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THE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

Issue 159

I sePTeMBeR 2017

MAGAZINE

IN

CHECK FASHION EXCLUSIVE: IN THE STUDIO WITH HOUSE OF FRASER’S AW17 COLLECTION

THE FUN OF THE FAIR AFFORDABLE ART FOR EVERY APPETITE

+ HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS HOW TO LIVE IN HARMONY WITH YOUR NEW PIECE

AFFIRMATION HOW DOES IT FEEL WHEN JAY-Z CALLS & PUTS YOUR BRISTOL BAND ON THE GLOBAL MUSIC MAP?

ON THE MARKET THE FINEST LOCAL PROPERTIES UP FOR GRABS

ALL IN GOOD TASTE

EDUCATION EXTRA OUR GUIDE TO GOOD SCHOOLING 2017/2018

DINING OUT IN BRISTOL HAS NEVER BEEN SO BRILLIANT

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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Knight Frank September.qxp_full page 24/08/2017 13:43 Page 1

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,195,000

Leigh Woods Immaculate 4 bedroom detached family home (2,348 sq ft) within established gardens. Kitchen/breakfast room and sitting room, utility room, family room, study, master suite with dressing area, 3 guest bedrooms, family bathroom, guest shower room. Garage, established gardens to front and rear and ample parking.

Guide price £525,000

New Instruction

Guide price £450,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

New Instruction

Clifton

Clifton

A generously proportioned lateral 2 bedroom apartment (1,047 sq ft) with private garden. Sitting room, kitchen/breakfast room, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, inner hallway/study and private garden. EPC E.

Deceptively spacious courtyard apartment (1,247 sq ft) with 2 bedrooms. Sitting room, sun room, kitchen, master suite, guest bedroom, family bathroom, ample storage. Patio gardens and allocated off street parking.

Guide price £1,750,000

Guide price £1,895,000

Leigh Woods

Winscombe

Wonderful home (3,067 sq ft) on a private road. 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, 6 bedrooms, dressing room, balcony, 2 bathrooms. Gardens, garage, garden room and summer house. EPC G.

Beautiful period home (10,084 sq ft). 8 reception rooms, kitchen, utility. 9 bedrooms, 8 bath/shower rooms. 2 bed cottage. Garage, tennis court, swimming pool, stores, gardens and grounds. In all about 2 acres. EPC E.


Knight Frank September.qxp_full page 24/08/2017 13:43 Page 2

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,295,000

Westbury Park Immaculate family home (2,932 sq ft) with sunny gardens, garage and parking. Bay fronted sitting room, dining room, kitchen/breakfast room, master suite, 5 guest bedrooms, family bathroom, guest bathroom. Sun terrace, gardens to front and rear, double garage and off street parking. EPC D.

Guide price £375,000

Guide price £585,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

New Instruction

Clifton

Harbourside

A beautifully presented apartment (666 sq ft) within this handsome Grade II Listed period town house. Drawing room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bathroom. Attractive communal gardens to front and rear.

Outstanding penthouse (1,125 sq ft) with terrace and harbour views. Dual aspect drawing room, kitchen/breakfast room, 2 bedrooms, en suite bathroom, guest shower room, ample storage, allocated off street parking. EPC C.

Guide price £1,795,000

Guide price £475,000

Bower Ashton

Clifton

A substantial house (5,903 sq ft) with 2 bed cottage and 1 bed annexe. 4 reception rooms, breakfast kitchen. 6 bedrooms 4 bath/shower rooms. Garage, summer house, gardens. In all about 1 acre. EPC E, cottage EPC D.

A generous 2 bedroom apartment (1,646 sq ft) with extensive cellarage. Drawing room, kitchen/breakfast room, 2 bedrooms, family bathroom, extensive loft area, cellar storage.


Knight Frank September.qxp_full page 24/08/2017 13:44 Page 3

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £995,000

Frampton Cotterell Beautifully presented 6 bedroom family house (3,565 sq ft) situated in an attractive village setting along a quiet no through lane. 4 reception rooms, breakfast/kitchen room, 6 bedrooms (3 ensuite), family bathroom. Attractive enclosed level gardens, double garage and parking for 4. EPC TBC.

Guide price £1,950,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £875,000

Wraxall

Shepton Mallet

Former granary (6,823 sq ft) in a rural setting. 4 receptions, kitchen/sitting room. 6 beds, 4 bathrooms. 2 bed annexe. Integral garage, outbuildings, gardens, pasture, swimming pool. In all about 2.7 acres. EPC D.

A beautiful Grade II listed town house (4,844 sq ft) in a rural setting. 4 reception rooms, large kitchen, 5-6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms. Attached cottage, garage, mature gardens and grounds.

Guide price £895,000

Guide price £599,999

Winscombe

Near Wells

An attractive country house (4,295 sq ft) on the edge of the village enjoying a rural outlook. 5 reception rooms, kitchen, 5 bedrooms (1 ensuite), 3 bathrooms. Gardens, stable block, double garage. In all about 1.86 acres. EPC F.

Beautiful home (1,896 sq ft) in 1 acre enjoying stunning views and outbuildings (2,143 sq ft). 2 reception rooms, kitchen, utility room. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Plans in place to convert into a 4 bedroom property. EPC E.


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40

52

Box-E is a fine example of Bristol’s exceptional dining scene – read on for our foodie special! Photo by André Pattenden

Hannah Williams & The Affirmations feature on Jay-Z’s latest record

Realist artwork ‘No-One Is Illegal’, featuring Electric Ladyland in Old Market. See more Tom White stuff at the Affordable Art Fair

Contents

September 2017

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

MUSIC

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14

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16

We meet a pillar of Bristol’s Milestones Trust

40

More on the moment world-famous rapper and music mogul Jay-Z called a Bristol band and offered them worldwide recognition

INTERIORS

Five of the best things to do in the city this month

CITYIST

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48

How to make your art work best in your domestic spaces

ART

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52

What to look out for at the Affordable Art Fair

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

CRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

City versus country, from Jarvis Cockerpoo’s perspective

Meet Chloe Savage, local couture embroiderer

WALK THE WALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

MOTORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

Andrew Swift reminds us of the historic woodland on our doorstep

Volvo’s new XC60 has all the attributes to prove a hit

WILD BRISTOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

EDUCATION EXTRA

We’re in search of the elusive otter...

Find out more about the Red Maids’ and Redland High merger, and read our guide to good Bristol schooling 2017/2018

READ ALL ABOUT IT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

FOOD FOOD & & DRINK DRINK SPECIAL

Back-to-school books as recommended by Charlotte Pope

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68

ALL IN GOOD TASTE

THE CULTURE SCIENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Bristol’s dining and producer scene has never been more brilliant – we collate just some of our favourite eateries from the myriad

FOOD HEROES

At-Bristol has some very exciting news to share...

WHAT’S ON & HAPPENINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Get the diary out!

Learn more about Andalusian-born indie olive oil producer La Trama

NEWS Tidbits from our local eateries and producers

FAMILY PLANNER

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38

City fun for the younger ones

HABITAT

FESTIVAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92

Bristol Festival of Puppetry encourages plenty of conversation this year

House murals are having a positive effect on property prices – we talk to one homeowner who’s pleased as punch with her piece

EXHIBITIONS

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44

What’s on at our local galleries this month?

FASHION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 We’re in the studio for first dibs on House of Fraser’s AW17 range... ..............................................................................

Emmeline Stevens on how to dress the skin we’re in

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Elly West is all about low-maintenance, natural eco-systems right now

FEATURES

STYLE

GARDENING

ON THE COVER

One of our favourite looks from House of Fraser’s AW17 collection – see p23 for more... Photo by Chris Daw; chrisdawphotography.com


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Fill your home with talking points and excellent things to stare at – this is a closeup of ‘Ocean Spill’ by Victoria Young Jamieson, whose work you can see at the Affordable Art Fair this month

THIS MONTH WE’VE BEEN...

Admiring... ...Bertha the colour-in vintage caravan, rescued from a life of neglect in a Brighton garden and transformed by Bristol company Eggnog! It’s such a nice idea for a kids' party, and includes colour-in picnic blanket and picnic table, bunting and more...

from the

EDITOR

Feeling...

“...People will stare. Make it worth their while...” – Harry Winston

A

rt and fashion have always been two of our favourite routes of escape – whatever the clouds on the horizon – and with a change of season approaching, we decided to fill much of the September issue with them. While we may not be able to exert much control over the weather, the workplace, world politics; we can, of course, be nicer to those we neighbour, but also dress to feel good, and create a better, more calm-conducive environment for ourselves at home. Flick to p23 for style inspiration from House of Fraser – we recently teamed up to shoot pieces from the new AW17 collection – or to p30 where Emmeline Stevens is helping us to dress the skin we’re in. Meanwhile, with the city currently awash with creativity, we’re taking a look at highlights from the Affordable Art Fair (p52) and how to live in day-to-day harmony with your chosen piece once you’ve brought it home (p48). We can always rely on music to take us to another place too, so elsewhere in the mag, we’re absconding into the story of The Affirmations – the Bristol band heavily featured on world-famous, Brooklyn-born rapper and music mogul Jay-Z’s new record 4:44. The owner of the distinctive, soulful voice all over national radio at the moment, Hannah Williams, talks about the fateful call that came, like a bolt out of the blue from across the pond, on p40 – we can’t wait to see what kind of places the collaboration with Mr Carter might take them to. With the kids embarking on the autumn term, we’re also talking to headmistress Isabel Tobias on p68, about the merger reviving a partnership first begun during the time of the women’s suffrage movement, and bringing two of the city’s oldest schools together to create Bristol’s newest, Redmaids’ High. Then we’ve our annual guide to good schooling; in addition to our pick of Bristol’s brilliant dining scene; discussion of the positive effects of street art and house murals on the property market; exciting news from At-Bristol; Festival of Puppetry events and plenty more...

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR Editor’s image by Paolo Ferla; ferlapaolo.com

@thebristolmag

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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@thebristolmag

...Silky smooth, thanks to anti-ageing superfruit serum Scienea – the latest launch from Amphora Aromatics on Cotham Hill. It’s made from allnatural ingredients and works to enhance skin density even from the first application...

So excited... ...For ‘Bristol in the Sky’ to commence! Extended to include 11 & 12 September, the 100ft-high pop-up dining event will enable foodies to enjoy breakfast, cocktails, gelato, even pie in the sky!

...And the opening of Mrs Potts’ Chocolate House, owned by Aussie couple Michael and Jennifer Potts, who are bringing their take on the chocolatey treats popular Down Under to Park Street. We also can’t wait to visit new eateries Squeezed, Wellbourne and Jamaica Street Stores, mind. It’s all going on...


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ZEITGEIST

Top

5

things to do in SEPTEMBER

BEE HAPPY

Image © Jon Craig

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS Take a look at over 100 Bristol venues from a totally different perspective this month as Bristol Doors Open Days festival invites visitors to see, smell, taste and feel the city like never before. From 7 – 10 September, punters can go behind the scenes at local institutions including the Redcliffe Caves, MShed, Bristol Cathedral, Bristol Museum and Colston Hall among others. Pre-bookable events are largely sold out, but there is a whole host of free activities still available, from guided tours and discovery trails to machinery demonstrations at Underfall Yard, bell-ringing and pop-up choirs.

Fancy learning more about the busy bees who keep our gardens and allotments thriving? Head to the Bee and Pollination Festival at University of Bristol Botanic Garden this month to find out more about the insects, bats and birds which are vital to our existence. Taking place from 2 – 3 September, the festival line-up includes live hive demonstrations, displays from university researchers, a bee trail and willow weaving workshops for children. Entrance costs £6, students and staff go free.

Image © Nich Wray

• bristol.ac.uk

TAKE CARE Harold Pinter’s classic 20th-century play The Caretaker is as relevant today as it was back in 1960, with universal themes of power, innocence, corruption and allegiance coming under scrutiny as the story unfolds. Davies, a homeless man, is invited into the home of Aston under the pretence of friendship and shelter. But as Aston’s suspicious brother Mick becomes involved, each man becomes wary of the other, desperate to take advantage of the situation by any means necessary. Running at Bristol Old Vic from 9 – 30 September, this is an unmissable psychological study, blurring the line between truth and reality against an ever-changing political and social landscape. Tickets from £7.50.

• bristoldoorsopenday.org.uk

• bristololdvic.org.uk

WEDNESDAY’S CHILD Duh-duh-duh-dum *click click*... Yep, that’s the first thing that enters our heads when we hear news that The Addams Family musical is coming to Bristol Hippodrome this month. From 19 to 23 September, Bristol audiences will be invited into the weird and wonderful world of the gothic clan, complete with stage starlet Carrie Hope Fletcher as downcast Wednesday, Les Dennis as the eccentric Uncle Fester and Samantha Womack as sassy matriarch Morticia. Times have moved on for the family since the 1991 film, and surly teen Wednesday is all grown up – in fact, she’s fallen in love with a ‘normal’ young man. What will happen when the two families collide?

Image © Kirstin Prisk Photography

APRÈS SEA SkyBar returns to idyllic Chew Magna once again, bringing the usual exclusive bars, excellent street food and chilled DJ sets from 8 – 9 September. ‘Freestyle Friday’ will feature an eclectic mix of musical styles from electro swing to disco, while ‘Beach House Saturday’ keeps it classic with feel-good beats and a laid-back summer-time vibe. Party-goers won’t be going thirsty between the Tanqueray Gin Bar, Ca Bolani Prosecco Bar and Ciroc Cocktail Bar either; all nestled within purpose-built stretch marquees. Let the good times roll! Tickets cost £20.

• atgtickets.com Image © Matt Martin

• the-skybar.co.uk

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THE CITY THE BUZZ

My

BRISTOL This month we catch up with Jess Sutton, support worker at Milestones Trust in Staple Hill So Jess, what brought you to Bristol? I was born in Bristol, but only grew up here until the age of six. I then lived elsewhere in the South West before moving back to Bristol when I was 22. Tell us briefly about what you do I help people with learning disabilities and have done for about a year and a half now. I completed an apprenticeship with Milestones Trust, which I passed at the end of 2016.

Submerge yourself! A diverse line-up of events, from street art to sculpture, outdoor photography exhibitions to pedal-powered cinemas, is planned for Wildscreen’s Witness the Wild Festival – which will submerge Bristol in all things oceanic from 30 September to 8 October. Community groups, visual artists, scientists, wildlife filmmakers and photographers will be working together to transform places, such as the Bearpit and public spaces in BS5, into ocean-themed sanctuaries, giving city residents the opportunity to learn about marine species and habitats and how to help protect them. With Wildscreen’s £3,000 crowdfunding target successfully reached, the team can now deliver the planned marine-themed art murals in The Bearpit and BS5, community sculpture workshops with local artists, pedal-powered outdoor wildlife film screenings in parks, a 24/7, fully sustainable outdoor wildlife photography exhibition and concerts using recycled instruments. The first Witness the Wild festival took place in Bristol in 2016, as part of the biennial Wildscreen Festival, and was the charity’s biggest public outreach programme in its 34-year history, reaching over 45,000 people through its packed programme. “We’ve chosen to go water-based in 2017 because even though half of the world’s population lives within 100 kilometers of the sea, it’s suffering from a bad case of out of sight, out of mind,” said Lucie Muir, Wildscreen CEO. “Half of every breath we take comes from the ocean, yet humans are having detrimental impact on it, from overfishing to plastics pollution, but we can all take little actions to help protect one of our most precious resources.”

Tell us about the Proud to Care campaign It shines a positive light on care and encourages more people to think about becoming a support worker, like myself. The campaign started in Devon and has now expanded across a large number of councils in the South West – Bristol included. It’s been a huge success which now allows more people to get involved. What else are you up to at the moment? I’m currently planning on travelling to South America towards the end of the year. I want to spend time with family and then spend winter away. What are you reading? Well, travel books about South America, of course! But other than that, mainly Terry Pratchet – the amazing Discworld series in particular.

• crowdfunder.co.uk/witnessthewild

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What are you listening to? I’m loving Gypsy Unit at the moment, who also happened to be playing twice at Boomtown this year. Favourite watering hole? I really like King Street so I would choose Small Bar when looking for the best tequila in town, or Kong’s so I can beat my boyfriend at Street Fighter. Evening in or evening out? I would have to say both as I just can’t decide: I’m a Gemini, I can never choose. After a night out, I usually have to have an evening in to follow. What are you up to this month? In September I will be going to festivals in both Croatia and Italy as my boyfriend is performing. Which interests will you be pursuing? I enjoy Capoeira, the Brazilian martial art: it’s a mix between a dance and martial arts. The Malcom X Community Centre is a good place to do it; we spend time learning Portuguese songs as well. Favourite local walk? Snuff Mills Park every week.

• milestonestrust.org.uk


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ist

THE CITY Go outdoors!

The National Trust’s South West Outdoor Festival has revealed a line-up of inspirational adventure talent, ranging from extreme athletes to world-class climbers. There’ll be a range of live music and adventure pursuits on offer from 8 to 10 September at Cheddar Gorge, as well as an appearance by charismatic adventurer Sean Conway, who is most famous for – besides his fabulous fiery beard – becoming, in 2015, the first and only person in history to complete the Great British Triathlon: cycling, swimming and then running the length of Britain from Land’s End to John O’Groats. Tales of wilderness exploration and outdoor derring-do will continue with appearances from effervescent queen of adventure Anna McNuff, and talks by ‘extreme sleeper’ Phoebe Smith – editor of Wanderlust magazine and author of numerous books about walking on the wild side. Professional climber Matt Helliker will be introducing Citadel, a film about his ascent of an unclimbed Alaskan peak with fellow British alpinist Jon Bracey, while elsewhere, audiences hear from Nick Butter, a Bristolian currently in the process of running 196 marathons in 196 countries. The Sunday headline spot, meanwhile, will be occupied by acclaimed adventurer Jamie McDonald, who defied a childhood marred by serious illness to become real-life superhero AdventureMan – a caped crusader raising funds for the hospitals where he spent much of his youth. • nationaltrust.org.uk/SWOF

BRISTAGRAM Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your Bristol pics using #thebristolmag

@flowyo gabristol getting bendy in Bedminst er Fiesta pic Love this n rolyn.eato ca @ from

Gorgeous ec lip art by @geor se-inspired ge_torrington

Sean Conway – photo by Adam Hoskins

As seen on screen The ‘24 Hours in Bristol’ photo-marathon competition is back at the end of September with a new format – all entries must be taken on smartphones or tablets only. The annual contest, which randomly allocates an hour of the day or night to each entrant, results in a ‘day in the life’ of the city – 24-hour coverage of Bristol at work, rest and play. Organisers have changed the format to reflect the rapid development of smartphone camera technology and enable anyone to enter, without having to own expensive camera equipment. A new website, designed to handle the huge increase in photos expected, is being created by Element78, based at Paintworks, in time for the competition, which will take place from midday on 30 September. “Fabulous images of Bristol are taken every day and remain trapped in people’s phones,” said Mike Porter, managing director of 24 Hours in Our City. “We aim to set the creative heart of Bristol free and celebrate the vibrant cultural diversity of the city.” With over £6,000 of prizes on offer, including an overall first prize of £2,000 – one of the world’s largest prizes for a mobile photo competition – it might be time to find out what your smartphone is really capable of... ‘Two Priests’ by Thomas Boot took a prize last year

• 24hoursinbristol.co.uk

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the ing nibbles at Delicious-look tery, snapped ea ne ur bo ell new W reton by @nataliebre @bristolgarden suk met Bluebell at Ro yal York Crescent recent ly


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B R I S TOL MAGAZINE

Canine country-time

W

e’re city people. We have a city dog. And, like most Bristol dogs, Jarvis Cockerpoo spends his time at home, in the garden or in the park. Occasionally he gets to visit Harbourside and bark at the seagulls, and at weekends we often take him for a walk in the country. And the country is, as they used to say about the past, another country… I suppose there are different types of dog owner. There are the lazy ones, whose mutts rarely go further than the nearest patch of grass, and the super-sporty ones whose hounds compete with them in humanand-dog races. This really happens, though only, I think, Up North. There are families whose canine members are used to moving along at toddler speed, never straying far from the pushchair and its cargo of snacks, and there are elderly people whose ball-throwing skills match the fetching abilities of their equally elderly dogs. Unkind observers might suggest that the youthful Jarvis is involved in a bit of a mismatch with yours truly. However you work the numbers, he is closer to his doggy prime than I to mine. He’s young, fit and ready to chase anything that is willing to run away. The pigeons, crows and squirrels in the park are used to this sort of thing. They get chased constantly and by much scarier beasts than Jarvis. Lurcher vs squirrel is a contest which can only have one winner. On seeing him barrelling towards them, the crows take off lazily and flap their wings once or twice, the squirrels run up a tree. And so on. For obvious reasons, this tendency becomes more awkward in the country – despite us having taken Jarvis into the fields regularly, from day one, in the hope that he would become acclimatised. Horses scared the life out of him at first, and when he saw one, he would spring about stiff-legged, barking madly. Ms Bartleby, when very tiny, divided animals into two species. If she saw a cat, she would point at it, smile and say ‘Kitty’. A dog; ‘Dog’. But suppose it was an unfamiliar animal, such as a horse. What then? Seeing the creature, she would stop abruptly, and stand staring at it with narrowed eyes. We would wait. Then the arm would extend, the finger would unfurl and she would say firmly; ‘Dog!’ Everything that wasn’t a cat, it turned out, was a dog. For Jarvis, everything that wasn’t a dog was either a) something that wanted to eat him or b) something he wanted to eat. Horses were in the former category, but he soon got used to them, and can now be trusted to ignore them or even to say hello with a wiffle of the snout. As responsible dog owners, we spend every minute of a country walk on the alert for livestock. The most ancient-looking cowpat or echo of a distant baa sees him shoved on his lead. And for good reason. Once we were out walking in the hills near Abergavenny – or on a hill, I should say. One ridiculously big Welsh hill that we had, for some reason, decided to circumperambulate. The path ran parallel to the slope, through dense bracken. Jarvis was at my heels, from nose to tail a Good Dog. No sheep in sight. Then someone slipped, or needed water, or demanded a sweet, so I turned, and Jarvis was gone. I looked around, called, and then from ahead of us came an excited bark – the woof of the chase. I started running, then quickly stopped as three large sheep – young, strong and extremely speedy – came towards me, filling the path like a bobsleigh team. I jumped out of the way and, as Jarvis came hurtling after them – eyes wide with excitement – reached down and scooped him up. He ran on and on, legs pumping thin air like a cartoon dog, until it sunk in that he was caught. He still dreams of that brief chase, I think, his back legs twitching. But it’s strictly squirrels only these days... ■ 20 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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The Bristol Magazine is published by MC Publishing Ltd. An independent publisher. The Bristol Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout the city. We also have special distribution units in the following stores and many coffee shops, hotels and convenient pick-up points.

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BRISTOL MAGAZINE Bristol and Exeter House, Lower Approach, Temple Meads, Bristol BS1 6QS Telephone: 0117 974 2800 www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk © MC Publishing Ltd 2017 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bristol Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


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FASHION | AW17 SPECIAL

RED ALERT This über-autumnal frock from Biba, £99, reflects the AW17 catwalks’ fondness for shades of red, as well as the continuing trend towards tiered garments. (Boots: model’s own)

THE AUTUMN

FORECAST

This month, The Bristol Magazine teamed up with House of Fraser to shoot the new AW17 collection and play with new-season styles, palettes and patterns

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FASHION | AW17 SPECIAL

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FASHION | AW17 SPECIAL

CHECK MATE Work some executive realness with a nice little update on the Nineties power suit – see this fine example from Linea (jacket, £75, trousers, £55). The standard Smart White Shirt has undergone various reinventions too – the bow detail of Linea’s take (£25, pictured opposite) can be tied front or back to add elan. (Shoes: model’s own)


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FASHION | AW17 SPECIAL

LEATHER WORKER Faux leather is experiencing a surge in popularity. Make a statement with Biba’s Pu stretch leggings, £49, Linea’s flute-sleeve blouse, £45 – speaking subtly to the Seventies – and Issa’s Ariel box clutch, £40

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FASHION | AW17 SPECIAL

SEISMIC SHIFT We’re seeing quite a bit of this shade around – we’ve decided to call it ‘chartreuse’ – and easily envision the embellished Mila dress, £179 from Issa London, making a slick transition from day to night, especially teamed with a simple leather like this from Label Lab, £69, and Therapy’s Rory crossbody, £20

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FASHION | AW17 SPECIAL

PRETTY IN PINK We enjoyed the fuchsia trend that first poked its head into SS17 – and here, with Issa London’s Valentina bow-neck dress, £89, it translates into more everyday glamour with some tough-edge boots and a baker boy hat (model’s own)

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FASHION | AW17 SPECIAL

EASTERN PROMISE We’ve seen designers journeying to the Orient, to bring us wrap fronts, silky separates, mandarin collars and more – and we love Biba’s pyjama-style printed trousers, £69, tapping into the wide-leg style You can join House of Fraser’s fashion and beauty team and celebrate AW17, with a glass of Prosecco and a generous serving of style advice, at the Cabot Circus store on Friday 15 September, 5pm – 10pm. Watch the new-season fashion show at Café Zest from 8pm – 9pm (call 0117 9125552 to reserve a slot) and visit favourite beauty counters for tips and tricks for the new season, plus £10 off on spends of £50 or more*. *Visit houseoffraser.co.uk for full terms and conditions

CREDITS Director: Amanda Nicholls Photography: Chris Daw; chrisdawphotography.com Model: Franciska Bodnar; bigmustard.co.uk Clothing: House of Fraser; houseoffraser.co.uk Hair: Tomasz Sadowski; seanhanna.com Make-up: Shari Knowles; shariknowlesmakeup.com Assistants: Emma Payne, Kate Mitchell THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Emmeline will be imparting advice at Harvey Nichols this month (image by Nina Allwood)

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FASHION

STYLING THE SKIN YOU’RE IN When it comes to dressing well, it’s often just your outlook that needs a make-over, says Emmeline Stevens, stylist and founder of The Image Consulting Company

M

any people think being a personal stylist is all about fashion and air-kisses but, in fact, a lot of my job is about helping people to increase their selfconfidence. When people look for help with their wardrobe, a lot of the time, what they are actually in need of is a boost – someone to show them how great they already are, and help them show that to others. You don’t have to be a smaller dress size to look good. Everyone, no matter what body shape they are, has an issue with something – whether it’s fretting about the size of their bottom, a saggy neck, or thin legs. But you don’t have to change your body to feel better about how you look – a lot of the time it’s about changing how you perceive yourself. Finding new ways to dress your shape can boost your confidence and make you think differently about how you look.

your wardrobe. If you don’t have someone close who can do this with you, a stylist can help. Finally, remember that while fashion is fleeting, true style is for life. It’s not just about what you’re buying, it’s about how you feel in those clothes. No one can change the way you feel except for you.

Quick confidence boosters

Leather lovelies: Faux leathers are becoming so much more popular and the quality has improved greatly over the years. Whatever your leather, this is a great investment as it’s a trend that won’t be going anywhere for a while.

Before you start shopping for your new wardrobe, there are a few things you can do to help focus your mind and ensure you get a new look that brings out the best in you.

Dress the best bits The first step is to identify the areas of your body you do like, and focus on dressing these. If you dress to accentuate the parts you feel positive about, you’ll be thinking less about the negative parts – and it’ll show.

Find the joy Every item in your wardrobe should have a function and each outfit you put on needs to make you feel good. Before you buy anything new, go through the things you already have and focus on how you feel in those items. Which pieces of clothing do you feel most confident in? Which ones do you use to hide yourself? Toss out anything that doesn’t bring you joy and from now on, only buy something if it truly makes you feel brilliant.

This season’s hot buys Going shopping? Here’s what to look for on the high street right now… Ravishing reds: If there’s one colour to watch for this season, it’s red. The designer catwalks were awash with rouges of every shade and the high street will be too. Interestingly, red is a colour that creates a chemical reaction in the brain, so if you’re looking for a pick-me-up, red is a great colour to choose.

Wide-leg trousers: Put away those skinny jeans – this season we’re all over loose fitting, wide-leg trousers. This trend is about comfort, but it’s important to get the right tailoring for your shape as well to make sure it’s flattering. It’s a sharp look, so keep accessories simple. Shimmer and shine: This autumn/winter we’ll be seeing lots more sequins on the high street, giving partywear an ’80s disco feel. We can’t get enough of this look – a little bit of shimmer can lift any outfit. ■ • Emmeline will be speaking at Style Your Future – an afternoon of talks, workshops and inspiration from some of the UK’s top fashion insiders – at Harvey Nichols Bristol on 14 September; theimageconsultingcompany.co.uk

Picture yourself Over the years, items of clothing come and go and it’s hard to keep track of how your style has evolved. Go back through your old photo albums and dig out a few pictures of yourself where you were really happy with how you looked. The trends may have changed now, and your body may be different, but take note of the colours and shapes you were wearing at the time. You might find that there’s a pattern – for example, all your ‘feel good’ pictures might be of you wearing dresses, but you’re now in trousers all the time through necessity. There might be ways of adapting those old looks you loved before to suit who you are now. It helps to look back in order to look forward.

Get a second opinion While the opinion that matters most is your own, having someone else there can help give you some perspective. Draft in a supportive close friend or relative and try on a few items with them there to see which things they like you best in. Often we can’t see the positive in ourselves because we’re so busy focusing on the parts we don’t like. If you can see yourself the way they see you, it might make you think differently about

Red and widelegged trends, as seen in River Island’s regular and plus size ranges

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HAPPENINGS | SCIENCE

The much-loved centre is evolving and changing its name to reflect the ‘culture of curiosity’ that it aims to promote

SCI-CURIOUS At-Bristol is undergoing a dramatic AW17 make-over that will result in a ‘powerhouse of scientific inquiry’...

Y

ep, it’s all going on at the beloved local science centre and educational charity this month, which is currently evolving to become known as (drum roll, please) ‘We The Curious’. It’s a transformation that follows a two-year consultation with staff, visitors, city partners and communities around Bristol – with a view to developing a relevant and compelling new vision and mission – and has been made possible thanks to £3million in funding from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial and Wellcome Trust’s ‘Inspiring Science’ Fund. The intention with We The Curious is to create a ‘culture of curiosity’ through a creative, multi-disciplinary space and movement, where science and culture collide and collaborate – a shift in focus that was inspired by research indicating a desire for the centre to be more challenging for everyone, and widen participation in new ideas. The Inspiring Science funding will allow for a physical realisation of the new direction; including a complete redevelopment of the ground floor, which will be a playful, inclusive space designed to appeal to people of all ages, from all walks of life; with the first major exhibition space driven entirely by the curiosity of the city. Dubbed the Curious City project, this will open in two phases. The first will begin this month alongside the development of an open-plan entrance area where questions and ideas will be gathered from the public – gradually informing the content of the exhibition space. The second phase is due to be carried out in late 2018 and will see an array of new experiences inspired by these questions from Bristol and beyond. These will include a ‘Theatre of Curiosity’ – a new space encouraging questioning and exploring how science works; a real, live research lab and public extension of university labs, where anyone can participate; The Wall of Everything – an interactive experience, exploring where curiosity has taken us so far in terms of scientific endeavour; and an impressive-sounding digital interface where people can contribute their questions and explore and answer others; plus personalised digital technology throughout the centre. The ground floor space will specifically look to appeal to those who feel science is not for them, strengthening its educational and social equality mission at a time when Bristol needs it; only 13% of children from disadvantaged Bristol communities are going to university compared to 44% in inner London, and there is a real lack of diversity among those taking up science, tech, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects and careers. “Since opening in 2000, the At-Bristol team have achieved so much,” says Phil Winfield, CEO of We The Curious. “We’ve brought people from all backgrounds together around inspirational experiences, using

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interactive exhibits, hands-on experiments, workshops, activities, and presenter-led shows in the UK’s only 3D digital planetarium. We run an extensive educational programme, supporting tens of thousands of students to build their skills in practical, cutting-edge science through our curriculum-enhancing programme, and we welcome thousands of visitors from under-represented areas and communities of Bristol to enjoy At-Bristol for free on our Hello Weekends. “But we want to do so much more. We believe in the power of curiosity. It unites both science and the arts. It helps us look at things with fresh eyes. It brings people together to solve the world’s smallest and biggest problems. Curiosity is a driver for exploration and learning, and at the heart of creativity. If we can inspire curiosity, our visitors are much more likely to continue their exploration beyond our walls. “We will create a powerhouse of scientific enquiry and playful exploration for the city. We will inspire and encourage people to interact and question all that they see, asking them to think again and think more deeply about the world in which we live. We will help build a new age of curiosity by nurturing people’s inherent inquisitive natures. “We believe that establishing a strong culture of curiosity in people of all ages and backgrounds helps to create a resilient, connected, creative and compassionate society that unites resources and disciplines to find solutions for some of the world’s toughest problems. “Curious City will help bring our new vision to life – connecting science and culture, citizens and research in the first major science centre exhibition generated entirely by the curious questions of its city.” The new logo for the centre will be visible in the building and online from 14 September, along with the new name, and a campaign is being launched to raise a further £1.3million to make Curious City a reality. Keep an eye on the website and social media channels to see how you can help launch the next generation of innovators... ■ • at-bristol.org.uk Curious City timeline • 11 – 13 September: At-Bristol closes for phase one refurb • 14 September: We The Curious opens with new foyer space • September 2017 onwards: We The Curious starts to gather questions and ideas from visitors • Late 2018: Building of Curious City – experiences and spaces inspired by questions from Bristol and beyond. • 2019: Curious City opens


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LOCAL | EVENTS

WHAT’S ON

Noah and the Whale frontman Charlie Fink comes to The Lantern

Denai Moore comes to The Louisiana, image © In Bloom

FROM 1 SEPTEMBER 2 – 3 SEPTEMBER, ALL DAY

Shindig Weekender Feast, Critchill Manor Feast your eyes and ears at this weekend festival with the likes of Crazy P, My Bad Sister and Late Nite Tuff Guy, plus a threecourse, nautical-themed feast in the evening. Boutique camping available, plus a variety of stalls and prosecco bar. Tickets from £49 to £79; shindig-events.co.uk 3 SEPTEMBER, 8.30AM

Walk/Run for Parkinson’s, Ashton Court Bring family and friends along to support by either walking or running their way around the beautiful Ashton Court estate. Registration costs £10 for the walk, £15 for the 10k run; parkinsons.org.uk

FROM 8 SEPTEMBER 8 – 10 SEPTEMBER, TIMES VARY

Affordable Art Fair, Brunel’s Old Station The Affordable Art Fair returns to Bristol this month with a host of fantastic artists presenting their work. Tickets from £3 to £12; affordableartfair.com

in Gloucestershire, complete with horse and dog shows, falconry, local food and drink, fishing, craft, archery and plenty more. Tickets from £3 to £12; framptoncountryfair.co.uk FROM 13 SEPTEMBER, 6.30PM – 7.45PM & PRACTICE UNTIL 8.30PM

Argentine Tango Classes, The Redland Club Learn the authentic, elegant, social style of tango dancing with Tango West, and practice posture, technique, balance and connection with both your partner and the music at your own pace. Classes cost £8 each, or £40 for six classes prebooked; tangowest.co.uk 14 SEPTEMBER, 7PM – 10PM

Beautiful Burma: An Evening with a Balloon Adventurer, The Bristol Improv Theatre InsideBurma Tours present balloon adventurer, travel writer and photographer Dr. Allie Dunnington, offering audiences the opportunity to hear about her experiences of flying high in beautiful Burma. Tickets cost £6; beautifulburma.eventbrite.co.uk

FROM 15 SEPTEMBER

10 SEPTEMBER, 9AM

15 SEPTEMBER, 6PM – 11PM

Frampton Country Fair, Frampton Estate

Cocktails in the City, The Passenger Shed

Enjoy a traditional country fair

Sixteen pop-up bars including

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Chef Romy Gill MBE brings the tastes of India to Harvey Nichols

The Milk Thistle and Pata Negra will be serving the finest tipples, from highball classics to innovative blends, for one night only at The Passenger Shed this month. Tickets cost £12; cocktailsinthecity.com 16 SEPTEMBER, 1.15PM

Opera Highlights, Lord Mayor’s Chapel Soprano Mimi Doulton, tenor Stephen Mills and baritone Wesley Biggs star in a concert of operatic highlights, presented by Paul Bambrough. Entrance is free, donations welcome; lordmayorschapel.org.uk 17 SEPTEMBER, 12.30PM – 6.30PM

Tiger Talks, Kings Weston House The Tiger Time wildlife charity presents a series of motivational self-development talks from Stuart Doughty, Nick Elston, Dan Gregory and other inspirational speakers. Tickets cost £32.45; eventbrite.co.uk 19 – 24 SEPTEMBER, TIMES VARY

Encounters Film Festival, Watershed The renowned short-film festival returns to Bristol this month, bringing animation, drama, comedy, romance, horror and more from international filmmakers to the Watershed cinema. Ticket prices vary; encounters-festival.org.uk

21 SEPTEMBER, 8PM

Charlie Fink: Cover My Tracks, The Lantern Noah and the Whale frontman Charlie Fink combines songwriting and theatre in this folk tale for the modern world. The captivating story questions what it takes to disappear in today’s interconnected and surveilled society. Tickets cost £21.50; colstonhall.org

FROM 22 SEPTEMBER 23 SEPTEMBER, 10AM

Stomp for Cancer, Millennium Square Mark the 10th anniversary of the Penny Brohn national centre’s royal opening with a sixmile stomp through Bristol, following The Chocolate Path and River Avon Towpath. Registration costs £10 for adults, children under 12 go free; pennybrohn.org.uk 23 SEPTEMBER – 8 OCTOBER, TIMES VARY

The Great Bath Feast, Various Venues in Bath Spend two weeks celebrating the finest food in Bath, with workshops, tastings and talks at foodie venues including The Abbey Hotel, The Scallop Shell, The Salamander, Simi’s Kitchen and many more. Ticket prices vary per event; greatbathfeast.co.uk


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24 SEPTEMBER, 4PM & 7PM

Insight Ensemble Goes Outer-Space! The Loco Klub Join the Insight Ensemble for a mystical, dazzling, heart-racing journey through space and time, exploring the classical soundscape of our universe. Tickets from £6 to £14; headfirstbristol.co.uk 26 – 30 SEPTEMBER, 2.30PM & 7.30PM

My Fair Lady, Bristol Hippodrome Watch the timeless tale of local cockney flower girl turned London socialite with BLOC’s production, featuring all the favourite tunes. Tickets from £16.90; atgtickets.com 27 SEPTEMBER, 7.30PM

The Flavours Of India, Harvey Nichols Celebrated Indian chef Romy Gill MBE brings the flavours of her home country to Harvey Nichols this month with a four-course feast, plus a Crazy Gin cocktail on arrival. Tickets cost £50 per person; call 0117 916 8898 to book 27 SEPTEMBER, 7.30PM

Denai Moore, Louisiana British-Jamaican artist Denai Moore brings her blend of R&B, folk and soul to The Louisiana, with tracks from her new album We Used To Bloom. Tickets cost £7.50; thelouisiana.net FROM 28 SEPTEMBER, 7.30PM – 9.30PM

The Gasworks Scratchy Folk Orchestra, Gasworks Studio Join this relaxed and sociable folk orchestra for a fortnightly evening of music-making, with traditional styles including Celtic, EasternEuropean, American and more. All abilities welcome, knowledge

of sight-reading is preferable. Costs £7 per rehearsal; gasworksscratchy-folk-orchestra.co.uk 28 SEPTEMBER, 6.30PM – 11.30PM

Fitzhardinge Dinner, Bristol Cathedral Join the Bristol Cathedral Trust for a black-tie gala dinner in celebration of the cathedral’s musical programme, with performances from the choir and stories from the archives. Tickets cost £95; bristol-cathedral.co.uk Hear about the experiences of Burma balloon adventurer Dr Allie Dunnington

30 SEPTEMBER, 10AM – 5.30PM

Open Day, College of Naturopathic Medicine Find out more about natural health with talks on longevity from nutritional therapist Caroline Pringle, food for vitality with Rosie Letts, an introduction to CNM training from Liz Elliot and more. Tickets cost £10; naturopathy-uk.com

Find collectables and antiques at Ashton Court this month

NEXT MONTH... 1 OCTOBER, 10AM – 3.30PM

Antique, Vintage and Collectables Fair, Ashton Court Mansion Browse 40 stalls offering fine jewellery, china, furniture, memorabilia, pictures, retro items, clothing and more, then stop off at the café for an afternoon cream tea. Entrance costs £2, under-16s go free; anniehawksley@blueyonder.co.uk 19 OCTOBER – 4 NOVEMBER, 1PM, 2.30PM & 7.30PM

Waiting For Godot, Tobacco Factory Theatres Samuel Beckett’s 20th-century classic tells the story of Vladimir and Estragon, whose existential discussions and unusual, comedic encounters ease their fruitless wait for Godot. Tickets from £14 to £18; tobaccofactorytheatres.com

BLOC Productions brings My Fair Lady to Bristol Hippodrome

EDITOR’S PICK... 23 SEPTEMBER, 7.30PM

The Big Anniversary Sing with BBC Radio Bristol, Colston Hall Join Colston Hall’s 150th birthday celebrations for an evening of live performances championing the notable musicians who have played the venue over the years, from Duke Ellington and The Beatles to Shirley Bassey and The Beach Boys. What’s more, you can join the revelry as an individual or group performer, with a pre-show rehearsal at 2pm and showcase at 7pm, backed by a live band. Tickets cost £10 for performers, £5 for audience members. • colstonhall.org

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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

FAMILY FUN

Our monthly guide to what’s on in Bristol for younger folk to enjoy?

Meet Fred, Tobacco Factory Theatres, Monday 4 September, 2pm & 7.30pm Meet Fred: a two-foot tall puppet who just wants to live a normal life, get a job and find a girlfriend. Instead, he fights prejudice every day, with the threat of losing his PLA (Puppetry Living Allowance) looming on the horizon. This touching, hilarious show is presented as part of Bristol Festival of Puppetry by Hijinx, a theatre group which celebrates diversity by including talented actors with learning disabilities in every show. Suitable for those aged 14 and over – contains strong language. Tickets from £11 to £15. • tobaccofactorytheatres.com; bristolfestivalofpuppetry.org

Top pick

community group Growing Together, these self-guided trails are designed to encourage city-based children to get outdoors and explore the natural world. Other activities on the launch day include Stick Man-inspired food, goody give-aways, craft workshops and more. Entrance is free; growingtogether.community/stick-man

DON’T MISS... Bee Movie and Bee Hotel Workshop, Watershed, Friday 1 September – Thursday 7 September, 1pm The next generation’s answer to A Bug’s Life, Bee Movie brings a whole new wave of insect-based hilarity to the big screen this month. The 2007 film talls the tale of rebellious honey bee Barry, who swaps the daily grind of life at the Honex corporation for cosmopolitan Manhattan – resulting in a friendship with human florist Vanessa. If you want to get the little ones buzzing beforehand, there’s also a bee hotel workshop on the Friday from 10am. Tickets from £4.50 to £6.50; watershed.co.uk

Hippodrome Glee Club, Bristol Hippodrome, weekly from Sunday 17 September, 10am Polish up your performing skills and improve your singing technique with a weekly Glee Club at the historic Bristol Hippodrome. Musical theatre-loving participants will learn to sing harmonies and rehearse dance routines, leading up to a glittering end-ofterm showcase on 9 July. Suitable for ages 8 – 18. Sessions cost £130 per term; for more information or to book sessions email alisoncobb@theambassadors.com

Stick Man Trails, Windmill Hill City Farm, launching on Wednesday 13 September, all day Join Stick Man, the character created by Gruffalo author Julia Donaldson and illustrator Axel Scheffler, for an exciting nature trail around Windmill Hill City Farm. Organised in association with local

The Flea Circus, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, Friday 22 September, 6pm – 8pm Dr Tim Cockerill reveals the secrets of the flea circus – fleas pulling chariots, riding tricycles and even fighting duels with perfectly crafted miniature swords. How do you feed a flea? Which household appliance spelled the demise of the Flea Circus in the 1950s? Find out in this family-friendly talk. Entrance is free; bristolmuseums.org.uk

The Six Wives of Henry VIII, Tyntesfield, Saturday 23 September, 7.30pm – 9pm Following a successful run at Bristol Old Vic, Living Spit theatre company present their hilarious two-man show about the infamous

The Six Wives of Henry VIII comes to Tyntesfield, image ©Farrows Creative

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Tudor king, Henry VIII. Featuring original music, silly songs, Barbie dolls and a distinct lack of historical accuracy, this is one unforgettable comedy show. Head to the National Trust’s beautiful North Somerset estate to discover how two blokes can embody an egotistical monarch and his six other halves – all without killing each other in the process. Suitable for ages 14 and up. Tickets cost £16; nationaltrust.org.uk/events

Bristol Academy of Drama Sessions (BS8 1SR), every Saturday from 9 September, 9am – 11am Bristol Academy of Drama’s term-time Saturday sessions offer students the chance to play drama games and learn many different theatre styles, from puppetry to shadow theatre, building to a final performance. Next term will see a retelling of James and the Giant Peach in February. Style-specific oneday workshops and week-long workshops are also available during the holidays. Suitable for ages 7 to 12. Fees are £150 per term; for more information, visit bristolacademydrama.wixsite.com


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MUSIC

AFFIRMATION

Meet the soul singer whose world was turned upside down after a call from one of the planet’s most famous rappers

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f you’ve heard the title track from Jay-Z’s latest album 4:44, you’ll have heard the soulful sounds of lesser-known (just for the time being, we reckon) artist Hannah Williams and her Bristol band The Affirmations. Some how, some way, their song, Late Nights & Heartbreak, mysteriously made its way across the pond to the rapper and mogul, and onto his so-called ‘apology track’ to Beyoncé, and has now got the act some serious global attention. We got the inside story... How did the 4:44 collab come about? No ID (producer) played it to Jay-Z along with a bunch of other soul tunes and…it spoke to him! What was that phone call with Jay-Z like? Tell us everything. I was convinced, when my drummer and manager Jai called me to tell me to “expect a phone call from Jay-Z”, that it was some elaborate wind-up. But apparently not. Mr Z called me 48 hours later to ask if he could have the sessions from our studio recordings and to re-record some alternate permutations of the chorus lyrics in case he wanted to diversify from the implied meaning in the original. I was on a coach on the way home from the Cathedrals Group Choirs Festival with about 50 students from the music department I run at the University of Winchester. We were nearly home when I thought to check my phone and let my husband know to come and pick me up. To my absolute shock and disbelief, I had missed calls from a US number and a text from Jay-Z saying: “Hello, this is Jay. Please let me know when you are available for a quick chat. Thank you.” WHAT?! Really?! So I went straight home and called him from my tiny rented house in Winchester and that was it. He didn’t use the 40 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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additional versions in the end which I am really pleased about as it shows that the original track totally speaks for itself. Had you any idea of the way your voice would be used on it? Not a flippin’ clue. We were all so surprised when we heard it, along with the rest of the planet, on 30 June. The fact that nearly half the track is just our sample, with no rapping over it, is mindblowing! We had no clue that it was destined to be the title track either. That was another shock. I’m delighted with the finished product and love that Jay-Z’s ‘rap’ is more like ‘floetry’. It lets the song speak for itself and doesn’t disrupt the natural rhythm and impetus of the original track. How and when did the band form? My original band, Hannah Williams and the One Takes/The Tastemakers, was formed back in 2009. Since then, it’s undergone a huge amount of changes and development. We have been a solid unit for about two years. The Affirmations are my best friends and I want to spend the rest of my life making music and history with them (I love you, guys!) You have a unique vocal sound. Who has influenced you? There are so many artists who have been at the forefront of soul at one time or another – or permanently, in some cases. I don’t think any artist wants to sound ‘like’ anyone else but we are all shaped and encouraged by what sounds we surround ourselves with. A short list: Nina Simone, Etta James, Charles Bradley, Sharon Jones, Otis Redding, Bill Withers, Minnie Ripperton, Jamie Liddell, Amy Winehouse, Michael Jackson, Lee Fields, Martha Reeves, Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye, Mahalia Jackson and Curtis Mayfield.

Above: Hannah and the band had absolutely no idea what Jay-Z’s finished track would sound like, and didn’t know it would end up being the lead single Opposite page, top to bottom: The soulful singer in action; all of Hannah’s band are Bristol born and bred


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MUSIC

We love the sort of Seventies-esque soul vibe you’ve given to Dazed and Confused – is that a fave song of yours? We are all Led Zep fans so the fact that track ended up on the album shouldn’t be a huge surprise, but how it came to be is a pretty cool story. Dazed was never on the recording plan but, one day, the band started chatting and jamming some Led Zeppelin tracks in between recording sessions and Malcolm said we should give it a go. This was something of an epiphanic moment where we suddenly realised what a killer track it could be with a soul/funk twist. We mashed together some original Jake Holmes and Jimmy Page lyrics to get the best of both versions and tell the story we wanted, with my character as protagonist. I am so glad we did it. It certainly takes everyone by surprise and gets a mega cheer at our live shows. At Wilderness festival, serendipity stepped in when Robert Plant just happened to be playing on the main stage just before our set. I really hope he heard our version drifting through the Oxfordshire air! Were you a big fan of Jay-Z before the feature? Of course, you’d have to be living under a rock to have not been influenced, or at least intrigued, by his work. Is there any other musical royalty you’d love to collaborate with? Yes. Hundreds. To name but a few, Charles Bradley, Jamie Liddell, Lee Fields, Gregory Porter, Martha Reeves, Mark Ronson, Adele, Missy Elliott... You come from a very musical background – we hear you could read music before you could read words! Have you ever wanted to do anything else or has a musical path always felt a foregone conclusion? Music has pretty much always been ‘the one’ for me. As a child, I remember wanting to be an opera singer; I had this grand idea of opening a vegetarian opera café! I still think that has a ring to it! As I got older, I realised opera was not my favourite and dabbled with a whole host of genres. Then, about 10 years ago, I had a very troubled period and nearly gave it all up completely. I thought I would try being a driving instructor instead. Seriously – what was I thinking!? Thanks to my incredible friends and family, I was pulled out of a serious depression and straight back into music with a totally new joie de vivre. I have never looked back. Well, only for inspiration and to shove my middle finger up at that moment in my life. We hear the (amazing) late Sharon Jones was a fan? She is my hero. What a woman! What a performer! What a human! Rest in peace, beautiful soul. We were lucky enough to support Sharon many years ago in Leeds and we got about an hour after the show to chat. She was so funny. A brilliant raconteur – full of wisdom and advice for us. She said I was ‘blessed’ which pretty much floored me! It was an amazing endorsement, especially coming so close to the start of my soul career. We still have a great relationship with Saundra and Starr (The Dapettes) who are carrying on with the Sharon Jones ethos of doing everything with love, grit and hard work. They have been so beautifully supportive of us and have personally given me a lot of advice and care over the years. Truly humble artists! Maybe one day I will get to record with Daptone with them and my amazing backing vocalists. (Come on, universe; make it happen!) Where did you record your album? At the Quatermass studio in Dalston London, with the totally awesome Malcolm Catto (co-founder and producer of The Heliocentrics). Is there anyone in Bristol who particularly inspired you or helped you on your way? Absolutely. My entire band and collection of songwriters live in Bristol. Many are Bristol born ‘n’ bred. I live in Winchester (very different to Bristol) and would move to Bristol in a heartbeat if I could. It is my favourite place to be on the planet. The sun always shines and good things always happen. The city has so much vibrancy in every possible sense of the word. Music is at the very heart of that and there’s such an acceptance of difference. Difference has dignity in Bristol. I love that. What’s pumping out of your own speakers right now? Lakuta’s 2016 album Rice and Peace. We shared a festival stage with them at Fieldview Festival and they were totally killer! Awesome fun backstage, too. What’s in the pipeline for the rest of the year? Hopefully a whole lot of touring. We are working hard on new material and booking up for shows so watch this space... ■ • Follow the band on Twitter: @HannahFWilliams

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CITY | EVENT Another must-see is YouTube hit Barnaby Dixon’s MicroPuppetry show at Tobacco Factory Theatres on 1 September

MASTER OF PUPPETS Another fabulously creative Bristol festival returns to start conversations about difference and inclusion

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orget what you thought you knew about puppets, because Bristol Festival of Puppetry is returning from 1 – 10 September, to start conversations with audiences and show them how iPads can become hand puppets, that film and animation is a form of puppetry, and that puppets, just like humans, can come in all shapes and sizes, with different abilities. With events at Watershed, Tobacco Factory Theatres and Puppet Place in Bristol, this year’s line-up of events welcomes artists from all over the globe and will reflect how the world has changed over the past two years since the last festival in 2015. The programme has been produced by Chris Pirie and Rachel McNally to ensure there is something for everybody, from free events for the curious, who are new to puppetry and wish to give it a try, to workshops for both wannabe and professional puppeteers, and BSL events for people with hearing impairments or other additional needs. “We are so excited to be inviting incredible artists from around the world to Bristol, to showcase the best of UK and local talent, and to stimulate conversations about puppetry in all its unique guises,” say the pair of the events, which will provide an opportunity for everyone in Bristol to celebrate the city’s diverse creative offering and for the producers to reach new communities with their rich programme of live shows, film and free activities – including...

physical and object theatre, focusing on visual performance and choreographic installation, placing movement at the centre of Olivia Lathuillière’s artistic approach. Yamasong: March of the Hollows, 10 September (6pm), Watershed An automated girl and tortoise warrior journey with a band of outlaws on an incredible quest. Their one hope is to find a legendary relic to defeat an army and save the creatures of their world. A gorgeous allpuppetry film continues in the epic visual storytelling tradition of The Dark Crystal and is brought to life by an incredible cast including Nathan Fillion, Abigail Breslin and Whoopi Goldberg. • bristolfestivalofpuppetry.org Image by Olivia Faye

Meet a puppet named Manu

Creatures of Bristol Carnival, 2 September (12pm), North Street The festival will be kick-started with a free family parade of carnival creatures, giant puppets and live music. A true celebration of Bristol’s creative community spirit. Tricyckle, 7 & 8 September (8pm), Tobacco Factory See a UK premiere from Canada’s Les Sages Fous, inspired by the collectors of Trois-Rivières who travel the city on old tricycles in search of junk. Tricyckle breaks the barriers between high culture and folk art as Les Sages Fous presents a theatre of paradoxes; grotesque and poetic, ritual and mundane, domestic and marvellous. The company recreates a lost world where the mask, the puppet, the object and the human can co-exist. A theatre as surprising and disturbing as it is undisciplined and wild. La Causeuse, 9 & 10 September (8pm), Tobacco Factory Without a word, a young woman guides her audience through darkly comic and poignant dialogues as she revisits the memories of a sordid and doomed romance. As wandering hands seduce and frolic, she dances and wrestles with her inner demons. A virtuosic piece of physical theatre from Equivoc, at the crossroads of dance, mime,

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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Quentin Blake exhibition, Sky Blue Framing & Gallery, September until December Illustration fans should head to Sky Blue Framing and Gallery, on North View in Westbury Park, this month. They have just launched their autumn season with half of the gallery showing new, limitededition print releases from the much-loved illustrator Quentin Blake – based on the wonderful Roald Dahl stories. This exhibition will be running all the way up to Christmas – which is helpful for those looking for a great present for any avid Dahl and Blake fans in the family. There is also a set of eight prints on show, based on Roald Dahl’s cheeky Revolting Rhymes, and another eight based on children’s classics such as The Twits, The Witches, The Enormous Crocodile, Matilda and other favourites. • skybluegallery.co.uk

Yatika Starr Fields, Rainmaker Gallery, until 30 September Native American painter and muralist Yatika Fields presents dynamic oil paintings rich in colour, movement and symbolism. Immersed in cultural practices from a young age, Field’s Indigenous sensibilities are integral to his art in powerful and often understated ways. His pictures are studded with references to tribal traditions, organic forms and aspects of contemporary life. “My work begins swiftly and intuitively as momentum shapes the composition on canvas,” he says. “I challenge myself to integrate the physical environment around me with its unseen emotional life.” • rainmakerart.co.uk

The Other Art Fair, Arnolfini, 1 – 3 September Artists from Bristol and across the UK will be joining together at Arnolfini at the start of this month, to meet potential buyers face-to-face and create a social, relaxed atmosphere intended to make first-time art buyers feel welcome. Visitors can discover artworks covering a broad range of genres from photography, stencilling, painting, sculpture, mixed media, ceramics to street art and taxidermy. Abstract artist Angie Kenber will be bringing her bright, bold and expressive artworks to the fair while local poet Clive Birnie will exhibit his detailed montages using cut up text and images. Meanwhile, Adrian Higgins will exhibit his limited edition digital prints, which are created through a collage of photographs, wallpaper swatches and Victorian ephemera; as Chris Otley showcases meticulous works on paper in graphite, with a focus on natural history. You’ll also be able to see how Grace Jackson’s work uses art as a form of therapy to talk about the issues that affect our society – particularly women’s issues and mental health – while Yuki Aruga shows intricate oil paintings and Evie Kitt (whose work is pictured to the left) exhibits her own unique and contemporary works. The accessible nature of the event means that around 60% of its audience are new to the art-buying experience. Artists are chosen by a selection committee of art industry experts to ensure a broad range of genres are showcased, and prices start from £50. • bristol.theotherartfair.com

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Evening Primroses

Foxgloves, Rhossili Bay

Grasses in the Dunes

Wales Revisited: Sept 2 - Oct 3 Solo Exhibition of new paintings by Judith I Bridgland Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol BS8 4UB

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EXHIBITIONS

Martin Greenland, Simon Allen and Jack Doherty exhibition, Beaux Arts Bath, 11 September – 7 October Former John Moores Prize winner Martin Greenland brings a striking collection of landscapes to Beaux Arts Bath, for the first show of their autumn programme. Part real, part imagination, they are a homage to the beauty of his native Lake District. Simon Allen’s wall sculptures are breathtaking too – gold and white gold gilded on to carved wood, they dazzle and shine, and are particularly special in low light. Meanwhile, Jack Doherty will be displaying his soda-fired porcelain. • beauxartsbath.co.uk

Water Salad on Monday, 28 September – 1 October, Elm Tree Farm BAFTA-winning Bristol filmmaker Esther May Campbell’s immersive, free photographic exhibition on a working farm in Stapleton. This show is the result of a year in situ at the farm where Esther has been watching life and death, harvests and growth, mud and blood and a lot of laughter. The farm has animals, plants, volunteers and adults with learning disabilities all working together, and the exhibition will capture daily life in black and white, with images pinned to various surfaces on the farm to create a treasure trail for visitors. • esthermaycampbell.com; elmtreefarm.org

● Wales Revisited, Lime Tree Gallery, 2 September – 3 October In 2012, Lime Tree Gallery held a very successful solo exhibition called ‘The Great Welsh Journey’, documenting Judith Bridgland’s travels through Wales in the form of dramatic landscape paintings and drawings. Since, the artist has returned to Wales, mostly to stay on the Gower Peninsula, in order to gather material for this new show – stamped through with colour, energy and drama – which hopes to demonstrate how revisiting a location can help you understand the landscape and see it with fresh eyes. Expect explorations of the beauty of this area, with its magnificent coastline, through a variety of paintings, drawings and new media. Judith will present in the gallery between 11am and 3pm on 2 September. Complementing the exhibition is a new series of fine linocut prints by Welsh artist Trevor Sowden, as well as beautiful semi-figurative sculpture by the Welsh-born Helen Sinclair. • limetreegallery.com

● Abigail McDougall exhibition, Coldhabour Framery & Gallery, 1 – 30 September September sees a welcome return to the city by the ever-popular Abigail McDougall, with a new collection of Bristol paintings and prints, alongside gallery regulars including Cath Read and Bex Glover. Potter Teän Kirby is back with more of her signature rocking birds and quirky pots, and is joined by local ceramicist Nicola Mortimer, whose use of vibrant colours, geometric patterns and asymmetric shapes, is bang on trend this autumn. • coldharbourgallery.co.uk

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ART & INTERIORS

Choose a work of art that creates a talking point; such as ‘Blue Swirls’ by Dragica Carlin

HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS So you’ve found the perfect piece. But how can you make sure the two of you live in harmony, day to day? Art dealer Jessica Lloyd-Smith has the answers...

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ART & INTERIORS

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uying art is one of life’s true pleasures. It’s fantastic for the soul on so many levels: when you find a work that you connect with, it’s something you can grow old with and pass on to future generations, and you are supporting a flourishing artist whose life’s work is the DNA of the very piece you’ve chosen. Art dealers and artists want people to buy art for all of these reasons and, ultimately, we want people to buy art for love. To be struck by Cupid’s arrow when they see the perfect artwork and – BOOM – for it to get under their skin so that they simply can’t walk away without taking the piece with them. But then looms the age-old question – will it match the sofa? How the romance is shattered... But the reality is that you do need to live with your art. The likelihood is that your artwork will outlive the décor in your home, so choosing something that you love is important – but we all want to live in comfortable, functional homes, not stark gallery spaces, so we need our art to help create a warm and personal living environment. So, how do you find the happy medium and select great art that suits your space? The chances are that if you are allowing your heart and personal style to lead when choosing both your art collection and your interior décor, they should naturally work harmoniously together, but here are a few tips to help make sure you choose art for your home wisely.

Personal style There is no real ‘right or wrong’ when it comes to art styles. Reputable art fairs and galleries will constantly curate their collection to showcase strong pieces, so the works on display should be of a good standard, which just leaves you to see which pieces you are drawn to.

Create the right ambience You need to think about the feel of the room in which you want your new piece to hang. Your choice of artwork can completely change the mood of a room. A serene, sensitive landscape can create an oasis of calm for sleeping or reading, while a bold, graphic print can transform the same room into a contemporary, energetic space. Understanding how you want to feel in your space is key.

First and foremost, always buy art you love. We love ‘Essence’ by Ione Parkin

natural and artificial – which may influence your choice. A backlit light box mounted with a photograph or a piece of neon urban art will have less impact in a very bright room than it would in a dark, cosy snug, for example. Artworks with a subtle or complex palette work well on a brightly-lit wall (ideally a wall flooded with natural light) where the detail really shines through, however don’t forget to rotate the positions of your art collection from time to time to prevent light damage to any of your pieces.

Your current collection

Consider the lighting While thinking about the mood, also consider the lighting – both

You also need to think about any other art you have in your home and consider the overall flow throughout the space. Don't be afraid to mix up the styles. Contemporary and traditional art, paintings and photographs can all sit comfortably side-by-side. Likewise, very contemporary abstract artworks can look spectacular in an old house, just as a more traditional painting can look sensational in a very minimalist, modern interior. Now is the time to play around with the balance of old versus new and curate a very personal collection.

Size matters

A bold, graphic print, like ‘Celebrate Our Tastes of LA’ by Bonnie and Clyde, can transform your room into a contemporary, energetic space

Do you have the space to display one very large piece and go for maximum drama? If you are set on the idea of a large piece and you’ve found the perfect artwork, it’s a good idea to hang it in plenty of space and keep the rest of the room minimal. You don’t necessarily need a huge room for a large work of art but you do need to give it breathing room.

Salon-style character An alternative to having one large piece is to create the same drama using a cluster of smaller prints, drawings and studies. This ‘salon style’ hang can be extremely effective and give a cool, contemporary feel to a wall. The key to this type of hang is to have a unifying theme across the pieces – maybe they’re all monochrome or have a common subject matter. Keep the frames and styles varied and throw in a few unusual pieces like mirrors, plates, maps or postcards – anything that will show off your personality and individuality.

Ú

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ART & INTERIORS

Commission a favourite artist to create a personal, unique work tailored for your space

A serene, sensitive landscape can create an oasis of calm

Hang larger artworks such as this piece by Mark Mawson, in plenty of space and keep the rest of the room minimal

Another dimension Don’t forget that art doesn’t only have to take up wall space. Ceramics and sculptures are incredibly collectable and add interesting focus to a space.

Get personal If you really can’t find that perfect piece, it’s always worth thinking about commissioning an artist to create a bespoke piece for you. Take time to find an artist whose style you love, chat to them about what you are looking for and trust their experience to create a personal, unique work, tailored for your space.

Do your paperwork It’s very hard to say whether a work of art will increase in value over time, as resale price is dependent on many factors including demand, quality and market conditions, but it’s always worth keeping hold of receipts and any other paperwork from your purchase in case your chosen piece does become an investment.

Be brave Finally, try to step out of your comfort zone and trust your instincts. Don’t automatically choose the type of art that you’re always drawn towards or that you ‘think’ you should buy. Challenge yourself. A work of art that creates a talking point and keeps you thinking will be much more treasured than an obvious choice that you lose interest in soon after buying it. There are numerous considerations to bear in mind when hunting for art. First and foremost, always buy art you love, enjoy the process and hopefully these additional tips will help you make the right choice in a vast and exciting market. ■ • Visit Jessica, director of Modern ArtBuyer, at the Affordable Art Fair this month, or visit her website; modernartbuyer.com

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Contemporary abstract artworks can look spectacular in a period home


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ART

ALL THE FUN OF THE FAIR Bristol is awash with creativity this month, especially with the Affordable Art Fair returning to Brunel’s Old Station

‘The Peace’ by Yuki Aruga – presented by Gala Fine Art

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ristol’s top graduates, one of the city’s best-known mural artists and even a drawing robot will be showcasing their talents at this year’s Affordable Art Fair from 8 – 10 September. Alongside dozens of returning favourites, the fair will feature seven galleries showing at the Bristol event for the very first time, and those of us visiting will be able to explore works by hundreds of artists from the locale and beyond – on sale for anything between £100 and £6,000. You might be looking to pick up a piece of AI (artificial intelligence) art – we mean, why wouldn’t you be? If this is the case, we suggest you make a beeline for Paul O’Dowd, who’s going to be creating some pretty special limited edition prints with his experimental drawing robot. Created as part of his research into mimicking complex human drawing and painting gestures in machines, the robot will draw up designs programmed by its creator – who is to be presented at the fair by UWE’s Centre for Fine Print Research alongside Stanley Donwood, who has created prints for Radiohead’s album art since the band’s beginning. Among the fair’s featured artists could well be the Next Big Thing, with a selection of pieces due to be displayed from UWE’s graduating class – including Josephine Atkinson, whose stylised photographs look at our psychological and sociological relationship with food. Her pieces will be shown alongside installations and sculptures by Connor Lowe and Alice Vaughn, which distort perceptions of scale and strength to explore themes of anxiety and obsession. Elsewhere, visitors will be able to pick up works by the fair’s artistin-residence and local mural artist Alex Lucas (see also p92) whose quirky and distinctive designs can be seen across the city. Perhaps you’ve spotted her seven-metre plesiosaur on Park Row, or seven-foot boxing hare on Stokes Croft? Represented by Clifton Fine Art, Alex will be selling a limited-edition print run of the motif she designed for September’s Great Bristol Half Marathon finisher’s t-shirt – with a portion of the profits going to local charity Studio Upstairs which provides holistic support to people experiencing enduring mental or emotional difficulties. If you’re heading to the fair in hopes of finding the best in international talent, you’re in luck as European galleries such as Bruno Dahl (from Denmark) are being hosted for the first time, while Capital Art London will share works by a mix of Iran’s most exciting contemporary artists. There’ll also be the chance to take part in handson workshops for all ages, attend informative talks and, new for 2017, purchase art from a selection of exhibiting galleries online if you’re unable to attend the fair.

• affordableartfair.com

Book online in advance to enjoy half-price entry* – simply enter the code BRISTOLMAG at checkout. *Offer excludes the charity private view and is based on on-thedoor prices (a small booking fee applies).

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‘Skywalk’ by Jane Ward, who creates images of imaginary, fragmentary lands by breaking down and collaging her digital photographs

Purple Fruit – one of UWE graduate Josephine Atkinson’s stylised photos looking at our relationship with food


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ART

Yeti Over MountFuji II by Phil Ashcroft

‘Drift’ by UWE’s Stu Cranfield, from a series based upon psychedelic experience

The dramatic ‘Tilt’ by contemporary artist Chris Hawtin

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It’s been all over the fashion world but embroidery is now an endangered profession! Why not see what you can create at one of Chloe’s classes at Tyntesfield?


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CRAFT oxxxx

SEW NOUVEAU Local couture embroiderer Chloe Savage on reviving a lost art, Hollywood commissions, and working for Chanel

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hile the ancient art of embroidery is one that has been passed down from generation to generation, from time to time there has been concern that it’s a craft that could die out. But with embroidery having enjoyed a surge of popularity in the fashion world, and the likes of Royal School of Needlework graduate Chloe Savage doing their bit to keep the love alive, we’re feeling pretty positive about its fate. We caught up with the local creative as she launches a range of embroidery courses... TBM: How did you get into embroidery? CS: I began sewing from a very young age – my mother is a trained fashion designer and couturier. But my grandmother taught me the basics of embroidery when I was seven. I didn’t really take it seriously until I was made redundant in 2010 – I decided that secondary school science teaching was dominating my life too much and so I changed career and began to train with the Royal School of Needlework and the Ecole Lesage in Paris. How do people perceive embroidery now? We love the embroidered and cross-stitched political messages we’ve seen doing the rounds recently! Unfortunately embroidery is still seen as rather twee and something Grandma did (floral tablecloths or needlepoint cushions). Although, more recently, it has seen a revival – the explosion of embroidery work on the catwalks has brought it more to the forefront. Social enterprise Fine Cell Work is also working with prison inmates to create embroidered pieces, and currently trains 250 prisoners in 24 prisons – 97% of whom are men – in paid, skilled, creative needlework. Pieces like the hand-embroidered Magna Carta and ‘The Whitewalker’ have increased embroidery’s visibility to a younger audience, too. What are you up to at Tyntesfield? I started my embroidery company a couple of years ago, and after a lot of begging by friends and acquaintances, I am now launching a range of beginners’ classes through Stoke Lodge and Tyntesfield. The classes at Tyntesfield will be based on the huge textile collection held at the house. Tell us more about your work with the National Trust. What are the challenges that come with it? I am one of the textile conservation team at Tyntesfield – we are responsible for the entire textile collection. This involves cataloguing, assessing, cleaning and conserving. Currently we are working on the curtains from the house, but we also work on the furniture, clothes, military uniforms. The challenges are, partly, the size of the collection and, quite often, the size of the pieces we have to work with. We deal with a lot of light damage and moth damage, where the fabric has completely degraded and needs to be supported or, in some cases, just packed away carefully for posterity. Which piece are you most proud of? I think my favourite couture piece would have to be for Chanel in 2015. Gold beadwork on a red jacket and skirt. I had the privilege to – if only briefly – work with the best of the best. How long does each piece take? This depends on the technique. Crewel work (wool on linen) is much quicker and forgiving than goldwork (couched thread and wire) due to the preparation of the padding that the gold is couched over.

What’s the trickiest part? That, again, depends on the technique being used. Personally, it’s silk shading – which is basically painting with thread. It can be a challenge to get the colours to blend well and the direction of the stitches correct. Any new projects in the pipeline? Currently I have a commission that will be auctioned at the Globe Theatre in London in October. What’s the studio like? I have a small studio in the garden at the back of the house. It’s rather full of boxes of thread, beads, fabric and my slate frames. Currently it’s taken up by an applique piece (entomology cabinet) and the commission for the auction. I have a large number of daylight lamps to help me match colours correctly and I have a radio in there, as I love to listen to audio books and theatre while working. My desk is covered in designs and samples for up and coming kits. Have you had any special commissions? I have had several commissions from the Middle East, all in gold. I have been mentored by Karen Nicol and also had the privilege of creating pieces for Daniel Craig. Who is your favourite embroiderer? That’s a hard question. Michelle Cariger, who does the Game of Thrones embroidery, is one of my favourites, but I also love Joe Mitchell’s embroidery, and Charlotte Bailey is an extremely talented, up-and-coming embroiderer. What’s the best way for us to get kids involved with the skill? By letting them experiment with large needles and colourful thread – once they have the ability to thread their own fine needle, bring them along to classes. Should it be taught at schools? I am very involved with the Campaign for Creativity, which is working to bring these basic skills back into the school curriculum. According to a recent heritage skills report, embroidery is now an endangered profession. What benefits does embroidery have? Because it is a slow hobby, it takes you away from technology – allowing you to slow down and take your time. This is invaluable to your mental health. It also improves self-esteem as you make something beautiful. It can also often be a social activity, allowing you to mix with like-minded people and get out from behind the TV and computer screens. Learning a new skill like embroidery improves mental function and helps keep those hands supple. Which other Bristol artists do you admire? I am a fan of Rebecca Dorsett. I love her exploration of the detail in images, but using very simple materials – pen and pencil.

• chloesavageembroidery.com

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BRISTOL UPDATES BITE-SIZED BUSINESS AND ECONOMY NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY

ON THE UP

Sky One HD comedy Trollied was filmed at The Bottle Yard

ANNIVERSARY GIFT

SMASHING JOB

Bloggs Salons have opened a second salon in Bristol, in the picturesque Harbourside area, on the seven-year anniversary of the first salon opening on the busy Gloucester Road. To celebrate, the salon threw an opening night party with blow-dries, manicures, drinks and canapés for local press, friends and clients, old and new. Alongside a range of bespoke services, the new salon is also launching refreshment packages for clients in conjunction with local restaurant Broken Dock. This includes a newspaper and pastries for early-bird clients, wraps and salads for those who pop in at lunchtime, and evening meals for the clients who come in after work. “The location is amazing and we can’t wait for everyone to see it,” says salon director Joe Hemmings. “ One of the most important areas for me was the new consultation chill-out area where clients can relax, wind down and begin the most crucial part of their Bloggs journey. It’s been amazing celebrating our seven-year anniversary for the Gloucester Road salon as well as the new opening.” • @bloggssalons

Tech repair specialist iSmash has opened one of its first stores outside of the capital in Bristol’s Broadmead. The Broadmead store brings together the best of the industry’s repair technicians, trained and accredited to ensure they meet iSmash service standards. The store contains four technician workstations and offers iSmash’s suite of products and services including smartphone, tablet and computer repairs, tech accessories, data recovery, device trade-in service and refurbished devices. The store is the next step in the company’s expansion journey – iSmash currently covers 20 major high street, train station and shopping centre locations across the UK. “We are a nation of phone and gadget addicts, all pushed for time; when things go wrong and breakages happen it can be a huge inconvenience,” said Julian Shovlin, founder and managing director. “This is where we found the gap in the market for the iSmash business, which plugs the gap between expensive manufacturers and unreliable independents.” • ismash.com

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New figures from Bristol Film Office show that film and TV production in the city continued to rise last year, contributing £18.3million to its economy in 2016-17. In a year that saw a number of new series choose Bristol as their base, including costume drama The White Princess (STARZ), powerful drama Three Girls (BBC) and comedy thriller Crazyhead (E4/Netflix), a number of major titles also returned to the city, including hit shows Broadchurch (ITV), Poldark and Doctor Who (both BBC). The Film Office issued film permits for 484 productions, up 31% on the previous year’s total of 370, and the number of filming days recorded increased, with a total of 1,050 taking place over the course of the year. Overall, inward investment from productions using services provided by Bristol Film Office and The Bottle Yard Studios totalled £18,354,000. The popularity of The Bottle Yard, with its eight stages and onsite business community, coupled with Bristol’s experienced crew and wider facilities infrastructure, drive the strong levels of production, while UK tax incentives have also played a role in attracting big budget productions to the UK, many of which look outside London for studios and costeffective locations. “Bristol’s cultural sector is a thriving environment of creativity, industry, opportunity and diversity,” Mayor Marvin Rees said. “This is, in part, fuelled by our growing reputation as a filming destination, attracting some of the biggest names in UK TV and film to either base their productions in Bristol or use the city as a backdrop.” Bristol Film Office’s Natalie Moore added: “Inward investment of £18.3million highlights how significant this industry is to Bristol’s economy. Not only are more productions opting to film here, but we’re also seeing a rise in recorded filming days. This means more work for local crew and is great news for Bristol businesses in other sectors like hospitality and transport, which benefit from workforces buying more products and services. Bristol’s architecture, green spaces and harbourside can meet most location needs, while the skill of our specialist crew and award-winning companies is world-class.” • filmbristol.co.uk


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PROBATE – CAN YOU AFFORD TO TAKE THE RISK?

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any people who are appointed as executors under a will know that their duties include administering an estate in accordance with the will to ensure that the beneficiaries receive what they have been left.

Few people seem to know that executors may be personally liable throughout the administration of an estate. They are not just liable to beneficiaries, should they fail to deal with the tax affairs of the deceased be it inheritance tax, income tax or capitals gain tax they can be liable to HMRC personally for failing to deal with matters. These tax bills can sometime run into thousands of pounds.

However, wills can be complicated documents and the law surrounding wills and probate is, to put it kindly, quite old. While wills do not have to be complicated documents they often are and mostly this is for a good reason.

Taking advice from a Solicitor can ensure that all your obligations as an executor are fulfilled so that not only are the wishes of the deceased carried out completely and correctly but also you are protected from claims against you for failing to administer the estate properly.

For example, the will may include provisions to ensure children from first marriages inherit their parents’ share of the estate, to protect minor beneficiaries and sometimes to protect beneficiaries from themselves or from others taking advantages of them.

Administering an estate fully and correctly can take time and if you are doing this around a busy life, sometimes even the most simple things can be overlooked. Using a Solicitor who specialises in this area can ensure that this does not happen.

This can mean that the will is complicated and not always as straight forward as may appear. Examples we have seen include a will where money was to be invested for an individual for his life time with the capital going to someone else in the future.

Obtaining legal advice may appear expensive, especially with the complexities of modern finances and complex family situations; however, with your family finances at risk if you do not fulfil your obligations correctly, can you afford to take the risk?

Sadly the executors did not realise the significance of this clause and paid the capital to someone who was not entitled to receive it. Fortunately it was returned once the situation was explained but the executors would have been personally liable to the other beneficiaries if it had not been returned.

For further advice on the administration of estates, Wills, Lasting Powers of Attorney and other private client matters, contact Andrew Jack or one of his colleagues at AMD Solicitors 100 Henleaze Road, Bristol BS9 4JZ Phone 0117 962 1205, email info@amdsolciitors.com or visit our website www.amdsolicitors.com

The executors would have been entitled to sue for the return of the money, but this could well have been costly and time consuming, and of course would have added extra stress at what is otherwise a difficult time.

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Andrew Jack

A local award winning law firm

Telephone us on (0117) 9621205 or visit our website www.amdsolicitors.com


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COMMON FAMILY LAW MYTHS - AND THE FACTS If you are famous you can get a quickie divorce Not true. Although the media frequently reports celebrity breakups as having 'quickie' divorces, in fact all divorces in England and Wales follow the same process. There is no fast track and you cannot pay 'extra' to obtain the final document, the Decree Absolute, more quickly. You can speed up the process by cooperating with the other party to the divorce, by making sure that all the forms are filled in accurately and swiftly and by hand delivering documents rather than posting them. However generally, from start to finish once the divorce petition has been issued a divorce will take approximately three to five months. Quite often, specialist family lawyers will advise that the Decree Absolute should not be applied for until and unless there is also a final financial settlement. That is particularly the case where pension benefits are involved.

Our Family Law and Divorce team provides expert family law advice on divorce and complex financial, international and childrenrelated issues. If one person has had an affair, then that will be reflected in the financial settlement to the other person The breakdown of a marriage causes all sorts of feelings: they range from anxiety to sadness, from to anger to fear of the future and sometimes, sadly, bitterness. It is not at all unusual for the person who has been ‘left’, especially where their partner has formed a

new relationship, to feel that it would be fair when sharing the financial assets for them to have more. In fact, in English law, the court will not look at the reasons for the breakdown of the marriage. The court is concerned with achieving fair financial settlements that meet both parties’ needs and behaviour is only taken into account in very exceptional and rare circumstances. Whilst sometimes that can be difficult for people to come to terms with, the discretion that a Family Court Judge has in this country means that all the circumstances can be taken into account to try to achieve a settlement that meets both parties’ economic needs for the future. That is why we often hear about people who live abroad trying to have their financial cases heard in court in London.

Pre-nups are only for the rich and famous It used to be the case that pre-nuptial agreements or pre-marital agreements were associated with celebrities - and it is certainly true that most reported cases of stars in the US include details of a pre-nup. In fact, in this country, if a pre-marital agreement is properly drafted by a competent specialist family lawyer, and signed in good time before the wedding (so there is no pressure at the last minute), then assuming that the couple have disclosed their financial circumstances to each other a court is very likely to uphold an agreement if it is challenged in a subsequent divorce. Pre-marital agreements can provide certainty. They can be particularly relevant when one half of a couple has either inherited wealth, or anticipates that that might happen in the future. They are often very reassuring for couples entering into a second marriage, especially where there are children from a first marriage. More and more people in this country now have pre-marital agreements. Some people say they aren’t very romantic, but they could be looked at in the same way as a Will - making provision for somebody that you care about so there is no uncertainty or expensive legal process on death or divorce.

If you live with somebody for six months or more then you are automatically entitled to a share of their property because you achieve the status of a common law wife or husband It is a commonly held belief that couples who live together but do not marry acquire rights to each other’s property after a certain length of time. In fact, that has not been true since 1753, when the Common Law Marriage Act was abolished. The starting point for couples who live together is that they have no automatic entitlement to each other’s assets. Generally, property will be divided on the basis of who owns it. In other words, if your name is not on the title deeds then you may face an uphill struggle in claiming a share. The number of couples in England and Wales who live together is increasing every year. People still make mistakes or assumptions about their legal rights that can cause hardship, especially after a long relationship and if there are children. Specialist family lawyers can advise about living together agreements and documents to protect property ownership. Those can be drafted by agreement at any time during the relationship but are best considered when a couple starts talking about living together.

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Alison Hawes T: +44 (0) 117 902 7754 E: alison.hawes@burges-salmon.com

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

EXCEEDING ALL EXPECTATIONS Boasting a classy interior, stylish design, and traditional rock-solid Volvo safety, the new XC60 has all the attributes to prove a hit. This second-generation model more than lives up to its promise, making it one of the best SUVs in its class. Words by Chris Lilly

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olvo has, over the past few years, become an extremely ‘cool’ manufacturer. Like beauty, coolness is a subjective matter, but there are few remaining who don’t rate Volvo. The Swedish brand produces stylish cars, with efficient yet powerful engines, and interiors that compete with the best on sale today. Volvo’s new XC60 has much to live up to then, not least its rather successful predecessor. The original XC60 came along at a good time for Volvo, when the SUV boom was just starting to take hold. The new model arrives at a similarly propitious time, though a far more competitive one. SUVs are big business and show no sign of slowing down. So while the original XC60 was up against the likes of the BMW X3, Audi Q5, Mercedes Benz GLC – and that's about it – the new model has rather more to compete with. Now, the XC60 is fighting against newer versions of the above models, plus new entrants in the shape of the Land Rover Discovery Sport, Alfa Romeo Stelvio, Jaguar F-Pace, Skoda Kodiaq, and a whole lot more. The market is rather more crowded then, making this Volvo’s life tougher than the first-generation model’s. The XC60 has some solid foundations though. Firstly, the new model is built on the same architecture as the larger XC90, and it shares a similar same engine line-up, too. The XC60 gets a choice of two diesels rather than the XC90’s one, but there is also a petrol and a plug-in hybrid available from the outset, covering plenty of bases. The same trim line-up is carried over too, with an entry-level inscription before a step up in two different directions. Momentum adds more refinement and luxury; R-Design added bite and sportiness. All three come as Pro levels too, giving buyers a bit extra on top of each trim level. Finally, we come to the design which, in my opinion, continues the good work Volvo has been doing for the past few years now. The XC60 is easily as stylish as the likes of the F-Pace and Stelvio. Again, beauty is in the eye etc, but the XC60 is a nicely designed SUV. It shares features from the XC90, but with a more compact stance and youthful design. It manages to look different enough to not confuse the two on the road – and is the better for it. The interior is XC90-lite too, or rather less of the ‘lite’ aspect of that statement. Climbing from a 90-Series car to the XC60 would, doubtless, highlight a few differences between the two, but I must confess that I can’t think of any working from memory – and I’m pretty well versed in the XC90, S90, and V90. The Volvo Sensus infotainment system makes an appearance again, which is good news since it’s one of the best around. The portrait layout means navigation is more logical – you can see more of the road ahead than in a landscape configuration – while it’s customisable and can offer different screens with tablet-style controls. Other instruments are similar to the XC60’s bigger brother too, with a rocker switch to start, the option of the gear selector being embedded with Swedish crystal, a digital instrument panel, and interior design that more than

lives up to Sweden’s high standards, let alone Volvo’s. In practical terms, the XC60’s seats are comfortable and supportive, while there is more than enough space in the cabin for four adults or two plus three children. As a family car, the options are restricted a little thanks to the transmission tunnel that runs down the centre of the car, restricting leg space for the occupant of the centre rear seat. Other than that, cabin space is good, and the boot is similarly spacious. It’s not class leading, but prospective buyers would have to be particularly miserly to complain about a lack of load space. As you might expect, being a Volvo, safety kit is exceptional. Systems such as City Safety with Steer Assist, Pilot Assist semiautonomous driving, and automatic emergency braking with pedestrian, cyclist, and large animal detection are all available. Passive safety is superb too, with a video of an XC60 being crash-tested shown to journalists. Despite being a pretty sceptical bunch, the room was amazed at the lack of damage a side-impact collision did to the Volvo, despite it rolling over. This is all well and good, but how does it actually drive? After testing the XC60 at its UK launch, I can report that it drives like a Volvo. If you are looking for the sportiest of SUVs, you’d be better off with an F-Pace. However, the XC60 far from embarrasses itself on a twisting road, and there are few twistier than in the Peak District where we were invited for the drive. The XC60 might dive a little under braking, and lean a bit in the corners, but there is nothing in its demeanour to put you off hustling the Volvo down a country road should the mood take – especially in R-Design trim with the sport chassis. The rest of the time – and let’s face it, the vast majority of the time – the XC60 is a far more usable proposition than some of its rivals. The comfortable interior is complemented by a supple suspension set-up that irons out imperfections in the road rather than telegraph them to its occupants. In and around town, the car feels nimble, helped, no doubt, by its shorter wheelbase than the XC90 – though it remains almost as wide. In terms of performance, the D5 Powerpulse is the pick of the models tested, though it is more powerful and pricier than the D4. Either model will perform perfectly well everywhere, it’s just the added 45hp over the D4’s 190hp comes in handy when you need to get out of a junction quickly or cruise at motorway speeds for a long time. The D5 will complete the 0-62mph sprint in 7.2 seconds, but it will still return 51.4mpg. A T5 petrol is available too, though it is unlikely to find too many buyers in the UK since it’s only a little quicker than the D5, but has a lower fuel economy figure. The T8 TwinEngine plug-in hybrid wasn’t available to drive, but the system is the same as is available in the XC90. It’s very good in the larger car, so in a lighter model, it should perform even better. In short, Volvo’s done a top job with the new XC60. It’s practical and safe, but also stylish and likeable. It does everything you need a family SUV to do, but with plenty of élan. ■

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CITY | BUSINESS

SETTLEMENT AGREEMENTS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SAMANTHA CASTLE

The prospect of redundancy is never a pleasant one, especially if it comes as a surprise. But if you’re leaving your job, negotiating a sound settlement agreement with your employer can make your future a whole lot easier.

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o if you’re offered a settlement agreement, what are your rights? Samantha Castle, employment law solicitor at Barcan+Kirby, tells you what you need to know.

What is a settlement agreement? A settlement agreement is a legally binding contract that sets out the full terms of a settlement between an employer and employee. They’re commonly given to employees who are being made redundant, but are also used to terminate an employee’s contract in cases where the parties have reached an agreement (mutual consent), where there’s been a drawn-out grievance, or if they’re guilty of misconduct.

What happens when you sign one? A settlement agreement is the formal sign-off between the employer and employee, so once the contract is signed, your employment is terminated. You’ll typically receive a termination payment in exchange for certain conditions. But by signing the contract, you’re waiving your rights to pursue a claim against your employer in a workplace tribunal - including claims for unfair dismissal, bullying or discrimination.

What should you do if you’re offered a settlement agreement? The first thing you should do is contact an employment lawyer – most employers will pay for, or at least contribute to, the cost of this initial meeting. Your lawyer is responsible for reviewing your settlement agreement. They’ll look at whether you’re being offered a fair deal and will consider whether there are grounds to make a claim against your employer. They may also be able to negotiate more favourable terms of your behalf – including a larger pay-out.

What should you expect to see in the agreement? For most employees, the most important aspect is their termination payment, with a breakdown of what you’ll receive. The first £30,000 is free of tax and National Insurance, however accrued holiday and pay in lieu of notice (PILON) is usually taxed as income. The agreement should state when this will be paid – usually within 21 or 28 days of signing the agreement. Your settlement agreement is also likely to contain a confidentiality clause - this prohibits you from discussing the terms of the agreement with anyone other than your immediate family and solicitor. It should outline how much your employer will contribute towards your legal fees and offer a guarantee that they’ll provide you with a favourable employment reference.

Can I refuse to sign a settlement agreement? Yes, particularly if the settlement terms you’ve been offered are less than expected or if you’re facing a period of sustained unemployment. By not signing the agreement, you retain your full rights to make a claim against your employer. But there are consequences to this – which your solicitor can advise you on. n If you have any questions, or you’d like to speak to Samantha Castle, you can contact her at s.castle@barcankirby.co.uk or on 0117 325 2929. www.barcankirby.co.uk

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WALK | THE WALK

O’ER THE LEIGH Andrew Swift reminds us of the historic woodlands we have on our doorstep

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here are lots of things that make Bristol a fantastic place to live, but one that may not immediately spring to mind is having one of the West Country’s finest ancient woodlands on the edge of the city. The importance of Leigh Woods, whose 500-acres are managed jointly by the National Trust and the Forestry Commission, is now recognised – and protected. Like many other ancient woodlands, though, it suffered grievous depredations throughout the 19th century and for much of the 20th. At times, it seemed as if it would be lost forever. Only through sensitive restoration has its fragile ecosystem been able to recover from decades of mismanagement and neglect, and started to re-establish itself. Ancient woodlands date back to at least 1600, and are an important link to the original wildwood. Careful management is the key to their survival. Coppicing and grazing are both crucial, as is the preservation of veteran trees, which, although dead or dying, are rich habitats for a wide range of wildlife. Many once-common trees such as small-leaved limes and wild service trees, which now rarely propagate from seed, are found almost exclusively in such woods. Leigh Woods also contains the mighty ramparts of Stokeleigh Camp, established over 2,300 years ago. This settlement flourished for around 400 years before being reoccupied in the third and fourth centuries AD, so was already ancient – and already abandoned – long before Bristol was even thought of. This month’s walk is an introduction to these fascinating woods, and is ideal for both children and dogs, although as part of it skirts the edge of the Avon Gorge, care needs to be taken.

Directions

● To get there by car, cross Clifton Suspension Bridge, take the first right up North Road and, after 900m, park in the lay-by on the right near the entrance to Leigh Woods (ST555730). ● Alternatively, for a longer walk, head to Clifton and, after exploring Clifton Camp, overlooking the gorge,

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walk across the suspension bridge. Carry on for 250m before turning right to follow North Road for 900m as it curves past a eclectic array of grand buildings. Go through the kissing gate (KG) into Leigh Woods and head up the track ahead, passing a veteran oak pollard, some 400 years old, on the left. Carry straight on and, after entering a clearing, bear right across the grass. On your right is a row of whitebeams, including two – Wilmott’s Whitebeam and Bristol Whitebeam – only found near the Avon Gorge. Carry on into the woods, past an oak heavy with acorns, some covered by contorted ridges – the result of eggs laid in them by gall wasps. Continue across a small clearing, on the far side of which lies the outer rampart of Stokeleigh Camp. A winding track leads across the ditch and through a breach in the inner rampart. As you carry on past tall ashes and aged hawthorns, on a track veined with tree roots, the only sign of the outside world is the belvedere atop a 19th-century villa across Nightingale Valley. On the far side of the camp, a view over the suspension bridge opens up, with the distant clump of trees on Kelston Round Hill visible on the horizon. There are no ramparts here – the cliffs of the gorge were enough to deter any unwelcome visitors. Opposite lies Clifton Camp, surmounted by its windmill-turned-observatory. The camp was occupied at the same time as Stokeleigh, but whether by a friendly or a rival tribe is not known. There was a third camp – Burwalls – on the other side of Nightingale Valley, but it was largely destroyed when the suspension bridge was built. Bear left to follow the track curving round the edge of the escarpment. After following it down through the northern ramparts – passing a small-leaved lime coppice on the right – turn left to follow a path from which you can appreciate the scale of the ramparts. After 200m, bear right, following a purple waymark (PW) – number 16 – into woodland with hazel coppicing in evidence. When you come to a wall, built in 1813 to

This page: See if you can spot the oak tree, heavy with acorns with knopper galls Opposite page: We love this ‘sofa’ carved out of a tree in the picnic area; plenty of yew to be seen


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mark the boundary between the parishes of Long Ashton and Abbot’s Leigh, go through a handgate and carry on in same direction. After passing the remains of another wall, follow the path as it swings right past veteran oaks, on whose gnarled branches ferns grow in mossy beds. After 200m follow the track as it curves left past an area fenced off for coppicing. After another 300m, you come to a small clearing with two benches. At its centre, with a metal tag, is a wild service tree, whose maple-like leaves may already be starting to redden. Turning right, you come, after a few metres, to a dead oak, stripped of its branches. Known as monoliths, such trees are important wildlife habitats. Beyond it stand ancient yews, one growing close to a still-flourishing oak. Return to the main track and turn left, but, instead of retracing your steps, turn immediately left again to follow another waymark – PW5. Carry straight on through stands of yew and holly, bearing right along a fence at PW7. You are on the edge of the gorge here – the cliffs on the far side can be glimpsed through the vegetation. When the track forks at PW8, bear right. Carry straight on past more veteran oaks and lime coppicing, and at PW11 bear left through a gap in a wall. When you come to PW12, however, do not go through a gate in the parish wall but bear right alongside it. Carry on for 400m, as the track grows ever narrower. After passing a tall beech with two trunks conjoined, when you come to a large yew growing in a gap in the wall, squeeze through the gap beside it to find a crocodile bench carved from a tree on the other side. Head past the bench and bear right along a broad track leading to a picnic area, where refreshments are available at weekends. There is also a compost toilet, an information hut and sofa carved out of a tree. To return to North Road, head left of the information hut, go through a KG, across the green and bear right along the track. ■

At a glance... ■

Length; time: 2.5 miles, 1.5 hours

Level of challenge: Straightforward; suitable for children and dogs (although the path runs close to the edge of the Avon Gorge); Red Devon cattle also graze Stokeleigh Camp

Extra info: Refreshment stall (open weekends) at end

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BRISTOL | WILDLIFE

Photograph taken in Bristol by Richard Scantlebury

SLIPPERY CUSTOMERS This month, Pete Dommett goes in search of one of the most elusive mammals...

I

waited a long time – and went a long way – to see my first otter. Earlier this year on a family trip to the Isle of Mull, we watched one of these charismatic animals crunching crabs by the ferry terminal, blissfully unbothered by the excited bunch of onlookers. It was a welcome tick on my wildlife bucket-list, but left me desperate to see more. Back at home, I phoned a naturalist I know to ask her about the best place to find otters locally. “Right here,” she told me emphatically. “Bristol’s absolutely dripping in them!” A quick Google search for ‘otters in Bristol’ proved her right. Sightings have dramatically increased across the city in recent years. Otters have been photographed hunting among the houseboats in the harbour and a video of one swimming in the Eastville Park lake was taken and tweeted by Avon & Somerset Police in January. Not long ago, such a thing would have been unthinkable. As for many other species, we did our best to do away with otters in this country. By the 1970s, years of persecution, poisoning through pesticide run-off into rivers and habitat destruction had left them on the edge of extinction. But, after hunting was finally banned and our waterways were gradually cleaned up, otters returned and, in 2011, the Environment Agency announced that they were again present in every English county. Since then, they’ve been increasingly turning up in urban areas, and now, with otters doing better than they have done for decades, the chances of seeing one have never been better. So I eagerly arrange to go out with the Greater Bristol Otter Group. Set up five years ago, this band of volunteer otterphiles conducts monthly surveys on the city’s waterways (of which there

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are over 100 miles), recording evidence of otter presence. I meet up with members, Sian, Cher and Hannah, under the M32 at the entrance to Eastville Park, and as we follow the shady, and surprisingly tranquil, footpath alongside the River Frome, I ask Sian how many otters there are in Bristol. “It’s difficult to know exactly,” she admits. “But signs of them have been seen on all the city’s main rivers – including the Avon, the Trym and here on the Frome – and on lots of the smaller streams and brooks too.” These signs, particularly paw prints, are difficult to detect today: recent rain means the river’s running high and covering the muddy banks. We pause at Colston Weir, where otters have been previously observed, but are treated to wonderful views of other urban wildlife instead: a kingfisher is perched on a partially submerged log, as oblivious to the passing joggers as they are to it. Then, further upstream, Hannah spots something on the exposed roots of a tree overhanging the river – it’s a blob of otter spraint. These tarry, black droppings are often deposited in prominent places by the waterside and act like a social media status update, telling other otters important information about the animal that produced it; such as its age, sex and whether it’s looking for a mate. Excitingly, it tells us that an otter has visited recently. I may have to wait a little while longer before I catch a glimpse of my first Bristol otter, but just knowing these elusive animals are here, secretly living among us, is good enough for now. ■ • Find out more about The Greater Bristol Otter Group at bristolottersurvey.wixsite.com


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THE US DELICIO GUIDE 7 201

A CITY OF GREAT TASTE We consider ourselves pretty lucky to have so much choice when it comes to places to eat – whether we’re simply grabbing some street food on the go, taking a pal out for coffee and cake, planning an evening chowdown with workmates or wining and fine dining a beloved by candlelight.

Bristol’s dining scene has never been so brilliant, with the standard continually rising pretty much across the board, and restaurateurs and producers upping their game left, right and centre. We hope our pick – featuring both classic city favourites and exciting, innovative newcomers – will help you choose the right foodie destination for both your mood and pocket.

Look out for our special window sticker which we have issued to all businesses featured here. The Delicious Guide is also being served up on our website: thebristolmag.co.uk

Our celebration of all the city’s most delicious things.

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HATTUSA AT BERWICK LODGE Berwick Drive, Bristol BS10 7TD Tel: 0117 958 1590 Web: berwicklodge.co.uk/dining Located inside the idyllic Berwick Lodge, Hattusa combines the luxurious atmosphere of the historic manor house with a perfectly prepared and artistically presented menu. Talented head chef Paul O’Neil, a Roux Scholar, channels his vision of high-quality modern British cuisine into each dish, while consistently aiming to source produce from local sellers. The restaurant’s modern yet classic style offers a refreshing, contemporary twist on traditional recipes, resulting in the likes of lemongrass-poached lobster and honey-glazed duck breast. Hattusa also takes pride in the talents of its sommelier, who has created an international wine list with recommendations to complement each dish on offer.

BAMBALAN Podium Level, Colston Tower, Colston Street, Bristol, BS1 4XE Tel: 0117 922 1880 Web: bambalan.co.uk Bursting onto the Bristol food scene last year, Bambalan soon became the place to be, thanks in part to its fabulous location, allowing diners to enjoy sunset drinks and music on the spacious terrace overlooking the city. It’s not just about summery alfresco dining, however, as regular events throughout the year, including Foozie pop-ups, (think bottomless brunches and silent discos) mean Bambalan always has something on the horizon to look forward to. The menu – a medley Image by Chris Cooper of Mediterranean fare – includes their much-loved babs, flatbread pizzas, salads and wood-fired meats. As if that isn’t enough to tempt you, the cocktail menu is full of fun-loving mixes including the Bristolthemed ‘Cheers, Drive!’ and tropical Bam White Sangria. We’ll see you at happy hour, then...

Image by Paolo Ferla

WOKY KO Unit 7, CARGO, Gaol Ferry Steps, Bristol, BS1 6WP Web: woky.co A casual diner offering modern twists on familiar Asian dishes, using responsibly sourced ingredients and no added MSG, Woky Ko is the brainchild of lovely former MasterChef finalist Larkin Cen. Choose from mouth-watering lunchtime and dinner menus featuring bao steamed buns, xiao sharing plates, hearty noodle and rice dishes, and even a salted caramel ice cream bao for dessert – all cooked to order and featuring Larkin’s unique and exciting flavour combinations. No booking is required either, so pop in on your travels around the neat little Wapping Wharf development.

THE ATHENIAN Cargo 2 Unit 16, First Floor, Gaol Ferry Steps, BS1 6WD 07925 883123 Web: theathenian.co.uk/bristol-location On the first floor of Cargo 2 in Wapping Wharf, you will find The Athenian: a small but expert purveyor of authentic Greek street food. The company was founded by Efthymios and Neofytos; two Londoners born and raised in Athens and Cyprus, who were inspired to represent the traditional cuisine of their country in the UK. Following the launch of the London location in 2014, The Athenian made haste to Bristol with the aim of providing Greek food prepared in the healthiest way possible. Souvlaki is their speciality: plump for a delicious pitta wrap filled with herby grilled chicken or pork (halloumi-esque talagani cheese as a vegetarian alternative, or mushrooms as a vegan option) plus other classic ingredients, all traceable to their Greek roots. Also serving Greek salads, Cretan dakos, The Athenian sure succeeds in its aim of providing simple, tasty and honest food from a menu passionately designed and produced.

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BACKWELL HOUSE Backwell House, Farleigh Road, Bristol BS48 3QA Tel: 0117 325 1110 Web: backwellhouse.co.uk Just outside of Bristol, away from the business of the city, is the quiet comfort of Backwell House, a resplendent Georgian estate surrounded by rolling Somerset hills. The picturesque hotel boasts boutique rooms fit for a queen, but it’s the chic dining room which has been drawing our attention lately. Head chef Ross Hunter wants for nothing when it comes to accessible ingredients, with herds grazing the lush surrounding pastures, local farmers’ pigs reared on the land, on-site bees providing the most delicious honey and chickens providing the freshest of eggs. We loved the pressed pork with crunchy garden peas, and innovative strawberry cannelloni with shards of meringue, not to mention the little amuse bouche of curried goat tartlets and deconstructed BLT sandwiches. The setting only enhances the experience, with hazy views of the landscape peeping through sash windows, posies from the Victorian walled garden on the tables and comforting English farmhouse furniture – and don’t forget to take a pew at the cider barrel bar before eyeing up the menu. We’re still dreaming about the Brixham crab bon bon...

WILKS RESTAURANT

THE IVY BRASSERIE

1-3 Chandos Road, BS6 6PG Tel: 0117 973 7999 Web: wilksrestaurant.co.uk

42-44 Caledonia Place, Bristol BS8 4DN Tel: 0117 203 4555 Web: theivycliftonbrasserie.com

Wilks restaurant is an independently owned, vibrant restaurant, presenting creative, accomplished cooking in a relaxed and informal setting. Opened in September 2012 by chef James Wilkins and wife Christine Vayssade, Wilks gained a Michelin star after just a year – a testament to James’ skill, who trained in top restaurants across France, Istanbul and Japan. Inspired by James and Christine’s travels, the cuisine at Wilks fuses international flavour with a commitment to locally sourced produce from farmers, growers, suppliers, and even the local artists who show their work in the restaurant. The menu is light and modern, with an emphasis on clean flavours and seasonal ingredients. The health-conscious will be pleased to know that rich butters and creams are kept to a minimum at Wilks, allowing the natural flavours of each ingredient to shine through (and helping to avoid that postdinner bloat we’re so accustomed to). Dishes over the summer included wild turbot fillet, lobster salad and corn-fed duck breast with bitter orange, girolles and blueberries. The puds are something to behold as well, with the likes of banana mousse, warm biscuit ganache and cocoa meringue with poached pear.

The picture of sophistication and style, The Ivy Clifton Brasserie lives up to the high expectations set by its London counterparts. The interior, designed by Martin Brudnizki, combines art deco decadence with local art and references to the city’s industrial heritage, while the extensive menu runs the gamut from crowdpleasing steak and chips to delicate crab linguine, grilled lobster and aromatic duck curry. Desserts are in no short supply either, with the likes of apple tart and crème brûlée to tickle the tastebuds. As you might well expect, this eatery features an impressive cocktail menu comprising both classic and contemporary drinks, including several uniquely created concoctions specifically tailored to Bristol, such as the ‘Brunel Breeze’ and ‘Clifton Royale’.

THE JETTY AT HARBOUR HOTEL 53-55 Corn Street, Bristol BS1 1HT Tel: 0844 811 1103 Web: bristol-harbour-hotel.co.uk/dining/the-jetty A treasure trove of seaworthy fare, The Jetty has established itself as a popular city staple over the past six months. Situated inside the luxurious Bristol Harbour Hotel, this hidden gem offers high-quality food and a glittering, luxurious interior, which makes for a sumptuous dining experience. From the more unusual cockle popcorn and miso-marinated salmon to traditional flavours of South Coast scallops and beautifully fresh sashimi, The Jetty certainly lives up to its nautical name. That said, meat eaters and vegetarians will want for nothing, with dishes as diverse as crispy duck, rump steak and mac ‘n’ cheese also on offer. We also recommend grabbing a cocktail at the slick bar beforehand (Garden Gate is a winner, trust us).

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THE CLIFTON SAUSAGE 7-9 Portland Street, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4JA Tel: 0117 973 1192 Web: cliftonsausage.co.uk The Clifton Sausage has been a Bristol institution since 2002. In that time, it has built up a stellar reputation for serving delicious dishes made from fresh, locally sourced ingredients. Here, the main aim is to show that when British food is done well, it can compete with the best food in the world for taste and satisfaction. Situated in the heart of Clifton Village, just a stone’s throw away from Brunel’s famous suspension bridge, the restaurant is furnished with pine tables, candles, and an array of interesting artwork. It’s all about comfort and class when it comes to the surroundings, food and service – and, with over 15 years of experience in catering for parties of all shapes and sizes, you can rest assured that you’re in safe hands. As the name suggests, these guys specialise in all things sausage, yet they have a wide and varied menu full of classic British dishes. So, even if you are not in the mood for a good old-fashioned bowl of bangers and mash, you’ll still find yourself spoiled for choice. The lunch menu at The Clifton Sausage is £9.95 for two courses and £11.95 for three, while the set party menu is £17 for two courses and £21 for three, and there’s also the full à la carte menu available throughout the day.

WILSONS

MESA TAPAS

24 Chandos Road, Bristol BS6 6PF Tel: 0117 973 4157 Web: wilsonsrestaurant.co.uk

2B North View, Westbury Park, Bristol BS6 7QB Tel: 0117 970 6276 Web: mesabar.co.uk

A sought-after venue for eating out, with glowing reviews in the national press, Wilsons has cemented its status as one of the finest eateries in Bristol. The simple and elegant aesthetic is satisfyingly effective in forming a relaxed environment for a delightful lunch or dinner, and every week the chefs make modifications to the menu to ensure they can fully exploit the ingredients – grown or collected themselves. Their food is presented both beautifully and artistically, and clearly utilises their delicious naturally sourced produce. We’ve no doubt you will feel immediately relaxed by the stripped-back interior, and impressed by the excellently prepared food – their experience and skill seem boundless. A must-try.

When Mesa decided to rebrand itself from its previous title ‘Manna’ to focus its attention primarily on tapas and small dishes; the decision was highly praised by their customers. The intimate and ultimately stylish ambience perfectly complements the traditional Spanish cuisine that’s served alongside an extensive drinks menu. Choose from many authentic meat, fish and vegetable dishes, all cherry-picked to represent the best possible selection of Spanish tapas. The combination of friendly and attentive staff, high quality (yet affordable) food and warm atmosphere makes for an enjoyable and comfortable environment, and explains why it is so popular with locals as well as those from further afield.

WAHACA 70-78 Queens Road, Bristol BS8 1QU Tel: 0117 332 4486 Web: wahaca.co.uk/locations/bristol Wahaca’s fresh and exciting menu is the result of Thomasina Miers’ search for authentic and flavoursome Mexican street food. The incorporation of the locally sourced produce and Thomasina’s personal experiences, locating the recipes, ensures that the menu truly embodies the essence of Mexican eating. There is a large variety of choices, ranging from smaller bites such as tacos and quesadillas, to larger plates like Yucatecan grilled chicken and marinated bavette steak. Gluten-free and allergen menus are also provided, and with the restaurant ideally located at the top of Park Street, it’s easy to find and close to the buzz of the city’s core.

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PATA NEGRA

THE ETHICUREAN

30 Clare Street, Bristol BS1 1YH Tel: 0117 927 6762 Web: patanegrabristol.com

Barley Wood Walled Garden, Long Lane, Wrington, Bristol BS40 5SA Tel: 01934 863713 Web: theethicurean.com

A super-chic Spanish tapas and wine bar in the heart of Bristol’s Old City, Pata Negra serves a regularly changing menu of seasonal small plates including fresh seafood, vegetarian dishes, and desserts – the churros are to-die-for! Popular with the lunch crowd, ideal for after-work drinks, and great for relaxed evening dining, it has daily deals very much worth an eyeball; the lunch menu offering three tapas for £10 (Monday – Saturday) and, between 3pm and 6pm, three pintxos and a glass of sherry for £7. The bar serves premium wines from the diverse regions of the Iberian Peninsula and the Enomatic wine cabinet enables self-service and a choice of eight top wines with self-service – just purchase a charge card from the bar.

HART’S BAKERY Arch 35, Lower Approach Road, Temple Meads, Bristol BS1 6QS Tel: 0117 992 4488 Web: hartsbakery.co.uk Hart’s Bakery originally began as a local worker and commuter favourite, however recent years have seen it grow to become one of Bristol’s best-loved independents. Specialising in slowproved sourdough and pastries, Hart’s opens at 7am when the aroma of freshly ground coffee and croissants, fresh out of the oven, wafts up to Temple Meads station. With everything on show, it’s great to grab a drink and watch the bakers at work. The display changes throughout the day, from the early morning treats to lunchtime savouries and afternoon cakes. There is a hot lunch special every day from noon – it might be delicious soup, a hearty bread bake or similar – but be quick, this is one of Bristol’s most popular lunchtime haunts.

Set within a gorgeously picturesque walled garden with breath-taking views of the North Somerset countryside, a visit to The Ethicurean can only be described as a joy for all of the senses. Taking a walk through the extensive and carefully maintained kitchen garden is feast for the eyes in itself, but sitting down to eat in the rustic former orangery is where the joy really begins. Offering fantastic gastronomic delights and, somehow, value for money all at the same time, the menu changes twice daily – depending on the produce from the garden – and offers the utmost in local and seasonal produce. Highly recommended are the Sunday lunches, which have achieved almost legendary status so those wishing to try them would be advised to book far in advance to avoid disappointment...

Image by Jason Ingram

FUSSELS FINE FOODS Church Farm, Parkgate Lane, Rode, Frome BA11 6AA Tel: 01373 831286 Web: fusselsfinefoods.co.uk Fussels Fine Foods has been producing single cold pressed rapeseed oil for the last 10 years from its third-generation farm in Rode, Somerset. With a family passion for farming and good quality British food, Andy Fussel and his team grow, harvest and press oilseed rape to eventually arrive at a carefully crafted, healthy oil that is highly versatile and incredibly delicious. Not only high in essential omegas, low in saturated fat and stable at high temperatures, rapeseed oil is also a great source of vitamin E. From frying and roasting, to baking and drizzling, Fussels single cold pressed extra virgin rapeseed oil is a kitchen staple. Yet the Fussels range doesn’t just stop at oil. Not only does the company offer a choice of smoked, chilli and garlic varieties to add a little spice to your cooking, it has an extensive range of dressings, mayonnaises, sauces and vinaigrettes available online, at local markets and from the Rode farm outlet. The latter has seen a recent expansion and now also hosts a demonstration kitchen which is cooking up a storm. Cookery courses, farm tours – offering an insight to the pressing process – and foodie demonstrations teach visitors all about British farming as well as how to use this golden oil at home.

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BROKEN DOCK KITCHEN AND BAR Millennium Promenade, Bristol BS1 5SY Tel: 0117 325 0898 Web: brokendock.co.uk Broken Dock is hidden away on Bristol’s waterfront overlooking the stunning view of the harbour and Ashton Court. Open from 8 ‘til late, it is the perfect place to lounge and try Broken Dock’s recently curated modern British menu. During the day feast on breakfast, brunch, salads, sandwiches and planks all topped off with the Chefs own-made ‘PhilFi Sauces.’ In the evening opt for delicious drinks, sharing planks, scallops, steaks and much more. The other essential ingredients to the soul of Broken Dock are the staff, with in-house landlady Natasha, Head Chef Phil and a vibrant team always ready to welcome you. With plenty going on, whatever your mood may be, take a stroll to the waterfront and see what they are up to.

CASAMIA The General, Lower Guinea Street, Bristol BS1 6SY Tel: 0117 959 2884 Web: casamiarestaurant.co.uk Fans of Casmia – and they are legion – say that eating at this Michelin-starred family run restaurant is not so much a meal out as an experience to savour and to talk about afterwards. Chef Peter Sanchez-Iglesias, who was among the star chefs on the BBC’s Great British Menu series, together with his team put on a wonderfully theatrical display for diners, with dishes that are a delight to the eye as well as the palate, adding evocative smells and sounds to complete the multi-sensory experience. They produce show-stopping tasting menus, which change from day-to-day, making most of seasonal ingredients. Regularly named as one of the UK’s top restaurants, Casamia is a favourite among Bristolians wanting to treat themselves.

HENNY AND JOE’S

PACO TAPAS

Web: hennyandjoes.co.uk

The General, Lower Guinea Street, Bristol BS1 6SY Tel: 0117 925 7021 Web: pacotapas.co.uk

Henny and Joe’s chai can be found in independent cafés, coffee houses, bakeries and farm shops all over the UK. The local company has gone from strength to strength ever since it started from its humble beginning nearly four years ago. Last year saw the company win its third consecutive title as the Taste of the West awards in the Best Hot Drink in the South West category. However, this success was down to the newly released Chocolate chai and not the company’s multi award-winning original Masala chai. Unlike other chai on the market, Henny and Joe’s chai is allergen and caffeine free as well as being completely vegan friendly so everyone can enjoy it. A chai latte made with Henny and Joe’s has the same calorie content as half a chocolate digestive biscuit and it’s a fraction of the calorie content of the leading chai brands.

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Bristolian Peter Sanchez-Iglesias was recently named UK chef of the year by the Good Food Guide. This impressively talented young chef presides over three family restaurants in the old general hospital near the harbourside, where his latest venture Paco Tapas is dedicated to his father Paco’s native Seville and its authentic Spanish tapas. As you’d expect from the Sanchez-Iglesias kitchen, this traditional peasant food made from classic ingredients – potatoes, fresh fish, eggs, pork, seasonal vegetables – is given the royal treatment. Diners at this tapas and sherry bar are transported to Andalusia with such delights as padron peppers, five-year Iberian ham and the classic patatas bravas, all accompanied by fine, Spanish sherry.


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BOX-E

THE ROSE OF DENMARK

Unit 10, Cargo 1, Wapping Wharf, Bristol BS1 6WP Web: boxebristol.com

6 Dowry Place, Bristol BS8 4QL Tel: 0117 329 0352 Web: roseofdenmark.co.uk

One of the first restaurants to have opened in the Cargo 1 development, Box-E is comprised of two charming former shipping containers. The vision of husband-and-wife team Elliott and Tess, who relocated from London to Bristol to follow their foodie dreams, Box-E has become a veritable success, already making the top 100 at the National Restaurant Awards and described as “small, but perfectly formed” by the inimitable Jay Rayner. With room for only 14 covers, eating at Box-E is always an intimate, excellent experience, with diners able to see the seasonal, modern, delightfully adventurous fare being carefully crafted in the kitchen. Image by AndréPattenden

The Rose of Denmark keeps it real as a lovely old pub with an authentic, welcoming feel, friendly folk, a roaring log fire and fine food and drink. The weekly changing menu is superbly put together, using freshest quality produce from local, awardwinning and sustainable suppliers; while the splendid cellar rooms and small courtyard garden cater very well for all types of functions. The team offers a comprehensive lunch bar menu, the well-known Rose of Ploughman’s, a bar menu that has something for everyone, plus tasty tapas and award-winning Sunday roasts.

BOCABAR THE OX 43 Corn Street, Bristol BS1 1HT Tel: 0117 922 1001 Web: theoxbristol.com 96a Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2QX Tel: 0117 973 0005 Web: theoxclifton.com Since its original eatery opened, tucked away in a basement beneath The Commercial Rooms on Corn Street, The Ox has extended its offering with its Clifton location and become known Bristol-wide for the excellent food and drink up for grabs, including some of the best steak in the city. The menu comprises prime meaty cuts, beautiful small plates, delectable desserts and an ace Sunday roast, as well as several great value deals including the early-bird steak offer. As a cousin to Hyde Co and The Milk Thistle, there’s always an impressive array of expertly crafted cocktails too, plus wine, local beer and excellent ales.

Paintworks, Bath Road, Arnos Vale, Bristol BS4 3EH Tel: 0117 972 8838 Web: bristol.bocabar.co.uk Having just celebrated its 11th birthday, Bocabar continues to employ its original style and ethos to great effect: providing a diverse selection of food served in a cosy and pleasant environment. Its once-plain industrial interior has been refined to include an eclectic supply of vintage furniture, a wide selection of local art, plenty of cheering fairy lights that brighten the whole room, and show off the building’s original framework. The food served is both satisfying and wide in variety, ranging from stone-baked pizzas to platters from the salad and deli counter: all offering the modern-day must of locally sourced ingredients. On top of this, Bocabar also extend invitations to their regular art exhibitions and live music performances. Their complimentary reviews and myriad awards speak for themselves – further urging folk to pay a visit.

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HANOVER ST BISTRO St Augustine's Parade, Bristol BS1 4UL Tel: 0117 302 3224 Located just inside the Hippodrome Piano Bar, Hanover St Bistro is a pretty handy spot to visit before taking in a show – be it for cocktails and nibbles or even a three-course meal. The starter dishes on offer include baked camembert, hearty vine tomato soup, and ginger and lemon chicken skewers, while the main courses comprise a selection of pizzas, salads and sharing boards. For those bringing their little ones to the theatre, a reasonably priced children’s menu is also available as well as a tempting selection of desserts. Those who book ahead are able to take advantage of a special offer and enjoy two courses for £12.95, adding a lovely touch to your theatre outing.

PI SHOP

GROUNDED CAFÉ BARS

The General, Lower Guinea Street, Bristol BS1 6SY Tel: 0117 925 6872 Web: thepishop.co.uk

Various Bristol locations: Bedminster, Brislington, Fishponds, Henleaze, Horfield, Keynsham, Redfield Web: cafegrounded.co.uk Open all day, every day, and serving seasonal food in a welcoming environment, Grounded has become a staple across Bristol. As the number of locations has grown and spread, the team has never lost sight of their original mission to be the heart of the communities they serve. The ethos is still evident today, with each branch showcasing the work of local artists on the walls, and regular live music events from homegrown soloists and bands. Popular with all ages and stages, the crowdpleasing menus have recently been revamped with a mix of breakfast items, baguettes, salads, tasty tapas, hearty main courses and wholesome pizzas. Each Grounded location also offers a full glutenfree menu, a children’s menu and a great selection of craft beers, wines, soft drinks and smoothies to boot.

For a classic sourdough pizza complemented with mouth-watering toppings and a pint of Bristolbrewed Left Handed Giant from the tap, the Pi Shop pizzeria has fast become the place to go. Down by the harbourside, it occupies a charming corner of the gorgeous General development and is handy for mates, dates and family outings, with a no-frills, pared-back interior. As you’d expect from chef Peter Sanchez-Iglesias (see Casamia and Paco Tapas on p.VI) the menu has been carefully thought out, with classics such as the margherita and Hawaiian, plus a smattering of speciality pizzas including courgette with flowers, ewe’s curd, rocket and mint. If the weather’s good, little ones in tow can play on the terrace before enjoying the kids’ menu, while adults sip on an ice-cold negroni or sazerac from the cocktail list.

THE CAULDRON 98 Mina Road, St Werburghs, Bristol BS2 9XW Tel: 0117 914 1321 Web: thecauldron.restaurant The Cauldron is unique in that it doesn’t cook on gas or electricity, instead using wood-fired ovens and big, cast iron cauldrons. Everything is handmade and ethically sourced, with many of the ingredients coming from within walking distance of the restaurant. The Cauldron’s menus – equally appealing to vegans or committed carnivores – range from a charcoal-cooked full English breakfast to a short but impressive list of dinnertime dishes. Creative plates include exciting, colourful salads, charcoal-grilled jerk aubergine and, for pudding, personally we’re intrigued by the lemon jelly and lime curd with cookie dough and pink sherbet meringue. No wonder The Guardian gave this independent gem a rave review...

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WELLBOURNE 25 The Mall, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4JG Tel: 0117 239 0683 Web: wellbourne.restaurant

Run by cousins Ben Harvey and Dom Burel, Pasta Loco is most definitely a family affair. Situated in Cotham, just off Whiteladies Road, the emphasis here is clearly on – you guessed it – pasta, freshly homemade and paired with delicious, seasonal ingredients. The cosy dining room and fun, relaxed front-of-house service is warm and inviting; the perfect atmosphere in which to enjoy the ever-changing menu. With options to cater for meat-eaters, pescatarians and vegetarians, as well as gluten-free pasta, there is something for everyone to enjoy – think linguini salsiccia carbonara and gnocchi with cavolo nero. As you’d expect, the drinks menu complements perfectly with a succinct list of pleasing wines and moreish cocktails.

Chefs Ross Gibbens Image by Natalie Brereton and Michael Kennedy bring over 30 years of combined experience to their newly opened restaurant in Clifton Village. Wellbourne’s daytime offering is informal, with snacks, open sandwiches, and signature vol-auvents served alongside fresh Bristol ground coffee. As night-time arrives, the focus turns to a small selection of innovative and seasonal dishes, from spatchcock quail to violet aubergine with garden chard – all of which can be paired with a range of craft beers and an impressive selection of wines. With only positive reviews to be found – so far, so excellent – Wellbourne is a welcome addition to Clifton and a delight waiting to be discovered by Bristolians.

THE COLOMBIAN COMPANY

AQUA

Tel: 07534 391992 Web: thecolombiancompany.com

153 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2RF Tel: 0117 973 3314 Welsh Back, Harbourside, Bristol BS1 4RR Tel: 0117 915 6060 Web: aqua-restaurant.com

PASTA LOCO 37A Cotham Hill, Bristol BS6 6JY Tel: 0117 973 3000 Web: pastaloco.co.uk

Raised surrounded by coffee farms in Colombia, company founder Jhampoll Gutierrez Gomez moved to Bath many years ago before establishing his business, which celebrates the very best of Colombian produce. He imports speciality green coffee beans from small farms who struggle to compete with larger, industrial scale farms. Following the success of his Castillo and Typica coffee varieties, Jhampoll has decided to expand his product range to include Colombian chocolate and Panela (sugar cane). He will soon be launching a new online store where you can pick up the outstanding produce and read more about Jhampoll’s experiences with local Columbian people.

Since opening in 1998, Bristol’s Aqua restaurants have established themselves as firm favourites with the city’s lovebirds. As the home of great Italian cuisine, the two Bristol restaurants showcase a love of Italy – both its culture and superb food – and express it with the passion of a true romantic. The à la carte menu is fulsome and offers a great variety of dishes from fig and mozzarella salad to breaded calamari and homemade Italian meatballs. Surprisingly, Aqua is also famous for its fabulous Sunday roasts – a perfect hangover cure if ever there was one. Whether dining with your other half or bringing the family along for a quick, delicious pizza, the staff at Aqua will make sure you are well looked after.

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DELICIOUS GUIDE | BRISTOL 2017

PRIMROSE CAFÉ 1 Boyce’s Avenue, Bristol BS8 4AA Tel: 0117 946 6577 Web: primrosecafe.co.uk The Primrose Café has been beloved by Bristol for almost 25 years. Nestled in the heart of Clifton Village, the café provides ideally located seating on the private roof garden, inside the cosiness of its building, or outside by the street, making it the perfect spot for a lazy summer afternoon. You can stop by for afternoon tea and cakes, or for Sunday brunch - the menu has a large variety of choices depending on how hungry you feel, and the staff will even do private catering for events. The ownership of the café also takes the time to make sure that all the produce is ethically and locally sourced. It’s undeniable that you will be charmed from the moment you arrive.

BRAVAS

ADELINA YARD

7 Cotham Hill, Bristol BS6 6LD Tel: 0117 329 6887 Web: bravas.co.uk

Queen Quay, Welsh Back, Bristol BS1 4SL Tel: 0117 911 2112 Web: adelinayard.com

The ethos behind Bravas came from the owner’s frequent trips to Spain enjoying the unpretentious and inexpensive food available there in the local tapas bars. Aiming to provide the welcoming atmosphere of a local pub, but with the quality of food you would expect in a great restaurant, Bravas have certainly succeeded in bringing this ethos to Bristol. To complement the mouth-watering tapas on offer are a fantastic range of Spanish wines and beers. Booking is advised, although there are 16 stools in the window area for unreserved dining when spontaneous tapas are needed! Spanish sandwiches and a takeaway menu of tapas are also available.

Opening its doors in December 2015, it only took a little over a year for this restaurant to be awarded a place in the prestigious Sunday Times Top 100 Restaurants Guide. A team of passionate and creative chefs, headed up by Jamie Randall and Olivia Barry, their aim is to serve modern European food in a relaxed, family atmosphere. Great care is taken with everything that reaches your plate, including baking their own bread, churning their own butter, and curing their own meats. With sublime tasting menu and a la carte options that frequently change, it is an experience not to be missed.

LA TRAMA OLIVE OIL Available at Brockley Stores, Main Road, Brockley BS48 3AT Tel: 01275 462753 Web: latrama.co.uk to order direct Spanish importer Elena Alcala is bringing premium olive oils to the south west of England from her family estate in the olive producing county of Baena in Córdoba. This is extra virgin olive oil, obtained from olives of the picudo or carrasqueño de Córdoba varieties as the main variety and, to a lesser degree, lechin, chorrúo or jardúo, pajarero, hojiblanca and picual. The olives are harvested carefully, either using mechanical or traditional methods, and the oil is made with the same care so as not to alter the olives in order to fully preserve their aroma, flavour and qualities. This is a fruity oil, with great floral aromas, slightly bitter hints of almond and a colour that varies between greenish yellow and greenish gold. It’s ideal for cooking, drizzling and dipping.

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FOOD HEROES

Elena (pictured above) and her family own ancient groves in Andalucía, Spain – dreamy!

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FOOD HEROES

ESSENTIAL OILS We discover a Bristol business with international heritage and excellent foodie, environmental and health credentials

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lena Alcalá has been appearing regularly across the region’s foodie market scene this summer – most recently in Portishead and at the Tobacco Factory – so we decided to do a little digging and found out all about how she brought her family business over from beautiful Andalusia, all for the benefit of Bristolian tastebuds, hearts and hangovers... TBM: So, tell us a bit about your background... I was born in the Andalusian province of Córdoba, southern Spain, in a town called Baena – where I grew up surrounded by olive trees and groves as far as the eye can see. Since a very young age, I have been involved in the harvesting of olives and production of olive oil and learning about the different types of pressings. Over the years, my father has taught my siblings and I everything there is to know about producing top quality olive oil. Having lived in the UK for 16 years, I have realised that the British are not quite as passionate about their olive oil as they are about their wine and I’m keen to change that, so I decided to set up a company to bring my family’s premium olive oil to the UK. In September 2016, La Trama – la trama being the name of the olive oil blossom – was created. How did you come to be in the West Country? I attended UWE Bristol for both my degree in marketing and MA in European business and then had stints in the coffee and wine industries. I fell in love with Bristol (and then a Bristolian) and have never left. I now live in Claverham, North Somerset, with my husband and two wonderful stepchildren who now love dipping bread into olive oil! I set up the business here because Bristol and Bath are very cosmopolitan cities which embrace different cultures and appreciate good quality products. I have also had a great help from the Start & Grow programme at Business West. Paint us a picture of the Andalusían groves... My family owns olive groves in different areas of the south of Cordoba, which have been passed from generation to generation. This part of Spain is well-known for the quality of the olive trees and they are on every hillside as far as the eye can see – interspersed with traditional white-washed villages. My father’s groves date back to the 1200s, when our ancestor from the Basque country (a commander of one of the armies that helped to reconquer Andalusia) was given the land as payment. My mum’s ancestors were peasants during the Napoleonic wars (1800s) and found a chest full of gold coins which they used to buy land – the mix of land from both sides is what makes up our family grove as it is today. My father retired from running his own law practice in his 50s, and decided to dedicate his efforts completely to the groves and the olive oil. Today, he is 72 and takes pride in the olive trees and all he has achieved for the family. Tell us about the making process... The harvest takes place between November and February, which makes Christmas a special time for me when I visit. Once I smell the olive oil, I know it’s really Christmas! When they are ready for picking, the olives are normally black or burgundy (green olives are not a separate type, they are merely less mature) and the best quality olives are the ones that haven’t fallen from the tree yet, so a tractor grabs the olive tree from the trunk and shakes it so the olives fall down into a carefully placed net. The olives that have already fallen are also picked, but are selected for a lower-end olive oil. The lorries arrive at the factory and offload the olives, which are separated from the leaves and taken away to be ground into a paste in modern steel drum mills for about 20 minutes. After, the paste is stirred

slowly for another 20 to 30 minutes in a container (a process called malaxation), where the microscopic oil drops coalesce into bigger drops, which facilitates the mechanical extraction. The paste is then pressed by centrifugation to separate the water. The oil produced by only mechanical (not chemical) means, as described above, is called virgin oil. Extra virgin olive oil is virgin olive oil that satisfies specific high chemical and organoleptic criteria (low free acidity, no or very little organoleptic defects). A higher grade extra virgin olive oil is mostly dependent on favourable weather conditions; a drought during the flowering phase, for example, can result in a lower quality (virgin) oil. It is worth noting that olive trees produce well every couple of years so greater harvests occur in alternate years (the year in-between is when the tree yields less). However, the quality is still dependent on the weather. Sometimes the produced oil will be filtered to eliminate remaining solid particles that may reduce the shelf-life of the product. What are the health benefits? The company’s motto is that ‘olive oil is a jewel to your health’ – especially those with heart conditions. Studies show a reduction of risk of coronary heart disease, and it’s also great for the skin. The Mediterranean diet is famous for its benefits – a 2014 meta-analysis concluded that an elevated consumption of olive oil is associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and stroke, while monounsaturated fatty acids of mixed animal and plant origin showed no significant effects. How do you ensure the best possible taste? There is no alteration to the process. It is all done solely by mechanical means, to allow the taste to be solely of pure olives. No additives or chemicals go in. The best quality olive oil also comes from the best quality trees, a good soil, a warm climate and a great deal of passion. Are you environmentally friendly? Definitely! We comply with all the EU environmental laws and the Consejo Regulador of the Designation of Origin Baena (the regulating quality control body and of health and safety). Furthermore, we use every bit of the olive. Even the olive stone – used in the houses for central heating. This is a very common practice in the area. And we could sponsor a tree if we wished to? Oh yes. I am keen for people to feel they have a connection with my home town and the olive oil produced in the region. By sponsoring an olive tree, people can help with sustaining and supporting the olive trees. They also receive two bottles of our premium Oronovus olive oil with the sponsorship certificate and an invitation to visit their tree and the factory. Are there any good alternative uses for your product? Other local manufacturers use our olive oil to make soap and creams as it is extremely good for the skin. We sell directly to these manufacturers from our family mill, or almazara, in Baena. A very unusual use of the product is to take a full spoon to cure hangovers (I don’t do this but many people in the south of Spain do), or to flavour ice-cream! Which other Bristol makers do you rate? Brockley Stores in Cleeve – they make the nicest pies and bread and have sold our olive oil since November 2016. I usually buy my bread for tastings there and it’s delicious! ■ • For further information visit: latrama.co.uk or follow Elena on Twitter: @TramaLimited

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FOOD & Drink

TASTY TITBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

IT’S BACK! Cocktails in the City returns to Bristol’s Passenger Shed on 15 September – after five years of touring the country – to bring 16 of Bristol’s best bars together under one roof. Visitors will be able to indulge in specially-designed cocktails by the likes of The Milk Thistle, Red Light, Hyde & Co, Her Majesty’s Secret Service and Harvey Nichols Second Floor Restaurant and Bar; and be invited to learn about the art of mixology with interactive masterclasses, games and food pairing experiences. "We really enjoyed taking part in the inaugural Cocktails in the City Bristol event a few years ago,” said Nathan Lee of The Milk Thistle. “Cocktails in the City is definitely the best consumer cocktail event this city has seen and we’re delighted to see it return.” There’ll also be street food from Bristol’s Bambalan, Eatchu and AlpMac. “A chance to pair our gyoza up with some amazing and innovative cocktails, what could be better?” said Guy Siddall from Eatchu. • cocktailsinthecity.com

FLAVOURS OF INDIA LET THE FEAST BEGIN The much-anticipated Great Bath Feast begins on 23 September. Running until 8 October, highlights include gourmet tasting menus; cookery school experiences; food trails and heavenly bake sales; three-course lunches created by the likes of chef Dan Moon (pictured below); a Jane Austen supper club; a Persian feast; and Great British Bake Off winner Nadiya Hussain, stopping off at Bath Children’s Literature Festival to share her favourite recipes and stories and encourage younger members of the audience to help with biscuit decorating. Comedian, broadcaster and chef Hardeep Singh Kohli will also be relating anecdotes about his passion for food and the development of curry culture in the UK – cooking with volunteers using fresh, local ingredients, and making sure any excess food goes to local homeless charity Julian House – as plenty more excellent events take place. Get involved! • greatbathfeast.co.uk

Chef Romy Gill MBE, owner and head chef at Romy's Kitchen, is all set to host an Indian-inspired four-course meal at the Second Floor Restaurant, Harvey Nichols Bristol on the evening of 27 September which includes a Crazy Gin cocktail on arrival, served in the Second Floor Bar. Romy, who writes for various magazines and newspapers and is a regular contributor to BBC Radio 4, is one of the few female Indian chef/owners in the UK, having opened Romy’s Kitchen restaurant in September 2013 in Thornbury. Romy was awarded a MBE for her services to the hospitality industry in the Queen's 90th Birthday Honours list in 2016 and has been a judge on the chef's table in 2016’s Celebrity MasterChef finals as well as being the resident cook for April 2016 in the Guardian newspaper. • romyskitchen.co.uk

CIDER I UP! Thatcher’s is hosting a free family open day on 16 September from 11am until 3pm – offering the chance to talk to cidermakers, taste ciders, do some apple pressing, visit the orchards on a trailer and get close to 150-year-old oak vats. And, if you’re feeling peckish, The Railway Inn will be open throughout the day, with its pizza oven in full swing. • thatcherscider.co.uk

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BRISTOL | EDUCATION

EDUCATING BRISTOL TBM’s comprehensive guide to education in and around Bristol

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hoosing a new school for your child is no mean feat, whether they’re about to start primary school for the first time or make the jump up to secondary education. As a parent the best way to ensure you find the right school for your child is to do a bit of your own homework. If you’re considering independent schooling now is the time to start looking ahead to next autumn and researching the options available in the Bristol area. Schools are becoming increasingly aware of the need to offer an allround education and a broad range of extra-curricular activities to engage pupils outside the classroom. Most parents will be looking for a school that balances a strong academic reputation with this extracurricular provision and the result is schools with an ever-growing list of clubs and activities to offer. If your child isn’t particularly academically minded a school strong in the extra-curricular department can provide the perfect opportunity for your child to really engage at school and become part of the community. While some schools may be highly selective there are plenty that cater for a more average ability, or even specialise in helping children in need of individual attention. Other considerations should include the size of a school – while some children may thrive in a more competitive environment, others will benefit from being able to progress at their own pace without pressure from peers. Pastoral care is an important factor, especially if you are looking at full-time or part-time boarding. Will the school nurture and emotionally support your child, while also teaching them the skills to become a confident, independent individual? Equally as important is the social aspect. Children will be hoping for

a school where they can make plenty of friends and develop a wide and welcoming social circle. Open days provide the best opportunity to really get a feel for a school – the staff, facilities, current pupils and the general atmosphere. These visits will enable you to see which school is the best fit for your child’s skills, personality and educational needs. Bristol is home to a number of schools which offer a unique combination of facilities and opportunities. In our education guide you can discover a little more about what each school offers and find out what they think makes them stand out above the rest.

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The new school badge is a contemporary design that was based on drawings put forward by the students themselves

BETTER TOGETHER We meet Isabel Tobias, headmistress of Bristol’s newest – and oldest – school, Redmaids’ High

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ou may recall the announcement, back in March 2016, of a merger between two of Bristol’s oldest schools, to create the city’s newest. Red Maids’ – also the oldest surviving girls’ school in the country – is joining with Redland High School for Girls, which has sold its 18th-century mansion home in the name of affording maximum opportunities for its students, as modern expectations of schools climb ever higher and educational establishments raise their game to meet them... TBM: So, this kind of merger is fairly unusual – how did the decision first come about? Isabel: The respective governing bodies began discussions, very much with the desire to strengthen the excellent single-sex provision for girls in Bristol that both schools had independently provided previously. Although the schools had been friendly rivals for more than a century, both were committed to a vision of excellence for girls and shared many more similarities than differences, so it was soon agreed that we would be a positive match for each other. In fact, after our merger was announced, important connections between the schools – dating back to the 19th century – were uncovered: a female governor from each school had worked together in the Bristol movement for Women’s Suffrage so they knew and helped each other even then! What has been the greatest challenge logistically? It was important to create opportunities for the girls, parents and staff to get to know each other and begin working together during a school year which was already busy and full of the normal school events and activities. We did this with parents’ suppers for some year groups, a joint parent quiz night, student shadowing, a combined sports day, bowling and rounders’ games and the chance for all the staff to get together socially and for meetings – among many other joint ventures! Combining the timetable for the new school year was like a giant Sudoku puzzle but fortunately we have a brilliant team here who worked through all the challenges. 68 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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What are you most looking forward to about the new era? Welcoming everyone back into our wonderful new assembly hall and performance space – Redland Hall. It is a magnificent new building with classrooms, offices, an archive room for recording everything about our unique heritage, music practice rooms, meeting rooms and break out/social spaces for the girls. The new auditorium will host all our major productions and concerts and I am looking forward to holding assemblies there as they are a special time when the whole school comes together to catch up on important news and to contemplate some of the big questions and profound aspects of life. What will it mean for the girls? What are they most excited about? It means lots of new friends, the opportunity of studying some new subjects, a wonderful new venue for their own performances – and a first-class new sports ground near Cribbs Causeway. What has been the reaction of the parents in general? Parents have been very supportive and positive. It came as a great surprise to most people and they wanted to understand the rationale – especially as all our parents are committed to the school they had originally chosen for their daughters. So, in the early days, there were lots of questions and some meetings. However, they have been involved in things such as choosing our new uniform, and in our regular parents’ discussion group. And now many have told me how excited they are and pleased about all the new opportunities open to their daughters. What is your future vision for the school as of September, when the physical side of the process takes place? I am excited about continuing to work on the things that are important for us: the high quality of the education we provide for the girls including STEM, languages, performing arts and sport; the important links we enjoy with schools and organisations in Bristol and around the world, especially where our students get to travel and visit them; and continuing to develop the expertise of our marvellous staff.


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EDUCATION

What new elements are being put in place? As I mentioned, there are exciting improvements to our site. Pastoral care has always been a high priority and as we are growing slightly in number, we have introduced assistant heads of year and more form time so that the girls have the continued personal support of dedicated staff. On this point, one of the most frequent questions I’ve been asked is about class size – it’s worth underlining that we are committed to maintaining classes of 24 girls maximum, though a number of subjectspecific classes are smaller than this, especially at GCSE. In the Sixth Form, the maximum class size is 15. What ideas or features from each of the schools will be brought to the students of Redmaids’ High? We are bringing together lots of excellent things from both schools’ backgrounds and traditions. John Whitson, the original founder of Red Maids’ way back in 1634, was a merchant and the ship emblem

representing discovery and adventure has always been important; Redland High’s daisy stands for open-mindedness and freedom from prejudice and ignorance and it is completely fitting that this comes with us into the new school. The girls have already talked in School Council about how to combine their special events, like house competitions and talent shows – things that they look forward to every year – and no doubt these discussions will continue. What’s the new uniform going to be like? The girls will wear a red and green plaid skirt with a red jumper and blazer. Our new school badge is a contemporary design that incorporates the ship and the daisy and was based on drawings put forward by the students themselves.

• redmaidshigh.co.uk There’ll be many more academic, arts and sports opportunities

Lisa Brown is heading up the infant and junior school

Isabel is committed to maintaining class sizes of 24 maximum

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BOOKS

READ ALL ABOUT IT With the start of the autumn term in mind, Foyles’ Charlotte Pope puts forward a few little school-themed tomes to settle nerves and ease the kids back into the routine

I AM ABSOLUTELY TOO SMALL FOR SCHOOL, BY LAUREN CHILD

THE DIARY OF A WIMPY KID, BY JEFF KINNEY

Mum and Dad say Lola is nearly big enough to go to school, but she is not so sure. As far as Lola is concerned, she is far too small and much too busy doing other things. Her big brother Charlie tries to convince her that school will be interesting and fun but Lola doesn’t think she’ll need to learn her numbers and letters – although she slowly realises it might be quite useful to count, read and write. Also, Lola’s invisible friend Soren Lorenson is a bit nervous about school, so she will have to go with him just to make him feel better. When Lola eventually comes home from her first day at school, she’s had a lovely time – her fears completely unfounded. Beloved children’s characters Charlie and Lola tackle the very common nervousness found in small children starting school for the first time. With Lauren Child’s wonderfully bright illustrations, this is just the thing to help kids ease their worries and start looking forward to their first day.

TOPSY AND TIM START SCHOOL, BY JEAN AND GARETH ADAMSON

It is time for these favourite twins to start school – and though they are a little nervous, Topsy and Tim are mostly excited to be finally going to primary school. They meet their new teacher, see old friends from nursery while having a look around their new classroom, and soon realise that school is a lot of fun! This is a lovely, short little book to help soothe those who might be feeling apprehensive about entering the world of Big School. The Topsy and Tim books gently introduce children to new experiences in a friendly and familiar way and this simple story is sure to help them get used to the idea of what school will entail.

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It’s Greg Heffley’s first day of middle school and he is determined that he will be popular: unfortunately, nothing seems to go to plan at all. On the first day of school, Greg is immediately rejected and forced to sit with another outcast, Fregley, who Greg desperately tries to keep a safe distance from. Greg is also worried about his best friend Rowley, who is not quite ‘middle-school material’ and who hasn’t quite grown up: Greg isn’t particularly happy when Rowley loudly asks him (in the middle of a crowded corridor) if he wants to come over to his house ‘to play’ rather than ‘hang-out’ – Rowley is becoming seriously damaging to Greg’s carefully cultivated cool-guy image... Greg’s story takes the form of his hand-written journal (“not a diary”, he insists) filled with scribbles and doodles of his day to day adventures, from his super annoying older brother Rodrick, to the perils of having to play a tree in the school play. Funny and incredibly readable, this best-selling kids series would be a perfect choice for getting reluctant youngsters reading.

WIGGLESBOTTOM PRIMARY: THE TOILET GHOST, BY PAT BUTCHART AND BECKA MOOR

The children in class 2R of Wigglesbottom Primary are convinced there is a sneaky ghost at work. Poor Theo Burke has been drenched by taps that turned on all by themselves, and soon it is very clear that the boys bathroom is haunted by a Toilet Ghost and that they are all in terrible danger. The children desperately enforce a juice ban, to prevent the Toilet Ghost from striking again but, before long, the boys are beginning to struggle... From a stinky shoe that can apparently tell the future, to a terrible ancient curse that is accidentally let loose during Show and Tell, there is always something going on at Wigglesbottom Primary. Pat Butchart and Becka Moor have created a hilarious book series that is perfect for readers aged 5-8, and will have little ones crying out for more!

FIRST TERM AT MALORY TOWERS, BY ENID BLYTON

Darrell Rivers is the new girl at Malory Towers, a boarding school for girls. She has remembered to pack her tennis racquet and her toothbrush, but can she remember to keep her fiery temper under control? Darrell soon settles in and meets the girls in her dormitory: there is timid Mary-Lou and head girl Katherine, as well as spiteful and spoiled Gwendoline. Darrell wants to do well but keeps getting distracted by funny girl Alicia Johns, who plays excellent practical jokes on the teachers. With friendships and quarrels and midnight feasts, the Malory Towers books are a joy to read. Written over 70 years ago now, they continue to be brilliant school stories that are ideal for girls aged 9-12.


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By Dr Andrew Daniel, Headmaster of Monmouth School for Boys

INSPIRING POWER OF SPORT

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port has a special power to bring people together, and sport, too, plays a significant part in the lives of pupils, former pupils and members of staff at Haberdashers’ Monmouth Schools. I am tremendously proud that we have been chosen as a hosting point on the Queen’s Baton Relay in September ahead of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games in 2018. Many of our past pupils have competed at Olympic and Commonwealth level in a variety of sports such as cycling, fencing, rowing, swimming and equestrian. And the Queen’s Baton Relay is a fantastic opportunity for us to put Monmouth firmly on the sporting map and inspire the next generation of stars ahead of the next Commonwealth Games. First to take the baton is former pupil Lewis Oliva, who is a member of the British cycling squad. Lewis, who is currently studying medicine at university, has competed at the last two Commonwealth Games in Delhi and Glasgow and is firmly on track to represent Wales at next year’s showpiece. Our five GB rowers, Welsh Under 18s netball and European Canicross champions, and our Welsh trampoline stars will be receiving the baton during the sporting celebration in Monmouth. Mackenzie Nordal, one of our school governors, is a former pupil who swam at the Commonwealth Games in Manchester in 2002 and will also be involved in the special day. We certainly have a rich pedigree of sporting achievement at Monmouth with staff who nurture the talents of our aspiring sportsmen and women. We have produced many Welsh international rugby union players, including Eddie Butler and teenage prodigy Keith Jarrett and, more recently, Hallam Amos. The school has always recognised the importance of sport and continues to make a significant contribution in delivering sporting excellence across the generations. n *The Schools have an established bus route covering the Thornbury area. For more information, visit habsmonmouth.org, call 01600 710 433 for Monmouth School for Boys or 01600 711104 for Monmouth School for Girls.

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EDUCATION NEWS UPDATES FROM THE CITY’S SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

GIRL POWER

The girls impressed world-leading scientists at WOMAD

CONGRATULATIONS!

LET THE GAMES BEGIN

A local family-run nursery group has been shortlisted for a national award for its innovative online and social media approach to connecting with parents. Mama Bear’s Day Nursery and PreSchool has been shortlisted for the Online and Social Media Award at the Nursery World Awards 2017. The award evaluates how well a nursery or day school uses their online and social presence as an informative, innovative and accessible tool for parents. Mama Bear’s owner Bev Driffield, who runs the group with husband Tony, said one of the company’s main considerations is its partnership with parents, which they believe is vitally important for a child’s development. “We strive to provide each of the children with us with a high standard of early education and support,” she said. “Working closely with parents comes hand in hand with this and we put a lot of effort into ensuring home and nursery life is cohesive, by communicating regularly with our parents. Supporting them with all aspects of childcare is something we are passionate about.” The Nursery World Awards will take place on 23 September at The Brewery in London.

Redmaids’ High School has acquired, from Aviva Investors, the sports ground near Cribbs Causeway, currently operating under the name Cribbs Sports & Social Club. The site is less than 10 minutes’ drive from the school, and its 16.7-acre plot includes four full-size grass football pitches, four tennis courts, a 3G allweather Astroturf pitch, a car park and changing and social facilities. Redmaids’ intends to invest in a new hockey pitch and upgrade the pavilion at the site in Henbury to ensure the highest quality amenities are available. In the meantime, the school will continue to use the grounds it leases at Golden Hill. “We are delighted to have acquired this sports ground,” said chair of governors, Jane MacFarlane. “It is already an impressive site and, with our further investment, this will be an invaluable asset for the school and wider community. With these new and improved facilities, we anticipate seeing even more participation in sport across the student body.” The school will work with the club to create a plan to improve the facilities further, ensuring – wherever possible – continued public access, consistent with the needs of the school.

• mamabear.co.uk

• redmaidshigh.co.uk

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Badminton School’s Science Outreach Team were recently invited back to WOMAD Festival – for a second year of performing their self-curated science demonstrations in the Physics Pavilion. The Physics Pavilion is hosted by CERN; the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, the Institute of Physics, Lancaster University and the UK’s Science and Technology Facilities Council, and was a new addition to the WOMAD line up last year. It gives festival attendees an opportunity to watch an exhilarating and entertaining programme of science demonstrations in between musical performances from around the world. The Badminton girls opened the day’s events on the Saturday morning, where they presented a range of science demonstrations including ‘The Whistling Kettle’, ‘Smokey Bubbles’ and ‘Exploding Pringle Tin’ to a diverse crowd of around 300 people. The girls executed demonstrations that many of them had seen prior to the festival but had not yet attempted themselves – all the more impressive! The physicists from CERN were so pleased with the confidence and talent of the Badminton girls that they asked if a couple of members of the team could step in to help them with their ‘Cloud Chambers’ workshop. Then, on the Sunday, the girls were given the honour of leading some of the workshop’s tables, rather than being second in command; praise indeed from the world leaders in scientific research. “Each and every girl from our Science Outreach Team should be extremely proud of themselves,” commented Mr Williams, head of science outreach at Badminton. “They represented Badminton on a national stage and did so with the utmost professionalism and confidence.” • badmintonschool.co.uk


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BADMINTON SCHOOL

BRISTOL GRAMMAR SCHOOL

CLIFTON HIGH SCHOOL

University Road, Bristol, BS8 1SR Tel: 0117 973 6006 www.bristolgrammarschool.co.uk website@bgs.bristol.sch.uk

Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol, BS9 3BA Tel: 0117 905 5271 Website: www.badmintonschool.co.uk Email: admissions@badmintonschool.co.uk

Reception Open Morning: Monday 25 September 9.30am-11.30am Open Evening: Friday 6 October, 4.00pm-8.00pm (until 6.30pm for BGS Infants and Juniors) Sixth Form Information Evening: Tuesday 7 November, 5.00pm-7.15pm

Autumn term: 8 September - 13 December 2017 Spring term: 5 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 4 July 2018 Age of pupils: 3 - 18 years Number of pupils: 450

Autumn term: 6 September - 13 December 2017 Spring term: 4 January - 21 March 2018 Summer term: 11 April - 5 July 2018 Age of pupils: 4 - 18 Number of pupils: 1,300 approx.

Day fees: £3,200 - £5,395 per term

Day fees: £2,750 - £4,740 per term

Religious denomination: Non-denominational

Religious denomination: Non-denominational

The curriculum: At Badminton, we believe in really getting “under the skin” of whatever we do, not just skating over the top. To phrase this eloquently, you could say it’s our holistic approach to education! The girls really delve into the subject they are learning, always complementing their studies and enriching their theoretical knowledge with practical co-curricular activities. The curriculum and timetable are constructed to achieve a balance between academic achievement, personal development, life skills and other enterprising activity and our small classes ensure that all the girls receive individual help and attention from their teachers.

From their first lesson aged four, to eighteen and looking ahead to university and the wider world, at BGS we support each child on their educational journey. Inspiring a love of learning and with a huge range of opportunities in and out of the classroom, every child can flourish here. The curriculum: The Infant curriculum covers all the requirements of the National Curriculum. Lessons are linked in to a topic-based curriculum, which allows the children to explore a particular area while linking the subjects into a topic. In the Junior School children enjoy a breadth of education that stretches far beyond the National Curriculum. In the Senior School and Sixth Form students enjoy choice and opportunity. They can discover their strengths through a wide range of optional subjects, within a curriculum that encourages them to realise their potential, explore their ideas and take their learning as far as they can go. In the Sixth Form students have the opportunity to take the Extended Project Qualification alongside their ‘A’ levels. The curriculum is supported by an extensive cocurricular programme that includes activities such as Photography, Samba Band, Cookery, various sports and many more.

Extra curricular activities: Our enrichment programme is extremely important in the overall development of the girls in our care, as it provides opportunities to pursue wider interests and to contribute to the community. There are many activities on offer and they range from clubs with an academic bias such as Model United Nations, Ancient Greek and Science Research to those that allow the girls to pursue creative interests, such as Leiths School of Cookery, Art and Drama. Music is also an important part of School life, with nearly 80% of girls learning at least one instrument during their time at Badminton.

Headmaster: Mr R I MacKinnon Scholarships and bursaries: Scholarships: A wide range of scholarships including Academic, Creative and Performing Arts, and Sport are available for entry into Year 7 and Year 9. Scholarships are also available for entry into Lower Sixth.

Pastoral care: We’re a small school with a familylike community that is vibrant and inclusive. The girls are known individually by all, allowing us to individually tailor our support of their specific interests and ambitions. As both a day and boarding school, we are able to offer Day Girls the option of flexi and occasional boarding, giving girls and their parent’s flexibility during the term. Through a wealth of shared experiences, the girls make a lifelong friendship network that spans the globe.

Bursaries Families with a low or limited income can apply for a means-tested bursary through our Schools’ Assisted Places Scheme. Visit us: Come and discover for yourself what makes BGS such an exciting and enjoyable place to learn, make friends, and begin life’s adventure.

Name of Principal: Mrs Rebecca Tear Outstanding characteristics: Girls at Badminton truly enjoy their education and often excel beyond their natural ability. The individual attention they receive means that they gain in self-confidence, preparing them for life beyond school. 76 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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For further information or to arrange a visit, please contact Hollie Matthews in the Admissions Office on 0117 933 9885.

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College Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 3JD Tel: 0117 973 0201 www.cliftonhigh.bristol.sch.uk admissions@cliftonhigh.bristol.sch.uk Autumn term: 6 September - 14 December 2017 Spring term: 4 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 16 April - 6 July 2018 Age of pupils: 3 - 18 years Number of pupils: 580 Day fees: £4,850 per term Religious denomination: Non-denominational The curriculum: Clifton High School is a fully co-educational 3-18 school. It is the only school in Bristol to follow the Diamond Edge Model of education. Research has shown that boys and girls benefit from being taught separately in key subjects during key periods in their education – therefore at Clifton High, pupils in Years 7-9 learn separately in Mathematics, English and the Sciences, coming together in other subjects and of course socially. In recent outstanding A level results two thirds of students achieved all A*-B grades, 31% above the national average. All students who applied to university were awarded a place, with 80% going to their first choice. Extra curricular activities: Clifton High is outstanding in its provision of enrichment activities from EYFS to Sixth Form. Clubs range from astronomy and trampolining, to robotics and an Eco club. The heavily subscribed Duke of Edinburgh’s award scheme and expeditions with World Challenge complement a vast range of educational visits (many included in fees), Forest School and trips abroad, including an annual sports tour. Pastoral care: The school is well known for its excellent pastoral care. From the ‘key person’ system in the EYFS to the thriving peer support arrangements, the pupils are cared for extremely effectively. Promoting a culture of safety where pupils feel secure and valued is central to the School’s aims. Name of Principal: Dr Alison M Neill, Head of School. Dr Mark Caddy, Deputy Head of School. Dr Helen Pascoe, Deputy Head of School Outstanding characteristics: Realising Individual Brilliance is the School’s tagline and this emphasis on bringing out the best in each and every pupil so they can develop their particular gifts and talents is much valued by parents. “Pupils’ personal development is excellent, and the School is highly successful in achieving its aim of enabling pupils to develop attributes and skills that equip them extremely well for the future”. ISI 2016


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CLIFTON COLLEGE

COLSTON’S

32 College Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 3JH Tel: 0117 405 8417 Web: www.cliftoncollege.com Email: info@cliftoncollege.com

West Lavington, Devizes, Wiltshire, SN10 4HE Tel: 01380 814500 Email: admissions@dauntseys.org Autumn term: 8 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 9 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 7 July 2018 Age of pupils: 11 - 18 years Number of pupils: 825

Autumn term: 6 September - 14 December 2017 Spring term: 10 January - 22 March 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 5 July 2018 Age of pupils: 2 - 18 years Number of pupils: 1,220 (Preparatory School, ages 2-13, 500; Upper School, ages 13-18, 720)

Day fees: £6,150 per term UK boarders: £10,180 per term.

Day fees: Nursery and Pre-Preparatory pupils from £1,950 Preparatory School day pupils from £4,275 Upper School day pupils from £7,870 Flexi Boarding and Boarding packages available

Bell Hill, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 5RW Tel: 0117 965 5207 Email: admissions@colstons.org www.colstons.org

Religious denomination: Christian foundation welcoming all faiths.

Autumn term: 4 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 8 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 5 July 2018

The curriculum: Clifton College offers an outstanding all-round education. The College is equally strong in STEM, Literature, Languages and the Arts. In 2016, 80% of A Level grades and 90% of GCSE grades were A*-B with a quarter of all candidates scoring only A*/A grades. 82% of our leavers secured a place at Russell Group universities while 8 students won places at Oxbridge and 11 went on to study medicine or dentistry. Scholarships and bursaries are available at 11+, 13+ and 16+.

Age of pupils: 3 - 18 years Number of pupils: 741 Fees: Upper School £4,535 Lower School £2,490-£3,390 Religious denomination: Church of England The curriculum: Lower School pupils enjoy the full range of academic subjects including languages, design technology, ICT, art and music. From the ages of 11 to 16 all pupils follow a broad and balanced curriculum in keeping with national policy. Most pupils take nine GCSE subjects with a compulsory core of English, English Literature, Mathematics and Science. In addition, pupils select three or four GCSE options and continue to follow a nonexamined programme of physical education and personal, social and health education (including careers education). In the Sixth Form students can follow three A Level courses or a mixture of A Level and BTEC courses and take part in our innovative careers and employability programme, Future Leaders, as well as having the option to take an EPQ (Extended Project Qualification).

Extra curricular activities: The extensive offering of games, activities and events that take place outside the classroom form part of the allround education Clifton College is known for. The school has a 330-seat, purpose-built theatre and the Joseph Cooper Music School houses 15 rehearsal rooms, two technology suites, four recording studios and a recital room. The impressive sports grounds total more than 90 acres and include an on-site swimming pool and gym, an international standard water-based hockey pitch, 3G rugby pitch, indoor netball and tennis dome, and rackets, real tennis and fives courts. Pastoral care: The school provides a real sense of community, both to its pupils and their families. Pupils form friendships that last a lifetime, with many opportunities in the years after school to network and join together again through the Old Cliftonian Society. The house system is at the centre of the Clifton College community; it provides a strong support network for pupils while inter-house competitions offer a fun way for pupils to compete across a variety of talents from the House Play Festival to inter-house debating.

Co-curricular activities: More than 50 clubs and activities are offered each term at Colston’s, as well as the Combined Cadet Force, Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme, ski trips, international sports tours, and cultural and language trips to various European countries. Pastoral care: Heads of house oversee teams of house tutors who are responsible for caring for pupils in tutorial groups. Tutors act as the point of contact for parents and the pastoral structures are a notable strength of Colston’s.

Name of Head: Dr Tim Greene MA DPhil

Name of principal: Mr Jeremy McCullough (Headmaster)

Outstanding characteristics: Clifton College is a traditional British public school with inspirational teaching, first-class inclusive sport, diverse co-curricular activities, exceptional pastoral care and an outstanding environment. It aims to inspire each child to seize learning and opportunity and realise their full potential through an eagerness to embrace life with passion, integrity and resilience, and to make a positive difference to the lives of others. 78 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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DAUNTSEY’S

Outstanding characteristics: Personal development is central to the Colston’s experience, and is secured through a wide range of activities and opportunities. Pupils are taught to display initiative and independence. The school encourages pupils to strive to be the best they can be. Colston’s is regarded as an extension to the family unit and each pupil is valued for his or her own talents.

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Religious denomination: Inter-denominational. The curriculum: The curriculum throughout the school is broad and balanced, offering all pupils the opportunity to study an extensive range of subjects. Lessons are delivered by specialist teachers in a challenging and stimulating environment that is conducive to a positive and enjoyable learning experience for the pupils. Dauntsey’s is keen to promote independent learning, enabling pupils to fulfil their potential and develop a range of key skills needed in later life. The timetable offers a great deal of flexibility with a well-structured weekly lesson arrangement and the extensive options system provides well for the different interests and aptitudes of all pupils. Extra curricular activities: All pupils discover a breadth and depth of education that takes them beyond academic achievement. Drama, music, art and sport all flourish and the rural surroundings provide an ideal setting for many outdoor activities which include sailing on the school’s very own Tall Ship, the famous 56’ gaff cutter, the Jolie Brise. Pastoral care: At Dauntsey’s each pupil joins a boarding or day house and is supported by his or her housemaster or housemistress and a team of tutors. Their aim is to ensure each pupil fulfils their potential and makes the most of the varied opportunities on offer at Dauntsey’s. Name of principal: Mr Mark Lascelles MA Outstanding characteristics: The equal balance of boarding and day pupils, the wide range of facilities, and the excellent pastoral support ensure that everyone feels part of the community. Visitors comment on the happy and friendly atmosphere; the energy, purpose and determination to do well.


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THE DOWNS SCHOOL

MONMOUTH SCHOOL FOR BOYS MONMOUTH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS

Wraxall Bristol BS48 1PF Tel: 01275 852008 office@thedownsschool.co.uk Autumn term: 6 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 9 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 23 April - 6 July

Almshouse Street, Monmouth NP25 3XP Tel: 01600 710433 Website: www.habsmonmouth.org

Day fees: Reception/Year 1: £3,510 per term Year 2: £3,935 per term Year 3: £4,305 per term Years 4 to 8: £5,315 per term

Open Morning: 6 and 7 October 2017 Sixth Form Taster Day and Information Evening: 19 October 2017 Autumn term: 7 September - 13 December 2017 Spring term: 4 January - 29 March 2018 Summer term: 24 April - 7 July 2018 Age of pupils: 7 - 18 years Number of pupils: 650

Religious denomination: C of E The curriculum: The Downs is one of the few truly independent 13+ Prep Schools in the South West. The 13+ Common Entrance syllabus is central to the academic curriculum which includes the traditional subjects, two modern languages and the theory of music. In the Pre Prep School, Maths and English are the central focus, the young children beginning their learning through play.

Day fees: £3,589 - £5,118 Boarding fees (per term): £6,500 - £10,276 Religious denomination: Anglican The curriculum: The Monmouth School for Boys curriculum is based on the National Curriculum but is not constrained by it. We introduce pupils to a wide range of subjects in their early years at the school and they usually go on to take 9 or 10 subjects at GCSE. Around 30 A level courses are offered in the Sixth Form. In addition to their A level studies, boys have the opportunity to pursue a variety of enrichment and supplementary courses.

Extra curricular activities: The school provides a broad all round education, genuinely inclusive of each child. The standard of all sports is exceptional (six internationals in six different sports in recent years) but there is a team for every child. There is enormous interest and activity in the Performing and Creative Arts: six choirs, 80% play an instrument, 140 attend Speech and Drama lessons, 9 productions a year, 160 attend dance lessons. There is also an extensive range of clubs, all Prep school children camp every year and regular trips are taken abroad.

Extra curricular activities: We offer a wide and varied co-curricular programme. All boys are encouraged to take full advantage of lunchtime and after school activities and clubs. They develop confidence and make friends through chess, karate, reading, choir and many other activities.

Pastoral care: The essence of the school is to really know and understand each of the children – their wellbeing is central to our thoughts. The school is in demand but there is no ambition to increase in size as this would prove detrimental to this core value. Matrons, tutors, form teachers and pupils themselves play an integral role in the process of providing outstanding considered pastoral care.

Pastoral care: Each pupil is allocated to a tutor who is drawn from the academic staff. Both tutor and housemaster are able to get to know each boy well over a period of years and provide experienced and sympathetic guidance throughout his school career. We ensure all pupils gain the utmost from their time at Monmouth, not only in the classroom, but through all the other experiences that the school has to offer.

Name of principal: M A Gunn M.A.(Ed), P.G.C.E. Outstanding characteristics: Our pupils are outstanding; they are highly motivated and experience considerable all round success. They nevertheless demonstrate humility and unaffected good manners; confidence in contrast to arrogance is applauded at The Downs. The stunning rural estate is unique in the area and essentially used to best effect. The entire community that is The Downs School is particularly close and happy in support of one another. Over the last decade almost every child has passed the 13+ entry requirements into the school of their first choice, over 60% with scholarship. 80 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Name of Principal: Dr Andrew Daniel BSc, Med, PhD, PGCE Outstanding characteristics: With a strong emphasis on academic success (65% of Sixth Formers go on to Russell Group universities), sport, the arts, music and CCF help shape the boys. Founded in 1614, endowment income ensures outstanding facilities and highly competitive fees. Scholarships and bursaries mean that one in five pupils receives financial support. Links with Monmouth School for Girls enable us to offer around 30 A level subjects and many joint activities.

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Hereford Road, Monmouth NP25 5XT Tel: 01600 711104 Website: www.habsmonmouth.org Open Morning: 6 and 7 October 2017 Sixth Form Taster Day and Information Evening: 19 October 2017 Autumn term: 7 September - 13 December 2017 Spring term: 4 January - 29 March 2018 Summer term: 24 April - 7 July 2018 Age of pupils: 7 - 18 years Number of pupils: 625 Day fees: £3,589 - £4,782 Boarding fees (per term): £6,500 - £10,276 Religious denomination: Anglican The curriculum: We offer a wide range of subjects in Years 7, 8 and 9 to stimulate academic and personal development. We take care to ensure that no girl closes off the choice of a whole range of subjects for GCSE and A level. Extra curricular activities: There is a wealth of lunchtime and after school opportunities which gives every girl a balance between work and play, helps develop some fantastic skills and truly enriches their learning. Pastoral care: We aim to create a caring and supportive environment both in and out of the classroom, helping each pupil to feel valued as an individual. Our pastoral philosophy is to develop resilience, confidence and skills which take the girls through later life, while offering each pupil bespoke care. Name of Principal: Dr Caroline Pascoe BCs (Hons), MSc, PhD Outstanding characteristics: Access to superb educational opportunities engages, enriches and inspires pupils. Sport, music, drama and art supplement academic achievement. Endowment income provides outstanding facilities and competitive fees. Scholarships and bursaries mean one in five pupils receives financial support. Close links with Monmouth School for Boys enable us to offer around 30 A level subjects and many joint activities.


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QEH

REDMAIDS’ HIGH SCHOOL

SIDCOT SCHOOL Oakridge Lane, Winscombe, North Somerset, BS25 1PD Tel: 01934 843102 www.sidcot.org.uk Autumn term: 6 September - 14 December 2017 Spring term: 9 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 9 April - 5 July 2018 Age of pupils: 3 - 18 years Number of pupils: 603

Redmaids’ High School incorporating Redland High School for Girls

Queen Elizabeth’s Hospital (QEH), Berkeley Place, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1JX Tel: 0117 930 3040 www.qehbristol.co.uk

Westbury Road, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol, BS9 3AW Tel: Senior School & Sixth Form 0117 962 2641; Infant & Junior School 0117 962 9451; admissions@redmaidshigh.co.uk junioradmissions@redmaidshigh.co.uk

Autumn term: 5 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 9 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 6 July 2018 Age of pupils: 7 - 18 years Number of pupils: 685

Autumn term: 6 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 9 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 6 July 2018 Age of pupils: Girls aged 4 to 18 Number of pupils: 800

Day fees: Juniors: £3,094 per term (£9,282 per annum) including pre and after school supervision until 5pm. Seniors: £4,662 per term (£13,986 per annum). Fees include text and exercise books, and essential education trips but do not include public examination fees or lunches.

Fees: Reception to Year 6: £3,000-£3,130 per term; Years 7 - 13: £4,600 per term The curriculum: Redmaids’ High provides the best opportunities in Bristol and beyond for academically able girls who aspire to achieve their full personal, social and academic potential. It was formed through the merger of Red Maids’ and Redland High schools, creating a stronger school with outstanding facilities and high quality teaching. In the Infant and Junior School, the girls enjoy a rich curriculum, achieving excellent results in national exams for music, speech and drama. In the Senior School, our curriculum is enriched through a greater choice of subjects at GCSE and the Sixth Form, offering A Levels or the worldclass International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma.

Religious denomination: Church of England, embracing all faiths The curriculum: The curriculum is broad but also offers the chance to study subjects in depth. The school expects pupils to work hard, believing a good education is a voyage of discovery to be enjoyed. Pupils are stretched but not stressed. Extra curricular activities: QEH prides itself on the range of activities it provides, reflecting the wide interests of students and the commitment of the staff. Variety is key and all pupils should find activities that interest them. QEH is also committed to outdoor pursuits, with around 150 pupils taking part in Duke of Edinburgh awards scheme, many attaining Gold Award.

Extra curricular activities: A large programme of clubs and societies enables us to identify and nurture talent wherever it lies and to instil leadership, teamwork and independent thought.

Name of principal: Mrs Isabel Tobias BA Hons Outstanding characteristics: The Infant & Junior School is integrated within its secluded Grange Court Road location, enjoying direct access to the Senior School for sport, dining and other activities. A stylish Sixth Form Centre offers space for independent learning and relaxation while our brand new Redland Hall provides a modern performance facility for music and drama. We offer sport and fitness excellence through our onsite facilities and a new 16-acre sports club less than 10 minutes away. We are an IB World School with a global outlook offering scholarships and bursaries to girls from all backgrounds to benefit from our outstanding education.

Name of Principal: Mr Stephen Holliday, MA (Cantab) Outstanding characteristics: QEH is recognised for its outstanding academic record and the friendliness and confidence of our pupils is notable. The school is not socially exclusive, having a good mix of people. Girls are now also able to take advantage of the outstanding education offered at QEH, by joining the co-educational Sixth Form from September 2017.

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Religious denomination: Non-denominational The curriculum: We provide a creative and stretching education that inspires children to want to learn. To achieve this, our curriculum is shaped to meet government requirements without an exam obsessed and prescriptive syllabus. Our curriculum and teaching methods are designed to foster students’ intellectual curiosity and creativity. We want to educate our students, rather than simply train them to pass tests. Throughout their time at Sidcot, students develop the self-motivation to enable them to take responsibility for their own learning. It’s no surprise that these personal qualities go together with academic excellence. Our results have been consistently excellent with average points per candidate always significantly higher than the world average scores. Extra curricular activities: At Sidcot we’re lucky in having an excellent rural location and top class facilities for sport, arts, crafts and environmental studies. The P.A.S.S. programme (Programme of Activities for Sidcot School) is based on the key Quaker values of integrity, stewardship, selfreflection, adventure and community. This range of co-curricular activities is embedded in the timetable for every year group, throughout the year. Year 9, for example, focus on self-reflection and practical life skills, first-aid, sewing, car maintenance and money management. Whereas Year 11 visit elderly people, run primary school after-school clubs and work with people with disabilities.

Pastoral care: Pastoral care is regarded to be of the utmost importance. Small classes are an important feature. Pupils are supported by an increased number of pastoral staff with a Head and Assistant Head of Year, and Tutors and Assistant Tutors.

Pastoral care: Pastoral care is second to none. Pupils need to feel happy and safe and, at QEH, they are free to enjoy their learning, exploring new opportunities with confidence. People often comment on how self-assured and well-mannered our pupils are. Their friendly spirit and good behaviour are partly the result of unobtrusive but strong pastoral care.

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Day fees: from £2,470 (Reception) to £5,530 (Year 13) per term. Nursery £20.70 per session

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Pastoral care: The Quaker value of equality is evident in the open and friendly relationships between staff and students, and between students of all ages. It’s often remarked that our students are extremely supportive of each other, making newcomers, students, teachers and visitors quickly feel at home. Name of Headmaster: Iain Kilpatrick Outstanding characteristics: - International Baccalaureate diploma Sidcot offers its Sixth Form the choice of both the IB and A levels. The ethos of the IB, with its broad curriculum and emphasis on study skills, community service and internationalism fits well with our Quaker values.


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BAREFOOT PREPARES BRISTOL SCHOOLS FOR A DIGITAL FUTURE

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e’re all living in a digitalised word and tech literacy is vital to our children’s futures. A study from BT and Ipsos MORI shows that 78 per cent of UK primary teachers believe tech literacy is as important as reading and writing; however, only 25 per cent agree they’re equipped to prepare children for a digital world. The Barefoot Computing Project is supporting primary school teachers across the UK with free workshops and resources that bring to life computational thinking in cross-curricular and engaging ways. Supported by BT and Computing at School, all the resources are aligned with all UK curricula, including engaging activities for SEN pupils. SO FAR, BAREFOOT HAS: • supported over 450,000 teachers • had over 100,000 resources downloaded • reached more than 1.25 million children #BAREFOOTBRISTOL In Bristol, and the South West, 32 per cent of schools are ‘less than good’, which is more than the national average. * This must change, and Barefoot is here to support you. Teachers who have used computational thinking in lessons see positive impacts on pupils’ learning across all subjects.

HOW CAN YOUR SCHOOL GET INVOLVED? Registering with Barefoot and booking a free workshop is a great way to begin. 217 schools in the Bristol area haven’t yet had a workshop – is this you? Book one for the new term, and we can help you to make sure that your teaching aligns with the requirements of the curriculum and explores computing in a way that’s easy to learn and fun to do. To book a free workshop for your school, or register for free resources and lesson plans, simply visit www.barefootcas.org.uk. WHAT PEOPLE SAY ABOUT US Genevieve Bovet-White, Primary Teacher, at Knowle Park Primary School, Bristol “As a computer co-ordinator for the school I accessed Barefoot at the end of last year and I feel more confident in teaching the new national curriculum with Barefoot. Barefoot has it all covered, it is user friendly and there are even videos we can watch quickly.” Find out more: http://barefootcas.org.uk/ * http://bit.ly/2p43zXp

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HEALTH | BEAUTY

INSIDE AND OUT: the indoor pool at Lucknam Park’s spa is linked to an outdoor pool, and right, the brasserie opens into the gardens. Inset, Susan Harmsworth

COCOONED IN COMFORT Country house hotel Lucknam Park is one of only three spas in the UK featuring the ESPA brand and treatments. Georgette McCready met ESPA founder Susan Harmsworth

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them find a little calm in an over stimulated world. As a result, in the new menu of treatments at Lucknam, there are three signature treatments which include attention to mindfulness. A group of journalists, who have notoriously over-active jangled minds were challenged to experience the mindful massage.

ucknam Park’s setting is enough to start the de-stressing process, tucked away as it is in the beautiful Wiltshire countryside, the old mellow stone house surrounded by traditional rose filled English gardens. Its spa facilities were updated just a few years ago and offer the chance for visitors to escape from the harsh reality of the world, even if it’s just for a few hours. This summer the spa has been given extra kudos as doyenne of the global spa business, Susan Harmworth MBE, chose Lucknam as only the third UK site for her ESPA brand. Susan visited Lucknam for the launch to talk about her philosophy and what ESPA will bring hotel and day visitors to the spa. ESPA’s naturally based products are made in Frome and used in five star spas in more than 60 countries. On meeting Susan the first thing that’s on everyone’s lips is, surely she can’t be 72? She has the complexion of a woman 20 years younger and the energy and zest of a woman 30 years younger. She is a living advertisement for her own products. I asked her about her own daily regime, which always begins with deep breathing exercises and stretches. She says: “I travel a lot and never go anywhere without my little bottles of aromatherapy blend oils. I use oils and serums daily, much more than I use moisturiser. I have a personal trainer who makes me work out in the pool and I am a great believer in the power of a positive mental attitude.” She also gave up sugar a year ago, including wine, and says she feels more full of energy as a result. ESPA’s philosophy is rooted in treating people’s bodies and their minds, in helping

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This is a 90 minute session and I am put in the reassuringly calm hands of Siobhan. All of Lucknam’s staff have been trained to ESPA’s own standards. We begin by breathing in the scents of a couple of different aromatherapy oil blends to help determine whether I need pepping up or quietly restoring. It turns out on this occasion it’s gentle restoration I’m in need of, so lying back I’m encouraged to relax both mind and body. After a series of deep, calming breaths and some visualisation techniques, Siobhan sets about gently but very thoroughly massaging me from top to toe. Because this treatment is for 90 minutes it gives the body

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time to really unwind and as the effects of the massage begin to penetrate, so the mind is stilled, brought back into the moment. She finishes with some tough work on my officebound knotty shoulders and then a head and forehead massage. I swear I am two inches taller when I finally serenely float from the treatment room . . . The brasserie at Lucknam is a delightful spot to have a delicious, seasonal lunch with produce from the hotel vegetable garden. On a warm sunny day the doors are folded back to allow scent from the lavender to drift in. If you’re fortunate enough to have a day to spend at Lucknam, the unravelling process can continue in the extensive spa, which includes an indoor and outdoor pool, sun loungers on the garden terrace, as well as steam rooms and a tranquil relaxation lounge. For the 21st century screen addict this setting also provides the ideal place to go wi fi cold turkey and, you know, actually talk to your companion. Lucknam Park in itself has the power to soothe the troubled mind, as you really do feel as if you’re getting away from it all. Add to that an ESPA treatment and you’ll emerge from the cocoon at least feeling, if not looking, like a beautiful butterfly. Both spa day packages – see the website lucknampark.co.uk, for full details – include a two course lunch, an ESPA treatment, wellbeing experience and use of the facilities: Choose from a Secluded Escape: 60 minute ESPA treatment, lunch in the brasserie and a dry floatation costs £165, or Time for Tranquility, a 90 minute ESPA treatment and lunch, also £165. The spa day packages are available Monday to Fridays, not at weekends. n


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the orangery l a s e r

&

b e a u t y

c l i n i c

Hydra Peel Infusion

Laser Tattoo Removal is extremely straightforward and can deliver great results. We have the most advanced lasers and this technology is effective on tattoos of any size or shape, and those done by both amateur and professional tattooists. This technology can also be highly effective on all colours, including the usually difficult to remove blues and greens.

Hydra Peel Infusion is a treatment that combines exfoliation, hydration, chemical peeling and non-needle mesotherapy to infuse different vitamins into the skin. Treatments have no down time and are suitable for all skin types. It can be used to target fine lines, wrinkles, dry skin, scarring, rosacea, sun damage and pigmentation as well as problematic skins.

Specialists in Ellipse IPL Permanent Hair Reduction Treatments

• Permanent Hair Reduction • • No more shaving, waxing or depilatory creams • • Safe and effective, even on fragile or delicate areas • • FREE CONSULTATIONS AND PATCH TEST • No.2 Kingsmead St. Bath • Tel: 01225 466851 www.theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk

POLLY HASELTON Qualified Cognitive Behavioural Therapist.

Experienced in working with Depression and Anxiety Disorders

To discuss working together, or to arrange a free initial phone consultation, please call or email: t: 07465 773 888 e: polly.cbt@gmail.com www: pollycbt.wordpress.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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SEPTEMBER 2017

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 87


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BRISTOL OPEN DAY

Saturday 30th September 2017 10.00am – 17.30pm Come and be inspired by the power of natural therapies to promote health and vitality! This event will be packed with fabulous tips on how to look after your health naturally.

10.00am

11.30am

The Secrets to Longevity

Food for Vitality

Caroline Pringle Age-defying solutions for protecting your DNA.Learn how diet and lifestyle can enhance your longevity.

Rosie Letts Discover the power of food as a means of improving your health and vitality.

1.30pm

3.00pm

Thyroid Balance

CNM Training Introduction

Jules Chandler Find out why the thyroid really is the master hormone! Learn how to balance your thyroid hormones naturally.

4.30pm

The Meridians of Health Andrew Nuttall Restoring the health of the body and mind with the power of acupuncture.

Liz Elliott How to become a successful natural health practioner by training with CNM.

Venue: CNM Bristol, Unit 1B Woodlands Court, Ash Ridge Road, Almondsbury, Bristol, BS32 4LB.

Tickets just £10 for the day

Please book your ticket online at

www.naturopathy-uk.com

CNM is the UK’s leading training provider in a range of natural therapies. 88 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

LET’S TALK ABOUT KNEE ARTHRITIS If you are suffering from knee pain, help is at hand. Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon Mr Jonathan Webb from Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield, discusses knee arthritis; its main symptoms, and when it’s time to see a Consultant.

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hen people talk about knee arthritis they are usually referring to osteoarthritis or ‘wear and tear’ damage to the knee. Arthritis of the knee is also a term used for some less common painful inflammatory diseases of the joint, such as rheumatoid arthritis. The underlying process in knee osteoarthritis, which may eventually cause severe pain, is of damage and complete wearing out of the articular cartilage (joint surface) in any part of the knee joint. This results in bone grinding on bone in the knee, which is a painful and disabling condition. Knee osteoarthritis may occur without a previous injury, but sometimes it comes on gradually after an initial injury to the joint surface, and it is well known that having a torn meniscus cartilage increases the risk of developing knee osteoarthritis later in life. Symptoms of knee osteoarthritis The predominant symptom of knee osteoarthritis is pain. This can be a relatively mild background ache in the knee, which might interfere with sporting activities or a long walk, right up to constant severe disabling pain which makes walking very difficult or impossible. Pain may also be so severe that sleep can be disturbed and there is pain at rest. The normal activities of daily living may become difficult to perform. Sometimes, because of the roughening and fragmentation of the knee joint surface, there may also be catching, clicking or similar symptoms. Swelling of the knee joint is often seen, and in severe cases, the shape of the knee may change.

Treatment of knee osteoarthritis If you have osteoarthritis of the knee you may well have had some form of treatment before coming to see a knee surgeon. These nonsurgical treatments include simple pain killers, anti-inflammatory tablets, injections of cortisone or other substances, advice about weight loss, modification of activities and physiotherapy. If there is a diagnosis of early arthritis or you are relatively young, it may be possible to realign your leg (osteotomy) to offload the damaged part of your knee. This can dramatically reduce your symptoms as well as prolonging the lifespan of your knee. If there are symptoms of mechanical locking in the knee, or stiffness, then keyhole surgery of the knee (arthroscopy) may improve this. However, arthroscopy treatment cannot reverse the arthritis damage. Eventually the decision might be made between yourself and your surgeon that the pain has reached the point where the only option is a knee replacement (knee arthroplasty). Mr Jonathan Webb at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield has a proven track record of long term success. To learn more or to book a consultation, call us on 0117 911 5339, or visit our website: www.nuffieldhealth.com/ consultants/mr-jonathan-webb.

Mr Jonathan Webb specialises in knee surgery, and has a particular interest in arthroscopic (keyhole) surgery and reconstruction of knee ligament injuries. He undertook a Fellowship at the North Sydney Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Centre in Australia. This is a prestigious unit treating National and International athletes from across Australia, as well as providing the medical staff in charge of running the Sydney 2000 Olympics. He successfully combined his medical training with a first class rugby career, playing for Bristol and Bath Rugby Clubs. He played 33 times for England, winning two Five Nations Grand Slams and reaching the Rugby World Cup Final in 1991. His empathy combined with the latest techniques in orthopaedic surgery for the knee has already helped treat national and international athletes from a variety of sports.

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 89


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High Quality Craftmanship

Specialist

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 91


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PROPERTY | ART

EXTERIOR GOALS Once perceived as detrimental to property value, street and graffiti art on houses is now a must-have for many

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ecent research, looking at the phenomenon and impact of street art on property prices and community atmosphere, has thrown up some interesting statistics. Remembering how we yearned to live in the ‘Cat-And-Mouse House’ when we first saw Boe and Irony’s work on it, we spoke to Affordable Art Fair artist-in-residence, Alex Lucas (lucas-antics.com) and her Bristol client, Jenna – who now enjoys Alex’s art every time she steps out of her front door – about how the commission came about. Jenna: the homeower “We first decided to have a mural as we looked out of our kitchen window at a blank wall, because it is below street-level. It was an awful magnolia! We thought about options for cheering up the space and, living in Montpelier, thought; ‘When in Rome!’ so it had to be street art. We had seen lots of Alex’s work around Montpelier and Bristol, and especially loved the characters she creates in her animals. We knew she lived down the street so we dropped her an email. She popped round to discuss ideas and before we knew it, we had created a vision for the whole house. We loved watching it develop day by day and are absolutely delighted with the final result. It’s lovely when people stop to take a photo or tell us how much they like it. We often hear squealing and giggling from the street when we’re in the kitchen. The vast majority of people love it and say it is the kind of thing they love about Bristol. Our neighbours nagged us to get on with it when we told them about the idea; there was even talk of extending it across three houses!” Alex: the artist “Living in Montpelier, we still suffer hugely from the negative effects of graffiti tagging and there is an incredible team of dedicated residents who spend a lot of their time keeping the area clean; washing and painting over the tags. My murals have always been about the community – sharing and empowering the people who live there. During the 10 days of painting the house, I soon came to realise how much of a community project it had inspired. I was offered cups of tea and food and engaged in conversations with complete strangers who happened to pass by. Many were intrigued and I was able to share my process and enthusiasm; walls don’t have to be blank!

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“I met with Jenna and James and we spoke about characters that they would like to feature on their house. They were very interested in a summer meadow theme with wild flowers and a couple of mice to represent them both on the front. It is very important to me that the client is involved in the design as I want them to love it! I like the idea that there is always more to find every time you look at the painting and you never become tired of experiencing it. “I drew everything by hand and then used Photoshop to superimpose the drawing on top of the building – that way, the client can see the mural before committing to paint! The original drawings are sometimes framed and kept by the client, to bring a bit of the outside back inside!” The stats: • 58% of Bristolians believe that a property on a street with a beautiful mural would be worth up to £50,000 more than one without • 22% of Bristolians would commission a mural for their own home • 54% of Bristolians would like more murals in their local area • 77% think murals in public spaces help foster a positive atmosphere • 49% of Brits believe Bristol is the UK street art capital Source: Affordable Art Fair

Bedminster abode the Cat-And-Mouse House

The finishing touches


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GARDENING

GOING NATIVE Elly West encourages a low-maintenance, natural eco-system and explores a secret Stapleton haven

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’m always so pleased when clients say that they want to grow native species in their gardens. They tend to be low maintenance, wildlife friendly, and they can also be very beautiful. One of my latest projects is to create a garden surrounding a new-build eco-house, with a minimal carbon footprint, and the garden needs to reflect the same ethos. Part of the brief, therefore, is to include native species where possible. Native plants are those that have evolved in the area, and so are uniquely suited to the growing conditions. They will have adapted to your climate and soil, and need less in the way of supplementary fertiliser, spraying or winter mulching. Local wildlife, including birds and butterflies, are also going to have a good relationship with your chosen natives. Many modern flowers are bred for their size and colour, and may not be as attractive to pollinators such as hoverflies and bees. Many hybrids are sterile and don’t actually have any sustenance for wildlife. But if you choose native flowers, you’ll be encouraging a natural eco-system, with a balance of pests and predators, which is all good in terms of making your plot more healthy and therefore lower maintenance. Wildlife-friendly gardens can also be extremely attractive, albeit perhaps in a more subtle way than some of the big, blowsy hybrid plants on the market. Gardens at RHS Chelsea Flower Show in recent years have showcased the trend towards more natural looking spaces, recreating wild landscape and terrain. And, after all, gardening has always been about taming nature. One Bristol project, Feed Bristol, has spent the last five years working with nature and promoting wildflowers. Based in Stapleton, it was set up by the Avon Wildlife Trust as a community food-growing project, using disused land near the M32. The six-acre site now supports several businesses, including its Wildflower Nursery. Although only a stone’s throw from the city centre, this secret haven has an almost magical feel, with winding paths 94 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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that take you through and around its many treasures including vegetable beds, medicinal herb crops, meadow flowers, trees and wildlife ponds, all managed organically. It’s a sanctuary – at this time of year, alive with bees and butterflies – really proving just how wildlife can thrive in an urban setting. Project manager Matt Cracknell is passionate about his work and the support it gives to local people through its volunteering programme. The volunteers, often from disadvantaged backgrounds, are central to Feed Bristol, and for Matt, the social impact is really important – he stresses the benefits people gain from being part of a team, working with nature and learning new skills. All are welcome, and the atmosphere is friendly and supportive. “The value of nature for health and wellbeing shouldn’t be underestimated,” he says. “I think it’s rare to find such a positive setting with motivated people, and that’s inspiring. We’re giving people skills and personal development, confidence and self-esteem, often helping them into employment or independent living. There are so many case studies, with people saying this has changed their lives.” The site had been left unused for 15 years prior to Feed Bristol moving in, although the soil was rich and had been cultivated previously. The infrastructure had to be built from scratch, and it was important for the project to generate its own revenue. Now there are regular workshops and courses, events, corporate volunteering days and, of course, the nursery, helping to make the site sustainable. The Wildflower Nursery is at the heart of the project, and stocks more than 200 plant varieties, all of local origin – sourced sustainably from Avon Wildlife Trust nature reserves, of which there are 30 in the region. Everything is grown from collected seeds or propagated on site from cuttings, and it’s open to the public on weekdays from 9am to 5pm, as well as the first Saturday of the month from 11am to 5pm. The nursery is also open to trade customers and those undertaking

Above: Temptations on offer at the Feed Bristol Wildflower Nursery include field scabious Opposite page: Find everything from veg beds to medicinal herb crops at Feed Bristol. Also pictured: project manager Matt Cracknell


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GARDENING

larger projects, or other community projects. Among the varieties sold in the nursery are some more unusual plants that are in decline, or that are particularly difficult to propagate from seed. “Some of the seeds we grow can take years to germinate,” says Matt. “Very few gardeners have the patience to do that. We work out the science of seeds. We may need to scarify, soak or freeze them first.” Among these harder-to-grow varieties are viper’s bugloss, betony and bugle, all available to buy as healthy-looking plants. Other temptations on offer include musk mallow, sneezewort, lady’s bedstraw, nettle-leaf bellflower, field scabious, cat’s ear, toad flax, purple loosestrife and burdock – their very names enticing you to create a wildlife haven in your own backyard. “Everyone always asks how to deal with slugs in the garden, but it’s about creating a pest-predator balance. If you have a wild zone or strip in your garden, a natural space, you’ll attract amphibians and birds to help deal with slugs.” The message is clear: with the right selection of plants, borders can start to look after themselves, your plants will be more healthy, and fertility and longevity is improved. • Feed Bristol can be found on Frenchay Park Road; for more information, visit avonwildlifetrust.org.uk/feedbristol

PLANT OF THE MONTH: FIELD SCABIOUS Our native field scabious, or Knautia arvensis has dainty, lilac, pincushion blooms that bob on the end of long stalks from July through to September or even October. It can reach up to about a metre in height, and likes a sunny spot. It’s not too fussy about soil type either. Field scabious is loved by bees and butterflies, and is perfect for a wildflower garden or meadow, where it will come back year after year, and largely remain disease and pest free. Cut down the dead flower stems when they start to look tatty. • ellyswellies.co.uk

Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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oulton Lodge is a handsome Victorian residence constructed circa 1867. This exceptional family home features a main residence over three floors, and a luxury garden apartment. The exterior is clad with beautiful white hydrangea and entry is via a short flight of stone steps which lead to a beautiful original orangery. Inside, the house is beautifully presented throughout with plenty of space and lots to enjoy. Many period features have been retained including the first floor galleried landing area, decorative ceiling roses and cornices, original sash windows with working shutters and fine fireplaces. In brief the accommodation comprises: Entrance orangery, reception hall, drawing room and dining room, kitchen/breakfast room with hand built English oak units and integrated appliances, cloaks and utility. Three first floor principal bedrooms and a family bathroom with a further three bedrooms and an opulent bathroom on the second floor. The self contained garden apartment has an open plan kitchen/dining hall, reception room, two double bedrooms and a family bathroom. Outside there is a large double tandem garage and the lovely front and rear gardens offer a good deal of privacy and are planted with established trees and shrubs. Discretely hidden in the front garden is a cedar wood summer house providing a charming spot for outside entertaining. This wonderful family home offers the option to live jointly with a dependent relative or to rent the garden apartment and generate additional income. Full details and viewing can be arranged by contacting Bristol estate agents Knight Frank

POULTON LODGE HAZELWOOD ROAD SNEYD PARK

Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

Guide price £1,950,000

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• Six bedroom family home • Two bathrooms • Period features including entrance orangery, hall and galleried landing • Separate 2 bedroom luxury apartment • Extensive but secluded lawned gardens to front and rear


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Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market

(0117) 934 9977

comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk HILL STREET, BRISTOL

TO LET – 10 TEMPLEBACK

• Modern open plan offices

• Stunning penthouse waterfront offices

• Iconic 70’s building

• 13,000 sq ft (1,208 sq m)

• Refurbished • 2,482 sq ft – 6 cars

• Single floor plate 8 car parking spaces

• New lease PRIME CITY OFFICES

‘NEW YORK STYLE’ OFFICES

• Newminster House BS1

• Open plan loft style suites

• 3 suites: 922 sq ft, 1,900 sq ft and 2,724 sq ft

• 2,170 to 6,660 sq ft • Superb space

• New lease

• New leases – rent O/A

16 ORCHARD STREET • Stunning offices

THE OLD POLICE STATION, BEDMINSTER PARADE

• 404 sq ft to 1,362 sq ft

• Unique cool office space

• New leases

• 1,925 sq ft

• Superb fit out

• Rent O/A

• New lease

THE DISTILLERY OFFICES

21 / 23 CLARE STREET, BS1

• Between Clifton and Junction 19 M5

• Prime A3 / café • Fully fitted for immediate use

• Stunning offices full of style

• 1,458 sq ft

• 6,426 sq ft

• Terms on application

• On site parking

VARIOUS SHOPS TO RENT • Clifton Village – 233 sq ft - £9,000 pax

• St Nicholas Street – A3 - £16,000 pax

• Chandos Road, BS6 – 590 sq ft - £9,750 pax

• Canford Lane, BS9 - £18,000 pax

• St Stephen Street BS1 – 404 sq ft - £10,750 pax

• Stokes Croft café - £11,440 pa

• Coldharbour Road, BS6 – 307 sq ft - £7,950 pax

* MORE SHOPS ON APPLICATION *

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon

Burston Cook September.indd 1

MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte BA Hons

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

21/08/2017 14:17


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market

(0117) 934 9977

comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk DAVIS HOUSE, FISHPONDS

FOR SALE – CHEW STOKE

• Ground floor office suite • 790 sq ft • 4 parking spaces

1) 3,666 sq ft comprising 8 offices (former piggery) on site of 1.1 acres 2) Bowling green & club house on 1.1 acres let on long lease 3) 2.5 acres pasture land SUIT OCCUPIER / DEVELOPER / INVESTOR

• £13.50 psf MOON STREET – BS2 FOR SALE

OFFICES TO LET – ONLY £7.50 PER SQ FT

• Offices c 2,575 sq ft

• 3,039 sq ft economical offices in bs5 (St Philips area)

• With residential development potential

• New lease - £7.50 psf

• Freehold - £475,000 + INVESTMENT FOR SALE – ST NICHOLAS ST BS1

KINGSGATE HOUSE, KINGSWOOD • Economical space to rent – only £10.50 per sq ft pax

• Comprising retail unit + two 3 bed flats

• 6 on site car parking spaces

• V popular location • Price on application

• Open plan office of 1,489 sq ft (138 sq m) NETHAM / ST PHILIPS

REGENT STREET, BRISTOL

• Warehouse units

• Excellent freehold investment opportunity • Ground floor lock up retail unit with parking • Net rent £15,500 pa, Exclusive • Quoting price only £175,000

• 1,600 to 7,000 sq ft • New flexible leases • From just £10,400 pax

CHANDOS ROAD – A3

COTHAM HILL – A3

• Full extraction fitted

• A3 restaurant

• Excellent restaurant / café

• V busy pitch in established location

• Rent only £9,750 pax

• New lease • Rent O/A

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon

Burston Cook September.indd 2

MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte BA Hons

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

21/08/2017 14:17


www.maggsandallen.co.uk

0117 949 9000

Lettings & Management

60 Northumbria Drive, Henleaze, Bristol, BS9 4HW

D T LE UIRE W EQ NO RR A IL SIM

D T LE UIRE W EQ NO RR A IL SIM

HENLEAZE

£2,500.00 pcm

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** 4 bed semi-detached family home located within the desirable location of Henleaze. Completely modernised throughout the unfurnished accommodation comprises large kitchen/ dining room, downstairs WC, utility room leading to the storage garage. On the upper floors are 4 bedrooms, ensuite, family bathroom and master bedroom with walk in wardrobe & storage area. Externally is a level garden, mostly laid to lawn with patio area and outside storage housing boiler.

WESTBURY PARK

£1,875.00 pcm

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** 4 bedroom home which offers fantastic family living. Accommodation comprises to the ground floor living room, playroom/dining room, utility room with WC and open plan kitchen/dining room leading out to the easy to maintain attractive rear garden. To the first floor are 4 double beds and family bathroom with bath and separate shower cubicle. Within close proximity of Westbury Park School, Redland Green and Durdham Downs.

D T LE UIRE W EQ NO R R ILA SIM

Here are a selection of properties we have LET within the last six months.

HENLEAZE

£1,850.00 pcm

D T LE UIRE W EQ NO R R ILA SIM

Urgently seeking similar properties to meet demand. If you’re thinking of letting your property call now to arrange a market appraisal.

HENLEAZE

£1,400.00 pcm

0117 949 9000 D T LE UIRE W Q NO RE R ILA SIM

HENLEAZE

£1,300.00 pcm

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** An unfurnished mid terraced family home located in a quiet cul-de-sac, close to Henleaze Road with its vast array of shops, cafés & amenities. The accommodation comprises to the ground floor sitting room, open plan kitchen/diner leading to the rear garden. To the first floor are 3 bedrooms and family bathroom UPVC double glazing throughout, gas central heating, off street parking for 2 cars.

Lettings & Management

Maggs & Allen Letting September.indd 1

D T LE UIRE W EQ NO R R ILA SIM

£2,400.00 pcm

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** Extended 5 bedroom family home located within close proximity of Westbury village and Henleaze. The unfurnished accommodation comprises large family kitchen/dining room, 2 reception rooms, utility room to the ground floor. 5 bedrooms on the first floor with 2 ensuites and family bathroom. Ample off street parking and pleasant rear garden.

D T LE UIRE W EQ NO R R ILA SIM

£1,900.00 pcm

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** Located in the much sought after location of Russell Road, Westbury Park is this fantastic 4 bedroom home. The property offers unfurnished accommodation comprising entrance hall, downstairs WC, living room, open plan kitchen/dining room. To the first floor are 3 and family bathroom. On the top floor is a further double bedroom with ensuite shower room.

D T LE UIRE W Q NO RE R ILA SIM

BISHOPSTON

£1,650.00 pcm

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** Located in a prime location on the Bishopston/Redland boarder is this semi-detached family home. The accommodation comprises entrance hall, open plan sitting/dining room, kitchen. To the first floor are 3 bedrooms and spacious bathroom with separate shower cubicle and bath. Further benefiting form integral garage, south facing rear garden and off street parking.

Auctioneers

£2,250.00 pcm

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** Located in the coveted location of Florence Park, Westbury Park, is this unfurnished period semi-detached family home. This warm and homely property has accommodation comprising over three floors. To the ground floor, large sitting room, dining room, kitchen/breakfast room, utility room with washing machine and downstairs WC. To the upper floors are 4 bedrooms, bathroom and a further shower room & 2 bedrooms on the top floor with large storage cupboard housing boiler. Externally is a manageable south facing garden with lawn area and patio.

WESTBURY PARK

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** A modern detached family home situated in a highly desirable location close to local amenities in Henleaze. The unfurnished accommodation includes 2 reception rooms, fitted kitchen, downstairs cloakroom, 3 beds and family bathroom. There is a level enclosed rear garden and driveway providing off street parking leading to a single garage.

D T LE UIRE W Q NO RE R ILA SIM

WESTBURY PARK

WESTBURY ON TRYM

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** A modern detached 4 bedroom family home situated in a highly desirable location close to local amenities in Henleaze, including ‘Waitrose’ supermarket. The unfurnished accommodation includes three reception rooms, conservatory, fitted kitchen, utility room, downstairs cloakroom to the ground floor. On the first floor are 4 bedrooms (master with ensuite shower room) and family bathroom (shower over bath). There is a level enclosed rear garden and driveway providing off street parking.

Estate Agents

D T LE UIRE W EQ NO RR A IL SIM

Commercial/ Investment

Chartered Surveyors

WESTBURY ON TRYM

£1,500.00 pcm

** NOW LET, SIMILAR REQUIRED ** Beautifully renovated throughout within walking distance of Westbury Village, the unfurnished accommodation comprises: living room through to kitchen/diner to the ground floor. To the first floor are 2 double bedrooms and family bathroom. Furthermore the loft has been converted into an additional double bedroom with ensuite wet room.

Land/New Homes

Energy Assessors

21/08/2017 14:18


OF

ER R

FE

www.maggsandallen.co.uk

0117 973 4940

LE

£3 MIU E PR

T

0 £4 MIU E PR

OF DER FE R

Commercial Agency

22 Richmond Hill, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 1BA

R DE UN FER OF

PARK STREET

SI RE MIL A Q UI R RE D

£1,250,000

Three storey commercial property, situated in a prime location measuring approximately 4,800sqft. Potential for conversion of the upper parts to residential/student accommodation, subject to obtaining the necessary planning consents. R DE UN FER F O

CHRISTMAS STEPS

W ON NE CTI RU T S IN

BEDMINSTER

£310,000

Triple fronted retail investment situated on East Street, within easy reach of Bristol City Centre let to one established tenant on a 15 year lease from 2005 at £17,500pa subject to 5 yearly reviews. Ideal investment opportunity.

WHITELADIES ROAD

£500,000

Mixed use investment comprising a ground floor takeaway and basement with a large, selfcontained 3 bedroom first and second floor maisonette fully let producing £34,560 per annum.

CITY CENTRE

£16,500 p.a

Well-established café/restaurant of approximately 600sqft currently trading as’ The Hatter’ located within close proximity to the City Centre. There is an ingoing premium sought of £55,000 to include fixtures and fittings.

SI RE MIL A Q UI R RE D

Commercial

£350,000

A unique freehold property, situated in a sought after location arranged over four floors and comprises a ground floor fully-fitted takeaway and a self-contained first and second floor maisonette.

REDLAND

Sales & Lettings Urgent requirement for Mixed Use/Commercial Investments throughout Bristol

W ON NE CTI U TR S IN

£7,800 p.a

Well presented shop of approximately 275sqft situated in a prime position in Redland, within close proximity of The Durdham Downs and ‘Waitrose’ supermarket.

Freehold & Leasehold Properties

Retail/Industrial required

Rent Reviews

Licensed Premises & Cafes

R DE UN FER OF

SI RE MIL A Q UI R RE D

Contact us today to arrange a free, no obligation valuation

KINGSWOOD

£425,000

AVAILABLE DUE TO RELOCATION. Well presented industrial unit of approximately 5,630sqft (Gross Internal Area) benefitting from gas central heating, air conditioning and ample off street parking to the front. Offered for sale Freehold and with vacant possession. R DE UN FER OF

CITY CENTRE

Commercial Team: 0117 973 4940

SI RE MIL A Q UI R RE D

£95,000

Modern office investment of approximately 505sqft situated in Bristol City Centre currently let at £5,050 per annum until February 2018 although we feel this is substantially below market level and would suggest a market rent in the region of £7,500 per annum.

Estate Agents

BRISTOL’S FASTEST GROWING COMMERCIAL AGENT

T LE ED RE AG

AVONMOUTH

£29,000 p.a

Industrial unit of approximately 7,324sqft (Gross Internal Area) arranged over two storeys benefiting from off-street parking to the front situated in a convenient location just off the Portway, Avonmouth

Lettings & Management

Maggs & Allen Commercial September.indd 1

HORFIELD

Auctioneers

WESTBURY ON TRYM

£20,000 p.a

A fully fitted restaurant of approximately 630sqft with additional kitchen, store room and upper floors providing customer toilets, shower and two store rooms. The property is situated in a highly popular location in Westbury On Trym village. Offers are invited for a full inventory (details available on request).

Commercial Agency

£525,000

A substantial mixed-use investment property comprising a ground floor retail unit, occupied by ‘Coral’ bookmakers, with 2 well-presented two bedroom flats above. The property is fully let producing £34,300 per annum.

PARK STREET

SI RE MIL A Q UI R RE D

£20,000 p.a

Prominent and well-proportioned retail unit with additional mezzanine of approximately 768sqft located within close proximity to Bristol City Centre benefiting from high footfall.

Chartered Surveyors

Land & New Homes

21/08/2017 14:19


Ocean New Homes news edit.qxp_Layout 1 24/08/2017 09:57 Page 1

BRISTOL PROPERTY | NEWS

A new estate agency to open in with an established name

R The Cigar Factory: Landmark former factory building in Southville undergoing conversion into loft style apartments Ocean Estate Agents and Williams Gunter Hardwick have just started to market this unique development situated in the heart of Southville. The Cigar Factory dates from the 1900’s and is part of Bristol’s heritage in the tobacco industry. Ellson Homes are now converting this building into 19 high quality 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments and duplexes, and a ground floor office space of around 4,700 square feet. The apartments will be set around a central atrium with natural light provided by a glass roof lantern. The original character of the building can be seen with the original factory staircase being retained accessing the different levels of apartments as well as exposed brickwork to the walls of the entrance and many of the apartments themselves. There are lots of different layouts and sizes vary with one bedroom apartments starting at 499sqft to the largest 3 bedroom duplex at 1298sqft. Views range from cityscape to far reaching. Many of these homes will include en-suite facilities and parking will be allocated to select apartments. Each apartment will feature a handleless kitchen with corian worktops and Neff integrated appliances, bathrooms with Duravit sanitaryware and tiling by Mandarin Stone. The living spaces will also include Karndean plank flooring. The ground floor commercial space is a blank canvas, measuring around 4,700 square feet net. With an impressive self-contained entrance, the space is highly versatile and a layout that could be subdivided or retained as an open space. The ground floor is being offered for sale to owner-occupiers. Ideally located, the independent shops of North Street are literally on the doorstep including cafes, bars, restaurants, gift shops and artisan bakers. The Tobacco Factory is across the road, a real hub of the community including a café/bar, Theatre – with a jam packed programme of shows and events for all genres and host to the weekly Tobacco Factory Sunday market – with a range of stalls selling eco-friendly, fairtrade and organic produce. As well as special street markets and night markets with live music. Along North St you will also find the Souk Kitchen, winners of Bristol Good Food Awards, Best Mediterranean Restaurant 2015 and 2016 and the Hen and Chicken – serving real ales, stone baked pizzas and home to Comedy Box – showing live comedy most Saturday nights. There are regular local events, including the North Street Fair, Bedminster Winter Lantern Parade, Arts Trail and Upfest – Europe’s largest street art festival attracting visitors from all over the world. The Harbourside is an easy walk with it’s numerous museums and eating and entertainment options, featuring it’s newest addition Cargo, made of shipping containers and home to some of Bristol’s most exciting food venues. Access to the city centre, Temple Meads mainline railway station, Bristol Airport and motorway network are all within easy reach. n Ocean will be holding a launch of the show home apartment on Saturday 30th September. Apartment prices starting from £194,950. To register your interest in this development and launch event, contact them on 0117 9469832 / landandnewhomes@oceanhome.co.uk To register your interest in the ground floor space, please contact Williams Gunter Hardwick 0117 9221222 / andrew@wghproperty.co.uk

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upert Oliver, a well-known member of the Bristol residential property scene has established his own firm, under his own name, which is due to launch later this month. “It is incredibly exciting, after 21 years of working in mid to high end property sales to be able to put my experience into practice under my own banner. By choosing to locate our offices away from the high street we can reduce costs, and therefore pass those savings onto our clients, whilst still providing a full estate agency service. Through the use of the very best of today’s property technology, combined with local expertise, I am looking forward to being able to provide our clients with a full personal service from valuation through to completion and to offer this with clear fixed pricing”. Rupert’s office is based in the heart of Clifton village in Somerset House, Canynge Road. n Rupert is available on 07780 905 200 or 0117 428 6464 for early enquiries, and for those looking for general advice, whether to buy or sell.

THE

BRIST OL MAGAZINE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK FOLLOW @THEBRISTOLMAG

TO ADVERTISE TEL: 0117 974 2800


P105.qxp_Layout 23 23/08/2017 12:29 Page 1

Luxurious duplex penthouse apartment now open for viewings at Crest Nicholson’s Electricity House

I

f you’re looking for a luxurious city centre bolthole in Bristol, look no further than Crest Nicholson’s inspiring two-bedroom penthouse show apartment. This spacious home, with interiors designed by Edward Thomas Interiors, is one of just three apartments still available at this popular redevelopment of Electricity House, an historic Bristol landmark. With a spacious layout over two floors including an open plan living space on the top floor that is perfect for entertaining with stunning views of the Bristol skyline. Two good sized bedrooms lead onto a private terrace, and have been designed to maximise space with fitted wardrobes providing plenty of storage. This apartment benefits from high-tech under-floor heating throughout to keep you warm and cosy during the colder months, and includes a secure under croft parking space plus separate storage in the unique tube in the atrium. Residents of Electricity House also benefit from a dedicated concierge service. Built in the 1930s by acclaimed architect Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, Electricity House is an iconic Bristol landmark. In 2014, Electricity House was restored to its former glory by award-winning housebuilder Crest Nicholson, offering homebuyers a chance to own a piece of history. Apartments at Electricity House are available using the Government’s Help to Buy scheme, making these beautiful penthouses more affordable for professional couples looking for a luxurious new home and families searching for a larger city-centre apartment alike. Located in the heart of Bristol city centre, Electricity House is just a stones’ throw away from Bristol Temple Meads station, which has great transport links right across the UK. Residents are less than a 10-minute walk from the Cabot Circus shopping centre and in close proximity to a great selection of buzzing restaurants and bars, with the popular Hotel du Vin just across the road. Just a quarter of a mile from the M32, there are also excellent road links for both business and more rural countryside pursuits. The final two and three-bedroom penthouse apartments are available from £479,000, or just £383,200 through Help to Buy. Potential buyers can book an exclusive VIP viewing of the show home between 10am and 5pm, Tuesday to Saturday or for more information go to https://www.crestnicholson.com/electricityhouse/.

Land & Development

B R O K E R S

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT SITES WANTED WITH OR WITHOUT PLANNING PERMISSION FROM SINGLE PLOTS TO MULTIPLE UNIT SCHEMES STRATEGIC LAND UNUSED PUBLIC HOUSES, HOTELS AND COMMERCIAL UNITS

contact: CAMERON GRAY mobile: 07876 197522

cameron@landdevelopmentbrokers.co.uk www.landdevelopmentbrokers.co.uk

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 105


Richard Harding PIF Sept 17.qxp_PIF Full Page 18/08/2017 15:54 Page 1

BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

A

n exceptionally stylish Grade II* listed Georgian townhouse which has undergone an extensive refurbishment in recent years and is now presented to an unrivalled standard. Set within the Royal Colonnade which dates from 1826 the property extends to an approximate gross internal area of 445.5 square metres / 4795 square feet. The accommodation is over four floors and blends beautiful period features with many high quality modern additions. Ground floor: Entrance hall, sitting room, bespoke kitchen connecting to dining room, utility room. First floor: Drawing room opening onto large balcony, master bedroom with en-suite bath/shower room, guest cloakroom, butler’s pantry. Second floor: Part galleried landing, guest bedroom with en suite shower room, three further double bedrooms, study, family bath/shower room. Lower ground floor: one bedroom selfcontained apartment. The apartment currently generates a healthy income but can easily be re-configured to form part of the main house. Outside there is driveway parking for 2 or 3 cars, a lovely inner courtyard beneath the magnificent columns, a large balcony and a 76ft tiered rear garden with sun terrace. Unquestionably a statement home of sheer elegance, character, light and space. Full particulars are available from agent Richard Harding.

ROYAL COLONNADE 14 GREAT GEORGE STREET BRANDON HILL • 5 double bedrooms • 3 bath/shower rooms plus cloakrooms • Self contained lower ground floor apartment • Bespoke Neptune kitchen with integrated appliances • An abundance of period features

Guide price: £1,695,000 Richard Harding. 124 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2RP. Tel: 0117 946 6690

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Andrews - Bristol - SEPT.qxp_Layout 3 21/08/2017 14:21 Page 1

Clifton Andrewsonline.co.uk

30 West Mall, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 4BG £450,000

0117 405 7659

A well-arranged and tastefully presented two double bedroom, second floor apartment on West Mall. This impressive Georgian terrace property, in a prime Clifton Village location, not only benefits from a striking period exterior but also ample storage. The apartment has been extensively redecorated in the current owners' custodianship and would be perfect for someone looking to be close to the centre of Clifton's desirable Village. Energy Efficiency Rating: Grade II Listed Building

clifton@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bishopston Andrewsonline.co.uk

7 Horley Road, St. Werburghs, Bristol, BS2 9TL £345,000

A charming Victorian house with a loft room currently used as a bedroom and arranged over three floors. In brief the property comprises; lounge with bay fronted window and feature fireplace; open plan kitchen / diner which offers access to the garden via the lean to conservatory. The first floor has two double bedrooms; family bathroom and stairs to the loft room / third bedroom. The loft bedroom is a well-proportioned room that has ample light from 3 velux windows. The rear garden is a well maintained mature garden with rear access. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

Bear Flat sales 01225 805680 0117 944 4400 bishopston@andrewsonline.co.uk Newbridge sales 01225 809685

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


Andrews - Bristol - SEPT.qxp_Layout 3 21/08/2017 14:22 Page 2

Westbury-on-Trym Andrewsonline.co.uk

Cavendish Gardens, Bristol, BS9 1RA £550,000

A wonderful example of a three bedroom family home in a lovely cul-de-sac position which is in close proximity to the beautiful Old Sneed Park nature reserve. 16'3 x 13'1 lounge, 11'0 x 10'0 breakfast room, and 13’0 x 8’11 dining room. Downstairs shower room, and upstairs family bathroom. All bedrooms have fitted wardrobes. There is a garage and parking to the front of the property.The enclosed rear garden is mainly laid to paved patio, there are a selection of trees and shrubs. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

0117 405 7685 westburyontrym@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Harbourside Andrewsonline.co.uk

Georges Square, Redcliffe Bristol, BS1 6LB £600,000

This beautiful two bedroom apartment is arranged over two levels, effortlessly blends contemporary style with period features. Located within 10 minutes walking distance to Bristol Temple Meads and 5 minutes to Queen Square. Totalling 1,450 Sq ft this bright and spacious property has recently benefited from complete high-end refurbishment. The accommodation enjoys a host of original features including imposing high ceilings, exposed brickwork, studded industrial beams and magnificent floor-to-ceiling period factory windows. Energy Efficiency Rating: C

Bear Flat sales 01225 805680 0117 911 4749 harbourside@andrewsonline.co.uk Newbridge sales 01225 809685

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com I could easily spout some nonsense about the housing market being buoyant and September a good time to sell. I’m not going to. It’s a realistic market right now. The so called London lull, higher fees and duties, and fears about Brexit mean limited numbers of new property coming up for sale. That means you’ll see lots of building work in Bristol as people sit tight and extend into their cellars or their lofts, rather than make a big move. That also means that good property, priced accurately, has little competition and will sell well, and perhaps even be fought over. A crucial

time, I would argue, to make sure you have a decent agent, who knows the local market and has the expertise to get the best deal for your valuable investment. If you are considering a move, you could be in by Christmas if you get started now. Don’t let negative press stop you from moving, just make sure you are well prepared and expertly supported. Howard Davis M.N.A.E.A Managing Director - CJ Hole Clifton

COTHAM Guide Price £895,000 A Grade II listed house offering: Sitting room, dining room, kitchen, utility, study, four bedrooms, two bathrooms and workshop. Externally there is an attractive front garden and an enclosed split level rear garden which has direct access to the detached garage. EPC E

CLIFTON Guide Price £595,000 Breath-taking views directly over Bristol’s historic harbour are enjoyed from this period Clifton house and gardens. The house offers a versatile interior comprising: Reception room, kitchen/breakfast room, three bedrooms, bathroom and plenty of storage areas throughout the house. EPC G

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton September.indd 1

Other offices also located at: Bishopston, Clifton, Hanham, Henleaze & Southville

21/08/2017 12:16


CLIFTON VILLAGE Guide Price £440,000

REDLAND Guide Price £325,000

An excellent location with a variety of restaurants, shops and cafes of The Village all within walking distance. A delightful third floor, two double bedroom apartment with allocated parking. EPC C

A spacious purpose built apartment, offering: Lounge, kitchen, two double bedrooms, bathroom, cloakroom and an allocated parking space. Located close to Whiteladies Road and Durdham Downs.

CLIFTON Guide Price £435,000 - SSTC

REDLAND Guide Price £365,000 - SSTC

An exceptionally high quality garden apartment in one of Clifton’s most desirable addresses. Set back from the road this recently modernised apartment offers a stylish contemporary home with local shops and Whiteladies Road just a short walk away. EPC D

An impressive and generously proportioned apartment on a lovely tree lined road in central Redland. This stunning property offers: Lounge/diner, kitchen, two bedrooms, two bathrooms. Local shops and cafes are just a short walk away on Chandos Road plus Redland railway station is just down the road. EPC D

REDLAND Guide Price £995,000 - SSTC

REDLAND Guide Price £950,000 - SSTC

A delightful Victorian semi-detached house ideally situated in a highly desirable road within a stroll of Whiteladies Road and The Downs. Retaining many original features and providing a versatile interior. EPC E

An exceptional semi-detached family house boasting a great deal of charm and character throughout and is well placed for Whiteladies Rd, Clifton Triangle and The Downs. EPC D

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton September.indd 2

Other offices also located at: Bishopston, Clifton, Hanham, Henleaze & Southville

21/08/2017 12:16


Henleaze 108 Henleaze Road, Henleaze

t: 0117 962 9221 Email: henleaze@cjhole.co.uk

HALSBURY ROAD, WESTBURY PARK Guide Price ÂŁ635,000 Beautifully presented throughout, this period family home has two interconnecting receptions with stripped exposed floorboards, period fireplace and column radiators, separate kitchen/breakfast room with bay to rear, French doors to a delightful garden, separate utility and downstairs cloakroom/WC. Three family sized bedrooms, modern bathroom with four-piece white suite and additional loft room and shower room within the loft space. Positioned within close proximity of Coldharbour Road shops and amenities and Redland Green Secondary School. EPC D.

Westbury-on-Trym 25 Canford Lane, Westbury-on-Trym

t: 0117 950 0118 Email: westbury@cjhole.co.uk

CRANLEIGH GARDENS, STOKE BISHOP Guide Price ÂŁ785,000 This natural four bedroom semi-detached family home is positioned within a quiet cul-de-sac in a popular area of Stoke Bishop, close to excellent schools. An impressive ground floor extension provides a contemporary, triple aspect kitchen/diner with views and access to the garden and granite work tops. The property also offers two individual receptions; front with bay and open working fire, and rear with bi-fold doors overlooking and leading to the garden. Four family sized bedrooms to the first floor, family bathroom and additional WC. Downstairs cloakroom, double driveway and 18m south-westerly facing mature private family garden. In good decorative order throughout. EPC TBD.

Other offices also located across Bristol and Somerset

CJ Hole September.indd 1

23/08/2017 11:54


Bishopston 92-94 Gloucester Road, Bishopston

t: 0117 9232 888 Email: bishopston@cjhole.co.uk

CLAREMONT ROAD, BISHOPSTON Guide Price £900,000 This spacious semi-detached period family home is located in the ever popular West Bishopston within the APR of Redland Green School and just moments from Gloucester Road. Sat within an envious elevated plot, the property boasts spectacular south-facing views across Redland complemented by a raised deck, a brick paved driveway offering off street parking and a spacious brick built garage/workshop. Internally the accommodation offers an entrance vestibule, hallway, cloakroom, sun room, lounge, study, kitchen/diner and utility to the ground floor. The first floor offers four well-appointed bedrooms, the master complete with en suite and dressing room, along with a family bathroom. The property also offers basement, undercroft and garden room with WC, all accessed via the rear garden. Further benefits include replaced double glazing throughout and modern boiler along with income generating solar panels installed and owned by the current owners; an early viewing comes highly recommended. EPC C

NORTH ROAD, ST. ANDREWS Guide Price £585,000

CROMWELL ROAD, ST. ANDREWS Guide Price £850,000

A stunning period residence ideally located in St Andrews within a moments’ walk of the popular Gloucester Road and St. Andrews Park. This semi-detached home is set in an enviable plot boasting a brick paved driveway offering parking for two vehicles, secure side access and a large family garden enjoying a secluded sunny aspect to the rear. Internally the property has been much improved by its current owners and offers to the ground floor: welcoming entrance hallway, bay fronted lounge complete with open fire, dining room, cloakroom and extended kitchen breakfast room opening onto the rear garden. To the first floor can be found three bedrooms and the family bathroom. Further benefits include modern gas central heating and spacious under croft storage area. Retaining a wealth of original features throughout, we highly recommend an early internal inspection. EPC E

A unique offering to the local sales market, we are delighted to introduce this fine semi-detached period home. The property spans four floors and boasts a fully self-contained two bedroom apartment to the lower ground floor. Offering a bayed lounge and separate kitchen, the apartment is an ideal income generator, capable of returning £850pcm. A fine family home occupies the upper three floors to include five spacious bedrooms, two bathrooms, WC, lounge and stunning open plan kitchen diner. The property is situated within an enviable corner plot with spacious mature gardens and off street parking for multiple vehicles accessed off the neighbouring Belmont Road. Ideally located in St. Andrews, just moments from St. Andrews Park, it’s also just a short walk to the popular Gloucester Road and within 2 miles of Bristol City Centre; an internal viewing comes highly recommended to appreciate the space and quality of the accommodation on offer. EPC E

Other offices also located across Bristol and Somerset

CJ Hole September.indd 1

23/08/2017 11:54


City Centre ÂŁ375,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

Two bedroom apartment An impressive Harbourside ground floor apartment with private entrance. 2 double bedrooms, open plan living area with fully fitted kitchen, 2 bathrooms and sun terrace with views across the Bristol harbour waterfront. The property comes with allocated underground parking and bike store. EPC - B

oceanhome.co.uk

Ocean September.indd 1

Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Westbury on Trym ÂŁ380,000 Four bedroom house

A spacious, light and airy Three/Four bedroom family home set over three floors in a very popular location with great transport links in and out of Bristol. The property is situated close to a number of good local primary schools and the Bristol Free School. EPC - C

21/08/2017 12:14


Redland ÂŁ650,000

Three bedroom maisonette Located within the catchment for Redland Green school, is this stunning property that provides a wealth of character and circa 1740 sqft. Impressive open plan living area overlooking the south westerly facing private garden, stylishly fitted kitchen leading to a large dining room and outside to the rear is a garage. EPC - D

Blaise ÂŁ400,000

Three bedroom house A fabulous opportunity to purchase this spacious contemporary family home in a popular cul-de-sac, the property is in a convenient location within 1.7 miles of the Cribbs Causeway retail parks and the motorway networks and less than a mile from the beautiful woodland estate of Blaise Castle. EPC - D

Ocean September.indd 2

21/08/2017 12:14


Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

Thurlbear, Taunton Guide Price OIEO ÂŁ1,950,000 The Old Rectory is part of the well regarded village of Thurlbear, a rural community nestled on the edges of the Blackdown Hills and situated some five miles from the large town of Taunton with both a well regarded local school and parish church and offering convenient access to the M5 motorway. EPC: F

Tickenham Hill Guide Price ÂŁ1,495,000 Rarely does a house like this come to market. A simply stunning and immaculate contemporary house. Occupying an awe inspiring position with far reaching, breath taking westerly views. A flexible interior with 4/5 beds, 4 baths in main house, 1 room annex with shower room. Impressive electric entrance gates and sweeping drive, leading to ample parking and double garage. The manicured and landscaped grounds (.8 of an acre) allows full enjoyment of the stunning views whilst maximising privacy. Convenient village position for amenities and schools. EPC: D

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 322 6362 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

Hamptons September.indd 1

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Fine & Country September.qxp_Layout 1 21/08/2017 12:02 Page 1

NEW INSTRUCTION

Durdham Park | Bristol

Guide Price ÂŁ425,000

Sitting at the top of Tuscany House, is this very light and bright apartment. The property and location offers any incoming purchaser the best of both worlds. A stylish home with easy access to all of Bristol, especially Whiteladies Road with the benefit of some simply stunning views. EPC: TBC

NEW PRICE

Clifton | Bristol

Offer in Excess Of ÂŁ900,000

A perfectly positioned modern mews house in the centre of Clifton, with a sheltered southerly facing garden, gated off-street parking and detached single garage. EPC: D


Fine & Country September.qxp_Layout 1 21/08/2017 12:04 Page 2

Leigh Woods | North Somerset

Guide Price £425,000

A superb, ground and first floor maisonette in the popular, modern development of ‘Robert Court’ just 600 yards from Clifton Suspension Bridge in Leigh Woods. The spacious sitting room opens onto the beautifully manicured communal gardens and further benefits include allocated parking behind gates. EPC: C

NEW HOMES

Coombe Dingle | Bristol

From £1,050,000

‘The Nestings’ is a stunning new development from Hawkfield of four distinguished family houses; each finished to a high standard in a sought after, secluded, mature tree lined setting in Coombe Dingle on the edge of The Blaise Estate. EPC: TBC


Richard Harding September.qxp_Layout 6 23/08/2017 13:11 Page 1

Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

WESTBURY PARK, DOWNS PARK WEST guide £1,250,000

A handsome and striking, 6 double bedroom, 3 bath/shower room, semi-detached Edwardian (circa 1911) family house with distinctive Dutch gable, further enjoying a beautifully landscaped 40ft x 30ft rear garden, driveway parking and tandem double garage, close to the Downs. A fine period residence, circa 3,158 sq. ft., having an abundance of character both internally and externally, greatly improved by the present owners during their 12 year stewardship now offers a seamless blend of characterful features with high quality modern additions. The neighbourhood has a great deal offer. The nearby schools, whether state or private are of an excellent standard and highly regarded. The local convenience store is a nearby Waitrose. Just a short walk away there is a fishmonger, two butchers’ shops, cafes, good small restaurants a plenty, a gastro pub and many varied independent shops to explore as well as the local library and cinema. Just over the road is Durdham Downs which offers 400 acres of recreational space. EPC: tbc

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


Richard Harding September.qxp_Layout 6 23/08/2017 13:11 Page 2

Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

SOLD STC

REDLAND, DURDHAM PARK guide £1,850,000

A once in a generation opportunity to purchase one of Redland’s finest homes; an exquisite 6 double bedroom detached period family residence situated in a leafy setting beside Durdham Downs. This magnificent house enjoys a beautiful and large level garden, off street parking for multiple cars and a detached garage and is a landmark Bristol home originally dating back to the 1820’s with an abundance of original character and features. Acres of the green open space of Durdham Downs are on the doorstep of this well-located property, whilst also being highly convenient for the local shops, cafes and restaurants of the Blackboy Hill, Coldharbour Road and North View/Waitrose Supermarket. Excellent schools are also nearby including Westbury Park Primary (within 300 metres) and Redland Green Secondary School (within 900 metres), as are bus connections to all central areas and Temple Meads station. EPC: F

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


LEESE

NAGLE

I N D E P E N D E N T E S TAT E A G E N T S

TEL: 0117 974 1741

STOKE BISHOP Guide price £900,000 Distinctive 1930’s five double bedroom detached family house is situated on a highly desirable side road within 450m of Elmlea infant school. The house has been sensitively updated to a very high standard whilst retaining a great deal of the period features and charm which define a property of this era. Today it offers spacious and comfortable accommodation suitable for families.

STOKE BISHOP £925,000 Tucked away in a quiet corner of an extremely desirable development with beautiful rear garden with sunny aspect this four bedroom modern detached executive style family home is an attractive proposition for families, retirees and those relocating to Bristol. Fantastic gardens surround the house and accommodation is spacious throughout. Completed chain in place.

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Here to accommodate

www.leeseandnagle.co.uk

TEL: 0117 962 2299

SHIREHAMPTON ROAD ÂŁ685,000 Stunning, extended 5 bedroom detached family home overlooking Shirehampton Golf Course. Immaculately presented inside and out this house certainly has the wow factor. Fantastic open plan kitchen/diner opening onto the rear garden. Two formal reception rooms, utility and cloakroom complete the ground floor. Upstairs are five bedrooms, master with en suite and family bathroom. The rear garden is level and attractively presented with feature sundeck entertaining area. Detached garage and off street parking to the front.

COOMBE DINGLE ÂŁ675,000 Choice of two superb new build five bedroom detached family homes with full NHBC guarantee. Finished externally to a traditional style the houses boast accommodation suitable for families and possibly downsizers who want the bedroom space to put up families. Contemporary open plan kitchen/diner opening via Bi-fold doors onto the rear garden. Formal sitting room and study. The ground floor also boasts utility and cloakroom. Upstairs on the first floor are four double bedrooms, guest room with en suite and family bathroom. The top floor provides a spacious master bedroom with large en suite. Garage and off street parking. Ready for immediate occupation.

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The Bristol Magazine September 2017  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol.