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ISSUE 200 MAY 2019

thebathmag.co.uk £3.95 where sold

SAY HELLO Marc Almond on his musical heroes THE ART OF ILLUSTRATION Lauren Child at the Holburne FAB-ULOUS FRINGE The arts festival with community at its heart PIONEERING PUB Tantalising flavours at the Marlborough Tavern TAKE IT TO THE FLOOR Tales from Bath Abbey’s ledger stones A SPECIAL EDITION

THE BATH FESTIVAL A 24-page essential guide to this year’s best literature, cultural and music events

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O NTHLY GUIDE TO LIFE AND LIVING IN BATH


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32 Jess Gillam: Robin Clewley Photography The Vain Princess: Lauren Child

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Contents 5 THINGS

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PUB BY THE PARK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Essential events to look forward to this month

Joe Cussens on the Marlborough Tavern’s growing profile

TAINTED LOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

INDISPENSABLE TWERTON

Melissa Blease talks to singer-songwriter Marc Almond

Catherine Pitt investigates the area’s rich history

WHAT’S ON

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Our guide to the top events happening around the city

PUSHING ARTISTIC BOUNDARIES

BATH AT WORK

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60

Neill Menneer’s photographic portrait of puppeteer Andrew Hume

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WONDERFUL WATERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Highlights from the Bath Fringe and Fringe Arts Bath

Discover the great outdoors of the south west lakes

I WILL NOT EVER NEVER EAT A TOMATO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

GREEN MATTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86

Illustrator and author Lauren Child comes to the Holburne Museum

Crystal Rose on the local heroes championing sustainable beauty

WALK THE WALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

COVER FEATURE TIME TO FIESTA!

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Andrew Swift’s country stroll from West Dean to Salisbury

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A go-to guide to The Bath Festival’s programme, featuring interviews with Jess Gillam, Hothouse Flowers, Elizabeth Day and much more

AHEAD OF THE CURVE

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Clair Strong embraces curvy interiors

VICTORIAN VOGUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

SCENTS FOR ALL SEASONS

Jessica Hope peeks at the Fashion Museum’s new permanent display

Gardener Jane Moore picks her favourite fragrant shrubs

CITY ART

HOT PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

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The finest homes to buy or rent

The latest art exhibitions from around the city

CREATIVE STUDIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 A look at the arts trails and open studios around Larkhall, Newbridge, Bear Flat and Widcombe

Even more great content and updates online: thebathmag.co.uk

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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

ON THE COVER

The Bath Festival brings the very best from the worlds of literature, culture and music to the city from 17–26 May. Plus don’t miss the Finale Weekend on 1–2 June at The Recreation Ground; thebathfestival.org.uk

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine

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Facehats by Amelia Holman, part of Fringe Arts Bath, 24 May at FaB 3, 15 New Bond Street; fringeartsbath.co.uk

EDITOR’S PICKS

WHAT DO THESE WOMEN HAVE IN COMMON? Why, they are both taking a starring role at The Bath Festival. See page xiv–xv of The Bath Festival special for more. bathfestivals.org.uk

from the

EDITOR Editor photograph by Matthew Sterling

T

his is our bicentennial issue. Yes, indeed, that’s 200, and what a way we’ve come. There’s no sitting back filing nails, mind you, because we’re still enthusiastically waving multiple flags to celebrate all the very best things about Bath. Our 200th issue is no exception. The major excitement is in the form of our 24-page special on The Bath Festival (following page 34), which runs from 17–26 May with the finale weekend on 1–2 June. We are delighted to be the festival’s media partner and our interviewees include saxophonist Jess Gillam (page iv–v) who talks to Jessica Hope about making big musical waves at the age of just 20; Mark Kermode (page xii) who tells me that his love of music is as intense as his love of films; and director and producer Alastair Fothergill who is coming to the festival to talk about his groundbreaking documentary Our Planet. On the food scene, the Angry Chef will be at the festival, and talks to Melissa Blease about the need to challenge some of the pervading food trends that surround us. We’ve also asked four Bathonians to name the events that they are most looking forward to – and it’s testament to the diverse selection that there were no cross-overs in their choices. Their recommendations include poetry from Holly McNish; Austentatious, the improvised comedy conjuring up a ‘lost’ Jane Austen novel; the Song Play event, The Lure of Hollywood in Film and Song; and the ambient sounds and cinematic moods of multiinstrumentalist, producer and composer Roger Eno. Arts abound in May, not just with the festival, but with local artists and craftspeople opening up their studios (see page 46). This month also sees the arrival of The Fringe and Fringe Arts Bath (Fab), which is presenting some pretty eccentric and noteworthy shows and performances, including Size Matters, a big exhibition of tiny work; 21st-Century Neanderthal exploring the world of online dating; and a new piece of immersive site-specific theatre called Dr YaYa and Mafia Wedding. There’s also an exhibition of Lauren Child’s colourful characters and intricate work at the Holburne Museum, which opens on 2 May and Jessica Hope talks to Lauren on page 32. One more name drop, as Melissa Blease chats to Marc Almond, previously of Soft Cell, who is performing at The Forum on 8 May, in a gig celebrating his musical heroes, including Charles Aznavour, Lou Reed and Marc Bolan. May is going to keep us all super-busy and constantly stimulated.

Emma Clegg Editor All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

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IT’S GOOD TO FAIL

Author and journalist Elizabeth Day is coming to Bath on 19 May to explain why her failures – including not fitting in at school, unsuccessful relationships, even a divorce – has given her a much richer life. She launched a chart-topping How To Fail podcast last year, where she discusses three life failures nominated by her guests, and her recent memoir has become a Sunday Times top-five bestseller. See pages viii–ix of the Bath Festival special for our interview with Elizabeth. bathfestivals.org.uk

MARSH MARIGOLD

The marsh marigold (Caltha palustris), also known as kingcup, thrives in ponds, marshes, damp meadows, ditches and wet woodland. A member of the buttercup family, it provides good shelter for frogs in a wildlife pond and early nectar for insects. An old wives tale says that marsh marigolds add the yellow colour to butter, as they are a favourite of grazing cows.

ILLUSTRATION BY JANET COLLETT The Bath Society of Botanical Artists; bsba.co.uk

that it’s not my fault ❝ Sheif Iknows don’t know how many Zs there are in LOSER ❞

LAUREN CHILD, CLARICE BEAN SPELLS TROUBLE


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5

ZEITGEIST

things to do in

May

Get festive

Explore The Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution has teamed up with The Nelson Society and the World Heritage Fund to bring guided walks around the city which focus on the life of Admiral Lord Nelson (1758–1805), who frequently visited Bath while recuperating from illness and battle injuries. Discover some of the key locations that he visited on these hour-long tours which take place on 11 May, 8 and 22 June, 11am, beginning at the BRLSI. £5 adults, free for children. Book through Bath Box Office; bathboxoffice.org.uk

Birds in the Hand by Yvonne Elston

Create Cracking cheese Gromit! Carrot Productions have teamed up with Aardman, the creators of the much-loved animation Wallace and Gromit, to offer modelmaking workshops where you can try creating your very own Gromit at The Forum on 31 May (12.30pm, 3.30pm and 5pm). Suitable for ages 7+, £10pp. There’s also two exciting showings of Wallace and Gromit’s Musical Marvels on the same day (2pm and 6.30pm), where Wallace prepares to perform his musical masterpiece My Concerto in Ee Lad – what could possibly go wrong? Tickets from £14; bathforum.co.uk

Wander Discover something new this month as the city’s popular art trails kick off. More than 180 artists and makers will open their doors to showcase their original work and give demonstrations, allowing visitors to walk from studio to studio, exploring the creativity on offer around the city. The Larkhall Open Studios begins on 4–6 May, followed by the Newbridge Arts Trail on 11–12 May. Then the Bear Flat Artists Open Studios takes place from 25–27 May, before the Widcombe Art Trail concludes the events on 22–23 June. See page 46 for more on the artists involved; bathopenstudios.co.uk

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MOBO Award-winning singer Corinne Bailey Rae will be at the Finale Weekend

Admire

Triple layered cream embroidered net pelerine collar with pendant squared ends, about 1827

A new permanent display is opening at the Fashion Museum on 17 May, drawing on the museum’s outstanding collection of historical fashionable dress. Collection Stories brings to life the fascinating tales of some of the incredible items dating from the 19th century which have previously been hidden in the archives. Plus, a new display, Fashion Focus, also opens this month, featuring an enchanting collection of antique dolls. Turn to page 38 to find out more; fashionmuseum.co.uk n

Wallace and Gromit © TM Aardman/W&G Ltd. All rights reserved

Section from colour Mezzotint. Wellcome Collection. CC BY4

The fatal wounding of Lord Nelson on the deck of HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar

Word on the street is that there’s a festival in town – and a pretty epic-sounding one at that. The Bath Festival returns this month (17–26 May) for its celebration of all things literature and music, with a programme bursting with big names from the world of culture. Bag your tickets now for talks by the likes of Melvyn Bragg, Jo Brand and Sara Cox; laugh your socks off with Austentatious; or have a boogie to the music of Roger Eno or Lankum. And don’t miss the almighty Finale Weekend (1–2 June), where the Bath Recreation Ground will host two days of toe-tapping music from the likes of legendary Van Morrison, Grammy Award-winning Clean Bandit and Corinne Bailey Rae. To find out more, we’ve got a whole host of interviews and information about the festival in our special supplement from page 34; thebathfestival.org.uk


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The city

ist

THE BUZZ THE BUZZ A swift return The swifts that spend their nesting period from May to August in the buildings of Bath have now returned from central Africa. The breeding swift population in the UK has plummeted since 1995 as building refurbishment has blocked access to traditional nest sites in eaves and roofs. The RSPB Bath Swift Group are carrying out a survey in the Bath area, so sightings of parties of swifts will be welcomed. Email David Robertson (dirobertson43@gmail.com) for your observations to be recorded. If there are swifts in your locality, make contact if you would like to install a nest box – these replace some of the lost nest sites and help sustain the numbers of breeding birds. Swifts will return to the same nest site each year, delighting us with their excited calls and acrobatic displays.

Bath and The Titanic

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Mark Langley is head of Bath School of Music and Performing Arts and the artistic director of Bath Spa Productions, who produce Sparkfest – an inspiring programme of theatre, music and dance I live in Southdown in a little Victorian terrace – an old market gardener’s cottage. Just right for me, near enough to work but far enough to get away at the end of a long day. I’m from South Yorkshire originally where I first started acting and, after studying in York, moved into directing opera, plays and musicals. I spent a large part of my childhood singing, performing and enjoying theatre. I love the light on the stone in Bath and it really is warmer down here. I was in Glasgow on Saturday morning and got off the train in Bath seven hours later and realised I’ve got used to it being warm. I like strolling around town but my absolute treat is a trip out to the Courts Garden in Holt. I love the flowers and tranquility of that garden. I like Prior Park for the same reason. When it comes to architecture, you can’t beat the Circus and the Royal Crescent for their grandeur and sweep, but a few years back I staged The Beggars’ Opera in the Old Theatre Royal. It’s now the Masonic Hall, but I love tracing the history of how the space worked as a theatre and, like all the best places in Bath, it is tucked away off the sidestreet.

On 14 April 1912, RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic. On 9 May, Bryan Chalker, former councillor and mayor of Bath, will give a talk on The Titanic and her links to Bath at the Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution. Chalker has researched the history of the ship, its passengers, and its Bath links. One passenger, Edwina ‘Winnie’ Celia Troutt was born and raised in Bath. When the ship hit the iceberg she boarded life boat number 16 and recalls hearing the ship’s band play Nearer My God to Thee as it sank. Tickets £5 on the door, £2 for members and students. brlsi.org

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I trained as an actor but once I got past my teens I never planned to be one – I got bored too soon. I was more interested in how you make the work, so I got into directing, especially opera which is still my great love. I studied drama at St. John’s in York largely because in those days all directors had degrees. When I was in my last year at university I got my first professional directing job. I had a clear sense of what I was doing and why during my drama course, but the surprise was the modules I took in phonetics – which have been of considerable importance in my career. They let me work as a voice coach. The blend of the dialect and accent work, being an actor with good voice work and a director meant that for me voice coaching

was always a really good blend of skills. I got to work with lots of great actors and singers, so had an insight into them as performers. I can speak in just about any dialect and accent after some practice, but really it’s about how I train actors to do it. My job is to break down the rules that govern the accent and make them accessible for actors in an easy-to-understand way. There is an easy flow between being a director, a coach and a teacher – the tricky thing is the management side, which fills up most of my time, but that is where you have to have a bit of vision and charisma to drive things through. “Don’t get things wrong,” would be my motto. Being a voice coach is like being a priest. It’s almost confessional, as you see the actors at their most vulnerable. My best memories are flying out to Hollywood to coach AnnMargret for a film she was shooting back in the UK. Iain Glenn was the one actor who made me work really hard, because he was so much of a perfectionist and I was so impressed by him. But my fondest memory has to be whenever I listen to the recording of Spend! Spend! Spend! and can hear Barbara Dickson still doing the accent I taught her. I’m the artistic director of Bath Spa Productions, which produces Sparkfest. I’m assisted by Kerry Irvine, my exceptionally talented producer, and together our job is to make sure that the shows go on, and as many people as possible see it. We just want to share the excellent quality of work that the students produce. Apart from Sparkfest, I’m interested this year in the Iford Opera production of Die Fledermaus, and, as always, Party in the City, which opens The Bath Festival. It’s one of the times when the students can make a lot of noise and everybody wants to hear it. ■ Sparkfest runs from 10 May – 17 June; sparkfest.co.uk


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ist

News from around the city

Music of the forest

Forest Live, a major outdoor live music series held by Forestry Commission England, will be taking place this summer in Westonbirt Arboretum, near Tetbury, Gloucestershire – one of seven beautiful woodland arenas being used across the country. The concerts are renowned for their informal and relaxed atmosphere within a spectacular forest backdrop. Money raised from ticket sales helps to look after the nation’s forests sustainably, for people to enjoy and wildlife to thrive. This year’s headline acts at Westonbirt Arboretum are Stereophonics (13 June), Paul Weller (14 June), Jack Savoretti and The Wandering Hearts (15 June), and Hacienda Classical (16 June). forestryengland.uk/music.

The inspirations and aspirations of fashion designers and textile artists Charles and Patricia Lester are the subject of an illustrated talk on 14 May at The Gainsborough Bath Spa hotel. Discover how they carved their own path, creating original pieces that celebrate colour and individuality. Charles and Patricia will explain their creative journey within the fashion industry, from making and selling children’s clothes to seeing their clothes worn by icons of the worlds of film and opera. £30 including a two-course lunch in the 3AA Rosettes restaurant, Dan Moon at The Gainsborough. Book on 01225 358888.

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Do you fancy playing a ‘casualty’ and experiencing an open-water rescue by a Newfoundland dog on 8 June? All while making a real difference to patients and families at the Royal United Hospitals Bath? You will be suited up, taken out into Portishead Quays Marina by boat and then asked to jump in… but it won’t be long before an incredible 14-stone, four-legged, hairy hero tows you safely back to the boat. There will also be a chance for photos with your rescuer. The day will be run by the incredible team at Newfound Friends UK and their welltrained and beautiful Newfoundland dogs on behalf of The Forever Friends Appeal. Registration £30, and participants are asked to raise a minimum of £100 for a campaign close to their heart at the RUH. foreverfriendsappeal.co.uk

Independent initiative

The joy of colour

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The Herschel Museum of Astronomy’s Wonder Women of Space budget exhibition has been rated one of the best in the country. by The Museums and Heritage Awards. The exhibition has been shortlisted in the category of projects with a limited budget achieving the biggest impact. Wonder Women of Space, a one-room exhibition, was funded by a small Bath and North East Somerset Council Heritage Grant. The exhibition focused on female space heroines, showing how these role models inspire young people today and change the way we see the world. bath-preservation-trust.org.uk

Bath’s hidden bath Archaeologists have begun re-excavating a hidden Roman bath at the Roman Baths. First discovered 130 years ago, the bath was excavated and then quickly backfilled with only very simple recording taking place, so no-one really knows what it looks like. Measuring 4 x 5 metres, it is one of eight baths known at the Roman Baths site, sited beneath York Street next to the main suite of baths. Stephen Clews, manager of the Roman Baths, said: “The excavation is part of the most significant archaeological investigations to have taken place here for more than 30 years. It is helping us to build a picture of what was happening on the south side of the site, where it has been very difficult to gain access to in the past.” The excavation is part of a wider programme taking place as part of the National Lottery funded Archway Project. romanbaths.co.uk/archway

Singing Donizetti

Iford Arts, the renowned opera festival, which attracts visitors from around the world, has just announced the cast for their production of Donizetti’s timeless, muchloved Italian comedy L’elisir d’amore. Robert Lewis will play Nemorino, the infatuated village boy and Claire Lees will play Adina, the wealthy object of his affection. They are joined by Matthew Durkan as Nemorino’s love rival, the selfimportant Belcore and Iúnó Connolly as Giannetta. The production opens on 31 August at Belcombe Court, Bradford on Avon and runs until 7 September. ifordarts.org.uk; Book via Bath Box Office


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You’ve got to have a dream Our roving reporter celebrates the spirit of entrepreneurship in Bath

W

hen our son was a student, struggling to make ends meet and tired of shovelling popcorn for punters at his local cinema to supplement his income, he was always coming up with ways to improve his lot in life. He once proposed to Spice Girl Geri Halliwell at a book signing and her acceptance and agreeing that she would live off his student loan cheered him up for weeks. Then he saw an advert for an ice-cream van for sale and he came to us, his parents, for advice. Well, we said sagely, it would certainly be enterprising of you to spend your weekends standing inside a hot van at beauty spots selling 99s with a flake on top. But we had heard vaguely about the ice-cream mafia showing their disapproval of rogue sellers trying to bag the best-selling sites. Would he and his Strawberry Mivvis be safe from harassment, we asked? And on rainy days people might not be in a hurry to buy Fab lollies, so how would he be able to make the repayments on the van? And then we looked at the selling price of said ice-cream van – it looked suspiciously cheap, we said. Ah, he replied, that’s because they’ve taken the freezer unit out. Then came the sound of parent smiting palm to forehead. Undaunted, our son has since gone on to busk successfully in Bath and Kingston-on-Thames, front a band which gigs regularly and to study for and pass an MSc while holding down a full-time job. So the spirit to succeed was always there in him, it just needed to find the right direction. Our window cleaner has a similar urge to be his own boss. He doesn’t let a little thing like not having a vehicle, or owning a card machine to process payments stand in his way. He walks for miles on his rounds, carrying his ladder, mop and bucket from street to street and cheerfully cleaning the gull droppings from householders’ windows. If you’re not in when he calls, he cleans your windows anyway and leaves a note saying he’s been and that you owe him. He never signs the note with his name or leaves a phone number or email address, but he always gets his cash even if it’s weeks later. He may not be the next Richard Branson, but he seems happy enough. I know another entrepreneur in Bath who, every time I see her, tells me all about the latest money-making scheme she’s thrown herself into. She never quite makes the fortune that she intended but her enthusiasm remains undimmed and I can’t help feeling that it’s the thrill of the chase that keeps her going. Like Del Boy she’s got the mantra ‘this time next year we’ll be millionaires.’ There are loads of entrepreneurs in Bath and I take my hat off to them. These are the bold ones, the people who spent their free time scribbling business plans on the backs of old envelopes, who are willing to commit their life’s savings and mortgage themselves up to the hilt because they believe their dreams can come true. These are the people who make the jump from being someone else’s wage slave, to becoming company director of their own empire, no matter how small. They are the ones who have that lightbulb moment – whether it be to open a deli or start making naturally scented candles – and to pursue that vision, come hell or high water. And when the rest of us are out and about enjoying the luxury of two bank holidays in May, spare a thought for our entrepreneurs. They’ll be the ones working the weekends, keeping their shops open all hours in the hope that we’ll call in and spend our money. They’ll be updating their website, trawling through their accounts to make the columns add up, or telling their children they plan to take them on holiday, but meanwhile could they just sweep the shop floor or empty the bins. Maybe during the May bank holidays you’ll have your own entrepreneurial vision and, should that happen, I hope your hard work is rewarded and your dreams become a reality. n

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ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING RINGS HANDMADE BESPOKE JEWELLERY REPAIRS AND REMODELLING

9ct white Gold and multi stone necklace. £475

9ct rose gold ring set with citrine, smokey quartz and blue tourmaline. £195

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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

See more online thebathmag.co.uk

Contact us: Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Editor Tel: Email:

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Financial Director Email:

Jane Miklos jane@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebathmagazine.co.uk

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The Bath Magazine and The Bristol Magazine are published by MC Publishing Ltd. The Bath Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout Bath and the surrounding area. We also have special distribution units in the following city centre stores and coffee shops

2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Telephone: 01225 424499. Fax: 01225 426677 www.thebathmag.co.uk Š MC Publishing Ltd 2019 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bath Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.

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DESIGNER COLLECTIONS HANDMADE BESPOKE JEWELLERY REPAIRS AND REMODELLING

NEW Alex Monroe Oceans collection, now available in store

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MUSIC | INTERVIEW

SAY HELLO...

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MUSIC | INTERVIEW

...TO MARC ALMOND

Tainted Love; Bedsitter; Say Hello, Wave Goodbye; Where Did Our Love Go? – the hits just kept coming for synthpop duo Soft Cell, vocalist Marc Almond and instrumentalist David Ball, in the early 1980s and then again in the noughties after the band reformed. Melissa Blease talks to Marc Almond, who is appearing at The Forum on 8 May

The gig will be a joyous evening of all sorts of things, including songs celebrating my musical heroes – Charles Aznavour, Jacques Brel, Scott Walker, Lou Reed, Marc Bolan

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ith a career that spans over four decades under his belt, English singer, songwriter and musician Marc Almond is arguably one of British popular culture’s most creatively diverse, prolific mavericks: a vanguard visionary with an audacious appetite for artistic expansion. Born in Southport, Lancashire in 1957, Almond and David Ball – the other half of synthpop duo Soft Cell, established in 1977 when the pair met at Leeds Polytechnic – provided the soundtrack to many a hedonistic, misspent youth. Their 1981 version of Gloria Jones’ cult Northern Soul classic Tainted Love remains the ultimate, evocative dancefloor hit, while their platinum-selling debut album Non-Stop Erotic Cabaret offers a compelling aural insight into the lives of UK Generation X. By the time Soft Cell disbanded in 1984, Almond had already started diversifying, having formed Marc and the Mambas – a loose, experimental collective – two years previously. He recorded his first solo album Vermin in Ermine in 1984, Stories of Johnny in 1985, Mother Fist and Her Five Daughters in 1987 and The Stars We Are in 1988, which included Almond’s version of Gene Pitney’s Something’s Gotten Hold of My Heart, which he later re-recorded as a duet with Pitney himself. He’s recorded an album of dark French chanson cover versions alongside poems by Rimbaud and Baudelaire set to music (Absinthe, 1993) and an album of Jacques Brel songs (Jacques, 1989.) He’s collaborated with a diverse list of artistes including Nick Cave, Siouxsie, Jools Holland, Matt Johnson, Bronski Beat and PJ Proby. He’s switched musical styles, record labels and managers multiple times, kicked a decadelong catalogue of addictions to the kerb with rehab therapy... and written about all of it in his engagingly frank 1999 autobiography Tainted Life (a second autobiography In Search of The Pleasure Palace followed in 2004, itself followed by three books of verse). In October 2004, he suffered a near-fatal motorbike accident which resulted in serious head injuries, multiple breaks and fractures, a collapsed lung, damaged hearing and posttraumatic stress disorder. He later became a patron of brain trauma charity Headway, and in 2018 he was awarded an OBE for

Services to Art and Culture... and all of this is merely an edited version of a fascinating career that holds multi-generational, enduring appeal. So, to bring us bang up-todate with Almond’s adventures... This month, Almond will bring his solo show to The Forum, Bath – but in terms of inspiration for the set list, he’ll have more than a few friends accompanying him. “The gig will be a joyous evening of all sorts of things, including songs celebrating my musical heroes – Charles Aznavour, Jacques Brel, Scott Walker, Lou Reed, Marc Bolan,” he says. “Brel and Aznavour are two remarkable songwriters, and true storytellers; they both continue to inspire and influence me. Sadly, I never met Scott Walker, which seems odd now [Walker died in March of this year]. He gave me so much inspiration; I even modelled myself on him during the Soft Cell years – that hair cut, and those dark glasses. His legacy is his remarkable voice, that stands out as one of the greatest. Of my many collaborations, though, my most memorable was probably Gene Pitney, who was a real gentleman and star; we met for the first time in Las Vegas, which was extraordinary. Marc Bolan holds a special place in my heart too, for both him and Bowie were the soundtracks of my growing up.” While Almond has provided the soundtrack for many lives, his own life has been far from struggle-free; one Telegraph journalist told him that his overwhelming thought having finished reading Tainted Life, was “how is this man still alive?”...to which Almond responded, “sometimes, I wonder that myself.” So what makes Almond, who celebrated his 60th birthday

last year, sad or happy today? “Politics, the current UK government and the hypocrisy of people sadden, disappoint and frustrate me, but Ricky Gervais has filled my life with laughter and joy,” he says. “In terms of places that make me happy, Russia is very special to me, for so many reasons and because of so many people. I’ve had a 30year relationship with Russia and there are so many adventures and stories about that relationship to share, but ultimately it’s about the genuine warmth and generosity within ordinary Russian people that I find remarkable: their indomitable spirit, their extraordinary view of life and death, their connection to the land and their country. I always think of going back to Russia as a kind of going home.” Staying on the subject of being happy and being at home, Almond says that, were he to host the dinner party of his dreams, his fantasy guests would be the fascinating French singer Dalida; inimitable English actor, raconteur and diarist Kenneth Williams; American silver screen icons Gloria Swanson and Lana Turner... and Ricky Gervais, the only one on the list who could actually make the date, given that the others are, sadly, no longer with us. And what does Almond think that he as an 18-year-old, would have said to his grownup self when he received his OBE last year? “It would have been inconceivable to me that I would ever be accepted by the establishment – grown-up me didn’t know what to say when I was told about it!” Would 18-year-old Almond have said something, perhaps, that he would regret today? “Regrets are a complete waste of time,” he says. “Life is too short to be unhappy – we don’t have to be defined by the things we did or didn’t do in our past.” As to how his future is shaping up, Almond is currently putting the finishing touches to a brand-new studio album due for release in February of next year: “It’s really different,” he says; “I hope people will like it as much as I do.” And of the forthcoming tour? “I’ll be sharing many of the most popular songs from my catalogue. Expect a night of hits and surprises. Expect to have a great time.” The time of our life, in fact? I expect so. n

Marc Almond will visit The Forum, Bath on 8 May: bathforum.co.uk

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WHAT’S ON in May The Modern Cheesemaker, aka Morgan McGlynn, will be chatting all things dairy at Toppings

Gyles Brandreth will be breaking a leg at Komedia

THE COMEDY ABOUT A BANK ROBBERY n Until 4 May, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath Ocean’s Eleven meets the Marx Brothers in this dynamite new comedy which is now enjoying its third year in the West End. The Comedy About A Bank Robbery is the latest fast and fabulous comedy by the brains behind the Olivier Award-winning Best New Comedy The Play That Goes Wrong. A priceless diamond has been entrusted to the security guards who are on the take. Can it be safely stored or will it all go horribly wrong?From £24.50; theatreroyal.org.uk REMEMBERING THE MOVIES n 1 May, 7.30pm, The Forum Strictly’s very own Aljaz and Janette are back on tour with their brand new show Remembering the Movies. If you loved their Remembering Fred show then get ready for a remarkable, unique and star-studded rollercoaster ride through some of the most successful, Oscar-winning and most memorable films of all time. From the Golden Age of Hollywood through to the modern mega musical, enjoy tributes to Audrey Hepburn, Saturday Night Fever, Gene Kelly, The Greatest Showman, Marilyn Monroe, La La Land, James Bond, Cabaret and many more... From £25; bathforum.co.uk THE FINEST OF EARTH: SELLING PORCELAIN AT 18TH CENTURY CANTON n 3 May, 7pm, BRLSI In the 18th century, Canton was the place to go for Europeans to buy porcelain. Dr Hui Tang’s talk draws attention to porcelain shops in Canton, describing what they looked like and how deals were done at the shops between Chinese merchants and European traders. £6/£4; brlsi.org 22 TheBATHMagazine

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Joanne Clifton and Ben Adams star in The Rocky Horror Show at Theatre Royal Bath

THE MODERN CHEESEMAKER n 3 May, 8pm, Topping and Co Booksellers, The Paragon Calling all cheese lovers! Get ready for an evening of tastings and an insight into the craft of artisan cheesemaking with Morgan McGlynn, one of the youngest women in the business. Aged 22 she opened her own shop, Muswell Hill Cheeses, and she is Sunday Brunch’s resident cheese expert on Channel 4, as well as the cheese adviser for Harrods, Selfridges and Fortnum & Mason. £10/£25 includes book; toppingbooks.co.uk THE BLUEJAYS – ROCK AND ROLL REVOLUTION n 3 May, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre Be transported back to the rocking ’50s with The Bluejays – the UK’s leading 1950s rock’n’roll band playing the biggest hits of Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, The Everly Brothers, Eddie Cochran and many more. £18.50/£20; chapelarts.org CONJURORS, CARDSHARPS AND CONMEN n 4 May and 1 June, 7pm and 9pm, The Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel Join two of London’s finest magicians – Tony Middleton ‘Sonic’ and Dominick Zwolinski – stars of the sell-out show Sleight of Hand on the Strand’s Savoy Hotel, for a new show at the five-star Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel. Discover impossible illusions, forgotten feats and intriguing stories from magic’s past. Suitable for families. £30/£40; bathmagicshow.com JOSHUA BURNELL AND BAND n 4 May, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre After releasing a folk song every week for a year, five-star reviews, BBC Radio 2 spins and a roaringly successful festival run, Joshua Burnell and his six-piece band are taking the show on the road. They’ve set feet

stomping and heads banging with riotous fiddle tunes, electric guitars and a healthy dose of distorted Hammond organ thrown in for good measure. £12.50/£14; chapelarts.org GYLES BRANDRETH: BREAK A LEG! n 5 May, 5pm, Komedia They say all political careers end in tears. In Brandreth’s case it’s tears of laughter as the actor, author, ex-MP, One Show reporter and QI, Have I Got News For You and Countdown star is back on tour with his new show celebrating all things theatrical. Without hesitation or repetition (and just a touch of deviation), Just a Minute regular Gyles delivers dazzling wit, wisdom, high drama, low comedy, and hilarious namedropping. £20; komedia.co.uk BIG GREEN DAY n 6 May, 2–5pm, St Stephen’s Church, Lansdown Road, Bath To celebrate some 13 years of restoring the church’s gardens, there will be a community event with live music, a Gardeners’ Question panel, children’s games, bell-ringing, tea and cakes. There will also be a guided tour of the church featuring its spectacular Victorian architecture, Art Nouveau designs and stained glass windows, plus more. Free entry. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW n 6–11 May, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath Richard O’Brien’s legendary rock’n’roll musical returns to the UK as part of a sellout worldwide tour, having now been seen by over 30 million theatre-goers. Squeaky clean college kids Brad and Janet have a twist of fate when their car breaks down outside a creepy mansion, and they meet the charismatic Dr Frank’n’Furter. It’s an adventure they’ll never forget… Starring World and European Champion ballroom dancer and former Strictly Come Dancing


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CULTURAL FILM SCREENINGS n Throughout May, The Little Theatre Cinema, Bath This month’s selection features the beautiful Tony® Awardwinning Broadway musical An American in Paris, presented from the West End, on 7 May. The Met Opera Live presents Poulenc’s masterpiece Dialogues Des Carmelites on 11 and 17 May, and there’s also a dog-friendly screening of Pick of the Litter on 12 May. Academy Award-winner Sally Field, Bill Pullman, Jenna Coleman and Colin Morgan star in Arthur Miller’s blistering drama All My Sons, broadcast live from The Old Vic on 14 May. Watch the Bolshoi Ballet as they present Carmen Suite and Petrushka on 19 May, and there will be a host of new films on show including Tolkien, Woman at War and Rocketman. See the full programme online; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little

professional Joanne Clifton and Ben Adams, member of the BRIT Award-winning boyband a1. Tickets from £16.50; theatreroyal.org.uk RMS TITANIC AND HER LINKS TO BATH n 9 May, 7.30pm, BRLSI On 14 April 1912, RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic. Former Mayor of Bath Bryan Chalker has researched the dreadful event and will reveal how the ship had several links to Bath, not least with Stothert and Pitt cranes and Bathonian Edwina ‘Winnie’ Celia Troutt, who survived the ship’s sinking and devoted her long life commemorating those who lost their lives that night. £5/£2; brlsi.org DS:UK: IN TRIBUTE TO DIRE STRAITS n 9 May, 7.30pm, Komedia dS:uK brings the experience of one of Dire Straits’ most iconic concerts and albums, Alchemy, to Bath in this tribute show. Playing the Love Over Gold concert in its entirety, dS:uK will play selected hits such as Tunnel of Love, Romeo and Juliet and Private Investigations. Early bird tickets £16; komedia.co.uk; direstraitstribute.co.uk EMMA STEVENS n 9 May, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre British singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Emma Stevens first picked up a guitar at the age of two and has since learnt cello, piano, banjo, ukulele and mandolin. Playing the majority of the instruments on her albums herself, Emma has achieved four consecutive play-listed singles on BBC Radio 2, extensive international radio play in the UK, Europe and Australia, and has supported The Feeling, Take That, Wet Wet Wet, and Simply Red to name just a few. £12/£14; chapelarts.org HENRY VIII AND THE MEN WHO MADE HIM n 10 May, 12pm, Theatre Royal Bath Henry VIII is well known for his tumultuous relationships with women, but what do we see if we look at the men in his life? Historian and joint chief curator of Historic Royal Palaces Tracy Borman explores Henry’s relationships with the men who surrounded him in this talk and reveals how they influenced his beliefs, behaviour and character. £10, or £25 including lunch; theatreroyal.org.uk SAM SWEENEY: THE UNFINISHED VIOLIN n 10 May, 7.30pm, Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon A veteran of Bellowhead, artistic director of the National Youth Folk Ensemble, founder member of trio Leveret, and an awardwinning instrumentalist at the forefront of the revival in English traditional music, Sam Sweeney released his first solo album, The Unfinished Violin, last year. The sometimes mournful, often hopeful, tunes on his record reimagine and reclaim some of the Continued page 24

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WHAT’S | ON

The Bluejays will be rocking out at Chapel Arts Centre

Listen to the beautiful melodies of Sam Sweeney at Wiltshire Music Centre

The Kingdom Choir is coming to The Forum

SPARKFEST n 10 May – 15 June, venues around Bath Innovative theatre, dance, music and the world premiere of a stage production of modern classic The Girl of Ink and Stars feature in a festival created by graduating creative students from Bath Spa University. Sparkfest, in partnership with The Bath Festival, offers five weeks of live performances in Burdall’s Yard and at other city venues, as well as pop-up appearances on the streets of Bath. See the full programme online; bathspalive.com LONDON MOZART PLAYERS: RELAXED CONCERT n 11 May, 2pm, Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon An inclusive performance of classical favourites, including Mozart, Strauss, Holst and Brahms by one of the UK’s finest chamber orchestras. Humming along is encouraged as part of this concert, during which there will be a relaxed attitude to noise. House lights will remain on and audience members are free to leave and re-enter at any point. £8/£4. This is followed by a formal concert at 7.30pm to mark the ensemble’s 70th anniversary. £28/£14; wiltshiremusic.org.uk HANDEL’S MESSIAH n 11 May, 7pm, Bath Abbey Combining the sensitive accompaniment of the baroque instruments with solos performed by Abbey Choir Girls and Men, you can expect a glorious evening of music under the direction of Huw Williams, Bath Abbey’s director of music. Accompanied on period instruments by the leading baroque ensemble Canzona. £7–£12; bathboxoffice.org.uk

AN EVENING WITH KATHERINE JENKINS n 11 May, doors 7pm, The Forum Britain’s best-selling classical artist of the last 25 years, Katherine Jenkins OBE is on tour following the release of her album, Guiding Light, which draws on the themes of life, hope, acceptance and a universal spirituality. Tickets from £29.50; bathforum.co.uk THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION AND THE DECORATIVE ARTS n 13 May, 7.10pm, BRLSI The Industrial Revolution had a profound impact on the decorative arts, bringing commodities that had previously been associated with the nobility within reach of the ever-growing middle-classes. Andrew Spira presents this Arts Society Evening talk and looks at how these new inventions led to the development of shops and new attitudes towards lifestyle. Non-members welcome, £8; batheveningarts.co.uk FOR THE JOY OF COLOUR: CHARLES AND PATRICIA LESTER n 14 May, 11am–3pm, The Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel Hear the behind-the-scenes stories of fashion designers and textile artists Charles and Patricia Lester, and discover how they create original pieces that celebrate colour and the individuality of each person who wears their timeless silks. £30, includes tea and coffee on arrival and a delicious two-course lunch in the 3AA Rosette restaurant, Dan Moon at The Gainsborough with wine. Book via Eventbrite or call: 01225 358888. THE BUSINESS OF MODERN SLAVERY n 14 May, 7.30pm, BRLSI Modern slavery has become one of the most high-profile human rights challenges of our time. Behind all this misery is the very real fact that it is a business. In this talk, Professor Andrew Crane from the University of Bath will draw from a multi-study research project to help uncover the murky

business of modern slavery and will explore with the audience ways that each of us can contribute to tackling one of worst, but most misunderstood, problems facing workers in the global economy. £5/£2; brlsi.org CAPTAIN CORELLI’S MANDOLIN n 14–18 May, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath Captain Corelli, an enigmatic young Italian officer, is posted to an idyllic Greek island as part of the occupying forces in 1941. Shunned by the locals at first, he proves to be civilised, humorous and a consummate musician. The captain is soon thrown together with Dr Iannis’ strong-willed and beautiful daughter Pelagia, who discovers all of the complexities of love, and how it can blossom in the most unexpected and profound way. Experience all of the passion and poetry that made this love story a multimillion best-selling novel and a smash-hit Hollywood movie. Tickets from £20.50; theatreroyal.org.uk A NIGHT OF MUSIC, COMEDY AND SPOKEN WORD IN AID OF BATH MIND n 16 May, doors 6.30pm, Komedia Komedia Bath is teaming up with Raise The Bar for a special event to raise funds for Bath Mind – a local charity who provide an invaluable service to improve, prevent and maintain mental health and wellbeing across B&NES. There will be music, comedy and spoken word performances as well as stories and a presentation from the team at Bath Mind. While affiliated to national charity, Mind, they receive no direct funding from them and therefore local support is invaluable. Featuring Dr Phil, Becky Brunning, Jordan from the Rizzle Kicks and more. £5; komedia.co.uk THE KINGDOM CHOIR n 16 May, doors 7pm, The Forum The Kingdom Choir, known for their spellbinding performance at the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Continued page 26

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The Kingdom Choir: Andrew Whitton

most beautiful melodies of the First World War, performed with musicians Rob Harbron, Jack Rutter, Patsy Reid and Ben Nicholls. £18/£9; wiltshiremusic.org.uk


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Join singer-songwriter Emma Stevens at Chapel Arts Centre

Markle, are a unique group of dedicated singers presenting their strong blend of choral discipline with the raw Gospel spiritual sound. Now on UK tour, expect captivating renditions of songs such as John Legend’s All Of Me, Stand By Me, and Beyoncé’s Halo. Tickets from £25; bathforum.co.uk DIE FLEDERMAUS: IFORD ARTS n 18 May, from 6pm, The Guildhall Celebrate the first night of this year’s Iford Arts season with a gala Champagne reception with canapés and a pop-up performance by the Iford New Generation Artists at 6pm in the Brunswick Room. Then head to the beautiful Banqueting Room for Johann Strauss’s classic operetta Die Fledermaus, a comic story of revenge, seduction and mistaken identity, centred on a high-society party thrown by Prince Orlofsky. Starring legendary comic baritone Simon Butteriss. £79; ifordarts.org.uk ROYAL SCHOOL OF NEEDLEWORK OPEN DAY n 19 May, 11am–3pm, RSN Bristol, Old School House, Britannia Road, Kingswood, Bristol The Royal School of Needlework (RSN) is the international centre of excellence for the art of hand embroidery and teaches a wide range of courses for beginners through to advanced. The specialist embroidery school is holding an open day for visitors to see the beautiful hand embroideries created by RSN students and find out more about the courses on offer. To book, call: 020 3166 6932, email: education@royal-needlework.org.uk; royal-needlework.org.uk LONDON: A WORLD CITY n 21 May, 7.30pm, BRLSI London has been proud to be at the helm of some of the most significant global collaborations this century such as C40 Cities, pioneering urban zero-carbon innovations. But with the IPCC declaring only 12 years to stop climate breakdown, 26 TheBATHMagazine

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and the realities of a post-Brexit world, what will global leadership look like in future? Jennette Arnold OBE from the London Assembly delves into these questions on the future of our capital city. £5/£2; brlsi.org NINA CAHAILL ON NICOLAS POUSSIN’S THE TRIUMPH OF PAN n 22 May, 6.30pm, The Guildhall Nina Cahill, Curatorial Fellow of Paintings 1600–1800 at the National Gallery, London will talk about Nicolas Poussin’s exuberant Bacchanal that is currently on display at Victoria Art Gallery as part of the National Gallery Masterpiece Tour 2019. Today’s viewers might be surprised to learn that this scene of drunken revelry was painted for a cardinal’s palace. Tickets from Bath Box Office, £5/£3; bathboxoffice.org.uk KAY PLUNKETT-HOGGE AND DIANA HENRY n 22 May, 7.30pm, Topping and Co Booksellers, The Paragon Celebrate the food of Thailand with tastes and stories as food writer Diana Henry interviews Kay Plunkett-Hogge as she cooks recipes from her new cookbook, Baan. This is a book about home cooking from tribal Tai Yai and Akha people in the mountains of the Golden Triangle; from stall holders and markets; from fishermen in Coastal Ranong, taxi drivers and chefs. £10/£20 includes book; toppingbooks.co.uk ADRIANO ADEWALE, GWILYM SIMCOCK AND JASON REBELLO n 24 May, 7.30pm, Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Past and present Wiltshire Music Centre Artists in Residence join together for a oneoff collaborative concert that will combine virtuoso performances, scintillating improvisations, and top-class music-making at its best. Features percussionist Adriano Adewale, and pianists Gwilym Simcock and Jason Rebello. £20/£10; wiltshiremusic.org.uk

Alex Mugnaioni stars in Captain Corelli’s Mandolin at Theatre Royal Bath

LET IT BE n 27 May – 1 June, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath Come together (right now) and experience the iconic music of The Beatles with this spectacular concert, jam-packed with more than 40 of The Beatles’ greatest hits. Direct from the West End and a sell-out European tour, this international hit show celebrates the legacy of the world’s greatest rock’n’roll band. Tickets from £12.50; theatreroyal.org.uk PLANNING AHEAD... PLANT SALE n 1 June, 10am–12pm, Bathampton Village Hall This plant sale is in support of Bathampton Village Show, and there will be refreshments, designer jewellery and a raffle. Free admission. Plant donations welcome before 9.30am. THE FESTIVAL OF NATURE n 1–9 June, venues around Bath and Bristol The UK’s largest free celebration of nature is back this summer, helping to engage and inspire people to connect with the natural world. The exciting programme features events happening across Bath and Bristol including free interactive exhibitions, live performances and talks from inspirational and world-renowned leaders of the natural history world. Weekend events are free to enter and tickets are available to book before special weekday events. See the full programme online; festivalofnature.org.uk ARSENIC AND OLD WALLPAPER: THE DARKER SIDE OF WILLIAM MORRIS n 3 June, 1.30pm, The Assembly Rooms In the last talk in The Arts Society Bath’s lecture series, Geri Parlby will explore how Victorian designer William Morris was a man of many faces. Probably best known as the creator of fabrics, wallpaper and stained glass windows, he was also a poet, artist philosopher and socialist. However, what is little known is his links to the richest copper

Captain Corelli’s Mandolin: Marc Brenner

Kick off Iford Arts’ new season with Strauss’s Die Fledermaus


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and arsenic mines in Europe, and in turn their links to his toxic green wallpaper. Visitors welcome, £10 on the door, no booking required; theartssocietybath.com HUMAN EVOLUTION: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE n 6 June, 10.30am, The Pavilion How did we evolve? Are we still evolving? As part of U3A in Bath’s public lecture series, Professor Laurence Hurst will address these issues using recent data from medical and population based studies of DNA. £2 for non-members; u3ainbath.org.uk BATH DIABETES, HEALTH AND WELLBEING FAIR n 8 June, 1pm, Parade Gardens This fair, hosted by Medical Management Services, will include fitness demos, health and wellbeing exhibits, nutritional and dietary information, and advice on diabetes and the latest technology in the sector. There will also be a ukulele band and morris dancing. Free admission for those with a Discovery Card. BATH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA n 8 June, 7.30pm, Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Conducted by Eugene Monteith, this performance features Grieg’s only large-scale orchestral work, Piano Concerto in A minor, Johan Halvorsen’s Symphony No 1 in C minor, and Delius’ The Walk to the Paradise Garden. £15/£7; wiltshiremusic.org.uk THE CHRIS SLADE TIMELINE n 13 June, doors 7pm, Komedia The Chris Slade Timeline was formed by Chris Slade in 2012 to celebrate his 50-plus year career as a professional rock drummer. Since then he has performed with all the greats including AC/DC, Manfred Man, Paul Rodgers, Gary Moore, Asia and many more. Expect to hear all the hits you know, plus plenty you forgot you love. All profits from the show will go towards local charities Dorothy House Hospice Care and The Bath Rugby Foundation. Tickets from £20; komedia.co.uk FOREST LIVE 2019 n 13–16 June, 6–10.30pm, Westonbirt Arboretum The Forestry Commission England’s major outdoor live music series is back this summer for four nights of great music, food and drink, in an informal and relaxed setting. This year’s headline acts include Stereophonics, Paul Weller, Jack Savoretti and Haçienda Classiçal. Tickets from £38.50. Money raised will help to look after the nation’s forests sustainably; forestryengland.uk/music HOPE BALL 2019 n 15 June, 6pm, The Old Rectory, Doynton A magical black-tie gala with proceeds going towards the Royal United Hospital Cancer Care Campaign. The art auction will feature international stars such as Miriam Escofet, winner of the 2018 BP Portrait Award at the National Portrait Gallery, and Richard Twose, plus local talent including Nick Cudworth and Louise Holgate. There will be some incredible experiences on offer including a private box at the Royal Opera House. £250pp, includes Champagne reception, three-course dinner with wine, live art auction, silent auction and entertainment; hopeball.co.uk PUB IN THE PARK n 21–23 June, Royal Victoria Park Last year’s festival was such a blast, so much so that it’s back and bigger this year! A merry band of top foodie folk will head to the west country bringing together brilliant food, live music and Michelin-starred chefs all in one place. Top chefs like Tom Kerridge, Angela Hartnett and Josh Eggleton will be serving up delicious dishes, while local producers will be showcasing the very best artisan produce that the region has to offer. And don’t forget the live music – Basement Jaxx and Gabrielle will be opening the festival on Friday night, with Scottish chart-topping band Texas headlining the Saturday evening shenanigans, and Will Young taking to the stage on Sunday night, as well as many more. Tickets from £20; pubintheparkuk.com n THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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FESTIVAL | INTERVIEW

FAB-ULOUS FRINGE

Bath Fringe and Fringe Arts Bath, known as FaB, are putting on a big show from 24 May – 9 June. There are few rules as to what is and isn’t included, which gives every event an extra thrill

CLOCKWISE, FROM MAIN IMAGE: Bear North Print Square, 1 June, 7pm, Rondo Theatre; Facehats by Amelia Holman, 24 May, 6–9pm, FaB 3, 15 New Bond Street; The Actors’ Wheel, The Last Days of Judas Iscariot, 31 May, 7.30pm, The Rondo Theatre; The Improlectuals, 28 May, 7pm, The Old Theatre Royal Library

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ARTS | IN THE CITY

Ray and Liz film screening, 29 May, 7pm, FaB 3, 15 New Bond Street

The Poseidon Conjecture narrative sketch show, 2 June, 7.30pm, St James’ Wine Vaults

F

Photomarathon, and 21st-Century Neanderthal explores the world of online dating, with compliments floating in the air. Just round the corner in Milsom Place is Hidden, where the resident artworks will throw a revealing light on the unseen. The Bath Open Art Prize returns to 44AD artspace in Abbey Street, with awardwinning painting, sculpture and prints selected by Dr Chris Stephens, director of the Holburne Museum, and artist Sandra Porter RWA. Visitors will be invited to choose their favourite for the People’s Choice, the winner of which will be announced on the last day.

ringe Arts Bath, or FaB, is a free festival of visual arts, featuring pop-up exhibitions, events, installations, performance, experiments and more in empty shops, open spaces and across the streets of Bath. FaB is a test-bed for early-career artists, or those who prefer to operate away from the gallery-based arts scene. It also provides up-and-coming curators with the opportunity to make an exhibition happen, giving artists from Bath’s ever-growing creative community opportunities to show their work. FaB 2019 brings you 27 exhibitions in 13 venues and countless events. The excitement kicks off with the Opening Night Arty Party on 24 May – this runs from 6pm till late in all FaB venues, with performances, a preview of exhibitions and refreshments from pop-up bars. We’re told to expect nonsense, oddness, and artiness on tap. In and around Walcot Chapel, Deviation Street brings a hybrid of music, ’zine archives and an exhibition, alongside Mud, which offers irregular sculpture workshops throughout the festival. FaB 1 at 94–96 Walcot Street will be hosting six exhibitions, including Size Matters, a big exhibition of tiny work, proving that a lot can be said within 5x5cm artworks. FaB 2 at 8 Broad Street hosts GIF, which looks at the contemporary language created by the gifs, memes and emojis that we are using more and more. Another show called Dull challenges visitors to engage with works born from an artist’s fascination with a subject, concept or material that others might overlook. Who, after all, has the right to decide what is dull or interesting? FaB 3 at 15 New Bond Street opens up a different view of the city with FaB

and performers, in the Best of Bath, to show off the very best of what they do. Bath Fringe 2019 will be hosting a dizzying 150 plus events, so only a few of the highlights can be mentioned below... The Bedlam Fair street weekend on 1–2 June will be an event to watch out for – don’t miss the Sunday in Saw Close, Kingsmead Square, and locations veering towards the centre of the city. This year, with the help of a grant from the Arts Council England, there will be a focus on celebrating the history of what used to be called alternative arts in Bath. It’s the 50th anniversary of the first Comtek festival, which led to the arrival of Bath Arts Workshop and Walcot Festivals – this, in turn, inspired the first Bath Fringe events and the current Fringe group. This will see an exhibition, a book, and art events around Walcot – which was the centre of activities in those early days – and will include the work of both mature and younger artists. The experimental theatre institution’s People Show will make an appearance – the company have been running for 51 years and their artistic style and sense of experiment has never lost its energy. On 9 June there will also be a new piece of immersive site-specific theatre called Dr YaYa and Mafia Wedding with the Natural Theatre, volunteers, and director Trevor Stuart, an outrageous theatre artist who introduced the acclaimed Lumière & Son in the early years of the Fringe. Indoor theatre has a strong presence, too, with shows at The Mission, The Rondo and other more surprising corners like The Museum of Bath at Work. Young Immersive Theatre group 20:20 Vision will be a standout performance on 8 June, and Brian Madigan’s Think of a… trilogy on 29 May will reach some kind of suitably mindbending conclusion. Curtis Eller’s American Circus, performing on 2 June, is a final highlight to mention – they are not in fact a circus, but the style of the music and the range of stories that their songs tell certainly justifies the label. n Bedlam Fair, 1 and 2 June, from 1pm, various venues

Curtis Eller’s American Circus, 2 June, 8pm, Old Theatre Royal

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ath Fringe is a city festival that has been running for over 30 years. It sees regular independent city venues and promoters doing a Fringe version of what they do all year, along with pop-up events in outdoor and unexpected spaces. Certain artforms – such as visual arts, theatre, and outdoor performance – have a festival culture in the way artists develop, and so festival appearances are important for them. The Fringe organisation aims to create support structures for emerging artists in this category. The Fringe also encourages local artists THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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CINEMA | HIGHLIGHTS

Take two: films

A controversial retelling of Tchaikovsky’s classic ballet and a historical biopic exploring the life of an acclaimed British writer feature at the Little Theatre Cinema this month. Words by Siân Yates

Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake: The Legend Returns Performed to Tchaikovsky’s iconic first score for ballet, which premiered in 1877, Swan Lake is an apotheosis of the traditional dance world. The dual role of the white and black swan played by the prima ballerina, the powerful pas de deux, sweeping ballroom waltzes and the charming dance of the cygnets created an extraordinary, uplifting spectacle with classical choreography that has kept it firmly in the ballet lover’s lexicon. This was until Matthew Bourne’s version premiered in 1995. In the controversial yet bold and beautiful re-imagining of the classic fairytale, Bourne shattered traditional female corps de ballet by introducing a cast of swans entirely made up of male dancers. Gone were the fragile, feminine swans of the original, instead replaced with a menacing,

testosterone-fuelled ensemble of feral hissing birds – sometimes unpredictable, sometimes dangerous. The contemporary adaptation turned convention on its head. The storyline is

dark and brooding, offering a perfect blend of dance, drama and comedy. It omits certain characters and plot twists that are part of the original performance, focusing on a tale of passionate male love, a repressed and deeply depressed prince (Dominic North), and the powerful swan (Will Bozier) who embodies the desires of the prince, representing everything he wants but cannot have. Bourne’s attention to fine detail is exemplified in the innovative set designs, which feature witty, clever touches such as a ‘please don’t feed the swans’ sign, as well as costumes, such as tight leather trousers, mirroring a more contemporary world and the sinister atmosphere created by various stage scenes, including a nightclub. Swan Lake: The Legend Returns has been re-imagined from the original, yet remains as vibrant and mesmerising as the opening performance 23 years ago.

Tolkien J.R.R. Tolkien is a towering figure in the world of high-fantasy, famed for writing the iconic novels The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Between 2001 and 2003 The Lord of the Rings inspired a spectacular trilogy of epic fantasy adventure films directed by Peter Jackson, one of the biggest and most ambitious film projects ever undertaken. Then, between 2012 and 2014 Jackson used The Hobbit to create its own trilogy, which became one of the highest-grossing film series of all time. With his name wedded to these international, big-statement films, it’s perhaps surprising a biopic on Tolkien has not come sooner. But who exactly was the man behind the books? Tolkien, starring Nicholas Hoult, explores the formative years of the man as he finds friendship, love and courage – all themes that themselves resonate throughout his Middle-Earth stories. His childhood in the Warwickshire countryside is believed to have inspired the hobbits’ home of The Shire in Lord of the Rings, and it’s clear that his experience fighting in the Somme during the First World War provided the material for the darkness within his novels. The film sees Tolkien as a child introduced to a fellowship of writers and artists who serve as a source of inspiration for the 30 TheBATHMagazine

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aspiring novelist. Over the years, their bond is strengthened as they weather love and loss, enduring pain and suffering caused by the outbreak of the First World War – as well as Tolkien’s tumultuous relationship with his lifelong love, Edith Bratt (Lily Collins) – experiences that would later shape and inspire his greatest works. Directed by Dome Karukoski and written by David Gleeson and Stephen Beresford, the film also stars Colm Meaney as Father Francis Morgan, along with Anthony Boyle, Patrick Gibson, Tom Glynn-Carney, Craig Roberts, Laura Donnelly, Genevieve O’Reilly, Pam Ferris and Derek Jacobi. Tolkien had the ability to create majestic visions and awe-inspiring tales and these have richly informed our contemporary

experience of fantasy drama. This historical biopic promises to reveal the fascinating background of the man who himself told such towering stories. n

SHOWING TIMES Matthew Bourne's Swan Lake: The Legend Returns, 21 May, 6.15pm; 28 May, 1pm Tolkien 3 May, time to confirm Little Theatre Cinema, St Michael’s Place; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little


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VISUAL POETRY

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hether you (or your children) have followed the hilarious adventures of the endearing Clarice Bean, giggled at Charlie’s attempts at teaching his little sister Lola a thing or two, or marvelled at Hubert Horatio Bartle Bobton-Trent’s endeavours at stopping his parents from throwing away the family fortune, you’ll know that author and illustrator Lauren Child has created some of the most loved characters in children’s literature over the past 20 years. Through her entertaining and informative story lines, paired with incredibly detailed and imaginative illustrations, the awardwinning Child has captured the hearts of 32 TheBATHMagazine

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young readers, parents and guardians across the world, selling three-million books worldwide in 19 languages. As well as this, the BBC’s animated television series of her books’ much loved sibling duo Charlie and Lola has been aired in more than 34 countries, and has picked up four BAFTAs. Child’s inventive use of vibrant colour, collage and textiles has brought her linedrawn characters to life, and many consider her to be one of the most prominent illustrators in children’s books in recent decades. Now, in a new display opening at the Holburne Museum, visitors will be able to see her extraordinary work on show and explore her creative process. Lauren Child: The Art of Illustration,

which opens on 2 May, celebrates her use of illustration as an art form and features works from Child’s original stories and her re-workings of her favourite children’s classics and fairytales. As well as this, there will be a family trail around the museum, its gardens and the city centre in Bath, so families will be able to go in search of the likes of Clarice Bean et al, plus some unusual objects and animals. So why decide on developing an exhibition? “Seeing illustration in galleries wasn’t something that I grew up with,” says Child, who is a trustee of the House of Illustration, founded by Sir Quentin Blake. “Hopefully visitors will see the thought process and how ideas link together.”

Lauren Child: Paul Grover/The Princess and the Pea © Lauren Child

Author and illustrator Lauren Child has been capturing the imaginations of young readers and adults alike for almost two decades. Now a display of her colourful characters and intricate work is going on show at the Holburne Museum. Interview by Jessica Hope


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ARTS | EXHIBITIONS

THROUGH THE KEYHOLE: Main image, author and illustrator Lauren Child with her dolls’ house which she uses to create imagery for her books. Above, a scene from the book The Princess and the Pea, which was photographed in Child’s dolls’ house by award-winning photographer Polly Borland. Below, Lola – one of Child’s most famous characters – from the Charlie and Lola series “As an illustrator, a lot of it is about observing the world around you. It’s about the way people move, how people look when they trip up by accident, it’s looking at your surroundings,” she says. “A good illustration is like visual poetry. You’re having to say a lot in a picture.” Also displayed at the Holburne will be the dolls’ house Child built when she was 18, which she has continued to redecorate and rework over the years, and has been an important creative tool in fashioning scenes and characters in her books. The house was used as the set for forming the imagery featured in Child’s reimaginings of fairytales such as The Princess and the Pea. “As I grew up, I found that making the interiors became more interesting to me even than playing with the house. Very soon I became interested by the arrangement of the rooms, how it is possible to set a scene and tell a story. It is almost like directing a film,” she says. Using cereal packets for floorboards, old doilies sprayed gold for a mirror frame, and bits of her own home’s wallpaper, Child built the miniature scenes from scratch before images were captured by award-winning photographer Polly Borland. Child’s love for colour and pattern was influenced from a young age by French artists such as Édouard Vuillard (1868–1940). “My father regularly visited art galleries, and so as a child I always went along too. He would point out the way Vuillard uses pattern in his work; how he puts pattern next to pattern so figures and objects are often

seeming to disappear into the pattern as they are posed in front of decorative wallpapers and curtains.” Fortuitously visitors to the Holburne will be able to see how Child’s work has been shaped by the likes of Vuillard as the most extensive UK exhibition of his works in more than 15 years – including many that are rarely publicly displayed – will also be on show from 24 May. By exhibiting her work in museums and through her role as the Waterstones Children’s Laureate for 2017–2019, Child hopes to change people’s perceptions of illustration. “I hope to help elevate illustration as an art form, which is a bit of a poor relation compared to painting and sculpture. People don’t see it as quite as significant and yet it is the first art form that we engage with as children. It’s everywhere around us, so I’m trying to get people to look at it and see the purpose and the beauty in it.” And changing the way illustration is used in children’s literature is something that Child has spearheaded with her revolutionary use of mixed media. Her eye for detail and texture has created a series of playful characters who continue to capture the imaginations of children and gain legions of fans across the world. n Lauren Child: The Art of Illustration is open from 2 May – 8 September at the Holburne Museum, Bath. Admission to the museum is £11 adults, £5.50 concessions, free for children; holburne.org THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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THE BATH FESTIVAL 17–26 May and 1–2 June 2019 Bringing the city alive with some of the finest musicians, speakers and writers

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FESTIVAL | HISTORY

The history of the festival

First launched in 1948, The Bath Festival has seen a host of inspiring creative performances within the musical and literary genres – with artists ranging from George Melly and Led Zeppelin to Sir Ted Hughes and Dame Hilary Mantel

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he Bath Festival has seen many outstanding moments in its 71 years. In 1951, the Boyd Neel Orchestra took to a barge on the River Avon to perform Handel’s Water Music from its floating stage; in 1960 the Carnival of Jazz saw the crowd dancing till 6am to the strains of jazz musician George Melly; and in 1969 The Rec saw 30,000 fans grooving the night away to the Bath Blues Festival with stars including Fleetwood Mac and Led Zeppelin. In 1961 a Roman orgy took place when people bathed in the baths, wore togas and ate, drank and partied hard. Memories that stand out for many are of Party in the Park when thousands would descend on Royal Victoria Park for a free evening of live music to mark the start of the Bath International Music Festival. While orchestras and choirs performed on an outdoor stage in front of the Royal Crescent, people sat on the grass with their picnics and the evening would conclude with a firework display. Those evenings inevitably had their challenges for organisers faced with funding and policing the event. Boisterous and often drunken behaviour by a few, and litter left strewn on the grass were an unwelcome hangover from the parties in the park. There will also be those who remember the earlier days of The Bath Festival when the world’s top classical musicians performed in the city. Violinist Yehudi Menuhin, a key influencer and director of the festival programme, played many times to rapt audiences. He formed the Bath Festival Orchestra and in 1961 the orchestra’s ranks included the 16-year-old cellist Jacqueline du Pré, who also took part in a performance in Bath of Schubert’s Trout Quintet with Menuhin, violinist Robert Masters and other members of the orchestra. The festival in 1964 also saw two of the greatest ballet dancers in history, Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev, performing a specially

Photograph © Bath in Time, bathintime.co.uk

Yehudi Menuin with Margot Fonteyn and Rudolph Nureyev during The Bath Festival in 1964

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choreographed performance of Bartok’s Divertimento at Theatre Royal Bath. Despite a centuries-long tradition of music-making and concerts in Bath, it wasn’t until 1947 that Ian Hunter, who had been involved in the Edinburgh Festival, thought the city would be ideal for a festival of arts aimed at young people. His proposal was welcomed by a city that was suffering the privations and shortages of the post-war period. The first young musicians arrived in Bath in April 1948, where, in the Pavilion, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain gave its first concert. The programme was designed by illustrator Edward Ardizzone with an introduction by author Horace Annesley Vachell who lived in Widcombe: “Edinburgh rose and gripped a great opportunity. We must do the same. Pilgrims of yore were admonished to see Naples and die. Let us say to the world: ‘Come see Bath and live.’” Other highlights of that first festival were a visit by a 17-year-old Princess Margaret and a Georgian-themed costume ball for 800. In those days circuses with animals were the norm and the Daily Express reported gleefully that a concert in the Pavilion, conducted by Sir Adrian Boult, was interrupted by the trumpet call of Dinah, a circus elephant camped in a field across the road. By 1949 some of the themes surrounding the festival began to take on a familiar sound. There was the question of funding and the debate about whether the festival should be unashamedly highbrow, or whether it should appeal to every man and woman. Another ongoing discussion surrounded whether the concert-goers spent money in the city’s shops and businesses. During his tenure (1940–55), festival director John Boddington, made his point: “Just think how much money is spent by the 400 women who attend the ball in the week preceding it. Nearly all of them will visit the hairdresser for a perm, or at least a wave and set. Many of them will buy powder paint and perfume and have their nails manicured.” In 1995 the Bath Literature Festival was launched, showcasing the leading writers, thinkers, journalists and poets of the day. During its 21 years, participants included Poet Laureate Sir Ted Hughes in 1995 in one of his last public appearances; Hilary Mantel, two-time winner of the Man Booker Prize; and Nobel Prizewinner Sir Kazuo Ishiguro in 2017. In 2007 Bath Festivals acquired the rights to the Bath Children’s Literature Festival, set up by John and Gill McLay. The largest dedicated children’s book festival in Europe, the ethos was to entertain children and to enthuse them about reading. Past contributors include Michael Morpurgo, Anthony Horowitz, Lauren Child, Michael Rosen, Eoin Colfer and Francesca Simon. The Bath Festival reinvented itself in 2018, aiming to secure a wider audience reach. The idea was to build on the heritage of the Bath Literature Festival and Bath International Music Festival, delivering a flagship festival with music and literature at its heart. This saw classical, jazz, world and folk music alongside fiction, intelligent debate, science, history, politics and poetry, as well as events embracing blends of music and literature and other artforms. The current festival also has a big emphasis on learning and participation opportunities for young people. This includes Sparkfest, a creative collaboration with Bath Spa University that offers a programme of theatre, music and dance around the city. Ian Stockley, The Bath Festival’s chief executive, explains the plan for the future: “The world of festivals is changing fast and we want to stay at the leading edge. The reality is that public money is in increasingly short supply and rather than bemoaning this we are using the spur positively to connect better with a growing number of patrons and sponsors. Most importantly we are excited about what can happen in the spaces between music, literature and other art forms.” n


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FESTIVAL | PARTY IN THE CITY

TIME TO PARTY

Here’s an al fresco affair like no other; Party in the City on 17 May kicks off The Bath Festival in style, promising live music, great food, and the chance to explore 36 venues across the city – not to mention, it’s free...

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xpect music pulsating through the streets; live performances in the city’s squares; and the tempting aromas of delicious street food, as Bath anticipates a much-loved event in its calendar, Party in the City. The fun starts from 6pm on Friday 17 May for a citywide celebration which typically attracts crowds of up to 20,000 people of all ages. Party in the City launches this year’s tenday festival of music and literature, which runs from 17–26 May as well as a special finale weekend on 1–2 June. The evening will feature every kind of music, from classical and jazz; pop and punk; and folk and choral – and with 36 venues opening their doors, all tastes are catered for. Party-goers will find festival outdoor stages at Queen Square and Parade Gardens, along with stalls selling delicious fresh cooked street food, or they can enjoy their favourite tipple from one of the festival bars. Party in the City’s sponsor SouthGate Bath is hosting its own al fresco party, with food, drink and no less than two stages with upand-coming bands from Bath College and three solo performer – Jon Pollard, Rosina Keri and Zoe Newton.

Get your groove on at Party in the City

• Kicking off the evening is Pitch Invasion, a unique piece of street performance inspired by the beautiful game. Gather at 6pm on Kingston Parade beside Bath Abbey to enjoy a specially commissioned show that is inspired by the sounds and songs of the football terraces at Bath City FC.

a lively and eclectic mix of film and TV themes, rock, pop, jazz and classical music. From 7.30pm party band Arkansaw Jukebox take to the stage playing covers from the likes of the Sex Pistols, Radiohead and Stormzy, all played in bluegrass style. Bringing the Queen Square party to a close, playing from 9.45–10.30pm, are festival favourites, Giovanni L’Immigrato, a 10-piece folk-indie super troupe who bring their own brand of high energy hoe-downs.

• Queen Square will showcase live music from 6pm through to 10.30pm. The Orchestra of Everything will be there from 6pm, a 40-piece local orchestra playing

• Bristol based singer-songwriter Danny McMahon’s modern country songs ease us into the night with a chilled-out set in Parade Gardens. From 9.20pm comes the return of

Allison Herbert Chief Executive of Bath BID “I’m looking forward to...”

party band the Blues Others. They’ll have you shakin’ your tail feathers to Blues Brothers big tunes and party anthems that will have you dancing until 10pm. • More than 30 indoor venues, including Komedia, St Swithin’s Church and Widcombe Social Club, will be offering free live music. Wander the city and discover choirs in the Central United Reformed Church in Argyle Street, punk-pop at The Pig and Fiddle in Broad Street and orchestras at the Assembly Rooms. See the full programme for Party in the City online; thebathfestival.org.uk

Austentatious

How the World Thinks

18 May, 2.30pm, The Forum

22 May, 12.30pm, Assembly Rooms

I want to see Austentatious, the improvised comedy conjuring up a ‘lost’ Jane Austen novel. Always witty, clever and hilarious, it seems like Bath is the perfect place to watch this show.

This afternoon lecture by Julian Baggini sounds like a fascinating overview of how different human societies have made sense of the world around them. I think this will be a lunchtime well spent.

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FESTIVAL | MUSIC

CLASSICAL’S RISING STAR

Classical music just got a whole lot cooler. Following a rousing Proms appearance, a Classical BRIT Award, and a moving performance at the BAFTAs, young saxophonist Jess Gillam is hitting all the right notes, says Jessica Hope


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FESTIVAL | MUSIC

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Robin Clewley Photography

lassical music is lost on millennials. They don’t know their Bachs from their Stravinskys. They’d probably clap in between movements, the fools.” – These may be speculative phrases, but phrases, nonetheless, that reflect the growing concern among some classical music fans who fear that younger generations are losing interest in this traditional form of music. However, the future of classical is assuredly in safe hands. For more than 40 years, the BBC Young Musician award has championed young performers. And in recent years, the calibre of musicians has increased and produced a number of youngsters who have been making a big mark on the classical scene. Violinist Nicola Benedetti (recently appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire for her services to music) and cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason, who played at Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding last year, are just two of the award’s winners who have recently shot into the limelight. And one finalist who has been trailblazing the music of the saxophone – and who you may recognise from her poignant performance at the 2019 BAFTAs – is Jess Gillam. As well as wowing audiences with her dynamic recitals, Jess recently became BBC Radio 3’s youngest-ever presenter at just 20 years old with the launch of her own show, This Classical Life, in April. Keen to promote the work of other young musicians, Jess talks to a young performer each week who shares the music that has inspired them. “Hopefully it shows the diverse range of music that classical performers listen to, and shows that musicians take inspiration from lots of different genres,” says Jess. “Perhaps genre isn’t all that important – what’s more important is having a reaction to music regardless of what it is classed as.” Despite her young age, this isn’t the first presenting gig for Jess. Last year she regularly hosted the BBC Young Musician podcast with bassist Sam Becker and pianist Zeynep Özsuca where they tackled a range of subjects from stage fright to pre-show snacks. “It was great to be able to make it with two of my best friends,” says Jess. “We’re all so passionate about sharing music.” The last few years have been a whirlwind for Jess. Aged 17 she made a guest appearance with Jools Holland and his Rhythm and Blues Orchestra, shortly before making history by becoming the first saxophonist to reach the final of BBC Young Musician in 2016. The following year she made her Proms debut. “I’d never been to a Prom before. I’d seen the Proms on TV, but I’d never actually been. So stepping out onto that

stage was a very surreal experience,” she says. “There is a real electricity in the room between the performer and the audience. You can actually see the faces of the audience, and because the Royal Albert Hall is round, it feels very intimate. You feel like you can play to just one person.” Her performance impressed audiences so much that she was invited back in 2018, this time to perform at the Proms in the Park in Hyde Park before rushing over to the Royal Albert Hall to play two pieces at the Last Night of the Proms, where she became the youngest-ever soloist to perform. Her rendition of Milhaud’s Scaramouche went down a storm with audiences, with one critic hailing it as the “indisputable highlight” of the night. Last year also saw Jess feature on the winners list at the Classical BRIT Awards alongside music legends such as Dame Vera Lynn, Michael Ball and Renée Fleming, after receiving the award for the Sound of Classical poll which recognises the best emerging artists under 30. Last month Jess released her debut album, Rise, after signing with Decca Classics, becoming the first saxophone player to join the prestigious record label. “Recording an album has been an ambition of mine for a very long time,” she says. “It’s an album of music that I love to play and have an emotional affinity to.” It features Jess’ signature piece Pequeña Czarda by Pedro Iturralde, which she performed at the wind category final of BBC Young Musician 2016. The album also includes a bonus track – Francis Lai’s Theme from Love Story, which Jess performed during the BAFTAs’ obituaries section in front of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and acting royalty. “It was a performance like no other that I have done before,” she says. “In a setting like that, it was a real honour to play.” Jess, who is from Ulverston in Cumbria, has come a long way since she first picked up a saxophone aged seven with the Barracudas Carnival Band in Barrow. She recalls that day: “There were loads of workshops on – stilts, dance, drums, costume-making, and the saxophone. I came to the saxophone last and completely fell in love with it. “I never made a conscious decision that that was what I wanted to do with my life. It is something I’ve been really passionate about and love. I’ve been lucky enough for that to develop into a career.” She is currently studying at the Royal Northern College of Music with an ABRSM Scholarship, and says that despite her parents not having a background in classical, their love of music was instilled in her from a young age. “There’s always been an appreciation for music in our

household. I was brought up where it was an important part of life and was something that was really valued and encouraged.” It was this which influenced some of the more modern tracks on her album. “I used to listen to Kate Bush on repeat growing up. And David Bowie is one of my musical heroes, so to have music by both of them on there alongside music by Marcello and Dowland will hopefully show the diversity and versatility of the saxophone.” When she’s not touring around the UK or abroad with different orchestras, Jess organises her own series of concerts in her hometown – something which she has done since the age of 12 – bringing international stars such as Snake David, Courtney Pine, John Harle and Tommy Smith to Ulverston. “Live music is such an amazing thing for any community to have access to. It is something I would like to try and keep alive as much as possible,” she says. Jess is also a keen activist against arts funding cuts in schools and wrote an open letter to The Guardian earlier this year. “We’re at a crisis point in the country at the moment where we have to realise how essential music is to society. Until [music] becomes recognised in the curriculum as a core subject, I think we are failing our children and not giving them the opportunities they deserve. “Music can teach children so many life skills such as empathy, co-operation, determination, perseverance, and the ability to fail and for it to be ok.” In order to help engage more children in music, Jess visits schools when she’s on tour for concerts, and gave pupils from King Edward’s School in Bath a music workshop last year. “One of the best ways for children to engage with music is by seeing it live and being able to speak to the musicians.” Despite only being 20, Jess has transformed the way the saxophone is perceived among the classical community, and you can expect a number of new commissions to be written just for her over the coming years. “One of the brilliant things about the saxophone is that it is still relatively young. It doesn’t have a very long history, so to be able to commission new music and help to create the repertoire for it is really exciting.” The classical world is moving into a new, more modern era, and younger generations are taking notice. With artists like Jess Gillam at the helm, the future of classical music is looking very bright. n Jess Gillam is playing at the Concert For The People of Bath on 23 May, 7.30pm, at The Forum. Tickets £15–£38; thebathfestival.org.uk

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FESTIVAL | INTERVIEW

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FESTIVAL | INTERVIEW

The festival man

The Bath Festival wants to make the arts accessible to all with original programming, innovative performances and community involvement. Emma Clegg talks to chief executive officer Ian Stockley

he decade leading up to 2017 saw the audience base at The Bath Festival narrowing into a more elitist, more middle-class following who could afford to go to the events. Sight was being lost of what the festival needed to be about; a celebration of the city that connects the wider community and creates opportunities for those with less access to the arts,” says Ian Stockley, explaining the strategy behind the merging of the music and literature festivals in 2017. The idea of community access and involvement is now at the heart of the festival ethos, Ian explains: “The power of the arts is all about connecting a wider community. And the more of that community you can take the arts to, the more successful you are as an organisation. I feel strongly that other festivals that connect to community are the multi-arts ones.” In 2022 the festival will receive less than 10% public funding, which naturally brings considerable financial challenges. “We have to build the commercial model as well as protect and savour the artistic integrity and the level of quality,” says Ian. “Because the reserves have been so low we haven’t been able to commit far enough ahead and we haven’t been able to secure some of the showstopping international names, particularly in the classical field where they are booked two or three years ahead. We have to grow the level of reserves to plan further ahead than we’ve been able to do up until now.” In order to balance financial stability with artistic integrity, Ian points out that it is

Ian Stockley: “I’m looking forward to...” Song Play The Lure of Hollywood in Film and Song, 21 May, 7.30pm, Komedia Richard Rodney Bennett: Portrait of a Composer in Film and Song, 22 May, 7.30pm, Komedia I’m excited by the Song Play events at Komedia, curated for The Bath Festival that combine the different art forms of words, film and song, while informing and enriching our knowledge of different key periods of 20th-century musical development.

critical to bring acts to Bath that sell out The Forum, the city’s biggest venue. He also says that it is much harder to make a music event pay for itself, as the cost to produce a music event is higher than a literature one.

The festival will continue to grow as an alchemy of music, words and dance, bringing wider art forms together

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Ian has a magical combination of musical and marketing expertise that he brings to his role. At school he played the tenor horn and later the French horn, gaining a musical scholarship to Charterhouse. After an economics degree, Ian went to the Royal Academy of Music and then worked professionally for 10 years as a classical singer (bass baritone). Later he moved into marketing, starting out at Reader’s Digest where he became fascinated by the market research process, and in 2000 launched the Bristol-based marketing agency Indicia. Ian is modest about his background and prefers to focus on the here and now: “I love my job because it combines that tremendous passion I have for the arts with my analytical side. It combines my heart and my brain. “We are all about making classical music more accessible to the next generation.

And curating a merging talent of young artists alongside established artists. I would love, in five years time, for someone to say “I saw Sheku Kanneh-Mason live at the Bath Festival in 2018”. We’ve got Jess Gillam coming this year, who has just been appointed as the youngest-ever presenter on BBC Radio 3 at the age of 20. And we have pianist Isata Kanneh-Mason, Sheku’s sister.” The Bath Festival Finale weekend, introduced in 2018 in its 70th anniversary year, brought an extravaganza of music and fun – audiences of almost 9,000 filled the Recreation Ground to watch headliners Paloma Faith and Robert Plant. The Bath festival has a long heritage and respecting that, while forging a new vision, can be challenging. “The heritage is a huge advantage but it also holds you back a bit,” says Ian. “From a blank piece of paper I’d start very differently. But I want to build on the heritage. The Norwich, Norfolk and Brighton festivals, more recent UK festivals than Bath, have always been about connecting people, whereas if you go back to The Bath Festival in the 1980s, Yehudi Menuin, William Glock and Michael Tippett were there to give platforms to wonderful musicians, but it wasn’t about using the arts to connect with the community. “May 2019 will be the third festival since we became a combined art festival. So we’ve got the context and the position for the next three years. It will continue to grow as an alchemy of music, words and dance, bringing wider art forms together in innovative programmes that will increasingly be seen as a distinctive feature of The Bath Festival.” n

Our Planet

Penguin Café

24 May, 8pm, Assembly Rooms

24 May, 8pm, Bath Pavilion

Our Planet has just been released on Netflix and has received five-star reviews. This new series, narrated by Sir David Attenborough, showcases the planet’s most precious species and fragile habitats. Hearing the behind-thescenes stories from Our Planet director Alastair Fothergill and producer Keith Scholey will be fascinating.

I’ve missed the different experience of a Pavilion event in recent festivals. It’s great that Penguin Café have been invited to the festival this year to perform there – they really transcend the divisions between popular and classical music. It will be a spellbinding evening of innovative and beautiful music.

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FESTIVAL | INTERVIEW

HOW THE LIGHT GETS IN

Author and journalist Elizabeth Day presents a podcast called How To Fail. She explains to Emma Clegg how she has come to understand that talking about failure is the ultimate expression of strength

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“He didn’t find it difficult to open up to the idea of failure but he just didn’t categorise it like that. He failed to win an Italian literary prize, but he flipped it and said ‘I was lucky enough to come second and I had a lovely trip to Italy and I got to eat pasta and meet wonderful people.’” Sebastian also named the time that he baked a soufflé and it failed to rise as one of his failures. “He was being facetious, but it was interesting that out of the three failures, that was one of them. A lot of the women I approached said that they couldn’t whittle it down to just three. It’s quite an interesting disparity.” Other named failures are small, but highly significant. Guardian columnist Nesrine Malik named one of her failures as getting a B in GCSE English. “She never told a soul, other than her family, because it was so shameful to her. It just didn’t tally with her identity. And she hadn’t spoken about it, ever.”

We are so much more beautiful as humans because of the scars we carry

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here’s something disarming about the phrase ‘how to fail’. The enabling, positive ‘how to’ and the downward negative of ‘fail’ seem to turn the idea of failure into a triumph. Journalist and author Elizabeth Day started a podcast in July 2018 called How To Fail and her recently published memoir of the same name has become a Sunday Times top-five bestseller, described as ‘life-changing’ by critics. So what’s it all about? In a world where everything is positively spun and presented to perfection, not least on social media, is it possible that failure might be a good thing? The idea of the podcast started with the end of a relationship. “I got dumped,” says Elizabeth. “It was three weeks before my 39th birthday and I was devastated by it because that stage of my life was not looking how I’d dreamt of it when I was a child – I always thought I would be married with children by my 40th birthday.” While Elizabeth was licking her wounds she listened to lots of podcasts – listening to pop music made her feel too sad – and had many honest conversations with her friends about how she was feeling. “Gradually I realised, looking back at my thirties, that I’d grown so much stronger as a result of things going wrong. And because of that I’d actually had a much richer life. “I began to think how great it would be if we could open up this conversation to a wider audience and make it more public, because so often we feel more ashamed to say that something has gone wrong. So I started thinking about doing a podcast.” Elizabeth drew her own logo, she sold her wedding dress on eBay to fund the first few episodes and then she asked friends and contacts to be her first eight guests – among them Sebastian Faulks, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Gina Miller, Dolly Alderton and Sathnam Sanghera. Each of them were asked to name and discuss three failures in their lives, humorous and lighthearted or intense and probing. Loaded on iTunes in July 2018, three weeks later her podcast was number three in the iTunes chart. “I realised that a lot of people had been yearning for precisely this kind of conversation,” says Elizabeth. Did any interviewees struggle with the idea of opening up in this way? “The novelist Sebastian Faulks wasn’t sure he was a good subject for the podcast. He said to me, ‘I’m just not sure that I have failed.’ And that was fascinating because this wasn’t a mindset that I was used to as a woman who is constantly questioning herself.

Then there was business owner and activist Gina Miller who brought a case against the British government in 2016 over its authority to implement Brexit. “Gina was completely engaged with the idea of failure from the outset – she believes that everyone fails and we need to cope with it because we need to build up the notion of resilience.” “It is difficult in the sense that I ask people to be honest, in quite an intimate way, and that doesn’t always come naturally. But I am always pleasantly surprised by how willing my guests are to go to profound places.” The failures that have been aired have included everything from living with depression, homelessness and suicide to failing driving tests and not winning tennis matches. One of the most memorable podcasts for Elizabeth was with mental health campaigner Jonny Benjamin. Jonny was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder when he was 20 and shortly afterwards he found himself standing on the edge of Waterloo Bridge about to take his own life. “Because he was in so much pain he could not see a way of continuing,” says Elizabeth. “A passing stranger noticed his

distress and stopped to talk to Jonny. That simple act of human compassion changed Jonny’s life, because he stepped back from the edge and has gone on to be this amazing man. Six years later he launched a campaign to find the stranger and they were reunited.” In her podcast, journalist and broadcaster Dolly Alderton quoted from Leonard Cohen’s Anthem: “Ring the bells that still can ring // Forget your perfect offering // There is a crack in everything // That’s how the light gets in.” Remembering this, Elizabeth says, “We are so much more beautiful as humans because of the scars we carry, because they are the source of our connection with each other.” You can connect through vulnerability in a way that you can’t when you are too busy telling everyone what a wild success you are.” Elizabeth feels that her own experience of failure – not fitting in at school, not listening enough to herself, having unrealistic expectations, having a trail of failed relationships including a divorce – has relevance for lots of people. “My own journey of failure has taught me about who I am and what I want. And about the necessity of being brave and being yourself. Being yourself is the only way to be, and being real, admitting to your flaws, your vulnerabilities and your failures is the ultimate expression of strength. “So my life is about knowing who I am and knowing that I am connected to everyone else on the planet. And to the world that I find myself in. The rest of it is just noise.” Elizabeth says that her How To Fail podcast has a positive future. “I get lovely messages saying ‘please never stop doing this podcast because it’s become a really important part of my life’, and I feel a responsibility to those lovely listeners. One of the great joys of podcast is that it’s honest. It’s so lovely to let an interview run into places that I find interesting and that the person wants to speak about. We’re seeing a shift, actually, in a world that is so governed by 280 character tweets. I think there is a yearning for something slower paced and more revealing.” n

Elizabeth Day will be talking about her book and podcast How To Fail at The Bath Festival on 19 May, 1pm, at the Literature Lounge. Tickets £9; thebathfestival.org.uk


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FESTIVAL | BOOKS

Festival reading

As well as a world-class music programme, The Bath Festival has a range of insightful events by top authors and academics taking place this month. Here’s just some of the latest titles to hit the bookshelves which will be featured at this year’s festival

The Forager’s Calendar

Discover

Examine

John Wright, £16.99, hardback, Profile Books Take a walk along a country path and you may not realise that there’s a plethora of wild foodstuffs available at your fingertips. The country’s foremost expert in foraging, John Wright, gives a month by month guide in this illustrated manual of what species can be found and where, how to identify them, and how to cook them. He will be speaking at The Bath Festival on 22 May, 10.45am, at the Assembly Rooms. £9.

Stone Mothers

Immerse

Erin Kelly, £12.99, hardback, Hodder & Stoughton A thrilling new Gothic tale from the bestselling author of He Said/She Said. Marianne grew up in the shadow of a Victorian asylum – a place that still haunts her dreams. She was 17 when she fled the town, her family, her boyfriend and the body they buried. Now she is forced to return, but she must strive to protect the life she’s built and never allow her husband or daughter to find out about her past. But she’s not the only one with a secret to hide... Erin Kelly joins authors Harriet Tyce and Sarah Hilary to talk about readers’ unwavering interest in crime fiction at Bloody Women on 26 May, 1.30pm, at the Masonic Hall. £9.

Queenie

Champion

Candice Carty-Williams, £12.99, hardback, Orion Books On a break from boyfriend Tom (it’s not a break-up, definitely not a break-up, she stresses), stuck with a boss who doesn’t even recognise her, and a family who don’t want to listen, Queenie Jenkins is struggling through life. This darkly comic take on modern life will have you agreeing with compassion, crying in solidarity, and rooting for Queenie every step of the way. Candice Carty-Williams will be speaking at Life, Love and Everything in Between on 18 May, 5.30pm, at the ballroom in the Forum. £9. X TheBATHMagazine

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Normandy ’44

James Holland, £25, hardback, Bantam Press D-Day is a subject that has dominated representations of the Second World War in countless publications and films. Renowned historian James Holland introduces a new perspective on this significant military event in Normandy ’44 (published on 16 May), by examining the brutality and violence of the campaign and the 76 days of bitter fighting in Normandy that followed. This re-examination challenges popular perceptions of what we think we know about D-Day and the Allies’ tactics against German forces in 1944. Holland will be at the Assembly Rooms on 21 May, 12.45pm, to talk about his work, which draws on unseen archival evidence and testimonies and eye-witness accounts. £10.

Sandettie Light Vessel Automatic

Pause

Simon Armitage, £16.99, hardback, Faber & Faber

Written over the course of several years for a variety of projects, commissions, collaborations and events, multi award-winning poet Simon Armitage has compiled an outstanding new volume of work which will be published on 16 May. Featuring single poems such as Zodiac T Shirt, written to be performed at the launch of Beck’s Song Reader, as well as the suite of ten poems about Branwell Brontë written at the time of the writer’s bicentenary, they cover an array of subjects including sculpture, the environment, travel, drama, and media, with many poems having never been previously published. Simon Armitage will be talking to James Long on 22 May, 2.30pm, at the Assembly Rooms. £10.

Reflect

You Will Be Safe Here

Damian Barr, £16.99, hardback, Bloomsbury

Recognised by The Observer as “a powerfully moving tale that weaves dazzlingly between the Boer war and contemporary South Africa,” and inspired by real events, You Will Be Safe Here explores the human capacity for cruelty and kindness. It’s 1901, the height of the second Boer War, and Sarah van der Watt and her son are taken to Bloemfontein Concentration Camp where the English promise that they will be safe. Skip forward to Johannesburg, 2010, and 16 year-old outsider Willem is sent to New Dawn Safari Training Camp. Here they ‘make men out of boys’. Guaranteed. Damian Barr will chat to bestselling novelist Patrick Gale at the Assembly Rooms on 18 May, 10.45am. £10. n


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FESTIVAL | REVIEW

COUNTRY LIVING: The characters in Ghost Wall re-enact what it was like to live in the Northumberland countryside (pictured here) during the Iron Age, with considerable consequences

Cries of the past

A haunting tale of violence, Iron Age rituals and the modern concept of nationality, Jessica Hope reviews Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss

Sycamore Gap: Kevin Standage/Shutterstock, Sarah Moss: Sophie Davidson

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s there such a thing as a native British person? In fact, has there ever been? Yes, there are characteristics which one might associate with the British – tea, the Queen, even David Beckham’s right foot as Hugh Grant’s character once proclaimed in Love Actually – but these are associations which reflect our culture, rather than our true roots. The origins of the inhabitants of these green and pleasant lands are multifarious and have evolved constantly over the centuries. Those who some think of as British natives, such as the tribes who lived here before the Roman conquest (the Venicones, Carvetii, Ordovices et al), all came from other lands. The British didn’t just “spring from English soil like mushrooms in the night,”as Sarah Moss writes in her latest novel Ghost Wall. Yet there are still people who think this is true – something we’ve seen in recent years with heated discussions around the likes of Brexit, Windrush and the rise of white nationalist hate crimes. Writing on her blog, Moss states: “I live in a country where xenophobia and nativism have become normal

Author Sarah Moss

in the last couple of years, where the rights of people perceived not to be British, or not British enough, are routinely denied…” And it’s views such as these that have a profound and lasting impact on the characters in Ghost Wall, as well as the reader. At just 149 pages long, this is Moss’ sixth novel (which is longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019), and it makes for uncomfortable reading. There are difficult scenes – some of which are vague in description, and yet you seem to know how to fill in the blanks. It is hard to not read this all in one go as Moss’ narrative swiftly carries you into the protagonist’s tortuous world, where modern life and ancient rituals begin to collide. Set in the rural Northumberland landscape in the 1990s, the novel follows 17-year-old Silvie as she and her parents join an expedition for university students to live just as people did in the Iron Age – foraging, cooking, using stone tools and wearing itchy tunics. Her dad, Bill, a bus driver, is obsessed with Iron Age history, and has somehow persuaded the professor to let his family join in. We soon see that Bill is taking the experiment more seriously than the students and academics involved,

and his short temper and chauvinistic views are quickly revealed. Bill sees the Iron Age as the ideal model for Britishness – “…he likes the idea…that if he goes back far enough he’ll find someone who wasn’t a foreigner” – which causes rising tension among the camp. Through her careful use of language, we understand that it’s Bill’s domineering nature and acceptance of violence that follow Silvie and her mother around like a heavy, dark cloud. And it is this that consequently sends the reader hurtling towards the harrowing finale, where elements of the past – and the Iron Age bog girl from the gut-wrenching prologue – emerge in the modern day, leaving you breathless, yet also somewhat bewildered as to how the final moments escalated so quickly. Ghost Wall reminds us of both the delicacy and the cruelty of humanity and the natural world, and denounces those who continue to look to the past as representing our small island’s glory days. n Sarah Moss will be speaking at The Bath Festival on 19 May, 3.45pm, at the Literature Lounge on Alfred Street. Tickets £9; thebathfestival.org.uk Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss, £12.99, hardback, published by Granta Books

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FESTIVAL | MUSIC

Dodge and skiffle

Mark Kermode has two great passions: films and music – and both dominate his life. He is coming to The Bath Festival to talk about his musical memoirs and to play skiffle and blues with his band The Dodge Brothers. Words by Emma Clegg

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The Dodge Brothers, from left: Alex Hammond, Aly Hirji, Mike Hammond and Mark Kermode

instruments such as washboards. “As a kid I used to listen to rock ’n’ roll and rockabilly and an awful lot of that is very homemade. So I’d always been in that area; I just hadn’t thought of it as skiffle. Then when The Bottlers started, calling ourselves skiffle became a thing. It’s just a DIY ethos that really appeals to me.”

I’ve always thought you should never be frightened of musical instruments and they are your friends

hief film critic for The Observer, co-presenter of BBC Radio 5’s Kermode and Mayo’s Film Review, and film critic for Film4 and Channel 4, Mark Kermode is the nation’s favourite film buff. He is now presenting a movie soundtrackthemed show on Scala Radio, opening up his second great love – music. But music has never been hiding in the wings for Kermode, who has been in a band since he was eight: “Alongside the film stuff, I’ve always played music and it’s been a big part of my life.” Kermode’s first band was with his brother in the back garden, using any household implements they could find. Then at school he was in rock bands and built an electric guitar from scratch. “Once I’d discovered you could build a guitar from string and glue and chipboard and wire, and that it could work, then I thought then I can pretty much do anything. I’ve always had this thing in my head that if you believe in something for long enough it will just come true.” Building the electric guitar was a key moment in Kermode’s musical journey. “If you haven’t got something, build it. And believe me if I can build an electric guitar then anyone can, because I am the worst woodwork student imaginable,” Mark says. After the rock band phase, Mark formed with friends a band called The Railtown Bottlers – they went on to win the National Street Entertainment of the Year competition, played at the London Palladium and were the house band on Danny Baker’s BBC One Saturday night chat show in the early 1990s. “What we were playing was old American blues and skiffle, or in America, jugband. We got quite big on the British skiffle circuit, which is a very small pond,” explains Kermode. “And then we were the house band on a BBC One TV series, and I was the musical director for the BBC despite the fact that I can’t read music. Playing with Rick Wakeman and Aimée Mann and Lloyd Cole, I just kept thinking ‘I have no idea how we got here.’” In 2001 Kermode formed The Dodge Brothers with Mike Hammond, Aly Hirji and Alex Hammond, with Kermode on double bass. They have produced four albums, the latest Drive Train, released last year. They also specialise in playing live accompaniments to classic silent movies at music and film festivals, with silent movie pianist Neil Brand. Kermode has always specialised in skiffle, a type of music with jazz, blues, folk and American folk influences. Popular in the 1940s and 1950s, it used improvised

Kermode has no false pretentions about his abilities: “I’m not a good musician. I’m famously cack-handed, but that’s never stopped me. I’ve always thought you should never be frightened of musical instruments and they are your friends. My musical career has been odd – it’s been much more successful than I ever thought was possible.” “I just look like I know what I’m doing. Also, I’m playing bass – no one can hear a wrong note on a bass.” Kermode’s honesty is disarming. “But surely,” I suggest, “you are downplaying your abilities?” “I don’t talk down my musical talent,” Kermode insists. “I know what I can and can’t do. I play double bass, guitar, accordion and bagpipes, all with the same level of ineptitude. I know that I’ve got away with things by the skin of my teeth.”

One of these skin-of-the-teeth experiences was when Kermode played John Barry’s theme from Midnight Cowboy on the chromatic harmonica in the Royal Festival Hall with the BBC Concert Orchestra as it was broadcast live on BBC Radio 3. He hadn’t played the chromatic harmonica until two weeks before the performance. Kermode’s new book, How Does It Feel: A Life of Musical Misadventure describes the experience leading up to the performance at the start of the book. “No matter how much I practised, I just didn’t get any better. Learning a new tune is one thing; learning to play it on a new instrument is a whole different world of pain.” “Somehow I got away with it. You can listen to it. It’s not terrible, it’s not brilliant, but it’s fine.” Kermode says that sheer persistence is the key to his musical success: “I’d rate enthusiasm and persistence over talent. And that’s been a guiding light, that you shouldn’t be put off by being unprepared or technically inept. I have managed to surround myself with other people who can play. And actually that’s the trick.” n

Mark Kermode talks about How Does It Feel: A Life of Musical Misadventure at The Bath Festival on 18 May, 8pm at the Assembly Rooms. He will then be joined on stage by The Dodge Brothers. £15; thebathfestival.org.uk


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FESTIVAL | EVENTS

ALL-STAR BATH

The stars are flocking to The Bath Festival, some of them in person; others in spirit. Emma Clegg goes all starry-eyed and takes the roll call, spanning the centuries from Socrates to Sara Cox

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he Bath Festival has always attracted the big stars, and there’s no exception this year. The oldest of our Bath Festival stars is Socrates. Born in 470 BC and one of the founders of Western philosophy, he’s quite big as stars go. He didn’t write things down, so we know about him through classical writers such as Plato and Xenophon. On 18 May Armand d’Angour, author of Socrates in Love, and philosopher Julian Baggini talk about his passionate early life and the mysterious woman who inspired him to develop his ideas. It’s probably not his wife Xanthippe, who Xenophon describes as “the hardest to get along with of all the women there are.”

Whizz ahead a few centuries and star or astéri becomes stella as we encounter the best story for our spa city, The Gods and Rituals of Roman Britain by Miranda Aldhouse-Green. The Romans, excellent at building roads and spas, did encounter considerable resistance from the Celtic and Anglo-Saxon population when they came to Britain, and on 21 May Aldhouse-Green talks about how this led to deities, cults and beliefs being challenged, adapted and absorbed by both sides. Leonardo da Vinci, Italian Renaissance polymath, is also in our line-up. Born in 1452, he loved everything from engineering and architecture to geology and astronomy, and is regarded as one of the greatest painters of all time. Why does his life continue to be so intriguing? Da Vinci expert Martin Kemp talks to James Long about his 50-year relationship with Leonardo on 23 May. Elizabeth I (b.1533) and Mary Queen of Scots (b.1542) have not been short of air time over the years – unsurprisingly as theirs

Socrates and Sara Cox: both with a flair for talking

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nothing more than a title suggested by the audience. I have a suspicion JA may have approved.

Leonardo da Vinci and Barbie: a match made in heaven? was one dramatic royal power struggle. We know how the story ends, with Mary’s head on the block and Elizabeth reigning long as queen, but it could so easily have been different, as the Catholic Church saw Elizabeth as illegitimate and Mary as the rightful English heir. The latest book on this challenging subject is Rival Queens: The Betrayal of Mary Queen of Scots by Kate Williams, who on 19 May talks about how she shook up the old story into a profile of a Mary who attempted to reinvent queenship and the monarchy. The influence of Shakespeare (b.1564), poet and playwright, stretches from continent to continent. Indeed his work defines us all, embedded within our drama, literature, language, poetry, art and culture. Sadly his star didn’t rise until after his death – critics of the time mostly rated him below John Fletcher and Ben Jonson. As Shakespeare said in Hamlet, “We know what we are, but not what we may be.” There’s always room to uncover new truths in his multi-layered oeuvre – and Oxford professor Emma Smith is at the festival on 24 May talking about her book This is Shakespeare, offering a penetratingly different side to the man. Jane Austen is the literary star of Bath. She only lived here for approximately five years, but we have appropriated her. She had mixed feelings about the city, but there’s no doubt that the social scene of balls, promenades and assemblies provided her with rich material. Comedy improv troupe Austentatious, who are appearing at the festival, drop any aspirations towards serious lit crit and instead go for improvisation, taking a lighthearted look at the culture of Austen. The comic performers conjure up a ‘lost’ Jane Austen novel on 18 May based on

Wallis Simpson (b.1896), an American socialite, became a star because of her association with Edward, Prince of Wales, later King Edward VIII. Their relationship, her nationality and the fact that she was twice divorced caused a constitutional crisis resulting in Edward’s abdication in 1936. Wallis was painted as a manipulative conspirator, but her reputation is defended by Anna Pasternak in her latest book Wallis Simpson: Master Manipulator or Misunderstood? which presents new information from those who were close to the couple, redeeming a woman wronged by history. Pasternak is at the Assembly Rooms on 23 May. Sir Michael Tippett (b.1905) was a slowburning star – he withdrew his earliest compositions and was 30 before his works were published. His music was known for the expansive nature of his melodic line and his handling of rhythm and counterpoint. Oliver Soden has written the first biography of Tippett and, in discussion with James Waters on 23 May, he identifies what made him such a unique composer. The first of our living stars, Nicholas Parsons (b.1923), has had a long career in television, radio and theatre, most famously as host of Sale of the Century and also of comedy radio game show Just a Minute. Trained as an actor, he appeared in Doctor Who in 1989 as a tormented clergyman. Coming to Bath on 24 May, Parsons shares his experience of the unpredictable and fascinating aspects of his life and work throughout his impressive career.

Shakespeare would have been impressed by Darcey


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FESTIVAL | EVENTS

Sir Michael Parkinson (b.1935) is firmly embedded as a national treasure. Not only is he a star, and an unassuming one, but he has interviewed countless stars of our time, among them Bing Crosby, Mohammed Ali, Nelson Mandela, Joan Collins, Tommy Cooper, David Bowie and Naomi Campbell, and the infamous 1970s interview with Rod Hull and Emu. His interview style was open, relaxed and attentive, focused on the interviewee. He’s at the festival in conversation with his son Mike on 18 May, showing highlights from the Parkinson archive.

Mary Queen of Scots and Jo Brand: both ‘take-me-as-I-am’, headstrong women Our action star at the festival is Sir Robin Knox-Johnston (b.1939), who in 1969 became the first person to perform a singlehanded non-stop circumnavigation of the globe in one of the smallest boats to enter the race – he rounded Cape Horn 20 days before his closest competitor. If this wasn’t enough, he won the two-handed Round Britain Race in 1970 and 1974, as well as the Jules Verne Trophy for the fastest circumnavigation in 1994. Suffice it to say that he’s super fast on water, and grazing superhero status. He’s at the Assembly Rooms on 23 May to reveal the extraordinary story of his life from his book Running Free. Writer and broadcaster Melvyn Bragg (b.1939) is best-known as presenter of The South Bank Show and the Radio 4 discussion series In Our Time. He’s had a pretty amazing life, from his early days in Carlisle and Wigton (where he lived above a pub) to reading Modern History at Oxford, his friendship with Labour Party leaders Tony Blair and Neil Kinnock and his active involvement with the arts. He talks about his latest novel, Love Without End, based on the love story of Heloise and Abelard, on 24 May.

Prue Leith (b.1940) replaced our own Mary Berry on The Great British Bake Off in 2017. While initially resentful, we have now taken her into our hearts, along with her bright outfits and exuberant necklaces, because she does appear to know about soggy bottoms. She talks to George Miller about her life-long passion for food and fiction, including her new novel The Lost Son, completing her Angelotti Chronicles trilogy on 23 May.

A rock band from Merseyside called The Beatles (formed in 1960) became the most influential band in history, mixing up influences and using unconventional recording techniques to create sounds that became associated with the counterculture of the era. Mark Lewisohn and Alan Johnson talk to David Hepworth about the band’s enduring appeal on 26 May.

Pam Ayres (b.1947), who hit the big time with her appearance on Opportunity Knocks in 1975, specialises in rhyming poetry about everyday subjects. Her poems’ delivery is characterised by her strong North Berkshire accent and her immaculate timing. She talks to Paul Blezard about her poetry, life and loves on 21 May. Jo Brand (b.1957), after 10 years in psychiatric nursing, moved to the alternative comedy stand-up scene where she had the stage name Sea Monster. In 2007 she learned how to play the organ in four months before performing Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D Minor for an audience of 8,000 people at the Royal Albert Hall, which says something about the woman she is. She talks to Francesca Beauman about her book Born Lippy on 18 May. There’s no doubt about it, Barbie (launched in 1959) is an icon of our era, reproduced well over a billion times. She was one of the first dolls taking an adult form and is named after her designer’s daughter, Barbara. But does she represent the characteristics of female independence or is she a metaphor for a culture preoccupied with how a woman looks? Moira Redmond, Zawe Ashton and Marisa Bate consider the evidence on 26 May.

Parky would have been a genteel escort for Jane

Pam and the Roman invaders would have produced some interesting poetry, but maybe not in Latin Mariella Frostrup (b.1962) has many claims to fame, but our favourite is the fact that her gravelly voice (once voted the sexiest voice on television) is used in lifts on the London Overground. Her latest book, Wild Women, which she discusses at the Assembly Rooms on 21 May, is an anthology of the greatest women’s travel writing ever written, from Edith Wharton to Dervla Murphy. Dame Darcey Bussell (b.1969) became principal dancer at the Royal Ballet at just 20 years old. Her star shone brightly until she retired in 2007, and her role as judge on Strictly Come Dancing, where her willowy elegance distinguished her, kept her in the limelight, although she’s moving on to new projects this year. She shares stories from her book Evolved on 18 May. The last of our starry visitors is broadcaster and radio presenter Sara Cox (b.1974), who grew up on her father’s farm near Bolton before achieving her first television show in 1996. Sara chats about her book Until the Cows Come Home on 19 May, her funny and heartwarming comingof-age memoir. n To see the full programme and to book tickets for The Bath Festival, go online; thebathfestival.org.uk

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Alastair Fothergill.qxp_Layout 1 25/04/2019 12:51 Page 1

FESTIVAL | INTERVIEW

ONE WORLD, ONE CHANCE

Climate change is the single largest threat to our world. In a groundbreaking new documentary, director and producer Alastair Fothergill addresses the issues the planet is facing head on. He talks to Jessica Hope ahead of his appearance at The Bath Festival

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aving travelled to the planet’s most treacherous environments, explored its vast oceans, and encountered the freezing temperatures of the Arctic, director and producer Alastair Fothergill has seen more of the natural wonders of the Earth than most. Now, more than ever, these are under threat from climate change – and without urgent intervention will soon be lost forever. “Our biggest single challenge at the moment is global warming. It’s having an impact on all habitats and producing effects worldwide,” says Fothergill, who is renowned for his work producing some of the BBC’s landmark natural history documentaries such as Planet Earth and Frozen Planet. This sense of urgency is what inspired Fothergill and producer Keith Scholey to create their latest documentary series, Our Planet. “I felt the time had come to not only celebrate the natural world and look at what remains, but delve into more depth about the challenges our planet faces.” Our Planet, produced by Fothergill’s Bristol-based production company Silverback XVI TheBATHMagazine

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Films, is a Netflix Original documentary series and launched in April on the streaming service. The eight-part series, made in partnership with World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), showcases the most precious species and habitats from across all seven continents, from the most remote corners of the Arctic to the jungles of South America, via the deep dark oceans. “We don’t film destruction. Our Planet is about the value of the habitat. And we talk about biodiversity and what we must save if we want to pass the world on to the next generation,” says Fothergill. The series also reflects on the positive changes happening in the environment, such as the sighting of an aggregation of more than 200 humpback whales feeding off the coast of South Africa. A commercial whaling ban was implemented in the 1980s after the whale population had been decimated from worldwide hunting, therefore discovering the whales near South Africa means a considerable increase in its population. The crew were also able to capture remarkable footage from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster zone. “Using motion-

controlled cameras that were left there for two years, we were able to film wolves in Chernobyl. Wolves are the top predator, and you only get them if the whole habitat is healthy. And there are in fact more wolves in the exclusion zone of Chernobyl than all the surrounding areas,” he says. News of this highly anticipated series shot onto the world stage when its first advert debuted to viewers of the Super Bowl final in February – this was also the only advert that Netflix purchased to be broadcast at the big game. “I think this reflects Netflix’s extraordinary interest in the series. The Super Bowl is the most expensive advertising in America – and probably the world. They’ve never done an advert at the Superbowl for a documentary before, and they estimate that 120-million people viewed it,” says Fothergill. Broadcasting the series through Netflix also means that the series’ core message can be spread across a worldwide audience. “We will be shown in 190 countries, with 139-million subscribers. A lot of those subscribers are aged 16–30, which is the age group which has deserted terrestrial TV,


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Tiger: Kieran O’Donovan/Silverback Films, Fothergill: Sue Flood

AT ONE WITH NATURE: This page, Alastair Fothergill in Antarctica, and left, a male Siberian tiger – filmed by an Our Planet camera trap – patrols a mountain range in the Sikhote-Alin range in the Russian Far East

and they are also the people who really care about the environment,” he says. “We’ll be on Netflix for years to come, allowing us to continue the conversation.” Following the global climate strikes in March where children from more than 100 countries across the world walked out of their classrooms to protest against the lack of governmental action in preventing climate change, the discussion about preserving the Earth definitely isn’t wavering. In order to keep the conversation going, there is an enormous source of regularly updated online content available from the WWF following the series launch, so audiences can find out more about the habitats featured in the series, as well as what people can do in their everyday lives to make a positive difference to global warming. There is also a fully illustrated companion book to the series available, published by Bantam Press. Working together on a joint project, WWF, Netflix, PHORIA and Google have created an augmented reality (AR) globe installation called REWILD Our Planet, which will go on tour around the UK, Singapore and New York. The first installation opened at We The Curious in Bristol last month and is open to the public until 2 June. Visitors can explore the planet through AR, investigating the vast habitats of animals from across the world as if you were really there.

From a young age, Fothergill was fascinated by animals and the natural world. Born in London, he went to Harrow before reading zoology at Durham University where he entered a competition for students to make a natural history documentary. “We went to Botswana and made a really rather bad film. But it was a wonderful way of appreciating that film-making was a way for me to show my passion for the natural world to other people.” After graduating, he joined the BBC’s Natural History Unit in Bristol in 1983, producing programmes such as The Really Wild Show. His first job with Sir David Attenborough was on the 1990 series The Trials of Life, and he has continued to collaborate with him on countless projects. Attenborough, therefore, was a natural fit to narrate Our Planet. “Most of the damage we have done to the planet has happened during David’s lifetime,” says Fothergill. “He’s 93 in May, and has a legacy. He’s now decided to be more outspoken about [climate change] than ever before. “He’s the voice that is really trusted. We are saying some stark facts [in Our Planet] – some would say controversial facts – but they’re not. By working with WWF, we are 100% certain that it’s scientifically accurate. But we are saying things that some people really don’t want to hear. But when it comes

from David with his authority, that’s what is absolutely critical to us.” After almost 30 years at the Natural History Unit, including a spell as the unit’s leader aged only 32, Fothergill and Keith Scholey set up wildlife production company Silverback Films in 2012. Recognised for his outstanding contribution to natural history programming, Fothergill was made a Fellow of the Royal Television Society in 2016, and was presented with an honorary doctorate from the University of Bristol in 2018. After dedicating much of his life to helping promote and preserve the natural world, Fothergill is hoping that Our Planet can encourage people to take accountability for their actions and make a real change to the environment. He says, “The word ‘Our’ implies ownership and responsibility. We only have one.” n

Alastair Fothergill and Keith Scholey will be speaking about Our Planet at The Bath Festival on 24 May, 8pm, at the Assembly Rooms. Tickets £10; thebathfestival.org.uk

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TheBATHMagazine XVII


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FESTIVAL | EVENTS

Classical’s rising stars

As well as bringing renowned names from the classical world to the city, The Bath Festival will be championing the young, talented stars of the future with a range of classical music events this month Rising star Tabea Debus on the recorder

ORA Singers

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hether you’re a classical connoisseur or a concerto newbie, the programme for The Bath Festival (17–26 May) is brimming with performances from the classical and choral world. As well as attracting high profile names, the festival will be showing audiences that the future of classical music is in safe hands with a series of six-hour long concerts by some of the finest newcomers all under the age of 30. Here’s a look at what’s on offer this month… The nation will be listening to Bath on the first night of the festival as BBC Radio 2’s Friday Night Is Music Night will be transmitted live from the Forum on 17 May, 7.30pm. Ed Balls presents as the BBC Concert Orchestra and special guests Ben Forster and Hannah Waddingham perform the very best show tunes from the world of musical theatre. £15–£34. The first of the festival’s Classical Music Stars of the Future series features pianist Pavel Kolesnikov, whose international career has developed at an astonishing rate. He will be playing the music of early Beethoven, Brahms and Tchaikovsky on 18 May, 12pm, at St Swithin’s Church. £20. One of the most charismatic classical performers of today, harpsichordist Mahan Esfahani will be performing some of Bach’s most unforgettable music on 18 May, 5pm, at St Swithin’s Church (£26), while the excellent Castalian String Quartet will play Beethoven’s Razumovsky quartets and Elgar’s Piano Quintet at the Assembly Rooms on 19 May, 11am. £13–£34. The popular Iford Arts Festival presents Johann Strauss’s classic operetta Die Fledermaus on 19 May, 5pm, bringing this hilarious story of revenge, seduction and mistaken identity to the Guildhall. £45. XVIII TheBATHMagazine

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Virtuoso Tabea Debus explores and pushes the boundaries of music for the recorder, and has performed widely in Europe, Asia and the USA. With distinguished theorbo player Paula Chateauneuf, she has devised a sparkling programme of music by three great Baroque composers for 20 May, 12pm, at St Swithin’s Church. £20. The 2014 BBC Young Musician finalist, and oldest member of the talented KannehMason family, pianist Isata Kanneh-Mason is coming to St Swithin’s Church on 22 May, 12pm, to perform the first of two concerts championing the music of Robert Schumann’s wife, Clara. £20. A multi-instrumentalist, producer and composer, known for his minimal approach, Roger Eno crafts an ambient sound rooted in classical music by incorporating elements of chamber, folk, jazz and electronic music. He will perform at the Assembly Rooms on 22 May, 7.30pm. £19. Having performed with orchestras such as The Philharmonia, the Royal Philharmonic and the English Chamber Orchestra, violinist Benjamin Baker presents a recital of Beethoven and Schumann on 23 May, 12pm, at St Swithin’s Church. The annual Concert for the People of Bath, dedicated to the memory of Brian and Margaret Roper, will take place on 23 May, 7.30pm, at the Forum. Encouraging future generations to develop a love of classical music, this year’s programme features Bath Philharmonia alongside BBC Young Musician finalist and Proms star Jess Gillam on saxophone, and Isata Kanneh-Mason will perform the second of Clara Schumann’s piano concertos. The night will be brought to a close by Ravel’s blazing Bolero. £15–£38. After winning the Most Promising Pianist prize at the Sydney International Competition, Daniel Lebhardt is set for

international stardom. His recital on 24 May, 12pm, at St Swithin’s Church will feature a programme ranging from the charm of Beethoven’s early sonata to the mellow beauty of Brahms’s late piano pieces. £20. After his acclaimed horn recital at the 2016 BBC Young Musician of the Year Final, Ben Goldscheider now performs as guest principal with many major orchestras around the world. He will be at St Swithin’s Church on 25 May, 12pm. £20. Piotr Anderszewski’s performances of Beethoven’s Diabelli Variations have been renowned worldwide for 25 years as a music-making phenomenon. The pianist is coming to the Assembly Rooms on 25 May, 2pm, for a performance that classical fans won’t want to miss. £13–£34. Renowned for celebrating diversity in classical music, the first professional orchestra in Europe to be made up of primarily black and minority ethnic musicians, Chineke!, is coming to the Forum on 25 May, 7.30pm. After their smash debut at the 2017 Proms, they will be bringing a programme featuring George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue and the timeless Porgy and Bess to Bath. £15–£36. The final day of the festival features an enchanting performance by the ORA Singers on 26 May, 7.30pm, at the Assembly Rooms. The choir will present great Renaissance choral masterpieces alongside newly commissioned music, with a cappella choral works by Clemens non Papa, Gabriel Jackson, Palestrina, Grier, Victoria, John Barber, de Ceballos, McKevitt, Esquivel, O’Regan and de Vivanco. £13–£34. n

To see the full programme and to book tickets for The Bath Festival, go online; thebathfestival.org.uk

Ben Goldscheider: Kaupo Kikkas/ORA: Nick Rutter

2016 BBC Young Musician of the Year finalist, horn player Ben Goldscheider


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FESTIVAL | EVENTS

Inquisitive minds

Whether it’s genes or plastic reduction, psychotherapy or the truth about dieting, The Bath Festival has got a range of science-related events to suit all our curiosities this month

Acclaimed psychotherapist Philippa Perry

World-leading cardiac surgeon Samer Nashef

F

rom how the body works to climate change and mental health to child psychology – these are some of the big topics readers are taking more of an interest in when wandering around bookshops these days. Science plays a key part in the themes featured at The Bath Festival (17–26 May) this year. Here’s some of the events to look out for over the coming weeks… The Nobel Prize-winning scientist Venki Ramakrishnan talks to writer, scientist and BBC Radio 4 regular Vivienne Parry about his fascinating journey to decode DNA in his new book The Gene Machine on 18 May, 12.30pm at the Assembly Rooms. £10. Consultant cardiac surgeon Samer Nashef is a world-leading expert on risk and quality in surgical care. He will be speaking about his new book, The Angina Monologues, and will be revealing the heartstopping stories of

Kate Double, Mr B’s Emporium “I’m so looking forward to...”

transplants and bypasses on 18 May, 2.30pm at the Assembly Rooms. £10. The threat of climate change is more present than ever. Journalist Ellie Mae O’Hagan talks to Greenpeace’s head of oceans Will McCallum (How To Give Up Plastic) and professor at the Institute for Social Futures at Lancaster University, Mike Berners-Lee (There Is No Planet B) on 18 May, 5.15pm, at the Assembly Rooms, as they share expert advice on how we can all take proactive, individual steps to help protect the environment and make a global difference. £9. James Long will talk to Wendy Mitchell (Somebody I Used To Know) about her experience of living with dementia on 23 May, 10.30am at the Assembly Rooms. They will be joined by author and campaigner Nicci Gerrard (What Dementia Teaches Us About Love) and journalist Steph

Booth (Married To Alzheimer’s) who will reveal the struggles of caring for her husband, actor Tony Booth. £10. Join the award-winning author Nathan Filer as he talks about his newest title, The Heartland, to Philippa Perry on 25 May, 11.45am, at the Masonic Hall. This powerful book of essays and personal stories will challenge and illuminate our understanding of those with schizophrenia. £10. The number of people suffering with stress and anxiety is escalating. Join the bestselling author Matt Haig on 19 May, 6.45pm, at the Assembly Rooms as he talks about his book Notes on a Nervous Planet and explores the notion of whether we can stay human in a technological world. £15. In her new book The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read, psychotherapist Philippa Perry talks about the mysteries of forming child-parent relationships. She will explore how parents make strong bonds with their children and how this can impact mental health in childhood and beyond on 25 May, 4.30pm, at the Assembly Rooms. £10. Sugar or fat? Laziness or poverty? Gut microbes or genes? The human race is getting fatter and food choice has never felt more complicated. Anthony Warner, aka The Angry Chef (The Truth About Fat) and University of Cambridge geneticist and television presenter Dr Giles Yeo (Gene Eating) delve into the latest theories, scrutinise diet advice and provide audiences with evidence-based science that everyone can digest on 25 May, 10.45am, at the Assembly Rooms. £10. n To see the full programme and to book tickets for The Bath Festival, go online; thebathfestival.org.uk

Hollie McNish

Sara Cox

18 May, 5.45pm, Literature Lounge

19 May, 2.30pm, Assembly Rooms

I’ve seen Hollie McNish read some of her poetry before and she was spectacular. Her poetry is lyrical and relatable, funny and thought-provoking and she always delivers her insights with such warmth. Among her repertoire you’ll find discussions of politics, motherhood, and friendships.

Now the presenter of Radio 2’s Drivetime, Sara Cox is the ultimate antidote to my road rage. I adore her down-to-earth sense of humour, which always has me in stitches on my drive home. It’s going to be fascinating to hear about Sara’s rural upbringing and I’ll be in the queue to get my copy of her book signed.

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TheBATHMAgAzine XIX


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CHEF | INTERVIEW

COOKING UP A STORM If you want to make The Angry Chef live up to his name, just mention clean-eating or sugarfree – Anthony Warner talks to Melissa Blease about the myriad food messages all around us and challenges some of the pervading trends

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he Angry Chef’s blog is not exactly bedtime reading for those of a delicate disposition. Take, for example, the philosophy at the core of his multiple tirades on the recent clean-eating trend (with profanities duly deleted): “The demonisation of perfectly sensible food choices is ignorant, misguided and prejudicial.” Or, his perspective on the carnivore diet: “An utterly delusional, nutrient-deficient dietary fad, largely undertaken by inadequate, disaffected males attempting to live out caveman fantasies in the modern age.” His thoughts on sugar could hardly be described as sweet, either: “We attack supermarkets for selling cakes, yet rarely challenge their exploitative wages that leave millions of hardworking people in poverty.” Now I’m not generally prone to bouts of extreme trepidation before an interview, but Anthony Warner – the real-life wordwarrior behind the impassioned Angry Chef persona – is rattling the journalistic equivalent of my saucepan lids before we’ve even said hello. However... XX TheBATHMagazine

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“A lot of people assume that I’m as foulmouthed and tempestuous in real life as I may appear to come across on my blog, but I’m generally not like that at all,” he says – in calm, gentle tones that completely belie his public image. “I created The Angry Chef in order to be heard in a world that sells us ideas, products, philosophies and beliefs, often in a disingenuous fashion. The anger is genuine, but in my real life I express that anger in a more socially acceptable way.” Anthony has worked in the food industry for 25 years as a development chef for large restaurant groups and in product development for big-brand food manufacturers and retailers. But in 2015, he began a mission to fight back against – and expose – the “lies, pretensions and stupidity in the world of food,” bringing both his science background (he has BSc from “a decent university”) and his passion for what and how we eat together on one fascinating menu. “I became acutely aware that there was a lot of stuff around diet and the food industry in general appearing online, where a lot of emerging ‘food celebrities’ were

attracting a great deal of attention,” he recalls, when asked about when The Angry Chef first donned his whites. “It was all very interesting, but when I looked closely, a lot of them were presenting some quite problematic, misinformed statements

Anthony Warner, aka The Angry Chef


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FESTIVAL | INTERVIEW

dressed up as fact. I initially created my blog in order to share my own opinions on the subject with a few friends and colleagues, but my message quickly resonated with a lot of people who were sick of being made to feel guilty about how they eat, or made to feel like they weren’t eating in an ‘acceptable’ way, or being told that what they ate was harmful, or stupid, or dangerous. I’ve always had an interest in pseudoscience and false beliefs, and why we hold them. But I’d never written anything before, and I certainly never expected what I wrote to become so popular.”

The relationship we have with food is very problematic, and often the way people are made to feel about eating makes life really difficult to navigate

Popular? Anthony’s work swiftly became the hottest dish of the day. Since instigating the blog, he’s published two hugely wellreceived books (The Truth About Fat: Why Obesity is Not that Simple, and The Angry Chef: Bad Science and the Truth About Healthy Eating, in 2017 and 2019 respectively, by Oneworld Publications) and has been cited in The Telegraph’s hit list of the 50 most powerful people in food. “It’s great that both the blog and the books are being recognised as significant or seen as providing a challenging and perhaps important narrative that the world of food writing has generally been missing,” he says, of his success. “But I’m much more interested in how widely the message can reach, from the food pages and out into the wider public domain. The relationship we have with food is very problematic, and often the way people are made to feel about eating makes life really difficult to navigate; there are so many ubiquitous messages out

there, and we really need to be careful because vulnerable people can be seriously affected by that. “In general, we accept it all far too much, not only from obscure corners of the internet but also from mainstream culture, and the way our bodies – particularly women’s bodies – are talked about. We’re being exposed to a diet culture that makes us feel bad about ourselves; you could say I’m fighting back against that culture, using facts.” So does modern life in general make Anthony angry? “My biggest anger is caused by people who constantly hark back to a time in the past when they believe things were better, like the 1970s. I was alive in the 1970s and our diets were terrible: you couldn’t buy salad, kids stuffed their faces in sweet shops, we ate Crispy Pancakes washed down with bottles of Coca Cola for dinner. Today, supermarkets are packed with fresh fruit and vegetables, and fantastic fresh fish, and things that were never available to us even ten years ago, but suddenly current narratives such as Brexit ‘Taking Our Country Back’ or Trump’s ‘Make America Great Again’ are really popular. People who think that everything was better back in the day without actually looking at the evidence of what it was actually like back in the day; that’s what annoys me most.” Looking forward, Anthony’s next book will raise big questions about the future of

food. “There’s no chance that our diets will be the same in 2050 as they are today,” he says, rather ominously. “Dramatic changes must be made for a number of different reasons, largely because the way we eat now is just not sustainable for a growing world population. We talk about the impact of diet on health, but you can’t disentangle that from sustainability. The past hasn’t given us any clues as to how we’re going to feed 10 billion people on the agricultural land that we have now; we’re facing huge challenges.” Fortunately for Anthony and, presumably, his friends, family and blood pressure (although he’d probably have a lot to say about the diet-related ‘causes’ of the latter) food brings him great happiness, too. “A good day for me involves lots of time talking, thinking and writing about food, then cooking for my family or people that I want to be around. One really important thing that we forget about food, in our modern culture, is that it’s all about sharing it with people that we care about – those shared moments are when food really brings benefits to our health.” All these topics and many more will be on the agenda when Anthony visits Bath this month, bringing his good friend and colleague Dr Giles Yeo – a pioneer in studies of the cause of obesity and the author of Gene Eating, published in 2018 – along to discuss, scrutinise and, more than likely, totally debunk the latest attentiongrabbing food news. “The event will appeal to anybody who has ever been confused by a news story about diet, health, nutrition or obesity, or is ever worried by those stories,” says Anthony. “Dr Giles and I will try to present the picture as it really is, cutting through the hype, the hyperbole and the ridiculous guilt-ridden associations that people have with eating.” The Angry Chef is cooking up a pretty cool food-world storm. n Anthony Warner will be speaking at The Science of Diets talk at The Bath Festival on 25 May, 10.45am at The Assembly Rooms. £10; thebathfestival.org.uk The Angry Chef: angry-chef.com

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TheBATHmagazine XXI


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FINALE | WEEKEND

CLOSING ROUND: Main image, The Recreation Ground will be home to a fiesta on 1–2 June, offering live music, poetry, street food, family fun and more. Inset from left, Raleigh Ritchie, Mabel and Van Morrison will be performing on the main stage over the weekend

A GRAND FINISH

Closing The Bath Festival will be the epic Finale Weekend featuring legendary music acts and plenty of fun for all the family on 1–2 June

A

fter the success of last year’s inaugural Finale Weekend, the fiesta is back at the Recreation Ground this year, ready to round off The Bath Festival in style. With some top headliners, two music stages and spoken word events, there’s a lot of fun for all to be had. Hosted by Bath Festivals and Orchard Live, headlining the main stage on the Saturday is Grammy Award-winning electronic band Clean Bandit, who have had four number-one UK singles and were recently nominated for two Brit awards. Supporting them is rising star Mabel, who was shortlisted in the breakthrough artist category at the 2019 Brit Awards, and Bristol-born singer-songwriter, rapper and actor Raleigh Ritchie (real name Jacob Anderson), who you might recognise from his role as Grey Worm in Game of Thrones. Opening the party will be London’s hottest new soul, jazz and R&B singer Jaz Karis. Topping the bill on the Sunday will be legendary musician and singer-songwriter Van Morrison, who has been performing to audiences around the world for five decades XXII TheBATHMagazine

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and recently released his 40th studio album. He’ll be supported by MOBO Awardwinning singer Corinne Bailey Rae, whose global hits include Put Your Records On and Like A Star. Irish rock band Hothouse Flowers and the classic soul and funk band MF Robots also join the line-up. There will be an eclectic mix of acts on the Big Top stage including Balcony, who played at Boardmasters last summer; Little Thief, a three-piece from Bristol reminiscent of The Black Keys and Queens of the Stone Age; and Renegade Brass Band, who have established themselves as the country’s premiere hip-hop brass bands. Plus look out for emerging folk singer/songwriter Michael Clark, and Tom Speight whose blend of folk and contemporary pop has amassed more than 43 million combined streams on Spotify. The festival is putting on Bath’s biggest talent competition during the festival, with live heats taking place at Moles, the Pig and Fiddle and Komedia, as acts vie to win a day’s recording with a professional engineer at the prestigious Real World Studios. During the Finale Weekend, the finalists will

take to the main stage in front of the crowds and a panel of music industry judges before a winner is crowned. There will also be a spoken-word stage where you can expect exciting new theatre and circus acts visiting from Bath Fringe’s Bedlam Fair. If you’re thinking about how to keep the kids occupied, then the brilliant children’s events organisers Super Pirates will be creating lots of fun for families. Expect water fights, crafts, face painting, storytelling and games for all ages. Plus, all activities in the family zone will be free. If rumbling stomachs come calling, then you won’t be short of food choices. There will be artisan food stalls available with a big focus on producers from the south west, including festival sponsors Bath Ales, local Bath Organic Farm burgers, and Styles Farmhouse Ice Cream from Exmoor. Grab a Pimms, and come rain or shine, the Finale Weekend is set to be a jam-packed party you won’t want to miss. n Tickets from £24.75. To book, go online; thebathfestival.org.uk


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FINALE | WEEKEND

Hothouse rock

Hothouse Flowers are an Irish rock group that combine traditional Irish music with influences from soul, gospel and rock. Their 1980s hits – including Don’t Go, Love Don’t Work This Way and Hallelujah Jordan – still resonate powerfully to us and it was fascinating to hear the work take shape. We decided to remain as true to ourselves as possible in the studio and not to rely on technology. Everything you hear on that album was played – no machines, no synthesisers – just five guys giving it their all.

What were some memorable highlights from the 1985–1994 years? Playing Wembley Stadium in London in 1991 as a special guest for INXS was a great gig – watching and hearing the entire stadium singing and clapping along to I Can See Clearly Now was a standout moment. The first time we played at Glastonbury Festival in 1989 we decided that the world should be just like that – peace, love, sunshine and music. It was also a great thrill to play multiple nights in the Royal Albert Hall in the round.

How do you work musically together as a band? Hothouse Flowers started as buskers in Dublin. What are your memories of those times?

Bono gave you encouragement and support in the 1980s. What was it that Bono saw, do you think?

Busking was like a right of passage or a path to freedom for us. It provided us with an arena where we could hone the craft of communication between performer and artist, and underline the fact that you can stop people in their tracks and transform the space no matter where you are. We had played indoor concerts before we went out busking, and looking back I guess busking was like the anarchic wing of the band. Anything and everything was possible in those given moments and that dynamic remains with the band still.

I think he saw a uniqueness in the band. You would hear our song Love Don’t Work This Way and think it was like a classic soul song. And whenever we got on stage we gave it absolutely everything… We had a hunger and energy to transform whatever space we were given to play in and to take people with us on a musical journey. This remains to this day the primal instinct that keeps us going.

What role did punk play in the band’s evolution? Punk rock appeared on our horizons in the late 1970s when we were in our early teens – it was as if music and rebellion were mixed together in a brand-new way. It coincided with a time in all of our lives when we were looking to break free anyway and stand up to authority. But punk rock lived alongside traditional Irish music and reggae music and all kinds of other music for us and we never really had to make too much of a distinction between them… They all represented freedom.

What have been your biggest musical influences? We grew up surrounded by traditional Irish music and that remains a deep source – bands like Planxty, the Bothy Band, de Danann and Moving Hearts. Alongside this I had a passion for blues such as John Lee Hooker and BB King. I loved (and still love) the lyricism of Bob Dylan and the swagger of The Rolling Stones.

We pretty much make it all up as we go along – we get behind our songs and let the music fly.

How do you feel about your most long-lasting ballads: Songs like Don't Go and Love Don't Work This Way? They feel as fresh as they ever did – we love them. Our better-known songs have been very good to us, so we keep them alive by reaching into them constantly.

How do you balance your solo careers with the band? Your first album People (1988) was the most successful debut album in Irish history. How do you look back on it? We had an amazing time recording this. The whole recording process was relatively new

Much like life itself – you learn to keep the plates spinning! The solo careers feed the band and vice versa, so it’s a happy symbiosis. n

Dr Andy Salmon Pro-Vice Chancellor, Bath Spa University “I’m looking forward to...” Roger Eno 22 May, 7.30pm, Assembly Rooms I’m no musician, but I love music, especially music that manages to cross over a whole series of boundary lines with beauty and economy. Roger Eno is cutting edgecontemporary, yet his style is rooted in earlier genres such as classical and jazz. He teaches us that for artistic purposes we must not ignore the past. His performance will be a real treat.

Explaining the Extraordinary 25 May, 11.45am, Masonic Hall Author Nathan Filer occupies a rich space at the junction of really great writing, and a searching analysis of identity and mental health. Addressing mental health is of great importance to me, for our whole society and especially for our young people. Hearing Nathan talk to psychotherapist Philippa Perry is bound to be challenging and fascinating.

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“We have a responsibility, every one of us” David Attenborough on Blue Planet II “I admire the freshness and attack of her writing, the passion and curiosity that light up the page” Hilary Mantel on Emma Smith “Perhaps the most completely convincing reading of the Diabelli I’ve ever heard in the concert hall” The Guardian on Piotr Anderszewski “Press this into the hands of everyone you know. It is utterly brilliant” Helena Kennedy on Invisible Women

“... lighting up the hall with her seemingly effortless virtuosity” The Arts Desk on Jess Gillam

“A younger, darker Pogues with more astonishing power” The Guardian on Lankum

“Ridiculously silly... wickedly funny” The Times on Austentacious “Even Liszt would doff the cap at Esfahani’s furious arpeggios and decorative flourishes” The Times on Mahan Esfahani “...brilliant, timely, funny, heartbreaking” Jojo Moyes on Queenie “Take a bow and give yourself a big round of applause” Elton John on Isata Kanneh-Mason

T

6M l • 17–2 a v i t s e F he Bath

ay a

2 019 • 01 2 e n u J nd 1–2

iva bathfest e h t • 2 25 46336

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London Camera Exchange in focus

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ath is one of the world’s most photogenic cities, it’s also home to an ever growing community of highly rated professional photographers as well as enthusiasts, and even the best of bloggers are using real cameras to capture superior imagery. Central to it all, many of them will be regular customers of Bath’s best camera and optical store; the London Camera Exchange. There has been a photographic store on the abbey corner of Cheap Street for more years than most can remember, with the small independent LCE taking over from Cyril Howes in the mid 80s and despite the huge advances in photographic and optical technologies, the core principles of LCE remain the same – it’s all about the professional expertise and most all the great customer service the staff offer. With their broad knowledge they are always happy to give help or advice. Some of them, including Mark the manager, used to be professional photographers and some are avid Bird watchers, so know exactly what their customers might need, and they are of course, pretty adept at problem solving. LCE’s main speciality these days are in cameras and binoculars. For photographers they are a Nikon Professional dealer, Panasonic Lumix Elite centre, Sony Professional centre and also keep ranges of Fujifilm, Olympus and Canon cameras. When it comes to optics they have a huge array of binoculars and spotting scopes, priced from £19.99 to over £3,000. Top end brands include Nikon, Swarovski, Vortex, Bresser, Opticron and Carl Zeiss. With close links to the now closed outlet in Chew Valley; Bath LCE is fulfilling all optical business – which is why the shop have a great variety of stock available, and also is the centre for most of the company’s online binocular and spotting scope sales. As the name suggests LCE will buy or part exchange equipment so customers can bring in their old gear to upgrade to newer models. It’s almost a form of recycling, but also a great way to purchase quality used equipment from a trusted source. The LCE team also like to be fully involved in local photographic and optical affairs and their expert knowledge can be found as they support local camera clubs. Throughout the year they organise various events and some major shows where top camera and optic manufacturers also take part to advise and give demonstrations. These include in store days, camera walks and training sessions in local venues. The Bath shop also hosts two major photographic shows at The Guildhall. Set in the wonderful ballroom, with a great variety of equipment on display, customers can see the latest gear, attend seminars and take advantage of all the special offers on the day. Coming up soon – their first show is on Saturday 8 June and the autumn event takes place on 19 October. Put the dates in your diary. The shop is open seven days a week including most bank holidays and customers are alway assured of a very warm welcome form Mark and the team. n Get in touch. London Camera Exchange Bath 13 Cheap Street, Bath BA1 1NB Tel: 01225 462234

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We provide Bath Airport transfers to and from all major airports in the uk. We use only HI spec vehicles and give a near on chauffeur experience at less than regular taxi prices. - Airport transfers - City to city travel - Hi spec vehicles - 1-8 seat vehicles available - Account work considered - Free Wifi in selected vehicles - Card payments taken with Izettle - Prices start from as little as £39 Call or email us for a quote now! Web: romanbathprivatehire.co.uk Email: Info@romanbathprivatehire.co.uk Tel: 01225 484346

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RECEIVE THE BATH MAGAZINE BY POST AND NEVER MISS OUT We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month, and there’s plenty of pick up points around town. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family, we offer a magazine mailing service. Make sure you never miss an issue... all 12 issues from just £30*

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AUCTIONEERS IN FINE ART, ANTIQUES AND LUXURY GOODS Highlights from our 23rd April sale A 19th century Chinese white jade pendant carved as two fish in a framework of reeds with two rings suspended from a wooden stand. 12cm tall. SOLD £2,280 incl. premium

A Chinese watercolour painting in scroll of mountain river scene. SOLD £1,080 incl. premium A 19th century Chinese white jade carved as conjoined rings surmounted by a dragon on wooden stand. 7.5cm tall. SOLD £7,800 incl. premium

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ARTS | EXHIBITIONS

DRESSING THE PAST

The Fashion Museum is taking a jump back to the 19th century with a new permanent display which draws on its world-renowned collection of historical fashionable dress. Words by Jessica Hope

Cream silk satin wedding dress with a wax orange blossom corsage and needlelace trimmings, 1900, worn by Emily Poor

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Purple silk satin shoes richly embroidered with glass beads and diamanté, about 1898

Cream silk waistcoat with coloured silk embroidery, 1850s

has all the traditions of a wedding dress you could expect, including a wax orange blossom as her something old, detailing made from the trim of a handkerchief as her something borrowed, and blue ribbons on her garters as something blue. The display also reflects on men’s fashion and features a man’s waistcoat from the 1850s that was once worn at Queen Victoria’s royal court. The cream waistcoat, covered in intricate, brightly coloured silk embroidery, demonstrates how while court dress for men had not changed much since the previous century, they were able to add elegant details and splashes of colour to brighten their clothing, as well as reflecting the pomp and ceremony of court. The museum will also be opening another display this month called Fashion Focus,

which will provide regular changing displays that go into further detail into the history of fashion. The first display, Little and Large, presents the museum’s rare antique doll collection, some of which were once used by shopkeepers to display their new clothing ranges to potential customers. Mirroring the dolls’ clothing are examples of items once worn by adults in the 1870s and 1880s. Collection Stories follows on from the museum’s other permanent exhibition, A History of Fashion in 100 Objects, and allows us a peek behind the scenes at the Fashion Museum’s remarkable items and the unique stories each piece has to tell. n Collection Stories is open from 17 May at the Fashion Museum, Bath and is included in normal admission; fashionmuseum.co.uk

Images courtesy of the Fashion Museum, Bath

F

ollowing the success of the Fashion Museum’s Royal Women exhibition which closed last month, a new permanent display showcasing selected items from the 19th century from the museum’s outstanding collection is opening in May – and don’t assume it’s just morning suits and big black dresses and petticoats, the Victorians knew how to play with colour and weren’t afraid to show it. The new display, entitled Collection Stories, allows visitors to see a number of the exceptional pieces that have previously been hidden in the museum’s archives. From shoes to waistcoats, hats to wedding dresses, the items will provide a top-to-toe glimpse into the varying styles, fashions and technologies that changed throughout the 19th century, as well as the stories of the people who once wore them. One item featured, displayed among the museum’s clothing rails and storage boxes, is a vibrant red striped plush stole lined with strawberry pink silk, dating from about 1812. The item has been in the collection since the museum was first established in 1963 by fashion historian Doris Langley Moore, who once wrote to the stole’s donor revealing that this was one of her favourite pieces in the museum. One of the stars on show is a wedding dress worn by socialite Emily Poor in 1900. The dress, which is in impeccable condition, was made by designer Mrs O’Donovan and


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Prominent French artworks, local artist collaborations and a long-standing open exhibition are just some of what are on show this month at Bath’s galleries and museums

GRAY M.C.A 5 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath Open: Wednesday – Saturday, 10am–4pm, Monday and Tuesday by appointment Tel: 01225 422117 Web: graymca.com THE SPRING SHOW Throughout May Gray M.C.A continues to showcase Fashion Illustration and Modern Textiles. During May original works from the estates of Kenneth Paul Block, Antonio Lopez and many more, together with the best of international artist textiles including Picasso, Calder and Moore. Above, Saraband, 1956, by Robert McGowen, screenprinted on cotton, Edinburgh Weavers

BRIAN GOODSELL AND DAVID MCMILLAN 44AD Artspace, Abbey Street, Bath Web: davidmcmillanartist.co.uk / 44ad.net VISUAL EXPLORATIONS OF THE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN 7–12 May Brian Goodsell’s approach to his painting is akin to that of a modern jazz tenor sax man who improvises. Both musician and painter venture into the unknown. David McMillan, with his fine and subtle sense of colour and design, creates a mysterious range of symmetrical and asymmetrical images. Both artists have developed their current practice over many years of experimentation and their visual explorations Rock and Rollingstock continue. by Brian Goodsell 40 TheBATHMagazine

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THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM Great Pulteney Street, Bath Open: Daily, 10am–5pm (11am Sundays) Tel: 01225 388569, web: holburne.org WHY MUSEUMS MATTER Until 19 May An exciting installation as a visual response to more than 1,000 ideas and comments by visitors on the subject of ‘Museums matter to me because…’, allowing us to understand what people value about museums in contemporary society. In the Wirth Gallery, there will be a display of the artwork of those who have engaged with objects from the Holburne’s collection, examining the connection between museums, creativity, mental health and wellbeing. VUILLARD: THE POETRY OF THE EVERYDAY 24 May – 15 September Édouard Vuillard was one of the leading figures in French art at the end of the 19th-century, famed for his small, subtle studies, mostly of figures in interiors. The Poetry of the Everyday celebrates the unique qualities of his early work (from the 1890s) in which he balanced an obsession with patterned fabrics and wallpaper with subtle, domestic psycho-dramas to create paintings with a striking emotional intensity. This is the most extensive UK exhibition of Vuillard’s works in more than 15 years, including many that are rarely publicly displayed.

The Candlestick by Édouard Vuillard


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A RARE BROADSIDE AND SURVIVAL… Lawrences’ recent 550-lot auction of books, maps, manuscripts and photography in Crewkerne recorded some remarkable results, with a steady demand in evidence throughout. One worth particular mention is a rare broadside (single printed sheet) published in 1688 and entitled, The Beginning, Progress and End of Man. Regarded as one of the earliest examples of the moving image, this unusual publication was intended to instruct and entertain. Believed to be unique for being coloured, and comparable with only a few others in the British Library and the Bodleian Library in Oxford, this rather worn but intriguing remnant from the era of the Restoration showed the strength of demand for rare ephemeral items. It was once in the collection of Thomas Pengelly, the noted 17th century merchant. To the delight of the vendor who had delivered it to Lawrences within a sketchbook unaware of its potential, this carefullycatalogued curiosity was bought for £9,500. Lawrences are able to handle entire libraries and have done so for many of the nation’s greatest private and public collections, as well as the thousands of private entries that come through the door each year. For further details, please contact: Robert Ansell on 01460 73041 or email robert.ansell@lawrences.co.uk

Lawrences AUCTIONEERS The Linen Yard, South Street, Crewkerne, Somerset TA18 8AB. T 01460 73041

lawrences.co.uk

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

VICTORIA ART GALLERY By Pulteney Bridge Open: Daily, 10.30am–5pm Tel: 01225 477233 Web: victoriagal.org.uk

GALLERY NINE

BATH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS 114TH ANNUAL OPEN EXHIBITION 18 May – 29 June Now in its 114th year, this popular exhibition showcases the best of the region’s artistic talent and is a must for art lovers and collectors alike. The society was founded in 1904 with 26 members. It has grown over the years Sweet Abundance by Stella Penrose to a membership of around 120 diverse, talented artists. Many distinguished 20th-century painters have exhibited with the society including Walter Sickert, Patrick Heron, Mary Fedden and Howard Hodgkin. The annual exhibition, which is open to non-members, attracts up to 1,000 entries, with sales doubling in the last few years. The prizes on offer total more than £3,000. During the exhibition members of the public can vote for their favourite artwork, the winner receiving the Public Choice Prize.

SPRING EXHIBITION

9b Margaret’s Buildings, Bath Open: Monday to Saturday, 10am – 5pm Tel: 01225 319197, web: gallerynine.co.uk

BATH OPEN STUDIOS Web: bathopenstudios.co.uk

Until 31 May

This exhibition features a range of work by artists including original signed prints and ceramics by internationally recognised artist Bruce McLean. Potter Clive Bowen studied painting at Cardiff Art School before being taken on as an apprentice by Michael Leach. He has been making wood-fired slipware since 1971. Sasha Wardell’s distinctive combination of pure white slipcast bone china is treated with unique decorating techniques and finished in a carefully chosen palette of muted, subtle colours. Jeweller Charmian Harris makes beautiful one-off pieces from silver, gold and semi-precious stones. Emily Nixon creates handcrafted rings for weddings and engagements and precious pieces that are inspired by textures found along the tide line. Red Garden Path by Bruce McLean

4–6 May – Larkhall Open Studios 11–12 May – Newbridge Arts Trail 25–27 May – Bear Flat Artists Open Studios 22–23 June – Widcombe Art Trail Bath’s popular arts trails feature more than 180 artists and makers as they open their doors to the public to showcase original artwork, give demonstrations or offer workshops. It’s an opportunity to discover the wide range of art and craft being created here, meet artists and makers, Cornish Coast by talk about their ideas or just enjoy browsing. Kerrie McNeil You might even buy a piece of original art at an affordable price. With painting, printmaking, photography and sculpture on show as well as glass, jewellery, ceramics and textile art, there’s something for all tastes. Whether you’re walking or driving, the routes are manageable and refreshments are provided at pubs, cafés and some artist venues. Turn to page 46 to find out more.

DAVID SIMON CONTEMPORARY 3 – 4 Bartlett Street, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm, closed Wednesday and Sunday Tel: 01225 460189 Web: davidsimoncontemporary.com MICHAEL ROTHENSTEIN: EXPLODING THE BOUNDARIES 3 May – 3 June A display of a unique collection of prints and original artworks of Michael Rothenstein, who was perhaps the most experimental British graphic artist of the 20th century. The exhibition of 90 Rothenstein works has been curated in collaboration with Rothenstein’s estate. The exhibition is accompanied by a major new illustrated book, written by Mel Gooding. David Simon comments that he is “honoured to be able to exhibit this extraordinary body of work by an artist who in many ways was underrated in his own time, but whose work was so influential to artists with his innovative print-making processes, some of the best examples of which we see in this major exhibition. This is an artist whose works are distinctive and iconic and in collections such as The Tate Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum, The British Museum and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.”

Left, Cockerel by Michael Rothenstein

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2018/19 Lecture Series

~ The last lecture of the season ~

Arsenic and Old Wallpaper The Darker side of William Morris! Poet, Artist, Philosopher, Socialist, best known for his wallpaper and fabrics. But less well known is his links to the richest copper and arsenic mine in Europe and his toxic green wallpaper said to have poisoned thousands across England!

Lecturer Geri Parlby

Monday 3rd June 1.30pm in The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street Bath Visitors welcome ÂŁ10 at the door (No Booking required)

www.theartssocietybath.com

Celebrating 50 years of the National Association of Decorative and Fine Arts Societies

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

CLIFTON CONTEMPORARY ART AXLE ARTS Leighton Road, Weston, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am–5pm by appointment Tel: 01225 461230, web: axlearts.com RACHEL JEFFERY 13 May – 1 June Cornish-based, abstract artist Rachel Jeffery takes her inspiration from landscape and geological formations. She has a special interest in natural forces, in particular light, and the stimulation of our senses. A graduate from Falmouth College of Art, Jeffery uses resin coloured with raw pigment. The technique gives a very short window with which to manipulate the flow and movement of the resin and so her canvases require careful foreplanning. She experiments continuously to create the exuberant celebrations of vivid colour, pattern and rhythm in her canvases. Yellow Flow by Rachel Jeffery

25 Portland Street, Bristol Open: Tuesday–Saturday, 10am–5pm Tel: 0117 317 9713, web: cliftoncontemporaryart.co.uk CLIFF AND CRESCENT: NEW WORKS BY NEIL PINKETT 10 May – 4 June The gallery will be showing a new collection of exciting works by celebrated en plein air landscape painter Neil Pinkett. Embracing the restless play of elements and unyielding terrain across his West Penwith home, Neil’s latest paintings also feature some very different landmarks, the elegant terraces and crescents of Clifton in Bristol. From ancient outcrops to refined architecture, Neil’s use of deeply textured, layered oils expresses the sheer physicality and presence of these diverse subjects. And the delicate play of light that glows from sky water and stone. Right, Evening Waves by Neil Pinkett

WALLER & WOOD 4 Abbey Green, Bath Open: Wednesday to Saturday, 11am–5pm, and Sunday, 12–4pm Tel: 07803 033629 Web: wallerandwood.co.uk

EMMA ROSE Upstairs at 78 Walcot Street, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am–5pm Tel: 07885 235915 / 01225 424424 Web: emmaroseartworks.com BLOOM 14–31 May This exhibition is built around the highlight painting Bloom, featured right. In response to the exuberance of the changing month of May, this exhibition features blossom, sun, storm, snow and mist abound in sky, sea and mountains. Her unique work is a mix of Indian inks and acrylics, occasionally using gold, copper and silver leaf. See Emma’s paintings, limited edition giclée prints and cards, and talk through commission ideas in her gallery. 44 TheBATHMagazine

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DISPLACED 24 May – 20 June This collaborative exhibition features the work of Annie Beardsley, Gary Wood and Carole Waller and aims to explore the theme of the unusual placement of objects and utensils associated with the ritual of food and dining. Annie Beardsley presents spoons inspired Spoons by Annie Beardsley by garden tools, the environment, and a search for a creative interpretation of the dining experience. Her utensils are made from a combination of semi-precious metals, and found objects recovered from places that have a particular significance for her. Gary’s ceramics include painted stoneware platters, interventions, platforms on which a spoon can rest, stages elevating food at the table. Carole’s work on painted and printed cloth explores the idea of place, placement and displacement. She is interested in Bath’s multiple layers of archeology and human habitation.

ART AT THE HEART OF THE RUH Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust, Combe Park, Bath Open: Monday – Sunday, 8am–8pm Web: artatruh.org GENIUS LOCI: SENSE OF A PLACE Central Gallery, 3 May – 18 July The title of this exhibition is taken from the Latin term genius loci, the guardian spirit or soul of a place. In contemporary use, it often refers to a location’s distinctive character or atmosphere, in other words, the sense of a place. This exhibition showcases five contemporary photographers: Sue Bishop, Benjamin Graham, Marianthi Lainas, Vanda Ralevska and Linda Wevill. n

Historique Aquitaine 33 by Linda Wevill


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The Framing Workshop has been trading as an independent family run business on Walcot Street for over 28 years. We treasure you, our client, and spend time helping you to ďŹ nd the best way to display and protect your cherished objects, artworks and memorabilia. Creativity and respect for each artwork are core to what we do. Every picture tells a story. Come and share yours.

80 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BD Tel: 01225 482748 www.theframingworkshop.com framing@theframingworkshop.com

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

Artful studios

More than 180 artists and makers from Larkhall, Newbridge, Bear Flat and Widcombe are opening up their doors in May and June for the annual open studios weekends. Each area has a trail map, which is available from local shops, Bath Central Library and Bath Visitor Information Centre. Here is what is in store... LARKHALL OPEN STUDIOS Saturday 4, Sunday 5 and Monday 6 May, 11am – 5pm Larkhall Open Studios welcomes 29 artists exhibiting for the first time this year. Nourish (venue one, on London Road) will host the work of Sarah Targett, Dominique Coiffait and Kate Clark, whose art shares a similar interest in flora and fauna. There will be delicious plant-based food, fine wines and lagers. Also new to Larkhall is Claremont Community Centre, venue 25, in Fairfield Park. This provides a light, bright space for 12 artists and wholesome refreshments from the kitchen. On the Sunday and Monday afternoons, you can enjoy the gentle music of the local psaltery player while admiring the paintings, photography and

jewellery. The age range of artists is wide, stretching from secondary-age pupils at St Mark’s School to an artist aged 101 in the Stratton House group exhibition at Claremont Community Centre. Across the road from the Community Centre is the new Claremont Pub, serving freshly baked pizzas. The school will run a café serving lunches and there will be craft activities for youngsters. The pub, the centre and the school will all provide a welcome rest if you’ve walked up from Larkhall. Ceramicist Alan Hemmings in studio 15 will be doing a raku firing on Saturday afternoon, and on Sunday and Monday morning he’s inviting the public to throw a pot. Bath Artist Printmakers, also venue one, invite you to see them working. And Vicky Sanders’ automata, at venue nine, reveals some unexpected surprises.

NEWBRIDGE ARTS TRAIL Saturday 11 and Sunday 12 May, 11am – 6pm Visit: newbridgeartstrail.com Celebrating its tenth year, the Newbridge Arts Trail brings together professional and non-professional artists and makers with Sometimes You Don’t Know What You’ve Got by Mark Thomas

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students, schools, business sponsors and the community. This year sees more than 40 artists opening up their doors, with 12 artists new to the trail. The array of art ranges from painting, printmaking, photography and digital art to jewellery, ceramics and sculpture. The Tootin Toucan by Rebecca Joy Percey

Waterworld by Olive Wood

self-guided trail has 16 venues, some where visitors can watch demonstrations, such as inking and printing processes. There’s an open garden at 165 Newbridge Hill as well as paintings and home accessories. A new venue this year is the café '8e' in Chelsea Road, where you can see paintings of rural landscapes from the south west and enjoy refreshments throughout the day. While most are private homes and studios, there are also group locations where several people exhibit together. At the Weston Methodist Church Hall in Kennington Road, there are examples of rug-hooking; oil, acrylic and watercolour painting; illustration, photography and digital art; unique silver and gemstone jewellery; and vibrant silk painting. Newbridge Primary School has work by the schoolchildren, while their art teacher and three other artists will show paintings and prints, ceramics and jewellery. Fairfield House, off Kelston Road, is the former residence of Emperor Haile Selassie. Here, two museum rooms display artefacts and information about Ethiopia and Rastafari culture. Artwork on display includes painting, drawing, prints, cards, photography and a video installation specially created for the trail.


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

WIDCOMBE ART TRAIL Saturday 22 and Sunday 23 June, 10.30am – 5.30pm Visit: widcombearttrail.com

Sculpture by Caspar Taylor

Tattoo heart by Lorelei Hunt

Art lovers are in for a treat at the new-look Widcombe Art Trail weekend. The trail this year will feature lots more artists’ homes, along with smaller, more intimate venues. This will allow for more informal interaction with the artists themselves, as well as insights into their working methods – not to mention a peek at some lovely homes. The revamped trail has attracted several new artists too: Sarah Ball will be showing her striking watercolours at one of the new venues, Carol Symon’s house, on Lyncombe Hill. Transport will be available to this venue. Just beyond, Rosemount Farm, also new to the trail, will host Alison Potter’s anthropomorphic pots. Completing the loop is Bewdley House, where painter Janet Coles will be sharing her home and garden (after a year’s absence) with other artists, such as Bridget Baker and Alex Nash. The Ring O’Bells will showcase artisan makers and their work, and St Matthew’s Church has a small group of painters in its gallery space, including new artist Sue Wordsworth who will be showing her ethereal intaglio prints and small watercolours.

Widcombe Long Pond by Alex Nash

View from Sydney Gardens by Pippa Wrigley

BEAR FLAT ARTISTS OPEN STUDIOS Saturday 25 and Monday 27 May, 11am – 5pm Visit: bearflatartists.co.uk More than 30 artists are opening their homes over the Whitsun Bank Holiday, with the dynamic mix of arts and crafts including painting, ceramics, jewellery, printmaking, photography, sculpture, glass and mosaic. The weekend is an opportunity to browse, chat directly with artists, and buy original artwork in a relaxed setting. Start the trail in Poets Corner and find the Fineline Art Group at the Methodist Hall. Head up to Shelley Road to see raku and stoneware ceramics by Kate Marshall and Esther Norman, photography by Pey Pey Oh, and watercolours by Bea Colborne. Then head back down to Shakespeare Avenue to see the work of two abstract artists, Maggie Simonsen and Lindy Dickins. In Chaucer Road, Ben Hughes shows his oil paintings, and poet Caroline Heaton exhibits her books. Three venues in Longfellow Avenue include printmakers James Nunn and Catharine Naylor, ceramicists Yvonne Elston and Claire Hubble, and contemporary jeweller Karen Parker. A new exhibitor in Devonshire Road is printmaker Charlotte Farmer, and in Castle Gardens you’ll find calligrapher Rebecca Joy Percey, seascape painter Kathryn Scaldwell and handmade African jewellery by Voice International. Head along to Hensley Road for Tamara Penwell’s sacred icons. Then, in Bloomfield Road, Sally Pollitzer shows prints and paintings, and at Elm Place, you’ll find comic artist Seth Woolley and sculptor Zoë Woolley. For both art and sustenance call in at The Bear in Wellsway. New exhibitors Juliet Catton and Amy Chandler are showing prints here, along with Richard Gardiner’s oil paintings and Lorelei Hunt’s decorative mosaics. Nearby in Bloomfield Avenue is woodworker Roly Prosser, also new to the trail. A short walk to Lower Oldfield Road brings visitors to work by three artists: colourful abstract paintings by Kristine O’Connor, kiln-formed art glass by K.T. Black, and oil paintings by Mary Liddell. n

Water Lilies by Pey Pey Oh

Birds in the Hand by Yvonne Elstonn

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MUSIC | INTERVIEW

Bluebeard illustration for Anatomy of Fairy Tales exhibition, Everhardt Museum, USA

Family paper cut for private commission

Tangled Wood giant drawing for the Holburne Museum

Paper Ruff for Burberry London Fashion Week event

Paper Maze, produced for Forest of Imagination 2018

SAY HELLO...

Paper cuts by Jessica


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ARTIST | INTERVIEW

Paper parade

Take an artist who loves a challenge. Ask them to create a painting to celebrate the independent businesses in Bath. Emma Clegg talks to Jessica Palmer, whose artwork for a new Visit Bath campaign has recently been revealed...

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essica Palmer is a master of reinvention. She has worked as a bottle washer, managed a Paris cookery school, worked for an MP, worked as a producer for the BBC, has a masters degree in politics, and after gaining an illustration MA at Kingston University, she started her career as an illustrator and artist. She has run workshops in high-profile galleries, works as illustrator for English Heritage, is the illustrator of five highly successful adult colouring books and the author of a book on paper-cutting. Jessica works fluidly across different media – collage, paper sculpture, paper-cutting, digital drawing and painting – and it’s her artfulness with paper that defines her creativity. “During my MA I did a lot of cutting out in life-drawing classes – big Matisse-style cut-outs,” Jessica explains. “It occurred to me that I could use paper cutting as my USP because nobody else was teaching paper art at the time.” Jessica’s paper pieces have a strong narrative feel. Her studio is surrounded with visual stories – a three-foot, threedimensional Elizabethan lady in fine paper attire with tranches of papery gold, red hair in tightly curled paper rolls edged with a flush of orange; Chinese paper relief art where the paper is folded and teased and inked and cut to give dimension and texture; and endless boxes of work in progress spanning everything from flat cuts of lettering to twirling, expressive threedimensional paper forms. Her two-dimensional work has its own allure, as narratives emerge from a page of white paper. The process starts with a BELOW: Jessica Palmer’s painting for the Independent Bath campaign

drawing, followed by the cutting out of negative shapes. This takes some know-how, Jessica explains: “The hardest thing for people to understand is what to cut out. How to do a positive shape, how to take away and leave behind a design. Most people think you cut away what you’ve drawn. But you need to cut away the negative space.” One of these commissions was created for a local family whose garden was once a Georgian pleasure garden at the top of Lyncombe Vale. They wanted Jessica’s piece to show people having picnics and fireworks, and reflecting people from different backgrounds and social status. Every piece Jessica makes requires a practical approach to materials. In 2018 she produced a piece, Paper Maze, for Forest of Imagination by the riverside, a spiral walkway constructed from cardboard, designed for children to investigate and explore. Another cardboard construction commission was to celebrate Hampton Court’s 500th anniversary in 2014 where Jessica was asked to build a model of the palace at a scale of 20:1. “I was the first artist to be able to use the Cartoon Gallery and make things inside the house. They wouldn’t allow me to have scissors or glue, though, or even a knife at first.” Constructed at home and flat-packed in the car, the palace was then built over three days on site. On show during half term, visitors could walk into each of the courtyards and look around the buildings. “Kids came in and they drew kings and queens looking out of the window and cats and dogs, all kinds of designs, every facet was covered with it.” Jessica has most recently been working with Visit Bath, who asked her to create an artwork that reflected the indie spirit of the city. Her creation is a fictional representation of individual artisans and makers. The figures

are colourful and characterful, conjuring up that special something that makes Bath’s independents so appealing. “This project was the perfect opportunity for me to combine design, painting and a touch of collage,” says Jessica. The brief asked for a colourful, vibrant image that would spark interest in Bath’s independents. “I found a reclaimed Victorian door, and Batheaston-based framers Lark Designs framed and built a stand for the piece. The finished artwork features glass-blowing, cocktail mixing, cheese-making, bookselling and much more, with decoupaged references to traditional crafts and the history of Bath.” The artwork will go on tour in some of Bath’s independent shops and at the end of May it will be sold, with proceeds going to local charity We Get It, who provide support for people in Bath dealing with cancer. This collaboration between a local artist and our independent shops is a meaningful way of celebrating the special energy of our city. n For more about Jessica's work: jessicapalmerart.com For more information about Visit Bath’s Independent Bath campaign, go to visitbath.co.uk/independent

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MUSICAL | HISTORY

Key moments

Bath-based square piano conservator and restorer Lucy Coad shares her plans to tackle a new challenge – the restoration of an Australian antique piano that has returned to the UK after leaving 231 years ago with the First Fleet of British settlers

Expert restorer Lucy Coad

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hile not quite as lofty or majestic as the grand piano, there is a certain down-to-earth charm associated with an antique square piano. Created in the period 1770–1870, this novel instrument gained immense popularity among the middle and lower classes – those who could not afford a grand piano, nor had the space in their homes to accommodate one. Due to its low manufacturing costs, the square piano afforded smaller households the luxury of tinkling the ivories and playing in the comfort of their own homes. “They were made in their thousands at the time, but have slowly been pushed to the back of people’s minds, and the back of their homes,” square piano conservator Lucy Coad admits. “They were very popular in Europe and worldwide because they are so much a part of the mighty piano’s history and a part of how we got to some of the magnificent instruments we see today.” Based in her workshop near Bath, Lucy is one of the world’s foremost piano tuners and restoration experts. With a career spanning four decades, she has spent a large amount of time developing her reputation and building up an arsenal of skills and experience. This included a three-year apprenticeship with Tim Hamilton, who specialises in converting and restoring historical pianofortes; a stint at the London College of Furniture where she learned to restore numerous pieces; and managing her own piano conservation shop in London, which opened in 1985, before moving to the south west and settling in Bath. Though she does restore the occasional grand piano, square pianos are Lucy’s forte. So much so, she has been tasked with a very 50 TheBATHMagazine

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special project – the restoration of a square piano that sailed to Sydney, Australia with the first British settlers more than 230 years ago. And it’s no easy feat – the piano is cracked and warped, and with a number of missing elements: “We are trying to fathom out the missing pieces – we can do this from looking at other ones on our records and we have lots of photographs of other pianos that we’ve worked on or seen. So we are slowly putting the jigsaw together.” Lucy’s aim is to restore the piano to its original sound and revive the connection this instrument has with the 18th-century colonists. The piano was accompanied from Australia to Bath by Professor Geoffrey Lancaster, a pianist and professor of historical performance practice. “Geoffrey found out that this piano was the first to reach Australia, and belonged to surgeon, George Morgan, who was part of a very musical family and who sailed in one of the boats of the first fleet, called Syrius,” Lucy explains. “So presumably music was in his blood. I don’t think it would have been very easy to entertain passengers on the boat with the piano. But it did stop at a couple points on the journey and we know that people came along and heard the piano being played.” The piano was made by Frederick Beck, a renowned maker in London at the time. The piano spent much of its time in Australia gathering dust – indeed it spent a

considerable amount of time in a laundry. Now, having made its journey on Emirates Airlines in just one day – approximately 279 less days than the original journey would have taken by sea – the square piano sits in Lucy’s workshop where over the next year it will be restored to its former glory. Lucy is passionate about her restoration work, but says that her profession is something of a dying art these days: “Everyone in the industry is very old now, and we really need to encourage young blood into the business. It’s happened at a time where many of the practical colleges have shut down due to lack of funds – even my old college is a thing of the past,” she says. “In Australia, the project is highlighting the worldwide problem of technicians throughout the whole piano trade. We need to encourage and train more people with artisan and practical skills; otherwise we will have no-one to look after these instruments when we retire.” The piano will be restored in time for a final concert in London in 2020 to celebrate Australia Day. It will then return to Perth in time for the 250th anniversary of Captain Cook first setting foot on Australian ground. Its return will also coincide with Beethoven’s 250th birthday. n Find out more about Lucy Coad’s piano restoration workshop: squarepiano.co.uk

The 230 year old square piano being restored at Lucy Coad’s workshop in Bath


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My prediction of fashion trends Duncan Campbell HAS BEEN DEALING IN ANTIQUE SILVER SINCE 1986.

They are guaranteed to change

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t is hardly news to report that for years now, many categories of antiques, especially furniture, have been about as fashionable as flu. The main reason for this seems to be a 21st century enthusiasm for clean lines and minimalism. A word to the wise, never to use the ‘m’ word in an antique shop, most antiques dealers will get twitchy at the very mention of the word minimalism. Thankfully for me, not everyone has gone along with this ‘empty shelf chic’, but a public lack of interest in objets d’art, along with selling platforms like eBay, has caused countless antique shops up and down the land to close up. However, the one thing you can rely on about fashion is that it will change and soon enough we will be lamenting not having bought that antique [inset item] in 2019 when it was ridiculously cheap. Timing is everything and not everyone has the space to store big georgian sideboards in anticipation of a price rise. We have now had an interior design look based around Scandinavian emptiness for nearly 20 years. Old brown furniture has mostly been sold off at firewood prices and granny’s fancy plates and nick nacks have gone off to charity shops.

How can it be then that the newest fad around is for ‘de-cluttering’, what on earth have folk been buying that is in such urgent need of a trip to the skip? I can only conclude that rather than buying beautiful items for the home, fashionable homeowners have been spending their hard earned money on the utterly useless. Funny old world! n www.beaunashbath.com, 01225 334234

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ART | IN THE | CITY

Setting the art bar high The Art Bar in the Abbey Hotel has recently had a decorative refresh and to celebrate, six talented local artists have been invited to exhibit there. We get the lowdown on their work, which ranges from dancing octopus lino cuts and decorative wood blocks to layered digital figurative artwork and a sculpture of an Egyptian goddess cat

From left: Jean Farrell, Emma Taylor, James Nunn, Emma Philippa Maeve and Rob Highton

Square Dreams, Emma Taylor An experimental piece, applying colours and shapes to a series of irregular wood blocks. Emma was the artist who illustrated the Abbey Hotel’s Minerval Owl sculpture in 2018. The owl was on display over the summer before being auctioned for charity. Emma was also commissioned by the hotel to complete a detailed large mural along the side of the hotel’s winter ski bar. She gets her inspiration from the outdoors and regularly takes on commissions including commercial and private murals, book illustrations, animal and house portraits, river map designs and design work for marketing. She has also launched an eclectic range of luxurious silk scarves.

emmataylorart.com

Blue with Black, Jean Farrell Each woodblock print has been pressed by hand giving unique image variations. Jean’s pieces explore the contribution of symbols and figures in sacred geometry within the landscape, searching for the true nature of the materials used, whether wood, paper, gold leaf or the voice. She responds to the individual materials selected, and the inner emotional journey undertaken during the making process.

inneroctave.co.uk

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Whispers, Rob Highton This large-scale digital print on canvas combines shadowy faces with immersive colours and grainy, inlaid textures. Rob uses traditional oil, watercolour and drawing techniques, combining them with photographic images, grainy

background textures and layered digital imagery. His latest range of ‘storytelling’ prints use rich colours that push his compositions towards the abstract. His artwork can be produced as giclée prints or as printed canvases.

robhightonart.com


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ART | IN THE | CITY

Octopus, James Nunn Bastet, Tom Hiscocks This acrylic sculpture of the Egyptian goddess cat, Bastet uses 3D scanning and laser cutting. Tom won the Dr Supanee Gazeley Fine Art Prize in 2013 for his degree show exhibition. His work has been exhibited in exhibitions across the UK and Europe. tomhiscocks.co.uk

Zhangjiajie, Emma Philippa Maeve An impression of the Zhangjiajie National Park created with layers of painting, drawing and embroidery. Emma is inspired by her travels and explores the everyday using textiles, surface design, machine embroidery and print.

emmaphilippamaeve.com

James’ background as a book illustrator has a huge influence on his art. Ideas and imagery in books are often a jumping off point for his work, and he loves the freedom to explore those ideas on his own terms. He is drawn to the animal kingdom, creating characters that the viewer can imbue with their own narrative. James is fascinated by surface and materials, and the relationship between abstract marks and figurative expression. jamesnunn.co.uk

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CITY | FOOD

Buzz in the park

Right around the corner from Royal Victoria Park, the Marlborough Tavern is taking a starring role in this year’s Pub in the Park festival. Joe Cussens, managing director of the Bath Pub Co, tempts Melissa Blease with dishes such as cauliflower and heritage carrot pakoras and lamb with aubergine and chickpea tagine

Cauliflower and heritage carrot pakoras with red lentil dhal will be on offer at Pub in the Park

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That line-up this year includes pop-up incarnations of superstar gastropubs including The Pony and Trap, Café Morano, The Hardwick, The Hand and Flowers and fellow Bath institution The King William, all of whom will be serving up festival-friendly incarnations of their menus – all in all, Pub in the Park’s second birthday party in Bath is set to be super-tasty. The Marlborough Tavern’s history, however, goes back much further than the festival’s does...

My festival menu is reflective of the kind of food we serve on our regular menus: simple, tasty and seasonal

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ive music courtesy of the likes of Texas, Will Young, Gabrielle and the Soul II Soul Sound System. Dedicated Champagne, gin, prosecco, Campari, cocktail and Pimms bars. Super-foodie eat to the beat opportunities at every turn, special guest appearances from the UK’s hottest superstar chefs and Fred Sirieix (Mr First Dates himself) hosting the whole shebang, all set against the glorious backdrop of Royal Victoria Park at its blooming best: now that’s what we call a festival. And when Pub in the Park returns to Bath for a second year running in June, there’s a whole new aspect to the super-enticing menu to rave about, as one of Bath’s loveliest, long-established independent pubs (that’ll be the Marlborough Tavern, then) prepares to headline on the food offering line-up. “The Pub in the Park team hosted a focus group at the beginning of this year asking for feedback and opinions on how best to move the festival forward,” says Joe Cussens, managing director of the Bath Pub Company: a family of four local, independent pubs, of which the Marlborough Tavern (taken over by the BPC in 2006) was the first. “We didn’t pitch ourselves, but a lot of people said it’d be nice to see a local business in the mix; having taken note of that feedback, the festival organisers invited us to join the fun. I guess we were an obvious fit really, because we’re right on the site’s doorstep. And, of course, we know our food is good enough to justify our presence on the star-spangled lineup.”

“This time 13 years ago, the only party we were looking forward to was a celebration at the end of a major refurbishment!” says Joe. “We first stumbled across the pub during its slightly dingy, pre-smoking ban era – it was all swirly carpets and fruit machines. But it was in a lovely location, and had a nice feel to it; we thought it could be so much more than it was. We didn’t originally set out to launch a gastropub – that was a fairly new term, back then, and it seemed a bit pretentious for what we wanted to do, which was create a more contemporary, relevant version of the classic pub. We became more foodie over the years because we became better at doing food, and it became clear that there was a demand for restaurant-standard menus served in a pubby atmosphere. People are inherently more comfortable in a pub environment than they are in a restaurant – you don’t have to dress up, you can just go and hang out with your friends and be sociable.” Inevitably, many changes have gone on behind the scenes at the MT since it first opened its doors. Fortunately for the pub’s merry band of regulars, those changes are subtle rather than shake-you-up. You won’t find a plastic straw anywhere behind the bar, for example, but you’re sure to notice the bigger selection of veggie and vegan food options, superb coffee, and amazing beer line-up, all of which have evolved at a pace,

especially of late. “We’re always evolving, but we never consider radical changes that would move us away from our core objectives which are pretty simple, really: great food, great service and a warm welcome, in a nice, friendly environment – that’s what we aim to do best. Our head chef Jack Scaterfield, who took to the MT hob earlier this year, has been perfect for us, and we’re a great fit. His food is spot-on for our ethos: tasty, inventive without being fussy, and with great veggie and vegan options too. Pub in the Park is a wonderful opportunity for him to showcase his work beyond our four walls.” “I like to bring flavours and influences from around the world to Bath, using the best-possible locally sourced produce. My festival menu is reflective of the kind of food we serve on our regular menus: simple, tasty and seasonal,” says Jack. “Each pop-up Pub in the Park pub is asked to do three tapas sized dishes, so I’m doing cauliflower and heritage carrot pakoras with red lentil dhal, fried curry leaves, fresh mango and coriander; lamb with aubergine and chickpea tagine, cucumber, yogurt, pomegranate and fresh mint; and salt and pepper squid with chilli jam, spring onion, fresh lime and basil. So, there’s a vegan dish, a meaty option and a seafood taster – something for everyone, designed to be eaten standing up or walking around.” And Jack is hoping, of course, to do some walking around at the festival himself during his downtime. “I’m looking forward to rubbing shoulders with chefs such as Angela Hartnett, Josh Eggleton, Alisdair Clarke and, of course, Bath’s own Chris Cleghorn, who earned a Michelin star for The Olive Tree Restaurant last year – they’ll all be on site, hosting demos. And at the end of each festival session, I’m hoping that the pub will have that same after-show buzz this year that it did last time around too.” “The Marlborough Tavern holds a place in people’s hearts, all year round,” says Joe. “People have got engaged and married there, met special people there, made friends there – I’m proud that we’ve created a place where our customers can create happy occasions; that’s what keeps the buzz alive, for me.” n Pub in the Park, Royal Victoria Park, 21–23 June; pubintheparkuk.com/bath The Marlborough Tavern, 35 Marlborough Buildings, Bath. Tel: 01225 423731; marlborough-tavern.com


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CITY | HISTORY

Chef at the Marlborough Tavern, Jack Scaterfield

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Wine May 2019.qxp_Layout 1 25/04/2019 13:05 Page 1

TRISTAN DARBY Columnist Tristan Darby is tickled pink by the rise of rosé this spring

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ver the past few years, we’ve witnessed a pink renaissance with the rise of rosé, which has shaken off the image of ‘sweet and sickly’, attracting a new generation of drinkers and winning over many sceptics with a rise in quality and a broader variety of styles. It’s synonymous with sunshine, too, and with the hope of warm months ahead – here’s my pick of the pinks for summertime sipping. Starting with sparkling, if you’re looking to entertain for a summer party, or for a fizzy pink to sip in the sunshine, a good choice is Pere Ventura, Cava Tresor Rosado (£13.95 at Great Western Wine). Made in the Penedès region between Barcelona and Tarragona using north east Spain’s native Trepat grape, with an attractive deep pink colour, it pops with strawberries, raspberries, and a light herbal edge. Fizzy and fresh with a long fruity finish, it’s great on its own, but also to serve alongside tapas-style canapés. If you’re after something a little more sophisticated, try Hattingley Valley, Rosé 2014 (£37.50 at GWW), a complex, elegant and impressive English sparkling from Hampshire. It’s made just north of Winchester from a blend of Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier and Pinot Précoce (an early ripening mutation of Pinot Noir, perfect for the British climate). With a portion of the base wine ageing in old Burgundy barrels and around two years bottle-ageing on lees, there’s a lovely mouthfeel and subtle toasty note alongside the wine’s delightful strawberry and cranberry flavours. I recently served this blind at a sparkling wine tasting next to a very well-known and respected Champagne house’s rosé, and this was the hands-down favourite. Elegant and fresh, it’s a splendid example of high-quality English sparkling wine. Moving on to still wines, fans of the popular Provençal style of rosé should check out Spain’s Chivite, Las Fincas Rosado (£15.95 at GWW), a deliciously dry, floral, fruity and mineral-tinged blend of Tempranillo and Garnacha (aka Grenache). The wine is from Navarra and made by one of the region’s finest, oldest and most famous producers, Chivite, as a homage to top Spanish chef José María Arzak. Red fruits, flowers and a slight tropical note appear on the nose, with a pale pink colour that contrasts the intensity of cherry-like fruit and weight on the palate. It’s as stylish as the sexy bowling pin bottle it comes in, and worth a try with grilled fish, prawns, sashimi or lighter rice or pasta dishes. Slightly richer summer food, such as barbecued chicken and fish, tuna, roast salmon and creamy pasta dishes would be well accompanied by Château du Donjon, Rosé Minervois (£10.95 at GWW), a southern French blend of cinsault, grenache and syrah from Minervois, an appellation just north of Carcassonne and Narbonne. There are cherry-like notes on the nose and palate, with some mineral freshness, orange peel crispness and a slightly herbal note. At just over a tenner, it’s a cracking rosé for the price. n

The Delicious Guide to Bath featuring all the fave eateries and foodie treateries is available online at our website www.thebathmag.co.uk

Learn more about the world of wine with Tristan on a course at Great Western Wine; greatwesternwine.co.uk/events

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CITY | HISTORY

Indispensable Twerton

The Domesday Book of 1086 records that Twerton, once known as Twiverton on Avon, was held by the Bishop of Coutances, when the population only consisted of 32 households. Catherine Pitt investigates the village’s rich history

Image © Bath in Time

The opening of Innox Park Twerton Bath, 1909

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medieval field system. At St Michael’s Church a Norman doorway dating to c.1100 remains, and roads such as Connection Road and The Hollow follow ancient tracks like the Roman Fosse Way and Wansdyke. Travellers from Bristol or the south west heading to Bath had to pass through Twerton. During the English Civil War (1642–1651) the village was commandeered by various troops. At one point Colonel Montagu’s Parliamentarian Regiment of 800 men spent the night at Twerton. The households were expected to feed, water and shelter men and horses, but with only 28 households the impact was huge. The Civil War ended up costing Twerton £219. 11s. 11d. – nearly £23,000 today. From the 17th century onwards the village of Twerton gradually became more industrialised, and the population increased to 800. As Bath developed into a fashionable spa resort, industries such as weaving were forced out of the centre and into the surrounding villages of Twerton, Widcombe and Weston. Initially weaving was produced in workers’ homes on handlooms, and the cloth was taken to mills for fulling or dying. In the early 1700s around 160 homes in Twerton contained hand looms. The industrial revolution in the late 18th and 19th centuries saw the mechanisation of weaving which

meant that hand looms were swiftly replaced by machines that could produce cloth at an astounding rate. In December 1797, Bath magistrates learnt of a plan by unemployed weavers in Twerton to march to Upper Mill and burn it down in protest. A company of soldiers and dragoons were ordered to defend the mill against an expected 1,000 men – however only 60 turned up.

One visitor to Twerton described the blue-tinged faces and hands of those who worked as dyers in the mills

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werton has always been on the peripheries of Bath’s history, although it contributed hugely to the city’s economic wealth. Much maligned in the press, the suburb continues to enjoy a community spirit which goes back to its days as a small village. Absorbed by the city boundaries in 1911, Twerton, or Twiverton on Avon as it was once known, began as a Saxon settlement on the banks of the River Avon, its waters being utilised for milling corn and later fulling cloth. Originally part of the Hundred of Wellow in Somerset – one of the 40 historical Hundreds in Somerset dating from before the Norman conquest – Twerton’s name means ‘Two Weirs’ in Anglo-Saxon, indicating its riverside location. There is some evidence of early occupation in both the Bronze Age and Roman period, but by 1086 the village was owned by the Bishop of Coutances, who leased the land to two men – Geoffrey Malreward and Nigel de Gournay. At the time the population of Twerton was 32 households, there were four mills, and the land was mainly used for agricultural purposes. De Gournay held the East Manor that once stood near Upper Mill, and Malreward the West Manor where the High Street is today. There is still evidence of medieval Twerton in the landscape today. High up around Kelston View and Round Hill one can still see the

Today all that remains of Lower Mill is a gatepost into the student accommodation that was built on site. The holiday venue of Bath Mill Lodge Retreat has been incorporated into what was once Newton Mill. Mill owners such as Broad, Wilkins, Chapman, Sperring and Carr, are still remembered however in local records, and in the names of local parks, woods and surrounding streets. The mills that used to exclusively produce cloth started to produce leather and paper, and armament manufacturing during the wars. By the start of the 20th century Twerton industries had grown and included a malting, tannery, gas holders, stone quarry, two coal mines, the Pitman Printing Press, Bath Cabinet Makers workshops, and the Stothert and Pitt crane works. Access to and from Twerton improved in the 18th and 19th centuries, which encouraged industry to set up in this area. Between 1724 and 1727 the river between London and Bristol was made much easier and safer to navigate with the construction of the Avon Navigation, including Weston and Kelston Lock. During the 1840s Isambard Kingdom Brunel extended his Great Western Railway from Bath through to Bristol, dissecting part of Twerton’s High Street and what is now Lower Bristol Road with his viaduct. Twerton did get its own station, but it closed in 1917 never to reopen. Bath’s tram system –


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CITY | HISTORY

Images © Bath in Time

A view of Twiverton (Twerton) Locks on the River Avon c.1740

Cook's Machining, Twerton Mills, c.1890

countryside, with some areas utilised by the company Langdon and Blackmore, a nursery business set up in the 19th century that exported begonias and delphiniums from the slopes of Twerton around the world. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, slum clearances from areas such as Avon, Peter and Milk Street, meant many people were rehoused in suburbs like Twerton. In 1875 a byelaw instructed developers to ensure new housing had gaps in-between, running water, and green space. This was a far cry from overcrowded and disease-ridden tenements in the city centre. New estates such as Southdown (begun in 1927), Whiteway (begun in 1938 and continuing post war), and adjoining Kelston View began to be built. After the end of the First World War the national Homes for Heroes scheme accelerated Twerton’s housing development and after the severe bombing in Twerton during the Second World War, further housing was built or rebuilt. Despite the expansion of Twerton over the centuries the area still maintained a village feel. The local flower show (first launched in 1876) brought people together. Twerton’s Cooperative Society was one of the earliest established in 1889. Also, the morning after a local’s death St Michael’s Church bell would toll and households would gather outside their homes to pay their respects as the coffin passed. With an increase in housing came additional infrastructure like religious and municipal buildings. A number of nonconformist churches established themselves here, such as the Methodists and Baptists, and each of them provided facilities such as halls, cemeteries, and schools for the local population. In 1843 a gaol was opened on Caledonian Road to replace Bath’s Grove Street Gaol. It could house 122 people in single cells (one of the first prisons at the time to do so) and cost £20,000 to build, but it closed after

I hardly think the citizens of Bath know what a great place Twerton is REV G.G. HICKMAN

which was begun in 1880 and electrified in 1903 – linked the suburb with the centre until 1939 when buses became a more popular method of transport. As industry increased so did the population in Twerton. In 1801 around 1,700 people lived in the village. By 1851 it had risen to 6,000 people, and in 1901 this number had almost tripled to 17,000. Local factory owners resolved some of the housing issues, building accommodation for their workforce, such as Rackfield Place, which was built 1820 by mill owner Charles Wilkins. Although many Twerton factory and mill owners donated money and housing to the area, these philanthropic efforts were in fact the consequence of the hard work of local men, women and children who facilitated these owners’ wealth. In the 18th century it was a novelty for visitors to Bath to walk out to places like Twerton to observe the small industries. One visitor to Twerton described the blue-tinged faces and hands of those who worked as dyers in the mills. There are also extant reports by Twerton factory workers at The Museum of Bath at Work that describe the cold and filthy conditions endured during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Children as young as seven were employed, and in the mills and factories they were exposed to fast-moving and dangerous machinery. Donkey boys from the local collieries were paid a mere 6d a load to take coal to Broad Quay, an eight-mile round trip, sometimes twice a day. This was before the NHS and before incapacity benefits. It wasn’t until 1876 that Parliament passed an act making the employment of children under 10 illegal. Twerton didn’t lose its village atmosphere. The author Henry Fielding moved to a cottage in 1748 (which was pulled down in the 1960s) to write part of Tom Jones and Jane Austen wrote of a country stroll she took to Twerton in April 1805. Much of the surrounding hills were still

35 years. Today only the governor’s house remains, transformed into flats. In 1930 Bath City Football Club (founded in 1889) bought Innox Park. The club moved 15,000 tons of soil, trees and plants to establish their football stadium. The club are still investing in Twerton today with a significant amount of money earmarked for a new stadium as well as High Street improvements. Twerton should be proud of its past, and of its future. Built around a village community, it continues to embrace this spirit in the 21st century. On the High Street the family run Bakers of Bath still supply the area with their bread and pastries as they have done since 1935. Groups like The Golden Oldies (est. 1988), a singing group for pensioners, and The Community Play Rangers, who for 40 years have facilitated outdoor play for local children, also offer community opportunities to society. Places such as Bath City Farm (est. 1990) enable adults and children to enjoy nature and animals, and pubs such as The Centurion (built 1954) has been awarded a Grade II listed status for providing a community hub in an urban environment. In conclusion, let’s remember the words of the Rev. G.G. Hickman in 1935: “I hardly think the citizens of Bath realise what a great place Twerton is. Twerton contributes very much to the well-being of Bath as a whole. We are Indispensable Twerton. We are IT.” n

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PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151


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Bath @ work

Our series of photographic portraits by Neill Menneer shows Bath people at work. View a gallery of Bath@work subjects at: thebathmag.co.uk

Andrew Hume

Puppeteer

I

was born in Mitchum, Surrey. My father was a chemist and we lived above the shop. I remember Saturday mornings when all the local kids, including me, went to watch cowboy movies at the cinema. The poor old manager had to control the children on his own as no parents ever went! In the park a huge mechanical clock towered above the rhododendrons. It was sponsored by Guinness; I know that because it had a giant Toucan sitting like a bird of prey on the top. Doors opened and metal characters came and bustled about. I loved the theatricality and drama of it, and I think this must have had a profound influence on my tastes and career. When my father got a job at Aerospace we moved to a caravan in Addleston. The factory, where I occasionally visited him, was build right in the middle of the old Brooklands racetrack and aerodrome. Quite a surreal location, looking back. I went to West Surrey College of Art in Guildford to take a foundation course in art and design. It was the time of the famous sit-ins, which were a very mild version of the famous Paris riots of 1968. Basically, we locked out the tutors and took over the premises. I remember one student using a lighter to squirt some gas under the door. This was exaggerated in the tabloids to say that students had been gassing the teachers. Early ‘fake news’, I guess. I later went to Farnham to study fine art and sculpture. After my first job making film sets, I went off to the Outer Hebrides. I was in essence a big hippy and had the vague idea that I would live a romantic life of self-sufficiency and artistic personal expression. This didn’t happen as I lived in a cottage with no garden... I loved my year there, but the reality was that it turned out to be unsustainable. On hearing that artists were supported in Ireland, I set off and hitched a ride which took me as far as Bath. I’ve never really left since. On my first night here I remember walking down The Paragon. The dark soot-covered buildings, the sweep of the crescent and the majestic Georgian architecture made a real impression on me. As did the Hat and Feather on London Road, which I chanced to visit. There I fell in with a gang who were to change my life. They wanted to start a Community Arts Centre – this was to have many artistic repercussions and its legacy still influences the cultural life of the city. The ethos was essentially counter cultural as it was about recycling, sharing and community. Very sixties. However, it wasn’t just pie in the sky as The Natural Theatre, John’s Bikes, The Riverside School, Civil Aid and Christmas dinners for the homeless all came out of the Bath Arts Workshop. There is an exhibition of their work at the Museum of Bath At Work in Julian Road from 8 June. As I always believed in enjoying my work, I set up the Puppet Theatre and Café under the arches near Pulteney Weir. For 20 years I put on my shows and provided special teas for children. I mainly create sculptures now, many of them mechanical contrivances with a pinch of humour and maybe even the odd political point thrown in. You can see a few of these at Larkhall Open Studios in May. n

From Kashmir to here

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151 THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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CITY | BUSINESS

Ask me! Allison Herbert CEO Bath Business Improvement District

L

ate last year, we introduced Welcome Ambassadors into the city. This team provides a warm and informed welcome to visitors to the city centre, acting as human information points and guiding people to their destinations.

On hand Thursday to Sunday each week, Emily and Christine head up the team of eleven ambassadors all of whom volunteer their time. Helen Pearson, one of the volunteers enjoys giving helpful advice; “I feel incredibly proud of the city that I live in and I know from my travels that knowledgeable staff can help to make a holiday experience even better. I want to offer that level of friendliness and service to visitors.”

The team have helped thousands of people already in the few months of operation. Interestingly we can already see that the types of questions change with the seasons as well as the time of enquiries. At Christmas the team were asked retail questions all day long as shoppers looked for specific stores. There were also quite a few people who needed help to find their car or coach. Since then, interactions have been much more tourism related. The top three are the locations of the Roman Baths, Thermae Spa and Visitor Information Centre, as well as requests for maps. As a developing initiative the Welcome Ambassadors have been learning where and when to help. Fridays and Saturdays are definitely the busiest, particularly in the mornings. The team plan their routes around the arriving London trains as a lot of visitors need help upon arriving in the city. The rest of the time they wander slowly through the city. The Welcome Ambassadors find that walking in pairs makes them most approachable by members of the public. They stop at intervals; it is usually at a crossroads such as Lower Borough Walls and Union Street, where people lose their way. Their distinctive blue jackets, emblazoned with ‘Ask me!’ helps assure a friendly response – and they have all the information at their fingertips; the ambassadors carry a tablet to look up anything they don’t know as well as a list of all the events going on in the city. We are delighted this new venture has started so well. With the tourist season heating up the team are well prepared to help give visitors to Bath an impression of friendliness and vibrancy. n For further imformation and updates visit; bathbid.co.uk

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HISTORY | UNCOVERED

Stories in the stones

Repairing and stabilising Bath Abbey’s collapsing floor has also involved cleaning and recording the ledger stones that had been hidden underneath the Victorian pews – here are some of the stories from the volunteers

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ath Abbey’s floor is unique. It is made up of 891 ledger stones (flat grave stones) which commemorate some of the individuals buried in the abbey. As part of the abbey’s £19.3m National Lottery Heritage funded Footprint project, the ledger stones will be conserved and the collapsing floor repaired. The project is also about providing new activities and opportunities for local people to engage with the abbey.

Since 2017, 71 volunteers from local organisations, such as BEMSCA, U3A, St John’s Foundation, Bath Spa University and the University of the West of England, have spent more than 600 hours on their hands and knees recording the inscriptions on the ledger stones. They have also researched the lives of those commemorated. Here, three volunteers, Zorana, Sara-Jane, and John, talk about their experience of the project and tell the stories of the people they’ve discovered...

Piccadilly and Ardwick Bridge. This shows his involvement and influence within the community at the time.

ZORANA I heard about Bath Abbey’s ledger stone project and thought it would be great to discover and share the stories of the people behind the stones. I was also looking for some experience of archival work. Helping to clean and record the ledger stones was an amazing opportunity to touch the stones. Recording the engravings was fun and at times challenging because the stone might have been worn or badly damaged. It was great to do something that would have a physical impact on the abbey. My task was to research and discover more about the people behind the names, such as date of birth, baptism records, parents’ names, siblings, professions, marriage and death records. Occasionally, portraits of the people were found, which makes the person’s life history more vivid. One stone I researched commemorates Lavinia Tooke (b. July 1801). Lavinia was one of eight children born to Lancashire parents Edward and Sarah Tooke. She was just four years and five months old when she died in Bath on 12 December 1805. She was buried the next day at Bath Abbey. Her father, Edward Tooke, is believed to have been a landlord because, in many newspapers between 1793–1804, his name was given as the point of enquiry for rented locations in the Lancashire area. No doubt the wealthy landowner brought his sick daughter to Bath to improve her health. In 1802. A resident of Piccadilly, Manchester, he was one of 20 men who requested a meeting with local residents to discuss road improvements between Manchester

SARA-JANE Having retired from teaching history in 2017, I quickly realised I missed researching history. Fortunately, I saw an article in The Bath Magazine about the Footprint project asking for volunteers to research the ledger stones that were being cleaned and recorded on the abbey floor. I then attended a fascinating training session on key ways to research the individuals named on the ledger stones given by the abbey’s head of interpretation, Ollie Taylor, who is responsible for the new activities and opportunities the Footprint project is providing. One of the stones I researched lies near the abbey’s west door, on the south side. It is a dark stone with a long inscription, commemorating the Chiltons, a family of plumbers. Sadly, the top has been sliced off when the Victorian heating grates were installed. So the Victorian upgrade to the abbey’s heating and plumbing ironically damaged a memorial to a plumbing and glazing dynasty who had served the church in the 18th and 19th centuries. One of the Chiltons that I researched was Benjamin Chilton, who lived in Westgate Street. Although he died over 200 years ago, I was able to gain valuable insights into his life. Benjamin Chilton’s inscription tells of a city plumber who died on 27 August 1765, aged 62. At Bath Record Office, I found that in 1722 he was apprenticed as a glazier for seven years. He became a plumber and, on 12 March 1764, advertised in the Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette for persons ‘willing to undertake the cleaning of St Peter and Paul [the abbey], as scavenger’. On 24 May he also advertised for ‘persons willing to undertake the enlightening the lamps belonging to the Parish of St Peter and Paul. Each lamp to have two burners to continue burning from sunset to sunrising; and to be trimmed once every night’. We therefore have Benjamin to thank for keeping the abbey clean and well-lit in the 1700s.

JOHN The ledger stones project seemed simple: get down to floor level and record the writing on the stones. The reality was different because hundreds of years of wear often made this a challenge. It was dirty, often uncomfortable, and took several pairs of eyes, fingers, and different lighting to trace the outlines of letters. Sometimes it would take an hour to record two older, worn stones. I was glad that my boiler suit had built-in knee pads. I also researched some of the names. Life was short before the mid-20th century and Ann Nation, like so many others in the abbey, died young in 1825, aged just 22. Finding out who she was, where she lived and what she did was like a detective story, gathering snippets of information from different sources. Nation was an unusual surname in 19thcentury England. Using the abbey’s baptism, burial, and marriage records, old rate books, and copies of the Bath Chronicle, I put together her story. It took hours and there were many false turnings. Her father John was a butcher on Cheap Street and she ran a School for Young Ladies for three years until her death near Camden Crescent. Her parents then took on the houses as dwellings. But we have no idea what she looked like, how many young women she educated, how a butcher’s daughter managed to open a school in such a prestigious location. All we know is that she must have meant a great deal to her parents because they went to the trouble of leaving her memory on the floor of Bath Abbey. n bathabbey.org/footprint

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CITY | NEWS

CITYNEWS BATH RUGBY SUCCESS

COMMUNITY PRIDE

B-LOCAL

Bath Rugby has reported a year of revenue growth and increased investment in its 2018 financial statements. The club saw a 7% rise in year-on-year revenue to £19.8m driven by an increase in central income relating to the new four-year domestic broadcast deal with BT Sport which runs through to the 2020/21 season, together with increased corporate and ticketing revenues. bathrugby.com

Komedia Bath – the high-profile, mid-scale venue that operates from a Grade II listed former cinema – has now completed its conversion to being community owned. The venue founders set out to disperse the ownership and control of the business on a community-share basis in 2017. They laid out their vision for the future in a detailed five-year plan, with advice from Dave Boyle, Community Shares and Coops UK, to define the structure of the society. The 69-day campaign run on crowdfunder.co.uk had great backing within the entertainment industry with artists, including Katherine Ryan, Daliso Chaponda, The Hoosiers and Mel Giedroyc, offering video messages of support. Komedia gained 304 investors and backing from Big Society Capital, and exceeded the investment target of £350k, raising a total of £379k. komedia.co.uk/bath

The Bath BID has announced a new scheme aimed at those who live and work in the city, called B-LOCAL and designed for the community of Bath. Some of Bath’s finest food establishments have developed special treats and benefits for local people to enjoy midweek during school term-times. These venues recognise that local people are the backbone of their business and want to find ways to give something extra. Look out for a leaflet or refer to b-localbath.co.uk. Go along with some proof that you live or work in the city and enjoy the benefits of being a local. bathbid.co.uk

FRAMING THE WAY Agriframes, who are sponsoring The Bath Festival, have made a long-term commitment to supporting this flagship city celebration. The company has played a leading part in the garden industry for nearly 50 years, designing and manufacturing structures and garden supports to suit both traditional and contemporary settings. Owned and managed by a Bath-based family, much of their design inspiration is drawn from the iconic architecture of the city. Created by gardeners, the Agriframes’ product range is constantly evolving and now includes coloured and textured finishes as well as a selection of carefully designed

Did You Know? Footfall is highest in the city between 1– 2pm

kitchen garden products developed in response to the growing enthusiasm for produce grown at home in an attractive setting. Managing director, Andrew Downey, who grew up in Bath, said “We are proud to sponsor The Bath Festival Finale Weekend and be part of such a vibrant celebration of our city and the talent it attracts – it is thrilling to be involved and for Agriframes structures to play a part in creating the spectacular festival setting.” Agriframes will be exhibiting at the Chelsea Flower Show this year. agriframes.co.uk

BATH BUSINESS BAROMETER UPDATE: MARCH 2019

provided by

High Street Footfall (Month on month % change)

n Despite the strong winds that Storm Gareth brought in week 11, March netted a further 5.4% increase in footfall for Bath. The last week was the strongest, bringing over 150,000 visitors to the city. March 2019 is also doing better than March 2018, with 5.1% more footfall this year. Sales continues to trend with footfall; week on week, when footfall increases, so, too, do sales.

The Bath Festival returns for its 71st year this May, kicking off a week of festivities with Party in the City on 17 May. Meanwhile, have you participated in The Theatre Royal’s Great Big Egg Hunt yet? Look for them through to 12 May – there are prizes to be won!

Bath

+5.4% South West UK

+3.5%

+2.8% Springboard Research Ltd.

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ocl A C C O U N TA N C Y

141 Englishcombe Lane, Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

Airbnb loophole blocked – Changes to rent a room relief

My life at Mogers Drewett

What is rent a room relief? Rent a room relief gives an exemption to income tax on profits earned through providing furnished residential accommodation in your only or main home. It applies if your gross receipts (before expenses) are £7,500 or less (this will be split if there is more than one recipient of the rental income). The gross receipts include not only rents, but also payments made to you for the provision of any other goods or services (meals, cleaning, laundry etc) in connection with the letting. New rules From the 6th April 2019, legislation has been introduced which will require an additional test of ‘Shared Occupancy’ to be met in order for the rent a room tax relief to apply. If the test is not satisfied, you will no longer be eligible to claim the relief on those receipts. The test of ‘Shared Occupancy’ means that you will have to be living (including sleeping) in the property for at least some of the time that the accommodation has been let.There has to be a period of overlap between the period you are living in the property, and the beginning of the rental period. This means that if you rent out your property while absent, you will not qualify for the rent a room relief. For example, from HMRC: “An individual lets their house (their main residence) during the Wimbledon tournament to a visiting family.The individual goes on holiday for the whole period of the rental. The receipts from the rental would not be eligible for rent a room relief as there is no shared occupancy during the period of the rental”.

For tax saving tips contact us – call Marie Maggs, Tom Hulett or Mike Wilcox on 01225 445507 for a no-obligation meeting. See our website for more. BE READY FOR MAKING TAX DIGITAL

What our clients say:

““As a business that works with a wide range of clients from private to public-sector organisations including pharmaceuticals, banks, local and national government and the NHS, our accountancy partners OCL have been instrumental in improving our financial systems. They stepped forward to modernise our accounts, moving us online with QuickBooks cloud accounting software.They were on hand to give us advice every step of the way and their knowledge of QuickBooks is superb.We have worked with OCL for several years and throughout they have always been professional and easy to work with - a business partner we trust.” ”

Jenna Larcombe, Solicitor - Commercial Property at Mogers Drewett, shares a behind-the-scenes snapshot of her career at Mogers Drewett and challenges the ‘stuffy’ perception so often associated with the legal sector. I joined Mogers Drewett nearly three years ago. Having grown up in Bath, I knew the firm was really well regarded and did high quality, challenging and interesting work. We’re a diverse team and while we have our roots firmly established in the South West, we have a number of ex- city lawyers that have brought us that vital national perspective too. Since joining the Commercial Property team, I’ve handled a variety of transactions including land sales and acquisitions, Landlord and Tenant matters, development and secured lending work. Aiming high I am already a team leader in the Wells office and have a clear pathway set out to help me achieve my career goals. As part of this, I am encouraged to attend both formal and informal events and play my part in the continued development and growth of the firm. Some days, I work in the Bath office where I live or visit colleagues in Sherborne. In reality, we work as one team across all the offices. No working day is ever the same. We are hard negotiators which means I often put in extra hours and get involved in some big deals – it’s always rewarding when you get those over the line! Client-focused I believe Mogers Drewett isn’t like other firms in the region. Behind the door is a modern, flexible firm that puts clients first. Sometimes that means travelling to a client’s office or flexing the nine to five day so that we can achieve the best, most positive outcome. Our clients enjoy working with us because we understand their needs and invest the time in building long term relationships. Everyone has preconceived ideas of what law firms are like but Mogers Drewett is anything but stuffy! It has provided me with excellent career opportunities and is a really positive and professional place to work. www.mogersdrewett.com

Call Marie Maggs, Tom Hulett or Mike Wilcox on 01225 445507 to arrange a no-obligation meeting

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

The Watersmeet Hotel in Woolacombe is a four star hotel on the waters edge with an indoor and outdoor pool & spa. Our two restaurants include a bistro and a fine dining option both with stunning views to the sea.

Our current ‘Ramblers Package’ offer is superb value and a great time to visit the North Devon coast in Spring The fabulous 3 night break includes the following:

• delux sea view room • 3 course dinner • complimentary cream tea • £715 per couple

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GREAT | OUTDOORS

The wonder of the water Being near water can send us into a meditative state that makes us happier, healthier and more creative: and luckily, living in the south west, we don’t need to go far to find a little corner of calm

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oets and painters have all attested to the inner peace that comes from being near water. It seems there’s just something innately calming about it – the sense of perspective that comes from surveying a blue horizon, the soothing sound of water lapping the shore and the twinkling of sunlight as it hits the surface. But it’s not just a romantic notion. Scientists suggest that being near water actually sends us into a meditative state that makes us happier, healthier, calmer, more creative and even more capable of awe. In fact, according to research, the mere sight or sound of water brings about a flood of neurochemicals to our hearts and brains. Evidence of this biological high means we’re now able to join the dots between being near, in or on water to a full range of emotional benefits. Luckily for those of us living in the south west, you don’t need to go far to find your bit of calm. We’re blessed with some of the best lakes in the UK, dotted over countryside, nestled in valleys and stretching from Somerset to the tip of the Cornish coast. What’s more, these beautiful blue 68 TheBATHMagazine

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spaces are all less than two hours’ escape from cities such as Bath and Bristol. The south west’s inland waters offer an oasis of calm and tranquillity away from the usual tourist hot spots. They’re less crowded than the beaches and give couples, families and campers a safe place to explore the water in the peace and quiet of the countryside. These are lakes such as the spectacular Wimbleball Lake on Exmoor, the rural idyll of Roadford Lake on the edge of Dartmoor and the Cornish lakes of Tamar near Bude and Stithians in scenic West Cornwall. They are powerful places – where the green world meets the blue. Places where you can relax and watch resident wildlife such as rare sandpipers, orange-tip butterflies and even birds of prey such as buzzards while you enjoy a moment of calm contemplation, walking the trails that gently curve around the water’s edge. They are havens not just for wildlife but walkers, families, sailors and anglers – all seeking out a piece of waterside serenity. Unlike the tidal terrains of the coast, these lakes also offer a safe place to explore the water too. Novices and experts can all enjoy safe adventure on inland water, with visitors

able to hire a kayak, canoe, stand-up paddle board, sail or windsurf on the water in confidence. The lakes of Wimbleball, Roadford and Stithians even offer tuition and have-a-go sessions with activity instructors giving visitors a taste of the fun to be had on the blue. The health benefits of getting your feet wet are not to be overlooked. Researchers found that some of the fittest and happiest people are found in and on the water. According to the scientists, people who take part in activities on water rate their experience as more enjoyable than those exercising on land. Luckily for those travelling from further afield, a trip to the lake doesn’t need to be just a daytime affair, with South West Lakes offering camping pitches, bell tents and glamping pods for visitors too. The unrivalled location of the lakes on national parks and moors means they’re some of the best places to stargaze and spot distant constellations while toasting marshmallows on the campfire. It means the lakes always offer a waterside break where you can rest up and park your worries for the week. For those camping with kids, they offer an


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GREAT | OUTDOORS

opportunity to give your family a break from the screens and give them a taste for the great outdoors. Families can get out on the water together, enjoy nature trails, explore outdoor play areas, build dens or even swing through the trees on high ropes. Walk or cycle the nature trails by way of relaxation and visit the lakeside café for aquatic views, a well-deserved coffee, a light lunch or piece of cake. Whatever the choice, a visit to one of the region’s lakes can stretch both your legs and your imagination. They are places where people get the chance to reconnect with each other and the natural world. We’re lucky enough to have these lakes on our doorstep so next time you’re feeling the stresses of inner-city life, maybe it’s cause to embrace the natural wonder of the water. ■

South West Lakes offers camping pitches, bell tents and glamping pods too

• Reader offer: get £2.50 off equipment hire at a lake with promotional code SWL250-BB19. Redeem online or at the lakes. Valid until 30/09/19. Find a lake near you: southwestlakes.co.uk

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FAMILY | EVENTS

Family diary IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO WITH THE CHILDREN THIS MONTH KOALA CREEK Throughout May n Longleat Home to a group of southern koalas, two hairy-nosed wombats and a whole mob of potoroo, Koala Creek is an addition to the walk-through animal areas in Longleat Safari Park. Adults £29.70, ages three to 15 £22.27, under threes go free; longleat.co.uk FRIDAY FUN NIGHT Friday 3 May, 6–8pm n Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park, Keynsham Have a late-night play in the barn and the outdoor adventure area and enjoy a BBQ or pizza indoors. Last entry to the park is at 7pm. Free for active annual pass holders. Standard admission prices; avonvalley.co.uk DANGEROUS DAYS 4 DADS Monday 6 May, 10am–6.30pm n Mill on the Brue Switch off from technology and spend a fun, action-packed day outside. Dads and their kids can have some quality time together while crawling over the assault course, whizzing down the 240m zip wire and learning bush craft. Suitable for ages eight and over. Take a packed lunch and change of clothes. £45; millonthebrue.co.uk GROW Saturday 11–12 May, 11.30am & 3pm n The egg It’s the first day of spring and tiny tendrils of new life are peeping out of the ground. Watch as giant seedpods roll onto the stage and performers appear from inside as roots reach out, grow and find each other. Enjoy 10 minutes of free play after the show. Running time 35 minutes. Adults £8.50, children £7.50. Lap seats are available for ages up to six months for £1.50. Suitable for ages three to five; theatreroyal.org.uk KIDZ ART Saturday 11 May, 2–3.30pm n Wiltshire Scrapstore, Lacock Get in touch with your inner artist and get creative using different materials and mediums to the usual holiday art club. Suitable for ages three to 11 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Booking essential. £7; wiltshirescrapstore.co.uk MEN BEHAVING DADLY Saturday 18 May, 9–10.30am n St Swithin’s Church, The Paragon Head to the crypt, meet other dads and have

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Koala Creek now open at Longleat

some quality time with your little one. There are toys, games, toast for the kids and coffee and bacon butties for the dads. £3 per dad. Pre-school children only; stswithinswalcot.org.uk NOISY HOLIDAY Saturday 18 May, 2pm n The Pound, Pound Pill, Corsham Kid Carpet returns to The Pound. The noisy animals are looking forward to their dream holidays and have some brilliant ideas about where in the world they want to go. Kid Carpet just wants them all to be together, but will he be able to keep everyone happy when he can’t even get them in the car? Suitable for ages three to eight. Children £7, family tickets £28; poundarts.org.uk

SUPER PIRATES HOLIDAY CLUB Tuesday 28 May, 8.45am–5pm n Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park, Keynsham Enjoy a world of adventure with the qualified Super Pirates crew as you climb through the huge indoor soft play area, take part in a spot of mini golf, go boating, have your face painted, enjoy the outdoor adventure playground, watch some falconry shows and much more. Make new friends, have plenty of fresh air and come home talking all about it. Packed lunch, morning snack, water bottle and weather-appropriate clothing is essential. Suitable for ages five to 11 years. £31 per day; avonvalley.co.uk

TRACTOR TED BIG MACHINES WEEKEND Saturday 25–27 May n Bowood House & Gardens Enjoy tractor and trailer rides, get up close to various big machines, bounce to your heart’s content, wang a few wellies and have fun at the digger den. Normal house and gardens admissions apply; bowood.org

FLOWER POWER Tuesday 28 May, 10.30am–12.30pm and 1.30–3.30pm n Fashion Museum Look at the fabulous floral patterns on display and then create a piece of fabric using flower stamps and paper. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Suitable for all the family. Free with normal museum entry; fashionmuseum.co.uk

FAMILY ARTS DAY Sunday 26 May, 11am–3pm n Parade Gardens Celebrate craft and creativity for children of all ages. Play a new musical instrument, sculpt with clay and try your hand at metal forging or green woodworking. Adults £2; free for Discovery Card holders. Under fives free; thebathfestival.org.uk

SIZING UP SCULPTURE Wednesday 29 May, 10.30am–12.30pm and 1.30–3.30pm n Victoria Art Gallery Explore the new exhibition and make a special sculpture using art papers. Suitable for all the family. Free drop-in session, no need to book. Children must be accompanied by an adult; victoriagal.org.uk


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FAMILY | EVENTS

Join Aardman experts and create your very own model

© Aardman Animations LTD 2018

Bath Festival’s Family Arts Day

WE’RE GOING ON A BEAR HUNT Wednesday 29 May, 2pm n The Pound, Pound Pill, Corsham We can’t go over it, we can’t go under it so, we’ve got to go through it! Set off on an adventurous bear hunt at this relaxed screening of the adaptation from Michael Rosen’s much-loved children’s book. Accompanied by sensory elements, the show will be interactive with the escapades of Stan, Katie, Rosie, Max the baby and Rufus the dog, who set off on an intrepid adventure in search of bears; poundarts.org.uk

WALLACE AND GROMIT’S MUSICAL MARVELS Friday 31 May, 2pm n The Forum Join everyone’s favourite dynamic duo as Wallace prepares to perform his musical masterpiece My Concerto in Ee Lad with help from his faithful canine companion Gromit. This interactive experience featuring specially created animations with orchestral accompaniment will be followed by a screening of Wallace & Gromit: The Wrong Trousers with the soundtrack performed live on-stage. A grand day out for the whole family. Tickets from £14; bathforum.co.uk

GROMIT MODEL-MAKING WORKSHOP Friday 31 May, 3.30–4.30pm n The Forum Try your hand at making your very own Gromit and learn from the experts. Ask questions about the Aardman Studios, learn the tricks of the trade and get hands-on. Plus, take your masterpiece home (alongside your Aardman Model Maker certificate) and animate it using Aardman’s Animate It! software. Don’t miss the specially created, interactive animation at 2pm. All materials are provided. Suitable for over sevens. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Tickets £10; bathforum.co.uk n

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION NEWS

RECRUITING NOW Kingswood Pre School is looking to recruit more staff members for various positions among its early years team. Do you have a creative approach to teaching and early years education? Can you roar like a tiger? Count the heads of bouncing children? Like playing teddy bears’ picnic? The school would like to hear from hardworking individuals who have a warm sense of humour. Singing in tune is not essential. If you would like to find out more, call: 01225 734350, or email: hr@kingswood.bath.sch.uk kingswood.bath.sch.uk

SUCCESS FOR APPRENTICESHIPS AND JOBS FAIR

NORLAND COLLEGE GRANTED DEGREE AWARDING POWER Norland College, the Bath-based specialist provider of early years training and education, has been granted taught degree awarding powers by the Privy Council, becoming the smallest undergraduate degree provider in the UK. This announcement is a major step towards the college’s ambition to become the first specialist early years university in the world. The granting of taught-degree awarding powers means that, from September 2019, students will be able to study for a Norland College degree alongside the prestigious Norland College Diploma. Founded in London in 1892 by Emily Ward, Norland College has been at the forefront of childcare training ever since, giving students the opportunity to become among the world’s most sought-after childcare professionals. The news comes less than 12 months after the college achieved a Gold rating –the highest standard possible – in the government-based Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) in June 2018. Norland graduates continue to be much in demand and the college is able to provide newly qualified nannies with 100% employment opportunities through its own in-house employment agency. norland.ac.uk

1,600 people networked with employers at the Bath College Apprenticeships and Jobs Fair recently at The Assembly Rooms. There were more than 90 stands of prospective employers at the fair, which was attended by schools, college students, young people, parents and members of the public. The Mayor, Cllr Patrick Anketell-Jones, commented that the fair was “informative, friendly and encouraging” after discussing the differences between levels of apprenticeships, going all the way up to post-graduate at Level 7. Nick, from a Bath-based company that exhibited at the event, took on an apprentice following last year’s fair. He said: “Pivoting our recruitment strategy to apprenticeships has been a revolutionary shift for our company. There is quite simply no way that we would have grown to the stage that we are without the support of the National Apprenticeship Service, and our apprenticeship provider.” His apprentice, Oliver, commented: “Having an apprenticeship has allowed me to not only work within my field of interest, but to earn money and develop my professional skills with a well-reputed company. I would highly recommend considering an apprenticeship to anyone looking for post GCSE or A Level prospects.” Bath College is the largest provider of apprenticeships in Bath and North East Somerset. bathcollege.ac.uk/study-with-us/apprenticeships

NEW HEAD ANNOUNCED

BACK TO SCHOOL FOR ALUMNAE Alumnae of the Bath High School were given a special tour of their former school in April. Built in 1790 as a private residence, the Grade II listed Hope House on Lansdown Road became home to Bath High School from 1926. The school stayed on the site until 2014. 20 former pupils were brought together by developers Acorn Property Group and property consultancy Savills to see the new chapter of the main school, which is currently being converted into five luxurious apartments, alongside the building of numerous new homes. Interested buyers can visit the show apartment through an appointment. To book, call 01225 474500. 72 TheBATHMagazine

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Prior Park College has appointed Ben Horan as its new headmaster, who succeeds James Murphy-O’Connor and will take up his post in September. Mr Horan said, “My visits over recent weeks have convinced me that the college is a community which is dedicated to helping its young people grow into happy and successful adults. I look forward to getting to know the staff, parents, alumni and, most of all, Prior Park’s wonderful students.” priorparkcollege.com n


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Sarah Wringer KIE Bath, 5 Trim Street, Bath, BA1 1HB Direct Line (01225) 473502 Email: sarah.wringer@kaplan.com

A.L.F.A. LANGUAGE SCHOOL FRANCE

HOST FAMILIES REQUIRED Would you like to host French students? Ages 11-17 Saturday 13th July – Friday 2nd August One Student – £545 Two Students in Room Share – £1030 Two Students in 2 Rooms – £1090 For further information please contact Mrs Susie Houston on 0777 379 2866 or email: susie.houston.alfa@gmail.com

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“I LEFT ZUMBA IN THE WORST MOOD,” SAID NO ONE, EVER. ®

zumbafitnessbath.co.uk • group classes • parties • fund-raisers • private classes • warmups • trial sessions

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

HEALTH & BEAUTY NEWS Putting My Clarins to the test, a great industry collaboration and a new release that is all about the lips – Crystal Rose on the latest updates in the sector

SUN PROTECTION

ON THE FAST TRACK Lucknam Park has just announced the launch of its spa therapist programme where it will pick two top students from Bath College and train them up to their highest standard. The students will receive part-time jobs while they study for their final year at the college, and set them on a fast-track pathway to senior positions at Lucknam Park. Adele Adams and Bobby Thomas, both 18, are the first two Spa Therapies Level 3 students to get on to the programme. They have been working at Lucknam Park around their studies and will start working at the spa full-time from July. Coming to the end of her studies, Adele says: “I’m really looking forward to the next stage of the programme. Working at Lucknam, I’ve learned the standards of a high-end spa and have got to know regular clients.” A wonderful opportunity for student therapists and a great industry collaboration.

Containing SPF 50 protection against UVA and UVB rays, the new UV Essentiel Gel Crème from CHANEL has antioxidant and anti-pollution properties. With a combination of natural and powerful active ingredients to prevent the appearance of skin ageing, pigmentation, wrinkles and dehydration, the formula is a cutting-edge gel-cream texture that protects the skin. It contains desert yeast extract and stimulates the skin’s natural defences to reinforce its barrier function, helping it to maintain optimal hydration levels. Expect refreshed, luminous, hydrated and primed skin from this all-in-one bottle. • UV Essentiel Gel Crème, £46, CHANEL; chanel.com

MY SKIN, MY RULES Aimed at those between 18 and 25, vegan-friendly range My Clarins is suitable for acne-prone skin and uneven skin complexions. TBM has been trying out a few of the products and here’s what we thought: Put to the test, the Clear-Out Target Gel visibly calmed irritations and noticeably aided in treating blemishes before they got too out-of-hand – not to mention the spot-on results. Applying the gel directly onto imperfections was simple with the nozzle and the clear-out gel did not dry out the skin – unlike many products that have been tried in the past. The Re-Boost Day Cream was applied daily before make-up application and it lasted throughout the day. The lightweight cream was very hydrating in the morning and gave a welcome reboost. With a unfragranced scent, the cream was not overpowering and prepped the face ready for the day ahead. • My Clarins ranges from £15 – £22 from Frontlinestyle; 01225 478478; frontlinestyle.co.uk

• bathcollege.ac.uk; lucknampark.co.uk

HAIR-FREE

ALL ABOUT THE LIPS Making it colourful this May is the launch of L’Occitane’s new lip collection. Infused with fruits, vegetables and herbs, the range will be released on 9 May and will include vegetarianfriendly and silicone-free lip scrubs, balms and lipsticks. Whether you want to turn up the colour, make an impression or keep it fresh, light and subtle, the lip colour collection is packed with a fruity punch. Expect appearances from fabulous figs, mouthwatering marmalades and more tasty treats. • L’Occitane; loccitane.com 78 TheBATHMagazine

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Unwanted hair in unwanted places? It’s never been easier to reduce tufts, especially with the IPL (intense pulsed light) Permanent Hair Reduction treatment available at The Orangery. You will begin with a consultation with a technician and then, if it’s your cup of tea, proceed to have six to eight sessions that are four to eight weeks apart. A pain-free way of removing those unwanted strands. If you’re happy to experience a brief sensation of an elastic band flick, then you’re good to go! • The Orangery, 36 Gay Street, Bath BA1 2NT; 01225 466851; theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk

OFFER

THE WELLNESS TOUCH Grab a great deal at Frontlinestyle this month and enjoy 30% off the Wellness Massage by Clarins (until 31 May). Pick from two massages: Rise and Shine and Beauty Sleep and enjoy 70 minutes of hands-on time. Using sensorial experiences, tension-relieving massage movements and plant-powered products, the treatment will leave your skin looking radiant and soothed and the mind and body well and truly looked after. • £49 (RRP £70); frontlinestyle.co.uk

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style Boutique Salons & Spa Winner of Best Hair Salon & Best Day Spa in Somerset 2016

Nestled in the very heart of Bath, Frontlinestyle’s Grade II listed Beauty Spa & state of the art Hair Salon offers an elegant and tranquil environment with a highly skilled, knowledgeable and friendly team. Popular treatments include….

Blow dry bar | Massage Facials | Lashes | Caci Synergy IPL & Electrolysis | Waxing | Nails Footlogix medi-pedi | Wigs

Book online www.frontlinestyle.co.uk 4/5 Monmouth Street, Bath, BA1 2AJ 01225 478478

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Established for over 25 years we are the experts in skin health, aesthetics and advanced beauty treatments in Bath.

WE SPECIALISE IN THE FOLLOWING AESTHETIC & BEAUTY TREATMENTS

Hydra Peel Infusion Tailored needle free Mesotherapy treatment which exfoliates, hydrates and rejuvenates the skin. Ideal for :• fine lines and wrinkles • skin texture • pigmentation • exfoliating • enlarged and blocked pores • scarring • rosacea

All our consultations are free of charge so please feel free to book an appointment to see which is the right treatment for you.

Natural Looking Results For many people the younger they look the better they feel. Age is an unstoppable process but we can help with our vast range of treatments performed by our highly qualified and experienced Dr. DERMAL FILLERS to revitalise your face and restore volume loss. “They gave me natural looking results which suits my whole philosophy on life.”

Ultracel AWARD WINNING Non surgical skin tightening treatment to lift the skin of the face, eyes, neck and décolletage, also delivering results on dark circles. • SCIENTIFICALLY PROVEN - stimulates new collagen and elastin which can reverse the signs of aging. • PAIN FREE non surgical treatment with NO DOWNTIME. • The only US FDA cleared non-invasive lift • IMMEDIATE RESULTS Treatments are performed by a Doctor from the AWARD WINNING Dr Rita Rakus Clinic, Knightsbridge, London as features in TATLER MAGAZINE. “My skin felt and looked 10 years better than when I walked in.”

MUSCLE INHIBITOR TREATMENT used by millions around the world to improve the appearance of facial lines and wrinkles. “My treatment made a fantastic difference giving me back my youthful appearance and my confidence.”


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Established for over 25 years we are the experts in skin health, aesthetics and advanced beauty treatments in Bath.

WE SPECIALISE IN THE FOLLOWING AESTHETIC & BEAUTY TREATMENTS

Permanent Hair Reduction Treatment • No more waxing or depilatory creams. • Safe and effective, even on fragile or delicate areas. • Free consultations and patch test.

– MAY OFFER –

£50 off under arm and bikini line packages until 31st May

All our consultations are free of charge so please feel free to book an appointment to see which is the right treatment for you.

The Body Clinic...

by Victoria Rawlinson, Heath & Fitness Practioner Bespoke Nutrition & Lifestyle Plans available Eat to suit your bodies needs. Lose body fat and enjoy abundant energy without feeling hungry all the time. Come and meet Victoria for a friendly relaxed chat. Find out how easy it is to begin the journey to a slimmer more vibrant and energised you.

Cavislim ~ Ultrasonic Liposuction & Radio Frequency This non-invasive treatment helps to reduce body fat and stimulates collagen to tighten & tone your skin.

LPG Endermologie ~ to reduce cellulite, tighten & firm the skin.

Ultratone ~

to reshape & recontour the body.

36 Gay Street, Bath • Tel: 01225 466851 • www.theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk


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HEALTH & BEAUTY

Wow all the way

Does your skin feel dull and tired and in need of a transformative boost? Emma Clegg talks to Suzannah Chamberlain at The Orangery about the wow factor benefits of the WOW Facial

I

nstitute Hyalual are a Swiss manufacturer and distributor of aesthetic products, specialising in skin rejuvenation, injectable cosmetology and products that improve clients’ natural beauty. The WOW Facial is one of their stand-out treatments, offered exclusively in Bath by The Orangery in Gay Street. This six-step process uses powerful medical ingredients and techniques to achieve skin luminosity, health and rejuvenation for up to three months post treatment. We spoke to Suzannah Chamberlain about why the WOW Facial is such a beauty game-changer. Suzannah explains that the WOW Facial always starts with a full consultation ahead of the treatment itself, where the specialist talks to the client about the quality of their skin and any concerns that they have. This allows Suzannah to understand every aspect of the client’s needs and recommend the best treatment. The first step of the WOW Facial is Resurfacing. An E.X.F.O cleanse, with key ingredients of lactobionic acid for loosening dead skin cells and producing collagen and rooboos extract, a powerful antioxidant, is a gel that is applied and massaged all over the face in circular motions. This cleanses the skin, removes any oils and balances the pH, making the epidermis naked and clean. There are four different types of resurfacing gels: glow enhancing for dull skin, advanced resurfacing for ageing skin, one for brightening, which suits uneven pigmentation, and one for acne-prone skin.

The before and after images show a dramatic change

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Each layer of skin contributes to the qualities of the skin, from appearance and glow to skin tone, complexion and radiance The next stage is Dermaplaning – the removal of peach fuzz and dead skin cells – this is another exfoliation process, ensuring that all the products will be fully absorbed. The sensation of dermaplaning is a very gentle scraping. This part of the facial gives the skin a flawless, airbrushed look, ensuring that the make-up goes on really smoothly. This will take between 20–30 minutes, depending on the client. The third stage is referred to as Electri. This is a product containing succinic acid and hyaluronic acid. Suzannah explains that as we age, our skin’s ability to hold on to hyaluronic acid depletes and the skin gets dry and dehydrates, leading to fine lines and wrinkles. Hyaluronic acid combats this and helps your skin feel really hydrated and plump looking. Succinic acid occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues and helps to stimulate the production of collagen and elastin. Only efficient when it is put into the skin, the Electri solution is applied with a Dermaroller, which makes tiny pinprick marks on the skin’s surface. This stage can feel a little uncomfortable, but it’s just like a gentle rolling of pins on your skin as the blood supply is stimulated to boost the collagen and elastin. The fourth step is the WOW Light, which involves placing a mask onto the face that gives a low-level light energy to activate the cellular metabolism. There are three lights – red, blue and green – that suit different skin types. The mask is left on for 20 minutes.

The fifth stage is the WOW Mask, Hyalual’s cult beauty classic loved by celebrities and models. With 4% hyaluronic acid, something we all have naturally, the skin is strengthened, moisturised, skin rejuvenation is promoted and the epidermis is made smoother. The WOW Facial is brought to a close with a final stage application of SPF and a gentle spray of Profi DeLux, which hydrates and energises the skin and promotes healing. If you would like your face to have a real Wow factor, then the WOW Facial could be the very best option for your skin. n The WOW Facial is available at the Orangery, 36 Gay Street, Bath; theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk


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CJ Beauty

NEW FACIAL TREATMENTS AVAILABLE

COSMETIC ACUPUNCTURE

Offering a wide range

Based on Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture points and modern day understanding of cell renewal. This celebrity endorsed treatment aims to..

massage

of treatments manicure pedicure

• Reduce fine lines & wrinkles • Rejuvenate skin • Brighten dull skin

waxing

• Increase collagen • Increase elasticity of skin

tinting facials

We recommend a course of 6 treatments, but clients often see results after just one. Problem area treatment Full Face Treatment with body points To Book Call

LVL lash lift callus peel

Owner Michelle previously Senior Therapist at Green Street House

hopi ear candles microdermabrasion

15% off for new clients on their first treatment

01225 422851 @jlw_cosmeticacupuncture

15% off

all packag es booked Cosmetic for Acupunct ure in May

Jaime Brain Dip CDT RCS (Eng) GDC 142490

IBX nail treatment

10 -11 Green Street , Bath, BA1 2JZ 07840 864829

cjbeauty.uk

Not happy with your dentures? Are your dentures loose or painful? We can help regain your confidence and your smile

WE OFFER • FREE Consultation • New Dentures direct • Flexible dentures • • Denture repairs • Saturday appointments •

BOOK YOUR FREE CONSULTATION ON

01225 311 681

27 Walcot Buildings (Weymouth Street), Bath, BA1 6AD

www.jbdentureclinic.co.uk

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

Stress busters

Stress is a form of anxiety, a human response that features in most people’s lives to some extent – but there are ways of managing it positively to keep your life in a more natural balance

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Hypnotherapist Andrea Kelly sees stress as a powerful force in our lives: “Stress can be defined as the degree to which you feel overwhelmed or unable to cope as a result of pressures that are unmanageable. We persistently worry about work, family and finances – it’s called a silent epidemic. Stress effects every single cell in the body and it is linked to a higher risk of heart attack and stroke, it can cause memory loss, IBS, obesity, insomnia and even lack of libido and fertility problems. It can also cause havoc with our skin and hair.

We think that stress only affects us in the brain, but it has a physical effect on our body and organs, too

S

tress in physics is described as the force that produces strain on a physical body. As a psychological concept, it wasn’t until 1915 when American physiologist Walter Cannon first applied the term ‘stress’ to his work relating to the flight-or-flight response. Is the concept of psychological stress, therefore, relatively young, to do with our fast-paced lives in the 21st-century: juggling multiple obligations, the relentless pace of technology, the merciless drive to succeed in the workplace, the pressures of social media? Or perhaps stress is just a new name for a human condition – reflected historically by terms such as melancholia, neurasthenia, depression, chronic fatigue or acedia, or ‘weariness of the heart’, in medieval times. Why do we get stressed? “Stress is a form of anxiety,” says hypnotherapist Viv Kenchington. “Causes can be things such as work and financial pressures, family issues, juggling work and family life, breakdown of relationships, illness or injury.” “All stress is anxiety related,” Viv continues. “It is when one has dropped into a fight, flight or freeze response. We end up doing things that we feel uncomfortable about later – like shouting at someone, ignoring someone on purpose, over-thinking when in social situations and then not being able to get your words out. “The negative impact that stress has can be seen in a host of different ways,” says Viv. “One’s sleep often suffers. Whether it’s not being able to get to sleep, waking during the night or finding it difficult to rise in the morning. This often results in a foggy head. Which in turn creates difficulties with focus, concentration and decision-making. “And if that’s happening, it can lead to panic attacks in social situations, shortness of breath, throat closing down, blushing, dry mouth, feeling faint even. All unhelpful symptoms when you are trying to get on and have a normal life.”

“We think that stress only affects us in the brain, but it has a physical effect on our body and organs, too,” says Andrea. Studies show that three-quarters of us have felt so stressed in the last year that we’ve felt unable to cope. We know stress is linked to a range of health problems from obesity to IBS. “A small amount of stress is good for us – it can motivate us and spur us on to get things done – but we need to make sure it doesn’t get out of control.” How then can hypnotherapy help? “I practise solution-focused hypnotherapy, a style that combines solution-focused brief therapy (a type of psychotherapy) with clinical hypnosis,” says Viv Kenchington. I get my clients focusing on what they want their outcomes to be. There are no time machines – we can’t change the past, but we

can control what happens next. Sessions are geared towards lowering stress levels, and people are often surprised at the amount of laughter in the clinic room. “The first half of a session is talking. Working the intellectual mind, focusing on what is going well, what’s been enjoyed and positive differences. The second half is the trance/hypnosis part where the person gets to relax after working their brain, an important stage, when working on solutions.” “During a consultation I talk about what is happening in the brain when we suffer with anxiety disorders and what we can do about it,” says Andrea Kelly. “We need to start the day without any anxiety so we can deal with our lives, but most of us don’t. I talk about the ‘stress bucket’ and how to keep it empty – doing makes it possible for us to deal with what life throws at us and enables us to actually enjoy our lives to the full. I will explain why sleep is so important – we know a lack of it is one of the biggest stresses on the body and it affects our mind too. It’s good quality sleep that is important. “If we don’t change what we are doing and thinking, stress can be a continuous lifestyle cycle. We need to change our relationship with stress and discover what we can do to keep our bucket empty.” Yoga teacher Holly Warren – who teaches at Yoga Bodhi in Bath and at Kaliyoga yoga retreats in the UK and Italy – says that yoga and meditation practices allow your body to cope better with stress: “Prolonged stress can lead to physical, mental and emotional disease. Bringing yoga, breath work and meditation into your life can bring dramatic improvements. “Yoga trains the counter-stress response, the parasympathetic part of the nervous system. This is measured using heart rate variability or HRV. Changing the rate and pattern of breathing alters HRV, reflecting shifts in the nervous system.


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HEALTH & BEAUTY

“Slow breathing slowly increases HRV. This is good as when HRV is higher it means the system is adjusting the heart rate as you breathe in and out, and is responding more robustly to changes in breathing. When HRV is low, it means something is impaired or the system is aging and becoming more rigid. “With regular practice, chronic daytime stress levels can drop and heart rate variability can increase, which is the measure of your ability to tolerate stress.” Holly also points out that many yoga poses support the reduction of stress – for example any position that reduces the restriction of the chest and the abdomen helps you breathe and mobilise more. Nutritional consultant Rebecca Jones says that nutrition can be used to balance your hormones, which helps to reduce stress levels. “When we experience a stressor, signals are sent from the hypothalamus in the brain to trigger the adrenal glands to release cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenalin. This activates the liver to mobilise blood sugar, provide energy to the muscles and heightens our senses so we are more alert and focused. These hormones often circulate for longer periods when we are experiencing chronic stress and our body asks for more and more cortisol. This plays havoc on the rest of our body and can affect our emotional wellbeing, fertility, mood and metabolism.

“When feeling stressed it is important to keep your blood sugar levels balanced. This means eating regularly and with small amounts of protein in each meal.” Life and relationship coach Alison Heather Sutton has a different perspective. She says that research indicates that 98% of people see stress as being caused by external factors, such as workload, expectations, family, moving house. “It looks to most people as if there is an external factor causing an internal feeling – but this is simply not true. It is neither the person or the circumstances that is causing our stress – it is what our mind is telling us about going to the dentist or managing the deadline. “Our mind is a self-correcting system, a bit like a snow globe – when you shake it up the snow flurries around so you can’t see the scene, but if you leave it alone it settles. Our minds are designed to do the same thing, to settle back down on their own accord. However, we tend to interfere with the process by habitually shaking the snow globe – this is the cause of stress. “In sessions together we explore more deeply the root cause of the experience of stress. As a result, you will let go of needing to control, manipulate or manage situations so that you feel better. Your experience of feeling overwhelmed settles when you understand that all you are experiencing is thought in the moment. n

Viv Kenchington, solution-focused hypnotherapist; hypnotherapyandhealth.co.uk Andrea Kelly, solution-focused hypnotherapist; andreakellyhypnotherapy.co.uk Holly Warren, yoga teacher; kaliyoga.com; yogabodhi.co.uk Rebecca Jones, functional nutritionist; inspiredwellbeing.org Kaliyoga retreats; kaliyoga.com Alison Heather Sutton, life and relationship coach; alisonheathersutton.co.uk

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SUSTAINABLE | BEAUTY

Green beauty

Reducing single-use waste and cleaning up our act – Crystal Rose dives a little deeper into the plastic problem and discusses a few of the good guys that are doing great things in the beauty industry

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RECYCLE BETTER Here’s a great way to reduce plastic waste: Send your beauty product packaging to recycling programme TerraCycle (terracycle.com). Partnered with Garnier, TerraCycle is a free service that welcomes all containers (including tubes, lids and caps) regardless of the brand. Simply print a freeshipping label, take your empties to your local drop-off location and reduce plastic waste for the planet.

SINGLE-USE ALTERNATIVES Bamboo face cloth, £5: Super soft, natural, antibacterial, and made with 100% organic and sustainable bamboo fibres. tropicskincare.com Face Halo cotton pad, £7: Reusable, double-sided and effectively replacing the use of up to 500 disposable cotton pads. facehalo.com BeGlow TIA, £199: An all-in-one sonic skincare system designed with a dual pulse to deep-cleanse, lift and tone. Banishes the need for cotton pads entirely. beglow.com Muse SmoothSkin IPL device, £399: Tackling two problems with one solution, this machine reduces hair growth and therefore the need for frequent use of your depilatory weapon of choice. smoothskin.com

Additionally skincare apothecary Kiehls (kiehls.co.uk) has launched its Recycle And Be Rewarded programme where you earn a stamp for each empty bottle you return and on your tenth return you can choose a complimentary travel product of your choice.

REDUCE SINGLE-USE We can’t shout this enough. As Collins Dictionary’s 2018 word of the year, use of the term ‘single-use’ has shown a four-fold increase since 2013 and can be seen as an indication of the global movement to kick our addiction to disposable products. We’re hoping that brands may follow the suit of the crueltyfree store Lush (uk.lush.com), which has recently opened its first ‘naked’ shop in the UK in a bid to ditch plastic packaging. Skincare saviour Dove is also in the midst of its #CareThatGoesFuther initiative, aiming to move to 100% recycled and recyclable plastic by the end of this year – watch out for the refillable deodorant that’s currently being piloted. Plus REN has recently released a body cream to add to its totally sustainable range and pledges to have zero waste by 2021. Using packaging made from 20% reclaimed ocean plastic and 80% from recycled bottles, this range also features the first, and only, 100% recyclable pump bottle. Many of us are aware of the effort to banish the use of single-use make-up wipes – as it can take many moons for the polyester sheets to biodegrade – but now it’s said that the use of cotton pads could be just as harmful to the environment. And, with hints that there may be some stronger laws coming into place with regard to plastic waste in the beauty industry, now is a good time to switch out those singleuse products and make way for a whole new generation of sustainable, good-for-nature tools.

LOCAL HEROES Here are a few superstars near us that are at the forefront of sustainability in the city and are doing great things for the environment... L’Occitane, available at The Bath Priory With ethical sourcing at its heart, L’Occitane has forged long-term partnerships with local growers and works directly with over 130 French farmers and 10,000 pickers. Producing eco-refills, packaging made with recycled materials and using renewable resources from sustainably managed forests, L’Occitane also limits its carbon footprint by lowering the use of air transport and using renewable energies, wherever possible. The first and only spa by L’Occitane in the UK, The Bath Priory offers a sanctuary of tranquility, while being earth and eco-friendly. Plus the recently launched initiative with TerraCycle welcomes customers to bring their empties into any L’Occitane boutique to be recycled. Ubiety The only product range on the market where all proceeds go directly to charity, in this case

Sustainably-sourced incense from Breathe & Be Incense

Dorothy House Hospice Care, Ubiety (findubiety.com) is fully sustainable and uses vegan and environmentally friendly ingredients only. Launched in February, the brand has quality, efficacy, integrity and giving back at its core. My Clarins, available at Frontlinestyle Eco-friendly bottles, plant-based ingredients and suitable for vegans, My Clarins is the latest skincare range that’s targeted at ages 18–25. Keeping the nasties out with antipollution ingredients and ideal for acne-prone skin, My Clarins products can be found at Frontlinestyle on Monmouth Street. Breathe & Be Incense Founder Ceri Evans, from Breathe & Be Incense (breatheandbeincense.com), tells us her products are all sustainably sourced, plasticfree, compostable, predominantly British-made and include zero waste – she’s a champion of sustainability indeed! Breathe & Be Incense is set to host monthly incense-making workshops to spread the beauty and benefits of incense. Natural Spa Factory Established in Bath, Natural Spa Factory (naturalspafactory.com) creates skincare products using botanically sourced ingredients (such as herbs, plants and flowers) and are all free from parabens, sulphates, MCI and microbeads. Plus, all products are not tested on animals, and they are made in the UK or France and are recyclable when possible. Kings Grooming The UK-made, vegan and cruelty-free Kings Grooming range (kings-grooming.com) comprises of environmentally sustainable ethical fragrances and grooming products that contain no parabens or palm oil. Kings also encourages men to challenge the unhealthy, unrealistic ideas that society holds about masculinity; ideas that often contribute to anxiety and low moods. Kings also funds local charities Mentoring Plus and Bristol Mind, as well as national male suicide prevention charity CALM. ■

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Image by Jo Hounsome Photography

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efined in the Cambridge Dictionary as ‘causing little or no damage to the environment and therefore able to continue for a long time,’ the word ‘sustainability’ in the beauty sphere covers the ethical side – being PETA-approved, veganfriendly, organic and eco-friendly – and the recyclability of packaging. Using recyclable packaging is vital, especially after recent claims that 70% of the waste in the beauty industry is from the packaging itself, according to Arnaud Meysselle, CEO of Ren Clean Skincare. These are all things that should be taken into account when considering the sustainability of a product. As part of a generation that’s clued-up, investedin and passionate about our planet, we think sustainability is key. Aiming to make it a little easier for you to switch out the old habits and make way for a few good-for-nature alternatives, here are our suggestions for small changes that could make all the difference…


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The medieval ruins of Clarendon Palace lie in one of the most unspoilt parts of Wiltshire, hidden deep in ancient woodland

A noble quest

A 12th-century palace steeped in royal history, roaming alpacas and a couple of quaint country pubs are among the hidden gems that feature on Andrew Swift’s linear walking route from West Dean to Salisbury

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larendon Palace, three miles east of Salisbury, was established as a royal hunting lodge shortly after the Norman Conquest. By the mid-12th century, it had become the venue for meetings of the royal council and special assemblies. In 1164, around 1,800 people were summoned to Clarendon during the crisis occasioned by the quarrel between Henry II and Thomas Becket. In 1357, Edward III moved his court there as the Black Death ravaged his kingdom. The last king to spend any length of time at Clarendon, however, was Henry VI, who, while staying there in August 1453, fell into a catatonic stupor which lasted over a year. Possibly because of the memory of Henry’s ‘great illness,’ later monarchs shunned the palace, although the deer park continued to be maintained. By the time Elizabeth I turned up for a day’s hunting in 1574, the buildings were so ruinous that a marquee had to be erected for the royal party. Today, the deer have departed and alpaca roam where kings once held court. The only part of the palace still standing is the east wall of the great hall. Although the size and extent of the buildings that once stood here is still apparent, the sense of abandonment is 88 TheBATHMagazine

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overwhelming. And, while the site is free to wander, hardly anyone does. A few weeks ago, on a sunny afternoon in the Easter holidays, I had the place to myself. While this is partly due to the eerily unspectacular nature of the ruins, it is largely because you cannot drive there. You have to walk – and walk a considerable distance. I had long wanted to feature Clarendon in a walk, and, having failed to come up with a decent circular walk, decided that a linear walk was the only answer. Having now walked it twice, I am happy to report that it improves on further acquaintance. Not only does it traverse one of the most unspoilt parts of Wiltshire, much of it lies through ancient woodland, with a distinctly medieval feel to it. En route, it passes two extraordinary churches, and it ends by weaving through one of the most historic parts of Salisbury. Best of all, there is a choice of two country pubs for a leisurely lunch. Getting there by train is relatively straightforward. The walk starts at West Dean, which has a station, known as Dean (Wilts), served by local trains from Salisbury. To get there from Bath Spa, you need – if you are going to make either of those pubs for lunch – to catch the 8.37am or 9.36am to Salisbury (both of which run a minute earlier

on Saturdays) and change there for a local train to Dean. Getting back is even simpler – just hop on a train at Salisbury. Leaving Dean station, turn right to head north through the village. After 300m, turn left to the Borbach Chantry, which can be found in the old churchyard. Most of the church was demolished in 1868, but the chantry, which formed its south aisle, was spared. Now cared for by the Churches Conservation Trust, it contains some magnificent tombs, including one to Robert Pierrepont, Earl of Kingston. Leaving the churchyard, turn left past the tree-covered site of a Norman motte, before turning right to return to the lane and continue north along it. After 1500m, bear left along Scouts Lane, and after another 600m turn left along a track into Bentley Wood (SU264293). This 1700-acre nature reserve is famous for butterflies, and at this time of year is also full of birdsong and bluebells. Continue along the track for two miles, and, when you come to a road, take the turning ahead signposted to Farley and Salisbury (SU234288). After 950m, turn left at a T-junction to the Hook and Glove pub (SU224292). Just past it, turn right along a footpath, and, when you come to a lane, turn


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THE | WALK

Hook & Glove pub in Farley right to find two Grade I-listed buildings – Fox’s Hospital, built in 1681 and All Saints church, built eight years later. Carry on for 100m and turn left along a track signposted to Pitton. After 575m, when five footpaths meet, carry straight on. After another 200m, bear left along a narrow track (SU224303). Carry on in the same direction for 1400m, climbing for much of the way, until, after going through a kissing gate (KG), a steep and slippery path leads down to the village of Pitton. Turn left at the bottom, and at the T-junction turn right past the Silver Plough pub (SU212312). At the crossroads turn left, and after 175m turn right along a footpath

with a Clarendon Way sign. After 100m the path swings left between fields. After another 750m, carry straight on, keeping to the left of two large barns, to follow a broad track through the woods (SU201311). Mighty conifers, intermingled with beeches, soon give way to something gentler – a mixture of ash, hazel, wild cherry, beech and rowan. After about a mile mixed woodland yields to hazel coppice, with a few timeworn oak, ash and beech trees. When you come to a broad track, turn right along it and, after emerging into the open, bear right towards the site of Clarendon Palace and go through a KG (SU183301). Information boards tell the story of the palace, but this is no manicured heritage attraction. The ground is rough and overgrown, and you need to watch your step. At the far end, head through a KG to rejoin the broad track heading westward. As it drops downhill and rounds a curve, the spire of Salisbury Cathedral comes into view ahead. After another 250m, when the lane curves right, follow a Clarendon Way sign straight across a field (SU174299). After rejoining the lane, carry on through a gate and, after another 800m, continue across 15th-century Milford Bridge. At a T-junction, carry straight on up a footpath. After crossing the railway, when the path forks, bear left. At the road, cross and carry on down Fowlers Hill. At the bottom, carry

straight on along an alleyway and turn right at the end. Follow a subway under the bypass, and bear left to carry on along St Ann’s Street. At the end, cross, go through a gateway into the Cathedral Close, and at the end turn right through an archway along the High Street. Turn second left along Bridge Street and carry on for 650m to the station. n Andrew Swift is the author of On Foot in Bath: Fifteen Walks Around a World Heritage City and co-author, with Kirsten Elliot, of Ghost Signs of Bath

FACT FILE n Distance: 11.5 miles n Maps: OS Explorer 130, 131 n Level of challenge: Straightforward, apart from one steep descent n Refreshment stops: Hook and Glove, Farley (4.5 miles from start). Open for lunch from noon to 2pm (3pm on Sunday) (01722 712247). Silver Plough, Pitton (6.5 miles from start). Lunch served from noon to 2pm (3pm on Sunday). Pub open until 3pm, all day Saturday.

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Interiors May.qxp_Layout 1 26/04/2019 10:08 Page 1

INTERIORS

Ahead of the curve ines – vertical, horizontal, straight, curved, flowing or angular – all play an important psychological role in design. You can use lines to create a very particular look or atmosphere, and different lines suit different spaces. For example, diagonal and zigzag lines (such as chevrons) bring movement, energy and excitement to a space, and work perfectly in children’s playrooms or creative home offices.

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Alternatively, straight horizontal lines can create a sense of harmony and tranquility. They visually expand the size of the space, and so are really useful in cramped bedrooms or living rooms. Vertical lines draw the eye up, and convey a feeling of strength and stability, which makes them particularly well-suited to kitchens or vaulted spaces. But that’s enough about straight, angular lines. Right now, the focus is on curves.

BACK IN STYLE

suddenly notice that our homes are full of angular shapes. It is very easy to fall into the trap of filling box shaped rooms with box shaped furniture and accessories. This can look great in the right spaces, but in the wrong ones it can feel sparse and severe. Breaking up the geometry with a few carefully placed curves can create an inviting softness that is very pleasing to the eye.

Curves in interior design are no new thing, but after years of straight edges, they’re making a comeback. You’ll be familiar with the almost iconic curves of the 1960s and 70s. Back then, psychedelic flowing lines conveyed a sense of wild liberation, shunning the conventions of mid-century design. Today’s curved lines are more subdued, but no less impactful, softening and humanising our living spaces.

CURVED CORNERS A TOUCH OF GRACE Curved lines are in tune with nature and indicate gentle and graceful movement. When used in repetition they can create soothing, rhythmic cadence. They have a very natural, human quality and that helps people forge a closer connection with the space. There is a great deal of power in a curve; they can be cosy and inviting, far more so than austere straight lines. Swooping forms can also be exciting and dramatic, creating flowing, musical statements and a striking and powerful space. Straight lines are everywhere in design, and many of us will 90 TheBATHMagazine

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Curves have other powers too: they can enhance the flow of a room, create defined areas in an open-plan space and visually lengthen an area. Curved furniture can be useful in tricky corners, and its lack of sharp corners make a practical, children-friendly option. Is there anything curves can’t do? ■ Clair Strong Interior Design is a small, friendly, creative business based in Bath and London, providing services for residential and commercial clients. Visit: clairstrong.co.uk or contact: clair@clairstrong.co.uk

THIS PAGE: far left, Atkin and Thyme Etienne glass top coffee table; left: Hurn, Hurn, Bloomingville Ronda oak wood tripod coffee table; OPPOSITE: Essential Home, yellow and blue bedroom

Sharp edges and sleek straight lines have had their day. It’s time for something softer to grace our interior spaces. Clair Strong talks us through the advantages of curved lines in interior design


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INTERIORS

Curved lines can visually enhance and expand a space

CURVY TOP TIPS Here are some lightning-fast tips on introducing curves:

• Create a spa-like effect in your bathroom with a curved bath. They’re more comfortable to bathe in, too.

• Choose a pleasingly plump and rounded sofa for maximum comfort in your living room. This will soften the harsh edges of your coffee table and TV.

• Prefer to start with smaller changes? Think port-hole or sunburst mirrors or arched floor lamps for a simple but striking feature in any room.

• An oval dining table is less formal than an oblong one, but no less sophisticated. • If your kitchen and dining room are all in one space, introduce curves to break up the cabinetry.

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DESIGN | INTERIORS

Designs on a hallway

The art of classical interior design is to preserve original features, adding sympathetic, authentic new elements where required. Sarah Latham, founder and creative director of Etons of Bath, has some tips on combining the two in this Georgian hallway

LIGHTING The simplicity of a lantern rather than a chandelier works best in a hallway. Hallway lanterns should always be of a good size, as if they are too small they look apologetic. Co-ordinate the metal finish of the lanterns with your door furniture and electrical accessories (switches and sockets).

PANELLING Panelling to archways and columns elevate their presence and add elegant detailing.

ARTWORK Arrange artwork symmetrically and plan ahead with wiring for picture lights at first fix.

FANLIGHTS Arched fanlights above a door can be mirrored with arched joinery to create a symmetrical and balanced arrangement.

ANTIQUE FURNITURE Antique furniture against a light and airy colour scheme provides contrast and allows these hero pieces to be fully appreciated.

LIMESTONE FLAGSTONE FLOORING

CONNECTING SPACES A hallway is a connecting space. If you have rooms with different characters and colours leading off that space it needs to work hard to connect them all together. A paint colour choice often needs to work up the stairs and on a landing as well as downstairs in the hallway so the way a colour responds to the variations in natural light needs to be considered carefully.

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Photograph by Adam Carter

A contemporary twist on the classic (where slate insert pieces would result in a busier, more contrasting pattern) – the same stone can be used throughout, but in a traditional laid pattern.

Etons of Bath, 108 Walcot Street, Bath; etonsofbath.com


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DAVINCI PENDANT BY BELID, SWEDEN

LIGHTING SPECIALIST 8 BATH STREET, FROME. TEL: 01373473555 WWW.FIATLUX.CO.UK TUESDAY – FRIDAY 9.30AM – 5.30PM, SATURDAY 9.30AM – 5.00PM

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Gardening May.qxp_Layout 1 25/04/2019 12:03 Page 1

GARDENING

No garden is complete without a scented plant or two

Scents for all seasons

Jane Moore picks her favourite fragrant shrubs and explains why scented plants are an integral part of any green space

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n the whole panoply of garden flora available, there has to be a spot for a fragrant plant or two in any garden. I’m a huge fan of scented plants – what’s not to like about miscellaneous scents as you wander about the garden, after all? Small, tall, shrub or climber, there is a scented plant to suit your space, however titchy it may be. But perhaps it’s the seasons that matter the most. Scent is synonymous with those languid summer days of roses and herbs and freshly cut grass. In spring, fragrance is part of that zinging promise in the very air of the season to come. But it’s a handful of scented plants that really get me through the winter months. And I’m not the only one – the big old bumble bees rely on scent in winter to draw them to the flowering plants as there are so few things flowering in the depths of winter. So perhaps that’s where we should start. WINTER PERFUME I’ve had burly delivery drivers stop me to ask what they can smell in the car park at The Bath Priory – and no, it’s not the bins. 96 TheBATHMagazine

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Instead it’s a couple of Sarcococca confusa bushes scenting the whole area with their tiny vanilla-fragranced flowers. Commonly called Christmas box, for the obvious reason that it flowers in late December and January, often continuing into February, it’s an evergreen stalwart that sits sturdily all summer long, biding its time for a long moment of glory in the winter. It’s a great plant to have near a door or front gate where you can keep it clipped into a nice, box ball shape, and it’s lovely to cut for flower arranging too. Viburnum x bodnantense ‘Dawn’ is one of the first plants I fell in love with back in my college days. It’s a super-flowering shrub with clusters of little pink flowers produced in winter on bare twigs which looks delightful – and it’s showier than you might imagine. You do need to allow it a corner of its own as it does turn into a thicket of stems, although you can prune it hard and thin out the older wood to keep it in its place. It has nice foliage through summer and gets some good autumn tints too, so it isn’t just a one-trick pony either.

For sophistication, elegance and happiness in light shade look no further than Daphne ‘Jacqueline Postill’. Fabulously fragrant with dainty pink flowers, she will set you back a few pounds as daphnes are always pricey, but oh so worth it. Tall and spare with the flowers produced at a handy nose height, place her near a path or in a sheltered spot to see her at her best. SPRING SCENTS I could not write a feature about scent without including lilacs. Be aware that you need some space and that they’re notorious for suckering and dying back, but a lilac is a joyous plant to own provided you keep it well-pruned and within bounds. My favourites are the white Syringa vulgaris ‘Madame Lemoine’ and deep purple S. v. ‘Charles Joly’. There are few plants as downright useful and attractive as the Mexican orange blossom or Choisya ternata, and that is without factoring in the fabulously fragrant foliage and flowers. Evergreen trifoliate leaves, a vigorous bushy growth habit and an ability to thrive even after pruning make


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this versatile shrub a surefire winner. Top that with its large fragrant mops of white flowers in late spring and early summer and it’s an easy-to-grow plant with a lot of potential for the average garden. While my favourite variety is Choisya ternata, for a small garden I would pick Choisya × dewitteana ‘White Dazzler’ with its dainty, slim leaves and smaller growth habit. Many viburnum varieties also flower fabulously in spring and quite a few have heady scent to go with those blooms. One I rate is the unromantically named Viburnum × burkwoodii ‘Park Farm Hybrid’, a real toughie with a vigorous growth habit and lots of sweetly scented spring flowers. For smaller gardens its parent Viburnum carlesii is a daintier, less rambunctious option, as is Viburnum juddii. SUMMER FRAGRANCE My other half is not a big fan of roses – “nasty, spiky things” – but even he agrees that there are few things that smell as wonderful as a really fragrant rose. I’m a huge fan of the David Austin repeatflowering roses, both as shrubs and climbers, and I’m not alone. Rosa ‘Gertrude Jekyll’ regularly comes out as top rose in gardening magazine polls and, if you only have the room or inclination for one rose, it is a goodie.

Rosa ‘Gertrude Jekyll’

Hard on the heels of roses comes the mock orange or philadelphus. It may be a one-hit wonder with a brief flowering time in June but, oh, it’s a belter. Those pure white flowers pack a fragrance so strong that it will literally stop you dead as you sniff the air, like Pooh bear catching a waft of honey. It’s incredibly easy to grow and loves a sunny spot. My favourite varieties are the singles such as Philadelphius ‘Belle Etoile’ and the lime-green leaved P. ‘Aureus’. My final choice for summer lies

Philadelphus, punctuated here with hollyhocks

somewhere between a shrub and a herbaceous plant and looks good treated in either way. The Russian sage or Perovskia atriplicifolia was my stand-out plant in last summer’s drought and it performed brilliantly throughout August and September with masses of dusky blue flowers topping its aromatic felted grey foliage. The bees absolutely loved it – and so did I. n Jane Moore is an award-winning gardening columnist and head gardener at The Bath Priory Hotel. Twitter: @janethegardener

“We used Mardan following a recommendation from a friend. They moved us in and out of storage and then into our renovated house. I would highly recommend them. The service was super efficient and the guys were quick, polite and courteous. Nothing was too much trouble and all of our possessions arrived safe and sound” Emma Webster, Moon Client

DOMESTIC & COMMERCIAL MOVERS • PACKERS • STORERS • SHIPPERS

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THE BATH DIRECTORY - MAY 2019.qxp_Layout 31 26/04/2019 11:22 Page 1

the directory Electricians

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Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

House & Home

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Aromatherapy • Reflexology/Facial reflexology Japanese Cosmo Facelift • Deep Tissue Massage For more information, please visit:

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Trowbridge & Neal’s Yard Bath

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• Interior and exterior • Wallpaper specialist • Ceiling repairs and lining

• Working with designer paints • Free quotations

• Over 20 years experience


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Does Bath have an ‘average’ homebuyer? Alex Bowater Branch Manager at andrews

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he UK holds an intriguing interest in property. On the onehand, we talk of the state of ‘the market’ as if it might be a single entity, whilst all the time knowing and acknowledging that it is anything but, and that what you can buy in one part of the country varies vastly to what is affordable elsewhere. Indeed, it’s not just the market itself which varies but the shape and size of those homebuyers who operate within it. From single first-time buyers who might require help from the bank of Mum and Dad, through to second-steppers, down-sizers and professional buy-to-let investors looking for multiple properties, the ‘typical’ purchaser simply doesn’t exist… Or at least not on a nationwide scale. Whilst there has, in fact, been a decline over the last twenty years in homeownership and a shift towards renting, the government’s Help to Buy equity loan scheme has helped increase owner occupation, especially amongst first time buyers. This is reflected here in Bath as the most popular type of household is currently those deemed to be ‘young and single’, although the average age of a first-time buyer in the city is, in fact, 35 – a figure which has risen by three years in the past decade. Of course, this only scratches the surface of the local property market and along with first-time buyers, the city also attracts numerous

[SOUTH WESTERN] LIMITED

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Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswolds | Dorset

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk

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homebuyers who are families. Indeed, it’s a city popular in this respect and it is estimated that there are almost 10,000 families here with one or two children, and almost 2,000 more with three or more children. Added to this, of course, is the fact 24% of all local people own a car and 5,000 families in Bath owning two or more. This affects the type of properties which are in demand and properties with driveways or secure parking are always popular. However, it will come as no surprise that in many areas of the city, purchasers do have to settle for on-street parking. These families in Bath will often spend as much as 64% of their earnings on a mortgage and so being confident in buying the ‘right’ property is absolutely vital. Terraced homes with at least three bedrooms remain a firm favourite here and there’s always strong interest in those which come to the market. A great example would be this bay-fronted period property in the sought-after Camden area of Bath that offers families four bedrooms and close proximity to a range of amenities and highly regarded schools. See: Andrewsonline.co.uk


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PROPERTY | HOMEPAGE

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ocated almost half way between Bath and Bradford on Avon, Monkton Farleigh has lots to offer including a primary school and historic public house. The village is in the catchment area for St Laurence secondary school in Bradford on Avon. No. 61-62 is a delightful Grade II listed property which has been beautifully maintained, creating a wonderful home. The solid oak front door gives access to the reception hall which opens to the front aspect sitting room with Georgian style windows, wood burning stove and oak staircase rising to the upper floors. The well appointed kitchen/dining room boasts a range of floor and wall mounted units with integrated appliances and lots of rear aspect windows allowing light to flood in creating an airy space. A useful boot room and a shower room complete the ground floor accommodation. The first floor provides the family bathroom and 2 well proportioned bedrooms, one having a range of built-in wardrobes whilst the other has a partially vaulted ceiling with exposed timbers. The second floor houses the master bedroom with a vaulted ceiling, ample eaves storage and a recess currently used as a study/music area but with plumbing for an en suite bathroom. Externally the rear garden is wonderful, with a sunny sunken terrace accessed from the kitchen and boot room, steps rise to the main level lawned garden with an array of mature planting and trees. Another set of steps lead up to a decked area with sun sail offering panoramic views over the adjoining countryside. In addition, an area of hardstanding provides off street parking for 1/2 vehicles. This gorgeous village house is being offered for sale with agents Cobb Farr.

Monkton Farleigh, Bradford-on-Avon • 3 bedrooms • 2 reception rooms • Grade II listed • Beautiful gardens • Off street parking

Guide price: £775,000

Cobb Farr, 35 Brock Street, The Circus, Bath. Tel: 01225 333332

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Richmond Place, Bath £865,000 • • • • • •

3/4 bedrooms 2 bathrooms 2 reception rooms Wonderful views overlooking Solsbury Hill Charming garden Period features throughout

01225 3333332 | 01225 866111


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Priory Park, Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire £875,000 • • • • • • •

4/5 bedrooms 3/4 reception rooms Detached Stunning garden and views 2 garages, parking and workshop En suite facilities Annexe potential

01225 3333332 | 01225 866111


Chatham Row, Walcot A remarkable Grade II Listed four bedroom Georgian townhouse, bursting with period charm throughout and benefiting from gated off-street parking & a picturesque garden. Located in the sought-after area of Walcot, the property is just a short level walk from Bath city centre.

Rent: ÂŁ2,800 pcm* beautiful living room | high ceilings & south-facing sash windows | drawing room | open plan kitchen / dining room | 4 good sized bedrooms (1 en-suite) | beautiful bathroom & shower room | unique garden room | enclosed courtyard garden | gated off-street parking

Reside Bath | 24 Barton Street Bath BA1 1HG | T 01225 445 777 | E info@residebath.co.uk | W www.residebath.co.uk

*An administration fee of ÂŁ420.00 inc. VAT applies.


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The Apartment Co - May 19.qxp_Layout 1 25/04/2019 14:20 Page 1

Should you stage your rental apartment? Peter Greatorex, managing director of The apartment Company

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ath’s rental market is fast paced and strong, and to achieve a consistently good return it’s important you do all you can to attract potential tenants. Apartments that are well presented certainly have an edge when it comes to viewings, but should you stage a rental property?

Your ideal home Brewery Court is a small development in the grounds of the old G & T Spencer’s brewery in Whiteheads Lane. With a history dating back to the early 19th Century this bespoke development blends the historic architecture of the original building with the six new mews houses. Philip Ratcliffe of local estate agents Kingstons is selling these delightful mews houses on behalf of Developer, Juniper Homes. “With a bespoke high quality internal specification, meticulous design, dedicated resident access and parking within private landscaped grounds, Brewery Court ticks all the boxes, particularly for people looking for the ideal lock up and leave giving them the freedom to travel for business or pleasure”. These very manageable new houses combine the honey coloured hues of Bath stone with the advantages of low maintenance that comes with a new build, all in a very central location. With the emphasis on keeping active, being able to walk to almost everything in Bradford on Avon from Whiteheads Lane which is a significant advantage. “People want to be connected to their local environment and Brewery Court lets you do just that” said Philip. “It’s the only new development that gives you both security and peace of mind, whilst being close to the shops, cafes and thriving life that Bradford on Avon offers”.

Why stage? Home-staging is often discussed in relation to apartments for sale, but less so when it comes to rental properties. You could be of the school of thought that it doesn’t matter, thus relying on the imagination of the tenants to do all the hard work. By doing so you are, in effect, allowing them to make presumptions about your apartment and its size that may be wrong and may influence their decision. Not everyone can walk into a space and immediately understand its actual size and see its potential. For many of us, we need to see that a double bed actually fits in the guest room with ease, that a three-seater sofa comfortably works against that wall and that yes, the kitchen will fit a table for dinner. You want tenants making decisions based on facts, not their initial interpretation of your apartment.

Should I furnish? Just because tenants are looking for an unfurnished apartment doesn’t mean you can’t help them see what it would be like to live there. Filling your property with furniture is not a solution, as it’s a significant, costly and unnecessary undertaking. What we at The Apartment Company would advise is to place a few key pieces in important rooms, thus providing your tenants with perspective. They will know what the bedroom looks like with a double bed, instead of having to imagine it. There are many ingenious ways of staging an apartment that won’t break the bank. Key pieces such as a bed and a sofa will turn your apartment into a home. A couple of accessories like tactile cushions and bedding, will add warmth and give your tenants that welcome they seek.

Ten great reasons to downsize to Brewery Court

Have you forgotten?

       

It can be easy to forget that rental properties aren’t just an investment, you are providing someone with a home. Just as buyers will search high and low for ‘the one’, the same goes for tenants. In some ways even more so, as they need to be assured they will be cared for when they move in, too. A well-presented apartment demonstrates your commitment to your investment, that you care for the property and want your tenants to make it their home. You understand the needs of your tenants and will do your best to make them feel safe and secure. It’s often the simplest of touches that can make the biggest difference. For more ways you can maximise your investment to attract a high number of potential tenants, come and chat to our lettings team. Working with tenants every day, we know what wins and what can hinder. At The Apartment Company we want your rental property to win everytime.

Secure development with parking All houses with rear gardens Stunning specification throughout Quartz worksurfaces in the kitchen Engineered oak flooring throughout the living area Just 5 minutes from central Bradford on Avon M4 just 20 minutes away 8-miles from Bath Travel to London Paddington in under 2-hours#Got a house to sell? Juniper Homes WiseMove can help Like to know more? Call Philip Ratcliffe at Kingstons on 01225 867 591

www.brewerycourt.co.uk 106 TheBATHMagazine

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The Apartment Company Pg@theapartmentcompany.co.uk or call 01225 471144.


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Camden

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Elm Grove, BA1 £650,00

A handsome, detached 1930’s family house, offering spacious and flexible accommodation. Two reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, four bedrooms, conservatory, family bathroom, shower room & downstairs WC, plus attractive front and rear gardens. Situated in a popular, family friendly cul-de-sac on the edge of Larkhall village. Energy Efficiency Rating: TBC

01225 809 868 camden@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Newbridge Andrewsonline.co.uk

Weston Lane, BA1 £560,000

Fantastic semi detached family home located on Weston Lane. Accommodation includes sitting room/ diner, Kitchen/ breakfast room, four bedrooms, garage, studio/home office, garden and off street parking. Pinewood occupies a very popular and handy position, being pleasantly situated on Weston Lane. The centre of Bath is about a mile or so away - via a lovely walk through Victoria Park and Botanical Gardens. whilst the various shops and amenities in Weston Village are located within half a mile. Energy Efficiency Rating: TBC

01225 809 685 newbridge@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


Central

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Downside Close, BA2 £495,000

01225 809 571

A detached home with four double bedrooms. Situated in a cul de sac location in the village of Bathampton just 2 miles from Bath city centre. The home has a spacious 22’3 x 11’10 lounge, separate dining room and kitchen. There is also a garage, parking and corner plot garden. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

central@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bear Flat

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Combe Down, BA2 £500,000

A 1930’s semi- detached family home situated on a generous corner plot with three bedrooms, two receptions , driveway parking, garage and south facing rear garden on the corner of Hansford Square and Hill Avenue. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

01225 805 680 bearflat@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


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BLOOMFIELD ROAD, Bath

Price £950,000

A detached five bedroom house with three bathrooms, a 39’ living room and a double garage, including an adjoining annexe, built around a courtyard on the south side of the city, 1.5 miles from the centre of Bath and within easy reach of beautiful surrounding countryside. Detached character property with adjoining annexe | 1.5 miles from the centre of Bath | 5 bedrooms | 3 bathrooms | 39’ living room | Gardens | Garage | Drive | EPC Rating: D

CHARLOTTE STREET, Bath

Price £947,500

Stunningly refurbished Grade II listed Georgian townhouse located in the heart of the city with Bath’s shops, restaurants and galleries on the doorstep. This family home offers 2,297 square foot of living space and includes a drawing room, kitchen, dining room, utility room, W.C., master bedroom suite, four further bedrooms, shower room, storage vaults and a courtyard garden. Refurbished Grade II listed Georgian townhouse | Period features | 2,297 square feet | Drawing room and dining room | Master suite | 4 further bedrooms | Shower room | Courtyard garden | EPC Exempt


GRAND PARADE, Bath

Price ÂŁ900,000

Exceptional three bedroom, two bathroom apartment in the iconic Empire, built in 1901, with views over Bath Abbey and the Guildhall, Bath. In the heart of the world heritage city of Bath, close to Bath Abbey, the River Avon, Pulteney Bridge and Weir, Waitrose and a short flat walk to Bath Spa railway station, all make this location hard to beat. 3 bedroom apartment in iconic building | 2 bathrooms | Stunning views | Located in the heart of Bath | Extensive communal facilities | EPC Exempt

MOUNT BEACON, Bath

Price ÂŁ550,000

An impressive Grade II listed three bedroom apartment, with city views over Bath in desirable Mount Beacon, just 0.6 miles walk down to the Assembly Rooms, Bath. Grade II listed 3 bedroom apartment | City views | Entire second (top) Floor | High ceilings | Master with en suite and dressing room | Private parking and dual access | Storage area | EPC Exempt


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Park Lane O.I.E.O £525,000 New build · Two double bedrooms · Two en suites · Open plan sitting room/kitchen · Private entrance · Private parking · Short level walk into the centre · Close to Victoria Park · Holiday lets and pets permitted · Approx. 980 Sq. ft

SALES

01225 471 14 4

LETTINGS

01225 303 870

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk


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Alexandra House

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£575,000

Modern apartment · Beautifully decorated · Two double bedrooms · Large veranda · Secure parking · Far reaching riverside views · Close to city centre · Approx. 1011 Sq. ft

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Millennium House

£1600 pcm

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New Marchants Passage

Northanger Court

Stylish living · Two double bedrooms · Central location · Communal roof terrace · Close to transport links · Modern kitchen and bathrooms · Lift access · Bike storage · Approx. 840 Sq. ft

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£500,000

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Moravian Place

£1100 pcm

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Bennett Street

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Marlborough Buildings O.I.E.O £360,000 Georgian · Grade II listed · Two double bedrooms · Top floor apartment · Sought after location · Close to the city centre

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Unfurnished · PRICE RANGE £1,100 to £1,200 pcm · Two double bedrooms · Private roof terrace · Close to local amenities · Allocated parking · Luxury bathroom · Council tax band B · Available 30th May 2019

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O.I.E.O £345,000

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Three bedrooms · Secured parking · Communal outside space · Close to the city centre · Ground floor apartment · Approx. 1079 Sq. ft

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Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · Contemporary shower room · Private parking for one · Roof terrace · Short walk to city centre · Stunning views · Available now

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Walcot Parade

£335,000

Georgian · Grade II listed · Two double bedrooms · Top floor apartment · Central location · Stunning views · Approx. 828 Sq. ft.

£925 pcm

Unfurnished · PRICE RANGE £925 to £975 pcm · One bedroom · Ground floor · Private garden · Central location · Permit parking · Available 1st of July 2019

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The Moorlands

O.I.E.O

£250,000

Grade II listed · Ground floor apartment · Two double bedrooms · Two bathrooms · Communal gardens · Private parking · Approx. 548 Sq. Ft

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk


Profile for MC Publishing Limited

The Bath Magazine May 2019  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath

The Bath Magazine May 2019  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath