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THE

Issue 168

I

june 2018

MAGAZINE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

THE CITY ECLECTIC Natural printing and eco-dyeing with flowers & foodstuffs; cycling round a traffic-free Bristol; a spot of silversmithing or West Country camper-vanning: what will you get up to this summer?

DADS WHO DO Fun-filled Father’s Day forays

SEVEN DECADES OF SOUND M Shed’s Bristol music exhibition

THE SIMPSONS IN SOUTHVILLE For Upfest’s 10th year!

THE REMAIN CAMPAIGN Holidaying on home soil

TIME TO DINE Bristol Food Connections is back

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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Classic Carpets June DPS.qxp_Layout 1 24/05/2018 15:08 Page 1

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Knight Frank May.qxp_full page 23/05/2018 13:03 Page 1

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Guide price £1,200,000

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clifton A superb Grade II* listed home (3,708 sq ft). 4/5 bedrooms, bathroom, 3 shower rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, 3 reception rooms, self-contained lower ground with reception/studio. Gardens, garage, views. No chain.

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stoke Bishop

clifton

Substantial house (4,326 sq ft) with 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. Extensive gardens with swimming pool. In all about 0.58 of an acre. EPC: F.

Immaculate Grade II listed home (3,051 sq ft). 5 bedrooms, 2 bath/shower room, kitchen, dining room, 2 reception rooms. Potential self-contained 1 bed apartment. Courtyard gardens. Garage by separate negotiation.

Guide price £395,000

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Guide price £695,000

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Leigh woods

clifton

A spacious top floor 2 bedroom apartment (1,037 sq ft) in a handsome Victorian detached building with far reaching views and parking. 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1 reception room with dining area, kitchen. EPC: E.

A beautiful example of a modern Clifton townhouse (1,253 sq ft) finished to an exceptional standard. 2/3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, WC, 1 reception room, kitchen/breakfast room, study/bedroom 3. Carport and private garden.


Knight Frank May.qxp_full page 24/05/2018 09:12 Page 2

Move. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. call 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Price on application

New INstructIoN

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sneyd Park

clifton

An exceptional 4 bedroom family home (1,449 sq ft) enjoying sunny gardens, parking and garage. Master suite and 3 bedrooms, family bathroom, drawing room, kitchen. Gardens, allocated parking and garage. EPC: C.

An exceptional period townhouse (3,170 sq ft) with views over New Fields. 5 bedrooms (2 ensuite), bathroom, 2 receptions, open-plan kitchen/family room. Front & rear gardens. Gated driveway. Further parking. EPC: D.

Guide price £1,395,000

New INstructIoN

Guide price £1,500,000

New INstructIoN

clevedon

compton Martin

Wonderful Victorian home (3,895 sq ft) situated in a sought after location. 5 bedrooms (1 ensuite), 2 bathrooms, 5 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, cellarage, storage. Level terraces, gardens, double garage (365 sq ft).

Charming farmhouse (3,097 sq ft) with extensive range of outbuildings (11,918 sq ft) providing huge opportunities. 4/5 bedrooms, 2 bath/shower rooms, 4 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast. Gardens, pasture. In all about 8 acres.


Knight Frank May.qxp_full page 23/05/2018 13:04 Page 3

Move. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. call 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £895,000

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edingworth Grade II listed Georgian house (4,823 sq ft). 6 bedrooms, 5 bathroom/shower rooms (3 ensuite), 4 receptions rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. 1 bed cottage (611 sq ft). Parking, garage, garden, sun terrace. About 1 acre.

Guide price £725,000

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congresbury

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A charming country house (2,919 sq ft) with rural views. 4-5 bedrooms, bathroom, shower room, library, drawing/dining room, kitchen/breakfast room, study. Mature gardens, garage, summer house. EPC: E.

A fantastic barn conversion (3,174 sq ft) set in approximately 1.2 acres. 4 bedrooms, 3 bath/shower rooms, kitchen/dining, 3 reception rooms. Gardens, paddock, garage, outbuildings. EPC: E.

Guide price £750,000

New INstructIoN

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webbington

Langford

A house of grand proportions (3,067 sq ft) with commanding views. 6 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3 receptions, secondary accommodation, swimming pool, stabling, garaging, approx 3.84 acres. EPC: F.

A well-presented detached property (2,320 sq ft) with pretty gardens and rural views. 4 bedrooms (1 en suite), bathroom, WC, kitchen/dining/living room, 3 receptions. Gardens, stream, woodland, views. EPC: C.


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56

Consider holidaying here in the West Country this summer or further south to the Isles of Scilly

86

70

We love Pata Negra’s interior and so does designer Jo Berryman (image by Chris Cooper; shotaway.com)

Chef Chris Griffett has a good thing going on

Contents June 2018 REGULARS ZEITGEIST

EXHIBITIONS

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14

Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

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44

What’s on at our local galleries this month?

ONE TO ONE

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48

Andrew Mania, whose work created quite the stir at this year’s Oscars

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16

Meet Food Connections’ chief exec and catch up on Bristol goings-on

TEXTILES

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50

Babs Behan’s debut book is ideal for those with home-dyeing ambitions

BRISTOL UPDATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Bite-sized business and community news from across the city

Why Kim Thomson’s jewellery-making workshops are a top shout

THE CULTURE MUSIC

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34

Tasty tidings from our local eateries and producers

WHAT’S ON & HAPPENINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 A mere cross-section of the city’s wide and varied events

City fun for younger persons in tow

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FOOD CONNECTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 CHEF PROFILE

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28

WILD BRISTOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

HABITAT Keep an eye out for the miraculous little glow-worm this summer

30

Bristol’s Premiership promotion means big plans for the club .......................................................

70

Forget tired old hors d'oeuvres, Chris Griffet’s catering is a cut above

Lawrie Jones looks forward to the Bristol Grand Prix .............................................................................

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22

Experiential gift ideas for dads who do

FESTIVAL FASHION

66

It’s back! Just some of the highlights from the forthcoming festival

FEATURES

RUGBY

OPINION

Melissa Blease on the subject of solo dining

FAMILY DIARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

CYCLING

FOOD & DRINK NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

The interactive exhibition celebrating and debating the Bristol scene

FATHER’S DAY

SILVERSMITHING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

THE GREAT OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 The colourful history of Castle Park

54

Crystal Rose rounds up some of her must-haves for this season

INTERIORS

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86

Designer Jo Berryman shares her local decor crushes

TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Holidays on home soil: we’ve found a few very pleasant pastures new

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Indulge your nosy side at Bristol’s domestic open-garden events

ARCHITECTURE

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62

Our city didn’t go all in on art deco, but there are glimpses to be seen

SCIENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 We speak with some of the main brains at We The Curious

ARTS & CRAFTS UPFEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 US pop culture’s First Family are vacaying in Bristol this summer 10 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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PROPERTY

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News and finds from the sector

ON THE COVER

Botanical artist Babs Behan is launching her debut book on eco-dyeing; with everything from natural printing and ice flower dyeing to vibrant table linen coloured with pigment made from the humble household onion (see p50). Image © Kim Lightbody

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See p50 for more on natural dyeing from Babs Behan (image © Kim Lightbody)

from the

EDITOR

T

he content of this month’s magazine massively reflects the eclecticism of this city; serving to remind us of how much there is to do in Bristol each summer and the sheer range available to its spoiled-for-choice residents. You might see or do something creative. Our arts and crafts section takes in the work of local artist Andrew Mania – whose Timothée Chalamet shirt caused a right stir at this year’s Oscars – and his current exhibition at Spike Island, plus silversmithing in Mangotsfield and our cover feature which coincides with the launch of Bristol botanical artist Babs Behan’s debut book on natural eco-dyeing. See p50 for a preview of the sorts of things she can help you create at home, using household foodstuffs, flowers and other materials to make rustic, colourful pigments. Then there’s the big news of Upfest’s collaboration with Matt Groening and America’s First (animated) Family The Simpsons, to celebrate the beloved street art festival’s 10th anniversary (p42). Best not to miss that, eh? Champions of Bristol’s melting-pot music scene, and anyone with even a passing interest, should definitely check out M Shed’s new and interactive ‘Seven Decades of Sound’ exhibition (p34) featuring everything from locally-themed ‘car-aoke’ to a festival area for reminiscing over glory days and a ‘club room’ where you can go back in time to momentous Bristol nights. Maybe you’ll opt for a little ‘staycay’ on home soil over coming weeks – might we suggest a woodland santuary in Somerset, a stay at a local winery or some quirky West Country camper-vanning? Turn to p56 for a few more Great British ideas. Don’t forget it’s Father’s Day this month – for those in need of a thoughtful gift, we’ve been exploring outside the box for experiences to bring a smile to the faces of dads who like to do. Think quintessentially Bristolian forms of flight, or futuristic forays via the magic of technology. Or you could plan a day out with him at Bristol Grand Prix early next month – an exciting date for the local cycling calendar, with the chance to cycle the route yourself, traffic-free (p28). We’ve also got a Bristol Rugby special on p30, since they did so well as to get promoted into the Premiership. Grub-wise, Food Connections is back with a theme of ‘time’ and loads of excellent events (highlights p68), while Melissa Blease is extolling the virtues of solo dining on p66. Plus there’s festival fashion, an appeal on behalf of the urban glow-worm, our city as seen through an art-deco lens, and more as always. Here’s to a suitably broad and wide-ranging Bristol summer...

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR Editor’s image by Paolo Ferla; ferlapaolo.com

@thebristolmag

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

thebristolmag.co.uk

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JUNE 2018

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No 168

@thebristolmag

THIS MONTH WE’RE... Excited...

...For Bar 44 to open. The Welsh restaurant group is heading across the water to Clifton Village with modern Spanish dining, sherries and Iberian cocktails. We can’t wait to visit Larkin Cen’s Woky Ko: Kauto on Queen’s Road either – it’ll be a toss-up between the roast char siu, alkaline noodles and soy egg in umami broth; and the clam, wild prawn and rice vermicelli in tom yum.

Saying adieu...

...To Colston Hall for a while as the transformation project commences! The team still have a way to go to reach the £48.8m target – perhaps help them out by naming a seat in the new hall? 8-10 June is the final weekend – Sunday will see a free (but ticketed) audio-visual experience and immersive installation produced by Limbic Cinema to celebrate the venue’s history.

Glamming up... ...For the D.I.S.C.O extravaganza that will be Glitterbox at Motion on 2 June. Armed with shimmering tunes designed to whip crowds into a frenzy under glitterballs galore, the likes of dancefloor dons Joey Negro and Todd Terry will be gracing the decks to make you feel like a starlet in 1970s New York.


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5

ZEITGEIST

fab things to do in JUNE

HEROES VS MONSTERS Playing music from films with ghastly villains galore, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra will be unleashed for a concert packed with epic soundtracks from films such as Jaws, King Kong and The Mummy. From prehistoric dinosaurs and giant beasts from the jungle to supernatural creatures of the night and psychopathic killers, Heroes and Monsters has Colston Hall in its clutches on 7 June from 7.30pm.

MOTHER EARTH RULES Join in with the Festival of Nature fun this month to mark its 15th year. From 2 – 10 June, explore the wildlife on your doorstep and enjoy free, interactive exhibitions, workshops and more. The talks tent is back, featuring wildlife experts and authors, and you can relax in Earth Timber Stone’s wildlife garden, learning how to make your garden more wildlife-friendly. Meanwhile thalassophiles can hear from Californian tidal expert Jonathan White on 4 June at The Station (see The Bristol Magazine website for our Q&A). Plus there’ll be superb sounds from musicians Alex Hedley, King Louis (Cape Swagger), Saskia and Jack Cookson – best enjoyed while guzzling food and drink from local, ethical providers. • festivalofnature.org.uk

• colstonhall.org

LOVE YOUR LOCAL CREATIVES UWE Bristol’s annual creative industries degree show is back this month. From Friday 8 – Wednesday 13 June, work by more than 500 talented graduates from undergraduate and postgraduate art, design, film and journalism programmes will be showcased for public enjoyment. This year’s theme is ‘Con-form’, and it’s inspired by the many students from over the past years who have protested for various causes. Developed by students William Bently and Myah Calista, this exhibition is all about going against the grain and rebelling against the status quo. The show is a great opportunity to see the work from the city campus locations at Arnolfini, Bower Ashton and Spike Island. • uwe.ac.uk

LAUGH YOUR SOCKS OFF

FAMILY FESTIVAL FUN Popular family shindig Wychwood Festival is returning to Cheltenham Racecourse for its 14th annual year from Friday 1 – Sunday 3 June. More than 100 acts are set to perform across four stages plus there’s plenty of music, dance and arts workshops, a circus school and a silly sports day to boot. The Gipsy Kings will headline the festival, while children’s television favourites Dick and Dom will take to the stage to entertain youngsters. Camping options are also available for families, and there are both day and weekend tickets too.

We’re gearing up for a giggle now that Bristol Comedy Garden is here. The five-day festival has already sold out lots of its shows but there’s still time to get tickets for other big names such as Milton Jones, Mark Watson, Shappi Khorsandi, Henning Wehn, Seann Walsh and Bristol chick Jayde Adams. Prepare to guffaw until your belly hurts, then head out of the tent to feast on delicious drinks and beverages from local street-food heroes. Enjoy the blistering line-up in Queen’s Square, celebrating the event’s seventh year, from 6 – 10 June.

• wychwoodfestival.com

• bristolcomedygarden.co.uk

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THE CITY THE BUZZ The project is expected to open to the public in autumn 2019

Literally making waves We’ve been checking for updates on Bristol’s proposed wave-pool for some time, so are thrilled The Wave Bristol has completed the contract with tech partner Wavegarden, for work to begin on the inland site. After more than six years of planning and various setbacks, all boxes are now ticked – land, funders, engineering and architectural team – and a timeline has been suggested for development. The completion date, which will see the surf-lake destination pushing waves for a testing period, is expected to be mid-2019, with the aim of being open to the public in the autumn. The pre-launch period will see patient Crowdfunders get exclusive access and the chance to redeem surf sessions pledged back in 2014. Surf city, here we come! • thewave.com

Unmissable history City Vestibules is hosting an exhibition at City Hall, College Green (29 May – 8 June). ‘Life in the Asylum’ showcases Glenside Hospital Museum’s historic collection of drawings, photographs and artefacts relating to mental health care in Bristol. Perceptive documentary drawings by Denis Reed – artist and patient at Bristol Mental Hospital – speak of life in this psychiatric hospital in the 1950s, and retain a startling power. The Victorians placed value on occupation as a treatment so patients would have been given a job within the hospital community – this was not considered appropriate for the new establishment and it’s this lack of occupation illustrated by Reed. Doctors also faced increasing pressure to find solutions to mental illness and developed experimental cures such as ECT; now widely recognised as primitive. Such documented history is a powerful reminder that what is considered progress at the time, in hindsight may not be; don’t miss it! • glensidemuseum.org.uk

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My

BRISTOL Meet Bristol Food Connections’ chief exec Claire Peeters Moving to Bristol was a lifestyle choice. I had been in Nottingham for 10 years and was ready for a change. Bristol ticked a lot of boxes, so even though I didn’t know it that well, I took the plunge. It was definitely place first, work second, but thankfully work didn’t follow far behind. I am the chief executive of Bristol Food Connections – the community interest company that runs the festival of the same name, which is a week-long celebration of Bristol’s amazing food (11 – 17 June). I’m currently finalising sponsorship arrangements and putting the finishing touches to the programme. I am also head of operations for the Sustainable Food Trust – between the two I’m kept on my toes! We’ve moved away from a primary focus on the city centre, towards a truly citywide event – aiming to shine a light on all the great food cultures and communities of Bristol and encouraging residents and visitors to go on a journey of exploration of all that is great about Bristol’s food. I’m looking forward to getting to parts of the city that I’ve never been to, meeting lots of new people and connecting with them through sharing food and stories. We’re working on making Food Connections week a time when good food takes over the city. That doesn’t have to mean attending organised events – we’re encouraging people to connect with each other through food in a range of ways – which could simply mean breaking out of the normal daily routine to make more time to eat together at home, work or school. Bristol is seen as a more sustainable city than most, but I think we could go further… I’d

like to see more restaurants making clear statements about their sustainability and welfare policies – especially when it comes to sourcing meat. I don’t eat meat unless I know how it’s been raised, and it can be hard to get to the bottom of this when eating out. My favourite place to eat? I’m going to cop out and pick Wapping Wharf – as I can always get something great there, whatever I feel like eating, and stagger there and back from my flat in Southville. I haven’t got through all of the Cargo restaurants yet – but I’m working on it! Root is a particular favourite. I love what they’re doing in terms of bringing veggies to the fore – they really know how to bring out their flavours. I’m looking forward to the history walk showing how food has shaped Bristol, a food philosophy breakfast with Bristol philosopher Julian Baggini, the Square Food Foundation dinner and the Magerios Feast at the Coexist community kitchen which will bring together refugee cooks for a multicultural sharing feast. I worked in McDonalds for two years when I was a teenager. When I first started working in the community/sustainable food sector, it took me quite a long time before I’d admit that to anyone. I’m really into making bread. My friend gave me some leaven to make sourdough, so I’m making about two loaves a week. I’d love to incentivise food businesses that put ethics first. And I’d make the city centre a car-free/cycle-friendly zone. If anywhere in Britain could do that, I think Bristol could. • bristolfoodconnections.com


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THE CITY

The game has a unique painted style that makes for an entertainment experience unlike any game’s before it

BRISTAGRAM Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your Bristol pics using #thebristolmag

Wisteria hysteri @anya.g a from .rowe

Memories retold for a new generation Bristol’s world-famous Aardman Studios has collaborated with Bandai Namco Entertainment Europe and DigixArt to create 11-11: Memories Retold – a storydriven narrative adventure set during the First World War, with a unique painted style that plans to deliver an entertaining experience unlike anything before. It’s a boundary-nudging game experience sure to touch many and brings together talents from studios, music production and narration to deliver an exciting and emotional journey. “Engaging audiences with compelling stories through animation is at the heart of what we do at Aardman,” said David Sproxton, co-founder and executive chairman. “With this project we want to produce an emotionally rich experience with a distinctive visual identity that reflects the sentiment of this narrative. 11-11: Memories Retold is truly an exciting step for us as it marks the first time that Aardman has collaborated on a game of this scale and we’re delighted to see this come to life.” stol ’s foxy Bri @chill1983 e talk of the th e photos ar t now office righ

• aardman.com

Excellent efforts from Bristol runners Last month saw 13,000 runners of all abilities (including representatives from The Bristol Magazine!) rise to the challenge of the Simplyhealth Great Bristol 10k. Winter Olympic bronze medallist Dom Parsons officially started the run and set the crowds on their way along Bristol Harbourside. Among them was Mayor Marvin Rees – running as a guide for blind runner Chris Blackabee along with a group of visually impaired runners from VI Runners Bristol. “Many congratulations and respect for everyone who took part,” said Marvin. “This was my first 10k and I was blessed to be asked by Chris to accompany him around the course. That to me is the great benefit of sport; it is a unifying force that brings people from all backgrounds and communities to participate, support and achieve together.” They were joined by a competitive club runner field, featuring some of the best from around the region. In the men’s race, Tom Merson from Exmouth Harriers AAC finished first with a time of 30:34, while Ruth Barnes from Avon Valley Runners took first place in the women’s field with a time of 34:23, followed by Bristol and West AC’s Charlotte Taylor-Green who did it in 35:00. Bristol charities including the Grand Appeal and Bristol Children's Hospital Charity were well represented, and 30 firefighters from Avon Fire and Rescue Service also took to the streets in full kit while carrying a six-metre long ladder as part of their fundraising for three-year-old Daisy Bowyer, who has cerebral palsy. This year’s Simplyhealth Great Bristol Half Marathon is to take place on 23 September while the 2019 10k will be staged on 5 May. • greatrun.org

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Gorgeous w ild garlic at Ashton Court (@crai gderrick40)

t miss this Upfes We’re going to ) 81 laa piece! (@lei

Clifton’s @annaca kecouture hosted @castexperi ences for a ring-making/cakescoffing session


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THE

B R I S TOL MAGAZINE

Follow us on Twitter @thebristolmag

See more online www.thebristolmag.co.uk

Contact us: Editor Tel: Email:

Amanda Nicholls 0117 974 2800 amanda@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Assistant Editor Email:

Jessica Hope jessica@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Health & Beauty Editor Email:

Crystal Rose crystal@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

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For advertising enquiries please contact us on: 0117 974 2800 Email: sales@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Financial Director Email:

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The Bristol Magazine is published by MC Publishing Ltd. An independent publisher. The Bristol Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout the city. We also have special distribution units in the following stores and many coffee shops, hotels and convenient pick-up points.

THE

BRIST OL MAGAZINE Bristol and Exeter House, Lower Approach, Temple Meads, Bristol BS1 6QS Telephone: 0117 974 2800 www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk Š MC Publishing Ltd 2018 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bristol Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.

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FATHER’S DAY

DADS WHO DO A tangible/wearable/edible gift is all well and good, but see his face light up when you present him with a one-off experience tailored to his favourite pastimes or passions

Up! As long as he has a decent head for heights, a balloon flight is a pretty brilliant gift for an allround top bloke. Bristol Balloons offers pleasant, safe flights in its colourful, silky creations, and vouchers ideal for the person who thought they had done everything. Where you go is entirely dependent upon the wind and no two flights are the same – you might spot Dad sailing over the Avon Gorge perhaps, champagne in hand! • bristolballoons.co.uk

Art of glass How about a bit of hands-on craft? Glass making is a fascinating experience and Bristol Blue Glass offers folks the chance to blow their own bauble from the molten stuff, with step-by-step instructions. Vouchers available online at £20 each, or you can just give the guys a call. • bristol-glass.co.uk

Indulge his inner child If immersive, cutting-edge technology in a fun environment sounds like his cup of Joe, get Dad down to VR Star for a taste of the future. The virtual reality experiences see you blast through the sky in multiplayer shooters, race in fully hydraulic cars or get your thrills on a rollercoaster. It’s two-for-one on 17 June – book online and pay in store, showing this article. • vrstar.co.uk

Lessons in the grape Would Father love to know more about his wine? Or enjoy a tasting? Clifton Wine School gift vouchers, priced from £22.50, are left open for him to choose a convenient event at his leisure and can be redeemed as full or part-payment against the cost of any event. They can be emailed last-minute and are valid for two years! • cliftonwineschool.com

For the active man Outdoor climbing, a giant swing, archery, orienteering, hot air balloon survival: Leap of Faith’s unique purpose-built adventure course at Wild Place is perfect for the adventuring papa who likes a physical challenge. This year dads go free (with a paying child) on Father’s Day. • leapoffaith.co.uk

Feeling supersonic Fanatical about engineering, is he? Journey through more than a century of remarkable history at Aerospace Bristol before stepping aboard Concorde Alpha Foxtrot – designed, built and tested here in the city. Together, learn of the first flights and today’s technology and see helicopters, missiles, satellites, and more. • aerospacebristol.org/gift-tickets 22 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Homesense fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/05/2018 12:46 Page 1


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Fantastic range of lighting

New 12 Light Polished Steel Disc Pendant

Lighting the way is should be

Tel: 0117 963 5943 Email: info@thelightingstudiobristol.co.uk www.thelightingstudiobristol.co.uk Visit us in store at: Unit 2, Bedminster Retail Park, Sheene Way, Bedminster, Bristol BS3 4TA

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Watch digest June BRS 2018.qxp_Layout 2 25/05/2018 11:31 Page 1

WISHLIST | WATCH SPECIAL

TEN OF THE BEST

There’s nothing that conveys good taste and personal style more than a fine luxury timepiece, whether it’s to complement an outfit, an occasion, or simply to be worn for pleasure. The world’s leading watch houses introduced new models for 2018, so we asked Mallory Jewellers in Bath pick out 10 of the best.

BREITLING NAVITIMER 8 This year the entire Breitling collection has been refined and revamped, however inhouse chronographs still remain at the heart of Breitling’s DNA as demonstrated with the new classic design Navitimer 8 B01, which is based around early 1930/40s cockpit clocks that did not have the slide rule function. We look forward to the arrival of the 2018 collection at the Mallory watch showroom, as Breitling moves into new and exciting design territory. Model: AB0117131C1P1 Price: £5,900.00

IWC JUBILEE PILOT CHRONOGRAPH In celebration of their 150th anniversary, IWC have launched the ‘Jubilee Collection’ which consists of 27 limited edition models equipped with stunning new blue or white lacquer dials. This particular model, the Jubilee Pilot Chronograph, has a 43mm steel case which houses the practical day/date automatic mechanism and stays true to the iconic pilot design. A fantastic choice for the stylish man about town, or the collector as this reference is limited to 1000 pieces. Model: IW377725 Price: £4,650.00

For further details on any of the timepieces shown and many more, visit: Mallory Jewellers, 1 – 5 Bridge Street Bath BA2 4AP Tel: 01225 788800 mallory-jewellers.com

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ROLEX GMT MASTER II Reminiscent of the iconic ‘Root Beer GMT’ the never before seen GMT Master II Everose Rolesor has done nothing but impress since its Baselworld release. Housing the new technically advanced 3285 calibre, with 70 hour power reserve, this model is eye catching and stylish with all the qualities one would expect of this marque. Model: 126711CHNR Price: £10,350.00

TAG HEUER CARRERA CALIBRE 16 With 2018 marking the 55th anniversary of the Carrera, TAG Heuer has introduced the new Carrera Calibre 16 Chronograph, a very wearable sports chronograph, which is inspired by the world of motorsport in its design. Offering blue and black dial options, bracelet and strap configurations and the Calibre 16 movement means that TAG Heuer has given us a great new watch for anyone wanting a little retro cool from a quality Swiss manufacturer. Model: CV201AP.FC6429 Price: £3,500.00

TUDOR BLACK BAY GMT 2018 sees Tudor’s meteoric rise continue with the arrival of the Black Bay GMT. Demonstrating its iconic roots with the 1969 inspired ‘Snowflake’ hands the watch now has the practical advantage of displaying worldwide time zones by way of the in-house manufactured movement and the blue and red ‘Pepsi’ bezel becoming the perfect companion for the modern discerning traveller. Model: M79830RB-001 Price: £2,790.00


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WISHLIST | WATCH SPECIAL

MONTBLANC STAR LEGACY This year Montblanc has introduced the ‘pièce de résistance’ to their classic watch offering with the new Star Legacy Small Seconds. Inspired by Montblanc’s pocket watches which were made during the late 19th century and early 20th century. This ladies’ model offers both beauty and classicism whilst paying homage to the heritage of the brand. It is presented in two sizes, each showcasing elegant diamond and guilloché detailing on the dial. It is available on a stainless steel bracelet or on a variety of strap options. Model: 118533 Price: £4,200.00

CARTIER SANTOS Last year we saw the return of the Panthère; this year Cartier has relaunched the iconic Santos in its collection. Available in medium and large size automatic options, the new Santos doesn’t fail to impress in terms of feel and functionality! The steel case shape has changed, making it even more comfortable and each watch has an interchangeable leather strap (as easy as pushing a button to change) and even the bracelet can be sized at home making it the perfect his and hers timepiece.

PATEK PHILIPPE AQUANAUT LUCE Combining the perfect mix of sporty and chic, the Aquanaut Luce launches in the new ‘Misty Blue’ for 2018. Framed with 46 illuminating diamonds, a 120m water resistant case and a tropical composite strap, it’s extremely comfortable to wear and a truly versatile piece for any occasion. Model: 5067A-025 Price: £12,420.00

Model: WSSA0010 Price: £5350.00

OMEGA DE VILLE TRÉSOR Slim, curvaceous and feminine, the new ladies’ 2018 Trésor range offers a strong and stylish collection set to inspire the next generation of watch fans. The Trésor is available in two case sizes, 36 and 39mm, with varying strap and dial options to invoke an individual feel. Every model is exquisitely set with diamonds around its beautifully shaped case, all powered with a quartz movement. Model: 428.17.36.60.04.001 Price: £3,280.00

PANERAI LUMINOR DUE 38MM This year Panerai proves that good things really do come in small packages with the arrival of the new 38mm Luminor Due 3 Days Automatic Accaio Panerai’s smallest ever wristwatch. Following on from the earlier success of the 45mm and 42mm versions of the Due, the sub 40mm sophisticated and slim case design, is set to appeal to both ladies and gentleman alike. Model: PAM00755 Price: £5,100.00

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Cycling.qxp_Layout 7 25/05/2018 12:28 Page 1

SPORT | CYCLING

TICKET TO RIDE Lawrie Jones looks forward to a most exciting event in the summer cycling calendar: The Bristol Grand Prix

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n Sunday 8 July, in a landmark step, or in this case, spin of the wheels, Bristol further establishes itself as Britain’s premier pedalling city. Over six kilometres of city-centre roads will be closed to traffic as Bristol hosts an all-day celebration of cycling. The morning will see the return of the Bristol Grand Prix. Now in its fourth year, the race has become part of the HSBC UK Grand Prix series, bringing with it some of the UK and Europe’s best teams such as JLT Condor, One Pro Cycling (owned by former Ashes winner Matt Prior) and Team Wiggins. They will battle it out for the win in a 100kilometre race run at speeds of almost 30mph. “Becoming part of the HSBC UK Grand Prix Series is a reflection of the support, commitment and love for cycling that makes Bristol so special,” says Phil Adkins, Bristol Grand Prix race director. “The incredible scenes we saw when the Tour of Britain came to Bristol in 2016 demonstrate just how passionate Bristolians are about cycling.” The high-profile race will attract media interest from across the world, with highlights screened across Europe. If the event is a success, the organisers hope that professional racing will become an annual fixture in Bristol. The action will begin at 8.30am with support races, including the prestigious Women’s Bristol Grand Prix, before the main event starts at 10.30am. The course remains a secret, but Phil allowed us a lucky sneak peek. “The race route will surprise everyone,” he says with a smile. “It will include sections through Millennium Square, a tough cobbled section in Queen Square and will travel all the way through to Broadmead, then back to Colston Street, and the start/finish line on Park Street.” 28 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Spectators will be able to enjoy the race completely free from anywhere around the course. And when the racing is over, they’ll be able to ride it too.

...If the event is a success, the organisers hope that professional racing will become an annual fixture in Bristol... Free for all At 2pm, the race track will be opened to everyone on two wheels as part of the HSBC UK Let’s Ride event, and race fans and riders will be able to enjoy over two hours of traffic-free cycling. Cyclists don’t need to register, they can just turn up on the day and join the ride at various points around the city. When it was run on a shorter course in 2017, the enthusiasm of Bristol’s cyclists caught the attention of British Cycling, the national body in charge of the sport. “Last year we were blown away by the response of the thousands of local people who got on their bikes and joined us,” says Julie Harrington, chief exec of the organisation. British Cycling may be surprised at our enthusiasm, but the evidence has shown time and again that Bristol people love cycling. A recent Sustrans report found that 10% of people in the city commute to work


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SPORT | CYCLING

...While announcements have yet to be made, insiders believe that Bristol could host a stage of the Tour of Britain... by bicycle, with an incredible 26 million trips made by bike in 2017. While some may be concerned about cycling during rush hour, Harrington hopes that people will gain some confidence on the trafficfree roads. “Events like HSBC UK Let’s Ride Bristol are a fantastic opportunity for people to get on their bike and take that first step towards making cycling a part of their everyday life,” she says.

Commitment to cycling Mayor Marvin Rees and Bristol City Council have been instrumental in making the event happen. Half way through his first term, supporting events like the Bristol Grand Prix is part of his plan to get the city active. “We have laid out our ambitions for sport in Bristol and are committed to growing participation, bringing major sporting events to the city and developing elite sports,” he says. Elite cycling may excite thousands of spectators expected to attend and help sell beautiful Bristol across Europe, but he’s keen to promote the benefits of the mass participation event too. “It will provide an exciting and unique opportunity for people of all abilities to not only watch professional cyclists compete, but to try out the route and enjoy our vibrant city-centre by bike completely free from traffic,” he adds. The 8 July event may not be the only time professional cycling will come to Bristol this year. While announcements have yet to be made, insiders believe that Bristol could host a stage of the Tour of Britain. Sponsored by Bristol business OVO Energy, the race has helped to raise the profile of the city among cyclists. They’re also supporters of women’s cycling, taking the bold step of equalising the prize money for both races. In 2017, the Bristol Grand Prix attracted over 15,000 spectators, with a further 5,000 taking part in the mass participation ride. This year the crowds are expected to be much bigger as cycling fans and riders turn out in force. Local businesses are hoping to benefit from increased trade during the whole-day event, with visitors encouraged to shop local. One of the greatest things about professional cycling is that watching it is completely free. So what should spectators do on the day? “You can just turn up!” enthuses Phil, who has some advice for those who have never been to a race before: “Look at the map on our website and pick out some spots. The top of a hill, around a tight corner, and on a cobbled stretch are where you can enjoy some real action. Don’t stay in one place. Take the time to walk the course, and enjoy Bristol.” And once the racing is done? “Get on your bike and enjoy the chance to ride around Bristol. You may never get this opportunity again so don’t miss it.” ■ • You can find more information about the event at bristolgrandprix.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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SPORT | RUGBY

Bristol Rugby lift the 2017/18 GKIPA Championship trophy at Ashton Gate

WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS Following Bristol Rugby’s domination last season and promotion to the Gallagher Premiership, there are big changes on the horizon. First up, a name change… Introducing Bristol Bears Words by Will Carpenter

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romotion back to the Premiership and the announcement of a club rebrand ensured an action-packed end to the 2017/18 season for Bristol Rugby – and with top flight and European rugby now back on the menu at Ashton Gate, it’s the beginning of an exciting and bold new era in the city. Just three days after a 68–10 demolition of Doncaster Knights at Ashton Gate in April – and the lifting of the GKIPA Championship trophy in front of 13,000 supporters – Bristol Rugby announced it would become Bristol Bears from June 2018, with the club’s owner Steve Lansdown describing the decision as: “an exciting and major commitment to ensuring the future of the club.” “We have to be prepared to break the mould and be relentless in driving the progression of this rugby club,” he said. “In a challenging market, in order to attract investment and new audiences, we must be brave in our vision. The development of the brand expands our appeal to a global audience at a time when the appetite for professional rugby is growing in international markets. “We believe these changes – alongside the matchday improvements to Ashton Gate and the continued engagement with local schools and our community – are critical to enable long-term success. We recognise that there is a history and tradition associated with all sports clubs and we are conscious and proud of the loyalty, bond and passion so many share for Bristol Rugby. “We hope that all supporters will embrace the changes and recognise the significant investment taking place – on and off the field – to bring success and a sustainable future for the club.” More than 4,400 supporters have already signed up for season tickets to follow Bristol Bears in the 2018/19 Gallagher Premiership, 30 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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with three months still to go before the start of the new campaign. Attracting a new generation of supporters was one of the key objectives behind the Bristol Bears decision, as was tapping into a growing USA and Asian rugby market, as the club’s chief operating officer, Mark Tainton, explains. “Rugby is evolving, and we cannot be left behind,” he said. “We respect the proud heritage and traditions of the club, but also the values of rugby union. “Premiership rugby is fast becoming a global game, with the US and Asia markets rapidly expanding and opening up exciting new opportunities in media and sponsorship. “We recognise the potential of this new platform and how it can accelerate our ambition to be a Champions Cup winning organisation. With fixtures now taking place outside of the UK and a regular audience of over 1.25million people watching Premiership rugby across the world, we have a significant chance to cement the iconic Bristol Bears vision as one of the leading brands in world rugby. “This is not a short-term fit, but instead we see this rebrand as breaking the mould and acting as a catalyst in kick-starting our journey to creating success. “We already have the world-class stadium – the best club rugby arena in the UK. We’re adding one of the best training facilities in the world, which will be completed by 2020.” Head coach Pat Lam and his hungry squad know all too well that the demands of the Gallagher Premiership far exceed that of the Championship, but with the beginning of a new era comes fresh expectation, and the future appears bright for players and supporters of the Bristol Bears.


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SPORT | RUGBY

BRISTOL RUGBY’S 2017/18 SEASON HIGHLIGHTS AUGUST • In one of the biggest coups in the club’s history, All Black Charles Piutau agreed to join the team ahead of the 2018/19 season, making him the world’s highest paid player with a £1million per season deal. SEPTEMBER • The GKIPA Championship season began for Bristol Rugby with a difficult 26–15 victory over Hartpury at Ashton Gate, despite trailing 7–8 at half time. • Bristol thrashed Richmond 50–5 as Max Crumpton scored four tries. • September ended with an impressive nine-try 61–38 victory over Bedford Blues, with Bristol racking up their highest ever score at Bedford. OCTOBER • Committed to encouraging home-grown talent, scrum-half Andy Uren signed a senior contract with his boyhood club for next season. • Rhodri Williams made an impressive six-minute hat-trick against Jersey to make the final score 36–17. NOVEMBER • Academy graduates Callum Sheedy, a fly half, and lock Joe Joyce signed contracts to stay at the club until 2020. • In an incredible performance, Bristol demolished Rotherham Titans in a 55–10 victory. DECEMBER • Bristol didn’t let up their league-leading status during the festive period as their impressive win over the Cornish Pirates featured the club’s eventual try of the season by Mat Protheroe. • Midfield duo Will Hurrell and Jack Tovey finished off the year by signing new deals with the club.

Photography by JMPUK

Siale Piutau in the snow at Rotherham

Rhodri Williams dives over against Jersey Reds

JANUARY • #SignedUpSaturday saw Pat Lam’s side sign nine new players ahead of the 2018/19 season including John Afoa, Harry Thacker, Jake Heenan, Aly Muldowney, Shaun Malton, Nic Stirzaker, Yann Thomas, Jordan Lay and Tiff Eden. • As big prospects for the club, James Dun, Aaron Chapman, Will Capon and Charlie Powell all agreed long-term contracts with Bristol Rugby. • The first month of the new year ended with a battle against Bedford Blues, with Bristol clinching a win by 18–13. FEBRUARY • Bristol took on Ealing Trailfinders in what came to be seen as the biggest game of the season, coming back from behind to beat the West London team 28–27. • In their 16th successive win of the season, Bristol beat London Scottish 15–55. MARCH • League leaders Bristol began March with their first (and, consequently, their only) league defeat of the season against Jersey Reds at Ashton Gate.

• Despite the unconventional snowy conditions that occurred in March, Bristol got back to their winning ways with a 24–3 win against Rotherham Titans. • Dan Thomas, who produced one of the most impressive performances of the season, agreed a two-year contract extension. APRIL • Winger David Lemi announced he would be leaving the club at the end of the season, while there was exciting news as Gloucester scrum-half Harry Randall signed for Bristol. • Following a victory against Nottingham and second-place Ealing’s defeat to Doncaster the next day, Bristol Rugby were confirmed the winners of the GKIPA Championship title. • In the final home game of the season, the team put on a winning performance as Bristol beat Doncaster Knights 68–10 in front of a packed crowd before lifting the trophy and celebrating with fans. • Before the final game of the season, the club announced its plans to change its name to Bristol Bears from June 2018. • The club ended the season on a high with an awards night that saw Joe Joyce scooping the prestigious players’ player of the season prize.

• Looking ahead to next season, Pat Lam secured signings of some of the league’s standout players including Jake Woolmore, Jake Armstrong, Tom Pincus, Lewis Thiede, Luke Daniels, Tom Lindsay and Piers O’Conor.

The new club crest for Bristol Bears

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SPORT | RUGBY

130 YEARS OF BRISTOL RUGBY

Bristol’s team from the first season, 1888-89

The opening match at the Memorial Stadium, 1921

1888: The Bristol club was formed at the Montpelier Hotel on 18 April 1888 when the Carlton and Redland Park clubs merged. Until the outbreak of the First World War, home matches were played on the County Ground. 1900: Jimmy Peters was a half back from local club Dings. He played 35 first team games for Bristol, and after he moved to Plymouth he became the first black player to play for England. 1908: Officials of the Bristol club were responsible for organising the England v Wales match at Ashton Gate in January. Wales won 28–18, but a thick fog hid the action from the crowd. 1914: Bristol played no matches during the First World War, and many of the club’s players served with distinction during the conflict. At least 26 men who played for Bristol made the ultimate sacrifice. 1921: The Memorial Stadium was built as a tribute to the players who died during the war. The opening match on 24 September was against Cardiff, Bristol winning 19–3. 1924: Bristol travelled to France to play Union Sportive Cognacaise, winning the game 8–6. The French club paid a return visit to Bristol three years later. 1930: Sam Tucker, Bristol’s famous hooker, was summoned to play for England in Cardiff on the morning of the match. He was flown from Filton Aerodrome in a two-seater plane. After landing he hitched a lift to the ground in a coal lorry, and arrived five minutes before kick-off. 1939: During the Second World War a team called Bristol Supporters played in place of Bristol Rugby. At least 16 men who played either teams were killed in the war. 1959-60: During John Blake’s captaincy, Bristol played a revolutionary 15-man style of rugby which became known as Bristol Fashion. The team peaked in 1959-60,

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winning 36 games, drawing one and losing 10. 834 points were scored in an era when the try was still worth three points. 1965-66: Under the captaincy of Derek Neate, Bristol won a record 39 matches and topped The Sunday Telegraph English Merit Table with 90%. 1971-72: Bristol equalled the club season record of 39 wins, topped 1,000 points for the first time in the club’s history, and won the English and English/Welsh Merit Tables. 1983: Captain Mike Rafter led Bristol to a memorable 28–22 win over Leicester in the Twickenham final. Every round of the cup campaign was played away from home, and winger John Carr scored in every match.

2004: Bristol won the Powergen Shield at Twickenham, defeating Waterloo 53–24. 2007: Bristol finished third in the Guinness Premiership, their highest ever league position. Only one match was lost at home. 2011: Bristol won the British & Irish Cup in May, beating Bedford 17–14 at the Memorial Stadium. This was a fitting finale for head coach Paul Hull, who left the club at the end of the season after 22 years. 2013-14: Bristol’s 125th anniversary season was their last at the Memorial Stadium. The final game at the ground was a defeat against London Welsh in the play-off final.

1984: Alan Morley beat the previous world record for the number of tries scored in a career for one club. In all he scored 479 tries in senior rugby, 383 of these for Bristol, and he was awarded an MBE. 1986: Alan Morley played his 520th and last first team game for Bristol. He is the leading appearance maker in the club’s history. 1987-88: The centenary of the club was celebrated with a special game played against the Barbarians, the match ending in a 20–20 draw. 1997: Outside half Mark Tainton became the record points scorer in the club’s history. His eventual career total for Bristol was 2,063. 1999: Bristol finished top of Allied Dunbar Premiership Two and won promotion just a year after being relegated. Promotion was sealed in the final match, a nail-biting win over Worcester. 2002: Bristol first competed in Europe’s elite rugby competition, formerly known as the Heineken Cup, in the 2002-03 season, beating Montferrand 24–19 in the first home match.

Bill Redwood, a superb scrum half who won two England caps in 1968

2014: A new era dawned for the club as Bristol moved to Ashton Gate. There was a thrilling ending to the club’s first game at their new home, with Ben Mosses scoring a last-minute try to defeat Worcester. 2015-16: Bristol were promoted to the Premiership after defeating Doncaster over two legs in the play-off final. They were relegated the following season. 2017-18: Bristol were promoted to the Premiership again as outright winners of the Championship. n • bristolrugby.co.uk


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Ashton Court in its party-hosting heyday

SEVEN DECADES of SOUND M Shed’s new, interactive exhibition has compiled stories told by people all over the city, with a view to celebrating and debating Bristol music

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O

ur local music scene is nothing if not eclectic and while Bristol might be best known for output bunched under the term ‘trip-hop’, there’s so much more to it than that, as many know. With festivals galore covering multiple genres and fiercely independent venues championing everything from jazz and blues to drum and bass, dance to dubstep, classical to krautrock, Bristol’s musical reputation has always drawn on a vast melting pot of influences. Since the late 1950s, acts from Acker Bilk, The Pop Group and The Wurzels to Rita Lynch, Way Out West and This Is The Kit have paved the way for other talent hailing from our harbourside city. ‘Seven Decades of Sound’ asks thought-provoking questions; from whether there is indeed one definitive ‘Bristol sound’ and whether the city’s best days of music are behind us, to where the heart of musical Bristol is. “Bristol emerged as an internationally recognised ‘music city’ towards the end of the last century and the creation of these musical cultures and innovations has been driven not only by artists and producers but crucially by the people of Bristol themselves,” says Dr Rehan Hyder, exhibition advisor and senior lecturer in media and


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MUSIC

Did you know... Project lead Lee Hutchinson bestows upon us some top Bristol music trivia

I recently discovered that a Bristolian has been a Eurovision Song Contest winner. Lee Sheriden – as the guitarist in Brotherhood of Man. His song Save Your Kisses For Me topped the leaderboard back in March 1976. Justin Quinnell sent in some great shots of Bob Dylan, when he performed at Colston Hall in 1986 – only Dylan wasn’t there to perform his music, but to act in a film called Hearts of Fire. Justin was employed as an extra and, as he recalls, Dylan didn’t sing a word – not even so much as mumble. Not that any of the extras were bothered – they were just happy to see their idol up close and personal. Ray and Barbara Willmott outside the Troubadour – image from Ian A Anderson

cultural studies at UWE Bristol. “Attempts to define the so-called ‘Bristol Sound’ have tended to oversimplify music in the city so this exhibition focuses instead on music makers and music lovers across the decades in order to highlight the rich cultural experiences provoked and inspired by the sounds of the city.” As well as personal tales from the public, opinions from various sages of Bristol music have been sought to give the exhibition a variety of perspectives – with the help of expert producers, authors, DJs, promoters and venue owners, the exhibition presents different aspects of local music through a series of interactive zones that we fully approve of. There is, for instance, a ‘club room’ where you can go back in time to momentous nights in Bristol venues including Bamboo Club, The Dug Out, The Granary, Lakota and Motion and throw some shapes; as well as a record library where you can flick through albums and leave Bristol music stories and opinions or vote for your favourite local record. We particularly enjoyed reminiscing about first gigs, first records and questionable fashion choices while dressing up and taking selfies in the teenage bedroom the team have created – walls adorned in posters and photos – to playfully illustrate why music is so important to people’s lives. Sink into a sofa in the lounge space and watch indie films detailing the significance of music scenes including reggae, grime and dubstep; or soak up floating visuals of Ashton Court’s party-hosting heyday in the festival area; you can even head inside a graffitied ’90s hatchback for a raucous round of Bristol music carpool karaoke, with anything from Bananarama to Massive Attack pumping on the stereo. “This exhibition is bringing to life the rich music history of Bristol,” says Marti Burgess, owner of Lakota and trustee of Colston Hall. “I am particularly looking forward to being transported back to the Lakota of the Nineties when me, my friends and everyone else used to dress up and dance to the best house music. Lakota had a real party atmosphere and the DJs were the best in the world alongside homegrown Bristol talent.” The M Shed show shines a spotlight on the city’s cherished independent venues and their historic trivia; from the performers permanently banned from Colston Hall to the big players who made it to Bristol – were you around when Bowie played the Anson Rooms in 1972? The team’s public appeal for stories has led to an influx of anecdotes, photographs, fanzines and memorabilia such as the first ‘beat’ suit worn by Mike Tobin (Mike Tobin & the Magnettes) which appear alongside photography by Beezer who documented Bristol music’s 1980s history – when the blossoming scene threw artists such as Roni Size, Mark Stewart and the Wild Bunch to the fore. Authored by Bristol folk themselves, ‘Seven Decades of Sound’ is one to visit for anyone with even a passing interest in the local scene – don’t miss Rough Trade’s pop-up shop on the ground floor of M Shed and be sure to share those super-fan selfies... ■ • The exhibition runs at M Shed until 30 September; entry ‘pay what you think’; bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed

Rumour has it that when Bristol band Johnny Carr and The Cadillacs were on tour in Hamburg during the early Sixties, it was lead singer Johnny’s operatic singing style and cover of You’ll Never Walk Alone that inspired Gerry Marsden of Gerry and The Pacemakers (who were also in Hamburg at the time) to cover it. So you could argue that Liverpool’s anthem can trace its roots back to Bristol – not a lot of people know that. When I saw the draft footage for our ‘club experience’ – where you can travel back in time to immerse yourself in a variety of different club scenes – I was really taken with it. I was like; “I want to hang out in the Bamboo Club and listen to some Skatalites… Beam me up Scotty!” I know it’s been said time and again, but it really does seem that the 1980s and 1990s were a hugely exciting time in terms of music in the city. There was so much going on in all kinds of different scenes – whether it was reggae, punk, post-punk, metal, rock, blues, folk, jazz, hip-hop, trip-hop, techno, jungle, drum and bass… You name it, Bristol had some truly great acts back then in all of those scenes. Lice at The Louisiana – image by Simon Holliday

Punks in Bristol 1982 – image from Frank Passingham and Simon Edwards

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WHAT’S ON IN JUNE Melanie C at Pub in the Park

Grillstock Festival on Bristol Harbourside

Miss Saigon Until Saturday 23 June, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome Cameron Mackintosh’s multi award-winning musical is in Bristol. In the last days of the Vietnam War, 17-year-old Kim is forced to work in a Saigon bar. There she meets and falls in love with an American GI named Chris but they are torn apart by the fall of Saigon; atgtickets.com/bristol

Bristol Comedy Garden Wednesday 6 – Saturday 9 June, times vary, Queen Square This summer’s line-up sees a top crop of comedians taking over the leafy heart of the city, Queen Square. Although some events sold out quickly, the programme also features Mark Watson, Shappi Khorsandi, Milton Jones, Miles Jupp and Jayde Adams. Tickets: £20–25; bristolcomedygarden.co.uk

Wychwood Festival 2018 Friday 1 – Sunday 3 June, Cheltenham Racecourse This popular, award-winning family festival features more than 100 acts performing across four stages, plus there’s music, dance and arts workshops, a circus school and a programme of talks, debates and comedy for all ages. The Gipsy Kings headline the programme, plus legendary kids’ performers Dick and Dom will be taking to the main stage for plenty of family entertainment. There’s also the option to camp overnight. Day tickets and weekend tickets available; wychwoodfestival.com

Tom Kerridge presents Pub in the Park Friday 8 – Sunday 10 June, Royal Victoria Park, Bath Join Michelin-star chef Tom Kerridge for a festival of cracking tunes and amazing food. Razorlight, Tom Odell and former Spice Girl Melanie C lead the music line-up, and you can enjoy great food from pop-up pubs including Tom’s The Hand & Flowers and The Coach. See other top UK chefs including The Pony and Trap’s Josh Eggleton and Number 6’s Paul Ainsworth live on stage for cooking demonstrations. Plus there will be loads of foodie shopping, eating and drinking to be done; pubintheparkuk.com

Effortless French: Bitcoin Big Bang Monday 4 June, 7.30pm, Redgrave Theatre, Clifton Rebel Film Festival is presenting a special screening of Effortless French. Four years after the bankruptcy of MTGox’s global Bitcoin in 2014, this documentary deciphers the complex personality of Mark Karpelès, the former MTGox owner and CEO. Simple geek, genius, manipulator, scammer – who really is this young Frenchman living in Tokyo? The directors Vincent Gonon and Xavier Sayanoff will be joining the event to share their personal take on the the story. There will also be a pop-up Bitcoin bar where you can exchange your hard-hodled cryptocurrency for liquid refreshment. Tickets: £12/£10; rebelfilmfestival.com 36 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Wonder Women: The Ladyboys of Bangkok Friday 8 – Saturday 23 June, times vary, The Sabai Pavilion, Durdham Downs, Stoke Road, Bristol Celebrating 20 years, The Lady Boys of Bangkok’s Wonder Women Tour will take the cabaret show to a new level, celebrating in style with the cast’s unique takes on Cher, Lady Gaga, Rihanna, Diana Ross, Pink, Shirley Bassey, and even Wonder Woman herself. From Comic Con to the catwalk, the silver screen to the stage, this year’s show has it all. There’s a two-for-one deal on all seats on Tuesdays; all seats £10 on the opening night. Tel: 0871 705 0705; ladyboysofbangkok.co.uk

BS9 Arts Trail Saturday 9 – Sunday 10 June, 11am – 5pm, locations around Stoke Bishop, Westbury-on-Trym and Henleaze To celebrate the fifth birthday, 14 venues will be open throughout the weekend for visitors to browse a high range of work by 76 artists – from painting to textiles; jewellery to ceramics, and much more. Many venues will offer refreshments so you can enjoy a summer walk around BS9, exploring art and beautiful scenery with opportunities to sample delicious food and drinks along the way. Entry to all venues is free, all ages welcome. A trail map and information on disabled access can be found at: bs9arts.co.uk Green Squares and Secret Gardens Saturday 9 – Sunday 10 June, opening times vary, various locations in BS8 Behind of many of the elegant terraces and crescents of Clifton, Cliftonwood and Hotwells are hidden gardens. This weekend will provide an opportunity to visit these communal gardens that are not usually accessible to the public. There will be refreshments, talks and guided walks throughout. £5 per person, allows entry into all the gardens all weekend. See the full programme online; gssg-bristol.com Con-form: UWE’s Creative Industries Degree Show Saturday 9 – Wednesday 13 June, times vary, UWE campus locations at Arnolfini, Bower Ashton and Spike Island, Bristol UWE Bristol’s annual Creative Industries degree show, Con-form, is back showcasing work from more than 500 talented graduates from undergraduate and postgraduate art, design, film and journalism programmes. This year’s theme is inspired by students of the past who have protested for various causes; uwe.ac.uk


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EDITOR’S PICK... A MONSTER CALLS THURSDAY 31 MAY – SATURDAY 16 JUNE, TIMES VARY, BRISTOL OLD VIC

Thirteen-year-old Conor and his mum have managed just fine since his dad moved to America. But now his mum’s very sick and she’s not getting any better. His grandmother can’t stop interfering and the kids at school won’t look him in the eye. Then, one night, Conor is woken by something at his window. A monster, ancient and wild, has come walking. It’s come to tell Conor tales from when it walked before. And when it’s finished, Conor must tell his own story and face his deepest fears. Suitable for ages 10+. Tickets: £7.50 – £39. • bristololdvic.org.uk

Red Bull Cut It Saturday 9 June, 10am – 5pm, Cheddar, Somerset Cut It, a new and unique lawnmower racing event (!) screeches into Cheddar this summer. This surprisingly high-octane race will see modified ride-on lawnmowers hit speeds of over 50mph as they hurtle over twists, turns, rollers, and jumps. Experts and novices will take to the turf to weed out the competition over four quirky tracks, designed by Red Bull in partnership with the British Lawnmower Association. Entries £15 per lawnmower, which can be used by up to four drivers; free for spectators. Register: redbull.co.uk/cutit

A Sense of the Divine – Pictures at a Concert Hall Saturday 9 June, 7.30pm, St George’s Bristol Exultate Singers explore the relationship between paintings and music as Dr Beth Williamson introduces artwork from across the centuries including Leonardo da Vinci, Canaletto and Monet, while the choir perform music associated with and inspired by these paintings. £24 – £15; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk; exultatesingers.org Forest Live Thursday 14 – Sunday 17 June,

Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire Paloma Faith and George Ezra may be sold out, but there’s still time to get tickets to enjoy this popular outdoor concert season with performances from mult-million record-selling The Script on Thursday, while Paul Heaton and Jacqui Abbott will take to the stage on Friday. Tel: 03000 680400; forestry.gov.uk A Night of All Things Cognac Thursday 14 June, 7 – 10pm, The Milk Thistle, Colston Avenue A decadent night of fine food and drink hosted in The Milk Thistle’s private dining

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Smoked & Uncut Festival at The Pig near Bath

Strictly’s Joanne Clifton stars in Flashdance at Bristol Hippodrome

Red Bull Cut It in Cheddar

room. The chefs from The Ox will be creating a very special three-course French-inspired dinner, paired with a Hennessy cocktail flight and rounded off with a tutored Cognac tasting. £65 per person; milkthistlebristol.com

Paul Lewis, one of the leading musicians of his generation, continues his journey through the piano music of Haydn, Brahms and Beethoven. Tickets: £15 – £32; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

Planetarium Nights Thursday 14, 21, 28 June, times vary, We The Curious The popular series of night-time planetarium shows continue with a mix of winter, spring, and summer stargazing, as well as an exploration of the solar system. Tickets: £8.50–£6.50; wethecurious.org

Wish You Were Here: The Fulldome Experience Friday 22 June, times vary, We The Curious Following on from the success of Dark Side of the Moon; The Fulldome Experience, Pink Floyd fans can now enjoy the unique experience of listening to this acclaimed 1975 album enriched with 360˚ psychedelic visuals in the planetarium. 16+. £8.50/£9.95; wethecurious.org

Moscow Drug Club and Tango Calor Thursday 14 June, 8pm, St George’s Bristol A curious musical place where certain elements of 1930s Berlin Cabaret, Hot Club de France, Nuevo Tango and Gypsy Campfire meet. Combining their original material with songs by the likes of Jaques Brel, Leornard Cohen, and Bertolt Brecht, Moscow Drug Club provide an intoxicating and intimate musical experience. Tickets: £15–£5; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk Bristol Choral Society: Bach Magnificat Saturday 16 June, 7.30pm, Bristol Cathedral Bristol Choral Society ends its season on an upbeat note with Bach’s Magnificat – a feast of trumpets-and-drums jubilation leavened with dazzling word painting. Conducted by Hilary Campbell. £5 – £30. Tickets available from Colston Hall; colstonhall.org George’s Ball Saturday 16 June, 6.30pm till late, The Grand Hotel, Bristol A charity ball to raise funds for Meningitis Research Foundation and Meningitis Now, organised in memory of George, a St Brendan’s Sixth Form College student who died in 2017 from Group B meningococcal disease. Guests can enjoy a drink on arrival, and a three-course meal, as well as a raffle and a disco. Tickets: £55; meningitis.org/George Paul Lewis – Piano Thursday 21 June, 7.30pm, St George’s Bristol In the second of his new four-part series, 38 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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UB40: Skyline Series Saturday 23 June, gates 6pm, Amphitheatre, Bristol Harbourside Worldwide platinum-selling British reggae band UB40 have been pumping out hits such as Red Red Wine and Cherry Oh Baby since 1978 – see them live! Tickets from £41.80; seetickets.com/tour/skyline-series Flashdance Monday 25 – Saturday 30 June, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome The inspiring and unforgettable story of Alex, a determined welder who dreams of becoming a professional dancer. When a romance complicates her ambitions, she harnesses it to drive her dream of attending Shipley Dance Academy; atgtickets.com/bristol The Poet who loved the War: Ivor Gurney Monday 25 June, 7.30pm, The Lansdown, Clifton Road As part of Clifton International Festival of Music, uncover the the remarkable story of the First World War soldier-poet-composer Ivor Gurney, who joined up in the hope that the army life would help ease a mental health condition. Eventually the realities of war took their toll and he spent the last 15 years of his life in an asylum. The poetry he wrote there is uniquely powerful, capturing the experience of the ordinary soldier. Gurney was also an accomplished composer and all the music used in this film is his own, some of it hauntingly written on the Western Front. Tickets: £5–£10, includes a welcome drink; colstonhall.org; cliftonfestival.com

Grease: A 40th Anniversary Special Tuesday 26 June, doors 7pm for 7.30pm, Redgrave Theatre, Clifton The pop culture phenomenon turns 40 this month and there’s only one way to celebrate – with a good ol’ sing-a-long. Indulge yourself with favourite songs from one of the most successful and beloved musical movies of all time, and enjoy this classic in its digitally restored glory. £16/£13; bristolfilmfestival.com The Elephant Man Tuesday 26 June – Saturday 7 July, times vary, Bristol Old Vic Joseph Merrick is The Elephant Man. The sordid spectacle of a travelling freak show, he moves from city to city, mercilessly put on display to the horrified delight of Victorian audiences. A London surgeon also takes a keen interest, but is soon faced with a moral dilemma – to help Merrick or to use him to advance his scientific career? Ages 14+, £7.50 – £31.50; bristololdvic.org.uk Smoked & Uncut Saturday 30 June, 12 – 10pm, The Pig, Pensford near Bath Classic festi-food is the order of the day across this festival, but if you fancy tucking into something a little heartier then head to one of the feasting tents where chef Angela Hartnett and her culinary friends will be hosting longtable three-course feasts in The Field Kitchen pop-up, and chef Mark Hix will be paying homage to the British love of a classic Indian takeaway. Make the most of the festival vibes and spectacular surroundings and sleep under the stars in your very own bell-tent if you fancy camping. Headlining the music side will be Paul Carrack, and Daisy Lowe will be the guest DJ; smokedanduncut.com Bristol Concert Orchestra Saturday 30 June, 7.30pm, St Mary Redcliffe Church This concert of two halves opens with Stokowski’s string arrangement of Purcell’s heartrending Dido’s Lament, an effective prelude to Vaughan Williams’ empassioned plea for peace Dona nobis pacem. The second half features Berlioz’s incredible Symphonie Fantastique. Tickets: £10 – £15, online or on the door; bristolconcertorchestra.org.uk


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Duke Ellington – Sacred Concert Saturday 30 June, 7.30pm, Redland Hall, Redmaids’ High School, Bristol Duke Ellington composed some of America’s greatest jazz music. But Ellington himself considered his Sacred Concert to be “the most important thing I’ve ever done”. This pivotal work signified a new musical movement – one that combined jazz and spirituality, exhibiting Ellington’s showmanship and his deep religious faith. Bristol Bach Choir perform with Swing Machine Jazz Orchestra. £20–£5. Tel: 0117 214 0721; bristolbach.org.uk In The Beginning: Bristol Chamber Choir Sunday 1 July, 3pm, St Stephen’s Church, St Stephen’s Avenue, Bristol Bristol Chamber Choir presents music by Aaron Copland and Cyril Rootham with Charlotte Newstead (soprano) and John Marsh (piano), featuring the works of Emily Dickinson and settings of Mary Coleridge. Tickets: £10, from Opus 13, St Michael’s Hill, or available on the door; bristolchamberchoir.org.uk The Frome Festival Friday 6 – Sunday 15 July, various locations around Frome The Frome Festival has been the town’s biggest celebration of the arts for 17 years. This year’s event will feature nearly 200 events including a mix of opera, pop, choral, jazz and folk music, plus theatre, workshops,

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Aston Merrygold will be at The Frome Festival

Summertime: Bristol Cabot Choir Saturday 7 July, 7.30pm, St Peters Church, Henleaze Bristol Cabot Choir will perform music from across the Atlantic including Gershwin and Cole Porter, plus newly commissioned pieces from Danish composer Jonas Hunt. Conducted by Rebecca Holdeman. Tickets: £5/£15, from Opus, St Michael’s Hill; opus13.co.uk; bristolcabotchoir.org

exhibitions, films and talks. Headline acts include JLS singer and Strictly contestant Aston Merrygold, Badly Drawn Boy and Scottish folk rockers Blazin’ Fiddles. The festival will be celebrating the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein with a variety of events, including a talk on works of film director Terence Fisher. For the full programme, visit: fromefestival.co.uk

Birdsong Tuesday 10 – Saturday 14 July, times vary, Bristol Old Vic Marking the centenary of the First World War, Birdsong is the critically-acclaimed stage show based on the novel by Sebastian Faulks. In pre-war France, a young Stephen Wraysford embarks on a passionate and dangerous affair with the beautiful Isabelle Azaire that turns their world upside down. 12+. £12.50 – £33.50; bristololdvic.org.uk

Bristol Male Voice Choir Saturday 7 July, 7.30pm, All Saints Church, Pembroke Road, Clifton An anniversary concert with world-famous special guests the Morriston Orpheus male voice choir conducted by Joy Amman Davies. Baritone Naill Allen from Only Men Aloud will be making his Bristol debut, plus Emma Britton from BBC Radio Bristol will present the concert. £15, buy online or on the door; bristolmvc.org.uk

The Play That Goes Wrong Monday 16 – Saturday 21 July, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome It’s Fawlty Towers meets Noises Off in this multi award-winning smash hit comedy. The Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society are putting on a 1920s murder mystery, but everything that can go wrong, does! As the accident-prone thesps battle on against all the odds to reach their final curtain call, hilarious results ensue; atgtickets.com/bristol n


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ARTS & CULTURE

SPRINGFIELD IN SOUTHVILLE American pop culture’s First Family are taking a vacation this summer – look out for them at this year’s Upfest

K

eeping schtum about the biggest and most prestigious Upfest collaboration ever was something of a Herculean task for everyone entrusted with the knowledge in the run up to the recent announcement from Bristol’s beloved street art festival. Upfest will be south of the river once more this summer from 28 to 30 July and, in celebration of its 10th anniversary (where did that decade go?) it will feature animated megastar family, The Simpsons. Festival-goers can expect interpretations of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie from renowned artists throughout the festival – now known worldwide for being the largest of its kind in Europe. Attracting over 400 talented artists painting 50 venues throughout Bedminster and Southville, the event sees participants travel from 70 countries and across the UK to paint live on 60,000 sq ft of surfaces in front of around 50,000 visitors across the weekend – which also features music stages, art workshops and other fun-filled community activities to round off the visual spectacular. This year, three Upfest artists have been selected by The Simpsons creator Matt Groening to bring the characters to life in their own unique styles. First up is Bao, born and based in Hong Kong and known for her freestyle work with vibrant murals and illustrations. Secondly there’s Bristol’s own Soker – a wildstyle writer who has been 42 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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putting his mark on the city since the late ’80s – and not forgetting Nomad Clan. The third to be handpicked, the Clan comprises of sought-after duo Cbloxx and AYLO – well revered on the international street art scene. The festival received a whopping 1,100 applications from artists everywhere from Denmark to South Africa, Malta, Argentina and Nepal, and organisers are now working through the huge number to whittle it down to the final line-up. “We’re incredibly pumped to be celebrating the iconic characters of The Simpsons – it’s a show truly loved by people of all ages,” says Steve Hayles, Upfest founder. “2018 marks a significant milestone for us, being our 10th anniversary. We wanted to go big and given the global phenomenon of The Simpsons, it’s the perfect collaboration.” For anyone who’s been living under a rock for the past few decades, and to give an idea of what a coup this has been for the festival, The Simpsons is the longest-running primetime scripted show in television history, which exploded into a cultural phenomenon back in 1990 and has remained one of the most groundbreaking and innovative entertainment franchises, recognisable throughout the world. Currently airing its 29th season, the show has won 32 Emmy Awards, was the first animated series to win a Peabody Award, and was nominated for an Academy Award in 2012 for the theatrical short


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CARTOON COUP: Upfest has secured the prestigious collaboration with The Simpsons creator to celebrate the street art festival’s 10th anniversary

We adore Manchester duo Nomad Clan’s distinctive style

Bao is Hong Kong-born and based; specialising in vibrant murals and illustrations

The Longest Daycare. Then, of course, there was The Simpsons Movie which turned out to be a hit feature film, and the series was honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2000. It has also been named ‘Best Show of the 20th Century’ by Time Magazine. “I feel honoured to have been chosen by Matt Groening and Upfest to be a part of the celebrations at this year’s festival, as a fan of The Simpsons since it began, and also having started painting at the same time,” says Soker. “It’s now nearly 30 years since el Barto and myself first started our graffiti careers and I couldn’t have asked for a better way of celebrating this occasion.” All three Upfest artists to be chosen have such unique and distinctive styles; we can’t wait to see their takes on Springfield’s finest.

• To be the first to hear about the anniversary plans as they are announced, keep an eye on the social media channels (@upfest) and website; upfest.co.uk

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STATE OF THE ART The BS9 Arts Trail, various venues, 9 & 10 June The trail celebrates its fifth anniversary this month. From 11am to 5pm on both Saturday and Sunday, 14 venues will be ready to welcome visitors in to browse the huge range of artwork on display. All of it is made by the 76 artists taking part and includes painting, print, textiles, jewellery, ceramics, photography and much more. The artists love to discuss their work, so feel free to ask them about how it’s created. There is no pressure to buy, but prices are often lower when you purchase directly from the artist. Entry to all venues is free and both adults and children are welcome. A trail map and information on disabled access can be found on the website and the printed version of the map can be found at cafes, shops and libraries across the city in the run up to the trail. The mix of venues comprises eight artists’ homes, two primary schools (Westbury on Trym and also Elmlea – which is hosting a drop-in Miss Rochie Makes workshop on the Saturday), a scout hut, the Stoke Bishop Village Hall, Oatley House Main Hall, St Monica Trust and the University of Bristol Botanic Garden. Show your map at the welcome lodge at the Botanic Garden and enjoy free entry to the whole garden. See the work of Sarah Mullen among many others

Another Way of Telling, Fox Talbot Museum: Lacock Abbey, until 9 September Lacock’s second exhibition of 2018 to celebrate the work of women photographers features works from two photographic series that focus on Japanese and Indian interiors in temples, shrines and palaces occupied by animals – bringing folk tales and fables to life in a mesmerising manner. Since 2012, artist and photographer Karen Knorr has been visiting India and Japan to research and reflect on traditions connected to Mughal period palaces in India and Shinto and Buddhist heritage sites in Japan. Her research into structures, colours, textures, nature and local fables has led to these images infused with the intense feelings of past history and sanctified spaces, inhabited not by people but by animals reflecting the traditions of storytelling. Lions, tigers, peacocks and cranes inhabit and somehow re-animate the rooms they occupy. These creatures, symbolic of legends and myths, lounge in Mughal palaces and stand majestically against distinct Japanese interiors and architecture. • nationaltrust.org.uk/lacock

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• bs9arts.co.uk

The Survivors by Karen Knorr


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Marla Allison: Painter From The Desert, Rainmaker Gallery, 6 June – 11 August

Ancient Layers of the Earth by Marla Allison

This solo exhibition showcases recent works by contemporary Native American artist Marla Allison. It presents acrylic paintings produced in her Laguna Pueblo desert studio alongside canvases painted during a 30-day artist residency in Bristol. As an artist from New Mexico, Marla is proud of her Laguna Pueblo identity and heritage, but also counts Pablo Picasso and Paul Klee among her influences. She combines all these elements to produce her own fresh, contemporary style. “I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered,’ she says. “I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started… My art is what lets me connect the past to my future. My paintings are based on the contemporary, which borrows from the past. I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.” • rainmakerart.co.uk

RING, Diana Porter Jewellery, until 30 June Diana’s annual wedding and engagement ring exhibition is back with an exciting mix of fine contemporary jewellery. Handpicked by the expert team, this curated exhibition features a range of talented designers, each chosen for their unique take on bridal jewellery. They have managed to secure some of the finest UK and international designers along with a selection of their most exclusive designs. There are men’s and women’s wedding bands, engagement rings and eternity bands; so, whether you’re thinking of tying the knot, recently engaged or just a ring enthusiast there is plenty of inspiration for all. This exhibition features the work of Disa Allsopp, Jacqueline Cullen, Jo Pond, Kim Victoria, Lene Vibe, Margaux Clavel, Nina Bukvic, Shivani Patel, Variance Objects and Yen. • dianaporter.co.uk

● Emma Jean Kemp: The Art of Acrobatics, Hours Gallery at Colston Yard, 8 – 24 June An exhibition exploring the movement and shapes created by acrobatics. With the explosion of the internet, it is easy to access images of people doing incredible things around the world, including acrobatics. These records are not only visually awe-inspiring but also a reminder of the impressive capabilities of the human body and what can be achieved with time and dedication. We are the most adaptive species on the planet and capable of so many things when we put our minds to it. This exhibition will explore some of these beautiful movements, from cartwheels, to handstand variations and somersaults. There will be sculptures depicting the pinnacle of a movement: the moment that is worked at for so long to reach. There will also be drawings and prints illustrating motion through time: exploring the lines and shape of the movement, giving us insight into the exertion that flashes by us. On the opening night (8 June, from 6pm-9pm) there will be some performances by dancers and acrobats, including Capoeira. • hours-space.com; emmajeankemp.com

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We can’t get enough of this somewhat haunting image from ‘Snapshot of a Collection’

A CASE OF

MANIA Lizzie Lloyd meets the local artist whose work created quite the stir at this year’s Oscars

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MUSIC

ndrew Mania is a Bristol-based artist who recently sparked much international media attention. A shirt on which he painted a portrait of actor Timothée Chalamet was worn by Hollywood director, screenwriter and producer, James Ivory, to collect his award for best adapted screenplay at the 2018 Oscars and the press went wild. We met up with Andrew in his studio in Bristol as he was preparing for his current exhibition, ‘Snapshot of a Collection’, at Spike Island.

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his works – they really relate to my portraits because of the way that he often takes pictures of people in front of fabric or patterned backdrops. Most of my collection comes from the 1930s, 1940s and some from the late 19th century as well. This is the period where photography started to be used as an art form, experimentally, rather than as just documentary. I really like photos that look different from the usual snapshot, that have something strange or awkward about them.

Lizzie: So what inspired you to paint a portrait on a shirt? Andrew: I saw this 2017 film called Call Me by Your Name, written by James Ivory. It’s really beautiful. There’s a shirt in it that the character Elio Perlman wears that I fell in love with. It has faces all over it – it reminded me of a Matisse and I wanted one like it. I spent weeks trying to find one online. I read somewhere that it was vintage and, realising I probably wouldn’t find one, decided to make my own. I really like the Elio character – he’s got this kind of wide-eyed openness that reminds me of people I’ve drawn in previous works – so I ended up painting his face onto the shirt. While in London I met up with a friend of mine, Xavier Solomon – curator of the Frick Collection in New York – and I was wearing one of my shirts. He took a picture of me and sent it to James Ivory who replied, soon after, that he really liked it and asked how he could get one so I made him one. The next day he suggested that if he got nominated for the Oscar he’d wear it to the ceremony.

And what’s next for you? I’m in the process of designing some t-shirts with James Ivory using the Elio image – these will be affordable and available to everyone. ■ • ‘Snapshot of a Collection’ runs until 8 July 2018; spikeisland.org.uk

Were you surprised by all the media attention? Yeah! When James appeared on the red carpet wearing it, within minutes the press was talking about it on Twitter. Since then I’ve done three different interviews for the BBC and also interviews with Vogue, Vanity Fair, Vice, ID and In Style. How do the shirts relate to your wider arts practice? It’s all quite new to me. I haven’t really worked out if they are fashion, or illustration, or art, or sculpture or a form of performance art. It’s kind of all those things combined. And of course lots of your work involves portraits too... I’ve always found portraits the most natural thing for me to do, since I was a teenager. It’s about the way the eyes of a portrait draw you in, how that eye contact creates a dialogue. Looking at portraits can be like looking at yourself while looking at another person. And even though I always draw other people, in many ways I think of them as self-portraits too. I’m also really interested in the gaze, in looking at people looking. Sometimes I work, with permission, from people’s profile pictures from social media. I’ve become interested in the way people project an idea of themselves in a selfie.

James Ivory wearing Andrew’s shirt

From the Spike Island show

Looking around your studio, you’re clearly interested in combining portraits with colour, pattern and fabric, sometimes in the drawings themselves but sometimes by hanging your framed drawings onto fabric that you have draped across your walls. I collect a lot of things for my house and these sometimes inspire my work, because of their material and texture. So, in a way, I see what I do in my artwork as an extension of interior decorating and vice versa. So what have you been doing since receiving all this attention? Preparing for my show at Spike Island. I’ve also been making some new hand-painted shirts ready for the Dallas Art Fair for Division of Labour and Copperfield. I’ve made two identical pieces that the two gallerists will be wearing on the stand so they’ll be like twins! I’m also showing with Coates and Scarry in New York in June. What can we expect from your Spike Island exhibition? It’s an exhibition of my collection of vintage photographs but there will be one or two drawings in there too. How I live with artwork in my home is really important to me so this exhibition is about extending a domestic setting into a gallery space. Can you tell us about the photography collection that you’re showing? I’ve been collecting photographs for about 15 years. I like the work of Carl Van Vechten, a photographer from the 1940s. I have about 80 of

‘Connor 2017’

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 49


Craft.qxp_Layout 7 25/05/2018 12:57 Page 1

CRAFT | TEXTILES

NATURE’S PALETTE If you’ve an interest in home-dyeing or botanicals, take a couple of leaves out of Babs Behan’s debut book Photography by Kim Lightbody

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rganic dyes have been used for thousands of years – the earliest record dates back to China in 2600 BC, and there were natural-dyed textiles found preserved in the tomb of Tutankhamun. Bristol botanical dye expert Babs Behan believes we should return to these ancient practices, not only for their beauty, but as a solution to today’s polluting textile industry. Having first learnt about natural dyeing and printing processes in India, and after six years of learning artisanal techniques, she returned to the UK to develop a manufacturing system using locally sourced fibres and set up a natural dye studio in Bristol, creating dyed cloth for designers and workshops. She’s now written a book – Botanical Inks: Plant-to-Print Dyes, Techniques and Projects – on how to transform flowers, foraged plants and even recycled food waste into dyes and inks, and imbue textiles and paper with beautiful hues. Look out for Babs’ dye garden at Feed Bristol on Frenchay Park Road, where she will be growing a range of plants and flowers suitable for workshops and products and, if you’re keen to have a go at the craft, we’ve a sneak preview of the book right here...

The humble household onion Onion (allium cepa) is an allium, from the family Liliaceae. It is found on every continent and may have been growing wild since pre-civilisation. It’s thought that the Ancient Egyptians believed the onion bestowed strength and that its concentric spherical rings symbolised eternity. Brown and red onions are a classic home-dyer’s choice – there’s always a plentiful supply, and the colour they give is surprisingly rich, making them a favourite when you want an impressive result with little effort. Brown skins make beautiful yellow tones when kept below a boil, while boiling the skins can provide rich burnt orange and rust-coloured dyes. Red skins offer slightly plummier tones. When used together, they create a vibrant, multi-dimensional hue. Onions are easy to grow from sets and take about three to four months to be ready to harvest. Store up supplies of onion skins from your own cooking – if you need more, ask a local greengrocer for the waste from the bottom of their boxes, or go to cafés or food producers and ask them to put aside a bag for you. Apparently, more than 500,000 tonnes of onion waste is thrown away every year in Europe. Imagine how much dye we could be making with all of that. Store dry onion skins in paper bags or cardboard boxes. Just make sure that it’s only the dry skins you have, and not any of the fleshy bits, and that they are fully dried out before going into storage, or things can get really smelly. Onion doesn’t need to be paired with a mordant [a substance, typically an inorganic oxide, that combines with a dye or stain and thereby fixes it in a material] but using one can deepen colours and strengthen the colourfastness of the dye. You should use the mordant that best suits the fibre you’re dyeing.

Babs creates her natural-dyed textiles in her Bristol studio

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CRAFT | TEXTILES

Learn to make everything from soothing sleep masks to a pretty floral hapazome print in Babs’ debut book

Create yourself some beautifully rustic table linen using the humble household onion

Making a dye bath Weigh your chosen fibre after it has been washed, scoured and dried. For a deep shade, use 50% of the weight of the fibre in skin – for example, for 400g of fibre, use 200g of onion. Onion skins are super-easy and quick to dye with. No need to chop them, simply put them in the dye pot and pour in enough water to allow the fibre to move freely. Bring to a simmer for 30 minutes. You’ll see the colour of the water changing and deepening quite quickly. Strain out the onion skins and use the liquid as the dye bath. Dye bath method: Suitable with the hot dyeing method [check out the book for more on this technique]. For the hot dye, simmer for about 30 minutes, or until you have the desired shade. You can use the dye bath a second time to get paler shades. Modifer: An acidic modifier will shift colours towards orangey yellow. An alkaline modifier will move colours towards green.

Making table linen There’s something special about using food waste to make beautiful, decorative table linen – and it’s a great conversation piece when you gather around the table with friends. Consider the range of colours you can create: rich bronze from onion skins, soft dusty pinks from avocado rind and pit, purple from red cabbage ends, yellow from carrot tops, and an array of beige and greens from coffee grounds or various types of tea leaves. Lengths of yellow onion-dyed linen, with soft edges, add a touch of romantic style. I love the rustic, crumpled look of freshly washed linen, but you can try any natural fabrics for making runners and napkins. You might also like to use larger swathes of fabric to make a full tablecloth or bed throw. Layer up different qualities of linen, from light, loose weave to thicker, heavier weights. You will need: Tape measure, dyed fabric, fabric scissors, iron and ironing board, dressmaker’s pins, sewing machine, sewing thread. Dye material: Onion skins. You’ll need 100% of the weight of the washed, scoured and dried fabric in skins – so for 500g of fabric, you’ll need 500g of dry onion skins.

Fabric: Irish linen (plant fibre). You can also use organic cotton, which would give a similar rustic finish. Or silk (animal fibre) is wonderful for a more romantic look. Mordant: For Irish linen, use two-step mineral mordant, oak gall, alum and soda ash [more on this in Babs’ book]. Dye method: Dye bath, hot dyeing method. For a similar shade, leave the fabric in the dye bath on a simmer for one hour. Then take off the heat and leave in the dye bath overnight. Modifer: I haven’t used a modifier in this project, but an acidic modifier such as lemon juice or light vinegar will give brighter hues. • Measure the table width or length, depending on where you want the runner to sit. A table runner looks good when it’s about one third of the width of the table, and running down the middle lengthways. So if the table is 120cm wide, the runner should be 40cm wide. If you want to leave the runner in place for dinner parties, make sure there is enough space on each side for placemats, without them overlapping the runner. • The length of the runner should overhang the ends of the table by about 15-25cm on each end. So, if the table is 175cm long, the table runner will be 190-200cm long. Napkins are square, and can be any size from 40 x 40cm to 50 x 50cm. Larger sizes tend to be for formal events, to be folded into shapes or around silverware. • When you’ve established what sizes you need, cut all the pieces from the fabric. I’ve left a rough, frayed hem as I like the rustic look. If you like a neater finish, allow 2cm extra all round each piece for a hem. • Make a double hem by folding the edges of each piece under by 1cm to the wrong side and then fold under again by 1cm. Press the folds with the iron and then pin into place, placing the pins at a right angle to the edge so that the needle can sew over them. • Using the sewing machine, sew the hem in place all round the edges, close to the first fold. ■ • Adapted from Botanical Inks by Babs Behan (Quadrille, £16.99); botanicalinks.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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CRAFT | JEWELLERY

A hidden makery IN MANGOTSFIELD Kim Thomson’s jewellery-making workshops are a top shout if you need yourself some creative relaxation

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t was a cracking Instagram shot of Kim Thomson’s puppy Pepper leaping joyfully into the air that put this local crafter on our radar – and, indeed, photography is one of Kim’s many creative talents along with various other arty skills – but it was the fruits of her jewellery workshops that had us hankering to try our hand at a bit of silversmithing. We could have chosen to attend her ring-in-a-day course at Bristol Folk House, but instead opted to fly solo and visit her domestic workspace north-east of Bristol – the city-centre sessions sell out super-quick and besides, the home visit option is more flexible and bookable on demand. Just let Kim know what works for you and she’ll schedule a private workshop around that; tailoring a class to your preferences if you have a specific item or design in mind, or helping to inspire creative ideas with her range of sample pieces. Happy to have an excuse to return to a lesser-visited part of town, we hop into the car and head for Mangotsfield. It can potentially be pretty daunting, entering into a person’s own home for a lesson, but Kim’s place is as welcoming as they come; her garden studio painted green, warmly lit and fitted with a gorgeous wooden workbench complete with suede jewellers’ skins in ochre. These hang from each work station to catch filings and rogue pieces of metal while, above, a collection of cute old Folkhouse postcards, family pictures and empty golden syrup tins, filled with crafting gadgets, add character. “I have a bit of a tool habit,” Kim says, gesturing towards the rows of differently sized hammers and buffing brushes around the room, and setting me up with a strip of my chosen silver. It’s clear she loves a challenge – she recently set herself a 100-day project that required her to turn the same piece of silver into something completely different every day – and people come to her with all sorts of items they want to incorporate into their creation. “Everything from family heirlooms to roadkill – yep, roadkill,” she says – so you aren’t ever to feel your request is too left field. Kim often works with young adults with additional needs as part of her community workshops and runs craft-based hen-party sessions so she’s good with all sorts of people and is experienced in adapting classes for participants with a range of learning styles or disabilities. During our mini-session we make a hammer textured ring, measuring the correct finger circumference and using a ball pein hammer to give the silver a classic dimpled texture – by whacking 52 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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seven bells out of it. Having filed the ends flat, we use half-round pliers to bend the straight wire until the ends match up perfectly and no daylight can be seen through the join. All the while, Pepper tailwags around our feet, adding to the cosy feel alongside the eclectic playlist soundtracking the workbench activity – which is only paused for herbal tea glugging and biscuit nibbling. Next comes the part of metalwork we remember loving at school; soldering. We apply some ‘flux’ – a compound that keeps the work clean by blocking oxygen – plus a tiny piece of solder to the join and give it a good blowtorching until the solder flies up the tiny gap. Quenched in water and popped into the ‘pickle pot’ to be cleaned, the ring goes onto a mandrel (or steel former) which we set about wallopping with a rawhide mallet to make the silver perfectly round and work-harden it so it keeps its shape during wear. It’s remarkably therapeutic – must be something to do with all that bashing – we reflect as we sand and polish our rather respectable new product. If you’re considering adding another string to your bow with a spot of silversmithing, we reckon a workshop with Kim is a great shout – and, come on, with optional puppy cuddles into the bargain? Can’t say fairer than that. • A three-hour workshop on your own design costs £90; makeit.kim


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Festival Beauty & Fashion v3.qxp_Layout 1 23/05/2018 12:02 Page 1

BEAUTY

FESTIVAL GLAM It’s the season we’ve all been waiting for – grab those bumbags and apply that (eco-friendly) glitter. Crystal Rose shares her fashion and beauty must-haves for the festival months

Planning a get-ready-together session before heading to where the party’s at? Glittermasque offers festival makeup for events, using bioglitter. Look out for the limited summer collection launching 1 June. • glittermasque.co.uk

Need to hit refresh during your festival stint? This spray revitalises the skin for all-over illumination.

Add some sparkle to those lashes with these gemstone falsies by NicLove.

£22, Too Faced; debenhams.com

£10; wildthing.com

What use would all the glitter goods be without the primer to minimise the fallout? Hold every sparkle of your masterpiece in place. £8, Glitter Primer Glue, NYX; boots.com

Glitter-packed holographic gloss, perfect for that funky lip fix. £16, Cosmic Gloss Lip Glitter, Fenty Beauty; harveynichols.com

Create your own eye-catching looks with these ‘voodoo gems’ from Bristol’s Shine Shack with Stick & Fix to keep them in position all festival long. £8 per pack; shineshack.co.uk

Biodegradable glitter is finally here! This fully eco-friendly festival must-have by Dust & Dance is for use on your face, body, nails and hair. £3.50 per pot; £10 for three; handmade7thsea.co.uk

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FASHION

QUAY AUSTRALIA BLACK ‘SOMERSET’ AVIATOR SUNGLASSES Frameless and reflective with a sleek brow bar, these polished aviators are a modernised twist on the shade game

VOSS PINK FLUFFY SANDALS Statement footwear with extra sass. With adjustable straps at the ankle and heel, these sure won’t go unnoticed

£45; debenhams.com

£85; drmartens.com

ETHNIC TURQUOISE DIAMOND AMULET NECKLACE Rock the festival with this statement piece from Thomas Sabo £238; houseoffraser.co.uk

CHIC BRAID FEDORA HAT Take your outfit to the next level with metallic threads, rose gold metal detailing and a contrasting brim £20; accessorize.com RAINBOW BEIGE FESTIVAL PLAYSUIT This frill Bardot playsuit in bodycon from Bristolbased Wildthing is super-cute and features a femina magicae print designed by L.O.M £105; wildthing.com SEQUIN ROMPER Embellished with multicoloured sequins this is sure to bring all the glitz to your festival wardrobe £60; topshop.com ORCHID BUMBAG For many, a festival outfit is not complete without that all-important bumbag. This one by Bristolbased Butchi & Gosmos has shimmering patterns and each bag is uniquely made to order £22; thatthing.co

CRYSTAL CHARM HAIR RINGS Be creative; try adding them to those on-trend braids... CAMBRIDGE TALL BOOTS With their Britpop-meetsBadminton vibe, these trusty waterproof wellies will get you through the mud in style. £110; muckbootcompany.co.uk

£11; regalrose.co.uk RAINBOW BLACK FRILL JUMPSUIT Nothing can compare to a full-length catsuit for partying attire. Dip yourself in glitter and you’re good to go. £135; wildthing.com

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TRAVEL

THE REMAIN CAMPAIGN As a nation we’re spending more and more on staycations – billions we’re told – and as the Brexit process chugs on, rather than facing an unfavourable exchange rate, holidaying on home soil may well seem increasingly appealing. Here are a few pleasant pastures new to consider adjourning to...

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hey can often save you a bit of money; they can be better for the environment with no need to rack up any air miles; they can be more convenient and cut out departure lounge hours: staycations are still on the rise. Considering the pound isn’t at its strongest, and just how much there is to do and see in many parts of the UK – with tough competition between regions to produce the most dynamic cultural calendar – domestic breaks are seeming ever more attractive to many. Every individual, couple, family or group of pals’ needs and preferences are different but today there seems to be something super-cool to suit us all. Whether an action-packed trip or doing the absolute bare minimum is top of the agenda, check out our suggestions for a stimulating Great British break...

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A camper trip means you can rock up to many a beautiful British location and get ringside seats

FOR: LIFE AMONG THE LEAVES

A stilted affair surrounded by serene Somerset greenery, The Birdhouse in Crewkerne is a top shout. Clad in local cedar, it looks like a giant bird box and inside there’s a vaulted ceiling, curved walls and windows framing verdant views. Luxuries include a lovely handmade bed, rain-head shower, access to a new woodland sauna and a kitchen with 80-year-old boards reclaimed from the parachute regiment Nissen huts from Salisbury Plain. Enter the organic farm site through a gate in the hornbeam hedge, head for a clearing alive with birdsong and find your sanctuary behind some luxurious yurts, also available to hire. The Birdhouse is a stilted affair surrounded by serene Somerset woodland

• theyurtretreat.co.uk

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FOR: THE ULTIMATE SENSE OF FREEDOM

What we love about the idea of a road trip in a pimped-up camper van like Bristol’s Quirky Campers’ is that you can plan out your route around the West Country and beyond as you go, on your waking whim, if that’s how you roll. The Quirky team scour the country to find the most beautiful and original campervans – each completely unique, having been built to the spec and aesthetic taste of their private owner – then persuade these owners to share them! • quirkycampers.co.uk 56 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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xxxxxx Fling open the back doors of your moveable accommodation for fabulous bedside vistas


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TRAVEL

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FOR: RUGGED BEAUTY

28 miles off the Cornish coast, lie the beautiful Isles of Scilly – a breath-taking archipelago offering the mildest climate in the UK, irresistible panoramas and a real sense of escape from everyday life. Natural beauty is the name of the game here. Choose to take advantage of it with some dolphin-spotting, watersports, boat trips, snorkelling with seals in the clear turquoise sea, or by exploring a botanical island hotspot. The pace of life feels wonderfully gentle across the five isles – St Mary’s, St Martin’s, Tresco, Bryher and St Agnes – with exotic flora and fauna abounding and the social calendar populated with live music, food festivals and hiking tours. (You can walk from Tresco to Bryher during the famous Scilly Low Tide Events when there is an extreme spring tide.) There’s also the new Island Helicopters service that’s just launched, if you don’t fancy taking the plane from Exeter or sailing on the Scillonian passenger ferry from Penzance. • islesofscilly-travel.co.uk

Natural beauty and a gentler pace of life are the name of the game here

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FOR: THE COSY GETAWAY

The master craftspeople at Plankbridge have been creating luxurious living spaces for years, producing private dens to delight the most exacting of ‘posh shed’ sybarites. Want to try one out? Their handmade shepherd’s huts, which balance tradition and modernity, can be found dotted around the country in places such as Colber Farm in Dorset, Hare Farm in East Sussex and Elmley in Kent – the only national nature reserve in England you can spend the night in. If you want every trip to the bottom of the garden to feel like a mini holiday, you could even have one built to spec at home – like HRH Prince Charles, who has one at Highrove – to include perhaps a mini-spa, garden theatre, yoga studio or home cinema. This crew maintain a ‘move-when-you-move’ promise too, so they will relocate your sanctuary for you if you ever have a change of address. • plankbridge.com

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FOR: SOLO TRIPPING

When was the last time you had a whole week completely to yourself; even a few days? Maybe you spend a lot of time alone but haven’t thought about a trip specifically geared up for travellers like yourself? Just like staycations, solo travelling is also on the rise; as are travel companies that cater for exactly this sort of trip. One Traveller specialises in holidays designed for the mature single traveller and is the brainchild of travel expert Ian Darkin, who wanted to address the industry shortcomings he spotted while working as a tour manager escorting singles holidays all over the world. Bringing together like-minded single people in their 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond, with a passion for travel, cities, culture and cuisine, it offers the chance to travel in a safe environment on a holiday with no single supplements (a premium often charged to people who take a room alone). And while booking your first solo holiday can seem daunting, word on the street is that it’s rather liberating and empowering – addictive stuff, according to some. This summer One Traveller is encouraging holidaymakers to rediscover the great British backyard with a countryside retreat in the heart of Oxfordshire – a great spot from which to explore the majestic Cotswolds. Think scenic walks and hearty pub lunches, quintessentially unspoiled English landscapes – anywhere from historic home of Shakespeare Stratford-upon-Avon, sumptuous Sudeley Castle with its impressive grounds or perhaps Hanbury Hall and Gardens. The guys are offering four nights in the four-star Billesley Manor Hotel in a double room for sole occupancy and the exclusive services of a tour manager plus some meals and excursions from £850 per person for departures in July and August. • onetraveller.co.uk/tours/the-cotswolds-2018 58 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Billesley Manor is a 16th-century pile that would be the perfect base for exploring Shakespeare country


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SET ON A BEAUTIFUL ORGANIC FARM IN SOMERSET

Treehouse, 3 luxury Yurts with beautiful communal lodge and brand new Roundhouse New woodland Sauna theyurtretreat.co.uk Email: theyurtretreat@gmail.com • Tel: 07773 505 671

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TRAVEL

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FOR: SPA WORSHIPPERS

R&R on the agenda? Try this gorgeous-looking new sanctuary

Last month a luxurious new spa opened on the Somerset Levels, taking inspiration from its untouched natural surroundings. Elements Boutique Spa, part of the peaceful Windmill Retreat Estate, is proud purveyor of a wholly relaxing rural experience featuring outdoor heated spa pool, sauna, a spacious relaxation area and range of Aromatherapy Associates treatments, all contributing to its haven of wellbeing in the midst of the West Country. Therapies are also available for guests going through cancer treatment. Guests can relish an overnight retreat in one of the sumptuous, secluded lodges – Allwynds, with its bubbling hot tub and private balcony, The Millstone with its flickering log burner or perhaps Levels View with its pleasant balcony – all a short stroll away from the local nature reserve, the historic ruins of St Michael’s Church and Burrow Mump. • windmillretreat.co.uk

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FOR: HISTORY LOVERS

Fifteenth-century coaching inn Sign of the Angel, AKA The Babberton Arms from Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (part of the movie was filmed in the Wiltshire watering hole) has five unique rooms we’d give our right arm to stay in – with quirky features from architects of centuries past. Downstairs is a panelled sitting room where you can plan out your days in dreamy National Trust village Lacock, a cracking two AA-rosette restaurant and a paddock which will gradually subsidise the produce for the kitchen, plus a garden reaching down to a stream – ideal for a cream tea on a summer’s day. Closer to home, try Berwick Lodge, nestled in a pastoral location a short drive from central Bristol, with views that reach across to Wales. It’s a magnificent manor house that started life in the 1890s, with enchanting gardens, contemporary style expertly combined with historic elegance, 14 individually designed rooms and an award-winning fine dining restaurant. • signoftheangel.co.uk; berwicklodge.co.uk

Right: Contemporary style meets historic elegance in a way that befits the gorgeous old Berwick Lodge

Explore lovely Lacock and stay in film location Sign of the Angel

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FOR: A DROP OF ROMANCE

We’ve been obsessed with the thought of staying at a winery recently and have discovered that just down the road, in Redhill, there’s a cute little family-run B&B called The Forge over at Aldwick Court Farm & Vineyard, which produces its own, award-winning English tipples. Arrange a tour and delve into the history of Somerset’s largest vineyard, cultivate an understanding of English viticulture, explore the 11 acres of grape vines – and then, of course, assess the fruits of the family’s labour by sampling their available vintages. Alternatively, how does the sound of a stargazers’ retreat grab you? We’ve been avidly Googling them here in the office and found a great spot in Brecon, converted from a stable used for forest ponies, between the quiet hamlets of Trecastle and Crai. Sleeping two and offering views of highest peak in South Wales, Pen y Fan, the romantic getaway is a little haven featuring a computerised Meade telescope for visitors to use, as well as its own observatory. Weeks start from £254 and short breaks from £191. Image from Aldwick Court Farm

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• aldwickcourtfarm.co.uk; breconcottages.com


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WHERE INDULGENCE BLOSSOMS Deep in the heart of the South West, nestled within the exquisite surroundings of the British countryside with views that reach across to Wales, is Berwick Lodge – a hidden secret just waiting to be discovered. Call us now to start your story.

Berwick Lodge, Berwick Drive, Bristol BS10 7TD Tel: 0117 958 1590 www.berwicklodge.co.uk

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ARCHITECTURE

Clifton’s Queen’s Court almost resembles an ocean liner in red brick

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ARCHITECTURE

ART DECO BRISTOL While the city didn’t go all in on the architectural style, there are still glimpses to be seen, says Ray Newman

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he protagonist of William Gibson’s 1981 short story The Gernsback Continuum finds himself pulled into an alternative reality in which the streamlined modernist design of the 1930s never went away. Spotting surviving examples of art deco architecture in Bristol can feel rather like that – the shock of a sudden glimpse into a time before the Blitz and the ensuing austerity, when buildings soared, waved and curved into blue skies. The term ‘art deco’ derives from the French Arts Décoratifs and arose in the early part of the 20th century. It was a self-consciously modern movement that drew on diverse inspirations including industrial design and Egyptian art, and employed bold colours and geometric patterns alongside expanses of black, white, pale grey or cream to sell a vision of clean, bright living. Bristol didn’t go all in on art deco, preferring the more conservative neo-Georgian style in many cases, and much of what there was has been destroyed by war or progress. Most of the city’s lavish art deco cinemas, for example, have been pulled down (the original Orpheus at Henleaze) or allowed to decay to their concrete bones like the Ambassador in Bedminster, now a climbing centre. There is still plenty to see, however, if you know where to look. Bristol’s surviving deco tends to be in the vaguely totalitarian Ministry of Information style, being intended to project an image of business-like modernity, not leisurely decadence. The Bristol Central Health Clinic of 1935 by C.F.W. Dening is typical, and easy to miss unless you catch it from the right angle and pay attention to the details. It is composed around a central tower that barely towers, and has geometrically formed text over its defunct doorways – ‘Women, Patients and Staff’. Alec French was an important Bristol architect whose firm is still trading today. His work includes the twin office blocks, Eagle House and St Stephen’s House, that take up most of one side of Colston Avenue. One oddity is French & Partners’ St Nicholas House which looks like pure 1930s deco but was actually built as late as 1959.

Clifton’s Queen’s Court, a block of flats built in 1937, is particularly striking. It resembles an ocean liner in red brick, its prow cutting into the road junction, with balconies turning its flats into seaview cabins. Halifax House on St Augustine’s Parade was constructed for the building society of the same name in 1937 before becoming Alec French’s own HQ, and most recently a branch of Toni & Guy. It is quite plain but with distinct deco touches around the balcony and in the black stone fascia. The city centre has more yet. Electricity House is a former showroom of 1937 by Giles Gilbert Scott – known for designing Battersea Power Station and the red telephone box. Northcliffe House, a former newspaper office built in 1929, is covered in scaffolding at the time of writing, but the clock tower peeping from the top gives a sense of its thrusting, mechanical modernity. The Odeon at Broadmead is one example of frivolous leisure deco, decked out in polished green and white tiles, and with a flying saucer canopy over what was once the grand entrance. Meanwhile The Merchant’s Arms at Stapleton, currently closed pending refurbishment or redevelopment, is a rare pub built in the streamline moderne style. In Stokes Croft there’s the former Blundell’s department store by W.H. Watkins at No. 77, much-altered but still unmistakably of the 1930s. The junction of Zetland and Gloucester roads has two minor relics: the former Morgan’s department store (lately Maplin’s) with its minimalist clock-face; and a Sainsbury’s supermarket which, if you look at the details, reveals itself as a branch of Burton’s the tailor, dating to 1938. The very humblest examples can be found in residential suburbs. Subtly streamlined semi-detached houses crop up here and there in Westbury on Trym, while Briavels Grove in St Werburgh’s is an entire cul-de-sac of houses with bold geometric door surrounds and sun-ray garden gates. It’s enough to conjure the sounds of Henry Hall and the BBC Dance Orchestra on the air: “It’s just the time for dancing/ Tomorrow is today/ Go where the music’s calling/ And dance the blues away…” ■

The Odeon is a frivolous example of leisure deco with polished green and white tiles

A minor relic can be seen on Sainsbury’s on Gloucester Road

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Food News.qxp_Layout 1 18/05/2018 13:15 Page 1

FOOD & Drink

TASTY TITBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

NEW TO BRISTOL

Chef Sam has roots in Bristol and is thrilled to be bringing her own cookery to the city

Gloucester Road has welcomed nutritional chef Sam Waterhouse and her multi-purpose culinary venue The Bristol Cookhouse. After years spent travelling the world, catering for high-profile clients, Sam came back to England to gain an MSc in nutrition and is now running food and cookery workshops in the new space. “Born in Malaysia, I returned to the UK and grew up not far from here,” she told those gathered at the launch. “My great grandfather was a master baker and confectioner just down the road on Newfoundland Street during the Second World War. My overriding childhood memories are of watching him decorate elaborate cakes, helping in his kitchen and collecting fresh produce from his vegetable garden. I was always destined to have a career in food; I’m so pleased it’s now back in Bristol.” The Cookhouse combines a fully-equipped food studio that can be hired for events and workshops, a private dining space for supper clubs, and a weekday canteen with open-plan kitchen, open for breakfast, lunch and healthy snacks. • thebristolcookhouse.co.uk

EVENINGS AT ARNOLFINI There’s been good news this month for the many folks whose first thought, at the sign of sunshine, is to hotfoot it over to Arnolfini to drink cider on the cobbles and dangle their legs over the harbour wall. Arnolfini Café has extended its opening hours to include an evening menu from head chef Iza Palicka – full of house-made comfort foods to pair with Bristol Beer Factory brews available at the bar. Expect dishes such as beef goulash with knedle dumplings and leafy salad; beetroot, bulgur wheat and walnut burger with mint yoghurt and avocado; and za’atar halloumi and couscous salad with pomegranate and tahini dressing. “We wanted a menu that was pretty homely but based around dishes we love eating and that we wanted to make from scratch,” said Iza. “We wanted to make it cosy and comforting as well as delicious, and cater for all dietary needs too.” • arnolfini.org.uk/visit/cafe-bar Ours is a pint of North Street cider from the Bristol Beer Factory bar, please

WE ATE ALL THE PIES There have been some seriously happy faces and contented bellies over here at Bristol Mag HQ lately. We seem to have been putting away all the pies since Pieminister launched its somewhat irresistible bottomless brunch experience. Priced at £20, the menu includes the Morning Glory pie (free-range British bacon, cheddar and potato hash, cheese bechamel, baked egg and sausages) and vegetarian counterpart the Munch Brunch (smoked cheese, veggie sausage, chestnut mushroom, baked egg and tomato topped with potato hash and a fat finger of crispy halloumi) with smoky baked beans. Plus there are baked skillets (gluten-free options too) best washed down with plenty of prosecco, Bloody Mary or Aperol Spritz for extra summery vibes. If you’re feeling a more virtuous start to the day, tea, coffee or juice is unlimited too. Choose between the morning session (11am) or the afternoon sitting (3.30pm) and for 90 minutes, fill your boots! • pieminister.co.uk

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The Creative Catering Company i n f o @ g r i f f e t t c a t e r i n g .c o m 07539256717

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FOOD & DRINK Tables-for-one represent around 12% of early dining trade; don’t be pressured into taking a tiny, chilly table wedged between the loos and the air-con generator

GOING SOLO Forget the ‘spotlight effect’, ‘me-time’ needn’t be kept behind closed doors says Melissa Blease

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as she been stood up by her date? Is he a bit weird? That woman looks really nice; why hasn’t she got any friends? On and on it goes: the constant justification, speculation and, occasionally, character assassination of the unaccompanied diner in our midst. Calm down! It’s just a person eating out alone, not some sinister/tragic drama unfolding before you. She hasn’t been stood up; she’s worked late, is meeting friends in an hour and doesn’t want to sink three glasses of wine on an empty stomach. The guy on his own is a college lecturer enjoying a post-class repast. The woman who ‘looks really nice’ is a restaurant critic just doing her job – and far from lonely. I take myself for lunch, dinner or a glass of fizz on a regular basis; it’s something I actively make time to do when life gets a bit stressy, and see it as a bit of a treat along the lines of sinking into an indulgent bubble bath or settling down for an evening by the fire with a good book. But if you’ve never done it, consider this: you can eat exactly what you feel like eating without the risk of food envy, peer pressure or obligation to share. It’s a heightened sensory experience, too; without small talk (or big conversations) to distract you, you’re more likely to focus on the food on your plate, and the general atmosphere of the environment around you – oh, and there aren’t any awkward moments regarding who pays the bill when you’re ready to leave, either. You don’t have to be single to do it, nor should the solo dining occasion have to be work-related... Although the latter situation in particular tends to be the time when most people ‘justify’ their table for one. “My job demands that I travel a lot,” says Ellen, a Bristol-based freelance HR consultant. “I used to spend evenings away from home 66 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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ordering hotel room service, or I’d grab a selection of ready-to-eat food at the nearest supermarket. Then one day, I found myself in a really lovely hotel, with a really lovely restaurant attached. On checkin, the receptionist asked if I’d like a dinner reservation for that evening and I thought, why not? I had the most lovely experience: great food, a relaxed environment – at last, I felt like a proper grown up! I take myself out for a meal quite a lot now, even when I’m not travelling, and even though I’m married; just because you find yourself out and about on your own at lunch or dinnertime, it doesn’t mean you have to eat a ready-made sandwich on a park bench.”

...Eat what you feel like without the risk of food envy, peer pressure or obligation to share... It’s a heightened sensory experience too... “But what do you do when you’re on your own at a restaurant table?” a friend asked, when I told him I was writing this feature. “What do you mean, do? I’m already doing something!” I replied. But if you, too, feel the need to do something else other than eat and spy on awkward dates – sorry, I mean people-watch – you are, of course, never alone with your phone. The manager of one Bristol restaurant told me that around 90% of solo diners spend the entire duration of their meal on their phones, talking, texting, or catching up on emails, social media and news.


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...Rarely is business so busy that there’s a hungry, braying crowd waiting for a singleton to clear their plate... Naturally, now that we can take our office (or indeed, our social life) with us wherever we go, why not use a restaurant table as a temporary office? Similarly, a book or a magazine can be equally engaging company. Personally, I prefer to sit back, chill out and keep an eye on the social brouhaha surrounding me. But however you choose to spend your me-time, it’s important that you don’t automatically put yourself (or allow yourself to be put) in ‘secondclass citizen’ mode the moment you step through the door. Despite the fact that tables for one represent around 12% of early dining trade in most restaurants on any given week, front-of-house staff at certain establishments still haven’t got with the programme, automatically reaching for two menus as they bustle you along to your table, and replying, “Oh, just one? Yes of course, that’s fine, really it is” a little bit over-enthusiastically when you make your solo status clear. Okay, having just one diner taking up a table that could easily seat four can be frustrating for a restaurant owner, but rarely is business so busy that there’s a hungry, braying crowd waiting for a singleton to clear their plate. So, don’t be pressured into taking a seat at a tiny, chilly table wedged between the men’s loo and the air conditioning generator just because you’re on your own. A long, long time ago – before I was less confident than I am now (and eating out alone does, I guess, require a certain amount of confidence) and before my job as a restaurant critic taught me more about how a restaurant ‘works’, solo me was seated in the equivalent of dining room Siberia on many occasions, regardless of how busy the restaurant was. These days, I’m far more likely to ask the restaurant (politely, of course!) why they keep such a badly-located table laid up than I am to actually sit at it. Fortunately, however, attitudes towards solo diners are a-changin’. “I really like it when people feel comfortable enough to eat with us on their own,” says Sarah, a waitress at one of Bristol’s hottest harbourside restaurant-bars. “When somebody comes in on their own, I never, ever assume that they’re meeting somebody else, or waiting for a friend to turn up, and I make sure they feel as welcome and relaxed as I want everybody else to feel.” So: go for a corner table if you’re in a quiet mood, opt for buzzy if you fancy a spot of people-watching. Bear in mind, though, that the people you’re watching aren’t necessarily watching you, despite the fact that, the first time you eat out alone, you may feel as though everybody around you is wondering why you’re doing it. A few years ago, Thomas Gilovich – professor of psychology at New York’s Cornell University – conducted a study into the psychological phenomenon he called the ‘spotlight effect’, which occurs when people tend to believe they’re more noticed than they actually are. Gilovich recruited a group of students to walk through and generally hang around in a highly populated public area alone, wearing a Barry Manilow t-shirt (the most mortifying anti-fashion statement the students could think of, at the time.) Over half of the tshirt wearers were convinced that the nearly all the people around them had (a) noticed them walking around on their own, and (b) made negative judgements regarding what they were wearing. In fact, less than a quarter of the people around them had even noticed the single person’s presence, let alone their t-shirt. “Because we’re so focused on our own behaviour, it can be difficult to arrive at an accurate assessment of how much – or how little – of our behaviour is noticed by others,” Gilovich concluded. In other words, we’re just not that important; unless you enter a restaurant or bar solo and naked, or wearing a clown suit, or carrying a kangaroo over your shoulder, the vast majority of the people around you won’t even notice you’re there. You, however, will have a lovely time, in excellent company. Table for one? Do it today. ■ THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Bristol Food Connections.qxp_Layout 1 23/05/2018 13:24 Page 1

FOOD & DRINK Image by Ibi Feher

TIME to DINE Notify your appetite and tie on your apron, Bristol Food Connections is back. With events all over the city, it’s about coming together and celebrating one of the things we love most...tasty grub!

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fter a year off, the festival is returning for its 2018 instalment from 11 – 17 June, when the week-long celebration of the city’s incredible food scene will see over 100 events taking place across Bristol. This year it’s centred around the theme of ‘time’ – taking in the future of food, its history, fast versus slow cuisine and other time-related events. From feasts and masterclasses to family activities and afternoon tea on the 3.15pm train to Weston-Super-Mare, Food Connections is all about leaving us with a good taste in our mouths – a positive legacy lasting long after the festival is over. You can even travel around the city with your World Food Passport, receiving a complimentary taster and stamp at certain stops. Here’s more to look out for...

Gala dinner The Chocolate Quarter, Keynsham Monday 11 June, 7pm Enjoy an exquisite evening of chocolate-themed food in the historic surroundings at The Chocolate Factory. Immerse yourself in this wonderful world as chef Adrian Kirikmaa takes your taste buds on a three-course journey.

Open community iftar Barton Hill Settlement Wednesday 13 June, 7pm Breaking the traditional Ramadan fast in true style with a delicious feast. Run by Bristol’s Sudanese Association, Somali Girl’s Cooking Group, Somali Kitchen and Food Without Borders, this unique iftar celebration aims to bring together people from all walks of society. Aside from the dinner, the gathering will also be hosting a couple of cooking masterclasses for teenagers and children, giving them the chance to learn the art of spice mixing and create some delicious, healthy East African food.

Community pizza party Outdoor Barn Kitchen, Windmill Hill City Farm Friday 15 June, 10.30am If you’re over 55, join the children from Victoria Park Primary School for a multi-generational pizza decorating competition. Adults and children will team up to create their dough masterpieces, which will be cooked in an outdoor, wood-fired pizza oven. After the judging, sit down and eat all your delicious hard-work – you’ve earnt it!

Chinese dumpling making workshop The Forge, Colston Yard Friday 15 June, 6pm Do you love Chinese dumplings? Learn how to make them from scratch at this unique workshop with expert chefs from 90 Food Lab at The Forge at Colston Yard. Learn the authentic way to make the delicious little parcels and you’ll also be making colourful wrappers, learning the art of Chinese tea and discovering the secret of delicious chilli sauce.

Stockwood Growing Together Southern Links Children’s Centre Saturday 16 June, 11am A celebration of the Bristol Ageing Better project that will see generations coming together to make and share fresh food grown at the new community allotment. Run by St Monica Trust, Redcatch Community Garden and Southern Links Children’s Centre to salute and support the growing project. Take away recipe cards and mini herb boxes to grow at home. • bristolfoodconnections.com

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FOOD | CHEF PROFILE

Chris’ catering business is no ordinary one; inspired by Michelin-star kitchens

Yuzu mackerel

Spring bomb canapé

YES, CHEF Forget tired old hors d'oeuvres, Chris Griffett’s catering company is a cut above Colourful and very creative; that’s the name of his game

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FOOD | CHEF PROFILE

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onventional catering. Not the words that spring to mind when you set eyes on Chris Griffett’s creations – the result of experimentation with myriad techniques including smoking, curing and fermentation. After years in acclaimed restaurants, Chris turned to private cooking for highprofile clients in France, Switzerland, Spain and Austria. Now he’s in Bristol, whipping up the likes of spiced crab taco and ale scratching with beer gel and thyme – he kindly filled us in on the story so far... My first cooking job was at the local fish and chip shop while I was in high school but my first chef job after Birmingham College of Food was at Whatley Manor in Wiltshire – a little different from deep-frying! Claude Bosi was a real influence – a lot of my friends went on to work for him while he had Hibiscus in Ludlow. It was the name on everyone’s lips. Back then, Glyn Purnell was his sous chef – how well he has done. I really enjoy cooking a curry at home – being from the West Midlands I grew up eating it a lot and remember my uncle cooking curries to sell at the factory he worked in. The smell of fenugreek takes me back to visiting my cousins in West Bromwich. I’m currently cooking a lot of dhal but also love slow-cooked lamb dishes and homemade naan. I once cooked a breakfast of chicken soup, potato dumplings and supernoodles for a business meeting in France. I was a little bit confused – but apparently they enjoyed it! I love our confit duck choux bun with rhubarb textures. I came up with the dish for a canapé event in London and will definitely be keeping it on the menu. Rhubarb is bang-in season and the perfect pairing for duck. We get Creedy Carver duck legs and salt them for 24 hours in a five-spice and juniper salt before we confit them in duck fat. I think our ability to offer a 100% bespoke menu for any occasion is what makes us stand out. I know a lot of caterers have standard A, B, C or D menus with different price plans but we operate on a different model with no set menus at all. It’s a real treat when we speak to clients who are passionate about food and take an active role in discussing the menu so we can come up with dishes they’re excited about.

THE US DELICIO GUIDE

Sharing platters are incredibly popular in private catering – something I think Ottolenghi has had a real influence on. People enjoy having an array of food to tuck into and a colourful spread down the middle of the table. We get an increasing number of people asking us about the provenance of our food which is something we really appreciate. Rare Butchers of Southville are great to work with; they are passionate about sourcing quality free-range, high-welfare meat from the local area and it really shows. The Ashton Court venison is stand-out! Every meal I have had at Wapping Wharf’s Woky Ko has been consistent and the beef short rib is delicious. I’m looking forward to the second restaurant opening, especially as it’s closer to where I live. I’ve always been interested in the process of making certain base ingredients – for example, vinegar. While working in restaurants this was generally ordered in and I could never figure out why, when homemade vinegar tastes so delicious. Years ago I worked at The Holt in Devon, and the owner was keen on making his own charcuterie. I learnt a fair bit about this and naturally my curiosity spilled over into fermenting all sorts of things. As I finished my training as a chef, Noma in Copenhagen was taking the culinary world by storm. It was almost like a kickback from the molecular gastronomy era, taking ingredients back to their natural state. Fermenting food is a natural process that mixes the two together, it’s molecular and natural. It has taken a while for these processes to filter down from Michelin kitchens to a domestic setting but now everyone seems to be giving it a go as they realise that it is a fairly straightforward process with great health benefits. ■

LOOKING FOR RESTAURANT INSPIRATION? The Delicious Guide to Bristol 2018 featuring all our favourite eateries is available online at our website thebristolmag.co.uk THE

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• griffettcatering.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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BRISTOL UPDATES

BITE-SIZED BUSINESS AND COMMUNITY NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY

CONGRATS!

Curvy Castle Bridge

ICE, ICE, BABY

DOING THEIR BIT

The Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) South West has announced the shortlist for its Civil Engineering Awards 2018, with Bathurst Basin Bridge, Metrobus; Hartcliffe Way, Metrobus; North Fringe to Hengrove; and Castle Bridge, Finzels Reach (the pedestrian bridge linking central areas of the city) all shortlisted projects. “Our Civil Engineering Awards recognise projects which promote the excellence of the engineering profession,” said Miranda Housden, ICE South West regional director. “The South West is full of innovative, inspiring projects and engineers, from a wide range of sectors and the shortlist for this year’s awards really showcases fantastic projects in amazing locations across the region.” The Bathurst Basin, Hartcliffe Way and North Fringe to Hengrove schemes are all part of the MetroBus project, an express bus service to run dedicated routes and aiming to provide quick, reliable journeys. The project should reduce emissions and congestion and improve transport in the area.

A shop aiming to be completely waste-free has opened on North Street in Bedminster. “The result of months of research and listening groups, driven by a passion to create a shopping experience without plastic, Zero Green is our way of helping people shop affordably and conveniently,” say owners Stacey and Lidia. The duo talked to other ‘zero-waste’ shops to source the right stock from suppliers with the same values. “We have been amazed by how ready people are to shop like this, also the range of people we have had in – children bringing in their parents as they have learnt about plastic pollution in school, older people who love shopping how they used to. We have a real emphasis on great customer interactions. “We hope to run zero-waste lifestyle workshops and to show schools and businesses how they can cut down drastically on plastic coming into their homes without compromising on quality. Even the smallest changes can make a difference; buying a bamboo toothbrush, swapping a shampoo bottle for a shampoo bar or buying pasta in a reusable container.

• ice.org.uk

• zerogreenbristol.co.uk

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Event, exhibition and experience specialists Ignition, whose head office is in Bristol, has been named as one of the UK’s Best Workplaces 2018, reaching number 19 in the small companies category of the nationwide rankings, following an in-depth company audit. According to the Great Place to Work Institute, which organises the rankings, the list represents “the largest survey of workplace cultures and people practices” in the world, while its methodology is “one of the most rigorous and highly regarded.” “It’s a wonderful achievement, a real milestone for us and the result of 11 years of hard work and putting our team and clients at the core of everything we do,” said Ignition CEO Sam Rowe. “Ignition is now a global player and this great recognition is a credit to our amazing management team, to the industry we work in, to Bristol and the South West and the attitude and ambition of our talented team. Knowing we have created an environment people really enjoy coming to work in is an unbeatable feeling.” Ignition specialises in the pharmaceuticals, aerospace and defence industries, working globally for companies such as Eli Lilly, Roche, Pilatus and Etihad Airways, and is also building its portfolio in the higher education, B2B and FMCG markets. The company is known for its high standards of client care and its transparent and ethical approach, especially with regard to social and environmental responsibility. It was the first company in its industry to receive the ISO 20121 for sustainable event management. Ignition has in-depth HR leadership programmes and practices to ensure staff feel valued, encouraged and inspired, with over 41% having been with the company for six years or more; a rare achievement in today’s fluid workplace market. HR initiatives cover everything from flexible working and work-from-home days to a floating holiday day for special personal occasions, as well as ‘input days’ for continuing education and a paid day each year to engage with a charity of the team member’s choice. • ignitiondg.com


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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

www.taskrabbit.co.uk

Help your community and earn some extra cash!

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ur to-do lists are being well and truly ticked off thanks to TaskRabbit, the app that’s designed to help you do away with your to-do’s. TaskRabbit allows Clients to hire Taskers from their community to fulfil the tasks they need doing around the house such as furniture assembly, mounting, gardening, moving, packing, and much more. Becoming a Tasker yourself is incredibly easy, and is a great way to earn some extra cash in your spare time! Taskers come from a wide variety of backgrounds, including young professionals, stay-at-home parents, retirees, students, and many others who want to help their neighbours whilst earning some extra money. Not to mention the flexibility that comes with picking your own hours, setting your own rates, and being your own boss – it’s no wonder that so many people are choosing TaskRabbit to build their independent business! Taskers use the app not only to make money, but also to be part of a growing community. Elite Tasker Darren joined in 2015 with the aim to meet new people in his city. “I thought it would be an easy way to build contacts and meet all sorts of interesting people. I immediately loved the flexibility. You can pick where and when you want to work. It’s also a great way to get to know the city.” To register you simply need to fill out the online form and check your email for a link to a virtual info session. Once this is complete, you’ll be able to download the app and start accepting jobs – simple as that!

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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

FAMILY DIARY Ideas for things to do with the little ones in Bristol this month

The Gruffalo & Room On The Broom Sunday 3 June, 4pm, Colston Hall Don’t you know? There’s no such thing as a Gruffalo! As a part of the Hoo-Ha! Festival 2018, the gang is making an appearance in the city this month. The telling of this enchanting story of a mouse who goes in search of a nut will be accompanied by the Welsh National Opera Orchestra and conducted by Terry Davies. But wait... there’s more! The fun doesn’t stop there as Room on the Broom will also be screening that evening. This is the tale of a kind witch who invites a surprising collection of animals on her broom before heading off on an unbelieveable adventure. These much-loved children’s classics by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler will have music composed by René Aubry and Huw Davies on guitar, which will be played alongside the animated TV films. This is a seated show; all ages welcome. Under twos go free; adult tickets £27.50, under 16s tickets £14.50. • colstonhall.org

Top pick... DON’T MISS... Rocketship Adventure Until 31 July, weekends, 2pm – 2.30pm, We The Curious, Bristol Harbourside Immerse yourself in stunning visuals and sounds as you escape planet Earth. Join Stella the bear on an adventure into space to find Ursa’s new starry home. Hurtle out to the moon, whizz past the sun and shoot up into the stars to discover what lies beyond our little world. Suitable for under sixes. Under twos are free, three – six years £2.50; wethecurious.org Scribble and Sketch Saturday 2 June, 10.30am – 12.30pm, Royal West of England Academy, Queen’s Road Ideal for all ages, Scribble and Sketch offers free, informal art and drawing activities, often inspired by the gallery’s current exhibitions. These sessions are designed for children and grown-ups to take part in together. Go and get creative in this friendly and relaxed environment, where everyone is welcome. Free admission. No pre-booking needed; rwa.org.uk Dockside Crane Rides Saturday 2 – Sunday 3 June, M Shed Imagine the working industrial harbour of Bristol past with a trip inside one of its electric cranes or the Fairbairn steam crane, and find out the vital part they played in the life of the 74 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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dockside. Buy tickets on board on the day; £2 per person for the electric cranes, the Fairbairn is free to explore, donations welcome; bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed Launchpad Monday 4, 11 and 18 June, 10.10am – 11am, Arnos Vale Be introduced gently to letters, numbers and science in this educational session for two, three and four year olds. With a variation of stories, role play, science experiments, parachute activites and lots more, the classes encourage your little ones to learn and have fun, while you spend time together. All the classes are taught by qualified teachers who are also experienced mums. Termly fees apply; arnosvale.org.uk MiniBeats – Superstrings Sunday 10 June, 10.15am, 12pm and 2pm St George’s Bristol Enjoy the sweet summery sounds of Superstrings; a combination of high notes from violins and darkly delicious tones of the viola and cello. Have the chance to explore the world of bows, bridges, frogs and spikes. With marvellous musicians from the Bristol Ensemble and presenter Laura Tanner, the session is 45 minutes long with no interval. Ages vary with each session. Recommended ages: three – five years (10.15am), five – eight years (12pm), all ages (2pm). Tickets: £6 with a family ticket available; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

Kidocracy Sunday 10 June, 11am and 2pm, The Wardrobe Theatre, Old Market Kidocracy offers the next generation a chance to rule – given the mess that grown-ups have made of the world. This fun, unique and exciting performance gives a young audience the chance to learn a little bit about politics and find their own voice. With entertaining debates with the audience to encourage children to speak up and be heard. Tickets: £8; recommended for ages six and over; thewardrobetheatre.com Glorious Greeks! – Wild Words Sunday 10 June, 12pm and 2.45pm, The Theatre Shop, Clevedon This Pandora’s box of storytelling, song, puppetry and participation will allow you to go on an awesome adventure inspired by the ancient Greek classic, The Odyssey. Outwit greedy monsters, escape the cyclops, survive the sweet-singing Siren Sisters and overcome the whirlpool to save the day with the most clever Greek hero of all time – Odysseus. Pre-show playshop from 2 – 2.30pm. Tickets £8; recommended for ages five and over; theatreshop.org.uk The Fabulous Bacon Boys Tuesday 19 June, 7.30pm, Theatre Tropicana, Marine Parade, Weston-super-Mare Living Spit is back with its unique spin on The Three Little Pigs – told entirely in rhyme and


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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

MiniBeats – Superstrings at St George’s Bristol

Skilling Gate – Tips for a Top CV Your CV is your personal shop window. It outlines your education, highlights your experience and champions your achievements. It should succinctly explain to a prospective employer how you can add value to their organisation. Through our extensive experience in recruiting, we have seen some outstanding CVs and some mediocre ones.

song – and a slapstick, comedy show filled with porcine puns, lupine laughs and rural rumbunctiousness. Join the Bacon Construction as three builder brothers with dwellings of straw, wood and brick, come up against the residents of Little-Muckle-in-the-Wold and a visit from the planning inspector, Miss Wolf. Recommended age seven plus. Tickets £10; thetheatreorchard.org.uk TYNTEtots: The Secret Garden Wednesday 20 June, 10 – 11.45am, Tyntesfield Inspired by the classic tale of The Secret Garden, explore Tyntesfield’s rose garden and go on a secret treasure hunt around the grounds. Play outdoor games and enjoy summer crafts before hearing the Victorian tale itself. Suitable for ages two – five. £3 adults, £7 children; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield Dinosaur World Live Thursday 28 – Saturday 30 June Bristol Hippodrome Grab your compass and dare to experience the dangers and delights of the dinosaur world in this interactive show. Join the intrepid explorer across unchartered territories and discover a pre-historic world full of t-rexes, triceratops and microraptors. Plus, there’s a special meet-andgreet after the show for all brave explorers to make a new dinosaur friend. Ages three and over; atgtickets.com/bristol-hippodrome Lego Café – Gincandescence and Wild Words Saturday 30 June, 2pm and 3.30pm, The Theatre Shop, Clevedon Imagine a story then build it in these two 80-minute sessions. This Lego-filled afternoon will have storyteller Michael Loader on hand to weave stories to inspire your colourful creations. You’re never too old to appreciate the magic of stories and a tub filled with plastic bricks. Suitable for all ages, £5 per child; theatreshop.org.uk n

Give children the chance to rule at Kidocracy at The Wardrobe Theatre

Here are our tips for writing a killer CV: - Writing a good CV takes time. You will not be able to knock one up in an hour. Your potential career depends upon it; give it the time it deserves. - Ensure it’s relevant to each job you are applying for. Research the company(ies) you’re applying to; highlight where your values align with theirs. Request a role profile and outline where you can demonstrate each of the skills and competencies required. - The top 30% of page one ought to be high-impact and attention grabbing. It should contain a short personal profile and bulleted recent achievements and key skills. Make them relevant to each role (see point above). - Ideally CVs should be two pages, three at a push. No more. Don’t try to cheat by using font size 8. - Make the most of the space by minimising the amount of personal contact information. Name, telephone number, email address, home address. - Absolutely no photos. - Give detail on your last 4 – 5 employed positions, working backwards from your most recent. Include company, duration and job title. Provide bulleted details of your responsibilities and achievements for each position. Any positions thereafter should be listed with no detail (to save space). Explain all career gaps. - Include examples of your skills and achievements wherever possible. Rather than suggesting you have “exceptional communication skills”, give context; “Leading a team of 6 customer service representatives has enabled me to build excellent coaching skills”. - List your academic and professional qualifications, starting with the most recent first. More experienced candidates need only summarise education. - Include your interests – recruiting firms want an insight into your personality and make sure you focus on any interests that provide an additional set of experience – sporting achievements, clubs or societies, charity work and so on. - Spelling and grammar. Don’t just rely on spellchecker; ask a friend or family member to proof read. Know the difference between there/their/they’re, your/you’re etc. Attention to detail is key - slapdash mistakes on your CV will have you out of the running faster than a Usain Bolt 100m. Skilling Gate is a Bristol-based recruitment agency. We’ve provided a template CV on our website, visit www.skillinggate.co.uk for more information.

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How did the

WATER CYCLE

WHAT IF the

START?

INTERNET stopped working?

IS A 100%

SUSTAINABLE

society ever ACHIEVABLE?

Do

CRABS think

PEOPLE WALK sideways?

How many

ATOMS are in a

SIX-YEAR-OLD GIRL?

LIGHT

IS INVINCIBLE?

DO ANIMALS in other countries

SPEAK OTHER

LANGUAGES?

MANIFESTO FOR CURIOSITY Bella Thomas talks to some of the main brains behind the scenes at We The Curious as they begin to design its new ground-floor space

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SCIENCE

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hose inquisitive folks at We The Curious – the Bristol science centre currently undergoing a huge conceptual transformation – have gathered just over 5,000 questions from the local public, from which they’re starting to plan out interactive exhibitions with the potential to cover almost everything you can imagine. Ideas and topics range from space to the human body, to all sorts of inventive, curious thoughts to really get you thinking. I mean, what time is it on the moon? If I took myself apart atom by atom, how long before I stop being me? “We are working with local universities to develop an exciting open lab space where people can take part in real scientific research,” say chief operating officer Donna Speed and chief creative officer Anna Starkey, “so we’re running some pilot events with our visitors – we want to become a place where live research is going on every day. An important part of the project is also to evaluate and track our transformation as an organisation – we are excited to have a social anthropologist from the University of Bristol working with us as part of an action research project with our staff. “It’s about the chance to really put the manifesto for curiosity into action, and culture change – the way we collaborate and open-up experiences of science, repositioning it as something to be enjoyed as part of culture. We’re also interested in developing research into the nature of curiosity itself – that’s up next!”

Donna and Anna

Expect thoroughly interactive exhibits exploring questions posed by the public

THE PASSION “I have always had a deep interest in particle physics – the poetic language and vast connective concepts about the smallest bits of existence completely capture my imagination and feelings about what it is to be human. It’s the stuff we’re really at the very edge of understanding that hooks me in – the great unknowns of the universe – and how we can bring more people into that conversation, to enjoy that sense of wonder. In a way it’s also the shifting place of science in culture that fascinates me too...” – Anna Starkey “When I’m at a planetarium show, temporarily transported to deepspace, looking at our planet, I’m at my most optimistic; the perspective science can provide and its progressive nature to discover and solve really energises me and gives me hope for what we can accomplish together. As Anna says, bringing more people into that conversation is key – then we can save the world!” – Donna Speed Image, left: The planetarium will be continuing its popular astronomy shows but the team is exploring other experiences in the space. An incredible set of gigs was hosted for Simple Things festival, including a special performance of Terry Riley’s In C by the Paraorchestra and Friends. “There’s also a very cool show at the moment from DJ Food,” say Anna and Donna. “Audio-visual electronic music experiences are particularly great in the immersive space of the dome.”

Why the community-led approach to programming? We used to have a space on our first floor called ‘News and Views’. Turns out, there weren’t really any news or any views, but what did happen was that people would handwrite their questions on index cards and stick them up on the wall. These questions were personal, funny, surprising; big existential questions, small quirky questions. It was so exciting to see our visitors sharing their curiosity in this way, and yet we weren’t really exploring any of their questions in our programming or exhibits. Here was the real engine of a science-centre, the curious energy of our visitors, so we asked ourselves; what if…we put people’s curiosity at the heart of what we do? Many cultural venues are moving towards a more participative approach to what they do – participation can be a bit of a buzzword but it is part of an important ongoing shift across the cultural sector, looking at who is coming to see exhibitions or attend shows or concerts, and thinking about how we can make ourselves more relevant and inclusive to audiences that reflect the full diversity of the communities in Bristol. Audiences are changing too, they want to feel part of something, to be active agents in discovery and creation. We have a responsibility as a city-centre venue to be a relevant resource for our whole city, and we have inspirational neighbours, like Arnolfini, who are leading conversations about how we can re-imagine the role of cultural institutions as agents of change in cities. We have passionate team members at We The Curious who are here because they want to address inequalities in access to education and opportunity, and that means looking hard at how we become a more diverse staff team, how we programme to allow new voices in. There is great energy and adventure in collaboration. • wethecurious.org THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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WILD BRISTOL

ON WITH THE GLOW Pete Dommett urges us to go in search of the most miraculous of insects

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ave you seen the light? Of a glow-worm, that is. I conducted a hastily constructed, unofficial survey at The Mall, Cribbs Causeway recently and asked 98 shoppers whether they’d ever spotted one of these bizarre, bioluminescent beetles (before an overzealous security guard stopped me getting to a nice, neat 100 people). Most (almost two-thirds) said they hadn’t and those that had said it was “years ago”. So where can you still see glow-worms glowing? Take a late evening stroll in Stoke Park or along the Bristol to Bath railway path at the end of this month, or during July and August, and you might get lucky. Look along the grassy verges for tiny, lime-green lights shining with the same unwavering intensity as the LED indicators you find on electrical appliances all around the house. These neon signals are produced by the flightless females in an attempt to attract the winged males flying overhead. They’re made by the mixing together of two chemicals (luciferin and luciferase) in specially adapted organs in the insect’s abdomen, just like the light from a Glastonbury glow-stick. Once common across the country, glow-worm colonies have become few and far between. The loss of the insect’s preferred habitat, which includes hedgerows, meadows and patches of rough grass, due to development and the general ‘tidying up’ of our environment has resulted in many ‘no-glow’ areas in the UK. They’re less scarce in the south and west of the UK, however, and are still clinging on – just – in the Bristol area. Steve England is a well-known conservation educator from Lockleaze and one of Avon Wildlife Trust’s ‘My Wild City Champions’. He’s spent his life watching the wildlife in Stoke Park, and the nearby Frome Valley; passionately working to safeguard it. “My favourite urban wildlife moment has to be finding a small colony of glow-worms within the park,” he told me. “But this species is not legally protected in any way whatsoever, which makes them very vulnerable. If we want to continue to see these amazing creatures, we have to be sensitive to their needs.” As well as suitable habitat, another element that glow-worms need to be able to glow is the dark, of course. It’s thought that increasing light pollution, in the form of street lighting, home security spotlights, garden lights and even increased traffic, can confuse male glow-worms and make it harder for them to find the fluorescent females. South Gloucestershire Council has responded sympathetically by switching off the streetlights along a section of the Bristol to Bath railway path, between Mangotsfield and Siston. It’s hoped that turning off the lights between May and September, to coincide with the glow-worm breeding season, will enhance their love lives and help them to survive. Perhaps another reason why the majority of the people I questioned at Cribbs said they’d never seen a glow-worm is that we simply don’t go looking for them anymore. (When was the last time you went for a walk after dark?) As a result, glow-worms are probably vastly unrecorded so people are being urged to submit any sightings to the national survey website (see below). Glow-worms are still out there then, twinkling like little scattered stars (as the nature poet, John Clare, described them). Have a look this summer and, you never know, you might just see the light. ■ • Report sightings at glowworms.org.uk or join Steve England’s nocturnal wildlife safaris in Stoke Park; steveengland.co.uk

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Increasing light pollution and the destruction of habitat are the plight of the little glow-worm (image by John Tyler)


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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

How to reduce sugar from your diet By Eva Killeen for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine)

R

esearch shows that reducing sources of sugar in your diet not only helps with weight loss, but can also reduce your risk for common health problems like type 2 diabetes, cancer, digestive problems, autoimmune conditions, and more. But where to begin? Start with cutting down on the obvious culprits - sweetened processed foods that are high in empty calories (such as sugar in your tea, fizzy drinks and cake, for example). One way of not consuming ‘hidden’ sugars which may be listed under other names such as fructose, dextrose, maltose, sucrose, ethyl maltol, lactose, or evaporated cane juice – is just to eat whole foods!

for a ‘product’, make sure that you check the label. You may be surprised by some of the common items which contain sugar. For example, in one of the most popular brands of soy sauce you’ll find sugar as the second ingredient! If you are a buying a plant-based milk always choose unsweetened.

1. Eat Whole Foods Seeds, vegetables, herbs, spices, nuts and seeds are all lower in naturally occurring sugars compared to most grains, but no matter what, all whole foods will inevitably be a better choice than processed foods. Choose chopped vegetables to fill up on and to help reduce your body’s craving for sweeter foods.

5. Try seaweed! Chromium is a mineral that may help to lower the body’s glycemic response and in so doing it can help reduce and even prevent sugar cravings. Seaweed has a high chromium content. Try blending up some Nori sheets to make seaweed salt. Alternatively, try adding some Spirulina powder to your smoothie.

2. Avoid ‘Low-fat’ options Low-fat products are generally higher in added sugars. Studies have shown that a large number of low-fat foods which are marketed as healthier options contain far more sugar than their full-fat equivalents. In short – ditch the low-fat and reap the rewards.

6. Shun artificial sweeteners Artificial sweeteners have no calories, so do not leave you feeling satiated. If you are not satisfied you will need something else, and will end up consuming more calories than you would have done in the first place. Artificial sweeteners can also train the taste buds to want increasingly sweeter foods. More worryingly, some artificial sweeteners have been linked to cancer, nausea, digestive upset, impaired memory, headaches, mood disorders and other serious health concerns.

3. Read food labels While whole foods are always best, if you opt

4. Eat your omegas Ensuring sufficient consumption of foods rich in omega-3 may help to maintain a balanced blood sugar and reduce cravings for sweeter foods. Oily fish such as salmon contains good levels. Chia, flax, and hemp, ideal for vegans, are also high in fibre, which may help you to feel fuller for substantially longer than sugary foods can.

7. Healthy swaps Try altering your current meals to make them low-sugar friendly: • Swap your corn based breakfast cereal for a bowl of porridge sprinkled with some chia seeds and fresh blueberries.

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• • • •

Swap a mocha for a green tea. Swap crisps for some cashew nuts. Swap white foods for wholegrain options. Swap pasta for courgetti, or rice for cauliflower couscous.

Nutritional Therapist Eva Killeen directs CNM’s Natural Chef and Vegan Natural Chef Diploma Courses.

Eva Killeen

Attend a FREE Open Evening to find out about training with CNM Bristol for a career in Naturopathic Nutrition or Naturopathic Acupuncture.

13th June at 6.30pm Please book on line at:

www.naturopathy-uk.com 01342 410 505 CNM is the UK’s leading training provider in a range of natural therapies. Colleges across the UK and Ireland


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Train in Clinical Hypnotherapy • Practitioner Diploma in Hypnotherapy • Thinking of advertising your business

Starting Soon

Our 2018 media pa ck can be viewed online

Held at weekends in central Bristol FOR A COPY OF OUR 2018 MEDIA PACK EITHER VISIT THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE WEBSITE THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK OR CONTACT US ON 0117 974 2800 EMAIL: SALES@THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

CNHC & BSCH Accredited www.lcchinternational.co.uk info@lcchinternational.co.uk Tel: 020 3603 8535

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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

RAPID RELIEF FROM VARICOSE VEINS - Legs Set for Summer! When the sun comes out, people are more likely to think of baring their legs to the elements but for some with varicose veins, this can spell worry. Newer treatments available at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield, now mean we can bare all this summer. Varicose veins are very common and affect more than one in three adults, both women and men. Often hereditary in nature, the other main causes are pregnancy, standing for lengthy periods at work, being overweight or having a leg injury. Whilst varicose veins may lead to symptoms such as aching and itching, more often than not, it is the appearance of blue, lumpy veins which is the main reason for seeking surgical treatment. New NICE guidelines state that the majority of varicose veins can be treated without general anaesthetic and without cuts any bigger than 1-2 millimetres. Sadly the NHS no longer offers treatment for the majority of patients. Treatment is available privately at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield, with prices starting at £2488, depending on the treatment type. South West trained surgeon, Nuffield Health’s Mr William Neary, who has also been an NHS consultant vascular and renal transplant surgeon for nine years, explains that guided treatment Mr William Neary, results in less discomfort and the outcomes are consultant vascular much improved. surgeon at Nuffield Mr Neary says, “In deciding when to have your Health Bristol Hospital veins treated, it is important to know how much

they are bothering you. With local anaesthetic and short treatment time needed, recovery is quick and there is minimal bruising, scarring or swelling, so you can both look and feel better sooner. During the consultation, an ultra sound scan will detect the source of the problem and from the size and position, indicate the required treatment. This could be endothermal ablation using a radio-frequency catheter or laser for varicose veins or foam sclerotherapy or a combination. These methods have a 95% success rate. Thread veins in the legs may also be treated by microscleropathy or Veinwave.” A free varicose vein information evening is being held at The Chesterfield on 5 July. To find out more or to book your place, please ring: 0117 906 4870 or see www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

Welcome to... the new you Conveniently located on the stylish Whiteladies Road, EF MEDISPA Bristol combines cutting edge aesthetic treatments alongside wellness services and fitness classes. The clinic offers a lifestyle centre for the vibrant city of Bristol & its surrounding areas. EF MEDISPA offers a selection of award-winning therapies including: bespoke peels & facials, anti-wrinkle injectables, advanced laser treatments as well as lifting, tightening and weight loss led body treatments.

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Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN


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We love this unusual water feature adjacent to the church

CHANGING SPACES Andrew Swift traces the colourful history of the city centre’s historic Castle Park

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o the uninitiated, Castle Park must seem a curious place, characterised by sudden changes of level, high walls, steep banks, paths leading nowhere, with a ruined church as its central feature. There seems an overall lack of continuity and coherence – not so much a planned public space as an area left in limbo because of a lack of agreement as to what to do with it. Yet there is no more historic spot in the city. This was where the first settlers put down roots, dedicating a church to St Peter and founding the town which would then grow to become Bristol. As the town became a city, defensive walls were built around it. Outside the walls arose a castle, one of the mightiest in the land, and by the end of the 14th century, Bristol was the second most important city in England after London. After Cromwell ordered the demolition of the castle in 1654, its site was soon redeveloped, to become the social and commercial hub of the city, a role it fulfilled for almost 300 years. It is hard to believe today, surveying the wide open spaces of Castle Park, that busy streets once lay here, lined with shops, pubs, department stores and factories, along with some half-timbered, jettied buildings; survivors from a distant past. Its end came suddenly, on the evening of Sunday 24 November 1940, as evening service in St Peter’s drew to a close, and the sound of air-raid sirens blasted across the city. In the six-hour-long bombing raid that followed, most buildings were gutted or destroyed. A few survived, as did the street layout but, although some businesses reopened, the council decided that, instead of rebuilding what had been lost, they would clear Broadmead, to the south, to create a new shopping centre. For the next 20 years, the area remained in limbo. Despite much talk of redevelopment, all that got built were two much-derided office blocks, insensitively wrapped around the ruins of St Mary le Port church at the west end of the site. The buildings that had survived, meanwhile, were all – except for the remains of the two churches – bulldozed while the council pondered what to do next. 84 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Ambitious plans – for conference, cultural, trade and leisure centres, museums, art galleries, libraries and much else – came and went, all shelved because of lack of money. In the interim, parts of the site were used for car parking. Eventually, in 1977, the council decided to landscape virtually the entire site to create Castle Park. Given its history, its suitability for this new role was somewhat questionable. For centuries the area had been covered by streets and buildings, with hardly a tree or a blade of grass in sight. On that terrible evening in 1940 it had been reduced to a bomb site. Now, as the last vestiges of the old street layout were swept away, and excavations revealed fragments of the Norman castle, it found a new role as the site of an ancient monument. Central to the greening of this bleak, riverside area – the loss of whose former role many still felt keenly – was the planting of trees. Central too was the park’s role as a place of remembrance. On the ruined walls of St Peter’s a memorial was unveiled to the civilians and auxiliary personnel killed in the bombing of Bristol. Other memorials include five silver birches, planted in 1995 to honour those Bristolians who died in the Normandy landings. Elsewhere, cherry trees have been planted to remember the victims of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Another plaque commemorates four Bristol men who died fighting with the Republican Army in the Spanish Civil War. In 1993, the developers of the Galleries Shopping Centre funded a major improvement programme. Several sculptures were installed, the best-known of which, Beside the Still Waters by Peter Randall-Page, stands at the east end of St Peter’s. More recently, in 2015, amid concerns that the park was beginning to look somewhat unloved, the council announced plans for its regeneration, and launched a public consultation. Water features which had run dry were reinstated, the fenced-off remains of the castle keep were reopened, and the scented garden south of St Peter’s was taken over by volunteers from homeless charity St Mungo’s Broadway to become a physic garden.


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THE GREAT OUTDOORS

Perhaps most crucial, though, has been the work, over the past 40 years, of the parks department, who have planted hundreds of trees, many now reaching maturity. To celebrate this achievement, a Castle Park tree trail has been devised, highlighting the range and diversity of the trees in the park. One of the most memorable plantings is an avenue of cherry trees, running down towards the river, their leaves and flowers creating, on sunny days, a dappled effect reminiscent of an impressionist painting. A more formal composition flanks Beside the Still Waters, with pleached limes and hornbeam hedges creating a shuttered space which draws the eye inexorably towards the gaunt shell of St Peter’s. And, in the lessfrequented north-eastern quadrant of the park, close planting, aided by high banks, effectively shuts the city out, apart from the high towers that overtop the lofty canopies of leaves. The most significant changes affecting the park, though, have occurred outside it. Until recently, few people lived in the immediate vicinity. The mixed-use development of the old George’s brewery site across the river, now linked to the park by a new footbridge, however, includes 437 apartments. A derelict site at the south-eastern corner of the park is also set to be redeveloped, providing a further 375 homes. The occupants of these properties are likely to see the park as an extension of their living space, and fight not only to protect it but also to enhance its amenities. There is, as the recent consultation exercise demonstrated, much that can be done to improve Castle Park. More crucially, there is the desire, by a growing number of people, to see those changes implemented. The transformation of this extraordinary site from Norman stronghold to commercial hub to green oasis has not been an easy one, and is still far from complete. It does now seem possible, however, that the time when Castle Park will be a resource of which Bristol can be truly proud may not be that far off. ■

Judas tree beside St Peter’s

Castle Street: a busy avenue filled with shops

• Free leaflets describing the tree trail are available at libraries and the Tourist Information Centre. It can also be downloaded at bristol.gov.uk/museums-parks-sports-culture/castle-park.

“WE JUST WANTED TO SAY HOW PLEASED WE ARE WITH OUR NEW KITCHEN. THE PROCESS FROM START TO FINISH WAS SUPERBLY SMOOTH AND THE ATTENTION TO DETAIL HAS PROVIDED US WITH A BEAUTIFUL KITCHEN. THANK YOU VERY MUCH”. MR & MRS GODBEER

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INTERIORS

Designer Jo Berryman shares her local interior crushes

THE BRIS LIST

K

nown for her cutting-edge work on prestigious residential, boutique and commercial projects worldwide, South Westbased Jo Berryman is an interior designer in demand. Her non-formulaic approach incorporates an innovative aesthetic, witty vignettes, flash metallics and harmoniously mismatched accents into glamorously edgy interior schemes. Here, she reveals five favourite Bristol haunts, and why she loves them…

The beautiful RWA

Rag & Bone Bristol “Amazing for all manner of reasonably priced vintage treasures, midcentury finds, characterful antiques and one-offs, this is my sourcing goto right now. I currently have an eye on a pair of bold, gorgeous 1970s Mazzega Murano glass pendant lights to suspend above my kitchen table.”

Pata Negra “For those moments when I want to inhabit an Almodóvar film and munch on divine Spanish tapas. This bustling, dark-hued venue in Bristol’s Old City somehow manages to be both contemporary and homely – I love its eclectic decor and bohemian feel.”

Pretty Pata Negra (image by Chris Cooper; shotaway.com)

Royal West of England Academy “A cultural institution, the local equivalent of London’s Royal Academy. It’s an absolute megalith of beauty, with a heavenly marble staircase, handsome Victorian architecture, and plenty of inspiring and exciting visual art in which to immerse yourself.”

Grace & Mabel “I’m a huge fan of this inspiring boutique, whether it’s for a demure tea dress or two, or just mixing and matching florals and layers – I’m big into DIY styling over haute couture. Lots of covetable accessories and home/lifestyle must-haves, too.”

Bell’s Diner “I love an unassuming and intimate eating experience – here, you can feast on local, seasonal fare yet feel like you’re seated in your own front room. They play an expertly curated selection of vinyl tunes on a fabulous old Bush Dansette, too – such a lovely vibe.” ■

News flash Jo has launched a high-spec design concept offering interiors expertise, themes and inspiration. Aimed at people looking for innovative ideas but who want to carry out the work themselves, the Flash Bible – £1,499 – is a way for potential clients to incorporate Jo’s irreverent, unique style into their interior schemes. Clients order and manage their own design installation from a bespoke shopping list created by Jo Berryman Studio, with ideas

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One of Jo’s own interior projects

for everything from colours and fabrics to furnishings, feature lighting and accessories. After sending an initial brief, they have an interactive meeting with Jo to discuss the space they want to refurbish. Jo and team then send a final list with sourcing links for everything needed to install and complete the new look. As a finishing touch, JBS then also helps with final spruce-up, styling and snagging. • joberryman.com


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‘Doug is a quality craftsman, offering a contemporary look and clever solutions for odd spaces. He is fair on pricing with no hidden extras, excuses or delays’. – Ann-Marie

THE

B R I S T OL MAGAZINE •

THEBESTOFBRISTOL PERFECTLYCOVERED TOADVERTISETEL: 0117 974 2800

Fitted Wardrobes • Bespoke Fitted Furniture • Alcove Units • Bookcases and Shelving info@hathawayscarpentry.com M : 07748 151 682 www.hathawayscarpentry.com

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 87


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BEHIND CLOSED GATES You see the fruits of years of nurture, development and evolution at domestic open-garden events. Elly West can’t wait to indulge her nosy side...

I

’m obsessed with other people’s gardens. And judging by the number of gardens that will open their gates to the public in the coming months, it seems I’m not alone. There’s something about being able to look behind a boundary, especially when doors are not generally open to outside eyes, that sparks the imagination. It’s the concept of the secret garden, a small slice of other people’s lives, and seeing how others live. It’s about gaining ideas and learning new ways of doing things, even if it’s just seeing an interesting plant combination, well-placed ornament or use of a material. Or perhaps I’m just nosy. In the course of my work as a designer I’ve been lucky to see many different gardens; no two jobs are the same, which is a huge part of the appeal. I always arrive with an open mind as things are never quite as expected, and it’s the same when I’m visiting open gardens. I remember the first time I attended such an event, many years ago when I was living in Ealing, West London. There was no clue, looking at the front of the house, a Victorian villa, that behind it was a treasure trove of intrigue. Tardislike, it was probably over 100 feet long (large by London standards) and was a tranquil haven of interlocking ‘rooms’. No lawn in sight, just pathways and planting leading from one area to the next. I was hooked. When I’m walking around my neighbourhood and among the residential streets of Bristol, I always like to see what people are doing with their front gardens, and when I’m on a train I love being able to indulge my nosy nature and see into back gardens as well. Looking at living, working gardens is very different from the spectacle provided by the show 88 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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gardens at Chelsea and elsewhere, which are much more like stage sets, created and dismantled in the space of weeks. The gardens that open their gates under the National Garden Scheme and other community organisations are, by contrast, ‘real gardens’ and the result of years of nurture, development and evolution. For as long as people have been creating gardens, other people have enjoyed looking at them, so perhaps it’s no surprise that so many people are happy to share their creations, often to raise money for charity. The National Garden Scheme (NGS) is perhaps the best known organisation for open gardens. The NGS was launched in 1927, when individuals were asked to open their gardens for ‘a shilling a head’. In the first year 609 gardens raised more than £8,000. Now around 3,700 private gardens open their gates, and last year’s efforts raised £3million for charity. The gardens can be found online at ngs.org.uk, or if you prefer a hard copy, then the ‘Yellow Book’ is published annually and lists them all by area. Each garden charges a small entry fee and usually offers tea and cake, with proceeds going to various charities. A quick search will reveal a garden open near you during most weekends of the gardening season for you to visit, appreciate, compare and take ideas from. There are also community events popping up around the country at this time of year, often advertised with local signs. Matthew Symonds, organiser of Bedminster Secret Gardens, which takes place on 2 and 3 June, says another side of Bedminster will be revealed behind the terraced red-brick houses, old factory buildings and rows or cafes and shops. Around 30 gardens will be open over the weekend and

Above: Pretty purple geranium ‘Rozanne’ – one of Alan Titchmarsh’s faves! Right: Who knows what sort of oasis you might find behind the red brick of a Bedminster abode, or in the sanctuaries of Stoke Bishop?


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GARDENING

proceeds will go to supporting projects that help reduce loneliness and isolation among local older people. “You’ll find shady secluded courtyards, Mediterranean sun traps, potters’ studios, shepherd huts and even a tiger in the gardens. Best of all, you’ll meet the green-fingered creators of these wonderful green spaces,” he says. “And did I mention there’ll be cake?” Stoke Bishop also has an open gardens event on 1 July from 1pm5pm. Pick up an event passport on the day from Aimee’s Wine House, Stoke Hill, or St Mary’s Church Hall, Mariners Drive, and follow the trail to find inspirational private gardens, large and small. For other events across the country, visit opengardens.co.uk.

Plan a visit PLANT OF THE MONTH: GERANIUM ‘ROZANNE’ This is one of my favourite plants for sheer flower power and reliability. Once established, it puts out mounds of fresh leaves each year topped with bright mauve flowers with a white centre, which keep on going for months from late spring right through into autumn. Plants are vigorous and can reach 60cm tall, but can easily be kept in check or propagated by dividing clumps in spring. It’s tidy enough for formal borders but also ideal in more rambling cottage garden schemes. The leaves cover the ground and smother weeds and are great for filling gaps. ‘Rozanne’ is not fussy about soil type and will grow in sun or shade. Leaves turn red-orange in winter and can be cut back and cleared when they start to look tatty. As with other hardy geraniums, it looks beautiful alongside roses and other cottage garden favourites such as nepeta, alliums and lavender, or combine it with zingy oranges and yellows such as achilleas and heleniums for a colour scheme that pops. I recently discovered that geranium ‘Rozanne’ is on Alan Titchmarsh’s list of favourite ‘plants you can’t kill’, so if you grow it, you’re in good company!

This list is not extensive, but includes some of the gardens open in the Bristol area over the next few weeks. • Bedminster Secret Gardens, 12 noon-5pm, 2-3 June. Around 30 gardens will be open around Bedminster, Southville and Ashton. Visit bloomingbedminster.org.uk to download a map and find out more. Minimum donation £2 per person, children free. • Stoke Bishop Open Gardens 1pm-5pm, 1 July. Visit opengardens.co.uk to find out more. £5 gains entry to all the gardens, children free. The following gardens open under the NGS. For full details, visit ngs.org.uk. Please check times and dates before travelling. • Greystones, BS9. 2pm-5pm, 3 June. • 16 Montroy Close, BS9. 2pm-5.30pm, 3 June. • Fernbank, Congresbury. 10.30am-5pm, 3 June. • Penny Brohn UK, Pill. 10am-4pm, 10 June. • Goblin Combe House, Cleeve. 1.30pm-5pm, 13 June. • Crete Hill House, BS9. 1pm-5pm, 17 June. • Swift House, BS9. 2pm-5pm, 24 June. • Vine House, BS10. 1.30pm-4.30pm, 24 June. ellyswellies.co.uk

Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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JUNE 2018 | THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 89


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PROPERTY NEWS

BITE-SIZED UPDATES FROM ACROSS THE CITY’S BOOMING SECTOR

SCHOOL’S OUT; BUT RESIDENTS IN

Plans include a Georgian Palladian garden apartment and three-storey town houses

Jonathan Brecknell outside 50 Park Street

NEW LIFE

HARBOUR SEQUEL

Urban Creation is to convert a run-down, empty building in the city centre into high quality student apartments. The Bristol company bought 50 Park Street, formerly a nightclub, from a private landlord, and the boutique flats will include modern touches including dishwashers, en-suite shower rooms and speedy internet connections. The site was cleared after a previous building was bombed during World War II but it was rebuilt in the 1950s. Urban Creation will bring back some traditional charm and character to the building by creating a mansard roof at the front of the four-storey building, as well as incorporating cornicing and period-style sash windows into the design. “I could see it had the potential to be transformed from a vacant, somewhat dilapidated building into a vibrant, characterful space for students to live in and make the most of city life,” said Urban Creation’s director and owner Jonathan Brecknell, who expects the apartments to be ready for occupation from January 2019. A ground-floor commercial unit will also be upgraded for use by a new tenant.

Construction work on the much-anticipated second phase of Wapping Wharf on Bristol’s harbourside has begun. The £43million regeneration works started last month, after developers secured support from Homes England. Wapping Wharf Living, a joint venture between developers Umberslade and Muse, has £23.4million of funding from Homes England for phase two, enabling the creation of over 250 new homes. The developers have appointed Balfour Beatty to build this phase of the regeneration scheme. Phase two will consist of two blocks of residential buildings, providing 256 homes. Most of the one, two and three-bedroom apartments will be offered for sale on the open market, with 93 being sold to Sovereign Housing for private rent and shared ownership housing. The construction works will also include the creation of ground-level car parking, bicycle storage and landscaping for the new homes. The early 19th-century, Grade-II Gaol Gate and Gaol wall structures – already stabilised – will act as a pedestrian feature entrance for residents, while four retail units will be created along a new road constructed through the centre of the site.

• urban-creation.com

• wappingwharfliving.co.uk

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Regional developer Kersfield has been granted planning permission to transform the main campus at Redland High School into 44 new properties. The plans include sympathetically restoring the Grade-II* main house, Redland Court, plus removing the 1960s sports hall and east wing, and replacing them with a new and complementary development providing the opportunity to reinstate the historic landscaping to the front of the building. Built from 1732-1735, Redland Court was owned by several Bristol merchants and bankers before being sold to Redland High School in 1885. The site became available after the school announced plans to merge with Redmaids’ School to create Redmaids’ High School, which has operated from the existing Redmaids’ School site in Westbury on Trym since September 2017. “We’re delighted to be going ahead with plans to restore the Redland High site for residential use once more – ensuring Redland Court is protected into the future,” said Alex Feilden-Cook, development manager at Kersfield. “We are very proud and excited by the mix and variety of units we have planned across the site, ranging in style from a Georgian Palladian garden apartment to modern three-storey town houses. In addition to making a financial contribution for the development of further affordable housing elsewhere in the city, we listened to feedback from councillors and amended the proposals to include five shared ownership homes in the Victorian former art building. “Working with a team of skilled designers and consultants, including The Nash Partnership and AWW Architects, our design philosophy for Redland Court has been to return the Main House to how it was originally designed and built. We have carried this philosophy throughout the scheme, staying true to the original character and intervening with a modern design touch where appropriate.” • kersfield.co.uk


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There’s bound to be something for your home in our enormous collection of handsome, hand-selected, hand-made rugs, kilims, furniture and accessories, reasonably priced from £50 to £5000. Cleaning • Restoration • Valuation

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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

T

here can be few more prestigious addresses in Bristol than Royal York Crescent. The Maisonette is a two storey apartment within a Grade II listed building and offers substantial and flexible accommodation with lovely southerly views. There is a generous ground floor footprint with plenty of Georgian features, good proportions and lots of natural light. To the front, the elegant drawing room has period details including two large sash windows with working shutters, a beautiful fireplace and cornicing. This room flow through to the dining room, again with fireplace and deep sash windows overlooking the garden. The original property has been extended to provide a breathtaking kitchen/breakfast and garden room. The bespoke kitchen has a full range of integrated appliances and there is also a tiled wet room and WC on this level. The architect designed glass extension is a superb example of linking the interior to the outside of the home. The master bedroom has views across the city to Dundry which can be enjoyed from a near full width private balcony. There are two further bedrooms and a contemporary tiled bathroom. The Maisonette has a peaceful and private rear garden with patio and area of flowering shrubbery and there is a charming summer room which has a multitude of uses and could even been extended with the necessary consents. Occupants also have use of the communal gardens to the south of the Crescent. Parking comes in the form of a garage to the front of the property. This is a stylish, spacious yet easily maintained home in a truly enviable location and an early viewing is essential. Agents are Knight Frank Clifton. Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

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THE MAISONETTE 31 ROYAL YORK CRESCENT, CLIFTON • Prestigious Clifton address • Master bedroom plus two further bedrooms • Bathroom and wet rooms • Architect designed glass extension • Private garden with summer room • Garage

Guide price: £1,350,000


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THE

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MAGAZINE

We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family then we are able to offer a mailing service for only £15.00 (6 issues) or £40.00 Euro zone; £30.00 (12 issues) or £70.00 Euro zone World Zone 1 £95.00 World Zone 2 £120.00

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For further information on sales/letting advice please contact:

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Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977 OFFICE FOR SALE

PRIME CLIFTON VILLAGE UNIT

• Large single ground floor office

• Prominent site onto The Mall

• Suit 4 desks

• 630 sq ft (gf) + 554 sq ft offices

• V rare opportunity

• Suit retail and office uses

• £115,000

• All enquiries to Tom Coyte OFFICES TO LET

OFFICES TO LET – BS9

• Newminster House BS1

• Churchfields – Westbury on Trym

• Suites of 662 sq ft, 1,712 sq ft & 2,953 sq ft

• 2,600 sq ft – 6 car spaces

• HIGH QUALITY SPACE

• New refurbishment

• Rent o/a

• Rent o/a

COLLEGE GREEN AREA – BS1

GOLDEN BOTTLE PUB – BS7

• Modern GF offices

• A4 Public House use

• Open plan +6 car spaces

• 900 sq m + flat • New flexible lease

• 2,482 sq ft

• Great opportunity

• New lease FOR SALE – OFFICES

LINK HOUSE, KINGSWOOD

• 11 Apex Court

• Modern office suite

• 2,484 sq ft + 7 cars

• 2,339 sq ft + 6 cars

• Close to M4 / M5 junction

• New flexible lease

• Only £325,000 ono

• Only £12.50 per sq ft

FOR SALE OFFICE UNIT

WEST STREET, BEDMINSTER

• Attractive city centre location close to Grand Hotel

Julian Cook FRICS

Burston Cook June.indd 1

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

• Large showroom (might suit office stp)

• 620 sq ft open plan

• 2,246 sq ft

• Ground floor unit

• £28,000 pax

• Only £160,000

• New flexible lease

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• • • • •

Sales / Lettings Acquisitions Valuations Landlord & tenant Auction Sales

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Rent reviews Property Management Investment Sales / Purchase Development & Planning Dilapidations Advice

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Clifton

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Charlotte Street, Bristol, BS1 5PX ÂŁ450,000

Located just off Park Street with its hustle & bustle of city life and just down from Brandon Park offering plenty of greenery and peace within the city. Energy Efficiency Rating: N/A

0117 405 7659 clifton@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bishopston Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bath Buildings, Montpelier, Bristol, BS6 5PT ÂŁ410,000

0117 405 7662

Andrews June.indd 1

An absolutely stunning, two bedroom, Georgian house in vibrant Montpelier situated just moments from bars, cafes and independent retailers on Picton Street and into Stokes Croft. Many retained period features and beautifully stylish with the flexibility of an extra room on the lower ground floor which could be a studio or further bedroom. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

bishopston@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

21/05/2018 10:38


Yate

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Cowship Lane, Cromhall, Wotten-Under-Edge, GL12 8AY ÂŁ800,000

A quite wonderful and unique 1800s 4 bedroom semi detached home located in the picturesque village of Cromhall. This also benefits from its own stable and paddock along with a fantastic rear garden. The property has a well sized living room with a wood burner and double doors that access the rear garden, a dining room and separate kitchen. The master bedroom has an en-suite. The property has a private driveway accessed through double gates and a detached double garage. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

01454 837 914 yate@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Westbury-on-Trym Andrewsonline.co.uk

Briarwood, Bristol, This well-presented four bedroom semi-detached house has a charming sitting room with dining room. The magnificent conservatory which is slightly raised from the rear garden, adjoins the patio, providing the ultimate BS9 3SS entertaining space. The kitchen is a delightfully well-kept space and also links to the conservatory. Downstairs ÂŁ750,000 shower room, which links back round to the third reception room which the current owners use as a study. From this elevated position, one can enjoy picturesque views across north Bristol. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

0117 405 7685 westburyontrym@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews June.indd 2

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

21/05/2018 10:39


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Rupert Oliver FP June.qxp_Layout 1 18/05/2018 16:56 Page 1

Littleton-upon-Severn, Bristol | Guide Price £1,295,000 A stunning Grade II Listed 8-bedroom farmhouse, situated in a popular village with an expanse of family accommodation which has been thoughtfully extended, stylishly refurbished and extensively renovated throughout. Detached Grade II Listed family home of circa 4500 sq. ft | Detached 740 sq. ft barn (with lapsed planning consent to convert to residential) | Desirable village location | 28’ family kitchen with AGA | Four reception rooms | Master bedroom suite | 6 further family bedrooms | Au-pair accommodation with private access | Four bath/shower rooms (two en-suite) | Cellar, utility and boot room | Fully enclosed landscaped gardens and grounds with parking for numerous vehicles Circa 4517 sq. ft (419 sq. m), The Barn circa 741 sq. ft (68 sq. m)

clear and effective property sales Fixed commission of £5,000 + VAT that you pay only on successful Completion Professional photography, floor plans and marketing included Transparent on-line tracking of your sale from valuation through to completion Our fee is fixed. Everything else is about moving To discuss your property sale or purchase requirements, please call or email Rupert, or visit us in our central Clifton office.


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Why settle for a flat when you could own a house in Southville!

I RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT SITES WANTED WITH OR WITHOUT PLANNING PERMISSION FROM SINGLE PLOTS TO MULTIPLE UNIT SCHEMES STRATEGIC LAND UNUSED PUBLIC HOUSES, HOTELS AND COMMERCIAL UNITS

contact: CAMERON GRAY mobile: 07876 197522

cameron@landdevelopmentbrokers.co.uk www.landdevelopmentbrokers.co.uk

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f you thought your budget wouldn’t stretch to a house, think again…. take a look at Bankside, Southville. This new development offers stylish and well-designed 3-bedroom mews houses and is tucked just of Coronation Road. As well as three bedrooms, these sizeable mews houses have a dedicated garage, private third floor terrace, en-suite to the master bedroom and a beautifully designed Masterclass kitchen with quartz worktops. Bathrooms enjoy sanitaryware by Villeroy and Boch and living rooms benefit from luxurious vinyl flooring with neutral carpets in all bedrooms. Just imagine what you could do with all this space; create a home-office or a personal dressing room! Go large with Help to Buy Prices starting at just £394,950 and with Help to Buy, one of these stunning new 3-bedroom homes could be yours. Here’s an example of how Help to Buy can help you to buy at Bankside: Plot 13 Asking Price 5% deposit 20% HTB Loan 75% Mortgage Monthly Mortgage payment

£394,950 £19,747.50 £78,990 £296,212.50 *£981.00

Stress-free Southville, the ideal location Bankside, BS3 is also in an ideal location; a short saunter from the river, the city centre is just 10 minutes away and pretty much everything else you need is on the doorstep. Southville has a great Sunday market at the thriving Tobacco Factory. Well known for its great independent restaurants, bars, cafes, theatres and the Bristol Beer Factory as well as local delis, organic butchers and great green grocers, it is most definitely a haven for foodies. And when you need a break from the fab food and drink on offer, BS3 also has its fair share of green space including the City Farm and friendly local parks. 3 bed houses from £394,950. Help to Buy is available on many of the homes so don’t delay, register your interest today www.banksidebs3.co.uk or call the joint agents, Ocean Home: 0117 946 9838 and Savills: 0117 910 0360 *Based on a mortgage repayment term of 35 years. Prices and terms shown are correct at time of going to press. Mortgage repayments must be made regularly or you could stand to lose your home. Ability to obtain a mortgage is subject to qualifying criteria. Mortgage payment amount is based on an average 2 year fixed rate mortgage.


HENLEAZE ROAD, HENLEAZE Recently renovated and immaculately presented throughout this fine Victorian semi-detached family home offers five bedrooms; master with ensuite, two receptions, a 16m landscaped private garden including double driveway and secure garage. EPC - E 2

3

5

Guide Price ÂŁ1,000,000

HOLMWOOD GARDENS, WESTBURY-ON-TRYM This substantial detached executive family home, positioned within an extensive plot with panoramic back drop and views to rear. Offering four receptions, four bedrooms with two ensuite shower rooms, a generous landscaped garden, double garage and driveway. EPC - C 4

3

4

Guide Price ÂŁ915,000

CJ Hole June.indd 1

22/05/2018 09:34


Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com As local and professional as we were more than 100 years ago… This clock was given to the founder of CJ Hole in 1891. It was presented to Charles Joseph Hole by the city in recognition of his business integrity. Many years later it was handed over to me by his great grandson who wished me every success in taking the business into the 21st Century. I had met him while valuing a plot in Cadbury Camp Lane, formally

the family summer retreat. Our marketing message is all about heritage and trust. ‘CJ Hole Clifton with more than 150 years property experience’. You know the score. Thing is, it’s absolutely spot on, and something I’m very proud of. I may have the advantages of car, mobile phone and internet, but the heart and soul of the business remains the same. To serve our clients with professionalism, care and local expertise …as true for Charles Joseph in 1891 as it is for me Howard Davis in 2018. Howard Davis MD Clifton

STOKE BISHOP Guide Price £1,100,000 A brilliant opportunity to purchase a substantial six bedroom link detached house on the highly sought after Church Road in Stoke Bishop. The house offers versatile accommodation over three floors and features lawned gardens to both front and rear. Offered with no onward chain. EPC E

REDLAND Guide Price £410,000 Located in one of Redlands conservation areas and occupying the garden level of this Victorian building, is an exquisite, two double bedroom flat offering a stylish interior and presented to the highest of standards throughout. The property offers a gated allocated parking space and attractive front and rear gardens. EPC D

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton June.indd 1

18/05/2018 13:53


REDLAND Guide Price £1,200,000

SNEYD PARK Guide Price £475,000

A Victorian family house arranged over four floors providing outstanding accommodation with exceptional views of the surrounding area from the upper floors. The property offers three receptions, kitchen/breakfast room, five bedrooms, three bathrooms and garden to the rear. Offered with no onward chain. EPC D

We are delighted to market this spacious two double bedroom ground floor garden apartment in a most desirable area. Local shops are just a short walk away and Durdham Down can be found at the top of Julian Road which offers over 400 acres of recreational space. EPC D

REDLAND Guide Price £385,000

REDLAND Guide Price £360,000

A lovely hall floor garden flat which is beautifully presented throughout. The property offers: Open plan living with direct access through the French doors into the private rear garden, two double bedrooms, modern bathroom plus the added advantage of off street parking. EPC D

A delightful and spacious maisonette on a popular tree lined road in Redland. The property consists of: Lounge/diner with large bay window, L-shaped kitchen, two double bedrooms and a contemporary shower room. The property has a parking space and is offered with no onward chain. EPC D

CLIFTON - SSTC

CLIFTON - SSTC

MORE LIKE THIS REQUIRED – If you are thinking of selling your property and would like a free valuation and market advice please do not hesitate to call the Sales Team at CJ Hole Clifton on 01179 238238. EPC D

BUYERS WAITING - An exceptional garden flat with an extensive, well presented interior offering three bedrooms and a fabulous garden situated in central Clifton. Rarely do such properties enter the market. EPC D

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton June.indd 2

18/05/2018 13:53


Cotham £315,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

Two bedroom first floor flat A beautifully renovated period conversion with generous rooms, high ceilings and lots of charm. The flat is perfectly situated for easy access to many of the city’s hotspots such as Gloucester Road, Whiteladies Road, the city centre and Durdham Downs. EPC - D

oceanhome.co.uk

Ocean June.indd 1

Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Cribbs Causeway £480,000 Four bedroom house

An amazing opportunity to purchase this 4 bedroom, end of terrace property. Brilliantly situated just off Passage Road, within walking distance of The Mall, Cribbs Causeway and with bus links to Southmead Hospital and other amenities. Upon entering this contemporary home, you are welcomed by a spacious hallway leading into a kitchen/diner. EPC - C

18/05/2018 13:53


Cotham ÂŁ325,000

Two bedroom garden flat Accessed via a private entrance is this attractive 2 double bedroom flat situated on a popular residential road in Cotham. French doors of the spacious living/dining room provide direct access to the lovely private rear garden. EPC - TBC

Brentry ÂŁ425,000

Four bedroom semi-detached house An amazing opportunity to purchase this 4 bedroom, end of terrace property. Brilliantly situated just off Passage Road, within walking distance of The Mall, Cribbs Causeway and with bus links to Southmead Hospital and other amenities. EPC - B

Ocean June.indd 2

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Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

Siston

Guide Price £1,250,000

Barrow Gurney Guide Price £725,000

The West Wing, which is Grade I listed, enjoys the original portico front entrance as well as a plethora of original and outstanding period features. EPC: exempt

This Grade II listed 4 bedroom home occupies a wing of Barrow Court and is steeped in historical importance with a myriad of period features. EPC: exempt

Leigh Woods

Redland Guide Price £400,000

Guide Price £1,250,000

A well appointed, 4 bedroom detached house with a beautiful vista to the front and rear. In all about 0.63 acres. EPC: E

Located in the heart of Redland, this deceptively spacious property benefits from fantastic proportions, period features and modern fixtures. EPC: D

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 369 1004 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

Hamptons June.indd 1

18/05/2018 13:54


Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

Backwell

Guide Price ÂŁ2,000,000

A beautifully appointed detached house, presented in first class condition, in the middle of its large plot with outstanding westerly views. There is a stand alone former stable block, a former riding arena and all weather tennis court in excellent condition. EPC:D

Long Ashton

Guide Price ÂŁ1,750,000

A generous and historically important period gem nestled on the cusp of Bristol amongst its own grounds. An abundance of charm and excellent proportions are without doubt its fine selling features. It is however the beautiful setting and land that make it stand apart from similar properties. EPC: exempt

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 369 1004 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

Hamptons June.indd 2

18/05/2018 13:55


RichardH arding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

COTHAM

guide £1,250,000

A classic large circa 2,750 sq.ft., 5 double bedroom Victorian period semi-detached family house in a prime location near Cotham Gardens Park. Has period features and abundant character, an elevated position with views, driveway parking and stunning kitchen/dining room that opens to a garden terrace and well stocked 57ft rear garden. Favoured location: Within a stone’s throw of nearby Colston’s Primary School & Cotham Gardens Park. Cotham School and St Peter & Paul RC Primary School are within 0.25 miles. Very central & convenient position for the main hospitals complex, the University & Park Street environs, city centre, BBC & Whiteladies Road & many high quality independent schools in the area. The wide open spaces of the Downs & the contrasting attractions of Gloucester Road’s urban vibe are also within easy reach. So much of Bristol seems to be just on the doorstep.

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP

Richard Harding June 2.indd 1

21/05/2018 14:29


RichardH arding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

REDLAND

guide £1,300,000

A handsome and large 5 bedroom, 2/3 reception room Victorian period semi-detached property with impressive lateral accommodation predominantly arranged over two floors, plus additional basement games room and valuable storage, off street parking for at least two cars and level front and rear gardens. Prime location for families within a level walk of Durdham Downs and Redland Green Park, whilst also being situated within just 300 metres of Westbury Park Primary School and 700 metres of Redland Green Second School. Local shops and cafes of Coldharbour Road, North View and Waitrose supermarket are also within easy reach. A spacious and impressive period home in a wonderful location for families and offered with no onward chain, making a prompt and convenient move possible. EPC: F

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP

Richard Harding June 2.indd 2

21/05/2018 11:11


Bristol’s Independent Estate Agents

Redland £999,999

Westbury Park Guide Price £750,000

A superb six bedroom family home situated in a highly convenient location. Adaptable accommodation with option of self-contained flat. Beautifully presented throughout with spacious accommodation. Level rear garden, three off street parking spaces and offered with no onward chain. EPC - E

Attractive, spacious five bedroom early Edwardian mid terrace family home with period features relevant to its age positioned in a convenient and quiet part of Westbury Park within 210m of Westbury Park infant and junior school and 880m of Redland Green senior school. EPC - E

Redland £565,000

Clifton £300,000

A lovely spacious three bedroom, two reception room bungalow with potential for a large loft conversion (subject to consents) situated in a convenient location within 410m of Redland Green School. EPC - F

Attractive, spacious one bedroom garden floor apartment set in a Georgian Grade II listed terrace with benefit of private southerly aspect rear garden and off street parking; a rare combination in the area.

TEL: 0117 974 1741 61 Apsley Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2SW

Leese & Nagle June.indd 1

sales@leeseandnagle.co.uk

18/05/2018 13:58


www.leeseandnagle.co.uk

Stoke Bishop

NEW INSTRUCTION

Guide Price £1,295,000

An individual, modern home reminiscent in style and size of the classic 1930’s detached houses in the locality. Engaging and beautifully presented, this six-bedroom detached family home ticks all the boxes for comfortable, convenient family living. EPC - D

Stoke Bishop Guide Price £799,950

Stoke Bishop Guide Price £795,000

Stoke Bishop Guide Price £599,950

This stunning 4 bedroom 1930’s semi-detached home is offered to the market with no onward chain. Situated in one of the most desirable roads in Stoke Bishop, the property has great square footage, fantastic gardens, off-street parking and a garage, all within catchment for Elmlea Primary School. EPC - C

Coppice Cottage is a stunning, extended 4-bedroom Edwardian family home with a superb rear garden. The property is situated on a desirable side road in Stoke Bishop and retains a great deal of its period character, whilst providing very comfortable familyoriented living spaces. EPC - D

1 Old Sneed Cottages is a modern 4 bedroom townhouse enjoying a lovely corner plot in the everpopular location of Stoke Bishop. The house is offered to the market with no onward chain and would suit a range of buyers including young families and downsizers. EPC - C

TEL: 0117 962 2299 125 Stoke Lane, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS9 3RW

Leese & Nagle June.indd 2

wot@leeseandnagle.co.uk

21/05/2018 14:22


Mallory fp.qxp_Layout 1 24/05/2018 10:24 Page 1

The Bristol Magazine June 18  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol

The Bristol Magazine June 18  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol