The Bristol Magazine October 2020

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THE

Issue 193

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

MAGAZINE

£3.95 where sold

I

octobeR 2020

Sanctuary & the city REDECORATING ON A DIME, TEXTILES INSPIRED BY BRISTOL’S BRIGHT HOUSES, GARDEN BUILDS THAT RAISE THE BAR, PLUS GO-TO INTERIORS EXPERTS

BEACONS OF HOPE

Because the night... belongs to all of Bristol. Backing our arts and ents sector

SCRATCHING THE SURFACE

AUTUMN LEAVES

FIFTEENMINUTE CITY

Bristol bookshops BAFTA-nominated The wellbeing share their best new uptick, and where local filmmaker reads to curl talks Cambodia’s the office sits in the up with rat pack new world order

AND... S O M U C H M O R E I N T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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Image by Dominika Scheibinger

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We are currently coveting this nextlevel DIY bespoke bar – what a dream of a garden build

24 Burning Bus Depot by Andy Council

The venue formerly known as Colston Hall has a new identity

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Contents October 2020 REGULARS ZEITGEIST

WINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

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Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

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Catch up on local news and meet Bristol music ace Rachel Mason

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

DBM Wines did so well in lockdown they had to move and expand

INTERVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 A chat with Charlie Bigham, about environment, food and community and Wells Food Festival

EDUCATION

...Finds new meaning in his old front door

CAREERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

BRISTOL UPDATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Boris’s apprenticeship guarantee, and an orchard of opportunity

Business and community news

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

HEALTHCARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Updates from local schools, colleges and educators

Bedminster Pharmacy’s Ade Williams’ advice for the coming season

INTERVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

CULTURE

Paul Dwyer, the new headteacher at Redmaids’ High School, on navigating a very different sort of school term

FASHION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

HABITAT

After a summer of sportswear, we want to fix up, look sharp for AW20

MUSIC

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THE WORKPLACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Bristol’s big concert venue asks us to embrace the statement of intent that is its new name; soon to be absorbed into the city’s entertainment lexicon

The 15-minute city, the place of the office in the new world order and the uptake of positive wellbeing trends

NIGHT-TIME ECONOMY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

GREAT OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Marti Burgess’s new project intends to help prop up the evening economy while restrictions are in place

The pandemic has raised not only a keener awareness of Bristol’s natural spaces but also urgent questions over their future funding

ARTS

INTERIORS

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West Bristol Arts Trail has introduced a virtual strand this year

FILM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 UWE’s BAFTA-nominated filmmaker on Cambodia’s rodent heroes

BLITZ ANNIVERSARY

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Modern artistic responses to historical records have vibrantly brought back to the surface some of Bristol’s remarkable wartime stories

BOOKS

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Independent local stores recommend their favourite new reads, and we learn more about Maya Kalaria’s debut poetry book

FOOD & DRINK NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Local news from chefs, restaurants and producers

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A seasonal special filled with go-to homes and gardens experts, Japandi and cottagecore, redecorating without remortgaging, domestic bar builds and a very Bristolian textile collection

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 It’s getting chillier but there’s no need to put the garden into cold storage until spring, says Elly West

PROPERTY

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News from local estate agents and developers

ON THE COVER The ‘Bristol blanket’ by local textile designer Angie Parker – inspired by lockdown walks that saw her weave her way around the city’s most colourful houses. Turn to page 64 for more; angieparkertextiles.com (image: Article Studio)

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This autumn especially, our domestic spaces need to be places of sanctuary. Stanley – on Loaf’s pudding sofa in midnight plush velvet – absolutely agrees (Instagram: @spanleythestaniel @loafhome)

THIS MONTH WE’LL BE...

Reading...

EDITOR

I

t looks like this autumn could call for more time spent indoors than the season usually necessitates – so our domestic spaces need to be places of safety and sanctuary. It’s unsurprising that interior themes surrounding mindfulness, minimalism, calm, and the countryside are taking hold and on p62 it’s a tale of two trends – cottagecore and Japandi – celebrating these moods. On p68, interior designer and stylist Emily Rickard talks redecorating on a dime, while on p64 we’ve the Angie Parker textile collection launching this month (built around the ‘Bristol blanket’ featured on our front cover) inspired by lockdown walks weaving through the city’s most colourful houses. Bristolians don’t just stand about during a crisis, as evidenced by the myriad locals who have come to the aid of their community during the 2020 pandemic, in myriad ways (p11). This trait is threaded through our history; just look at the heroic actions of city residents during the Blitz (see interpretations of Second World War archive materials by Bristol artists on p24). Economically, the city is facing massive challenges, with the future of many everyday features of normal life unsure, including nightlife and the office. On p38 we talk about the place of the latter in the new world order, the idea of the 15-minute city, and the uptick in positive workplace trends, while on p18 Marti Burgess shares how she plans to help the night-time economy survive. On p16 there’s the venue formerly known as Colston Hall’s story around its new identity and statement of intent as the Bristol Beacon. Elsewhere BAFTA-nominated UWE filmmaker Bethany Staley talks Cambodia’s rat pack – able to sniff out TNT and light enough to walk over landmines without setting them off, African giant pouched rodents can search an area the size of a tennis court in 30 minutes and definitely give Basil the Great Mouse Detective a run for his money. We’ve also plenty of rich autumn leaves, in the form of best reads to curl up with this season, recommended by our local bookshops, as we envision ourselves escaping into book after book and devouring different perspectives to broaden our horizons from home. Bristol author Maya Kalaria also talks of the beautiful lessons to be found in grief, which society tends to overlook due to its overwhelmingly taboo nature. Then there’s a little AW20 fashion fix, Andrew Swift’s celebration of Bristol’s natural spaces – lifelines for local communities that save the NHS millions every year and deserve a higher priority as part of the green recovery programme – and Bedminster Pharmacy’s Ade Williams gives us the winter health lowdown. Stay safe, all.

Aromatic... Bristol’s Jones & Modha has launched a natural, environmentally conscious eau de parfum. The Somerset-made unisex scent – light, with citrus tree aromas, spice and woody warmth – celebrates the Gujarati and Welsh heritage of its creators, Hemali Modha and Catrin MacDonnell. 2.5% of profits will be donated to environmental charities. • jonesandmodha.co.uk

Booking...

Follow Breaking Bread on Instagram: @breakingbreadbristol

...The Pipe and Lovers, as the pop-up pub garden on the Downs continues its run through October, with a reimagined food menu, Sunday kitchen and guest chefs, improvements to the heating and table set-up, plus comedy and live music.

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR

@thebristolmag

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• Twitter: @bristolblackHM @itsaishathomas @rmest2018

Image by Rosie Parsons Photography

from the

October is Black History Month – the ultimate goal being to eradicate the need for a separate month of celebration of Black culture and contributions to society, and for the Black experience to be fully incorporated into the general known history of the UK. Bristol Black History Month online magazine launches on 1 October, featuring achievements and histories of Black, Caribbean and African communities but intended for everyone to engage with. We’ll also be keeping an eye on the social media channels of Aisha Thomas, giving Black educators a platform with her representation project Beyond the 26.

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@thebristolmag

• breakingbreadbristol.co.uk


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Avon Valley Pumpkin Patch

top things to do in October

Rich Hall and friends are due to grace the stage on 3 October

Enjoy Avon Valley’s Massive Pumpkin Patch Festival is set to return for weekends and half term throughout October. Roam the Covid-safe patch and pick your pumpkin in time for Halloween. Book an entrance time slot with free car parking on site between 11am to 4pm, tuck in to eats from the local food vendors and enjoy a warm mug of hot chocolate while you hunt for the perfect orange orb to carve out or cook with. Visitors can also enjoy fair rides, ‘pumpkin paintball’ and ‘pumpkin slingshot’ as well as soaking up the autumn atmosphere. • avonvalley.co.uk The Haunted and Hidden Bristol Walking Tours take place every Friday

Laugh

Back by popular demand, Comedy at the Gate is due to return on 3 October, with Rich Hall and friends set to grace the stage at Ashton Gate Stadium. Renowned for his expertly crafted tirades and quickfire banter, Rich has honed an awesome act and will be joined by two special guests as Andrew Ryan and Rosie Jones accompany him on the bill. At the time of going to print, the event is due to take place at the Dolman Hall space, with socially distanced picnic benches, and those who book the earliest will receive seats closest to the front. The bar will be open and Pizza Workshop will be supplying audience members with their mouth-watering creations. • ashtongatestadium.co.uk

View From 10 – 23 October, the brilliant work of UWE graduate and photographer Eva Watkins will be on diplay at Room 212. The exhibition is set to showcase her awardwinning photo series of Bristol synchronised swimmers – a group initially formed to celebrate the 100th year anniversary of Henleaze Swimming Lake, consisting of 80 people aged between 11 and 76. Eva specialises in analogue portrait and documentary photography. Her main inspiration is groups of people who pursue a different approach to life, working collaboratively and building a relationship. Working as a team and in the water has substantial benefits for mental and physical wellbeing, and over time this group has facilitated the forming of strong friendships, enabling swimmers to share significant life moments with one another.

Image by Eva Watkins

ZEITGEIST

• room212.co.uk

Walk The Haunted and Hidden Bristol Walking Tour, which previously featured on Living TV’s Most Haunted, has been entertaining punters for the last 10 years. Running throughout October, it will teach walkers about Clifton’s ghostly highwayman; ghostly sightings of a monk; and Bristol’s famous haunted cinema and 16th-century haunted house. The Covid-compliant tours depart from Bristol Cathedral, College Green, every Friday night at 8pm. Tickets cost £5. • hauntedandhiddenbristol.co.uk

The Trinity Centre’s outdoor venue will launch on 16 October

Listen Renowned music venue, cultural hub and one of Bristol’s beloved independent live music venues, The Trinity Centre is set to launch a new outdoor performance space in a specifically erected tent for events throughout October. On 16 October, Garden Sessions will launch with Bristol’s experimental trio Waldo’s Gift, Livity Sound’s Hodge & Danielle, and Afrobeats’ DJ Neyo, Dancehall Generals, DJ Wally and DJ Simba. Audiences can can book tables for up to six people and food and drinks will be served via table service. • trinitybristol.org.uk

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Find us

Opening times

Monday - Saturday: 9.30am - 5.30pm Sunday: 10.00am - 4.00pm

Contact

5 Saracen Street, Bath BA1 5BR

Monday - Saturday: 10.00am - 5.00pm

Email: showroom@bath.kutchenhaus.co.uk Tel: 01225 634 025

Inside Clifton Down Shopping Centre, Whiteladies Road, Clifton BS8 2NN

STORES NATIONWIDE

Email: showroom@bristol.kutchenhaus.co.uk Tel: 0117 213 0896


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ist

THE CITY

My

BRISTOL Image by Jon Stone

Meet music industry ace Rachel Mason We moved from London when I was three so I grew up in the countryside just outside Bristol in a beautiful little village called Wrington. The band is booked to play Westonbirt Arboretum on 11 June next year

Forest-shaped future gig English alternative rock band Keane, who hail from from Battle, East Sussex and formed in 1995, have announced new gig dates as part of Forest Live, the summer concert series presented by Forestry England. After a six-year hiatus, the band made a return in 2019 with their latest studio album Cause and Effect and a sold-out UK tour. The release follows on from a succession of previous number-one albums that have accumulated over 13 million sales worldwide including Under The Iron Sea, Perfect Symmetry, Night Train, Strangeland and their big debut Hopes and Fears, which generated hit singles Somewhere Only We Know, Everybody’s Changing, This Is The Last Time and Bedshaped. Forest Live is a major outdoor live music series that introduces forests to new audiences in unique, natural woodland arenas around the country. Over 1.9 million people have attended a Forest Live gig in the last 20 years, cracking out the picnic blankets, deckchairs and strawberries and enjoying great music while supporting the nation’s forests through buying a ticket. Going to a concert helps Forestry England create beautiful places, run important conservation projects and keep growing trees. Every year they plant some eight million trees sustainably, caring for the nation’s 1,500 woods and forests, and sustainably supplying around half of the country’s home-grown timber. They manage the biggest and most diverse area of land in England, from forests to heathlands, mountains to moors, farmland to urban green spaces, and recently they have reintroduced sea eagles and pine martens back to the countryside. Keane, along with their special guest acts Flyte and Michael Ryan, are scheduled to play Westonbirt Arboretum, near Tetbury, on 11 June 2021. • forestryengland.uk/music; keanemusic.com

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Rachel has written for the likes of Dua Lipa and Olly Murs

I’ve written for Dua Lipa, Olly Murs, winners of The Voice UK, American Idol alumni and some fantastic BBC Introducing artists. I’m also the first person to have judged music contests on six continents in the same year. During lockdown I created Unlock Your Talent, an international arts festival to raise money for local mental health charity Vine Counselling Services. I’ve also written a song to raise money for postnatal depression support charity PANDAS which has just been released on my label. I struggled with postnatal depression after my children were born so I run a songwriting project called Lyrical Light where people who have had issues with their maternal mental health can get together and talk about their experiences. Then, as a group, we write a song to help with the healing process. Being one of the few women to run a record label can be tough as I feel there’s still a tendency to dismiss women as not being strong enough for the music industry. On the upside I have used my ‘mama bear’ supportive and gentle style of dealing with clients to set me apart from the more controlling labels. I can see music as colours and taste it. It’s a condition called synesthesia and people often refer to it as my ‘superpower’! My career highlight so far has been being called an inspiration by Harry and Meghan, for my work mentoring young musicians. Currently being mastered at Bare Wall Studios in Bristol is a song I’ve just written with my friend, Hamilton cast member Aaron Lee Lambert, inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement. It will be released to raise funds for BAME charities. I’m also writing a book about real life experiences with postnatal depression. It will include song lyrics written at Lyrical Light workshops. Along with amazing songwriter Riva Taylor I’m about to launch the brand new venture The Songwriters Circle. This will support upcoming songwriters and give them opportunities to perform at The Roundhouse in London and The Bluebird Cafe in Nashville.

I’m part of an amazing Bristol networking group called Freelance Mum and the women there are the most amazing, creative, supportive people I’ve ever met. Bristol musicians including Massive Attack, Portishead, John Parrish and Beth Rowley have always inspired me and I love listening to their music. I’m loving listening to Amy Wadge’s new EP and we also have Radiohead and the Hamilton soundtrack on a lot at home as this is our toddlers’ favourite music! Our favourite place to eat and drink is Eden in Clifton. Everything is vegan and absolutely delicious! Ordinarily my husband and I go to music events in Bristol often and particularly love The Fleece and The Old Duke. We’ve seen some great performances at the bigger venues too – Colston Hall [now Bristol Beacon, St George’s and the Hippodrome. If I was mayor of Bristol, it would be hard to do a better job than Marvin Rees but I think I’d introduce a ‘mental healthcheck day’ where people would have the day off to reflect on their own mental health and there would be help available for anyone who needed it. n • rachelmasonmusic.com


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Dark side of the light Bristol astronomer, photographer and filmmaker Josh Drury has been selected to represent the South West as a delegate on behalf of the International Dark Skies Association, to raise awareness of light pollution and the need to protect the night sky. Josh hopes to collaborate with local MPs on how we can reduce our impact on the environment, and engage a wider audience with the ‘dark-sky movement’. Light pollution is a newly defined area for climate conservation that threatens professional astronomical observations, human health and wildlife conservation including the migratory patterns of nocturnal marine life and the food chain. “Satellite constellations are now posing a risk to our open window to the universe,” says Josh, who is also setting up his own organisation called Space4All, “and will eventually outnumber the amount of visible stars in the night sky.” Space4All will encourage practical astronomy and engage members of all ages and backgrounds in interactive astronomical experience through the use of equipment including telescopes and binoculars, in a safe, fun and inclusive Stargazer Josh has been atmosphere. “Ultimately, Space4All selected to represent Bristol on behalf of the IDSA is to inspire people to feel compelled to protect the night sky,” adds Josh. “Events and workshops will actively promote conservation and hopefully excite more of us into looking up to the night sky and feeling compelled to protect it.” • joshduryphoto-media.com

Real Great Westerners Two local volunteers are being recognised for their outstanding work during the pandemic – each having a high-speed GWR train named after them. Iain Bugler, nominated by BBC Radio Bristol listeners, organised a hot food service in Nailsea, delivering up to 300 meals a week. Remarkably he started the project just after radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment, and sadly, he passed away in July at the age Royal Fort Gardens of 51. “Iain was such a great chap; good humoured and enthusiastic,” said friend (image: Barbara Evripidou) Catherine Blease. “He gave everything to the town – while he knew he was ill, he was thinking of other people.” Iain’s widow Kate (pictured with son Ed) said: “He’d just finished chemo and radiotherapy when lockdown happened. [The service] started with 50 meals and just jumped to 300. He co-ordinated it all from home on his laptop.” Sarah Williams-Martin was nominated for her work with Compassionate Community Emergency Volunteer Response in Bath and North East Somerset. She volunteers seven days a week and built a database to manage the 2,500 who signed up to help during lockdown, ensuring every person who contacted the group was given the support of a volunteer. “This is amazing,” she said. “I just wanted to make sure people were looked after – it mushroomed into quite a lot.” BBC Radio Bristol has run its Make A Difference campaign to link those who need help with those who can offer it, and teamed up with GWR in August. “Nearly two million listeners have contacted their BBC local radio station looking for help, or offering it out,” said Stephanie Marshall, head of the BBC in the South West. “The stories of heroism have helped put a smile on faces across the country.” GWR interim MD Matthew Golton said: “The GWR has a long and proud history of naming trains after Great Westerners and to that list now we can add the names of Iain Bugler and Sarah Williams-Martin. It has been a privilege to learn more about those people who have helped to make such a huge difference. We were particularly overwhelmed by the stories of these two winners and I hope our train-naming ceremonies will serve as a fitting tribute to them.”

AR evolution Bristolians have been sharing what they would like to see included in an augmented reality tour centred around the Seven Saints of St Pauls’ murals, which began as an exhibition from the Iconic Black Britons project led by local artist Michele Curtis. A celebration of the Windrush Generation who came to Bristol and made political and social strides for change, this honoured the accomplishments of the founders of the 1968 St Pauls Festival and their city contributions. Building on three years of collaboration with Boomsatsuma, Iconic Black Britons created an AR prototype as part of Bristol and Bath Creative Digital Placemaking Pathfinder, bringing the murals to life to enhance engagement between visitors to St Pauls and the stories behind the people and the area, allowing audiences to experience new elements of the narrative through animation and audio. A wide audience of Bristolians was invited to complete an online survey, in place of the faceto-face consultations planned before the pandemic, to help the leaders of the project understand what is important to them and deliver a prototype that would serve the community and develop wider audiences. “This is an AR evolution to St Pauls Art, Culture and Heritage Trail, which completed the first two stages of development in 2019,” says Michele. “The launch of the accompanying mobile app and guided tours provided opportunities for members of the public to engage with the rich cultural heritage of the African Caribbean community and learn about our shared local history.” Along with Lyndsay Davies, creative projects manager at boomsatsuma, Michele has led an all-female team of creative technologists and animators in designing the tech to enhance the current tours by augmenting visuals and audio to allow audiences to further engage with the Saints and their impact on Bristol. The prototype will be finished this month, with members of the public welcome to take part in the tour before the collaboration looks for more funding to complete the project. • iconicblackbritons.com/the-seven-saints-ofstpauls

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Doors of protection

T

he other day I took the front door off its hinges. I’d seen people do this before, but it still took me about five years to pluck up the necessary courage. The door in question is old. It might even be as old as the house, which was constructed by Edwardian jerry builders using secondhand bricks and coal dust. As a modern door it’s a failure, offering little in the way of insulation. And with the winter rain it swells in the frame so that leaving the house becomes a nightmarish struggle. Every winter I promise myself I will do something about it, but then summer rolls around and the door shrinks and… you know the story. This year I had no excuse. Having spent a sizeable chunk of lockdown reading John Le Carre and puzzling over crosswords, I owed the old house some attention. In August I tried unscrewing the hinges but couldn’t get the screws to budge. Time ambled by. A month later I was back, equipped with a cordless electric screwdriver that LIGHTS UP when you pull the trigger. With this lure I coaxed Master Bartleby into helping me, and we were off… One thing a lifetime of occasional DIY-type bodging has taught me is that you should never do anything that can’t be undone. I once dismantled a tap to change the washer, which turned out to be of an unusual size that was no longer made. When I put the old one back in and turned on the water, the tap gushed uncontrollably, so I ended up calling a plumber to fit new taps. And now here I was, messing about with the front door. The front door! As the screws were pulled reluctantly from their hinges I wondered what I would do if they refused to go in again. Then the door broke free, instantly becoming a dead weight. Fortunately my helper’s attention span had not quite reached its limit, and he grabbed the toppling door. Together we manoeuvred it onto its side, sticking out into the front garden. I’m not sure what kind of wood the door is made of but it had been sorely tested by years of damp. Thankfully I had some wet rot wood hardener left over from previous bodging and this we applied, followed by wood filler (ditto) and, after a light sanding, undercoat. This performance was observed by a succession of neighbours and tradesmen. “About time you got rid of that old door,” said one approvingly. And then somehow it was 3.30pm and, as I applied a coat of gloss, next door’s kids appeared at the gate. “Why is he painting a DOOR?” they asked their mum, who gave an embarrassed shrug. “It sticks,” I said, “in the winter.” The children stared. “Why doesn’t he buy a new one?” “We like our door,” I said rather defensively, and I realised as I said this that it was true. The door has always been there, standing between us and the world outside. Our kids have trapped their fingers in it, grown tall enough to open it, slammed it after a row. And now here I was, giving something back at last. Young Master B appeared, asking when I needed help again as he had to go out. “Won’t be long now,” I told him, trying to remember how long gloss paint takes to dry. The dog appeared, stared at the door for a moment, then gave me a pitying look and went back to the couch. The boy went out. Darkness came and the temperature dropped, but fortunately there was no sign of rain. Ms B came to see if I wanted something to eat. “I’d better stay here with the door,” I said. “Someone might steal it.” “Who on earth would steal a door?” “You never know,” I said, going in search of a camping chair. I unfolded it beside the supine door, and settled down to wait. ■

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FASHION | WOMENSWEAR

Practical magic: We’re loving the celestial zodiac vibes of this John Lewis And/Or midi dress (£89, available 25 October) and knee-high boots (£179) ensemble

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FASHION | WOMENSWEAR

Fix up, look sharp

Spent the summer lounging in sportswear? Relish the chance to smarten up that this change of season always presents with grown-up midis and ‘70s styles à la Mrs America, perennial prints, and, of course, cosy knitwear

Amber leopard boot, £199, Whistles

Brigitte

om £98, frames fr

Icons sweate r,

te Ace & Ta

£266 , Quant

um Courage

Rota boot in tapioca, £109, Fox & Feather

Sonnes Art sweatshirt, £40, Bristol Co.Lab

Skinny sunglasses, £12, That Thing

Khaki shearling coat, £1199 Whistles

Ribbed beanie, £39, scarf £49, Peregrine Clothing

Jenniger hat, £23.99, Fox & Feather

Coach H utton B a John Le g, £395, wis

Tan midi skirt, £279, Whistles

Monstera leaf earrings, £12, That Thing

Sky high knit in Kentucky blue, £42, Fox & Feather

Somerset by Alice Temperley dress, £130, John Lewis


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MUSIC

Beacon of hope

Image: Dominika Scheibinger

The venue formerly known as Colston Hall asks the city to embrace its new name – positioning the concert hub as a focal point and source of inspiration – and absorb it into its entertainment lexicon

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he Beatles, The Rolling Stones, David Bowie and Jimi Hendrix are among the many music legends who have raised the roof of Bristol’s historic concert venue on Trenchard Street at one time or another. Given they were the forward-thinking creatives of their generation, we don’t think it’s too much of a supposition to suggest they’d probably have got behind the venue’s latest headline-making happening too. One of the most controversial projects in the country is reaching its conclusion as its physical transformation gets closer to completion, and with the new name for the venue formerly known as Colston Hall now announced as the Bristol Beacon. Images of Bristol flashed all around the world on 7 June when protesters pulled down the statue of slave trader Edward Colston, rolled it through the streets and dumped it in the harbour. While a name change for the music venue that bore his name has been in talks for years, the statue’s toppling, and the global attention on the city which ensued, brought the issue into even sharper focus. Branding agency Saboteur worked with the community to develop the new name as part of the venue’s most radical transformation in its 150-year history. Local schools and creative organisations took part along with the strategic research consultancy Morris Hargreaves McIntyre, and the Bristol Music Trust. Bristol’s mayor, Marvin Rees, took a personal interest in the project. The name was chosen because it describes a focal point, a gathering place and a source of inspiration – a place that will be visible beyond the boundaries of the city – which everyone involved in the project felt encapsulated what the venue means for the city. The idea is to ‘set music free’. “The more I see ‘set music free’, the more I like it and the more it makes me think that is exactly what this process is doing for us,” said Andy Boreham, head of marketing at Bristol Music Trust, while Louise Mitchell, the Trust’s chief executive, said: “I couldn’t be more pleased with this outcome and it’s been a complete delight to work with Saboteur, who taught me loads about branding but also a lot about ourselves, which I’m sure will stay in the organisation for a long time to come.” 16 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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In addition to the big stars and bands, Bristol Beacon hosts a diverse variety of events and education workshops and it was felt that the new name would better represent the content of the shows and performances it puts on for the multicultural audience in Bristol. “This has been a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” said Nick Eagleton of Saboteur. “This project is about much more than renaming a venue – the conversations around it have been about the identity of the city itself. We had to set this great venue free; free from the murky clouds of a name with a dark history. Free from the assumption that this was exclusively for the white, middle-aged, middle class. And we had to allow it to be free to soar like music itself. Free to challenge, provoke and seduce. Free to be the place where everyone in the city could find something that they loved.

We had to plunge into the heart and soul of Bristol... It was a joy, because Bristolians don’t hold back

“We had to plunge into the heart and soul of Bristol and we did that with a huge collaborative group that spanned the whole community, from schoolchildren to the mayor himself. It was a joy, because Bristolians don’t hold back – if they’ve got something to say, they say it. This was a great, inspiring project. What wonderful, uplifting people to work with. And what a start for our new branding studio. We feel as if we landed a part in a great blockbuster show. How often do you get the chance to make history? And how often do you make new friends for life?” ■ • bristolbeacon.org


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THE

B R I S T OL MAGAZINE

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Images: Soul Media Photography

EVENING ECONOMY

Because the night... belongs to Bristol Marti Burgess, lawyer and partner at Bevan Brittan, owner of Lakota, and member of The Society of Merchant Venturers, talks Bristol in a Box – a new project intended to help prop up the evening economy while restrictions are in place

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ristolians don’t just stand about during a crisis, as evidenced by the myriad folk who have come to the aid of the community during the 2020 pandemic, in myriad ways. This trait is threaded through our history – just look at the actions of some city residents during the Blitz (see p24). Economically, the city is facing massive challenges – the likes of which it has never seen before, with certain sectors worse hit than others. Nightlife, beyond socially distanced dinners here and there, or a few drinks on the cobbles, has felt almost non-existent – there is certainly no blowing off steam while throwing shapes on a club dancefloor. Steam sharing is officially frowned upon. But there are those in the city who are thinking hard of Marti Burgess ways to help this sector survive. Enter, Marti Burgess. TBM: Tell us a little about the multifaceted project you are working on to help Bristolians continue to experience the city’s night scene Bristol @ Night, which I chair alongside Councillor Beech, was set up to support the night-time economy and ensure that developers coming to the 18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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city or involved in revitalisation of the city centre understood how important our night-time economy is to the city’s identity as a vibrant place where creatives flourish. We also were seeking to ensure that the NTE [night-time economy] had a voice when big decisions were being taken around things like changes to the licensing policies. The pandemic has been an unexpected shock to our system and has meant that we had to immediately focus our attention on supporting the night-time economy and ensuring that those working within it were able to access the support available and then understand the new legislation on opening up. Bristol Nights, which we are launching with the help of Mel Rodrigues [creative producer and founder of Gritty Pearl Productions which specialises in grassroots and multiplatform events and content] is an extension of that. We took part in the Bristol Business Festival where we shared some stories from operators who have opened up, or who are still closed, about how they are doing. Bristol in a Box, which will be launched soon, will be promoting the activities of the great bars, repurposed venues and restaurants that have opened up.

Bristol is full of innovative people and that creativity is not just going disappear. As soon as we are able, the scene will bounce back and all that latent creativity will be unleashed


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EVENING ECONOMY

How are night-time businesses coping, from where you stand? It is a really tough time and many will not survive. Some who are fortunate enough to be able to repurpose their spaces might just get through and those fortunate to get something out of the cultural recovery fund will also be given a lifeline, however I do not think the scene will ever be the same again and we might not only lose venues but musicians, and some of the great freelancers behind the scenes, who work on lighting, sound and decor, may just move into different industries. It’s really sad to see. What is the broader vision for getting the night scene back on its feet? Bristol is a city full of innovative people and that creativity is not just going to disappear. I know and trust us enough to be confident that as soon as we are able, the scene will bounce back and all that latent creativity will be unleashed. Our job at Bristol @ Night will be to support those working in the NTE and ensure that new ideas don’t get caught up in red tape and provide access to those within the local authority that can help those ideas come to fruition. We are working on a mapping and data exercise about the size and value of our NTE which will hopefully embed a strategy to support it in our local authority’s policies for licensing, economic recovery and planning.

absolutely brilliant in making sure as many operators as possible know what support is out there for the sector and signposting them to his other colleagues who can help with things like licensing, pedestrianisation and using spaces outside their venues. Jason is one of those unsung heroes just getting on with his job but actually really making a difference. What did you speak about at the first virtual Bristol Business Festival? The work of Bristol @ Night and what we are doing to support the NTE; also Lakota and the launching of Lakota Gardens. Hopefully people will understand that we are doing what we can to support the sector and the steps we have taken to engage the mayor, our local MPs and WECA [the West of England Combined Authority] to lobby the government for additional support. How has it been to be part of the Merchant Venturers organisation? It has been an interesting few months, having joined at a time when contested histories are making the news throughout the world. Bristol is right at the epicentre of this conversation and I am pleased to be involved. How is the open-air events space at Lakota working out?

We are working on a mapping exercise about the value of our night-time economy which will hopefully embed a strategy to support it in our local authority’s policies for licensing, economic recovery and planning

It has been a real pleasure to do something different with our space. We have definitely put on a more eclectic mix of shows than we normally do inside the venue. We have done sit-down raves with some great DJs such as Eats Everything and Skream, jazz ensembles, comedy performances with local acts like Mark Olver but also household names like Russell Howard, and live music. It has been fun to do and, to be honest, as a former raver with bad knees, it has resulted in me going to my own venue more than ever before. For all the positives, though, it is not the same as running a 2,000-capacity venue and we have had to completely change our business model to survive. Luckily the team who work for us love challenges and have really gone for it and have made no compromises on the quality of the shows. ■

What innovative measures or creative Covid responses have you seen?

• Twitter, Facebook & Instagram: @BristolNightsHQ; bristolnights.info

Loads of stuff has happened which is just brilliant; simple things like restaurants such as Little French and Bakers & Co surviving by becoming shops. The Food Union idea of paying restaurant owners to supply food for NHS staff working through the height of the pandemic. Box-E and all of their staff packing food boxes. Loads of great content being streamed online so people could try to have nightclub experiences at home. I loved that places were delivering cocktail mixes to people’s houses. The online St Pauls Carnival actually managed to have that carnival feel which was brilliant. The Arts Channel delivering great content such as theatre and live music online was also groundbreaking. Have those with entertainment businesses experienced any highs as well as lows – coming together to work towards common goals? Absolutely, it is amazing how the scene has come together. Breaking Bread is a great example of that; two Stokes Croft bars, a Michelinstar chef, one of Bristol’s great independent restaurant chains and a dance music festival coming together and starting a new multi-purpose event space on the Downs has been excellent but you would not have automatically imagined that happening before the pandemic. Also the work done by organisations such as Barbie and the Food Union to support their respective sectors has been really impressive and shows what happens when you come together. It is great when you see a call out for help from an operator on the Barbie platform and the amount of other operators jumping in to help them. Who is your local night-time economy hero? I know everyone likes to knock the council but Jason Thorne, the officer who works for the council on Bristol @ Night, has been THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Goin’ out west Although many of the city’s usual arts trail venues are unable to open safely in line with social distancing, it’s not stopping our local creatives from sharing beautiful works

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oathe to deprive its artists or community of its annual pleasures, West Bristol Arts Trail – usually host to 50 venues brimming with beautiful visuals – is, for the first time, hosting a virtual trail in addition to 18 physical venues (subject to change) where safety measures can be observed. Instead of the usual map-brochure containing the full details on where to find fine locally produced pieces to feast your eyes on, there will be various documents to download from the website. Facebook will be employed (check the trail’s website for the link) as a platform for artists and makers to showcase their work and communicate with those who are interested in viewing and purchasing it. Founded in 2008, in response to popular local demand, West Bristol Arts Trail has taken place annually in mid-October ever since, with around 120 local artists, designers and makers usually exhibiting their art in homes, studios and community spaces around Clifton, Cliftonwood, Redland and Hotwells. This month, on Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 October, 11am – 5pm, artists and makers will post photos of their work on the group page alongside details of how to purchase. Artists exhibiting virtually include Bristol illustrator Shelli Graham who uses watercolours and coloured pencils on her greeting cards and gifts. Anyone interested in buying can comment on a post – which may direct customers to artists’ online shops if they have them – and the artist will then arrange payment and delivery.

See wonderful works such as this by Lloyd Lewis, one artist exhibiting on the physical trail

Other artists lined up for 2020 include former world kickboxing champion Lloyd Lewis who is exhibiting work physically at Engineers House on The Promenade, Clifton Down. Lloyd became a secondary school science teacher after his big sporting wins and then, after undergoing three spinal surgeries, decided to combine his passions and become a martial arts school owner and an artist. Since then he has been exhibited in the Royal West of England Academy and appeared on Sky Arts’ Landscape Artist of the Year. Exhibiting via open house is abstract landscape artist (oil on canvas) Kate Edmunds, who’ll be offering work through an art trail auction, with a view to making it more affordable in uncertain times. Meanwhile popular Bristol creative Jenny Urquhart will be showing her works at 12 Howard Road and the pieces of landscape watercolourist Chris Dye will also have a physical presence. The 24 artists offering physical exhibitions are listed on the trail website. For any enquiries relating to the physical trail please contact Douglas Henderson on westbristolarts@yahoo.co.uk, and for those relating to the virtual trail contact Eva Pollard via evaglassdesign@yahoo.co.uk or Dona Bradley via artist@dona-bdrawings.co.uk. ■

• westbristolarts.com

Check out pieces such as this fruity number by Nancy Chambers and, below, gifts by Shelli Graham

Storm on Mt Blanc by Andrew Jones

Lockdown View by Kate Edmunds

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FILM GARDENING

APOPO works tirelessly to clear landmines that were dropped during the Cambodia-Vietnam war that ended over 30 years ago

A pivotal partnership Following the 2020 BAFTA Student Film Awards, Millie Bruce-Watt speaks to finalist and UWE graduate Bethany Staley, whose short film documents one charity’s mission to clear Cambodia of landmines with the help from some furry friends

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spiring environmental filmmaker and now student BAFTA-nominated director, Bethany Staley is part of the next generation of talented and innovative creators shining a light on some of the world’s most important yet largely untold stories. While studying a masters degree in wildlife filmmaking, Bethany set her sights on a Cambodian charity working tirelessly to rid its country’s landscape of unexploded ordnance that fatally injures men, women and children on a daily basis – 31 years after the Cambodian-Vietnam war came to an end. Bethany’s 12 minute and 17 second-long film, titled Scratching the Surface, delves into the work of the Belgian non-profit charity, APOPO – which has formed an unlikely, but vital, allegiance with African giant pouched rats – and follows the stories of those who live alongside the landmines and adapt to the devastating effects that they have on their everyday lives. Having been interested in the idea of human-animal relationships since studying an undergraduate degree in human geography at Cardiff University, Bethany was drawn to APOPO after discovering its relationship with the rats. With an extraordinary ability to detect TNT from the ground’s surface and light enough to walk over the mines without setting them off, one rat can search the size of a tennis court in 30 minutes – an area that would take a human four days to negotiate. “I knew I wanted to make a film about the relationship between humans and animals and I knew I wanted to explore that subject in a very positive way,” Beth says. “A lot of the stuff we see on TV at the moment is about human-animal conflict, about tigers in Indian

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villages, for example – and it’s really important to show the stories because they’re issues that we need to address – but, I thought, there are so many stories about humans and animals out there, how can I take this subject matter and actually flip it on its head and show human and animal cooperation and show how important animals are to us and the need to protect them?”

Able to detect TNT and light enough to walk over mines without setting them off, a rat can search the size of a tennis court in 30 minutes

The giant rats are of invaluable assistance to the entire operation and, since APOPO launched in 1997, they have helped clear 13,200 mines from Tanzania, Mozambique, Angola, Columbia and Cambodia – saving countless lives across the world. “These animals are nocturnal so they can only work for about two to three hours a day from 4am to 7am. The rats’ ears and skin are so sensitive because they’re nocturnal animals – they’re not used to being out in the sun – so the handlers make sure they sun cream their ears and their tails, which is really sweet. They have a really good bond.”


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The heroic rats have helped clear 13,200 mines around the world

After contacting APOPO, Bethany set up a crowdfunder for her shoot, before finally raising enough to fly to Cambodia in April 2019. “I spent about two and a half weeks out there, mainly in Siem Reap, which is where APOPO are based. I filmed on their training field and at the rehab centre as well. Then we went up to the northwest border of Cambodia, where it borders with Thailand. That’s an area called the K5 Mine Belt, still one of the most densely mined areas of land in the world. To see the work they were doing out there was just incredible.” While filming on the mine belt, Bethany spoke to local villagers, farmers, parents and families whose lives revolve around the landmines, documenting their reality. “The amazing thing is I had no idea what a minefield would look like, really, and then I got out there and I just had in my head that it was going to be this kind of desolate area of land, there was going to be nothing, but when we got there, they were clearing the landmines in the middle of this village. There was an active minefield, which was all cornered off while they were working, but about 300 metres to the right there was a house with a family, with kids running around in the garden. They were running around happily but it was shocking that people still have to live in an area that is littered with landmines.” While following the work of APOPO, Bethany also spent time at a rehab centre, set up by the Persons with Disabilities Foundation, where she documented the lives of survivors who are learning to live with their life-changing injuries. “It’s incredible to be able to talk to the villagers. I spoke to one man and got his perspective of what APOPO was doing with the rats and, firstly, he was so shocked that rats are clearing landmines, which you would be, but he was just so unbelievably grateful for the work that APOPO was doing out there because it means that, once his area is safe and the mines have been cleared, he can start farming again and he won’t have to worry about his kids and their future.” It was Bethany’s course director, Peter Venn, who put her short film forward for the BAFTA Student Film Awards this year, unbeknown to Bethany until she received an email about being a finalist. Bethany was one of nine finalists selected from almost 700 submissions from film schools in 35 countries. “I didn’t actually realise he had submitted our films into the BAFTAs so when I got the email to say that, firstly, I was shortlisted and then that I was a finalist, I was just so shocked. I had to ring him up to ask whether it was all true.” The young filmmaker credits the wildlife filmmaking course, which is partnered with the BBC Natural History Unit, for putting her in the position she is today and for the opportunity to make Scratching the Surface. “It’s an incredible course, I learned so much on it and they gave me the opportunity to be able to make this film in the first place. There’s such an amazing array of filmmakers, producers and production studios in Bristol focusing on

Bethany documented the lives of survivors who are learning to live with their injurires

environmental issues and we’re really lucky that we have this resource in the city.” The BAFTA night itself was a very “Covid experience”, Bethany explains, as the official ceremony took place via Zoom. However, she still feels honoured to be following in the footsteps of so many great filmmakers that made their first appearance as a finalist at the BAFTA Student Awards, most notably Ryan Coogler, who went on to direct the critically acclaimed superhero film, Black Panther. “It’s such a privilege to be recognised in that way. The night was different because it was during lockdown. Normally what happens is the finalists fly over to LA for the ceremony but, unfortunately, they couldn’t do that this year and did it as an online ceremony instead but we still got dressed up.” Bethany looks forward to delving deeper into stories of the natural world, raising awareness of organisations protecting those who are suffering. “I’m still very much at the beginning of my documentary career but making films and making stories about the natural world and how humans fit into it is what I really want to do. Hopefully now, with the recognition from BAFTA, I’ll be able to keep making films and exploring social and environmental issues and highlighting stories from around the world that really need to be told.

The rats’ ears and skin are sensitive because they’re nocturnal animals so the handlers sun cream their ears and tails

“I wanted people to understand the impacts of landmines and how they continue to devastate countries even after the war has finished,” she says. “I wanted to change people’s perception of rats and take them away from thinking that they are these smelly, diseased animals, which some are, but these ones are really intelligent; they can smell landmines in the ground, they can sniff them out and detect them, they are so intelligent. I’m just trying to emphasise the value in animals and wildlife so that we can carry on protecting them.” It is thanks to filmmakers like Bethany, who emerges with the next generation of filmmakers and storytellers, that we learn of often unseen perspectives and are made aware of issues plaguing people’s lives. Ultimately, they make the world a better place. ■

• Watch Scratching the Surface online at vimeo.com/372354444

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ART

Blitz Art 67, by Laura Crouch

Extinguishing Fires, by Anna Marrow Playing Cricket, by Anna Marrow

All imagery courtesy of ancestry.co.uk

Night Train, by Nay Groves

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Technicolour heroes A beautiful new project showcasing an impressive breadth of modern artistic responses to historical records from the Blitz (7 Sep 1940 – 11 May 1941) has vibrantly brought back to the surface some of Bristol’s remarkable wartime stories

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hree Bristol artists have contributed beautiful new work to a collection marking 80 years since the start of the Blitz and depicting life during this period of World War II. Commissioned by family history brand Ancestry, the 80 different works are all based on real-life untold stories from the areas hit hardest by the Blitz, including Bristol – whose historical records and images local creatives Anna Marrow, Andy Council and Nay Groves have interpreted to celebrate lesser-sung local acts of heroism and bring to life extraordinary efforts through their own contemporary styles. Anna Marrow chose to showcase the bravery of University of Bristol librarian James Cox, who cycled through an air raid to respond to an elderly woman’s cries for help, after an incendiary bomb fell through her roof. James knocked a hole in the ceiling and caught the bomb in a basin, before smashing his hand through a window to throw it outside. Despite suffering burns and cuts to his hands, James cycled to the university to put out a fire on the roof of the new library block. “I was particularly inspired by the incredibly brave librarian, fighting fires with already wounded hands,” says Anna, “and I wanted my image to have a feeling of ‘boys own adventure’ annuals, combining the nostalgia and heroism in the story.’’ Andy Council depicted two police constables who managed to recover the bodies of enemy airmen from a crashed plane at Portishead Dock while Nay Groves created an image of Private Arthur Hill and Sergeant Arthur Saunders, who were on duty at the hospital train during every air raid and worked hard to save trains from catching fire. “One night documented the duo rescuing a man found unconscious on the railway tracks,” says Nay. “They carried the man over a quarter of a mile, dodging huge bomb craters and regularly falling flat on the ground to avoid nearby bomb blasts. I wanted my artworks to evoke the stoicism of the people in stories such as these and their ability to continue with the task at hand despite the chaos going on around them.” The collection was inspired by the War Artists Advisory Committee, established at the outbreak of World War II by the government’s Ministry of Information. Its aim was to compile a comprehensive artistic record of Britain throughout the war and by the end of World War II it included 5,570 pieces. The Civilian Gallantry Award records – a treasure trove of stories – highlight the incredible, often dangerous work carried out by air raid wardens, first aid workers, firewatchers and messengers, with vivid details of the exploits and heroic deeds of civilians fighting a war away from the battlefields and making sacrifices on the home front. Using artistic mediums ranging from digital illustration to oil painting, 33 UK artists have created contemporary interpretations of records and images. “As we mark the 80th anniversary of the start of the Blitz, a time of tragedy but a time that truly demonstrated the great British spirit, we wanted to pay tribute to the original War Artists Advisory Committee by adding our own update,” said Russell James, family history expert at Ancestry. “By preserving these stories in a new and engaging way, we hope we can shine a light on what our families went through and encourage people to discover their connection to the Blitz.” The collection coincides with Ancestry’s launch of StoryScout which helps users create an engaging narrative of their ancestors’ lives. ■

Crash Recovery, by Andy Council

• Visit ancestry.co.uk/Blitz80 or follow #Blitz80 on social media

Flag Factory Girls, by Krystal Wong THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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BOOKS

Autumn leaves

As the new season approaches, more than ever we envision ourselves escaping into book after book and devouring different perspectives to broaden our horizons from home. Here three local bookshops offer a taste of what’s on offer

ur Twitter feeds seem full of people who, for example, capitalised on newfound free time of furlough and managed to publish a book amid the chaos of lockdown – so the coming year could well see a proliferation of first-time writers and fresh literary voices offering up new imagined worlds and viewpoints to ponder. In addition to the planned works of literature’s established authors, there’ll be plenty to get stuck into as we start to hunker down.

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett It’s no surprise that Brit Bennett’s second novel has already been snapped up by HBO for a miniseries, because it is a uniquely and inherently engrossing story – an intersectional family saga that glides through issues of race, community and legacy, all through the lens of one fictional town in the American Deep South. The title refers to the disappearing act of one of the Vignes twins – two seemingly inextricable girls whose lives take shockingly different turns when one of them runs away.

The independent North Street bookshop serves Bedminster brilliantly with its events, coffee and next-day ordering, and delivers worldwide too. Co-owners Dan and Emily Ross share what they’ve been reading.

The Liar’s Dictionary by Eley Williams Prepare yourself for a full serving of wordplay in Eley Williams’ first full-length novel, an utterly unique story of made-up words, pelican ambushes and bomb scares, set in the crumbling offices of the (completely fictional) Swansby’s New Encylopaedic Dictionary. One errant employee in the 19th century has riddled the dictionary with fake words (known in the trade as mountweazels), and it’s up to intern Mallory in the present day to unearth and correct them. As you might imagine, it’s a task fraught with unexpected outcomes…

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What’s the story, Storysmith?

The Harpy by Megan Hunter With the nights beginning to draw in, you’ll be in need of a clutchyour-knees-on-the-sofa sort of book to make the most of the chilly atmosphere, and Megan Hunter’s deliciously odd and disturbing new novel is just the ticket. A cuckolded wife comes up with a plan for revenge, the sheer vindictiveness of which starts to make her question her own grasp on reality. It’s both domestic and magical, terrifying yet oddly liberating.

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The Book Of Trespass by Nick Hayes Any venture outside these days can feel like a bit of a trespassing, so there’s no better time to explore exactly what this loaded word means.


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Nick Hayes argues that public access to land is the great social equaliser, weaving in stories of ravers, travellers, witches, walkers and protestors, each of them with their own unique claim to land which, apparently, doesn’t belong to any of us. Flavour, by Yotam Ottolenghi We are a bit obsessed with the latest volume from the perennially inventive Yotam Ottolenghi. He has a bit of a reputation for ingredient-guzzling recipes which will have you darting into several more shops than you perhaps intended, but trust us: it is always worth the effort, and this is one of his most accessible collections yet. We’ve already hammered out an encouragingly tasty version of the aubergine dumplings alla Parmigiana, and we’ve got our eyes on the mushroom lasagne…

illuminate these feelings. Rebecca Solnit’s A Field Guide to Getting Lost is in part a balm – a book of tangentially related essays one might wrap around oneself for comfort. Solnit has no cure for modern anxiety; this is not a book of wellbeing, but what I took from it helped me to see more clearly, more empathetically, myself, and the temporary, translucent world we inhabit with more joy than fear.

What they’re reading at Max Minerva’s

The Book of Trespass by Nick Hayes As society slips toward collapse sometime mid-January 2021, as we flee to the forests or hunker in holes dug under the basement, The Book of Trespass by Nick Hayes will at least let you know where best to pitch your tent, and on whose land can you shelter (pretty much no one’s is the answer; that 92% of land is off-limits is just one of the startling facts Hayes offers). A walkers-guide-to-where-you-cannotwalk-but-should-anyway, this, in the most political sense, is a flaneur’s guide to the countryside and one we may all need very soon.

Mr Wilder and Me by Jonathan Coe The Rotters Club and Middle England author is back with a novel that is at once a tender coming-of-age story and an intimate portrait of one of cinema’s most intriguing figures, Billy Wilder. Jonathan Coe turns his gaze on the nature of time and fame, of family and the treacherous lure of nostalgia.

Seven Brief Lessons on Physics by Carlo Rovelli Stuck indoors, staring at the TV as the pandemic figures rise and fall, watching with sad eyes as the foxes in facemasks queue for the bins? Is it all getting too much? Open the window, look up… and out! Seven Brief Lessons is a remarkably slim and poetic volume that contains black holes, the architecture of the cosmos, infinite particles, quantum mechanics, life, the universe and everything in-between. As things on Earth stagnate while simultaneously, somehow, they all fall apart, this exploration of the heavens and its working is a paradoxically joyous perspective on our own insignificance.

This season brings us more newly published books than ever before, says Jessica Paul at Max Minerva’s – the family-owned bookshop on the border of Henleaze and Westbury Park – with over 1,400 books being published in just over a month. Her top picks start with...

The Silence by Don Delilo The master of postmodern literature is back in one of our most anticipated novels of the year. It is Super Bowl Sunday in the year 2022. Five people are due to have dinner in an apartment on the east side of Manhattan. The hosts are a retired physics professor and her husband; they are joined by one of her former students and await the arrival of another couple, delayed by what becomes a dramatic flight from Paris. In the apartment, talk ranges widely. The opening kick-off is one commercial away. Then something happens and the digital connections that have transformed our lives are severed. What follows is a dazzling and profoundly moving conversation about what makes us human. English Pastoral by James Rebanks The author of the beloved number-one bestseller The Shepherd’s Life returns with a stirring history of family, loss and the land over three generations on a Lake District farm. James Rebanks was taught by his grandfather to work the land the old way. Their family farm in the Lake District hills was part of an ancient agricultural landscape: a patchwork of crops and meadows, of pastures grazed with livestock, and hedgerows teeming with wildlife. And yet, by the time James inherited the farm, that landscape had profoundly changed. This is a book about what it means to have love and pride in a place, and how, against the odds, it may still be possible to build a new pastoral: not a utopia, but somewhere decent for us all.

On the Black Hill by Bruce Chatwin Fretting over your Ocado delivery slot or whether you’ll get WiFi once all the 5G towers are aflame? Relax, and read On the Black Hill, a beautiful, understated novel of a time, not so long ago, when modern living meant your mare was shod and advanced technology was the plough. On the Black Hill, twin brothers are born, live out their quiet lives and die, in the same bed of their small farmhouse as the 20th century explodes somewhere just over the hill. There is such warmth and gentle humour, such humanity and love, in this novel, but Chatwin (a complex, nomadic, not altogether sympathetic man) never allows sentimentality to invade the Hill. It remains my favoured burial spot. A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin; Dune by Frank Herbert Sometimes a book is not enough. Sometimes you need a whole new world to sink into, to swallow you whole. As world-building novels go, it would be hard to beat either A Game of Thrones or Dune. Set respectively in an imaginary past and an apocalyptic future, neither is particularly fantasy or science fiction. The dragons and sandworms are brilliant gargantuan distractions. But the real stories are in the labyrinthian layers of character and politics, the machinations, murders, passions and betrayals, and once you begin (there are five big books in each series!) you may almost need another lockdown. ■

Piranesi by Susanna Clarke The long-awaited return from the author of the multi-million copy bestselling Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell. Piranesi is a slow burn, literary thriller that will keep you on the edge of suspense right to the very last page.

What’s on the shelves at Bloom and Curll

From his Colston Street store, where Nick Hayes’ new read has also been deemed a hit, Bloom and Curll owner Jason Beech gives us his autumn reading recommendations. A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit I’ve found, since lockdown, that time has become more mutable. Places seem less concrete. People appear almost translucent. Everything seems a memory that exists only halfway, insubstantially. It’s worrying and, worse, it’s really difficult to find a book that can THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Bittersweetest taboo Bristol-based British-Indian poet, therapist and broadcaster Maya Kalaria’s first book is published this month, featuring fascinating thoughts on grief and its beautiful, overlooked lessons

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nspired by Maya’s experience of losing her mother to leukemia when she was nine years old, and being part of a family and wider society which did not encourage the expression of sorrow, Half Woman, Half Grief also speaks via its themes and imagery of feelings of disconnection to India – Maya’s motherland – through colonialism. It’s a pertinent time for Bristol to explore such ideas, as Maya explained during an enlightening chat this month. Grief is still a taboo because we’re not comfortable with our own pain. It’s almost as if we fear that once we open the floodgates, we’ll never be able to close them again, or we’ll lose our sense of identity. When we look around, there are so many examples of people doing everything but sitting with their pain. From using substances to cope, to overworking or shopping, avoidance is rife. We see it in the difficulties we have in approaching someone who is grieving; we’re not taught how to support them but instead encouraged to avoid the subject or pretend that everything is okay. When someone is crying we often offer them a tissue, as if we’re saying ‘I need you to stop crying because your sorrow is triggering my own pain.’ The irony is that when we do sit with our pain, we start to truly heal. We can channel grief into a more positive power by simply allowing it to be what it is without trying to block it. Grief has a natural flow, and once it is experienced, it does ease. It isn’t some horrible, nasty enemy but rather our body’s healthy and natural coping process. When we become more comfortable with allowing it within ourselves and sharing our pain with others, we allow them to experience their own grief. We normalise and welcome it. That in itself is an incredibly healing and transformative process which I believe would have a hugely positive impact on our society. The main thing I have learned about colonial grief is that the past can never be buried forever, and that if a history of oppression is hidden, grief inevitably turns into fury. I feel like that’s what we were witnessing over the past few months in Bristol; a long-held, bubbling grief that could no longer be contained by the descendants of oppressed and historically enslaved communities. I can only speak from what I’ve observed and what I know as an Indian person, but it seems that people from the Black communities in Bristol not only carry the grief of their ancestors who suffered at the hands of colonialism, but they don’t often have the safety or space to truly heal because, sadly, racism and ignorance is still rife. I have seen positive, tangible change in the way we tackle this since the statue toppling. For a start, we’re all talking about it now. The fury and grief is out in the open, and this is the first step to healing as we can’t heal what we can’t see. The most oppressed communities have started to be heard, and even though it will take time, I can already see those around me becoming more open to our shared history and how the impact of British colonialism still affects Black and Brown communities daily. It has been incredibly healing and affirming to be able to express the parts of myself which I’d long-hidden for fear of them not being accepted, and to have people truly hear my deep pain. Often, authentic acknowledgment is all it takes to catalyse healing.

I wish for my readers to allow their grief to transform them, and for the book to be their guide. I want them to know if they allow grief to overcome them, it can be an incredibly healing and empowering process rather than something to be frightened of. There are so many beautiful lessons to be found in grieving that our society overlooks. 28 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Grief includes fury, shame, sorrow, despair, and all the ‘ugly’ emotions that we’re taught are unacceptable, and this is entirely normal. Through misogyny and racism, we lose so much of our personal freedom, human rights and authentic self-expression. These are real, tangible things that we grieve for. For example, both misogyny and racism contributed to my development of body dysmorphia. I often grieve the confident girl I could have been had I not encountered these toxic systems which are in-built into the fabric of our society. I also believe that men and male-identifying people have just as much to grieve from misogyny as it can take away the empathic, receptive and nurturing sides of themselves – often connected with the feminine. How we deal with environmental grief is a poignant question, as huge wildfires ravage North America and so many people around the world are experiencing this kind of grief. It is completely normal as we are witnessing the Earth (our provider) undergo unrecognisable shifts, and things will never look the same again. I would encourage people to grieve for it the same way as they would a human or animal as we’re all inextricably connected to the Earth, and to share this grief with others as, chances are, they’re feeling it too. Once this grief is released and shared, it is unblocked, and creative solutions can flow through. I’ve always experienced Bristol as a creative, self-expressive and pretty progressive city, and the people I have met have encouraged me to be completely myself. I have a very intense side to my personality which is reflected in my poetry, and just knowing that this intensity is not only welcomed but genuinely appreciated by those around me has encouraged me to share pieces I might not have otherwise, for fear of being ‘too much’. With grief still a taboo topic I needed this validation. I spent years in the mental health field where a lot of people I worked alongside were incredibly supportive of my writing. Seeing the young people I worked with pursue their creative dreams also inspired me; in fact, the book came about because of a pact I made with a young illustrator I supported at work. I also met my partner through a Sacred Poetry group in Easton which was recommended by a writer friend, and he has been so supportive of my creative endeavours. I believe the theme of grief will continue for many of us. For reading around this I would recommend The Wild Edge of Sorrow: Rituals of Renewal and the Sacred Work of Grief by Francis Weller; an extraordinary book about all kinds of grief, and returning to indigenous, ritualistic ways of healing which many of our ancestors used to use. I also loved Untamed by Glennon Doyle, which deals with misogyny, racism and grief in a poignant, eye-opening yet hilarious way. Both books had me in tears! ■ • Half Woman, Half Grief, is out on 31 October; mayakalaria.com


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FOOD & DRINK TASTY TIDBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

A WELL-DESERVED WIN

The picturesque pub’s new owners are chuffed with the win

The Rising Sun in Pensford has been named Britain’s best beer garden by radio station Union JACK. Owned by St Austell Brewery, the watering hole is renowned for its idyllic setting, large riverside garden and views over Pensford viaduct and weir. Run by Lisa Faulkner and Becca Fricker since 2019, it received almost a fifth of the public’s votes and held a day of live radio broadcasts which saw Union JACK airing some of its flagship shows from the beer garden. Entertainment included the 'Not-In-A-Pub Pub Quiz', hosted by renowned TV quizzer Mark ‘The Beast’ Labbett from ITV’s The Chase. “We feel honoured,” said Lisa Faulkner. “Thank you to the Union JACK team and everybody who took the time to vote for us. Our beer garden has a stunning backdrop, so we feel lucky to operate a pub in such a beautiful location. We currently have an outdoor bar too, ensuring all social distancing rules can be adhered to, while our guests soak up the views.” • Instagram: @risingsunpensford

LESSONS FROM LOCKDOWN The Community Farm has curated a collection of 15 articles on how the pandemic has affected people involved with food, wildlife, economies and social outreach in the local area, with a view to exploring what the pandemic exposed about our food system and the systems it intersects. The business and personnel strategies, focus group results, personal experiences and market analysis will help food-based organisations to thrive now and in the event of a future lockdown. Insights and lingering questions are identified that should help smaller, independent players navigate this exceptional period of socio-economic upheaval. Contributors include employees and volunteers affiliated with the Soil Association, Feed Bristol, Better Food, Going For Gold Bristol, EcoWild, Poco Tapas Bar and The Community Farm. Its MD, Kim Brooks, investigated the strengths and weaknesses of the UK’s food supply chains. “I’m so thankful to this diverse group of people for taking the time to collect their thoughts and create this time capsule,” said Kim. “It provides great insight into not only the impact of the pandemic, but our daily choices as ‘investors’ in our food system. Now we have an opportunity to learn from this time.” Download a free PDF of the article collection from the farm website below.

The farm’s learnings are intended to help food-based organisations thrive in the event of a future lockdown

• thecommunityfarm.co.uk/?p=6018

GUTEN TAG, KLOSTERHAUS!

The Quakers Friars building has a dazzling interior

D&D London’s Cabot Circus restaurant Klosterhaus opens on 2 October within the 18th-century Grade-1 Quakers Friars building. The menu has been developed by executive head chef Bjoern Wassmuth and head chef Rhys Grayson and includes Mittel-European classics and German favourites. The restaurant, bar and outdoor terraces pay homage to the dining scene of grand Mittel-European cafes. The slick interior, featuring an island bar centrepiece, is the creation of the award-winning Design LSM and features artwork inspired by the Bristol-Hannover connection, mixing the earthy tones of early industrial imagery with the rich colours of Renaissance and Old Masters portraits. Expect the savoury likes of soused herring, venison ‘Baden Baden’ and mouth-watering schnitzels. Desserts include twice-baked cheesecake, warm apple strudel, Black Forest gâteau and Sacher torte. Chefs have worked closely with local suppliers to source produce such as beef from Meat Box and fish from Wings of St Mawes. • klosterhaus.co.uk

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Richard is unapologetic about striving for quality and value: “You should never have even one disappointing bottle in your basket. “

Richard, Susan and Aidan

The new shop in Princess Victoria Street

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Leaders of libation During such challenging times for Bristol’s independent businesses, it’s heartening to hear of local successes and, DBM Wines, which has just expanded after enjoying a roaring delivery trade during lockdown, is one of those avis Bell & McCraith (DBM Wines) was established in 2009 by three wine professionals who had each spent over 30 years working in wine. Having worked for some of the largest wine companies, Richard Davis, Aidan Bell and Susan McCraith MW – one of only 300 Masters of Wine in the world – had a clear idea of what they wanted to do, as well as what not to do. The mission from day one was to provide a place where you could buy your wine from people who know their stuff, but aren’t stuffy about it. Instead of overwhelming with a huge number of different wines, they would use their experience to sort the wheat from the chaff and identify real value for money without compromising quality. The business began its life at Leigh Court, a Georgian mansion just to the south of Bristol, later moving to a shop and offices in Clifton Village, and has now moved to its large new shop in Princess Victoria Street. At it recent launch, we took the opportunity to mine the expertise of Richard Davis.

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you add a passion for really nice wines to that, it’s infectious and attracts like-minded customers. Over time, it has become the DNA of the business. If you have the best team, the rest is easy.

TBM: How did Bristol’s drinking habits change during lockdown?

We love accessible wines that taste just like the posh stuff. Any tips?

Richard: I’m pleased to say that our existing customers stocked up on great deals during lockdown as we were able to pass on some great bin-ends. People are enjoying more wine at home and having it delivered, but that is partly because supermarket shopping is not a pleasure at the moment and people are probably just compensating for the fact we’re eating out less and not going to the pub on the way home. Thankfully we have picked up hundreds of new customers in Bristol who want to have home-delivered wine.

Top European estates have purchased property in the New World to expand, and use their skills to make excellent wines that are much less expensive than their better known cousins. The Barons de Rothschild (Lafite) Chile and Argentina domaines are a great example.

How have your own changed? I’d like to say that I have become a saint and eschewed all vices, but sadly that’s not true. We’ve been working flat-out as an essential business throughout the pandemic, so when I get home, I really need a glass of wine or two – although I have banned biscuits in the office in an attempt to keep trim. At the start of lockdown we managed to launch a new website in just 10 days with the help of our IT company Evergreen. We focused on online/email and phone and managed to offer next-day delivery in Bristol and the UK throughout, which was hugely popular. It was lovely – we had people ringing us saying “I’ve just seen your van delivering to my neighbour, can you deliver to me?” which, of course, we could and still do. Looking back now, I’m surprised I managed to stay so measured in my wine consumption. What are your recommended wines for autumn/winter 2020? Something rich and warming, but interesting. I am frequently buying a fantastic Chardonnay from Ktima Gerovassiliou. It tastes like a really decent white Burgundy but is less than half the price, as it comes from Greece. My go-to red at the moment is Aruma Malbec from Argentina. This one is rich, subtle and super smooth, having been made by the Rothschild winemaking team. What gives you the edge over other indie wine businesses? Good people. I’m lucky to work with a great team who share an ethos of kindness and generosity which makes life a pleasure at work. When

Do you think the wine world is succeeding in becoming less elitist? Somewhat. We have consciously tried to show ourselves as open and accessible to all since we started, and I think we have succeeded. We have laid out our new shop to consciously put customers at ease. The front features all the everyday wines and great offers, so you can grab a bottle for the evening easily. Further back, the layout is by region where you can explore a greater range and the treasures an area has to offer. Generally, I think people are often sold unexciting, dull wines that are not worth the money, by enticing adverts, so I am not apologetic about striving for quality and value. You should never have even one disappointing bottle in your basket.

What’s exciting in the world of French wine? What’s your go-to? New young talent is coming through, making fantastic wine in classic areas and lesser known appellations as well. They are vibrant, exciting wines made by passionate, highly skilled teams who are shaking things up. Frederic and Cecile Gueguen (a young couple with a new domaine in Chablis) are one of my favourites at the moment, not only making great Chablis, but reviving old varieties like Sacy, and Aligote that are just delicious. Tell us about the community in Clifton Clifton is an amazing place, and there are great people doing lots of marvellous work behind the scenes to support businesses and the community. As chairman of the Clifton Village Business Improvement District I get to work with other business owners to promote the village. Recently the BID purchased 15 beautiful planters made from recycled plastic to provide safe areas for food businesses to use outside space. As a company we have helped the University of Bristol with their production of hand sanitiser for key workers by providing sturdy boxes for distribution. We’ve also been providing packaging for a local food bank. Why is it key for a business to embed in the community it serves? It’s in the word ‘community’. If everyone gives a little and helps out others when they can, then that goodwill feeds the community and everyone benefits. Clifton is great at that. It does mean popping out for a pint of milk can take a long time, as you can end up chatting to numerous residents, business owners and customers on the way! ■ • dbmwines.co.uk THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Real food; virtual setting It’s not unusual to hear business owners talking about the sustainability of their company and their responsible approach to its workings, but this can come across as a politically correct chant. Not so with Charlie Bigham, whose love of the environment and his community is clear in every decision he makes, discovers Emma Clegg

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harlie Bigham is very modest about his food expertise, surprisingly considering the success of his business, which he set up in 1996 with the aim of creating really delicious, top-quality dishes. “I’m a cook not a chef,” Charlie tells me. “I would be hopeless in a restaurant, however I have cooked for a long time and I’ve picked up a few skills on the kitchen front over the years.” His meals are freshly cooked and packaged ready to prepare in the oven or on the hob. While convenient, these are not ready meals, he is at pains to emphasise: “Why compromise by putting things in the microwave and settling for something that doesn’t taste so nice? We just make nice food – that’s our objective. “Our consumers write into us all the time,” Charlie explains, “and say, ‘I never buy ready meals, I love cooking, most days I cook from scratch myself, but every now and again I just want a night off and your food is home-cooked and it’s really tasty.” It all started with Charlie leaving his job and taking time off in 1995 to travel to India. Captivated by the tastes, colours, textures and aromas of the cuisine, he decided to set up a food business. After perfecting three dishes in his home kitchen – Caribbean lamb,

Cajun chicken and salmon with a dill sauce – he went knocking on doors and managed to find some upmarket London food shops who were up for stocking him. Then Waitrose were interested. Then Sainsbury’s and Tesco. Another element that makes Bigham’s meals so distinctive is the wooden packaging. “Long before David Attenborough did the commendable job of bringing plastic packaging to the forefront of everybody’s minds, we knew plastic was not right and wanted to avoid it as much as possible.” The food parcels certainly stand out on the supermarket shelves as being different. “Most people decide what to buy in a nano-second, and so our packaging sends a signal to consumers that maybe we are a bit different,” says Charlie. Bigham’s has two kitchens, one in North London and the other near Wells, where Charlie lives. Here the meals are prepared at Quarry Kitchen, in a former quarry in

Two of Charlie Bigham’s meals with their distinctive packaging

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Dulcote. Quarry Kitchen was named RIBA’s South West Building of the Year in 2018, for its technological functionality and environmental transformation of a disused landscape, and in June this year, more than 900 solar panels were installed. “It’s quite a big quarry, about 20 acres of hole in the ground,” says Bigham, and we’re surrounded on most sides by 120-foot cliffs. We have peregrine falcons flying around and badgers foraging and 20 acres of wildflower meadow outside our door. It’s a pretty unusual location. It makes a difference; if you’re making a high-quality product, start with a high-quality environment. We make some of our best-selling dishes here including our fish pie and chicken tikka masala. Because of their ready supermarket channels, the business kept on operating successfully in lockdown: “We are a bit of light relief and we have appealed to consumers who perhaps haven’t heard of us or used us before,” says Charlie. “So there have been positives, but I would far rather it hadn’t happened.” Charlie talks of the many artisan producers who have had their business taken away since the period of lockdown, but reflects that some food outlets have benefitted: “Some small retailers and producers have had quite a busy time. We don’t have enough diversity in the whole way our food market works so if it’s made this a bit better that’s something to celebrate.” Charlie is a man of ethics – he cares about the environment and about his close community, and this philosophy and sense of responsiblity runs strongly through the mechanics of the business. “I have always had a view that business has an important role to play in society – it’s there to make a profit and provide employment, but businesses should be responsible players in society, so we want to have a positive impact on the world, whether that’s from an


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FOOD & DRINK

The Quarry Kitchen in Wells is sited in Dulcote Quarry and in 2018 was named RIBA’s South West Building of the Year

environmental point of view or by engaging with the local community.” The company’s community involvement is ever-present. Since the Quarry Kitchen opened in 2017, Bigham’s has employed more than 300 people locally and contributes to a number of local initiatives, including the Cheddar Valley Food Bank, Wells SOUP and Wells Carnival. Bigham’s also hand-delivered 1,500 lasagnes to its neighbours during the height of lockdown, to spread a little comfort and warmth among those living nearby.

Ticket holders can cook alongside top chefs Mark Hix and Thomasina Miers Another collaboration saw them working with The Swan in Wells in August, providing free meals for the Eat Out To Help Out scheme – with a donation from sales made to mental health charity Heads Up, which they have started supporting. Wells Food Festival is now in its eighth year and has made a name for itself as one of the busiest and most successful food festivals in the UK. Charlie Bigham’s has supported the festival for four years, but this year the company has become the headline sponsor, with the plan of helping the festival reach another level. While the physical festival has sadly been cancelled, on the calendar instead is a virtual two-day food event. “It was obvious quite a few months ago that holding the festival in its normal physical guise could be a challenge, so we thought, ‘well are we going to let that defeat us or should we have a plan to run a standalone virtual festival?’.

“I haven’t come across another festival quite like ours, so we are sticking our necks out, but early signs have been really encouraging. There are a lot of small artisan producers who have had a really, really tough time over the last few months, because they haven’t been able to go to their normal markets to sell their produce.” The virtual festival is already live and visitors are now able to peruse the wares, with orders being generated online. The website brings all the enthusiasm of the outdoor food market to the screen, with a charming image by illustrator Emily Sutton showcasing the different parts of the festival: the artisan food market, liquid refreshments in Brewed, Chilled and Distilled, music on the bandstand, competition corner, the story of Wells, and tent talks. “It’s all an experiment,” says Charlie, “but it’s really exciting – normally it’s a local event, so people come from the region, and not much further afield. But once you go online your potential audience increases.” There are around 150 producers involved

and many of them are new to the festival. They include the Incredible Brewing Company from Bristol and The H’eggs Company, Bath Culture House and the Wild Flour Cake Co. from Bath. At the heart of the festival’s food programme is the Bigham’s Banquet – a live streamed ‘cook-along’ where ticket holders can cook alongside top chefs Mark Hix, Thomasina Miers, Henry Harris and Merlin Labron-Johnson, as well as Bigham’s head chef Rupert Willday. The event will be hosted by food critic and MasterChef judge William Sitwell and Charlie Bigham himself. Limited to 1,000 places, tickets for the banquet on 10 October (6-9pm) cost £20, with all proceeds going to Chefs in Schools – a charity working to transform food in primary schools across the country. In advance of the cook-along, participants will receive a Bigham’s goodie bag containing an apron, a Wells Food Festival tea towel, a banquet recipe booklet, plus a voucher for a free Bigham’s dish of their choice. At-home festival-goers can also sign-up to further cookery masterclasses and talks by Charlie and his team of master chefs, flower arranging with Georgie Newby, artisan florist and flower farmer at Common Farm Flowers, ‘no dig’ gardening tips by Charles Dowding, as well as music by the Harlem Rhythm Cats and a photography competition. The site proclaims, “Let’s make 2020 the year we fill our baskets with the very best produce, made by the small, most passionate businesses who make our country the home of fantastic food.” The baskets are virtual, but the food is real. Go along and soak up the atmosphere without leaving home. n • Wells Food Festival with Charlie Bigham’s, 10 & 11 October, free to attend. To book a place at the Bigham’s Banquet visit wellsfoodfestival.bighams.com

The opening page of the Wells Food Festival’s website uses this characterful illustration by Emily Sutton, who also creates illustrations for Charlie Bigham’s packaging THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK 2020 | 2010 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 35 | OCTOBER THEBATHMAG.CO.UK 51 | january | TheBATHMagazine


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BRISTOL UPDATES NEWS FROM LOCAL BUSINESSES AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS

Simon’s travel bags are a hit at Silverstone

RACING’S HEART

NOW OPEN IN CLIFTON VILLAGE Luxury aesthetic and wellness clinic The Fountain Medispa has just opened in the centre of Clifton Village, offering highly trained practitioners, a cruelty-free, ethical focus and, in the boutique, premium skincare brands, cult makeup collections and niche beauty products. The team makes a point of watching out for the latest and most innovative brands to make sure they are a go-to spot to find the best in the industry. Masseuses are experts in reflexology, aromatherapy, hot stone and sports rehabilitation treatments, among other specialist body treatments including full-body exfoliations and wraps to sumptuously nourish and revive skin. Every month one of the therapists creates a signature treatment that incorporates carefully crafted scents, products and techniques for a unique spa experience. Appointments for these signature treatments are limited and are in high demand, so be sure to keep an eye on them via social media for chances to snap up one of the coveted experiences. • thefountainmedispa.co.uk

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Bristol craftsman Simon Jordan has been celebrating legends of motorsports lately, while raising money for charity with the launch of his two new leather duffle bags. The Champions of Monaco and Jim Clark bags, using highquality hides from Bridge of Weir Scottish Leather Group – one of Europe’s oldest tanneries and world-renowned in the automotive industry – are a tribute to Formula One’s Sir Jackie Stewart OBE and Jim Clark OBE. Each one sold has raised funds for Sir Jackie Stewart’s Race Against Dementia and The Jim Clark Trust. Simon Jordan, who started his automotive career as a restorer of British sportscars, has designed fine leather goods for over 15 years, with private clients including many heroes of motorsport. His company, Jordan Bespoke, supplies corporate clients including Aston Martin, Bentley, Jaguar and McLaren. The travel bags feature a striking interior lining and genuine automotive seatbelt webbing for handles and straps, with the Champions of Monaco bag, made to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Monaco Grand Prix, also displaying original photographs of past winners in its lining. “I’ve used a Simon Jordan bag for many years and was delighted when he suggested creating a unique product to support my Race Against Dementia charity,” Sir Jackie Stewart said recently. “Dementia is a cruel disease that will affect many of our lives – it is my aim to ensure we do all we can to beat the disease and ease the lives of those who suffer from it.” The Jim Clark bag, meanwhile, celebrates one of motorsport’s most gifted talents – tragically killed in a wet Formula 2 race in 1968 at Hockenheim – with a colour scheme reflecting his famous blue and white peaked helmet and styling including the racing hero’s signature, plus black and white Formula One images. “Every product has a part of my heart and soul within it, especially when it is motorsport related, but working with a hero like Sir Jackie to help the Race Against Dementia, and The Jim Clark Trust, takes that to another level,” Simon said. “My father suffers with dementia and I know how destructive it is. Playing a small part in the fight against the disease is very important to me and many others around the world.” Sir Jackie has used a Simon Jordan bag for years • jordanbespoke.com


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THE WORKPLACE

Richard looks forward to the day that the table tennis corner can come out of retirement but until then it’s all about adapting

The times, they are a-changing

There’s a lot of talk about the 15-minute city, post-Covid, and where the office now sits in the new world order. Placemaker Richard Pearce, CEO of TCN UK – regenerating unloved buildings since 2006 – talks city centres, regional hubs and how the pandemic has accelerated the uptake of positive workplace and wellbeing trends

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ground floor office suite in Bristol, owned by Robert Hitchins Ltd, was brought to market by Colliers recently – emphasising attractive pluses such as cycle storage and showers, because these are the increasingly important must-haves of the post-Covid era. Commuters – some reluctant to use public transport – now need a range of options and alternatives offered to them and the 1,528 sq ft suite at the PS21 building at 21 Prince Street, next to Queen Square, would come, we were told, with two basement parking spaces as well as providing amenities for those biking it in. It got us thinking about offices and their place in society, and chatting to TCN’s Richard Pearce – CEO, chartered surveyor and creative-minded placemaker – who has been ahead of the curve, but pondering the same thing.

Profound potential implications

“In March, we wondered: where the hell is this going to go? Are people ever going to go back into an office?” Richard admits, about the potential implications of the pandemic. “In the early days it felt properly profound. Then – as ever – human nature prevailed and we realised that everyone wants to come together and, yes, Zoom and Teams are brilliant for certain aspects of life but for other bits it doesn’t come close. So now we are seeing people adjust what they’re doing. We’re starting to find our feet.” 38 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Richard’s team have been busy helping businesses they host to adapt as they work out how they’re going to get back into the office. “We’ve created the distance; our community/collaborative areas are a dull version of their former self at the moment, with table tennis tables parked up and no beers after work, but they’re still being used for socially distanced meetings. People bring their own cups and oneway systems are key. Everyone’s very respectful of each other and helping each other out – I think that’s been quite heartening across the board. We’re missing the good old office booze-up on Thursday night but the fun stuff will come back. We just have to endure this period to get back to those sunny uplands.”

The joy of old buildings with character and soul is they’ve normally got a lot of ways in and out, windows that open and close and good old-fashioned things like that which suddenly are really important


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THE WORKPLACE

Different features to the fore

TCN’s portfolio is a picture of beautifully regenerated old buildings that have had new life jazzily injected into every corridor. “The joy of these old buildings with character and soul is they’ve normally got a lot of ways in and out, lots of space, nooks and crannies for people to keep out of each other’s way, windows that open and close and good old-fashioned things like that, which suddenly are really important. We don’t do tall multi-storey buildings, we’re not fans of skyscrapers, so the majority of people can use the stairs and don’t have to queue at lifts. It’s about simple buildings that don’t cost a fortune for people to work in and be inspired by.” It’s interesting how different features are coming to the fore; it might not have mattered how many entrances an office building had before but now it’s really quite a plus point. At Temple Studios in Bristol, a lot of the ground-floor units have got their own front door – something that’s become more valuable as workers prioritise getting in safely and controlling their own environment. “We’ve never been massive champions of coworking,” says Richard; “we tried it but we like everyone having their own offices so they can make them their own with their culture and identity as a business, then come out and use the shared areas when they want to get together or collaborate. They know we’ll get them to their door safely with our one-way systems, sanitisers and minimised touch points, then they control who comes and goes.” First and foremost, the modern office, as we move ahead, needs to both facilitate safety and be affordable. It’s not about layering on lots of services that you’re trying to make a profit from – bells and whistles such as expensive photocopying – it’s about providing a platform that engenders business growth, in slightly more soulful, spacious buildings.

We get them to their door safely with oneway systems, sanitisers and minimised touch points, then they control who comes and goes Al-desko, alfresco

In Brixton, for example, Piano House – TCN’s imposing converted Victorian warehouse – has an open glass atrium and a roof terrace; at Bristol’s Temple 1852 there are picnic benches stationed in an alfresco suntrap, overlooking street art and next to Temple Meads train station. It’s about refraining from overdeveloping sites, so there’s always space to breathe and move around. “This is all wellness and lifestyle stuff that people want anyway, and something we’ve championed – as much outdoor space as we can get, and buildings in locations near places like Hart’s Bakery! We’re in this human business and Covid has just accelerated and accentuated what people have always wanted. If you look at the more mainstream institutional industries – people being forced to sit in desks in rows inside, staring at screens – well, that’s been a nightmare for years but no-one’s had any choice because of the old traditions: if you get a ‘day off’ to work from home you’re very lucky and don’t expect it too often, you know? But Google, Facebook, Twitter have been doing flexible working for 20 years – you get a big freelance team when you’re on a project, smaller when you’re not, so flexibility in these industries has always been paramount.” You do imagine working on a roof terrace to be inspiring. “It’s a wonderful place to come up with ideas and solve problems. Bike racks have been a big thing for us for a while; we put a big one in Temple Studios a year or two ago. At the time, investors were like: ‘You’re giving over all the inside space to bikes? They don’t pay any rent!’ But it’s for the greater good. This is a scheme we want people to subscribe to, it’s lifestyle, a feel-good factor, another reason to come to us. Covid has brought this – what was starting to happen as a trend – into sharp focus, and put it in the mainstream so every employer’s saying it now.”

mad, says Richard. “It was miles from the West End. They said; who on Earth is going to rent offices in Brixton? And we thought; a lot of people because there’s a cool culture. You don’t need to go to the West End to sit outside a restaurant. Do it locally. That’s always been part of our DNA. Norwich’s Fuel Studios is a classic example. When we were buying it, the valuers said the value would be hit because it’s not in the ‘office location’ or CBD – central business district. This huge, beautiful building was not worth what it could be.

Live locally, work locally, support your community. That’s more important than which type of Porsche you drive or how many hours you can do, as per the ’80s culture “It’s in the Lanes, the lovely part of Norwich with the barber shop and producers and cocktail bars, and they were telling us that was worse than being out on a business park where all the other offices are. There’s been that mentality for years – but when I finish work I want to go for a drink and a high five. It’s all part of the lifestyle, and obviously there’s the environmental angle to it too which is very important.” Central is the mantra: live locally, work locally, support your community. “That’s whats life’s about,” says Richard. “That’s more important than which type of Porsche you drive or how many hours you can do, as per the ’80s culture. Local is our Future: Steps to an Economics of Happiness is a great book that came out pre-Covid, about how you can work and enjoy being within a community.” So, will it all completely push out into boroughs and local economies, as some have suggested? “I think there’ll be a revival of some of areas through people working near home but there’ll still be a place for the city centre. The days are over of trains packed with people piling into the middle of London every day. You might work two days a week in Balham, buy your lunch off a local, then two or three days at head office with the team, going for dinner in the West End. It’s that balance which you can then play out into London versus the regions; great cities that are within reach of London. Norwich, Bristol; regional hubs where you can have an office for 15% of the London cost, attract great staff who appreciate cheaper housing, good schools, getting to the beach on weekends, and when you’ve got the client presentation you jump on a train and an hour or so later you’re in the capital.” Bristol, he’s found, has been at the forefront of all these positive new trends. “The cycling, the local, the pride in being a Bristolian and championing local causes it’s always been very strong on. That’s why so many people want to live here and it gets great retention from its universities and it’s a wonderful place to work and live – a good example of the 15-minute city in action and a template for where a lot of cities will get to over time, accelerated by this pandemic.” ■ • tcnuk.co.uk The suntrap at Temple 1852, Bristol – this city is a good template for where many will get to over time

The 15-minute city, a world away from Wall Street

When TCN bought Piano House in 2006, everyone thought they were

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BRISTOL UPDATES NEWS FROM LOCAL BUSINESSES AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS Emily has worked in London and New York as an interior designer and stylist and is now based in Bristol with her prop business

HERE TO PROP YOU UP

Image: Jon Day

Bristol-based interior designer and stylist Emily Rickard and her team have recently opened a boutique online prop supply company servicing the photographic industry. Having worked extensively in London and New York as an interior designer and stylist on commercial photo shoots, Emily recently spotted a gap in the market for the supply of props for shoots in her industry. Aimed primarily at photo shoots for cookbooks, food, interiors and still life, Bristol Prop Merchants offers set walls, backdrops, fabrics, lighting, tabletop items and unique furniture objects for hire. As more shoots are happening outside of London, this service is perfect for smaller interior shoots, local location shoots or test shoots in Bristol and the surrounding area. To see a selection of unique items, follow on Instagram @bristolpropmerchants or visit the Facebook page for more information. Interior design, photography and styling students receive 10% off the retail price, as do photo shoots taking place in either Paintworks or The Forge. For a full inventory and price list or rental enquiries contact bristolpropmerchants@gmail.com • facebook.com/bristolpropmerchants

NEW AT THE BOTTLE YARD Laura Aviles has been appointed senior film manager at Bristol Film Office and The Bottle Yard Studios – which has confirmed its first Netflix booking The Last Bus, and was recently awarded the prestigious Sir Ambrose Fleming Memorial Award. Laura will oversee delivery of Bristol’s filming strategy, promoting the city as an outstanding filming location with a complete and consistent offer encompassing studio filming and logistical support. “Having built my production career in Bristol producing content for many different commissioners and channels, I’ve worked with and witnessed the skills and professionalism of Bristol crew and facilities companies firsthand,” says Laura. “My focus is firmly on ensuring that as a unified film team we can continue to build on past successes.” In line to film at The Bottle Yard is Emily Mortimer’s BBC One adaptation of Nancy Mitford’s novel The Pursuit Of Love starring Lily James, Dominic West, Emily Beecham and Andrew Scott, which has begun filming in the Bristol and Bath area. • thebottleyard.com

TAKING BIDS Machine Bidder, which offers an online auction platform to various clients including finance companies, banks, liquidators, and engineering companies, for the sale of industrial assets, is hosting an online auction sale due to the closure of a business in Walton. Machine Bidder staff have a wealth of knowledge within the capital equipment business, specifically machine

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tools, sheet and fabrication equipment, hydraulic and mechanical presses, gearcutting, overhead cranes and compressors and assist clients in making the right decisions when they are considering selling equipment. They also have a private treaty sale (by negotiation) with the same company, RHG Stone Engineering, for key equipment on site. The auction closes on the 8 October. • machinebidder.com

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A production specialist with more than 25 years’ industry experience, Laura will oversee delivery of Bristol City Council's filming strategy


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397 Lots, including: CNC EQUIPMENT: YAMAZAKI Slant Turn 25 Universal 1500. XYZ 4000 CNC Turret Mill with Proto Trak AGE 3 Axis. DRILLING: QUALTERS & SMITH Model R3 Radial Arm. RICHMOND SR2 Radial Arm. ELLIOTT Pillar Drill. GRINDING: SNOW 72” x 15” Vertical Spindle Surface Grinding Machine. DORMER ZBM80 Drill Point Grinder. LATHES: DEAN SMITH & GRACE SB 1810 x 72” Hardsgyde Straight Bed. COLCHESTER Triumph 2000 x 30” Gap Bed. COLCHESTER Triumph 2000 x 50” Gap Bed. 2 x HARRISON 12” x 24” Straight Bed. COLCHESTER Bantam 2000. MILLING MACHINES: RAMBAUDI MS3P Horizontal/Vertical Turret Mill with Newall DRO. CINCINNATI Turret Mill with Newall DRO. Rambaudi Versamill 12 Milling Machine with Newall DP700 DRO. SAWING MACHINES: MEBA Eco-line Model 335 DG Horizontal Bandsaw. RUSCH Horizontal Bandsaw. TRENNJAEGER ST251 Cold Saw OSMOND Chop Saw with Mitreing. WICKSTEED Power Hack Saw. SPEEDAX 20” Vertical Bandsaw. SLOTTING: SACHMAN SYNCHRON 225mm Slotting Machine. BUTLER 10” Slotting Machine. SHEET METAL: KEETONA Hydroform 2540mm x 3mm Folding Machine. WELDING EQUIPMENT: ESAB LAX320 Mig Welder with ESAB MEK Wire Feed Unit. ESAB LAR500 Mig Welder with ESAB Wire Feed Unit. ESAB LAW 410 Mig Welder. KEMPPI Master TIG MLS 3003AC/DC. KEMPPI FastMig M420. OXY Acetylene Set with Gauges, Hoses & Trolley. INSPECTION: FARO Gage Plus Inspection Arm (2007). Large Selection of Inside/Outside Micrometers MISCELLANEOUS: SWEENEY & BLOCKSIDGE No.8 Flypress. PELLOBY Free Standing Jib Crane 1.6 Ton SWL. Several Jib Cranes. FORKLIFTS: 4 x LANCER BOSS Side Loaders. COMPRESSORS: HYDROVANE Model V11 ACE084035V400 Screw Compressor complete with Air receiver. HYDROVANE 711 Classic Screw Compressor. HYDROVANE 60 Screw Compressor. GENERATOR: DORMAN/STAMFORD Diesel Generator


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CAREERS

Orchard of opportunity Apprenticeships are receiving a little more attention at the moment – but partnering with colleges to offer talent schemes is nothing new for the area’s most famous fourth-generation cidermaker

Possible paths include cidermaking, farming and hospitality

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ver the summer, it was announced by the Prime Minister that every young person in Britain would be guaranteed an apprenticeship as part of the country’s economic recovery. Robert Halfon, chair of the Education Select Committee, who proposed the idea, said the radical measure was a chance to re-establish a ladder of opportunity. For one West Country employer, though, it’s more of an orchard of opportunity. Partnering with colleges to offer talent schemes is not a new thing for the area’s most famous fourth-generation cidermaker, which in 2018 introduced the Thatchers Young Talent Programme down at Myrtle Farm in Sandford, Somerset. A family-run company that, we can all agree, has experienced significant growth over the last 10 years, Thatchers has kept moving forward, looking to recruit additional staff in every department, from cidermaking and farming to hospitality and sales, in line with this growth. However, they’ve found two things – firstly that Thatchers has not been front of mind with school leavers and graduates, and secondly that there has been a distinct lack of knowledge about careers within the food and drink sector and apprenticeships. As a result, relevant apprenticeship applications have been limited. “So,” says Emma Cox, head of field sales, “we decided to take the matter into our own hands, and set off on the journey of creating our own apprenticeship programme to attract the best people and increase our investment into training and development.” Over the Thatchers Young Talent Programme’s first three years, over 30 people have been welcomed onto the scheme, gaining qualifications in a real-life work environment. “But it’s more than that,” says Emma. “You develop the skills, knowledge and behaviours to have a successful career in industry. It is extremely important to train the next generation and as a local employer we wanted to provide career opportunities for local young people who felt that they did not want to go to university but gain valuable experience in a real business with real opportunities.” The key objectives have been to inspire, educate and lead, putting the young people at the heart of the programme and ensuring they 42 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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have all of the skills and knowledge to be able to have a successful career within the food and drink industry. Apprentices undertake mentoring and skills development in three key areas: commercial awareness, employability skills and technical knowledge. They get involved in a host of activities and visits to local businesses, acting as apprentice ambassadors at local school careers fairs and, for some, even filming their own personal case studies for the national apprenticeship Fire It Up campaign. Thatchers worked closely with local schools and colleges to create the programme, resulting in apprenticeships developed for tailored pathway academies to meet their own skills objectives – Cider Academy with Bridgwater and Taunton College; Brand and Chef Academy with Weston College, and Thatchers Sales Academy. As a levy-paying employer, they have used their funds carefully to look at how they can develop the apprenticeship provision to not only increase the skill set of their young talent but also to enhance the development of current employees. “Apprenticeships allow people to earn while they learn, gaining experience that can kickstart their career and support businesses during these uncertain times,” says Tracie Leahy, head of apprenticeship recruitment at Weston College. “I’m delighted businesses are recognising this and we’re seeing more employers contact us as they seek to hire new talent and develop existing. The notion is improved for businesses by the government’s apprenticeship incentive scheme, where employers gain up to £3,000 in government funding by offering an apprenticeship to someone under the age of 25, plus, for 25 and overs, £1,500 incentive funding. Apprenticeships are also a fantastic way of retraining existing staff who may need to take on extra or different responsibilities due to the effect of the pandemic on business.” ■

• Applications for the next intake of Thatchers apprentices open in February 2021 – keep an eye on the website for details; thatcherscider.co.uk. Contact apprenticeships@weston.ac.uk for more on Weston College opportunities.


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EDUCATION NEWS UPDATES FROM THE CITY’S SCHOOLS, COLLEGES AND EDUCATORS

GO BETTY!

Betty’s interest in football began when she started playing for Westbury Park Foxes, aged five

CARBON CRACKDOWN Fairfield High School in Horfield has won a carbon reduction competition against other schools from around the UK. The Schools Carbon Challenge 2020 was created by Powerful Allies Ltd which specialises in 100% renewable energy procurement, to help schools reduce consumption, cost and emissions by making cultural changes, adapting equipment and infrastructure, and setting up energy monitoring portals. Fairfield reduced their carbon consumption by nearly 36% in the space of 12 months, and won the £2,020 prize. “A huge part of a school’s budget goes on keeping the buildings heated and energised,” says Tamsin Whinton, energy manager at Powerful Allies. “Although this is a necessary commodity, we should be

UPS AT THE DOWNS The Downs School is hosting an open day on 7 November, having welcomed its community back at school this term. Laughter has spilled out again from classrooms as the children reconnected with their friends and the school’s 70 acres of outdoor space and woodland has been explored once more. “The success is down to the fantastic teamwork between staff, parents and pupils,” says new headteacher Debbie Isaachsen. “Everyone is working together to ensure the school operates as close to normal as possible.” During lockdown all pupils had remote access to live lessons with their teachers, and assessments took place remotely to ensure individual academic progress. As

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aware of the environmental impact of our usage and take responsibility for reducing it.” Rachel Lacey, finance and premises manager at Fairfield added: “We converted our whole school to LED lighting in 2019 which has been a large contributing factor. Our active eco team are thrilled to see the impact that this, in conjunction with their initiatives and proactivity, has had.” • fairfield.bristol.sch.uk

well as a full curriculum of academic and creative lessons, pupils had group sessions with tutors, the school counsellor, more social time including virtual family quiz nights and fitness challenges which evolved into a ‘race around the world’. Online provision has continued this term and any child who needs to self-isolate has access to work and the school is ready, should a repeat lockdown happen. Pupils’ physical and mental wellbeing is a regular discussion at weekly pastoral care meetings and surveys have already been sent to pupils and staff to see if there is more support the school can offer. Although external sporting fixtures are yet to start, staff have been creative with outdoor pursuit days, park runs and house events to ensure everyone remains fit and healthy. • thedownsschool.co.uk

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Year 13 student Betty Platt, a member of the senior hockey team at Redmaids’, has been selected to play for the Bristol Rovers Women’s FC squad, after attending an open training session earlier this summer. Betty’s interest in football began when she started playing for Westbury Park Foxes aged five. She played for the local team throughout secondary school, and more recently had her first taste of adult football, playing a season for Bristol Ladies Union FC. “I went along to one of their open sessions and after a couple more weeks of attending training sessions, I was asked if I would like to join the team for the coming season – to which, of course, I answered yes!” said Betty, speaking on her recent call-up to Bristol Rovers. “The coaches and girls have been so welcoming and I really feel like part of the team.” Despite lockdown restrictions, Betty managed to keep active and get her football fix from home. “Sport helped me immensely during lockdown. Especially at the beginning, it felt like all structure had been taken out my day, but going out on walks, runs, and practising football skills in the garden provided a sense of routine and definitely helped my mood.” Encouraging more girls and young women to get involved in sport is important to Betty and is something that is engrained in the curriculum at Redmaids’ High. “Not only does sport help to promote a healthy lifestyle, but it is also a great way to socialise and bring people from all areas and backgrounds together. I have made so many friends from all parts of Bristol, and beyond, through playing football, and it’s increasingly easy for girls and women to get involved.” Claire Maggs, director of sport at Redmaids’ High School, said: “Huge congratulations to Betty on her footballing achievement. “She is one of the best goalkeepers we have seen at Redmaids’ High School. It is fantastic to see that all her effort, determination and hard work has paid off." • redmaidshigh.co.uk


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EDUCATION

Season of the new starter Paul Dwyer, the new headteacher at Redmaids’ High School, talks managing energies for a marathon rather than a sprint while navigating a very different sort of school term

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eptember threw far more than the usual sorts of changes and challenges at our city’s schools this year. Guiding Redmaids’ High School through them all has been one of the autumn term’s many new starters, Paul Dwyer, who has just taken the reins from Isabel Tobias as headteacher. With his previous post as deputy head at North London Collegiate, and having completed his undergraduate degree in history and PGCE at Oxford, Mr Dwyer has strong experience in girls’ education and is known for encouraging teachers across the globe to challenge themselves. He regularly speaks at national and international conferences on education, hosts a podcast designed to help teachers reflect on their practice and was president and a founding fellow of the Chartered College of Teaching. But it wasn’t just his impressive CV that bagged him the Bristol job. Groups of students had a chance to talk to the candidates during the process and the nine girls who met Mr Dwyer concluded that he was just the sort of approachable and personable person they’d like to lead the school – respecting tradition while sharing the students’ desire for more sustainable practices within school to address climate change. He acknowledged the importance of supporting lower year groups on their journey towards sixth form, said Tuqa from Year 10, while Phoebe from Year 13 recalled his comments around celebrating the school’s academic success even further. We caught up with Mr Dwyer ourselves to find out a little more about his ethos, and how the first month has been. TBM: So, why Redmaids’ High School? Mr Dwyer: I am a passionate believer in the transformative nature of education for all, and it is clear to see this has been a core aspect of 48 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Redmaids’ High since the beginning. It’s a privilege for me to a part of this community with its combination of strong respect for our heritage and history and forward-facing perspective of what education can and should be. Not many schools can trace their foundations back to 1634 while considering deeply what knowledge and understanding our students will need in 2034. I’m also passionate about girls’ education, the opportunities that it can provide and the role it has to play. I’ve been fortunate to work in some wonderful girls’ schools during my career, and Redmaids’ High is perhaps the most storied and warmest school environment that I’ve had the pleasure to be a part of. This, combined with their firm commitment to outstanding pastoral care, made it an obvious choice for me to apply for when the opportunity arose and I am incredibly grateful for the chance to lead this tremendous school. Bristol is such a beautiful and lively city that is steeped in history; I have very fond memories of time spent here and look forward to creating more with my family. How has the team coped so far with the new challenges of a very different sort of term? We are indebted to all members of our community for helping to make the start of the new academic year as successful as it has been so far. From our support colleagues who have worked tirelessly to ensure the school site is ‘Covid-ready’ to the teachers and students who have all adapted to bubbles and helped us return safely, everyone has had a role to play in getting this year off to a great start. Teachers have had to make adjustments to their approach to ensure that lessons are taught safely while still demonstrating to students the joy to be had in learning, while students are attentive to the changes we have made. Using technology creatively and thinking about the new pathways it can open for great


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teaching and learning has always been a strong part of Redmaids’ High’s approach and so we were well equipped to adapt quickly to the ‘new normal’ of lockdown and to make our safe return to site. How have the children found things so far?

involved and this is the basis of our direction. Letting students run away intellectually and model scholarship to one another while delighting in the possibilities beyond the classroom will always be important for us and I can’t wait to highlight how we plan to build on this in the coming months and years.

I have been so impressed with the maturity and ability to adapt shown by students across all year groups. From Year 7 who have managed the transition into Senior School with aplomb, through to Year 13 who look forward to the exciting opportunities that lie ahead for them, everyone has engaged so well with the new year and been incredibly supportive of one another. They have continued to throw themselves into school life and the sounds of laughter and learning around the site have reminded us of the strength to be found in a community being physically together.

Have you read any brilliant books lately?

What measures have you put in place to help with fostering positive mental health in staff and pupils?

As a history and politics teacher I have always had a tremendous fondness for The West Wing. It’s perhaps a little dated in some respects now (notably the fashion choices of its characters!) but holds up as one of the best TV programmes I’ve seen. My favourite film is less cerebral, but no less witty in my opinion – 10 Things I Hate About You.

We have always tried to ensure an open atmosphere around school, where students and staff feel able to talk about their mental health and the challenges that they face. We pride ourselves on the strength of our pastoral system, where all students have someone they know they are able to talk to, as well as being encouraged to think about proactive strategies for developing positive mental health. Similarly for staff, we have tried to ensure that there is someone they feel able to talk to about the difficulties of our current circumstances and we are working hard to promote an environment where everyone feels seen and noticed. Communities depend on the strength of that individual attention, whether in a colleague dropping by to say hello or the opportunity to share ideas about teaching in a bubble. We haven’t taken this feeling for granted and owe a great deal to all members of our staff for their efforts and support to one another.

The Education of an Idealist by Samantha Power, President Obama’s ambassador to the UN. This is a powerful memoir by an incredible woman, who remains honest about her idealism and desire to make the world a better place, while also recognising the compromises she had to make in a variety of high-profile political positions. What is your favourite film or TV show?

The sounds of laughter and learning around the site have reminded us of the strength to be found in a community being physically together

What’s gone really well?

What is your greatest achievement?

Seeing students still participating in a range of exciting and scholarly lessons, engaging with one another outside of the classroom about what they have enjoyed and found inspiring and how they might continue the conversations has been a real joy for all of us to see!

I’m incredibly proud of my daughter and the person she is fastbecoming, even though she’s still only two. Having the chance to lead the Chartered College of Teaching as president is also something that I will always count as among my most treasured achievements.

What’s been the biggest challenge aside from the logistics of children moving around the site?

What is your favourite memory from your school days?

Not being able to celebrate whole school assemblies or invite parents in to see performances of their daughters, whether on the hockey pitch, in the orchestra or up on stage, has been hard already and will only feel more difficult as the year develops. We hope to return to a greater degree of normalcy before too long, but we also know the likely long-term impact that coronavirus will have. Managing ourselves and our energies for a marathon rather than a sprint will also be something we need to keep in mind.

Not many schools can trace their foundations back to 1634 while considering deeply what knowledge and understanding our students will need in 2034

I am fortunate to have many great memories from my time at school, but one that sticks out is a conversation with my history teacher in Year 12 about university applications and what might be possible for me. It’s not too much of an exaggeration to say that this conversation helped put me on the path that led to my joining Redmaids’ High as head, and has always served as a reminder of the difference that teachers can make for each of our students. ■ • redmaidshigh.co.uk Not being able to invite parents in to see performances, whether on the hockey pitch or in the orchestra, has been hard but students and staff have adapted brilliantly

What exciting plans do you have for this year? We’re building something very special at Redmaids’ High and we look forward to being able to share more about our work very soon. If education is to be transformative it needs to be ambitious for all THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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HEALTH & WELLBEING

Flu jabs and the Covid fight Vaccination saves lives and builds healthy communities. Ade Williams, lead pharmacist at Bedminster Pharmacy, community champion and brilliant ambassador for Bristol, dispels flu jab myths and gives us the lowdown on eligibility

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he West Country produces many illustrious daughters and sons. Vision, enterprise and innovation are commonly shared traits. Edward Jenner, an unassuming, collegiate, countryside physician, is esteemed as an exemplar of this. In 1807, Napoleon Bonaparte, locked in conflict with Britain, released two English prisoners of war at the request of Jenner and permitted their return home, as a gesture of thanks for his work in the field of smallpox vaccination. Napoleon’s now very famous explanation – “What that man asks is not to be refused”, and remark that ‘‘he is one of the greatest benefactors of mankind’’ – encapsulated Jenner’s high esteem. Edward Jenner is the father of immunology, inventing vaccination. The legacy of his work has arguably saved more lives than any other human’s. While we all now await a vaccine, not knowing how the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) will react with others during autumn and winter months, we know that having your flu vaccination is an essential part of our fight against Covid-19 pandemic. Why? A spike in respiratory illness caused by influenza will bring our already stretched health system to a breaking point. We must never forget that flu kills an average of 8,000 people every year in the UK. The UK’s topmost human disease national risk remains a flu pandemic. New and emerging infectious diseases, i.e. Covid-19, were second. Experts agree there is a high probability of another influenza pandemic occurring. It’s impossible to forecast exact timing, but the World Health Organisation estimates that between 2 and 7.4 million deaths may occur globally. Needle phobia – a fear of medical procedures that involve needles or injections – can pose a barrier. It is common, affecting at least one in 10 people, but thankfully surmountable. Many people do not confront this fear because they feel embarrassed and avoid clinical settings, especially vaccination appointments. Don’t be ashamed of being scared of injections; please talk with health professionals about your anxiety. We can offer proven techniques and adapt our approach to helping you overcome this fear. Sadly, the internet, especially social media, has become a cesspool of misinformation and conspiracy stories about vaccine safety. These malicious campaigns seek to play on our healthy democratic values, where minority opinions can be aired, robustly discussed and corrected. They are instead employing manipulation and cynicism to warp the misinformed as bastions of libertarianism. Bristol must stand up to them – our choice will always be to protect the whole community as well as the individual. Some important reminders: the flu jab cannot cause the flu – it is an inactive vaccine that primes your immune response. It does not have 50 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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any live flu virus. It takes up to 14 days after the jab to be fully protected; this explains the usual coincidence, so get your jab early. We need a flu vaccination every year as the antibodies that protect us from flu decline with time and flu strains can also change from year to year. Community pharmacies and GP surgeries, both part of the NHS, use the same vaccines. You can get your free NHS vaccination from either; information will always be shared to update your records. Irrespective of age, if you have an underlying health condition (such as diabetes, chronic heart, kidney, liver, or respiratory disease), are pregnant, work in social care/nursing homes/hospices, are a paid or unpaid carer, or a household contact of immunocompromised persons or persons on the NHS shielded patient list, you are eligible for the free vaccine. This year alongside the usual over 65s category, 50-64 year olds have been added – details of the eligibility criteria are now imminent. GP surgeries and school nurse teams also offer the free NHS flu vaccine for children over the age of six months with a long-term health condition, children aged two and three years on 31 August 2020 (that is, born between 1 September 2016 and 31 August 2018), children in primary school and children in Year Seven (secondary school). Children aged between six months and two years who are eligible for the flu vaccine will receive an injected flu vaccine. Children eligible for the flu vaccine aged between two and 17 will usually have the nasal spray flu vaccine. At war with Britain, Napoleon had all his French troops vaccinated against smallpox and awarded Jenner a medal! Vaccination saves lives and builds healthy communities. Do not delay, get your jab today. ■

• Follow Ade on Twitter: @adewilliamsnhs or @bedminsterpharm


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Signature Experience - October By Anna

Pumpkin Spice Exfoliating Massage

Exfoliating granules are applied to help remove dead skin, drain your lymph nodes and boost your circulation. Allow yourself to let go as the healing hands of our Spa therapist take you on a therapeutic journey where your mind and body transcend, assisted by the healing blends of pure essential oils in combination with gentle nurturing and relaxing Swedish based massage. ÂŁ85. 1 hour 15 minutes

Fountain Medi Spa 1 West Mall, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4BH

Tel: 0117 239 8370 Web: thefountainmedispa.co.uk

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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

“Eliminating gluten cleared up my health issues” Christina Colligan, CNM Graduate in Naturopathic Nutrition

F

rom aged three, I suffered from severe atopic dermatitis. In my teens, I developed asthma. My gut health was compromised, often causing me to be constipated. I saw several doctors and specialists, as well as herbalists and homeopaths. I underwent some blood tests when I was 15 and I discovered that my vitamin and mineral status was low. I removed dairy from my diet and took the supplements that were prescribed by my homeopath. In 1999/2000 I had unexplained weight loss. Then in 2001, I was severely ill and anything I ate gave me diarrhoea. My local GP didn’t know what was wrong with me; however, through my own research, I learnt about gluten intolerance and coeliac disease. I was experiencing the exact same symptoms that presented with these conditions. I eliminated all gluten products for four days and I felt so much better. A blood test later confirmed I had coeliac disease. I was advised to also exclude dairy from my diet for six months to allow my intestines to heal. After doing this, my eczema and asthma

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disappeared and my gut health improved; I also gained weight. After seeing how food impacted my body and affected my symptoms, I developed a keen interest in nutrition. Unfortunately, after many years of compromised absorption, I was left with low cortisol levels and unbalanced gut flora. I only wish I’d met a nutritional therapist after my diagnosis who could have explained the 5R gut healing protocol to me. Simply cutting out gluten is not enough when you are diagnosed with coeliac disease; you also need to heal your gut which has been damaged by the gluten. I used to be a project manager for a large corporate. Starting a family made it impossible for me to continue with my demanding role. Instead, it was an opportunity for me to immerse myself in a big interest of mine and study nutrition. I decided to study Naturopathic Nutrition at the College of Naturopathic Medicine (CNM) as I was attracted by their hands-on approach to learning and the fact that the lectures are taught by experienced practitioners. I loved the variety of teachers and learning about their experiences. The diversity of students in my class was amazing and I was blown away by how generous everyone was in sharing their knowledge and experience. My time at CNM prepared me for setting up my own business and it was a great platform for networking and opportunities. Having recently relocated to Sweden, I now work at the Nordic Clinic in Stockholm three days a week. I see a variety of clients, supporting them with a wide range of ailments including pre-diabetes, autoimmune conditions, IBS, hormonal issues and optimising performance through nutrition. CNM has totally changed my life. I love my work now. I’m passionate about what I do as it feels meaningful and I’m making a difference

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to other people’s lives. I don’t ever see myself stopping work; it’s my way of life now. I love that the learning never stops; every client is unique and I’m continually expanding my knowledge

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GREAT OUTDOORS

Park life The pandemic has raised not only a keener awareness of Bristol’s natural spaces – lifelines for local communities that save the NHS £111 million a year and deserve a higher priority as part of the green recovery programme – but also urgent questions over their future funding. Words and images by Andrew Swift

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ristol’s parks and green spaces have come into their own in recent months. From places where people escaped outdoors for a few precious moments in the early days of lockdown, they have since become busier than ever, full of strolling couples, children playing and socially distanced groups perched on camping chairs, meeting up after long weeks of isolation. But, while many more people have come to appreciate these green oases, they face greater challenges and a more uncertain future than ever before. Maintenance and enhancement of their facilities had already been hit by years of austerity and declining council revenues. The pandemic has raised not only a keener awareness of Bristol’s green spaces, but also urgent questions over their future funding. Most people will, naturally, gravitate to parks and open spaces close to where they live, rarely if ever visiting those further afield. While such places will always be primarily a lifeline and green lung for their local communities, that is no reason why people from across Bristol should not seek out and explore these green spaces hidden within the city’s streets. A few years ago, while planning a book of walks from stations on the Severn Beach Line, I became fascinated by these largely unknown spaces and tried to incorporate as many as I could into each walk, creating a series of green odysseys through the city. My research into their history also threw up many astonishing stories. Some green spaces started out as anything but. In St Werburgh’s, an abandoned railway cutting has been transformed into Narroways Millennium Green, a self-contained haven cut off from the outside world

by steep banks. Netham Park has even less auspicious origins, occupying a site once home to a vast chemical works, while the windswept crags of Troopers Hill owe their character to centuries of quarrying and mining. Most extraordinary, though, and most tragic, is Castle Park, once streets of tightly packed buildings at the city’s historic core, until targeted by the Luftwaffe 80 years ago. Two of Bristol’s most popular open spaces – Royal Fort, owned by the university, and Brandon Hill, the city’s oldest park – were the sites of Civil War forts. They both have fantastic views, as do Victoria Park – originally known as Windmill Hill – and Perrett’s Park, occupying a natural amphitheatre overlooking the city, with a toposcope to help visitors identify landmarks. One of Bristol’s best-loved parks is St George, not least because of its lake, complete with tree-capped island. A serpentine lake can also be found in Eastville Park, gateway to the Frome Valley Walkway. Elsewhere, there are surprises aplenty – Badock’s Wood has a 3,500-year old burial mound, while in St Andrew’s Park is a memorial to the crew of a Wellington bomber that crashed there in 1941. Several parks contain listed buildings, although few are as quirky as the ornate domed urinal in Mina Road Park. Parks have come a long way since the days of manicured lawns, ‘keep off the grass’ signs and elaborate floral displays. And, while there will doubtless be some who – from the comfort of their private gardens – will view parks as an unnecessary extravagance whose time has passed, they are now more vital than ever for our mental and physical health.

The windswept crags of Trooper’s Hill owe their character to centuries of quarrying and mining

Listed urinal in Mina Road Park

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GREAT OUTDOORS Research by Fields in Trust has concluded that the ‘wellbeing value’ associated with the frequent use of parks and green spaces is not only worth £34 billion a year to the UK adult population, but saves the NHS around £111 million a year solely because of a reduction in GP visits. And that’s before adding in the contribution carefully managed green spaces make to reducing pollution in urban areas. The experience of the last few months has, not surprisingly, led to calls for parks and green spaces to be given a higher priority. The Open Spaces Society, Britain’s oldest national conservation body, is campaigning for them to be a central plank of the green recovery programme, with an aim of ensuring that everyone has access to wellmaintained and safe green spaces within 300m of their homes. The Bristol & Bath Parks Foundation, formed in 2018 to encourage volunteering in parks and to obtain grants, public donations and legacies to fund projects, has recently launched the ‘Love Your Park’ campaign to support community groups dedicated to making parks welcoming, free of litter and rich in nature. Groups involved with St George Park and Manor Woods Valley Nature Reserve in Bishopsworth both hope to be awarded grants to improve facilities as a result of this initiative. Over on the slopes of the Avon Gorge, the lost gardens of Bishop’s Knoll, one of most atmospheric places in the city, have already received a grant from the Veolia Environmental Trust to carry out conservation work and clear undergrowth to open up access, while preserving the magic and sense of wildness in this hidden spot. What all these initiatives have in common is that they are not vastly expensive. They are almost entirely small scale, community-led, carried out largely by volunteers and funded by charitable donations. Pound for pound, ploughing money into reinvigorating green spaces in the urban environment will have a profounder and longer-lasting impact than almost anything else. Many of Bristol’s green spaces were only saved from development by concerted action, lengthy court battles and violent struggles over ownership and access. The best known campaign was to stop the destruction and development of the Downs, but St Anne’s Woods,

THE

KI TC HEN PAR TNER S DESIGN STUDIO

Trooper’s Hill, Leigh Woods and many other open spaces were only saved by campaigns by local people. As recently as 1992, Royate Hill, a five-acre nature reserve on the trackbed of a massive railway viaduct in the east of the city, was only saved after residents stood in front of bulldozers brought in to clear the site for housing. Such battles – and victories – in the face of overwhelming odds are worth recalling in these uncertain times, as an inspiration to maintain and enhance their legacy for future generations. ■ • Andrew Swift is the author of Walks from Bristol’s Severn Beach Line, published by akemanpress.com, which features over 50 of Bristol’s parks and green spaces. For more information: parksandgardens.org; bristolparksforum.org.uk; yourpark.org.uk/projects/love-your-park; fieldsintrust.org; woodlandtrust.org.uk/visiting-woods/woods/bishops-knoll

The serpentine lake cof Eastville Park, gateway to the Frome Valley Walkway, c1910

Remote Kitchen Design Service Available Call or email for further details 01179 466433 • studio@thekitchenpartmers.co.uk

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HOMES & INTERIORS | BRISTOL GUIDE 2020

Home comforts As we prepare for the colder seasons and more time indoors, we’ve put together an autumn/winter guide to provide some interior design inspiration for your artistic endevours. Whether you’re looking to upholster an armchair, renovate your kitchen or redesign your living room, our local experts are here to help

MANDARIN STONE

BONITI Dunsdon Barn, West Littleton, Wiltshire SN14 8JA 01225 892200; boniti.com

15 Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4HW 0117 9731552; mandarinstone.com Renowned for its comprehensive natural stone collection, Mandarin Stone has gained quite a reputation for its on-trend and beautifully designed porcelain. Ranging from tiles that cleverly mimic materials such as wood, concrete and marble to striking glazed and patterned tiles, the collection has endless surface design possibilities. Established for over 25 years and with 10 inspirational UK showrooms, it offers dependable specialist knowledge as well as technical expertise. Almost the entire natural stone and porcelain collection is held in stock in the UK, so lead times are short.

Run by Giles and Simon Lunt, Boniti is a high-quality interiors (and exteriors) business, whose showroom is a destination for all types of natural stone, porcelain and timber flooring, as well as decorative tiles, stoneware, Kadai firebowls, garden furniture, homeware accessories and the very desirable Everhot range cookers. Boniti has an impressive client list of property developers and a specialist bespoke service that can supply and fit worldwide. When it comes to any project – both large and small – the Boniti team are masters of their profession and it shows in every detail. You can reach the showroom easily from junction 18 of the M4.

BRACEY INTERIORS 15 Waterloo Street, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4BT; 0117 9734664; braceyinteriors.co.uk With over 50 years’ experience, Bracey Interiors has earned an enviable reputation for its design services. Working throughout the UK and abroad, the team creates unique and bespoke interiors for clients. Within the showroom in the heart of Clifton Village, Bracey showcases fabrics and wallpapers from all the major suppliers as well as a unique and eclectic mix of home accessories. Paints by Little Greene and Paint & Paper Library are also mixed to order in a matter of minutes. No matter how big or small your requirements are, Bracey Interiors has friendly staff ready to help. With their own workrooms they ensure all soft furnishings are made to their exacting standards, and offer an installation service. 2017 saw their Silver House project win three awards in the RSAW Welsh Architecture Awards.

SARAH MILLMORE UPHOLSTERY 42 Eastfield, Westbury on Trym, Bristol BS9 4BE 07970 719929; sarahmillmoreupholstery.co.uk Sarah has been producing hand-made unique furniture for over 25 years, as well as restoring and upcycling existing pieces of furniture. She is trained in both traditional and contemporary upholstery. Her work is inspired by her love of colour, texture and Scandinavian design. She is also passionate about upcycling retro and vintage furniture, adding vibrant colours and bold textures to rejuvenate quirky furnishings. Whether you desire an original product or a transformation of an existing piece of furniture, Sarah provides a bespoke service and offers a wide selection of high-quality designer fabrics.

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HOMES & INTERIORS | BRISTOL GUIDE 2020

PAUL WHITTAKER

D P YOUNG

0117 2230086 / 07879 666221; paulwhittakerbathrooms.co.uk Showroom by appointment at Bathroom Solutions, 54 Redcliff Street, Bristol BS1 6LS

Shires Yard, Bridport, West Dorset 01308 424511; aacornjoinery.co.uk; info@aacornjoinery.co.uk

BATHROOMS AND WETROOMS

Paul Whittaker Bathrooms and Wetrooms is a design, supply and installation bathroom company with a huge reputation in the Bristol area. Working closely with his clients, Paul is able to deliver cleverly designed bathrooms and wetrooms, expertly installed by his experienced team of fitters. With 3D design layouts to help with decision making and project management through the course of the works, Paul Whittaker makes bathroom renovations easy and stress-free.

ACORN JOINERY & DESIGN

Create more space for your family, bring your garden into your home – a relaxing place for dining, working or just hanging out – and add value to your home at the same time. A bespoke solid oak conservatory can do all of the above – and at a price to suit your budget. D P Young is a family business; three generations of craftsmen with over 50 years of experience ensures your conservatory will not only be perfect but also beautiful. Although conservatories are the main thrust of the business there is also a wide range of other bespoke products available for your home; windows, doors, staircases, kitchens, bookcases, cabinets – the list goes on – and all with the option of being crafted in hardwood or softwood. For your garden and driveway, how about a garden office, garden room, guest suite, pool room, workshop, garage or carport? The only limit is your imagination. Projects crafted in their Dorset workshops, delivered and installed all over the country.

IH INTERIORS Bromley Heath Road, Bristol, BS16 6HU 07740 212617; ihinteriors.co.uk

HONEYCOMB INTERIORS Unit B5, BV Studio’s 37 Philip Street, Bristol, BS3 4EA 07793452422; honeycombinteriors.co.uk

Belarus-born interior designer Inna Hart has been successfully growing her studio in Bristol and is on a mission to show that interior designers don’t just work with the rich and famous. She offers free no-obligation consultations, visiting the home or business to help owners explore options and establishing what service suits the project best. IH Interiors’ pricing structure is extremely transparent. The fee is calculated by square metre and Inna believes this is a very fair approach and that any home can benefit from professional expertise. Full interior design services for residential properties are charged at only £20/m2 and the design fee depends on the size of the space, regardless of budget. This also allows her to work on smaller projects such as a single room installation or split a bigger project into smaller phases. Inna has experience working at all levels from budget to high-end spec suppliers, sourcing predominantly at trade prices.

Honeycomb is Beth Chippindall, an accomplished interior designer with more than 10 years’ industry experience in a variety of environments including multi-discipline architecture firms and top 100 interior design practices. She created Honeycomb to provide clients with a dedicated and personalised service, becoming a trusted creative partner to everyone she works with. Our homes truly are our private havens, and the one space where we can let our own personal style run free. Artwork, wall colour, furniture, and those small finishing touches are what makes a house feel like a home. Honeycomb’s aim is to create beautiful spaces in which people love to spend time. Whatever the scale of your ambition, they work on projects of any size, from the overhaul of a family room through to a full house refurbishment.

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HOMES & INTERIORS | BRISTOL GUIDE 2020

MARBLE SUPREME Unit 8, Bridge Road, Kingswood, Bristol BS15 4FW 0117 9563030; marblesupreme.com Marble Supreme provides master craftsmanship in stone. Whether you’re looking for new stone worktops for your kitchen or bathroom, it offers a range of materials to suit your needs. With over 20 years of experience, the team produce a wide range of products from beautifully crafted granite kitchen worktops and flooring, right through to bespoke stone fireplaces, vanity tops, splashbacks and sink surrounds. They provide a complete service – from sourcing the perfect stone for your needs, to crafting perfectly fitting, beautifully finished kitchen worktops. They also pride themselves on delivering the very best in granite, marble and quartz stone, knowing their creations will play a part in family life for years to come. Whether you know what you want or are considering the options, the team is happy to discuss your plans so pop into the Kingswood showroom.

ORIENTAL RUGS OF BATH Bookbarn International, Hallatrow Business Park, Bristol BS39 6EX 01761 451764; orientalrugsofbath.com Oriental Rugs of Bath is home to an eclectic collection of authentically handcrafted rugs, kilims and furnishings from the Middle and Far East. Personalised on approval services are offered as standard and all stock is available to order easily online (with free nationwide delivery). Expert advice is readily available for all rug-related enquiries and bespoke orders can be successfully organised. The specialist cleaning and repair service provided is renowned, restoring the most valuable of antique and modern oriental rugs.

LUMINATION LIGHTING Lumination, within Gardiner Haskins, Broadplain, Bristol BS2 0JP 0117 922 6435; lumination.co.uk

JUST SHUTTERS 0117 3701594; justshutters.co.uk/bristol Whatever your style – contemporary, modern, cosy or traditional – Just Shutters have the perfect fit for you. The shutters do not fade, warp or age and come with a lifetime guarantee. Rob and Linda Reeves are experts in the field, trained to the market-leading Just Shutters standard. They are passionate about shutters and transforming the homes of local people, with an understanding of outstanding quality, great value, and professional customer service. Work closely with Rob and Linda as they tailor Just Shutters to your tastes, giving you honest and impartial advice. The company has the largest range of material and finishes in the UK, granting you choice and options in terms of shutter style.

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Lumination Lighting is a leading specialist retailer of lighting products and services, stocking more than 20 of the leading industry suppliers from the UK, Europe and the Far East which includes their own exclusively designed and specified ranges. Lumination understand that lighting design is not only about the location, intensity and control, it is about the aesthetics and the ambience created. They provide a comprehensive service covering all aspects of lighting and offer a design service to help you achieve the best possible results. There are hundreds of products on display in the showroom and online and thousands more products available to order. The store is manned by trained and experienced advisors who actively ensure that they are in touch with latest trends and technological developments and are only satisfied when you have exactly the lighting you desire.


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HOMES & INTERIORS | BRISTOL GUIDE 2020

KÜTCHENHAUS Clifton Down Shopping Centre, Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2NN 0117 2130896; kutchenhaus.co.uk Kütchenhaus is the UK arm of company Nobilia – the largest manufacturer of fitted kitchens in Europe, making up to 3,000 kitchens daily. This means Kütchenhaus can not only keep prices competitive but still deliver highquality, German-engineered kitchens. They provide a wide selection of kitchen styles and can create both traditional and contemporary looks in matte and gloss textures. With their free design service, they can come up with superb, photo-realistic images giving a clear visual of a customer’s ideal kitchen. They also supply a full range of appliances including Bosch, Neff, CDA and Miele. Buying a kitchen is a big decision, and the Kütchenhaus team in Bristol work closely with every single client to give them complete confidence in their important new purchase.

THE KITCHEN PARTNERS The Kitchen Partners Design Studio, 102 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2QY 0117 9466433; thekitchenpartners.co.uk When you work with The Kitchen Partners on Whiteladies Road you work directly with Fiona and Clinton Patey, from the initial enquiry, throughout the design process, to the final completion. They will ensure the journey always begins with you. It’s your kitchen, your home and you will be a fundamental part of the process, with access to all trades involved. The Kitchen Partners are design, planning and installation professionals dedicated to giving each client their dream kitchen. As a fully independent retailer they are able to offer clients not only a greater variety of choice, but the best quality prices and lead times when considering a kitchen restoration. They have a keen eye for up-to-the-minute kitchen design and extensive product knowledge, based on many years working in the kitchen and interior design sectors. With innovative spatial awareness and flair for interior design, they will make your visit to their kitchen design studio a worthwhile and rewarding experience.

KINDLE STOVES Glenavon Farm, 331 Bath Road, Saltford BS31 3TJ 01179 243898; kindlestoves.co.uk At the heart of your home should be the perfect stove. Kindle Stoves is a local specialist in clean-burning, eco-design ready stoves approved for burning wood in Bristol, with a wood-burner to suit every home and every style. The team stock the super-efficient Woodwarm, Contura and Rais models as well as many more, offering a full installation service – from fireplace alterations, to slate hearths and stone fireplaces. Their lovely showroom, situated just outside Keynsham, has one of the largest displays of wood-burners in the South West and is open seven days a week. Pop in for advice and brochures or to book a home survey. They also sell seasoned logs, gas fires, and the Big Green Egg outdoor cooker.

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HOMES & INTERIORS | BRISTOL GUIDE 2020

ARCHITECT YOUR HOME 0800 0515304; architect-yourhome.com Architect Your Home’s service kicks off with an initial design consultation in your home – think of this as the real starting point of your project. It will provide you with sketch drawings of a properly considered and collaborative design proposal, help you develop a clear understanding of the practical implications of your design and equip you with the necessary tools so that you can move your project forward confidently to the next stage. During the consultation there will be an in-depth discussion to fully establish requirements and aspirations, a set of sketch design drawings showing the proposals, advice on planning permission/listed building consents/structure etc, an agreed proposal by the end of the session, and recommendations on the next steps and how to move the project forward.

WREN KITCHENS Cribbs Causeway Retail Park, Lysander Road, Bristol BS34 5TX 0117 2443168; wrenkitchens.com A visit to the Wren Kitchens website reveals an exceptional choice of over 60 kitchens in three ranges to suit all tastes and pockets. The Vogue, Infinity and Infinity Plus collections are further divided into modern, shaker and traditional styles, allowing you to create your own perfect kitchen. Add to this your choice of handles and thousands of unit sizes and you’re well on your way to creating a truly unique room which will be the heart of your home for many years to come. Book a showroom appointment for a free consultation with one of Wren’s expert kitchen designers; chat about layout and design requirements; see a personalised 3D design and get a quick price estimate, with no obligation to buy. Whether you’re looking to follow the latest colour trends or choose something timeless and classic, Wren will have the kitchen for you.

STRUCTURAL SKINS Unit 15 Bonville Business Park, Bonville Rd, Brislington, Bristol BS4 5QR 0117 9292 642; structuralskins.co.uk Structural Skins are suppliers of the highest quality Italian porcelain tiles, imported directly from the leading manufacturers in the Modena region. Although their customers are typically commercial designers and professional clients across the country, Bristol residents can also take advantage of this local business and the prices that come with buying directly from the factory. Standard 10mm porcelain tiles, oversized 6mm sheets, 20mm outdoor slabs and decorative tiles are all available in many different sizes, styles, colours and finishes. Incredible likenesses of marble, wood, cement, and stone, along with terrazzo and patterned tiles from brands like Floorgres, Rex Ceramiche, CasaMood, LEA and Quintessenza, are the finest on the market. Take a look at some of the ranges available on the website, or feel free to get in touch with owner Nicky Leyland to discuss your project directly.

SOUTH WEST UPHOLSTERY South West Upholstery, 196 North Street, Southville, Bristol, BS3 1JF 0117 370 2745; swupholstery.co.uk The team at South West Upholstery are experts at bringing domestic and commercial furniture and upholstery back to life in addition to creating new pieces to order – everything from sofas, chairs, headboards, cushion replacement and pouffes to coach seats, restaurant and bar furniture, caravan, motorhome and boat upholstery and commercial vehicle upholstery. The company recently unveiled its newly refurbished showroom on North Street, Southville, displaying a wide variety of fabrics, furniture and sample projects. The new showroom will also be stocking a range of beautiful, handcrafted homewares from Nkuku so customers will be able to shop for lamps, furniture, lighting, chairs and other fabulous pieces to take away.

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Interiors Guide October 2020 P 5 & 7.qxp_Layout 1 25/09/2020 18:22 Page 2

HOMES & INTERIORS | BRISTOL GUIDE 2020

GAROLLA 0800 468 1982; garolla.co.uk

FIAT LUX 8 Bath Street, Frome BA11 1DH 01373 473555; fiatlux.co.uk Fiat Lux opened its Frome showroom in 2003, and since then it has been a go-to place to see a huge range of superb lighting, from traditional fittings and shades to the most up-to-date trends in contemporary lighting designs. For interior lighting projects there are fixtures and fittings, bulbs, coloured cords and cables in every possible combination, as well as a full display of exterior lighting ideas. Fiat Lux works with leading manufacturers such as Vita, Original BTC and many more and is an established favourite with property developers, architects, interior designers and all lighting aficionados, professional and domestic. Whatever your style, mood or interior desire, a trip to Fiat Lux will really light up your ideas.

Boost your kerb appeal today with one quick and easy purchase from Garolla. The nation’s largest roller garage door installers, Garolla specialise in creating beautiful, bespoke garage doors that can truly transform your home’s exteriors. And with local installers across the country, it couldn’t be easier to update your home. Hand-crafted by highly skilled professionals, every Garolla roller shutter garage door is created with your home in mind. Increasing your thermal efficiency, safety and security these garage doors are an invaluable addition to any home and allow you to sleep easier at night. Available in a range of 18 vibrant shades and two different slat sizes, you can design the perfect accompaniment to your home’s style and architecture.

LOAF Unit 1D, Centaurus Rd, Cribbs Causeway, Bristol, BS34 5TS 020 3141 8300; loaf.com Brit-brand Loaf makes laid-back furniture for people to kick-off their shoes beside and lead happier, more relaxed lives among. Launched in 2008, the homeware brand has made it their mission to encourage people to enjoy their homes more. The comfy sofas and upholstered beds are hand-produced in Long Eaton, Derbyshire – the heart of British upholstery making – while the mattresses are handmade in Wiltshire. The brand opened its eighth Shack in Bristol in August 2019 in Cribbs Causeway, the West of England’s biggest shopping destination. The 5,000 sq ft Loaf Shack includes a mattress testing station, oodles of squidgy sofas and arcade games for little (and not-so-little) Loafers to enjoy, making it a haven for kicking back and relaxing. There’s even an old-school ice cream parlour where visitors can lap up their favourite scoop.

GARDEN AFFAIRS Trowbridge Garden Centre, 288 Frome Road, Trowbridge BA14 ODT 01225 774566; gardenaffairs.co.uk Garden Affairs specialises in made-to-measure, high-quality garden buildings. The extensive display of top-notch garden offices, posh sheds, summerhouses and gazebos can all be made to the size and style you require – flexibility is what they’re all about here. Take a look at the range of garden rooms – with contemporary concepts that solve the problem of space constraints, especially in city gardens. The Linea range of modern, Scandi-style cabins are perfect for all uses, comply with most planning guidelines and look great too. Garden Affairs offers a fixed-price installation service throughout the UK, or you can choose for a DIY kit to be delivered to your door.

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INTERIORS

A tale of two trends This autumn could call for more time indoors than the season normally does – in which case, our domestic spaces have got to be places of sanctuary. Enter ‘cottagecore’ and ‘Japandi’, aiming to help bring calm and clarity into coming months

East meets West

With internet searches for feng shui on the up, and the concept of hygge very much still with us, it doesn’t take a lot of brain-racking to dismantle the portmanteau ‘Japandi’, created to describe an increasingly popular hybrid home design trend combining elements of Japanese and Scandinavian styles. “This trend feels very relevant again now, as we all need to bring

some calm and mindfulness into our immediate environment,” says Lucy Ackroyd, head of design at textile veteran Christy. “There’s no better time than autumn to focus on carving out a little slice of zen for ourselves as we head towards the festive period.” Combining the content and cosy feel of Scandinavian hygge, with the Japanese foundations of feng shui and minimalism, she says, strikes the perfect balance between home comforts and fresh, modern style. “To get the look in your own home, opt for natural materials and clean lines. Contrast is a key element of this trend – try mixing a simple Japanesestyle bed in a light wood, with bountiful throw pillows and cosy blankets to combine styles in an autumn-appropriate way.” Japandi is a personal favourite for interior designer Beth Chippindall of Honeycomb Interiors in Bedminster. “I love to see the mixture of warm tones of timber and the textures from the Scandi/hygge style blended with the crisp design and simpleness of Japanese interiors – creating a functional but oh-so inviting palette which highlights all of nature’s beauty.” Image: Style Library

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iven the nature of our current collective circumstances, it’s not surprising that interior moods revolving around mindfulness, calm, the clean and the open countryside are sought after at the moment – and as we head into autumn, we’re all about creating a space of safety, sanctuary and simplicity in the domestic sphere. Which of the following aesthetics, if either, works better for you depends on whether you find comfort in unfussy urban minimalism or rural rusticity, traditional florals and frills.

The idea behind Japandi is bringing beauty, balance and calm to the home (image via @houselust on Instagram)

Ben Pentreath has collaborated with Morris & Co to recolour original wallpaper

Dark industrial surfaces and softening accessories

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INTERIORS

Return to domesticity

Willow Bough Tomato/Olive by Ben Pentreath for Morris & Co

“Jumbly” charm in the words of Ruth Crilly, owner of this Georgian home in Somerset (Instagram: @casacrilly)

Images: Christy

The wholesome, folky aesthetic of cottagecore, with favourite motifs of floral embroidery, old-school frills and chintz, came to dominance on social media via hundreds of thousands of hashtags on Instagram feeds, and goes hand in hand with the terms ‘grandmillennial’, ‘grandmacore’, ‘farmcore and ‘faeriecore’ as well as the botanicals that have been popular for the last few years. As lockdown forced people to re-evaluate what’s really important in life and embrace the small things, there was a shift towards the idolisation of a simpler, slower way of life, making cottagecore, to many, seem all the dreamier. A reaction to external stressors – emphasising purity, escape, the outdoors, softness and peace – it was something of a cultural movement from the confines of quarantine, praising the concept of a self-sufficient life and celebrating a return to traditional skills and crafts such as foraging, baking and pottery. You can create a pastoral, rural vibe whether you live in a chocolatebox cottage or a high-rise apartment, says Lucy. “You want the home to feel inviting and charming. Using warm whites, pale pinks and duck egg blues on the walls will create the perfect backdrop. Layer this with prairie-esque touches, botanical prints and feminine fabrics to create the nostalgic, romantic look of an idyllic English country cottage. “To create a rustic aesthetic without painting walls, use soft pastels and muted tones in your home accessories, while combining a mix of textures to give a super cosy, kitsch feel. In the bedroom, layer highquality bed linen in neutral shades, with thick woven wool blankets, finishing off with some pastoral print cushions and plenty of candles for that soft, warm glow.” Beth Chippindall worked in the Cotswolds for years and always loved

the quirky, quaint interiors she came across in rural villages. “This 2020 trend is very pandemic-friendly with people revelling in both homemade crafts, like embroidery and lampshade making, while still appreciating true craftmanship. I love the refreshing and reinventing of antique pieces for modern living and seeing people learning fabulous hobbies like flower arranging for their hallway table – every interior needs flowers, real, faux or dried!” Inna would like to see a slightly toned-down version of cottagecore incorporated into a commercial hospitality project such as a restaurant or bar. “I think it will appeal to many businesses out there,” she says, “especially now, when everyone is trying to do their bit for the planet.” The return to traditional skills and crafts is being celebrated in many of the new fabric and wallpaper collections, says Alison Bracey at Clifton’s Bracey Interiors. “GP & J Baker’s new Block Party showcases five artisan hand-block print fabrics in a range of colourways,” she says. “William Morris, regarded as one of the greatest designers and outstanding figures of the Arts & Crafts movements, produced many iconic designs which have now been recoloured and translated by Ben Pentreath and have just been launched. It’s a wonderful collection of colour and celebration of William Morris and perfectly celebrates cottagecore.” ■

Ben Pentreath for the Queen Square collection

A contemporary cottagecore-inspired corner of calm versus the more traditional (pictured, right)

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Images: Style Library

For Inna Hart of Bristol’s IH Interiors, if you’re taking this route, you’ve really got to commit to it. “I would definitely recommend sticking with the same scheme throughout the property rather than implementing it in just one area. Think ‘Wishbone chair’, think clean lines, think organic linen,” she advises. “The way I see the best representation of this style is in what both Japanese and Scandinavian cultures have in common – balance! It’s so simple, yet so hard to achieve in interiors. Remember to steer away from colour, in favour of only natural colours with black and white. To compensate for lack of colour, Japandi is built on the basis of geometrical patterns and a lot of texture – raw wood, rough fabrics, matte metals, exposed cement surfaces, forest greenery.”


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INTERIORS

Styled shots: Article Studio, portrait at the loom: Alice Hendy Photography

The blanket (sized at 180x140cm) was designed to help Bristolians add a pop of colour to their homes this autumn

Cosy up, Bristol fashion Weaver, designer and colourist Angie Parker’s latest collection of handwoven designs and small-batch textiles launches this month, inspired by lockdown walks among the city’s famously colourful houses

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s well as nimble new business models, lockdown prompted all sorts of creative projects in resourceful Bristol – from photography collections depicting different residents looking out from their front windows to textiles inspired by the vibrant house facades that characterise certain stretches of the city. The latter struck local weaver Angie Parker as a brilliant idea for a new collection as she wandered past them during daily walks – especially once she’d done some digging into their history. Since the mid 1960s, there’s been a growing number of brightly painted houses jazzing up the urban landscape, something which has grown in popularity in recent years. When the bursts of colour from Angie’s daily walks started to find their way into her designs, she decided to do some research into the history of these picturesque properties. Aware that local company Stride Treglown had, in 2017, launched the Bristol Colour Capital initiative to promote Bristol as the most colourful city in the UK, Angie approached the architects for their thoughts. Head of sustainability Rob Delius shared the findings from resident research collated and presented at a seminar where a scheme to link repainting homes with utilising home energy improvement grants was discussed. Rumour has it that architect, entrepreneur and politician George Ferguson may have been the first to paint his newly acquired home in Cliftonwood. On meeting up with George, Angie established that he painted his dull grey house terracotta red in 1966, using Sandtex® 64 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Masonry Paint, as his pal up the road painted his house a rich blue shade at the same time, and this is how one of the most photogenic streets in the city began its transition into technicolour. These terraces had previously been earmarked for demolition, with the proposal of three blocks of flats to replace them. A u-turn in planning enabled savvy investors to buy the run-down properties cheaply, and it gave them the opportunity to make their mark on the city. Now the views of these houses from the docks are almost as photographed as the suspension bridge. George cites the influence of 1960s psychedelia, Glastonbury, and the general feeling of freedom at the time for the decision to paint away the grey – and with so many of Bristol’s terraced houses being rendered, it’s easy to see how the idea gathered momentum. Another rumour is that the trend started in Totterdown, where a local decorator offered cheap house painting to make use of the free coloured paints he’d acquired. He became pretty busy after the first few daring homeowners started the ball rolling. Once one person took the plunge, it seemed the rest of the street would gradually follow. While painted houses aren’t exclusive to Bristol, in this city the trend was led by the residents, rather than artist initiatives or planners. That said, Bristol is home to thousands of artists and creatives, so it’s hardly a surprise that residents here take every opportunity to express themselves though bold combinations of house colour and front doors. The hilly landscape in the city lends itself to the aesthetic, with one


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INTERIORS

respondent to the Stride Treglown survey pointing out how much they love spotting their home from the opposite side of the city. Over the past decade the rainbow has grown apace, with reasons including the influence of travel, as well as simply wanting to join in with what many see as ‘a Bristol thing’. Colour choices are personal, of course, but according to the ST report, most respondents were considerate of their neighbours when selecting colours that complement the rest of their street. Angie’s rugs and wall hangings are handwoven in BV Studios on Phillip Street in Bedminster, opposite Windmill Hill City Farm, with the new lambswool ‘Bristol blanket’ – created in partnership with Bristol Weaving Mill – sporting the uplifting colours of central Bristol abodes to lift spirits and brighten the home. “Designing textiles based on these houses was a joyful experience, with the biggest challenge being the limit on the number of colours I could use when working with my local mill,” says Angie. “Everyone I’ve asked finds the views uplifting and cheerful, and as a designer I feel incredibly fortunate to have such joyful and inspiring blocks of colour to feast my eyes on, every time I walk out of my house. “My intention is that the blanket will encourage people to use more colour in their homes to improve their mood and wellbeing. Incorporating blankets, throws and rugs is a way to do this without feeling overwhelmed if you’re nervous about bringing in bold colour.” Angie wanted to reflect with her design the connections between neighbours and local community which, for many, were strengthened during lockdown, and is sending 10% of sale profits to mental health charity MIND. “I wanted to reflect the special bonds that formed from the shared experiences, in the hope that we continue to strengthen them and support each other in the present and the future,” she explains. She hopes the project will be the start of an ongoing dialogue too – does living in a colourful neighbourhood make people happier? Can colour really improve health and wellbeing? Does Bristol have more coloured houses than any other UK city? Have your say via the Angie Parker website below. ■

Angie trained in rug weaving in the 1990s and started her textile practice five years ago

• The Bristol blanket is priced at £295 (The Bristol Magazine readers will receive 20% off – contact Angie through her website contact form for a link to the offer); angieparkertextiles.com

The collection is based on Bristol’s most colourful houses

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INTERIORS

The heart of the home

Kutchenhaus is harnessing the latest tech to provide virtual appointments and using a new online 3D design tool to create kitchens remotely for customers who do not wish to visit. Rob Cash, who has over 15 years of design experience, told us more

Does Kutchenhaus offer a complete service? We offer a mixture of options from supply only to full installation. Our teams take care of the whole installation including electrics, plastering, flooring. We find this is the best option when purchasing a kitchen, as the installation teams are familiar with the product and can install quickly and correctly. What is the process with a new client? We start with a chat about the project and understanding the brief. We can work from architect plans if the customer is planning an extension, or we can carry out a home visit. We would invest time in producing an initial design that we would go through in more detail during our design meeting. Once we have finalised the kitchen design and a customer chooses to purchase we have a team who will manage the process of the order through to completion.

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o, what are the advantages of this German brand of kitchen? German manufactured products are known for attention to detail and quality. It’s no different with our German kitchens, where each is made to order to customers’ unique specifications. Our friendly local team are passionate about designing and supplying kitchens, reflected in the great reviews we receive. Have this year’s events have affected the way you think about kitchen design? The kitchen is usually the hub of the home and a place to entertain friends and family, however for many it has turned into the home office too. Breakfast bars have been extra popular this year to provide a space to work or socialise with the family. Is there a style that typifies Kutchenhaus? Not really, as we can offer a wide range of styles, colours and materials. We offer contemporary and traditional kitchen ranges and a large selection of true handle-less designs. Every kitchen is unique to customers’ specifications and we have options which will suit most tastes. The manufacturer is always improving their offer and constantly improving their range of units and finishes. How do the virtual appointments work? One of the best outcomes of lockdown for us 66 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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has been the introduction of our virtual design service, where we can design kitchens remotely. This has meant that we can share our screen with customers in the comfort and safety of their home. While this has enhanced our service, there really is nothing better than visiting our showrooms to get inspired about your future kitchen project. Are there any new work-from-home features? While we specialise in supplying high-quality German kitchens, our furniture is so versatile that it can be used for other rooms including living, bathroom and home offices. All our units are made to order and can be used in different ways to improve the whole home. What are your plans going forward? We have been very proud of the success of our Bristol store and the recommendations we are receiving are the result of the passion we put into our work. We have also just expanded to a second location in the centre of Bath, which is a positive news story among all the current negativity. What’s Bristol been asking for this year? Extensions have continued to be very popular for those looking to improve their homes instead of moving. However there has also been a big push towards using our furniture to furnish living rooms and TV media stations. With open-plan rooms being very popular there have been more requests for matching furniture. No 193

What are the price points for a kitchen? We cater for a wide span, from the £5,00010,000 bracket all the way to the £40,00050,000 bracket. Our average order value in Bristol is £15,000-20,000, however price is all relative to the size and the materials. What are the accessory options? There is a wide choice of appliance companies to choose from which vary in price and quality, allowing us to cater for different requirements. We deal with great quality brands including Bora, Quooker, AEG, Smeg, Neff, Blanco and Caple, to name just a few. What difficult decisions around commissioning a new kitchen can Kutchenhaus help with? Customers want to know they are going to get their quality kitchen and get a good deal. We believe that the price vs quality that we offer is very competitive and we can compete with the majority of the main players supplying kitchens. We also offer competitive finance options to help make purchasing our kitchens more affordable. Will clients have continuity in their dealings? Our well-rounded team manages the whole process once a customer has made their order. There are no call centres to deal with, you deal directly with our local team. We deal with all aspects of running the business and all have the same goal, to achieve stunning completed kitchens and glowing reviews. n • kutchenhaus.co.uk


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INTERIORS

Decorating on a dime Revamp without remortgaging: how to give your home a décor makeover without breaking the bank. Words by Emily Rickard

Go maximalist with plants, says Emily

Images: Kenton Simons

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ith many of us spending so much time at home, it’s useful to know how we can achieve a new-look space without breaking the bank. During the recent global lockdown, many turned to DIY to combat boredom and help with a feeling of calm and wellness. The sales of paint, plants and DIY materials soared by up to 25% for many suppliers according to the Independent, and even postlockdown, many of us look to making our homes a more comfortable and inviting place to be. It’s important to love the home you’re in, and coming into winter we may again find ourselves at home far more than we used to be. Have you often yearned for a home makeover but thought it an unachievable and expensive goal? The good news is, it doesn’t have to be. Initially, before embarking on any decorating, try simply moving some items around. Create a fresh new space for yourself – you’ll be amazed how it makes you feel. The simple act of rearranging furniture in a room, or re-styling shelves and working with what you already have, feels surprisingly refreshing. Get organised, clear your space, start with a blank canvas and it will feel brand new. After an initial re-arrange, if you are ready to take the next step, it’s paint, paint and more paint. It’s a relatively inexpensive tool to refresh your home and you can get really clever with the use of it. Update the ceilings with a contrasting colour to the walls, paint a kitchen splashback with wipeable paint instead of piling up the costs of tiling. Think about fun patterns you might want to create with dividing walls into sections rather than using only one colour, paint woodwork and don’t just stop there; you can bring that colour up the walls by a few inches from the skirtings or even halfway up the wall. If you don’t want to rip up floors or remove tiles, consider painting these too. You’ll be amazed at the results you can achieve with a few pots of colour. Bathroom, floor and wall tiles can all be painted – Farrow & Ball and Johnstone’s floor paint are my favourites.

Drawing inspiration from nature

Paint a kitchen splashback with wipeable paint instead of piling up the costs of tiling

Create a new gallery wall – sourcing new prints and art frames can be largely inexpensive. Looking on Etsy, in vintage shops and online. You’ll also be surprised what you can get from just looking around at what you already have; old gift cards, postcards, curios. Gallery walls don’t just have to be art and frames, they can also include threedimensional objects too – a wooden scroll with a sculpture on it, for instance. For second-hand sourcing in Bristol my top picks are Rag & Bone, The Reclaimers, Wessex Reclamation. For new items, my favourites are Fox & Feather, Mon Pote Home, Reason Interiors. Finally, add a few more plants – in the bathroom, kitchen, living room and even bedrooms. A fresh pop of green brightens up any room for only a few pounds. If you can afford it, go maximalist in a room with plants, because it really makes an impact. ■ • emily-rickard.com 68 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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On recent walks to Clevedon Beach, Leigh Woods and Abbots Pool it occurred to me that so many beautiful palette combinations already exist in nature, and we can draw from these when choosing colours and textures to work together in home design. Clevedon pebbles showing hues of grey, blush, cream and taupe now sit in a wooden tray in my studio and I use them to put together initial neutral palettes with clients. Each pebble contains so many different colours if you look closely enough, and each colour just works. Nature is such a beautiful and simple inspiration. Similarly, in the woods, different tones of browns and greens you see in ageing trees, bark and leaves are the perfect accompaniment to each other. Speckled creams and browns in feathers may also be the perfect wall/woodwork pairing. Nature’s palette doesn’t lie. Next time you might be stuck on pairing colours, go outside, take a walk and pick up things from nature that inspire you, or make you feel something – this is the most wonderful way to naturally bring together a new scheme for your home.


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HOMES & GARDENS

Raising the bar

There are beer gardens and then there are boutique hotel spaces inspired by The Outdoor Bar Company. Ever since we saw the craftsmanship that goes into their new bespoke builds, we can’t get the image of a swanky home watering hole out of our dreams. Imagine hosting your own Oktoberfest in one of these... LED lighting packages, controllable from a smart phone, mean you can illuminate your night scene in almost any hue

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e loved hearing of the handy DIYers knocking together their own makeshift pubs at the bottom of their gardens during lockdown – let’s see, there was The Stagger Inn, The Locked Inn, The Staying Inn, The Doghouse, even a Peaky Blinders-themed joint called The Garrison, in tribute to the show. Many of us were able to get out for a fix of Bristol’s brilliant nightlife over the summer as things grew more stable, but as autumn draws in and the possibility of further restrictions returns, the launch of new West Country outfit The Outdoor Bar Company feels welltimed. Taking the idea of the domestic drinking venue decidedly up a notch, it’s offering to bring the style and vibe of a custom-made boutique hotel bar to the gardens of those with the available budget to splash out on something bespoke made with professional craftsmanship. We’re talking outstanding build solutions coupled with the sort of high design that you’d expect to find in some the of the world’s best hotels – but in your own back yard. Behind the venture is Chris Jones, who draws on 20 years of experience creating lauded hotels throughout the United States. “Out of the adversity of the past six months, comes opportunity,” says Chris, who normally spends his time between Barcelona and Bath. “I think the ‘new normal’ has led to lots of folks having an enhanced appreciation of what we have on our own doorstep – and being able to socialise in our own gardens has provided a great relief for many. Taking that a step further, having the charm of a boutique hotel bar creates a great alternative that I think will ‘stick’ even when the world starts to free up again. “We also see an opportunity for the many local pubs to enhance their gardens, with the addition of a stunning outdoor bar and accompanying revenue opportunity.” The bars are already creating a buzz, with one recently completed project in Bath conveying the feel of a New York hotel bar with stools pulled up to a copper bar-top fronted with reclaimed wood. A piped rear back bar with vintage teak and a custom canvas roof completes 70 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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the look and the bars have their own mini beer kegs, plus coloured LED lighting packages, controllable from a smart phone, mean you can illuminate your night scene in almost any hue. Each of the bars is individually designed and equipped with a raft of amenities, but design takes centre stage, and you’re able to incorporate everything from beer and wine taps, to pizza ovens, heater units and – wait for it – a DJ booth for showing some garden shapes and really dance like nobody’s watching. There’s even an offgrid solar option for more remote locations. “No two bars will ever be the same,” says Chris, of the company’s core value.

Design takes centre stage, and you’re able to incorporate everything from beer and wine taps, to pizza ovens, heater units and – wait for it – a DJ booth

Then you can, of course, name your bar and get stocking with your favourite tipples. Through partnerships with local companies, The Outdoor Bar Company intends to promote curated wine, beers and spirits from local purveyors and naturally, given the Barcelona connection, some Catalonian cava. And no waiting of 10-12 weeks for delivery - One month inception to completion, so maybe we will all be able to celebrate Christmas after all Here’s to a brilliant night on the (patio) tiles... ■ • Build prices vary, depending on size and scope, but start at £6,500; outdoorbarco.co.uk


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Suppliers of the best in Italian porcelain tiles for walls and floors.

Marble, Wood, Cement, Stone and Terrazzo styles in a variety of sizes and finishes. Standard 10mm tiles, oversized 6mm sheets and 20mm outdoor slabs. Appointment only. To arrange viewing and for advice

Tel: 0117 929 2642 www.structuralskins.co.uk


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GARDENING

With summer’s fanfare behind us, it’s time to seek out new attractions. Frost-covered sedum makes for a pretty focal point

Seasonal stars It’s getting chillier, days are shorter and all the signs of autumn are here, but there’s no need to put the garden into cold storage until spring, says Elly West

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ear-round interest is high on most people’s garden wish list, and there are plenty of plants to choose from that will keep the colour coming. With summer’s fanfare behind us, it’s time to seek out new attractions. Some plants continue to offer vibrant flowers, but the forthcoming season also brings the more subtle charms of berries, fruits, leaves and stems. It just takes a bit of planning for a garden that will bring surprises and fresh elements to enjoy whatever the time of year. When I’m designing a border I usually aim for a mix of evergreen and deciduous shrubs, flowering perennials, grasses and bulbs, so that even the smallest space rings seasonal changes. I keep a mental scorecard, with around a quarter of the plants at their best (or at least doing something) for each season, to maintain continuity and balance, and to prevent the garden looking too static. But plants are notorious for not obeying the rules. Who hasn’t experienced the joy and mystery of a rogue flower, totally out of season? As I write this in September, I’m looking at a sprinkling of burgundy goblet blooms on my Magnolia ‘Susan’, a spring-flowering show-stopper in my front garden. And with semi-decent weather and a sheltered spot, many summer flowering plants don’t seem to realise they are supposed to be having a rest, and will keep going until the first frosts and beyond. It’s not uncommon for pelargoniums and even roses to throw out the odd flower into November and December. Maybe it’s a result of climate change, but I’m not complaining. Late bloomers such as sedums, heleniums and red-hot pokers will bring fiery colour through autumn, prolonging the warmth of summer into the cooler months. And there are many flowering shrubs that are grown for their cold-weather displays, including winter jasmine, witch hazel and mahonia. It’s the evergreen shrubs that provide the backbone of the winter garden, often going unnoticed in summer but providing necessary structure in autumn and winter, especially beautiful with a light frost and 72 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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spidery dew-laden cobwebs sparkling in the sunlight. Skimmia japonica ‘Rubella’, any kind of topiary, and architectural plants such as phormiums or fatsia can play starring roles over the next few months. Variegated evergreens are also a good choice, great for brightening a shady corner. Try green and white Euonymus fortunei ‘Silver Queen’, which can be trained against a fence or wall. Where space is at a premium, each plant has to pull its weight, preferably with seasonal changes to look forward to. This is why I think every garden should have at least one tree. A crab apple, for example,

Aim for a mix of evergreen and deciduous shrubs, flowering perennials, grasses and bulbs, so that even the smallest space rings seasonal changes

will provide spring blossom, fresh green leaves, fruits and autumn colour, plus height and structure all year long. The leaves of Japanese maples are glowing with autumn shades of red, orange and yellow right now. And, of course, silver birch is a classic for its distinctive white, papery bark, all the more striking in winter when the leaves fall. I also love dogwoods for their colourful branches. Cornus ‘Midwinter Fire’ is a particular favourite, with glowing stems in shades of orange, pink, red and yellow through the winter.


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GARDENING

Grasses add movement to the border and a restful pause in summer between more exuberant flowering plants. It’s a partnership that works with a raft of perennials such as achilleas, geraniums and salvias, which intermingle with the strappy blades and late-summer seedheads. Then when the perennials die back, the grasses become more prominent. Pheasant’s tail grass (Anemanthele lessoniana) turns to warm shades of russet brown at this time of year, and has a beautiful arching habit. Berries can be just as vibrant as flowers, and are great for wildlife. Callicarpa bodinieri ‘Profusion’ also goes by the name of beauty berry, and it’s easy to see why. The clusters of unusual, violet, jewel-like berries appear in autumn and remain long after the plant has lost its leaves. Cotoneaster, holly and (if you can bear the thorns) pyracantha, also put on great displays of berried treasures. Wildlife will also appreciate any seedheads that are left on the plant for as long as possible, attracting birds and small mammals, as well as looking particularly decorative on a frosty morning. Rudbeckia, sea holly, phlomis and the silver-coin-like seedheads of annual honesty all hold their own in the autumn and winter garden. Containers give a fading garden an instant boost – most garden centres have seasonal displays of bedding plants and small shrubs that are looking good now and suitable for pots. Try a permanent centrepiece, such as a compact pittosporum, grass or viburnum for structure, surrounded by pansies, cyclamen or winter-flowering heathers. Hellebores also make good container plants, where the delicate beauty of their nodding winter flowers won’t be overlooked. Think about scent as well. A flowering Daphne odorata or Sarcococca confusa in a pot near the front door will waft its sweet perfume and give you a boost every time you brush past. I love bulbs all year round for their ability to surprise us. When they are dormant we forget they are there until the tips of green shoots push once again through the soil. In spring they are everywhere, but there are plenty for autumn and winter too. Nerines, autumn crocus, colchicums, winter aconites and then early snowdrops and Iris reticulata will keep things going through those darker months.

Plant of the month: Nerines Candy-pink Nerine bowdenii is a South African bulb that is hard to ignore with its showy display of lily-like autumn flowers. Plants like a sunny, sheltered spot and slightly congested roots, but dislike being disturbed, so if you move a clump you may have to wait a year or two before they flower again. Poor soil suits them well, while richer soil and shade will encourage lots of leaves rather than flowers. They are also happy in pots. Tidy up the leaves as they die back, and remove faded flowers to keep plants looking neat and to encourage more blooms. Bulbs should be planted in autumn with the neck of the bulb just exposed above the level of the soil. Leaves appear in spring, then die back at the end of the summer before the flowers appear.

• ellyswellies.co.uk

Create space with a garden room GARDEN OFFICES • LOG CABINS • STUDIOS • SUMMERHOUSES POSH SHEDS • TIMBER GARAGES • OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES

01225 774566 • www.gardenaffairs.co.uk Visit our Display Centre at Trowbridge Garden Centre 288 Frome Road, BA14 0DT THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

RECEIVE THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE BY POST

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934

www.thebristolmag.co.uk/subscribe or Tel: 0117 974 2800

THE

B R I S T OL MAGAZINE

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PROPERTY NEWS BITE-SIZED UPDATES FROM ACROSS THE CITY’S BOOMING SECTOR xxx CHANGE HERE!

Jodie Fraser has managed apartment blocks across Bristol, Cheltenham and London for four years

Network Rail has bought the Bruneldesigned Grade I-listed Bristol Old Station – the city’s first railway station when it opened in 1840 as the western terminus of the Great Western Railway from London Paddington. Currently housing business incubator Engine Shed and event space the Passenger Shed, the building is one of the oldest surviving railway stations in the country, and this move via Bristol City Council means it will be back under railway ownership for the first time in three decades. Commercial uses will continue, along with refurbishment of the historic facilities.

SMALL BIZ SUCCESS

Image by Jon Craig

• networkrail.co.uk

LEADING THE WAY A UK first took place in a Bristol car park recently when 11 zero-carbon Zed Pods apartments were craned into place as part of a partnership with Bristol City Council, Bristol Housing Festival, YMCA and Bristol and Bath Regional Capital. The one and two-bed apartments, built on a podium above the car park in Chalks Road, St George, are modular units that can be erected within days, with the lowest possible running costs. Each is precisionmade in a factory environment to high environmental standards. Because the development takes advantage of the air rights above a council-owned car park, the land cost has been removed thus making the development extremely affordable. It’s the first 100% socially rented development of its kind in the country. The development will deliver council housing for young people in need of affordable housing and those at risk of housing crisis, including NHS workers. Bristol City Council has been working with YMCA Bristol to seek tenants. “We wanted to address key worker and affordable housing issues without compromising on our values of sustainability and quality,” said Zed Pods operations director Dr Rehan Khodabuccus. “We are pleased that Bristol City Council has had the foresight to partner with us direct and are so enthusiastic about the potential for more developments like this.” Marvin Rees, mayor of Bristol, said:

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“It’s an exciting and yet practical approach to addressing some of the housing challenges we have and I hope we can see more of these sort of projects delivered in the near future. We have to be thinking creatively about how we best use the space we have in the city and not keep pushing people further and further out because they can’t afford city house prices.” The project came about as a result of Bristol Housing Festival – all about trying out new ideas and better ways to live in our cities. “Our aim has always been to deliver tangible projects so I am thrilled that the Zed Pods project is now actually a reality,” said Jez Sweetland, Bristol Housing Festival project director. Ben Silvey, YMCA, added: “This development provides much-needed affordable housing for young people and we want to make sure we create a community here. We are now taking applications for four ‘community builders’ to move in when the site is ready in November. These will effectively be ‘super tenants’ who are being asked to unite residents and encourage them to get involved in their community.” • zedpods.com

No 193

Jodie Fraser, founder of Fraser Allen Estate Management, has been named as one of the nation’s Small Biz 100 in a national campaign highlighting inspiring small businesses. The 36-year-old, has run her business managing the homes of residents in apartment blocks across Bristol, Cheltenham and London for the last four years. “I fully support the aim of the Small Business Saturday campaign as it promotes the ethos of supporting independent small businesses, from retailers to local suppliers. Now, as one of the Small Biz 100, this year I plan to work with independent solicitor Andrew Turner from Hughes Paddison to offer a morning of my time to assist the general public with any queries they may have regarding property management and property law. “I also plan to support small business by arranging a networking event where everyone involved is a local business, for example a photographer who can capture the event and a local baker who can provide cakes and refreshments. Watch this space!” Marking 100 days building up to Small Business Saturday on 5 December 2020, the Small Biz 100 provides a major profile boost to small businesses across the UK, particularly at this challenging time. Showcasing individual businesses through social media daily, the campaign aims to support and celebrate a vibrant range of small, community-driven businesses. “Given the phenomenally tough time small businesses have had, and the special role they played supporting communities in lockdown, it’s vital we continue to support them as this crisis continues,” said Michelle Ovens MBE, director of Small Business Saturday UK. “This year’s Small Business Saturday is going to be the most important one yet, and were determined it will also be the best.” Small Business Saturday has grown significantly, with a record turnout of 17.6 million people choosing to shop small on the day last year, generating an estimated £800m. • smallbusinesssaturdayuk.com


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Redland Court Reimagined. Launching September 2020 The long awaited and much anticipated Redland Court development is launching the first release of homes in September.

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et within 3 acres of tranquil parkland, Juniper Homes will be offering a small collection of new and exquisitely refurbished historical 1-3 bedroom apartments and three stunning 4bedroom Town houses in this first release. Redland Court is Bristol’s finest landmark development, where classic meets contemporary with uncompromising style and character. The result is a development where no two homes are quite the same and a collection of homes combining specifications and finishes that exceed expectation. Features within these spacious homes include breath-taking skyline views out across the City, soaring ceiling heights, restored historic features, private outdoor terraces and allocated parking. The scheme also falls within the coveted Redland Green School catchment area. Redland is one of Bristol’s most popular locations. With the City on your doorstep, a home at Redland Court is a once in a life time opportunity. Creating homes for 21stCentury living Juniper Homes’ challenge has been to honour the historic fabric of the buildings, whilst introducing the standards we now expect. Attention to detail within the homes is evident and the individual building specification reflects the period of the property. Living space 78 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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has been allocated with flair and imagination and cultivates an elegant and sophisticated palate of materials and finishes; each chosen to enhance the spirit of the individual buildings. With the current move to home working, Redland Court will also provide ultra-fast reliable broadband connectivity. 3-acres of landscaped grounds and private terraces Emerging at the top of the buyer’s wish list is outdoor space. Redland Court is set in 3 acres of private residents’ gardens and grounds, all being lovingly brought back to life. From the sweeping lawns of the residents’ parkland to private outdoor terraces and gardens that enhance so many of these spacious homes, this unique development has so much to offer its future residents. Redland Court offers a range of house and apartment styles including: • Spacious 1 – 4 bedroom apartments, duplexes and triplexes • Spacious 2 - 4 bedroom houses from single storey contemporary designs to town houses set over three floors For further information on Redland Court call the agents: Savills on 0117 910 0360 or Ocean on 0117 946 9838 or visit www.redlandcourt.co.uk


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Clifton, Bristol | Guide Price ÂŁPOA An exquisite Grade II* Listed townhouse rich in period detail and beautifully presented; complete with a self-contained two-bedroom apartment, courtyard garden, roof terrace and gated parking. Elegant four-bedroom Grade II* Listed family home | Separate self-contained two-bedroom apartment | Sympathetically refurbished by the current owners | Numerous retained period features | Enclosed rear courtyard garden and first floor roof terrace | Spacious kitchen and dining room | First floor drawing room and separate sitting room | Four upper floor bedrooms and two bath / shower rooms | Lower ground floor two-bedroom apartment | Gated rear parking for several vehicles

In all circa 3391 sq. ft (315 sq. m).


CLIFTON BS8

GUIDE PRICE

CLIFTON BS8

£550,000

£1,500,000

GUIDE PRICE

A grand hall floor level GARDEN (front and back) flat offers GARAGE, gardens, CELLAR rooms and a spacious interior complete with many ORIGINAL features. NO ONWARD CHAIN.

An individually ARCHITECT designed FIVE bedroom stone built detached house, with additional THREE bedroom annex, a secluded location tucked away at the end of a private CLIFTON mews, double GARAGE, PARKING, courtyard and mature gardens, superb Clifton location.

REDLAND BS6

FAILAND BS8

GUIDE PRICE

£390,000

GUIDE PRICE

£525,000

An exceptional top floor TWO bedroom apartment forming part of this desirable Victorian mansion, roof TERRACE and COMMUNAL GARDENS and OFF STREET PARKING.

A most attractive and well-presented DETACHED bungalow with gravel DRIVEWAY leading to the GARAGE and CAR PORT. Beautifully maintained GARDENS. TWO DOUBLE bedrooms with ensuites and a spacious LOFT space.

REDLAND BS6

REDLAND BS6

OIEO

£950,000

A substantial and well-presented Victorian gable fronted family house. Offering SIX bedrooms, spacious kitchen/breakfast room, living room, two family bathrooms, en-suite, cloakroom, second reception room and home office. GARDENS front and rear and NO ONWARD CHAIN.

0117 923 8238

GUIDE PRICE

£390,000

Two DOUBLE bedrooms wonderfully light flat provides amazing views across the city and towards Bath, a SUNNY BALCONY allocated SECURE UNDERGROUND PARKING space and location convenient to the City, The Downs and Whiteladies Road.

www.howard-homes.co.uk

hello@howard-homes.co.uk


SNEYD PARK BS9

GUIDE PRICE

£675,000

CENTRAL BS1

GUIDE PRICE

£435,000

An attractive THREE BEDROOM semi-detached house, integral GARAGE and PARKING, private COURTYARD. Good size living/dining room and CONVERVATORY, recently installed kitchen.

TWO DOUBLE bedrooms, PRIVATE TERRACE with direct views over the harbour. Extensive open plan living area. Secure, off street PARKING space. NO ONWARD CHAIN. Viewing highly recommended.

REDLAND BS6

KINGSDOWN BS2

GUIDE PRICE

£675,000

An exceptional THREE DOUBLE bedroom GARDEN flat with GARAGE. Spacious, light and wellpresented interior. Within close proximity of The Downs, Whiteladies Road, Redland Railway Station and Redland Park. Viewing is highly recommended.

CENTRE BS1

GUIDE PRICE

£299,950

A superior TWO BEDROOM apartment within this iconic building. Panoramic views over the city enjoyed from each balcony, surrounded by shops, restaurants and cafes. NO ONWARD CHAIN.

GUIDE PRICE

£585,000

A beautifully presented THREE BEDROOM Victorian house, TWO reception rooms and SEPARATE kitchen, attractive bathroom, original FIRE PLACES, ENCLOSED WALL GARDEN, excellent central location. Viewing is highly recommended

CENTRE BS1

GUIDE PRICE

£480,000

A stunning TWO DOUBLE bedroom WATER FRONT apartment. Beautifully presented interior with expansive living space, direct views over the historic floating harbour and Castle Park. Offered with an ALLOCATED PARKING SPACE. Viewing is highly recommended.

203 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2XT


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