in their droves. Bristol would continue to supply a steady flow of lads until conscription was introduced from January 1916. Some 55,000 Bristolians would join up in total: amazingly, this represented around 50 per cent of the city’s able-bodied males of military age. Around 6,000 of those men would die, mostly in combat, or from wounds sustained during or after the war. Several of the Gloucestershire Regiment’s battalions were Bristolbased. The 1/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion Territorial Force was stationed in the city at the beginning of the war and had been mobilised and sent to Boulogne by the spring of 1915. The 2/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion Territorial Force and 2/6th Battalion Territorial Force were both formed in Bristol, mobilised and landed in France in May 1916, and then fought on the Western Front, including the biggest German counter-attack against the British at Cambrai in 1917. The 7th (Service) Battalion meanwhile, another Bristol-formed battalion, had a different experience of war. Departing from Avonmouth, it landed at Gallipoli to fight the Turks in July 1915, before being evacuated to Egypt in January the following year, and then transferred to Mesopotamia in February 1916 for more operations against the Turks. A number of other Bristol-formed battalions from the Gloucestershire Regiment found themselves at the forefront of some of the most famous battles of the First World War, including Loos (1915), the Somme (1916) and Passchendaele (1917). The 12th (Service) Battalion, a ‘pals’ battalion’ dubbed Bristol’s Own, raised right at the start of the war by the Citizens’ Recruiting Committee, fought in major phases of these battles in France before being transferred to Italy, where it stiffened Italian resistance against the Austrians, before returning to the Western Front for the final push to victory. 60 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Not all Bristol men joined the Gloucestershire Regiment – in fact, there were men from the city in almost every regiment, especially the Somerset Light Infantry and Royal Gloucestershire Hussars. Eric Welchman was born in Sri Lanka, where his father was a missionary, but he was resident in Bristol from the age of six, when his father returned home to become a local vicar. Eric grew up in Berkeley Square in Clifton and was educated at Clifton College – a keen sportsman, he trained as an officer, joining the Lincolnshire Regiment in 1912. Lt. Welchman’s fate was to perish at the British Army’s first major engagement of the war – the Battle of Mons – in August 1914. He was aged just 21 and among the first officers of the conflict to die. Eric’s father was still ministering in Bristol when the next world war came around: his church at the time (Temple Church) was wrecked by German bombs in 1940. Also involved in this battle was Clifton-born Captain Douglas Reynolds. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his bravery in orchestrating the recovery of British guns under enemy fire during the retreat from Mons in August 1914, thereby preventing them falling into enemy hands, and silencing a German battery the following month. The centenary of that first action saw a VC paving stone laid in Bristol, outside St Peter’s Church in Castle Park – the first of eight to be installed in the city to commemorate the brave men, either born in the THE THREE WHITEFORD BROTHERS: During the war Graham served in the army; Wilfred refused to fight but agreed to join the NonCombatant Corps; Hubert refused to take any part in the war and was repeatedly court-martialled and sentenced to hard labour. From August 1918, he served sentences in Wormwood Scrubs and Bristol. He was not released until May 1919. After this, their father took all three brothers to a local photographer where this picture was taken. He was proud of each of his sons for the decisions they took in relation to the war. (Image by permission of Bristol Radical History Group)


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REMEMBRANCE

Opposite page: A group of Bristol’s Own soldiers, photographed between December 1914 and February 1915 (image SOGM) This page, clockwise from top left: Bristol Territorials went into the trenches for the first time at Ploegsteert Wood, Flanders, in April 1915 where many were killed or wounded (image Clive Burlton); the unveiling of the Cenotaph on Colston Avenue, Bristol in 1932 (image Bristol Archives); Bristol Lunatic Asylum was converted into Beaufort War Hospital in 1915. This image shows patients on the hospital’s MC ward (image Glenside Hospital Museum); 6th Gloucesters recruiting poster (image Bristol Archives)

city or with a strong connection to it, who won Britain’s highest award for gallantry. Promoted to major, and a battery commander, Reynolds was twice mentioned in despatches, then mortally wounded after being gassed, dying in a French hospital in February 1916, aged 33. He left a four-week-old son. Many Bristol men were already in the Royal Navy when war broke out, being swiftly joined by another 600 from the reservists, then over 2,800 more who joined up as the war progressed, with many working on minesweepers. Large numbers of Bristol residents were also in the merchant navy; several hundred would end up losing their lives including deck-boy William Clements, who was just 16 when the hospital ship SS Llandovery Castle was sunk by a German U-boat on 28 June 1918. We should not forget that the army and navy both had fledgling air arms, which would amalgamate to become the RAF by the end of the war. Come the war’s conclusion, the RAF had more 1,500 Bristol F.2B fighters at its disposal – a plane that had been manufactured by the Bristol Aeroplane Company, first established at Filton in 1910. As a result of this conflict being history’s first ‘total war’ in which a whole nation was mobilised to support, both at home and overseas, many Bristol residents were exempt from fighting on the front line, such as dock workers who were essential in continuing the workforce at home. As well as men, the war changed the lives of Bristol women forever. Shortage of men meant women were employed in traditionally male roles, and they made their mark particularly in munitions production. Women helped churn out shell cases, explosives, engines, motorcycles and aircraft in numerous factories around the city, while a new installation at Avonmouth in 1918 saw them producing shells containing mustard gas. This was dangerous work, and during the final six months of the war there were three fatalities and more than 700 injuries from a workforce of 1,100. The factory even had its own hospital. Not everyone could embrace the war, and it is known that 350 men from Bristol and the surrounding area regarded themselves as conscientious objectors. Many of them were imprisoned in harsh conditions, while others undertook non-combatant roles. Either way, many found it hard to obtain employment after the war, as they continued to pay a price for the courage of their convictions.

Many of those who returned to Bristol during and after the conflict were wounded (some more than once) and some were permanently disabled. The city became a centre for treating the wounded as Bristol Royal Infirmary, General Hospital, Cossham and Southmead all played their part as military hospitals, while the Bristol Lunatic Asylum in Stapleton, as it was known, was taken over by the War Office as Beaufort War Hospital, becoming a military hospital with more 1,400 beds for the sick and wounded. It was then renamed as Glenside Hospital after the war. The city’s large houses also found another use as hospitals – Kings Weston House, Ashton Court Mansion and Redmaids’ School to name but three.

Every one of Bristol’s parishes has a memorial dedicated to those who died during the First World War, with more names added following subsequent conflicts. Tragically, the city’s suffering did not end with the war’s conclusion in 1918 as at least 1,200 Bristolians died during the influenza pandemic, also known as the Spanish flu of 1918-19, which swept across the world and killed an estimated 50 to 100 million people. This month Bristol’s war memorials will once again be the focus for Remembrance, with added poignancy as we recall the end of a shattering conflict that finally ground to a halt 100 years ago after levels of death and destruction that would inhabit people’s worst nightmares for years to come. Some people may still venture to ponder why we bother remembering a war from so long ago: if you could count the 1914-1918 names on all the war memorials in Bristol you’d have many thousands of very good reasons. n

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FOOD & Drink

TASTY TIDBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

GROWING TREND

The good ship Bessie Ellen is bringing tasty goods over from Portugal

PORT O’ BRISTOL One of the last surviving West Country trading ketches is currently on its way to Bristol from Portugal, with a cargo of wine, olive oil, almonds, chestnuts and salt from small producers. The Bessie Ellen was part of a fleet that once stood at nearly 700 from 1900 to 1930, when working sailing ships were an everyday sight in English ports and harbours. The ship, docking in Bristol at the beginning of November, is being sailed on behalf of a growing community of sail-cargopioneers committed to a way of business that honours producers, reduces transport emissions and offers quality products at an honest price. Bristol’s Portuguese wine importers, Xisto Wines, and sail cargo initiative New Dawn Traders, are working with Underfall Yard and The Bessie Allen’s owners to coordinate this. Bristol will become one of several ports forming part of a trading network that connects producers and buyers with sailing cargo ships. “I have been working on ‘Port O’ Bristol’ for many years; a project that links the twin cities of Porto and Bristol, reestablishing their ancient trade links,” said Anton Mann of Xisto. “It will be bringing barrels of finest organic artisan Portuguese wines made by celebrated wine makers especially for this voyage, to be bottled in Bristol.” Alex Geldenhuys of New Dawn Traders added: “This is an experiment in rethinking how we trade. We are asking our customers to pay upfront for the cargo and to collect direct from the ship, so everyone is invested in the voyage. The savings from no longer needing onward distribution, storage or retail marketing are passed on to the buyer. By making quality products affordable and still paying the producer a fair price, we can grow a market for ethical produce, shipped by sail – one community at a time.”

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Plant-based restaurant Suncraft opened its doors on Gloucester Road recently and, in a first for the city’s restaurants, partnered with urban farming pioneers Grow Bristol on an in-house hydroponics system for producing ingredients such as spinach, pak choi, edible flowers and mizuna (Japanese mustard leaves). Head chef Kane Danaher’s menu of Asian-inspired vegan bowls includes delicious dumplings and parsnip mash, and spiced potato and spinach cakes, many of which are gluten-free too. “We are producing interesting and healthy fresh and fermented food that people are becoming more and more familiar with and we’ll be working hard to keep it ethically sourced but light and fresh all year round,” said Kane. Holding around 140 plants, the hydroponics unit is a selfregulating system using no pesticides, just a metre from Suncraft’s kitchen team, who also have plans to make their own probiotics. "With hydroponics and 'vertical growing' we can grow fresh and healthy produce right next to the point of consumption,” said Grow Bristol’s Dermot O’Regan. “It saves on the water use and carbon footprint of our food and keeps it in the highest quality." James Koch from Suncraft added: “Of course we can only grow a fraction of the food we will be serving but our own growing system will set the scene for a conversation with our customers about the importance of local food and the role we are playing in creating a more sustainable and transparent food system.” An optional 20p donation is also being added to every dine-in customer’s bill in return for unlimited filtered still and sparkling water by Belu who give 100% of each donation to their charity partner WaterAid to transform lives with clean water, worldwide.

• suncraft.co.uk Carrot and coconut kheer. Image by Hattie Ellis


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Food News2.qxp_Layout 1 25/10/2018 17:21 Page 1

FOOD & Drink

TASTY TIDBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS Pete’s off to the Big Smoke! (Image by John Blackwell)

TASTE SRI LANKA Sri Lankan street food specialist The Coconut Tree launched its third restaurant on Gloucester Road last month. All recipes at the affordable 80-cover eatery and bar hail from Ceylon, where the founders are originally from, and all dishes are available to share in typical Sri Lankan fashion. Tapas-style plates include spicy cuttlefish; chickpeas stir-fried in coconut oil, onions, garlic, mustard seeds and chilli; and diced pork belly cooked in 30 roasted spices. There are plenty of vegan dishes and polenta flour is used, meaning most of the menu is gluten-free. Try local street-food hybrid kotthu, with egg, veg and/or meat, or coconut milk pancakes called ‘hoppers’ – 50p of each one sold in December will be donated to Help Bristol’s Homeless as part of the ethos to contribute to the neighbourhood environment. The cocktail menu is based around Ceylon arrack – a Sri Lankan spirit made from fermented coconut sap – and blends sweet and fiery flavours such as pineapple and turmeric. The Sri-presso Martini, with coffee-infused arrack and cardamom, is well worth a punt or you might opt for The Drunken Sri Lankan served in a handmade ceramic elephant to help raise awareness of elephant rescue efforts. • thecoconut-tree.com/bristol-glos-rd

CAPITAL COUP Top Bristol chef Peter Sanchez-Iglesias is to take the culinary reins at the top-floor restaurant within The Standard’s highly anticipated London hotel, opening in 2019 – the boutique brand’s first hotel outside of the US. Following on from the success of his restaurants Casamia and Paco Tapas, this will also be Peter’s first restaurant in London. “Peter is one of the most talented and innovative young chefs in the UK, if not the world,” said Amar Lalvani, CEO of The Standard. “We are honoured to be collaborating with him and are thrilled that The Standard, London, is the stage that he has chosen to display his artistry to the world.” Peter arrives with tremendous accolades, including Chef of the Year in the 2018 Good Food Guide, in which Casamia was also named one of the top 10 restaurants in the UK. In the 2019 Good Food Guide, Casamia rose to number eight in the listings. Paco Tapas was awarded a Michelin star in October 2017, just a month before its first anniversary. This year marks the 11th guide in which Casamia has held a Michelin star. “For me the attraction of working with The Standard is the whole experience. I’ve been a massive fan of The Standard for years – their hospitality, their image, look and everything they do,” said Peter. “To me they always approach their businesses in a new and refreshing way. When I first heard about the possibility of coming on board I was like ‘hell yeah’! I never thought I’d work with a hotel but this is different. The team are amazing. The people behind this project are hugely creative, open minded. It’s completely the right fit.” We reckon Peter’s bold flavour profiles, complemented by the restaurant’s spectacular views of central London, will create quite the capital dining experience.

• sanchez-brothers.co.uk

HAVANA AT HARBOURSIDE The capacious waterfront building formerly occupied by Bordeaux Quay has had new life breathed into it thanks to Cuban-inspired restaurant and bar Revolución de Cuba. Pushing its ‘party like there’s no mañana’ mantra, it aims to feed foodie wanderlust via Latin American flavours, vibrant cocktails and carnival atmosphere. Expect burgers, burritos, tacos and tapas including roasted chorizo in red wine and honey sauce; albondigas; Mojito prawns with a lobster mayo; and halloumi tacos with butternut squash and courgette. The cocktail list, dominated by premium Cuban rums, hopes to help recreate heady Havana nights of the ’50s à la Ernest Hemingway on daiquiris. “I’m really excited to have been given the opportunity to work in the beautiful city of Bristol again,” says GM Matt Glister. “We have the most amazing waterside location for our brand new restaurant and bar, with all the colour of Cuba, its carnival vibe, fab food and amazing rum cocktails.”

• revoluciondecuba.com

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THE US DELICIO GUIDE the best places in Bristol to eat, drink and enjoy The Delicious Guide to Bristol featuring all our favourite eateries and foodie treateries is available online at our website thebristolmag.co.uk THE

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 65


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FOOD & DRINK

GODLY NECTAR Bristol beer expert Andy Hamilton goes back to the origins of the beverage in his latest writings

Andy nobly taste-tested 1,500 beers in pursuit of the perfect pint

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omething rather amazing happened around 7,000 years ago in what is now known as Iran (and was then known as Mesopotamia); beer was first invented. It’s hard to imagine what this drink would have tasted like as the grains used would have been different and we can only guess at what yeast would catch on this strange porridgey brew. But what is known, from clay tablets depicting the scene, is that it was drunk in dramatically different ways to how we drink beer now. First of all, it was drunk while still fermenting and, being a few thousand years before the pint glass was invented, drunk from a bowl using reed straws. Folk also believed that they were imbibing part of the divine – that there was some sort of god in their beer – so at least two people would gather around the bowl and they would drink at the same time, sharing this spiritual experience. In some ways I think our attitude towards beer reflects where we are as a society. During the 1980s and 1990s it was hard to come by good beer and so many of us drank bland lager. At this point, too, we were happy to watch less than a handful of TV channels and we were not the most tolerant. Nowadays our attitudes are changing, despite some reports saying otherwise, we are pretty open as a society and I think the myriad beer choices reflect this openness. Open-minded, generous people being more open to try new things. If I had have written my book The Perfect Pint back in the 1990s it would have been pretty short, but as it was my task was huge. I intended to try as much beer in the UK as possible, in the end giving tasting notes on about 70 different beers whittled down from 1,500 that I tried over the two years that I wrote the book. With all this diversity is it possible to have one perfect pint? Well, yes and no. As I explain in the book, “The Perfect Pint is something of a dichotomy: it can never be found and yet you always have it. The Perfect Pint is always going to be the one you are enjoying right now...perfect for which ever moment you choose to have them (it).” So instead of creating a guidebook of which beer to try (there are plenty of voices on the internet arguing about that) I have created a toolkit that enables the reader to make their own mind up. A toolkit that arms you with knowledge of how your favourite beers are made (and how to make them yourself) and how four key ingredients affect the flavour of your pint. Having immersed myself in the beer world I don’t know, any more, if these are common knowledge, so forgive me if I am teaching you to suck (pickled) eggs, but they are: hops, yeast, water and malt (being malted grain). Change one of these ingredients or even how you use 66 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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one and you can completely change the taste of your beer. Perhaps the best example of this is yeast, the smallest ingredient in beer. Just recently I brewed a beer using the wild yeast I harvested from my kitchen. I kept it simple, using the same ingredients as I would have for a pale ale, yet this was more like a French farmhouse beer, with far more character than the beer I’d have ‘normally’ made. Just as it is when cooking your own food, once you know how your beer is made it enhances the flavour of the beer. It also makes it much easier to then find those flavours in all the beers that you try. Some of the most flavourful on offer are on sale at this time of year for the winter season. These are known as old ales and winter warmers. Dark beers with a high ABV (alcohol by volume). Box Steam do a good one known as Dark & Handsome which is a great balance of woody and smoked malts with a long chocolate finish. It might be unfashionable (although it’s beer, so it shouldn’t matter), but I am also a fan of Theakston’s Old Peculiar which is so complex that, if you want to learn beer tasting, it’s a great place to start. n • Andy (Twitter: @AndyRHamilton) runs brewing workshops locally, grows ingredients for beer in his vertical hilltop garden, and forages for them around the parks and waste grounds of Bristol. He has convinced commercial, craft and home brewers across Britain to share recipes in his new book (£12.99, Bantam Press) in which you can learn to taste and talk beer like the pros and discover the secrets of a perfect porter, irresistible IPA, super stout or marvellous mild

A five-point guide to tasting beer • Look at it in the glass, note the colour and if it is hazy or clear. These first observations will give you an idea of what to expect. • Swirl then smell it, for more of an idea of the taste, and the waiting also helps to coat your tongue in a flavour-enhancing amino acid – so you’ll enjoy the beverage even more. Swirl again if you are not getting much. • Take a sip and let it sit on your tongue before drinking. • Get ‘zen’ and really think about what’s going down your neck as you sip, taking notes on the flavours you pick out.

Andy’s top local pubs to find it • The Drapers Arms, The Hillgrove, Wild Beer, Star & Dove, The Famous Royal Naval Volunteer


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GARDENING

One of Tom’s top three ingredients

Tom (pictured right) with ‘The Boss’

BEHIND THE PASS Take five with Regent Street chef Tom Maynard (and a small sherry, perhaps...)

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ow that the Bar 44 brigade have had time to settle in over the summer, we’re asking chef Tom all the questions that have been on our lips since our first visit in launch week.

TBM: So how do you come up with your dishes? TM: I collaborate heavily with Owen Morgan (The Boss) on creativity, local seasonality and we both take inspiration from trips to various Spanish regions. I talk with suppliers and producers. Ideas must be fun, skilled, creative – food that people want to eat but can’t get elsewhere. We have a unique take on Spain. Why have sherry with/in your food? It is the world’s best category for food pairing – fact. There is no ingredient or dish that you cannot pair a sherry with. Once people get their heads around a few of the facts and what to drink it with, it is so rewarding to see their faces when the pairing is right. Which sherry myths do you most wish to be debunked? It being for Grandma, for Christmas, and sweet and sticky – 90% of sherry is dry and should be served chilled like a glass of good wine. Hit us with some facts... There are huge amounts of styles, containing the driest to the sweetest wine in the world. It can only come from three towns in the southwest of Spain, dubbed ‘the sherry triangle’. Sherry is sexy, cool and incredible for drinking and cooking with. I never thought I would say this but sherry now accompanies our Sunday lunch at home; it’s perfect with some great beef from Nigel Buxton or local Welsh lamb. Which is your most beloved type? Crisp, fresh fino or manzanilla – simple with a plate of great shellfish. Tell us about dishes you’ve created just for Bristol The dish I love is the West Country hake, Welsh cockles and Spanish fino sherry. It sums us up in one plate – local, Welsh and Spanish inspirations and fusions always in play. What’s your favourite dish? Wild cured seabream with avocado and cucumber. Delicate yet punchy, exceptionally clean, it relies on the freshest of produce that 68 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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must be handled correctly. Delicious paired with a crisp, dry sherry. What could we, without fail, always find in your fridge? A cold beer for when I get home after a long day and, since working in Spanish restaurants, the most amazing cheese and charcuterie. Fave 15-minute supper to make at home? Huevos rotos – broken eggs stirred into sautéed potatoes and anything else knocking around. For me, Spanish black pudding, roast peppers, jamón, chorizo. My girls love it. Equally good for breakfast or latenight munchies. What food would you spend your last tenner on? The very finest jamón, one of the world’s best ingredients. Where else in Bristol do you love to eat? We love our neighbours Bosco and Wellbourne; we haven’t made it yet to Shop 3 Bistro and Wallfish. We are regulars and friends with all the Spanish tapas and small-plate restaurants in town. Who are your local heroes? We love Reg the Veg in Clifton Village, he always helps us out. Mevalco is our main Spanish supplier. What restaurant trend can you see being the next big one? Naked eating in the dark! Who knows; things change weekly in the industry and it’s great to have so much diversity and quality in the UK. What are the three most useful ingredients at Bar 44? Great Spanish olive oil, jámon, sherry. Any tips for tapas-making at home? It certainly is a delicate balancing act. For dinner parties, I recommend preparing some dishes the day before. Make sure you have great charcuterie, cold nibbles and cheeses ready to go and keep your guests happy while you are cooking. There are some great Spanish delis around Bristol. Sherry conquers all, so keep their glasses full and they won’t notice if there is a delay... n • bar44.co.uk


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Award winning fish & chips www.cliftonvillagefishbar.co.uk www.stokebishopfishbar.co.uk 4 Princess Victoria Street, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 4BP 13 Druid Hill, Stoke Bishop, Bristol, BS9 1EW

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FOOD & DRINK

DEAR PRUDENCE Melissa Blease meets the cookery doyenne with the jazzy wardrobe and a whole new generation of fans since her primetime promotion

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FOOD & DRINK

I

f experience is the crucial seasoning for food-world longevity, Prue Leith is the undisputed leader of the pedigree pack. She was appointed OBE in 1989, CBE 21 years later and is the recipient of no less than 13 honorary degrees from UK universities. She’s written 12 cookery books, seven novels, an autobiography and countless columns; she founded both a Michelin-starred restaurant and a school of food and wine and was a judge on BBC2’s Great British Menu for over a decade. Yet the woman who has recently been introduced to a whole new generation as the expert cook whose gentle nod is as hot an approbation of baking greatness as the legendary Hollywood Handshake claims that, prior to her most recent TV success, she could walk down the street pretty much unnoticed. “Hardly anybody who became a Great British Bake Off fan when the series first began would ever have heard of me, because a lot of that fan base weren’t even alive when I wrote my last book,” notes Prue – who’s just released her first new book in 25 years – but in saying so is perhaps doing herself a slight disservice as a revered name on the spine of many a classic cookery book. “It was only people of a certain, erm, vintage who’d ever heard of me before I took over from Mary Berry!” Born in South Africa in 1940, Prue relocated to Paris in her late teens and attended the Sorbonne. “I got into food when I was living in France because it’s difficult not to,” she recalls. In 1960, she enrolled at the prestigious Cordon Bleu Cookery School in London where, to supplement her student budget, she developed a sideline catering for private dinner parties – and a chance encounter with a butler who worked for a firm of stockbrokers proved to be a pivotal landmark in her early career. “I was living in my little mews house and making lunches and dinners for private parties. But as I did all the shopping, cooking, serving and washing up on my own, I could only really do one dinner a day. But the company just wanted cold buffets delivered readyto-eat; I could feed a lot of people fairly easily, some days preparing the company buffet while working on a hot supper for another job – that made a huge difference to my little business.”

Showstopper moments But that business didn’t stay little for long. “Being responsible for the food served on the Orient Express was another big leap forward,” says Prue. “I got the job after the owner asked me to cook a trial lunch for him and his wife. The meal had to be served on the Pullman train in the half-hour gap between Victoria and Folkestone. “I decided to do a summery green pea soup followed by cold beef and interesting salads, but I wanted to make it suitably memorable, so I created little croutons in the shape of steam trains, floated them on top of the soup and made little puffs of smoke from blobs of cream. My little trains were apparently enchanting enough to get me the job! I owe a great deal to those croutons.” Prue developed her businesses, including party and event catering company Leith’s Good Food, Leith’s School of Food and Wine and her Notting Hill restaurant, chairing and founding all manner of charitable institutions and educational initiatives while maintaining non-executive status on various boards including British Rail, British Transport Hotels and Whitbread PLC. But in 1993, she decided to follow a major career path diversion. “I stopped writing cookbooks because I wanted to write novels,” she says. “So I gave it all up – the cookery school, the restaurant, the catering company, the cookbooks and columns – and resigned from all the boards, apart from selected charities. That was that; I stayed at home and wrote seven novels and my autobiography, Relish.” But as we all know, Prue’s professional story doesn’t end there. In 2006, Prue was “lured back into the food world” by good friends Oliver Peyton and Matthew Fort – the other two-thirds of the exacting Great British Menu judging triumvirate. “The GBM chefs reinvigorated me – I’d find myself writing down what I’d eaten at a judging round, or asking for a recipe, or trying to reproduce what the chefs had created at home. But it was The Great British Bake Off that really inspired me to write another cookbook. I found myself getting so involved with the 12 amazing bakers, each of whom are so imaginative, sweet and clever; I

get to know them all very, very well indeed and I often take their recipes home with me – my husband says I’ve made more cakes for him in the last year than I have in the eight years we’ve been together!”

Changing culinary landscape The new title is for cooks of all levels and experience – “nothing is overcomplicated, many recipes are fairly easy to make, and most of them focus on fast and fresh.” So in many ways, we’re on classic Prue Leith cookery book territory? “In a way, yes. But food has changed so much since I first started writing about it,” she says. “It’s so much more interesting now than it was even 20 years ago, and we can easily find ingredients that I used to struggle to get hold of. If I mentioned avocado, broccoli or even a green pepper when I first started writing for the Daily Mail in the early 1970s, I’d get indignant letters from people saying they’d never heard of such things. Today, we can buy things like sumac and za’atar and balsamic glaze in almost any large supermarket. How we cook has changed too because people haven’t got the time to do the classic, two-day consommé kind of cooking anymore – they want something they can put together in half an hour. And people are much more aware of healthy eating – because of that, I considered updating my recipe for tarte Normande for this book. But I thought; no, the glory of a tarte Normande comes from the amount of butter there is in the pastry, the amount of cream in the filling, and the sweet apricot jam on top – the result is an utterly divine mouthful. So I put it in just as it was in one of my very first books.” And as Prue is fond of telling the Bake Off bakers, it’s definitely worth the calories.

...If I mentioned avocado, broccoli or even a green pepper when I started writing for the Daily Mail in the 1970s, I’d get indignant letters from people saying they’d never heard of such things...

On a less extravagant theme Prue says that her polenta cake – inspired by an original recipe she ‘nicked’ from the River Cafe’s Ruth Rogers – is the recipe she’s most likely to turn to again and again. “It’s simple, delicious, gluten-free and perfect served with crème fraîche at the end of a dinner party or just enjoyed with a nice cup of tea.” Prue talks of her own food hero (“I’ve known Jamie Oliver since his Naked Chef days; he’s an absolutely lovely boy. I call him Saint Jamie because his heart’s in the right place and he’s done so much for food education”), chefs she most admires (former GBM winner Tommy Banks) and her favourite restaurant (the historic Bentley’s Oyster Bar and Grill in London’s Mayfair.) Her recently acquired status as style icon comes up too, not least because she wore an eye-catching hand-painted outfit from West Country textile artist Carole Waller for a recent Good Housekeeping cover: “I love Carole’s work,” says Prue; “I have another of her pieces in my collection too.” But there’s one more question I just can't help asking. “No, I’ve never been the recipient of the Hollywood Handshake!” she laughs. “He keeps telling me that I should start a trend for the Prue Pat, but really! That sounds so patronising...” ■

• Prue Leith will be in Bath, talking about her new cookbook Prue: My All-Time Favourite Recipes on 14 November; toppingbooks.co.uk/events/bath/an-evening-with-prue-leith THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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EXPLORE BRISTOL

OLD CITY, NEW FEEL Bristol’s historic heart, Corn Street and its surrounds have been transformed in recent years as a range of exciting start-ups have taken advantage of the amazing architecture, fascinating history and quirky spaces to build their businesses, alongside established names. Lawrie Jones takes a stroll around...

O

nce Bristol’s trading and financial centre, this area of medieval origin is now home to an eclectic mix of bars, coffee shops, restaurants and places to stay. It’s all helping to give the constantly evolving Old City a new feel. “Walk down Corn Street and look up at the buildings and you can really appreciate how stunning the Old City is,” says Grant Callaghan, GM of the Harbour Hotel. “It’s clear this is the area that built Bristol.” The Old City, including Broad Street, Corn Street, King Street, Welsh Back and Queen Square, may look much the same today as it did hundreds of years ago, but what’s on offer today is quite different. Always a popular drinking spot, in recent years the Old City has slowly shed its lad-focused past, developing into a more continental, family-friendly destination, says Nathan Lee, MD of the Hyde & Co Group. The owners of a host of stylish night spots including The Ox, Bambalan and Pata Negra – which has just relaunched the lovely kitchen responsible for sating all our churros-based desires – Lee and his partners have played a key role in broadening the Old City offer since opening their first business in the area in 2011. What drew them to it? “We felt there was a change in the air and we could see the potential of the area with its wonderful architecture and great links to the rest of Bristol,” Nathan says. “Looking back, it’s crazy that other people didn’t see it that way – it’s the true heart of the city after all.” Located so close to Broadmead, Cabot Circus and Park Street, it’s been pretty ideal for shoppers for a while now, as well as those seeking an after-work drink. But it’s also become a great place in Bristol to stay. Opened in 2016, the Harbour Hotel occupies the historic former HSBC and Lloyds Bank buildings at the top of Corn Street. As well as gorgeous rooms, it has a respectable restaurant, decadent bar and even a chic subterranean spa. According to Grant, the Old City today is thriving. “Visitors want to come here, and people want to stay here.” Over at the recently redeveloped Mercure Grand Bristol Hotel, GM Nicholas Carn agrees. How would he describe this corner of the city today? “Fun, cool, progressive and inclusive,” he says.

Eating revolution You’ll more than likely find yourself crossing paths with a few of the food bloggers who frequent its ancient footpaths, too. “In the heart of the Old City visitors are perfectly placed to discover Bristol’s culinary offerings,” says Emily Henley, writer of popular blog Bristol Bites (bristolbites.co.uk). Over the last decade, tired shops, pubs, restaurants – and even banks – have been replaced by a diverse range of new businesses and established names, she says. “It’s now home to such an interesting range of bars and restaurants, some of the city’s top independent coffee shops, and some great locally owned restaurants and market traders,” she says. At the centre of the Old City’s redevelopment is St Nicholas Market, one of Bristol’s not so hidden gems. Operating since 1743, it was named Britain’s Best Large Indoor Market in 2016, by the National Association of British Market Authorities. 72 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Housed in the Grade-I listed Exchange building, the market hall is home to a variety of independent traders. If you’re a visitor to the city, or just haven’t been for a while, it’s worth browsing what’s for sale – anything from hats and jewellery to art, records, books and sweets – especially if making a start on the old Christmas shopping is high on the agenda. If you’re hungry, the real action happens outside in its famous food hall. Visit any weekday lunchtime and you’ll find yourself jostling for position in the lengthy queues that snake from Matina, past Eat a Pitta and Pieminister and through the bustling, vibrant space. There are at least 21 different stalls and cafes in the market, serving cuisine from around the world, prepared with love by independent traders. The growth of the food market has played a key role in transforming the area, Emily believes. “The variety of food and drink offerings available within the market building itself – for me, that’s what’s been the biggest change.”

Old City challenges The investment made by national chains like Harbour Hotel, and local entrepreneurs like Hyde & Co, illustrates how much the quarter has improved but, of course, it’s not perfect. “We face a few


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EXPLORE BRISTOL

Harbour Hotel occupies the historic former bank buildings at the top of Corn Street and features sumptuous yet quirky and characterful interiors plus a gorgeous underground spa

Lucy Anna Flowers inhabits the same site as the flower stall from 1914 (Rebecca Noakes Photography)

Get some unique bits for the Christmas stockings in the market then pop into Pata Negra for delicious tapas or treat-day churros

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EXPLORE BRISTOL

Noche Negra (upstairs at Pata Negra) is a great shout if you fancy a slice of local nightlife

St Nick’s Market’s roof from above (image courtesy of Herbert Frank Tarring Collection/Rebecca Noakes Photography)

Emily suggests a sit-down steak session at The Ox if you’ve a spare £15 burning a hole in your pocket

challenges such as rough sleeping, antisocial behaviour and graffiti, but that’s no different to any city centre,” Nathan states. What is different is that the Old City is benefitting from the support of the Bristol City Centre Business Improvement District (BID). “The Old City area is an exciting place to shop and eat, and we’re focused on helping to improve the way it looks and feels,” explains Keith Rundle, operations director at City Centre BID. The organisation works with businesses to improve the area, and its team is planning street cleaning and graffiti removal, as well as a Christmas lights installation in 2018 which will become a fixture. “It’s part of our responsibility to help the Old City to grow and develop, creating more reasons for people to visit.” Keith says. It seems to be working. In September, new steakhouse Mugshot opened, giving diners another reason to visit. If you’re looking for somewhere new to eat, the Old City sure is a good place to start.

Emily’s best Old City bites For £5: Edna’s Kitchen just on the edge of Castle Park. The mezze salad box is fantastic: packed with falafel, couscous, salads, dips, homemade chilli relish and pickles. It’s generous and it’s delicious! For £10: Burger Theory. Head in for lunch between Tuesday and Friday for a burger and fries for £8.50; and their burgers are amazing. My favourite is the KFC: Korean fried chicken thigh with a sweet and sticky chilli glaze, spring onions and salted peanuts. And if you fancy going over budget, order a side of the tzatziki halloumi fries... For £15: The Ox. The set lunch menu is priced at £15 exactly for three courses – or alternatively, they have a 6oz rump steak, fries, sauce and a glass of wine for the same price.

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Diadem advert for self-raising flour – which was invented by Bristolian Henry Jones (image courtesy of Bristol Culture)

Lynn Hanby of Aardvark (Rebecca Noakes Photography)


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EXPLORE BRISTOL

The historic heart of the city’s big 275 A year of celebrations and events has been launched to mark the 275th anniversary of the opening of St Nicholas Market and highlight the significant role it has played over the last centuries. It has been the traditional centre of Bristol market activity since 1743. The permanent indoor buildings and outdoor stalls are home to the largest collection of independent retailers in the city, offering crafts, giftware and fresh produce; a basement chock-full of Indian tapestries; two of the city’s oldest pubs (The Rummer and The Crown); Bristol’s oldest sweet shop and its biggest body of books. The public is being invited to share memories and experiences of the market as part of a project looking at the entire history of the Exchange, with a view to showcasing what it has meant to local people through an exhibition featuring old photographs, newspaper articles and documents and forming a permanent legacy. Along with the night market and a light projection on the front of the building, it will be displayed inside the Exchange in December to show what Bristol remembers so far, and allow people to add memories. “The Corn Exchange played a key part in building Bristol’s international trade relationships and was instrumental in generating the wealth of the city,” said Lord Mayor Cllr Cleo Lake when she launched the celebrations recently. “Although the modern market is very different, it still has a central role in trading within Bristol, which is an incredible achievement. “Today St Nicholas Market is home to over 60 stalls and some traders have been working there for over 40 years. It has a great reputation for the variety of food on offer, which really captures a positive essence of Bristol in terms of our diversity and international flavours.”

The Exchange: where it all began Bristol has a rich and proud trading history generally based on its maritime heritage. The merchants and traders of the time gathered at what was known as the Tolzey – a lean-to structure which was not large or spacious enough for the ever-growing city and was exposed to the elements, meaning traders regularly complained about their health and being disturbed by horses, drays and carriages. By way of an act of Parliament in 1721, John Wood The Elder was commissioned to design and oversee the building of the Exchange, for merchants and traders to assemble more conveniently. They dealt in Indian cloth; slave-produced goods from the Caribbean and North America such as sugar, tobacco, coffee and chocolate; butter, eggs and chickens from Wales and iron goods from central England. The Exchange is not only a jewel for Bristol but is of some national importance as it was the first built outside of London and is a rare surviving relic of 18th-century business.

Did you know? • Building started in 1741; everyone in the official party gave the foundation stone three mallet blows and a number of onlookers also jumped upon it! Construction was completed and the Exchange opened on 21 September 1743. It appears that it was a day of great ceremony; prisoners who were detained due to debt were released, the workmen were treated to a handsome dinner, and bread and wine was made ready at the council house afterwards. Dignitaries, merchants and traders met at the nearby Guild Hall in Broad Street and walked to High Street, Queen Square, Small Street and to the Exchange itself, and cannons were discharged from Brandon Hill. • The Exchange cost £56,000 to build, including the cost of the land (approximately £12million today). The main entrance doors are made of the finest English oak, weigh over 1.25 tons each and have over 1,000 studs. A royal coat of arms is set into the pediment above the clock face. Festoons between columns represent Great Britain and four quarters of the known world. • The original pavement to the front of the Exchange was installed in 1771 and was the first in the city of Bristol. A 28’ square tetrastyle hall built in the Corinthian order provides an entrance

to the exchange hall and to what was once an adjoining tavern and coffee house. Representations of America, Asia and Africa are located over the entrances and exits of the hall, symbolising the position that Bristol held in terms of world trade during the first half of the 18th century. Twenty four niches remain empty to this day, as the original plan to fill them with statues of eminent men of navigation and commerce was not fulfilled due to a lack of available funds. High on the wall in the hall’s south corner is a faint parish boundary mark, with a few more annotated within the Exchange basements and upper floors. Originally the hall did not have a roof and was open courtyard. The current hall was then paved in stone, slightly higher at its centre to allow for rainwater drainage. In 1872, after much lobbying by the traders and merchants, a major programme of works was undertaken to create a design by the architect Edward Middleton Barry. This introduced a roof and the office areas which are used by the market’s team today. The Exchange clock was built in 1819 and installed in 1822. It has two minute hands, which goes back to when Bristol had its own local time. In 1880 parliament decreed that GMT should apply throughout the country; prior to that, people relied upon local time. Bristol lies two degrees and 36 minutes west of the Greenwich meridian, and therefore it takes the sun 11 minutes to move from above the high point over Greenwich to the high point above Bristol. In 1841 the first train pulled into Temple Meads Station, and the railways ran to London time. Therefore if you were catching the 11 o’clock train to London, you would need to remember that it would leave Bristol at 10.49. Bristol adopted GMT in September 1852. The original roof was removed in 1949 because it was damaged by bombs dropped during the Blitz, and during WWI the Exchange became the distribution point for enormous quantities of margarine. The history of the building is originally as a place of business, but in 1813 the first corn market was held, leading to its renaming as the Corn Exchange.

Stories from St Nick’s Turtle for tea in 1790 John Weeks was the proprietor of popular coaching inn Bush Tavern, a building now demolished that used to stand opposite the Corn Exchange where Bristol Harbour Hotel is now. The 1790 bill of Christmas fare shows that turtle was at the top of the list.

Flowers and flour Vibrant blooms are a welcome sight wherever you see them, and the glass arcade at St Nicks is no exception. Flower stalls have added to the vibrancy of St Nicks throughout the decades and Lucy Anna Flowers inhabits the same site as a flower stall from 1914. The market also has a strong link to flour. The Diadem advert visible above the archway is for self-raising flour which was made by a company in Easton. Self-raising flour itself was invented by Bristolian Henry Jones who patented it 1845.

Sounds of the Sixties The Corn Exchange wasn’t always packed with great stalls and fantastic record shops – it has been a dance hall in more recent times and was a popular live music venue during the 1960s, that saw the likes of Pink Floyd, The Byrds, The Who, Rod Stewart, Elkie Brooks, Cream and The Rolling Stones strut their stuff. The Yardbirds, The Pretty Things and Spencer Davis played several times in the main hall and a Tuesday night club called The Bristol Chinese R’n’B and Jazz Club was established, attracting American blues singers John Lee Hooker, Sonny Boy Williamson and Little Walter. • Do you have a great story about St Nick’s? Did you go to any gigs at The Corn Exchange? Get in touch! Anyone wishing to share stories/photos/memorabilia should send them to markets@bristol.gov.uk

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BRISTOL UPDATES

BITE-SIZED BUSINESS AND COMMUNITY NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY Sarah Lancashire starred in Bristol-filmed hard-hitting drama Kiri (image by Nick Wall)

LOCAL FILM IN FINE HEALTH

Peter is head of Osborne Clarke’s Bristol office

GREAT FIT

CONGRATULATIONS

Reach Robotics, the creator of the world’s first augmented reality gaming robot MekaMon, has appointed Nintendo veteran James Honeywell as marketing director. Founded in 2013, the start-up’s staff has grown 124% since the mainstream launch of MekaMon in November 2017, with a number of key hires including former Deliveroo CFO and finance director for Amazon EU operations, Philip Green. The appointments follow £5.8million of funding from South Korea and Singaporebased investors, allowing for strategic recruitment to support the the Bristol startup’s aim to bring high-end robotics and augmented reality to mainstream gaming and technology audiences. Having overseen the product launches of Game Boy Advance, Wii, DS and 3DS, Honeywell was named MCV Unsung Hero in 2015 and arrives from dementia product specialist Unforgettable.com. “I saw the long-term potential of MekaMon straight away,” he said. “The way Reach is using this technology is like nothing I’ve ever seen before and founder Silas’ vision is one that I can really get behind.”

International legal practice Osborne Clarke has taken home two awards at the 2018 Bristol Law Society Awards. The firm, which has over 500 people at its offices in Temple Quay, was awarded Law Firm of the Year while legal director Phillip Chivers was named Pro Bono Lawyer of the Year for his work with Avon & Bristol Law Centre. Judges singled out Osborne Clarke for demonstrating excellence in legal services. The firm has had impressive international revenue growth in the last year, and doubled UK income in the last five years. “As well as being involved in many high-profile deals in the region, we have made significant investments in technology, which have allowed us to offer increased innovation to our clients,” said Peter Clough, head of the Bristol office. “We also continue to invest in our people, with wellbeing initiatives and development programmes. This award tops off a fantastic year for us and really reflects the hard work of our fantastic people.”

• reachrobotics.com

• osborneclarke.com

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Figures released by Bristol Film Office, currently celebrating its 15th birthday, have reflected another healthy year for film and TV production in the city, with £15.2million inward investment generated and a 10 per cent rise in recorded filming days. In a year that saw more than 383 productions issued with permits to film in the city, Bristol Film Office recorded 1141 filming days at Bristol locations. Accompanying figures released by The Bottle Yard Studios indicate that for every ‘broadcast hour’ of on-screen drama made at the studios last year, an estimated 14 FTE jobs were created. “As we celebrate 15 years of promoting Bristol as a film-friendly city, we’re delighted to look back on another strong year,” Bristol Film Office’s Natalie Moore said. “£15.2million is a significant total and the rise in filming days shows Bristol is more than maintaining its popularity as a leading filming destination outside London. The fact that we can host four major features and 10 TV productions in one year is proof that Bristol does filming really, really well. “Over the past years the Film Office has worked with homegrown and visiting productions across Bristol and the local industry has grown in size and reputation. We’ve witnessed milestones – the opening of The Bottle Yard in 2010 and Bristol achieving UNESCO City of Film status last year are just two that stand out – but what has remained at the heart of our work is a clear understanding of how beneficial filming is to Bristol, both economically and culturally. Right now our armoury is stronger than ever; our track record, the versatility of our locations, the appeal of The Bottle Yard Studios and the expertise of our crew base, facilities companies and post production sector, all go together to form a very competitive package.”

• filmbristol.co.uk


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Buying a Home? Do you know who is responsible for the buildings insurance between exchange of contracts and completion? The Process In a conveyancing transaction there are two key stages. The first is known as exchange of contracts and the second is completion. Contracts are exchanged once the buyer and their solicitors are satisfied as to the Property’s Title, its physical condition and that necessary purchase funds are available. At exchange of contracts a 10% deposit is usually payable by the buyer and a legally binding contract comes into existence meaning that neither party can legally withdraw from the deal without incurring severe financial penalties. Completion takes place on the date agreed in the contract and on that date the buyer is entitled to have possession of the property and the seller must vacate it. Buildings Insurance Under Common Law the responsibility for the risk of damage or destruction of the property passes to the buyer on exchange of contracts unless the contract provides otherwise. The seller has no obligation to insure the property after exchange of contracts except in certain circumstances, eg where the property is leasehold and insured by the Management Company or Freeholder or the contract provides the responsibility will remain with the seller. The buyer is therefore responsible for insuring the property from exchange of contracts. It can often come as a surprise for a buyer to learn that they must insure the property before they can even move in! The property may be in an area classified as being at a raised risk of flooding or it may have a history of subsidence or be an unusual construction, which may require further consideration from the insurer before they agree to insure it. What if I am taking out a mortgage? If you are taking out a mortgage on the property you can agree with the lender that they will arrange the property insurance for you. However, if you are insuring the property the lender will inform you of the sum you should insure it for. Know the position A prudent buyer should make enquiries as to whether they will need to insure the property they are buying well in advance of exchange of contracts to avoid causing unnecessary last minute delays. Whether you are a purchasing or selling a property it is important that you understand the conveyancing process as well as your liabilities and responsibilities. AMD Solicitors Residential Property Service can advise you on these matters and will proactively support you to ensure your transaction is as stress free and cost effective as possible. If you would like any further information please call the team on 0117 9735647 or email us at info@amdsolicitors.com. Š AMD Solicitors

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EDUCATION NEWS UPDATES FROM THE CITY’S SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

GAME ON

Professor Jane Harrington from UWE and Mr Liu Xiaoming signing the Memorandum of Understanding

STEM TO STEM

TWIN PEAKS

A Bristol primary school teacher, who developed a website offering STEM activities and advice for educators, has recently published her first book. Emily Hunt’s 15-Minute STEM contains 40 quick, easy-to-resource science, technology, engineering and maths activities for five to 11year-olds, designed to help them make real-world connections with the world around them. These disciplines have an impact that can be seen in all aspects of our lives – from construction to space exploration, caring for our environment to the digital revolution, the demand for STEM skills is only set to grow. There is, however, a well-publicised underrepresentation of women and people from ethnic minority backgrounds in STEM careers, so it is vitally important that all children are given the opportunity to realise their own capabilities first-hand. Great STEM education helps children understand how they could use their learning in the future. It is an important tool in breaking stereotypes and encouraging the pursuit of STEM careers, and an important priority in modern education, leaving teachers and parents asking what kind of activities they should be exploring. Emily’s book equips them with what they need to confidently teach, with step-bystep instructions so cross-curricular activities can be slotted into a busy day.

The latest high-powered delegation from Bristol’s twin city of Guangzhou met with senior figures from the city council and University of the West of England recently. Led by Zhang Jianhua, the deputy secretary general of the People’s Government of Guangzhou, the delegation met Cllr Asher Craig, deputy mayor at City Hall and then visited UWE to sign a Memorandum of Understanding to ensure the continuation of the reciprocal scholarship scheme between the two cities. During their stay, the delegation also took time to visit the University of Bristol’s Botanical Gardens to admire the wonderful sculpture of the Kapok Flower presented by Guangzhou in celebration of the 15th anniversary of the sister city relationship. “We were delighted to welcome the latest high-level delegation from Guangzhou to Bristol, strengthening the ties between our two cities and the University of the West of England,” commented Diane Francombe, chief executive of the Bristol and West of England China Bureau. “The signing of the MoU between the People’s Government of Guangzhou and UWE is significant as it formalises a relationship which has spanned 14 years and will result in more scholars from Guangzhou studying in Bristol – and it opens doors for other exciting educational partnerships to develop.”

• howtostem.co.uk

• bristol.gov.uk

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Access Creative College, the UK's leading games, music and media college, has announced it is investing £5million into the local economy by opening a digital campus in the city centre. Phase one of the facility is due to open its doors to students in spring. Situated just around the corner from Broadmead, the new campus will be located in the new cutting-edge creative hub on All Saints’ Street, which is already home to several digital and arts businesses. “The creative industries now contribute some £92billion per year and represent one of the fastest growing sectors in the UK,” said Sally Larkin, centre manager. “We want to create a campus in a prime location, which is worthy of our students and can help feed the local economy with new skills in and around Bristol. The city has become such a hotbed for successful, fast-growth creative businesses, and we see a real opportunity for our students to contribute to that.” Students will benefit from brand new state-of-the-art facilities, across two floors with potential for future expansion. Phase one includes a virtual reality suite, media green-screen suite and iMac media labs plus collaborative spaces. Music students will continue to benefit from the renowned rehearsal and studio facilities at the satellite site in Hengrove. “Across our campuses throughout the country, we have an alumni that includes some of the biggest names in the business, such as Ed Sheeran, Rita Ora and Jess Glynne,” Sally continued. “However, we’re now making this Bristol investment to broaden our offering with an additional focus on providing a range of industry-led courses in media and gaming. We’ll also continue to further bolster our impressive portfolio of partnerships with local organisations, festivals, games companies, studios and manufacturers to give our students the best possible opportunities.”

• accesscreative.ac.uk/bristol


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Faisa Yusuf, Head Girl at Monmouth School for Girls.

Charlie Walker, Head Boy at Monmouth School for Boys.

DETERMINED TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE A teenager, who supports children with arthritis and looks after a woman with Alzheimer’s disease, has taken up a leadership position at Monmouth School for Girls. Faisa Yusuf, 17, is the new Head Girl and hopes to read Medicine at the University of Cambridge. The newly-appointed Head Boy at Monmouth School for Boys, Charlie Walker, is working towards reading Medicine at the University of Oxford. Charlie, 17, also runs an initiative to equip children in West Africa with the basic tools they need to learn in the classroom. Both students are outstanding role models in Monmouth Schools Sixth Form, which has introduced co-educational teaching in Years 12 and 13. “Being crowned the bard at our 2017 Eisteddfod has been my proudest moment at school,” recalled Faisa, who achieved nine A*s and an A at GCSE. “The poem I wrote conveyed my thoughts on the importance of memories and the how dementia and old age can make a person lose so much of themselves.” Faisa, who is studying Biology, Chemistry and Maths at A level, added: “I want to become a better person and make a difference to at least one person’s life.” Charlie, a keen musician, set up the African Pen Project to provide Tanzanian children with much-needed pens, pencils and basic equipment for writing and drawing. He is also determined to follow in the footsteps of his father, a fifth generation medic in the Walker family. “I want to use my opportunities and responsibilities to help others,” added Charlie, who achieved 10 A*s, a 9 and an A at GCSE and is studying Biology, Chemistry and French at A level. n Our Sixth Form Taster Day and Information Evening is taking place on Wednesday 7th November. For information, please visit www.habsmonmouth.org/sixthformtaster, call 01600 710433 for Monmouth School for Boys or 01600 711104 for Monmouth School for Girls. *The schools have an established bus route covering the Thornbury area.

New Head for Monmouth School for Girls M

rs Jessica Miles has been appointed as the new Head of Monmouth School for Girls. Currently the Head of Queen Margaret’s School in York, a day and boarding school for girls aged 11-18, Mrs Miles will take over the Headship in April 2019. Mrs Miles graduated from Oriel College, Oxford in Spanish and Linguistics and gained her PGCE from King’s College, London. She has extensive teaching experience, initially as a Spanish teacher at Dulwich College where she worked her way up to become Head of Lower Sixth and was mistress in charge of rowing. From there, Mrs Miles taught French and Spanish at Sherborne School and was also a boarding house tutor before moving to be Deputy Head and Head of Sixth Form at Leweston School in Dorset. Mr Audley Twiston-Davies, Chairman of Governors, said: “We very much look forward to welcoming Mrs Miles to Monmouth School for Girls. She was selected from an impressive field of candidates and we are confident that she will have the vision and dynamic leadership qualities needed to develop further the girls’ school and continue to build the successful collaboration with Monmouth School for Boys following the launch of co-educational teaching in the Sixth Form in September.” Mrs Miles said: “I am honoured and delighted to be joining Monmouth School for Girls at such an exciting time in the school’s history. “It is a unique school with an ethos that aligns with my own vision for education by combining academic achievement and co-curricular success. “I will strive to build upon the obvious strengths of the school and to develop excellent working relationships with pupils, parents, staff and the wider local community.” For more information, please visit: www.habsmonmouth.org/girls or call 01600 711104 for Monmouth School for Girls.

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EDUCATION

A NEW TACK First-time Bristol author Kathryn Mortimer’s book of intergenerational perspectives highlights the mismatch between the expectations of Baby Boomer and Gen X parents and the reality of life for their millennial children. Here, she calls for more flexibility in the conventional education model

After diagnosis, some youngsters are forced to sit on the sidelines and watch friends move on with lives of opportunity; and there’s no annex to the rule book of parenthood that explains how to reconcile your child’s mental illness with their need for qualifications

M

ental illness among the young is reaching epidemic levels; barely a day goes by without another story of loss and devastation hitting the news. For sufferers and their loved ones, it is often difficult to look beyond personal misery and focus on the many stories offering hope and inspiration. This is particularly true in the early years after diagnosis. Plans for the future are destroyed. GCSEs, A-levels, a university degree all suddenly seem unobtainable. Youngsters are forced to sit on the sidelines and watch as their friends move on with bright lives full of opportunity. Meanwhile, they are left behind to deal with the despair of what can feel like a broken, directionless existence. Parents are thrown into turmoil; not only do they have to deal with the immediate challenges of caring for their mentally ill child, but their thoughts inevitably turn to the future. Without qualifications, how will their child find a rewarding career? What careers are suitable for people with mental illness? Will their child end up stacking supermarket shelves in the dead of night? This is the heart-breaking situation I found myself in five years ago when I discovered my daughter Sally was self-harming. A short time later she was diagnosed with severe anxiety and depression. It wasn’t long before prescribed medication dulled her brain, rapidly turning her from an intelligent, high-achiever into someone who struggled to concentrate, or answer even the simplest questions. Inevitably she fell off the education production line, dropping out of school at the age of 17 without any A-levels. This led to a sense of abject failure being piled on top of her already low self-esteem. When Sally dropped out of school I felt an overwhelming need to get her back into education. Education, education, education. This has long been the mantra from the government, the education system, employers and society in general. Throughout my entire life I have been brainwashed into believing that qualifications, tertiary education and a career are the only way to succeed in life. Everything else is failure. There is no annex to the rule book of parenthood that explains how to reconcile your child’s mental illness with their need –whether real or 82 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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perceived – for qualifications. If such a tome exists, I’ve never seen it. Neither have I come across career guidance for young people with mental illness. No specialist career officers. No questionnaires. Nothing. You have to write your own. With the benefit of hindsight, I’d encourage the very first sentence of the very first page to shout out; “Forget about education. Forget about careers. They can wait. Focus on getting better!” Thankfully society has moved on to a place where mental illness is no longer so taboo – testament to all the hard work that has happened across the world. Countless research projects, academic studies and media attention have come together to shine a light on the myriad mental health problems plaguing modern mankind. What we now need is for education and employment to catch up. For many youngsters prone to mental illness, full-time education and traditional careers are simply not suitable. Let’s accept this reality, and look for creative ways of adapting the system to meet their needs. Let’s focus on removing the stigma, guilt and sense of failure attached to dropping out of education. And for those forced down this path, let’s turn our collective thinking towards improving their future employment prospects. Sadly there is a wealth of data to call on. Let’s put it to good use by collecting, analysing and learning from it. ■ • Back in the ’90s Kathryn and husband David set out on their parenting adventure – expected to guide their bundles of joy on the tried-and-trusted path of a good education, top qualifications, sporting success, and all manner of other CV-enhancing extra-curricular activities, to be rewarded when their children hit their 20s and got a great job, moved out and declared financial independence. But the path is not always straightforward... Her book, Mother of Millennials, explains the world of a misunderstood generation and the injustice behind the common portrayal of lazy, entitled, narcissists; acquainting readers with terms such as ‘emerging adults’ and ‘quarter-life crisis’ and delving into the relevance of issues such as the environment, veganism and LGBTQ rights. For more, visit motherofmillennials.co.uk

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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

FAMILY DIARY Ideas for things to do with the little ones in Bristol this month

Enchanted Christmas

Saturday 1 – Sunday 23 December, 4 – 9pm Westonbirt Arboretum Set out on an illuminated trail and discover Westonbirt’s magical world of breathtaking light spectacles and interactive displays among the trees. Once you’ve finished the trail, head to the festive village and soak up the seasonal cheer by listening to Christmas choirs, getting stuck into some arts and crafts, enjoying a few fairground rides and catching a glimpse of some beloved Yuletide characters. Other dates are available. Adult tickets £14, children (aged five – 18) £7, under fives go free. Advanced booking is essential.

• forestryengland.uk

Don’t miss... voyage down to the surface of Mars as you find yourself dealing with the disappearance of stars on this magical journey. Combining live theatre with an immersive 360-degree fulldome planetarium experience, this 30-minute show is designed for children aged five and over. Tickets £3.50 per person in addition to your day entry ticket. Children must be accompanied by an adult; wethecurious.org

DON’T MISS... Grizzly Cuts and Gruesome Scars Daily until Sunday 4 November, 11am – 4pm, SS Great Britain Earn a certificate of bravery and scare your friends with a few swashbuckling injuries courtesy of professional special effects makeup artists. Plus you can learn about the real illnesses and injuries experienced on board. Suitable for children three years and above; £10 for adults. Included in the price of admission; ssgreatbritain.org

The Snow Baby Sunday 11 November, 11am and 2pm, The Wardrobe Theatre, Old Market Deep in the remote, snowy forest an icy wind blows and snowflakes fall from the sky. When the snowstorm hits, Doris is left to survive by herself with nothing but bad weather and a cloud of hungry crows; how will she cope? Enjoy this show of puppetry, imaginative storytelling and music. Suitable for ages three – eight. Tickets £8, ages two and under go free; thewardrobetheatre.com

Autumnal Antics Thursday 1 November, 10am – 3.30pm, Bristol Zoo Gardens Get arty on the Downs and create some colourful autumn art using seeds, leaves and berries. In the afternoon you’ll be making a leaf lantern to take home with you. Suitable for ages eight – 12. Drop off children at 10am and pick up at 3.30pm. £15 per child; bristolzoo.org.uk Spooky Tales in Filwood Thursday 1 November, 10.30am – 3.30pm, Filwood Community Centre Explore some tales of terror before you get making and creating during the half term. Expect creepy creations and hair-raising hijinks. Tickets £35 or £15 for residents local to the community centre. Suitable for children aged seven – 12; tobaccofactorytheatres.com

Toddler Toad Hall Talk Tuesday 13 November, 11 – 11.30am, Slimbridge Wetland Centre Get hands-on with a few super amphibians followed by a craft session. Please arrive at 10.30am for an 11am start. Guests are welcome to stay on after the talk and enjoy the indoor amphibian-themed play area, feed the birds or let off some steam in Welly Boot Land. £2 per child. Suitable for toddlers; wwt.org.uk

You Are Here! Friday 9 November, 11 – 11.30am and 11.45 – 12.15pm, We The Curious Go on an out-of-this-world adventure with Wow Tours. Zoom through Saturn’s rings and

Toddler Takeover: Colour Spectacular Friday 16 November, We The Curious Dive headfirst into the world of light and colour and enjoy making some mess with autumn leaves. Roam around the whole space

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and visit the story-telling sessions filled with actions and props. Adults £7.65, children aged three and above £5.75, children under two go free; wethecurious.org Fireworks at Sea Saturday 17 November, 6pm, The Grand Pier, Weston-super-Mare Enjoy a spectactular fireworks display out at sea, as well as the best views from the pier. Entry is strictly ticket only. Standard tickets cost £7.50 and include unlimited rides. Gold and platinum tickets are also available. Suitable for ages 12 plus; grandpier.co.uk TYNTEtots: The Enormous Turnip Wednesday 21 November, 10 – 11.45am, Tyntesfield Estate Inspired by the classic fairytale of The Enormous Turnip, have a go at vegetable printing, try your hand at gardening and test your strength. Suitable for two – five years; tiny tots are welcome when accompanying an older sibling or companion. Adults £3 or free if a National Trust member. Children £7; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield Christmas Carriage Rides Saturday 24 November, 11.15 – 11.30am, Tyntesfield Estate Treat yourself to a festive ride and start getting into the Christmas spirit as you travel across the Tyntesfield estate in a Victorian horse-drawn carriage. Rides start from outside of the front of the house and children must be accompanied by an adult. Booking is essential and it’s recommended that you bring a torch with you. Other times are available, and don’t forget to wrap up warm... nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield


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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

Get a few gruesome cuts and grizzly cuts at SS Great Britain

The Borrowers by Mary Norton Thursday 29 November, 7.30pm, Tobacco Factory Theatre Plunge into the quirky, wonky world of young Arrietty and her family as they make use of anything and everything they find. From cotton buds to crisp packets, the Borrowers are the original up-cyclers. This Christmas, the Factory Theatre is being transformed into a giant adventure playground to tell the story of The Borrowers. Running time is two hours, including interval. Recommended for ages six plus. Tickets from £12; family tickets available; tobaccofactorytheatres.com

Join the Borrowers at the Tobacco Factory Theatre

Go Aloft! Climb The Rigging Throughout November, SS Great Britain Could you have sailed the seven seas? Step into the shoes of a Victorian sailor and climb the main mast of the SS Great Britain, ascending to over 25m above ground level. Height and weight restrictions apply. Free for under 18s; £10 for adults; ssgreatbritain.org Festive Family Woodworking: Tyntesfield Reindeers, Saturday 1 December, 10am – 12pm, Tyntesfield Estate Get those sleigh bells ringing as you construct

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your very own reindeer from Tyntesfield timber. £25 for an adult and child pair. Booking essential; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield Clowns: The Eggs-hibition Until 6 January, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery Step into their gigantic shoes and tumble into the wonderful world of clowns. Each egg is a record of a clown’s own unique identity, preserving the unwritten rule that no clown should copy another’s look; bristolmuseums.org.uk n

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SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

BEAUTIFUL BUILD-UP The countdown to Christmas has become bigger than the day itself in the beauty world. Crystal Rose rounds up a few of the best indulgent advent calendars for party-season preening

Diptyque

Find a candle carousel – yep you heard right – a limited-edition giant Feu De Bois hand-enamelled in gold and 23 more little pleasures all at your fingertips. Diptyque has certainly not disappointed this year. £20, NYE Advent Calendar; next.co.uk

£320, exclusive at Diptyque boutiques; diptyqueparis.co.uk

Elemis

The 25 Days of Beauty box from Elemis is sure to provide all the skincare staples. From a superfood facial to a full-size procollagen marine cream to wake up to on Christmas morning (spoiler alert!) each little drawer is full of surprises. £150 (worth over £345); elemis.com £40, Daisy Park Advent Calendar; cathkidston.com

Marks & Spencer

If it’s anything like the last, this year’s calendar from M&S is set to be a good’un. Stuffed full of the likes of Philip Kingsley, Stila, Skyn Iceland and This Works (just for starters) – you’re not going to want to miss out of this miniature closet of dreams. £35 when you spend £35 on clothing, beauty or home; marksandspencer.com £165, John Lewis and Partners Beauty Advent Calendar; johnlewis.com

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SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

Charlotte Tilbury

Debenhams

The Beauty Universe has everything needed to blow your regime out of this world. It includes Charlotte’s famed Magic Cream made from a secret formula and adored backstage by models, plus a tub of mesmerising eyeshadow – and that’s just a hint of what’s to come. We can’t wait to shake up our Christmas party look.

Our men’s advent calendar calls have finally been answered. This year, Debenhams has released its Christmas countdown for the guys. The calendar includes shower gels, post-shave balms and moisturiser. Shed Man Advent Calendar, £15; debenhams.com

£150, charlottetilbury.com

The Body Shop

Full of indulgent treats, this year’s calendar offering is one of three. Inspired by the thriving wildlife of the forest, the Dani is brimming with 25 luxurious treats. Goodies include bath delights, beauty essentials and – it wouldn’t be Christmas without it – peppermint candy cane shower gel. £65 (worth £121), Dani Advent Calendar, available in-store; thebodyshop.com

Molton Brown

A luxurious taster cabinet full of fragrance infusions. From a Christmas bauble to pre-soirée pampering rituals, every day of the countdown will feature a festive treat.

£42 (worth £177), No7 Beauty Calendar; boots.com

L’Occitane

£175, Opulent Infusions Advent Calendar; moltonbrown.co.uk

This year, L’Occitane has collaborated with fashion designer Castelbajac Paris with a range of miniature hair and body products hidden behind each calendar door. Truly Christmas come early. £49 (worth £85), Classic Advent Calendar; uk.loccitane.com

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 87


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

CNM’S UNIQUE APPROACH TO ACUPUNCTURE

A unique naturopathic approach to Acupuncture, taught by CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine), adds an extra dimension to the effectiveness of this age-old therapy and offers benefits for both clients and practitioners.

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cupuncture continued to be developed from around 100BC as an integrated healthcare system along with herbs, massage, diet and moxibustion (heat). As much as the Acupuncturist was interested in how signs and symptoms manifested, it was the cause of the disease which was of most interest: ‘Why is this happening?’ Understanding why our health has become imbalanced gives us knowledge, not only as to how to make deep and tailored changes but also to ensure that we can prevent it from happening again, or at least be able to reduce the severity of any future symptoms. Identifying the cause of health imbalance is fundamental to the naturopathic approach taught at CNM, and it’s the reason why CNM developed ‘Naturopathic Acupuncture’. CNM Diploma Courses elaborate on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to give students a thorough grounding as to why disease occurs, as well as the tools to educate their client in self-care. Client education and empowerment covers dietary and lifestyle advice, tailoring a support package specific to each individual.

Re-acquainting the client with what best suits their body, promotes the body’s ability to heal itself using food. In fact, the type of foods, how we eat, even in what mood we eat and when, contributes to the development of our ‘Qi’, which is a concept translated from TCM as ‘our vital force’ or ‘energy’. A CNM Student of Naturopathic Acupuncture learns, for example, why for some people, eating cold fruit such as pears, would not be beneficial for their health. CNM’s Diploma Course in Naturopathic Acupuncture starts with the study of Biomedicine, as it is important to have a grounding in a subject which applies both biological and other natural-science principles to clinical practise. Naturopathic Acupuncturists need to know, for example, how Diabetes Type 2 manifests and how it is treated from a Western perspective as well as how it is approached from a TCM perspective. Studying Biomedicine in the first year of the course underpins the Eastern knowledge that is taught in the following years, and ensures that students are able to compare and contrast Eastern and Western theory. Our health in modern life is very different to that of the Chinese in the 15th Century, so CNM Students also learn how the body can be overloaded with toxins, both from the external environment and from what we put into our mouths or on our bodies. Examples of toxins include pharmaceutical as well as recreational drugs, caffeine, alcohol, processed foods and toxins from within the environment. Helping clients detox from these substances is all part of being a Naturopathic Acupuncturist. For example, dry skin brushing, as well as taking an Epson Salt Bath, can support elimination of toxins through the skin.

By using a combination of Acupuncture and diet to increase the effectiveness of detoxification organs, the body can help facilitate its own recovery path to good health. Naturopathic Acupuncturists can see the further benefits when their client’s diet and lifestyle is addressed, optimising their own effectiveness as practitioners. CNM’s Naturopathic approach to Acupuncture is specifically designed to combine ancient Chinese principles with the needs of modern people, to produce maximum health benefits for all. Instead of settling for getting rid of symptoms, the aim of Naturopathic Acupuncture is to promote a feeling of true wellness and vitality from a totally holistic perspective. Naturopathic Acupuncture offers a highly rewarding career choice and the chance to make a real difference in people’s lives.

Attend a FREE Open Evening to find out about part time training with CNM Bristol for a career as a Naturopathic Nutritionist or Don Geoff Naturopathic Acupuncturist.

14th November Please book online at:

www.naturopathy-uk.com 01342 410 505 CNM is the UK’s leading training provider in a range of natural therapies. Colleges across the UK and Ireland.

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK | NOVEMBER 2018 | THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 89


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HEALTH & BEAUTY NEWS FROM THE SECTOR

DRUNK IN LOVE It’s official, Drunk Elephant has finally landed in the UK. It’s been launched in Space NK stores and online, so you can now shop your favourites without the costly shipping price. Ever wondered about the name? When founder Tiffany Masterson started sourcing ingredients she fell in love with African marula oil and was fascinated by the myth that elephants become drunk after eating marula fruit. Hence, Drunk Elephant was born! Free from SLS, silicones, essential oils, drying alcohol, chemical sunscreens and fragrance and dyes, this beauty company is all about making a clean break from the suspicious six. They believe that these culprits are to blame for skin problems – and they’ve certainly got our attention. We’re all about the JuJu Bar and the Virgin Marula Luxury Facial Oil. • drunkelephant.co.uk; spacenk.com

HUNTING SEASON The first ever men’s collection from Jo Malone has just launched. A quintessentially British collaboration with Huntsman Saville Row, it’s the perfect pairing of scent and style. The collection has four refined fragrances all tailored to the modern man – for those laidback days, wild nights and everything in-between. We love the gold typography on each bottle and their matte burgundy caps. It’s about time Jo Malone joined the male grooming market and we’re enjoying the debut.

• 100ml cologne £120; jomalone.co.uk

HELLO, HUXLEY The Korean skincare brand has landed on the Harvey Nichols website. Aiming to bypass the gimmicks and fuss associated with Korean beauty, Huxley is now bringing its simple K-Beauty methods to the UK. Top tip: try the pH Balance Toner: Extract It, with slightly acidic pH levels just like that of a newborn baby’s skin. • harveynichols.com

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ENCHANTED BY ELEMIS Elemis has recently launched three new scents to fill your home with beautiful aromas this autumn/winter. For optimum relaxation, light up and enjoy notes of lavender, English rose and orange and make your space into a little seasonal sanctuary of your own. • Joyful Glow, Rose Glow and Soothing Glow, £27.50 each; elemis.com

MINDS MATTER Clifton wellbeing expert Nicky Maidment is encouraging employers not to ignore the mental health of their staff and recognise its importance for the benefit of both business and employee. Reports from the Office of National Statistics indicate that nearly 16 million work days are lost a year due to mental health-related sickness. Nicky believes that openness around this subject leads to a happier, healthier and more productive workforce – we couldn’t agree more! • purplemindsnlp.com


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Knee pain in the over 50s

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steoarthritis is the most common cause of knee pain in people over the age of 50. This type of early arthritis is mainly caused by wear and tear to the cartilage that lines the knee joint, leading to the bones rubbing directly against one another. Worn cartilage can cause pain, swelling, weakness, limited movement and difficulty with every day activities, such as walking and going up and downstairs. If you start to feel stiffness or pain in any joints for more than two weeks, it is advisable to see your GP. Treatment will depend on the severity of the disease. Reassuringly, consultant knee surgeon Mr Jonathan Webb advises, “The process of cartilage breakdown in the knee joint may be delayed through physiotherapy, which will keep the knee mobile and the muscles strong,

Nuffield Health’s Mr Jonathan Webb, consultant knee surgeon

knee surgery nearly 20 years earlier when I snapped my cruciate ligament, had suffered knee joint infection and septic arthritis, so basically my knee was shot. I am a very active person and wouldn’t accept the NHS verdict that a knee replacement wouldn’t work and potentially amputation would result. At the Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, Mr Webb explained what he would do, shaving off part of the knee cap before inserting the new knee prosthesis. When he came in to see me after the operation, he told me how gnarly my knee had been and what he had done to make it good.” “I threw myself into post operative weekly physiotherapy and exercised for two hours a day to rehabilitate my knee. I wasn’t going to let the expert surgery go to waste! It was definitely worth raiding my piggybank to pay for the operation, as it has given me back my life. Beforehand it was a total trial of endurance to ride. Now I can ride, lead my horse, exercise at the gym and walk my two dogs in comfort and with confidence.” Surgeon Jonathan Webb says, “I am thrilled that we have been able to help Ms Lawton return to her active life. She was very motivated to get the best from her knee replacement and has done very well indeed.” For more information, please ring 0117 906 4870 or see www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

preserving the function of the joint. Physiotherapy can be extremely helpful if the patient is struggling to straighten the knee fully or has just an isolated area of arthritis behind the kneecap.” Mr Webb advises, “Before embarking on activities such as a long walk or a round of golf, occasional painkillers or an antiinflammatory can be useful. For higher impact sports, such as skiing, the use of a knee brace or specially fitted insoles can help. Depending on the extent of the damage to the knee, simple keyhole surgery to tidy up any torn cartilage may be possible. As symptoms worsen, more extensive surgery, including joint replacement, is often the best option.”

New Knee for Horse Rider Emma At 51, horse rider Emma Lawton was told she was too young for a new knee by her local hospital in Wiltshire. Emma persisted for four years to be referred to an NHS knee specialist, however when the long awaited appointment arrived, the consultant actively discouraged her from seeking treatment, saying it was unlikely to be successful. Many years previously, Emma had seen Mr Jonathan Webb, so said she turned her back on the NHS and contacted Mr Webb herself at the Nuffield Health Joint Replacement Centre Bristol. Emma is absolutely delighted with her total knee replacement that she received at The Chesterfield in May. Emma, says, “My new knee is fantastic and my surgeon, Mr Webb, was simply wonderful! He has such a reassuring manner and gives you total trust and confidence in what he is doing. After four years of being in constant pain and becoming used to my disability, he has made me feel like a proper working human again. My knee was a challenging case, as I had already undergone THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 91


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Hey, pal, weren’t you sniffing around last issue?

THE ROMAN ROAD TO WALES Despite Bristol’s rich history, there is little to show for almost four centuries of Roman rule. However, Clifton offers a starting point, discovers Andrew Swift before venturing across the bridge to a far-flung outpost of empire

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f the villas and scattered settlements established hereabouts by the Romans, virtually nothing survives. There was a Roman Road, though, which ran west from Bath, crossing Durdham Down before dropping down to a port called Abonae, where Sea Mills stands today. Mariners’ Path in Sneyd Park is said to follow its course but, although Abonae was once a busy port, nothing of it remains above ground, apart from the foundations of one small building. Even so, Abonae was very much a stopping-off point rather than a destination in its own right. Many of those who marched across Durdham Down were soldiers of the Second Legion, who embarked at Abonae for Isca – modern-day Caerleon – on the banks of the Usk. Isca was a garrison town, and with good reason. After the invasion in AD43, the Romans swept relentlessly across southern Britain. Having crossed the Severn, however, their advance faltered as they came up against the warlike tribe of the Silures, who had no wish to be part of the Roman Empire. Faced with the might of the Roman army, they resorted to guerrilla tactics, which worked remarkably well for over 30 years, until the appointment of a particularly determined Roman governor called Sextus Julius Frontinus. Having finally routed them, Frontinus ordered a garrison to be built so that any further trouble could be nipped in the bud. This was no makeshift encampment. With barracks for around 5,000 soldiers, a massive bathing complex with heated changing rooms, warm and cold baths, exercise rooms, an open-air swimming pool and an amphitheatre capable of accommodating the entire garrison, it was on the most lavish and impressive scale. The next step was to win the Silures over, using techniques the Romans had honed to a fine art over the course of their many conquests. Twelve miles to the east they built a town called Venta Silurum – ‘town of the Silures’ – on the road to Glevum (Gloucester). After the Silures were granted semi-autonomy in the first century AD, 92 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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a forum-basilica was built and Venta Silurum became an administrative centre. Earthen ramparts topped with timber palisades were thrown up around it. A grid of streets was laid out. A temple was built. Large villas appeared, with tessellated flooring, bath houses and underfloor heating – luxurious. With the Silures having abandoned their warlike ways, the need for a heavily fortified garrison at Isca was less pressing, but it remained an important military base until it was decommissioned around the middle of the fourth century. At roughly the same time – and possibly as a consequence – the ramparts of Venta Silurum were replaced by high stone walls with fortified towers and gateways. Despite this, it too seems to have been largely abandoned – or at least to have ceased functioning as an administrative centre – a century or so later.

...Many of those who marched across Durdham Down were soldiers of the Second Legion... The Romans built to last, however, and, although both sites were plundered for building materials, neither of them was redeveloped. Over a millennium and a half later, they contain some of the finest Roman remains in Britain. At Caerleon, part of the bath house survives, as well a section of the fortress wall and the foundations of row upon row of barracks. Most impressive, though, is the grass-covered amphitheatre, which was known in medieval times as King Arthur’s Round Table, because of a legend that Arthur held court there after the Romans left. At Caerwent, large sections of the defensive walls – standing up to


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THE GREAT OUTDOORS

five metres high – have survived. On the south and west sides, where they are at their most intact and impressive, they still look out across open country towards wooded hills. A village was established within the walls in the Middle Ages, but even today far less people live here than in Roman times. Although some of the site has been excavated, revealing the foundations of villas, the forum-basilica and a row of shops and houses, much of it is still given over to grass, with who knows what treasures lying beneath. The feeling that this is a place that time forgot hangs heavy. When Channel 4’s Time Team visited in 2008, they discovered, in just three days, a row of shops in one part of the site and a villa in another. The most surprising thing about Caerwent, though, is how few people know about it and how few visitors it receives. Although there is no entry charge, and you can wander freely, the car park – which is also free – rarely has more than a handful of cars in it. Caerleon is more popular, with a range of events staged in the amphitheatre, but out of season you may find yourself virtually alone amid one of the most extensive Roman sites in Britain. There is no entry charge here either, and again you are free to wander. Even knowing nothing about their history, Caerleon and Caerwent would still be mightily impressive – and evocative. For children, free to explore and let their imaginations run riot, they are fine adventure playgrounds. And if, like me, you have a dog who loves exploring ruins, they tick that box as well. It is the sheer scale of what the Romans left behind in this far-flung outpost of empire that is so astonishing. You can only wonder at how magnificent these settlements must have been when first built – and how utterly unlike anything the Silures had seen before. Bristol may not have much to remind us of the long centuries of Roman rule, but what lies on the other side of the Severn, less than an hour’s drive way, more than makes up for it. ■

Caerwent mosaic

Caerleon amphitheatre makes for a fine playground for those with vivid imaginations

• Caerleon Fortress & Baths NP18 1AE; ST338905; Caerwent Roman Town NP26 5AU; ST467906; cadw.gov.wales/daysout

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GARDEN DETOX Pick a crisp, sunny day and undertake a tidy-up during this season of change, advises Elly West – but don’t forget the interest and beauty to be found in the frost-covered fronds of the dead and dying

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ovember is a month of transition. One foot is firmly placed in autumn, with apples still hanging on the trees and fiery fallen leaves to kick through, but it’s only a short hop to winter’s dark evenings, with overnight frosts and – dare I say it – Christmas looming. There are plenty of jobs to be done this month to get the garden (and you) ready for a winter rest, so there’s no need to shut the back door and give up on the great outdoors just yet. Keep an eye on the weather and if we’re treated to some crisp, sunny days, then a few hours spent outside will reinvigorate both you and your garden, preparing it for winter, so you won’t have to look out on a bleak and dismal mess for the next few months. Now is a good time to give the garden a proper tidy up. But before you start, take a good look at what’s there. I’m a big believer in leaving seed heads for as long as possible before you clear them away, as there is much beauty to be found in the dead and dying, particularly when covered with a sprinkling of frost. Wildlife will also benefit from the extra food and shelter. Some of my favourite winter seed heads include phlomis, hydrangeas, achilleas, sedums, eryngiums and ornamental grasses, all of which offer many weeks of interest after the main show has faded. However, if dead growth has turned black and soggy, leaves are tatty and plants are starting to collapse, now is the time to clear them away and add them to the compost heap. This way, you can be selective about what you keep and what you get rid of, so the stars can shine out of the border without the distraction of the messy stuff. Dead growth left lying in the border can also encourage pests and diseases, so sweep up those fallen leaves and use them to make leaf mould instead. Don’t be timid when you’re cutting back stems, go right down to the base and remove all the unwanted growth. Have a good clear-up now and the bones of the garden are revealed, 94 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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providing a good opportunity to assess what’s worked and what hasn’t this season. Check if there are gaps to fill and think about what you might do differently next year. Another autumn job that’s high on my list is planting spring bulbs. It’s not too late to get these parcels of promise in the ground, and tulips actually benefit from being planted later rather than sooner, as they’re less likely to succumb to viruses when soil temperatures drop. Squeeze them into gaps in the border, under trees and shrubs, or in pots ready to be moved into prominence when they start to flower. Plan carefully and you can have a succession of colour starting with snowdrops, crocus and iris reticulata, followed by narcissi, hyacinths, fritillaries and tulips, through to early summer alliums and camassia. This November I’m going to have a go at taking root cuttings from some gorgeous terracotta verbascums – a variety called ‘Firedance’ that I picked up at one of the RHS shows last summer. They weren’t cheap and unfortunately don’t produce seed, so I’m hoping to bulk up supplies of this stunning variety this way. Propagating plants from root cuttings is easier than it sounds, and is suitable for plants such as verbascums, and also oriental poppies, that have quite thick, fleshy roots. Carefully dig up the plant and cut off one or two thick, vigorous roots close to the plant. Remember which way it was growing – this is vital! Prepare a tray of gritty compost and cut the root into sections about 2cm long. If you make a horizontal cut at the top (the end that was nearest the plant) and a sloping cut at the bottom of each piece, it makes it easy to remember which way up they go. Place them in the compost vertically, so the top is just below the surface, then leave them in a sheltered spot such as a cold frame to root. The parent plant can be put safely back in the ground. Each little piece of root should start to sprout leaves and

Above: November is a month of transition; have a good clear-up now and the bones of the garden are revealed, providing a good opportunity to see what’s worked and what hasn’t this season Opposite: Elly’s plant of the month, providing structure and colour throughout the winter


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GARDENING become a new plant ready for planting out by next spring. Magic! ‘Firedance’ is one of my favourite verbascums and I can’t have too many, so fingers crossed it works. It’s also a good time to plant new shrubs, hedges and trees, before the soil freezes. The bare-root season has started, and plants bought bareroot will generally be cheaper than their pot-grown counterparts. It won’t be long until the cold weather makes it much more pleasant to stay indoors, so if you’re short of time, focus on the areas that you can see from the house. Plant up some winter pots for your patio, and think about your front garden. It’s amazing what a difference a wellplaced pot can make, especially if you choose plants rich in winter fragrance, such as Sarcococca confusa, Viburnum x bodnantense, or Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’. Next to the front door, alongside winter bedding and a few spring bulbs, it will give you a lift right the way through those colder months until spring is here again. ■ • Elly West is a garden designer. For more details, visit ellyswellies.co.uk

Plant of the month Euphorbia amygdaloides ‘Purpurea’ is a plant I often include in my planting schemes for its deep-purple foliage and acid-green bracts that provide contrast and drama in spring and early summer. This summer, mine definitely took a battering in the heat. They were looking so tatty towards the end of July that I cut them all hard back, but autumn has brought a resurgence of new foliage that will provide structure and colour through the winter. It’s a compact variety with leaves that darken as they mature, red-tinged beneath, and forms a neat mound. Euphorbias are low-maintenance and grow well in sun or shade. They self-seed freely, but are easy to pull out if you end up with too many. Just be careful to wear gloves when dealing with them, as the milky sap can irritate the skin.

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WILD BRISTOL

Greys were introduced from North America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as fashionably exotic additions to large country estates

MAY CONTAIN NUTS Our wildlife columnist Pete Dommett has been making friends with the city’s squirrels this month

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ute. There, I’ve said it. When it comes to writing about wildlife, the c-word is not something that trips comfortably off my keyboard (I like to think, rather pompously perhaps, that I’m better than that). But, as I sit among the browning leaves in Bristol’s Brandon Hill, surrounded by several friendly, furry creatures like a scene from a Disney film, it’s the first word that springs to mind. Not everyone feels the same way about grey squirrels. They were introduced from North America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as fashionably exotic additions to large country estates, but rapidly spread across the nation. As they did, greys wreaked havoc on both forests (by stripping bark from young trees) and populations of native red squirrels (which are outcompeted for food by their Amercian cousins and also highly susceptible to the deadly ‘squirrel pox’ virus that greys transmit but are unaffected by). Their habit of raiding garden bird feeders for food and birds’ nests for eggs has also made grey squirrels public enemy number one. In areas where red squirrels remain, it’s vital that greys are kept at bay. But, in the vast majority of Britain, controlling the numbers of this well-established species seems somewhat futile. As one of very few mammals that most of us can see easily and often, maybe we can enjoy these adaptable, intelligent and entertaining animals instead. Autumn is a fascinating time to observe squirrel behaviour. Throughout the season, greys (along with jays) are busy foraging for the abundance of hazelnuts and acorns, but it’s Brandon Hill’s horse chestnut harvest that’s proving irresistible to my bushy-tailed companions today. When a couple of conkers fall from the tree that I’m sitting under, two squirrels immediately come bounding over like a pair of pocket-sized kangaroos. One takes a nut in its paws and nibbles it then and there. The other carries its prize a few feet away and buries it beneath the leaf litter. Like an Alabama farmer preparing for the apocalypse, squirrels stash away supplies to see them through the darker days. 96 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Come the colder months, when sustenance is scarce, greys spend much of their time searching the woodland floor for these secret caches, desperately hoping that they haven’t already been discovered by mice, voles or other squirrels. Zoologists believe that they use a variety of methods to re-find food, including a sound spatial awareness of their territory, a memory for landmarks such as specific trees and an acute sense of smell. However, it’s estimated that squirrels only unearth just over half of their buried bounty.

...It’s estimated that squirrels only unearth just over half of their buried bounty... As autumn advances into winter, the breeding season beckons. Female greys lead loved-up males on frantic courtship chases through the leafless trees. They helter-skelter round trunks and along branches after her – all the time chattering and barking excitedly – before she eventually selects the best suitor to mate with. At Brandon Hill, and other parks in the city, the more confiding nature of urban greys offers the opportunity to witness this aerial game of kiss-chase at close quarters. So whether you love or loathe them, consider them to be ecological criminals or undeniably adorable, what was once said about American GIs during the Second World War could (with a slight change in wording) be applied to this other visitor from across the pond. Grey squirrels are oversexed, overfed and over here. ■ • Find out about Brandon Hill’s wildlife at avonwildlifetrust.org.uk


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• Plain and Ornamental plastering • • Wide selection of new cornices, ceiling roses etc • • Cornice made to match existing and repair work • • Lime plastering and rendering • • 29 years experience •

RECEIVE THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE BY POST

Tel: 07970 278028 Email: info@john-boyce.co.uk www.john-boyce.co.uk

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THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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NOVEMBER 2018

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 99


Knight Frank DPS Nov 18.qxp_PIF Full Page 25/10/2018 09:34 Page 1

BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

L

ocated in a secluded position in a private drive, Avonwood occupies a magnificent south-facing position with spectacular, uninterrupted views to the south along the Avon Gorge. The house is arranged over four floors with a good balance of formal entertaining space and family rooms. The principal rooms all face south over the Gorge. The main reception rooms are spread over the ground and garden floors, with access to the full-length balcony or veranda and gardens. The drawing room is especially lovely with sash windows onto the balcony and a large seating area. The lower floor of the house is given over to leisure with a cinema, glamorous steam room and gym. There are five bedrooms in total. The master suite has a balcony, bathroom and dressing room. Three of the further bedrooms have en suites and there is a family bathroom. As well as the main house, the property comes with a separate cottage which consists of a kitchen, sitting room, bedroom and shower room. The landscaped gardens feature a summer house, outbuildings a BBQ terrace and a vineyard. Avonwood must surely be on the list of dream homes in Bristol and offers an idyllic lifestyle with a blend of city and country life. For full details contact agents Knight Frank Clifton. Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

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AVONWOOD SEA WALLS ROAD, SNEYD PARK • Five bedrooms • Four bathrooms • Separate one bedroom cottage • Cinema, gym, steam room • Summer house, outbuildings & vineyard • Spectacular view of Avon Gorge

£ Price on Application


Knight Frank DPS Nov 18.qxp_PIF Full Page 25/10/2018 09:35 Page 2

BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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Seven drawer solid pine chest £595.00, shown in Lime White, but available in any colour of Farrow and Ball paint. This item and many others in our store are available in bespoke measurements, quotations are available on request. All our prices include VAT and Free local delivery. Please come and visit our showroom at 253, Hotwell Road Tuesday - Saturday, 10am – 4pm or call us on 0117 927 3700

Stay Local, Be Local, Use Local

airbristol Specialists in short term lettings and Airbnb Management

www.airbristol.com Tel: 0117 9113473 • hello@airbristol.com

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The General fp.qxp_Layout 1 22/10/2018 10:25 Page 1


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

CLIFTON RETAIL SHOPS

THE DISTILLERY OFFICES

Various shops to rent in Clifton:

• Between Clifton and Junc 19 of M5 • Superb loft style studio offices • 1,100 – 3,000 sq ft • On site gym • New lease – Rent on application

• Clifton Village – c £20,000 pax • Cotham Hill – c £9,500 pax • Whiteladies Road – c £20,000 pax • Café business for sale in BS8 – O/A BRADBROOK HOUSE ALMONDSBURY

HARVEYS CELLARS DENMARK STREET, BS1

• Open plan office suite

• An iconic restaurant / bar • Fully licensed with kitchen • Excellent location • Only £24,000 pax

• C. 2,020 sq ft • Easy access to M4/ M5 • New flexi lease

6 MARSH STREET

1 & 2 Eden Office Park

• Excellent A3 restaurant opportunity

• Easy access to Clifton and Gordano

• May suit other uses

• Open plan ground floor office unit

• New lease

• 9 car spaces • New lease

• Rent on application

NEW STUDIO OFFICES

UNIT 4 BROOK OFFICE PARK, EMERSONS GREEN BS16

• Located in BS5 • High quality refurb

• Open plan office suite • 3,752 sq ft – 21 car spaces • High quality – comfort cooled • New flexible lease

• Adjoining the new Proctor Stevenson HQ • New lease

BS1 OFFICES

TO LET. 442 STAPLETON ROAD, BRISTOL

• High quality refurb

• Business space suitable for stores, offices, leisure etc

• 2,500 – 3,600 sq ft • 4 car spaces

• 1,2496 sq ft

• New lease

• 1 mile from Bristol city centre and easy access onto M32

• Rent on application

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Burston Cook November.indd 1

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

22/10/2018 14:38


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

ST STEPHENS HOUSE, BS1 HQ OFFICE TO LET Located on the recently pedestrianised and revamped Colston Avenue, St Stephens House has undergone a striking refurbishment to provide a self contained office finished to the highest standards: • Contemporary

• 6,554 Sq Ft

• Creative

• Up to 6 car parking spaces

• Newly refurbished

• Elevated ground floor position

• Self contained

• DDA compliant

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Burston Cook November.indd 2

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• • • • •

Sales / Lettings Acquisitions Valuations Landlord & tenant Auction Sales

• • • • •

Rent reviews Property Management Investment Sales / Purchase Development & Planning Dilapidations Advice

22/10/2018 14:39


Clifton

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Rockleaze Road, Sneyd Park, Bristol, BS9 1NF £495,000

A charming two bedroom Victorian terraced house just one road back from the Clifton and Durdham Downs. Beautifully blending period features with contemporary style, including an open-plan kitchen/diner with French doors onto a lovely rear garden. Upstairs there are two double bedrooms, the master in particular is a great size, the full width of the property and with three sash windows to the front elevation and a beautifullytiled contemporary bathroom features a bath and a separate shower. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

0117 405 7659 clifton@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bishopston Andrewsonline.co.uk

Ferndale Road, Filton, Bristol, BS7 0RP £425,000

0117 405 7662

Andrews Novembe.indd 1

A well presented, five bedroom semi detached house situated on lovely Ferndale Road. Briefly comprising a bay fronted lounge, dining room, L shaped kitchen / breakfast room, 18’6 x 8’9 conservatory, five bedrooms; one with en-suite Bathroom, additional shower room, off street parking, garage and garden. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

bishopston@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

24/10/2018 10:19


Downend

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Dibden Lane, Emersons Green ÂŁ550,000

0117 911 3519

Tucked away within a quiet cul-de-sac location, but with good access to the ring road, an exceptionally welldesigned four double bedroom period style barn conversion, with exposed beams, it has plenty of character and and charm. On the ground floor a cosy family lounge and smart modern kitchen, while on the first floor is an impressive galleried landing. Outside there are level gardens to the front and rear. Energy Efficiency Rating: TBC

downend@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Harbourside Andrewsonline.co.uk

Unity Street, Bristol, BS1 5HH ÂŁ450,000

0117 911 4749

Andrews Novembe.indd 2

A bright, spacious and immaculately presented two double bedroom apartment, located within an elegant and imposing former school built circa. 1865. The apartment has been very recently been given a superior upgrade in its decor and fittings. The space offers a light, very well presented interior with a generous open plan living space with dual aspect windows looking across College Green and City Hall. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

harbourside@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

24/10/2018 10:19


Andrews Advertorial fp 2.qxp_Layout 1 26/10/2018 11:56 Page 1

ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

The best of country and town living at Chewton Court W oodstock Homes build a select number of exclusive new homes each year, so they can deliver superior properties without compromising on quality. As one of the leading homebuilders in the South West and South Wales for well-designed and appointed homes they take a great care in the overall design and construction, from initial plans to final working techniques. Andrews Land & New Homes have been chosen as the appointed agent as they share the same core values of delivering high standards ensuring your move is as smooth as possible. Chewton Court is a fine example of Woodstock Homes delivering a high-end, quality product. In the 18th century it was very much the done thing to build a romantic folly on one’s estate. Now, enjoying the view of the historic Owl Tower, next to the delightful River Chew and the classical lines of Chewton Place House, will be just one of the pleasures of life at Chewton Court. Through the passing seasons, nature is our most welcome companion. Here, deep within the river valley and down a long and winding private driveway, Chewton Place House is a hidden Georgian gem.

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Set midway between Bath and Bristol, Chewton Court offers a gated, country residence that is just minutes away from all the cultural, social and business life of these distinguished cities. There, two of the nation’s oldest working theatres rub shoulders with a rich choice of world cuisine, internationally recognised schools and universities, renowned museums, and no end of shops to browse around to your heart’s content at Bristol’s Cabot Circus or Bath’s array of boutique shops. Meanwhile, more day-to-day requirements can be met, nearby Waitrose approximately 1.4 miles away, while bustling Keynsham is a wonderful, helpful neighbour. A superb property set in an even more wonderful location ideal for someone looking for country life with the accessibility to amenities and transport links.

For more information or to arrange a viewing, please contact Andrews Land and New Homes on 0117 946 1799 or email: Bristol&bath@andrewsonline.co.uk


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PROPERTY NEWS

BITE-SIZED UPDATES FROM ACROSS THE CITY’S BOOMING SECTOR

ACTION TAKEN FOR TENANTS

As of last month, landlords renting a Bristol property to five or more people need a special licence

LOOKING UP

Imran Ali is all for the decision

With the window closed for comments on the Council’s draft planning guidance for higher density urban developments, a local architect has called for bold decision-making. BDP’s Yuli Cadney-Toh says it must support innovative ways of increasing urban density while reassuring people that this is a chance to improve the quality of Bristol’s public realm. The region’s joint spatial plan identifies the need for 105,000 new homes by 2036. As things stand, the majority will be just outside Bristol and the economic centres and away from jobs, increasing reliance on transport and placing strain on infrastructure. Yuli advocates that “building up is better than building out” and argues that the time has come to make use of the remaining good brownfield sites; that building at height must be part of the debate to deliver a range of homes which attract and retain Bristol’s young, mobile workforce. “Bristol must have a plan which supports development and unites the city in its vision for the future,” she said. “A joined-up approach to planning, transportation, infrastructure and development will bring investment, jobs and homes. Things can, and should, be looking up. Buildings of height offer unparalleled opportunity for sustainability – from energy efficiency to cutting road traffic. As campaigners stoke fears about an army of tall buildings overshadowing our attractive, heritage-rich city, there is a risk that they themselves will overshadow the debate.”

HOT TOPIC FOR LOCAL HOTELIERS The announcement of the latest phase of development at Ashton Gate Stadium has been welcomed by Bristol hoteliers. The £100million investment will include a new sports and convention centre next to the existing Bristol City Football stadium. Hotel owners and operators across the city have also backed YTL’s proposed extension of the Brabazon hangar in Filton as a world-class arena. “This is great double boost for the West Country capital and we are hoping the city’s leaders are equally positive,” said Imran Ali, chairman of the Bristol Hoteliers Association. “While a decision is yet to be made on the longterm future of the Temple Island site in the centre of the city, the news that two private investors are willing to pump millions of pounds into the city should be welcomed with open arms. We need to grasp this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity; if not, we run the risk of falling behind more progressive, forward-looking cities.” • bristol-hoteliers.co.uk

• bdp.com

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A new national licensing scheme introduced to improve housing for tenants living in privately rented properties has come into force. Previously, larger shared rented properties with three storeys or more needed a licence from Bristol City Council. But from 1 October, the law on licensing these properties in England changed, with landlords who rent any property to five or more people from two or more families having had to apply for a licence by 30 September or face a penalty. A shared house or flat with five or more unrelated tenants, or a house containing five or more bedsits, are examples of the types of properties affected by the change. These properties will need to meet current licensing conditions and comply with standards, including minimum room sizes and new rules on refuse and recycling. “We know from experience that licensing is a good way to deal with issues of poor standards of accommodation and inefficient property management,” said Councillor Paul Smith, cabinet member for homes and communities. “While most landlords are providing quality rented accommodation, much of it is in poor condition and no one in Bristol should be living like that. We want to ensure every tenant in the city is provided with safe and quality housing.” If landlords or agents failed to apply for a new licence by 30 September they will be liable for an unlimited fine or a financial penalty of up to £30,000, as well as having to pay higher licence fees. Landlords who operate an unlicensed property also face other consequences, for example; not being able to gain possession, risking being ordered to repay tenants up to 12 months’ rent and, in the very worst circumstances where the property has not been licensed, the council can take over management.

• bristol.gov.uk


Delph Property fp.qxp_Layout 1 25/10/2018 14:36 Page 1

Unity St, Bristol, BS1 5HH

Luxury 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apartment with private parking £455,000 • Recently refurbished throughout

• 105 sq m / 1130 sq ft

• Old school conversion

• Dual aspect living room

• High ceilings

• Utility room

• Views over College Green

• 999 year lease

• Next 2 years service charge paid

• £5,000 contribution towards furniture

020 7907 5555

RElms@delphgroup.com

www.delphgroup.com


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PROPERTY

THROUGH THE KEYHOLE...

MAXIMISE THE VALUE OF YOUR LAND AND PROPERTY IF YOU’RE THINKING OF RETIREMENT, OR YOUR BUSINESS ISNT QUITE GOING TO PLAN

IF YOU OWN A DETACHED CARE HOME, HOTEL OR PUBLIC HOUSE, or a parcel of land with potential We have clients actively seeking new opportunities, with or without planning permission

T

his family house on Downs Park East looks neat as a pin from the outside; its characterful facade of patterned red brickwork forms a pretty attractive first impression of this well-located five double-bedroom house. The good vibes continue as you head inside the Edwardian, semi-detached property on the sunny side of this desirable Westbury Park road close to the Downs, and step into any one of the three reception rooms it has to its name. A lovely extended kitchen/dining space leads directly out onto a level south-westerly facing back garden – the place has been extended and improved by the current owners during their ownership, yet has plenty of exciting potential to be gently updated cosmetically. Outside, to the front, the garden has been landscaped to provide the rare benefit of off-street parking for two cars (have we got your attention yet?). The house is also only a short stroll from the shops and restaurants of North View, Westbury Park Primary School and Redland Green School too. The ground floor comprises a generous entrance hallway and sitting room with arched sash windows, plus a family room that connects through to the fresh, airy breakfast room to create a real social hub for the house – we love the island and row of skylights letting a whole load of extra light in. There’s also a useful third reception room as well as a wet room/WC and handy shared side access pathway for the house. Upstairs, find the first of the five bedrooms, with its own charming balcony, then two further double bedrooms and a modern bathroom with shower and WC. Level-up again and cross the bright landing to find the two extra double bedrooms that make up the full complement for this lovely family home. Better book that viewing hadn’t you, househunters? n

We offer a completely confidential service, with over 20 years experience of delivering residential projects, tailor made to suit your individual circumstances Please email or call directly: Cameron Gray 07876 197522 cameron@landdevelopmentbrokers.co.uk

PROPERTY PROFILE Guide price: £1,000,000

www.landdevelopmentbrokers.co.uk

Agent: Richard Harding; 124 Whiteladies Road Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP; 0117 946 6690; richardharding.co.uk

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Andrews The Old Library fp.qxp_Layout 1 22/10/2018 12:52 Page 1


ANdrews New Home - Chewton Court FP.qxp_Layout 1 14/09/2018 16:24 Page 1


HENLEAZE AVENUE, HENLEAZE Benefitting from many original period features and marketed with no onward chain, is this three storey, five bedroom semi-detached family home with a 16m landscaped garden to rear and is positioned adjacent to Henleaze shops and amenities. EPC - E 3

2

5

Guide Price ÂŁ865,000

HOLMWOOD GARDENS, WESTBURY-ON-TRYM A well-presented, substantial four bedroom detached modern family home offering spacious kitchen/diner with heated floors, two further reception rooms, integral garage, ample parking to driveway and private rear family garden. EPC - D 3

3

4

ÂŁ850,000

CJ Hole November.indd 1

22/10/2018 10:42


Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com Where has the time gone? We are already in our eleventh month of the year, how fast these months are going by. With only one month to go to the festive season, who is getting excited for all things Christmas? However, let’s not get side tracked, we have been busy over October. The clocks have changed, we’ve had many new instructions, sales agreed and pumpkins carved! There has been continued high demand for properties in Clifton

and surrounding. There is no surprise that our patch is booming with first time buyers and people relocating. Bristol has been voted the top city to live in, it is thriving, and we cannot wait to help our buyers find new homes, in time for the New Year. We are ready to tackle November and see where it takes us. As always, we will keep you all updated! Howard Davis MD Clifton

REDLAND

FAILAND

OIEO £900,000

GUIDE PRICE £650,000

A substantial five bedroom family home offers a generous entrance hall, three reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, two bathrooms, cloakroom, basement area, integral garage, driveway and a southerly facing rear garden. The house requires modernising and does retain a great deal of its original charm and character throughout. EPC F

A spacious three double bedroom family home, consisting of a kitchen diner with access to the rear garden, master bedroom, with the bonus of a staircase to a spacious landing and two further rooms, a front driveway with parking for several cars plus access to the double garage. EPC E

REDLAND

STOKE BISHOP

GUIDE PRICE £665,000

A beautifully presented period home offering three bedrooms plus a loft conversion which is used as a home office, fabulous views, an impressive sitting room plus dining room and a rear kitchen with French doors to rear garden. Located closely to Redland Green School, offered with no onward chain. EPC E

GUIDE PRICE £575,000

A most impressive four bedroom family home with a warmth of character and beautifully presented throughout. It offers: Entrance hall, dining room with direct access to the rear garden, lounge, kitchen and utility room overlooking rear garden, four bedrooms, two bathrooms, rear garden and front paved driveway. EPC E

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton November.indd 1

23/10/2018 11:47


CLIFTON

GUIDE PRICE £375,000

CLIFTON

GUIDE PRICE £340,000

A beautifully presented bright and airy two double bedroom flat. The property is remarkably spacious, providing a wide staircase leading up to the property itself, an outstanding open plan living room/kitchen and a modern bathroom. EPC D

A spacious two double bedroom first floor apartment. This fine Victorian building offers an entrance hall with all rooms leading off, lounge with triple bay windows, high ceilings a working fire, modern kitchen diner with a large sash window, three bedrooms and a modern shower room. EPC D

SNEYD PARK

REDLAND

GUIDE PRICE £315,000

GUIDE PRICE £295,000

A beautifully presented ground floor apartment with a private courtyard garden at the rear, consisting of: lounge/diner with access on to the separate kitchen, two good size double bedrooms (one with en-suite), separate shower room plus a utility area. EPC C

A lovely light and spacious two double bedroom top floor flat, enjoying the sunny outlook onto leafy Redland, the property consists of a large and wellpresented lounge/dining area perfect for entertaining guests, a separate kitchen and a three piece suite bathroom. EPC D

HOTWELLS

CLIFTON

OIEO £280,000

An impeccable listed one bedroom flat, boasting stunning views over the city. Having been lovingly refurbished to a high standard; a new fully fitted kitchen also benefiting from a large communal garden, with an enclosed storage area for bikes.EPC D

GUIDE PRICE £280,000

A most impressive grade 2 listed one bedroom garden flat offers a spacious, well presented interior and an attractive private rear garden. A spacious living room to the front, bathroom, double bedroom and kitchen which with rear door leading into the garden. EPC C

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton November.indd 2

23/10/2018 11:46


Rupert Oliver FP November.qxp_Layout 1 23/10/2018 14:53 Page 1

Sneyd Park, Bristol | Guide Price ÂŁ2,000,000 A magnificent family house on the edge of The Downs; situated along a private road with a majestic poolside setting and exceptional privacy. Gated gravel drive with generous off-street parking | Detached double garage with clock tower | Fabulous entertaining space both inside and out | Swimming pool and detached pool house / annex with bar | Stunning period family house arranged over three floors | Unique and bespoke features fitted throughout | Two exquisite reception rooms and a superb family kitchen / dining room | Six bedrooms and three bath / shower rooms | 8 seat Jacuzzi and 2 dining terraces | Wonderfully private location overlooking The Downs Circa 4605 sq. ft (428 sq. m)


Richard Harding November.qxp_Layout 6 22/10/2018 12:48 Page 1

Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

An impressive, stylish & individual 3/4 bedroom newly built contemporary city home in a prime central & convenient location offering a bespoke high specification interior, a sunny garden & spectacular rooftop terrace with far reaching cityscape views. EPC: tbc

KINGSDOWN

guide £725,000

An exceptionally spacious (circa 4,000 sq. ft) and impressive 5/7 bedroom Victorian period semidetached family house with roomy lateral space on each of its three floors. Has a level 45ft x 40ft south-westerly facing lawned rear garden, off street parking for 2 cars and an extensive flexible lower ground floor with independent access.

CLIFTON

guide price range £1,500,000 - £1,600,000

A charming & immensely versatile, 5/6 double bedroom, 2 bath/shower Wonderful location in a coveted road twixt nearby Whiteladies & Pembroke Road/Clifton Village room, Georgian style (circa 1852) Clifton townhouse located & central areas of Bristol are also within easy reach, as are excellent schools including Bristol conveniently between Clifton Village and Bristol's historic harbourside Grammar, Cotham and Clifton College. A superb residence. EPC: D with 70ft south-easterly facing rear garden. EPC: E

CLIFTON

guide £725,000

An inviting & characterful 4 bedroom semi-detached period family house with magnificent 130ft rear garden & flexible accommodation over 3 floors. EPC: E

BISHOPSTON

guide £750,000

A stunning & beautiful, extensively renovated and much enhanced 5 double bedroom, 3 bath/shower room Georgian style early Victorian period family house, circa 3,500 sq. ft., with driveway parking for 2 cars, roof terrace & 45ft semi open-plan kitchen/dining/living room with sliding doors opening to 65ft south-west facing rear garden. No chain makes for a straightforward move.

REDLAND

guide £1,495,000

A most attractive and well-located 5 double bedroom, 3 reception room Close to so many amenities: Whiteladies Road, Clifton Down station & Cotham Hill shops nearby and Edwardian semi-detached family home situated on the sunny side of this within easy reach of the Downs & city centre, BBC, Hospitals & University Hub. EPC: D desirable road located close to Durdham Downs. EPC: D

WESTBURY PARK

guide £1,000,000

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


Clifton ÂŁ300,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

One bedroom apartment A one double bedroom hall floor garden apartment set in the Grade II listed Property situated between Clifton Village and the Triangle being sold with no onward chain. EPC - C

oceanhome.co.uk

Ocean November.indd 1

Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Henbury ÂŁ255,000

Three bedroom house This contemporary decorated family home has undergone much restoration and updating in the last 25 years. The heart of the house is the kitchen dining area, which measures almost 19 feet wide, it gives access to the conservatory and to the living room which has a bay front. EPC - D

22/10/2018 10:46


Harbourside ÂŁ500,000

Two bedroom penthouse apartment A luxurious and spacious penthouse forming part of a beautiful and historic Grade II listed building, built circa 1823, once Bristol and Clifton Oil & Gas Company. Sympathetically refurbished to a high specification, located on the North side of the Harbourside within easy access of Clifton Village and the City Centre. EPC - D

Westbury-on-Trym ÂŁ550,000 Three bedroom house

A well-presented and characterful 1930s, three bedroom semidetached family home positioned on a quiet side road with level access to Westbury-on-Trym shops and amenities. Positioned within close proximity to Henbury Golf Course and Blaise Castle Estate and offering good access to the M4 and M5 motorways. EPC - E

Ocean November.indd 2

22/10/2018 10:46


Bristol’s Independent Estate Agents

St Andrews £850,000

Clifton £450,000

We are delighted to offer this beautifully restored Edwardian 4 bedroom semi-detached family home. No attention to detail has been spared and the currently owner has clearly invested time, money and a great deal of attention into every aspect of this utterly stunning home. EPC - E

This Impressive, stylish first floor three bedroom apartment set in an attractive building within a few minutes of Whiteladies Road. Attractively presented throughout the flat also has an allocated parking space. EPC - D

Clifton £335,000

Westbury Park £285,000

A well-presented 2 bedroom purpose built ground floor garden flat, boasts a south westerly facing enclosed private garden, allocated parking space and spacious maintained communal gardens. EPC - C

A character two bedroom top floor apartment with allocated parking space set in a highly convenient location on the Redland/Westbury Park borders. EPC- E

TEL: 0117 974 1741 61 Apsley Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2SW

Leese & Nagle November.indd 1

sales@leeseandnagle.co.uk

22/10/2018 10:47


www.leeseandnagle.co.uk

Westbury on Trym

Guide Price £625,000

This nearly 1500 sq. ft. 3-bedroom semi-detached family home located a quiet cul-de-sac, primarily in the Elmlea school catchment. This home has huge potential with the possibility to extend to the side, rear and roof space subject to obtaining necessary consents. The larger than average room sizes for this design of house makes it ideal for families. EPC - D

Westbury on Trym Guide Price £610,000

Coombe Dingle Guide Price £550,000

Brentry £365,000

This immaculate 3 bedroom 1930s semi-detached family home is offered to the market for this fist time in over 40 years. The property has been looked after during the current vendors ownership and has a wonderfully well stocked garden. Stoke Grove is an extremely popular road due to its proximity to Elmlea Primary School. EPC - D

We are pleased to offer this stunning 5 bedroom semi-detached family home. The development was built circa 2014 and has been extremely popular over the years, giving a modern lifestyle in a quiet area of BS9 with superb links. The property has been improved and provides all of the modern utilities that growing families seek. EPC - B

This is a fine example of a 4 bedroom semi-detached family home in a lovely cul-de-sac location. It has been cherished by its current owners and would lend itself to a wide range of buyers. A truly wonderful property which will be of interest to an array of buyers. Viewing highly recommended. EPC - D

TEL: 0117 962 2299

125 Stoke Lane, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS9 3RW

Leese & Nagle November.indd 2

wot@leeseandnagle.co.uk

22/10/2018 14:40


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The Bristol Magazine November 2018  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol

The Bristol Magazine November 2018  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol