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thebathmag.co.uk

ISSUE 199 | APRIL 2019 £3.95 where sold

THE POWER OF PORTRAITS Sir Thomas Lawrence to the present day CRICKET AND COCAINE at the Rondo TRAMS IN BATH from horses to electric power TEUTONIC TRAVEL Bauhaus to the Berlin Wall INTERIORS Going geometric

Meet Chineke! – the groundbreaking BME orchestra coming to The Bath Festival T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O NTHLY GUIDE TO LIFE AND LIVING IN BATH


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90

64

50

Contents April 2019 5 THINGS

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10

Essential events to look forward to this month

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54

Neill Menneer’s photographic portrait of Carole Banwell, general manager at Bath City FC

COVER FEATURE ORCHESTRAL EQUITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Founder of Chineke! Orchestra Chi-chi Nwanoku on how she is championing change in the classical world

WHAT’S ON

BATH AT WORK

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RESTAURANT REVIEW

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ON THE RIGHT TRACK? 22

62

Emma Clegg pays a visit to The Griffin Inn ...............................................

64

Should we bring back trams to Bath? Georgette McCready looks at the history of the city’s tramways

Our guide to the top events happening around the city

MAKING A CHANGE 80 BLOCKBUSTING YEARS

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30

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Emma Clegg talks to the Little Theatre Cinema’s owner Hilary King

Simon Horsford talks to University of Bath’s Mark Brosnan about how his team are making life more manageable for autistic people

WHAT A BLOOD BATH

HEALTH KICK

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32

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72

78

Thriller and crime writers heading to The Bath Festival

Crystal Rose on rejuvenating facials, master colourists and more

THE LONG WALK BACK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

WALK THE WALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

Melissa Blease talks to director Shane Morgan about a new play on cricketer Chris Lewis’ drug smuggling attempt

Andrew Swift’s country stroll

PROMOTED CONTENT CITY ART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 The latest art exhibitions from around the city

MAKINGS OF A MASTERPIECE

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Charteroak special supplement on luxury holiday homes in Cornwall

HOT PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

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50

The finest homes to buy or rent

Jackie Brown talks to Bath-based artist Harriet Dahan-Bouchard

PORTRAIT OF A PRODIGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Catherine Pitt explores the life of artist Sir Thomas Lawrence, a child prodigy who spent his formative years in Bath

Even more great content and updates online: thebathmag.co.uk

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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

ON THE COVER

Chi-chi Nwanoku, founder of Chineke! Orchestra, which is performing at The Bath Festival on 25 May at The Forum; thebathfestival.org.uk

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine


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THE BARBIE DEBATE

Is Barbie an iconic toy encouraging creative play or a metaphor for a culture obsessed with how a woman looks? Moira Redmond, Zawe Ashton and Marisa Bate discuss her legacy at The Bath Festival, one of a series of events focusing on women – see page 38.

from the

from the

EDITOR

EDITOR’S PICKS SPACE FOR SCULPTURE The Cotswold Sculptors Association is holding an exhibition of indoor and outdoor sculpture, Creating Spaces, at Abbey House Gardens in Malmesbury. The outdoor exhibition runs from 1 April to 30 May; the indoor exhibition from 1–26 April; cotswoldsculptorsassociation.com

Editor photograph by Matthew Sterling

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ortraits are plenteous this issue, in both the literal and descriptive sense. We have a profile by Catherine Pitt on page 52 of leading English portrait painter Sir Thomas Lawrence. Born in Bristol and spending his early years in Bath, he was laid to rest in St Paul’s Cathedral – and painted some pretty amazing portraits in between – and so is a local boy to be proud of. Fast forward to the 21st century and Harriet Dahan-Bouchard is continuing the legacy of traditional portraiture and works just a stone’s throw away from where Lawrence first honed his craft – see Jackie Brown’s feature on page 50. The Rondo, our local fringe theatre, has a production of The Long Walk Back on 17 April, presenting a theatrical portrait of cricketer Chris Lewis who had a hard-hitting fall from grace when he tried to smuggle £140,000 worth of cocaine through Gatwick Airport. Melissa Blease interviews director Shane Morgan about their dramatisation of his story on page 36. We’re also starting to talk all things festival because The Bath Festival is coming to town from 17–26 May. Our cover has a picture of Chi-chi Nwanoku with her double bass – Chi-chi is the energy force who started up the Chineke! Orchestra, the first BME (black and ethnic minority) professional orchestra in the UK. She explained to me the orchestra’s reason for being and how they are both championing change and celebrating the joy of music (see page 20). We have also profiled some of the festival events around its Bloodbath theme on page 32 – Woman in the Dark and Killing Eve both feature, which gives you the edgy but fascinating vibe. With Bristol Airport offering regular flights to Berlin and Cologne, Simon Horsford waxes lyrical about travelling to Germany on page 76, with suggested activities ranging from running through the Elbe Mountains to visiting the most German of all German castles, the Wartburg Castle in Eisenach. Simon also talks to Mark Brosnan, a professor at the University of Bath’s department of psychology, on page 72 about his research work into autism and how spring and summer out-of-term schools are being run to help austistic people who are about to leave university and engage with the job market. We’ve also sampled the gastronomic pleasures of The Griffin Inn on page 62 and Green Park Brasserie on page 60. April is the month when everything starts to open – and we invite you to open up your month within our pages.

Emma Clegg Editor All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

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PERFORM AT YOUR BEST

The Natural Theatre Company are about to launch the summer term of their Adult Theatre School. The ten-week course offers adults the chance to learn performance skills from industry professionals at the Naturals’ HQ in Widcombe. Now in its second year, the aim of the course is to give adults a place to have fun, de-stress and meet like-minded people. Adult classes run on Monday evenings from 29 April – 8 July from 7– 9pm; naturaltheatre.co.uk

FRITILLARIES

The nodding chequered flowers of the snake’s-head fritillary thrive in grasslands, hay meadows and wetlands. Carpets of the flower used to surround our rivers and adorn our wet meadows, but they are now a rare sight as these areas have been drained and ploughed for agriculture. Fritillaries can be grown in a well-dug loamy soil, but leave the grass long around them.

ILLUSTRATION BY JEN SHEPPARD The Bath Society of Botanical Artists; bsba.co.uk

...the hanging cups of fritillaries, ❝ the snaky flower, scarfed in dull purple, like Egyptian girls ❞ VITA SACKVILLE-WEST (1892–1962)


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5

ZEITGEIST

things to do in

April

Reflect

Chuckle

As museums redefine their place in society, and their financial positions become more vulnerable, the question of why museums matter is all the more urgent. The Holburne Museum is hosting a talk with Tristram Hunt (Director, V&A), Sonia Boyce, (artist and professor of Black Art and Design at University of the Arts London), Maria Balshaw CBE (Director, Tate) and Chris Stephens (Director, Holburne) on 11 April, 7pm, exploring the ways that cultural engagement can enhance and alter people’s lives. £12.50; holburne.org

How happily married are the happily married? Following a sold-out run at the National Theatre and direct from a West End transfer, Katherine Parkinson reprises her recently Olivier-nominated role as Judy in Laura Wade’s new comedy about one woman’s quest to be the perfect 1950s housewife. In Home, I’m Darling, Judy quickly discovers that behind the gingham curtains, things can begin to unravel, and being a domestic goddess is not as easy as it seems. On at Theatre Royal Bath from 16–20 April, tickets from £24; theatreroyal.org.uk

Toe-tap Expect Gaelic ballads, high-energy tunes, hypnotic riffs and, of course, clog dancing as the folk multi-instrumentalists The Shee head to Wiltshire Music Centre in Bradford On Avon on 14 April, 7.30pm. Showcasing the talents of 2017 Radio 2 Folk Musician of the year Rachel Newton on harp and strings, the band brings together an adventurous brew of traditional folk, Gaelic tunes and bluegrass music. £16/£8; wiltshiremusic.org.uk

Maria Balshaw CBE, the director of the Tate

Admire

Watch To celebrate 80 years of the Little Theatre Cinema bringing the very best feature films to Bath, the cinema is screening a programme of events to mark this anniversary. The BAFTA-nominated 1957 classic The Smallest Show on Earth will be shown on 6 April, 1pm, following the tale of Matt and Jean Spencer (played by real-life couple Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna) – a middle class couple who inherit a decrepit movie house in a tiny railroad whistle-stop, complete with its doddering employees. Just when they’re about to write it off, their doorman comes up with an effective method to make a huge profit on this shaky enterprise. Tickets from £7.90; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little

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Maria Balshaw by Hugo Glendinning, 2017/David Stewart/ Nicolas Poussin, The Triumph of Pan © The National Gallery, London

As part of the National Gallery’s prestigious Masterpiece Tour, Nicolas Poussin’s The Triumph of Pan is being displayed at Victoria Art Gallery from 11 April–7 July. This impressive French painting, dating from 1632, was commissioned by the notorious Cardinal Richelieu, and will be on show alongside works from the gallery’s own collection, reflecting on the timeless relevance of the Classical in art and design. Free; victoriagal.org.uk


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The city

ist

THE BUZZ THE BUZZ

My BATH

Wendy Matthews is co-artistic director of Bath Fringe Festival and has been involved in the city’s alternative arts scene for many years. She also helped mastermind the community buy-out at The Bell Inn on Walcot Street

Wolfy comes to Bath

I live in Bathwick and have done for a long time. I first moved to Bath in the mid ’70s as a student.

Kate is a middle-aged woman trying to steer some order into a life that is going off the rails. When she adopts a lurcher called Wolfy, the shabby rescue dog saves her from herself. But when Wolfy disappears, it is up to Kate to hit the streets of London and find him. Will she save him, as he has saved her – or will she lose everything? A brilliant, lifeaffirming tragi-comic memoir, Lost Dog is published on 4 April and Kate and Wolfy will be representing themselves at Topping & Co bookshop in The Paragon on 10 April at 8pm, entry £7. Go along and meet them. toppingbooks.co.uk

The big issue of climate

I don’t drive and love the fact that I can walk everywhere I want to go – into town through Henrietta Park or to The Fringe office at The Bell on Walcot Street. I appreciated the light on the Bath stone buildings from the minute I arrived – such a contrast to the grey and red brick up north! The Holburne café is just round the corner from where I live and it’s a lovely place to meet friends. If I have something to mull over like a report or grant application I like to sit upstairs at Mokoko Coffee in Abbey Churchyard or Boston Tea Party in Kingsmead Square. I love popping over to Bristol for a jazz concert, exhibition or just a pint in one of the many great pubs. Or the same in Bath – I was involved with the community buy-out at The Bell and am still on the board and there’s no better place for live music in the city. I studied geography and sociology at Leeds University and then moved to Bath to take a teaching diploma at the University of Bath.

Is climate change the most politically contentious scientific issue of our age? It is the subject of a talk by David Warrilow OBE at the Bath Royal Literary & Scientific Institution on 11 April at 7pm. Formerly a government science advisor and UK climate change negotiator and now president of the Royal Meteorological Society, Mr Warrilow will review how climate change has shifted centre stage in an increasingly polarised debate; and will consider whether tensions between environmentalists and free marketeers about the extent of environmental degradation can ever be resolved. Tickets £7 or £4 for BRLSI members. bathboxoffice.org.uk

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I never took up teaching as there were few jobs around when I graduated. After a few different jobs I became a vegetarian cook at Moles, Huckleberries and The Hat & Feather. At the same time I’d become involved in the alternative arts scene in the city, the Bath Arts workshop, Walcot Festivals and organising benefit gigs at small local venues. At the end of the ’80s I’d been travelling for a spell and came back to no job. I then volunteered to run Bath Fringe’s Kite Festival. In 1992, the group that had been organising the Fringe fell apart and I got together with a group of local artists, promoters and venues and we decided we’d take it over. I’ve been there ever since. I’m co-artistic director for the Fringe, along with my colleague Steve Henwood. We’re the only ‘workers’, though we have a lot of volunteers and helpers, and our friends Arran and Scarlett who run Fringe Arts Bath. Since Council funding stopped about 10 years ago we’re really thankful to have the support of local benefactors such as The Roper Family Trust and Andrew Fletcher to cover core costs. We also apply to Arts Council England for project funding each year and have just been awarded a lottery grant of over £40,000 for this year’s fringe. I love the variety of art forms that the Fringe includes – it’s great to be able to support and encourage new talent in the region. My motto in life would be ‘Let’s do the show right here!’ Bedlam Fair is our Street Theatre weekend on 1 and 2 June. This year is the 50th anniversary of the first alternative festival in Bath and there will be an exhibition at the Museum of Bath at Work to celebrate. There are so many great theatre shows at The Mission and The Rondo that it’s unfair to pick just one out! The Bath Fringe 2019 runs from 24 May – 9 June; bathfringe.co.uk


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The city

ist

News from around the city Piet Oudolf film screening Ride and raise £1,000

Cyclists of all abilities are invited to set themselves a challenge by taking part in an epic 205-mile ride in aid of Children’s Hospice South West – and raise £1,000 for the charity. The 11th annual Ride for Precious Lives takes place from 12 July to 14 July. Registration is limited to 125 riders. The ride will take cyclists from St Austell to Bristol, across three counties. Entry is £230, which includes food and hotel accommodation, ride jerseys and access to first aid and mechanical assistance from a crew. chsw.org.uk/ride

Hope for a ball Saturday 15 June sees the return of the Hope Ball. This year’s black-tie gala will be held in a dream garden: the private grounds of The Old Rectory, Doynton, a beautiful space divided into a series of garden rooms. The three-course menu is inspired by the fresh garden produce from The Old Rectory, presented by the award-winning chefs at Eat Five Star, paired with sommelier-selected wines from the finest vineyards. There will be a curated art auction during the evening, featuring stars such as Miriam Escofet, Bruce Munro and Richard Twose, and local talent including Nick Cudworth and Louise Holgate. The garden will also play stage to a series of world-class performers and musicians. All proceeds from the night will go towards the Royal United Hospital Cancer Care Campaign and the new building works. Tickets £250. hopeball.co.uk 14 TheBATHMagazine

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The film Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf is being shown at a private charity screening at Kingswood School on 2 April in aid of the expansion of the breast unit for The Forever Friends Appeal at the RUH. The film takes viewers inside Piet Oudolf’s work and creative process and follows Oudolf as he designs and installs the beautiful garden at Hauser and Wirth. Suggested ticket contribution of £25; refreshments 6pm; film 6.45pm. support.foreverfriendsappeal.co.uk

Magic’s in the air Bathbased magician Dominick Zwolinski and London headliner Tony Middleton are bringing classic conjuring to the Macdonald Spa Hotel. Their new show Conjurors, Cardsharps and Conmen runs monthly from April, and promises sleight of hand, exposes of card cheats, and mind-reading. The next shows are on 13 April and 4 May. Tickets from £30. bathmagicshow.com

Portrait success An award-winning photographer has won the title of South West Photographer of the Year from the British Institute of Professional Photographers (BIPP). Roz Collins, who relocated to Bath 18 months ago from West Sussex, specialises in contemporary fine art images and portraits, preferring natural, ambient light and using the environment as a creative backdrop. Roz is running a Portrait Day on 3 April at The Holburne Museum. rozcollins.co.uk/portrait-days

Bath photo maps Brain’s Foto Guides, Bath edition, is a unique map created by a photographer for photographers and photoenthusiasts. The map reveals a ‘beyond the postcard’ view of Bath, packed with tips on where, when and how to take great pictures. Designed with an emphasis on inspiring photographers of all abilities to discover new ways of looking and exploring the city with a camera. £6.99, but there’s a 20% discount for The Bath Magazine readers (use discount code: ilovebath). brainsfotoguides.com

Independent initiative

Visit Bath launch its Independent Bath campaign on 1 April, highlighting the diverse range of independent businesses in the city. From one-off boutiques, quirky cafés, bars and restaurants to jewellers, artists, museums, galleries, markets and festivals, there is something for everyone. Shopping includes Icarus Jewellery in Broad Street for handmade silver jewellery, Bath Aqua Glass in Walcot Street where you can see pieces being made, Topping & Co. in The Paragon for all things literary, and Rossiters in Broad Street for an Aladdin’s cave of gifts. Amazing food outlets include the Bath Pizza Co who create wood-fired pizzas in Green Park Station, The Bath Brew House in James Street West specialising in craft beers and with its own microbrewery and Newton Farm, a family farm just outside Bath in Newton St Lowe with an award-winning shop. For entertainment there’s Komedia in Westgate Street and the Bath Comedy Festival, which runs until 14 April. visitbath.co.uk/independent n


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DESIGNER COLLECTIONS HANDMADE BESPOKE JEWELLERY REPAIRS AND REMODELLING

A superb collection of pieces by British designers

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Play the tourist

Our roving reporter looks at the variety of guided tours on offer, taking in everything from buns to bombs

I

A treat for the eyes...

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heard a strange story recently about some tourists who were found wandering in Bradford on Avon town centre asking passersby where they’d find Shakespeare’s house. It took a bit of head-scratching before it dawned on the locals that the visitors had got their Brads and their Bards muddled up. After the confusion was over the incomers seemed happy enough to forego Hamlet in favour of a ham sandwich and a pint at a local hostelry. This set me wondering what tourists might expect to see when visiting Bath. The open-top bus – or topless bus as my friend Dawn insists on calling it – provides a visual introduction to Bath, although I’m not sure whether the stone artisan houses of Combe Down hold quite the fascination of the Royal Crescent. Neither am I convinced that the much-repeated account of the young Queen Victoria never wanting to return to the city after overhearing someone say she had fat ankles, ranks up there as a historic factoid, along with the crowning of Edgar, King of all England, or the very bloody English Civil War Battle of Lansdown. As you’d expect Bath has some fantastic tours for tourists. On a sunny day, lulled by the gentle sway of the red double decker bus, there’s nothing better than a gentle, seated ride around town, peering into people’s first floor windows as you pass. The Mayor’s Honorary Guides provide splendid free walking tours of the city centre – and are even forbidden from taking tips, which must baffle the Americans. I sometimes pass groups of tourists, huddled against the weather, being talked at by an earnest tour guide – the sort that waves an umbrella to get the crowd to move on – and wonder whether they’re enjoying their visit to Bath or whether they’ve paid for a tour out of duty. So it’s good to see that traditional city tours have been joined by a host of alternative guided trips. One of the funniest has to be Bizarre Bath, which like The Mousetrap, is a long-running hit which its audiences have never betrayed with a spoiler. I also enjoyed the Haunted Bath tour, when my god-daughter and I both swore we saw something spectral in Royal Victoria Park. It’s a shame that we ‘saw’ were two completely different visions so we put that down to the excitement of the moment. For sheer entertainment you’d be hard pushed to beat the two-hour Bath Pub Tour, a jolly romp round the city’s historic hostelries with quizzing and history along the way. I’ve also sampled Savouring Bath’s Food Heroes of Bath walking tour. That’s an easy-going walking buffet of some of the best artisan kitchens and cafés of the city. What’s not to like about munching your way around a city you’ve just arrived in? I have to confess to not having tried The Bombing of Bath tour, which takes in the sites hit during the Blitz of April 1942. I guess this offers visitors the chance to touch the scars left on city buildings by the Luftwaffe and vent their views on post-war architecture. When we have friends visit I have my own quirky guide to Bath. It’s a pleasure to see their faces when it dawns on them they’ve misheard Peter Gabriel’s hit song all these years and it’s actually Solsbury, not Salisbury Hill. We usually go for a quick spin – literally – round the revolving wooden doors of the Francis Hotel, as these were the very doors that The Beatles entered for a drink at the bar when they played The Pavilion in the early 1960s. On a cold day I lead them to the warmest radiator in Bath. It’s inside the Pump Rooms, opposite the portrait of Charles Dickens, and they can get a glimpse of part of the Roman Baths by walking through the majestic Pump Room – an attraction in its own right – and peering out of the window. My kids will testify that I’ve always been keen on sharing quirky facts. But I may have overdone the story-telling to hold their interest on family visits to ancient monuments and castles as now when we go anywhere historic they raise a cynical eyebrow. “Now Mum’s going to tell us this is where the monks actually walked...” n


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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

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Contact us: Publisher Email:

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Editor Tel: Email:

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MUSIC | INTERVIEW

Orchestral equity

Chineke! Orchestra is the first professional orchestra in Europe to be made up of primarily black and minority ethnic musicians. Emma Clegg talks to founder Chi-chi Nwanoku about how the orchestra was conceived and why its aim is to champion change and celebrate diversity in classical music ahead of coming to The Bath Festival

C

hi-chi Nwanoku grew up in Kent and Berkshire, where she was the only black person in her year at school. “White was my world; my mother was white and my father was black. I didn’t even question it.” Chi-chi trained as a 100-metre sprinter, eventually competing at national level, but her running career ended abruptly after a knee injury when she was 18, which is when she took up the double bass. Her A Level tutors could see Chi-chi was an excellent musician and told her that they thought she could have a musical career if she took up an unpopular instrument. “They shoved the double bass in my hand, which I was alarmed at because I was five foot nothing, but it was love at first sight. And so I was propelled into a completely white world and I barely thought about it,” she says. Chi-chi studied at the Royal Academy of Music and then with double bass soloist and teacher Franco Petracchi in Rome. She soon found herself in demand internationally and

forged a successful career as a player and soloist. On top of many musical accolades over 30 years, she was awarded the MBE in the 2001 Queen’s Birthday Honours and the OBE for Services to Music in 2017. On 14 September 2014 Chi-chi was going to a concert at the Royal Festival Hall given by the Kinshasa Symphony Orchestra, a selftaught orchestra from Congo who were celebrating their 10th anniversary. As she was on her way there she met Ed Vaizey, the Culture Minister at the time, who invited her to the pre-concert reception where he was heading. Chi-chi knew Ed Vaizey well – indeed he had on previous occasions asked her why it was only her, as a black musician, that was seen regularly on the international concert platform. When they arrived at the reception, there was a BBC interview taking place on the other side of the room with a white violin soloist, part of a documentary the BBC were making about the Kinshasha Symphony Orchestra. Chi-chi and Ed were welcomed by Gillian Moore, the director of music at the South

Bank, who was horrified that Chi-chi hadn’t been invited. She was also apologetic about the interview taking place. “What does she [the white violinist] know about Africa?” asked Gillian. Chi-chi remembers that moment clearly, with Ed Vaizey by her side, at the pre-concert reception: “That was when I had this out of body experience when everything went quiet around my head. It was like I used to feel at the start of 100 metres when all I could hear was the starters orders. I went into this other headspace and I could not hear anything around me. “I said very calmly, ‘We are used to this. You’ve been telling our story for centuries.’ If you can picture the room – this fancy reception for the Kinshasha Orchestra concert, the BBC interviewing people, not a black face in the room, apart from the one who hadn’t even been invited. So it was laughable because I became the elephant in the room and I popped the bubble.” Chi-chi remembers the concert: “They played Beethoven and Berlioz and then a couple of pieces from their own country

Members of the Chineke! Orchestra, including Chi-chi Nwanoku, second from right

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MUSIC | INTERVIEW

where the white people had to leave the stage. It was just beautiful.” As she walked back towards Waterloo Station after the concert, she remembers clearly saying to herself, “I have to do something about this. It feels completely wrong that there were looks of incredulity from the audience that there was more than one black person playing Beethoven. Playing it brilliantly. Why should that be? Where is everyone? There wasn’t a single black colleague there, none of the black people who had mentored me. The penny dropped big time. I had something very important to do. And I thought it was meant to be that Ed Vaizey was the one I bumped into on the way to this concert; it was meant to be that he was standing right next to me when this lightbulb moment happened at the reception. “The next morning I was on the phone to every music establishment in the country, every college, every conservatoire, the British Council, the government, the South Bank centre, the Barbican. They all knew me and they received the idea really well and asked me to come in for a meeting. It was then that I realised I had a voice, and a duty to use it.” In this way the Chineke! Foundation was born (Chineke means the creator of good things in Igbo). The next stage was to find an orchestra of black, minority and ethnic (BME) musicians to, literally, play out the music-for-everyone philosophy. “I researched everywhere, talking to friends of mine who are soloists with other orchestras – I had to find people one by one. I went underground, almost like a detective.” Chi-chi resolved that the new orchestra would not be London-centric, because the issue was global. She also invited a few people from Europe and then from America and South Africa. “I went and looked for them and I found them,” she says. Chi-chi collected together 62 musicians for an orchestra and raised money to fund three days of rehearsal before their first concert. While all the musicians were highly trained in classical music, they had never performed together and didn’t know each other. Anxious about this, Chi-chi decided to call another two days of rehearsal but because she had no extra budget, she asked people to come of their own goodwill to the two extra days if they could. Between 35–40 musicians arrived on the first day and 40–45 on the second. “I could sense the feeling from everybody that it was more important to be there than count the pennies,” says Chi-chi. “I realised that perceptions would be changed when we walked on stage and performed at the highest level. And you have to change perceptions in order to get systematic change. We were creating a pathway.” The Chineke! Orchestra performed first in the Queen Elizabeth Hall in 2015 and then at the Royal Festival Hall in 2016, but since 2017 they have been in constant demand, performing concerts and giving community workshops virtually every month.

This part of the arts industry is very under-represented at a time when we live in possibly the most diverse time in history

Photography by Eric Richmond

Chi-chi explains how the world of classical music still embraces the familiar white middle-class stereotype and has been behind in welcoming in new faces. “This part of the arts industry is very underrepresented at a time when we live in possibly the most diverse time in history. There is developing diversity in most industries but not in the classical music industry of creative arts. Classical music is thought of as high art, western art, and we are all well aware of the inhuman international practices at the start of it that funded the west.” The role of education in music is another frustration for Chi-chi: “Since I was a child, music has been slowly and systematically removed from state schools, which is where there is generally a higher amount of ethnic diversity. I also think families of different ethnicities don’t necessarily encourage their children to go into

“All I want to do is go out there and share the wonderful world of music” classical music for a profession because they don’t see it as something that will provide economic security.” And so the day of the inaugural performance of the Chineke! adult orchestra also saw the first appearance of the Chineke! Junior Orchestra, which Chi-chi describes as the pipeline to the professional orchestra and to the idea of music that is available to all. Another focus has been the exploration of different and forgotten musical pieces. “From day one we’ve been exploring work by composers who have been written out of history, literally. So the likes of Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Florence Price, Chevalier de St Georges and Ignatius Sancho, whose work can stand alongside Beethoven and Elgar. It’s something that we are committed to. We are educating the next generation, industry and our audiences. We are shining a light not just on ourselves but on more repertoire, we are expanding the repertoire because the great canon is very stuck.” Chineke! is playing at The Forum in Bath on 25 May as part of The Bath Festival, with pieces in the programme including Music for the Theatre by Aaron Copeland, Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin, Suite from the Threepenny Opera by Kurt Weill and Starburst by Jessie Montgomery. The philosophy of Chineke! is simple, sharing the joy of music and breaking down conventional barriers. As Chi-chi says, “All I want to do is go out there and share the wonderful world of music. And advocate music education for every single child regardless of background, ethnicity and wealth. Because it’s so good for you to learn an instrument.” n Chineke! are performing at The Bath Festival on Saturday 25 May at The Forum, 7.30pm, tickets from £15; thebathfestival.org.uk THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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WHAT’S ON in April

Comedian Kiri PritchardMcLean at Komedia

The Leylines at Chapel Arts Centre

CULTURAL FILM SCREENINGS n Throughout April, The Little Theatre Cinema, Bath The cinema’s next dementia friendly screening will be The African Queen, starring Katharine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart, on 1 April, 11am. Marking the 350th anniversary of Rembrandt’s death, Exhibition on Screen will showcase London’s National Gallery and Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum major Rembrandt show on 15 April, 6.30pm, and 17 April, 1pm. Watch theatre on the big screen as the National Theatre’s All Above Eve (starring Gillian Anderson and Lily James) will be shown on 11 April, 7pm, and 26 April, 1pm, and RSC’s As You Like It will be broadcast live on 17 April, 7pm. There are also new releases such as Wild Rose (from 12 April) and Mid90s (from 19 April). See the full programme online; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little

BATH COMEDY FESTIVAL n Until 14 April, venues around Bath Get ready to giggle as the funniest festival in Bath returns this month with more than 150 shows. The line-up includes the self-styled ‘German Comedy Ambassador in London’ stand-up comedian Henning Wehn at The Forum on 11 April. Jess Robinson will be bringing her multi-award-winning celebrity impressions to Widcombe Social Club on 5 April, while Kieran Hodgson will be at the Rondo Theatre on 13 April. Or be transported to The Nags Head for some wheeling, dealing and eating at the Only Fools The (cushty) Dining Experience at the Abbey Hotel on 1 April. Plus there’s much

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much more to laugh your socks off at. Go online for the full programme and to book tickets; bathcomedy.com THE ARTS SOCIETY BATH: UNDERSTANDING ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ART n 1 April, 1.30pm, Assembly Rooms Egyptologist, author and lecturer Eileen Golding examines the wall reliefs and paintings found in tombs, drawing on examples from the Old, Middle and New Kingdom periods. Visitors welcome, £10 on the door; theartssocietybath.com GABRIELLE n 1 April, doors 7pm, Komedia One of the UK’s most successful British singer-songwriters Gabrielle will be bringing songs from her new album and showcasing her signature hits such as Dreams, which stormed the charts around Europe 25 years ago. From £25; komedia.co.uk THE ARTS SOCIETY BATH EVENING TALK: DAME ZAHA HADID n 1 April, 7.10pm, BRLSI Lecturer Anthea Streeter explores the exciting work of Zaha Hadid who developed a new form of architecture by rejecting 90degree angles. If you have a keen interest in cutting-edge design, you will be mesmerised by her daring yet brilliant structures. Nonmembers welcome, £8; batheveningarts.co.uk EQUUS n 2–6 April, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath An undoubted 20th-century masterpiece, Peter Shaffer’s Equus is inspired by a true story which explores the complex relationships between passion, sex, religion and sanity. When teenager Alan Strang’s pathological fascination with horses leads

The Craft4Crafters Show returns to the Bath & West Showground

him to commit a devastating act of violence, psychiatrist Dr Martin Dysart reluctantly accepts the task of uncovering what actually happened. From £20.50; theatreroyal.org.uk COLLECTION HIGHLIGHT TOURS n 3 April, 1–1.45pm, Victoria Art Gallery Discover the stories behind the Victoria Art Gallery’s principal treasures with Dr Chris Davies. U3A IN BATH: CLASH OF EMPIRES: THE ROMAN INVASION OF GREECE, 200BC n 4 April, 10am–12pm, Bath Pavilion Lecturer Ben Kane will describe the pivotal clash between Rome and Greece in the late third century BC and will shine light on these little-known events and the fascinating characters who lived through them. Admission is free for members, donation of £2 for non-members. U3A in Bath is an organisation for retired people who want to try a range of activities, which also holds monthly public lectures; u3ainbath.org.uk BOOTLEG BLONDIE n 5 April, 7pm, Komedia Bootleg Blondie is the official Debbie Harry and Blondie tribute band, the only Blondie tribute to play the legendary CBGB’s in New York City before its demise in 2006 and to have the honour to be mentioned on Blondie’s 11th album Pollinator. Lead vocalist Debbie Harris also starred on the BBC’s Even Better Than The Real Thing. £16; komedia.co.uk DORIC STRING QUARTET n 5 April, 7.30pm, Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon An evening of masterworks with WMC’s resident quartet. The programme will feature Schubert’s profound and moving final Quartet in G major, as well as Beethoven’s


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gripping String Quartet Op 18 No 6, and Britten’s last completed major instrumental work, Quartet No 3 Op 94. £20, free for under 25s; wiltshiremusic.org.uk UB40 n 6 April, doors 7.30pm, The Forum Birmingham’s world-famous reggae stars UB40 are celebrating their 40th anniversary with a 40-date tour around the UK. Expect to hear greatest hits such as Food For Thought, One In Ten, Kingston Town, (I Can’t Help) Falling in Love With You and Red, Red Wine, among others. Tickets from £37.50; bathforum.co.uk BLOOMFIELD TENNIS CLUB OPEN FORTNIGHT n 6–18 April, Bloomfield Tennis Club, Wellsway, Bath Always wanted to play tennis? Why not try it out at a friendly, local club for free? Pop along to one of the adult club sessions during this open fortnight for a game. Club sessions on: Saturday 6 and 13 April, 2pm; Tuesday 9 and 16 April, 6pm; Thursday 11 and 18 April, 9.30am (women only); Thursday 11 and 18 April, 6pm. Find out more online; bloomfieldtennisbath.co.uk MARSHFIELD VILLAGE SCARECROW TRAIL n 6–22 April, Marshfield Village There’s fun for all the family on this trail of 50 space-themed scarecrows which you can spot around the lovely village of Marshfield, while helping to fundraise for Marshfield Primary School. Map and entry form £2.50 available from the local shops and pubs. Prizes for trail winners and art competition. Free Easter egg for every returned entry form. THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN n 8–13 April, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath Rachel Watson longs for a different life. Her only escape is the perfect couple she watches through the train window every day, happy and in love. Or so it appears. Adapted from Paula Hawkins’ novel and starring Samantha Womack and Oliver Farnworth, this gripping new play will keep you guessing until the final moment. From £25; theatreroyal.org.uk

PHENOMENAL WOMEN 2019: DAME FIONA REYNOLDS n 10 April, 6pm, Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel In conjunction with Business West and the University of the West of England, The Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel continues its Phenomenal Women events series with a talk by Master of Emmanuel College, Cambridge Dame Fiona Reynolds DBE. The event will begin with prosecco, canapés and networking. £15; thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk

KATE SPICER’S LOST DOG n 10 April, 7.30pm, Topping and Co Booksellers, The Paragon Writer and journalist Kate Spicer is a middle-aged woman trying to steer some order into a life that is going off the rails. When she adopts a lurcher called Wolfy, the shabby rescue dog saves her from herself. Kate will be talking about her life-affirming tragi-comic memoir, Lost Dog, which explores the enduring relationship between human and canine. £7/£16.99; toppingbooks.co.uk #MISJUDGED – THE EASTER STORY ON TRIAL n 10–13 April, 7.30pm, St Philip and St James Church Hall, Odd Down, Bath Brand new re-telling of the Easter story in a contemporary musical by St Philip and St James Church Drama Group. £7/£5, tel: 01225 835228 or visit: tinyurl.com/spjc-mj Continued page 24

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WHAT’S | ON

THE CRAFT4CRAFTERS SHOW n 11–13 April, 10am–5pm, Bath and West Showground, Shepton Mallet The Craft4Crafters Show returns to the Bath and West Showground to showcase a fantastic array of craft suppliers, exhibitors and workshops. With two floors packed with traders, groups and guilds, visitors are in for a real treat as the event attracts some of the best needle and hobbycraft traders from around the country. £9 adult, £8 concession, under 16s free. craft4crafters.co.uk THE SCIENCE AND POLITICS OF CLIMATE CHANGE n 11 April, doors 6.30pm, BRLSI David Warrilow led UK delegations to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for 20 years. He will review how climate science has become centre stage in an increasingly fractious debate on the environment, development and wealth, and how the debate has become a battleground between environmentalists and free marketeers. Scientific objectivity is essential but can it be heard above the strident voices of political opinion? £7 non-members, £4 members; brlsi.org THE GEORGE MICHAEL STORY n 11 April, 7.30pm, Komedia The only touring show to perform George Michael’s hits in chronological order, covering his incredible career and 100million record selling history. A full live band with video screens supports the show including video footage of George and interviews with the man himself. £21–£25; komedia.co.uk WEST OF ENGLAND YOUTH ORCHESTRA AND TOM POSTER n 12 April, 7.30pm and 13 April, 3pm, Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Join some of the finest young musicians in the south west for this wonderful programme of Russian symphonic favourites. In this culmination concert of their Easter training

course, the young musicians will perform with pianist Tom Poster who makes a welcome return to WMC. £15/£7.50; wiltshiremusic.org.uk ELEGANCE IN THE AFTERNOON CHARITY FASHION SHOW n 13 April, 2.30pm, The Guildhall Enjoy a sparkling reception before being seated for afternoon tea, followed by a fashion show featuring the work of west country textile designer Clare Walsh, whose hand-printed pieces include kimonos, linen coats and bags. BBC Points West presenter Imogen Sellers will compere the event, and there will be a raffle and auction in aid of Dorothy House Hospice and Motor Neurone Disease Association. £30; bathboxoffice.org.uk CONJURORS, CARDSHARPS AND CONMEN n 13 April, 7pm and 9pm, The Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel, Sydney Road, Bath Join two of London’s finest magicians – Tony Middleton ‘Sonic’ and Dominick Zwolinski – stars of the sell out show Sleight of Hand on the Strand’s Savoy Hotel, for a new show at the five-star Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel. Discover impossible illusions, forgotten feats and intriguing stories from magic’s past. Suitable for families. £30/£40; bathmagicshow.com BATH MINERVA CHOIR SPRING CONCERT n 13 April, 7.30pm, St Swithin’s Church, The Paragon Join Bath Minerva Choir, Bristol Ensemble and a team of renowned soloists – Jennifer Thomas (soprano), Julia Portela Piñon (mezzo soprano), James Hutchings (tenor) and Stuart Orme (baritone) – for an evening of Mozart and Haydn including the Nelson Mass and Mozart’s Vesperae Solennes de Confessore. £15. Tickets available from Bath Box Office (bathboxoffice.org.uk); bathminervachoir.co.uk

Bootleg Blondie at Komedia

SHAKESPEARE’S BIRTHDAY OPERALETTA n 13 April, 7.30pm, The Holburne Museum Celebrate Shakespeare’s birthday in the elegant surroundings of the Brownsword Gallery. Join Operaletta as they return to the museum for their annual concert of solos, duets, trios and ensembles inspired by the Bard. £15; holburne.org THE LEYLINES n 13 April, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls West country collective The Leylines formed in 2013, bringing a genre-defying, eclectic sound that ranges from traditional folk to full-blown festival rock. They are now on tour with their new studio album, Recover Reveal. £12/£14; chapelarts.org HISTORY OF BATH RESEARCH GROUP: LEOPOLD BUILDINGS, HEDGEMEAD n 15 April, 6.30pm, St Mary’s Church, Bathwick Nigel Pollard will give a talk on the history of this small group of artisan homes and their survival through landslips, the war and the sack of Bath to become EH listed today. Visitors welcome at the meeting, small donation (£2) is suggested; historyofbath.org ART STORE TOURS n 17 April, 12pm, Victoria Art Gallery Explore the wonderful paintings, drawings and sculpture in the permanent collection housed and cared for in the Victoria Art Gallery’s art stores. AN EVENING WITH FORENSIC SCIENTIST ANGELA GALLOP n 17 April, 8pm, Topping and Co Booksellers, The Paragon Angela Gallop is the UK’s most eminent forensic scientist. During a career spanning more than 40 years, she has helped to drive change and transformation within the service. Angela will talk about her book When the Dogs Bark, which gives an insight Continued page 26

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Equus: The Other Richard

Ira Mandela Siobhan and Ethan Kai in Equus at Theatre Royal Bath

Doric String Quartet at Wiltshire Music Centre


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WHAT’S | ON

Daria Kulesh at Chapel Arts Centre

into a remarkable life spent specialising in cold-case investigations. £7/£20 includes book; toppingbooks.co.uk TALK PETERLOO: THE STORY OF THE MANCHESTER MASSACRE n 18 April, 7pm, The Holburne Museum Join historian and author Jaqueline Riding as she discusses her acclaimed book on the 1819 massacre of peaceful protesters for parliamentary reform, and her role as a historical consultant for Mike Leigh’s film, Peterloo. £10; holburne.org THE LONG WALK BACK n 19 April, 8pm, The Rondo Theatre, St Saviours Road, Bath Based on real live events, award winning playwright Dougie Blaxland’s The Long Walk Back tells the epic story of an international sporting star’s catastrophic fall from grace. England cricketing all-rounder Chris Lewis enjoyed a meteoric rise to fame and fortune in the 1990s before being sentenced to 13 years in prison for smuggling cocaine. £14/£12; rondotheatre.co.uk. Turn to page 36 for more. EASTER EVENINGS n 19–22 April, open until 8pm, Roman Baths The Roman Baths will stay open late (last admission 7pm) every day over the Easter weekend, with live music, entertainment and a prosecco bar beside the Great Bath. Visitors will be able to see the historic site illuminated by flaming torches. There will be live music from Elysium Brass on Monday and Friday and Bath Spa Quartet on Saturday and Sunday, and The Natural Theatre Company’s costumed characters will give impromptu performances. Normal admission required, free for Discovery Card holders; romanbaths.co.uk/easterevenings EASTER CRAFT FAIR n 20 April, 11am–2pm, Komedia

Head to Komedia for its first craft market of 2019. Bath’s newest and finest artists and designer makers will be showcasing their huge range of products for sale. From illustration, homewares, clothing, houseplants, art, ceramics, textiles and more, the venue will be bursting with local talent. There will also be homemade cakes, salads, paninis and hot drinks available. Plus there will be a kids’ play area. Free entry. EASTER EGG HUNT n 21 April, 2–4pm, St Stephen’s Millennium Green, Richmond Road The Easter bunny has visited the Millennium Green and there are plenty of eggs to be found. Easter egg hunts will be arranged in three age groups up to 11 years old and there will be an opportunity to make an Easter Bunny headdress. Tea and cakes will be for sale. Donations welcome, proceeds go to the upkeep of the Millennium Green garden. If it rains then the event will take place in St Stephen’s Centre; millenniumgreen.org.uk SHAKESPEARE’S WOMEN AND THE NEED FOR DISGUISE n 23 April, 2pm, BRSLI “Disguise I see thou art a wickedness,” remarks Viola in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, entangled in a plot not of her own making. Alison Smerdon MA (OXON) will discuss how cross dressing – though not the only form of disguise in Shakespeare’s plays – has many unexpected consequences for the characters themselves, those they encounter, and also for the audience. £5/£2; brlsi.org URBAN POLLINATORS: THEIR ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION n 25 April, 7.30pm, BRLSI Cities have the potential to provide excellent conditions for pollinators. For example, there are more bee species in cities than in the surrounding countryside and rare pollinators have been found in allotments, road verges and cemeteries in the United

The Comedy About a Bank Robbery at Theatre Royal Bath

Kingdom. Urban pollinators also face some challenges and these include alien plants, habitat loss and over-zealous mowing. Professor Jane Memmott from the University of Bristol is a notable researcher in this area, and will talk about pleasures and pitfalls of working on urban pollinators, and provide suggestions to make your own urban patch. £5/£2; brlsi.org ALUMNI OF THE CHOIR OF CLARE COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE n 26 April, 7.30pm, Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Conductor Graham Ross and his outstanding Alumni of the Choir of Clare College, Cambridge present a magnificent a cappella programme exploring the music of heaven, spanning centuries of repertoire from soaring Renaissance masterpieces by Lobo, Schütz and Taverner, to intimate close harmony arrangements of Gershwin and Irving Berlin. £22/£11; wiltshiremusic.org.uk DARIA KULESH AND MARINA OSMAN n 27 April, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls Beguiling and enchanting Daria Kulesh’s collaboration with the extraordinary pianist Marina Osman offers a fantastic variety for every listener regardless of their language and cultural background. Expect plenty of authentic Russian flavour, superb musicianship, multilingual banter and heaps of heartfelt, infectious energy. £10/£12; chapelarts.org SUNDAY WALK: FAMILY FORAGING WITH DAVE HAMILTON n 28 April, 10am, Topping and Co Booksellers, The Paragon Wild food is nutritious, delicious and completely free. During this fun walk with forager and horticulturist Dave Hamilton, you’ll forage for food during a walk in beautiful Bath. Along the way, you’ll learn how to identify a wide range of wild plants, Continued page 28

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TCAABR: Robert Day

Pianist Tom Poster joins the West of England Youth Orchestra at Wiltshire Music Centre


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WHAT’S | ON

The Alumni of the Choir of Clare College, Cambridge at Wiltshire Music Centre

Oliver Farnworth and Samantha Womack in The Girl On The Train at Theatre Royal Bath

KIRI PRITCHARD-MCLEAN: VICTIM, COMPLEX n 28 April, 7pm, Komedia You might have seen Kiri on Comedy Central at the Comedy Store, The Russell Howard Hour or heard her on The Now Show. You might have no idea who she is, that’s fine too. What you should know is she’s very quietly been going mad for a few years and, to borrow a phrase from Uma Thurman, she’s been ‘waiting… to feel less angry’. So, it’s time to talk about victims, love and lies. You might not believe her, but she’s used to that. £10/£12; komedia.co.uk AKERVINDA IN CONCERT n 28 April, 7.30pm, Widcombe Social Club Grammy-nominated a capella vocal quartet Akervinda will be bringing their enchanting and invigorating Nordic folk music to Bath. £15; bathboxoffice.org.uk THE ART SOCIETY BATH: HOW PLEASANT TO KNOW EDWARD LEAR n 29 April, 1.30pm, Assembly Rooms Popular lecturer Tim Stimson returns to give an illustrated lecture on artist, ornithologist, diarist, musician and traveller Edward Lear. Visitors welcome, no booking required, £10; theartssocietybath.com AN EVENING WITH GILL SIMPSON n 29 April, 7pm, Royal High Prep School, Weston Park East, Bath Gill Simpson, business and parenting coach and director of Chapter Forty Four will deliver a participative session that invites the audience to consider their own roles and responsibilities as parents, as well as being given some facts, ideas and inspiration surrounding the topic of parenting in the digital age. Drinks and canapés from 6.15pm. To book, email Diana Rejiester: d.rejiester@rhsb.gdst.net

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THE COMEDY ABOUT A BANK ROBBERY n 30 April – 4 May, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath Ocean’s Eleven meets the Marx Brothers in this dynamite new comedy now enjoying its third year in the West End. The Comedy About A Bank Robbery is the latest fast and fabulous comedy by the brains behind the Olivier Award-winning Best New Comedy The Play That Goes Wrong. A priceless diamond has been entrusted to the security guards who are on the take. Can it be safely stored or will it all go horribly wrong? From £24.50; theatreroyal.org.uk PLANNING AHEAD... REMEMBERING THE MOVIES n 1 May, 7.30pm, The Forum Strictly’s very own Aljaz and Janette are back on tour with their brand new show Remembering the Movies. If you loved their Remembering Fred show then get ready for a remarkable, unique and star-studded rollercoaster ride through some of the most successful, Oscar-winning and most memorable films of all time. From the Golden Age of Hollywood through to the modern mega musical, enjoy tributes to Audrey Hepburn, Saturday Night Fever, Gene Kelly, The Greatest Showman, Marilyn Monroe, La La Land, James Bond, Cabaret and many more... From £25; bathforum.co.uk THE FINEST OF EARTH SELLING PORCELAIN AT 18TH CENTURY CANTON n 3 May, 7pm, BRLSI In the 18th century, Canton was the place to go for Europeans to buy porcelain. Dr Hui Tang’s talk draws attention to porcelain shops in Canton, describing what they looked like and how deals were done at the shops between Chinese merchants and European traders. £6/£4; brlsi.org THE BLUEJAYS – ROCK AND ROLL REVOLUTION

n 3 May, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls Be transported back to the rocking ’50s with The Bluejays – the UK’s leading 1950s rock ’n’ roll band playing the biggest hits of Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, The Everly Brothers, Eddie Cochran and many more. £18.50/£20; chapelarts.org BIG GREEN DAY n 6 May, 2–5pm, St Stephen’s Church, Lansdown Road, Bath To celebrate some 13 years of restoring the church’s gardens, there will be a community event with live music, a Gardeners’ Question panel, children’s games, bell-ringing, tea and cakes. There will also be a guided tour of the church featuring its spectacular Victorian architecture, Art Nouveau designs and stained glass windows, plus more. Free entry. DS:UK: IN TRIBUTE TO DIRE STRAITS n 9 May, 7.30pm, Komedia dS:uK brings the experience of one of Dire Straits’ most iconic concerts and albums, Alchemy, to Bath in this tribute show. Playing the Love Over Gold concert in its entirety, dS:uK will play selected hits such as Tunnel of Love, Romeo and Juliet and Private Investigations. Early bird tickets £16; komedia.co.uk; direstraitstribute.co.uk SAM SWEENEY: THE UNFINISHED VIOLIN n 10 May, 7.30pm, Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon A veteran of Bellowhead, artistic director of the National Youth Folk Ensemble, founder member of trio Leveret, and an awardwinning instrumentalist at the forefront of the revival in English traditional music, Sam Sweeney released his first solo album, The Unfinished Violin, last year. The sometimes mournful, often hopeful, tunes on his record reimagine and reclaim some of the most beautiful melodies of the First World War, performed with musicians Rob Harbron, Jack Rutter, Patsy Reid and Ben Nicholls. £18/£9; wiltshiremusic.org.uk n

The Girl On The Train:: Manuel Harlan

as well as how to use those plants in a variety of dishes. £9/£5 children, £16.99 includes book; toppingbooks.co.uk


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ARTS | INTERVIEW

Celebrating 80 years

Known for its comfy chairs and vintage aesthetics, Bath’s Little Theatre Cinema is a firm favourite for watching new releases, much-loved classics, and live cultural screenings from top theatres from around the world. As the theatre celebrates the 80-year anniversary of showing feature films, Emma Clegg talks to owner Hilary King, the daughter of the theatre’s founder

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heatre director and playwright Consuelo de Reyes first met Peter King when she advertised for a stage manager in the 1920s for her community theatre in Bath. Their daughter Hilary King, who now owns the Little Theatre, explains, “My parents’ passion was community theatre. They rented an early 18th-century house in Bath and they developed a theatre within the house. Amazingly it seated 200 people in what I guess must have been great discomfort, because in the 1920s and 30s comfort didn’t really feature. Their community theatre involved the local population and they ran all sorts of courses – including drama courses and courses to learn about theatrical productions and make-up lessons.” The picture below shows the participants of one of those courses outside Citizen House in 1938. Consuelo first came to Bath to work with Helen Hope, one of Bath’s first female magistrates, who was closely involved in

women’s and children’s welfare before the welfare state existed. When Hope died in her fifties, she left her considerable fortune to Consuelo, enabling her to build and develop the Little Theatre. Built in 1935, the majority of the building has a Georgian design: “You can see the early design of the building was different and we now have this odd bit at the front which doesn’t quite match the very rigid Georgian style. I think they threw in a projection box as an afterthought. And you can tell that the architect had never designed a cinema before because if you get up in the balcony while the film is showing and go out of the front door your head is projected onto the screen! There are various other anomalies around and I suppose that is what gives the building its character,” she says. The cinema retains some of the decorative features of the typical 1930s, while more recently it has undergone a discreet conversion into a two-screen arthouse cinema that is now part of the Picturehouse group.

The first production at the Little Theatre in 1935 was Vickie, a play written by Consuelo de Reyes about the young Queen Victoria, who was a great heroine of hers. When asked if she had ever seen a production of Vickie, Hilary said she’d not only seen the production, but had appeared in it on a number of occasions along with her sister Helen, who she remembers played the young princess as a child. “Queen Victoria was rather extraordinary in the social context. She was just 18 when she came to the throne in such a man’s world, so my mother’s plays are about Victoria’s relationship with Albert, with her mother, with her governess, Baroness Louise Lehzen and with how she managed her role.” Hilary explains that in its early years the theatre put on some very unconventional theatre productions for the time: “We did all sorts of extraordinary things, experimental theatre, too, not necessarily the classics. Our Town was one, a play by Thornton Wilder, an American playwright. Revived by The

Citizen House in 1938 showing a group attending a drama course. Consuelo De Reyes, Hilary King’s mother, is in the second row from the front, six from the left; Peter King is shown in the front row, far left

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ARTS | INTERVIEW

The Little Theatre

Hilary King projection technology, the Little Theatre has retained the charm and welcoming warmth of a 1930s cinema, including a luxury balcony with sofas in the main auditorium. With her young life having been dominated by her parents’ community theatre, Hilary went on to develop a career in London as a therapist in marital and family work: “I moved right away from theatre – it was the last thing I wanted to do.” This experience later proved very useful, Hilary explains, when she became involved with the management of the Little Theatre after her sister’s death in 1984: “My training was actually extraordinarily valuable when it came to running a cinema, which is about managing people and the way they respond to what’s going on underneath the surface, what their needs are and how to manage them.”

Times like this are good for cinema... people are not looking for dark, soul-searching films, they are looking for escape

National quite recently, it’s a play with just four characters, two parents and two kids and no furniture, just chairs positioned as car seats, so it was quite experimental for its day. “We also did a production by Ernest Toller, a German refugee and expressionist playwright, who wrote experimental socialist plays and in that we played the workers lying on the ground – I must have been about 12 and I can remember it was very dark – we were lying on the ground and writhing, chanting ‘we are the poor who labour on earth, bound to the wheel from the day of our birth.’ You might assume that the productions would be solid, good middle-class stuff, but, no, it wasn’t always and I admire them for doing that at the time they did it.” While Consuelo and Peter’s commitment was to the theatre, the theatre and its courses operated for a maximum of two to three months during the year. For the rest of the time in those early years it ran as a news cinema after being equipped with a Western Electric (WE) sound system in 1936. “The news cinema was effectively the television of today, because in the 1920s and 30s there was no visual news outside the news cinema. So you went to see a news reel that changed twice a week. You went to see current events, you might go to see a funeral, a coronation, any major event.” This is hard to imagine nowadays in a time where our every interaction with the world is so dominated by instantly accessed moving images. The Little started playing feature films from 1939 – the 80th anniversary being celebrated this year. The first two films were Peg of Old Drury starring Anna Neagle, followed by Oh Mr Porter starring Will Hay. The cinema thrived on local support throughout the years as other Bath cinema venues closed, and in 1979 the former scenery store and lounge area were converted into a second screen. In spite of many refurbishments to keep the cinema up-to-date with digital sound and the latest

“While I didn’t want any connection with the cinema, I felt loyalty to it, because it was something that the family had invested so much in. So I wanted to see it survive, but hoped that others would look after it. And they did of course. But my mother died in 1948, and then Jim Fairfax Jones took over the running of it.” Then Helen, Hilary’s sister took over, but when she died suddenly,

Hilary thought, “Right, now it’s my turn”. Hilary remembers her early days running the cinema: “There were all sorts of restrictions. There was only one print of any given film that was available at one time, so there were struggles to get the film that was wanted to bring in the audiences. “There have been so many changes in the time I’ve been associated with the theatre. And so many times when things looked bleak. We now have television, yet cinema goes on surviving and flourishing. It’s absolutely fascinating to see how at times of stress people go to the cinema more often, so, in that respect, times like this are good for cinema. People are not looking for dark, soulsearching films, they are looking for escape.” Hilary reflects on the success of Green Book, a 2018 good-hearted comedy-drama by Peter Farrelly dealing with racism and homophobia: “I was wondering why it got the Oscar because seeing it from this side of the Atlantic, it is full of every sort of cliché you can think of. Right down to knowing what’s going to happen in the next scene. I think that’s about recognising that however grim the world is at the moment, just look at the distance we’ve covered in terms of black and white relationships. I think it’s selfcongratulatory in the context of everything being a total mess at the moment. If we’ve survived that, we’ve made progress, and then maybe, maybe there is going to be a future for us.” The Little Theatre has been with the Picturehouse Cinemas Group (now the arthouse group of Cineworld) since 2003 and is the only privately owned cinema in the chain. Let’s hope that it continues to show its particular brand of on-screen magic that has enabled it to survive alongside the blockbuster cinema chains and support us through the ever-changing cultural shifts around us. n picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little

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CITY | CULTURE

Jodie Comer and Sandra Oh in the hit TV series Killing Eve, based on the bestselling novellas by Luke Jennings

THRILLING MATTERS From classic whodunits to edge-ofyour-seat dramas, the public’s growing fascination for the crime and thriller genre isn’t wavering. The Bath Festival is exploring the nation’s love affair with the dark side of fiction by bringing some of thriller writing’s biggest names and rising stars to the city next month

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ecognising the very best of modern crime and thriller writing, The Bath Festival has created the BloodBath events collection for this year’s festival – a series of talks by some of the biggest names in this area of fiction, as well as new authors that are set to make it big on the literature scene in 2019. Were you one of the millions that were glued to the BBC’s Killing Eve last year? Or are you always turning the page of an Agatha Christie classic? Well, there’s something for every thriller fan to get stuck into as the festival begins in May… Kicking off the BloodBath events is BBC Radio 2 producer Joe Haddow, who talks to Alex Michaelides and Vanessa Savage on 19 May, 11am, at the Literature Lounge about their novels which are predicted to be the biggest debut thrillers of the year. The film rights for Michaelides’ The Silent Patient were snapped up by an Oscarwinning producer more than a year before the book was published, while Savage’s The Woman In The Dark is a chilling tale of family dysfunction which will go down a treat with fans of Clare Mackintosh and B.A. Paris. £9. Internationally bestselling writer of psychological crime fiction, Sophie Hannah has a 32 TheBATHMagazine

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lifelong love of Agatha Christie. Nearly 40 years after Christie’s death, Hannah became the first author to continue the story of the great Belgian detective, Poirot. On 21 May, 7pm, at the Assembly Rooms, she will be chatting to Paul Blezard about her three Hercule Poirot novels The Monogram Murders, Closed Casket and The Mystery of Three Quarters, and explains what it’s like to be published in 49 languages and 51 territories. £10. Literary critic Alex Clark will get the inside scoop on this year’s hottest political thrillers on 24 May, 4pm, at the Assembly Rooms as she speaks to ITV News at Ten presenter Tom Bradby about his latest novel Secret Service, which tells the story of an MI6 Officer foiling a plan for a leadership challenge. Also featured will be BBC Radio news producer Peter Hanington, whose new book A Single Source tells the story of a veteran BBC reporter caught in the middle of the Arab Spring, as well as Sam Bourne (pseudonym of journalist Jonathan Freedland), whose thriller To Kill the Truth deals with a deadly conspiracy that could ignite another American civil war. £10. On 26 May, 1.30pm, at the Masonic Hall, bestselling author of The Poison Tree Erin Kelly presents her latest novel, Stone Mothers, alongside crime-writing newbie and author of one of the most anticipated debut novels of 2019, Harriet Tyce (Blood Orange).

They will talk to award-winning local author Sarah Hilary (Never Be Broken) about their exciting new novels and the enduring appetite for crime fiction the twistier, it seems, the better. £9. Who could have guessed that when not working as the Observer’s dance critic, Luke Jennings was imagining a suspenseful story around an elite female assassin and an intelligent, yet obsessed, MI6 agent. Little did he know that after selfpublishing this story as four e-book novellas (titled Codename Villanelle), they would soon become the basis for the show that had the nation gripped last autumn, Killing Eve. It starred Jodie Comer and Sandra Oh, who won the Golden Globe for best leading actress in a television drama for her portrayal of Eve Polastri. Now Jennings is heading to Bath’s Masonic Hall on 26 May, 3.15pm, to talk to Alex Clark about the inspiration behind his novels and the whirlwind of seeing his work go from the page to the big screen. £10. n

To see the full programme and to book tickets for The Bath Festival, go online; thebathfestival.org.uk


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CINEMA | HIGHLIGHTS

Take two: films

A live-action reimagining of a beloved Disney tale and a celebration of a laugh-a-minute comedy classic feature at the Little Theatre Cinema this month. Words by Jessica Hope

Dumbo Following on from the recent success of the likes of Cinderella (2015) and Beauty and the Beast (2017), Walt Disney Pictures is releasing its next live-action reimagining of its classic films this month with the heart-rending and much-loved story of Dumbo. Inspired by the 1941 animation, and directed by Tim Burton (Edward Scissorhands, Batman, Alice in Wonderland), it follows eccentric circus owner Max Medici (Danny DeVito) as he recruits former circus star Holt Farrier (Colin Farrell) and his children to care for Dumbo, a baby elephant who is tragically torn away from his mother and whose giant ears have made him the laughing stock of the already struggling circus troupe. As the children, Milly and Joe (Nico Parker and Finley Hobbins), befriend Dumbo, they discover that his enormous ears do in fact

Monty Python’s Life Of Brian Four decades on since it first hit the big screen and Monty Python’s Life Of Brian is still fondly remembered for its quick-witted sketch-style comedy and iconic parodies, and continues to attract legions of younger fans who are just discovering the masterful comedy of John Cleese, Eric Idle, Michael Palin et al. Now, to celebrate its 40th anniversary, a one-off special screening is John Cleese, Michael Palin and Graham Chapman

Finley Hobbins, Nico Parker and Colin Farrell in Dumbo

allow him to fly. As word of this gets out, the persuasive and exploitative director V.A. Vandemere (Michael Keaton) and French trapeze artist Colette (Eva Green) swoop in to save the circus with a larger-than-life

attraction, Dreamland, but dark secrets lurk behind all of its wonder and extravagance. Be warned, you’ll want to get your tissues at the ready.

heading to the Little Theatre this month, where audiences can pick up a limitededition commemorative pack. After bursting on to our television screens in 1969 with the highly successful Monty Python’s Flying Circus (which featured an impressive 45 episodes), the British surreal comedy group Monty Python moved into the movie world with the successful production of Monty Python and the Holy Grail in 1975, before producing Life Of Brian four years later. As a satirical take on the New Testament,

the film was highly controversial when released and was banned in several countries, but is now considered as one of the greatest comedy feature films of all time by audiences around the world. The story follows Jewish anti-Roman activist Brian Cohen (played by Graham Chapman), who is constantly mistaken for the Messiah following a series of coincidences, such as being born in the manger next door to that somewhat more famous stable in Bethlehem. He begrudgingly amasses a band of clueless followers who question everyone and everything from ex-lepers and Pontius Pilate, to Roman centurions and crucifixion. It’s a classic which will have you humming Always Look on the Bright Side of Life as you leave. Blessed are the cheesemakers, readers… n

SHOWING TIMES Dumbo From 12 April, times vary Monty Python's Life Of Brian 18 April, 8.30pm Little Theatre Cinema, St Michael’s Place; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little

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Ma San Auction In Bath

AUCTIONEERS IN FINE ART, ANTIQUES AND LUXURY GOODS Pair of jade bangles. SOLD £1,320 Qing dynasty hardwood book stand. SOLD £2,400

19th Century Chrysanthemum dish with Yongzheng mark. SOLD £2,400

A 19th century Tibetan gilt Qing dynasty Huanghuali copper repoussé Kalachakra sedan chair document box. dance mask. SOLD £4,560 SOLD £960

Accepting ents consignm ian s A for May 019 2 art sale

Free valuations and home visits • Over 30 years experience • Competitive commission rates • Direct contacts in Hong Kong and China • Sales every month 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Tel: 01225 318587

www.masanauction.com

The Framing Workshop has been trading as an independent family run business on Walcot Street for over 28 years. We treasure you, our client, and spend time helping you to find the best way to display and protect your cherished objects, artworks and memorabilia. Creativity and respect for each artwork are core to what we do. Every picture tells a story. Come and share yours.

80 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BD Tel: 01225 482748 www.theframingworkshop.com framing@theframingworkshop.com

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THEATRE | INTERVIEW

The long walk back

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e are human beings. We are fallible, we are vulnerable, and we are absurd; therefore, we will always make mistakes. What we need to learn to do is try and figure out how to move on from those mistakes.” The mistakes that Roughhouse Theatre director Shane Morgan is referring to in this instance aren’t his own. But the very fact that he can empathise so strongly with the absurdity that forms the basis of the human condition is at the very heart of why The Long Walk Back – a Roughhouse/Live Wire Theatre production that pitstops at the Rondo Theatre in Bath on 17 April as part of a national tour – has such a powerful message for all of us. Written by award-winning playwright Dougie Blaxland, The Long Walk Back focuses on the trials and tribulations of former England cricketer and international sporting superstar Chris Lewis. In the 1990s, Lewis enjoyed a meteoric rise to fame and fortune; in 1994, he was named International Cricketer of the Year. But in 2008, within months of his cricketing career ending, he was arrested at Gatwick Airport for smuggling cocaine with a street value of over £140,000 into the UK. Lewis was released from prison in 2015, having served six years of a 13-year prison sentence at HMP High Down. In 2017, his biography Crazy: The Road to Redemption was published. Lewis is still very much on the book circuit with Crazy, talking about his experiences. “He’s working with a lot of academies, young offenders and people who are coming up in the sporting industry,” says Shane. “I would say it’s all part of his rehabilitation, but there’s more to it than that. Everything Chris does today is all part of his plan for the future; basically, he’s allowed for a conversation about himself and the mistakes that he made to create a plan for the future for others too. He wants to embrace what he did so he can understand and explain the root cause of why he did it. People who know nothing about sport can relate to The Long Walk Back – everybody can, because it’s all about the psychology of the person.” Shane and Dougie seem to be attracted to using sport as a backdrop to dramas that ultimately focus on the game that is life. In 36 TheBATHMagazine

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2015, they collaborated to produce Hands Up for Jonny Wilkinson’s Right Boot (the fascinating story of early 20th-century rugby player Frederick Stanley Jackson) followed in 2016 by When The Eye Has Gone, another Blaxland drama exploring the all-too-brief life of Colin ‘Ollie’ Milburn, who died in 1990 aged just 48. So why – and how – are their creative goals driven by sport?

Chris has allowed for a conversation about himself and the mistakes that he made to create a plan for the future for others, too

“In a previous life, Dougie was a professional cricketer,” Shane explains. “He was commissioned to write When The Eye Has Gone to go alongside the Professional Cricketing Association’s mental health programme Mind Matters. When The Eye Has Gone was very well received – we toured it nationally twice. Jason Ratcliffe – who spearheaded and championed the PCA’s Mind Matters campaign as deputy CEO until 2016 – is now an agent who represents Chris Lewis. He approached Dougie with Chris’s autobiography in hand – and that, for us, was when The Long Walk Back was born. As Dougie and I have worked together on numerous occasions, we kind of have a shorthand now which is really lovely.” The resulting drama itself relies on another charismatic duo to bring Shane and Dougie’s interpretation of Lewis’s tale to theatrical life. “It’s a two-hander, with Martin Edwards in the role of Chris, and Scott Lewis as the enigmatic Other Man, who shares a prison cell with Chris and takes on the roles of other key characters in his life, such as the security guard at Gatwick that pulled him over, his remand barrister, and even his grandma – all the different characters who crossed paths with Chris at different stages of his life. It’s not a Stars In Their Eyes version of Chris Lewis – it’s very much our actors’ interpretation of what’s on the page. They actually haven’t met Chris yet; by the

time they do, they’ll have already formed their own versions of him.” So if Martin and Scott haven’t met the man himself yet, how does the man himself feel about seeing his life unfold live before him, on the stage? “For many years, Chris lived in the international spotlight so in a way, he’s used to watching his life happen in front of him,” says Shane. “When you’re in the spotlight, you’re almost a caricature of yourself anyway, and that allows you to divorce yourself from your own behaviour. Chris completely divorced himself from his behaviour and therefore felt as though he had no responsibility for that behaviour. He had fame, acclaim and a huge disposable income – he once went out for some milk and ended up coming back with a brand new Mercedes just because he saw it, and fancied owning it.” If a Mercedes once made Chris Lewis tick, what inspires Shane and Dougie – surely one of the most prolific creative collaborations working in theatre today? “Both Roughhouse and LiveWire thrive when we’re dealing with authenticity – we like telling stories that are unexpected, and very human,” says Shane. “The Rondo Theatre is perfect for us; it takes risks, and doesn’t shy away from what I call brave programming: supporting productions that don't necessarily rely on subscribers, or people-pleasing. There’s a wonderful theatre-going community in the south west, and a real appetite and support for independent programming. We want to attract dynamic audiences; if 100 people come to see one of our productions, we want to inspire 100 different conversations – we don’t serve plays on a platter, we want our audiences to work too.” After The Long Walk Back is over, Shane and Dougie are back in the sports arena again with Getting the Third Degree, commissioned by Kick It Out to mark the 25th anniversary of its ongoing battle against racism in football. “What I get really excited by is strong, non-linear narrative,” he says. “We try to make life linear, but it isn’t; life is messy, conversation is messy, our mistakes are messy. The Long Walk Back is about all of that – and all of us.” n The Long Walk Back is at The Rondo Theatre, 19 April, 8pm; Rondotheatre.co.uk; Roughhouse Theatre: roughhousetheatre.com

Photography by Lisa Hounsome

In 2008 cricketer Chris Lewis attempted to smuggle £140,000 worth of cocaine through Gatwick Airport, and was sentenced to 13 years in prison. A new play by Dougie Blaxland charts the extraordinary journey that took Lewis from a hard-hitting fall from grace to a profound recognition of his mistakes. Melissa Blease talks to director Shane Morgan


Image by Eric Richmond

Photography by Lisa Hounsome

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CITY | CULTURE

THE FEMALE FOCUS From burqas to Barbie, motherhood to data bias, The Bath Festival brings a range of thought-provoking events to the city in May exploring the position of women in society

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ollowing last year’s special events programme at The Bath Festival which celebrated the centenary of some women in the UK getting the vote, this year’s 10-day festival (which kicks off on 17 May) features a variety of talks, performances and debates focusing on women’s experiences from the past and present. The Is Feminism For All? and Hollie McNish events have already sold out, so expect tickets for others to sell quickly. Here’s some of the highlights you can expect to see… Mariella Frostrup’s latest book, Wild Women, is an extraordinary anthology of the greatest women’s travel writing ever produced. The broadcaster will be joined by journalist and author Bella Pollen at the festival on 21 May, 5pm, at the Assembly Rooms to discuss 50 female globe-trotting pioneers of travel from the 18th century to the present day, such as Edith Wharton, Dervla Murphy and Cheryl Strayed. £10. Historian and journalist Anna Pasternak explores the life of the woman at the centre of the most scandalous love affair of the 20th century. In her new book Untitled: The Real Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor she presents new information from those who were close to Wallis and King Edward VIII, redeeming a woman wronged by history. 38 TheBATHMagazine

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Pasternak will be speaking at the Assembly Rooms on 23 May, 12.30pm. £9. Bringing up tiny humans can be tough, and the panelists at the Ain’t No Hood Like Motherhood talk (23 May, 8pm, Assembly Rooms) will be the first to admit that life with children can be as difficult as it is delightful. Writer and blogger of Slummy Single Mummy Jo Middleton; bestselling author of Why Mummy Drinks, Gill Sims; and NHS midwife Leah Hazard will share the highs and lows of their perfectly imperfect parenthood journeys in a conversation with author and journalist Lucy Atkins. £12. Taking a step back in history, acclaimed social historian Hallie Rubenhold will be talking about her new book, The Five. The book unearths the stories of the victims of the Victorian period’s most sensational crime: the 1888 murder spree of Jack the Ripper. Hallie will talk to Caroline Sanderson about the five women’s lives and their tragic, untimely deaths on 24 May, 10.45am, at the Assembly Rooms. £9. In The Salt Path writer Raynor Winn shares her personal story of human strength and endurance. After losing everything, including their home, Raynor and her terminally ill husband made the impulsive decision to walk the 630-mile, seaswept, South West Coast Path. She talks to Alex Clark about their journey of salvation, coming to terms with

grief and the healing power of the natural world at A Remarkable Journey on 25 May, 1.45pm, at the Masonic Hall. £9. Barbie turns 60 this year, but should we be marking her birthday? Should we celebrate her as an iconic toy that encourages girls to play imaginatively and creatively or is she just a metaphor for a culture preoccupied with how a woman looks rather than what she says? Do you love or loathe her? Join Guardian writer and blogger Moira Redmond and actress, director and writer Zawe Ashton (Character Breakdown, Fresh Meat) for a lively discussion with journalist and author Marisa Bate about our perceptions of Barbie, her history, and her place within present-day children’s toys. Takes place on 26 May, 3.30pm, at the Assembly Rooms. £9. The final day of the festival will feature award-winning campaigner and writer Caroline Criado-Perez who will talk about her powerful and provocative new book Invisible Women on 26 May, 5.15pm, at the Assembly Rooms. In a world largely built by and for men, Caroline’s work exposes the data bias and gender politics that have a profound effect on the health and wellbeing of women’s lives. £10. n To see the full programme and to book tickets for The Bath Festival, go online; thebathfestival.org.uk


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2018/19 Lecture Series Monday 1st April 2019

‘Understanding Ancient Egyptian Art: Wall Reliefs and Murals’ Lecturer Eileen Goulding

Investigating splendid wall reliefs and paintings made over 3000 years ago

Monday 29th April 2019

‘How Pleasant to Know Edward Lear’ A man of original and versatile genius,Lear made his living producing topographical watercolours of great delicacy, this illustrated lecture focuses on his biography and his timeless humour

Lecturer Tim Stimson

All Lectures at 1.30pm in The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street Bath Visitors welcome £10 at the door (No Booking required)

www.theartssocietybath.com

Celebrating 50 years of the National Association of Decorative and Fine Arts Societies

BATHAMPTON ART GROUP

Ruby by Yvonne Francis

When 75cl just isn’t enough

Spring Exhibition Saturday 27th April 2019

at Bathampton Village Hall, Holcombe Lane, Bathampton BA2 6UL

10am and 5pm

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Bright textiles, local artists, art fairs and solo exhibitions feature in this month’s arts and exhibits round up WALLER & WOOD

Painted silk scarf by Carole Waller and concrete neckpiece by Rhiannon Palmer

4 Abbey Green, Bath Open: Wednesday to Saturday, 11am–5pm, and Sunday, 12–4pm Tel: 07803 033629 Web: wallerandwood.co.uk GRIT Throughout April The spring collection of original painted clothes and scarves by Carole Waller is colourful and quiet, light and dark, full of texture and character. A range of pieces from £65–£650 are available, including paintings on silk, bamboo, cotton and fine wool fabrics. This wearable art is available from the gallery, alongside edgy contemporary jewellery in unusual materials and beautiful ceramics by Gary Wood.

WILLIAM GOODSIR Walcot Chapel Gallery, Walcot Street, Bath Web: williamgoodsir.com

Photo by Egle Vasi

24–28 April, 11.30am–6.30pm This exhibition of William Goodsir’s work includes his recent paintings inspired by lyrics of Bob Dylan. Free admission.

Right, Going Downtown by William Goodsir

DAVID SIMON CONTEMPORARY 3 – 4 Bartlett Street, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm, closed Wednesday and Sunday Tel: 01225 460189 Web: davidsimoncontemporary.com HUGO GRENVILLE 5–29 April Hugo Grenville is a painter of light, colour and pattern, influenced by his love and extensive knowledge of European painters from Pierre Bonnard and Henri Matisse to Patrick Heron. With a large number of major solo exhibitions in New York and Palm Beach, David Simon Contemporary presents his first solo exhibition in England for 10 years in this touring show. This exhibition showcases a collection of new paintings of female figures in interiors showing his passion for fabrics and pattern as well as some landscape paintings.

Left, I Remember Well That Summer Place by Hugo Grenville

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MOUSEMAN CREEPS BACK TO CREWKERNE... Stylish oak furniture with a solidity and strength of design and obvious handmade construction with a small mouse carved to a leg or side rail will be familiar to all those of us who follow the antiques programmes on the television. ‘Mouseman’ as he is usually known, as Robert Thompson, is almost unique amongst Arts and Crafts furniture makers having an established workshop that went on to thrive and which still flourishes today. Two nearly identical chairs sold in Lawrence’s recent fine art sale display all the features that we love to see from ‘Mouseman Furniture’ not least really well-carved mice which act as a signature and mark of authenticity. These chairs, a design known as ‘monks chairs’, are unusually early examples displaying design details that are seen on more recent examples and have all the desires, influences and creativity that led to their creation at the end of the 1920s or early 1930s. Robert Thompson was born in 1876, and his father was the village joiner, wheelwright and occasional carpenter. His father died in 1895 leaving 19-year old Robert to run the workshop where he developed his skills. Robert admired the elaborate carving on Ripon Cathedral, solid oak chests from the 17th century and traditional sturdy furniture made by carpenters and joiners. It was the vernacular furniture of the 17th century, combined with the theories of the Arts and Crafts movement that informed his approach to design and it is as part of this tradition of furniture making that his work is best understood. These Monks chairs are to a design that was first made in 1919 for Father Paul Neville, headmaster at Ampleforth College, one of the most important early patrons for Robert Thompson. They are almost certainly from the early 1930s as they have the extra carved detailing at each side of the curved backs, a male and female head on one and a fish and flower on the other, details reminiscent of ecclesiastical misericords or corbels, and a finely carved Yorkshire Rose to the side panels. Why a mouse? The story is that, whilst working on a church screen in 1919, Thompson’s work-mate remarked that they were ‘poor as church mice’ and he spontaneously carved a mouse on the screen. This fabled mouse has apparently never been found but the mice came to represent ‘industry in quiet places’ and has featured on everything the workshop have ever made and is now a highly valued registered trademark. By Matthew Denney, Senior Valuer. We also hold specialist valuation days and events throughout the South West. For clients not able to visit the salerooms or for valuations of larger items, we can arrange visits to clients’ homes free of charge. For further details, please contact: Andy Sagar, Valuer on 01460 73041 or andy.sagar@lawrences.co.uk

For more information on buying or selling Mouseman furniture please contact Matthew.Denney@lawrences.co.uk.

Lawrences AUCTIONEERS The Linen Yard, South Street, Crewkerne, Somerset TA18 8AB. T 01460 73041

lawrences.co.uk

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

NICK CUDWORTH GALLERY

Beethoven’s 5th by Nick Cudworth

London Street, top of Walcot Street, closed on Mondays Tel: 01225 445221, web: nickcudworth.com Throughout April This exhibition features original oil paintings of Bath and surrounding areas. Also on show are paintings and prints of a variety of subjects including portraiture and landscapes throughout the country. Nick paints in his studio at the rear of the gallery and is available to discuss the work with visitors.

BATHAMPTON ART GROUP Bathampton Village Hall, Holcombe Lane, Bathampton Web: bathamptonart.co.uk SPRING EXHIBITION 27 April, 10am–5pm Paul Weaver will judge the paintings in various categories at the Bathampton Art Group’s spring exhibition, and the public will have the opportunity to vote for their favourite painting. Some of the artists will be demonstrating throughout the day. Cards and paintings by members will be on sale. Delicious homemade savouries and cakes available. Pulteney Weir Bath at Dusk by Jane Riley

VICTORIA ART GALLERY By Pulteney Bridge Open: Daily, 10.30am–5pm Tel: 01225 477233 Web: victoriagal.org.uk SHARMANKA TRAVELLING CIRCUS Until 7 May Sharmanka, from the Russian word for barrel organ, is a performing mechanical theatre that will delight young and old. Sound and movement combine with striking images to make for a humorous and at times slightly macabre experience. The sculptures are the work of artist and inventor Eduard Bersudsky. The works incorporate pieces of old furniture, metal scrap and grotesque carved figures. Performances take place every hour.

AXLE ARTS Leighton Road, Weston, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am–5pm by appointment Tel: 01225 461230, web: axlearts.com EASTER WEEKEND OPEN-HOUSE 19–22 April Enjoy Axle Arts’ open house over the Easter weekend where a mixed exhibition of painting, print, ceramic and bronze from gallery artists will be on show, including Derek Balmer PPRWA, Corinna Button RE, Lynne Cartlidge RCA, Peter Ford RE, Jeannette Hayes PPS, Melissa Kiernan, Mick Morgan, Sumi Perera RE and Tamsyn Trevorrow. Left, St Peter by Melissa Kiernan

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LOUISE BOURGEOIS PRINTS Until 7 May Accompanying Sharmanka is a Hayward Touring print exhibition by one of the most important and influential artists of recent decades, Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010). She is best known for her powerful, emotionally charged sculptures.

Terror Bird by Val Hunt

ENDANGERED AND EXTINCT CREATIVE RECYCLING Until 7 May With inspiration, ingenuity, humour and skill, artist Val Hunt has created a fascinating selection of sculptural pieces of animals, exotic birds, fish, dinosaurs and species of flora, all threatened or extinct. These have been made from a selection of throwaway material, especially Val’s favourite medium, drinks can metal. This exhibition presents a subtle message about recycling and preservation, raising awareness of why the creatures on show are endangered or extinct. Free entry.


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

Peregrine Study by Jim Starr

ARTBAR Abbey Hotel, North Parade, Bath Open: Daily, 10am–11pm Tel: 01225 805960, web: abbeyhotelbath.co.uk 17 April – 30 June An exciting collection of eclectic artwork on show in the Abbey Hotel’s newly redefined ArtBar. Celebrating the work of five inspiring and talented local artists, the carefully curated collection ranges from abstract textile images and images applied on wood, to dramatic, contemporary lino print designs and layered digital figurative artwork.

FRESH: ART FAIR Cheltenham Racecourse Web: freshartfair.net

CLIFTON CONTEMPORARY ART 25 Portland Street, Bristol Open: Tuesday–Saturday, 10am–5pm Tel: 0117 317 9713, web: cliftoncontemporaryart.co.uk SINGING COLOUR 9 April – 3 May The intense series of screen prints created by Patrick Heron through the 1970s draw you into a realm defined by unfettered visual sensation. They are colour, space and shape set free from the dictates of symbolism. For spring, the gallery will be showing a collection of these timeless works. They will be complemented by and contrasted with pieces from other 20th century masters including Terry Frost, William Scott, John Piper, John Hoyland and Patrick Caulfield.

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THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM Great Pulteney Street, Bath Open: Daily, 10am–5pm (11am Sundays) Tel: 01225 388569, web: holburne.org GEORGE SHAW: A CORNER OF A FOREIGN FIELD Until 6 May George Shaw makes remarkable paintings of Tile Hill, the council estate in Coventry where he grew up in the 70s and 80s, which reveal the latent beauty even in the most mundane subject matter. Shaw’s hyperrealist paintings record the run-down and overlooked aspects of modern life. Where Constable and Turner found majesty in pastoral settings, Shaw The End of Time by George does so in abandoned Shaw, Arts Council Collection, garages, huge England Southbank Centre, London flags in windows and suburban woodland. This is the first major retrospective of Shaw’s work, and the Holburne Museum is the only European venue for this exhibition. WHY MUSEUMS MATTER Until 19 May An exciting installation as a visual response to more than 1,000 ideas and comments by visitors on the subject of ‘Museums matter to me because…’, allowing us to understand what people value about museums in contemporary society. In the Wirth Gallery, there will be a display of the artwork of those who have engaged with objects from the Holburne’s collection, examining the connection between museums, creativity, mental health and wellbeing.

French Landscape by John Piper

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© George Shaw courtesy Anthony Wilkinson Gallery, London / Photo: Peter White

26–28 April, 11am–6pm (closes 5pm on Sunday) Described as “the best contemporary art fair outside London,” Fresh: Art Fair is an easy and exciting way to see 51 leading UK galleries in one place. There will be 5,000 original prints and paintings, sculpture, glass and ceramics from emerging new talent to Royal Academicians, with prices from £100 to £20,000 or more. Expect work from the likes of Blake, Hockney, Hirst, Emin, Sutherland and McLean. There will also be a printmaking demonstration by Jim Starr; talks on framing by London framing experts Darbyshire; talks on art in interior design by Instagram star Dee Campling; talks on history of art and understanding contemporary art by Alison Bevan, director of The Royal West of England Academy; and painting and sculpting demonstrations every day. Weekend tickets £6 per person on the door or £8 for two tickets when bought online. Children under 16 go free. Friday is free all day, no ticket required.


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nick cudworth gallery

On Salisbury Hill Oil on linen-prints available

APRIL EXHIBITION 2 – 30 April

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

GALLERY NINE 9b Margaret’s Buildings, Bath Open: Monday to Saturday, 10am – 5pm Tel: 01225 319197, web: gallerynine.co.uk SPRING EXHIBITION

Photo by Ruth Clark

12 April – 31 May

THE EDGE The Edge, University of Bath, Claverton Down Open: Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 5pm Tel: 01225 386777, web: edgearts.org EMMA HART: BANGER Until 27 April Emma Hart makes art about the routines and spaces of everyday life. Banger is a new body of ceramic works that continues her investigation into relationships and domestic life, in this case the car as the interior space where so many family dynamics are played out. Beyond the windscreen there are urban scenes clamouring with signs and instructions and rural horizons with endless possible routes to navigate. In Banger the relentless velocity of decision-making is as inescapable as the changing weather. Free admission.

Gallery Nine’s latest exhibition features a range of work by artists including original signed prints and ceramics by internationally recognised artist Bruce McLean. As a leading figure in the British contemporary art scene, luminous colours and organic shapes give Bruce’s work a Pottery by Clive Bowen fantastic expressive quality. Potter Clive Bowen studied painting at Cardiff Art School before being taken on as an apprentice by Michael Leach. He has been making wood-fired slipware since 1971. Sasha Wardell’s distinctive combination of pure white slipcast bone china is treated with unique decorating techniques and finished in a carefully chosen palette of muted, subtle colours. Jeweller Charmian Harris makes beautiful one-off pieces from silver, gold and semiprecious stones. Emily Nixon creates beautiful handcrafted rings for weddings and engagements and precious pieces that are inspired by textures found along the tide line.

BATH OPEN STUDIOS Web: bathopenstudios.co.uk

THE SPRING SHOW Throughout April Gray M.C.A continues to showcase the very best of fashion illustration and modern textiles in its Bath gallery. Throughout April the gallery will also be exhibiting historic modern textiles at Messums Wiltshire’s outstanding spring show, Material: Textile, until 28 April.

4–6 May – Larkhall Open Studios 11–12 May – Newbridge Arts Trail 25–27 May – Bear Flat Artists Open Studios 22–23 June – Widcombe Art Trail Bath’s popular arts trails start in May, so plan ahead to visit open studios in different parts of the city at the weekends. In total, more than 180 artists and makers will open Oil painting by their doors to the public to showcase Kathryn Scaldwell original artwork, give demonstrations or offer workshops. It’s an opportunity to discover the wide range of art and craft being created here, meet artists and makers, talk about their ideas or just enjoy browsing. You might even buy a piece of original art at an affordable price. With painting, printmaking, photography and sculpture on show as well as glass, jewellery, ceramics and textile art, there’s something for all tastes. Whether you’re walking or driving, the routes are manageable and refreshments are provided at pubs, cafés and some artist venues.

Below, Musical Fawn, 1963, Bloomcraft Fabrics by Pablo Picasso

BRIAN GOODSELL AND DAVID MCMILLAN

GRAY M.C.A 5 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath Open: Wednesday – Saturday, 10am–4pm, Monday and Tuesday by appointment Tel: 01225 422117 Web: graymca.com

44AD Artspace, Abbey Street, Bath Web: davidmcmillanartist.co.uk / 44ad.net

VISUAL EXPLORATIONS OF THE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN 7–12 May Brian Goodsell’s approach to his painting is akin to that of a modern jazz tenor sax man who improvises. Both musician and painter venture into the unknown. David McMillan, with his fine and subtle sense of colour and design, creates a mysterious range of symmetrical and asymmetrical images. Both artists have developed their current practice over many years of experimentation and their visual explorations continue. n 46 TheBATHMagazine

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Anthropogeometry II by David McMillan


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A warning to all antique owners Duncan Campbell HAS BEEN DEALING IN ANTIQUE SILVER SINCE 1986.

Time to act

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or the last few years the antiques trade has been anticipating changes in UK law relating to the sale of ivory, which will come into effect on 21 September 2019 six short months away. These changes will make it illegal to buy or sell ivory with a sanction of up to five years in prison. The law will apply not just to antiques made from ivory but to any ivory inlay, knife handles, clock-dials, decorative details etc. While there is an exemption for items that contain less than 10% ivory (20% for musical instruments), this exemption will only be made if the item has been certified by CITES, a process which will take some time and cost between £60–100 per item.

It can be difficult to distinguish ivory from bone, plastic or bakelite even for ‘the trade’. From September, getting it wrong may prove very costly. Having been aware of the new law for some time, I have been avoiding ivory altogether but, even in the silver trade, that is very hard to do. Before plastics, ivory was the only choice for many applications, for example, old teapots with silver handles have insulators fitted to stop the handle from becoming too hot to touch. These tiny insulators are made from walrus ivory and will cost me £60 –100 per pot to certificate. Currently, prices for old ivory are holding very steady in the salerooms and in the antiques market more generally, as buyers, mostly Chinese, soak up what they can in advance of the ban. It may be a coincidence but elephant poaching is also on the rise. As we get closer to a complete ban on old ivory, the demand seems tragically to have moved on to ‘new’ ivory. Poaching elephants is a horrific crime - about that there is no argument. What I find very difficult to fathom is how destroying skillfully made antiques, even if they incorporate long dead ivory, will help the poor pachyderms. This new law ably signals the virtue of those who pressed for it but it has the potential to criminalise the innocent. n www.beaunashbath.com, 01225 334234

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Makings of a masterpiece

The days of the likes of Gainsborough dominating the city’s art scene may be long gone, but the demand for traditional portraiture is as popular now as ever according to Bath based artist Harriet Dahan-Bouchard. Words by Jackie Brown

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n the 18th century, art in Britain underwent a transformation and Bath became a magnet for portraiture. Many renowned artists took up residence in the city, including Thomas Gainsborough, William Hoare and Sir Thomas Lawrence, to paint the countless musicians, actors, and high society elites who flocked to enjoy Bath’s thriving social scene. Despite today’s advances in photography and the instantaneous sharing of pictures on social media, it seems the demand for traditional portraiture is unwavering. One such artist of this traditional style is Harriet Dahan-Bouchard – a talented young portrait painter who works from her studio in one of Bath’s Georgian townhouses, just a stone’s throw away from where Sir Thomas Lawrence first honed his craft. With her father, Philip Bouchard, being an artist and her mother an art teacher, it was quite natural for Harriet to find herself among canvases and tubes of paint when she was growing up. “When I was seven my father bought me a book on August Ingres, which I fell in love with. I asked him if it was something I could do when I grew up. He said being a portrait 50 TheBATHMagazine

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painter was probably the most stable line of work to pursue as an artist, so I said ‘I’ll do it.’” And Harriet hasn’t looked back since. After studying at St Gregory’s School and Downside School, Harriet undertook an art foundation course at Bath College before training for three years in Florence, Italy at the Charles H. Cecil Studios. It was here that she perfected the traditional techniques used in drawing and oil painting for portraits. Since then she has been working as a professional artist in Bath for seven years. With technological advancements and an increasing use of photography, is there really a market these days for people wanting to commission a traditional oil painting? Harriet is quick to confirm that it is something coming back into fashion: “I think people are keen to own an oil painting which can be enjoyed as a piece of art, capturing a moment in time. “A painting can be seen as immortal, and will be handed down through generations as something beautiful and special in terms of both sentimentality and value. People are aware of things being so disposable that they are now looking for something which will still be appreciated in years to come.”

Each of Harriet’s paintings are unique and she enjoys adding personal touches about her clients’ interests and character to her work. “Although I am trained to produce a specific product a lot of me goes into it. Getting to know my clients makes up a large part of my job and this helps me to bring their character into the painting.” But could it be a rather lonely profession for such an outgoing character as Harriet? “No, not really – as an only child I am used to my own company, and I think it is just as likely that you could feel lonely in a large office environment full of other people. “I work as a volunteer at the Holburne Museum and also as the Artist in Residence at Victoria Art Gallery where I am giving one day demonstrations in portrait drawing. I also get to know new sitters and their families really well, and they range in age from young children to the very elderly.” Harriet recalls her very first portrait commission: “She was a 15 year-old girl called Natalia, dressed in her polo kit. I was 23 and had just finished my training. She was the only job I had lined up, and I was so nervous. It suddenly occurred to me that it was no longer me, the artist, paying a model


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ARTIST | PROFILE

to sit still and pose for me, but that now the roles were reversed.” Harriet’s first major commission was the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, which involved a trip to the Royal Courts of Justice. “This could have been so daunting, but he and his wife treated me with such kindness and patience which really helped me to trust in myself and to build my confidence. He wore his chain of honour for the portrait, which normally only comes out twice a year for the Queen!” Harriet has also painted the Bishop of East Anglia (this portrait now hangs in the Cathedral of St John the Baptist in Norwich), and the Treasurer of Lincoln’s Inn, which resulted in her being invited as a guest of honour at the top table of a white tie dinner along with 200 barristers. “More recently I painted a family portrait for the author Anthony Horowitz,” she says. “It was great fun to work with a big name. They were up for something different from the usual formal portrait which meant I was able to experiment, creating a contemporary take on my old masters training. “I also enjoyed adding personal, fun touches like part of a hand-written script for the Moriarty series of Sherlock Holmes lying on the desk, a little Spitfire aeroplane as a nod to the Foyles War series which Horowitz also wrote, and a poster of Alex Rider on the back wall.” Looking at the variety of her commissions it is easy to see how Harriet is able to adapt her formal training to meet her clients’ needs. And yet, as she explains, regardless of who she is painting, the thought process remains unchanged: “With the Horowitz painting, which was in his studio, I used a strong sense

of perspective,” she says. “As I was growing up I was influenced by my father’s enormous surrealist paintings, and this particular commission enabled me to play around with putting people into a space.” As well as her father’s work, Harriet has been inspired by many of the great traditional artists from history. “I especially admire Sir Thomas Lawrence, John Singer Sargent, Rubens, Reynolds, Van Dyke, all the classical, English School. I also like De Lazlo as I can relate to his attitude and interaction with the sitter, and I have recently discovered Sorolla, a Spanish artist who uses a similar technique to Sargent,” she says.

People are aware of things being so disposable that they are now looking for something which will still be appreciated in years to come

Crescent photography/Chris Wakefield

TRADITIONAL BEGINNINGS: Left, Anthony Horowitz and family by Harriet Dahan-Bouchard; above, Harriet giving live drawing demonstrations at Victoria Art Gallery, where she is the current Artist in Residence; right, a portrait of Harriet’s hairdresser, Josh, from Artizan

While under pressure to depict the sitter as accurately as possible, it is unsurprising that Harriet has been asked to remove the odd wrinkle or straighten a nose. “Sometimes they do get me confused with a plastic surgeon,” she laughs, “but I tell them they would have to pay extra! “My training lends itself naturally to seeing the beauty of people. Even if a client comes in with insecurities or doesn’t conform

to their idea of good looking, it is these things that give them their character.” Harriet’s clients come from a range of backgrounds and professions. “I have recently been working with a very old English family who have several of my portraits hanging in their home just outside Bath where their ancestors have lived for 600 years,” she says. “I am currently finishing a portrait of their teenage daughter. They have been working with me as a team, enjoying the process, and creating a special experience for us all.” When she isn’t working on portraiture, Harriet uses her artistic talents in her every day life. “I paint still life as I find it quite therapeutic. I have designed a Christmas card for the Holburne Museum and some fun illustrations for clients’ dinner place name settings. I am always looking for new opportunities and am ready for a challenge.” Speaking of which, Harriet’s flatmate surprised her by entering her into the Channel 4 show First Dates in 2017: “I went along with it and appeared on the show. I turned up with a portrait for Fred, the maître d’ – it was great fun, but I got more out of it in the way of finding commissions than finding the love of my life,” she laughs. With the demand for portraiture coming back into fashion, Harriet is leading the way in continuing Bath’s tradition of honing portraitists, helping to capture moments in time for families and individuals to treasure for generations to come. n Harriet is running monthly portrait drawing demonstrations at Victoria Art Gallery until May. To find out more about her work, visit: harrietdahanbouchard.co.uk

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HISTORY | ARTS

Portraits of a great painter April marks the 250th anniversary of the birth of one of the greatest portrait painters in British history. Historian Catherine Pitt explores the life of Sir Thomas Lawrence, a child prodigy whose formative years as an artist were nurtured in Bath

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small-scale head and shoulder profiles. Before moving to Bath, Lawrence was taken by his family on what could be termed a promotional art tour to Oxford and London. At this point he had advanced to drawing in pastel crayons. In London Lawrence met the great portrait painter, Sir Joshua Reynolds, who is recorded as having pronounced Lawrence as his successor. “He (Reynolds) declared Lawrence the most promising genius he had ever met with,” according to Fanny Burney in 1780. Initially Lawrence favoured being an actor rather than an artist. Family and friends persuaded him otherwise, recognising that although talented in memory and good looks his drawing skills surpassed his acting abilities. In 1779 Lawrence’s father was declared bankrupt and this forced the tour and the move to Bath. His family recognised that this popular city, filled with the wealthy and fashionable of society, would give Lawrence ample opportunity to show off his talent and make some money. By 1782 the Lawrence family were settled in the city, first renting lodgings at St James’ Parade. In the 18th century, artists would create a separate studio in their own homes, and a gallery where the public could browse and discuss the work displayed. The artist Thomas Gainsborough initially had a home

ir Thomas Lawrence’s meteoric rise to success in the art world was a result of his own natural talent, and his pushy parents. Born in Bristol, Lawrence grew up in Devizes, Wiltshire, where his father was landlord of The Bear, a coaching inn on the London to Bath road. A precocious prodigy, Lawrence’s talent was not just in art. He had an aptitude for memorising poems and excerpts of plays, which did not go unnoticed by those who lodged at The Bear. Lawrence’s father pushed his son to perform at all opportunities. Until the 18th century, portrait painting in Britain had been dominated by artists from the Low Countries and Germany. Now home-grown talent was emerging, and a new type of portrait, the conversation piece, was realised. In these pictures the subject was surrounded by representations of their home or idealised landscapes. When Lawrence was born it was Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723– 1792) who led the field. Lawrence was adept at sketching from around the age of four, and producing saleable work at age six. In their memoirs the actor David Garrick and the diarist Fanny Burney record their meetings with Lawrence and his talents at The Bear. The few surviving early portraits produced by Lawrence show that he started off working in graphite pencil, drawing quick,

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Image from Wikimedia Commons/Tokyo Fuji Art Museum

The Prince Regent, later George IV, 1822

Image from Wikimedia Commons/Sotheby’s

Sally Siddons, Sarah Siddons’ eldest daughter, 1795

and studio in York Street, but later, as his success grew, he moved to The Circus where his rich patrons could easily visit. Between 1700 and 1800 Bath saw more than 150 artists moving to and working in the city. Early newspapers from this period give small glimpses into the start of Lawrence’s early career. On moving to Bath his father took out an advert offering his own skills to teach writing, with a brief mention at the end about Lawrence and his “striking sketches of likeness.” Later the adverts were just about his son, the artist. By the age of 13 Lawrence had become the main breadwinner for the family. In Bath Lawrence worked mainly in pastels, which were quick and cheap to use. The phenomenon of such a young artist intrigued the fashionable set and he would often be inundated with requests from those wanting to view his work or commission a picture. Soon Lawrence was receiving up to four sitters a day and finishing three or four portraits a week. He would spend half an hour with the sitter, then half an hour immediately afterwards sketching from memory. Initially Lawrence’s parents were charging 1 guinea per portrait (just two years earlier it had been 2s. 6d per picture), the equivalent of £90 today. As demand increased, this soon tripled to three guineas, a huge sum. When Gainsborough was in Bath (1759–1774) he was charging five guineas for a head painted in oils. By the time Lawrence left the city five years later, aged 17, he too was charging five guineas, but this was for a pastel portrait. The fascination with Lawrence’s youth, beauty and talent opened many doors for him in the city. Many of Bath’s upper class residents such as Mary Hartley, Dr Falconer, and the Honorable Mr Hamilton became his patrons and allowed him to study their private art collections. This was a huge opportunity for a self-taught artist. Lawrence also made the most of similar offers from local landed gentry, such as the Methuen family of Corsham Court, nearby in Wiltshire. Some of Lawrence’s patrons wished to send him to Italy to study the Renaissance masters; others, such as Lady Frances Harpur, offered to adopt him. His father turned all these offers down, stating his son’s talents “required no cultivation,” but perhaps this was as the family feared losing their main source of income. In 1784 the Lawrence family moved to Alfred House at 2 Alfred Street, in close


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Sketch of Arthur Atherley by Thomas Lawrence, 1791 proximity to the Upper Assembly Rooms. Lawrence would often attend balls there, returning home to sketch from memory any person that may have caught his eye that night. The rent at Alfred Street was £120 a year, a huge amount for a lower middle-class family. It was possible, though, with the money Lawrence’s work brought, as well as rent from a lodger, and money from the eldest son who was now minister of St Michael’s Without, Broad Street. One of Lawrence’s most popular portraits from his time in Bath was that of the great local actress Sarah Siddons. His portrait of her as Zara in The Mourning Bride was turned into an etching and copies sold to the public. The Duchess of Devonshire was another of Lawrence’s famous sitters and she later described how unnerving it could be being scrutinised by him for a portrait. To ensure accuracy Lawrence, unlike other painters, would get so close to his sitters that they could feel his breath on their faces. It is thought that during Lawrence’s time in Bath, and under the guidance of his mentor, the artist William Hoare (1707– 1792), that he first began to paint in oils. Once Lawrence moved to London in 1787, he exclusively painted in that medium. Alan Cunningham, Lawrence’s contemporary biographer, described how Lawrence always painted standing up with the light to his left. If a sitter could only make one or two appointments, he would use a life-size mannequin as a guide for the figure. On occasion he even suggested what outfit a client should wear. In a first sitting Lawrence would draw in detail the head on canvas, tracing all dimensions and expressions. In the second sitting he would then actually begin to paint. These sittings for oil paintings would last around three hours and often eight or nine sittings were required. On many occasions the gap between sittings and the final portrait could be long, but perhaps not quite as long as the portrait of Lady Mexborough with her baby son. Years after their sitting Lord Mexborough

Image from Wikimedia Commons/Metropolitan Museum of Art

© Holburne Museum

Portrait in oils of Irish actress Elizabeth Farren, later Countess of Derby, before 1791

contacted Lawrence for receipt of the actual portrait. Lawrence wrote back saying he would oblige if mother and child would sit once more for him. Lord Mexborough agreed regarding his wife but explained that it may be difficult for the child as he was now an officer in the Guards. Lawrence never signed any of his portraits. However his predilection, from the age of 12, for sticking handwritten care guidelines, such as “be pleas’d to keep this from the damp and sun” on the back of his work meant art historians are able to identify his pictures. Even as a youth the demand for his portraits exceeded production. At his death

in 1830, over 200 unfinished portraits were discovered in his studio. Lawrence’s career had seen him rise from the public rooms of The Bear, via the social whirl and opportunities given to him in his years in Bath, to finally the pinnacle of his career in London. Knight of the realm, portrait painter to King George IV, and President of the Royal Academy, Lawrence was feted both at home and abroad. Despite all these accolades Lawrence died in debt. He was so revered as an artist that he was laid to rest in St Paul’s Cathedral; his funeral procession fittingly sketched by fellow artist and child prodigy J.M.W. Turner. n

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Bath at Work Apr Carole.qxp_Layout 1 18/03/2019 17:08 Page 1

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151


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Bath @ work

Our series of photographic portraits by Neill Menneer shows Bath people at work. View a gallery of Bath@work subjects at: thebathmag.co.uk

Carole Banwell

General manager, Bath City FC

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went to a convent school in Cheltenham and always felt a bit intimidated by the genteel surroundings so wanted to rebel. I started to get into football around the age of ten – I always say football was my ‘punk’ because back then it was a way to be different as a girl. Initially I supported Liverpool seeking the glory – a premiership club is often a ‘gateway drug’ as it were. However I soon discovered that following more local teams was far more rewarding and began following Cheltenham Town FC. When I was at Reading University I would watch Reading and later, when I worked in Frankfurt, I became a season ticket holder at Eintracht Frankfurt. On graduating with a Latin degree I initially worked on the graduate scheme at KPMG, then got a job selling computers in Germany. I was there for eight fantastic years and the job combined everything I had learnt as an accountant from purchase ledgers to payroll and more. On moving back to the UK I landed a really varied role with Lester Associates who provided an all-round service to Commonwealth IT specialists working in London. We helped with accommodation and recruitment and acted as a kind of agency. After the birth of my first child I decided to go to law school as I had always enjoyed the legal side of things. I had litigation experience in both Frankfurt and London and had also been involved in contract law. I also wanted a more focussed professional qualification. I was duly admitted on to the roll of solicitors in 2006 after completing my legal qualification while working for a printing trade association. I ran a legal helpline for members from home and this suited me at the time as I now had two children (Roman and Alexandra). I left in 2016 with no fixed plan, but as a result got involved in volunteering. Firstly at the Port Elliot Festival down on the south coast and then at Bath City Football Club where I ran the shop on matchdays. This was the beginning of my involvement with the Twerton club and it was an important time as it faced some existential challenges. It was in debt and urgently needed a rescue plan. The successful community ownership bid offering shares to the public and fans was successful and allowed us to pay off some of the immediate debt. We believe we now have a sustainable future with a robust business plan that involves a partial development of our ground. We have a joint venture with Greenacre Capital and our proposals for the site are really exciting. They offer so many benefits to the area and community. We will get a brand new grandstand, the high street will be redesigned and improved, as will the facilities in the stadium which will provide new income streams to support the club. Non-match revenue will come from many fresh sources including the sports bar, gym, hot desking office space and hiring out the new artificial surface pitch to schools and other sport teams. WECA, through the Love Your High Street Initiative, will also be providing an additional £650K. All in all it’s a massive boost for City, Twerton and Bath. I can’t wait to see this bright new future emerge...

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151 THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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Food news November.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2019 15:25 Page 1

FOOD&DRINK NEWS 15 HEADS FOR A MILLION

Fifteen Cornwall is Jamie Oliver’s much-loved beach restaurant at Watergate Bay on the north Cornwall coast. Since opening in 2006, this inspiring project has changed the course of hundreds of young lives and boosted the local economy. During April, Fifteen Cornwall is expecting its one millionth guest – and it could be you. Whether you’ve stopped off for breakfast before a day out with the kids, catching up with friends for a long lunch or treating someone special to dinner, you could be the one millionth guest for the prize of a three-night VIP ‘Taste of the Bay’ experience for two. You’ll stay at Watergate Bay Hotel for the best in Cornish comfort and three miles of golden sand on your doorstep. Each night will bring a different dining experience in the Bay, including meals at Zacry’s and the Beach Hut, plus you’ll be given a six-course tasting menu at Fifteen Cornwall. The prize also includes a day of experiences to suit you, with choices including surfing, mixology or cooking. All guests visiting for breakfast, lunch or dinner throughout April will be entered into the competition. Fifteen Cornwall, On The Beach, Watergate Bay, Cornwall TR8 4AA; 01637 861000; fifteencornwall.co.uk/about-us/one-in-a-million-terms

the delicious guide the best places in the city to eat, drink and enjoy

the delicious guide to Bath featuring all the fave eateries and foodie treateries is available online at our website www.thebathmag.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

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A NEW FACE AT BATH ALES

Bath Ales, which became part of the St Austell Brewery family in 2016, has hired Georgina Young as its new head brewer. Georgina, who is currently head brewer at Fuller, Smith & Turner, will oversee all aspects of the brewing and packaging of Bath Ales’ brands and report into St Austell Brewery and Bath Ales Brewing Director, Roger Ryman. She will be based at Hare Brewery, Bath Ales’ new state of the art brewhouse which opened in May 2018. Having grown up in Bristol, Georgina started her brewing career at Smiles Brewery, working alongside Richard Dempster, one of the founders of Bath Ales. She then went on to run the pilot brewery at the Brewing Research Institute before joining Fuller’s as a production brewer where she served in roles across all aspects of production. She took on the role of head brewer in 2017, the first female at Fuller’s to do so. George holds a Masters degree in Brewing and Distilling and is a Master Brewer of the Institute of Brewing and Distilling. “I’m delighted to be heading back to my home town of Bristol where my parents and sister still live. So when a great brewer like St Austell offered me such a fantastic opportunity, I just couldn’t say no,” she says. bathales.com n


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FOOD | OPINION

No to the know-it-all

Talk about food, but don’t overdo it on the detail, says Melissa Blease, who much prefers eating a good meal to being told all about it by a foodie know-it-all

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ancy a pleasant evening sharing good food in good company? Warning: give it a miss if conversational lines come back to you as follows: “Actually, I took an Indonesian cookery course when I was in Jakarta so I know exactly how Nasi Goreng should taste...” “Actually, what we’re eating isn’t sushi, it’s sashimi. When most people say they like sushi, they actually mean they like nigiri and/or maki, which is actually...” “Actually, consult the rules set by the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana in 1984 and you’ll find that this isn’t actually an authentic Napoletana at all – and after all, Naples is where pizza was invented...” Actually, you’re driving me – and many, many others who just want to get on and eat the thoroughly decent grub in front of them – round the bend. Okay, if you’re reviewing a restaurant and the menu/chef/server is pretending that your dinner is something that it plainly isn’t, or if you’re a Great British Menu judge, or a guest critic on MasterChef, your observations might be pertinent. But when we’re eating out with a group of friends or sharing an athome dinner, the one thing that can dull the appetite is the know-it-all foodie. I, like many people, love food; whether cooking, eating out, researching recipes, planning a dinner party or shopping for ingredients, it’s one of my most joyous joys in life. On from that, I also love chatting to

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people who can tell me what the food I’m making, eating or shopping for is all about... but only in the appropriate circumstances. Having said that, even I have found myself suppressing a sneaky yawn when certain chefs overshare exactly how they’re going to be using aquafaba on their spring menu... but at least those chefs are (actually) experts in their field. Take the dreaded “I took a cookery course at a hotel in Mexico...” bore. Okay, I’m sure that was great fun – it’s something I’d probably do myself if I were to find myself in Tijuana with time on my hands and cash to splash. But honestly, really... half-day cookery courses are offered alongside massages, yoga classes, cocktail-making workshops and much more, in millions of hotels around the world. While I’m sure that the majority of those courses are informative, edifying and enjoyable, there’s no way that they can turn anybody into an expert in a couple of hours. Yes, it’s good to know your enfrijoladas from your entomatadas, but when you’re chilling out with a plate of nachos, a dish of guacamole and a big pot of chilli... well, that is not the time to be told which Los Angeles suburb you can find the most authentic Tex-Mex in, and Angelina Jolie has been seen eating there. Oh just shut up and eat before you drive me loco! Don’t expect to escape from the know-itall ‘good taste’ bore in a bar either. Tempering, specific gravity and oxidation. Flairing, activating and reverse dry shake

double-straining. Classic coupe, high ball or Nick&Nora? If you’re in the company of a self-proclaimed cocktail connoisseur, you’re going to be told that you have a lot to learn about what you’d like to drink, even if you thought you knew what you wanted. Oh, how I fondly recall the days when a gin and tonic was simply a gin and tonic, before we were asked whether we’d prefer a cranberry-, thyme-, melon-, chilli-, rhubarb-, rosemary-, or even jam-infused gin with our Mediterranean, floral, herbal, sweet or salty tonic water – and before somebody, somewhere intervened just as you’ve finally got your drink in hand to tell you all about how you’ll find the best gin and tonic in the world in the Last Hope Distillery bar in Puerto Natales, Chile. Aaargh! And relax... So, how to deal with the problem of the increasingly endemic problem of the foodie/drinkie know-it-all? There are three directions you can take: The polite ‘Feign Interest and Move On’: “hmmm, fascinating! I had no idea that the Caesar salad was invented in Mexico – you really must tell me more about that next time we meet. Talking of which... is anyone watching that new Ricky Gervais comedy, After Life?” The combative ‘Get Competitive’: “Actually, you’re totally, completely wrong about pizza. The precursor of pizza was probably a form of focaccia developed by the Romans (panis focacius, don’cha know). There’s no mention of pizza in Neapolitan cuisine until at least the late 18th century...” The ‘Drastic-Sarcastic’: “This isn’t authentic Tom Yung Goong? Crikey! We’re eating a lie! Tip it in the recycling bin, quick! I had no idea I was making Thai food for somebody who’s taken a two-hour cookery course at the Marina Phuket Resort!” Or, you could just keep calm and carry on, secure in the knowledge that if the foodie know-it-all, not where our next meal is coming from, is the biggest problem at our table then we’re very lucky. Anyway, as Oscar Wilde once said, “after a good dinner, one can forgive anybody anything.” But whether or not Oscar would have felt the same way if he’d at been at the same dinner party as the person who spent an hour telling the host that pasta is a descendent of Asian noodles first bought to Italy from China by Marco Polo during the 13th century, we’ll never know. I’d much rather hear a theory on how Oscar would have dealt with foodie know-it-alls. n


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Opening in April Underwood is a brand new modern european restaurant, set to open in Spring 2019 next to Pulteney Bridge. A mixture of different cultures, it is set to cater to a variety of tastes and aims to push the boundaries of taste pairings. We will also have a light dining section upstairs with a patisserie section (which will include diabetic friendly desserts!). The owners behind this idea are the Dombrowski siblings, Andrew and Inna. Born of European descent, they say this is what pushed them to create a restaurant that draws inspiration from various countries, Andrew and Inna were both fascinated and drawn towards cooking through their father, who encouraged them to learn cooking from the early age of 7. Over years, each of them moved up the ladder, with Inna becoming a Director and Andrew the Head Chef. He has now been working as a Head Chef for over 8 years in England, with Inna managing various businesses. They decided to unite and thus, Underwood was created.

16 Argyle Street, BA2 4BQ

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FOOD | AND | DRINK

Spring eating

Melissa Blease waves in the changing season with a new deli lunch menu at Green Park Brasserie which will kick the afternoon slump goodbye and add a spring to your step

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t feels a little bit odd – albeit in the best possible way – reviewing the Green Park Brasserie; after all, this lively, multi-faceted restaurant, bar and live music venue opened its doors in an atmospheric former Victorian railway station (that’ll be Green Park Station) back in 1992 and has long since earned a place on the much-respected Bath institution list of reliably good places to eat, drink and generally be merry in. Surely we’ve all been there, done that... and keep going back? If you haven’t visited the Braz to enjoy its highly-acclaimed live jazz (on Wednesday to Saturday evenings), you’ve surely chilled out here on a Saturday morning, when the Farmers’ Market brunch is in full swing to complement the glorious goings-on at the Farmers’ Market out back, from which many of the ingredients on the GPB menus are sourced. If you haven’t done dinner here – either as a cosy/romantic/table-for-two affair or as part of a party (the spacious dining room offers plenty of options for both options all under one roof but subtly discrete of each other) – you’ve surely experienced the something-for-everybody Sunday roast? Or maybe you’ve just popped in for a cocktail... Oh, it’s all going on here, all the time; the GBP may be turning 27-years-old this year, but a youthful outlook, constant contemporary adaptations and imaginative diversification all guarantee that time never stands still for the Braz brigade. Talking of time... those of us who claim to 60 TheBATHMagazine

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never have the time to enjoy a proper lunch need to update their perspective at the Green Park Brasserie right here, right now. The recently introduced (see what I mean about moving with the times?) deli lunch is a simple, straightforward and utterly delightful addition to the existing lunch classics menu (soup, burgers, salads, omelettes, fish pie, etc). It waltzes us through a fresh, light, healthy array of mix’n’match options, all offering invigorating, lighthearted food for thought twixt breakfast and suppertime. This is how it rolls: you choose one main attraction from a regularly changing selection that may include options such as Wiltshire ham, sausage roll, cheesy tart, Newton Farm topside beef, honey glazed Wiltshire ham or falafel, and team your choice up with three salad sides – all for £10. You can, if you so wish, add additional salads to your bespoke deli platter, or opt for simply salads alone; they’re all priced individually at £2 each. Our lunch party of two opted for a Somerset pork, apple, thyme and sage sausage roll (succulent, beautifully seasoned pork wrapped in a perfectly flaky, buttery overcoat) and a Worthy Farm Cheddar and sunblushed tomato tart: a heavenly combination thrumming with characteristically smooth, subtly nutty cheesiness and sweet/tart tomatoes, tightly packed into a shortcrust pastry case. Of the salad selection, the new potato, red onion and rocket medley was satisfyingly chunky;

the butternut squash, sweet potato and artichoke combo proved to be a sophisticated, Ottolenghi-ish, thoroughly modern combination; the fine bean, pea and mint melange bought a taste of early British springtime to the table. Portions are substantial but in that nice, light lunchappropriate way that leaves you feeling happily full but definitely not ready for a snooze. To the contrary, in fact, when my lunch date and I met up again at the end of the working day, we both agreed that our midday deli pitstop had fuelled us up nicely for a very productive afternoon. It’s worth mentioning here that the semialfresco Bath Pizza Co outback – the GPB’s little sister venture, established around three years ago – offers a regularly changing menu of wood-fired pizzas also made with produce sourced from the traders at the market on their doorstep and also available at lunchtime, when regular deals proliferate. But now that spring has sprung and an urge to eat light, eat bright and get fresh is slowly but surely replacing the comfort food cravings that kept us going through the long, dark days of winter, the GPB’s new deli selection offers the perfect new season celebration, kicking the lunchtime slump to the kerb. n

The Green Park Brasserie, Green Park Station, Bath BA1 1JUB Tel: 01225 338565; greenparkbrasserie.com


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TRISTAN DARBY Columnist Tristan Darby has been struck with a seasonal case of spring fever

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pringtime is now upon us and the changing seasons bring a change in the availability of locally produced food. I’m a big fan of pairing plate with glass, and while I’m certainly no snob, it really can up the level of pleasure when you get it right. You don’t have to break the bank to find a great wine for the occasion, either, and I’ve chosen bottles that deliver real bang for the buck to suit different dishes you might be cooking. Vina Leyda, ‘Garuma’ Sauvignon Blanc (£11.75, Great Western Wine) is a zippy and zesty white that gets its name from the single vineyard site where the grapes are grown in Chile’s cool coastal Leyda Valley, 50 miles west of Santiago. The region gets a cooling effect from the Humboldt current of the Pacific Ocean and is famed for its vibrant fresh wines. Garuma is a wonderfully aromatic expression of sauvignon with notes of chopped green chillies, fresh lime and underlying exotic passion fruit. It’s really vibrant, with zingy acidity and concentrated flavours of limes and grapefruit. This would be a hit with crab linguine, Thai fishcakes, leafy goat’s cheese salads, or creamy asparagus pasta and risotto. A great wine to cover heartier fare like creamy fish pie, roasted chicken, monkfish, butternut squash or mushroom dishes is J. Lohr, Riverstone Chardonnay (£16.95, GWW). It’s from Califonia’s Monterey County, a place of both warm sun and cooling fogs that help to create wines full of flavour but, importantly, balance. Supple, creamy yet zippy in the mouth with lovely honeydew melon and peach flavours – it’s also a great seasonal sipper enjoyed on its own. For the same dishes, red wine fans could gently chill down a lighter, dry fruity red such as Bertani, Bardolino ‘Le Nogare’ (£12.50, GWW) a bright, mouth-watering, cherry fruited and slightly herbal red from vineyards on the eastern shore of Italy’s Lake Garda. If you’re reaching for lamb shanks, chargrilled steak or even prime rib of beef, try the vibrantly fruity Rhoneinspired Ken Forrester, Renegade (£13.95, GWW). Made by one of the legends of South African wine, Renegade strikes a brilliant balance between the new and old world styles of Grenache, Syrah and Mourvedre blend wines. It’s super fruity, smooth and fresh with just a nip of tannin. Strawberry, cherry and raspberry fruits lead the way, alongside some peppery spice, a slightly smokey note and a touch of black olive – delicious. Speaking of local produce, check out Ramsbury Gin (£35, GWW). Made on the Ramsbury Estate near Marlborough, the gin’s base spirit is produced on-site from estate-grown wheat, before redistilling with botanicals including local quince. Heat for the still is generated by a biomass boiler fed by trees from the estate’s forest, the wastewater is filtered through a reed bed system creating a habitat for wildlife and the spent botanicals are dehydrated and used as a seasoning in their smokehouse. Weighty, savoury and slightly sweet in style, it’s best served with plenty of ice and a couple of thin apple or pear slices. n

The Delicious Guide to Bath featuring all the fave eateries and foodie treateries is available online at our website www.thebathmag.co.uk

Learn more about the world of wine with Tristan on a course at Great Western Wine; greatwesternwine.co.uk/events

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Food review April Griffin.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2019 14:46 Page 1

RESTAURANT | REVIEW

The Griffin Inn Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2AP. Tel: 01225 420919; thegriffinbath.co.uk

R E V I EW

Great monster munch

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he griffin is a mythological creature with the body, tail, and back legs of a lion; the head and wings of an eagle; and an eagle’s talons as its front feet. Griffins were known from classical antiquity for guarding treasure and priceless possessions – appropriate, I’d say, in the case of The Griffin Inn in Monmouth Street. First opened in 1730, the inn’s (almost) 300-year pedigree carries a Grade II listing. Bought in 2018 by the St Austell Brewery, Cornwall’s leading independent family owned brewery, The Griffin Inn was renovated last autumn and joined 178 other south-west pubs and breweries in the group, including the Inn at Freshford with its gastropub fare and local ales; the Cross Guns at Avoncliff, a country pub on the canal towpath; and the Old Crown in Kelston with its hearty pub cooking on the edge of the Cotswold countryside. All these are now operated by the Griffin Inn’s tenant Jack Werner. This is an upmarket, comfortable, atmospheric pub – classy and gently aspirational but still firmly down-to-earth – with reclaimed oak flooring, exposed stone walls, cosy seating, saffron glow paintwork and burnt umber leatherette upholstery. 62 TheBATHMagazine

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On a Friday evening it was buzzing, reverberating with relaxed post-work conversations and waves of warm laughter washing around the bar, enjoying the selection of 20 handpicked ales and ciders. In tune with The Griffin Inn’s sense of no-nonsense style, the menu offered wholesome flavours in simple dishes. This is a world away from pub grub, with choice dishes such as dressed crab on toast with lime mayonnaise, cured tofu and ceviche salad, Cornish mussels cooked in cider and leeks, Cape Malay spiced rice, portobello mushroom kievs and truffle fries. There were also a host of vegan and gluten-free options. Settled on a table at the back away from the bar and in a soft, subdued light, we had a pre-starter of chargrilled focaccia and rosemary butter served with plump green Nocarella olives. Carbohydrate before a meal is a dangerous gambit so I cut my foccacia piece into elegant slivers and then ate it all anyway. For starters I decided on Caprese salad: bull’s heart tomato and mozzarella with basil leaves – delightfully cool, tangy and freshly textured – and for Rob it was the soup of the day, leek and broccoli soup in a country-style asymmetric bowl served with toasted sourdough. For the main course, I had poached hake fillet, heirloom potatoes and sprouting broccoli with lemon butter sauce. The cubed heirloom potatoes were coyly buried underneath a gastronomic mountain of broccoli and fish, the potato a treasure trove of deliciousness uncovered by my investigative fork to blend with the clean fish

and the citrus sauce. Rob went for the butter poached rump steak, collard greens, bone marrow sauce and fries. Meat on a plate par excellence, a bold, stalwart dish if ever there was one, with two beef marrow bones forming a Stonehenge sculpture, protecting their steak and gravy contents with the slim crispy chips as a delicate accompaniment in their own container. Bone marrow, incidentally, the soft fatty substance inside a bone, while having always been appreciated for its flavour and nutritional content, has upgraded its gastronomic profile in recent years, for its high in fat properties (69 per cent unsaturated) and protein. Someone once told me that the classic steak dish is the one to assess in any restaurant as if they’ve got this right, they know what they are doing. It seems they do at The Griffin Inn. Flavours of bramble, black cherry and baked plums in glasses of Pas d’Histoire Rouge supported our meal and, following the fruit theme, dessert brought blackcurrant sorbet for me – an uplifting, tongue-tingling chilled but explosive finale of black berries. Rob, taking the more robust route once again, had chocolate, almond and prune tart with ice cream; the verdict was ‘divine’. We’ll be back for more of this Griffin’s treasure. n The Griffin inn is open Monday – Thursday 11.30am to late, Friday – Saturday 8am to late, and Sunday from 8am – 9pm Prices: starters from £6; mains from £15; desserts from £7 EC


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CITY | HISTORY

On the right track? As the idea of introducing a modern tram system in Bath is under discussion, Georgette McCready looks back at the decades when trams were the main form of transport for Bath

EARLY DAYS The earliest trams, operated by the Bath Tramways Company, were pulled by horses. Drivers wore smart uniforms and hats and the tickets were sold and checked by conductors, many of them little more than schoolboys. The headquarters were at the Porter Butt Hotel on London Road, with stables for the horses behind the hotel. The tracks were set into the roads and the first route – from what is now Bath Spa railway station, through the High Street, along Walcot Street to Grosvenor – was formally opened by the city mayor on Christmas Eve in 1880. Sadly, within four years the horse-drawn service failed to make a profit and the business changed hands twice, until in 1902 the company was taken over by the Bath Corporation, which put the laying of more tracks and the electrification of the network into the hands of the Bath Electric Tramways

The last day of service for Bath's Electric Trams on 6 May 1939

Company. So the golden age of Bath trams was launched. ELECTRIC TRAMS There was no doubt that the city needed a reliable public transport system. Many men and women worked in manufacturing and needed to commute from home to work.

In its prime the Bath Electric Tramways Company ran 14.78 miles of tram routes in and out of Bath

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here is much talk around a plan to install a modern tram system in Bath to alleviate air pollution and traffic problems. But before anyone can jump up and down about such a transport network being inappropriate for our historic city, let’s remind ourselves that for almost 40 years the city had a thriving tram system used daily by hundreds of people.

A regular electric tram service began in January 1904 when, on the first day, 22,800 people were transported around the city by 17 of the 20-strong rolling stock. Most of the trams were double deckers, but a fleet of six single deckers were bought to serve Oldfield Park, so they could pass under the low railway bridge at Westmorland Road. In its prime the Bath Electric Tramways company ran 14.78 miles of tram routes in

and out of Bath. Passengers could travel from as far out of town as Bathford to the east, travelling in to the Guildhall, or as far west from the city centre as The Globe pub at Newton St Loe. The development of hundreds of homes in Oldfield Park worked alongside the building of the tram system, allowing working people a convenient way to get about. The trams must have looked very smart, particularly when newly painted, in the livery of primrose yellow and medium blue, their numbers picked out fairground style in red and gold. THE TRAM EXPERIENCE Although a tram could take 33 passengers upstairs on its open-top deck and 22 downstairs, at peak times as many as 120 were crammed on board. Passengers would get on at the back of the tram, with the option of climbing the winding staircase to reach the top deck where they sat – or stood when the seats were wet – outside in all weathers on hard wooden seats, or they sat on seats on the bottom deck under the beady eye of the conductor. Each tram sported bold advertisements for products such as Borthwick’s Baking Powder, the Bath Coal Company, or Bovril. It was said that each tram had its own quirks and traits. No 20 was known as being slow, while No 23 was poor at pulling and was nicknamed Sleepy Lizzie. Tram drivers were known as

FIRST-GENERATION TRAMS

Image © Bath in Time

Horse-drawn tramways were introduced at the start of the 19th century. Germany saw the first electric tramways in 1881, after which existing horse-drawn tramways were converted to electric. The emergence of motorbuses and trolleybuses – running on rubber tyres without needing rails – saw tramways fall out of favour. The rising popularity of cars also had a detrimental effect. By the end of 1962 all but one tramway in Britain (Blackpool) had closed. Many systems remained open in Europe, and have been progressively modernised over time.

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CITY | HISTORY

Image © Bath in Time

The tramshed in Beehive Yard c.1935

THE DEMISE OF THE TRAM Given that the trams were widely used by the local population, why did the service come to an end in May 1939? Firstly, the company failed to invest in modernising or updating its stock, so passengers in the 1930s were still travelling in the same carriages built in the early 1900s. Secondly there was an increase in the number of buses on routes that the trams did not cover, including the steep hills of Widcombe and Lansdown, as well as bus routes further afield, to Corsham, Chippenham and Bradford on Avon. But the Bath tram system clearly held a special place in Bathonians’ hearts. For the

very last day of service souvenir tickets were issued for the final tram, which set off at midnight on 6 May 1939 with the Mayor of Bath, Captain Adrian Hopkins, at the helm. The tram was laden with passengers wildly waving and cheering and photographs from the occasion show a crowd of several hundred strong, who had turned out in the dark to witness this historic moment. The last tram did not go far, simply round to the Tramshed in Walcot Street. Very little remains today to remind us of Bath’s tram era. The overhead wires have been removed, the tramcars themselves were mostly taken up to the Glasshouse sidings opposite St Martin’s Hospital in Odd Down where they were dismantled for scrap and the tracks that zig-zagged the city streets were torn up. But you can still admire the redbrick building in Walcot Street known as the Tramshed and picture the trams parked neatly inside. To mark the 80th anniversary of the last of the Bath tram network the Museum of Bath at Work in Julian Road is planning a weekend of talks and an exhibition in June. Details are to be confirmed, but this will give us the chance to look at Bath transport in a new light and perhaps seriously consider the re-introduction of trams to our modern-day city. n

Each tram had its own quirks. No 20 was known as being slow, while No 23 was poor at pulling and was nicknamed Sleepy Lizzie

motormen and they and the conductors were given a strict code of conduct, enforced by tram inspectors. Woe betide the conductor who left torn ticket stubs on the floor of the carriage, or the motorman who turned up in brown boots instead of the regulation black and would be sent home in disgrace. There were a few accidents over the years, mostly when trams ran out of control, sometimes turning over. In 1918 a tram ran out of control by the Weston Hotel at Newbridge, careered down a slope, hit a wall and overturned, resulting in the death of Councillor Olinthus Newman who was thrown out of the vehicle and killed. But the worst accident happened in a heatwave in July 1933 when a tram slipped on tar as it climbed Wells Road. The brakes got covered in tar and failed and the tram slid backwards before colliding with another vehicle, causing the death of two passengers and injuring 37 more.

The tramway in Southgate Street, 1938

With thanks to The Bath Tramways by Colin G Magg, published by The Oakwood Press, second edition 1992, and Buses and Trams of Bath by Steve Chislett, published by Millstream Books, 1986. Both are available from the Bath & North East Somerset Council run central library at the Podium. THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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CITY | NEWS

CITYNEWS AWARDS TO LUCKNAM Lucknam Park Hotel & Spa has received two awards at the Prestigious Star Awards 2019: Best Meeting Venue and Silmiya Hendricks was highly commended for Best Marketing Manager. Silmiya commented: “We are delighted that Lucknam Park has received the award for Best Meeting Venue and I feel honoured to have been awarded highly commended. These awards are a great reflection of the hard work the team have put in.” lucknampark.co.uk

SLEEP OUT FOR GOOD

BUSINESS BRAIN AT BID

A team from Bath law firm Stone King has so far raised £871 in aid of Julian House after being sponsored to sleep rough for a night. Their efforts were part of the homelessness charity’s Big Bath Sleep-Out at Alice Park in Bath. Over 300 people recently bedded down in the park and braved the cold weather. The sleep-out has seen hundreds of people taking part over the 10 years it has been running. stoneking.co.uk

Mary Dy has joined the Bath Business Improvement District (BID) as Place Management and Data Coordinator. She will manage the data streams, helping the businesses of Bath to make the most of the springboard footfall camera information and leading on all other business information. Mary will be a brilliant resource for the BID and the city’s businesses. It is more important than ever to make sure that investment is well targeted and the BID’s data gives a solid foundation for making decisions. bathbid.co.uk

THREE STEPS UP

GWR UPGRADE

Savills Bath has announced three promotions within its local team. Carly Foster and Will Wright have been promoted to associate directors and Ellie Mackenzie has become an associate. Carly Foster is PA to the head of southern and Ireland residential. She has worked for Savills for five years and provides operations support across the two regions and for the residential sales team in Bath. Will Wright is an experienced valuer of residential investments, with specialist experience of operational and development portfolios in the purpose-built student accommodation sector. He advises a wide range of funders, developers, universities

The sizeTree ofteam the receiving high-speed fleet for the The Olive their award Great Western Railwy is doubling. A total of 93 new intercity express trains will replace existing services by the end of 2019. The first trains will be seen in the autumn, starting with routes to Bristol, South Wales and the Cotswolds. There will be 20% more seats, all ergonomically designed and with greater legroom. There will be air-conditioning in all areas and window blinds throughout. The new trains will also have more tables, a plug socket for everyone, and Wi-Fi throughout the train. There will also be LED information screens, inside and outside the train, giving details of the journey. gwr.com

Did You Know? Bath BID Welcome Ambassadors have helped over 2,500 people since the start of the programme

From left: Will Wright, Carly Foster and Ellie Mackenzie and institutional investors in the south west and Wales, and in university cities across the UK. Ellie Mackenzie is a sales negotiator in the residential development sales team. Ellie started working in property in the capital before moving to Bath and joining Savills in 2016. savills.co.uk

BATH BUSINESS BAROMETER UPDATE: FEBRUARY 2019

provided by

High Street Footfall (Month on month % change)

+5.1%

n For the most part, February 2019 experienced fair weather which may have contributed to the 5.1% increase in footfall from January. In terms of gross footfall count, 2019 was on par with 2018, with the highest percentage of footfall for February falling within half-term. Sales have also increased with footfall, week on week. Welcome Ambassadors have seen an increase in people asking about things to do in Bath, compared with before Christmas, when people tended to ask the whereabouts of certain shops. This month’s feature event, the Bath Comedy Festival, is underway until Sunday 14 April. Easter holidays are coming soon; the perfect time to explore what’s new in the city, including restaurant The Botanist, which has opened its doors in The Octagon.

Bath

South West UK

+4.0%

+6.7% Springboard Research Ltd.

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ocl A C C O U N TA N C Y

141 Englishcombe Lane, Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

Making Tax Digital for VAT (MTDfV) – ‘Soft Landing’

Knowing your boundaries

From the 1st April 2019 HMRC will require VAT registered businesses with a turnover above the VAT registration threshold of £85,000 to keep records in digital form and file returns using compatible computer software.

What records need to be digital? The records required are those needed to complete your VAT return.They will need to be kept within computer software that can record and preserve digital records, pass this information to HMRC, and receive information back from HMRC. If you are still using accounts ledgers and paper receipts, you will be required to have digital records and submit via compatible software. This does not have to be done on one program, it can be several that have digital links between them. Digital Links – What are they? A digital link is a transfer or exchange of data electronically between (or within) software programs. This means that any information in your bookkeeping or accountancy software must flow freely without any manual intervention into your VAT return (you will not be able to manually transpose data within your software, or between different pieces of software). The use of “Cut/Copy and Paste” in selecting and moving information is not a digital link. However, if the cells in a spreadsheet were linked via a formula, that would be acceptable (the information updates itself).

What is the ‘Soft Landing’? HMRC are allowing time to implement digital links in your business. This ‘soft landing’ period will be for the first year and takes effect from your first return period that starts after 1st April 2019. For example, if your return period starts in May 2019, the 1st return that would need to comply fully with MTD will be the return from May – July 2020.You will have a year to get your accounting software up to the standard required by HMRC. During the ‘soft landing’ period, HMRC will accept “Cut/Copy and Paste” as a digital link for these VAT periods. However, we believe it would be better to get your processes and software up to the required standard as soon as possible, to avoid any possible issues when the ‘soft landing’ period ends.

For tax saving tips contact us – call Marie Maggs, Tom Hulett or Mike Wilcox on 01225 445507 for a no-obligation meeting. See our website for more. BE READY FOR MAKING TAX DIGITAL

What our clients say:

““Best wishes and genuinely I cannot thank you enough for the support you have shown us. I recommend you guys to anyone I can so I really hope something comes of it as some way of a thank you.”

To put it simply, boundaries separate your land and property from that of your neighbours, determining who owns what. A boundary feature can be a fence, wall, hedge, ditch, piece of wire, or sometimes just the edge of a driveway. You can get an idea of where the boundaries are by looking at the property’s title plan (held by the Land Registry) but most title plans don’t show exact boundaries or all the details evident on the ground, such as paths or the slope of the ground. At the start When you buy a new property or area of land, a solicitor will ascertain where the boundaries are and what responsibilities, if any, are outlined in the deeds. Checking whether the ownership joins up to the public road or other land you own is vital. It is also important to find out at this stage whether any boundaries have been moved or if there is, or has ever been, any sort of boundary dispute. If a discrepancy arises between where the paperwork says the boundaries are, and where the boundaries appear to be, a solicitor can investigate this. Sometimes agreements occur over the years that haven’t been documented but are well-established – for example, a property or land owner might have been looking after a plot of land adjoining their property that no one else wanted and moved a fence to incorporate the land into theirs. In a case such as this, it’s vital to take steps to have this change recognised in law or take out insurance to protect against the risk of the land being taken away at a future point by the true owner. Changing boundaries So, what happens when there is a dispute over a boundary line or if you want to change an existing boundary? Most issues can be resolved by talking the matter through with your neighbour, either directly or with the help and advice of a solicitor, and getting the agreed change recorded at the Land Registry. If a dispute continues, it is ultimately a Court that makes decisions so it is recommended that you seek expert legal support. www.mogersdrewett.com Frank Collins, Partner at Mogers Drewett

Call Marie Maggs, Tom Hulett or Mike Wilcox on 01225 445507 to arrange a no-obligation meeting

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CITY | NEWS

CITYNEWS ARTS AT ABBEY HOTEL

Five months after the launch of exclusive brasserie Koffmann & Mr. White’s, the Abbey Hotel has unveiled a range of newly renovated bedrooms. The rooms have been given a stylish makeover to cover three creative themes: film, art and photography. From modern lighting to framed artwork and vibrant colour schemes, the concept for each bedroom is based on the city’s connections to art and culture over the years. Each premium room has a modern en-suite bathroom with a geometric black and white design, superior lighting and luxury shower facilities. The style has been replicated in the hotel’s ArtBar, which has also had a makeover. The Abbey Hotel was bought by KE Hotels in February 2018. abbeyhotelbath.co.uk

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NEW GEORGIAN-STYLE HOMES

NEW PARTNER

Acorn Property Group and Galliard Homes have been transforming Hope House, a Grade-II listed Georgian mansion in six acres of private parkland. It was originally the home of Charles Hamilton, son of the 6th Earl of Abercon, and later part of Bath High School where Mary Berry CBE learnt to cook. The new residential address provides 54 refurbished and newly built Georgian style homes in landscaped grounds, complete with concierge, a tennis court and underground parking. Honey-coloured Bath stone, sash windows, quality paving and handcrafted metalwork have been incorporated into the new-build elements of the scheme to complement the listed mansion. All the homes have been designed to an impressive specification including fully fitted designer kitchens by Leicht, with integrated Miele and Neff appliances and granite worktops. acornpropertygroup.org/development/hopehouse-bath

Mogers Drewett has expanded its commercial property team and welcomes Richard Pike as a new partner. Richard has extensive experience in commercial property law, with a focus on development, option and overage agreements. He also specialises in acting for landowners and mineral and aggregates operating companies on the management and extraction of mineral deposits. Richard has worked in private practice in London for law firms Addleshaw Goddard and Shepherd and Wedderburn, and in-house for the London Development Agency, where he advised on projects such as the land assembly for the 2012 Olympic Park and the Emirates Air Line cross-Thames cable car. Most recently, Richard has practiced in Bath with the national firm Thrings. mogersdrewett.com


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EDUCATION

EDUCATION NEWS EASTER COURSES AND REVISION

MUSICAL STARS AT SCHOOL

The Paragon School is hosting various holiday clubs this Easter. Camp Teepee from 16–18 April brings day camps to the school grounds, with activities including fire lighting, raft building, stick carving and shelter building. There’s also a singing workshop on 9 April suitable for years 3–6 where participants can learn to sing and perform songs from The Greatest Showman. For those with a creative bent in years 3–6, there’s a printmaking workshop on 8 April and a workshop to improve drawing skills on 9 April. Courses are £35 per day. Monkton Combe School is also holding courses on 15–19 April to help students who are revising. The courses offer expert advice from teachers, offering individual guidance and support to each student through the revision of demanding topics and difficult subject material. Booking: paragonschool.co.uk/holiday-club; monktoncombeschool.com

A talented group of parents, past and present, took to the stage in the school hall of St Stephen’s Church Primary School, Lansdown in March to perform in a fundraising concert. Organised by local music teacher Jeni Reid to raise money for a school piano, the event was sponsored by The Piano Shop, Bath. The night raised almost £2,000, match funded by Jon Kelly from The Piano Shop. The all-star line-up included distinguished musicians from the world of rock, jazz, bluegrass and classical music, including Justin Adams and Leon Hunt. Music included Beethoven’s Spring Sonata for violin and piano and songs from Phantom of the Opera. st-stephens.bathnes.sch.uk; thepianoshopbath.co.uk

KES ARTISTS GO NATIONAL

The work of Year 5 artists at King Edward’s Junior School will be exhibited at the National Gallery, London, later this year, as part of the Take One Picture initiative, the National Gallery’s flagship scheme for primary schools. Each year the scheme focuses on one painting from the gallery’s collection to inspire cross-curricular work in classrooms – this year it was an 18thcentury painting, An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump, by Joseph Wright of Derby. Pupils were interested to learn that Wright spent two years in Bath, where he lived just outside the Royal Crescent and made a living as a portrait painter. In response the children created a series of batiks, relief prints, selfportraits, ceramic birds and acrylic paintings. The gallery will be exhibiting the relief prints of Brock Street in Bath, created by Year 5 children after they decided to focus on Joseph’s time spent living there. The children photographed every house on the north side of the street, and then created relief prints of each building using reduction printing. kesbath.com 70 TheBATHMagazine

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NFL SAINTS SUPERSTAR

Year 7 and Year 8 students at St Gregory’s Catholic College in Bath were treated to a whistle-stop visit from NFL Saints player and former student, Alex Jenkins, as he

touched down in the UK for a season break to visit friends and family. Alex was a pupil at St Gregory’s in Odd Down, before heading to the United States for a scholarship and career in professional American Football for the New Orleans Saints. Alex presented the school with a special signed copy of his American Football shirt and gave a presentation to students on his career followed by a busy Q&A session, answering questions and talking honestly about the challenges and highlights along the way. Alex told them, “I was just a little kid from Odd Down who made it big so if I can do it, any of you can do it!” st-gregorys.org.uk

DRAMA MASTERCLASS

ON THE RUGBY FIELD

Four pioneering Year 12 IB Physics students at The Royal High School were awarded 2nd prize in the 17–18 year old age category in The National Engineering Competition, which invites girls to solve the major challenges of the 21st century. Entrants had to design solutions from scratch or research current engineering work. Genevieve, Honor, Charli and Clara investigated how to reduce the amount of black plastic in landfill. royalhighbath.gdst.net

Millfield Upper Sixth pupil Josh Gillespie has signed a professional contract to join Northampton Saints rugby club in July. The 18-year-old also became the youngest player to represent the club last November after being called up for the team’s Premiership Rugby Cup game against Wasps. Josh, who has played for the Northampton Saint’s Academy since the summer of 2017, is studying for three A levels in economics, chemistry and psychology while training with the premiership team. millfieldschool.com


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A.L.F.A. LANGUAGE SCHOOL FRANCE

HOST FAMILIES REQUIRED Would you like to host French students? Ages 11-17 Saturday 13th July – Friday 2nd August One Student – £545 Two Students in Room Share – £1030 Two Students in 2 Rooms – £1090 For further information please contact Mrs Susie Houston on 0777 379 2866 or email: susie.houston.alfa@gmail.com

Sarah Wringer KIE Bath, 5 Trim Street, Bath, BA1 1HB Direct Line (01225) 473502 Email: sarah.wringer@kaplan.com

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EDUCATION | AUTISM

A picture of autism

How can autistic people develop the skills to manage the different way they interact with the world? Simon Horsford talks to Mark Brosnan, a professor at the University of Bath’s department of psychology and a director of its Centre for Applied Autism Research

M

ark Brosnan is making a difference to people’s lives. A professor at the University of Bath’s department of psychology and director of its Centre for Applied Autism Research, he and his team are passionate about making life easier and more manageable for autistic people. In recent years increasing research has raised the awareness of autism and shown it to be a growing global issue. At the last estimate in the UK (more than 10 years

ago), it was recognised that around one per cent of the population have been diagnosed with autism, so that’s upwards of 700,000 people. A more recent study in the United States put the figure there at around 1 in 59, which if translated to the UK would be around 1.2 million. A statistic many might find surprising. I am talking to Brosnan ahead of World Autism Awareness Day on 2 April (and World Autism Week, 1–7 April), which aim to put the spotlight on the hurdles that people with autism face every day.

Mark Brosnan

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Brosnan explains “Autism is a life-long condition, so there is never a cure, but there are ways of managing it. It’s also now part of the neuro-diversity movement, which is trying to accept difference in terms of equality. Many members of the autistic community don’t see themselves as having a deficit, but, rather, having a difference in their social processing from ‘neuro-typical people’ as they call us.” He says that many also prefer the term ‘autistic people’ rather than ‘people with autism’. I ask Brosnan how he defines autism. “If you take the deficit model, it is about difficulties with social interaction, everyday chit-chat, making eye contact, knowing what to say, feeling awkward in social situations and understanding what the intentions of other people are. Autistic people do, though, have a problem being seen as having a deficit, rather than a difference. Coming from psychology, we have a diagnostic criteria, so we ask ‘what do you need help with?’. But, formally, it is characterised as having difficulties with social interaction combined with repetitive behaviour and a preference for routine, or focused interests.” A recent independent review also accepted that autism is “not a mental health condition.” Last year a study at the University of Cambridge posited the ‘male brain theory’ about autism, in other words, autistic people will, on average, show a shift towards ‘masculinised’ scores on measures of empathy and systemising. So they will be below average on empathy tests, but at least average, or even above average, on organisational skills. Brosnan, however, adds the rider with this particular study that women are often under-diagnosed as they are more adept at camouflaging their condition. The sobering fact, however, is that Brosnan says “About half of the people with a learning disability manage to get employment, whereas with those autistic people who are willing and able to get work only 16 per cent do so.” A far lower proportion than any other disability group. He continues, “People with autism can have a wonderful skill set and a wide range of abilities; they score highly in a classic intelligence test, but there is that hurdle of the interview and the application form.


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EDUCATION | AUTISM

Mark Brosnan with the Countess of Wessex

“So if we can start to think about having to overcome those hurdles, we can make adjustments to enable them to work within an organisation. To this end Brosnan – who also lectures students on final year psychology – and his colleagues run two out-of-term spring and summer schools, the former aimed at people with autism who are about to leave university and seek employment, and the latter at those about to start university. It’s all about making a level playing field for potential students and employees.

You see people arriving thinking no-one is going to want them and when they leave you see the optimism and a belief that they have so much to offer

that other banks have also approached the university to get involved in the employment school. The summer version has about 30 people on the autism spectrum for whom going to university can be an anxious and particularly stressful time. Brosnan says: “They come here for three days so they can get the whole experience of living in halls, attending lectures and doing some sport type stuff.” Both schools give Brosnan that wow moment: “You see people arriving thinking no-one is going to want them and when they leave you see the optimism and a belief that they have so much to offer.” Brosnan has been at the university for 16 years and helped set up the Centre for Applied Autism Research three years ago. A particular focus is developing digital technology to support children on the autism spectrum; he has long been fascinated by how people interact with technology and some years ago wrote a book on technophobia. “We are keen to incorporate the autistic community in the design of digital technologies, such as Maths Island Tutor, and they’ve come up wth some fantastic ideas which we would not have thought of. It’s all about involving them and asking

what they want to happen if they get an answer right.. or wrong. “There are a range of apps being developed and there is also something called Social Stories, which began in the US and is typically used to address challenging behaviour and essentially explains what is going to happen step-by-step so a child fully understands and isn’t unnerved by new experiences.” The university has also run a four-week Smart ASD online course, which explores how new apps can best support autistic children, with or without learning difficulties. It is designed to equip carers and practitioners with skills and new ideas. They are planning to run the course during World Autism Week. Elsewhere in the centre they are working on the criminal justice system and how autistic people can best be interviewed (whether they are the accused or a witness); one survey suggested 69 per cent of autistic people were unhappy with how they had been treated by police officers. The centre is also looking at how those suffering with depression and anxiety can be helped psychologically, and it is also studying which parts of the brain are implicated in autism. Away from work, Brosnan is a campanologist (bellringer) at St Mary’s Church, Bathwick. “I’ve only been doing it a couple of years and I am a total beginner. On one level it’s quite simplistic, but it’s actually quite complicated and takes years to master. It’s almost meditative and you have to rhythmically adjust what you’re doing to match everyone else. It’s a real challenge and quintessentially English.” One other trait that features with those on the autistic spectrum is honesty. It’s appropriate then that Brosnan, ever the psychologist, once said that if he possessed one superpower, it would be Wonder Woman’s lasso of truth: “Think how different the world would be if people could only tell the truth,” he says. Through his research the pioneering Brosnan is certainly giving a truer picture of autism and helping those on the spectrum cope with the realities of everyday life. n • bath.ac.uk/research/centres/appliedautism-research • autism.org.uk

The spring school is backed by JP Morgan, who have been proactive in helping tackle the issue. Students spend a day at the university learning interview skills and how to write a CV and another day with JP Morgan. Interviews by Skype or extended email conversation can also help build up an understanding before any face-to-face meeting. The positive news is

Interview skills and the opportunity to attend a lecture are two of the things offered at the spring and summer schools to introduce autistic people to the student experience THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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FAMILY | EVENTS

Family diary IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO WITH THE CHILDREN THIS MONTH MINI RANGERS Tuesdays and Fridays, 11am n Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park, Pixash Lane, Bath Road, Keynsham Blow away the cobwebs and get back to nature as you join one of the animal keepers on their daily rounds with the friendly farm animals, reptiles and small furries. Dress for the outdoors and enjoy a cup of squash and a biscuit afterwards. Free. Term time only; avonvalley.co.uk

Get creative at The Edge this month

MAKE AND PLAY Thursday 4 April, 10–11.30am n Wiltshire Scrapstore, Lacock Enter an imaginative world and create whatever comes to mind. Different materials will be provided to ensure creativity, exploration and messy play. Enjoy a free goodie bag of scrap to take home. Suitable for ages under five. All children must be accompanied by an adult. Tickets £6; wiltshirescrapstore.co.uk FRIDAY FUN NIGHT Friday 5 April, 10am–8pm n Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park, Pixash Lane, Bath Road, Keynsham Have a late-night play in the barn and the outdoor adventure area and enjoy a BBQ or pizza indoors. Last entry to the park is at 7pm. Free for active annual pass holders. Standard admission prices; avonvalley.co.uk BOWOOD’S BIG SPRING ADVENTURE Saturday 6–22 April n Bowood House & Gardens The Bowood Easter Bunny is back with his friends and has left clues around the Estate for you to find. Work out the word that he has hidden and you’ll be rewarded with a chocolate treat. Then, from 13 – 22 April, enjoy the new big Easter egg trail. Crack the secret code to unlock the Easter basket; bowood.org THE BIG BAD FOX & OTHER TALES Tuesday 9 April, 2pm n The Pound, Pound Pill, Corsham, Wiltshire, SN13 9HX Told through beautiful hand-drawn animation, The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales unfolds around loveable countryside creatures as they try (and fail), to fulfil their traditional roles in the farm and the forest. £7.50, £6 under 16s; poundarts.org.uk EASTER FAMILY TAKEOVER DROP-IN Saturday 13 April, 11am–2pm n The Edge, University of Bath

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Take part in a this fun, free and informal creative activities exploring Emma Hart’s exhibition Banger. Whether you stay for ten minutes or an hour, get stuck in drawing and making in the Resource Room with artist educator Victoria Willmott. Suitable for ages four to 12; edgearts.org JUNIOR ASTRONOMERS’ WORKSHOP Saturday 13 April, 1–4pm n BRLSI Calling all junior astronomers, enjoy a workshop filled with investigations of the history of the universe and discover how humankind uses technology to discover the secret of outer space. Suitable for ages eight – 12 years. £10; brlsi.org EASTER HOLIDAY ART CAMP Monday 15–18 April, 9am–4pm n The Holburne Museum Spend Easter having days packed full of fun and take part in creative activities inspired by the museum’s collection and exhibitions. £40 per day. Suitable for ages five to 11 years; holburne.org POTTY ABOUT POTS Monday 15 April, 10am–12.30pm and 1.30–4pm n The Roman Baths Use wax crayons to create some amazing pot designs inspired by the Roman pots collection. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Included in admission price; romanbaths.co.uk

SHINE A LIGHT ON SCIENCE Tuesday 16 April, 10am–1pm n BRLSI Explore the science of rainbows, infrared, spectroscopes and more in this family workshop. Enjoy science experiments, a family trail and virtual reality with plenty of fun to be had on the topic of light and colour. Tickets £8. Children must be supervised; brlsi.org BUTTONED UP Tuesday 16 April, 10.30am–12.30pm and 1.30–3.30pm n Fashion Museum Look at how buttons were used on different outfits throughout the centuries and create a button brooch. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Suitable for all the family. Free with normal museum entry; fashionmuseum.co.uk PLINK & BOO: CAN’T SIT STILL Wednesday 17 April, 11am, 1.30 & 3.30pm n The Pound, Pound Pill, Corsham, Wiltshire, SN13 9HX Welcome to the topsy-turvy world of Plink and Boo. Combining acrobatics, live music and lots of toys, enjoy an interactive circus theatre experience that playfull explores why sometimes people can’t fit into boxes. This show is accessible to d/Deaf and EAL audiences. £7; poundarts.org.uk BATH WORLD HERITAGE DAY Thursday 18 April, 11am–3pm


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FAMILY | EVENTS

Go potty about pots at The Roman Baths

Go on a big spring adventure at Bowood House & Gardens n Green Park Station Explore the city’s exceptional architecture and engineering achievements and developments – past, present and future. There will be themed talks, guided walks along Bath riverside, hands-on activities, such as stone carving, displays, and a chance to meet costumed characters from Bath’s past – including 18th-century architect John Wood; bathworldheritage.org.uk

MEN BEHAVING DADLY Saturday 20 April, 9–10.30am n St Swithin’s Church, The Paragon Head to the crypt, meet other dads and have

some quality time with your little one. There are toys, games, toast for the kids and coffee and bacon butties for the dads. £3 per dad. Pre-school children only; stswithinswalcot.org.uk THE SUN, THE MOON AND THE COFFEE POT Tuesday 23 and 24 April, 10am & 11.15am n The egg Enjoy an original tale about balance and meet the mischievous sun that wants to play. Hoping to stop the night time, the sun wants everyone to stay up and play all day long. Lap seats are available for ages up to six

month for £1. Suitable for ages six months – four years. £4; theatreroyal.org.uk SUNDAY FOLK Sunday 28 April, 2–4pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, BA15 1DZ Calling young musicians keen to develop their musical ear within a supportive and friendly environment. Spend a Sunday afternoon learning new folk tunes and developing your ensemble skills, under the expert guidance of experienced music teachers from the Bath Youth Folk Band. Suitable for ages seven to 14; wiltshiremusic.org.uk n

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Germany travel Bath Steve.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2019 16:42 Page 1

Brandenburg Gate, Berlin

Touring Teutonia

Whether the agenda demands a visit to a fancy schloss or gallery; cocktails and beach-bar hopping; gorgeous walks or delectable architecture, art and design, Germany has much to offer, says Simon Horsford

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ermany isn’t on everyone’s radar when it comes to a holiday. But it should be. And more and more British travellers are heading there – in 2017, the number of overnight stays was up to 5.6 million, with 6.9 million predicted by 2030. Bristol Airport has regular flights to Berlin and Cologne – there were, in fact, six destinations before the demise of Flybmi earlier this year and hopefully they will be replaced. So why should we go? For one, the sheer variety and choice of holidays, from hiking to culture (the Association of British Travel Agents has called it a “cultural powerhouse”) and mountains to beaches. Then there’s its powerful and very recent history. There are cool or rustic bars aplenty (the country offers more than 5,000 different beers) and luxurious spas. The food scene is strong too (a world away from sausages, although they do have 1,200 varieties, and sauerkraut). So for 2019, here are five ideas to get your Teutonic tour underway.

Designs for living: Bauhaus centenary Literally meaning ‘building house’, the hugely influential Bauhaus school with its union of functional design, minimalist style and geometric simplicity emerged 100 years ago but only lasted 14 years – when it was stamped out by the Nazis in 1933. 76 TheBATHMagazine

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Yet its revolutionary ideals and elegant designs have been seen in everything from housing estates and factories and even a coal mine to art and typography and ultimately Bauhaus sparked the Modernist movement. It’s taken a while for Germany to properly reembrace the role of Bauhaus, but this year two museums devoted to the revolutionary art school will open. The cradle of Bauhaus can be found in Weimar and Dessau and, in the former, the new Bauhaus Museum Weimar opens its doors on 6 April. Designed by Heike Hanada, it will trace the early phase of the movement with a display of more than a 1,000 related works, from Marianne Brandt’s teapot to chairs by Marcel Brauer, furniture by Mies van der Rohé and paintings by Paul Klee. Enjoy part of a collection started by Bauhaus founder and architect Walter Gropius. The only remaining Bauhaus building in Weimar, the Haus am Horn designed by Georg Muche, will also open to the public on 18 May; it was built for the first Bauhaus exhibition of 1923. In Dessau, a striking steel and glass building will form the Bauhaus Museum in a city park, opening on 8 September. With temporary exhibitions and many objects from the Bauhaus collection, it’ll add another layer to the movement’s memory.

The royal connection: Victoria and Albert 2019 marks the 200th anniversary of the

births of Queen Victoria (24 May) and Prince Albert (26 August). Several exhibitions will mark the event and emphasise the British crown’s strong German links – Queen Victoria was the daughter of Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, while Albert, a cousin, was the Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. It was only in 1917 that King George V changed the royal family’s name from Saxe-Coburg and Gotha to Windsor. So if you hanker after a royal angle, visit some of the castles associated with Victoria and Albert. This is a country, after all, that is said to have more than 25,000 castles – the Germans certainly love a fancy schloss. Friedenstein Castle in Gotha (stiftungfriedenstein.de) was where Queen Victoria declared “I feel so at home here” after dancing with Prince Albert during a stay in 1845. The vast Baroque castle and its Ducal Museum will feature two relevant exhibitions this year. ‘Marriage as a Success Model: German-English Marriages’ (5 May – 30 November) focuses on the marriage policy of the Ernestine dynasty, in particular Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, and Princess Augusta, who married Friedrich Ludwig of Hanover, later Prince of Wales, and became the mother of King George III. A further exhibition, ‘Gotha and the English Crown’ (4 August – 27 October) will display portraits of this dynastic relationship. The Ekhof Festival also takes place here at the


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TRAVEL | EUROPEAN

Bauhaus-style building in Weimar

Ekhof Theatre, the oldest Baroque theatre in the world (28 June – 4 August). Worth visiting too is Schloss Rosenau in Coburg (schloesser-coburg.de/deutsch/rosenau), the birthplace of Prince Albert which is set in an English-style landscaped park. Victoria and Albert also spent time at the hilltop Wartburg Castle in Eisenach (wartburg.de), a UNESCO World Heritage Site and said to be “the most German of all German castles.”

Back to the wall

Images: AdobeStock.com

It’s 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, a seismic event that will be commemorated on 9 November. The once-divided city of Berlin together with former East German cities such as Dresden and Leipzig have various events marking the peaceful revolution that swept away the Deutsche Demokratische Republik. It’s Leipzig, though, that it’s worth making a beeline for. It was here, after all, where the second city of Saxony kickstarted the revolution a month early – on 9 October – with several weeks of Monday-night demonstrations. At its peak, 70,000 people turned out on the streets demanding greater freedom and democracy and chanting “we are the people” and “no violence.” This year (on 9 October) the city will again stage a Festival of Lights in Augustusplatz with performances by a variety of international artists. Throughout the event visitors and locals will be encouraged to form an illuminated ‘89’ with thousands of candles. For a reminder of what life was like in the former East Germany, head to Runde Ecke (runde-ecke-leipzig.de), a former base of the Stasi secret police and now a fascinating museum devoted to its nefarious workings, its methods and how it controlled day-today life. As a member of the citizens committee that set up the museum says; “It

gives an insight into what happens when democracy and freedom are missing.” Check out, too, the Museum Zeitgeschichtiches Forum Leipzig (hdg.de) which presents a history of Germany since 1945 under the title of ‘our history, dictatorship and democracy’.

Hiking highs Germans certainly love their hiking – and there is a National Hiking Day (14 May) which combines with Healthy Hiking Weekend. Ten new trails (Bavaria and Baden-Wurttemberg) have been announced this year and in all there are some 124,000 miles of trails throughout the country, leading through national parks and eyecatching towns and villages. Test your walking boots and stamina on The Painters’ Way in Saxon Switzerland, which runs for some 70 miles (you can do bits of it) and begins in Pirna. Running through the Elbe sandstone mountains, it’s a tough trail (there are iron ladders at one point) but highlights include the Lichtenhain waterfall, Königstein fortress and the spa town of Bad Schandau. The hike is so-named because it attracted 19th-century Romantic painters, such as Casper David Friedrich. The Danube Peaks Trail has the advantage that its 35 miles can be explored in four daily stages (bear in mind you are climbing more than 3,200 metres). On the edge of the Swabian Jura, it’s considered a good practice for the Alps.

Berlin: summer in the city This most cosmopolitan of cities is wonderful in summer, with everything from beer gardens and lakes to pop-up beach bars on the river Spree. Known for its nightlife, it comes into its own from May to September. The mother of all beach bars is the Strandbar Mitte – across from Museum Island – and here you will find an Italian theme and even palm trees. If you want to

mix with local elite then make for Ku’damm Beach in the Grunewald district where you can sip Champagne on white sun loungers set on floating wooden walkways over Halensee Lake. For something rather different go to Deck5 – Skybar (Schönhauser Allee 80), which offers views over the Berlin skyline as you dip your feet in sand. Want to watch an open-air movie? There are several sites, but one of the most fun is Autokino (Kurt Schumacher Damm), a drive-in where the sound comes via your car radio. They do cool snacks and cocktails too. Love ice cream? Then Aldemir Eis (Falckensteinstrasse 7) is the place to go, where the owner sees ice cream like fashion with different varieties for every year. Berlin’s lakes, too, are a must-see – why not take a dip in one such as Schlachtensee in the middle of a forest in the south-west of Berlin? Or take a stroll around the boardwalk. And you can’t possibly miss out on a beer garden. A popular one with locals is Prater Biergarten (Kastanienallee 7-9), which has been around since 1837 and serves excellent local dishes and copious amounts of great beer. ■ • germany.travel

Nightlife at The Strandbar Mitte, on the banks of the river Spree, Berlin

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

HEALTH & BEAUTY NEWS The latest superfood squad on the beauty block, an injectable alternative, an all-vegan range aimed at the younger generation and new premises – Crystal Rose discusses the latest goings on

SUPERFOOD SKINCARE SQUAD Already packing a powerful punch, the superfood family from Elemis has grown. Four new vegan-friendly nutrient-dense goodies have been recently introduced, rich in supergreens, supergrains and superfruits. Combined with an active pre-biotic, the squad protects and maintains the skin’s delicate microbiome (the army of microbes that protect us against germs) while giving it the nourishment it needs. There’s a four-in-one treatment mist enriched with coconut water, a gentle scrub jam-packed with fruit extracts, an omega-rich purifying mask and a nourishing treatment mask containing avocado, passionfruit and wheatgrass extract. • Kefir-tea mist, £26; Vital Veggie mask, £30; blackcurrant jelly exfoliant, £28; Berry Boost mask, £30. Elemis products and treatments are available at Macdonald Bath Spa, Sydney Road, Bath BA2 6NS; elemis.com

MY CLARINS Skincare saviour Clarins has just launched a range specifically targeted at those between 18 and 25. With a focus on keeping nasties out, My Clarins’ products include anti-pollution ingredients – perfect for the city-residing student. Suitable for acne-prone skin and uneven skin complexions, the range features a rebooting hydrating moisturiser and an imperfection targeting cream. Featuring eco-friendly bottles and ticking all the boxes, the range is plantbased and suitable for vegans. Frontlinestyle is offering a complimentary facial with skin consultation when two or more My Clarins products are purchased. Available until Tuesday 30 April. • My Clarins ranges from £15 – £22 from Frontlinestyle; frontlinestyle.co.uk

FACIAL RESURFACING

COSMETIC ACUPUNCTURE

Packed with a combination of results-driven alpha hydroxy acids and cell-penetrating peptides, these treatment pads will help to plump up fine lines and wrinkles while minimising pores and reducing breakouts. After a gentle exfoliation, skin will look and feel lighter and brighter. Plus, the pads are biodegradable and made of cotton.

New to Enhance Medispa, the cosmetic acupuncture is a fantastic alternative to those not wanting to go down the injectables route. The procedure is becoming an increasingly popular holistic, noninvasive and non-surgical way of combating signs of ageing. Helping to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and promote a more youthful appearance, cosmetic acupuncture is also known to help with acne, acne scarring, dull or dry complexions and uneven/pigmented skin. Available at Enhance Medispa with Jessica Craven-Francis, a qualified physiotherapist, HCPC and CSP registered and with experience working within the NHS and private sector.

• Multi-acid resurfacing facial pads, £30, Elemental Herbology; elementalherbology.com Available at the Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa

CJ BEAUTY HAS MOVED Previous head therapist from Green Street House, Michelle Taylor has moved premises and is now back in Green Street. Situated above Heaven Hair, CJ Beauty offers a wide range of treatments from massages and manicures to waxing and microdermabrasion. Plus, new customers get 15% off their first treatment. • CJ Beauty, 10–11 Green Street, Bath BA1 2JZ; cjbeauty.uk

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• Cosmetic Acupuncture available every Monday 9am–2pm with Jessica Craven-Francis. Enhance Medispa; enhancemedispa.co.uk


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FITNESS & WELLBEING

FITNESS & WELLBEING NEWS

An exclusive, new after-hours package; yoga retreats; and understanding your shoulder pain – Crystal Rose shares the latest in the sector

AFTER HOURS

HOLLY JOINS KALIYOGA

Enjoy exclusive evening access to the Thermae Bath Spa and hang out in the natural thermal waters in the open-air rooftop pool while sipping a glass of bubbles and taking in the sights of the city by night. An exclusive new package accommodates up to 60 guests from 9.30–11.30pm, with access to the indoor Minerva Bath and the multi-sensory Wellness Suite. There are opportunities to arrange bespoke elements such as live music in the Minerva Bath and canapés in the The Springs Café Restaurant.

Bath-based yoga expert, Holly Warren, has been welcomed on board Europe’s best yoga retreat and natural health holiday Kaliyoga. Watch out for their daylong events in the UK this year, including an appearance at Balance Festival in London next month, where the team will be spreading its Kali-magic.

• Thermae Bath Spa; thermaebathspa.com

• Kaliyoga Retreat; kaliyoga.com

SHOULDER TALK If you’re suffering from shoulder pain, Circle Health Bath is on hand to help. Find out more about the causes of this pain, diagnosis and treatment and the future of the shoulder from surgery consultant orthopaedic surgeon Mr Gavin Jennings. Non-surgical treatment will

Looking good

also be discussed by senior physiotherapist Darren James. The even it free, but places are limited so be sure to book ahead. • Shoulder pain talk Tuesday 30 April, 7–8.30pm; Circle Health Bath; circlehealth.co.uk

R E V I EW

Non-invasive, non-aggressive and with no down-time necessary, Crystal Rose heads to The Body Clinic at The Orangery and finds out more about the Ultimate Body Package

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ombine three body toning and smoothing treatments and nutritional advice. The result: a happier, healthier and ultimately rejuvenated body. Health and fitness practitioner Victoria Rawlinson, from The Body Clinic at The Orangery, seeks to help people lose body fat and change their body in a non-invasive and natural way. The bespoke package is designed to suit your personal requirements. Treatments include Cavislim, also known as ultrasonic liposuction, which helps to reduce body fat and cellulite. This cavitation technology uses ultrasound waves to break down fat cells and release the liquid fat, which then passes naturally from the body. Radio Frequency goes hand-in-hand with Cavislim and gently heats the skin to stimulate collagen and tighten and tone the skin. Next comes Ultratone, the professional multi-body version of Slendertone. This highly adaptable treatment uses electronic stimulation of the muscles to reshape and recontour, creating a tightened, toned and more youthful physique. The Ultratone treatment is surprisingly relaxing, yet stimulates muscles at up to 900x a minute. 80 TheBATHMagazine

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Victoria recommends this as an ideal way of getting your body in shape after having a break from exercise.. The final treatment available in the Ultimate Body Package is the LPG Endermologie, a non-surgical procedure and the first cellulite treatment to be FDAapproved. Great for breaking down fat, rejuvenating skin, eliminating toxins and water retention, the lymphatic drainage can be used as an all over body treatment or for targeting problem areas. Slip into the white suit, imagine an allover-body pair of tights, and then lay down on the couch. Victoria begins the Endermologie treatment on the legs and glutes. Instantly feeling the aspiration (suction) that starts the stimulation of the fibroblasts (the cells that produce elastin, collagen and hylaronic acid in the body), the rollers set out to minimise volume and firm the skin. The sensation is that of a deep massage. It’s quite satisfying to feel the machine working with force but no pain. Southern manager and specialist for LPG, Emma describes the treatment as stimulating skin cells, aiding in weight loss and decreasing volume in a natural way. She also

reveals that Endermologie has been reported as being used by famous faces such as Jennifer Lopez, Beyonce and Matthew McConaughey. Combining nutritional information and a tailored treatment plan, the Ultimate Body Package is focused on understanding what’s right for you and your body. Six or twelve sessions are recommended for best results. For those looking to achieve skin and body toning, rejuvenation, firming and sculpting in a non-invasive and natural way, these are the treatments for you. n Book your free consultation to discuss your requirements. Treatments can be taken as a package or individually. Prices start at £50 per treatment. Available at The Body Clinic at The Orangery Clinic; theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk


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WE SPECIALISE IN THE FOLLOWING AESTHETIC & BEAUTY TREATMENTS Established for over 25 years we are the experts in skin health, aesthetics and advanced beauty treatments in Bath.

The WOW facial The WOW facial is a skin transformational treatment with no down time designed for that ultimate WOW effect. A 6 step process using powerful medical ingredients and techniques to achieve skin luminosity, health and rejuvenation for up to 3 months post treatment. The WOW facial has been through a heavy process of research and development in order to achieve the biggest WOW Factor for skin types.

Hydra Peel Infusion Hydra Peel Infusion is a treatment that combines exfoliation, hydration, chemical peeling and non-needle mesotherapy to infuse different vitamins into the skin. Treatments have no down time and are suitable for all skin types. It can be used to target fine lines, wrinkles, dry skin, scarring, rosacea, sun damage and pigmentation as well as problematic skins.

36 Gay Street, Bath • Tel: 01225 466851 www.theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

Plane sailing

In need of some skin rejuvenation, Crystal Rose heads to Enhance Medispa for a dermaplane and LED light therapy session

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eceiving a total face refresh has never been easier. Long gone are the days of worrying about those little patches of fuzz on your face and never quite being able to reach that optimal glowing complexion that others seem to achieve. Not only is dermaplaning essential for exfoliating the face and abolishing that peach fuzz (fine vellus hair that you often find on your side-burn areas), it is also a great way to stimulate collagen and elastin in the skin – proteins that typically reduce with age. If it’s a deep clean and exfoliation that you are after, then look no further than the dermaplaning treatment available at Enhance Medispa, on George Street. Offered with an optional addition of a LED light therapy afterwards, dermaplaning is a simple and safe way to rejuvenate the skin. Heading to the medispa (virtually) next door to TBM HQ, I’m met by owner Hannah, who begins by discussing my skin concerns and talking me through the whole process over a cup of coffee. It’s important to note that sun exposure, sun beds, chemical peels, microdermabrasion and botox should be avoided 14 days before and after the treatment. Equally avoid waxing, tweezing, depilatory creams, threading, intense pulsed light (IPL) treatments, retinols and high percentage AHAs and BHAs a week before and after the treatment. Let’s begin with debunking a few myths about dermaplaning – all things that I was worried about beforehand. Firstly, it is not similar to shaving. Not only is dermaplaning performed by trained professionals, a surgical scalpel is used on taughtly stretched skin. Plus, the strokes used during the treatment are much shorter in order to resurface the skin on a deeper level and therefore be a lot more effective than shaving – this treatment is not just to remove hairs, but to also scrape away the outermost layers of the epidermis. Have no fear, you will not suddenly grow facial hair – a worry that I expressed to Hannah. In the first two weeks after the treatment, hairs may feel a little blunter and more noticeable as you will be more wary of any regrowth, but the type of hair will not be altered. Rest assured that in three to four weeks the fluff will have returned as it was before. The treatment begins with a meticulous double-cleanse using the HydroPeptide

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cleansing gel – once to remove make-up and impurities and again to ensure that the skin is squeaky clean. Next comes an application of the HydroPeptide pre-treatment toner. As the final step before the dermaplaning begins, this is essential for balancing and brightening the skin and is used for prepping before the treatment. Before Hannah gets to work, she ensures me that this is a pain-free treatment and it will feel similar to a scraping sensation. As Hannah sets to work around my face, I feel as though the old, dead skin is being thrown away. Skilled at what she does, Hannah removes the skin and peach fuzz with no fuss while chatting. I’m in good hands and find myself really enjoying the sensation of the treatment. It is refreshing and I can instantly feel the fresh layer of skin being uncovered as she works. Avoiding the upper lip and eye area, the treatment can cause slight redness and tightness but I found it to be fine. When finished, my skin was a little red in my sensitive areas but I felt refreshed and replenished. The recommendation after the treatment is to change your pillow case to reduce any bacteria transferring to your fresh face and it is vital to avoid touching your skin. Hannah informs me of this while applying a dollop of anti-bacterial gel to my hands to ensure that I don’t transfer any nasties to my skin. And,

when it comes to make-up, it’s essential to have a day off. This is so you give your face time to cool down, relax and recover before applying anything on top. All dermaplaned and rejuvenated, Hannah then applies the HydroPeptide rejuventating mask; this helps to calm, cool and restore the skin. The LED light therapy mask is then applied on top to help brighten my skin. This green light helps to control hyperpigmentation, sun damage and give the skin a more radiant appearance and, it is also a great way to end the treatment. After 10 minutes laying back and relaxing under the LED mask, my skin felt soothed and rejuvenated and I was ready to tackle the outside once again. After removing the rejuvenating mask, Hannah then applied the HydroPeptide face lift moisturiser to help protect my skin from the pollution in the city. The application of this, in addition to the final stage of applying tinted SPF 30 sunscreen (HydroPeptide solar defense tinted), I felt like a totally new woman. Fresh-faced and cleaner than ever, I’ve got the glow that I’ve always dreamed of and a super-soft, fuzz-free face to match. n Dermaplaning, £65 and additional LED Light Therapy session, £10. Available at Enhance Medispa, 3 Miles’s Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2QS; enhancemedispa.co.uk


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NEW FACIAL TREATMENTS AVAILABLE

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• Reduce fine lines & wrinkles • Rejuvenate skin • Brighten dull skin • Increase collagen • Increase elasticity of skin

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by Victoria Rawlinson, Heath & Fitness Practioner Bespoke Nutrition & Lifestyle Plans available

Eat to suit your bodies needs. Loose body fat and enjoy abundant energy without feeling hungry all the time. Come and meet Victoria for a friendly relaxed chat. Find out how easy it is to begin the journey to a slimmer more vibrant and energised you.

Problem area treatment Full Face Treatment with body points To Book Call

01225 422851 @jlw_cosmeticacupuncture

Cavislim ~ Ultrasonic Liposuction & Radio Frequency This non-invasive treatment helps to reduce body fat and stimulates collagen to tighten & tone your skin.

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WE OFFER • FREE Consultation • New Dentures direct • Flexible dentures • • Denture repairs • Saturday appointments •

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36 Gay Street, Bath • Tel: 01225 466851 www.theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

Master of the hues

Upcoming hair trends ‘to-dye-for’, the science behind colours, and home maintenance tips – Crystal Rose heads to Frontlinestyle to meet master colourist Alexa

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olour. It’s a powerful thing. It has the capacity to instantaneously change your mood, and life sure would be dull without it. As I sit down with master colour expert Alexa at hair and beauty salon Frontlinestyle to talk all things colour, she explains to me the endless amount of fun you can have with colour in the hair industry. From balayage and highlights to block colour and ombré, hair and the versatility of colouring is exciting. Alexa has a clear passion for colour. Having joined Frontlinestyle six months ago, and having previously worked at the Regis Salon in Jolly’s for five years, Alexa delves into her master colourist past and reveals a few top tips for maintaining your colour. Firstly, home maintenance is key. You can invest in a quality salon transformation but, if you’re not using the right products at home, it can all, literally, go down the drain in just a few short days. It’s essential to find the hair care that is tailored to you, your hair type and your colouring. The Wellaplex, for instance, is great for keeping the bonds in your barnet strong. The stronger the bond, the more the colour locks in more permanently. For blondes, for example Alexa recommends the System Professional silver shampoo – perfect for removing those brassy and yellow tones and enhancing cool, ashy ones. Studying for her Wella Master Colour Expert degree at the London studio nine years ago, Alexa began the internationally recognised, intensive 18-month course after studying at London College of Fashion. She then trained in South Kensington and

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worked in Canary Wharf before leaving the big smoke to go to Cheltenham, Bristol and then finally Bath. “It takes you out of your comfort zone and completely strips you back,” Alexa explains about the course. Becoming a MC educator, you’re taught to look at hair and colour differently. Learning along the way about the science of hues, perception of colour and the legal side of it all. The importance of the patch test, a hot topic in the beauty industry right now, is to safeguard you. It’s all about ensuring your safety and that 48-hour patch test is absolutely essential. Concluding with two assessments – a theory and a practical examination – Alexa doesn’t give too much away about the final test. Maybe it’s a closed-lip agreement by all master colourists? Now available online and at studios in London and Manchester, the Wella Master Colour programme is one of the highest accolades in the industry. And, it’s a great way of establishing contacts that may stay with you forever, says Alexa as she reminisces about her experiences. As Alexa delves into her favourite hair transformations, she enthuses about her enjoyment for the ‘clean slate challenge’. A possible indiction of the final assessment in the Wella qualification, completely transforming a client’s hair gives Alexa a great sense of achievement – not to mention the results looking so darn good. A hot new trend hitting the hair world is the new Opal-Essence range by Illumina Color. A gorgeous collection of five opalescent shades, this latest breakthrough from Wella Professionals is one not to miss. Having fallen in love with the Titanium Rose shade, I couldn’t get enough of this metallic

Queen of colouring, Alexa Whyte

milky family that provides a sheen of warm and cool light reflections. Copper Peach and Chrome Olive are also beautiful. A favourite colour range of Alexa’s is Colour Fresh by Wella. A fun, primary colour-filled crowd, Colour Fresh is the perfect way to create a vibrant look and have a total hair refresh. There’s so much more to colour than I originally thought, and endless ways to perceive it. There’s the movement in the hair, the skin tone of each individual and the preferred style of hair, that all need to be considered. If you’re looking for a complete hair transformation or a simple but effective change, there’s a master colourist on Monmouth Street that we think might be your perfect match. n Master Stylist hair treatments with Alexa are available from Frontlinestyle; 4–5 Monmouth Street, BA1 2AJ; frontlinestyle.co.uk; 01225 478478


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AN INDEPENDENT MEDISPA IN THE HEART OF BATH SPECIALISING IN AESTHETIC AND BEAUTY TREATMENTS

A Dr led Injectables clinic at Enhance Medispa by an experienced Harley Street trained medical Doctor. Anti-Wrinkle Injections are a safe, effective and affordable way to rejuvenate the face. At Enhance Medispa, we will customise your anti wrinkle treatments to your anatomy, your preferences and your individual needs. As a result, we recommend a complimentary consultation with your first visit. This ensures you get the best treatment for you, and achieve the result you are after. The consultation can always be followed by a treatment at the same visit time. Dr Kathryn Hogg is passionate about enhancing your looks in the most natural way to achieve a fresher and more youthful appearance.

Call us today to book your FREE no obligation consultation Lower Ground Suite, 3 Miles’s Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2QS info@enhancemedispa.co.uk | 01225 422851 | www.enhancemedispa.co.uk Open Monday to Saturday. By appointment only

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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Four symptoms of endometriosis women should never ignore

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ndometriosis affects 1 in 10 women in the UK, but many put up with its symptoms for years, not realising the damage they are doing to their health and fertility. Here, Mrs Caroline Overton, a consultant gynaecologist at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, gives you a need-to-know guide on the symptoms of endometriosis. Endometriosis explained Endometriosis is a condition where cells like those found inside the womb (uterus) grow outside the womb. Often, women won’t know they have it because the symptoms can start as a teenager, and they learn to accept them as normal. In most cases, endometriosis is treatable, but the longer it goes undiagnosed, the more damage it may be doing to your lifestyle, internal organs and future fertility. If you’re concerned about any of the following symptoms, speak to your GP. Painful periods Endometriosis often runs in families, so many women regard their painful periods as normal when they compare themselves with their mother or sisters. During the menstrual cycle, the lining of the womb (endometrium) builds up and bleeds as a period. With endometriosis, the womb lining-like cells (endometrial cells) in the pelvis build up and bleed in the same way. This is why the pain starts in the days before the period, and why the period pain is more severe and lasts longer than normal period pain. Normal healthy periods do not interfere with everyday life or work. You should be able to manage a normal period with a tampon or a pad. It might be normal to take painkillers to manage the pain, but you shouldn’t need to regularly take time off work or school. Mrs Overton says: “If you are having to change the way you dress, miss work or social activities, have a ‘bed day’, stop exercising, and are planning your life around your periods, then your periods are not normal. These could be signs of endometriosis.” Pain going to the toilet Over time, the womb lining-like cells in the pelvis can create adhesions between the pelvic organs, causing them to stick to each other, sometimes contributing to pain during bowel movements and urinating. This can happen at any time, not just during the period. 86 TheBATHMagazine

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Pain during sex Unfortunately, women with endometriosis may have only known sex to be painful and so think this is normal. The monthly bleeding in the pelvis has no way to leave the body and so can build up and cause internal scarring and inflammation. These painful areas are agitated during sex, diminishing a woman’s ability to enjoy intercourse, and sometimes placing a strain on sexual relationships. Difficulty getting pregnant When endometriosis is left untreated, fibrosis (scarring) can occur and the adhesions between organs in the pelvis can damage the ovaries and tubes. Not only does this make getting pregnant more difficult, but can also render women infertile. Treatment for endometriosis The contraceptive pill or Mirena IUS are often effective treatments for endometriosis because they make the periods shorter and lighter. They are good treatments for women who don’t want to start a family, but are not suitable for women trying to get pregnant, as they are contraceptive. When and if women stop the pill, the symptoms of endometriosis can re-appear. When treatment hasn’t worked or when women want to start a family, there is the option of surgery. Laparoscopy is an operation carried out under general anaesthetic with a day’s stay in hospital. Laparoscopy can diagnose endometriosis and, if agreed beforehand, it is possible to treat by removing the endometriosis and releasing adhesions at the time of the operation. When endometriosis is severe, it can cause extensive inflammation, scarring and damage to the pelvic organs, including the bowels. Under these circumstances, removal of the endometriosis is more complex and may require further surgery at a later date. If you are experiencing any of the issues described, don’t simply accept them as normal. Mrs Overton says: “Although there is no known cure for endometriosis, we offer evidence-based treatments to help you live a pain-free life. If surgery is the best option, then we offer abdominal and laparoscopic techniques to ensure that you are back on your feet as quickly as possible.” Caroline Overton is a recognised national expert in endometriosis, with over 30 years’ experience of treating women with known or

suspected endometriosis. She completed two years of research at Oxford University, studying pain and endometriosis, and in 2016, she received an award as one of the top 100 researchers in the UK. She founded the University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust Endometriosis Centre, and chaired a national committee setting standards for the treatment of endometriosis in 2017. At Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, Mrs Overton offers endometriosis clinics for women with known or suspected endometriosis, providing expert advice as well as support from physiotherapists and specialist nurses, who can offer personalised dietary and exercise advice. If you would like to book an appointment with Mrs Overton, call the Bristol Women’s Clinic at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield, on 0117 906 4887, or visit our website: www.nuffieldhealth.com/ hospitals/bristol/womens-health

Consultant Gynaecologist, Mrs Caroline Overton.

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol


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Rose & Crown, Hinton Charterhouse, in the early 19th century

Looking north over Wellow

Tait Wood

Seven country miles

Fancy an invigorating country walk with plenty of refreshments en route? Andrew Swift follows a trail from Norton St Philip to Hinton Charterhouse, Wellow and Hassage

A

frequent criticism of country walks is the lack of a pub en route. When there is a decent pub, however, another problem can arise, for most country walks entail driving to the starting point, which means at least one member of the party has to remain abstemious. Happily, neither problem arises on this month’s walk. To celebrate the coming of spring, it offers the choice of five excellent pubs, and, as the starting point is served by a half-hourly bus service from Bath, there is no need to drive. Although only seven miles long, and, at its furthest point only six miles from the centre of Bath, it is a proper country walk, following green lanes and muddy bridleways through quiet valleys and across breezy farmland. It starts in Norton St Philip, many of whose ancient buildings are tucked away off the busy main roads that plague this historic village. Then it’s across the fields to Hinton Charterhouse, from where a green lane leads to Tait Wood and the valley of the Norton Brook – a spot which seems utterly remote. A brisk climb up another green lane leads to the high ground above Wellow, with views back towards Bath, before bridleways head 88 TheBATHMagazine

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down to the hidden hamlet of Hassage, with its glorious 17th-century manor house. A little further on is Tucker’s Grave, one of the most celebrated and unspoilt pubs in Somerset, from where quiet lanes and bridleways lead back to Norton St Philip. The other pubs include The George in Norton St Philip, built by the monks of Hinton Priory it is believed to have had a licence since 1397. On the other side of the road is The Fleur de Lys, a relative newcomer, having only been licensed since 1584. Hinton Charterhouse also has two pubs – The Rose & Crown, rebuilt after a disastrous fire in 1880, and The Stag, first licensed as a beerhouse in the 19th century, but as welcoming and traditional as any of them. The walk starts in the centre of Norton St Philip, opposite the bus stop (ST774559). Go down Bell Hill, beside the George Inn, and take the first right along North Street. At the end turn right uphill, and at the main road cross and go over a stile. Follow a faint track diagonally across a field, heading to the right of a white house. On the far side of the field, cross a stile and follow a waymark sign alongside a fence. Go through a gate at the end and head for a kissing gate (KG) on the other side of a drive.

Go through it and follow a faint track alongside the hedge on the left. At the end of the field, go through a handgate a few metres to the right, which leads across a plank and through another gate into a field. Head across it, bearing slightly to the right towards a metal gate, and go through a handgate beside it (ST775572). Go through the gap in the hedge a few metres further on and follow a faint track across a field towards a KG leading into woods. The track through the woods curves slowly right, before coming to a broad track, along which you bear left. Carry straight on across a field, continue through an avenue of trees and, after emerging into the open, carry on through a KG and turn left along a lane (ST776582). As you enter Hinton Charterhouse, look out for a house – No 21 – with a lamp over the door. This was The Mason’s Arms, which closed in the 1950s. A little further on, however, you come to The Rose & Crown, still very much in business. The Stag, Hinton’s other pub, is 100m to the right along the main road. To continue the walk, cross the main road and head along the lane to the left of the Post Office. After 100m, when the lane


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THE | WALK

ends, continue along a bridleway. Although narrow at first, it soon broadens to assume the character of a green lane. Carry on in the same direction and after 1200m, go through a KG into Tait Wood (ST760576). Follow the track heading straight downhill, bear left at a T junction at the bottom, and after 100m, when the path branches, bear right. After another 200m, look for a waymark on the right and follow it down to a KG. Turn left along a lane for 100m, before turning right along a byway. After crossing the Norton Brook, follow a track steeply uphill (ignoring a turning to the left). As you climb, the village of Wellow comes into view to the right, and, when the land eventually starts to level out, you can see Norton St Philip away to the left. Carry on past the converted buildings of Upper Baggridge Farm and continue along a lane in the same direction. From here, you can see the buildings of Odd Down clustered on the hillside three miles to the north. After 350m, opposite a turning on the right, go through a handgate on the left and follow a track across a field (ST745567). Carry straight on through another field as the land drops steeply away. At the bottom, bear left for 60m before following a track winding down to the right through the hedgerow.

Carry on downhill and, after crossing a stream, continue along a muddy green lane which soon starts to climb. After 350m, go through a gate to enter the hamlet of Hassage. After 100m, when the lane swings right past Hassage Manor, a byway branches off to the left (ST752558). This is the way back to Norton St Philip, but, before turning along it, carry on along the lane for 700m, turn left at the crossroads, and after another 300m you come to Tucker’s Grave (ST751551). From here, head back to Hassage and turn up the byway. After 400m, ignore a track bearing left, and carry straight on past a ruined barn. After another 200m, the track curves right before turning left 50m further on (ST758558). Instead of carrying on along it, however – and coming to a dead end – carry straight on along a rough track heading towards a gabled house surrounded by farm buildings in the valley below. Carry on downhill in the same direction and cross a footbridge over a brook at the bottom. Go through a KG, bear right and almost immediately left to follow a bridleway alongside the brook. After 250m, the track leads through a gate to start climbing a high-banked, muddy green lane to Norton St Philip. At the end, turn left along a lane and, after 125m, turn right at the crossroads. Look out for a 15th-century dovecote 50m along on

the right, follow the lane as it curves past the 17th-century Manor Farmhouse, and at the end turn left up Bell Hill to return to The George. n Andrew Swift is the author of On Foot in Bath: Fifteen Walks Around a World Heritage City and co-author, with Kirsten Elliot, of Ghost Signs of Bath

FACT FILE Distance: 7 miles Challenge: Straightforward, although with some climbing and muddy sections. Sheep may be encountered at a couple of points. Map: OS Explorer 142 Bus: D2 from Bath bus station, half hourly Monday to Saturday until around 5.30pm George Inn, Norton St Philip (georgeinnnsp.co.uk); Fleur de Lys, Norton St Philip (fleurdelysnsp.co.uk); Rose & Crown, Hinton Charterhouse (theroseandcrownbath.com); Stag, Hinton Charterhouse (thestaginn.plus.com); Tucker’s Grave (tuckersgraveinn.co.uk)

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INTERIORS | AND | STYLE

Retro geometrics

Interior designer Clair Strong shares her ideas on how to incorporate the sharp lines and angled motifs of geometric patterns into your home with contemporary flair

C

elebrating bold shapes, sharp lines and block colours, geometric prints and patterns have been used in art and design for centuries. For as long as humans have been creating art, geometric patterns have existed. More recently, however, we’ve seen iconic geometric patterns

filtering through from the Art Deco era, from mid-century Scandinavia, and from the Memphis design movement of the 1980s. It’s these kinds of patterns that remain popular today. Intrigued by this ancient art form? Here are some ideas for working some retro geometrics into your home.

FURNISHINGS AND ACCESSORIES There’s no need to make big design changes to enjoy the clean energy of geometrics. Textiles are a quick, easy and affordable way to try out a new look or to give a space a new impetus. Geometric rugs are a classic device for brightening wood floors and adding instant cool to any space. Cushions and curtains also make great canvases for your favourite geometric patterns. Choosing colours and patterns that already match your current interior scheme should also prevent any additional work or expense.

BATAK Velvet Chair and CAUCA Rug, Brabbu

Malmo Retro Leaf wallpaper, Arthouse

WA L L PA P E R A N D PA I N T Wallpaper is one of the most direct ways you can decorate with pattern. There are now thousands of prints and patterns to choose from, including many retro geometric designs. What is most exciting about wallpaper is that it’s not restricted to walls. You can upcycle tatty vintage furniture with retro geometric papers or paper the ceiling instead of a feature wall. You can even wallpaper panelled doors or window sills, creating an incredible visual effect. If you’d rather avoid wallpaper altogether, you can create a geometric effect with paint and masking tape. It requires a very steady hand (or the hiring of a professional), but by using a few choice retro hues and a simple template you can create a beautiful feature wall. Yellow velvet lamp with fringe by Abode Living 90 TheBATHMagazine

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INTERIORS | AND | STYLE

TILING Geometric designs lend themselves well to tiles, and the effect on floors and walls can be quite arresting. Tiling has been popular since the Victorian era, so it poses a great opportunity to embrace retro patterns in the home. Floor tiles are particularly popular at the moment because they allow you to keep walls neutral while still having an interesting splash of pattern. Tessellation provides instant sophistication and looks great in all areas of the home, but particularly bathrooms. Using black and white chequered floor titles – popular in the 1940s – is a traditional approach that remains in vogue today. Black and white is a bold colour scheme and can feel harsh in the wrong room. If you’d like to soften the look, choose grey tiles instead of black.

Scintilla Sapphire star pattern tiles, Walls and Floors Ltd

Lamp by DelightFULL

B R I N G I N G T H E PA S T INTO THE PRESENT While geometric patterns may have their roots in the past, there are ways to make them feel fresh and modern. Colour is the most powerful. Choose colours that complement your space, but instead of opting for oranges and browns, choose patterns in modern colour schemes such as cool blue, grey and yellow or jewel tones. For example, rooms with low ceilings might feel claustrophobic when decorated in dark colours, but lighter hues will open them out. Conversely, light-coloured patterns might get lost in huge, expansive spaces, so choose something bolder for a more dramatic effect. When choosing patterns, busier geometric patterns may feel stuffy and old-fashioned in some spaces, while minimalism always feels quite modern. If you prefer the minimalist approach, opt for a simpler geometric pattern to decorate your home with. n

Clair Strong Interior Design is a small, friendly, creative business based in Bath and London, providing services for residential and commercial clients. Visit: clairstrong.co.uk or contact: clair@clairstrong.co.uk Newton Sideboard, Atkin and Thyme

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vintage furniture contemporar y styling

15 Walcot Buildings. London Road. BA1 6AD 07785 332536 team@verveliving.uk

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SINE FELT PENDANT WHITE / GREY BY VITA  COPENHAGEN

LIGHTING SPECIALIST 8 BATH STREET, FROME. TEL: 01373473555 WWW.FIATLUX.CO.UK TUESDAY – FRIDAY 9.30AM – 5.30PM, SATURDAY 9.30AM – 5.00PM

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DESIGN | INTERIORS

Designs on a bathroom

Georgian buildings wouldn’t have had any internal bathrooms, so installing a new bathroom in period houses usually involves dealing with small spaces that have been carved out over the years. Working in tight spaces means that design, layout and lighting are key. Sarah Latham, founder and creative director of Etons of Bath, offers a few tips

WALLPAPER Add a distinct wall covering to create a point of interest and add wow factor. Ensure the room is well ventilated and that the wall covering won’t be in direct contact with water. There are also decorators’ glazes that can be used to give it that extra protection.

LIGHTING

Ensuite bathroom at Queensberry Hotel in Bath, designed by Etons of Bath

Using decorative lighting in a bathroom can help to make the room more homely. Just having recessed ceiling spot lights can be stark and unflattering. Bathrooms require lights that have a specific IP rating, so check this before you buy.

DESIGN LAYOUT Due to the drainage location which is expensive to change, the toilet is the most difficult thing to move in the bathroom so it’s best to try to work around it. So start with that and then add in the other elements you require.

TILES This wood effect floor tile was used to give a traditional feel. It was combined with a more costeffective blue metro tile to add colour. Always make sure the tiles for the floor are porcelain or listed as suitable for floor use, otherwise they will be too soft and may crack.

FUNCTIONALITY Ensuring your bathroom is functional as well as sumptuous is an important factor – this heated towel radiator is a small detail but makes all the difference. Making sure there’s somewhere for a hand towel near the basin, or specifying a mirror with de-misters so that they don’t steam up are all important details to consider as well as what AV or heating you might want to incorporate.

Etons of Bath, 108 Walcot Street, Bath; etonsofbath.com

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Gardening April.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2019 15:39 Page 1

GARDENING

It’s time to get those plant pots in order before the summer kicks in

Get your garden in gear

Spring has sprung! And it’s time to get this gardening show on the road, says Jane Moore

I

f you’re anything like me you’ll have spent the winter bumbling along, pottering pleasantly in the garden on nice days and thinking “I’ll get around to that in the spring when the weather and soil is warmer and the plants and I are feeling a bit more lively.” Well there is no escaping that the moment has now come. Bustling bird activity, the longer days and a certain unmistakeable vitality scent the air. Only the unwise would sit back on their laurels at this juncture, especially as their laurels are probably shooting away with new growth beneath their very butts. Heed my words, I warn you. I once took a fabulous holiday in April – spring flowers in Greece – absolutely lovely and wonderful temperatures. But oh I paid for my holiday. I have learned the hard way that if you let April slip though your fingers, you’ll be playing catch up through May and June. GET ON TOP OF WEEDING These little blighters spring into action before anything else, trying to get a grip on your borders before the real plants can. Be vigilant and be brutal. I think little and often is 96 TheBATHMagazine

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sometimes the best way. So rather than blitzing through the garden and then forgetting it for a couple of weeks, a postwork foray for half an hour or so keeps them at bay. This theory also works for slugs and snails. GET YOUR BORDERS IN ORDER Whatever it takes, a good cut back of herbaceous stems left for winter interest, a short-back-and-sides haircut for the grasses and some raking of leaf debris all spruces the garden up and gets it in good shape. A little pruning is timely too, especially for the winter stem dogwoods and the roses if you haven’t done them already. Follow up with a nice mulch of garden compost and perhaps a little fertiliser and before you know it your borders are good to go. LIFT AND DIVIDE Now is the time to do the last plant moving and dividing. Don’t leave it any longer or the plants will be too big and bushy and you’ll spend all summer watering them like a lunatic. It’s the perfect time to split herbaceous plants such as asters, crocosmia

and Iris sibirica which always end up in huge forest-like clumps dominating an entire bed. Set to with a spade – I don’t bother with all this two forks shenanigans as these plants are born survivors – and chop them into chunks. These pieces you can spread around the garden, although please don’t end up with asters everywhere as you can always give some away, do swapsies or even pot up a few for the next garden club sale. THE BORING JOBS So far it’s the fun side of gardening; now comes the chores. Clean the patio – you and I both know it’s green and somewhat slimy and is really letting the side down, so give it a good scrub with whatever you find works best for you. Do the same with the garden furniture – unsavoury garden furniture offers no invitation to sit down. There, that didn’t take too long did it? SORT OUT YOUR POTS Be ruthless. You know those winter pots you did last autumn have had their moment. Let’s be honest, there may be a few violas manfully flowering on, but they’re a bit


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straggly and the skimmia centrepiece is definitely past its best. So off to the shed with the forsaken and forlorn. Now you can treat yourself to a trip to the garden centre to pick up a handful of bulbs and primroses to put together a couple of spring pots to see you through to the summer. While you’re there you can pick up some fertiliser and patio cleaner for the other jobs. Oh, and have tea and cake with a fellow gardener to keep the enthusiasm levels high. LOVE YOUR LAWN The lawn is never top of my jobs list, but a little time and trouble in spring does pay off big time in summer. Ideally we should feed, weed, aerate and scarify, but I think the last is the most vital on many lawns. Scarifying with a springbok rake is one of those jobs that makes you wilt just thinking about it, but it’s actually never as bad as you think. It’s also curiously satisfying, watching all that moss and dead grass gathering on the rake and it really does do the lawn a power of good. Plus it’s lovely stuff to add to the compost heap. GET SOWING Tis the season for sowing, sowing, sowing. Where to start though? Almost any vegetable that you want to grow, get them going now, particularly the usual suspects such as

Give the lawn a bit of TLC and get adding to the compost heap

beetroot, carrots, parsnips and salad greens. These can all be direct sown straight into the bed, although the salads will also grow beautifully in modules such as old bedding plant packs, which means you can protect them from the slugs and snails. When it comes to flowers, a lot of my favourites I grow from seeds annually. Sweet peas, nasturtiums, calendula and annual grasses I start off on modules and plant out where I want them. Others are so

wonderfully easy, such as beautiful nigella and glorious opium poppies, as they can be sown directly into any old bit of spare soil you may have and pop up as if by magic, flowering their little socks off at the height of the summer with almost no effort on my part. Now that’s my kind of gardening. n Jane Moore is an award-winning gardening columnist and head gardener at The Bath Priory Hotel. Twitter: @janethegardener

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THE BATH DIRECTORY - APRIL 2019.qxp_Layout 31 21/03/2019 11:36 Page 1

the directory Electricians

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Somerset Lane, Lansdown A striking 3 bedroom home located on a secluded street on the lower slopes of Lansdown, offering contemporary open plan living, a short walk from a number of highly regarded schools. The house benefits from off-street parking, an attractive garden and 3 beautiful en-suite bathrooms.

Rent: ÂŁ2,800 pcm* spectacular open plan living area | high ceilings with exposed beams | floor-to-ceiling windows | contemporary fitted kitchen | Miele appliances | stone work surfaces | 3 double bedrooms | 3 beautiful en-suites | dressing room | off-street parking | private balcony & attractive garden

Reside Bath | 24 Barton Street Bath BA1 1HG | T 01225 445 777 | E info@residebath.co.uk | W www.residebath.co.uk

*An administration fee of ÂŁ420.00 inc. VAT applies.


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PROMOTED CONTENT

Home made easy

Get more when you rent at Spring Wharf. The one and two bedroom riverside apartments come with exceptional services and facilities and are available to move in now

Spring Wharf is more than just a home, it is a neighbourhood and community for like-minded individuals. The shared spaces for residents – including the outside deck with allotment benches, a BBQ area, a residents’ lounge and a gym with state-of-the-art equipment – have been designed to build a happy and healthy community. The one and two-bedroom flats come in all shapes and sizes and give you much more than your usual rental agreement; pets are welcome, WiFi is included, and there are no letting fees. For extra peace of mind, there is a team on site coordinating everything from maintenance to lending a helping hand. The rental contracts are also

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flexible so you can stay as long as you want, from six months to five years. Plus there’s secure bike storage – and car parking spaces are also available for rent. All apartment interiors have been designed by Kibre (kibre.co.uk). The bespoke designer furniture, which has been sustainably sourced and built to last, can be included in your rental agreement, or you can bring your own furniture. To book a viewing and have a look around, call the team on 01225 530 050 or visit springwharf.com


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ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FROM JUST £30 SUBSCRIBE ONLINE AT thebathmag.co.uk/subscribe or Tel: 01225 424 499

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The Apartment Co - April 19.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2019 14:56 Page 1

Why buying an apartment needs more than a feeling Peter Greatorex, managing director of The apartment Company

H

ave you ever made those impulse buys and then, maybe a few days or weeks later, regretted it? If it’s a top or a pair of shoes then, although annoying, you can live with it, but what if it’s a property? We want to make sure that the apartment you purchase is based on a decision made with your heart and your head.

[SOUTH WESTERN] LIMITED

Love at first sight. It’s easy to get swept away by the glorious Georgian façade; as you step inside the spacious rooms with period touches, you begin to smile. Beautifully decorated, you start to see your furniture gracing the space and there is no doubt that this property is melting your heart, but is it the right home for you? We all want that feeling, yet the one may not come with the wish list package that you initially imagined. When you buy an apartment you need to think about the short to long term; yes, this apartment may be perfect for you today, but what about in 12 months’ time?

Location. Before we start spurting a bit of Kirstie and Phil and saying it’s all about location, location, location – yes, in some ways it is, but not always. You’ve chosen an area you like because it’s close to work and your friends; you may not necessarily know every area in Bath, but it’s where you feel the most comfortable. We would never want you to live somewhere that wouldn’t make you happy, but there are so many areas of Bath that you may not have discovered. Trust our judgment; when we get to know you and have a sense of what you’re looking for and why, we will be able to match you with some fantastic apartments.

Trusting. Yes, we are asking you to trust our experience to show you some properties that may not be right on paper. Circumstances change, you may get a new job, and your friends could move, so we need to ensure that the property we find will be a good home to you no matter what changes around you. We don’t have any mysterious Jedi powers, just years of knowledge from working in the Bath apartment market. Picture perfect. We can all make any property our home: we paint the walls a colour we prefer, we inject our own taste through furniture, and flair through accessories. Therefore, as they say, never judge a book by its cover. It’s important to be realistic about the amount of work you want to do and the associated costs, but every apartment is a blank canvas waiting for you to make it your home.

Crafting beautiful homes

Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswolds | Dorset

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk

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Let your head have its say. Make sure you have a list of headbased decisions on a piece of paper before you enter any property. You should think about finances, and that’s not just the mortgage but all the costs associated with that particular apartment and the lease. Amenities are also important; what’s close by? If you have hobbies or interests, are they within an easy distance? You don’t want the distance to be an excuse for not continuing, as this will add a niggle about where you’re living. If you have a family, a shop for those forgotten or last-minute essentials close by could be a must and a potential life-saver. When you let your head have its say, you will know that the apartment is one that will work for you in many ways.

When you get that feeling. Should you get ‘the feeling’ when you walk into an apartment, never ignore it. It is magical and means you can really see yourself living there. Just remember to let your head have its say and you will be doing your best to ensure you will be happy in your new home for many years to come. If you would like to see a collection of apartments we feel would be perfect for you, just give us a call. The Apartment Company Pg@theapartmentcompany.co.uk or call 01225 471144.


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Bear Flat

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Oldfield Road, Bath BA2 £1,100,000

An elegant semi-detached Victorian villa on Oldfield Road with circa 2,920 sq ft of accommodation. This family home offers great lateral living space, period details, 5/6 bedrooms, en-suite bathroom, shower room and family bathroom, three reception rooms, kitchen dining room, level gardens and off road parking. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

01225 805 680 bearflat@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Central

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Russell Street, BA1 £425,000

01225 809 571

Situated in one of Bath’s most desirable streets, opposite The Assembly Rooms and just 0.1 mile from the city centre. The grade II listed courtyard apartment has a private entrance, spacious 18’5 x 14’6 lounge, two double bedrooms, bathroom and en-suite. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

central@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


Camden

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Gillingham Terrace, BA1 Offers in excess of £465,000

Gillingham Terrace is a row of period houses tucked away in a no-through road. This well presented house features a number of period features including stripped wood floors, period fireplaces and sash windows. It is light and bright, offers flexible accommodation and has extensive city views. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

01225 809 868 camden@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Newbridge Andrewsonline.co.uk SSTC

Badminton Gardens £475,000

This lovely link detached house is light and bright. Accommodation includes sitting room, dining room, kitchen, study, separate WC and an integral garage. Upstairs there are three bedrooms and a family bathroom, front and rear gardens and driveway parking. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

01225 809 685 newbridge@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


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IVY COTTAGE, West Kington

Price ÂŁ1,200,000

A delightful stone built home located in the much sought-after village of West Kington. This characterful period property also benefits from a detached barn, garage/workshop and carport, as well as about 3.5 acres of flat paddock and woodland. Detached period home | Five bedrooms | Two reception rooms | Utility room and downstairs W.C. | Separate barn studio with garage and office | Paddock and small woodland | EPC Rating: F


NORTHAMPTON STREET, Bath

Price ÂŁ995,000 SSTC

A beautifully presented four bedroom Grade II listed Georgian townhouse in a sought after location less than a ten minute walk to the heart of Bath. Arranged over four floors with kitchen and breakfast room on the lower ground floor, and drawing room, withdrawing room on the ground floor, and four bedrooms, family bathroom and another WC on the top two floors. Beautifully presented Georgian townhouse | Four bedrooms | Three reception rooms | Kitchen dining room | Bathroom and shower room | Rear garden | Sought after location | EPC: Exempt


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The Lodge

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£1800 pcm

Open Plan Living Space · Pets considered by negotiation - please ask · Three double bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms · Central location · Beautifully designed with Immaculate Decor · Council Tax Band F

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EW

Bathwick Street

£1050 pcm

EW

Old Walcot School

£825 pcm

01225 471 14 4

LETTINGS

N

£1650 pcm

Unfurnished · Three bedrooms · Bathroom · Shower room · No pets · Parking permit · Council Tax Band E

EW

North Parade

£995 pcm

EW

Hexagon

Cavendish Road

£750 pcm

£1300 pcm

First floor Apartment · Beautifully presented ·

Desirable location · Super views · Unfurnished · Allocated parking · Available March 2019

EW

Queens Parade

£895 pcm

Furnished · Fabulous views · Georgian apartment · One double bedroom · Central location · Available now

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Unfurnished · One bedroom · No pets · Council Tax Band A · Allocated Parking Space · Available Now

01225 303 870

EW

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Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · Versatile accommodation · Stunning views · No pets · Central zone parking permit

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Unfurnished · One double bedroom · Close to all local amenities · No pets · No Students · Council Tax Band C

SALES

Camden Crescent

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Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · Luxury bathroom · No pets · Private parking space · Available now

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EW

EW

Walcot Buildings

£750 pcm

Unfurnished · Fabulous views · Open-plan living space · Close to City Centre · One double bedroom · Residence parking permit · Agency fees £420 inc VAT · Council Tax Band A · Available now

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk


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m

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EW

Park Lane

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O.I.E.O

£550,000

New build · Two double bedrooms · Two en suites · Open plan sitting room/kitchen · Private entrance · Private parking · Level walk into city centre

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EW

Edward Street

O.I.E.O

£495,000

EW

Old Orchard Cottage

Portland Place

O.I.E.O

£335,000

O.I.E.O

£525,000

EW

Kensington Chapel

O.I.E.O

£435,000

EW

Bennett Street

EW

Cavendish Crescent

O.I.E.O

£335,000

£525,000

EW

New Marchants Passage

O.I.E.O £360,000

Stylish living · Two double bedrooms · Central location · Communal roof terrace · Close to transport links · Modern kitchen and bathrooms

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Grade II listed · Georgian apartment · Lower ground floor · Two bedrooms · Rear courtyard · City Centre location · Approx 872 Sq Ft

O.I.E.O

Grade II listed · Georgian · Period features · Private terraced garden · Two double bedroom · Premium location · Ground floor

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Grade II listed · Penthouse apartment · Two double bedrooms · Two en suites · Beautifully decorated · Outside space · Gated parking · Lift access

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Georgian · Grade II listed · Two double bedrooms · First floor maisonette · Light and airy · Close to city centre · Private parking

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Grade II listed · Georgian · Two bedrooms · Balcony · Tall ceilings · Beautiful views · Short walk to the city centre

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Georgian · Three double bedrooms · beautiful modern décor · Stunning views · Central location · Approx 916 Sq ft · Grade II Listed

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Stoneleigh Court

O.I.E.O

£265,000

Top floor apartment · Three double bedrooms · Balcony · Stunning views · Private garage · Communal grounds · Bright and spacious accommodation

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk


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Profile for MC Publishing Limited

The Bath Magazine April 2019  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath

The Bath Magazine April 2019  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath