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Issue 180

THE

I

june 2019

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

ROCKING ROBINS The homegrown funnyman returns for Bristol Comedy Garden

THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

BETTER PLAY THAT SAX

...And the special Classical music’s cool relationship between new star Jess Gillam Bristol and Worthy Farm at St George’s

PEDAL POWER

ANOTHER DIMENSION

The Bristol group that paved the way for England’s first cycling city

How to create your own alfresco art gallery at home

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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36

Sax star Jess Gillam

30

80

Glasto 1997

Contents

June 2019

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

ART

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18

Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

20

Meet World Snooker Champion and Bristol lad Judd Trump

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Take pleasure in the simple things while adrift in the sea of uncertainty! ...............................................

68

News and upcoming seminars from Lansdown Place plus this month’s charitable cause

SHOPPING

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26

Father’s Day gift inspiration

HEALTH & BEAUTY

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76

News snippets from the sector

THE CULTURE CYCLING

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48

What’s on at the city’s galleries?

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WEALTH MANAGEMENT

EXHIBITIONS

CRAFTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Stonehenge is hosting a special exhibition and a Spike Island artist’s work has been chosen as the sole focus

GARDEN GALLERY

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90

Alice Maltby offers tips on how to create points of interest and add another dimension to your home with an outdoor sculpture space

FOOD & DRINK NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 The latest from local foodies, restaurants and producers

RECIPE

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55

Great British Bake Off star Briony May Williams shares her recipe for New York-style rainbow bagels, just in time for Pride next month

REVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

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28

Celebrating 40 years of the Bristol and Bath Railway Path

GLASTONBURY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Malcolm Croft celebrates Worthy Farm’s hot happening and throws a spotlight on its special connection with Bristol

SPIRITUAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Jessica Hope’s verdict on new pizza restaurant Dough

ALFRESCO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 A few suggestions of where to scoff and sup in the sun this summer

HABITAT GREAT OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Pillar, peacemaker, pioneer: Bristol vicar and Glasto disciple Lee Barnes

Andrew Swift delves into Bedminster’s rich history; no part of the city so richly rewards aimless exploration

MUSIC

WILD BRISTOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

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36

Young saxophonist Jess Gillam is hitting all the right notes – go see her at St George’s this month

Pete Dommett dons his shades and tries his hand at ‘fish-twitching’

WHAT’S ON

Elly West is looking to the future

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40

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

A cross-section of the city’s varied events scene

PROPERTY

COMEDY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

News and developments

Find out more about homegrown talent John Robins, who’s on his way back home for Bristol Comedy Garden

ON THE COVER

FASHION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 One Redfield resident’s collaboration in favour of the empowerment of women, and bringing colour into the ethical fashion landscape

4 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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No 180

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Homegrown comic talent John Robins (p46) – gigging at Bristol Comedy Garden at the start of July and kicking off his new touring show Hot Shame at Tobacco Factory Theatres in September.

94

Image by David White/REX

East Street, Bedminster, c1920


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Richard Harding June.qxp_Layout 6 22/05/2019 10:03 Page 1

Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

Cotham BS6 Guide Price £335,000

Kingsdown BS6 Guide Price £635,000

An intriguing & characterful 3 double bedroom, 2 reception room grade II listed period cottage offering well balanced accommodation with a charming private walled rear garden. Occupying a prime location within a highly prized & historic Kingsdown conservation area. Offered with no chain.

Cotham BS6 Guide Price £495,000

A beautifully presented 2 bedroom flat with private entrance with 21ft x 18ft front garden & 46ft x 27ft rear garden. Located on the borders of Cotham & Redlandk. EPC: tbc.

Lots of potential - a very spacious (circa 1,300 sq. ft.) 4 bedroom, 2 reception, hall & first floor maisonette set in a fine early Victorian period building. A civilised apartment offered with no chain. EPC: D

SOLD STC

Montpelier BS6 A stylish 3 bedroom Victorian family Guide Price £535,000

Clifton BS8 Guide Price £475,000

home, set back from this popular road & benefiting from 2 joined reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, useful cellar & rear garden EPC: D

A charming & immaculately presented Victorian period townhouse set within a desirable cul-de-sac of similar period houses with 2 double bedrooms, 2 receptions, separate kitchen/dining room & sunny rear courtyard garden. EPC: D

Professional, Reliable, Successful

Kingsdown BS6 Guide Price £795,000

An elegant & well-proportioned 5 double bedroom grade II listed Georgian townhouse located in an historic, central, yet remarkably peaceful quarter of the city. Potential for cosmetic improvement, a 70ft x 20ft rear garden & a garage. Offered with no chain.

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

Clifton BS8 Guide Price £475,000

Kingsdown BS2 Guide Price £785,000

Redland BS6 Guide Price £585,000

Redland BS6 Guide Price £575,000

A warm welcome awaits in this lovely & very charming 3/4 bedroom, 2/3 reception Victorian town house with a delightful 41ft x 18ft southerly facing rear garden, lots of character & bright spacious rooms. Very well presented with a laid back homely feel. EPC: D

Redland BS6 Guide Price £495,000

A pretty & engaging 2 bedroom, 2 bath/shower room (circa 1,010 sq. ft.), late Georgian period three storey terraced house. In a much favoured and sought after locationt. EPC: E

In a coveted road - a recently refurbished 3 bedroom, 2 bath/ shower room garden flat in an impressive semidetached Victorian building. Has front garden & private section of rear garden. No chain. EPC: D

An individual 3 double bedroom modern detached mews house in a coveted road in Redland with well-arranged lateral space over 2 floors with a south facing private town garden EPC: B

A particularly well appointed 3 bedroom garden flat providing deceptively spacious comfortable living accommodation with a 50ft x 42ft private rear garden and off street parking. EPC: E

Professional, Reliable, Successful

Redland BS6 Guide Price £685,000

A large (circa 1,700 sq.ft.), 3 storey, 4 double bedroom plus study Victorian period family house with south westerly facing rear town garden. Spacious, lovely & full of character. Offers a thro’ kitchen/breakfast room opening onto the garden. EPC: E

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

Clifton BS8 Guide Price £795,000

Abbots Leigh BS8 Guide Price £1,325,000

A truly exquisite 5 bedroom (2 en-suite) detached family house with ample off road parking & double garage in an enviable village location. Extensively renovated over the last 5 years, this gorgeous & special family home enjoys roomy, lateral accommodation & a beautiful 75ft x 75ft landscaped rear garden. EPC: D

Cotham BS6 Guide Price £865,000

A spacious practical & manageable 4 bedroom modern semi-detached townhouse (circa 1,443 sq. ft inc garage) with an off street driveway parking space, front & rear town gardens. EPC: D

A large (over 2000 sq. ft.), 5 double bedroom period semi-detached family house in a lovely location high up in Cotham enjoying fabulous cityscape views over Redland & Clifton & a pretty town garden. EPC: E

Stoke Bishop BS9 An immaculately presented 3 Guide Price £550,000

Abbots Leigh BS8 Guide Price £825,000

double bedroom, 2 reception room semi-detached character house in a leafy location. Low maintenance 49ft x 18ft level rear garde. EPC: E

Enjoy the gentler pace of rural life whilst retaining easy access to Bristol. 4 bedroom house set in lovely gardens with an overall plot of circa 300ft x 50ft & parking. EPC: C

Professional, Reliable, Successful

Coombe Dingle BS9 Guide Price £995,000

Dating back to 1910 - a handsome & well-proportioned 4 bedroom, 3 reception room Edwardian detached family house situated in leafy Coombe Dingle with tastefully updated interior, gated osp for multiple cars, a storage garage/workshop & an exceptional (110ft x 50ft) level lawned rear garden with a covered verandah. EPC: E

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

SOLD STC

A large & impressive, circa 3,500 sq. ft. 5/6 bedroom, 3/4 reception, 3 bathroom Victorian period family house with 36ft open plan kitchen/breakfast/family room, landscaped 63ft x 26ft min front garden & 61ft x 40ft max rear garden. Has an elevated position in a sought after road close to Cotham Gardens Primary School & Park, Cotham Secondary School within 600m. Sold with no onward chain. EPC: E

Cotham BS6

Price Guide Range £1,350,000 - £1,400,000

Exciting potential for updating & refurbishing to create an elegant residence of distinction ideal for families or city professionals & business people. A handsome & impressive large Victorian town house with 5 bedrooms, 3 reception rooms over three main floors plus kitchen, utility room, bathrooms & useful basement cellar rooms; lots of living space with scope for both individual privacy & family togetherness. In a prime Clifton location near Clifton College & the Downs. No chain. EPC: F

Clifton BS8

Guide Price £995,000

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


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THIS MONTH WE’RE...

Image by Hannah Morris

Many Bristolians are gearing up for Glasto this month – check out Malcolm Croft’s feature on the festival on p30 (image by Andrew Allcock)

Loving... ...The sound of Food Connections’ Father’s Day events. You can spice up Dad’s life with a samosa masterclass on 16 June at Emerson’s Green Village Hall – learn to season, fold and fry the godfather of Indian snacks – or perhaps treat him to fish and chips while cruising on The Matthew. • bristolfoodconnections.com

from the

EDITOR

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR

@thebristolmag

16 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

thebristolmag.co.uk |

JUNE 2019

|

No 180

@thebristolmag

Booking... Ever been to the internationally renowned Iford Arts Festival? For the past 20 years it has put on a lush concert programme at magical Iford Manor, but this year it has a new home at equally beaut Belcombe Court in Bradford on Avon (into which a geodesic dome is being flown from Abu Dhabi to ensure acoustics are perfect). Get 50% off tickets for L’elisir d’amore – Donizetti, a new Iford Art production sung in English, when you quote BRISMAG on booking. • ifordarts.org.uk

Broadening...

Image by Addie Chinn

W

e are so ready to let the West Country entertain us this summer – if the diary isn’t bulging by now, we don’t know what you’ve been playing at, quite honestly. A lot of us are gagging for some giggles, going by the rate at which Queen Square shindig Bristol Comedy Garden has sold, and with organisers having pulled in some of the biggest and brightest comics on the circuit right now – from Sean Lock and Stewart Lee to Aisling Bea and homegrown talent John Robins – we can’t say we’re surprised. See p46 for our chat with the latter – a Bristol-born lad and this issue’s cover star – on everything from beloved old city haunts to Jon Richardson’s life-altering roast dinner. This month, scores of Bristolians are also gearing up for Worthy Farm and what many regard as the greatest show on Earth, Glastonbury. As the nearest transport and traveller hub, Bristol has a longstanding connection with the festival – and on p30 Malcolm Croft takes a look at this special relationship and what it has meant. Meanwhile, right here in the city, and being credited with making classical music a whole lot cooler, is young saxophonist Jess Gillam, following her rousing Proms appearance, Classical BRIT Award and moving performance at the BAFTAs. Hear her hit all the right notes at St George’s Classical Mixtape Summer Gala on 28 June, as we suggest on p36. Jess Connett has dug up some gorgeously retro imagery from engineer and Bristol and Bath Railway Path designer John Grimshaw’s personal archive on p28 to celebrate the 40th anniversary of what is now one of the busiest cycle routes in the country, and the local group that campaigned for better cycling provision for city dwellers. Don’t forget this month also sees Bristol County Ground host the Cricket World Cup (Afghanistan v Australia on 1 June; Pakistan v Sri Lanka on 7 June; Bangladesh v Sri Lanka on 11 June), and to celebrate this SS Great Britain is hosting a lovely little exhibition exploring the ship’s own historic role in international cricket (p50). Elsewhere, we’ve the Bristol artist chosen to exhibit her conversation-starting work at Stonehenge, and gardening journalist Alice Maltby on what to consider if and when creating your own outdoor art space. In food, Briony May’s been getting us in the mood for Pride next month with her NYC-style rainbow bagel recipe and, speaking of dough, there’s the verdict on Baldwin Street’s latest restaurant, plus ideas for alfresco drinking and dining. Add to that a casual delve into Bedminster’s rich industrial history, plus local, ethical fashion and Father’s Day gift suggestions, and we have what we’d like to think is a nice summer melting pot. Enjoy June.

...Our boozy horizons ahead of the new whisky bar coming to Bristol next month. The great minds behind Black Rock in London are bringing their concept to the old telephone exchange building on Marsh Street in July, hoping to make whisky more accessible and serving the city’s biggest selection of the stuff, plus hearty bar food. • blackrock.bar


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5

ZEITGEIST

top things to do in JUNE

GET RACING Grab a Pimm’s and get your hats at the ready as one of the biggest days of the racing calendar – Ladies Day – returns to Bath Racecourse on 15 June. If you feel like glamming up, you can put your best dressed foot forward for the style competition to be in with a chance of winning a £500 cash prize and a pair of diamond earrings from SP Green jewellers. Keeping the party going with superb live music will be The Revue Showband and Jukebox Duo, and to tempt your taste buds there will be artisan Lovett pies served in the Beckford Bar, fancy hotdogs in the 1811 Bar and sandwiches at Coffeemaker Café. Gates open at 11am, with the first race at 1.15pm and the last at 5.20pm. Tickets from £13.

GO SOCIAL The global conference Social Media Week returns to Bristol from 10 – 14 June, bringing a stream of events, talks and seminars hosted by top names in the world of social media including Facebook, Buzzfeed, Twitter, Glassdoor and Yahoo. This year’s theme is ‘Stories’, exploring how people who work in social media, such as content creators, journalists, marketers and technologists, have a responsibility to be truthful in their communication. Events include a look at trends for 2020, mental health’s connection with social media, and how small businesses can benefit from using digital tools. See the full programme online. • smwbristol.co.uk

• bath-racecourse.co.uk

RAVE – CLASSICAL STYLE Forestry Commission England’s major outdoor live music series Forest Live is back this summer for four nights of great music and food and drink in the beautiful setting of Westonbirt Arboretum. From 13 – 16 June, headline acts Stereophonics, Haçienda Classiçal will be bringing Paul Weller, Jack Savoretti and its crossover of clubbing and classical to Westonbirt Haçienda Classiçal will be bringing some of their biggest hits to the Gloucestershire countryside. Pack a picnic or enjoy the variety of hot food outlets on offer – there will also be a fully licensed, cash-only bar. Tickets from £38.50. Money raised will help to look after the nation’s forests sustainably. • forestryengland.uk/music

The UK’s largest free celebration of nature is back from 1 – 9 June, inspiring all ages to engage with the natural world. The Festival of Nature kicks off with a day of interactive exhibitions, live performances and talks from inspirational and world-renowned leaders from the natural history world at Green Park in Bath, and concludes with a big weekend of fun stretching from Millennium Square to Harbourside and Queen Square in Bristol. Try your hand at angling, take part in insectthemed willow crafts, and find out how a messy garden can help creatures great and small to thrive.

Tickets are selling like hotcakes to this year’s Bristol Comedy Garden, so hop to it if you don’t want to miss some of the biggest names in comedy coming to Queen Square next month. From 3 – 7 July, the likes of US stand-up sensation and star of Channel 4’s Catastrophe, Rob Delaney (left); the multi awardwinning Sara Pascoe; Reginald D Hunter; Joel Dommett; and British Comedy Award winner Aisling Bea will grace the stage. There will also be street-food, craft beers, cocktails and more. Turn to page 46 for our interview with Bristol-born comedian John Robins.

• festivalofnature.org.uk

• bristolcomedygarden.co.uk

18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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JUNE 2019

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No 180

Haçienda Classiçal: Anthony Mooney

BOOK

DISCOVER


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ist

THE CITY THE BUZZ

My

BRISTOL Meet Whitchurch-born Bristol lad and recently crowned 2019 World Snooker Champion Judd Trump

I played at Keynsham Snooker Centre from the age of around six to 19 so from a very young age they helped me, giving me somewhere to play for free and good conditions to practice so I am very grateful to them and everybody I met there, who were all very supportive along the way.

Flourishing local tech Elderly residents at St Monica Trust (Cote Lane Retirement Village) tried out driverless cars last month – the culmination of the UK’s first study into driverless cars for older people. It’s anticipated that the first adoption of autonomous vehicles will be for the elderly and those with mobility issues and it’s hoped that they’ll be installed into retirement villages within five to 10 years. The £5.5million project, known as Flourish, is run by a multi-sector consortium of organisations including the University of the West of England and is the only Innovate UK funded project focused on older people.

It was an amazing achievement to beat one of snooker’s all time greats – I knew it would be a tough game as my record against John Higgins wasn’t great but I always look forward to playing him so I just tried to enjoy it and show everybody how I can play on the biggest stage of all. I felt a lot of disbelief, really, that I’d finally achieved my dream of becoming world champion. I’d obviously dreamt of it for a long time but for it to finally come true in front of all my friends and family felt amazing.

• flourishmobility.com

Sporting heroes growing up were Tiger Woods, Floyd Mayweather and Ronnie O’Sullivan – all greats in their respective fields, who seem to intimidate opponents. I don’t have any pre-game rituals or habits; I am not really a superstitious person so I try not to think too much about things and just try to enjoy everything that’s going on. My dad got me into snooker; he has always been a big fan and watches it everytime it’s on the TV so that rubbed off on me so from a young age. Everything has been snooker, snooker, snooker.

Relish the retro Vintage clothing enthusiast Kate Seymour, who shares a space in Bedminster art shop Casper and specialises in sourcing colourful items of clothing from the ‘80s and ‘90s and lovingly giving them a new lease of life, is bringing her eclectic collection to Wapping Wharf this month with the opening of new shop Something Elsie. “My love of vintage probably goes back to my gran who had amazing fashion sense,” says Kate. “I have always loved searching for unusual pieces and I get a real buzz out of finding quirky clothing that will make people smile. Plus, as we all strive to be more sustainable, buying second hand is ethically a sensible choice.” Something Elsie will be moving into the unit previously home to Temple Cycles. • Instagram: @somethingelsievintage

20 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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No 180

I’ve kept a close eye on Bristol golfer Chris Wood over the last four or five

years – I have a lot of respect for anyone who’s doing great things in an individual sport. If I was to choose a challenge match now it would probably be to play against Stephen Hendry in his prime as I never got the chance to see him at his best. The most difficult thing about being part of the snooker scene at this level is the amount of time spent alone, locked away practising and at tournaments across the other side of world – it can be tough being away from everyone for long periods of time and also mentally challenging. n • Follow Judd on Twitter or Instagram: @judd147t Judd proudly holding the championship trophy aloft last month


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THE CITY

Bristol is one of Europe’s most bike-friendly destinations and Nightrider provides a unique way to explore its sights (image by Jon Craig)

A grand night out Fun-filled charity cycle event Nightrider is returning to Bristol next month, set to take place across 6 and 7 July. All about seeing the sights and having a great night out with friends and family for a good cause, the popular event has scores of riders already signed up but, with the aim of raising £100,000 in one night, organisers are calling for more to get involved. Nightrider is a little different to many other fundraising events as it’s not timed, it’s not a race and everyone taking part can support any charity they choose. Participants can register for one of the event’s many charity partners including British Heart Foundation, Alzheimer’s Society, Cancer Research UK, The Grand Appeal and Great Western Air Ambulance, or register for another charity of their choice to support. Organised by charity tour operator Classic Challenge, the event is open anyone over 18 who is prepared to put in some training beforehand and there are two distances to choose from – 50km or 100km. As the UK’s first ‘cycling city’, Bristol is one of Europe’s most bikefriendly destinations and Nightrider provides a unique way to explore its sights and attractions. There are two 50km loops through the city, taking in major landmarks and hidden gems, and corporate packages available so it’s great for company team-building. “If, like me, you are newbie to road cycling events, Bristol Nightrider is a great challenge, with the support and friendly atmosphere to match,” says Sue Ravenhill-Handley, who took part in Bristol Nightrider 2017 for the Great Western Air Ambulance Charity. Nightrider is clearly sign-posted so that riders can cycle at their own pace, with break stops every 25km plus medical support and mechanical backup provided throughout the night, and everyone receives a well-earned breakfast with their medal at the finish line.

Bridging the filmmaking gap Bristol-based Cables & Cameras, which launched in January of last year to showcase the work of black, Asian and minority ethnic (or BAME to use the common acronym) filmmakers and creatives, has since become a vibrant and much-needed forum where people can come together to share, discuss and get feedback on their projects. This month, Cables & Cameras will be hosting a groundbreaking, all-day event called The Conversation, featuring talks, workshops, and screenings aimed at helping BAME artists gain better access to the film and TV industries. “BAME representation in film and TV is well below where it needs to be,” says Cables & Cameras founder Gary Thompson. “In Bristol, for example, we have a diverse community and mix of cultures, but sometimes we don’t see or hear the stories that affect us in dayto-day life. Diversity is on everyone’s lips at the moment, and the lack of representation is clear. “The Conversation is an event that aims to bridge the gap. It will give young and emerging talent the opportunity to speak with seasoned professionals who can share experience, advice and guidance. And it will fill the void that currently exists by providing a route in to what can be an exclusive and hard-to-access industry.” The Conversations’s first keynote speaker will be Channel 4 reporter and presenter, Jordan JarrettBryan. Jordan will be joined by a number of award-winning directors and industry representatives, as well as emerging talent from Bristol’s filmmaking community. The event is for students, career professionals, and everyone in between – anyone who is committed to, or wants to take part in, a conversation about BAME representation in film and TV is welcome. It’s hoped that this will be the first of many such events for Bristol’s ever-broadening cultural calendar. The Conversation takes place at The Cube Microplex on Saturday 8 June 2019. Tickets are free for under-16s, or £15 on the door or online. • cablesandcameras.com

• nightrider.org.uk Pierre Niyonira, UWE film making student (image by R. Thompson)


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THE CITY

Bristol is one of Europe’s most bike-friendly destinations and Nightrider provides a unique way to explore its sights (image by Jon Craig)

A grand night out Fun-filled charity cycle event Nightrider is returning to Bristol next month, set to take place across 6 and 7 July. All about seeing the sights and having a great night out with friends and family for a good cause, the popular event has scores of riders already signed up but, with the aim of raising £100,000 in one night, organisers are calling for more to get involved. Nightrider is a little different to many other fundraising events as it’s not timed, it’s not a race and everyone taking part can support any charity they choose. Participants can register for one of the event’s many charity partners including British Heart Foundation, Alzheimer’s Society, Cancer Research UK, The Grand Appeal and Great Western Air Ambulance, or register for another charity of their choice to support. Organised by charity tour operator Classic Challenge, the event is open anyone over 18 who is prepared to put in some training beforehand and there are two distances to choose from – 50km or 100km. As the UK’s first ‘cycling city’, Bristol is one of Europe’s most bikefriendly destinations and Nightrider provides a unique way to explore its sights and attractions. There are two 50km loops through the city, taking in major landmarks and hidden gems, and corporate packages available so it’s great for company team-building. “If, like me, you are newbie to road cycling events, Bristol Nightrider is a great challenge, with the support and friendly atmosphere to match,” says Sue Ravenhill-Handley, who took part in Bristol Nightrider 2017 for the Great Western Air Ambulance Charity. Nightrider is clearly sign-posted so that riders can cycle at their own pace, with break stops every 25km plus medical support and mechanical backup provided throughout the night, and everyone receives a well-earned breakfast with their medal at the finish line.

Bridging the filmmaking gap Bristol-based Cables & Cameras, which launched in January of last year to showcase the work of black, Asian and minority ethnic (or BAME to use the common acronym) filmmakers and creatives, has since become a vibrant and much-needed forum where people can come together to share, discuss and get feedback on their projects. This month, Cables & Cameras will be hosting a groundbreaking, all-day event called The Conversation, featuring talks, workshops, and screenings aimed at helping BAME artists gain better access to the film and TV industries. “BAME representation in film and TV is well below where it needs to be,” says Cables & Cameras founder Gary Thompson. “In Bristol, for example, we have a diverse community and mix of cultures, but sometimes we don’t see or hear the stories that affect us in dayto-day life. Diversity is on everyone’s lips at the moment, and the lack of representation is clear. “The Conversation is an event that aims to bridge the gap. It will give young and emerging talent the opportunity to speak with seasoned professionals who can share experience, advice and guidance. And it will fill the void that currently exists by providing a route in to what can be an exclusive and hard-to-access industry.” The Conversations’s first keynote speaker will be Channel 4 reporter and presenter, Jordan JarrettBryan. Jordan will be joined by a number of award-winning directors and industry representatives, as well as emerging talent from Bristol’s filmmaking community. The event is for students, career professionals, and everyone in between – anyone who is committed to, or wants to take part in, a conversation about BAME representation in film and TV is welcome. It’s hoped that this will be the first of many such events for Bristol’s ever-broadening cultural calendar. The Conversation takes place at The Cube Microplex on Saturday 8 June 2019. Tickets are free for under-16s, or £15 on the door or online. • cablesandcameras.com

• nightrider.org.uk Pierre Niyonira, UWE film making student (image by R. Thompson)


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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 23


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B R I S TOL MAGAZINE

The simple things

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t’s hard to be optimistic when the country seems to be adrift on a sea of uncertainty. I’m aware that in the days between me writing this sentence and you reading it we will have voted in the European elections, with results that might make the situation worse rather than better. In years gone by I used to counter an attack of the glooms by humming Reasons to be Cheerful by Ian Dury. The song lifted my spirits and so did the singer, a man who refused to be held back by childhood polio and who always took pleasure in the simple things of life. I found myself humming his talismanic tune recently, and it still works its magic. I was riding around the harbour on my bike, getting some much-needed exercise after a day at the computer keyboard and recovering from a phone conversation – an argument – with a relative from an older generation. Quite a close relative, but not at that moment my favourite one. Our argument had been – surprise, surprise – about the B word, and it had culminated in said relative growling, “We just need to get out!” I can’t remember my response, but I don’t think it was any more measured. So I pumped up my bike tyres and trundled down the hill to the water, and as I went the song began to play in my head. At the Arnolfini I crossed over Pero’s Bridge and made my way across Millennium Square, before heading towards Hotwells along the water’s edge. This was a ride I used to do often when the kids were little and a tour around the harbour was an adventure. You could never be quite sure what was going to happen next, except that the demands for hot chocolate/ice cream would start after about five minutes. And that someone was bound to get a wheel stuck in the railway tracks and fall off. And that the youngest would run out of steam on the way home and have to be carried somehow. Not reasons to be cheerful at the time, perhaps, but looking back I smiled. There were plenty of people wandering about in the evening sunshine, and as I did my best not to run anyone over I tried to remember the first time I saw the SS Great Britain. It’s tricky because of all the documentary footage, but I’m pretty sure it was in the late 1980s, and what I saw then was a rusting hulk, or a hulk at any rate. Restoration must have been well underway by that time so perhaps I’m exaggerating, but whatever condition Brunel’s boat was in, the surrounding area was worse. You couldn’t easily walk or ride round the harbour in those days, but nobody was complaining. You saw a semi-derelict wood yard here, and a fully derelict gasworks there, and the only tourists were TV location scouts looking for scenes of urban decay. The City Docks had closed in the late 1960s, and the Council had almost carried through its plan to fill the harbour in and build a road along it. Councillors had objected to the planned return of the SS Great Britain, arguing that Bristol was a vibrant working city and not a museum like Bath, but had eventually allowed the vessel temporary accommodation in a dry dock. But slowly the ship that rose from the grave became the focus of a new vision for the centre of Bristol. Crossing over by the locks at the bottom end of the harbour I pushed my bike through the working yards where boats are still built and ropes woven, then rode past the houses built on the former woodyards. A group of children were out sailing, two to a dinghy, bundled up in lifejackets. The wind blew in a desultory manner from every direction and none, making the sails flap as the little boats turned this way and that, carrying youthful cries of excitement across the water and reminding me that even in the sea of uncertainty, the simple things can still be celebrated. ■

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WIN £250 TO CELEBRATE THE LAUNCH OF M&S WHITELADIES ROAD FOODHALL

COMPETITION

To celebrate the recent opening of M&S’s new Foodhall on Whiteladies Road, The Bristol Magazine is giving you the chance to win a £250 M&S Gift Card to spend in the new store.

From M&S’s vegan Plant Kitchen range, through to foodie gifts perfect for Dad this Father’s Day, the Foodhall offers thousands of delicious and great value products for the whole family. With BBQ season just around the corner, customers visiting the store will also be able to enjoy M&S’s summer Grill range, which includes the return of Our Best Ever Burger – it flew off shelves last year and this year it’s back with a new look, topped with cheese, gherkins, tomato sauce and an oozy mustard melt!

Store Manager Greg O’Connor said: “We’re delighted to have opened our doors just in time for BBQ season and wanted to celebrate with the community by sharing this brilliant prize. We know how much Bristolians love their food, so we’re really excited to meet the winner and make sure they are set up for the ultimate summer feast!” The store also offers the full range of M&S Clothing & Home products via its Collect in Store service. Customers can opt for next day pick up if they order by 10pm the night before on M&S.com.

One lucky reader will win a £250 M&S Gift Card, which will be available to collect from the Whiteladies Road Foodhall store. For your chance to win, all you need to do is answer the following question: What is your favourite M&S Food product?

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T&Cs. Voucher must be collected from M&S Whiteladies Road Foodhall. (40a Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 2AZ). Prize is not transferable, no whole/part cash alternatives. For full terms and conditions, or information regarding data compliance or how your personal data is being used, then please visit: www. marksandspencer.com

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SHOPPING | FATHER’S DAY

Papa cool Shout-out to all the awesome father figures in our lives! This month we’ve picked out a few gifts to say thanks for everything that they do

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1. Water resistant bluetooth speaker, Bose, £99.95, John Lewis & Partners; johnlewis.com 2. Montblanc reversible leather belt, £190, Mallory; mallory-jewellers.com 3. The Duppy Share rum, £27 avilable at Harvey Nichols and John Lewis; theduppyshare.com 4. Softer Touch beard oil, £22, House 99; next.co.uk 5. Truman razor and blade in orange, Harry’s; boots.com 6. Dad-themed ½ pint mug, £19.95, Emma Bridgewater; emmabridgewater.co.uk 7. Whisky and cedarwood cologne, £120 per 100ml, Jo Malone; jomalone.co.uk 8. RSPB rCUP, £12; rspbshop.co.uk 9. Gentlemen’s bamboo socks by Powder Designs, £10, Kondi Gifts; facebook.com/kondigifts

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 27


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CYCLING

The Cyclebag volunteers, who had carried out thousand-strong demonstrations calling for more cycling provision, resurfaced the former railway

The first section of path opened between Bitton and Bath and was immediately well-used

“It was an entrance to a car-free utopia”: the traffic-free path is a place for people of all ages to cycle

xxxx It took only 10 weeks to get the five-mile section ready for cyclists

Volunteers of all ages helped to create the path: kids in flared velvet trousers brandished rakes, while their long-haired dads rolled the surface flat

Photos courtesy of John Grimshaw

John Grimshaw was the engineer who designed the Bristol and Bath Railway Path

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CYCLING

Pedal power Forty years ago volunteers began a ground-breaking project to link Bristol and Bath with a cycle path. Jess Connett gets on her bike...

I

t was the section from Bitton to Saltford and on to the outskirts of Bath that the volunteers tackled first. Work began one hot weekend in June 1979 (the exact date has been lost over the decades), when the first lorry full of limestone dust carefully drove onto the old railway. The tracks were gone but their ghosts remained where the sun-bleached grass did not grow. Kids in flared velvet trousers brandished rakes, while their long-haired dads rolled the surface flat. After 10 weeks of spreading dust over the coarse ballast, they had created five miles of what would become the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, one of the busiest cycle paths in the UK. “Then we prayed for rain,” recalls John Grimshaw, the civil engineer who had mapped out the practicalities of building the path. The rain would bind the dust into a hardwearing surface. “It didn’t rain. So we hired a pump, to get water out of the River Avon. And then, of course, five minutes after we switched it on, it rained.” John was part of Cyclebag (Channel Your Calf and Leg Energy Bristol Action Group), set up in a room above the Nova Scotia in July 1977. Their thousand-strong demonstrations, calling for more cycling provision, strained against car-centric town planning ideals that had run a dual carriageway through Queen Square. Bristol had only one purpose-built cycle lane at the time: on the M5 motorway bridge near Avonmouth. “There wasn’t another metre in this part of the world,” John emphasises. “I remember going to a conference where the government cycling officer said he wanted to eliminate cycling fatalities, and he would do that by eliminating cyclists. That really was their policy. It all just seemed a nightmare, and it was all negative, so I wanted to do something more positive.” Cyclebag would later become Sustrans, with John at the helm for 30 years. The new cycle path would run along Midland Railway’s Mangotsfield and Bath branch line, which opened in 1869. For just over a hundred years it connected Brummie holidaymakers with Devonshire fresh air, and carried coal from South Gloucestershire. But the passenger service failed to survive the Beeching cuts of the 1960s, and train traffic ceased entirely in 1971. The route was earmarked to be turned into a bypass by Avon County Council. Meanwhile, members of Cyclebag were touring Europe, visiting cities with purpose-built traffic-free routes for cyclists. The group began to plan a path that would connect the outskirts of Bristol to the outskirts of Bath. By avoiding the traffic on the A4 and the hilly alternative road through Kelston, Cyclebag envisaged people ditching their cars and cycling for everyday journeys. “Children from the ‘deprived’ inner city areas could safely cycle out to the open country to go fishing along the river,” gushed a Cyclebag publication from the time, “horse riding at Hanham Green, to be railway enthusiasts at Bitton, to go boating at Saltford, or to the races at Lansdown.” The path was not just a path. It was an entrance to a car-free utopia where children could learn to cycle in safety. It was where everyone could regain the confidence that, a generation earlier, where cars were a rarity, people on bicycles didn’t know they had. Cyclebag made a planning application in April 1979. They secured £10,000 from Clark’s shoes, got permission to lease the land, and rolled up their sleeves. As soon as the stretch opened, it became “insanely popular” John says, with a thousand walkers and cyclists counted during one weekend. On a sunny Sunday afternoon, little seems to have changed in 40 years. The car park at Avon Valley Railway is full of cars sporting bike carriers. A dad packs a tricycle down with ruthless efficiency, while

serious lycra-clad cyclists spill through the gates to get back onto the wide – now tarmacked – path. A mum waits for her daughter on a bright pink bike to finish the ice cream that is mostly on her face, before they cross the tracks and pedal on along the embankment towards Bath. In 1981, Cyclebag restarted the project to bring the path into Bristol. It would take another four years to reach Lawrence Hill. In the meantime, they were busy building car-free paths all over the country, including the Pill path under the Suspension Bridge. “We built wherever we could,” John says. “The idea was that every town needed a Bristol and Bath Railway Path. We should try to get a greenway down every canal, every river, every park.” With the city centres linked, the number of journeys taken annually rose into the millions. After a hundred years of trains chugging between Bristol and Bath, a new transport era had been ushered in. The path now carries more passengers on bikes than the Midland Railway ever did. ■ The Bristol and Bath Railway Path is now one of the busiest cycle routes in the country

The railway line had been closed by the Beeching cuts of the 1960s

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GLASTONBURY

THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH When you pack away the flip-flops at the height of summer and prepare to don the wellies, it can mean only one thing: Glastonbury is back. And this year the iconic festival is bigger and better than ever before. Malcolm Croft celebrates Worthy Farm’s hot happening and throws a spotlight on its special connection with its nearest major transport and traveller hub – Bristol

GERT LUSH: Welcoming performers and peacemakers alike, across scores of stages and fields, for many Bristolians, Glastonbury is the greatest show on Earth (image by Andrew Allcock)

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GLASTONBURY

F

or millennia, British summertime has begun with the arrival of the Summer Solstice; the day – or the precise second in the day, to be exact – when the nation experiences peak daylight hours before turning back towards winter. For the last 49 years, however, the sun has come second to another bright star for many – Glastonbury Festival, now considered the definitive starting gun for the silly season. The flame for Glastonbury first sparked when Pilton dairy farm owners Michael and Jean Eavis snuck through a hole in a fence at 1969’s Bath Blues Festival in order to watch their favourite rock group, Led Zeppelin, perform. Today, Glastonbury Festival is the largest greenfield music and contemporary arts festival in the world. But, to its most ardent attendees, it is so much more than just another of the UK’s 280 summer festivals. As Vice magazine once nailed it: “Glastonbury’s more than just a five-day farmyard bender. It is the greatest show on Earth.” Indeed. And it’s a show that caters for every soul, style and sound imaginable. The numbers speak for themselves: 1,500 acres, over 750 food stalls (almost 20 per cent of which are traders from Bristol/Bath), 900 shops, one million square metres of camping space and more than 100,000 members of staff keeping it all safe and tidy. Thankfully, there are also more than 5,500 toilets (more of which later) to keep up with the supply and demand. Oh, and how could we forget, the most thrilling line-up of internationally acclaimed headliners (this year: The Killers, The Cure, and Stormzy reign supreme on the Pyramid Stage), emerging talent, performers and peacemakers across scores of stages, areas and fields – numbering into the thousands. Yes, you’ve guessed it. These days, going to Glasto – as well as simply watching it on the BBC’s now-beloved broadcasts – is perceived as a cultural badge of honour, as British as fish and chips, or Brexit. But what is the impact on Bristol, its nearest (and nicest) neighbour?

Music, mud and mayhem As the festival kicks off Somerset’s summer in style, from 26 – 30 June, more than 210,000 people are expected to descend upon the county, a quarter of whom are residents of the South West. Approximately seven per cent of Glasto-goers originate from Bristol and Bath, according to the one-and-only definitive survey (2007) of the festival to date. For decades, Glastonbury’s connection to Bristol has run much deeper than waiting for Idles’ hotly anticipated headline performance this year and being a stone’s throw (40km) from the festival entrance. There are, and have always been, many vital non-traffic links that have bound Glastonbury and Bristol together. Arcadia, Glastonbury’s large flaming spider area (and the definitive after-hours image of the event) was conceived and built in Bristol (remember its Queen Square takeover in 2015?); and the ‘Pee Power’ toilets, which hit the headlines in 2016 for their revolutionary ability to turn urine to electricity, are now one of Glastonbury’s most prominent partners: they were invented in Bristol. Michael Eavis was even made a Master of Arts by the University of Bristol in 2006; in his acceptance speech he thanked the city for all its support of his “wild idea”. But the connections don’t fizzle out there. It’s estimated that one-third of all festival-goers travelling by train pass through Temple Meads en route to Castle Cary, the nearest station to the site, including Bristol’s city centre bus station (FYI, the local bus service is the 376). The remaining 64 per cent of festival attendees who travel to the festival by car (more than 50,000 vehicles), encounter severe congestion on the country roads that connect the two destinations, a journey made even more torturous by the fact that the nearest motorway is 25km away. It’s understandable that Bristolians who commute by car and public transport find the two days either side of the festival unbearable. “I love Glastonbury,” said James, a local commuter, “but I try not to drive or use public transport when the festival is on. “Too many people,” agreed Emily, another train user who has seen Bristol Temple Meads “in meltdown” before and after the festival’s run. But, ask anyone in Bristol, the consensus is the same. “The whole of Somerset feels alive when the festival is on,” said Carol, a resident of Stokes Croft, “and Bristol has extra buzz about it too.” Of course, Bristol doesn’t need Glastonbury to make money from live music. Annually, the city generates £123million in revenue for live performances all by itself. Yet, with its proximity to Worthy Farm, it’s inevitable that Bristol benefits from the festival. But by how much?

Local connection In 2007, Bristol-based company, Baker Associates, undertook a local economic impact survey to understand just how much Glastonbury swings the dial money-wise. The report’s aim was to not only fully understand the local economic effect of Glastonbury – for the first time, and no further reports have been done since – but to also help plan future festivals. The report continues to prove invaluable. “We’ve always said that the festival had a big economic impact but we’ve never been able to prove it,” said Dick Vernon, trading manager for Glastonbury Festival, after the publication of the report. “Now we have an independent group who have come up with some staggering figures.” John Baker, from Baker Associates, asserted that the “study clearly shows that the Glastonbury Festival has a significant economic impact, both locally and across a wider geographical area, with figures greater than for comparable festivals or events elsewhere in the UK.” ➲

Main man Michael Eavis and daughter Emily (image by Jason Bryant)

Those Somerset sunsets, those pastoral views... (this image and below by Andrew Allcock)


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Here’s one from the archives: the burning of Mr Eavis's cart (image by David White)

The iconic patchwork lettering (image by Jason Bryant)

More than a decade on, Bakers’ data is as revealing as ever. Bristol, and Bath, remain at the heart of the conversation, and since the report – the only de-facto statistical analysis of Glastonbury’s local impact – it’s fair to assume that as the volume of ticket-holders has increased to 210,000 (an increase of 40,000 more merrymakers, since 2007), so too will the favourable figures. As the largest major city, Bristol, naturally, has earned more than its share of the pie. It is estimated that Bristol’s net earnings over the festival weekend equates to more than £2.4million, with an additional £3million invested in Bristol and Bath companies – in particular for staff and stewarding to keeping the site safe and clean (toilets, waste disposal, cleaning), signage, traffic and parking, and “non-permanent structures like screens and tents”. Expenditure for electric and power hire went predominantly to providers in Bristol and Bath, and with more than 120 generators required to keep the festival running hot, the energy bills, you would imagine, must also be quite substantial. Every year the festival takes place more than £100million is injected into the local economy and, according to Mr Eavis himself, “a substantial proportion of that, £52 million, is spent in Somerset.” An additional £1million is donated to local charities and causes and, today, more than £10million worth of business is supplied to local companies based within 25 miles of Worthy Farm. Across a handful of industries, naturally, local businesses see a decent bump in trade. As one shop owner near Temple Meads claimed: “It’s common to see a tripling of normal sales for everyday items such as water and takeaway food. The nearest ATMs get hammered too.”

Glastonbury has a rich history and attending is perceived as a cultural badge of honour (image by Nils Jorgensen/REX)

Glastonbury heads to Bristol (?)

The Killers, The Cure and Stormzy will reign supreme on 2019’s Pyramid Stage (image by Jason Bryant)

With news breaking last year that Michael and daughter Emily (effectively in charge of the festival’s music organisation and logistics since 2008) are looking to set up another Glastonbury Festival away from the Worthy Farm site from 2021, there has been much speculation as to where that secret site will be unveiled. Though the name of the new festival will change to the Variety Bazaar, the DNA of Glastonbury will run through its veins and has been described by Michael as “the last big gamble of my life”. While the site, no doubt, won’t be announced until after the 50th birthday bash in 2020, several sites have been mooted with Michael letting slip that one proposed site is “about halfway” between Worthy Farm and the Midlands “as the crow flies”. Bristol, the happiest city in Britain (according to a national poll in January 2019) – and with more than enough green fields to spare – is, coincidentally, just about halfway between Glastonbury and the Midlands, meaning that the bond between Bristol and Glastonbury could become even stronger. This is Glastonbury, after all, anything could happen… ■


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SPIRITUAL

Pillar & pioneer Verity Hesketh meets the forward-thinking Bristol vicar and Glasto disciple who, each year, can be found providing a safe space to breathe in among the heady energy of the festival

D

ue to the rapid kinesis of 21st-century living, fluidity within community is not only important, it is vital to the survival and continued positive evolution of modern society. This evolution is only possible through the innovators: those of us who take life, embrace it, shake it and push it to the limit. Such a person is the Reverend Lee Barnes, vicar of Holy Trinity, Hotwells and St Stephens. “In the world there are generally two types of people; pioneers and settlers,” Lee says. “I’m a pioneer; I like the experience of brand new people and places. I see being a human in this amazing world as a gift. The joy, sorrows and tears and laughter that life throws our way are all part of this.” For the large part of his twenties during the hedonistic 1990s, Lee travelled all over the world; first of all around the UK, stumbling on the concept of faith via fellow travellers and learning the craft of hitch-hiking by chance. Initially incredulous, then inspired, Lee took the cue from this impromptu source, beginning his investment in the something that would eventually lead him to Australia, and to God. “The power of faith is in sharp relief when you’re travelling. It’s that unshakable belief that things will just work out in the end, no matter what, no matter if your home is non-existent, or if you’re not sure where the next sleep or meal will come from.” Gaining hitching confidence, Lee explored America, then began on Australia. “I was quite broken inside at this time, even though on the surface I seemed, to all intents and purposes, fairly normal.” This way of seat-of-the-pants travelling would daunt many people, especially us modern, civilised humans, cushioned in our artificial world of hyper-organisation and hyper-awareness, brought about by the technology we carry in our pockets, our handbags and even on our wrists. Not for Lee; “Hitch-hiking is a largely positive way of getting about, not least because it is totally immersive, meaning that you can get into a culture via immediate human connection. It is also an acutely intense way of travelling.” On returning to the UK, Lee began his Christian journey, increasingly pulled towards community work and eventually communicating this to his own vicar: “I asked for an appointment with him and just burst out; ‘Look, don’t laugh, but I think God’s calling me to be a vicar.’ And he started laughing; ‘I’m only laughing because it’s taken you this long to see it.’ “I’ve realised since that a calling or vocation of any capacity is not just about us, it’s about other people from the outside seeing that it makes sense.” To speak to Lee about Bristol is to strike a match; “I am completely blessed to live and work in the centre of Bristol. It’s a fantastically progressive part of the world; with so many exciting things going on. It’s also got challenges like anywhere else; genuine issues that are obvious. It’s not a perfect city by any means, but I feel hugely influenced by the creativity and the amount of exciting ideas and projects that are forged here.” As well as his work in Bristol, every June Lee ups sticks to head up the Sanctuary Marquee at Glastonbury Festival. “I’ve been going to Glastonbury since 1992 and I got involved with what is now known as the Sanctuary Marquee in 2005. The Sanctuary Marquee is a Christian breathing space in the midst of the amazing energy of the festival,” he says. “It is open for anyone, whether it’s simply to get out of the wind and rain, for those having a sudden crisis or even a wedding blessing. For those seeking answers,

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Lee feels blessed to live and work in “fantastically progressive” Bristol and is influenced by the exciting ideas forged here

Lee has been going to Glastonbury since 1992 and got involved with the Sanctuary Marquee in 2005

and for those seeking questions. We literally do not know what is around the corner every year. “Almost every experience at the Sanctuary Marquee is a memorable one, but one incident a couple of years ago particularly tickled me. We decorate the tent every year with a different theme, and this particular year it was Christmas. This guy, who was totally out of it, stumbled into the tent some time in the early hours of the morning, curling up for a sleep underneath our decorative Christmas tree. His face as he started waking up in the morning was absolutely priceless – he must have thought that he was in an alternative universe, or a really, really long trip that he was just coming out of and that he’d woken up a whole seven months later.” Trippy experiences aside, Lee and his dedicated team have worked tirelessly to make the Sanctuary tent the beautiful preserve and festival staple that it is today, offering festival goers something beyond the music, art and partying. “I wouldn’t be who I am without Jesus,” says Lee. “But the adventure of being human is my central inspiration in life.” So if you’re going to Glasto this month, why not take a moment to seek out the spiritual? n


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CLASSICAL’S RISING STAR

Classical music just got a whole lot cooler. Following a rousing Proms appearance, a Classical BRIT Award and a moving performance at the BAFTAs, young saxophonist Jess Gillam is hitting all the right notes, says Jessica Hope

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Radio 3’s youngest-ever presenter at just 20 years old with the launch of her own show, This Classical Life, in April. Keen to promote the work of other young musicians, Jess talks to a young performer each week who shares the music that has inspired them. “Hopefully it shows the diverse range of music that classical performers listen to, and shows that musicians take inspiration from lots of different genres,” says Jess. “Perhaps genre isn’t all that important – what’s more important is having a reaction to music regardless of what it is classed as.” Despite her youth, this isn’t the first presenting gig for Jess. Last year she regularly hosted the BBC Young Musician podcast with bassist Sam Becker and pianist Zeynep Özsuca where they tackled a range of subjects from stage fright to pre-show snacks. “It was great to be able to make it with two of my best friends,” says Jess. “We’re all so passionate about sharing music.” The last few years have been a whirlwind for Jess. Aged 17 she made a guest appearance with Jools Holland and his Rhythm and Blues Orchestra, shortly before making history by becoming the first saxophonist to reach the final of BBC Young Musician in 2016. The following year she made her Proms debut. “I’d never been to a Prom before. I’d seen the Proms on TV, but I’d never

actually been. So stepping out onto that stage was a very surreal experience,” she says. “There is a real electricity in the room between the performer and the audience. You can actually see the faces of the audience, and because the Royal Albert Hall is round, it feels very intimate. You feel like you can play to just one person.” Her performance impressed audiences so much that she was invited back in 2018, this time to perform at the Proms in the Park in Hyde Park before rushing over to the Royal Albert Hall to play at the Last Night of the Proms, where she became the youngest-ever soloist to perform. Her rendition of Milhaud’s Scaramouche went down a storm with audiences, with one critic hailing it as the “indisputable highlight” of the night. Last year also saw Jess feature on the winners list at the Classical BRIT Awards alongside music legends such as Dame Vera Lynn, Michael Ball and Renée Fleming, after receiving the award for the Sound of Classical poll which recognises the best emerging artists under 30. Last month Jess released her debut album, Rise, after signing with Decca Classics – becoming the first saxophone player to join the prestigious record label. “Recording an album has been an ambition of mine for a very long time,” she says. ➲

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lassical music is lost on millennials. They don’t know their Bachs from their Stravinskys. They’d probably clap in between movements, the fools.” – These may be speculative phrases, but phrases, nonetheless, that reflect the growing concern among some classical music fans who fear that younger generations are losing interest in this traditional form of music. However, the future of classical is assuredly in safe hands. For more than 40 years, the BBC Young Musician award has championed young performers. And in recent years, the calibre of musicians has increased and produced a number of youngsters who have been making a big mark on the classical scene. Violinist Nicola Benedetti (recently appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire for her services to music) and cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason, who played at Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding last year, are just two of the award-winners who have recently shot into the limelight. And one finalist who has been trailblazing the music of the saxophone – and who you may recognise from her poignant performance at the 2019 BAFTAs – is Jess Gillam. As well as wowing audiences with her dynamic recitals, Jess recently became BBC

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“It’s an album of music that I love to play and have an emotional affinity to.” It features Jess’ signature piece Pequeña Czarda by Pedro Iturralde, which she performed at the wind category final of BBC Young Musician 2016. The number one-selling album also includes a bonus track – Francis Lai’s Theme from Love Story, which Jess played during the BAFTAs’ obituaries section in front of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and acting royalty. “It was a performance like no other that I have done before,” she says. “In a setting like that, it was a real honour to play.”

...There is a real electricity in the room between the performer and the audience... Jess, who is from Ulverston in Cumbria, has come a long way since she first picked up a saxophone, aged seven, with the Barracudas Carnival Band in Barrow. She recalls that day: “There were loads of workshops on – stilts, dance, drums, costume-making, and the saxophone. I came to the saxophone last and completely fell in love with it. “I never made a conscious decision that that was what I wanted to do with my life. It is something I’ve been really passionate about

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and love. I’ve been lucky enough for that to develop into a career.” She is currently studying at the Royal Northern College of Music with an ABRSM Scholarship, and says that despite her parents not having a background in classical, their love of music was instilled in her from a young age. “There’s always been an appreciation for music in our household. I was brought up where it was an important part of life and was something that was really valued and encouraged.” It was this which influenced some of the more modern tracks on her album. “I used to listen to Kate Bush on repeat, growing up. And David Bowie is one of my musical heroes, so to have music by both of them on there alongside music by Marcello and Dowland will hopefully show the diversity and versatility of the saxophone.” When she’s not touring around the UK or abroad with different orchestras, Jess organises her own series of concerts in her hometown – something which she has done since the age of 12 – bringing international stars such as Snake David, Courtney Pine, John Harle and Tommy Smith to Ulverston. “Live music is such an amazing thing for any community to have access to. It is something I would like to try and keep alive as much as possible,” she says. Jess is also a keen activist against arts funding cuts in schools and wrote an open letter to The Guardian earlier this year. “We’re at a crisis point in the country at the moment where we have to realise how

essential music is to society. Until [music] becomes recognised in the curriculum as a core subject, I think we are failing our children and not giving them the opportunities they deserve. “Music can teach children so many life skills such as empathy, co-operation, determination, perseverance, and the ability to fail and for it to be okay.” In order to help engage more children in music, Jess visits schools when she’s on tour for concerts, and gave pupils from King Edward’s School in Bath a music workshop last year. “One of the best ways for children to engage with music is by seeing it live and being able to speak to the musicians.” Despite now only being 21, Jess has transformed the way the saxophone is perceived among the classical community, and you can expect various new commissions to be written just for her over the coming years. “One of the brilliant things about the saxophone is that it is still relatively young. It doesn’t have a very long history, so to be able to commission new music and help to create the repertoire for it is really exciting.” The classical world is moving into a new, more modern era, and younger generations are taking notice. With artists like Jess Gillam at the helm, the future of classical music is looking very bright. n • Jess Gillam is performing at the Classical Mixtape Live 2 Summer Gala on 28 June, 7.30pm at St George’s Bristol. Tickets £5 – £30; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

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PITCH PERFECT: Saxophonist Jess Gillam recently became BBC Radio 3’s youngest ever presenter


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WHAT’S ON IN JUNE Rising folk star Emily Mae Winters plays at Cafe Kino

See OperaUpClose’s new English version of Puccini’s La Bohème at Bristol Old Vic

Yola 1 June, 8.30pm, Fiddlers Club Inspired by country and soul from the likes of Aretha Franklin, The Band, Gillian Welch, Gene Clark and The Byrds, Yola is a force of nature and an incredibly talented singer. After several years working as a writer, producer and featured vocalist with dance artists such as Massive Attack, Duke Dumont and Chase and Status, she has embarked on solo career. The Festival of Nature 1 – 9 June, venues around Bristol and Bath The UK’s largest free celebration of nature is back this summer, helping to engage and inspire people to connect with the natural world. The exciting programme features events happening across Bristol and Bath including free interactive exhibitions, live performances and talks from inspirational and renowned leaders of the natural history world. Weekend events are free to enter and tickets are available to book before special weekday events. See the full programme online; festivalofnature.org.uk The Les Miserables Sing-Along Workshop 2 June, 2 – 4.30pm, St Werburghs Centre To coincide with the UK tour of Les Miserables, celebrate the songs of one of the most popular musicals ever written. Laugh, cry and sing your way through this exhilarating musical journey. £15, includes refreshments; sing4wellbeing.co.uk La Bohème 3 & 4 June, 7.30pm, Bristol Old Vic OperaUpClose present their highly acclaimed, Olivier-Award winning, new English version of Puccini’s La Bohème. One of the most accessible and moving operas ever written, La Bohème charts the ups and downs of a group of idealistic graduates as they bicker, party, try to make ends meet and follow their dreams. From £11.50; bristololdvic.org.uk 40 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Joanne Clifton and Ben Adams star in The Rocky Horror Show at Bristol Hippodrome

In Conversation: Paul Simon Richards and Esther Leslie 4 June, 6.30 – 8pm, Spike Island Paul Simon Richards discusses his video work Quasi Monte-Carlo – currently presented at Spike Island – with Professor Esther Leslie. From the use of lighting, colour and drawing to the socio-political meaning of fairy-tales, Richards and Leslie shed a light on the aesthetic, technical and political implications of animation, drawing links between a range of modern and contemporary films, from Zbigniew Rybczynski’s experimental video Tango (1981) to blockbuster Disney productions Moana (2016) and Frozen 2 (2019). £3/£5; spikeisland.org.uk Edgelarks 4 June, 8pm, The Wardrobe Theatre After retreating to a remote Cumbrian cottage to write, Edgelarks are celebrating the launch of their upbeat folk album, Feather, with a UK tour. £15; thewardrobetheatre.com Campfire Club 6, 13, 20 and 27 June, 7pm, Windmill Hill City Farm Campfire Club is heading to Bristol for the first time, giving audiences the chance to discover extraordinary new music around the warmth of the campfire with The Nest Collective. Listen to unamplified music by the likes of Harri Endersby, Vera van Heeringen and Sam Lee and enjoy enjoy food, friendship and fire. £9 – £16; thenestcollective.co.uk/campfire-club-bristol Green Squares and Secret Gardens in BS8 8 & 9 June, opening times vary, Clifton and Hotwells Behind of many of the elegant terraces and crescents of Clifton, Cliftonwood and Hotwells in Bristol there are hidden gardens. Enjoy an opportunity to visit many of these communal gardens, which are not usually

accessible to the public. £5 entry for both days, includes a booklet, map and information on things to look out for; gssg-bristol.com Style and Sustainability: Homes and interiors 8 & 9 June, 10am – 4pm, Court House Farm, Church Road South, Portishead Calling all lovers of beauty and vintage – the wonderful medieval and Tudor property and garden hamlet Court House Farm is now hosting regular monthly creative events providing lifestyle inspiration with pop-up vintage homeware, textiles and talented handmade designs. Find out how an ordinary family learned to live plastic free; enjoy crafting workshops alongside sustainable makers; and browse the vintage textiles and homeware on display. Plus take some time to see the newly planted open gardens. £5; courthousefarm.com Harmonic Mass: Bristol Bach Choir 8 June, 7.30pm, St James Priory A concert featuring two beautiful compositions for a cappella choir. The first is by Swiss composer Frank Martin, whose virtuosic Mass for Double Choir was never intended to be performed publicly. The other is the meditative contemplation of Rheinberger’s Mass in E flat. Bristol Bach Choir will also be joined by Meadow Brooks, a percussion finalist in last year’s BBC Young Musician of the Year. £5 – £22; bristolbach.org.uk Henleaze Concert Society: Summer Serenade 8 June, 7.30pm, Trinity-Henleaze URC, Waterford Road An evening of light music by Gershwin, Cole Porter and Jerome Kern, performed by the professional musicians from Bristol Ensemble. £5/£16.50, from Opus 13 music shop; henleazeconcertsociety.org.uk


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EDITOR’S PICK... SPICE GIRLS 10 JUNE, GATES OPEN 5PM, ASHTON GATE STADIUM

Stop right now! It’s time to add some spice to your life as, two decades after they revolutionised the ‘90s pop landscape, the history-making, best-selling female group of all time – the Spice Girls – are bringing girl power back for their UK tour. Mel C, Emma, Mel B and Geri will be bringing classics such as Wannabe, 2 Become 1 and Goodbye to Bristol. Plus Sporty, Baby, Scary and Ginger will be supported by number-one selling singer-songwriter Jess Glynne, so that’s enough to make you holler. As you’d expect, tickets sold quick, but resale and hospitality tickets are still available if you’re fast. Viva forever! ticketmaster.co.uk

Summer Fête 9 June, 11am – 3pm, Badminton School With a huge variety of stalls, activities and entertainment to enjoy, there will be lots of fun for all the family to be had come rain or shine. There will be a special delivery of ice cream and crêpes to tuck into, and no fête would be complete without such classic games as hook-a-duck, facepainting and splat the rat. Plus there will be cream teas prepared by the school’s head chef for £25, book in advance. Free entry; bit.ly/2W4Dt6U Vocal Works Gospel Choir 9 June, 7.30pm, St George’s Bristol

We wanna really, really, really wanna zigazig ah… with the Spice Girls

Broadway Soul is an uplifting and high-energy show from the inspirational Vocal Works Gospel Choir. Celebrating the soulful and gospel side of musical theatre, the programme includes hits from shows such as The Lion King, The Greatest Showman, Dreamgirls, Hairspray and Hamilton, and promises to raise the roof. 14+. £11 – £16; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk Emily Mae Winters 9 June, 7.30pm, Cafe Kino, Stokes Croft Fast-rising star on the UK folk/Americana scene, Emily Mae Winters has that rare quality in a singer that makes critics reach for

the superlatives. Described as having a voice that “stops you in your tracks” and “arresting, enthralling, tantalising” by Americana UK, Emily combines bittersweetness with a unique drama in her performance. £8.97, tickets from Eventbrite; emilymaewinters.com Social Media Week Bristol 10 – 14 June, times vary, venues around Bristol Social Media Week returns to Bristol, hosting a range of events that shares the best ideas, innovations and insights into how social media and technology are changing business, Continued on page 42

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society and culture around the world. See the full programme and book tickets online; smwbristol.co.uk The Royal Ballet: Romeo and Juliet 11 June, 7.30pm, Millennium Square Shakespeare’s star-crossed lovers encounter passion and tragedy in Kenneth MacMillan's 20th-century ballet masterpiece. Watch The Royal Ballet’s production at the Royal Opera House at this live screening on the big screen in Millennium Square. Free; roh.org.uk Forest Live 2019 13 – 16 June, 6 – 10.30pm, Westonbirt Arboretum The Forestry Commission England’s major outdoor live music series is back this summer for four nights of great music, food and drink, in an informal and relaxed setting. This year’s headline acts include Stereophonics, Paul Weller, Jack Savoretti and Haçienda Classiçal. Tickets from £38.50. Money raised will help to look after the nation’s forests sustainably; forestryengland.uk/music Much Ado About Nothing with The HandleBards 14 June, 7pm, Tyntesfield Enjoy an outdoor production of Shakespeare’s comedy Much Ado About Nothing on the Croquet Lawn, presented by The HandleBards – a troupe of cycling actors who carry all the set, props and costume needed to perform extremely energetic, charmingly chaotic and environmentally sustainable Shakespeare plays across the globe. £8/£16; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield Life, Love and Hope 15 June, 7.30pm, Bristol Cathedral The final performance of Bristol Choral Society’s season features a beautiful programme of music combining evocative, thought-provoking words on life, love and hope alongside some of the most wonderful choral arrangements. The programme features Copland’s In the Beginning and Tippett’s Five Negro Spirituals. Conducted by Hilary Campbell. £5 – £28; bristolchoral.co.uk

Funny Bones: Nish Kumar and friends 16 June, 7.30pm, Bristol Hippodrome Nish Kumar heads a fantastic line-up of comedians to raise funds for Bristol city centre hospitals. Also set to tickle your funny bones on the night are Laura Lexx – who returns for a second year – Jake Lambert, Kiri PritchardMcLean and more to be announced. From £34.55; atgtickets.com/bristol Take Stock of Sustainable Sourcing 17 June, 10am – 1pm, Colston Hall An event to inspire chefs and caterers to become stewards of sustainability by choosing ingredients that will reduce climate impact and protect our soil fertility, health and wildlife for generations to come. With informative talks, an expert Q&A panel session and a marketplace of Soil Association certified organic suppliers, you’ll leave with the inspiration, understanding and organic suppliers you need to make a positive difference in your restaurant, café or public sector catering establishments. £6; theticketsellers.co.uk The Rocky Horror Show 17 – 22 June, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome Richard O’Brien’s legendary rock’n’roll musical returns to the UK as part of a sell-out worldwide tour, having now been seen by over 30 million theatre-goers. Squeaky clean college kids Brad and Janet have a twist of fate when their car breaks down outside a creepy mansion, and they meet the charismatic Dr Frank’n’Furter. It’s an adventure they’ll never forget… Starring World and European Champion ballroom dancer and former Strictly Come Dancing professional Joanne Clifton and Ben Adams, member of the BRIT Award-winning boyband a1. Tickets from £13; atgtickets.com/bristol The Canterbury Tales 18 June, 7.30pm, Tobacco Factory Theatres A colourful cast of characters set off for Canterbury, competing to tell their tales of love, lust, adventure and chivalry. Brimming with verve and energy, Chaucer’s well-loved

Bristol Symphony Orchestra will be joined by Dakhla Brass at Clifton Cathedral

stories from the likes of the Miller, the Steward and the Wife of Bath, among others, are brought beautifully and vividly alive by the students from Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. 14+. £10/£15; tobaccofactorytheatres.com Stream Farm Dinner 20 June, 7pm, Harvey Nichols Bristol James Odgers from Stream Farm, based in the hidden valley high up in the Quantocks of Somerset, will be hosting an evening celebrating organic and local produce. Guests can learn more about James’ commitment to field-to-fork sustainability and their shared farming vision while enjoying dishes such as roast loin of lamb with peas and beans, and honey parfait and strawberries. Four courses, £40pp. To book, call The Second Floor Restaurant: 0117 916 8898 or email: reception.bristol@harveynichols.com Make Music Day 21 June, venues around Bristol Organisers of Make Music Day UK are bringing its flagship event to Bristol. This global grassroots festival celebrates all genres and styles of music, and is free and open to anyone who wants to take part, whether performing or watching. There will be performances from Bristol Samba Band and Orchestra of Everything in Millennium Square, plus live music from venues such as Bristol Airport, St George’s Bristol, The New Room, St Mary Redcliffe, Withywood Community Arts Centre and the Rope Walk in Bedminster; makemusicday.co.uk Yalla Walk 21 – 24 June, times vary, Queen Square Mental health and performance charity Many Minds are putting on an ambitious multicultural, participatory outdoor performance to tackle segregation and stigma and celebrate equality and neurodiversity as part of the Bristol Refugee Festival. Yalla Walk will be performed by Many Minds’ members and refugees and asylum seekers, and explores their experiences of living in Bristol. Free/£6; many-minds.org/yalla-walk Continued on page 44

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Jack Savoretti: Chris Floyd

Acoustic singer Jack Savoretti joins the line-up at Westonbirt Arboretum for Forest Live

Join Vocal Works Gospel Choir at St George’s Bristol

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One Night in Miami... at Bristol Old Vic

Jazz meets Bristol Symphony 22 June, 8pm, Clifton Cathedral For the third in the Jazz Meets Bristol Symphony concerts, conductor William Goodchild and the 70-piece Bristol Symphony Orchestra will be collaborating with Londonbased jazz flautist Gareth Lockrane – whose big band has just scooped Best Big Band in the 2018 British Jazz Awards – and the Bristolbased sextet Dakhla Brass. Arrive early for a drink on the terrace. £10/£20; bristolsymphonyorchestra.com Trust 10 23 June & 28 July, 9 – 11am, Tyntesfield Take in the beautiful views across the valley around Tyntesfield at this 10k run around the National Trust property. Meet at the Home Farm visitor centre. Free, booking not needed; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield The Mousetrap 24 – 26 June, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome The scene is set when a group of people gathered in a country house, cut off by the snow, discover – to their horror – that there is a murderer in their midst. Who can it be? Discover why Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap has kept people guessing for so long, becoming the longest running show of any kind in the history of theatre. 12+. From £13; atgtickets.com/bristol 5x15 Bristol 25 June, 7.30pm, The Station, Silver Street Five speakers, 15 minutes each, no scripts! Psychotherapist Philippa Perry on our relationships with our children, Amy Sinclair from Extinction Rebellion on her role in the London demos, Prof Alan Winfield on intelligent robots and their future, One25 and their incredible work in Bristol with sex workers, and historian Hallie Rubenhold on the truth about Jack the Ripper’s victims. £14, tickets via Eventbrite. One Night in Miami... 25 – 29 June, times vary, Bristol Old Vic Before they were icons they were friends… 44 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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It’s 1964 and Cassius Clay is crowned the new heavyweight champion of the world and celebrates with three of his closest friends – activist Malcolm X, American football icon Jim Brown and soul star Sam Cooke – in a downtown Miami motel room. That much we know is true. What follows is an imagined account of a fabled real-life event. Starring Olivier Award-winning Matt Henry, this is a play about prejudice and brotherhood, that asks on which side of the fence we stand when hard choices need to be made? From £10; bristololdvic.org.uk Does Capitalism Have a Future? 26 June, 7pm, Waterstones, Broadmead Capitalism is in crisis and many question if it can survive. Economic growth is sluggish and the benefits of capitalism are not shared widely. Economist Paul Collier believes we have lost the sense of ethical obligation to others that was crucial to the rise of post-war social democracy. In this talk, Collier outlines ways to heal these economic, social and cultural rifts. £6/£8; ideasfestival.co.uk The Basement Tapes 29 June, 8.30pm, Spielman Theatre, Tobacco Factory Theatres Following her grandmother’s death, a girl faces the overwhelming task of clearing out the basement. She discovers a series of mysterious tape recordings made by her grandmother. As she hears these tapes for the first time, things start to unravel… Part of Incoming Festival 2019. £5; tobaccofactorytheatres.com Summer Fayre and Classic Car Show 30 June, 10am – 4pm, North Bristol Rugby Football Club The Freemasons of Bristol are hosting a day of food and drink, classic cars, children’s entertainment, and a variety of stalls to explore at this summer fayre. Car parking is £5, free entry. A Magic Carpet of Choral Music 30 June, 3pm, St Stephen’s Church Bristol Chamber Choir presents a programme

Catch Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap at Bristol Hippodrome

of music including rounds, canons, glees, catches, part-songs and madrigals from the 13th to the 20th century. £10, tickets from Eventbrite, Opus 13 on St Michael’s Hill, and on the door. Join the choir for a post-concert Pimm’s; bristolchamberchoir.org.uk Carmen 2 July, 7pm, Millennium Square Bizet’s greatest opera tells the story of the enigmatic and seductive Carmen and the dangerous passion she arouses in Don José. Pack a picnic and head to Millennium Square as Carmen will be screened live from the Royal Opera House on the big screen. Take a blanket or camping chair. This is a chance to watch a world-class opera performed live for free; roh.org.uk Bristol Comedy Garden 3 – 7 July, Queen Square The mighty Bristol Comedy Garden returns this summer with yet another outrageously good line-up of comedy greats – such as Phil Wang, Tim Key and Sara Pascoe – paired with street-food, craft beers and more. Many of the shows have sold out already, so get your tickets quick; bristolcomedygarden.co.uk Music through the Ages 6 July, 2.30pm, St Peter’s Church, Henleaze A concert of beautiful, evocative pieces including works by Byrd, Handel, Schubert, Parry, Elgar, Whitacre, followed by tea and cake. Conducted by Rebecca Holdeman. Retiring collection for Bristol Age UK. £5/£15, tickets from opus13.co.uk Bristol Nightrider 6 & 7 July, 10.30pm, Bristol The popular charity cycle ride Bristol Nightrider is returning, allowing cyclists to support any charity they choose. There are no time restrictions or race placing, and it’s a great chance to see the city’s sights while raising money for a good cause. Choose from 50km or 100km, and see the major landmarks and hidden gems Bristol has to offer. Sign up on a charity place for £45 or own place for £99; nightrider.org.uk n

Campfire Club: Owen Tetley/The Mousetrap: Johann Persson

The Campfire Club is coming to Bristol for the first time this summer


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COMEDY

Robins in the Garden Local lad John Robins is returning to Bristol thanks to this summer’s Comedy Garden. Here he talks beloved city haunts, Jon Richardson’s life-altering roast, absolutely bombing at Ashton Court, and his warts-and-all tour kicking off at Tobacco Factory

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hilip Larkin once said about home; it’s the place in which “no elsewhere underwrites my existence” – and that’s how Bristol comedian John Robins tells us he feels about returning to his home city. “I always look forward to it,” he says. “Performing here feels like slipping back into the way things ought to be.” Which is rather nice, isn’t it? We caught up with the candid comic ahead of his upcoming Queen Square appearance... What can the Bristol audience expect from the Comedy Garden show?

Fingers crossed, pizza. Will and Cass, who book it, play a very dangerous game of cat and mouse with their food stalls. One year you’ll get pizza, the next year it’s nowhere to be seen. And when I threaten to pull the gig, suddenly, there’s our old friend pizza again. It’s like they’re testing me. What was it like living in Bristol with Jon Richardson, Russell Howard and Mark Olver? Round-the-clock hi-jinks?

Do you have a comedy hero? Very many. Alan Partridge, Phil Kay, Chris Morris, Rik Mayall and Ade Edmondson. But I went to Ian Cognito’s funeral yesterday. I gigged with him a lot when I first started out; he taught me a huge amount about how to play a room, how to commit to each and every gig, every line you deliver. He was the only person I ever saw whose mind was never elsewhere. He never phoned it in, never had somewhere else to be, or another project taking priority. It was all about that room, that audience, that performance at that moment in time. No one else in comedy was as present in the room as he was. He’s a hero to many, many people. I miss him very much. Ever been to a gig that genuinely changed your life in some way? Phil Kay, Late ‘n’ Live, Edinburgh 2005. I’d never seen anyone improvise like that, and probably never will again. Did winning the Edinburgh Comedy Award change things for you?

I’m not gonna lie to you, there were some hi-jinks. But at the time Richardson was the only one drinking so they weren’t far beyond mild hi-jinks. And then he cooked a roast that looked so delicious I had to have some white wine with it. That glass of sauvignon blanc probably set my career back seven years I’d say, and I think he knew that when he roast that hellish tender lamb. Which places would you like to return to if you get time? Hare On The Hill, The Hillgrove Porter Stores, The Highbury Vaults, The Alma Tavern, The Quinton House, Eldon House. In that order. I used to go to a bar called Roxy’s at the bottom of St Michael’s Hill. It was run by a Dutch guy called Eddie. I went there a lot on my own after finishing work at Borders bookshop. Once I arrived and it was just Eddie, nailing hats to the ceiling. Then a sales rep from Lucky Strike came in and gave me 400 fags. I’d given Eddie two albums – The Best Of Bob James and Frank Zappa’s Roxy & Elsewhere – and he played them as I drank. Then a few weeks later I crashed a wedding reception there and was sick in my mouth one minute before the start of Lent. I didn’t drink for another two years. Until that bloody roast… What did you learn from your worst gig? And where was your first? Never assume you’re going to do well. Ashton Court Festival 2005. My first was an open mic night at The Hatchet, run by Mark Olver. That night has had so many incarnations and venues, from The Bunch Of Grapes, to Oppo, Channings, and is still going strong at The White Rabbit. If you traced its various line-ups back to the beginning it’s probably had a better roll of honour than The Comedy Store. In fact, it definitely has. You’re known for your candidness about issues such as mental health; has this been a very conscious thing or is it just part of your style? I was getting there with stand-up, but then the Radio X show with Elis sped everything up. Chatting to him every week for five years meant I just had nowhere to hide. I couldn’t pretend to be anything I wasn’t, or hide behind any kind of persona. I’m a ludicrous, pathetic man full of shame and frustration, but that can be very interesting comedically. 46 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Career-wise it didn’t change a huge amount to be totally honest. It was all very surreal: winning with Hannah [Gadsby]; and the show I was doing [based on his break-up with Sara Pascoe]. It felt much more like a personal achievement than a comedy achievement. So it’s not like I was suddenly all over TV. That said, these days a few less negative voices call to me across the night as I lie awake in bed. Radio has been much more transformative than the award, and so it should be. Work should be what changes your career, not a competition. I’d much rather people come and see me because they like what I do, than because they expect me to be something I’m not. Did you see Bristolian Judd Trump’s snooker championship win? I’m afraid I’m a die-hard Ronnie O’Sullivan fan. The only reason I was glad Trump won was because it meant John Higgins didn’t equal Ronnie on five world titles. So there’s the new Radio 5 show; any other side hustles in the pipeline? We start on 31 May and I can’t wait. Me and Elis at The BBC! It’s insane. I’m also pursuing a career as a terrible golfer with Alex Horne that you can see on our YouTube Channel ‘BadGolf’. Your next tour kicks off in Bristol; tell us about Hot Shame... I’m starting the tour with a week at the Tobacco Factory in September and I’m so excited! The show is a kind of extension of shame-related things we’ve chatted about on radio. I think it’s such a powerful emotion, and can really ruin your mental health, so I’ve decided to put it all into the show. A warts-and-all trek through some of my most embarrassing moments. I’ve done a few work-in-progress gigs to prepare and I think it’s going to be great fun. I’m also being supported on tour by Bristol’s own Robin Allender, a musician and comedian who I’m proud to call my friend. ■

• Missed out on tickets for Bristol Comedy Garden? See John perform new show Hot Shame at Tobacco Factory Theatres, 2 – 7 September


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COMEDY

John won the Edinburgh Comedy Award in 2017, jointly, with Hannah Gadsby – it was the first time the prize had been shared between two performers

...I’m a ludicrous, pathetic man full of shame and frustration, but that can be very interesting comedically....

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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART We love this Bristol-inspired artwork by Tony Marwick

BS9 Arts Trail, 8 & 9 June, various locations Around 80 local artists will be exhibiting at the sixth annual trail. Works include painting, print, textiles, jewellery, ceramics, photography, mosaics and much more. Visitors are welcome at 14 locations within easy walking distance in Stoke Bishop and Henleaze and all with free entry. The artists will be available to talk about their work and methods in an open and easy environment, with work available to buy directly from them. Many will also be able to discuss commissions. Some will be exhibiting in their own home, others in venues such as Elmlea Primary School, Redmaids’ High School, Stoke Lodge, Stoke Bishop Village Hall and Bristol Botanic Garden (get free entry to the gardens during the trail when presenting the trail brochure). This, showing the best route, disabled access and refreshment locations, will be available at various locations close to the start of the trail, and online. • bs9arts.co.uk

Getting Warmer, 8 June – 6 July, Clifton Contemporary Art To embrace mid-summer, CCA is showing a selection of atmospheric seasonal works that evoke and radiate warmth, light and new life. From the shimmering wild meadows of Sally Stafford to Lynn Cartlidge’s gently luminous still-life paintings, the exhibition is designed to celebrate the longest days. It also includes Stephanie Axtell’s radiant, intuitive pictures, inspired by the flora, fauna, landmarks and elements of her Cornish home, and Sarah Brown’s richly ambient pastel landscapes and local scenes. The gallery will be closed 14 – 21 June. • cliftoncontemporaryart.co.uk

Summer Day by Sally Stafford

Open Studios 2019, 14 – 16 June, Jamaica Street Studios Parties, newly commissioned artworks and the signature auction will spring up over three floors of Jamaica Street’s historic former Carriage Works building. A unique chance to meet over 30 artists, all working in the heart of Stokes Croft. Spend the day getting lost behind the scenes of one of Bristol’s most exciting artist studios... • jamaicastreetartists.co.uk

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Get lost in one of Bristol’s most exciting artist studios


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EXHIBITIONS

Cricket World Cup Exhibition, SS Great Britain, until 21 July The SS Great Britain is steeped in cricketing history, having transported players to Australia in 1861 and 1863 before any sporting world cup events were established, when the All England Cricket Team played Australia. Celebrate the ship’s role in international cricket with its special exhibition. EM Grace’s diary, along with photographs and other objects telling the stories of the two cricket team tours, can be seen in the show, and visitors will be issued with replica boarding cards of some of those early international cricketers as they explore the world’s first great ocean liner, sit in the First Class Dining Saloon and step inside the cabins where EM Grace and his teammates travelled. There is even the chance to dress up as a Victorian passenger or climb the rigging in the footsteps of a sailor. • ssgreatbritain.org

Freefall by Deirdre Elphick and Seated Man by Martin Elphick

Elphick and Elphick: Unlimited, 22 June – 13 July, Bristol Guild Gallery Painting and sculpture coincide in a joint show celebrating artistic freedom and comprising common themes and interests: in people, movement, landscape and the natural world. Both artists explore colour and form unfettered by particular materials or artistic movements, and use both older and contemporary ways of working. Martin Elphick is celebrated for his work remembering the First World War in Bath Abbey. For the Guild Gallery exhibition he is showing new figurative and abstract work. Deirdre Elphick has a particular love of capturing movement when drawing people and of colour in both her landscape and abstract paintings. She studied foundation art in Bristol and fine art at Winchester School of Art under Gillian Ayres, and won the Corsham Open Art Prize in 2018; Martin won the Bath Society of Artists’ sculpture prize in 2018 and is a co-founder of the Cotswold Sculptors Association. • bristolguildgallery.co.uk

Altered Ocean, Royal Photographic Society, until 23 June An exhibition by award-winning photographer Mandy Barker, whose work investigates the issue of marine plastic debris. Working with scientists, she aims to highlight current research on the effects on marine life and, ultimately, ourselves. Large-scale prints provide an insight into her journey and connection with the issue over the past 10 years. Plastic and scientific samples allow the visitor to engage fully with the current critical issue. The achievements in relation to this work show the power of photography to communicate, educate and inform, but above all it will further help to create awareness by empowering change. See the marine-inspired work of Mandy Barker

This Is A Stereotype by Cannupa Hanska Luger

• rps.org

The Young Americans, Rainmaker Gallery, until 8 June Last chance to see this remarkable exhibition featuring bold prints by Jordan Craig, colourful abstractions by Terran Last Gun and an astonishing reconstructed self-portrait by Greg Ballenger. The show also includes the supernatural narrative photography of Cara Romero, dynamic figurative images by Manuel Ramirez and vibrant artworks by Yatika Starr Fields and Phillip Vigil. Collectively these artists embrace influences from traditional Native American design and 18th-century portraiture to contemporary street art and Japanese anime. Educated, articulate and fearless, this generation of Native artists epitomises the exciting and fast-changing scene of indigenous art. • rainmakerart.co.uk

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HOT ATTRACTIONS IN SUMMER AUCTION... Lawrences in Crewkerne have already received a selection of pictures for their Summer Fine Art sales in July. An interesting view of the Avon at Bristol, dating from before the completion of the famous bridge in 1864, is attributed to the Bristol artist John Syer and was probably painted in the 1850s. The original constructors went bankrupt in 1837 after the building of the towers and an anxious funding crisis had forced a halt in construction in the 1840s. Nonetheless, for those with a head for heights and a strong wish to cross the gap, a basket slung from a 32mm cable (originally installed for the swift transfer of materials) enabled individuals to be shuttled across the gorge in the basket clearly visible in this scene. There is a pleasure steamer, ‘Avon’, in the foreground. During the 1850s, Syer lived at four addresses in the city in Redland, Clifton and Cotham. The 53 x 76cm canvas is expected to make £3,000-4,000. And, a beautiful watercolour sketch by Dame Laura Knight, a study for her 1920 RA exhibit, ‘Lamorna Cove’, is accompanied by a letter from the artist to the buyer in 1965 when it was bought for £78.15s. The subject dates from the summer of 1919, shortly before Knight and her husband, Harold, moved to London. This early composition for the celebrated oil concentrates upon the glittering light of the water that has filled the cove upon the rise of the tide. “The little bay”, Knight recalled, had been “turned to gold by the reflection of the sun shining on the cliff above ...it was an excessively bright canvas”. Indeed, the subject was so memorable that it lingered long in Knight's memory, so much so that, during a week of murky fogs in the capital in the winter of 19191920, she developed her sketches and her acute visual memory into the stunning exhibit for the Royal Academy that summer. The challenge was to recall the sparkling and ever-changing colours that had so memorably illuminated the cove. Such was Laura Knight’s inspiration that she managed to pin down just enough of the glorious light, sunshine and rippling water on that magical day to recreate the special ‘ebullient vitality’ of the Cornish coast in the dark days of a London winter whilst 300 miles away from the county of Cornwall that she loved so much. The 38 x 42cm watercolour is estimated at £10,000-15,000. If you have anything you would like to enter into the sale, then please contact the Picture Specialist: richard.kay@lawrences.co.uk

Lawrences AUCTIONEERS The Linen Yard, South Street, Crewkerne, Somerset TA18 8AB. T 01460 73041

lawrences.co.uk

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ART

It’s about pioneering an understanding of British craft skills and tools by illustrating the importance of their value to economic, social and cultural development

Linda was particularly intrigued by the story of the Amesbury Archer, a man buried with the earliest gold and copper objects, as well as metalworking tools and several Beaker pots

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The exhibition is inspired by conversations with present-day makers and tradespeople


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Conversation starter Did you know that the first contemporary art exhibition has opened at historic Stonehenge, courtesy of Bristol artist Linda Brothwell? We found out a little more... Images by Jo Hounsome Photography

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howcasing 40 works in silver and copper made by the locally based applied artist in her Spike Island studio, ‘Conversations in Making’ is inspired by Stonehenge itself, by the Neolithic tools found in the landscape and by conversations with present-day makers and tradespeople. These include people living and working in neighbouring Amesbury – from a thatcher to a tattooist, a cobbler to a leather worker, a key cutter to a hairdresser. Linda Brothwell has also been influenced by the natural materials found in the countryside around Stonehenge and prehistoric artefacts from Wiltshire and Salisbury museums’ rich collections, as well as historical accounts, photographs and drawings. She was particularly intrigued by the story of the Amesbury Archer, a man buried with the earliest gold and copper objects, as well as metalworking tools and several Beaker pots. He had travelled to Stonehenge from central Europe, bringing with him knowledge of metalworking which transformed prehistoric Britain. The exhibition allows visitors to peer into the past and see Stonehenge with fresh eyes. The finished artworks are a tribute to the traditions of tool use and vessel making in the Stonehenge area, from olden times but also today. The set of distinctive, unique vessels form a portrait of the area, charting the connections between Stonehenge and the communities that have lived around the monument, both past and present. “Stonehenge has inspired art and artists for centuries – from those who illustrated medieval manuscripts, to the Romantic paintings by Constable and Turner and more recently artists such as Jeremy Deller,” says English Heritage historian Susan Greaney. “So it’s really exciting to host a contemporary art exhibition at Stonehenge for the first time. Linda Brothwell’s work, which looks at tools and vessels as a thread linking people and place over time, provides an intriguing new way to think about Stonehenge and the archaeological objects found here. A visit to the new exhibition, coupled with a trip to Wiltshire and Salisbury Museums to see some of the ancient objects that have inspired Linda’s work, makes for a great day out and provides a fascinating picture of Stonehenge.” Linda – whose previous project The Tool Appreciation Society was dedicated to makers and their tools – has work in both the V&A Museum and the Royal College collections. She has exhibited in the UK and internationally for the British Council, The Design Museum, Palais de Tokyo, the Korean National University of Cultural Heritage, and The Royal Society for Arts. She is pioneering an understanding of British craft skills and tools by illustrating the importance of their value to economic, social and cultural development. “Often I work by first mapping a place; talking to people about what they do with their hands and with their days,” she says. “Conversations in Making is my attempt to map Stonehenge and Amesbury by talking to the people who live, and have lived, here, whether through real-life dialogues with local makers or imagined exchanges with the historical figures such as the Amesbury Archer.” Brothwell’s final conversation is with the Stonehenge visitor, and the local community, inviting them to walk around the exhibition and try to hear the conversations. When the exhibition ends, the 40 objects will find their way back into the community – into schools, libraries and perhaps even the local chip shop – to be used and loved, remain in dialogue with the place they came from and with the people who inspired them, and allow the conversation to continue. ■ • Linda Brothwell: Conversations in Making runs until 24 November at the Stonehenge visitor centre

Linda works by first mapping a place; talking to people about what they do with their hands and with their days


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FOOD & Drink

TASTY TIDBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS Romajo’s offers all sorts of lovely options for busy Bristol folk

DELICIOUS DELIVERY

WAKE UP TO ORGANIC On 12 June, various independent businesses in Bristol will be throwing open their doors for an Organic UK campaign aiming to spread the joy of organic food. Up to 300 events across the country – in partnership with local cafes, delis, farm shops and independent stores – will celebrate organic food, showing how easy it is to make the switch. Stores will be offering free mini breakfasts and some will be taking their events to the next level with special extra activities – from cooking demos to meet and greets with local farmers and producers. So far, businesses signed up to help raise awareness of the goodness of organic in Bristol include Wild Oats, Harvest, Matter Wholefoods, Scoopaway Health Foods, Better Food and La Ruca. Check it out! • feedyourhappy.co.uk/wakeup

A young Bristol chef has launched a new meal delivery business to help locals make healthier choices during their busy day to day lives. “I set up Romajo’s due to the battle with my own health and weight for the last few years,” says chef Jonny Burnett, previously of The Post Box Eatery in Claverham. “Although I can cook, I never found the time or motivation to put the right stuff in my body, so I was always carrying extra timber! After closing the Post Box Eatery, I was longing to get back into the food industry but wanted to create something different. I knew several other people who led busy lives and were forfeiting their health and diet as a result and I wanted to create a solution. All of our dishes are labelled with nutritional content, cooked in our purpose-built Bristol HQ, and delivered to the doors of our customers on Wednesdays and Sundays. Every single one is dairyfree, and many are gluten-free too.” Customers simply head to the website and select the meals they would like delivered to their door in 100% recyclable packaging. Expect the likes of vegan mushroom, thyme and baby radish risotto, as well as classics with a healthy twist such as wild garlic chicken kiev, Cajun wedges, chilli-crushed peas and peppers, and chilli chicken coconut curry with herby rice. Receive 10% off your first order with BRISTOLMAG101. • romajos.co.uk

NEW AT FINZELS REACH Popular local venue Bocabar's third restaurant and bar is to make Finzels Reach its home. Open seven days a week from September, on the ground floor beneath Channel 4, it is set to be a drinking and dining hub with an eclectic feel, combining a rustic look with a little luxury. Expect velvet drapes, vintage lamps and reclaimed wood and copper as well as a part-covered outside seating area, and stone-baked pizzas, mezze and daily specials on the menu alongside cocktails, specialist gins, local craft beers and wines. “It's a great fit; we love the combination of historic and new architecture, giving the area its own unique character, combined with the fact it's in an excellent location,” said Melissa Eavis, who co-owns and runs Bocabar with Paul Eavis, having started the business 15 years ago. "We'll be spending lots of time at Finzels Reach to ensure we respond to feedback and that the offer is something that appeals to those who live and work in, as well as visit this thriving new area." • bristol.bocabar.co.uk

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Homeslice! Brilliant Bristol baker Briony May shares what she’s been making this month

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ew York, New York! I have just returned from a week in the Big Apple with my family and it really is a city like no other: the buzz, the people, the food. Every corner features a street-food stand serving up waffles, hot dogs, pretzels and, of course, bagels. They come in so many flavours – sesame seed, poppy seed, cinnamon, raisin, the list goes on! In the last few years though, there has been a new bagel on the block – the fabulous rainbow bagel. It does what it says on the tin: it is a bagel but more colourful than a unicorn at the Easter Bunny’s birthday party. Now, I think we need to bring the rainbow bagel to Bristol so here is my method to try at home... Ta-dah!

New York, New York! Briony wants the rainbow bagel in Bristol

NYC Rainbow Bagels Ingredients: 10g dried yeast 325ml warm water 500g strong white bread flour 3 tbsp sugar 2 tsp salt Pink, yellow, green and blue gel food colourings Method: • Pour yeast onto 300ml warm water and set aside for five minutes until frothy. • In a large bowl, mix flour, sugar and salt. Add yeast and water mixture. Mix together with your hands to form a stiff dough. • Tip onto a floured surface and knead for 10 minutes until smooth. Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cling film. Leave for an hour to rise. (TIP: steps two and three can be done in an electric stand mixer with a dough hook.) • Heat oven to 220°C/200°C fan. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Place a large pan of water on to boil. • Tip the risen dough onto a lightly floured surface and knock out the air with your first. Knead briefly until it forms a smooth ball. • Divide dough into four. Knead five drops of pink gel food colouring into one of the smaller dough balls until even in colour. Repeat with the remaining three balls and the remaining colours. • Roll out each coloured dough into a six-inch sausage. Line them up next to each other. Pinch the ends together, then twist them to create a multicoloured sausage. Tuck the ends under and knead very briefly into a ball to bring the coloured doughs together. • Divide the multicoloured dough into 10 even balls. Use your thumb to poke a hole in the middle of each. Place each bagel on the parchment paper and cover loosely with cling film. • When water in large pan is boiling gently, drop shaped bagels in two at a time. Flip after a minute. Remove, drain on kitchen paper then place back on parchment. • When all the bagels have been boiled, place in the preheated oven for 20-25 minutes. • Transfer to a wire rack until cool. • Best served toasted with cream cheese. ■

• Follow Briony on Twitter and Instagram: @brionymaybakes. Illustration by Cat Faulkner (@catherinedoart) THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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RESTAURANT | REVIEW

DOUGH Pizza fans, rejoice! The base just got cranked up a notch at this inclusive, newly opened restaurant, says Jessica Hope

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s a city, Bristol is pretty good at serving up a pizza or two. In recent years, the number of independent places opening their doors and expanding their premises hasn’t gone unnoticed. With the likes of Flour and Ash on Cheltenham Road, Bosco on Whiteladies Road and Regent Street, Pizzarova’s multiple locations and Bertha’s sourdough delights at Wapping Wharf, residents and visitors alike have wholeheartedly embraced the Italian foodstuffs empire locally. And the pizza love-in isn’t just happening on Bristol’s shores. Down the road in Bath, there have been legions of fans flocking to The Corridor over the past few years for one restaurant in particular – Dough. Founded by friends Emiliano Tunno and Massimo Nucaro, Dough’s reputation as a great spot to grab a casual bite to eat, catch up with friends over tasty dishes, and even put a smile on the kids’ faces, has grown exponentially. Word quickly spread earlier this year when the duo announced they would be opening a second restaurant in Bristol. Having taken over the capacious premises of what was the Italian restaurant Aquila on Baldwin Street, the new incarnation can seat up to 160 diners, set across two floors. As you arrive you can see cocktails being masterfully poured into tall glasses at the bar, and if you sit downstairs you can watch the chefs spinning the supple, elastic dough around in an acrobatic style overhead and skilfully extracting pizzas out of the enormous curved brick oven in the open kitchen.

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...Prepare yourself for instant cheesy heaven – this is simply like eating a proper punchy cauliflower cheese, minus the chunks of veg... As the name of the restaurant suggests, there is a big focus on pizza bases here. There are 12 different doughs to choose from – including turmeric, hemp, seaweed and multigrain – with the flour coming direct from one of the best mills in Italy. The recipes came about following chef and co-founder Emiliano’s experiments in developing gluten-free varieties. Wanting to offer diners more choice when eating out, the thoughtful team have created a range of alternative and healthier doughs compared to other establishments, with the aim of cutting down on sugar and boosting natural vitamins and minerals in dishes. This means that those with dietary requirements and intolerances are well catered for here and don’t have to miss out on the proper taste of Italy. Eager to try out these famous doughs ourselves, we visited the new branch on Baldwin Street. As we sat down for an early evening dinner,


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tables began to fill – being just a hop and a skip from cultural hotspots such as Bristol Old Vic, Bristol Hippodrome and the Watershed, you can see how this is an ideal location for pre or post-theatre dining. To kick off, I went for a Limoncello Splash cocktail (£8.75) which featured limoncello, Aperol, Cointreau, egg white, lemon and strawberry juice. This refreshed the palate, although despite the amount of citrus ingredients, I was amazed by how sweet it was. My dining parter, A, went for her go-to spring-summer choice of Aperol Spritz (£8.75) which immediately set the Italianate tone the moment it touched down in its slightly retro zigzag-stemmed glass. Most of the starters on the menu are traditional Italian, as you would hope – think carpaccio di manzi, bruschetta and burratina. Yet my eyes (and my stomach) couldn’t help but gravitate towards a slightly off-cuisine option – the cauliflower soufflé (£8.95). Prepare yourself for instant cheesy heaven – put simply, this is like eating a proper punchy cauliflower cheese, minus the chunks of veg. At the centre is a soft gorgonzola, while the accompaniment of a tomato sauce and splashes of balsamic vinegar add a clean contrast to the smooth, intense cheese flavour. Toppings of crispy onions and parsnips bring a much-appreciated crunch to the dish. Going down the classic route, Amanda selected the Caprese salad (£8.95), because sometimes the simple dishes are the best way to get the measure of an establishment. It passed the test with flying colours, resplendent in its presentation with chunky slices of tomato and beefy buffalo mozzarella, bedecked with dehydrated basil leaf and sat on a bed of flavour-packed basil pesto flecked with sticky balsamic. With a mighty 22 pizzas to choose from,

A TASTE OF ITALIA: Opposite, the restaurant has many dough options, meaning it can cater to all tastes and dietary requirements This page, clockwise from top left: Saving on the washing up, the gnocchi alla curcurma is served in an edible bread bowl; co-founder and chef Emiliano Tunno showing off his pizza spinning skills; any new pizza place has its work cut out making its mark among the competition but there’s plenty to charm here

as well as plenty of pasta and other dishes (worthy of note are those that come in edible bread bowls, such as the gnocchi alla curcuma) you may need a little longer than usual to choose your main course. Keen to try out one of the doughs, I picked the pizza named Smokey – featuring tomato, mozzarella, speck, smoked mozzarella and rosemary (£15.50). Presented on the grano arso base, translated as burnt grain, it benefited from this additional subtle nutty flavour and produced a good crust that you could really slice in to. The salty, crispy speck ham was complemented by the subtle smoked cheese, however the sheer generosity of topping did lead to a bit of a soggy middle. Amanda was sorely tempted by the ravioloni di pesce (£15.95) – homemade crab and prawn ravioloni with a porcini mushroom sauce, cherry tomatoes and truffle oil – before eventually siding with the grilled swordfish with a salmoriglio sauce served with a rocket and parmesan salad with balsamic glaze (£17.50); the lemony dressing a decent bedfellow for the meaty seafood. This was all enjoyed alongside a crisp, easily quaffable glass of Verdicchio Dei

Castelli Di Jesi (from £4.50). The wine list isn’t extensive and only a few are available by the glass, but the selection is well matched with the variety of the menu (bottles start from £21). Portions are pretty princely, so a dessert shared between two can be just enough sweetness to round off the meal. The double layered vanilla and chocolate panna cotta we sampled (£5.75) was impressively served in diagonal layers in a large glass. Although you couldn’t inspect the wobble as you might with a traditional freestanding panna cotta, the blend of chocolate and vanilla, with a crunch from a liberal amount of crushed Amaretti biscuits on top, hit the right spot. It’s early days for Dough. There are one or two elements still to be ironed out, and there’s no doubt there’s strong competition from other purveyors around the city, but with a growing band of followers and plenty of thought put into pleasing all pizza lovers, we reckon this new establishment will soon make its way into Bristolians’ hearts. n • Dough, 30 – 34 Baldwin Street, Bristol; doughpizzarestaurant.co.uk

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FOOD & DRINK | ALFRESCO

LET’S GO OUTSIDE The simple joys of summer in Bristol are something we could wax lyrical about for quite some time – and right up there is the divine pleasure of sitting, supping and snacking alfresco in the outdoor spaces belonging to its brilliant bars and restaurants

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hether it’s a rooftop retreat at an innercity oasis, waterfront idyll or pretty urban patio from which to watch Bristol buzz by, it’s a truth widely acknowledged that there’s nothing much better than a leisurely afternoon moseying around the city’s fine establishments when the sun shows its face. Needless to say, there’s just not the page space to big up every spot that’s close to our hearts (especially at the rate they open here and, anyway, surely fun in the sun at Cargo and Wapping Wharf goes without saying) but this issue we’ve picked out a few choice suggestions from the plethora angling for your attention this season.

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The enviable view from Broken Dock

FOR: A TRANQUIL HARBOUR SUNTRAP Bristolians in the know flock to Bambalan’s terrace for brunch and beats

Independent gem Broken Dock is top of many a local foodie’s to-dine list, and word has quickly spread of its award-winning roast dinners (think honey-glazed pigs in blankets, roasted root veg, goose-fat roast potatoes). Soak up the sun in the outdoor seating area overlooking the harbourside – such an enviable view – and if you fancy a few nibbles, take a glimpse at the grazing menu, with the likes of salt and pepper squid, parmesan chips and sticky ribs to name a few options. Delicious local ingredients feature across the menu, and whether you’re brunching with friends or enjoying dinner with a loved one, we feel quite strongly that you can’t let this summer go by without a visit... • brokendock.co.uk

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FOR: BANGING BRUNCH & BUOYANT BEATS

Bambalan is a beloved part of the Hyde & Co family although no longer the baby, with Seven Lucky Gods having just come along in Wapping Wharf. This cool and colourful Colston Tower-based customer is, without doubt, the one if you’re in need of summer party vibes, with DJs on the terrace every Friday and Saturday. (Last month they had none other than Norman Jay MBE gracing the decks!) But there’s also a new summer menu – the new vegan bab is a stand-out dish with Vietnamese marinated tofu, Asian-style slaw and peanut vegan mayo – including sharing boards of sticky chicken wings, juicy meatballs and hot flatbreads with dips for chowing down on with an after-work craft beer or cheeky spritz. • bambalan.co.uk


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FOOD & DRINK | ALFRESCO

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FOR: HISTORIC WATERSIDE VIBES

When The Ostrich – dating back to 1745 – was built into the sandstone cliff face of Redcliffe Hill, it became a firm favourite with the sailors, merchants and dock-workers who frequented the dock-side inn. Some say it was named after the market stall that sat in front of the pub, selling only feathers. Others claim the name derives from Oyster Reach, by which the nearby Trimm Mills pond was once known. Perhaps, most likely, it got its moniker from the ship of the same name that would moor close by. Surviving a fire in Victorian times, and the demolition of many close neighbours, The Ostrich remains one of the city’s longest running establishments and, with its own cave connected to Bristol’s famous interlocking caverns, its walls are steeped in history. Recently Butcombe Brewery got Joseph Hanna of The Cottage in as GM and revamped the place; it reopened in April with a fresh interior and new menu from head chef Jasper Prickett (previously executive chef at The Urban Standard). The outdoor bar and airstream van in its 482seater garden serves Americana-style street food along the lines of loaded fries, soft-serve ice cream and boozy ice pops, while British pub classics, smoked, grilled and roasted meats, sharing boards and small plates are available indoors. Perch on striped deck chairs and bright benches, among barrel tables and festoon lighting and enjoy a pint of the new Ostrich Ale, seasonals from the brewery, or your pick of over 30 rums as a nice little nod to all those sailors who passed through its doors back in the 18th century. • butcombe.com/pubs/the-ostrich

Ú

Perch on striped deck chairs with a pint and a snack from the outdoor airstream van

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FOR: SOMETHING SHIPSHAPE xxxxen)

If you’re thinking less impromptu and looking to arrange a slightly more formal alfresco affair in advance – a place to take the team at work, perhaps – Brunel’s SS Great Britain is ideal with its charming views and different dining options for summer events. Think Pimm’s on arrival, tasty barbecue grub and a private bar, with entertainment options too. Or, if breakfast is more what you have in mind, try a ‘sunrise social’ on board – we can’t think of many more motivating backdrops. Nibble and network on the historic weather deck and start the day right with fresh breakfast rolls, granola, smoothies, fruit and muffins until 9am (from £25pp plus VAT for up to 30 guests). Want to wow? Book exclusive use of the ship and host a first-class drinks reception on the sunny deck, among the serene swans swimming below and, above, hot air balloons floating peacefully by. On 6 June, the Decks, Decks and Deckchairs event will feature food, drink and DJs for reclining guests (7-10pm, £8).

Decent grub guaranteed for the team

• ssgreatbritain.org

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FOR: A HIDDEN ROOFTOP ESCAPE

Somewhere else to consider if you want to abscond from the daily hustle and bustle is the Urban Roof Terrace, tucked away atop the Bristol Marriott Hotel City Centre. A great shout for unwinding with an after-work drink with colleagues or friends, it has a happy-hour deal from 4pm to 7pm every day, when you can get two cocktails for the price of one – and this extends across the whole menu rather than just a few select libations. Inspired by Bristol street art from the popular local graffiti artist Cheo, and bedecked with twinkly lights, the space has super city views to offer as well as a relaxed ‘back garden’ vibe that draws families and couples up to terrace level for a game of table tennis or Jenga, followed by a slap-up meal prepared by the Marriott chef. • marriott.co.uk; @urban_roof_terrace (Instagram)

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Tasty tempura veg at SS GB

SEE ALSO... Mud Dock: mud-dock.co.uk The Navy Volunteer: navyvolunteer.co.uk Under the Stars: underthestarsbar.co.uk Three Brothers: threebrothersburgers.co.uk Steam: steambristol.co.uk Racks: racks-bristol.co.uk La Fiorentina: lafiorentina.co.uk Grain Barge: grainbarge.com Bomboloni: bomboloni.net Pump House: the-pumphouse.com Spoke & Stringer: spokeandstringer.com Olive Shed: theoliveshed.com Adelina Yard: adelinayard.com Weber & Trings: weberandtrings.co.uk The Ethicurean: walledgarden.co.uk Veeno: theveenocompany.com Zero Degrees: zerodegrees.co.uk Primrose Cafe: primrosecafe.co.uk Yurt Lush: eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk


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BRISTOL UPDATES

BITE-SIZED BUSINESS AND COMMUNITY NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY Kri

PROJECT AMAZON

General manager Pat Faulkner leading behind the scenes tour

ON THE TREECONOMY A study has revealed that there are some 600,000 trees growing in Bristol – and they are worth £280million to the city. Funded by the Woodland Trust, Bristol City Council, Forestry Commission and the Forest of Avon Trust, it showed Bristol’s trees store 360,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide and remove 14,000 tonnes more each year, equivalent to annual emissions of 9,000 cars. The worth to the city of £280million included the cost to replace the trees, plus the value of the carbon stored in all the wood. “Intuitively we know trees are good for us. They are the green lungs of our city,” said the Woodland Trust’s Joe Coles. “Urban trees bring life and colour, connecting us with nature, reducing stress, and boosting our mental health. Now we can also demonstrate the economic value of some of the services that trees provide.” Mark Ashdown, chair of the Bristol Tree Forum, added: “This report helps set the base line for the One City Plan’s goal to double Bristol’s tree canopy cover by 2046. It is an ambitious plan, but with the full support of Bristol City Council – making sure enough land is set aside for tree planting, protecting existing trees and ensuring adequate funding is made available – we can all secure the future of Bristol’s urban forest and help citizens lead healthier, happier lives.” Bristol’s canopy cover is currently around 12%, but experts believe the figure needs to increase substantially to help us combat climate change and air pollution, protect biodiversity and promote health and wellbeing.

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FINZELS FANFARE Historic England and English Heritage are to move to Bristol’s Finzels Reach, which is fast making a name for itself as one of the city’s most exciting new quarters. Historic England and sister organisation English Heritage will consolidate their sites across Bristol under one roof within the Fermentation Buildings. Historic England is the public body that helps people care for, enjoy and celebrate the country’s historic environment, while English Heritage is the charity that cares for over 400 historic buildings, monuments and sites. “It’s certainly been an exciting few weeks for Finzels Reach with such a fantastic array of businesses sharing the news that they will be joining this new city centre community,” said Peter Walford, director at Cubex, the developer behind Finzels Reach. “It’s excellent to have Historic England and English Heritage on board and we look forward to welcoming them. We have taken great care in transforming these historic buildings to breathe new life into them while retaining the character and charm that comes with such a rich history.”

Amazon hosted a behind the scenes tour of its state-of-the-art fulfilment centre in Bristol recently when a group of local guests joined Jack Lopresti MP for a preview of the site, which is due to open later this year. During the tour of the site, which features cutting-edge Amazon Robotics technology and is in the final stages of completion, guests met several members of the new Amazon team and saw the areas where products will be stowed, picked and packed before being shipped to customers in Bristol and around the world. Amazon in Bristol will employ more than 1,000 permanent staff when it opens. These employees, we’re told, will receive competitive pay and comprehensive benefits which, combined, are worth more than £700 annually and include private medical insurance, income protection, employee discount and a company pension plan. “We’re looking forward to opening our newest fulfilment centre in Bristol later this year and it was great to welcome Jack Lopresti MP and local business leaders like David Brown, Chief Executive of The Bristol Port Company for a tour of our new building,” said Bristol general manager Pat Faulkner. “Guests learned about how an Amazon fulfilment centre works to serve our customers locally, nationally and globally and we also discussed recruitment for our new building. We have opportunities across a wide range of roles including IT, operations, engineering, automation and more and we’re encouraging people in the region to apply today.” Earlier this year, Amazon announced plans to create over 1,000 full-time apprenticeship roles in the UK over the next two years, and one member of the team who met with guests was Sarah Crossman, an automation engineering apprentice who will work at the Bristol site. The apprenticeship programme is aimed at people who have a passion for learning new skills and who want to start their career – possibly as an alternative to college or university. • amazon.jobs/bristol


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WHY DEPRESSION IS NO FRIEND TO SMALL BUSINESSES By Gary Keating, ActionCOACH Bristol. www.actioncoach.co.uk/garykeating

A

re you okay? I’m asking this because I know the reality of the situation is that a lot of us aren’t. Starting a business means taking on a whole new range of responsibilities that will, in turn, produce a new list of problems. At a certain point, we lose focus or ambition. But the worst thing we can lose is hope. I’m talking in very plain terms here about depression. Depression is a largely silent problem, at least to those on the outside. Much in part to the shame that sufferers feel and a reluctance to bring it to the forefront. We are quick to class ourselves as failures.

Instead of telling yourself ‘I failed’, try to look at it from a different perspective. After all, if you haven’t tried then you miss the opportunity to learn. Many of my clients have faced stress and anxiety as a result of running a business with a lack of knowledge. I have worked with Jake Voelcker of Bristol Bicycles for several years now. Before working with me, Jake struggled with the pressure of running his business alone. Finding himself “bogged down in hundreds of tiny details”, Jake turned to ActionCOACH. Through our 1-on-1 coaching programmes, Jake found a “new perspective” allowing him to see the “long-term and the big picture”.

When I asked Jake what he would say to business owners facing similar struggles, he stressed the importance of getting some external help. All too often, we are afraid to ask for help. Here at ActionCOACH, we have helped so many of our clients see the forest from the trees. As someone who has struggled with depression and has stared failure in the face, I know what it takes to run a business. There is another cost to running a business that we try not to face, but truthfully we must not ignore it. If you are struggling to run your business alone, then contact us today: call 01275 370 864 or email bristol@actioncoach.com


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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

Family diary Ideas for things to do with the little ones in Bristol this month

Get Growing Garden Trail Saturday 1 – Sunday 23 June Various locations around Bristol

© Lucie Laborde Briulet

Explore the city’s community allotments, orchards, smallholdings, mini market gardens, city farms and unique berry maze at Bristol’s eighth Get Growing Garden Trail. Kick off the trail on Saturday 1 June, 10am at Elk Tree Farm or perhaps head to Blaise Community Garden on Saturday 8 June and take a guided tour before joining in with various craft and growing activities while learning about organic and sustainable growing. • bristolfoodnetwork.org

Top pick... DON’T MISS... MathildaMathilda Sunday 2 June, 2pm and 7pm, The Wardrobe Theatre, Old Market Go on an adventure with a paper heart that gets caught in the wind after fluttering from the fingers of a little girl who’s been practising writing her name on it: MathildaMathilda. This tale of connection and separation explores how two heads are better than one. Suitable for kids aged over 11 years. £8; thewardrobetheatre.com Card Ninja Sunday 2 June, 7pm, Tobacco Factory Theatres Containing ninjas – not magic – and using genuine playing cards, this is a show stacked full of fun with plenty of high-flying cardflicking stunts. With extreme precision, impeccable timing and astonishing speed, Javier Jarquin will dazzle audiences and have you in disbelief throughout. Suitable for ages over six years. £12; tobaccofactorytheatres.com The Festival of Nature Big Weekend Saturday 8 & 9 June, 10am – 6pm, Various locations around Bristol Explore nature and go wild. Enjoy free interactive exhibitions, music workshops and talks across Queen Square and Millennium Square. Plus, there are hands-on opportunities with creepy crawlies and insects at Bristol Zoo and chances to discover the history of bird nesting at Bristol Museum; festivalofnature.org.uk The Amazing Bubble Man Saturday 8 June, 12pm, 2pm and 4pm, Tobacco Factory Theatres

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Explore the dynamics of bubbles and mesmerising tricks. From square styles to fogfilled shapes, giant bubbles, volcanoes, tornados and trampolines, the bubble fun is endless. Suitable for all ages. £10; tobaccofactorytheatres.com Slimbridge Cygnets Tuesday 11 June, 11am, Slimbridge Wetland Centre Take a stroll to look for dragonflies and damselflies before you craft using what you have seen. Children £2, adults free if members, otherwise normal admission rates apply. Why not stick around after and feed the birds, let off steam in Welly Boot Land or enjoy the indoor amphibian-themed play area? Arrive 10.30am for 11am start; wwt.org.uk MiniBeats Percussion Pandemonium Sunday 9 June, 10.15am, 12pm and 2pm, St George’s Bristol Wiggle those fingers and stretch those arms before you bash, smash and crash your way into summer. Prepare to be amazed by the selection of instruments from the biggest musical family. There will be lots of opportunities to listen, learn, be inspired and get involved; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk Summer Fête Sunday 9 June, 11am – 3pm, Badminton School Enjoy an afternoon of summer fun, hooking ducks, painting faces and splatting rats. There will be a brass band, craft stalls, refreshments and activities for all ages, plus a special delivery of ice-cream, cream teas and crêpes to tuck into. Free; badmintonschool.co.uk Gangsta Granny Wednesday 12 June, 6.30pm,

No 180

South Street Playing Fields, Bedminster Heartbreak Productions brings you its openair, fastpaced, laugh-out-loud adaption of the popular children’s story by David Walliams. Meet Ben, an 11-year-old aspiring plumber, fed up with spending his Friday nights at Granny’s – all she wants to do is play Scrabble and eat cabbage. Until, that is, he discovers she is an international jewel thief and needs his help to pull off her biggest heist yet. Tickets from £8.54; ganstagranny.ticketsignite.com Bowood’s Treasure Island Day Saturday 15 June, 11am – 6pm Bowood House & Gardens Visit some pirates who have docked their ship nearby, take part in a treasure trail, dress up as a pirate, enjoy the inflatable pirate slide and join in with all the fun. Normal house and gardens admissions apply. Complimentary to season ticket holders; bowood.org Muckers Saturday 15 June, 1pm and 4pm, Tobacco Factory Theatres Life is fun and funny – especially when it comes to Paloma and Pichon – until this pair are catapulted into a strange new world where they begin a surreal adventure, determined to find out what Big Luz is all about. Created by award-winning theatre maker Caroline Horton and an international ensemble, Muckers features original songs and lots of Spanish and asks what it takes to stand proud and be true to ourselves. Suitable for ages over seven. £8; tobaccofactorytheatres.com Family Takeover Day Sunday 16 June, 11am – 2pm, SS Great Britain Become a part of the crew and volunteer to


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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

Expect bubblemania with Louis Pearl

Get down with wildlife at The Festival of Nature

work with your family at SS Great Britain. Go behind the scenes of the ship, take as many breaks as needed and enjoy a celebration at the end as a reward for all your hard work; ssgreatbritain.org TYNTEtots: Alice in Wonderland Wednesday 19 June, 10am – 11.45am, Tyntesfield Estate Play croquet by the Rose Garden, create a mad hat, help the Queen of Hearts by painting the white roses red, and hear the story of Alice in Wonderland. Suitable for ages two to five; tiny tots are welcome and free of charge when

accompanying an older sibling or companion. Appropriate outdoor clothing is essential. Adults free, children £8; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield I’m Bitter About Glitter Sunday 23 June, 12pm, The Wardrobe Theatre, Old Market A gentle exploration of identity, belonging and choice between a mother and son. Watch as the duo delve into tricky questions of gender binaries, identity and social pressures to conform. Recommended for those over eight. £8; thewardrobetheatre.com

The Secret Garden Sunday 23 June, 4pm – 6pm, Wild Place Project The Chapterhouse Theatre Company takes to a stage beneath the sky in a retelling of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden; a story of a young girl wanting to discover the location of her uncle’s secret garden and locate the key to open it. Expect magical encounters. Blankets and chairs advised. Tickets include 3pm entry to the Wild Place Project. Advance booking essential. Suitable for all ages. Tickets from £7; thewildplace.org.uk n

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EDUCATION NEWS UPDATES FROM THE CITY’S SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

FILM FOR LEARNING

SMART THINKING THANKS TO NEW SAMSUNG INITIATIVE St Mary Redcliffe Primary School is a pilot school for Samsung Electronics’ Energy in Schools initiative – awarded government funding from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. The school will have access to a unique energy management system that shows real-time energy usage, pricing and carbon emissions using the Samsung SmartThings kit and smart meter sensors installed throughout the school. The initiative is designed to support school facility managers and energy champions to understand energy consumption and potentially save schools thousands. Pupils will be participating through coding lessons; collecting data, measuring temperature to programme a lightbulb to turn green when too cold, or red when too hot. “This initiative will empower pupils to play an active role in adapting how their school uses energy while learning cuttingedge coding skills,” says Samsung R&D Institute’s Kit Lam. “We’re not only demonstrating ways tech can help reduce energy consumption, but we can help inspire the next generation of top coding talent to go on to solve real-world problems like climate change.”

• stmaryredcliffeprimary.co.uk; samsung.com

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QEH BREAKS RECORDS AT THE TEN TORS In its 20th year of taking part in the annual Ten Tors challenge, QEH had an unprecedented six teams representing the school, with two in each of the 35, 45 and 55-mile categories. In addition, for the first time the school not only had two brothers taking part, but also a brother and a sister. Collectively the 38 QEH participants walked over 1800 miles; equivalent to walking from Bristol to Moscow, turning around, and walking 100 miles back again! “Statistics alone cannot really represent the mental and physical strength and resilience needed to take part in such a challenge,” said headmaster Stephen Holliday. “Well done to not only all those who took part in the challenge itself, but also came along to train over many horrible, wet weekends throughout the winter. Truly one for the QEH history books.” • qehbristol.co.uk

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The Paul Hamlyn Foundation has announced four years of funding for education charity Into Film’s Film for Learning project. It’s a new teacher and senior leader professional development initiative which aims to improve young peoples’ engagement, participation and attainment in literacy by supporting teachers to use film as a tool for teaching and learning. “As a school that has developed a strong focus on good communication skills through our storytelling work and our commitment to oracy, Film for Learning offers us a valuable opportunity to consolidate these approaches and further develop them in new and exciting ways,” said Francesca Beers, senior leader at local participating school Easton CE Academy. “We recognise that film and visual imagery play an important role in developing language and comprehension as well as being a creative and imaginative way of sharing learning and ideas. We can really see how this project will support our staff in continuing to develop a vibrant curriculum that really engages our learners.” The project builds on the success of Into Film’s previous Paul Hamlyn Foundation funded project, Full STEAM Ahead – a twoyear teacher development project that worked with 10 schools in Northern Ireland. Catherine Sutton at Paul Hamlyn Foundation added: “Having already got expertise in teacher development, Into Film’s high-quality approach to using film for teaching and learning has a powerful impact on literacy and development, in particular for young people experiencing disadvantage. Film for Learning will offer a valuable opportunity to develop the skills, experience, confidence and networks to sustainably embed film-based learning in the curriculum and in teachers’ practice.” The programme includes access to films, screenings, resources and more. Teachers will receive training on teaching literacy through film and curricular filmmaking, the value of film in education, developing capabilities to use film across the curriculum and becoming film leaders within their school.

• intofilm.org


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FASHION

Chaos & Colour A young Redfield resident has collaborated with a social enterprise to focus on the empowerment of women in textiles and bring more colour into the ethical fashion landscape. Her shop, aimed at the vibrant, Earth-conscious fashionista, launches this month

The NGO equips women with formal training in garment making, giving them economic independence

P

ariss Cozier grew up dreaming of being a novelist, and now she tells stories through clothes; specifically those of the women who created them. Having studied English literature at Falmouth, and worked for an interior design comms agency in London, she was soon packing her bags for South East Asia; later returning without a penny to her name but with a newfound ambition to address ethics, inclusivity and sustainability through fashion. Thus passion project Chaos & Colour was born, in Redfield, where Pariss moved to live with her cockapoo. “I was becoming more conscious of my impact and habits, trying to buy less and second-hand, but struggling to find brands that reflected both my personal style and beliefs – my love of colour combined with shopping ethically, and celebrating women from all backgrounds,” she says, of the project’s inception. “Currently, global fashion doesn’t do a good job of connecting people to what they wear, and we are starting to see the consequences. Understanding what the fabrics are, where they come from and the lives behind each garment is more important than ever. Often, these stories are of women from developing countries, treated like commodities in the broader landscape of fast fashion and consumerism.” Last year Pariss travelled to northern India, to an unassuming desert village on the edges of the Blue City, to meet the director of Saheli

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Pariss started the brand to marry together her passions for colour, ethical shopping and female empowerment

Women, an organisation which equips women with formal training in garment making, giving them economic independence and a sustainable livelihood to support their families. The NGO has created jobs, established the first health centre in the village and funded the education of 80 girls so far. Most of the collection is made using Ikat weaving; an ancient technique of wrapping threads together tightly and dipping the bundle in dye. It is only on the loom, when the artisan begins to weave the threads together, that the unique Ikat pattern emerges; it’s a slow, labour-intensive process which is why it isn’t commonly used in the wider fast fashion market. Everything is designed by Pariss, inspired by traditional textiles, and she plans on producing a limited selection each year – garments with longevity – to reduce global environmental impact. “I am drawn to fusing complex textiles with the simplicity of natural fibres,” she says. “I wanted to make the collection bold but wearable so it can serve as day wear and be striking. I want to give every piece a story, so people can connect and feel special in what they wear. I also want to show that there is life outside of London; that you can create a sustainable, thriving business outside of the Big Smoke. Bristol is perfect; there is such a sense of community and support.” n • Instagram; @chaos.colour; chaosandcolour.com launches 1 June


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HEALTH & BEAUTY NEWS FROM THE SECTOR

BRIDGEWATER BOTTLES Reusable bottles are on the rise (it’s National Refill Day on 19 June, run by Bristol-based City to Sea!) and now the latest instalment from stainless steel container makers Chilly’s is here. In a beautiful collaboration with Emma Bridgewater, three new designs are now available. Keep hydration levels up and save the planet from unnecessary plastic waste.

MO’ MOTION, FEWER PROBLEMS On a mission to be more than a hotel, Village Hotel Bristol has recently launched a special new initiative called Village Green. Aiming to become a business that truly embeds itself within the community, the hotel group is committing over 30,000 hours a year to volunteering in the community. In addition, one day a month will also be dedicated to supporting local sporting groups or events as part of a wider goal to encourage health and wellness in the community. As part of this and his work with Village Hotels, Olympic distance running champion Sir Mo Farah surprised local school children last month by joining them for one of the new fitness classes inspired by his own training, called Motion. “You’re so young; believe in yourself, whatever you do,” he offered, as part of his Mo-tivational chat with the kids. “If you work hard, you can achieve it.” • village-hotels.co.uk

GOOD LUCK, CHARM

STILA SUMMER Revolved around enhancing your natural looks and giving you that extra confidence to boss whatever task is at hand, the Stila summer collection has landed. From the 12 Beauty Boss lip glosses to the two vibrant new eye shadow palettes ideal for festival season, the Work It collection is beautiful. We headed to Harvey Nichols to meet with lead make-up artist Sascha Jackson, who tipped us off on the lip gloss goss – apparently it’s back in a big way, so keep an eye out for a shift towards shine. • Get It collection, Stila, available at Harvey Nichols; stilacosmetics.com

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Local girl Charm Annice McFarlane (aged 25) is set to represent the city this month at the 2019 event Miss Earth. Taking place at the Arden Hotel and Leisure Club in Birmingham on Saturday 22 June, Miss Earth is a global organisation that promotes environmental awareness and encourages young women to be eco-friendly and protect our planet within the fashion and beauty industry. An advocate for natural, cruelty-free cosmetics, Bristol-born beauty buff Charm is hoping to become the next environmental ambassador for England. Good luck! • Instagram: @charmannice

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• Anemone design, £25; emmabridgewater.co.uk

OFLO We recently discovered Bristolbased oFlo, which specialises in organic cotton pads. Using sustainable materials, oFlo hopes to put an end to plastic waste and reduce the annual use of over 4.3 billion disposable sanitary products. Made with premium materials (including the organic cotton thread), each pad is made with nickel-free, rust-proof poppers. If you’re interested in beginning your low plastic waste journey, oFlo is a great way to start. After all, to make big changes, you have to start small. • Individual liners from £7.85; oflo.co.uk; Twitter: @oFlo_pads

SHOUT OUT Shout, the UK’s first free text-service for anyone struggling with mental health, has been launched by the Royal Foundation. The free and anonymous 24/7 text messaging service connects people experiencing negative mental health with instant support from trained volunteers. If you’d like to become a part of this vital support service, head to the website to find out about becoming a volunteer. • giveusashout.org


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CNM opened a whole new world to me It has been a really incredible journey developing my knowledge in an area which I am passionate about. Eloise Schwerdt, Nutritional Therapy Graduate & Natural Chef Lecturer, College of Naturopathic Medicine

I

was working as a Private Chef in restaurants around London and further afield but I wanted to learn more about food, how it can affect our health and wellbeing and the right way to look after myself and the people closest to me. At first, what really motivated me was gaining more knowledge, however, I didn’t know where to start, or why. I was attracted to CNM by the course content. It covers a wide range of topics within the area on Nutritional Therapy. Over the course of the three years I gained a real understanding for the subject, as well as clinical practice which gave me the confidence to apply the knowledge in as similar a setting as to what I now have with my clients. Now I feel confident not only making the right choices for me and my family, but also helping others. It has been a really incredible journey developing my expertise in an area which I am passionate about. CNM opened a whole new world up to me and I love learning something new every day. Aside from the knowledge, the relationships I have formed with my fellow students and CNM tutors have been invaluable. CNM has brought me together with many like-minded and passionate people, something I am very grateful for. I met so many wonderful people throughout the course and feel honoured to be part of a group of fellow graduates and to have formed the Naturopathic Nutrition Collective (NNC) with them. We continue to meet monthly, the NNC being a group where we discuss relevant topics and case studies and invite a range of specialist speakers to broaden our knowledge and continue our development. Practicing now as a Nutritional Therapist and using the knowledge I have from the

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course, I understand food in a completely different way and feel confident in providing my clients with nutritional information, food and recipes which not only taste amazing but are actually nourishing and good for them! For me, the two careers I now have go hand in hand and it has been a natural progression to fuse the new information I have gained with cooking food in a holistic way, whilst knowing why it is beneficial to do so. I would say that my experience at CNM was an awakening, insightful and pioneering journey. I am now so much more aware of the many choices I can make which will either affect my life in a positive or negative way. I feel geared up with a tool kit, which I can use to make informed decisions and choices, not only about the way I want to live my own life but to also enable me support others to change their lives, too. I am continuing to work as a private chef alongside building my business in Nutritional Therapy. I encourage people towards a more holistic and naturopathic lifestyle offering cookery lessons and store cupboard makeovers. Alongside this, I also teach at Demuths cookery school in Bath and more recently, at the CNM Natural Chef Diploma Course. I love the ability to make a difference to people’s quality of life by empowering them with knowledge. Often the changes are simple but effective; we can support the body through a whole range of different chronic diseases with diet and lifestyle. I like having the opportunity to meet different people on a daily basis and to really get to understand the full picture of what brought them to their current state of health. It is so incredibly rewarding, getting to delve deep into a client’s history in order to pinpoint root causes, drivers or mediators and enable them to make the necessary changes, so they improve their overall wellbeing, restore balance and reach optimum health. CNM was the start of a journey for me into moving towards a better quality of life and helping others to improve theirs. Eloise is one of the CNM Expert Speakers at our June Open Day. For more information and to book call 01342 410 505 or visit naturopathy-uk.com/events/open-days/

Orange Blossom Panna Cotta Recipe by Eloise Schwerdt, Natural Chef Lecturer, College of Naturopathic Medicine This Panna Cotta is set with seaweed, young coconut meat, and coconut oil to create a silky smooth set custard which still has the 'jiggle' of a traditional recipe. Ingredients • ½ cup coconut meat • 1 cup cashews, soaked • ½ cup coconut milk • ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons light agave • 2 tablespoons irish moss paste • ½ tablespoon of orange blossom extract • ½ vanilla pod, scraped • ½ cup coconut oil METHOD Blend all ingredients together in a highpowered machine until smooth. Portion ½ cup servings into suitably sized moulds and then place in the fridge to set until ready to serve. Serve alone or with the addition of an infused foam (rose works really nicely) and a blended berry coulis to add flair. Fresh edible rose petals, stewed fruit, activated nuts or a spiced syrup also go very well with this delicious dessert. Credits: Recipe Eloise Schwerdt

Attend the CNM June Open Day Change Career Improve Your Health Help Others

Geoff Don

22nd June, 2019 Please book online at:

www.naturopathy-uk.com 01342 410 505 CNM is the UK’s leading training provider in a range of natural therapies. Colleges across the UK and Ireland.


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Solving your spinal problems

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ack pain or nerve pain affecting the arms or legs can affect anyone at any time of life. It could be the result of a slipped disc, arthritis of the spinal joints, repeated minor stresses, bone deterioration, or an injury. Whatever the reason, it can bring pain and misery to sufferers, seriously affecting their quality of life and work. Back pain will affect over 80 percent of us at some stage in our lives, and is the most common cause of absence from work in the UK. However, by reducing the stresses and strains on the spine during daily activities, the risk of developing back pain or limb pain from spinal nerve compression can be lessened. It is important to be constantly aware of maintaining a good posture, both at home and at work. Daily spinal health checklist: • Be aware of your posture and ensure your spine is straight and well-balanced. • Take time to improve core muscle tone, and set aside a few minutes each day for tensing exercises of your stomach, pelvic and back muscles. • Good exercises for back muscles include swimming, walking, cycling and gentle keep-fit. • Maintain a good body weight to avoid unnecessary strain on your spinal joints. • Remember to use correct lifting techniques and distribute the weight evenly while carrying. • Don’t bend when you could kneel or squat, and never stoop or bend over for prolonged periods, especially for lifting.

• If bending over or sitting for a long time, gently stretch backwards when standing up. • Avoid sit ups, double leg lifts, and touching toes. • Always warm up and stretch before sport, and cool down and stretch afterwards. Many spinal problems can be prevented and some can be self-treated. However, when the symptoms do not settle, or worsen, then professional help and advice may be needed. Patients with persistent or progressive symptoms can benefit from a specialist assessment and diagnostic spinal MRI scanning with a view to offering physiotherapy, injection therapy, and pain management. The spinal team based at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital in Clifton provides comprehensive assessment and treatment for a range of spinal conditions affecting the neck and back. The spinal multidisciplinary team includes Consultant Spinal Neurosurgeon Mr Nitin Patel, Consultant Orthopaedic Spinal Surgeon Mr Stephen Morris, Consultant in Pain Medicine Dr Gareth Greenslade, and Clinical Psychologist specialising in pain Dr Angela Caney, as well as radiologists, physiotherapists and specialist nurses. Mr Patel explains, “The majority of patients with spinal conditions improve with nonsurgical treatment through specialist physiotherapy, pain management or steroid injection treatment, combined with patient education about exercise and injury prevention. Patients who fail to improve with non-surgical treatment, and are suffering with symptoms that interfere with their work and leisure activities, may have a condition that is

Consultant Neurosurgeon and Spinal Surgeon Mr Nitin Patel; Consultant Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon Mr Stephen Morris; and Consultant in Pain Medicine Dr Gareth Greenslade.

treatable with surgery. Wherever possible, less invasive microsurgical techniques are selected to improve the symptoms and aid postoperative recovery. Surgery may involve micro-surgical nerve decompression for arm or leg pain. In general, these procedures have a greater than 80% success rate of relieving symptoms, allowing patients to return to work and leisure activities.” Dr Gareth Greenslade, Consultant in Pain Medicine, treats problems ranging from simple back pain to the aftermath of major trauma and pain which may persist after surgery. Dr Greenslade comments, “After assessment, the patient may have image guided injections, medication, acupuncture or TENS, specialised physiotherapy and clinical psychology. I am fortunate to be working with a group of expert surgeons who avoid surgery whenever they can. Their approach is up-to-date and based on the best evidence.” In addition to Mr Patel, Mr Morris and Dr Greenslade, also available for consultation at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital are Consultant Neurosurgeon Mr Nik Patel, and Consultant Orthopaedic Spinal Surgeons Mr Ian Harding, Mr Priyan Landham and Mr Michael Katsimihas. Private patients treated at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital also have the option to benefit from their unique Recovery Plus programme, providing extended postoperative physiotherapy support. Provided at the two Bristol Nuffield Health Fitness & Wellbeing Centres in Clifton and Stoke Gifford, Recovery Plus ensures a smooth recovery and promotes long-term health. If you have been suffering from back pain and would like to book an appointment with one of our specialist Spinal Consultant Surgeons at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, call 0117 911 6062, or visit our website: www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

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GARDENING GREAT OUTDOORS

Art on East Street

From the ashes of industry With so much on offer around Bristol, it is not surprising that some people rarely venture south of the river. Yet Bedminster has a vibe and history unlike anywhere else; there is no part of the city that so richly rewards aimless exploration, says Andrew Swift

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edminster has only been part of Bristol since 1831. Before that it was in Somerset, founded as a settlement huddled round a minster church when Bristol was little more than a handy river crossing. But, while Bristol sloughed off that inauspicious start to become England’s second city, Bedminster remained little more than a village. In 1644, disaster struck when Prince Rupert, preparing for the second siege of Bristol, sacked and burned Bedminster to the ground. Recovery was slow, but by the late 18th century the Rev John Collinson could report that Bedminster “is now grown so populous and crowded with buildings, as to form a very considerable suburb to the city of Bristol.” Even so, it still only had around 3,000 inhabitants. What changed all that was coal. There had been small-scale opencast pits in Bedminster since the 17th century, but the first shafts were not dug until 1748. By the dawn of the Victorian age, though, 18 pits were up and running. Factories were built to take advantage of the plentiful supply of coal and by the 1880s Bedminster’s population had rocketed to around 80,000. It was then that the second industry to make a major impact arrived, as WD & HO Wills opened a tobacco factory on East Street. The last colliery closed in the 1920s, but tobacco production

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continued to grow, as did Bedminster, with new housing estates built on the hills to the south. The Second World War brought devastation, while post-war clearances saw many factories and Victorian terraces demolished. In the 1980s it was the turn of the tobacco industry to be stubbed out, and Bedminster fell on hard times. From the ashes of industry, however, sprang a new spirit. One of the main catalysts for regeneration was the Tobacco Factory, established in 1994 by George Ferguson in the old Franklin Davy factory on North Street. Designed as a hub for local artists and independent businesses, 25 years on it is one of the most famous buildings in Bristol, while the community market held in its yard every Sunday draws visitors from across the city. North Street, meanwhile, has been transformed into one of the best independent shopping streets in Bristol, where you can find vintage clothing (try Rhubarb Jumble or the brand new Patina), hand-made chocolates, hand-crafted gifts, vintage records, a newly opened bookshop, bakers, delis, cafés, pubs, restaurants and much else. There is also drama – Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory, the acta Community Theatre in Gladstone Street and Show of Strength Theatre Company, established at the Hen & Chicken in the 1980s and still going strong. Street art, of course, also has a high profile thanks to


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GREAT OUTDOORS

New indie fabric store Like Sew Amazing, burger supremo Oowee, the lovely Zara’s Chocolates and Upfest HQ are all resident on popular North Street

Perrett’s Park

One of the main catalysts for regeneration was the Tobacco Factory, which got a new lease of life in 1994

We love North Street’s quirks

Upfest, based at its gallery in North Street. This year the organisers have launched a summer-long project – Upfest Summer Editions – bringing local, national and international street artists to transform walls across Bedminster. North Street may be Bedminster’s most celebrated locale, but there is plenty to see elsewhere. It has some of the best parks in the city, such as Greville Smyth and Victoria Parks, with their wide open spaces; Dame Emily Park, on the site of one of Bedminster’s biggest collieries; and Perrett’s Park, a natural amphitheatre high on a hillside with panoramic views northward. Near Bedminster station is Windmill Hill Community Farm, established in 1976 on a plot of waste ground, and the Green House, HQ of the National Federation of City Farms and Community Gardens. The Malago Greenway follows the fast-flowing brook which once powered Bedminster’s mills, while, for a more serious excursion, the South Skyline Walk (bssw.org.uk) takes in not only the Malago, but also several parks and three nature reserves on the Northern Slopes. Given Bedminster’s history and the pace of change over the past 200 years, it is hardly surprising that it can seem somewhat disconnected: industrial compounds standing alongside green spaces, forsaken churchyards by busy roads, backstreets where monumental chapels tower over Victorian beerhouses. It is in this variety, and in its hidden corners, that the spirit of Bedminster lies, and there is no part of the city that so richly rewards aimless exploration. To get you started, one of the best ways of getting under the skin of Bedminster is to join the Show of Strength Theatre Company (showofstrength.org.uk) for a guided walk – ‘Blood and Butchery in Bedminster’ – which runs every Tuesday evening. On 15 and 16 June, there is also an opportunity to visit some of Bedminster’s secret gardens – details at bloomingbedminster.tumblr.com. ■

Bedminster was founded as a settlement when Bristol was little more than a handy river crossing. This is The Spotted Cow in the 1930s

• Follow @BedminsterBID for latest news on the area Vertiginous streets of multi-coloured houses


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WILD BRISTOL

Fish-twitching is the piscatorial equivalent of birdwatching: actively going in search of different species, such as pike, for the sole pleasure of simply seeing them

Gone fishing June is prime time for spotting water-based wildlife. Pete Dommett dons his shades and tries his hand at ‘fish-twitching’

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he coarse fishing season begins again this month. From now until next March, the city’s waterways will be lined with eager anglers. I’m joining them on the riverbank to hunt for prize specimens, but I’m not actually trying to catch one. Fish-twitching is the piscatorial equivalent of birdwatching: actively going in search of different species for the sole pleasure of simply seeing them. Fish are sometimes overlooked by natural history programmes and, because they’re generally out of sight, for the majority of us, they’re mostly out of mind. Many British fish are spectacular creatures, however, and can be found in all types of water, including urban rivers. So, on a quest to discover what be-finned beauties Bristol has to offer, I head to Eastville Park. At the lake, I immediately notice a gang of carp cruising around like slow-moving submarines, their dark backs occasionally stirring the surface. A new information board lists the wildlife that lives in the area – birds, otters, trees, wildflowers, butterflies, dragonflies and bats – but disappointingly doesn’t mention fish. Flowing around the edge of the park, the River Frome is unexpectedly clear. Like many of Bristol’s watercourses, it often appears brown and murky, especially after heavy rain, but I quickly pick out several finger-sized fish (maybe minnows?) darting in and out of the hazy shadows. A shoal of larger fish hangs lazily in a pool of slack water, just above Colston Weir. Sunglasses (preferably with polarised lenses) help cut through glare and, through mine, I can make out the muted red fins of roach – a common species across the country – and another, slimmer fish, with greenish fins and a darker tail, that I don’t recognise. Trying to identify it, using my Collins Gem Guide to Freshwater Fish, is like beginning birding again. I’m not sure, but could they be dace? Further upstream at Snuff Mills, I’m surprised to see an old chap enjoying a spot of lunchtime fly-fishing (which has a different season 82 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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to course fishing). As he casts his line across a deeper stretch of the river, I ask him what he’s hoping to catch. “Well, it’s mainly roach, chub and dace in here,” he tells me. (Aha! I was right!) “But there’s a few trout as well. I caught one a couple of years ago.” He continues, remembering the moment with a smile. “Lovely it was. Well over four pounds and a couple of feet long.” Brown trout in Bristol – who knew? Back in the park, I scan the lake for the vaguely menacing forms of the carp, but it’s a different fish that catches my eye this time. Or perhaps I catch its eye. A huge pike, loitering in the weedy fringes of the water, watches me warily. Fish have remarkably good vision and can also feel vibrations through their lateral line, but I manage to creep close and grab a photo of it on my phone. This magnificent, torpedo-tuned predator is near enough to touch, but, elementally, in another world altogether. Suffice to say, fish-twitching has me completely hooked.

Pete’s top five fish-twitching tips 1. Wear polarising sunglasses to cut through surface glare. 2. Wear dull-coloured clothes. 3. Walk slowly and quietly along the bank to minimise disturbance. 4. Look for features in the water (rocks, weed beds, overhanging trees, even shopping trolleys). These offer shelter and attract fish. 5. Encourage fish into open water with a handful of sweetcorn kernels (they are easy to see when taken and don’t affect water quality). ■


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We just want to say thank you for the excellent design, plus all the help and sound advice you have given us and a special thank you for our stunning kitchen. - Mr & Mrs Tickner

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DESIGN | INTERIORS

Hotel style at home Most of us revel in the luxury of a top-quality, well-designed hotel room, so why not try to recreate this comfort in your own bedroom? Sarah Latham, founder and creative director of Georgian interior design specialists Etons of Bath, provides some helpful advice on bringing hotel luxury home

COLOUR SCHEME THEME Decide on a key style, whether classic, contemporary, bold or calming

Select a harmonious palette of colours that is restful and calming to ensure a feeling of sanctuary

FABRICS AND FINISHES Co-ordinate the finishes on furniture and select decadent, tactile fabrics

HEADBOARD Add upholstered headboards to your bed for comfort and luxury

CURTAINS Curtains with pelmets help to cut the light out for a better night’s sleep. Combined with tie-backs they result in the ultimate window dressing

FURNISHINGS A chaise (or coffee table) and chairs and a bench at the end of the bed create a sense that you can spend time in the space at any time of the day

PANELLING Panelling can elevate the plainest of walls. Decorative detailing can add contrast to accentuate this feature beautifully

BED Use the largest bed that the space will accommodate to exude comfort and grandeur

LIGHT SWITCHES Bedside switching gives the added functionality of being able to turn the lights off after you have climbed into bed. It’s worth spending time working out the dimming and control systems for the room to optimise lighting for different times of day

RUGS AND CARPETS A large rug creating a zone around the focal point of the room, especially when placed on top of a luxurious, deep-pile silk carpet is the ultimate indulgence

Photographs of a recent project by Etons of Bath

Etons of Bath, 108 Walcot Street, Bath; etonsofbath.com

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GARDENING

Long, hot summers won’t faze succulent plants such as stonecrops, and less watering is good news for gardeners and the environment

Gardening for the future Elly West on modern-day pariahs peat and plastic, plus the domestically recyclable pots being trialled in nurseries this year, and the rest of the organic gardening latest

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e gardeners are, by nature, forward-thinking, and gardening and caring about the environment generally go hand in hand, so it’s no surprise that more and more of us are looking at ways to practice sustainability in our plots. Never has the health of the planet been such a hot topic: we’re all much more aware of the need to recycle, reduce plastic use and avoid wastage where possible, and this awareness has increased dramatically in the last decade or so. There’s still a great deal of work to be done, but even small changes can have a big impact if we all do our bit. Increasing numbers of people are attempting to garden organically, avoiding pesticides and weed killers, choosing plants that are good for wildlife, and looking for peat-free alternatives in compost. This month I’ll look at a few ways we can help to go that bit greener, while hopefully saving some money and having a healthier, happier garden.

Water conservation Writing this on a wet spring day, it’s hard to know what the summer holds, but if it’s anything like last year when there was barely a green lawn in sight by the end of July, then we need to start planning ahead to save water. Climate change means a hot summer like 2018’s could become the norm, and a valuable addition to any garden is a water butt or two (or more). These can collect run-off from any outside buildings such as sheds, garages and greenhouses as well as the house. Plants in pots will always need watering, but if you mulch the compost surface and move them to shadier spots on hot days, you can limit the amount of extra water you’ll need to provide. I rarely water plants in a border, unless they are newly planted. Letting the soil dry out encourages them to put down deeper roots in search of moisture. It’s also about choosing the right plant for the right place. Sunnier spots, as well as 88 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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areas under trees or next to walls, are likely to be drier so choose plants that can cope with drought. Mediterranean plants with silvery leaves, such as lavender, or succulent stonecrops and euphorbias are all drought tolerant. Ferns and other woodland dwellers can cope with dry shade. I also never bother watering an established lawn. Yes, the grass will look like a disaster after a long hot summer, but it’s the first thing to recover once the rain returns. When you are watering, choose morning or evening to avoid evaporation and direct the water at the roots of a plant rather than the leaves.

Reducing plastic An approximate eight million tonnes of plastics end up in our oceans every year and many companies are now working hard to reduce singleuse plastic consumption, largely due to consumer pressure. Despite our best intentions, most garden sheds are full of plastic – compost bags, watering cans, pots, trays, labels, sprays, fertiliser containers and so on. But the gardening industry has also been getting greener, with a move towards recyclable and compostable pots, particularly for seed sowing. Around 500 million black plastic pots are used each year in the UK, with many ending up in landfill. The main problem is the colour, which the sorting machines can’t cope with so they can’t be included in kerbside collections. Some nurseries will collect pots for recycling. However, a new taupecoloured pot that can be included with our domestic recycling could solve this problem and is being trialled in nurseries this year. Until they become the norm though, we can help by reusing plastic pots and making them last as long as possible. Wash them and store them, then use them again. Keep plastic out of the sunlight where possible, as it makes it brittle, and if you are buying new pots, choose eco-products such as coir or paper, or use old loo rolls and egg boxes for seed sowing.


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GARDENING

Go organic Organic gardening has been popular for years, and to some extent we are being steered in that direction whether we choose it or not, with many pesticides being withdrawn from general sale because of their harmful effects on wildlife. With a balanced eco-system and healthy plants that suit their environment, pests and diseases need not be a problem. Encourage natural predators such as toads, birds, lacewings and ladybirds into your garden by leaving wilder areas where they can create habitats, building bug houses and growing plants for pollinators. It’s all about biodiversity and creating a natural balance. Squash greenfly with your fingers or spray them with soapy water, rather than using insecticides. Catch slugs in beer traps or use barriers such as grit, copper rings or crushed egg shells rather than pellets. Spend time digging out weeds, rather than reaching for the spray gun. Build a compost heap and make your own leaf mould as a free way to fertilise and mulch your garden, while recycling suitable food waste at the same time. Peat, along with plastic, has also become a modern-day pariah. The government’s target to phase out peat use by 2020 may be behind schedule, but plenty of manufacturers are now providing peat-free compost alternatives, which we ought to choose in order to save our peat bogs. Check the label as it should say what is in your bag and the percentage of peat (if any). If we stop buying, they’ll stop producing. One Bristol company working hard to promote both peat and plasticfree gardening is houseplant specialist Little Green. All its plants are grown and sold in peat-free compost and terracotta or ceramic pots. It also offers a plastic plant pot recycling service to prevent pots ending up in landfill; just bring them along to the stall at the Tobacco Factory Market on Sundays, 10am to 2.30pm. There are certainly ways we can help create a better future with a little bit of thought and effort. And a garden that’s full of healthy plants, buzzing with beneficial wildlife and working in harmony with nature and the environment is something we can all aspire to. ■

Plant of the month: Verbascum I saw these gorgeous flowers en masse at one of the RHS shows last year in an unusual pale terracotta colour, and have had a thing for them ever since. I’ll be honest – they aren’t the easiest of plants. I’ve heard it said that they die in the bag on the way home from the nursery. I planted a few in my back garden in 2018 and I’m not totally sure if they’ve survived (I blame last year’s hot summer!) although I’ve forgotten exactly where I put them so I’m hoping they may still surprise me and pop up among summer’s fanfare. However, I’m not giving up. Seeds I’ve sown this spring are now robust little plants, and I’m going to keep my eye on these ones to make sure they flourish. Their appeal, for me, lies in the colours. Gorgeous tones of peachy apricot, terracotta, dusky plum and lemon yellows adorn elegant stems, and it’s the smaller perennial varieties that I love, rather than the super-tall, velvety leaved Verbascum olympicum. Cultivars to look out for are the newly introduced ‘Firedance’, which is a rust-red; pinky-toned ‘Merlin’; and pale yellow ‘Clementine’.

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ALFRESCO ART

Stained glass can find a home anywhere, dancing in the sunlight as opposed to Appreciate the power of photography to static stone sculpture. We have some very communicate, educate and create awareness talented designers in the South West to alter damaging human behaviour

Babruysk (Peter Garrard)

Birdwatching (Jitka Palmer)

Julius (Debs Paproska Cole)

Renee Kilburn ceramics (image: Catherine Davis Photography)

Green Man (Jude Goss)

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Big Hug (Karen Edwards)


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ALFRESCO ART

Another dimension Gardening journalist Alice Maltby, who works with beautiful Bristol Botanic Garden, on how to add extra points of interest and create an outdoor sculpture gallery in your own garden

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culpture has delighted garden owners and visitors since time immemorial. Just think of the ancient Roman gardens at Pompeii and Herculaneum, the Italian Renaissance garden and the formal gardens in France. Our own landscape gardeners expanded the scale of some garden ornaments to temple follies. The Far Eastern tradition of making garden decorations, often functioning in association with Feng Shui principles, has an almost timeless history too. Chinese gardens with scholar’s rocks, Korean stone art, and Japanese gardens with Suiseki and Zen rock gardens have a symbolic meaning and natural ornamental qualities. Sculpture brings an enormous amount of pleasure to gardeners, irrespective of the depth of their pockets, whether we are talking about the Heather Jansch driftwood horses or simple stained glass sculptures dotted about. Used creatively, they can enhance particular areas of the garden. Buying a sculpture to celebrate a special event such as an anniversary gives long-lasting enjoyment.

need to choose pebble fountains instead of deep ponds. Wildlife can also enjoy and benefit from water features whether we are thinking of deer, badgers, hedgehogs or bees liking a drink of water from pebble fountains or grander waterfalls. Birds really enjoy splashing around in bird baths too. Natural light is what distinguishes a sculpture in the open compared to a gallery space with well controlled spotlights. The effects of sunshine and shade on the sculpture must be considered to create the desired impression. Seating can be a sculpture in its own right. Just think of the beauty of a Lutyens bench with its elegant cut-out back and rounded scroll-shaped arms originally inspired by English architect Sir Edward Lutyens in the 19th century. Whatever you do, it is important to make the garden your own, says sculptor and artist, Jitka Palmer: “If there is a focal point in the shape of a sculpture, it draws the attention and makes the garden special and Oak leaves (Willa Ashworth) inhabited. Sculpture can be something like a companion which becomes beautifully embedded in the greenery and flowers. In the case of the stone sculptures in particular, they get gradually covered by lichen and become an integral part of the outdoors.” So, how to decide on the type of sculptures you would like? Sculptor Nicholas Moreton proposes several categories to consider: “Sculpture mimicking nature – plants, geological forms, pebbles etc. ➲

...Sculpture brings an enormous amount of pleasure to gardeners, irrespective of the depth of their pockets...

So, what are the key considerations when you start designing your outdoor gallery? Crucial factors are the type of garden style you have created and your own personality. Is the garden contemporary, a traditional cottage-garden style, formal or informal? What type of person are you: artistic, sophisticated, fun, quiet? What secrets might you discover behind Luke Jerram’s intriguing doorway? (Pictured) How do you anticipate positioning the sculptures? Do you want them to be clearly visible as stand-alone features like statues on a plinth or partially hidden, nestling in the grass surrounded by cheerful nasturtiums? An alternative to using plinths is to take advantage of structures already present in the garden – a wall, an old wood trunk, a natural stone, or a raised position within the lawn. Wall ceramic plaques can enhance garden walls and fences. The presence of children will influence some decisions – for example, water is an important feature in many gardens but you may

Swans (Hayley Jones)

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ALFRESCO ART

Mention mosaics and people often think of Gaudi’s magnificent ones in Barcelona. They have such joie de vivre

The sculpture uses patterns and formal elements of plant growth: the spiral (fern); the flower (a round centre with repeat petals surrounding it): the tree, the vegetable or fruit. Animal sculpture might fit this category. “Also there is human presence within nature – figures and heads and abstract sculpture, sometimes with little concern for form, but instead a strong emphasis on the material, its qualities and texture.” Another decision involves the types of materials you might be considering. Ceramics and stone sculptures seem particularly at home in the garden, whether you favour natural stone creations or highly glazed pieces. Any metal can be used to create sculptures, including iron, steel, stainless steel, bronze and copper. Each metal has different characteristics and requires varying techniques to work. Wood is made for outdoor sculpture and willow sculptures are also very fashionable at present. One of my personal favourites is mosaic. Mention mosaics and people often think of Gaudi’s magnificent ones in Barcelona. They have such joie de vivre. Stained glass, also, can find a home anywhere. We have some very talented stained How about one of Heather Jansch’s glass designers in the gorgeous driftwood horses? South West who allow their designs to sway in the breeze and dance in the sunlight as opposed to static stone sculptures. A good idea is to visit sculpture and art trails and flower shows for inspiration. I always think that meeting the creator personally enhances the pleasure from the piece. By selecting some unique sculptures, you can glean immense pleasure from your homemade garden gallery, whatever you choose, and enjoy it in all weathers. ■

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If you want some alfresco inspiration, visit Bristol Botanic Garden. We love Luke Jerram’s illusory mirror door installation


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PROPERTY NEWS

BITE-SIZED UPDATES FROM ACROSS THE CITY’S BOOMING SECTOR The 18 June auction will feature lots to suit buyers of all types

NEXA LEVEL

INVEST IN THE TEAM

An innovative independent estate agency launched in Bristol last month, promising to shake up the local market. NEXA Bristol is the latest business to join Wapping Wharf, and the brainchild of former Bristol Rugby players who have developed successful careers in property. Born out of a sense of frustration they experienced with the traditional UK estate agency model when working on their own property businesses, NEXA aims to turn things upside down. The model is based on offering a single point of contact from the team of property experts, to advise and look after individual customers from start to finish, whether they are renting, buying, selling or developing. Staff are generously rewarded for results so the company can attract the best in the business to offer unrivalled expertise. The model was successfully trialled in Portsmouth, where NEXA ranked in the top three agencies on Rightmove within a year. Former Bristol Rugby players Daniel Gray, Rob Higgitt and Olly Kohn are joining forces with Daniel’s brother Jamie Gray in establishing NEXA, while Jake Gready, whose career in property spans 25 years, heads up the team as MD.

Property adviser Savills has appointed residential agent William Swinburn as an associate director in its Bristol team. William has worked in property for more than eight years, starting his career in Bristol before moving to London, where he ran the residential sales and lettings department of an independent firm. William returns to Bristol to join Savills residential sales office in Clifton. “Joining the Bristol team represents the best of both worlds; the opportunity to work for a global property firm and return to my South West roots,” he said. “It’s a privilege to represent and grow Savills’ diverse portfolio, which represents some of the best-in-class homes in the city.” William’s appointment follows the promotion of office administrator Kirsty Coleman. “William brings with him just the right blend of experience which, coupled with his enthusiasm for the Bristol market, makes him an excellent fit for us,” said Richard Brooks, who heads up Savills’ residential sales office in Clifton. “It is important to us to invest in the development of our people, and as such, I was very pleased to see Kirsty promoted to an associate. She has supported our Clifton office for more than seven years and is an integral member of our team.”

• nexabristol.com

• savills.co.uk

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LOTS OF INTEREST! Market leading property auctioneers Maggs & Allen have recently released their 18 June 2019 catalogue featuring a fantastic array of commercial and residential lots throughout Bristol and the South West. Of special interest this month is a large collection of commercial investment properties in sought-after Clifton Village, Redland and also the city centre. “Freehold investment properties rarely become available in prime locations such as Clifton Village,” says auction manager Rob Ansell. “For such a large portfolio of commercial investments to come up in the same auction really is a once-in-alifetime opportunity for investors.” However, it’s not just commercial properties that will be on offer on 18 June; the auction catalogue includes a varied selection of 30 lots with something to suit all buyers. For expert DIY enthusiasts there is a great range of houses requiring renovation and, for the more experienced builders and developers, there are several building plots and development sites with planning consent in place. The property consultants at Maggs & Allen have over 30 years’ experience in auctioning all types of land and property throughout the Bristol region and their reputation is built upon providing expert professional advice while delivering the highest levels of customer service. This has enabled them to retain the highest auction success rate in the Bristol region for nearly a decade. If you would like full details of the lots that will be on offer in the 18 June auction, please visit the website (maggsandallen.co.uk) or to request an auction valuation of your property, feel free to contact the auction team on 0117 973 4940.

• maggsandallen.co.uk


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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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uilt in the 1870s, soon after the Clifton Suspension Bridge enabled Bristol’s affluent merchants to accede to Leigh Woods, this beautifully restored family home occupies one of the city’s most sought after residential locations. Towerhurst benefits from good access to the city and is just minutes away from Clifton Village, yet enjoys a rural feel with huge private gardens and is set within almost an acre of land. This spacious property benefits from lots of natural light and tastefully restored period features, including fireplaces, ceiling coving, detailed central roses with herringbone woodblock flooring to reception rooms, and tessellated flooring in the entrance hall. The tower room offers panoramic views of Bristol’s floating harbour, and even towards Bath in the distance. The modern kitchen/breakfast/family room forms the centrepiece of this house and continues the flow of space and light throughout. Bi-fold doors lead out to a huge landscaped garden and terrace. Spread over four floors, this stunning property also features a drawing room, dining room, games room, utility room and workshop, a wine cellar, triple garage and ample parking. There are seven good-sized bedrooms, including a master bedroom with an en suite bathroom, dressing room and a second dressing room or study area. There is also a staff bedroom with a shower room on the lower ground floor. This property is perfect for a family looking to escape the hustle bustle of Bristol, while enjoying great access to the city when required. For full details contact Knight Frank Clifton. Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 295 0425

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TOWERHURST LEIGH WOODS BRISTOL • Beautifully presented private family home situated near Clifton Village • 8 bedrooms • Large, open kitchen/breakfast room, and gym, games room & wine cellar • Gardens, garage and ample off-street parking

Price on application


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Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977 57 QUEENS ROAD, CLIFTON

KNIGHTSBRIDGE COURT, DOWNEND, BS16

• Prime shop to let

• Modern office building

• Fully fitted café

• 780 sq ft + 3 cars

• 1,200 sq ft

• Open plan • To rent – only £12 psf

• New lease

WESTFIELD PK – OFF WHITELADIES RD, CLIFTON

STUDIO OFFICES CLOSE TO BBC – BS8 • Coming soon

• Loft style offices

• Suite 1 - 1,500 sq ft

• 1,600 sq ft

• Suite 2 - 2,000 sq ft Open plan studio

• 5 car spaces • New lease CITY CENTRE OFFICES

CLIFTON VILLAGE

• Open plan

• Prime retail / office unit

• 815 sq ft

• Separate courtyard

• Light & bright studio space

• Office suite

• Affordable rent

• To let together or individually

CLIFTON OFFICES

OFFICE TO LET (MAY SELL)

• Self contained office building • 1,500 sq ft

• Purchase your own 5 – 10 person office unit

• 2 car spaces

• QC30 – BS1

• New lease – rent o/a

• £17.50 psf to rent

CITY CENTRE OFFICES

FOR SALE, PENTHOUE OFFICE, CLIFTON

• Stunning boutique contemporary refurbishment

• High quality office with contemporary finishes

• 8 secure car spaces

• 773 sq ft

• 4,300 sq ft

• £260,000

• New lease – rent o/a

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon

Burston Cook JUNE 4.indd 1

MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice 22/05/2019 15:35


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

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1 WEST MALL, CLIFTON, BRISTOL, BS8 4BH RETAIL OR OFFICE USE TO LET Due to relocation to freehold premises close by… • One of Clifton’s finest units!

• Office/Retail

• Situated on The Mall, Clifton

• Prime location in the heart of Clifton Village

• Ground floor 629 sq ft (58.50 sq m)

• Quality accommodation • Courtyard offices 554 sq ft (51.48 sq m) • Mix of period & contemporary space • Ready for immediate occupation

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon

Burston Cook JUNE 4.indd 2

MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

• High level of natural light

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• • • • •

Sales / Lettings Acquisitions Valuations Landlord & tenant Auction Sales

• • • • •

Rent reviews Property Management Investment Sales / Purchase Development & Planning Dilapidations Advice 22/05/2019 15:35


BURSTON COOK ARE PROUD TO SUPPORT

BRISTOL DOWN SYNDROME TRUST A Bristol Charity helping children with Down Syndrome

From right Julian Cook presents Burston Cook sponsorship to Caitlin MacMillan, Ollie Cook & Ellie Moxham with Charity co-founder Jonathan Cook. Julian comments, “We are so proud of Caitlin, Ollie and Ellie who recently completed the Ten Tours on Dartmoor with other friends, to raise money for this amazing Bristol based Charity”.

OUR AIM IS: ■ To advance the development and education of children with Down Syndrome ■ To help children with Down Syndrome achieve their potential and be included in society ■ Achieved by offering speech & language therapy & practical advice in a friendly environment ■ To bring families together for mutual support

Your help and support would be so much appreciated

www.bristoldownsyndrometrust.org.uk

(0117) 934 9977 Burston Cook JUNE 4.indd 4

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CITY | BUSINESS

HOW TO STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD ON A POPULAR PROPERTY RICHARD BROOKS

head of residential, Savills Clifton. Specialising in the marketing and sale of the city's prime property.

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he prime housing market has faced its fair share of disruption in recent years. Most of it has been politically induced: a combination of some things taxation and all things Brexit. However, despite the headwinds brought in by heightened political uncertainty and fragile consumer confidence, the market has held up surprisingly well this year. While some discretionary buyers and sellers are sitting on the sidelines, those who are in the market are serious about it. Indeed, Savills research shows a 14% increase in new buyer applications across the south of the country in the first three months of 2019.

In Bristol this story could not ring truer. Applicants and viewing numbers are high and many of our properties, particularly those in the highest demand – close to good schools, transport links or green spaces – for example, are generating competitive bidding situations. This has been increasingly the case as we move into the property ‘high season’ of late spring, early summer. For vendors, this is hugely encouraging. For motivated buyers, it can be frustrating. While luck and circumstance undoubtedly factor, if you’re buying in Bristol today, there are a number of things you can do to set yourself apart from the competition. Preparation and research are both key. Go to your first viewing with a list of questions and with all parties involved, as the ability to act quickly can be imperative in securing a popular property. Make sure you understand the vendors situation; are they are looking for a fast transaction or are they still in the process of finding their next property? If you have questions, ask. Push for answers and give yourself the best chance of making a quick decision on the property.

If you then decide to bid, offer what you think the property is worth. Many of the very best houses are currently selling above the guide price so don’t expect offers to be accepted. If you are unsure of values then speak to the agent, who should have in-depth knowledge of previous sales in the immediate area. Put your best foot forward and if it turns out to be too low, at least you can walk away with no regrets. Your ability to proceed with the sale will also be important. Make sure your finances are in order, you have a mortgage agreed in principal and a nominated solicitor. This demonstrates that you’re a serious buyer and that you’re in a good position to move forward. If you haven’t bought since the Mortgage Market Review in 2014 you may find that this process has become slower and more complex; instructing a good broker can make all the difference. Vendors looking to move quickly might dismiss a higher offer from a less prepared party. Finally, be flexible. Don’t argue over minor points, establish that you are happy to progress at the pace of the vendor and create a positive rapport. Buying and selling a house is one of the biggest financial transactions a person will make in their lifetime, enabling it to be as stress free and simple as possible can make a huge difference. Savills Clifton offers its clients a full appreciation of the market, based on in-depth specialist research and sound local knowledge. If you are thinking of buying or selling in the area, contact our team of experts. n Richard Brooks, Savills Estate Agents. 20 The Mall, Clifton Village, Bristol, BS8 4DR Web: savills.co.uk

Recent sales include 12 Richmond Hill in Clifton and Hill View in Coombe Dingle. 18 Goldney Road in Clifton has been hugely popular with buyers

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BRISTOL’S Largest ever auction of commercial investment properties... Auction sale on Tuesday 18 June 2019

0117 973 4940

£3 GU 75 ID ,0 E 00 +

£2 GU 35 ID ,0 E 00 +

www.maggsandallen.co.uk

The Mall, Clifton RESTAURANT & MAISONETTE

Waterloo Street, Clifton 2 SHOPS & 2 OFFICE SUITES


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E ID 0+ U 0 G 5,0 2 £7 Park Street, City Centre FIVE STOREY FREEHOLD INVESTMENT

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Portland Street, Clifton ART GALLERY & FLAT E ID 0+ U 0 G 0,0 5 £2

E ID 0+ U 0 G 5,0 2 £2

Whiteladies Road, Clifton FREEHOLD RETAIL INVESTMENT

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Worrall Road, Clifton CAFÉ & 4 BEDROOM MAISONETTE

Abbotsford Road, Redland TWO STOREY COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT


Howard Davis t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings)

Some people think our job is easy. They think that property just sells itself. That a buyer appears from nowhere, loves a house or flat and agrees to buy it - just like that. Some think the sale then speeds effortlessly to a satisfactory conclusion and without any other assistance. Let me tell you it doesn’t work like that - well not for most of the time anyway. A ‘proper’ estate agent’s job is not to sell houses; rather it is to move people. Moving anything is often complicated, can be fraught with difficulty and have unforeseen consequences. It all takes planning, patience, knowhow, experience and resolve. It means expecting the unexpected, problem solving and, when other people are involved, the

highest level of tact and diplomacy. Estate agents shepherd people, contracts, surveys, mortgages, removals, withdrawals, gazundering, false starts, disappointments, the unforeseen and triumphs from one place to another. Sometimes it’s a smooth process. But all too often it isn’t. Some may think that selling houses is not much of a job, and in many ways they might be correct. But moving people and families on to the next stage of their lives and making it as seamless and stress-free as possible is a job we enjoy and think is well worth doing.

REDLAND

KINGSDOWN

SSTC £1,200,000

Howard Davis MD Clifton

GUIDE PRICE £899,000

An exceptional seven bedroom family house set over four floors; offers an extensive interior retaining a great deal of its original charm and character throughout, consisting of a reception room, dining room, kitchen/breakfast room, utility room, a family bathroom, a home office and a garage. EPC E

A rare opportunity to acquire an outstanding architect designed family home with breath taking views over the city. Set over three floors with an open plan living/ kitchen area, three bedrooms, three bathrooms, a south facing rear garden, a roof terrace and allocated parking. EPC C

REDLAND

HARBOURSIDE

GUIDE PRICE £825,000

An attractive, bay fronted Victorian family home offers a well presented and versatile interior over three floors. Currently arranged as a 6 bedroom home with an up to date HMO licence the house would also be very suitable as a family home. EPC E

GUIDE PRICE £775,000

A charming 4 double bedroom Georgian home, well presented throughout and offers a light and versatile interior with views towards the harbour and surrounding area. Externally there is an attractive courtyard garden to the rear with a garage situated in a nearby block. EPC D


KINGSDOWN

GUIDE PRICE £765,000

KINGSDOWN

GUIDE PRICE £750,000

A well-presented period property offers a ground floor shop which we understand has A3 and A4 license. The first and second floors offers a three bedroom maisonette. The basement rooms offer a utility area and separate cellar storage rooms. EPC C

A well-presented period town house with accommodation set over four floors. The versatile interior is currently arranged as a six bedroom student home but would also make an excellent four bedroom family house with three reception rooms and a kitchen/dining room. EPC D

HARBOURSIDE

CLIFTON

GUIDE PRICE £500,000

GUIDE PRICE £425,000

An impressive apartment offers a generous three bedroom interior, terrace with views towards the water and a south west facing private rear garden, a spacious open plan living/dining and fully fitted kitchen area with access out to the front terrace. EPC B

A two bedroom garden apartment consisting of: lounge diner, separate kitchen, master bedroom featuring an en-suite plus French doors leading on to the private rear garden, main bathroom, aforementioned rear garden plus a rear allocated parking space for one car. EPC C

CLIFTON

REDLAND

SSTC £385,000

A spacious and truly stunning two double bedroom first floor apartment set in a GRADE 2 listed Victorian building, comprising of: large open plan living area consisting of a lounge/diner, kitchen master bedroom and a lovely en-suite shower room, second double bedroom plus a modern bathroom with a quality suite. EPC E

SSTC £375,000

A superior two double bedroom period flat offers a spacious living room, a separate kitchen which leads off the living room, a large master bedroom, a second double bedroom and the bathroom leading off the hallway featuring a stained glass window. EPC D


BRYNLAND AVENUE, BISHOPSTON This stunning extended four bedroom semi-detached family home is set in the highly-desirable Bishopston, close to the varied amenities of the Gloucester Road. Offering unique accommodation arranged over three floors including parking for two vehicles as well as a garage with pit. EPC - TBC 2

2

4

GUIDE PRICE £765,000

KENNINGTON AVENUE, BISHOPSTON This larger than average three bedroom family home is ideally positioned within a short walk of popular local schools and the amenities of the Gloucester Road. This well-cared for period property has been extended and offers parking and an enclosed rear garden. EPC - D 3

2

3

GUIDE PRICE £625,000


STOKE LANE, WESTBURY-ON-TRYM Renovated over the last ten years, within close proximity to the local shops of Stoke Lane, this superbly presented five bedroom three storey family home has an open plan kitchen dining living area leading to a landscaped garden measuring approximately 21m in length. EPC - E 2

1

5

ASKING PRICE ÂŁ775,000

BRANSCOMBE ROAD, STOKE BISHOP Extended to the ground floor, this three bedroom semi-detached family home is positioned within the ever popular Branscombe Road of Stoke Bishop and benefits from a 23m south facing garden and large driveway. Marketed with a complete chain. EPC - D 2

1

3

ASKING PRICE ÂŁ582,500


hamptons.co.uk

Pembroke Road, Clifton Guide Price £2,500,000

A stunning Victorian Villa with extensive accommodation of about 5707 sqft. Ample off road parking, garaging and south/west facing garden. Beautifully refurbished with first class fittings and exceptional period features throughout. EPC: Exempt

West Mall, Clifton

Guide Price £800,000

Pembroke Road, Clifton Guide Price £475,000

Occupying the entirety of the top two floors, with private parking & a private Set in an elegant and impressive Grade II listed Victorian house in Clifton, this spacious apartment offering approximately 1,000 sq ft also benefits staircase from the communal hall, this extremely spacious, Grade II* listed from an invaluable off-street parking space. EPC: E apartment is a most attractive proposition in prime Clifton Village. EPC: D

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 369 1004 | bristol@hamptons-int.com


Redland ÂŁ400,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

Two bedroom garden flat A particularly spacious (952 sqft) garden flat with parking space. Sympathetically furbished giving a clean bright modern feel yet still maintaining the period grandeur. A great space for entertaining with a large L shape open plan reception. EPC - TBC

oceanhome.co.uk

Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Westbury-on-Trym ÂŁ425,000 Three bed semi detached house

Available with no onward chain is this charming Victorian semi detached home. Inside the property has a lounge with bay window, dining room with double doors opening onto the rear garden and a good sized kitchen on the ground floor. Upstairs are three bedrooms, a very spacious bathroom and an additional W.C. EPC - D


Westbury Park £335,000

One bedroom garden flat with study A stunning hall floor apartment with high ceilings, ornate period mouldings, working fireplace, private garden, garage, large open plan kitchen/diner, master bedroom overlooking the garden and a second bedroom/study. No onward chain. EPC - D

Sneyd Park £500,000

Two bedroom apartment A spacious first floor apartment with it’s own garden at the front and a single garage. The accommodation has an entrance hallway, lounge/ diner, kitchen/breakfast room, two double bedrooms and family bathroom. Set in a prestigious and coveted location on the fringes of the Downs and within easy reach of Whiteladies Road. EPC - C


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Profile for MC Publishing Limited

The Bristol Magazine June 2019  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol

The Bristol Magazine June 2019  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol