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THE

Issue 160

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

MAGAZINE

£3.95 where sold

I

october 2017

INSIDE STORY Autumn interiors and easy seasonal updates for the home

AMANDA PLEASE! WE CHAT WITH THE ORIGINAL WAKELEY WOMAN

ABSOLUTELY LIT: BRISTOL’S FESTIVAL FOR READERS AND WRITERS RETURNS

OH, JAMAICA! DISCOVERING STOKES CROFT’S CONSCIENTIOUS NEW EATERY

THE WAIT IS OVER: TOBACCO FACTORY THEATRES’ FIRST MAJOR SOLO PRODUCTION

ALONG CAME A SPIDER: BEHIND THE WHEEL OF THE NEW FIAT 124

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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FOR THE FULL RANGE OF MIELE APPLIANCES

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DESIGN | PLANNING | INSTALLATION

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THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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OCTOBER 2017

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 5


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22

44

54

Love Amanda Wakeley? Her womenswear is now in Harvey Nichols

Contents

We loved Jamaica Street Stores’ wall art – especially this by Anna Higgie

October 2017

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

Read about the history of swing dance as Circus City returns

FEATURES

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14

FASHION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 We catch up with the original Wakeley Woman after her Bristol launch

Five of the best things to do in the city this month

16

FESTIVAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

We Are Curious: about Anna Starkey, actually

Bristol is a hotbed of creative talent; Judy Darley tells us what not to miss at Bristol Festival of Literature this month

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

MOTORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

...is back to reality

Chris Lilly finds himself behind the wheel of the Fiat 124 Spider

READ ALL ABOUT IT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

THE GETAWAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Spooky reads for shrinking under the bedclothes with

Need to press pause? Consider life among the leaves at Treetop Escape

BRISTOL AT WORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

EDUCATION

CITYIST

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70

We meet renowned instrument rescuers, Studio 7

QEH has welcomed girls to its sixth form for the very first time; headmaster Stephen Holliday tells us more

WILD BRISTOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

NATURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

Pete Dommett is all about otters right now

BBC wildlife presenter Gordan Buchanan chats close encounters

WALK THE WALK

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86

Andrew Swift is Cotswolds-bound for this month’s outdoor amble

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

THE CULTURE THEATRE

FOOD & DRINK Tidbits from our local eateries and producers

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38

We chat to Caroline Flack as part of her national musical theatre debut, and hear about Tobacco Factory Theatres’ first major solo production

WHAT’S ON & HAPPENINGS

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34

RESTAURANT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 We pay a visit to new Stokes Croft eatery Jamaica Street Stores

HABITAT INTERIORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I-XVI

Get the diary out!

Our seasonal special dedicated to AW17 decor and home improvement

DANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

GARDENING

Aisling Mustan looks into the background of swing dance as Circus City presents an event all about the movement

Combine beauty with practicality in your outdoor space

EXHIBITIONS

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PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 46

We catch up with the experts at Fine & Country

What’s on at our local galleries this month?

HAUNTED BRISTOL

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50

Are you brave enough to take John Hughes’ Halloween tour?

FAMILY DIARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 City fun for the younger ones

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ON THE COVER

Interiors are following fashion, with prevalent mustard tones, says Bristol’s Bracey Interiors: we love Little Greene’s Mortlake Yellow and sage roomset


Schmidt October fp.qxp_Layout 1 20/09/2017 14:35 Page 1

B R I S T

L

Kitchens and Interior Solutions

INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS Europe’s leading kitchen brand. Boasting French style and German engineering, we offer the best of both worlds. Beautiful and affordable made-to-measure kitchens with no compromise on quality or service. Our showroom design specialists tailor-make your kitchen then our complete installation service ensures an efficient, hassle-free fitting. With Schmidt, you don’ t have to wait until the next sale to enjoy unbeatable quality and service at an affordable price.

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B R I S T

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Knight Frank October.qxp_full page 20/09/2017 11:30 Page 1

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,950,000

Sneyd Park A substantial Victorian home (5,136 sq ft). 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, 6 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, and separate 2 bed garden apartment. Mature level gardens, parking and garaging. EPC E & D.

OIEO £1,450,000

New Instruction

Guide price £1,275,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

New Instruction

Abbots Leigh

Sneyd Park

Contemporary home (2,883 sq ft) in sought after village. Kitchen/dining area, sitting room, drawing room. 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms (2 en suite). Garage, gardens/terraces and swimming pool lane.

An exceptional family home (3,876 sq ft) with self-contained apartment. Kitchen/breakfast room, 3/4 reception rooms, 4/6 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms. Gated parking and gardens.

Guide price £1,295,000

Guide price £875,000

New Instruction

Durdham Park

Redland

Immaculate family home (2,932 sq ft) with gardens, garage and parking. 2 receptions, kitchen/breakfast room, master suite, 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Sun terrace, gardens, double garage, parking. EPC D.

A beautiful Victorian family home (1,927 sq ft) in one of Redland's most sought-after locations. 2 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, utility, master suite, 3 bedrooms, family bathroom, gardens and parking.


Knight Frank October.qxp_full page 20/09/2017 11:30 Page 2

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £2,575,000

New Instruction

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

Burrington A wonderful Grade II Listed home (7,196 to 8,768 sq ft). Standing in immaculate mature gardens and grounds within an ‘Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’ this former rectory has seen a full and sympathetic restoration. 6 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, gym, wine store, cellars. Coach house with 2 bedroom flat, garages and workshop. Heated swimming pool. About 1.81 acres.

OIEO £1,600,000

Guide price £1,195,000

nTheMarket.com

SSTC

Leigh Woods

Leigh Woods

A wonderful home (3,067 sq ft) on a private road. 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, 6 bedrooms, dressing room, balcony, 2 bathrooms. Gardens, garage, garden room and summer house. EPC G.

Immaculate 4 bedroom family home (2,348 sq ft) within established gardens. Kitchen/breakfast/sitting room, utility room, family room, study, master suite, 3 bedrooms, bathroom, shower room. Garage, gardens and parking.

Guide price £525,000

Guide price £375,000

Clifton

Clifton

A generously proportioned lateral 2 bedroom (1,047 sq ft) apartment with private garden. Sitting room, kitchen/breakfast room, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, inner hallway/study and private garden. EPC E.

A beautifully presented apartment (666 sq ft) within this handsome Grade II Listed period town house. Drawing room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bathroom. With attractive communal gardens to front and rear.


Knight Frank October.qxp_full page 20/09/2017 11:30 Page 3

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

OIRO £5,000,000

New Instruction

Chew Valley An exceptional 9 bedroom Grade II Listed house (11,746 to 12,782 sq ft) in parkland grounds. There is a cottage, walled garden, stable yard with development potential, various stone barns and buildings. About 51.7 acres.

Guide price £1,275,000

Guide price £995,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

New Instruction

Frampton Cottrell

St Briavels

Beautifully presented 6 bedroom family house (3,565 sq ft) situated in an attractive village setting. 4 reception rooms, breakfast/kitchen room, 6 bedrooms (3 ensuite), bathroom. Level gardens, double garage and parking.

Detached 6 bedroom house (4,432 sq ft) in a private and stunning setting, benefitting from a separate 2 storey studio/home office block, gardens, walled kitchen garden, woodland and paddocks. In all about 10.8 acres. EPC F.

Guide price £795,000

New Instruction

OIEO £600,000

Tickenham

Congresbury

A beautifully presented house (2,132 sq ft) situated in a hidden setting with views to the Mendip Hills. 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, 5 bedrooms (2 en suite), bathroom. Enclosed garden, double garage, parking.

Immaculate detached house (1,948 sq ft) with stunning distant views. 2 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, utility. 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (1 ensuite). Gardens, terrace and parking. EPC G.


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THIS MONTH WE’VE BEEN...

On fleek...

from the

EDITOR

We want Wren Kitchens’ Infinity Plus Contour kitchen in Baker Miller Pink so much it hurts – see our interiors section for more

...In the facial department thanks to Harvey Nichols, who recently launched Rihanna’s lovely Fenty Beauty brand. Beauty buffs have been going crazy for the magnetic Match Stix – we love the vibrant chilli mango – and hexagonal highlighter Killawatt. We also checked into Brow Hab at the Blink Brow bar for the perfect arch, a little brow-growth oil and a side of heavenly head massage...

Devouring...

“...If you love something, it will work; that’s the only real rule...” – Bunny Williams

A

s you’ll see, around halfway through the October issue, this month we’ve asked some of our local interior design experts to put in their two pennies’ worth on what’s hot in the world of home decor, as the gradual retreat indoors prompts many of us to re-evaluate our living spaces. They’ve offered up some gert lush ideas and gorgeous roomsets for inspiration; but Bunny’s right. If you’re planning to refresh your home this autumn, then yes, read up on the fashions and cherry-pick your fave ideas; pore over the dreamiest pictures and consult Instagram to your heart’s content, certainly; but your best bet is to go with what you love, which will always transcend the trends. Meanwhile on p22, we’re talking to couture maven Amanda Wakeley – who recently opened a concession in Cabot Circus – and catching up with Caroline Flack (p38) as she heads to the city as part of her national musical theatre debut. Judy Darley is talking about the festival of literature over on p28, and Bristol as a hotbed of creative talent, and then on p30 we have spooky reads suitable for shrinking under the bedclothes with this Halloween, as well as haunting historical stories of local streets (p50) – will you brave a bone-chilling tour of the city? Having heavily stalked its progress on social media, we also pay a physical visit to Jamaica Street Stores – the exciting new restaurant in ever shape-shifting Stokes Croft – while Chris Lilly finds himself behind the wheel of the Fiat 124 Spider and BBC wildlife presenter and cameraman Gordon Buchanan chats close encounters before his appearance at Bristol Grammar School. With more theatre, travel, education, art and property to be found throughout, we hope this issue does just what it says on the tin. We’ll see you in November when we’ll be hunkering down and looking ahead to (*gulp*) Christmas...

...New York Times food columnist David Tanis’ ambitious, refreshingly fuss-free autumn release, out 3 October (order from Foyles Cabot Circus or Waterstones, The Galleries). He’s taking us through the market, ingredient by ingredient and encouraging intuitive, spontaneous cooking in all of us.

Loving...

Squid ink ravioli stuffed with crab – Pasta Loco create next-level carby treats

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR

@thebristolmag

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

thebristolmag.co.uk

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Nº 160

@thebristolmag

...Bristol’s recent foodie openings, especially the new Park Street branch of a firm favourite of ours – Friska – and Easton’s Scandi-influenced eatery, Dela. And we’re beside ourselves with excitement at the news of Pasta Loco’s impending ravioli bar... Mmm-hmm, yep.


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ZEITGEIST

Top

5

things to do in OCTOBER

IN MOTION

BROKEN BRITAIN Join Middle-Weight Theatre Company for a double bill at The Alma Tavern Theatre, running from 19 – 21 October. First up is Sound Bite, Middle-Weight Theatre’s debut production set in 1969. Two men, Dick and Mickey, are tasked with providing Neil Armstrong with the first iconic words to be spoken from the surface of the moon. But there’s just one problem...writer’s block! Following up is Remedies: A Ballad of Broken Britain, an original play by Matt Roberts which takes a look at Britain’s ills, from Brexit to benefits and broken homes, through the eyes of five unique characters. Tickets from £8 to £10.

Taking place from Friday 29 September right up until Saturday 16 December, Motion’s In: Motion series is set to bring a fantastic array of performers to the city, championing Bristol’s thriving music scene and diverse night life. In October, expect shows from the likes of London Elektricity, Paul Oakenfield, The Heatwave, and a whole host of other renowned DJs, producers and musicians. Tickets cost £16.50.

Image © Sarah Koury

• bristolinmotion.com

SIMPLE THINGS Now in its seventh year, Simple Things festival is back this month with a characteristically adventurous musical line-up, celebrating the best in electronica, post-punk, experimentalism and a vibrant array of other boundary-breaking styles. Innovative performers include Indianabased electronic musician Jlin (pictured), Bristol DJ Shanti Celeste, indie band Wild Beasts, the visceral Idles – recently picked to support Foo Fighters – Canadian singer/poet Marie Davidson and plenty more. As ever the festival, which takes place from 20 – 21 October, will utilise a diverse network of Bristol’s best venues, with Colston Hall at the heart of the goings-on. Tickets cost £40.

• middleweighttheatrecompany.com

• simplethingsfestival.co.uk

ALL ABOARD THE SPOOKY SHIP As the nights get longer and the chilly air sets in, step on board Brunel’s ss Great Britain for a Victorian fright-fest to remember. Just in time for Halloween, guests can explore the eerie sights, sounds and smells of the 174-year-old ship, but watch out for what might be creeping in the shadows… Spooky Ship tours take place from 28 – 29 October, times vary. Plus, children can hear tales of the Victorian crew’s gruesome injuries and can get the chance to frighten their parents with a prosthetics and special-effect makeover, from 21 – 29 October. Feeling brave? Become a true sailor and climb the mainmast, available everyday until 31 October. Tickets: £14 adults, £8 children, under fours go free.

Image © Michael Wharley

TALL TALES

• ssgreatbritain.org

Head to Bristol Old Vic this month and be transported to a small Irish town with Conor McPherson’s chilling, awardwinning play. Running from 10 – 14 October, The Weir focusses on a group of locals who each share ghostly tales, whiling away the hours in a cosy, rural pub. But the arrival of a young stranger, haunted by a secret from her past, turns the tales of folklore into something altogether more unsettling. Tickets from £10. • bristololdvic.org.uk

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THE CITY THE BUZZ

My

BRISTOL

Image by Martin Parr

Meet Anna Starkey, creative director of We The Curious So what initially brought you to Bristol? The first time I came was to see the Exploratory when it was at Temple Meads. I remember it being compellingly dark and exciting inside. I visited for Animated Encounters, when I was working in animation, and then, a few summers back, I got a call from At-Bristol’s chairman, who was looking for people working in both science and the arts. I ended up being a creative consultant; then I applied for the job I have now.

Martin Parr at Paintworks Martin Parr Foundation, a new centre for British photography and the works of Martin Parr, will open in Bristol on 25 October. Its Paintworks space, comprising of a studio, gallery, library and archive centre, aims to support and promote photography from the British Isles by preserving the archive and legacy of Martin Parr, and holding a growing collection of works by British and Irish photographers as well as images taken in the British Isles by international photographers. Martin Parr is one of the most significant documentary photographers of post-war Britain, with an international reputation for his innovative imagery, oblique approach to social documentary, and contribution to photographic culture in the UK and abroad. He is known as an important collector, especially of photobooks, and over the past 40 years, his dedication to discovering and promoting the overlooked, and his support of photographers and photography has contributed to the way the history of the medium is understood and defined. The gallery space will be open to the public on a regular basis, with the first exhibition from 25 October – 20 January to be ‘Black Country Stories’ by Martin Parr, followed by ‘Town to Town’ by Niall McDiarmid and the David Hurn ’Swaps’ show in Spring 2018. The Foundation, which is working closely with the Univesity of the West of England, will also offer the facility to book group visits and individual research sessions alongside a programme of public talks, educational events, book signings and seminars. “Postwar British documentary photography continues to be underappreciated and I wanted to make a small contribution to rectify this,” said Martin. “The Foundation will support and preserve the legacy of photographers who made, and make, important work focused on the British Isles.” • martinparrfoundation.org

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which muses on cities and creativity), and Phox Pop magazine. These’ll be instantly pushed back when Philip Pullman’s The Book of Dust hits the doormat. What’s pumping out of your speakers? French electro artist Vitalic. It’s such a joyful thing to discover a new artist/musician/writer that you’re really into and find there’s a whole catalogue of their work to explore.

Tell us about what you do My role was introduced to bring a bit of friendly disruption to how we operate as a science centre. I look after the vision and direction for what we do as a cultural space – exhibitions, events, programming.

Where do you like to dine? I am eating my way through Cargo 2 and would love to experience Casamia and the Pony and Trap one day. Meantime I am a major fan of The Stable, and Clifton Village Fish Bar does the freshest fish and chips – perfect on a cold evening when I’m feeling lazy on my way home.

What are you most excited about with the We The Curious evolution? Seeing what happens when we work more collaboratively and bring new and known voices into the conversation when developing ideas. I get most excited by setting up spaces and intersections where something new can come about that we haven’t even imagined yet. Individually, I am also excited by that flash of energy lighting up someone’s face when they have a new experience that intrigues them.

What event are you going to in October? I’m most excited about Grayson Perry’s exhibition at Arnolfini, and looking forward to St Georges being open again – I hope to hear pianist James Rhodes there. Portico Quartet are on at the Lantern, Simple Things Festival has a cracking lineup, and The Bekkrel Effect promises to combine physics and circus at Bristol Old Vic, so I can’t miss that.

What first sparked your interest in science? I’ve wanted to be an astronaut forever, but I think it was a combination of Frank Close’s Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, called the Cosmic Onion, and my supernova of a physics teacher that ignited my interest in the big stuff; the theatrical scales and vibrant language of cosmology and particle physics. What are you working on at the moment? Re-imagining the ground floor and entrance of the HQ of We The Curious. This will be the first major exhibition space entirely based on the curiosity of the city in which it lives. We’re working with people all around Bristol to find out what questions they’re most interested in exploring with us, and we’ll start from there… It might end up an exhibit or an experience or experiment! What are you reading? Top of the pile are Homo Deus by Yuval Noah, Flaneuse by Lauren Elkin (a female perspective on the history of the flaneur

Nº 160

What interests will you be pursuing? I love singing so would like to join a chamber choir again, and one of our great team here recently left to run the Bristol Improv Theatre so I want to sign up to one of their courses and pick up where I left off in sketch comedy a long time ago. What local event will you be attending? I’m keen to hear some of the discussions going on at Festival of the Future City, part of the Bristol Festival of Ideas. • wethecurious.org


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THE CITY Success across the pond

A film-maker from Bristol has had his first book on film-making published by an international American publishing house. Three years ago, Paul Dudbridge, who is primarily a cameraman and director shooting TV, drama, music promos; as well as a parttime teacher, decided to write a book on everything he knew about being a filmmaker, for his students. “I thought I could release it for free, online, or even self-publish,” he says. “During the process of writing it, I interviewed professionals in the business – one was Hollywood writer/producer, Pen Densham, who suggested I talk to his Paul has now had a second pitch publisher and the next thing I knew I accepted – congrats! had a call from the president of Michael Wiese Productions, who decided to take on my book and release it internationally! Having the opportunity to have the work go worldwide is a dream come true – I wasn’t particularly good at English at school and only got a C at GCSE, so it goes to show that anything can happen!” Paul has since since pitched a second idea to the publishers, which has also been taken on and is now being written now for release in early 2019.

BRISTAGRAM Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your Bristol pics using #thebristolmag

@theurb anstan just intro dard du dedicated ced a mac ‘n’ cheese m enu...

ston Hall’s s loved Col @piccyped outfit from Voyder birthday

• shootingbettermovies.com

Let’s get digital, digital A six-day celebration of all things tech is returning to nearby Bath from 17 – 22 October and this year’s theme ‘Tech for Everyone’ aims to make it more inclusive than ever. Bath Digital Festival wants to celebrate the diverse talent in the South West, with almost 50 events packed into less than a week. “We’re committed to digital inclusion and innovation,” explains festival co-organiser Jim Morrison. “As technologies change and advance, everyone is impacted. So it’s extremely important to us that this is reflected in the content and line-up of Bath Digital Festival in 2017.” Each of the six days has a topic, from digital creativity to digital working, digital intelligence to digital for good. Those flocking to the festival can enjoy a digital art show, interactive comedy, a digital tour of Bath itself, Google seminars, an exploration of AI, eco-digital activism and much more. Now in its fifth year, the festival has expanded with the huge growth of technology and innovation in Bath and the greater South West region, with previous events showcasing industry-leading speakers, interactive workshops and hackathons. Get involved by attending, volunteering, or sponsoring – the choice is yours.

Sophie Ellis -Bextor visit ed newly open ed @butterm the ilkmaple

• bathdigitalfestival.co.uk

for in the sky Breakfast ves lo is ew hl @sara

We want this @bristol_chees e fromage/floris try wedding colla b

Almost 50 events are being packed in

18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Back to reality

T

he summer is a time of wandering and dreams; the autumn, for most of us, is a return to reality. To think, only a few weeks ago we were sitting on a rock on a Welsh hillside with the sea far below, gazing at a tumbledown farmhouse and imagining how amazing life would be if only we could live here, in the midst of all this beauty! We came home to discover that the students down the road had turned their house into a nightclub while the population of cars had mysteriously doubled over the summer. City life seemed like a drag. Then, one Saturday morning, I took the dog out to discover the park abuzz with activity. People were busily unloading stuff from a van parked by the bowling green. Ah, it must be The Fete, I observed to the dog, who expressed no great interest. He has developed a bizarre fascination for conkers and can think of little else besides his snuffly quest for shiny treasures. I wasn’t particularly excited either. When the kids were little and enjoyed puppet shows and face painting, the fete was quite an event, but now? Would I bother? The dog suddenly stopped and stood rooted to the spot, staring. A conker! I envied him his youthful enthusiasm. It turned out that I was going to bother going to the fete. Musicians and poets were due to perform. There would be a bar. Old friends. You love the fete, I was told firmly. Did I? This assertion reminded me of the time my mother decided that I loved fish pie, and went out of her way to make one whenever I was around. Remarks about the deliciousness of other dishes fell on deaf ears. I loved fish pie, and that was that. The fete likewise. Mrs B set off first, full of fervour. “Don’t be long!” OK, I said, I’ll just finish reading this article on health and safety regulations after Brexit – it’s really good! Then I had to pop out for coconut milk as we were down to two cans, and remove several burrs from the dog, but somehow, in spite of all this, I arrived at the park just as things were getting going. Running late, said a semi-official man. Trouble with the sound. He nodded towards the stage – in reality, two gazebos placed one behind the other. They were full of microphones and wires, which led into a tiny tent to one side. From within came sounds of consternation, followed by a cry of triumph. A couple I recognised as parents from primary school days came on stage and began playing country tunes; each had a guitar and while one strummed the rhythm the other picked out a melody line. They weren’t bad. No, they were really good. They sang too, and their voices like the guitar music rose and fell together. Some tiny children started dancing in that way young kids have, bending at the knee and flapping their arms up and down as if learning to fly. When the set ended, I spotted an old friend I hadn’t seen since, well, since before the summer. I told him about the tumbledown Welsh farmhouse. Yes, he said, but what about all this? As the next band started up – a five-piece – it began to rain. “This wasn’t in the forecast!” someone cried out, but the rain carried on. It got heavier. As the band covered up their instruments, the audience retreated under the trees nearby. Friends and strangers shared umbrellas and consulted phones. It’s set in, someone said. No more music, someone else said. Everything’s soaked. Such a shame! I looked hopefully up at the sky with the rest. Behind us, among the dripping trees, a woman began singing, and two others joined in. They sang haunting old love songs, acapella-style in the rain, as I stood rooted to the spot, staring, and remembering that, in fact, I do quite like city life after all. ■ 20 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Editor Tel: Email:

Amanda Nicholls 0117 974 2800 amanda@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Web Editor/Staff WriterJessica Hope Email: jessica@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Publisher Email:

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Inspiration for her collections is often drawn from Japan, says Amanda, who loves the beauty and simplicity of the country’s styles

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FASHION

AMANDA, PLEASE! This revered style maven has brought her own particular brand of effortless chic to the city

L

oved by many for her ‘clean glam’ signature style and coveted cocktail dresses – once worn by style icons like the late Princess Diana and sported today by the likes of Beyonce, Angelina Jolie and Scarlett Johansson, British fashion designer Amanda Wakeley is a leading force in the fashion industry since 1990. Having recently opened a concession in the Bristol branch of Harvey Nichols, she’s now bringing her timeless style to our city – so we took the liberty of stopping her in her tracks for a brief chat about it all... So why did you choose Harvey Nichols? Harvey Nichols are great partners for us. We have shops in their London, Leeds, Edinburgh and Manchester stores and we share a loyal customer base who enjoy the boutique department store approach of Harvey Nichols which has a far more curated offer. Have you spent much time in Bristol before? I don’t know the city well but I like its cosmopolitan yet relaxed vibe. Tell us about your AW17 collection; what influenced its development? Every season we draw our inspiration from different sources and create a muse – our woman of the season. We talk about who she is, how she would dress and put herself together, and that influences the collection. For winter, the Amanda Wakeley woman explores Japan. With a French father and Japanese mother, she was raised European, but grows ever more intrigued by her Japanese descent. Old family photographs urge her to learn more about this rich and storied culture and to find a connection with her heritage. She spends fall exploring Kyoto and the surrounding regions and becomes captivated by the local culture, customs and history. Traditional dress – both past and current – informs her style and silhouettes.

How would you describe the Wakeley Woman? She is a multi-talented, multi-tasker… She wants to look effortlessly stylish in all elements of her life. Where or from what do you draw most inspiration? Everywhere – as a designer, your eyes are like sponges. You are constantly processing visual information, whether it is colours, textures, silhouettes or aesthetic – nature, the street, a movie, an exhibition. But, at the end of the day, fashion is innately intuitive – it has to feel right at the time… What’s been your proudest moment in fashion? Receiving my OBE in 2010. Are you a fan of the traditional dress of any particular country? I have repeatedly drawn inspiration from Japan – I love the beauty and simplicity of a traditional kimono and how elements of that can be reworked in so many ways. What other plans are in the pipeline for the business? We are constantly working on our on-line presence as so many customers like to ‘pre-shop’ before actually going into a store and our website tells the story of the brand as well as the collection. We are working hard on widening our accessories offer and have a new jewellery collection, home fragrance and sunglasses in development. ■ • amandawakeley.com

Amanda’s autumn collection is full of effortlessly chic pieces – she herself will be wearing the sports-inspired pants and oversized knit layered over a white shirt

What did your time as a model, and working in retail, teach you? How transformative a well-cut piece of clothing can be – how empowering and elevating. That, combined with exemplary customer service; making your customer feel part of the brand. This is a very kind and inclusive brand which is not always the way in fashion… Who do you love dressing? It’s always a privilege to dress women for important moments in their lives – whether that is walking down the red carpet, up the aisle, an important meeting or even those challenging school-gate moments… So it’s less the who and more the how that I find rewarding… What has been your biggest challenge recently? There is so much noise in the world and so many mediums to reach people. People have information overload so the challenge is working out how to reach your customer in a way that is still relevant to the brand and yet gets you heard. What would we typically find you in, day to day? Which of your own pieces do you wear most? I am definitely a pants girl, and I am proud to say we have some really great styles for every body shape. This autumn I will be wearing our easy, sports-inspired pants and a chunky, oversized knit, layered over a white shirt. Can you remember the first person to buy something you designed? Yes – it was while I was still at school. I would often make pieces on commission during my school holidays! THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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SHOPPING | SHOES

BEST FOOT forward

GUCCI BLUSH HORSEBIT LEATHER LOAFERS, £450

Slip on and slope away in style...

GIVENCHY SLIDERS, £450

Sliders are the comfort shoe of the moment and we love Givenchy’s cute take on the style

ROCKSTUD PATENT LEATHER PUMPS, £665 Make a statement with these killer heels from Valentino

SOPHIA WEBSTER EVANGELINE SUEDE PUMPS, £475

We first spotted these winged wonders in a chic Italian shop window and have been obsessed ever since...

If the bank balance can stretch to it, and a well-deserved treat is on the cards, feminine footwear aficionados might like to take a look at Harvey Nichols’ latest pick of high-end heels and funky flats as a starting point... You’ll find us with our noses pressed up against the glass stands...

GUCCI ACE GLITTERED TRAINERS, £450

The appetite for glitter shows no sign of abating as we head into AW17

• harveynichols.com

GIANVITO ROSSI VAMP ANKLE BOOTS, £560

The desire we feel for these navy suede boots is very, very real SAINT LAURENT LOU LOU LEATHER MULES, £510

It’s fine to start planning for party season in October, isn’t it?

AQUAZZURA LOTUS BOOTS, £620

Some embroidered satin to ease you into the new season?

AQUAZZURA POWDER PUFF SLINGBACKS, £530

Sassy pom-pom kitten heels in pink velvet? Yes please...

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KutchenHaus October.qxp_Layout 1 22/09/2017 17:54 Page 1

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THE ARTS

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THE ARTS

BOOKISH BRISTOL Bristol Festival of Literature offers a chance to discover different sides to the city, with cool, cultural happenings unfurling in caves, cafes, cemeteries and more. But what makes Bristol such a literary hotspot? Words by Judy Darley Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Join the Novel Nights gang on 25 October (photo © Sophie Carefull); content coach and author Amy Morse hosts her Blogging for Writers event at Flow (photo © Visuable); when the party is lit: find out how a literary consultant can help budding writers, at The Square Club in Clifton (photo © Sophie Carefull); the acclaimed Flow restaurant will be hosting literary dinners and cream teas; hear editor Grace Palmer chat with Cornerstones consultant Dionne McCulloch (photo © Sophie Carefull)

F

rom Angela Carter to JK Rowling and Bob Hope to Stephen Merchant, Bristol has more than its fair share of literary offspring. Okay, so JK actually hailed from neighbouring Yate, and Bob Hope only lived here from 1906 to 1908, but it can’t be denied that the city’s laidback, open-minded attitude is uniquely suited to those of us with creative inclinations. This is the city that spawned a new generation of street artists and draws countless spray-can enthusiasts to the internationally renowned Upfest, while yarn stormers liven up bus stops and hook painstaking replicas of our urban landmarks. Aardman Animations still have their offices close to the waterfront on Gas Ferry Road, while Bristol Old Vic, Tobacco Factory and The Wardrobe all regularly stage work by local playwrights – MayFest takes this a step further with imaginative and thought-provoking happenings in unlikely venues ranging from parking garage rooftops to humble residential living rooms. On a brief stroll you’ll likely see examples of local innovation dating back centuries, not least Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s jaw-dropping marvels Clifton Suspension Bridge, Bristol Temple Meads and the ss Great Britain. Our heritage as merchants and sailors may have something to do with this enduring idea-fuelling curiosity. It certainly led to Daniel Defoe writing Robinson Crusoe after chatting to former castaway Alexander Selkirk over a pint or two. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift and Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson are among the other seafaring tales rooted in Bristol’s past. Quite simply, we Bristolians are no strangers to dreaming big, and pursuing these dreams, which contributes to this being such a cheerful and playful West Country wonderland. Even the brightly coloured houses in Hotwells and Totterdown demonstrate our urge to brighten up the world. On the literary side, there’s also the factor of the University of Bristol’s impressive alumni, who include bestselling author Rachel Joyce, who wrote The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, One Day author David Nicholls, and Julia Donaldson, creator of the immensely successful Gruffalo series. David Walliams and Matt Lucas both studied at the university, as did playwrights Mark Ravenhill and Sarah Cane. Catherine Johnson, playwright of sun-drenched musical extravaganza Mamma Mia, began writing for Bristol Old Vic as an unemployed single mum living in Bristol. And who says fairytales aren’t real? The grassroots nature of our literary festival reflects the can-do attitude of our homegrown talent, with the whole shebang run by volunteers with a passion for reading, writing and the powers of the imagination. There’s an air of excitement about the whole thing, as organisers and audiences alike come out to be inspired, to pick up new skills or for the chance to sit back and let new and original fiction pour into their minds. With local restaurant Flow getting involved, and many of the events making use of Bristol’s more eccentric and unlikely settings (Redcliffe Caves, anyone?), this is a literary festival for all the senses. So, sit back, breathe in and allow yourself to be swept away... Whether you’re a writer, reader, listener, or simply curious, there is plenty to feed your literary appetite, including...

Stories of Strong Women, 20 October, 1pm, Spielman Centre, Arnos Vale Cemetery In the dark days of Trump, strong female protagonists are more important than ever. Following on from 2016’s focus on women in non-fiction, this year’s discussion celebrates the fictional heroines breaking new ground. Coach, author and comedian Becky Walsh will interview a panel made up of historian and thriller writer Lucienne Boyce, publisher Cheryl Morgan, children’s writer Virginia Bergin and novelist Jean Burnett. Expect laughs as well as literature during this thought-provoking debate. The Flash Slam, 20 October, 7pm, 51 Stokes Croft This hotly anticipated event offers up a night of bite-sized tales delivered by members of Bristol’s many writing groups. With the winning team selected according to applause, this is very much a participatory event. Award-winning comedian Angie Belcher comperes. “I’m looking forward to hearing the weird and wonderful stories coming from the minds of the Bristol writing community,” she says. “It’s a great gig as the audience always gets on board with the ethos of the festival, that of support and encouragement for all writers. It’s also a right laugh!” Tangent Book Fair, 21 October, 1pm, The Space, People’s Republic of Stokes Croft This is the perfect spot for anyone who loves to spend their spare time with their nose in a book. You’ll have the chance to browse titles from Tangent Books, Bristol Books, Fiducia and Bristol Radical History Group. Listen out for readings, and take the chance to chat to authors and have your new books signed. Though the event is free, book lovers are likely to come home lighter in wallet. You have been warned. Ask An Editor, 25 October, 7.30pm, The Square Club Monthly literary gathering Novel Nights hosts a special event revealing how literary consultants help writers. Cornerstones consultant Dionne McCulloch will chat with Grace Palmer about her role as editor, explain how a literary consultancy helps writers and provide tips on self-editing, as well as answering audience questions. A rare opportunity for aspiring and experienced authors alike to discover what makes a manuscript successful. Literary Dinners in collaboration with Flow restaurant, various dates; prices from £25 The festival has teamed up with the acclaimed restaurant Flow for a series of dinners and cream teas, including My Artichoke Heart: An Evening of Food and Verse on 26 October, and Blogging for Writers with content coach and author Amy Morse on 27 October. “Natural storytellers are often natural marketers, and don’t even know it,” says Amy. “I want to help other writers to realise the power and potential in their words, and of course, their need for afternoon tea!” • Full details at unputdownable.org; @BristolLitFest

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BOOKS

FRIGHT NIGHT In the spirit of All Hallows’ Eve, Foyles bookshop’s Charlotte Pope picks out favourite bone-chilling literature to have us cowering beneath the bedclothes in terror, plus some suitably spooky kids’ reads

PET SEMATARY, BY STEPHEN KING

I’m a big fan of King and have read a lot of his work: but this is my absolute favourite, and what I consider to be his most bone-chilling novel. When Louis Creed gets a new job, he and his family move to a new house. Their new neighbour warns them about the busy highway next to their house, and sure enough, when his wife has taken the children to visit relatives, little Ellie’s beloved cat, Churchill, is knocked down and killed. Louis knows his daughter will be devastated, but neighbour Jud offers a solution. Behind their new house is a pet cemetery (misspelled ‘sematary’ on the crude sign), but Jud leads Louis on beyond it, where Louis buries the cat. The next afternoon, the cat comes home, seemingly alive, but with something unmistakably strange about him. Louis is deeply disturbed, but when a horrific tragedy strikes the family, he can’t help but wonder: if the ‘sematary’ could bring the cat back to life, could it work on a human?

FUNNYBONES, BY JANET AND ALLAN AHLBERG

In a dark, dark house in a dark, dark cellar, live some...skeletons! Big Skeleton and Little Skeleton decide to take Dog Skeleton for a walk and perhaps give someone a fright on the way. The skeletons get up to all sorts of mischief, from playing on the swings, to visiting the skeleton zoo. They soon decide to give each other a scare and end up so spooked that they run all the way home, back to the cellar. This fun picture book has been a firm favourite since its publication in 1980 – authored and illustrated by award winning husband-and-wife team Janet and Allan Ahlberg. The Ahlbergs’ name is synonymous with brilliantly told children’s stories – I remember reading these as a child and adoring them – and Funnybones remains a great choice for a Halloween-themed bedtime story. 30 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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THE TURN OF THE SCREW, BY HENRY JAMES

Our unnamed protagonist is hired to be a governess for a young man in London who has suddenly become lumbered with the care of his young niece and nephew. Eager to please her new employer, she sets off to a remote country house to begin her work. Her new charges are cherubic and sweet: Miles and Flora seem perfect little angels, so when the house receives a letter saying that Miles has been expelled from school for wicked behaviour, nobody can quite believe it. The accusation seems impossible and is immediately forgotten, before the governess begins to see the ghostly figures of a man and woman in the grounds. Her descriptions of the pair match exactly to those of the late Miss Jessel, her predecessor, and another employee, Peter Quint – also long dead. Before their deaths, Jessel and Quint spent a lot of time with the children, and the governess becomes convinced that Miles and Flora are aware of the spirits, and have been corrupted. Is there really a demonic presence at work, or are these fears simply the ravings of an insane mind?

THE WITCHES, BY ROALD DAHL

Beware: witches are real. One little boy learns all about the perils of them from his grandmother, and knows to be on his guard. Witches dress like everyone else and seem as normal as can be, but deep down they are dastardly and cruel, and they hate children. The Grand High Witch hates children most of all and wants to make every single one of them disappear! When visiting a hotel with his grandmother, the boy accidentally stumbles upon the secret meeting between all of England’s witches and discovers their hideous secret – the witches are planning to turn every child in England into a mouse, so that terrible teachers will become afraid and squish them flat! Can the boy stop them from carrying out their evil plot? A classic of children’s fiction, from one of the nation’s favourite children’s authors.

THE TELL-TALE HEART, BY EDGAR ALLAN POE In this classic work of Gothic literature from the master of the macabre, our narrator has committed a murder. The old man that he lives with has a pale blue, ‘vulture-like’ eye that repulses and horrifies him, and in his desperation to escape the eye’s gaze, he kills the man and dismembers him, hiding his body beneath the floorboards. Soon the police arrive, called to the building by a neighbour who heard a scream in the night, but the narrator is confident that no one will suspect a thing, and welcomes the investigators in to look around. He encourages them to take a seat – right on top of the spot where the body is concealed. Yet although originally calm and collected, the narrator begins to feel uneasy. He fancies he has a strange sort of ringing in his ears, an incessant noise getting louder and louder, and suddenly he knows what it is: the old man’s heart, beating beneath his feet... First published in 1843, this short story remains haunting to this day.


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Free Jewellery Valuation Day at Clevedon Salerooms

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Clevedon Salerooms will be holding a FREE no-obligation Specialist Jewellery, Watch, Silver & Gold Valuation Day at the Salerooms on Tuesday 10th October between 10am – 4pm. Clevedon Salerooms Specialist Valuers, Gemmologist John Kelly FGA, watch specialist Marc Burridge ASFAV and Toby Pinn MRICS will be providing free no-obligation verbal estimates with the 16th November Specialist Sale in mind. This pre-Christmas Specialist sale attracts international interest. For more information contact the salerooms on 01934 830111 or visit www.clevedon-salerooms.com

Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers

Tuesday-------------------------------------------------10th October 10am-4pm

The Auction Centre Kenn Road, Kenn Clevedon, BS21 6TT

Held at Clevedon Salerooms, Kenn Road, Kenn, Clevedon, BS21 6TT Tea &  Coffee served. Every lot, in every auction, illustrated and sold with live internet bidding

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

Tel: 01934 830111 www.clevedon-salerooms.com

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LOCAL | EVENTS

WHAT’S ON

Brit-hop group Too Many T’s come to The Exchange, image © Too Many T’s

Murder on board the ss Great Britain

FROM 1 OCTOBER UNTIL 14 OCTOBER, 7.30PM

Puccini’s Tosca, Tobacco Factory Theatres Opera Project returns to Tobacco Factory Theatres with Puccini’s fiery tale of love, lust, jealousy and murder, complete with a 12piece orchestra and famous arias including ‘Vissi d’arte’ and ‘E lucevan le stelle’. Tickets from £15; tobaccofactorytheatres.com 1 OCTOBER, 8.30PM

The Shimmer Band, Thekla Bristolian psychedelic pop outfit The Shimmer Band return to their hometown with the This Feeling ‘Alive’ tour, alongside Bang Bang Romeo and BlackWaters. Tickets cost £11; ents24.com

7 OCTOBER, 7.30PM

Bruch and Beethoven concert, Trinity-Henleaze URC Church Professional orchestra the Bristol Ensemble performs Bruch’s iconic Violin Concerto with the soloist Emil Huckle-Kleve, alongside music by Mozart and Beethoven. Tickets £16; henleazeconcertsociety.org.uk, 0117 923 0164

FROM 8 OCTOBER 10 – 14 OCTOBER, 2.30PM & 7.30PM

Crazy for You, Bristol Hippodrome

1 OCTOBER, 10AM – 3.30PM

Antique Vintage and Collectables Fair, Ashton Court Mansion Browse 40 stalls offering fine jewellery, china, furniture, memorabilia, pictures, retro items, clothing and more, then stop off at the café for a delicious cream tea. Entrance costs £2, under-16s go free; anniehawksley@blueyonder.co.uk 2 OCTOBER – 19 NOVEMBER, 6.30PM

Ice Road, Jacob’s Wells Baths Four orphans join forces to survive the murderous Leningrad

34 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

blockade in this show from Raucous theatre company, fusing Russian folklore, historical accounts, creative technology and original music. Tickets from £16.50; raucous.org.uk

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Caroline Flack and Tom Chambers star in this high energy, high-kicking, gloriously glamorous show from Watermill Theatre, featuring a fabulous score from the Gershwin brothers’ songbook. Tickets from £22.90; atgtickets.com 12 OCTOBER, 7.30PM

Clarinet Magic, Colston Hall Join Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra for an evening of passionate music starring clarinet soloist Andreas Ottensamer,

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Tosca comes to Tobacco Factory Theatres, image © Harkimedes

featuring works from Schumann, Hindemith, Brahms and Weber. Tickets from £8.50 to £36; colstonhall.org 13 OCTOBER, 7.30PM

Murder Mystery Dinner, ss Great Britain Dust off your deerstalker, fill your pipe and become a detective for the evening on board ss Great Britain. Try to solve the crime and enjoy a three-course meal complete with Winter Pimms – what more could you ask for on Friday 13th? Tickets cost £70; ssgreatbritain.org

FROM 15 OCTOBER 15 OCTOBER, 9.30AM – 12.30PM

Champion Tree Walk with Chris Watts, Tyntesfield A fantastic walk for gardening and horticulture enthusiasts alike. Chris will take visitors on a journey across the estate to discover hidden gems and some ancient giants. Tickets cost £10; nationaltrust.org.uk

Tickets from £10 to £18; bristololdvic.org.uk 19 – 21 OCTOBER, 10AM – 5PM

Craft Show and Quilt Exhibition, Bath and West Showground See the famous Magna Carta Quilts along with over 100 quilt exhibits. Plus, discover over 150 leading craft supply businesses, groups and guilds, embroidery displays, workshops, demonstrations and make-andtakes. Tickets from £7 to £8; craft4crafters.co.uk 19 OCTOBER – 4 NOVEMBER, 1PM, 2.30PM & 7.30PM

Waiting For Godot, Tobacco Factory Theatres Samuel Beckett’s 20th-century classic tells the story of Vladimir and Estragon, whose comic discussions and unusual encounters ease their fruitless wait for the mysterious Godot. Tickets from £14 to £18; tobaccofactorytheatres.com 21 OCTOBER, 7PM

18 – 21 OCTOBER, 7.30PM

The Bekkrell Effect, Bristol Old Vic Circus, punk, pop and chaos combine in this exhilliarating visual feast, inspired by physicist Henri Becquerel’s discovery of radioactivity. Devised by French company Groupe Bekkrell, this comic show forms part of Bristol’s Circus City festival.

Westonbirt Charities Gyspy Ball, Westonbirt School Enjoy a free drink on arrival, delicious moroccan mezzes and tagines, magicians, entertainers and dancing to the fabulous gypsy punk band Ushti Baba, all in aid of Home-Start SD and the Great Western Air Ambulance. Tickets cost £65; westonbirtfair.org


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LOCAL | EVENTS

21 OCTOBER, 10AM – 4PM

Bristol Casefile: Mystery of the StarEaters, Bristol Shopping Quarter This month, 12 secret locations in Broadmead will take part in a truly immersive gaming experience for would-be detectives and adventurers, turning the Bristol Shopping Quarter into a life-size game board. There’s also a prize for the best dressed team – the more creative the better. Tickets cost £10, under-12s go free; bit.do/casefilebristol

FROM 22 OCTOBER

Brahms’ monumental Requiem and Schuman’s Lieder, the latter miniature masterpieces sung by The Sixteen Associate Director Eamonn Dougan. Tickets from £5.38 to £31.18; bristolchoral.co.uk

The Bekkrell Effect comes to Bristol Old Vic, image © Massao Mascaro

29 OCTOBER, 10.30AM – 12.30PM

Fungi Forays, Tyntesfield Join Tyntesfield’s local fungi experts for a foray into the world of fungi growing across the estate. Book onto one of the sessions to view samples from the annual fungus audit and become an expert yourself. Tickets cost £10; nationaltrust.org.uk

The Magna Carta Quilts at the Craft Show and Quilt Exhibition, image © David Dyson

NEXT MONTH...

24 – 25 OCTOBER, 10AM – 5PM

Westonbirt Charities Fair, Westonbirt School This charitable fair features an abundance of gifts and treats on sale, free talks by local authors, a reindeer hunt, wearable art, free visits to the historic gardens and more. Tickets cost £7.50 to £8, profits go to Home-Start SD, the Great Western Air Ambulance and Toucan for Children; westonbirtfair.org

3 NOVEMBER, 6.30PM

800th Anniversary Banquet, Bristol Harbour Hotel Celebrate the 800th anniversary of the ceremonial role and traditions of the Lord Mayor of Bristol with a banquet reflecting eight centuries of food and drink, created by eight of the country’s leading chefs. Tickets cost £150; call 01179 733569 to book 4 NOVEMBER, 7.30PM

25 OCTOBER, 7PM

Too Many T’s, The Exchange UK hip hop duo Too Many T’s, made up of Leon Rhymes and Ross Standaloft and influenced by the likes of Beastie Boys, bring their debut album South City to The Exchange this month. Tickets cost £8.75; bristolticketshop.co.uk 28 OCTOBER, 7.30PM – 9.30PM

Brahms Requiem, Colston Hall In their first concert of the season, Bristol Choral Society present

Romantic Masterworks, St George’s Bristol Romantic masterworks from four of the most influential composers of the 19th and early 20th century. The programme includes the Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, performed by the internationally acclaimed pianist Nicola Meecham. Also featured is Delius’s Walk to the Paradise Garden, a masterpiece in orchestration, and Mahler’s Adagietto from his Symphony No. 5 – one of his best loved pieces of music. The concert concludes with the emotionally powerful Symphony No. 4 of

Brahms, often called ‘the tragic symphony’ for its intense passion. Tickets from £5 to £17; bristolsymphonyorchestra.com 11 NOVEMBER, 7.30PM

In Remembrance Concert, St Mary Redcliffe Join Bristol Bach Choir as they start the season with a concert of reflection and remembrance, featuring works by Bach, Vaughan Williams and Eleanor Daley, conducted by Christopher Finch. Tickets from £5 to £20; bristolbach.org.uk

11 NOVEMBER, 7.30PM

Bristol Phoenix Choir Concert, All Saints Church, Pembroke Road Bristol Phoenix Choir performs Beethoven Mass in C, Schubert Magnificat and Mozart Te Deum with soloists Elinor Cooper (soprano), Helen Vincent (alto), Mike Gormley (tenor) and Alexander Learmonth (bass), under their conductor Paul Walton, accompanied by Matt Davies. Tickets cost £12.50, £5 for students, under 16s free; bristolphoenixchoir.org.uk

Image © Matt Martin

EDITOR’S PICK... 18 OCTOBER – 11 NOVEMBER, 7.30PM

War Horse, Bristol Hippodrome The National Theatre’s unforgettable adaptation of Michael Morpurgo’s War Horse comes to Bristol Hippodrome, complete with life-sized puppets from award-winning Handspring Puppet Company, which bring breathing, galloping, charging horses to the stage. The emotional story takes place at the outbreak of the First World War, and follows the story of Joey, young Albert’s beloved horse, who is sold to the Cavalry and shipped to France. Fate takes Joey on an extroardinary journey, while Albert embarks on a treacherous mission to find him and bring him home. Tickets from £22.40. • atgtickets.com

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THEATRE

CRAZY FOR CAZZA? Matthew Amer meets a TV star making her national musical theatre debut and stopping off in Bristol this month

Opposite page, clockwise from top: Cazza identifies with strong, naughty, vulnerable Irene, the character she plays in the show; the TV presenter and actress stars alongside Strictly winner and Holby City actor Tom Chambers; the cast of the show are what’s known as ‘quadruple threat’ actors – as they all play their own instruments

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aroline Flack knows all about troubled romances after her stint presenting Love Island – one of the most watched and talked about shows of the summer and the source of many a heated watercooler conversation, with relationships going dramatically wrong, or right. So it is fitting that her theatrical debut sees her play the character of Irene – a woman with a similarly bumpy love life – in hit musical Crazy For You. “She’s strong. She knows what she wants. But there’s a vulnerability,” Flack tells me as we chat during rehearsals. “She gets hurt the whole way through, but she’s brilliantly defiant. She stays strong and doesn’t give up. She’s naughty as well. There are definitely bits of Irene that are like me.” Touring the UK until May 2018, the musical is a joyful, romantic comedy packed with Gershwin songs and telling the story of Bobby, a banker who longs to be a stage star. When he’s forced to foreclose on a failing theatre, he falls for the owner’s daughter; who would want nothing to do with him if she knew who he was. Irene is the woman he leaves behind. “It’s feel-good and fun,” says Flack. “It’s a show the whole family can enjoy, but it’s got a very cool vibe to it too. It’s one of those shows where you have a smile on your face the whole way through. I know, because I’ve seen the rehearsals. I think audiences will be blown away by the talent of the cast.” Said cast, which includes Strictly Come Dancing winner Tom Chambers and West End star Charlotte Wakefield, are indeed supremely talented. While the ‘triple threat’ performer – singer, dancer, actor – is considered the holy grail of musical theatre, these guys are quadruple threats as they also play their own instruments. “I’ve never been so in awe of a cast before,” Flack gushes. Crazy For You is a reunion of sorts for her and Chambers. Both won the BBC’s flagship Saturday evening dance competition and starred together when the show’s live version toured the country. When Flack talks about the Casualty and Holby City star, who built his stage reputation leading the casts of Top Hat and White Christmas, she does so in terms that make him seem like a big brother. He looked after her and supported her when she was nervous – the ideal person to have around as you make your professional theatre debut. It was Flack’s time on Strictly in 2014, and the live tour, that reignited her ambition to perform on stage – an ambition she’d held since childhood. When, as a teenager, she discovered that performing could be a career, she set her heart on it and studied for three years at Bodywork Company in Cambridge. “It’s the only real qualification I have,” she laughs. Her stage aspirations morphed into a presenting career when she started being offered jobs. From co-presenting Channel 4’s celebrity sports show The Games in 2005, she moved on to Gladiators, Saturday morning kids show TMI, I’m A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here Now! and The Xtra

Factor. They’re projects she clearly loved, but that eagerness to get back to the theatre was always lurking. “It wasn’t just a case of wanting to be on stage, it was wanting to be on stage but doing the right thing,” she explains. So why was this Watermill Theatre production the show that brought her back to the theatre? The answer, she says, is that playing Irene gives her the opportunity to get to grips with a character rather than worrying about leading an entire show singlehandedly. It’s the chance to relearn her craft and refresh her memory of theatrical performance. And, in a show packed with jazz standards like I Got Rhythm and They Can’t Take That Away From Me, she has a fantastic solo number. “As soon as I heard Naughty Baby,” she enthuses, “I thought ‘Yes, this is great.’” Choreographer Nathan M Wright has created a new routine specifically for Flack. It’s still being finalised as we chat, so she can’t give too much away, but she does say it “plays to her strengths,” and uses a piano and rope. “It’s saucy and suggestive, but not too naughty,” she laughs. Handily, for an actor about to set off on a tour around the country, she’s a fan of the nomadic life. “I’m a traveller at heart,” she grins. “There is so much more to the UK than London and I don’t get to see it enough, so I’m massively excited. There are some really amazing venues around the UK, and to play them will be hugely exciting.” I wonder whether, having worked on both Strictly and X Factor, Flack has sought dance or vocal advice from any of the shows’ experts. “All my experts are standing in front of me in this production,” she replies with a smile. “I only have to ask them.” She needs no extra advice on dealing with pre-show anxiety either. While she may not have performed in a musical before, competing in Strictly – both on TV and on tour – tested her courage. She’s an old hand at live TV too. “The nerves never kick in until just before you start,” she explains. “An hour before, they suddenly hit.” They come with a “good sickie feeling,” she says. “I have a little mantra I say to myself. It’s never changed. I say that in my head and then I get on with it.” With Strictly, Flack’s success revolved around just two people. When she’s presenting, it’s often just herself “on a sofa, chatting to someone”. With Crazy For You, “you’ve got 30 people all working together.” And she is relishing the team ethos that comes with being part of a musical production. The cast are even talking about getting her involved in the music side of the show. “Everyone says that they’re going to teach me something by the end of the tour,” she tells me. “I am aiming for the drums.” So don’t be surprised if, at some later date, you see Flack with drumstick in hand, proving herself not just a bona fide musical theatre star, but a quadruple threat too. ■

• atgtickets.co.uk/bristol

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The 2017 Bristol Poppy Ball is being held at The City Marriott Hotel, Bristol. The Poppy Ball will commence with a Sparkling Reception featuring The Royal Air Force Association Band Ensemble, followed by a 4 course Dinner, an Auction, Raffle and then Dancing to a popular Pop/Rock Band and a Disco. Jon-Allan Butterworth is our Guest Speaker; Jon formerly served with The RAF and is the first Member of the Armed Forces injured in the Iraq Conflict to not only participate in the Rio Paralympics but also to win Gold for Cycling! We are also proud to announce that our Guest of Honour will be Johnny Johnson MBE, the last British Member of The Dambusters. Tickets are £55 each and one ticket would be complimentary should you wish to book a table of 10. Dress is Black Tie or Mess Dress for Gentlemen and Long or Cocktail Dress for Ladies. For tickets please go to: www.bristolpoppyball.co.uk or Telephone Jon Taylor on 07773 913 738

CHOOSING HIS WORDS WISELY Bristol based playwright Matt Roberts discusses his two original plays being performed at The Alma Theatre this October. When you start writing a new play, what tends to be the impetus and how long does it take to complete? It usually comes in an arbitrary or accidental way - it could be something I over-hear in a shop queue, see on a documentary or just some throwaway comment I hear from a friend. And when I’ve got the idea, it’s all about pace and intensity - I have a kind of ‘golden window’ where I’ll feel linguistically, dramatically and thematically ‘in the zone,’ and that’s when 90% of the play gets written. I can’t incubate a play - it all has to come out ASAP! You are currently on tour with two of your plays, ‘Sound Bite’ and ‘Remedies.’ Two plays in one night? Sounds ambitious. It is. I’m sure it’s been done before, but it’s still unusual. And it’s important for us to be able to offer audiences something different and to have, to use a grotesquely corporate term, a ‘unique selling point.’ It’s a considerable challenge: condensing the scripts, learning hundreds of lines, rehearsing on different sets - it’s really tough, but thoroughly exhilarating. Who are Middle-Weight Theatre Company? The company was formed in 2013 by myself and Tom Stabb. The formula is really simple: I write the plays, Tom directs, I usually end up acting in them with Al Wadlan, the third core group member, and then we draft in other actors to fill the cast. I love that we don’t compartmentalise our roles - Al has great direction ideas, Tom frequently contributes to my writing; we are all completely enfranchised to offer ideas across all aspects of a project. It’s brilliant. We all have a very similar vision for the company - challenging, progressive writing and memorable performances.

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What are the two plays about? ‘Sound Bite’ is set in 1969, an hour before the Apollo 11 moon landing. Two NASA press officers have been put in charge of writing Neil Armstrong’s first words on the moon - and they’ve got writer’s block. The play shows the gruelling (and at times ludicrous) process they go through trying to compose the iconic statement. ‘Remedies’ is essentially a diagnosis of ‘Broken Britain.’ I wanted to examine and analyse why our country seems to be in such a state of depression and volatility. So, in it, two pharmacists observe the maladies of their customers and deconstruct how the ills of our citizens reflect the ills of our country. It’s quite a heavy and rich piece, but it’s lubricated by a lot of pathos, satire - and there are some excellent condom gags in there too! How does it feel to have your plays performed at the world famous Edinburgh Fringe Festival? When your play has had a sell out week, you get this sense that you’ve reached the apotheosis of your craft and there’s no-one out there better. And then you go to the Edinburgh Fringe, walk around the Royal Mile, see a handful of plays, and suddenly you think, ‘Oh. There are literally a thousand other writers, actors and directors who are just as imaginative, talented, dedicated and relentless in the pursuit of excellence as our company. It’s very sobering and very humbling. And consequently, when you have a show that does well at the Fringe, it’s total euphoria. Also the battered Mars bars are quite nice. Middle-Weight Theatre Company will be performing at The Alma Theatre, Clifton, October 19th, 20th & 21st. All shows at 8pm, £10 / £8. Tickets available: www.thealmatavernandtheatre.co.uk or middleweighttheatrecompany.com


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THEATRE

THE WAIT IS OVER Tobacco Factory Theatres’ first major solo production opens this month – director Mark Rosenblatt tells us more

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ixty-five years old, Waiting for Godot is Samuel Beckett’s stillinfluential play about the struggle for purpose, the power of friendship and the hunt for a pair of decent boots. Over recent months, Mark Rosenblatt – associate director at West Yorkshire Playhouse from 2013-2016 – has led a team of local and national artists including designer Janet Bird, composer and sound designer Dave Price, Tobacco Factory Theatres’ own Matthew Graham for lighting design, and clowning director Bim Mason (co-founder of Circomedia) in bringing new life to the 20th-century literary classic... TBM: The play has often been classed as one of the most important plays of the 20th century. Do you agree, and if so, why? Mark: There aren’t many plays that make a splash in popular culture. Even if you’ve never seen or read it, the Chaplinesque bowler hats, the conceit of eternally waiting for this guy Godot, even knowing that it’s the play where ‘nothing happens’ – all these hallmarks are not just familiar, they’re really well-known. I think that tells you how much of an impact the play has made. Now I’ve had a chance to really dig into it, I understand why. It’s a high-wire act and yet is written with such certainty and confidence, so precisely and with such brilliant comic patterns. It manages to place a foreground of music hall riffs against a backdrop of deep tragedy and despair and it plays with the biggest universal ideas – hope, trying hard to get through life, filling time, purpose, wondering what it all means and how we use and abuse relationships. And yet, somehow – and I think this is where its magic really lies – it manages to do so in a way which resists explaining itself. It’s rich and specific and inexplicably about everything and nothing. What can audiences expect from this interpretation? A portrait of friendship in all its tenderness and cruelty. Laughter. The intimacy of Tobacco Factory Theatres in the round. Have you taken the action into a particular space and time? It’s open. Our design is deliberately ambiguous but hopefully fires up some associations for the audience. It will feel simple, stripped back, modern, but with nods to the past. How would you preface the play for someone who’s never heard of it? It’s a play about a tetchy friendship between two vagrants, stuck in some kind of Groundhog Day loop, meeting in the same place, day after day in the hope of getting something from a landowner called Mr Godot. (A job? Something more?) They can’t remember everything, maybe their memories are going – were they here yesterday, is this the right tree? – and if they don’t stop finding stuff to do – anything – they

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might have to face the silence and the memories of what they have been running from – or is it towards? – all these years. How do you make this kind of work accessible to a 2017 audience? Explore it deeply – make it tender, cruel, silly and deep. We’re all like those things – full of contradictions. What is your favourite moment in the play? When Vladimir and Estragon finally work out that the only way to stop Pozzo falling down is to hold him up. There has been controversy in Bristol and across the US recently regarding the issue of slavery, particularly in regard to monuments and place names. How do you think a modern audience will respond to the character of Lucky the slave, and his master Pozzo? It’s shocking, no doubt. But the longer you spend with them, the more you realise these two people can’t let each other go. The bind between master and slave, in this play, is complex and full of twisted love. It doesn’t make it right. It just makes it complicated. How did you become a director; what advice can you give? I directed at school and university and won a competition which helped me break through. I wrote to established directors and asked if I could meet them. A couple let me assist them. I was lucky to have a couple of people who championed me. I set up my own company so I wasn’t reliant on freelancing. I huffed and puffed. I still do. Advice-wise, crikey. It’s not really a career in any traditional sense. You need to be resourceful and tenacious and keep working out what you want to do and not try to mimic others. Keep at it. What is your favourite theatrical work, and why? The Three Lives of Lucie Cabrol by Complicite. I saw it when I was at school. It was unlike anything I’d ever seen. Visceral, physical, brutal, tender. It felt like seeing the dark side of the circus. Do you have any other exciting productions coming up this year? I’ve just made a show in New York with amazing composer/performer Heather Christian. It’s playing now in Brooklyn and is a new piece about her relationship with the dead (she talks to them); finishing with a blues Requiem Mass performed with a 30-strong community choir. I’m also about to direct Frank McGuinness’ adaptation of De Profundis, Oscar Wilde’s letter from jail to his ex, Bosie. It’s a one-man show at the Vaudeville Theatre in the West End in January. ■ • tobaccofactorytheatres.com


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Swing Circus features Kenyan circus performer Moses Opiyo and Nigerian dancer Precious Onyenekwu

The Lindy Hop – with its roots in traditional African dance – began in the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem and spread like wildfire

Also worth a watch during the festival is Ockham's Razor’s ‘Tipping Point’ (image by Mark Dawson Photography)

Image, right: American GIs on Bristol’s Park Street

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CULTURE

SWINGING CITY Bristol’s biennial circus festival is back from 12 – 29 October, with events for theatre lovers, party animals, punks, science fans, jazz disciples, swing dancers; the list goes on. Aisling Mustan looks into the local background of the latter

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hen the big bands of Duke Ellington, Count Basie and other jazz legends took over American pop culture in the 1920s and ’30s, the swing era began. Born in the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem, with its roots in traditional African dance, the Lindy Hop spread like wildfire in America. Against the backdrop of segregation, young white Americans mimicked swing steps created in the black communities they were separated from legally and culturally. It was the arrival of American GIs during WWII that brought swing dancing to these shores. Dancehalls and ballrooms, that were closed due to lack of business, flung open their doors to working-class girls who had never danced before and American soldiers who taught them the new moves. Black GIs based in Bristol during WWII were housed in segregated units but many experienced a new-found freedom in the city while off duty. The American authorities met local resistance to their attempts to introduce segregation beyond the barracks and black GIs mixed with white women in ways that could have led to lynch mob violence in some US states at the time. And despite the government’s attempt to discourage inter-racial relationships, many blossomed in the dance halls. For many white American GIs, however, the freedom enjoyed by their black comrades-in-arms was unthinkable. Coming from a culture of strict apartheid, the sight of black Americans dancing with white British girls was an affront to them and the well-established pecking order back home. Delphine Higgs, a young woman living in Bristol during WWII, recalled the time: “The Americans were in camps all around Bristol, and every evening, truckloads of American soldiers arrived in town for entertainment and to meet their girlfriends.” One evening Delphine and her friend were walking home from a dance when: “Suddenly from Castle Street we were confronted with hordes of wild white Americans, all arms and legs and in an ugly, angry mood. A young woman and her black American boyfriend were just getting over a rope intending to proceed down Castle Street. The white American soldiers surged forward and hit the black American soldier on the head and he fell to the ground, with the girl screaming.” In 1945, hundreds of women in Bristol – who had been denied the opportunity to say goodbye to their black GI boyfriends – linked arms and marched on the Bristol barracks singing the Bing Crosby hit Don’t Fence Me In. Barriers were broken down and the gates of the railway station were rushed, the women crying; “To hell with the US Army bars! We want our sweethearts!” Unfortunately, it was very difficult for these relationships to continue as interracial marriage was illegal in about 20 American states at the time. Some say the seeds of the civil rights movement were sown during this time. The tolerance generally shown in the UK and the rest of Europe inspired many African Americans to fight oppression on their return to the US. By the ’60s and ’70s, swing dancing had all but died out, but in the 1980s, dance enthusiasts tracked down many of the original dancers who were still alive, learnt from them and launched a new era of swing. Loz James is the founder of Swing Circus, a Bristol-based group which harnesses the energy of swing dance to create uplifting, energetic circus and dance shows. As part of this year’s Circus City, Loz and her crew of performers will take over the Trinity

Centre for three days to revisit and celebrate the roots of swing dance. “It’s really important to acknowledge the African American roots of swing as a cultural response to oppression,” says Loz. “The events in the dance halls of Bristol during WWII show the hypocrisy of the time. It’s hard to fathom white GIs dancing steps created in Harlem to impress local Bristol girls and turning to violence when black GIs wanted to do the same! “Our event will look at the connection between traditional African dance and dances like the Lindy Hop and the Jitterbug; as swing dancing is rooted in black African rhythms and movements. We’ll have Precious Onyenekwu, a wonderful dancer from Nigeria, teaching a workshop on African solo dance and Moses Opiyo, a talented circus performer from Kenya, performing in our cabaret show. And we’ll have workshops introducing steps from the swing era of the ’20s and ’30s.” According to one of the founders of Swing Dance Bristol, David Zilkha, who is teaching a workshop at Swing Circus, Bristol’s swing dance resurgence is a reflection of the characteristics of the city. “Swing dance is a naturally good fit for Bristol,” he says. “There is a strong sense of community, an independently minded spirit and a willingness to have fun and explore something new.” So, dust off your dancing shoes! Swing Circus is suitable for complete beginners, and the three-day event (20 – 22 October, tickets from £15) will have you jiving and jitterbugging in no time. Featuring a programme of workshops, cabaret shows, circus performances and evening dances, Bristolians can learn from the best in the business – including choreographers from BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing.

More from Circus City The festival will fire imaginations for three jam-packed weeks as organisers and performers keep Bristol firmly on the map as an international capital of contemporary circus. Don’t miss... The Bekkrell Effect, 18 – 21 October One of this year’s big highlights is a collaboration with Bristol Old Vic, bringing the critically acclaimed French show, The Bekkrell Effect, to Bristol for its UK premiere. Inspired by physicist Henri Becquerel’s discovery of radioactivity, this is an all-female show described as ‘part riot grrrl pop song, part circus spectacle…combining the power of punk with risk and flare’. Tickets £8-£18, Bristol Old Vic. Tipping Point, 27 & 28 October Aerial theatre trailblazers Ockham’s Razor are bringing their brandnew show, Tipping Point, to the city. Winner of the Total Theatre Best Circus Award at Edinburgh Festival 2016, this daring work is a feast of high-risk brilliance performed with grace and power. Tickets £10-£15, 1532 Theatre at Bristol Grammar School. Around, 25 October – 28 October The renowned Race Horse Company bring their new show Around to Circus City for families. It’s a fun, tender show about the life of a circus troupe as they overcome hardship through collaboration and cooperation. This playful performance mixes circus skills old and new: juggling, acrobatics, hula hooping, mime, clownery, blowing bubbles and breakdancing! Tickets from £9, Circomedia. ■ • bristolcircuscity.com

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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART We love the super-autumnal ‘Prince Pumpkin’ by Frances Cooley

West Bristol Arts Trail, various venues, 14 & 15 October

Since 2008, this annual public event has welcomed thousands of visitors to the area to view the work of artists living and working in Clifton, Cliftonwood, Redland and Hotwells; and now the West Bristol Arts Trail is celebrating its 10th year with over 100 artists in 50 homes, studios and public spaces, showcasing their work to the public. Taking part in the trail this year are fine artists, photographers, potters, ceramicists, printmakers, jewellers and sculptors; and each venue will be completely different, with visitors viewing finished paintings, works in progress or watching artists give demonstrations about their creative process. The free trail offers a unique opportunity to meet artists in their studios, talk to them about their work or buy directly from them. Pick up an event map or plan your visit through the West Bristol Arts Trail website, which hosts biographies and a selection of images for participating artists – look out for the yellow balloons across the area which mark each venue.

• westbristolarts.com

Quentin Blake exhibition, Sky Blue Framing & Gallery, until December

Young Designers Grant: Rosalyn Faith, Diana Porter, 1 – 31 October Last year, Rosalyn Faith was awarded the Diana Porter Young Designers Grant, as part of a new scheme offering £1,000 to help towards equipment and materials. Diana Porter and the team also provided mentoring and advice, guiding Rosalyn through the early stages of setting up her business and refining designs for a competitive market. The grant has allowed Rosalyn to facilitate the production of her first commercial collection, to be featured in a dedicated exhibition in the Bristol shop and gallery. Rosalyn Faith originally trained in textile design, specialising in the construction of sculptural fabrics through the timeless technique of knitting. It is then that she developed her passion for sculptural forms and progressed to studying metal work, learning to use precious metals and stones which created a new, treasurable feel within her work. Bringing the two disciplines together, Rosalyn is now on an exciting journey, creating her own collection of process-led, contemporary jewellery. Each piece is hand made in her studio space in Bristol where she is an active member of Centrespace Co-operative alongside working as a talented member of both the shop and workshop teams. • dianaporter.co.uk

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Illustration fans should head to Sky Blue Framing and Gallery, on North View in Westbury Park, this month. They have launched their autumn season with half of the gallery showing new, limited-edition print releases from the much-loved illustrator Quentin Blake – based on the wonderful Roald Dahl stories. This exhibition will be running all the way up to Christmas – which is helpful for those looking for a great present for any avid Dahl and Blake fans in the family. There is also a set of eight prints on show, based on Roald Dahl’s cheeky Revolting Rhymes, and another eight based on children’s classics such as The Twits, The Witches, The Enormous Crocodile, Matilda and other favourites. • skybluegallery.co.uk

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EXHIBITIONS

Martin Greenland, Simon Allen and Jack Doherty exhibition, Beaux Arts Bath, until 7 October Former John Moores Prize winner Martin Greenland brings a striking collection of landscapes to Beaux Arts Bath, for the first show of their autumn programme. Part real, part imagination, they are a homage to the beauty of his native Lake District. Simon Allen’s wall sculptures are breathtaking too – gold and white gold gilded on to carved wood, they dazzle and shine, and are particularly special in low light. Meanwhile, Jack Doherty will be displaying his soda-fired porcelain. • beauxartsbath.co.uk

Art On The Hill, around Victoria Park, 7 & 8 October The Windmill Hill and Victoria Park Arts Trail takes place in the residential area around Victoria Park in South Bristol from 126pm, including a Saturday evening concert. Art On The Hill is an annual community festival of visual arts, craftwork, performance, food and participatory workshops in over 50 private houses and community venues in this small, walkable residential area. There is limited parking locally (bus numbers 75, 76 and 90 stop nearby!) and a beautiful brochure booklet and an app for mobiles will also be available. Follow Art On The Hill on Twitter for updates (@Art_On_The_Hill). Beautiful work by Helen Perry

• artonthehill.org.uk

● 165 Annual Open Exhibition, RWA, 1 October to 3 December Artists from all over the world have submitted 2,750 artworks to this annual exhibition – the biggest open exhibition in the region, now in its 165th year. Entries include painting, drawing, film, photography, sculpture and mixed-media works by artists of all ages and backgrounds, both emerging and established – this year including renowned painter and president of the Royal Academy, Christopher Le Brun, and photographic artist Tom Hunter RA. • rwa.org.uk

● Deeper Surfaces, Clifton Contemporary, 20 October – 18 November Whether drawing you across the raw, exposed edge of Cornwall’s Atlantic coast, or into the innate character of a living subject; in this show, the painted surface is a dynamic, breathing space. Hannah Woodman uses oil on canvas or gesso, watercolour and charcoal on paper to invoke the sense of isolated engagement she feels while creating her potent landscapes, while Carl Melegari’s intense sculptural oil on canvas portraits and animal studies, muted yet teeming with colour, engage the viewer as layers, drips, gestures and marks combine to reveal the presence and personality of each figure. Above: ‘Giacomo’ by Carl Melegari

• cliftoncontemporaryart.co.uk

● Grayson Perry: The Most Popular Art Exhibition Ever, Arnolfini, until 24 December This show tackles one of charismatic artist Grayson Perry’s primary concerns: how contemporary art can best address a diverse cross section of society. On show for the first time outside of London, the exhibition is central to a programme of events inspired by Perry’s irreverent take on contemporary culture. In the exhibition, Perry continues to explore many of the themes and concerns that recur in his practice, drawing from his own childhood and life as a transvestite, as well as wider social issues and his abiding interest in his audience. • arnolfini.org.uk Pictured left: Grayson Perry, Object in Foreground, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London. Photo by Stephen White

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If you love history and horror, you’ll love John’s Bristol tour

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HISTORY

HIDDEN & HAUNTED As the nights get longer and the dark days set in, John Hughes reveals some of the spooky goings on around the city

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rom gruesome murders to knife-throwing ghosts, haunted cinemas to the spirits of notorious highwaymen, there’s plenty that goes bump in the night around Bristol. With Halloween almost upon us, here are just some of the places that might make the hairs on the back of your neck stand up when you’re strolling around the city...

Pembroke Road, Clifton

Otherwise known as All Gallows Lane, this street has a rather gruesome past belied by its pleasant facade. In the 1870s, the Downs was frequented by highwaymen, the most notorious of which was a Welshman named Jenkins Protheroe. Suffering from dwarfism, Protheroe used to feign injury and then rob, and sometimes murder, the innocent people who stopped to help him. He was finally caught and hanged for his crimes in 1876 – his body hung up in chains, covered in tar and left out to rot as a warning to others. Apparently, his ghost would climb down from the gallows and haunt the area until his body was finally buried on the junction of the road with Clifton Downs.

Llandoger Trow, King Street Dating back to 1660, this historic public house was originally made up of five shops before being converted into an inn. The ghost that haunts the building is of a disabled boy with a metal plate on his shoe, which is distinguishable by the step-drag-stepping sound he makes as he walks around the top floor of the pub. Other ghostly figures have also been caught by staff on CCTV. Late one night, two figures were spotted in the Jacobean room at the front of the pub. Staff went to ask them to move on, only to find that the figures had vanished...

Odeon Cinema, Union Street Screen three is known as one of the UK’s most haunted cinemas. This screen is next to the office of the former manager who was murdered there in 1946. At the time of the murder, the Odeon was showing a Hollywood adaptation of Rudyard Kipling’s The Light That Failed to an audience of around 2,000 people. During the film, five shots were fired on-screen, followed by a sixth heard in the manager’s office. The case was never officially closed, but the manager’s killer was believed to be a man named Billy ‘The Fish’ Fisher, who confessed the murder on his deathbed. Screen three is now said to be haunted by the ghost of the murdered manager who often appears in row three of the auditorium.

was known as the Holy Cross. Experienced fire staff have often stated seeing a figure in medieval clothing walking through the upper part of the building.

White Hart, Lower Maudlin Street Following a murder in the pub’s bar in 1706, a ghost – known as George to regulars – has been known to cause a fright or two over the years. Staff have found kitchen knives stuck in the top of the kitchen table, plates of food have been lifted up and down during the night, and there’s been plenty of poltergeist activity.

All Saints Church At the centre of Bristol’s Old City is the 12th-century All Saints Church, now used as a diocesan education centre. Air raid wardens based at the church during the Second World War often reported seeing a monk walking through the church, talking to himself.

The Rummer Hotel Also located in the Old City is one of the UK’s oldest coaching inns, which has supposedly seen Oliver Cromwell and Queen Elizabeth I visit as guests back in the past. The pub was run for many years by the famous Bristol Berni Inn chain and was refurbished in 2005. A walking tour group once had a figure of a man appear behind them, next to the open fire (which is also the oldest part of the building), giving them a well-timed fright. John Hughes’ Haunted and Hidden Bristol Walk combines a tour of some of the most haunted buildings around Bristol, with many iconic television and film locations and anecdotes. The tour begins at College Green at 8pm and runs most Fridays all year round. Private tours are also available; Halloween night walks are running at 6pm, 8pm and 10pm on 31 October. Advance booking always required. ■ • hauntedandhiddenbristol.co.uk The lovely Llandoger is home to a few ghostly residents

Bristol Fire Station The city’s fire station was built in 1975 on the site of the former Knights Templar, a religious order established in the 12th century during the Crusades. In the first month of the opening of the station, the chef, Mrs Rhodes, chased a figure through her kitchen, thinking it was an intruder, but it disappeared. Temple Church next door was originally built by the Knights Templar and THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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FOOD & Drink

TASTY TITBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

BRISTOL’S GOT BUTTERFLIES... In celebration of its first birthday, The Ivy Clifton Brasserie has partnered with Perrier-Jouët to create ‘Butterfly Kisses’ – a champagne afternoon tea available until 30 November. Making the most of the restaurant’s grand internal space, an installation of over 700 handmade green, white and gold origami butterflies has been suspended from the ceiling, creating a canopy under which the tea is served. All guests receive their own origami butterfly at the end of their meal, which unfolds to reveal a secret message and, for 225 of the luckiest, a bespoke Ivy Collection prize – anything from limited edition champagne flutes to a complimentary dinner for two. And the eats? Well they include truffled chicken brioche rolls, marinated cucumber and dill sandwiches, warm fruit scones, raspberry cheesecake, completely irresistible chocolate and salted caramel mousse and a crème bruleé doughnut. • theivycliftonbrasserie.com

NEW TO WELSHBACK The team behind the Absurd Bird diners has opened a quirky, independent eatery overlooking the waterfront at 5-7 Welshback, beneath the Mercure Hotel. Buttermilk and Maple’s experimental kitchen, overseen by chef Timothy Newton, serves everything from buttermilk chicken to salted caramel French toast, truffle poached eggs and lobster mac and cheese (we can happily vouch for this one), with bespoke cocktails poured by Soul Shakers plus superb ciders and local craft beers from regional brewery Lost and Grounded. “We are conscious to promote the best of Bristol, from locally sourced sourdough to carefully curated craft beers,” said Mark Hall, of parent group Splendid Restaurants. “Why look any further than our own back yard?” • buttermilkandmaple.com

SCANDI EATING IN EASTON A laid-back new restaurant with an emphasis on communal dining opened in Easton last month. Inspired by the Scandinavian approach to food and socialising, Dela is named after the Swedish word for ‘share’, and celebrating time spent eating together is fundamental to its ethos. Dela is the creation of Mike Orme and Lara Lindsay, who have spent the past two years working towards its inception – having immersed themselves in Bristol’s flourishing food scene for the last decade. After sell-out events at Harts Bakery, Dela has found its permanent home in Mivart studios – an airy space with high ceilings and Scandi influences. Suppliers have been selected for quality, proximity and sustainable production methods, and partners include East Bristol neighbours Arbor Ales and The Bristol Loaf; and artisan cheese supplier The Bristol Cheesemonger. • delabristol.com

TAKING ACTION Action Against Hunger is calling on Bristol diners to raise funds to help children around the world to survive – by simply dining out. During October, eateries including The Pony and Trap, No Man’s Grace and Adelina Yard will offer dishes where a percentage of the cost goes to the Healthy Mums Healthy Kids appeal or give customers the chance to add a donation to their bill. UK aid from the Department for International Development will match every penny raised, helping to eradicate life-threatening malnutrition. “Our appeal aims to provide young mums in Matam, north-eastern Senegal, with good nutrition and support so their children can have a healthy start,” said Matthew White, director of fundraising and communications. “All you have to do is eat at your favourite participating restaurant to help mums and kids have healthier, happier futures.” Fancy hosting a dinner party in aid of Action Against Hunger instead? Visit actionagainsthunger.org.uk

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Photo: A. Parsons/i-Images for Action Against Hunger


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JAMAICA STREET STORES We pay a visit to a new Stokes Croft opening with conscientious credentials and cracking cookery at the core

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he much-discussed rate of Bristol restaurant openings means that, realistically, it’s nigh-on impossible to get round to each one – even if you’re lucky enough to have news of them drop into the inbox on a seemingly daily basis – but sometimes we see something special on the horizon, and stalk its progress on social media so intently, that we know a visit is a must. Such was the case with Jamaica Street Stores – one of the most anticipated new kids on the block this season – and not least because of the crack team behind it, traced back to the likes of River Cottage Café, Bagel Boy and Poco. Expectations are high from the outset but, happily, from the minute we get past the red iron pillared frontage of the listed former screen-printers, we love what this little foodie supergroup have done with the place. The Grade-II Edwardian surrounds make for a grand setting; the industrial character of the building kept at the fore but tempered by bountiful botany – gargantuan pot plants suspended from the high ceilings, on-trend terrariums, an actual tree growing from the middle of an off-centrepiece. There are a couple of minor finishing touches still to be sorted, but it’s opening week, and our attention is soon stolen by dreamy wall art including an illustration that Anna Higgie – based in the artists’ space above the restaurant – did for GQ Japan.

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The green theme doesn’t stop at the décor, as is apparent after a chat with GM Mitch Church; but while sustainability, animal welfare, fair trade and environmental impact are core considerations, it’s not something they’re aiming to shout too loudly about, figuring that by now, it ought to be the done thing, rather than a USP. “It should be the standard, everybody should be doing it,” says Mitch, who ensures the ethos extends to all aspects of the business – down to the cleaning products, which are also low on the carbon footprint front. If it’s not too busy, and you like your dishes cooked and assembled before your eyes, be sure to bag the best seats in the house, overlooking the open kitchen, and chat to good-humoured sous chef Paul, who lived in Bristol for years then worked near Normandy before the Jamaica Street opportunity presented itself. Initially terrified of the open kitchen, he admits, he’s taking well to his new role of chef on-show. ‘Are You Game?’ asks, boldly, a fruitily named Australian chardonnay on the ample wine menu, although predictably we end up armed with old favourites – the New Zealand sauvignon and an Argentinian malbec. Always eager to tick off uncharted tastes and combinations, choosing between the Lyme Bay brill with tiger’s milk and dulse (both new to these palates); and the pan-fried mackerel with pickled

This page: The interior is a chic botanical dream Opposite page, clockwise from top: Lyme Bay brill in prawn crackers; sous chef Paul in action; delicious oyster mushroom ravioli; the industrialstyle exterior; pan-fried mackerel with pickled cucumber, rhubarb and blackberries


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RESTAURANT | REVIEW

cucumber, rhubarb and blackberries, is too tricky so we save ourselves (and our waitress) the agony and order both. There’s plenty to intrigue on the bill of fare, from a very much intentionally ‘raw’ section featuring Dartmoor lamb tartare with mysterious ‘green emulsion’, egg yolk semi-freddo, burnt leek and mint; to a lovely array of plant-based dishes. First to materialise at the chef’s table is the brill – cool pieces of fish, each placed in a prawn cracker with red pepper, the dulse (also known as sea lettuce flakes), and the habanero-infused coconut milk, which really lifts the flavour of the ensemble to pack a warm little punch. Dishes are sent out the minute they are ready, and next we see head chef Billy Trigg busying himself with our oyster mushroom ravioli before bestowing it with smoked mushroom ketchup and pickled

...The industrial character is kept at the fore but tempered by bountiful botany – gargantuan pot plants, on-trend terrariums, an actual tree....

shitakes submerged in a dark dashi lagoon. It’s a deliciously autumnal arrangement that we instantly wish we’d ordered two of. A generous portion of fried chicken thighs in Korean-spiced batter isn’t far behind, with kimchi; honey, paprika and peanut sambal; macerated kale and hot, hot habanero mayo – which comes with a word of warning from Paul. W thinks said warning is unwarranted, while I’m left wondering where a cold glass of milk is when you need it. The seasonal mackerel dish is the favourite of our savoury picks; the tartness of the rhubarb and blackberries the perfect pairing for the charred fish – although upstaged, according to the sweet-toothed of our twosome, by the vegan and gluten-free banana and honeycomb pudding with rum cream and hazelnuts. The style of the dishes on Billy’s menu provides a clue as to where he honed his craft (18 months as head chef at The Ethicurean) but there’s certainly something new in the mix too. It’s experimental with a thread of exoticism, and we’re so glad he ditched the idea of working abroad to stay in the South West with us, and the rest of this already well-oiled machine. And for anyone with mild concerns regarding gentrification: from what we can see, this is a distinctive yet down-to-earth project from a group of earnest, enthusiastic Bristol blokes who love the area and are keen to do things conscientiously. Could be worse. An exciting opening for the ever shape-shifting Stokes Croft. ■ • jamaicastreetstores.com

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BRISTOL UPDATES BITE-SIZED BUSINESS AND ECONOMY NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY Image by Matthew Grayson

WHEELS TO THE WORLD

After

Before

NO PULLING WEEK

GROWING TOGETHER

Across the world, more people suffer from trichotillomania (TTM) – which causes sufferers an overwhelming urge to pull out their own hair – than struggle with an eating disorder. So, TTM expert and hair-loss specialist Lucinda Ellery is launching International No Pulling Week from 1 – 7 October to raise awareness of this secretive condition which is often triggered by anxiety, is closely linked to OCD and has affected famous names such as Katy Perry and Justin Timberlake. Countless cases go undiagnosed as many people are embarrassed by their condition. Some sufferers also suck or chew their hair, which can cause digestive issues. “So many suffer in silence and we really want to break down the barriers that are stopping them getting help,” says Lucinda, who has studios around the country including Bristol, as well as New York and Los Angeles, and pioneers hairloss solutions. “Increasing awareness will, we hope, encourage the 90% of sufferers currently suffering in silence to come forward and seek treatment.”

Local law firm Barcan+Kirby has launched a communities-based sponsorship programme, which will fund growing-related projects around Bristol and South Gloucestershire. Community orchards, gardens, meadows and a city farm, located in proximity to the law firm’s six high street offices, will see a boost to funds via the ‘Growing Together’ campaign, enabling the projects to complete much-needed maintenance or to kick-start new projects. Recently in Thornbury, volunteers for the community orchard and Morton Bridge Wildflower Meadow were given an opportunity to learn the traditional method of scything. Ten new volunteers received instruction from a local expert on the grass-cutting skill, which has been used on farms and fields in England through the ages. A brand new scything kit was also given. “We have always prided ourselves on being at the heart of the local community,” said Bill Willcocks, managing partner. “We advise clients throughout various life stages, so it felt fitting to choose projects related to growth and lifecycle for our support.”

• nopulling.org; lucindaelleryhairloss.co.uk

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Motivation Charitable Trust has relocated its UK operations to Bedminster, having spent the last 20 years in Brockley, North Somerset. The team have settled into new premises on Sheene Road, right in the heart of the local community. The charity, experts in the design and provision of appropriate wheelchairs for use in developing countries, had outgrown its former home, and sought a unique site to meet its varied and complex needs. From the new premises, the team are continuing to develop a range of affordable wheelchairs, and run training programmes and projects that enable disabled people to enjoy greater independence and opportunity. “The Motivation team is excited by the prospect of change and feels energised by this next phase in our history,” said David Constantine MBE; himself a wheelchair user as well as Motivation’s co-founder. “We are looking forward to meeting our neighbours and becoming an integral member of the Bristol community.” The move also coincided with a recent change in leadership at Motivation, in the form of Amanda Wilkinson, who joined the charity as CEO at the start of 2017. “We’ve grown as an organisation, not only in size but in reputation and impact too, and we need a working environment that reflects this and allows us to look to the future,” she said. “Our new office offers Motivation an accessible space for housing all of our UK staff under one roof, as well as storage and workshop facilities. The new premises also gives us more dedicated space to build prototypes and trial new technologies such as 3D printing.” Motivation’s Rough Terrain Wheelchair has helped over 25,000 people around the world to get mobile. But, from India to Uganda, Kenya to Sri Lanka, more people are waiting to start living life to the full – so if you can help the team to raise the £21,000 they need to take another 150 people off that waiting list, and would like to find out more about Motivation, be sure to visit the website. • motivation.org.uk


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PREGNANT & EMPLOYED: WHAT ARE MY MATERNITY RIGHTS? SAMANTHA CASTLE

If you’re expecting a baby, it’s good to be aware of your employment rights – whether you’re employed, self-employed or a casual worker.

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lthough every employer’s maternity policy will be different, you still have a basic entitlement as Samantha Castle, employment specialist at Barcan+Kirby, explains.

What are my minimum rights? If you’re pregnant, you’re protected by law against discrimination, unfair treatment and/or dismissal due to your pregnancy. You’re entitled to Statutory Maternity Leave, Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) and time off for antenatal appointments. When it comes to maternity leave, you’re entitled to up to 52 weeks off work. This is regardless of your length of service, how much you’re paid or whether you work full or part-time, and includes casual workers and those on a zero-hours contract.

Statutory maternity pay Minimum maternity pay is calculated on your salary and length of service. Every employer will offer SMP – this currently equates to 90% of average weekly earnings for the first six weeks and £136.78 or 90% of your average weekly earnings (whichever is lower) for the next 33 weeks. You’ll qualify for SMP if you have worked for your employer continuously for at least 26 weeks up to the 15th week before your baby is due. You must be earning at least £113 a week before tax. If you’ve not been with your employer long enough to qualify for SMP, you may still be entitled to Maternity Allowance. Some employers also offer enhanced maternity pay as a way to attract and retain female workers. This is usually given as a contractual right and differs from employer to employer.

Time off for antenatal appointments All pregnant employees are entitled to paid time off for antenatal appointments. It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been working for your employer, or how much you’re paid.

I’m self-employed – what am I entitled to? As a self-employed worker, you won’t be entitled to SMP, but you will be entitled to Maternity Allowance from the government assuming you earn more than £30 a week and have worked for the 26 of the 66 weeks leading up to the baby’s due date.

What can I do if my employer won’t give me maternity rights? Speak to your employer and reiterate your employment rights – they might be unaware of what you’re entitled to. If this doesn’t work, send an informal letter to your employer, outlining the situation. If you’re being treated unfairly because you’re pregnant, you can take action against your employer through an employment tribunal – although this should be a last resort. If your employer does dismiss you or selects you for redundancy because of your pregnancy, you can make a claim for discrimination. An employment solicitor will be able to assist you with your case, and can determine if you have a claim for maternity discrimination. n If you have any questions around your maternity rights, or would like to speak to Samantha Castle, contact her at s.castle@barcankirby.co.uk or on 0117 325 2929. www.barcankirby.co.uk

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Iconic chairs by Hans J. Wegner

The CH25 in oak-soap, CH22 in oak-walnut oil, CH26 in walnut-oak, CH23 in oak-walnut oil, and the CH24 in oak-white oil.

S annon F U R N I T U R E LT D

Contemporary Nordic furniture from Carl Hansen and Son, Fritz Hansen and Swedese. Lighting by Louis Poulsen. Our homewares include Marimekko, Iittala, Rorstrand, with lots of Moomin mugs, fabric and throws from Denmark, Sweden and Finland.

68 Walcot Street Bath BA1 5BD 01225 424222 www.shannon-uk.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

ALONG CAME A SPIDER Fifty years after the iconic original was introduced, the Fiat 124 Spider makes a more than welcome return. Words by Chris Lilly

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iat has a proud history of building fun-to-drive, two-seater sportscars, with the 124 Spider the latest in a long line that includes the likes of its predecessor the Barchetta, and its namesake from the 1960s. With this new 124 Spider, Fiat is trying to recapture some of that heritage – and why wouldn’t it, when you consider the runaway success of the 500? The styling harks back to the original 124 Spider, and the two-seater, convertible, rear-wheel drive set-up is classic roadster; all looks good then for the Fiat. That positivity continues when you consider what makes up the 124 Spider under the skin. For those that don’t know, the Fiat is largely based on Mazda’s MX-5. If you’re going to base your new sportscar on any model, it might as well be the class-leading and widely-praised MX-5. This is something of a double-edged sword though, since Fiat has solid foundations on which to build – it has tweaked the suspension, brakes, and steering – but the 124 Spider also has a very strong rival which it will instantly be compared to. So how does the Fiat stack up? Starting with the styling, personally I like it. The 124 Spider is one of those cars that looks better in the metal than it does in photos. Pictures seem to convey it as a bit of a bruiser, a bit too muscular for a lightweight roadster. When you walk up to one though, it is more delicate looking than photographs convey, and the 124 Spider looks every inch a modern roadster. To be honest, I prefer the sharper looks of the Mazda, but certainly am not put off the Fiat because of its design – and it is, at least, markedly different to the MX-5. The same cannot be said of the interior, which is basically a carbon copy of the MX-5’s. This is no bad thing, since the cabin is relatively stylish, but clean, simple, and driver focused – as it should be. It’s not spartan though, with a good sat-nav/infotainment system available, which is straight from the Mazda parts bin. The rest of the cabin is true roadster in fashion – that is to say, a bit of a squeeze. It’s not too small by any means – and I’m a chap of average height and fairly substantial build. The transmission tunnel is wide and tall, and the car’s waist-line high. There are few cubby holes, and those there are, are of limited size. But you shouldn’t expect anything less from a two-seater convertible. The steering wheel is a lovely size and not too cluttered with buttons, and the gearstick offers a crisp and weighty shift, making it feel as though you are driving the 124 Spider, not just going through the motions. Everything is designed to offer a real roadster driving experience, and it works. Each time you climb into the Fiat, a smile spreads across your face, even if you’re just popping to the supermarket. The boot is small but not impossibly so. You need to accept limited practicality if looking at roadsters, but the 124 Spider offers (just) enough space and practicality to use as a daily driver. The roof is fabric and manual to keep things simple, costs down, and the car’s centre of gravity low. It’s easy to put up or down in less than five seconds too, with a safety catch above the rear-view mirror, before

you just push the whole roof back until it clicks into place behind you. Simple yes, but effective. With the roof in either position, visibility is fairly good. It’s better out back with the roof down obviously, but even with it closed, the view rearwards isn’t bad at all. It’s easy to place the car too as the boot is truncated from the point you can see in the rear-view mirror, making it simple to park. The front view offers similar precision as the haunches over each wheel let you know where the front axle is, and there isn’t much of an overhang out front either. This helps with how the car drives, no matter if you’re in a multi-storey car park or on a flowing B-road. The 124 Spider has a good weight to its steering when on the open road, and it’s precise, meaning you don't have to guess where the wheels are, or take a couple of bites at turn in. The Fiat’s suspension will deal with many a scenario without fuss, too. The set-up is a little more supple than Mazda’s which means the car offers less out-right handling ability, but is a better cruiser and more practical every day for those who aren’t passionate about ‘drivers’ cars’. It still offers a good driving experience, but the Fiat is better suited to speed bumps or poor-quality roads, and is a little more comfortable on the motorway than its cousin from Mazda. The biggest difference between Fiat’s and Mazda’s offerings, though, comes under that long bonnet. The engine on offer from Fiat is a turbo-charged unit, rather than Mazda’s naturally-aspirated powerplants. What this means in terms of driving dynamics, is that the MX-5 revs more freely, but the 124 Spider has more low-down grunt, again making it easier to drive every day. With 140 bhp and 240 Nm of torque on tap from the 1.4 litre turbo petrol, the 124 Spider will complete the 0-62mph sprint in 7.5 seconds. It’s not startlingly fast then, but plenty quick enough for most. Drop a cog and put your foot down, and the 124 Spider proves an effective overtaking weapon, and when you’re pushing hard, the Fiat provides a great driving experience without having to travel at ridiculous (and illegal) speeds to begin to feel what it is capable off. You do have to change down that gear though to make sure the turbo is on song, otherwise the pick-up can seem a little sluggish initially. The engine – like the styling and handling – is more muscular and less finely balanced than the MX-5’s. The Mazda offers a sharper driving experience, and is still the class leader in that regard. However, Fiat sensibly hasn’t tried to beat Mazda at its own game with a similar car. Instead, the 124 Spider has a character of its own and is a more attractive proposition for those that placer a higher priority on comfort than MX-5 buyers. It will still put a big grin on your face when the weather’s good and an empty road opens out in front of you. Importantly though, the 124 Spider isn’t the sort of car you have to keep in the garage the rest of the time, and is a genuinely usable proposition every day. ■

• fiat.co.uk

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THE GETAWAY

SKY’S THE LIMIT This treetop escape should be high on your to-stay list if you’re venturing down Devon way...

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rowing up, we ached with jealousy whenever we saw the kids across the road having secret meetings and embarking on swashbuckling adventures in their gigantic custom-made treehouse, so when we found out about a (much more sophisticated) larch-clad treetop hideaway launched just over a year ago in High Bickington, we figured we owed it to the inner child to finally experience life among the leaves. A few weeks down the line, and one sunny south-bound drive later, we’re chugging down Braggs Hill – past swathes of pastoral greenery in every direction – and entering the Millbrook Estate. Bought up by Bob and Kate Boothby after they quit their jobs – running a telecommunications company in Weston-super-Mare – to transform the dilapidated rural pile, its fortunes have about-turned. As we approach our weekend retreat, we feel as if we’re on location for George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces – the peaceful parkland super-secluded, the views already spectacular as the road begins to incline, and the cool, contemporary curves of the sizeable structure ahead coming into view. Parked up next to a set of enormous solar panels, door code punched in and bags dumped hastily inside, it’s all we can do to keep said inner children from leaping, limbs akimbo, onto the super king-size bed. The fresh aroma of the timber interior whooshes up our noses as we scurry into each room to take stock, and celebratory sounds of the Seventies pump through the multiroom Sonos, as requested when asked, during the booking process, what soundtrack we might like to be greeted by. If luxurious interiors are your thing, we daresay you’ll appreciate the gigantic Natuzzi sofa in soft leather; the synced-up, state-of-the-art tech in almost every corner; the mood lighting and the underfloor heating. We’re predictably taken with the stylish Emma Bridgewater crockery and glasstopped coffee table made of stacked tree logs – a fitting reminder of our surroundings, in case they slip our minds. Except they couldn’t possibly – not with vast floor-toceiling windows that slide open to allow access to the terrace. Gazing out of those, as we lazily check emails on the wi-fi later that day, is like having the ultimate desktop background in widescreen. As with the most sumptuously situated swimming pools, it’s the ‘infinity’ factor that creates the greatest feeling of opulence – perspex panels protecting us from the terrace precipice, ensuring maximum uninterrupted panorama and making it feel as through we’d only need to spread our arms to take flight towards the gently rustling trees beyond. The smell of a still-warm granary loaf, left in the breadmaker next to a little butter dish and jar of Millbrookmade raspberry jam, should we be peckish on arrival, draws us to the fully equipped and very attractive Italian designer kitchen. Here we also discover, most notably, a champagne fridge full of different vintages, varying in price to cater for different budgets. 62 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Once we’re unpacked and settled in, we set about making dinner – the apartment is self-catering – and relish the act of pretending we’ve moved significantly up in the world and are casually cooking for the fam in our own home. If you really don’t fancy the idea of cooking, however, there’s the option of hiring The Nest, attached to Treetop Escape via a romantic wooden walkway. It’s a particularly nice feature if you’re planning on hiring the place for an intimate wedding – already a very popular option – or other special occasion, and like the idea of enlisting the services of a recommended local chef. Before we sit down to dine, we figure we should freshen up and try out the uber-powerful walk-in showers, complete with giant shower heads. There are GHD straighteners in the bedroom for styling the old mop afterwards, as well as Jean Paul Gaultier and Vera Wang on the dressers, for us to spritz on before supper. It’s clear Bob and Kate – who also have another gorgeous property, Rose Cottage, just down the road – have spent lots of time here, going over each potential step of a stay and making sure every need is covered at their properties. When it comes to escapism, a hot tub always helps, and the Beachcomber here is just big enough to accommodate the four persons that the apartment sleeps, with an ecomode and bubbly jets to massage away any residual stresses. The lack of light pollution also means the night sky offers more than enough by way of visual entertainment should we tire of each others’ ugly mugs – we set down a little bluetooth speaker beside the tub, along with a couple of Bellinis, and lie back, remarkably content for the remainder of the evening. The next day we wake to the sight of birds on their morning commute – and lambs a-leaping across the hills, tails wagging as they scamper over to Mum for breakfast – and reach for the binoculars and bird book on the bedside table. After a full English on the terrace, we wander the 32-acre estate, finding a fascinating family of affable, freerange alpacas; artistic sculptures and plenty of wild garlic beside a babbling brook, before picnicking around the tree swing next to the lake. It’s easy to see why the place has attracted so much interest and already won awards as a wedding venue. Secluded, sumptuous, undeniably unusual and with admirable eco-credentials, it sure is somewhere different to tie the knot, although if you don’t have such a lavish excuse as an engagement to celebrate among the trees and sink into a deep William Holland tub once the revelry is over, you could hardly be judged for escaping for a simple weekend’s unwinding... ■

• £1,600 per three or four-night stay; wedding packages start from £2,600; treetopescape.co.uk

Opposite page, clockwise from top left: The Nest, reached via a romantic wooden walkway and featuring a private chef, should you wish to hire one; the chic, contemporary interior and infinity terrace beyond; we found the views were best enjoyed from the outdoor hot tub, Bellini in hand; you can’t beat an alfresco breakfast featuring Emma Bridgewater crockery; oh but wait, you can if you encounter the alpaca crew


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THE GETAWAY

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BRISTOL @ WORK Rhys Williams finds out what’s new at Studio 7

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t Nicholas Market – resort of the independently minded, temple to the independently produced, and crucible of the independently edible – has a new attraction: Studio 7 Music Repairs. Two years ago, what was then a tiny artisan workshop located in the Old City’s creative hub Centrespace, celebrated its 40th anniversary. Owner Richard Smith had long been trusted by local musicians to offer high quality repair and servicing of their instruments, and four decades in the business seemed like a good opportunity for him to take stock and look back with satisfaction on a successful career. However, since then a transformation has taken place: far from resting on his laurels, Richard chose to do the opposite and expand. A year after his anniversary celebrations, the unit adjacent to Studio 7’s Centrespace home became available and Richard grabbed the opportunity to double the size of the workshop. At the same time, he doubled his team size by recruiting French repairer Irène Fantapié. “I needed more space to get all of my equipment and the instruments in, and I’d just about moved into the new unit when I received a letter from France,” he says. Irène, having qualified in the prestigious Institut Technologique Européen des Métiers de la Musique in Le Mans, and worked at Buffet Crampon and Selmer – world-leading producers of wind-instruments – had decided to move on from her job in a Parisian music shop. “She arrived with her bag of tools, sat down, started working and has been here ever since!” he says.

...In an increasingly digital age, people like to see craftspeople working with their hands to perform a skill... Irène is now a partner in Studio 7 and the business has become a thriving two-person enterprise. “Because Irène is able to do a lot of the work that comes in, we’re able to offer a fast turnaround,” says Richard, who received his training in the School of Musical Instrument Crafts at Newark in the 1970s. “We are the only technically trained and qualified musical instrument repairers in Bristol and between us we have half a century’s worth of experience.” Studio 7’s main expertise is in woodwind and brass instruments but the workshop has a much-expanded repertoire. “We now have the space to take on keyboard repairs and amplifiers,” Richard says. “The fact we’ve been trained in acoustics and electronics enables us to cover musicians’ electronics, especially vintage equipment.” Richard and Irène’s skillset is such that they are capable of inventing new repair tools and techniques when the need arises: and they have developed a method of repairing the plastic toothplate on metal saxophone mouthpieces which have worn out. “We have a niche business and we tend to create niches within it!” Richard proudly explains. “If we only see five people in a year who need a particular kind of specialist repair, it’s another five people that we’ve helped out.” This bespoke approach is rooted in a fundamental desire to offer a useful and high-end service to musicians, a belief in the virtues of good service and a genuine concern that the specific needs of each customer are met. And the approach is bearing fruit: several music shops in

Bristol now send their repair work to Studio 7, and the workshop also provides services to local schools, as well as organisations such as Bristol Plays Music, which has recently started to send instruments for repair. Other clients include one of the country’s top oboists, who not only sends their own instrument for repair but also refers all of their students to Studio 7; and a professional instrumentalist from one of London’s top orchestras who prefers to travel from London to use the company. The studio even has an inadvertent trademark; the green tag used by Richard and Irène to indicate that an instrument has been repaired – and which is often left attached by musicians – having been hailed by one local saxophone teacher as a guaranteed mark of quality. If a student’s instrument has one attached, the teacher knows that it will be in perfect working order. One area of the business that Richard particularly hopes to expand is that of working for local schools and educational institutions to support musical education. “That’s another passion of mine,” he says. “Getting kids involved in music. There aren’t enough facilities in this country for children learning music. We have a really good relationship with some local schools and one of my goals is to try to help them provide the best instrument training they can by helping them to maintain stocks of playable instruments and advising them on which instruments to buy.” The partnerships that Studio 7 has developed are especially satisfying for Richard, whose desire to expand the reach of music by supporting people who want to play instruments is also evident in his work with the One-Handed Musical Instrument Trust – an organisation which works to remove the barriers to making music that are faced by people with physical disabilities. “We’re proud to lend our expertise to finding practical solutions, such as the flute we modified for a player who’d lost some fingers of one hand.” This eagerness to engage more readily with musicians from all backgrounds informed Richard’s decision to expand into St Nicholas Market. Walking through the famous Bristol institution, he saw a space available and thought; “That’s exactly what we need!” While Studio 7’s base in Centrespace is ideal as a workshop, Richard realised that its backstreet position wasn’t ideal in terms of promoting the business. “Being in St Nicks offers us increased visibility because the shop is easily accessible and has windows on two sides. This means that people will be able to watch us repairing instruments; an approach that has been very successful for music workshops in France and Germany, which have found that, in an increasingly digital age, people like to see craftsmen working with their hands to perform a skill.” Richard emphasises that the St Nicks shop constitutes an expansion and a new way of presenting Studio 7 to the public, rather than a move away from its base in Centrespace: “We’ll be using the workshop in St Nicks to meet customers and receive instruments while keeping our Centrespace facility for working on brass instruments, keyboards and amplifiers; and work involving larger machinery, such as replacing the tenon on a bassoon or straightening a trumpet bell. The St Nicks shop will become the main point of focus – a kind of interactive space.” On his ambitions for Studio 7, Richard is clear: “What I want to achieve is a steady stream of people with whom we can build good relationships and who want to keep coming back because of the good service they’ve received from us. We hope to be seen as the Bristol musical instrument repair shop.” Judging by their impressive roster of clients and recent expansion, the prospects of success seem excellent. ■ • studio7musicrepairs.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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BRISTOL INTERIORS SPECIAL

A CHANGE OF SCENE With autumn in full swing, here’s our pick of the excellent interior services Bristol has on offer, and design inspiration gathered from the professionals

Image: Cole & Son’s Deco Palm wallpaper from the Geometric II collection – inspired by the exotic foliage found in Miami, worked into a contemporary geometric style, and taking the palm motif to new heights

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Farrow & Ball’s Studio Green wall colour reflects the trend for more dramatic, vivid hues, and an increased confidence when it comes to decorating choices

INSIDE STORY What do we want? Gorgeous autumnal interiors. When do we want them? Now. Bristol’s designers and experts put in their two pennies’ worth...

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uch as we love summer interiors, they don’t get a lot of air time compared with autumn and winter ones. Naturally – and especially if you’re a hopeless box-set junkie like us – we spend more time indoors as the evenings draw in, the weather thwarts efforts to go out and be sociable, and the same four walls become over-familiar friends; so it follows that now is a favourite time to refresh our living spaces. But what’s new?

We’re in love with Diana’s Insta feed – especially this image featuring sumptuous velvets and Cole & Son’s textured ‘Singita’ wallpaper

Diana Baker Designs “Wallpaper is coming back for AW17; and soft, pretty tones inspired by nature,” says Diana Baker, who has firmly arrived on the South West’s booming interior design scene, having recently opened a studio in Clevedon. “We are now inspired by our desire to connect more with the great outdoors – there has been a shift to rich, earthy tones of terracotta, brown, natural greens, strong blues and blush hues.” After 28 years in the interior design industry, Diana’s influences derive from her extensive travels (Cairo, Vienna, Dubai and Moscow to name a few) and she relishes the challenge of converting commercial period buildings back into private residences – breathing new life into them and transforming them into modern homes while preserving their heritage. “Small details go a long way and you can easily transform a bedroom with large velvet cushions and pillows in emerald green or blush pink to create a cosy and tranquil atmosphere,” she says. “I am also seeing a big shift from the sleek, mid-century modern look to the Victorian. So watch out for plenty of brass, bronze and dark wood furniture. As for accessories, buy throws, crystal decanters and elegant butlers’ trays. “I am also a firm believer in ‘scaling up’. I hate looking at a cluttered room so I try to avoid using lots of small pieces of furniture. Light the room at different levels – the scaling up rule applies to table lamps too – and, of course, remember to choose what you love.” • dianabakerdesigns.com

Stefanie James “This autumn’s interior colour explosion comes by way of wallpaper,” agrees Stefanie. “As an eclecticist and colour fanatic, I love this season’s continuing trend of maximalist, large-scale, bold colours and prints. From exotic tropical and garden themes, to bohoAnother uber-autumnal scene from Diana Baker – featuring Tom Faulkner’s Capricorn console table and Florentine gold mirror, and illustrating the continuing penchant for bold designs

chic; East meets West to metallic Art Deco ‘Astoria’ – named after the Waldorf in NY – there’s an array of irresistible papers just bursting with opulent hues. “It’s worth remembering a larger pattern makes a confined space feel roomier. Mix with smaller-scale patterns, plains and a few tasteful, strategically-placed eclectic furniture pieces and accessories. Again, decorating a dark or poorly-lit room in an artistic scheme of moody tones with fresh, light colour woodwork and decorative art and lighting creates drama, contrast and depth. “Finally, throw in pops of accent colour with a modern or vintage sofa, the occasional chair or rug, and you’ll be right on trend with a collected minimalist look. Remember, blue and green should always be seen; orange and red get in to bed.” • stefaniejames.co.uk

Bracey Interiors “Interiors are following the fashion trend, with yellows, mustard tones and moody blues all prevalent,” thinks Alison Bracey. “Little Greene have re-launched their ‘Colours of England’ palette to include these new shades – two to watch are Grey Stone and Mortlake Yellow – and pattern can also be seen everywhere. GP & J Baker’s latest collection ‘East to West Carnival’ takes its inspiration from their historic roots and features many eclectic designs, while Designers Guild are continuing to gain inspiration from florals; their latest collection ‘Tulipa Stellata’ is a combination of florals and decorative damasks. The painterly effect helps to create amazing floral patterns but with a modern twist. “The trend for wallpapers is to either use them as a single feature wall, or full-on pattern in a study or downstairs cloakroom. For those wanting to paper a whole room, the trend is more towards textures or the more traditional damask all over designs.” • braceyinteriors.co.uk

Farrow & Ball The revered colour specialists are seeing a continued interest for more dramatic, vivid hues, with deep reds and rich greens signalling a readiness to embrace colour within interiors. From the vivacious

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Interiors are following fashion, with yellows and mustard tones prevalent. Little Greene has relaunched its ‘Colours of England’ palette to include Mortlake Yellow – here it is against a wall in Sage Green, Toad on the skirting, and Flint cornicing

A lovely recent project of David Hutton’s in Devon

Cole & Son’s Marquee Stripes design, inspired by pottery and aiming to capture the beauty of artistic brush markings, would be lovely as a feature wall

tones of ‘Radicchio’ (a deep red), to chic ‘Studio Green’; Farrow & Ball are witnessing more confidence with decorating choices. “Pink has been at the forefront of decorating for the last year and there is now a natural progression to stronger reds, with their spirit of bold optimism,” they say. “Radicchio feels exuberant, romantic and sensual, rather than clean or graphic, due to its complex underlying blue tone; and sits seamlessly with the harmonious greys of Mole’s Breath, Purbeck Stone and Ammonite, despite their more minimal aesthetic, to create rooms with impact and depth. Radicchio should always be the dominant force of the scheme, while the greys remain an intrinsic, but more recessive element, so rooms remain happy and vital.” Meanwhile, they say, there’s something almost defiant about the use of the botanic Studio Green. “It is unapologetically clubby and has a fantastically timeless, old-world quality, but can be used in the most modern of rooms. The sober colour reflects nature, especially when combined with creams to create rooms that feel calm and serene. Studio Green walls not only create an alluring retreat, but also provide sanctuary and contribute to a feeling of both harmony and security.” • farrow-ball.com

David Hutton Interiors “There are a lot of exciting trends emerging for the season ahead, including some enduringly popular ideas that I’m glad to see are still holding strong,” says David, whose most high-profile recent projects in Bristol have included the Cask Store show apartments at Finzels Reach – which won a Highly Commended award for interior design at the UK Property Awards. “Don’t be afraid to go dark: as we prepare to face the shorter days of winter, introducing dark colours to your home may seem counterintuitive, but the tone of your colour IV THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Bold opulence is still having a moment – introduce with accessories such as Blackpop’s velvet cushions


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choice is key. A dark but warm red, for example, works well with the new trend for dimmable lighting, which together creates an especially cosy atmosphere to come home to. Specific colours to look out for are shades of rust, which are going to be big this season. We’re seeing more and more of these shades in both furniture and textile designs. “Mix it up,” he continues. “If you’re open to incorporating an eclectic mix of patterns and styles throughout a room to create a truly individual look, you’ll be excited and inspired by some of the new ideas coming through. Geometric patterns are still huge, so if you want to be fully up to date, these are the styles to go for. Similarly, there’s a real move towards mixing old and new items. Many homes already have their own individual blend of the old and new, but now it’s about a deliberate combination of older items with newer styles. So, that antique vase perched on top of a contemporary sideboard suddenly has a cutting-edge feel about it, while that retro mirror above a sleek, modern fireplace looks bang on trend.”

Roomset showing off Camellia – Smalt, from Little Greene’s ‘Blue’ capsule collection

...As we prepare to face the shorter days of winter, introducing dark colours may seem counterintuitive, but tone is key... David also encourages us to keep it natural. “As well as their aesthetic value, homes centred on organic materials such as stone, wood and natural fabrics are healthier and cleaner energy-wise, which is one of the reasons why I don’t see this trend letting up any time soon. There are some simple ways to introduce a fresh, natural feel to your space – stone instead of tiles in contemporary kitchens and bathrooms; stone veneer incorporated into walls, fireplaces and worktops for added personality. For me, wood is a must in every scheme, as it can totally warm up a room in an instant. Cost-efficient types that can be deployed in a natural décor include oak, maple, poplar, elm, and walnut. If you are aiming for a more exotic ambience, however, turn to high-end timbers such as mahogany, teak, and cedar, or spice up your home with the help of voguish custom blinds and shades made from bamboo or rattan. “As with all trends, remember you can have too much of a good thing. Too much stone can make a scheme feel cold and uninviting, while too much wood can make your home look like a sauna! While keeping on top of the latest trends in interiors can provide a great source of inspiration, it’s important to always choose themes or pieces that you’re happy to live with. Go with what makes you feel happy; it will end up being timeless if it’s something you really like.” • davidhuttoninteriors.co.uk

David has been using on-trend moody blues and deep, warm reds

Go for the full-on pattern Bracey Interiors are seeing with Cole & Son’s grand Khulu design; featuring watercolour paintings of classical vases entwined with leopards, parrots and lions

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We can’t get enough of Wren Kitchens’ Infinity Plus Contour in Baker Miller Pink

KITCHEN NIGHTMARES? ...Never fear, Bristol’s interiors specialists are here to help you turn them into dreams

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t’s one of the most important spaces in the house – the location for valuable family gatherings and special-occasion cookery; claret and catch-ups with friends; ultra-philosophical house party conversations; quiet reflection and email checking over a cuppa on a rainy autumn morning. So making it one of your favourite places in the house is a must. We asked some of the area’s experts about their current hero kitchens...

Hobsons Choice “One of our favourite recent projects has been a bulthaup b3 kitchen in horizontally book-matched cherry veneer, stainless steel and kaolin white,” says Richard Keyes, head of design at Hobsons Choice. “Working collaboratively with our Clifton client and esteemed local property development company Berkeley Place, we were able to create a kitchen/dining space that was stylish, highly functional and complementary to the period architecture. “The kitchen features cooking, cooling and extraction technology from Miele, alongside what is quickly becoming a ‘must-have’ – a boiling hot water tap by Quooker. We also supplied the dining area, consisting of a bulthaup c2 table in kaolin (to complement the kaolin tall units) and Carl Hansen & Son CH20 chairs in oak and black leather. Created using a laser-welded laminating process, the table appears seamless; as if honed from a solid block of material while being incredibly hardwearing and easy to clean. “As with every Hobsons Choice kitchen, the client’s lifestyle, cooking preferences, storage needs and style of property were carefully considered to create a space that would fulfil every need; the result VI THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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being an intelligently designed and installed kitchen that makes life better for the client while adding value to their home.” • hobsonschoice.uk.com

We’d love a baking sesh in the Hobsons Choice bulthaup b3 kitchen in cherry veneer, stainless steel and kaolin white


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Wren Kitchens “Our current hero is the Infinity Plus Contour kitchen in Baker Miller Pink,” says Darren Watts, showroom development director for Wren, who have introduced this on-trend design with a view to bringing warmth and tranquility to Bristol homes. “When it comes to colour, pink isn’t going anytime soon, and this is the queen of all the pinks – a shade thought to have calming properties and soothing as a sunset. “Deceptively simple, the beauty of this kitchen is its ability to fit wonderfully into any setting, making it the perfect canvas for a palette of colours. Baker Miller Pink can be pretty and playful in matt or glamorous in gloss.” Wren help make the Contour kitchen completely unique by personalising it with your choice of handles and thousands of unit sizes and styles – from open shelving to wine racks and pet beds – to match perhaps with a cool quartz worktop, herringbone flooring and sleek silver appliances. “If an entirely pink kitchen is not for you, try using the shade as an accent in a romantic island paired with units in neutral greys or whites,” says Darren. “Alternatively there are 50 special colours to choose from, from clean Super White to dramatic Midnight or cheerful Bumblebee.”

Kutchenhaus love a sleek finish – go for their handleless finish if you want to ensure an ultra-hygienic space that exudes elegance and modernity

the range is very versatile; an effective design option with contemporary, open-plan spaces in extensions or contrasted within a more traditional home environment.” • kutchenhaus.co.uk

• wrenkitchens.com

Kutchenhaus “We believe that a kitchen should be visually beautiful, extremely well made and absolutely comfortable to use and maintain,” says Marten Röstel. “The majority of our design options follow the principles of modernism – particularly our Line N handleless range which follows this ethos perfectly. Sleek, clean lines and a stylish minimalism allow for an uncluttered and hygienic aesthetic, brilliantly suited to kitchens. This contemporary aesthetic has a great appeal for most tastes and means that it will still look ‘fresh’ for many years to come. “A popular and creative possibility with Line N is that we can incorporate a LED lighting strip below the worktop, which we think really exudes style and elegance. As opposed to a groove or channel cut in to the top of the door front, the handleless finish allows for a strong, durable and uninterrupted door front, and apart from looking visually striking, has many practical benefits, with nothing to catch dirt or for everyday grime to hide behind, and the continuous surfaces making maintaining hygiene a breeze. Whatever the size or style of the home, Another fab Kutchenhaus roomset

Intoto Kitchens “Clever mixing of desirable Victorian features in your home with clean, functional and contemporary handleless units can provide a breath of fresh air,” add Clinton and Fiona Patey at In-toto Kitchens Bristol. “We love this type of serendipitous style mixing, and recently fitted a modern galley kitchen with a beautiful, large Victorian dresser taking centre stage – fading into the background until its superior functionality is required; and giving the best of both worlds.” • intoto.co.uk

Schmidt Kitchens “One of the latest trends is to seamlessly blend the kitchen and living space into one functional environment,” says Marielle Medaets, managing director of Schmidt Kitchens on Whiteladies Road. “At Schmidt we can easily address this as we offer a wide range of colours, finishes and units either for the kitchen or living space, making it easier than ever to create your own unique space. Customisation covers every aspect of our design philosophy: dimensions, aesthetics, functions. “We are also seeing a demand for stylish, elegant designs converging with technology that is revolutionising the way our kitchens integrate with our busy lives. Controlling your oven while you are out and about is no longer a futuristic wish; and as the only Bristol location to be lucky enough to have the latest Siemens StudioLine appliances – fully connected and demonstrating the Siemens Homeconnect App – we can even show you how to voice control it. We’ll also show you how Sous Vide, a restaurant cooking method, can easily be mastered at home, resulting in healthy dishes with intense flavours; and clue you in on how to perfect your coffee blend and strength from your tablet.” • schmidt-kitchens.com

Schmidt has a huge range of colours, finishes and units

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THE INTERIORS GUIDE | BRISTOL 2017

BRACEY INTERIORS 15 Waterloo Street, Clifton Village, Bristol BS8 4BT Tel: 0117 9734664 Web: braceyinteriors.co.uk Winner of RSAW Welsh Architecture Awards - Interior Design 2017, and with a trading history of over 50 years, there isn’t much that this team doesn’t know about interior design. The retail showroom displays products from all the recognised brands, with some being exclusive to Bracey. Paints by Little Greene and Paint Library are mixed in the showroom, and curtains and blinds are lovingly made in the Bracey workrooms. The in-house design team is available to offer a comprehensive design service, offering 3D visuals, CAD drawings, budgets and costed specifications. Whether you are looking for a complete re-design/refurbishment of a single room or just a tin of paint/roll of wallpaper, they’re ready to help.

MARBLE SUPREME Unit 8, Bridge Road, Kingswood, Bristol BS15 4FW Tel: 0117 956 3030 Web: marblesupreme.com Marble Supreme provides master craftsmanship in stone. Whether you’re looking for new stone worktops for your kitchen or bathroom, there is a range of materials to suit your needs. With over 20 years of experience, the team produce a wide range of products from beautifully crafted granite kitchen worktops and flooring, right through to bespoke stone fireplaces, vanity tops, splash backs and sink surrounds. It’s a complete service, right from sourcing the perfect stone for your requirements, through to crafting perfectly fitting, beautifully finished kitchen worktops. They pride themselves on delivering the very best in granite, marble and quartz stone, knowing that their creations will play a part in family life for years to come. Whether you already know what you want or are still considering the options, they are always happy to discuss your plans so pop into the showroom in Kingswood.

ARCHITECT YOUR HOME Tel: 0800 849 8505 Web: architect-yourhome.com Architect Your Home’s service kicks off with an initial design consultation in your home – think of this as the real starting point of your project. It will provide you with sketch drawings of a properly considered and collaborative design proposal, help you develop a clear understanding of the practical implications of your design and equip you with the necessary tools so that you can move your project forward confidently to the next stage. During the consultation there will be an in-depth discussion to fully establish requirements and aspirations, as well as the set of sketch design drawings, advice on planning permission/listed building consents/structure etc., an agreed proposal by the end of the session, and recommendations on the next steps and on how to move the project forward.

NISI LIVING Web: nisiliving.co.uk Mediterranean homes are a riot of colour and texture; places where informal gatherings of friends and family happen effortlessly and spontaneously. We may not have the same climate here in the UK, but that needn’t stop us designing vibrant spaces for dining and entertaining in our own homes. Named after the Greek word for island – ‘nisi’ – Eleni and Julian Portch’s Bristol-based online store Nisi Living provides everything you could need to live a more colourful, more vibrant, more Mediterranean lifestyle. Eleni’s childhood experiences with her Greek relatives feed into not only the ethos of the brand, but into her own family life here in the UK. The hand-picked collection is packed with colour, character and quality, sourced worldwide from designers whose work celebrates colour, style and warmth. So many beautiful things can be found over on their website – our Nisi Living wishlist is longer than our arm!

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INFINITI2

SLIDING DOORS, WARDROBES

100 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2QY Tel: 0117 973 8100 Web: infiniti2.co.uk In need of some storage therapy? Then head to Infiniti2 and discover the art of space management. Their tailor-made wardrobe and sliding-door storage solutions are not just ingenious, but visually beautiful too. Experience a sense of order that continues throughout your home when your clothes, shoes, accessories and all your other everyday clutter are tidied and sorted and given an extended life. They offer inspired design, craftsmanship and all the finishing touches – from bedroom wardrobes to walk-in dressing rooms, the smallest of box rooms to home office organisation, the Infiniti2 effect is as pleasurable as the joy of being in control. With design, planning and installation, Infiniti2 presents the complete bespoke service.

BRISTOL FIREWOOD

MANDARIN STONE

283 Bath Road, Keynsham, Bristol BS31 1TN Tel: 0117 256 5556 Web: bristolfirewood.com

15 Regent Street, Bristol BS8 4HW, UK Tel: 0117 973 1552 Web: mandarinstone.com

Bristol Firewood is situated just outside Saltford, along the A4 linking Bath and Bristol. For over eight years they have been selling the very best in terms of value-for-money, quality kiln-dried logs. There are many different options of firewood products, the most popular being the kilndried ash nets of firewood and mixed nets of alder, birch, ash and oak firewood. All the wood is kiln-dried to ensure optimum ease of lighting and maximum heat output and it is all netted for your convenience, with a moisture content of 12 – 15%. In addition to kiln-dried logs, they also sell kindling, wood pellets, peat briquettes, coal, heat logs, natural fire lighters and much more. If there is anything else that you need, the team will do their utmost to cater for your needs. Deliveries to Bristol and Bath (all BS & BA postcodes) is free, and ordering is simple: go to the website, add your products to the basket, choose your delivery day and the friendly delivery people will drop off your products and help stack them in a convenient place for you. If you have any questions, just give them a ring; the Bristol Firewood team are happy to take your call. Special Bristol Magazine offer: Enter code POST17 to get two free bags of kindling worth £9.50 with every order over £50.

Founded by Alma Small in 1989, Mandarin Stone has become well-known as a purveyor of high quality stone products at reassuringly good prices. They currently have over 100 different lines including marble, sandstone, granite, limestone, travertine, terracotta, slate basalt and many more, as well as an ever-expanding collection of porcelain, ceramic, decorative and glazed tiles. Mandarin products are stocked to high levels, which allows them to be delivered in short lead-times, and consequently the Bristol showroom in Clifton Village has become a firm favourite with all customers, working either on residential or commercial projects.

MOSS DESIGN AND BUILD Unit D, Baptist Mills Court, Bristol BS5 0FJ Tel: 0117 379 0505 Web: mossdesignbuild.com Moss Design and Build is a collection of architects, designers and craftsmen, who together provide a full design and construction service under one appointment. They take away the stress that is often associated with traditional build projects and ensure that the quality they pride themselves on is upheld in all aspects of a project. Their MOSSpods are unique modular constructions that combine high-end traditional craftsmanship and contemporary design. These pre-designed timber buildings do not require planning permission in most cases and are built within a matter of weeks. There are two ranges of MOSSpods, the luxury Park Range and the contemporary River Range. Alongside the MOSSpods and MOSSextensions, services also include interior, landscape and garden design to seamlessly integrate new additions into their surroundings.

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THE HIDE COMPANY Old St. John’s, Old Coach Road, Ford, Wiltshire SN14 8RS Tel: 07909 542 990 Web: thehidecompany.co.uk ‘Watch it...Play it...Hide it!’ – Local specialist furniture company Hide has the perfect solution if you are looking to conceal your television from view when it’s not in use. They offer a range of cabinets, sideboards, bookcases and end-of-bed chests to house all standard flat screen TVs from 28" to 42", and they also offer a bespoke design service for customers who require a different solution not covered in the standard ranges. All the designs are made locally and during October and November they are offering a free initial design consultation at the workshops for all new enquiries. Plenty of time to order your own ‘Hide’ for Christmas, then – and once you’ve got it, all you’ll need to do is press the remote and watch your TV ‘Hide’ effortlessly from sight. Take a look at their website for more information.

IN-TOTO KITCHENS

DISNEY FLOORING

102 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2QY Tel: 0117 946 6433 Web: intoto.co.uk/bristol

11 Zetland Rd, Bristol BS6 7AG Tel: 0117 942 4949 Web: disney-flooring.com

The spacious in-toto design studio on Whiteladies Road has six fantastic displays that encapsulate the very latest in kitchen design and product innovation. The core value that owners Clinton and Fiona Patey and their team bring to the Bristol design studio is a clear focus on complete customer satisfaction. They have a keen eye for upto-the minute design and extensive product knowledge, innovative spatial awareness and a flair for interior design ideas. If you want to talk to kitchen professionals who are passionate about design rather than focussed on sales, then this is the place for you. They firmly believe that getting the design right, however long it takes, is paramount to a successful kitchen installation. So why not pop into the Clifton showroom, have a complimentary tea or coffee, and take your first step to achieving your dream kitchen.

This local, independent flooring retailer will encourage you to think differently about your floor. Disney Flooring offers a wide range of carpets, vinyl, wood, laminate and rugs, and the team specialise in custom-made rugs and runners, with their own sewing machine and rug room for completing border work on jobs large and small. If you are considering a hard floor that’s practical, you’ll find a great range of vinyl tiles including some exclusive designs. The service includes measure, supply and fitting. Behind the scenes they are always working closely with interior designers so every customer can be sure they are up to speed with product designs. The installation team are well known for a great service with satisfying results.

TRANQUILO LIVING Tel: 0117 951 1993 Web: tranquiloliving.co.uk Instagram: @tranquiloliving Tranquilo Living produces unique and stylish furniture that can be custom-made to suit your specific desires and dimensions. Their design and choice of materials offer both style and substance, combined with a modern yet characterful look. Favoured materials include hand-sanded reclaimed scaffold boards, metal and concrete, which work beautifully in both contemporary and traditional interiors. Check out the website and drop them an email (tranquiloliving@gmail.com) and they’ll be happy to discuss your requirements. Tranquilo Living is offering a 20% discount to all new customers placing orders before 5 November quoting the code: BRISTOLMAGAZINEOCT2017

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THE MOROCCAN ENCAUSTIC TILE COMPANY 11 Portland Street, Bristol BS8 4JA Tel: 0117 973 0000 Web: moroccanencaustictiles.com

AND SO TO BED Squires Court, Bedminster Parade, Bristol BS3 4BX Tel: 0117 953 1738 Web: andsotobed.co.uk For luxury beds, bedframes, headboards and beautiful bedroom accessories, this is the place to be. And So To Bed was founded over 40 years ago and is a highly respected and inherently British brand. The level of detail and quality of finish, that has become synonymous with an And So To Bed piece, is overseen by a leading design team and each and every product in their range is made by hand and finished by skilled artisans devoted to their craft. Spend a little time at the Bristol showroom, and you’ll likely find you are spending more quality time in the bedroom of your dreams.

Created by hand in The Moroccan Tile Company’s own workshop in Marrakech, using traditional methods, these beautiful tiles are available here in Bristol, in their warehouse and shop in Clifton. There is an astonishing choice of vibrant and colourful patterned tiles or chic, timeless black and white, any of which would add a focal point to your kitchen, bathroom or anywhere in the home. Not only do Moroccan encaustic tiles look sensational, they’re also extremely durable, being thicker than many other types of glazed clay tiles. As a result, Moroccan encaustic tiles will stand up to wear and tear for years without any issues, and maintenance is extremely easy. The Moroccan Tile Company offers genuine expertise, with stock patterns and tiles available as well as a bespoke service. The only problem is which of the gorgeous designs to choose...

KÜTCHENHAUS Clifton Down Shopping Centre, Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2NN Tel: 0117 2130680 Web: kutchenhaus.co.uk

KINDLE STOVES Glenavon Farm, 331 Bath Road, Saltford BS31 3TJ Tel: 0117 924 3898 Web: kindlestoves.co.uk

Kutchenhaus is the UK arm of a company called Nobilia. Nobilia is the largest manufacturer of fitted kitchens in Europe; making up to 3,000 kitchens daily. This means Kutchenhaus can not only keep prices competitive but still deliver high quality, German-engineered kitchens. They provide a wide selection of kitchen styles and can create both traditional and contemporary looks in both matt and gloss textures. With their free design service, they can create superb, photo realistic images giving a clear visual of a customer’s ideal kitchen. They also supply a full range of appliances including Bosch, Neff, CDA and Miele – so there’s wonderful choice too. Buying a kitchen is a big decision, and the Kutchenhaus team in Bristol work closely with every client to give them complete confidence in their new purchase.

At the heart of your home should be the perfect stove, according to Kindle Stoves; specialists in stoves approved for burning wood. They have a wood burner to suit every home, and they are stockists of the super-efficient Clearview, Contura and Rais models as well as many more. They offer a full installation service – from fireplace alterations, to slate hearths and stone fireplaces. Their new showroom is lovely, situated just outside Keynsham and with one of the largest displays of wood burners in the South West. It’s open seven days per week; pop in for advice and brochures or to book a home survey. They also sell seasoned logs, gas fires, the Big Green Egg outdoor cooker and Aga Rayburn range cookers.

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THE INTERIORS GUIDE | BRISTOL 2017

STONE AGE

PARK FURNISHERS

14 Waterloo Street, Clifton Village, Bristol, BS8 4BT Tel: 0117 923 8180 Web: stone-age.co.uk

Willway Street, Bedminster, Bristol, BS3 4AZ Tel: 0117 966 9253 Web: parkfurnishers.co.uk

Bespoke flooring and bathrooms for a new-build stone farm house was the brief to Stone Age for the West Country barn pictured below. Working alongside Joseph Interior Design, Stone Age helped to achieve a classic, contemporary space befitting this modern home. The project included an entrance hall, kitchen, living and dining space and bathrooms. In the open-plan living spaces, the owners wanted to create a natural flow between the rooms. To help achieve this, Stone Age suggested using Basse Beige limestone cut in 500 x 15mm running lengths throughout. This stone is fairly uniform, offering a warm colour with a slightly mottled appearance that subtly softens the rooms. For more details, advice and pricing visit the Clifton showroom or their website.

Park Furnishers is Bristol’s premier destination for furniture, flooring and fitted kitchens, celebrating 50 years as a proud, independent, family-owned business. On display you’ll find over 300 sofas, 100 dining sets and 100 different beds. There’s a huge choice of carpets and flooring to discover, with many stocked rolls and remnants ready for immediate delivery. The kitchen department has over 20 fitted kitchens on display and their consultants offer a free measuring and design service. As well as all of the above, you’ll find a host of home accessories including lighting, pictures and mirrors. While you take time out to discuss your options, complimentary tea and coffee is available in the in store coffee lounge. Always an enjoyable and worthwhile visit.

SCHMIDT BRISTOL

BONITI INTERIORS

170 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2XU Tel: 0117 301 8888 Web: schmidt-kitchens.com

Dunsdon Barn, West Littleton, Wiltshire SN14 8JA Tel: 01225 892200 Web: boniti.com

Founded in Germany in 1934, Schmidt has been designing precision, made-to-measure furniture for more than 80 years, creating innovative solutions adapted to customers’ wishes and needs. The company is now one of Europe’s leading furniture manufacturers. They aim to offer complete freedom in customising the design and functionality for your perfect kitchen. The Schmidt design lab brings together stylists, engineers and interior architects who work together to conceive and realise the interior solutions of the future, pooling their expertise and creativity to give life to harmonious and functional living spaces. There are four collections of kitchen styles to choose from; design, contemporary, modern and rustic – each with myriad options available to personalise your space. For true inspiration and expert kitchen advice, visit the new Schmidt showroom at the top of Whiteladies Road.

Run by Giles and Simon Lunt, Boniti is a high quality interiors (and exteriors) business, whose showroom is a veritable destination for all types of natural stone, porcelain and timber flooring, as well as decorative tiles, stoneware, Kadai firebowls, garden furniture, homeware accessories and the highly desirable Everhot range cookers. Boniti has an impressive client list of property developers and the specialist bespoke service can be supplied worldwide. For all projects – large, small – the Boniti team are masters of their profession and it shows in every detail. The showroom is easily reached from junction 18 of the M4 – why not pay a visit?

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HUGHES CARPENTRY

THE BED WORKSHOP

Unit 14, Old Mill Road, Portishead, Bristol BS20 7BX Tel: 01275 844 899

The Old Pickle Factory, Braunton Road, Bedminster, Bristol BS3 3AA Tel: 0117 963 6659 Web: thebedworkshop.co.uk

Hughes Carpentry has been trading for over eight years. Located in Portishead, it has a skilled and friendly team of carpenters ready to help with your woodworking needs. They specialise in both domestic and commercial carpentry so whatever you require – whether it’s bespoke fitted kitchens or wardrobes, or a shop re-fit – this excellent team is more than capable. And, if you’re a qualified carpenter or want to become an apprentice, feel free to give them a call as they’re always looking to expand. Head over to the Hughes Carpentry Ltd Facebook page for news, weekly offers and an impressive picture gallery of their recently completed projects.

Inside an old redbrick Victorian factory, expert antique furniture restorers and cabinet makers Paul Wood and Ned Fitzgerald stock a fascinating range of French antique and early 20thcentury furniture including farmhouse tables, beds, chairs and dressers which have been carefully selected from Brittany and Normandy and then lovingly restored. Their team of buyers are always willing to try and source any specific pieces and if you don’t find your perfect bed in stock, they’ll make it for you in the adjoining workshop which specialises in reproduction, and contemporarystyle beds. There is a wealth of expertise here and The Bed Workshop should be the first port of call for lovers of vintage furniture.

WHITTAKER WELLS 157 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2RF Tel: 0117 983 8485 Web: whittakerwells.com

GARDINER HASKINS Broad Plain, Bristol BS2 0JP Tel: 0117 929 2288 Web: gardinerhaskins.co.uk

Since opening in September last year, Whittaker Wells – ‘The Boys Who Sew’ – has developed into one of Bristol’s leading interiors showrooms, with their focus on colour and pattern. Window treatments are a speciality – curtains and blinds all handmade on site (you can visit the gorgeous workroom if you like). They are also a main dealer for Luxaflex, supplying shutters, awnings and blinds of all kinds, including fully motorised versions. With five paint ranges and a mixing machine for both Mylands and Designers Guild, they also provide on-site colour consultations – in fact, any help you need. Over 100 books of the finest wallpapers, from the leading brands, help them offer a full interior design service too. This year they are working hard to further develop their showcase of local Bristol talent, with artisans selling one-off furniture, art and interior finishes. The dramatic and inspiring showroom itself is worth a visit.

You’ll find everything you need to make your home your own – all under one roof – at Gardiner Haskins, Bristol’s largest independent homecentre and one of Bristol’s most established businesses. Whether your home is undergoing a revamp or you’re starting from scratch, this place has all the elements you need to turn your unique vision into a reality, for less. From big brand appliances to classic, contemporary furniture, you can overhaul entire rooms at their fitted kitchens and bathroom departments or enhance your home using their range of DIY and decorating essentials. Their luxury home furnishings department, with designer brands and made-to-measure curtain service, will enable you to add all the style and finishing touches you need to turn your house into a beautiful home.

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DE FR LI EE VE RY

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BRISTOL MAGAZINE SPECIAL OFFERS

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PLACE YOUR ORDER, SELECT DELIVERY DAY, DELIVERY WILL BE MADE

t: 0117 2565556 • www.bristolfirewood.com

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High Quality Craftmanship

Specialist

Kitchens - Bedrooms - Bathrooms

Princess Victoria Street, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4BX. Tel: 0117 329 8799 Exclusive Partner of Torchetti Kitchens: www.torchetti.it

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE XV


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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

FAMILY DIARY What’s on in Bristol for little ones to enjoy this month?

Bristol Family Arts Festival, various venues, Sunday 1 October – Tuesday 31 October, times vary Bristol Family Arts Festival returns to venues across the city this month, bringing a packed lineup of creative events for all ages. Activities include storytelling at ss Great Britain, pumpkin carving at Tyntesfield, the Arnolfini ‘Big Draw’ plus plenty more workshops, theatre performances, music and messy making opportunities. Don’t miss the traditional festival finale at Arnolfini on 28 October too, offering games, arty experiments and creation stations from 1pm to 4pm. • arnolfini.org.uk

Top pick...

Image © The Architecture Centre

DON’T MISS... Legally Blonde The Musical, Bristol Hippodrome, Monday 2 October – Saturday 7 October, 7.30pm & 2.30pm She may have just been dumped by her beloved boyfriend Warner Huntington III in favour of a ‘serious’ girlfriend, but Elle Woods (played by Lucie Jones) has got a plan up her glittery, designer sleeve to win him back. With the support of her sorority, she makes it to Harvard Law School with pooch Bruiser in tow, and despite first impressions finds success and friendship in her newfound career. Tickets from £15 to £43, suitable for ages 8+; atgtickets.com

Alice in Wonderland, Redgrave Theatre, Tuesday 3 October – Thursday 5 October, 7.30pm Mischievous Alice has had a steampunk makeover in this exciting new production from ITV West Television Workshop, featuring all of Lewis Carroll’s classic characters, from the eccentric Mad Hatter

and March Hare to the fearsome Queen of Hearts. Should Alice follow the mysterious White Rabbit down the rabbit hole? Or play it safe, reading on the riverbank? I think we all know the answer to that one... Tickets from £10 to £12; redgravetheatre.com

There are spooky goings on at ss Great Britain this month – don’t worry, it’s only raspberry jam!

The School of Music – Live! St George’s, Sunday 15 October, 11am Meurig and Rachel Bowen’s new classical music book for children comes to life in this special event directed by Lynne Lawrence. Starring actor-musicians Amy Porter, Laurence Kilsby and Lydia Kenny, The School of Music features a fun and fast-paced sequence of sketches and interactive musical games, plus the chance to meet the book’s characters: composerguitarist Ronny ‘Beethoven’ O’Reilly, percussionist Roxy Mojo, star-singer Diva Venus and cellist Rufus Vibrato. Tickets cost £6, suitable for ages 6+; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

Mark Thompson’s Spectacular Science Show, The Lantern, Colston Hall, Sunday 22 October, 2.30pm

See science in a brand new light with Mark Thompson’s Spectacular Science Show, image © Steve Ullathorne

Hit BBC show Stargazing Live presenter Mark Thompson brings his Spectacular Science show to The Lantern – and it’s guaranteed to get little ones interested in the wide world around them. Explore the strange and magical properties of matter with exploding elephant’s toothpaste, vortex generating dustbins, vanishing beakers and even exploding Pringles tubes as astronomer Mark enthralls audiences with the magic of science. Tickets from £8.60 to £12.90, suitable for ages 6+; colstonhall.org

The Spooky Ship, ss Great Britain, Saturday 28 October & Sunday 29 October, 6.30pm – 9.50pm, tours every 10 minutes Climb aboard Brunel’s ss Great Britain this month for a Halloween fright-fest like no other. Watch out for ghoulish figures roaming the decks as the ship’s past comes to life; follow your ghostly guide into the darkest corners of the vessel; explore the eerie sights, sounds and smells and discover live actors lurking in the shadows. Tickets from £9 to £14; ssgreatbritain.org; bristololdvic.org.uk

Autumn Stargazing, We The Curious, until Monday 4 December, times vary Aspiring astronomers will love the previously named At-Bristol’s mesmerising planetarium, which combines up-to-date photographs from the Hubble telescope with visuals from the most advanced planetarium in the UK, and visualisations from researchers at the University of Exeter. Hear stories of ancient stargazers, fly to far-away galaxies and see the view from newly discovered exoplanets. Tickets from £1.74 to £3.50; wethecurious.org


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By Dr Caroline Pascoe, Headmistress of Monmouth School for Girls

HARD WORK PAYS OFF WITH OUTSTANDING RESULTS Results days are always met with excitement and intrepidation. And the introduction of the reformed GCSEs heightened the emotions in many schools and households across the country. While the first cohort of pupils took the numerical grades at Monmouth, we chose to continue with the more challenging IGCSEs and letter grades because it is still the predominant language. Our girls delivered an outstanding set of results as the school achieved its best-ever A* performance at GCSE level. An impressive 49% of all grades were A* – emphatically eclipsing the 42% of A*s we were awarded last year. Almost half of all grades were at A* and a remarkable 90% of all grades were at A* to B which showed that the hard work of staff and pupils certainly paid off. The results were excellent across the board with 11 girls achieving 10 A*s or more. We recognise the importance that science, technology, engineering and maths plays in our girls’ education. Three girls, in particular, deserve a mention. Budding inventor Kia Ballantyne, who has appeared on BBC television’s Dragons’ Den programme, achieved eight A*s, two As and a distinction in additional maths. Kia became a UK Junior Engineer of the Year in 2015 after co-creating a gadget, called Crikey Bikey, which is a harness to help parents teach their children to ride a bike safely. Another talented engineer, Lisa Davies who designed an award-winning car dehumidifier and air freshener called Xorbit, was awarded 10 A*s and a distinction in additional maths. Niamh Gray attained 10 A*s and distinction in additional maths after earlier helping the school to win a £100,000 prize in a national green energy makeover competition. All three are excellent role models and an inspiration to the younger pupils at the school. n *The Schools have an established bus route covering the Thornbury area. For more information, visit habs-monmouth.org, call 01600 710433 for Monmouth School for Boys or 01600 711104 for Monmouth School for Girls.

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EDUCATION NEWS UPDATES FROM THE CITY’S SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES The centre needs your help to secure £12,000 and make the building as green as it can be

VOTE GREEN!

NEW FOR CLIFTON

GET THEM OUTDOORS

Clifton College opened Holland’s House, its new girls’ day house, in September; coinciding with anniversary plans to celebrate 30 years of girls at Clifton. Holland’s House is the 12th house at Clifton College and was named in honour of Louisa Percival, whose maiden name was Holland. In the 1870s a coeducational school was unthinkable, but there was growing pressure for female education. John Percival, the founder of Clifton College and his wife, Louisa, were strong advocates and, in 1869, they opened the Bristol branch of the Association for the Promotion of the Higher Education of Women – with Louisa as secretary. Holland’s House, fittingly the first College House to be named after a woman, will honour Louisa’s forward thinking contributions to female education. “This represents a very exciting period of expansion and the high demand reflects the superb opportunities and holistic education available to girls at Clifton,” explained Dr Tim Greene, head of the college.

A new outdoor nursery that aims to immerse and teach children in the Bristol countryside has opened for registrations after demand from local parents. Situated in a forest setting in Stoke Park Estate, 10 minutes drive from central Bristol, it comes after the success of a playgroup that has had a waiting list for over two years. Founded and run by primary school teachers with over 25 years’ combined experience, children will be taught den-building, foraging and outdoor cooking, woodwork, instrument making and mud painting – come rain or shine, using tents and trees for shelter. “I’ve witnessed children utterly transformed as soon as they connect with nature,” said cofounder Janie Ankers. “They become relaxed and more receptive to learning, and in the crucial formative years, it can make such a difference to their development.” Cofounder Lizzie Staite added: “With Little Foxes Forest Pre-School, we are on a mission to offer children from Bristol the opportunity to learn in a natural environment; to become decision makers, explorers, foragers, chefs, climbers and so much more.”

• cliftoncollege.com

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The Southville Community Development Association, the charity behind the successful Southville Centre, is soon to open a new community hub in BS3 – and the team is now asking Bristol to vote for them in a competition to win £12,000 to make the new building as green as it can be. The Chessel Centre is due to open at the end of this year and will house a much-needed 54-place nursery, a community space and offices for the charity. It will also provide space for community groups, after-school clubs for children and social clubs for older people, as well as outdoor play areas. The project has been shortlisted to win a share of the Marks and Spencer Community Energy Fund in order to fund solar panels for the roof, that will enable the building to not only generate the electricity it needs but create a surplus to fund further charitable community activities and initiatives in the local area. Voting closes on 20 October, with the winners announced in early November. The SCDA have already raised £1.6million to build the Chessel Centre on the corner of Chessel Street and Garnet Street but the ambition is to create a community hub with zero carbon footprint. The building has been built to enable the charity to install further panels, a green roof, and as much green space as possible but the costs are high. “There is huge demand in the Bedminster and Southville area for quality childcare provision and additional services and activities for the local community, particularly isolated groups,” said Simon Hankins of the SCDA. “The Chessel Centre will make a considerable difference but we want to ensure the building provides an eco-hub for BS3 and sets an example of how we can improve the area and air quality. Now we have the opportunity to raise the additional funds we need to further improve the green credentials of the building and use the energy generated to increase our charitable activities in BS3.” • mandsenergyfund.com/projects; southvillecentre.org.uk


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Excellent schools remain excellent precisely because they grow and develop, says Stephen

HERE COME THE GIRLS We talk to Queen Elizabeth’s Hospital School headmaster Stephen Holliday about a historic recent development

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or the first time in over 425 years, QEH has welcomed female pupils. Of those that applied, 17 girls were recently selected to join the newly co-educational sixth form; and in preparation for their arrival, the Sixth Form Centre was transformed over the summer, with the creation of a vibrant new social space, IT centre and private study space as well as female changing rooms and facilities. Stephen Holliday is looking forward to overseeing the new chapter. TBM: So how did the decision to welcome girls to QEH come about? Stephen: Our 425th anniversary has inevitably been a period of reflection as well as future planning. QEH was consistently achieving high standards across all areas of school life: examination results, pastoral care and co-curricular activities. Financially we were also in a strong position, with more boys attending the school than ever before. Excellent schools remain excellent precisely because they grow and develop, rather than rest on their laurels. We have a clear vision for the future and our co-educational sixth form – along with our recent £3million investment into new science, art and music facilities – is part of this vision. Were there any other reasons for the growth? We believe we have an excellent sixth form provision which will be attractive to girls, and believe the introduction of girls will also be of benefit to QEH boys preparing for the next phase of their lives. We will be able to offer all the benefits of a QEH education to more students and, since university life and the modern workplace sees men and women working alongside each other on equal terms, it seems natural to offer this opportunity to boys and girls in the sixth form at QEH. Were parents involved in the discussion? As this is a commercially sensitive decision, it was not possible to discuss this with parents ahead of the announcement. However, we care about the views of parents and were pleased to see that in our values survey, which took place shortly before we announced the news, a 72 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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number of parents commented that they wished they could send their daughters to school at QEH! Since making the decision public, we have received overwhelmingly positive comments from parents. What has been the greatest challenge to come with the change? One of the greatest challenges has been the building itself and the constraints this places on us. However, we have invested heavily into an exciting expansion of our Sixth Form Centre and in recent years we have also completed a brand new science block with three additional laboratories, a new ceramics suite and new music facilities, creating more space within the school. What are you most looking forward to about the new era? Knowing that our sixth form students will be even better prepared for the next stage in their lives has always been our main aim and I’m sure we will see that. Also, we are enjoying seeing girls around school and look forward to the contributions they will make, in all sorts of ways, to our community. Will the uniform be the same for the female students? Sixth formers at QEH are expected to adopt a smart, professional dress code and the dress code is designed to promote confidence and professionalism. Girls are expected to adhere to a similar dress code to boys – i.e. a dark suit and a smart collared shirt. Expand a little on what it will it mean for the students, practically Obviously, the school will feel different, particularly in the sixth form, though for many boys aged seven to 16, life will remain pretty much unchanged – apart from seeing girls around and having them as prefects, peer supporters or peer mentors, which can only be a good thing. QEH enjoys a local and national reputation for academic excellence, high quality extra-curricular provision and sensitive pastoral care. We are known as a friendly pastorally-sensitive and close-knit school and those strengths will remain. Overall, we believe


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School life will remain largely unchanged for the younger students, except for having girls as prefects, peer supporters or mentors

that by remaining a single-sex school from seven to 16 and having a co-educational sixth form, we will offer our boys the best of both worlds at the most appropriate stages in their educational development. So, our ethos and values will stay the same, but for some, the ‘feel’ of the school will be different and, we hope, better. How do the boys feel? They are excited, obviously, but already it seems as though the girls have always been here because they’ve settled so quickly and look and feel part of our sixth form. What is your future vision for the school? In many ways, more of the same – we enjoy a reputation for academic excellence, sensitive pastoral care and high quality and varied extra-curricular opportunities. We are determined to continue doing what we do best, while always looking to enhance our facilities, both in school and at our sports grounds at Failand, as well as making sure we are at the forefront of educational development. For example, we have introduced an exciting enrichment programme for years seven to 10. Students are given the skills and guidance to cope with the pressures of the modern world, and to develop their talents and personalities beyond the academic curriculum. In these formative years prior to external examinations, they spend an afternoon a week participating in activities and sessions that have been designed to support and challenge them. There are four strands to the programme – personal development, mental wellbeing, physical wellbeing and creativity and innovation. So recently, for example, students have had first aid training, yoga sessions, bushcraft and survival skills activities, and have been creating stop motion animations! • The sixth form open evening for prospective students will be held on 9 November; qehbristol.co.uk

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• Co-educational day school for pupils aged 5-13 with

dyslexia and other specific learning/language difficulties.

• Located in Wiltshire between Bath and Chippenham. CReSTeD approved.

• Fully qualified specialist teachers with maximum class size of eight - reducing to one-to-one as required.

Call 01225 743 566 or visit www.CalderHouseSchool.co.uk

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NATURE

Growing up on the Isle of Mull gave Gordon a love of the wilderness

WILD THINGS Glued to any television show about the natural world? Head to Bristol Grammar School this month to fire your most burning questions at one of the experts...

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BC TV wildlife presenter and cameraman Gordon Buchanan has travelled the world – from South America, Asia and Africa to Papua New Guinea, Russia and Alaska – and now he’s Bristol-bound. On 8 October, he’ll be at Bristol Grammar School to regale wildlife enthusiasts with spell-binding stories of the natural world. As presenter of the popular Animal Families and Me series, with a reputation for relishing dangerous and tough assignments, he shares an insight into his weird and wonderful experiences with some of the world’s most fearsome and majestic animals – all illustrated with his own film footage and photography. Ahead of his local appearance, we talked to him about his most challenging expeditions, favourite critters and closest encounters... What do you think influenced your choice of career? Growing up on the Isle of Mull was a big influence, definitely – for two quite opposite reasons. Mull offered freedom and a sense of wilderness but, being an island, it was claustrophobic and limited in what it had to offer to someone with an adventurous spirit. How did you get discovered for TV? I’d started to make a film about leopards in Sri Lanka. They are notoriously elusive cats and sightings were so few and far between that the film was going to fall flat on its face as a straight natural history documentary. My boss at the time, the producer Mike Birkhead, realised that the film would have to be not a film about leopards but a film about trying to make a film about leopards. It was only me in the field so I filmed myself without the pressure of a whole crew looking and listening. Everything since stemmed from that. So it was the late Nick Gordon who gave you your first break? Yes. Nick was the first ever person I had ever met who had a truly 78 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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enviable job, was ambitious, simply loved doing what he did and strived to be the best at it. Were you always passionate about wildlife? As a kid I was wildly passionate about spending time outdoors – it was the only thing that mattered to me. Thinking back, I was always very bored indoors. There was nothing inside that compared to the adventures and excitement to be had out in the rain, wind, snow and occasional sunshine. Wildlife was part of that experience and I loved it but I wasn’t a junior naturalist. I didn’t have binoculars, camera and almanac, just a pair of wellies. What’s the most important thing you’ve learnt, so far? Work hard, follow your nose, trust your instincts and good things will come in life and in the wild. Most difficult things about working with wildlife? I used to be very frustrated by the lack of control I’d have over any of the process. I’d spend weeks fantasising about being able to turn into any creature I wanted so that I could get the desired shots in the best scene in the best light. Now I love that lack of control. Unpredictability is more exciting. Really, now the only difficulty is the time away from home and the people I love. They are the ones who make the sacrifices. Have you ever missed an amazing filming opportunity? I’ve seen amazing things happened unexpectedly – too fast to react to – but that comes with the territory so I don’t beat myself up. But I messed up pretty enormously one time. I’ll only say that it was one of those once-in-a-lifetime shots that I was running the camera on – or at least I thought I was running the camera on. I was so excited, I hit the button twice so the camera wasn’t recording…


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NATURE

Moments on the job which make it all worthwhile…? I love the reward of watching a programme go out and seeing everyone’s hard work realised in something that can be shared with millions of other people. In the field, sometimes it may be an epic wildlife event or fascinating behaviour but increasingly, the things that make it all worthwhile are the fleeting temporal moments. The way the light touches the land, a crashing wave, a rain storm, the subtlety of an animal moving in a particular way. All these things make me feel very lucky to have been there at that moment to have witnessed such beauty.

What’s the longest you have waited for an animal to turn up? Did a couple of 48(+) hour stints without sleep, with finger on the button, in Svalbard in the Arctic this summer waiting for barnacle geese to jump off their nesting cliff with their young and for Arctic foxes to show up to predate on them. It was mid-summer so it is perpetual daylight. Great for fiming, bad for sleeping. What’s your favourite part of the UK? And beyond? In the UK, the Highlands of Scotland around Aviemore has a special magic; it has some of the most grand and wild-looking pine forest in the country. In particular, Abernethy Forest and the area around Loch Garten. After many years of driving that road back to Mull, I never tire of the drive over Rannoch Moor and through Glen Coe. Beyond that? The Arctic. I love the place and the animals that live there. What has been your closest encounter with a wild animal? I’ve been chased by bears, elephants, tigers and many others, but one of the first and most memorable encounters was in Sierra Leone when I was 17. I was driving back to camp when seven giant fruit bats escaped from a holding container in the back of the car. They are huge and they flapped and nipped me all the way back to camp. Memorable only really because, at the time, I was terrified of bats! What’s your favourite animal to film? A hunting leopard takes some beating but any bird in flight is great fun and a challenge to film.

What’s your favourite wildlife programme? Possibly a film called Hokkaido – Garden Of The Gods made by Patrick Morris at the NHU. I watched it a long time ago; it was very emotional. I don’t want to see it again in case it disappoints me all this time later. And I love the memory of it, so I don’t need to see it again. The early Alan Root films I loved in my early teens are what made me want to be a wildlife cameraman. I think the Expedition series would do the same for me nowadays if I were a young fella! When you’re not filming or working, how do you relax? I’m not a great relaxer but in my free time I like to be outside without the pressure of having a camera. I have a little wooden boat that I love to be out in, rain or shine. Recently I have been heading over to the west coast to freedive. I am loving that. Watching fish – looking at sea urchins, starfish, soft corals, kelp forests – is very relaxing. But equally I love just being at home on the sofa, chilling at the weekend with some good TV and a glass or two of wine. In a parallel world your alternative career would be… I worked at a pony trekking centre for years as a kid. I was majorly into horses. I used to ride in events around Argyll and wanted to be an international show jumper but now I’d settle for being an Olympic cross-country rider. Sadly I don’t bounce too well these days. Advice to your 16-year-old self? Don’t worry, you’ll get there in the end so embrace, enjoy and make the very most of the opportunities that come you way. Life is serious business so have as much fun as possible. Finish the sentence ‘Wildlife filmmaking is…’ Nice work if you can get it! ■ Follow Gordon on Twitter: @gordonjbuchanan

Gordon has travelled all over the world since getting his first break in the wildlife presenting world

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Photograph by Martha Dommett

MAGICAL MUSHROOMS October is the perfect month to find fungi. Pete Dommett takes his family on a forest treasure hunt...

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hoa! Come and look at this one!” My son, Will, is standing by a silver birch stump, the top half of the tree severed by a recent storm. On the remaining trunk, strange pale blobs are bursting out of the bark. “It’s a marshmallow tree!” he jokes, squeezing the soft, spongy shapes between his fingers. We’re out in the woods (where better to spend an autumn afternoon?) on a fungi foray. This has become something of a seasonal must-do activity in our household and the kids love it. The fabulous array of species on show – in a vast variety of shapes, sizes and colours – holds their fascination for hours. And, unlike with other wildlife we’ve tried to see, the children don’t have to be quiet: fungi aren’t going to fly or run away from their excited yelps of discovery.

...The children don’t have to be quiet; fungi aren’t going to fly or run away from their excited yelps of discovery... Will’s younger brother, Tom, calls us over to examine something he’s found hidden in the piles of browning leaves beneath his feet. The grubby yellow globes he’s uncovered look like dogs’ long-lost tennis balls, but on breaking one apart, a centre the colour and consistency of caviar is revealed. We take a cautious sniff – there’s a sharp tang of burning rubber. Exploring fungi with our different senses adds to the enjoyment, but tasting them demands a high degree of caution. Of the 17,500 or so species found in the UK, only a fraction is potentially deadly poisonous. Still, picking for the pot does rely on

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precise identification, but has nevertheless grown in popularity in recent years. The wild food movement has meant a rise in foraging for edible fungi and, in some places, has lead to over-collecting for commercial use. The Fungus Conservation Trust is understandably concerned about the impact this has on the ecology of our woodlands. After all, fungi are vital for their welfare: they break down dead branches and other plant material, recycling the nutrients to bring life back to the forest. Without them, this delicately balanced ecosystem just wouldn’t work. But according to the latest State of Nature report, 11% of Britain’s fungi species are now estimated to be at risk of extinction. Carrying on our quest, we try to identify the fungi we find in our field guide. Will’s marshmallows turn out to be birch polypores – a type of bracket fungus – and we think what Tom unearthed earlier were earthballs. We discover clusters of vivid yellow sulphur tufts and tiers of tiny, stripey turkey tails on another tree stump and crusty, black King Alfred’s Cakes seemingly glued to a fallen ash. My daughter, Martha, is absorbed in taking photographs of delicate, translucent porcelain agaric mushrooms, and a colony of jelly fungi clinging to the underside of a rotting log – looking like it should be lurking under the sea – delights and disgusts us all. This month is a good time to go looking for fungi. Badock’s Wood, Stoke Park and The Downs are some of the best places in Bristol. Leigh Woods, on the edge of the city, is well-known as a top spot for fungi, with over 300 of the larger species recorded here – including one or two rarer examples such as the beautifully sounding goldflecked woodwax and the less-appealing Satan’s bolete. Go on, get out there this autumn and put the fun into fungi. ■ • UK Fungus Day is on 8 October. To join a guided foray at Leigh Woods, visit nationaltrust.org.uk/leigh-woods. Avon Wildlife Trust is also running an Introduction to Fungi course on 21 & 22 October. For more, see avonwildlifetrust.org.uk/whats-on


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CAN WE HELP OURSELVES AVOID DEMENTIA? By Gemma Hurditch for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine).

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ementia now affects three in ten people over 70 years of age in the developed world. Younger people are increasingly being diagnosed with the condition. Dementia is defined as a significant loss of intellectual abilities, often memory loss, to the extent where it interferes with social or occupational function. There are different types of dementia. Alzheimer’s disease is responsible for more than 70% of cases. The majority of other cases are linked to circulatory disease. This type is known as vascular dementia, where there is chronic reduced blood flow to the brain. At least 10% of people diagnosed with dementia have mixed type - Alzheimer’s and vascular. Dementia is NOT a normal part of the ageing process. Given that there is currently no medical cure for the condition, is there anything we could do to try to help ourselves avoid it? Risk factors The causes of Alzheimer’s disease are poorly understood. Dietary and lifestyle factors, heavy metal toxicity, genetic variations, cardiovascular health and head trauma are all believed to play a role.

Vascular dementia risk is increased by all cardiovascular risks; high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and smoking etc. Diet and lifestyle is a major part of the equation. Naturopathic approach The naturopathic view of health emphasises prevention, and is based on the premis that all disease starts with disruption to the body’s balance, including insufficient intake of vital nutrients. A naturopath considers all the potential triggers for any health issue. These may be related to diet, lifestyle, toxins in the home/work environment, constitutional susceptibility and other factors. Natural ways to address risk factors • Get your levels of homocysteine (a problematic amino acid) tested. If above 9 umol/L see your naturopath or nutritional therapist about a B vitamin programme to reduce it. • Ditch processed foods for more vegetables and fruits, to normalise blood pressure and increase vitamins and minerals. • Look up the details of a low glycemic load diet, designed to balance blood sugar and promote a healthy weight. • Choose organic produce wherever possible to reduce chemical exposure and maximise healthful plant phytonutrients. • Minimise red meat intake and aim for only grass fed, organic cuts. • Eat oily fish 3 x per week; small mackerel, herring, anchovies. Larger fish may be too polluted with mercury. • Consume turmeric to help reduce inflammation. Take half a teaspoon of the dried spice with some cracked black pepper to enhance absorption.

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• Reduce inflammatory foods like sugar, dairy and processed grains. Replace with additional green leafy vegetables, fruit and nut smoothies, quinoa and brown rice. • Exercise five days a week for 40 minutes, a brisk walk is good. • Sleep is important. Ensure good rest, away from your screens and devices. • Maintain hobbies and social interaction learning new things and keeping the brain active is protective and can compensate for loss of function in other areas. A naturopathic practitioner can make you a personalised plan. We can never be in complete control of our future, but for most of us, adopting a naturopathic approach can help improve our chances of a healthy and cognisant lifespan. Gemma Hurditch

Attend a FREE Open Morning to find out about part time training Geoff Don with CNM Bristol for a career as a Naturopathic Nutritionist or Naturopathic Acupuncturist.

21st October at 11am. Please book online at:

www.naturopathy-uk.com 01342 410 505

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Helping women through all life stages Your body is amazing. No other working machine in our lives receives so little attention but runs for years and years. Mrs Caroline Overton, a Consultant Gynaecologist at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, offers some simple women’s health tips that will help you keep your body in good working condition, whatever your age.

Health in your 20s & 30s Periods & fertility Not all women have a 28-day period cycle. A period cycle of between 25 and 35 days is normal, and tells you that you are ovulating. Women often count the days that they are not bleeding, but the length of the cycle is counted from the first day of the period to the first day of the next. Ovulation occurs 14 days before the period arrives, so for a 25day cycle, ovulation occurs on day 11 with the fertile days 9-11. For a 35-day cycle, ovulation occurs on day 21 with fertile days 19-21. Keep a record of your period dates to know what your pattern is. Hormones & PMT It is normal to have cyclical changes in the body in response to hormones produced by your ovaries. Estrogen is produced in the first half of the month, and oestrogen and progesterone in the second half of the month. Progesterone is the “moody hormone” and you may recognise feeling “pre-menstrual” with breast tenderness and moodiness. 84 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Generally these symptoms are manageable, but for some women they can be extreme. The simplest treatment is to recognise what is happening and to make allowances, or try vitamin B6 or evening primrose oil. If the changes are affecting you, your work, family or relationships then see your doctor for help. Ovulation & PCOS The term polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may suggest that the ovaries are enlarged and full of abnormal cysts. However, the medical name for the egg sac is follicular cyst and here PCOS means “many egg ovaries”. The majority of women with PCOS are able to have children without difficulty. However, some women have irregular periods with long gaps between the periods, together with symptoms of greasy skin and hair, acne, sometimes unwanted hair on the face or body and loss of head hair. Treatment is available whether you just want control of the symptoms or whether you want to regulate your periods because you are planning on starting a family. Nº 160

Cervical smears It is normal for you to be offered your first smear at the age of 25 and then every three years. The test can be uncomfortable, but lasts less than a minute. The smear test checks that the cells look healthy and tests for Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). You come into contact with HPV through sexual intercourse. There are about 100 different types of HPV, but some HPV types called “high risk HPV” are more commonly linked with cell changes. It doesn’t mean that they are high risk to you or your partner. If one of these HPV types is detected, you will be offered an annual smear until you develop immunity and the HPV disappears. Symptoms of cervical cancer are irregular bleeding or discharge, so don’t put off going for that check-up. Endometriosis It’s really important for women to recognize what are normal periods. If your periods are so painful that you need to attend Accident & Emergency, take time off work, have a bed day, or plan your life around them, then your


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periods are not normal. You might have endometriosis or adenomyosis. Other symptoms of endometriosis are pain going to the toilet, especially around the time of your period, and pain during intercourse. The majority of women with endometriosis and adenomyosis conceive without problems. There is no cure, but treatment is available from painkillers, hormones or surgery. Ovarian cysts Ovarian cysts are common. The majority of ovarian cysts relate to ovulation, are innocuous, and come and go. If the cyst has dispersed on a repeat scan, this will have been related to ovulation. A persistent haemorrhagic cyst can be a sign of endometriosis. Other common types of cysts are dermoid cysts which can contain hair and even teeth. Small cysts might require no treatment, but larger than 5cm, we normally recommend surgical removal by keyhole or laparoscopic surgery. Fibroids At least one in four women develop one or more fibroids during their lifetime. They can vary in size from the size of a pea to larger than a melon. The biggest fibroid I’ve ever removed weighed a stone! They are most common in women aged 30-50 and can sometimes run in families. They don’t require any treatment if they are small and don’t give any symptoms. Large fibroids can cause abnormal bleeding, pressure on the bladder and/or bowel, bloating and difficulty getting pregnant. Fibroids can be removed surgically and there are new drug treatments available. Health in your 40s In your 40s, it is normal for your periods to get closer together, and this can be a problem if your periods are very heavy. It can feel that you are having hardly any break between periods and women can present with tiredness and symptoms of anaemia. Symptoms of the perimenopause can start in your 40s even before periods stop. It’s the time when the ovaries gradually begin to make less oestrogen, and can start in your 30s or even earlier. The result can feel like a hormonal and emotional rollercoaster. Anxiety and depression can be major features of the perimenopause. Taking some very gentle bio-identical oestrogen can help smooth the hormonal lows. The menopause The menopause is the date of your last ever period (meno = period, and pause = stop). For most women, the end of periods is a relief and it is the symptoms of low estrogen or perimenopause that they need help with. Should I take HRT? No woman plans to go on HRT. Most women can manage the hot flushes, but when they are every 15 minutes with obvious sweating, when the night sweats wake you up every hour at night, it becomes very difficult to function. Fatigue, depression,

anxiety and worse premenstrual syndrome can all be symptoms of the perimenopause. The hormonal and emotional rollercoaster of the perimenopause can be helped with bioidentical oestrogens and progesterone. A bit of a buzz word, as these are synthesized like all drugs, but they are identical in structure and function to the oestrogen and progesterone produced by the ovaries. On coming off the HRT, the symptoms will return, but since bio-identical hormones are available as a gel or patch, it is easier to slowly reduce the dose. So if HRT is such a help, why don’t women stay on HRT forever? The answer is that Women’s Health Initiative and Million Women study discovered an association between HRT and breast cancer. The longer you take HRT, the greater the risk. Taking HRT for five years after the age of 50 to help with perimenopause transition carries only an extra risk of breast cancer. If a thousand women age 50 opt to take HRT for five years, then six extra women would develop breast cancer over the five years.

Pelvic floor and bladder By the time you are 60, it is normal to get up once a night to pass urine, twice a night after age 70. It is important to try to maintain a healthy weight in to your 50s and 60s and beyond. Extra weight places a strain on your pelvic floor, which when combined with the hormone changes of the perimenopause could mean you may notice symptoms of urinary leaking or a bulge from the vagina (prolapse). Urinary stress incontinence is leaking of urine when moving, coughing or sneezing. Urinary urge incontinence is that feeling of not being able to get to the loo quick enough, sometimes called latchkey incontinence. Neither are dangerous, but require a check-up and treatment is available. Like all working machines, your body needs a bit of looking after, but with good care and a few simple checks, there is no reason that you can’t keep it in tip top condition for many years.

Sex drive Sex drive in the perimenopause can decline and sometimes dramatically. In combination with HRT, topical testosterone gel can help. If vaginal dryness and discomfort on intercourse is a problem (and it can be even if you are on HRT), then vaginal oestrogen pessaries or cream can help replenish the vagina. Health in your 50s and 60s Breast screening with mammograms is offered from the age of 55. Cervical smears are offered every five years (rather than three years). Look out for symptoms of ovarian cancer. It’s important that women know the symptoms to look out for, because these can be subtle. Ovarian cancer generally presents with enlarging ovaries, and pressure from the ovaries can result in: • • • • • •

Mrs Caroline Overton has over 30 years’ experience in looking after women’s health. Her research interests are miscarriage and endometriosis, and in 2016 she was nominated in the top 100 researchers in the UK. She practises at the Bristol Women’s Clinic at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield. Appointments are available on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, with a weekly operating list on a Wednesday. For more information, call 0117 911 5339, or visit our website: www.nuffieldhealth.com/consultants/ mrs-caroline-overton

Bloated tummy Always feeling full Tummy pain Reduced appetite Increased girth Needing to wee more

These are also symptoms of a benign enlarging ovarian cyst or fibroid. An ultrasound scan can tell the difference and a blood test for CA125 is useful to screen for ovarian cancer. Bleeding after the menopause requires an urgent check-up Once your periods have stopped, it is abnormal to have any bleeding and you should tell your doctor if you notice any. This is called a red flag symptom of possible cancer and you would be referred urgently for a check-up. It is important to remember that although a check-up is important, the majority of women do not have cancer.

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Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN Tel: 0117 911 5339 • www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

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WALK | THE WALK

STRIDING STROUD Andrew Swift is Cotswolds-bound for this month’s outdoor amble

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troud has long been noted for its independent spirit, café culture and rich industrial heritage. Set amid some of the most dramatic scenery in the Cotswolds, it is also at the centre of an ambitious canal restoration project. All of which makes it an ideal choice for a brisk autumnal walk.

Directions

● You can either drive to Stroud or take the train. If you’re going by car, park up and head along George Street to the square in front of the Subscription Rooms, where you will also find the town’s visitor centre (SO851051). ● If you’re going by train, leave the station by the main exit, head along the approach road, turn right along Russell Street and then take the first left to the square in front of the Subscription Rooms. ● Head up Kendrick Street, to the right of the Subscription Rooms and, at the end, turn right up the High Street. At the top of the High Street, cross a zebra crossing to continue up Nelson Street, where a recently-uncovered sign from 1906 can be seen on the Golden Fleece. ● When the road forks, carry straight on along Castle Street. Just before The Castle – an 18th-century house with a sham castle in its front garden – turn right down Castle Pitch. After crossing a road, carry on down steps, turn right at the bottom, cross a zebra crossing, go down steps to a supermarket car park and head straight across it. Go down steps to another road, cross at the pedestrian lights and turn right along a footpath under a railway viaduct. ● Follow the path as it runs alongside the road for a short distance, before bearing left down to the canal and turning right along the towpath. After 75m, the path curves away from the canal through the site of the Stroudwater Dye Works, which used part of the viaduct as a warehouse (SO853047). Windows can still be seen in some of the arches, and, as you cross a footbridge over the River Frome, you can also see the remains of the mill that powered the works. Carry on beside the railway for 400m 86 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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and, at the road, cross and turn right uphill. After 150m, turn right up a path which climbs steeply before curving to follow an old holloway. At the lane, cross and carry on up another lane which soon degenerates to a gated track. When you emerge by the gates of Mount Vernon, cross a lane and carry straight on up a track (SO855039). After 200m, when the track levels out, fork right up a grassy track. After 100m, cross a road to a parking area and head across Rodborough Common towards the line of trees ahead. When you come to a wall (SO850039), look over it to see Rodborough Fort in the distance, before turning right alongside the wall. Originally known as Fort George, Rodborough Fort was built around 1764, but, after a serious fire in 1843, was rebuilt in grander style around 1868. In the late 20th century, it became a camping and caravan centre, but is now a private house again. Follow the path alongside the wall as it drops down past the castle gates and curves left through woodland. When the woods end, superb views open up ahead. As you emerge into the open, look to your right to see the distinctive profile of Doverow Hill with the River Severn, the Forest of Dean and the Welsh hills beyond. After curving left past the embattled gateway, carry on alongside the walls for 50m, but, as the walls curve south, start to bear away from them. Follow a grassy track running past the lip of an old quarry, with views over the Nailsworth valley, and, when faced with a bewildering choice of tracks (SO849038), carry on in roughly the same direction, to head between two clumps of pines ahead. Behind the clump on the right is the settlement of Little London, its name dating from the time when Welsh cattle drovers camped here en route to the capital. Head straight on, passing another large walled enclosure on the left, where early 20th-century Arts and Crafts houses stand amid the trees. When the wall curves east, however, follow it, ignoring tracks branching off downhill. When you come to a road (SO854028), you

This page: The Rodborough Fort – originally known as Fort George – embattled gateway Opposite page: A serene scene featuring the canal – completed in 1789, closed in 1933 and now the sibject of a multi-million pound restoration project – and railway viaduct


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WALK | THE WALK

will see the Bear Inn – 17th century but massively enlarged in 1925 – to your right. Cross the road ahead and turn left along a grassy track running in the same direction as the road. When you come to a lane (where cars are usually parked), cross and carry on along a grassy track heading downhill. After going through a gate, follow the track as it winds steeply downhill, go through a five-bar gate at the bottom, and, when you come to a lane, turn left (SO857033). After a few metres, turn right through a kissing gate to follow a track down through a meadow. A stile at the bottom leads across railway tracks, on the far side of which more steps and another stile lead onto a bridge over the Thames & Severn Canal. ● Completed in 1789, the canal closed in 1933, but is now the subject of a multi-million pound restoration project. A left turn along the towpath takes you past Griffin Mill Lock, beyond which the canal becomes ever more reed-choked, although the presence of large diggers suggests that this will soon change. Carry on under a bridge, and after another 350m, you come to Bowbridge Lock, restored in 2015, with a circular spillway. ● Carry on under a bridge to continue along the towpath. After 300m comes the sound of rushing water from the sluice gate of Arundel Mill, which stood on the right. Shortly after this, the canal crosses the river on an aqueduct, before curving left along a new section, built because a road now runs along the original line of the canal. ● As there is no towpath here, carry on to the road, turn left along the footpath under the viaduct and, after 50m, bear left down to the canal and turn left along the towpath. After about 200m, you will see the former Hill Paul clothing factory looming above. Built in the 1890s, it was saved from demolition in 2001 and converted to apartments. Below it, a derelict canalside building heralds the approach to Wallbridge Wharf. After passing Wallbridge Lock, turn right across the bridge, head up the road and take the first right up Cheapside to return to the station – or carry on under the railway bridge to return to the town centre. ■

At a glance... ■

Length; time: 5 miles, 2.5 to 3 hours

Level of challenge: Mostly on well-walked footpaths, but with one steep climb – and an equally steep descent

Map: OS Explorer 168

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GARDENING

HIGH LIFE Elly West hunts for ways to combine beauty with practicality in the garden

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hile we all want a garden that is beautiful to look at, most of us need to use our outdoor space in a practical way as well. There are certain household items that need to be stored outside such as bins, recycling, logs, bikes and, of course, gardening tools. In nearly all the gardens I design, outdoor storage of some description is a must. But sheds and stores are not always the most attractive garden items and many are positive eyesores. One way to resolve the problem is to hide them away, grow plants in front, cover them with trellis, or paint them in an attractive colour. Or, another idea that is gaining in popularity is to incorporate a shed or store with a ‘green roof’. A green roof is just that – a roof overlaid with a growing medium to create a habitat for plants. They are also sometimes known as living roofs, and are great in small gardens or front gardens where growing space is at a premium, as they provide another area for plants. In Germany, green roofs have been popular since the 1960s, helping to combat global warming and blending new houses into the countryside. Millions of square metres of green roof have been going up every year, with an estimated 10 per cent of all German flat roofs having been ‘greened’. And in the UK they’re catching on as well, with planning authorities increasingly looking for sustainable design. A green roof is an environmentally friendly choice as it can potentially trap large quantities of rainwater that would otherwise go straight into the drainage system – helping to alleviate flooding. The plants are also doing their bit to transform carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas, into oxygen. In theory, a roof can provide a home for just about any type of plant, with the right structure and reinforcement, as 90 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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indicated by entire gardens raised up into the skyline. But for most of us, we might just want to prettify an existing shed or introduce a new outdoor building with a green roof. If you do decide to have a go, just make sure your structure is well supported for the additional weight of soil, water and plants, which could be in excess of 50kg per square metre. Adding a green roof to your garden is a great way to add interest, colour and create a focal point (as well as a talking point) and it doesn’t have to be large scale or complicated. Creeping varieties of sedums are ideal for covering a small roof as they’re low-growing and low-maintenance. With their fleshy, evergreen leaves, they’re extremely drought tolerant, and many flower at different times of the year, giving seasonal interest with a carpet of pinks, yellows and reds. A quick online search for ‘sedum roof’, and the popularity of sedums becomes obvious. You’re spoilt for choice with the various companies offering ready-to-roll-out sedum matting, supplied in a similar way to turf. Many boast 16 or so different varieties in their turf (try greenrooftops.co.uk, where rolls of matting cost £17.50 per square metre). A more expensive option is to buy the plants in cells or modules, where they come with the different layers required for proper drainage. Or, of course, you can just take a trip to the garden centre and choose plants you like in the ‘alpine’ section. Small bulbs will also do well on a green roof, as long as it is properly drained. Dave Morgan’s Bluum Stores, based in Backwell, creates green roof stores and bespoke, custom-built projects. Dave was inspired by his own need to find an attractive solution for outdoor storage. “When I was building my house, it was part of the planning conditions to have a store for the bins,” he explains. “I couldn’t find one I liked, so decided to make one

Above: Sedums are the perfect choice for a green roof, thriving in poor or minimal soil and requiring virtually no maintenance Opposite page: Bluum in Backwell are making some lovely ‘green roofed’ storage options


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GARDENING

with a green roof. It generated a lot of positive feedback from people who really liked it.” The business, which Dave began earlier this year, is still in its infancy but is going from strength to strength, with new products being introduced to the range all the time. He’s passionate about what he does. “I want to take the boring stuff that you have to have around the garden, make it look fantastic and create more green space,” he says. He now makes bike sheds, bin stores, log stores, tool storage sheds and also smaller items such as hedgehog houses, bird boxes and house number signs that incorporate a place to grow plants. He’s particularly proud of a recent project – a custom-built rabbit hutch, painted grey and with a green roof where fresh herbs can be grown to feed the rabbit. All his roofs are braced and reinforced to take the weight of the plants, and can be supplied with or without sedum turf. The roof is lined with a waterproof liner, then topped with geotextile and capillary matting, to help with drainage. The roof is then ready to be filled with compost and plants! Visit bluum.co.uk to find out more.

PLANT OF THE MONTH This month the focus has to be on sedums, also known as stonecrop, which make the perfect choice for a green roof, as they thrive in poor and minimal soil. They’re hardy enough to withstand our cold winters and are extremely easy to grow, requiring virtually no maintenance as they spread. Most thrive in full sun, but will tolerate some shade. Key to healthy plants is drainage, so make sure your green roof has a pitch of around 10 degrees, with somewhere for water to run. Plants will quickly rot if they’re left standing in water for long, particularly in winter. My favourites for a green roof are sedum acre, which has starry yellow-green flowers for months in summer, and S. spurium ‘Dragon’s Blood’, which has beautiful, longlasting dark red flowers and glossy, deep burgundy leaves. • ellyswellies.co.uk

Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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n the market for the first time in nearly 100 years, Harptree Court is an exceptional Grade II listed house, situated in a private position with superb uninterrupted views over parkland and the Chew Valley. This truly beautiful Georgian country house was built in 1797 and is currently a wonderful family home, with a few B&B rooms, and is probably best known as the idyllic backdrop to the Great British Bake-off (BBC Series 3 and 4). The main house is quite splendid with a myriad of living and reception rooms on the ground floor and a total of 9 bedrooms on the first floor, many with en-suite facilities. The main house has an approximate gross internal floor area of 11,746 sq. ft and there are various farm buildings and stabling making up this very substantial property. There is a staff flat within the main house and a cottage adjoining an old stable yard. The stable yard has excellent development potential (subject to consents). There is also an old farmyard with separate road access, a large traditional walled garden and a romantic, fully self-contained tree house which generates a sizeable income. The peaceful woodland and parkland is mainly down to grazing and in total extends to about 52 acres. Further land may be available by separate negotiation. This is a rare and unique opportunity and the sale is being offered though agents Knight Frank. Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

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HARPTREE COURT EAST HARPTREE SOMERSET • Magnificent Georgian country house • Cottage and staff flat • Stables with development potential • Treehouse holiday let with income • Approximately 52 acres

O.I.R.O £5,000,000


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Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market

(0117) 934 9977

comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk HILL STREET, BRISTOL

‘NEW YORK STYLE’ OFFICES

• Modern open plan offices

• Open plan loft style suites

• Iconic 70’s building

• 2,170 to 6,660 sq ft

• Refurbished

• Superb space

• 2,482 sq ft – 6 cars

• New leases – rent O/A

• New lease THE OLD POLICE STATION, BEDMINSTER PARADE

• Ground floor office suite

• 4 parking spaces

• Superb fit out

• £13.50 psf

• New lease PRIME SHOP TO LET 51 PARK STREET, BS1

NUMBER ONE BRISTOL, BS1

• Prominent busy pitch

• Forming part of the prestigious No.1 Bristol development of 150 flats • Retail sales 3,284 sq ft • City centre pitch • New lease

• 1,300 sq ft sales + 580 sq ft stores • Existing café use • New lease

COTHAM HILL – A3

21 / 23 CLARE STREET, BS1

• A3 restaurant

• Prime A3 / café

• V busy pitch in established location

• Fully fitted for immediate use

• New lease

• 1,458 sq ft • Terms on application

• Rent O/A

CITY CENTRE A3 CAFÉ

UNION STREET BROADMEAD PRIME RETAIL UNIT

• Full extraction fitted • Busy city centre location

• 705 sq ft sales + 624 sq ft lower ground • High footfall – great pitch • New lease • Only £25,000 pax

• New lease - £15,000 pax

Burston Cook October.indd 1

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

• 790 sq ft

• 1,925 sq ft

FRICS

DAVIS HOUSE

• Unique cool office space

Julian Cook

Tom Coyte BA Hons

• • • • •

Sales / Lettings Acquisitions Valuations Landlord & tenant Auction Sales

• • • • •

Rent reviews Property Management Investment Sales / Purchase Development & Planning Dilapidations Advice

20/09/2017 10:01


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PROPERTY

From left to right: Senior partner Stuart Oliver, associate Giselle Holman and associate Philip Stevenson

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PROPERTY

ASK THE AGENT We catch up with a few of Bristol’s property experts

he folk at Fine & Country were more than happy to oblige when we suggested picking their brains for tips and opinions – so this month we spent time talking about Bristol’s beautiful architectural styles, and the potential effect of our political climate on the housing market, and learning about the team as Bristol-dwellers...

T

in the last 20 years, the credit crunch, Brexit, the introduction of home information packs alongside EPCs, the demise of home information packs, stamp duty thresholds being played around with – and now the additional three per cent for second-home owners/buyto-let landlords. The market and market place is still moving along.

TBM: How’s the Bristol market at the moment? Philip Stevenson: The Bristol market place has been incredibly busy over the last three years, with the usual slowing for the summer holidays, which affects the whole market place for parts of July and August. However with a new school term starting, parents with children starting school next year will have one eye on infant/junior schools while forward-planning for secondary schools within the area. Giselle Holman: It’s a strong market overall. A very popular location and ever more accessible to London and other key cities.

Has the team taken part in any charity initiatives or events recently? Giselle: We attended the Bentley promotion at Rybrook, which was fascinating as there was a talk from a polar explorer as well as, of course, some magnificent cars! Philip: We very recently showed the cleverest and brightest of the city how a couple of modest estate agents could win at a quiz night in the Village – we’re heading back to defend the title very soon!

Have you noticed any new patterns or trends? Giselle: More buyers from London and overseas, particularly Asia. Stuart Oliver: London buyers are still in the market for purchasing homes in the South West and we still seem to be speaking to a number of them on a daily basis. The market is a little less forgiving now for properties placed onto the market at an inflated price, as they now will not sell or attract the number of viewings they deserve, so the top tip from me is to ensure you put your property onto the market at the right price. Ensure your agent demonstrates and produces examples of other properties sold in order to substantiate their market appraisal. Philip: The secret is out, Bristol is the place to be. Over the last 18 months I have seen a marked increase in fellow Londoners moving here, and Southmead Hospital has increased in size – bringing new members of staff and their families to Bristol. Also, we have two exceptional universities, with just over 62,000 students, and 68% of these students are either staying within the city or coming back to the city to start families or to further their careers. When the electrification of the train line between Temple Meads and Reading is done, hopefully before 2024, I can see the market place rising again. What’s your top tip for buyers right now? Giselle: Get your ducks in a row, whether you’re a first time buyer or downsizing – being prepared is paramount. Stuart: Don’t be afraid to make offers, and get yourself into the best possible purchasing position by having all your mortgage agreed in principle, and solicitors instructed and on standby. The stronger your buying position, the harder you can negotiate. Philip: Two things. Trust your agent – other than children, the biggest commitment is buying a property. We deal with people’s homes every day and, in turn, they are trusting us to sell their biggest assets. Never be afraid to ask your agent anything property related; we are here to help. I’d also recommend having your own private survey carried out. Any thoughts on how our political situation will affect our market? Stuart: I do think there is a level of uncertainty out there in the market at the moment, but it certainly hasn’t had a major effect on the housing market. People still need to move. Giselle: Once confidence is restored, the bumps will dissipate! People still need to move for many reasons. Philip: So far, so good. But as far as 2019/2020 onwards is concerned, who knows? We have seen the market at its very lowest in the last 10 years, but on the flip side, we have also seen the market rise to a level never imagined. The market place is truly resilient and has overcome,

What do each of you like to do in your spare time? Giselle: I enjoy yoga, eating out (a lot!), socialising and seeing my family and dogs – Bilbo, Logan and Murphy – in Cornwall. Philip: Sleep! I have three children who all have better social lives than my wife and I, and if they aren’t at Cubs, Brownies, Cadets, hockey, various after-school clubs or out with their friends then I like nothing more than walking my dog, listening to proper music. What are your favourite Bristol venues? Stuart: They vary depending on what I want from an evening; from the Glass Boat on Welsh Back to the Cow Shed on Whiteladies Road. Giselle: Tyntesfield, Slimbridge and The Downs are super to collect my thoughts and generally unwind – nature, it’s a cure-all. Philip: It has to be Bristol Zoo first and foremost, and after a day there, nothing beats a Byron Burger and real fries... Which area of Bristol do you live in and why do you love it? Giselle: I live in Cotham – the location is perfect and my commute to work is easy peasy. Stuart: I live in Portishead due to my love of boating and of the sea. A summer evening walk around the marina, stopping off for a drink, really can make you think you could be overseas on holiday. Philip: I’m very lucky to be able to live north of the city, which offers the perfect combination – we have countryside all around us and really easy access back into Bristol. What eras or property styles are your favourites? Giselle: I’m a sucker for a period property, however, a well thoughtout new build can hold its own. Philip: The Victorian era is my personal favourite, especially the Bristol Victorian era. When I look at Victorian terrace houses right across the city, I think how the architects and engineers of the day must have had an eye on the future, as these homes are the most versatile and accommodating homes going, with so many different combinations within a terrace – no two ever seem to be the same. What’s the city’s most up-and-coming area? Philip: The whole area has seen a marked increase since 2014, but the east of the city is now coming into its own, but still with pockets of areas outshining others. We deal with a wide and varied property selection right across the city and beyond, and areas such as Montpelier, St Pauls and Keynsham are flying, as well as areas north of the city, such as Thornbury which is getting rave reviews. ■ • fineandcountry.com

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Clifton Andrewsonline.co.uk

22 Church Road, Abbots Leigh, Bristol, BS8 3QS £650,000

0117 405 7659

A stunning property on desirable Church Road in Abbots Leigh, with views over the Severn to the Welsh Hills in one direction and over open countryside in the other direction. Original character blended seamlessly with a wealth of contemporary, fittings and appliances. With three bedrooms which are complemented by a stylish bathroom. This is a unique and spacious property which has had an extension to the side and rear. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

clifton@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bishopston Andrewsonline.co.uk

22 Rosling Road, Horfield, Bristol, BS7 8SX £525,000

A well presented 1930s semi detached home situated in one of Horfield's most sought after locations. The property comprises of; entrance hall; lounge with bay fronted window; contemporary kitchen with integrated appliances; dining room with French doors opening onto the rear garden. The first floor offers three bedrooms, two of which are doubles; family bathroom with four piece suite. To the front there is off street parking for two cars with side access to an attractive rear garden measuring in excess of 60ft in length with a summer house. Energy Efficiency Rating: TBC

Bear Flat sales 01225 805680 0117 944 4400 bishopston@andrewsonline.co.uk Newbridge sales 01225 809685

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


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Westbury-on-Trym Andrewsonline.co.uk

Arbutus Drive, Coombe Dingle, Bristol, BS9 2PW £479,950

This wonderful four bedroom semi-detached family home has plenty of character, having lounge with log burner, dining room measuring 20’ x 11’ with sliding patio doors on to the rear garden, and 17’ fitted kitchen with side access. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

0117 405 7685 westburyontrym@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Harbourside Andrewsonline.co.uk

Electricity House, Colston Avenue, Bristol, BS1 4TB £390,000

Electricity House is an iconic grade 2 listed building with an amazing history. It has been located in the centre of Bristol since the late 1930s and recently converted into luxury apartments by Crest Nicholson. The development offers a concierge reception desk which is found in the very well-appointed atrium and lobby area. The apartment itself offers 2 double bedrooms, parking and basement storage. Energy Efficiency Rating: C

Bear Flat sales 01225 805680 0117 911 4749 harbourside@andrewsonline.co.uk Newbridge sales 01225 809685

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


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BRISTOL PROPERTY | NEWS

Century Place

O Redcliffe Parade – Luxury waterfront apartments ready to reserve now

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he first phase of the eagerly anticipated new development of luxury apartments at Redcliffe Parade, one of Bristol’s most sought-after waterfront locations, has been released. Buyers are now able to reserve one of these beautiful and exclusive one or two bedroom apartments off- plan and many of them also benefit from secure allocated parking. With rare and spectacular views towards the Floating Harbour and City, Redcliffe Parade occupies a tranquil and elevated position only minutes from the heart of Bristol, offering an ideal waterfront location to enjoy all that Bristol has to offer. Redcliffe Parade is one Bristol’s most notable architectural landmarks and highly respected developers Change Living are undertaking the careful and expert restoration of this historic Georgian terrace, which will see many original features being retained. These features will be complemented with the very best in contemporary design, with handmade Neptune kitchens, including integrated Neff appliances, giving style and a sense of individuality to each apartment. The Porcelanosa bathrooms will provide luxury and modern functionality. Knight Frank and Ocean Estate Agents have been jointly instructed to market this spectacular development and will be able to guide purchasers through the process of reserving their new home at this beautiful conversion. n To reserve your new home now please call Knight Frank on 0117 317 1999 or Ocean on 0117 946 9838.

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cean Estate Agents are excited to be bringing to the market Century Place, the brand new conversion of this classic period style building into 32 quality studio, one and two bedroom apartments. Ideally situated in the middle of the city between the Georgian Portland Square and Cabot Circus with its diverse food and drink options, many shops, and luxury and international brands at Harvey Nichols department store. Castle Park is within a 10 minute walk – a green space in the middle of the city. Templemeads railway station is easily accessible. Each apartment has been thoughtfully planned, from the layout and function of each space, to the Smeg appliances. All of the living spaces are open plan, ideal for entertaining. Each apartment will have a high quality contemporary finish including a luxury shower room with large walk-in shower and smart metro tiling, soft carpeting in the bedrooms and Porcelanosa kitchens in matt pale grey with integrated Smeg appliances. Décor throughout will be in a neutral palette. Studio apartments have prices from £102,500, one bedroom apartments from £139,950 and 2 bedroom apartments from £194,950. n Show home viewings will be held on 14th October, by appointment. Contact Ocean on 0117 9469832 / landandnewhomes@oceanhome.co.uk


Henleaze 108 Henleaze Road, Henleaze

t: 0117 962 9221 Email: henleaze@cjhole.co.uk

WEST BROADWAY, HENLEAZE Guide Price ÂŁ617,000 Superbly presented and renovated throughout, this extended four bedroom family home, offers character throughout with a welcoming hallway, living room with leaded light stained glass bay window and wood burner. Extended lounge/diner to rear with bi-fold doors, modern kitchen/breakfast room with Corian worktops, dual aspect including additional bi-folds to a family garden. Downstairs WC/cloakroom, utility/pantry cupboard. The first floor has three family sized bedrooms and a modern bathroom with a four-piece quality suite and bamboo flooring. Modern loft conversion offers the master suite, triple aspect, oak flooring, designer radiators, and ensuite shower room. Substantial rear, side and front landscaped gardens with parking for two vehicles and detached garage. EPC D.

Westbury-on-Trym 25 Canford Lane, Westbury-on-Trym

t: 0117 950 0118 Email: westbury@cjhole.co.uk

THE DINGLE, COMBE DINGLE Guide Price ÂŁ750,000 Architecturally designed and extended, this unique Edwardian semi-detached family home is approached via butterfly style electric gates which match the extension to the pitch within the ground floor front facade. This property has a 28m family garden, kitchen/breakfast room, two receptions, front with bay and rear with stone Minister style fireplace and extended contemporary living room leading to garden, utility, downstairs shower room and guest suite/bedroom four. The first floor has three double bedrooms with family bathroom with an open outlook to rear. Further benefits include parking, detached garage with office over and positioned within the popular The Dingle, in the secluded back water of Combe Dingle. Adjacent to Blaise Castle boasting that rural lifestyle and yet within close proximity to Westbury-on-Trym village. The property has ten fully paid up solar panels, six on the roof to the South and four to the West thus benefiting from the governments electricity feed in tariff. EPC D. Other offices also located across Bristol and Somerset

CJ Hole October.indd 1

20/09/2017 10:02


Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com The average detached house in Clifton (£802,000) is nearly half a million pounds more than the national figure. Even the average price for a flat (£337,000) is more than the national figure for a house. You begin to get an idea of where BS8 and its surrounding north Bristol suburbs sit in the housing market. Even in the southwest figures are well above the norm. House price growth in Clifton shows + 5% for the last 12 months but staggeringly, nearly ten times that figures (44%) for the last 5 years. Like London, I would now argue that prices are levelling out. That’s not a bad thing. The good news is that buyer demand remains steady and there is considerable choice. There are also good deals to be had in the Buy-to-Let mortgage market. You only

have to look at new restaurants opening and the streets teeming with students and young professionals to know that Bristol remains economically vibrant, buoyant and fluid. The figures are interesting (if not astonishing) but unlike London, Bristol remains a viable option, admittedly not for all, but certainly for many, looking for a great quality of life in a beautiful part of the city. Howard Davis M.N.A.E.A Managing Director - CJ Hole Clifton (Source: Dataloft, Land Registry, ONS, Bank of England, RICS)

REDLAND Guide Price £1,050,000 – SSTC We have buyers waiting for similar properties to above, so if you would like a free no obligation property valuation or just some free professional advice please contact the Sale Team at C J Hole Clifton on 01179 238238.

COTHAM Guide Price £895,000 A Grade II listed house offering: Sitting room, dining room, kitchen, utility, study, four bedrooms, two bathrooms and workshop. Externally there is an attractive front garden and an enclosed split level rear garden which has direct access to the detached garage. EPC E

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REDLAND Guide Price £475,000

COTHAM Guide Price £320,000

A recently renovated, spacious and grand hall floor apartment with plenty of original features and just a short walk to Whiteladies Rd and Durdham Downs. The lovely apartment consists of: Entrance hall, kitchen, lounge/diner, kitchen, three double bedrooms, two shower rooms and off street parking. EPC D

A beautifully presented top floor apartment with far reaching views. The apartment offers: Own internal staircase, hallway, lounge/diner, kitchen, two double bedrooms and bathroom.There are local shops at the top of Cotham Road plus Gloucester Road is just a short walk away. EPC D

CLIFTON Guide Price £379,000

REDLAND Guide Price £950,000 - SSTC

A well-presented garden level flat situated in a most convenient location. The flat has its own private entrance, living room, kitchen, utility/storage cupboard, two double bedrooms, bathroom and conservatory with access to the part communal rear garden. EPC D

An exceptional semi-detached family house boasting a great deal of charm and character throughout and is well placed for Whiteladies Rd, Clifton Triangle and The Downs. We have disappointed buyers looking for similar properties

REDLAND Guide Price £755,000 – SSTC

HARBOURSIDE Guide Price £450,000 – SSTC

A charming Victorian bay fronted family home offering a spacious and versatile interior. The house retains a great deal of its original charm and character throughout with fire places, coved ceilings and central staircase.

This beautiful property has stunning views and consists: Lift access to the top floor, generous open plan lounge/dining/kitchen areas, two double bedrooms, two bathrooms, access to the private balconies plus a secure allocated parking space.

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Kingsdown £465,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

Four bedroom House

A characterful 4 bedroom terraced family house with far reaching views over Bristol, tucked away on Marlborough Hill Place, yet immediately convenient for the City Centre, Bristol University and Bristol Royal Infirmary. Versatile accommodation, stripped wooden flooring throughout and residents’ parking zone. EPC - TBC

oceanhome.co.uk

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Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Stoke Bishop £550,000 Three bedroom house

This three bedroom semi-detached property is located within a quiet cul-de-sac in a popular area of Stoke Bishop, within walking distance of the local shops and close to fantastic schools. The accommodation offers sitting room with bay window to the front, open plan kitchen/dining room leading to the large rear garden. EPC - E

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Clifton £500,000 Two bedroom Flat

Forming the top floor of this large period semi is this exceptionally spacious apartment (1500 sqft) found towards the end of a cul-desac just off Durdham Downs. There are 2 large double bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 26’ living room and 15’x13’ kitchen/diner, off street parking and the potential to add value. EPC - D

Westbury-on-trym £325,000 Two bedroom house

A delightful 2 double bedroom cottage located in the heart of Westbury-on-Trym village. Upon entering the property a door to the right hand side leads directly into the first reception room currently utilised as the lounge. The 2nd reception room is located at the end of the main entrance hall which is adjacent to the fitted kitchen. EPC - D

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Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

Thurlbear, Taunton OIEO £1,950,000

Tickenham Guide Price £1,495,000

Lower Failand Guide Price £1,150,000

A stunning former rectory in a tranquil village position. EPC: F

A unique and spectacular modernist eco home. EPC: D

A recently renovated family home with country views. EPC: E

Clifton Guide Price £985,000

Clifton Guide Price £950,000

Longwell Green Guide Price £720,000

A lovingly refurbished 5 bedroom Grade II Listed townhouse. EPC: F

Hall floor 3 bedroom maisonette in Clifton. EPC: D

Fabulously designed 4 bedroom detached house with rural outlook. EPC: B

Winford Guide Price £750,000

Portishead OIEO £495,000

Rudgeway Guide Price £495,000

A generously proportioned and private detached family house. EPC: E

71 Lockside epitomises waterside living with far-reaching views. EPC: C

This charming coach house exudes character and charm. EPC: D

Longwell Green Guide Price £830,000

Clifton Guide Price £470,000

Clifton Guide Price £470,000

Fabulously designed 5 bedroom detached house with a bespoke finish. EPC: B

Three bedroom bay-fronted garden apartment with private entrance. EPC: E

An elegant two-bedroom Clifton garden apartment with parking.

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 369 1004 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

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NEW INSTRUCTION

Durdham Park | Bristol

Guide Price ÂŁ425,000

Sitting at the top of Tuscany House, is this very light and bright apartment. The property and location offers any incoming purchaser the best of both worlds. A stylish home with easy access to all of Bristol, especially Whiteladies Road with the benefit of some simply stunning views. EPC: TBC

NEW PRICE

Clifton | Bristol

Offer in Excess Of ÂŁ900,000

A perfectly positioned modern mews house in the centre of Clifton, with a sheltered southerly facing garden, gated off-street parking and detached single garage. EPC: D


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Leigh Woods | North Somerset

Guide Price £425,000

A superb, ground and first floor maisonette in the popular, modern development of ‘Robert Court’ just 600 yards from Clifton Suspension Bridge in Leigh Woods. The spacious sitting room opens onto the beautifully manicured communal gardens and further benefits include allocated parking behind gates. EPC: C

NEW HOMES

Coombe Dingle | Bristol

From £1,050,000

‘The Nestings’ is a stunning new development from Hawkfield of four distinguished family houses; each finished to a high standard in a sought after, secluded, mature tree lined setting in Coombe Dingle on the edge of The Blaise Estate. EPC: TBC


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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

A stunning 2 double bedroom garden apartment of circa 1200 sq.ft., boasting a contemporary triple aspect kitchen/breakfast room extension (15’5” x 12’10”) with sliding doors out to a fine southerly facing rear garden. Also benefiting from its own private entrance, detached timber garage and offstreet parking. The apartment is presented to the highest of standards throughout - blending a contemporary kitchen extension with period charm and character - high ceilings and bay fronted rooms create a wonderful feeling of light and space. EPC: D

CLARENDON ROAD, REDLAND

guide £550,000

A bright and immaculately presented 3 double bedroom, 3 bath/shower room apartment, of circa 1500 sq. ft., forming part of this 1700’s elegant and imposing grade II* listed building with an abundance of period detail, access to residents’ communal gardens and secure allocated parking. Very conveniently located within a short distance of Clifton Village (0.5 miles), Bristol’s city centre, Universities and Hospitals as well as the Waterfront area, the beautiful Downs and delightful parkland of Ashton Court Estate are within easy reach providing lovely walks and recreation space. A very special apartment with many attributes such as natural light, period features including high ceilings, period fireplaces, sash windows and beautiful grand communal hallway.

COTHAM SIDE, COTHAM

guide £400,000 - £415,000

An impressive hall floor apartment for sale in Clifton Village - situated in a much sought after location just a moments stroll from Sion Hill and the Clifton Suspension Bridge. Enjoying a wealth of period features and high ceilings with well-presented 2 bedroom accommodation. A charming hall floor apartment forming part of this imposing grade II listed Georgian building on Gloucester Row, a convenient Clifton Village location. The apartment is accessed via a communal pillared portico and has been finished to a good standard throughout having recently been re-decorated and re-carpeted. To be sold with no onward chain making a prompt move possible.

An exceedingly appealing 3 bedroom, 2 bath/shower room hall floor apartment set in an attractive period semi-detached building with a delightful bay fronted sitting/dining room and kitchen/ breakfast room and family bathroom. The property also benefits from an allocated off street parking space and communal front and side gardens. Located in a delightful secluded location tucked away on a quiet side road overlooking St Matthew’s Church, whilst being handy for the city centre, Gloucester Road and Whiteladies Road. This stunning apartment has been the subject to recent renovation (2015) to include re-fitted kitchen, bathroom suites, boiler and re-wiring. EPC: D

Professional, Reliable, Successful

DOWRY SQUARE, HOTWELLS

guide £550,000

GLOUCESTER ROW, CLIFTON

guide £415,000

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

SION HILL, CLIFTON

guide £1,100,000

Overlooking Christchurch Green and Clifton’s iconic Suspension Bridge; a beautiful large 4 double bedroom, 3 reception room, grade II listed Georgian town house arranged over five floors, of circa 2,740 sq. ft., with courtyard garden, balcony and roof terrace. A fabulous, light filled and elegant Georgian period townhouse situated within this highly desirable area of Clifton Village. The area is keenly sought after with access to Clifton Village and its range of boutique shops, bars, restaurants and further essential amenities; as well as Clifton High School and Clifton College, Clifton Suspension Bridge, the Downs, Clifton Observatory and Bristol’s excellent transport infrastructure. On the ground floor, a good sized open-plan kitchen/breakfast/dining room with Kährs oak hardwood stripped flooring, with sash window to the front elevation and working shutters. The kitchen provides generous storage in Norema Scandinavian units and a range of integrated appliances including Neff double oven, fridge/freezer, dishwasher and Bosch 4 ring gas hob with extractor over. On the first floor, there is a gracious drawing room which enjoys two multi-paned sash windows and a full width balcony overlooking the Suspension Bridge, this is linked via bi-folding doors to a separate sitting room which together creates a perfect room to entertain. On the upper floors, four well-proportioned double bedrooms are served by two family bathrooms and there is also a roof terrace from which to enjoy elevated views. Fine period home situated on this historic grade II listed row overlooking Christchurch Green and the Suspension Bridge.

KINGSDOWN PARADE, KINGSDOWN

guide £975,000

A most intriguing 4 double bedroom, 3 reception room, 2 bath/shower room, grade II listed Georgian town house enjoying a beautiful 75ft south-easterly facing garden; an elegant and cleverly designed family home, originally dating from circa 1793, having therefore an abundance of period features which are blended seamlessly with many high quality modern additions.

Situated on Kingsdown Parade, a highly-regarded Georgian street situated high up in Kingsdown on the borders of Cotham, offering all the convenience of the city with all central areas, excellent schools including Cotham School and Bristol Grammar School, Bristol University and hospitals all nearby; a friendly neighbourly community who all enjoy the ambiance and character of this historic and atmospheric quarter with its cobbled streets and fine period buildings. A highly individual family home with so much to appreciate and savour – location, facilities, atmosphere, character and lots of light and space.

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


LEESE

NAGLE

I N D E P E N D E N T E S TAT E A G E N T S

TEL: 0117 974 1741

6 1 A P S L E Y ROA D, C L I F TO N , B R I S TO L B S 8 2 S W

|

sales@leeseandnagle .co.uk

BISHOPSTON Guide price ÂŁ1,100,000 Stunning refurbished Victorian family home in highly desirable location. Designed with modern living in mind this is effectively a new home and offers comfortable family orientated accommodation over four floors with large open plan kitchen/living area opening onto rear terrace. 2 further reception rooms, utility, cloaks, 5 bedrooms (master en suite) 2 further bath/shower rooms. Landscaped rear gardens, views to rear and off street parking for several cars and basement store rooms. EPC - TBC

CLIFTON Guide price ÂŁ475,000 A lovely two bedroom semi-detached Mews style house occupying a tucked away position just off Whiteladies Road in central Clifton. Built in 2014 by Linden Homes the home provides open plan living space with balcony, two bedrooms, bath and shower room. There is also an integral garage. We feel the property is ideally suited to those looking to downsize to a minimum maintenance house in the area that they can literally lock and leave for periods of time. It will also be of interest to those wanting a house rather than a flat. EPC - B

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Here to accommodate TEL: 0117 962 2299

www.leeseandnagle.co.uk

125 STOKE LANE, WESTBURY-ON-TRYM, BRISTOL BS9 3RW

|

sales@leeseandnagle .co.uk

STOKE BISHOP £825,000 This is one of the most beautiful and versatile 4/5 bedroom semi-detached family houses we have been given the opportunity to market this year. The house was built in the 1920’s but has been improved and extended considerably over the years offering an incredible nearly 2400 feet of internal space, being ideal for any growing family. EPC - D

STOKE BISHOP £925,000 Tucked away in a quiet corner of an extremely desirable development with beautiful rear garden with sunny aspect this four bedroom modern detached executive style family home is an attractive proposition for families, retirees and those relocating to Bristol. Fantastic gardens surround the house and accommodation is spacious throughout. Completed chain in place. EPC - D

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The Bristol Magazine October 2017  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol