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Bristol Cover July 18.qxp_Layout 1 22/06/2018 10:00 Page 1

THE

Issue 169

I

juLY 2018

MAGAZINE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

PENCIL IT IN Saatchi brings The Other Art Fair back to Bristol

Time for walkies Gromit’s unleashed, and this time he’s got company

Bristol baller The life & times of ‘father of cricket’ WG Grace

In the foreground The valuable arts projects taking place in Bristol schools

PLUS...

CITY OF BEST FIT Why Channel 4 should make the move to Bristol

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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clifton

clifton

A beautiful Grade II listed house (3,218 sq ft) retaining many original features. 5 bedrooms, 4 bath/shower rooms, WC, 3 reception rooms, 2 kitchens. Garden and terrace, garage with storage above.

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Guide price £1,800,000

New INstructIoN

Guide price £1,500,000

Near wells

stoke Bishop

Award winning home (3,728 sq ft). 5 beds, 3 baths (1 ensuite), 47ft long living area, kitchen/dining area, study, utility, wine cellar, integral garage, outbuildings with potential. Grounds of 1.4 acres. EPC: D.

Detached home (3,703 sq ft) with 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, enclosed gardens with swimming pool, triple garaging. EPC: F.


Knight Frank July.qxp_full page 20/06/2018 16:01 Page 2

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Guide price £1,650,000

New INstructIoN

clifton An exceptional period townhouse (3,170 sq ft). 5 bedrooms (2 ensuite), bathroom, 2 reception rooms, open-plan kitchen/family room. Front & rear courtyard gardens, gated driveway, parking. EPC: D.

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Guide price £1,395,000

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clifton

clevedon

Immaculate lateral period apartment (1,369 sq ft). 3 bedrooms, family bathroom, 1 reception room, bespoke kitchen/breakfast room, ample storage. Resident controlled parking scheme.

Wonderful Victorian home (3,895 sq ft). 5 bedrooms (1 ensuite), 2 bathrooms, 5 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, cellarage, storage. Level terraces, gardens, double garage (365 sq ft). EPC: E.

Guide price £525,000

New INstructIoN

Guide price £450,000

New INstructIoN

clifton

Leigh woods

Immaculate two bedroom apartment (1,124 sq ft) within Clifton Village. 2 bedrooms, bathroom, drawing room, kitchen/breakfast room, utility room, WC. Garden and off street parking. EPC: C.

An immaculate 2 bedroom apartment (1,092 sq ft). 2 bedrooms (1 en suite), guest shower room, sitting/dining room with access to private balcony, kitchen. Ample storage. Parking and communal gardens. EPC: D.


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NeW INStruCtION

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

Belluton Beautiful Grade II listed house (7,428 sq ft) enjoying south facing views. 5 bedrooms, 3 bath/shower rooms, 4 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, garaging, 1 bed annexe, tennis court, pasture. In all about 11.13 acres.

Guide price £1,075,000

NeW INStruCtION

Guide price £695,000

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NeW INStruCtION

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Near Wells

An immaculate house (3,471 sq ft) situated in an idyllic village location. 5 bedrooms (2 ensuite), bathroom, 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, study. Huge attic with stairs. Gardens, paddock, outbuildings. EPC: F.

An exciting and rare development opportunity to convert an agricultural building into a contemporary residential home with fabulous views towards Glastonbury Tor and beyond. The property has full planning permission.

Guide price £775,000

NeW INStruCtION

Guide price £300,000-£350,000

COMING SOON

Dodington

Brockley

An extremely well-presented country house (2,454 sq ft) with far reaching views. 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, WC, kitchen/sitting room, dining room, family room, study. Garage, store, studio, gardens. EPC: E

Two exceptional building plots with planning permission to build 4 bedroom properties. Within 10 miles of central Bristol, yet in a stunning rural setting.


Knight Frank July.qxp_full page 20/06/2018 16:01 Page 4

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Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,500,000

Compton Martin Charming farmhouse (3,097 sq ft) with extensive range of outbuildings (11,918 sq ft) providing huge opportunities. 4/5 bedrooms, 2 bath/shower rooms, 4 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast. Gardens, pasture. In all about 8 acres.

Guide price £775,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £895,000

Horton

Edingworth

Newly converted stone barn (2,604 sq ft) finished to an extremely high standard throughout. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, WC, open plan kitchen/ dining/sitting room, utility. 2 garages, store, garden, terrace and views.

Grade II listed Georgian house (4,823 sq ft). 6 bedrooms, 5 bathroom/ shower rooms (3 ensuite), 4 receptions rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. 1 bed cottage (611 sq ft). Parking, garage, garden, sun terrace. About 1 acre.

Guide price £875,000

Guide price £495,000

Shepton Mallet

Wraxall

A beautiful Grade II listed town house (4,844 sq ft) in a rural setting. 5-6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 4 reception rooms, large kitchen. Attached cottage, garage, mature gardens and grounds.

A pretty cottage, (1,607 sq ft) with sensational views over the surrounding countryside. The property offers potentail to modernise. 3 bedrooms, bathroom, kitchen/dining room, 2 reception rooms. Garage and gardens. EPC: F.


Contents.qxp_Layout 1 22/06/2018 11:46 Page 1

28

58

Contents

July 2018

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

SUSTAINABILITY

......................................................................

14

Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

22

...........................................................................

16

............................................................

62

Bristol groups are working towards a greener state of affairs

TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 For rolling hills and starlit rambles, try Lee Byre in Devon

Meet the new Lord Mayor and catch up on Bristol goings-on

SPORT

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

CRICKET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

...Is considering a spot of wild swimming

BRISTOL UPDATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Bristol-born ‘Father of cricket’ WG Grace enjoyed a life of free-spirited exuberance, says Stephen Roberts

Bite-sized business and community news from across the city

HOCKEY

MOTORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Alex Danson on the world cup and playing for Clifton Robinsons

Chris Lilly on the new Audi A8

FOOD & DRINK

THE CULTURE

..........................................................................

76

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

WHAT’S ON & HAPPENINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Tasty tidings from our local eateries and producers

A mere cross-section of the city’s wide and varied events scene

REVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

EXHIBITIONS

..................................................................

42

What’s on at our local galleries this month?

FAMILY

............................................................................

64

CO-WORKING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Bristol is part of an exciting global trend changing the way we work .......................................................

....................................................................

Snippets from the sector

REVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Treat your trotters at Gloucester Road stalwart Icon Beauty

70

HABITAT

72

WILD BRISTOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

Some of the bright young things ushering in a new era for events

EDUCATION

HEALTH & BEAUTY NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Summer fun, including our review of Bristol’s Leap of Faith

CREATIVE BRISTOL

Sign of the Angel in Lacock is well worth a summer jaunt

Foreground has been doing valuable work with Bristol schools

July is perfect for butterfly-spotting says Pete Dommett

FEATURES

THE GREAT OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

GROMIT UNLEASHED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 The Grand Appeal takes its poster pup to ground-breaking new heights

TELEVISION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

The mysterious manor above the M32 and its much-debated future

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Furnish your contemporary border schemes with fab fuchsias

PROPERTY

Could Bristol be home to big boy of broadcasting, Channel 4?

THE OTHER ART FAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

......................................................................

News and finds from the sector

Vibrant, accessible and with a brand new location this month

ONE TO ONE

...................................................................

46

A chat with local actor and producer Guy Potter

ARCHITECTURE

.............................................................

There’s power and beauty in the concrete jungle, says Ray Newman 10 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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JULY 2018

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No 169

48

ON THE COVER

Seahorse MK2, a giclee print by artist Olivier Marc Thomas Leger who has exhibited at The Other Art Fair – see p32 to find out more about the 2018 edition

96


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Editor's letter.qxp_Layout 1 22/06/2018 14:45 Page 1

Release the hounds: keep an eye out for Gromit and co around Bristol as of 2 July

THIS MONTH WE’VE BEEN... Excited...

...To hear that Zara’s Chocolates on North Street is moving to a new, larger home just down the road. Zara’s vision for a hot chocolate bar includes a dramatically expanded range of products, workshops and community and educational opportunities. There’s plenty of work to be done to the space though; follow on Twitter @ZarasChocolates if you’d like to donate to the Kickstarter and help bring her plan to fruition...

from the

EDITOR

Listening to...

T

here are so many reasons to be in Bristol this summer, from The Other Art Fair which is back in a new location this month; Southville’s beloved Upfest; and the Gromit Unleashed trail, on the arts front – the latter even featuring levitating animatronic creations for 2018 – to international cricket with England vs India at The Brightside Ground, and top British rowing talent at the new Power8 Sprints at Harbour Festival. All the above speak in their different ways of a city culture that’s full of imagination, diversity and innovation. Broadcasting titan Channel 4 knows it too; that’s why Bristol is in the running to be its brand new second home – a final decision on which is to be made this autumn (see p26 for more). It’s a hub for all kinds of creatives, including actors and producers like local resident Guy Potter who have been drawn over from the Big Smoke by the quality of the offering. He tells us why he chose to live and work in this city on p46. Even Dennis Quaid and Richard Dormer were here recently, filming Fortitude for Sky Atlantic at The Bottle Yard Studios. Dennis Quaid hanging out in little old Whitchurch, mind. This is a place that’s conducive to flexible, forward-thinking ways of working and that’s another reason it’s so darn attractive; this issue we’ve also been looking into what’s evolved into a pretty cool co-working scene – and why it works so well in Bristol (p58) – as well as meeting some of the young people said to be ushering in a new era for the events scene (p70). Within our communities, lots of Bristolians are quietly working towards a greener state of affairs, thinking about the challenging road to carbon neutrality. Read about some of the local groups you can join up with, and the steps that are being taken, on p62. Meanwhile, Lizzie Lloyd has been finding out what arts organisation Foreground has been doing for our schools (p72), Stephen Roberts has a look at the life and times of Bristol-born ‘father of cricket’ WG Grace (p28), Emma Clegg dines out at Sign of the Angel in chocolate-box village Lacock (p52) and Ray Newman admires the Brutalist side of Bristol. Until the next time...

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR Editor’s image by Paolo Ferla; ferlapaolo.com

@thebristolmag

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

thebristolmag.co.uk

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JULY 2018

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No 169

@thebristolmag

...The new album from Bristol trumpet player Gary Alesbrook – who has played with the likes of Kasabian, Noel Gallagher, Scissor Sisters, Rag ‘n’ Bone Man and Kelis. Jazz In Movies, which was released late June, is Gary’s first solo effort and features vocals from Kasabian lead singer Tom Meighan. Catch Gary playing next at The Fringe in Clifton on 11 July

Jealous...

Image by Kirstie Young

...Of students graduating in Bristol – a long, hopefully hot summer in the city stretching out before them. And because they’re all getting free fizz when eating at The Ox, Bambalan and Pata Negra from 13 – 27 July. Mention the offer when booking – essential – in order to claim...


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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

Assembling your furniture is a thing of the past!

W

e all know the feeling of coming home after a successful home improvement shopping trip and wanting to put our feet up surrounded by our shiny new furniture. But before that can happen, our new purchases need to be lovingly assembled via a manual and some nuts and bolts. For some this is all part of the fun, but for those of us who want to skip straight to the feet-up stage there’s TaskRabbit—the app that’s designed to help you do away with your to-do’s. Launched in Bristol a few months ago, you can now book a Tasker directly through IKEA to assemble your new purchases as quickly as the following day - the dream! Taskers are independent contractors who task when they want, where they want, and at rates they set. Trust and safety is TaskRabbit’s top priority, therefore all Taskers undergo an extensive vetting and registration process before joining the Community. So treat yourself after your shopping trip and skip to the feet-up stage by booking your Tasker at checkout, in store, or online at IKEA.

www.taskrabbit.co.uk THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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JULY 2018

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 13


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5

ZEITGEIST

fab things to do in JULY

HAVE A WAPPING TIME

After a four-year hiatus, St Pauls Carnival is back this month for its 50th anniversary. Bringing people from around the world to celebrate the best in African-Caribbean culture, the streets of St Pauls will be coming to life on Saturday 7 July. Starting at 12 noon and finishing up at 10pm, the carnival will be adding yet more creativity, vibrancy and diversity to our culture-rich city. Put on by the community, for the community, this event is all about unity and celebrating together. Grab your carnival outfit, get dancing and enjoy a day of carnival vibes African-Caribbean style. • stpaulscarnival.net

Image: joncraig.co.uk

CARNIVAL COMEBACK

Head over to Wapping Wharf’s maritime shindig on Saturday 21 July, part of Bristol’s Harbour Festival. With a host of sea shanty singers, bubble-blowing pirates and storytelling mermaids, the whole family will be entertained at the waterside hotspot. Don’t miss out on the first ever fringe event from midday and enjoy an afternoon of free family entertainment plus the chance to browse the independent shops, tuck into delicious food and enjoy a drink on the sparkling waterfront. • wappingwharf.co.uk

GET ON UP Bristol’s beloved street art festival Upfest is south of the river once more this summer as renowned artists return to the city between Saturday 18 and Monday 30 July. Marking its 10th anniversary, the event is set to feature animated megastar family, The Simpsons. This year, The Simpsons creator Matt Groening has selected three Upfest artists to bring the characters to life

in their own unique styles so you can expect to see interpretations of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie throughout the festival. Welcoming around 50,000 visitors across the weekend, it will see over 400 talented artists who will be painting 50 venues throughout Bedminster and Southville. • upfest.co.uk

CLIMB ABOARD WITH SHAKESPEARE UNDONE PLAN YOUR SUMMER School is nearly out so this issue we’ve collated a summer fun guide with a roundup of all the goings on around the city during the holidays. We’re talking about the likes of Polka Theatre production of Chocolate Cake, seeing the last Concorde to ever fly, visiting the only Grade-I listed pier in the UK and taking an almighty leap of faith. Turn to page 66 to see more fun things for all the family to do during the school break.

14 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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No 169

As part of the annual Bristol Shakespeare Festival held throughout July, The Natural Theatre Company will be bringing the city Shakespeare Undone. From 25 – 29 July, be taken on a theatrical journey through the nooks and crannies of the SS Great Britain with this unpublished play ‘unearthed’ and stored among Shakespeare’s memorabilia. With early sketches of his most iconic characters, first drafts of famous scenes and just a little bit of nonsense, see Shakespeare come to life around you. • bristolshakespearefestival.org.uk


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CITYIST.qxp_Layout 2 22/06/2018 11:45 Page 1

ist

THE CITY THE BUZZ

My

BRISTOL Meet Bristol’s first Green Party Lord Mayor; councillor and director at Black Artists On The Move, Cleo Lake It’s a privilege and a great achievement to be the first Lord Mayor of Bristol for the Green Party. I was born here in Bristol. My father was from Jamaica and arrived here via London; my mother was born in Hove and grew up in Staffordshire so I consider myself first-generation Bristolian. Many claim the city and that’s great but I also like to acknowledge those who have been here for generations.

The location’s characteristics have become a real feature of the show

Midsummer fun Insane Root Theatre Company has transformed a dilapidated swimming pool in Bristol for a production of Romeo and Juliet which is running until 29 July. The Shakespearean performance is to be the first of its kind at the venue – Eastville Park Swimming Pool – which was originally built as a Victorian lido and later damaged by shrapnel in the Second World War before being turned into a community garden. In recent years the space has fallen into disrepair and been closed to the public after being used for late-night raves, but the Bristol-based theatre company was immediately convinced of its value as a cultural space. “When we set eyes on the pool we instantly felt that its layers of history and tension between the natural and human worlds would provide the perfect landscape for this famous play,” said the show’s director Hannah Drake. “The space feels very theatrical. The walkway around the pool and the steps down into it offer a natural ‘amphitheatre’, while the scrawled graffiti on the pool, the nearby children’s playground, and the sirens from the M32 have all become characters in our production.” Insane Root has built a reputation for performing in unusual locations including the Suspension Bridge Vaults, Redcliffe Caves and St John on the Wall's crypt. Their openair adaptation of Shakespeare‘s enduring tale of love-at-first-sight features 10 performers playing multiple roles among the audience. “Audiences will travel into a completely immersive and new vision of Verona, which is full of ferocious brawls, raucous parties and secret trysts,” added producer Justin Palmer. Snacks and refreshments will also be available at a pop-up bar – sounds like a midsummer night’s dream to us...

Today I visited a school and attended student awards and a concert at the cathedral held by the High Sheriff. Each day is different. One of my projects that I am working on is getting women into cricket so I have organised a cricket taster for Year 10 students from five different schools which I’m really looking forward to. Recently I was also part of staging the Windrush At 70 celebration at M Shed. Arts and culture are my passion. Before becoming Lord Mayor I led two weekly dance sessions; one for the Malcolm X elders forum and the other was Dance Riot which fuzed high-energy dance with creativity. I am a member of Sheba Soul Ensemble which is a theatre collective that focuses on bringing to life ancient African stories. In our most recent production Lovesplay I took on the role of King Solomon which was a great challenge. I also recently gave a monologue performance as the ghost of Rosa Parks which is emotionally demanding but an honour to do. I am also a director for international arts organisation Black Artists On The Move.

My mother got me into activism; she would take my sister and I on marches and demonstrations from the age of six. I want to be a bridge to connect people in Bristol who might otherwise not connect. I want the city to better understand its history so that we can move forward collectively and I wish to do this through the Diaspora Season of Art and Understanding which is a series of arts interventions running this autumn/winter. Fun is also a priority. What would I improve about Bristol? Access to affordable high-quality, feel-good housing; air quality; transport; equality; a more Afrocentric school curriculum. Glen’s Cafe at St. Paul’s Learning Centre is always good if you want to meet familiar faces. Glen is also an incredible singer. I also like Fi Real in Old Market. I’m starting to explore Chandos Road in my ward of Cotham and one of my recent great finds is the Polish bakery in Lawrence Hill. There are many places I would like to visit that I haven’t yet... July is going to be a brilliantly busy month. I plan to be part of the carnival troupe Women of Windrush, hopefully leading the St. Paul’s carnival procession. I’m looking forward to the harbour festival concert which might see a chance to meet Jimmy Cliff! There is a Black Pride event that I have been invited to and also a Bristol University event at the Goldney Hall Orangery; while the fire authority have their graduates’ ceremony which includes a spectacular demonstration. The best event, though, will be my first ‘at home’ event at the Mansion House. I’m inviting young people and their carers and we have Avon Wildlife delivering a workshop among other fun activities. I have almost an obsession with heraldry; I find it fascinating as well as history generally. My maternal grandfather, Scots Canadian Big Bill Campbell, is credited with bringing country and western music to the UK. Currently I’m trying to master making fufu with soup – a West African dish that will feature in some events that are planned for later this year...

• insaneroot.co.uk • Follow Cleo on Twitter: @CleoDanceBaton 16 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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No 169


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THE CITY

BRISTAGRAM

The teams will be packed with top rowing talent

Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your Bristol pics using #thebristolmag

The race is on... An innovative, new and fast-paced sprint British rowing competition is coming to Bristol Harbour Festival on 22 July and will be shown live on BT Sport. The Power8 Sprints will see both male and female crews compete for their city, headto-head in a knock-out tournament over a 350m course which allows spectators to get close to the action and see every stroke of the high-octane efforts from start to finish. BT Sport will be broadcasting live from the event, with BT Sports presenter Craig Doyle heading the line-up. Several cities are taking part in the dynamic new race format, and Bristol’s new ‘city champion’ Matt Gotrel – who won gold as part of the men’s eight at Rio 2016 – will lend his support to the Bristol crew and drum up some friendly rivalries ahead of the inaugural event. “The Power8 Sprints is a great new concept for rowing and one I’m excited to be a part of,” he said. “I hope that people from the city will get behind us in the lead up to the races in July.” Andy Parkinson, CEO of British Rowing, added: “Our eight city champions are just the tip of the iceberg as each crew is packed with great British rowing talent.” • bristolharbourfestival.co.uk; britishrowing.org

@heather cowper h as b The Phys ic Garden een enjoying in Castle Park

ndry’ by ‘Dirty Lau kinslive aw nh @be

The @wethe curious_ cube popped up in St Werburghs last month

Digital delivery Did you know that Brandon Hill might be Britain’s oldest public space; or that the Clifton Observatory was once a windmill? An audio map to Bristol has been launched to provide an insight into the city’s rich past, architectural wonders and influential characters. Placeum (an amalgamation of ‘place’ and ‘museum’) is free and designed to engage both visitors and residents who might want to find out more about their city. The guide comes in the form of mini podcasts, or ‘microcasts’: short audio recordings, each two to three minutes long. Pithy and memorable, they allow listeners to pick and choose from an audio smorgasbord of places, themes and topics as they explore their surrounds. Placeum is the brainchild of Sam Green, a Bristol-based ex-journalist and barrister who has researched and recorded more than 70 aural snippets of 25 locations around the city – more than three hours’ worth of audio. Sam believes Placeum is unique in that it is the first to give visitors complete freedom, allowing them to go where they like and listen to what they like for as long as they like. Wherever they go, users can follow a map on their mobile phone, and markers on the map indicate audio recordings about where they are. “Bristol has a hugely rich and varied history and it's a great place to have a wander,” says Sam. “Using microcasts adds understanding and helps bring the sights to life.” The audio recordings offer history, background, context and commentary; you can also hear contemporary accounts of events, excerpts from novels, and in one case a 30-page 18th century ode to a water fountain...

The Guardian foo d critic @gracede nt (left) at City Hall to help present the BBC Food & Farm ing Awards

• placeum.org

18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

’s @madedotcom er summer supp ol club @delabrist

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B R I S TOL MAGAZINE

WILD WATERS

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few years ago, someone had the brilliant idea of creating a beach on Redcliffe Wharf, and that summer the old docks were filled with the sounds of families enjoying a day at the seaside. The cry of happiness at the unbucketing of a sandcastle; the cry of distress at an ice cream dropped, head-first in the sand. The only sound missing was the one we all crave on a hot day: splashing. There was a beach, and there was water, but we all know that the only swimming anyone does in the Floating Harbour is accidental… This wasn’t always the case. I don’t know when this stopped, but in the old days, younger males would jump into the harbour en masse when the weather turned hot – irrespective of what else might be in the water with them. We moderns are more fussy, but perhaps one day we will see the city’s bronzed youth diving off the quayside outside Arnolfini. Of course we have plenty of options should the sun decide to shine this month: swimming pools and lidos and such. But there’s something about swimming in water that isn’t officially sanctioned, slipping into a river or pool and bobbing about with the moorhens. It isn’t illegal to swim in a river, provided you’re allowed on the bank, but we’re so used to following rules all the time that it feels illicit. When you see an inviting stretch of water your only guide is your common sense. A group of us go camping near Tintern every summer and usually manage to have a dip in the Wye. What a wonderful river that is! It’s wide and strong, with a current that varies with the tides, but the biggest hazard we’ve encountered so far is the Morris dancing outside the pub on the opposite bank. A curious phenomenon is the behaviour of certain small fish. I have no idea whether these fish are young or just small, but I do know that they love dead skin. Sit on a rock with your feet dangling in the water and along they come, nibbling at your toes and heels, giving you what is basically a spa treatment. Slightly disconcerting for younger members of the party but, for everyone else, pampering au naturel. On the subject of things French, there’s a quite different attitude to wild swimming across the Channel, where rivers like the Dordogne and the Lot are enjoyed with Gallic abandon. Once, years ago, we were on a camping holiday in some remote part of France when we came upon a river cascading from pool to pool down a rocky hillside. The sun was hot; the water cold and inviting. But there were two snags. First, we were on our way back from the shops and had no swimming things with us. Second, we were English, so le skinnydipping was out of the question. The place was deserted though, so after some debate we jumped in en famille, in our underwear. Time flew by as we dived and splashed, and clambered and cavorted, then lay on the rocks to dry off. The sun sank behind the hills. And a small fleet of cars brought an extended family of locals to enjoy an evening picnic beside the river. To begin with we didn’t notice them, hidden as we were among the rocks, but they certainly noticed us. At least they did when we were forced to leave our hiding place and walk right past them in our baggy English pants. Leading the way, Dad walked with head held high, as if it were perfectly right and proper to go about in a pair of maroon Y-fronts. As we scuttled after him, the picnickers watched in silence broken only by a little girl asking her mother who these strange people were. And the mother responding with a shrug and the single word, ‘Anglais.’ 20 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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THE

BRIST OL MAGAZINE Bristol and Exeter House, Lower Approach, Temple Meads, Bristol BS1 6QS Telephone: 0117 974 2800 www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk © MC Publishing Ltd 2018 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bristol Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


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FAMILY

TIME FOR WALKIES... Unleashed once more, Gromit is out and about in Bristol for another summer – but this time he’s got company... Find out how The Grand Appeal has upped the arts trail game and taken its poster pup to ground-breaking new heights (quite literally!)

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romit, the clay canine of A Grand Day Out fame, and other beloved box office hits, is back in Bristol this month – spottable in familiar sculpture form all over the city, and sporting beautiful themed designs from local artists, sponsored by local organisations and businesses. He’s not alone, however. This time round he’s got faithful owner and madcap inventor Wallace in tow, plus – somehow – that pesky penguin, arch nemesis Feathers McGraw, is following them around too. They just can’t shake him off, can they? Led by Bristol Children’s Hospital charity The Grand Appeal in collaboration with Aardman Animations, Gromit Unleashed 2 follows the success of Gromit Unleashed and Shaun in the City, in 2013 and 2015 respectively, which raised millions to save lives and support young patients and their families. From 2 July until 2 September more than 60 sculptures, each individually designed and decorated by high-profile artists, designers, innovators and local talent, will be spread across Bristol – this will be the world’s first arts trail to feature three licensed characters. This year’s event also sees collaborations with international brands and household names, including Bristol-filmed gameshow The Crystal Maze plus exciting, all-new, interactive animatronic sculptures...

Isambard and Wallace: both loved for amazing inventions that’ve put Bristol on the map. Artist Tim Miness is responsible for Wallace’s Brunel makeover – find him at the SS Great Britain site, naturally

Locations: branching out The 2018 trail is super-inclusive, showcasing more of Bristol and the surrounding areas than ever before. Thornbury represents the most northerly point, with Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park and Chew Valley marking the east and south boundaries respectively, and Weston-super-Mare in the west. St Mark’s Road in Easton, the Royal Fort Garden at the University of Bristol, Hartcliffe Community Farm and Blaise Castle are four of many locations taking part in the trail for the first time, with Clifton Suspension Bridge, Temple Meads and The Mall at Cribbs Causeway returning for a third time. All sculptures are free to access and wheelchair friendly – with any sculptures situated at attractions with entry fees to be located at the entrance. A map and an app is available as of the start of July to help navigate the full trail, in addition to which there will be shorter ‘trails within trails’ for visitors to discover across the whole of Bristol.

New interactive elements Organisers have brought together the best and brightest of Bristol’s diverse creative and tech industries to create a really special, pioneering feel to this year’s edition. With the help of four ‘trailblazers’: Creditcall, Renishaw, Rolls-Royce and the University of Bristol, the event is going where no arts trail has gone before, putting innovation at the forefront of Gromit Unleashed. 22 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Find Feathers in full peacock regalia at Hartcliffe Community Farm


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‘Gromitronic’ comes courtesy of Renishaw, with a plasma ball nose and waggling 3D printed tail

WHERE YOUR MONEY GOES Ten of the sculptures in the trail will fundraise for specific wards, services and departments in Bristol Children’s Hospital. This means that visitors can choose which one to support and donate through a designated contactless donation point. At the end of the trail these sculptures will be auctioned off for their designated service or department. Those are ED, Major Trauma, Neurosurgery, Cardiac, Bereavement and Palliative Care, PICU, NICU, Oncology and Surgery & Theatres. Seven other donation points will fundraise for the entire hospital. The remaining sculptures will also be auctioned off to support the hospital as a whole. Continued on p24

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Look out for artist Zoe Power’s bold and cheerful Gromit, covered in Bristolian expressions, geometric elements and images of the city, on Clifton’s Sion Hill

Drawing on their expertise in STEM disciplines, Renishaw, RollsRoyce and University of Bristol have each created extraordinary interactive and robotic sculptures to amaze trail fans, and show just what is possible when you combine arts and science. The Grand Appeal has partnered with global payments technology company Creditcall to provide contactless payment technology around the trail to help drive fundraising for Bristol Children’s Hospital during the trail and make it easier and quicker than ever to donate. With the promise of augmented reality, feats of engineering, and truly unique sculptures never seen in a public arts trail, organisers hope to take Gromit fans to unprecedented places – and, we must say, we are brimming with excitement. Some of the interactive sculptures were unveiled at the Brabazon Hangar at Filton Airfield recently, ahead of the trail launch, to show how forward-thinking technology has been harnessed to showcase Bristol’s diverse creative and tech industries. Gromitronic, designed and built by a young team of Renishaw engineers, combines multiple technologies including mechanical engineering, electronics, software and metal 3D printing and features everything from a plasma ball nose to a waggling 3D printed tail to entertain the young and young-atheart, while aiming to stimulate discussion about engineering technologies. Look closely at the collar and you may also recognise a few Bristol landmarks – all 3D printed in miniature. High-flyer Gromjet, brought to life by Rolls-Royce, recognises the importance of engineering and aviation in Bristol’s past, present and future. Using the same technology reserved for its Pegasus engine on the Harrier and the LiftSystemTM on the F-35B Joint Strike Fighter, engineers equipped Gromit with hybrid-electric engines which take him to new heights – literally! Rising up to one metre, Gromjet is the result of advanced processes such as 3D scanning and printing. Named after a watchmaker’s most complex design, A Grand Gromplication was designed and produced by three University of Bristol engineering students – Christine Braganza, Ella Allan and Octavia Clark – after their design won a competition by the Faculty of Engineering. Inspired by steampunk culture and its connection with gears and cogs, A Grand Gromplication is a play on the term used by watchmakers to describe the most intricate designs. The term is also a nod to the historic Bristol time, which placed Bristol 10 minutes ahead of London before the introduction of Greenwich Mean Time in 1884. The students spent over 350 hours installing over 700 cogs on Gromit, using computer aided design, 3D printing, gear ratios and soldering. 24 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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“Watching Gromitronic, Gromjet and A Grand Gromplication slowly come to life over the last six months has been the most exciting wait of our lives,” says Nicola Masters, director of The Grand Appeal. “We are absolutely delighted with the incredible results and are so grateful to every single person involved for helping us take Gromit Unleashed 2 into totally new territory. To quote a certain inventor, ‘We’ve tested this on Gromit – haven’t we lad?’” Oh yes, it’s going to be a cracking summer. ■ • grandappeal.org.uk; gromitunleashed.org.uk

‘A Grand Gromplication’ from University of Bristol engineering students


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The Crystal Maze presenter Richard Ayoade cosying up with the show’s themed Gromit

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TELEVISION

The 2019 move will see 300 Channel 4 staff leave London and see its nations and regions content spend increase, from 35% to 50% of main channel UK commissions, by 2023 – over £250m more in total

CITY OF BEST FIT Could Bristol be the second home of broadcasting titan Channel 4? Many locals think it’s very much cut out for the job

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hether you work in the media or not, you’ve no doubt heard the news: Channel 4 is on the hunt for a new location. The publicly-owned broadcaster is facing the biggest ever structural change in its 35-year history, since government decided it should relocate its operations outside of London. In April, the channel launched ‘4 All The UK’, its plan to create a new national headquarters and two new, smaller creative hubs outside the capital. The bidding process saw Bristol put its case forward alongside other UK cities, such as Liverpool, Cardiff and Glasgow, for why it would be the best match for C4. The city celebrated in May when it was shortlisted as one of seven cities in the running for the national HQ, which will be home to a new studio with the potential to be a base for daily programmes, and a new digital production unit. There’s no doubt that Bristol, with a strong media sector that is already home to more than 130 production and post-production companies, the BBC’s Natural History Unit and popular production space The Bottle Yard Studios, ticks the boxes when it comes to what C4 is looking for; a working population of more than 200,000, travel time to London of three hours or less and a “high level of physical and digital connectivity/infrastructure” (the city recently hosted the UK’s first public trials on the 5G testbed). But mayor Marvin Rees has been keen to point out that it’s the city’s culture and values that also make Bristol the best fit for C4 and its staff facing relocation. “Bristol is a city of diversity – with a commitment to inclusion, stretching from our grassroots organisations to the top of political leadership – where we champion the fact we experience the same raw material of urban life in very different ways. It’s in this we find the city’s true wealth – its culture of creativity, unorthodoxy, innovation, 26 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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questioning and restlessness,” he said. It’s this culture, we quite agree, that’s provided fertile ground for the likes of Aardman Animations, the Natural History Unit, photojournalist Martin Parr, Banksy, poet and novelist Helen Dunmore, Massive Attack, activist Paul Stephenson and many others to flourish and influence the fabric of our society – locally and on a greater, often even global, scale. “Every city will offer a nice building in a nice location with the best digital connection they can provide,” Marvin continued. “That can be taken as read and Bristol will do the same. But my belief is that in Bristol, Channel 4 will find a city with whom it shares values and a group of people it wants to work with.

...Bristol has a culture of innovation which disrupts the norm and has always been a city that makes things happen... “Channel 4 is built on innovative and distinctive broadcasting which stimulates debate and champions alternative points of view. It is committed to diversity and nurturing new talent to change people’s lives. These are values we want in Bristol and it is because of this that I believe that Channel 4 would be good for Bristol and Bristol would be good for Channel 4.” DFLs (Down From London-ers) are something most of us are wellused to by now (whether or not we are pleased about the effect on house prices), and we reckon this particular newcomer from the capital


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TELEVISION

would have itself a wonderful second home in Bristol, thanks to its creative network, spirit of independence, innovation, diversity and debate, as well as being hugely beneficial for the city. So far, feedback on the news seems to have been largely positive, especially from Bristol’s creative businesses. “From a start up, less than five years ago, Plimsoll Productions has become the largest regional indie and, according to the latest Sunday Times Fast Track 100, the fifth fastest growing company in the UK. We simply couldn’t have done this if we weren’t based in Bristol,” says Grant Mansfield, CEO and founder of the Bristol, Cardiff and Los Angeles-based company, which creates and produces non-scripted shows for television and online. “No other city, outside London, offers such a distinct, diverse and creative talent pool. Bristol is a great place to live and work and the direct 90-minute train journey between our city and the capital means it’s easy for talent and ideas to move in both directions. “Mayor Marvin Rees understands the sector, its strengths and its weaknesses. Working with him, we intend to become an even more creative and, crucially, much more representative media city. Channel 4 would be a transformational partner in these ambitions.” The case is certainly strong; the city has a great track record in drama and entertainment made for Channel 4 – everything from The Great British Bake Off, Poldark, Skins and The Crystal Maze to Kiri, Teachers and Deal Or No Deal – and actively creates opportunities for new voices in media and tech through the likes of Boomsatsuma’s media production diploma and more. It’s a world-class production base with “a full ecosystem of support services and facilities,” including Films at 59, Doghouse post-production facility and Moonraker VFX. “Bristol has a culture of innovation which disrupts the norm and has always been a city that makes things happen,” says Marvin. “Now, with our fantastic partners across the city’s creative and media sectors, we look forward to welcoming Channel 4 to show them our talent, creativity and the possibilities of our city. We will discuss how we could work together and develop their vision for the future alongside ours.” With representatives from the broadcasting heavyweight having made their visit to the city, the final decision is expected to be made in October. ■ • Follow the bid’s progress on Twitter: @BristolandC4 Marvin and media, tech and digital industry members, including Aardman, Icon Films, Plimsoll Productions and Watershed, welcomed the C4 team to Bristol in June to present Bristol’s pitch in person

...No other city offers such a distinct, diverse and creative talent pool and the direct 90minute train journey to the capital means its easy for talent to move in both directions...

Reactions from the Twittersphere...

@wethecurious_ Why should Channel 4 come to our brilliant city? Because it’s diverse, friendly, challenging, inclusive and super creative!

@wildscreenfest We might be biased but we love that it’s the beating heart of the world’s natural world storytelling industry. But also that it’s a city full of collaboration, imagination and talent.

@thebottleyard Bristol attracts exciting productions to film in the city time and time again, using our world-class crew and post production houses, often featuring our fantastic locations with @BrisFilmOffice support.

@aardman Great to hear Channel 4 are thinking of moving to Bristol – it’s been our home for over 40 years and is bursting with creativity, collaboration and talent. 10/10 would build HQ here!

@wiltshireglo It’s got everything. Music, vision, creatives, independents. Bustle or chill. Wonderful people. Adventure. Art. Peace. Quiet space, or vibrant noise. Did I mention the people? Landscape and cityscape.

@luisamsanders Surely Bristol is the obvious new home for Channel 4! Creative, inclusive, often subversive. C’mon – you know what to do :)

@nseatweets Bristol has a great track record in entertainment made for Channel 4; from The Crystal Maze to Skins and Teachers

Why wouldn’t C4 come to Bristol? Everything that’s good in a city is here in Bristol – thriving communities, creative spaces, visionary people, amazing landscapes.

@fearstephen Bristol is the ideological home of Channel 4 in my opinion, the fit is perfect. Both are quirky, successful and unconventional. Bristol and its population will welcome you like no other place can @Channel4. The Bristol business community is fully behind this bid to bring @Channel4 to our amazing, quirky and successful city where a large, diverse workforce will help it produce more brilliant programmes like @C4Gogglebox.

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WG Grace by Herbert Rose Barraud (1845-1896). Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Did you know gargantuan Grace was possibly a bit of a petrol-head as well as a keen sportsman and doctor?

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BRISTOL BALLER His life may have been bookmarked by violent events but WG Grace enjoyed a life of free-spirited exuberance, that of the gentleman cricketer. Words by Stephen Roberts

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hwack! The ball met the middle of the bat as though it was magnetised, and leapt over the cordon of helpless fielders, bouncing just once before it disappeared over the boundary rope and into the undergrowth. It was another four to the ample, legendary figure of WG Grace. He was, literally and metaphorically, cricket’s first big attraction and sport’s first superstar. William Gilbert Grace was a Bristolian, born in the year of revolutions 170 years ago, and who would die in another turbulent year – 1915, during the early stages of the First World War. (He supposedly stood in his garden shaking his fist at German Zeppelins.) His existence on this Earth may have been bookmarked by violent events, but Grace himself enjoyed a life of free-spirited exuberance, that of the gentleman cricketer. Grace was born on 18 July 1848 in Downend – today a residential outer-suburb of Bristol, although it would have been a distinct village, surrounded by countryside, when Grace came into the world. The house in question was Downend House in North Street. He was the eighth of nine children and was baptised in the local parish church. His mother and father were both keen on the game of cricket apparently, so while there is absolutely no truth in any aphorism that he might have been born with a bat in his hand, perhaps he was blessed with the next best thing; encouraging parents. In 1850, when Grace was two, the family moved to a nearby residence called Chestnuts, which had a short-lived orchard. His father began systematically clearing said orchard to create a practice pitch for his children to play on. Grace recalled that he watched a cricket match for the first time when he was barely six and played for the West Gloucestershire club in 1857, when he was only nine. The first recorded match in which we know Grace participated was one played at Durdham Down, just after he turned 11. Grace was part-educated at home as his tutor was the curate of Downend parish church. There were other parental ambitions, besides Grace being able to wield a bat: they wanted him to become a doctor (his father was the local GP). In later life, whether he was ministering to the sick, or crashing willow against leather, he cut an imposing figure: he grew to be six-foot-two.

With his full black beard, he marched to the wicket looking every inch like Little John from Robin Hood stories but armed with a cricket bat instead of a staff... The young man was a prodigy. By 1864, he was playing for Gloucester County, aged just 15, and was chosen for the prestigious ‘Gentlemen versus Players’ match. This match tells us a lot about the mores of the time: a first-class cricket match generally held once or twice a year, for well over 100 years. It was contested between gentlemen (amateurs) and players (professionals). Grace turned out for the gentlemen and it was his considerable presence that enabled the amateurs to more than match the professionals. Incidentally, considering the sums of money that Grace earned from playing the game (read on), it does seem like a bad case of ‘shamateurism’ that he could turn out for the gentlemen.

DOCTOR’S ORDERS: The mural at Stapleton Road railway station showing Grace in batting pose, with reference to the Easton Colliery Blast in 1886 where he assisted as a doctor. Grace’s medical practice was based on the same road

Aged 18, Grace played for England versus Surrey, scoring 224 not out, but also found time to show off his all-round sporting prowess by dashing off part-way through the game to compete in a hurdles race at the Crystal Palace, which he won. On another occasion, it is said that he deliberately gave up his wicket so that he could take his first ride in a car. So, he quite possibly was a petrol-head too. Not just a cricketer, he enlisted at Bristol Medical School in 1868 when he was 22, going on to obtain a medical degree in 1879 and have his own practice in Bristol. If you’re wondering how it took so long for him to qualify, it was simply that he spent more time at the crease than he did at his studies. By the time he finally became a doctor, he had morphed from bachelor to keen cricketer and a married father of three. His first love was always cricket, so medicine was not allowed to get in the way of a good innings. You can almost visualise Grace, a right-hand bat, practicing his favourite bludgeoning strokes, while half-listening to the woes of a patient. The cricket was still number one: in 1876 he managed to wallop over 800 runs in just eight days. Meanwhile, his most celebrated act as a doctor is said to have occurred (typically) at a cricket match when an unfortunate and accident-prone fielder impaled himself on the boundary fence. In later life, when he grew (literally) into the pot-bellied genius of caricature, he wouldn’t have been leaping over any hurdles. Apparently, there was no horse strong enough to support his weight. With his full black beard, he marched to the wicket looking every inch like Little John from Robin Hood stories but armed with a cricket bat instead of a staff. In the hands of the gargantuan Grace, the bat must have resembled a small toy. He peaked at a roly-poly 22 stone and has been dubbed ‘the beard that was feared.’ And what sort of a man was Grace? He was undoubtedly a family man and adored his children, plus he could be rather generous on occasion. THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Not all his traits were as attractive, however, as he was a bit money-oriented, displayed a sense of humour that might be described as ‘bluff’ and was most tenacious when it came to winning, employing any ruse possible to upset an opponent, to the point where it might be deemed ‘sledging’ today. That lack of ‘grace’ from Mr Grace was best exemplified by the famous story of him being dismissed three times in three balls. He stood his ground and refused to walk when given out leg before, then caught, but had his options removed with his stumps when he was clean bowled. Another, possibly apocryphal tale, had Grace given out LBW, but admonishing the umpire with the words, “They came to see me bat, not you umpire.” Presumably he carried on batting... Touring became part of the game in the Grace era and he found himself exhibiting his talents in Canada, the United States and Australia. His first tour of Australia was over the winter of 1873-74 when Mrs Grace tagged along for a cricketing honeymoon. Showing that mercenary nature, Grace managed to extract a fee of £1,500 (more than £150,000 in today’s money). On his second tour (1891-92), one-fifth of the cost of supporting a 13-strong team went directly to Grace. Those tours would have gone off without incident. Compared to today, when it seems curfews might need to be imposed to prevent players over-indulging and misbehaving, Grace liked nothing more than a game of whist for winding down. It was, of course, a different era. Grace achieved a notable milestone in 1895, by which time he was in his early 40s, when he scored his hundredth century. The tribute (benefit) that his fans subscribed to in that year was considerable, coming to more than £5,000. This was in recognition of his services to the game. Just for the record, that’s a sum equivalent to over £600,000 in today’s money. He also received a letter of congratulation from the Prince of Wales, the future Edward VII. On two occasions he captained the England team, and at the age of 50 he was still good enough to open the batting for the team. Grace died on 23 October 1915 of a cerebral haemorrhage, aged 67. In a first-class career spanning 43 years, this single man had revolutionised cricket and the art of batting. With his towering bulk, Grace was a larger-than-life character, tailor-made to bring the game to a wider audience and make it England’s

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summer sport of choice. It was Grace who enabled the transition from village green to international stage. While his girth increased in middle-age, he may not have been the epitome of athleticism, but he came to rely on power rather than aesthetics, which no doubt pleased the crowds. He wafted his bat around as though he was about to poke the fire, then sent the ball flashing over the boundary. A mark of the man’s celebrity is the fact that he is so wellknown by his initials, even today, over 100 years after his death. Can we honestly say the same of many others? n 224 NOT OUT: Top left, WG Grace, centre, with the Gentlemen XI for the fixture vs Players at Lord’s Cricket Ground, 1899, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons; top right, WG Grace batting, c1880, Archivist/Adobe Stock; below left, a UK postage stamp celebrating 100 years of county cricket, c1973, chrisdorney/shutterstock.com; below right, William Gilbert Grace, coloured lithograph by Sir L Ward [Spy], 1877, Wellcome Collection, CC BY

WG  GRace FactFile • Grace is known as the ‘father of cricket’, its first all-round cricketer. His family was full of cricketers, including two more England players, both brothers of his. • An amateur cricketer, but professional doctor, Grace was also known as The Doctor. • Grace scored 2,000 runs in a season five times, and 1,000 runs in a season 28 times. • A medium-pace bowler, he took 10 wickets in a match on 64 occasions. • Although he came to have a considerable waistline, he was a nifty fielder. • In a possibly apocryphal tale, Grace replaced his bails after being bowled and continued batting. • In Monty Python and the Holy Grail Grace appears as God. • Grace once treated an injured would-be burglar, then sent him on his way with a hefty kick. • Grace founded the world’s first recognised indoor bowling club in 1905 at Crystal Palace.


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PORTISHEAD

&

Flower Show

Country Fair

SATURDAY 28th & SUNDAY 29th JULY 2018 Flower Show Field, Clapton Lane, Portishead, BS20 7RA Oreo Animal Encounters, The Quack Pack, Gundogs, Falconry, Punch & Judy, Harlem Rhythm Cats, North Somerset Samba Band, Chicken Teddy’s and Vintage Dairy Display. Horticultural and Handicraft Exhibits Bar and Refreshments and Trade Stands

The Clifton Club, founded in 1818, continues to be Bristol’s most exclusive Private Members Club. Overlooking the Mall Gardens in Clifton Village, the magnificent, historic club building radiates comfort, luxury and charm. Idyllic private event spaces suitable for weddings, functions and corporate events make The Clifton Club the perfect choice of venue, whatever your occasion.

Adults £5.00, Children under 17 Free www.portisheadflowershow.com

The Friendship Force of Bristol is seeking hosts for visitors from

COLORADO USA 26th September - 2nd October 2018 & has vacancies on its trip to

BRAZIL in May 2019

Exclusive Private Members Club Extensive Social Events Calendar Bespoke Wedding Service Dedicated Meetings and Functions Team

We are a not-for-profit organisation All you need is a warm heart and a spirit of adventure! To apply - or just want to find out more in the first instance call or e-mail Geri Phillips-Hughes on 0117 9621416 gphillipshughes@gmail.com

Fine Dining Experience For Membership, Event or Wedding Enquiries, please do not hesitate to get in touch Tel: 0117 9745039 Email: enquiries@thecliftonclub.co.uk

@cliftonclub

@thecliftonclub

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BRISTOL’S GOT TALENT Vibrant, accessible and happening sooner than you probably realised, in a new location; it’s The Other Art Fair

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etting up and out of the house early on a summer’s Saturday, grabbing a coffee as we stroll through Wapping Wharf, past the chattering harbourside cranes and along to a local art fair full of talent and colour – especially if the weather matches the upbeat vibe – is, for us, one of life’s pleasures. Thus we’re pleased The Other Art Fair has come around again so soon (last year it took place in September at Arnolfini), with its biggest Bristol fair to date taking place from 26 – 29 July. Back with 100 artists, this leading UK artist fair will open its doors over four days in a new location for its Bristol edition – The Passenger Shed – and the big news is that acclaimed British artist and author Harland Miller plans to release a one-off, limited edition print in support of Art on a Postcard, which raises money for The Hepatitis C Trust via secret postcard auctions, sales of prints and postcard boxsets. Harland, best known for his large-scale, photo-realistic paintings, posters and prints of vintage Penguin book covers, has released a triptych of hand-finished prints entitled Colour Made Me Hard, Back on the Worry Beads and Overcoming Optimism in support of the charity. At his last release with Art on a Postcard, buyers camped out all night to be first in line, while this year they will get the chance to enter a ballot at The Other Art Fair to get their hands on the limited edition print. These artworks will be available only at the Bristol fair as part of Art on a Postcard’s secret auction on Sunday 29 July and 32 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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visitors will have to attend the fair in order to enter the ballot for the chance to buy one or the whole series. The Other Art Fair will, as always, introduce artists from Bristol and across the UK to potential buyers face-to-face in its social, relaxed atmosphere, making the fair especially appealing for first-time art buyers. There they’ll find everything from photography, stencilling, painting, sculpture, mixed media, ceramics to street art, with prices starting from £100. The line-up has been carefully selected by contemporary art experts Rebecca Wilson, chief curator and VP art advisory at Saatchi Art; respected artist Eileen Cooper; Sarah Martin, head of exhibitions at Turner Contemporary in Margate; and curator of last year’s Turner Prize, George Vasey. The Other Art Fair Bristol is the sole UK edition outside of London, attracting over 6,000 visitors across the weekend. “Following popular demand in previous years, we have decided to extend the fair from Thursday evening, as well as moving to a much bigger venue,” explained fair manager, Jessica Chow. “This has given us the opportunity to showcase even more artists and create some fantastic immersive experiences for visitors. Bristol is such a culture-rich city so it’s a brilliant location to host the fair again this year.” Turn the page for our pick of local artists, contributing to that richness, to look out for...


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ART

A serene scene from painter Dawn Reader

Expect immersive experiences

See bold portraits by former potter Jane McCall

We’ve been fans of Brook Tate’s characters – depicted on wood panels and often complemented by gold or silver leaf – for a long time

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ART

Dawn Reader Dawn’s a Somerset artist who has been painting for as long as she can remember and even had work featured on Channel 4 television. Inspired by seascapes and light, she has travelled the world chasing the light she paints. Simplifying and softening the forms of the landscape using a limited and somewhat muted palette, Dawn aims to extract and focus more on a spiritual serenity. The application of light and dark in the work serves not only to bring depth and perspective but also to emphasise the force and power in creation.

Grace Green Fellow Somerset painter Grace focuses on the fruitfulness and fertility of life in all its forms but principally the absorption in organic growth. Sometimes the abstracted plant forms represent the microscopic cell structures in nature. Sometimes less organic forms such as chicken-wire have been introduced as a reminder of constraints that are placed by man over nature. But throughout, the primary desire is to focus on growth, nurture and transformation. More recently a figure is present, introducing the feeling of interaction between human and nature.

Robert Hewer Bath-based painter Robert predominantly focuses on the face and human figure, using their physical structure as a vehicle for exploration into creating form and shape with paint. Robert is intrigued by the myriad ways in which paint can be used to describe form, more specifically the human form; whether it be using different mediums, layering the paint or different methods of application. Through the medium of paint he is constantly searching for that balance of a subtle yet convincing depiction of the face and figure. Robert Hewer’s rather ethereal work explores the ways paint can be used to describe the human form

Brook Tate Self-taught painter Brook Tate has exhibited across the globe. Hailing from Hastings, Brook has always been fascinated with the work of the Old Masters, painting since a young age. Brook works and lives in Bristol now, finding inspiration in people he meets. Brook uses colour to complement the portraits as well as gold and silver leaf. These masterpieces are created on wood panels, each with different grain and slightly different to the previous one. Large portions of the wooden panels are left free from paint so the viewer can enjoy the natural markings of the wood. ■ • Follow on Twitter @theotherartfair or visit bristol.theotherartfair.com

Grace Green focuses on the fruitfulness and fertility of life

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LOCAL | EVENTS

WHAT’S ON IN JULY The Play That Goes Wrong at Bristol Hippodrome

1599: A Year in the Life at The Bristol Shakespeare Festival

The Elephant Man Until Saturday 7 July, times vary, Bristol Old Vic Joseph Merrick is The Elephant Man, the sordid spectacle of a travelling freak show. Led by the UK’s leading disabled actor Jamie Beddard (Messiah), and inspired by the extraordinary life of a man with a physical disfigurement, this multi-award-winning play from Bernard Pomerance explores changes in perception, resilience and the fragility of the human spirit. All performances are captioned, with signed, audio described and relaxed performances also available. Ages 14+, £7.50 – £31.50; bristololdvic.org.uk Smoked & Uncut Saturday 30 June, 12 – 10pm, THE PIG, Pensford near Bath Classic festi-food is the order of the day across this festival, but if you fancy tucking into something a little heartier then head to one of the feasting tents where chef Angela Hartnett and her culinary friends will be hosting longtable three-course feasts in The Field Kitchen pop up, and chef Mark Hix will be paying homage to the British love of a classic Indian takeaway. Make the most of the festival vibes and spectacular surroundings and sleep under the stars in your very own bell-tent if you fancy camping. Headlining the music side will be Paul Carrack, and Daisy Lowe will be the guest DJ; smokedanduncut.com Bristol Concert Orchestra Saturday 30 June, 7.30pm, St Mary Redcliffe Church This concert of two halves opens with Stokowski’s string arrangement of Purcell’s heartrending Dido’s Lament, an effective prelude to Vaughan Williams’ empassioned plea for peace Dona nobis pacem. The second half features Berlioz’s incredible Symphonie Fantastique. Tickets: £10 – £15, online or on the door; bristolconcertorchestra.org.uk 36 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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In The Beginning: Bristol Chamber Choir Sunday 1 July, 3pm, St Stephen’s Church, St Stephen’s Avenue, Bristol Bristol Chamber Choir presents music by Aaron Copland and Cyril Rootham with Charlotte Newstead (soprano) and John Marsh (piano), featuring the works of Emily Dickinson and settings of Mary Coleridge. Tickets: £10, from Opus 13, St Michael’s Hill, or available on the door; bristolchamberchoir.org.uk 1599: A Year in the Life Tuesday 3 – Saturday 14 July, times vary, Stackpool Playhouse, Southville The Bristol Shakespeare Festival presents this world premiere. It’s the year 1599 and William Shakespeare is in trouble. The competition’s got stiffer, his theatre’s been dismantled and everyone’s telling him what he should be writing. But when you’re in trouble, the best way out is to get in a bit deeper. 1599 shows how a single year transformed Shakespeare’s fortunes – a year when he wrote Henry V, Julius Caesar, As you Like it and Hamlet... A year when the theatre literally moved. Written and directed by Ed Viney, a Bristol director and assistant director at the Royal Shakespeare Company. £6 – £13; bristolshakespearefestival.org.uk The Frome Festival Friday 6 – Sunday 15 July, various locations around Frome The Frome Festival has been the town’s biggest celebration of the arts for 17 years. This year’s event will feature nearly 200 events including a mix of opera, pop, choral, jazz and folk music, plus theatre, workshops, exhibitions, films and talks. Headline acts include JLS singer and Strictly contestant Aston Merrygold, Badly Drawn Boy and Scottish folk rockers Blazin’ Fiddles. The festival will be celebrating the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

with a variety of events, including a talk on works of film director Terence Fisher. For the full programme, visit: fromefestival.co.uk Bristol Male Voice Choir Saturday 7 July, 7.30pm, All Saints Church, Pembroke Road, Clifton An anniversary concert with world-famous special guests the Morriston Orpheus male voice choir conducted by Joy Amman Davies. Baritone Naill Allen from Only Men Aloud will be making his Bristol debut, plus Emma Britton from BBC Radio Bristol will present the concert. £15, buy online or on the door; bristolmvc.org.uk Summertime: Bristol Cabot Choir Saturday 7 July, 7.30pm, St Peters Church, Henleaze Bristol Cabot Choir will perform music from across the Atlantic including Gershwin and Cole Porter, plus newly commissioned pieces from Danish composer Jonas Hunt. Conducted by Rebecca Holdeman. Tickets: £5/£15, from Opus, St Michael’s Hill; opus13.co.uk; bristolcabotchoir.org Summer Action Festival Saturday 7 July, 9am – 5pm, Castle Combe Circuit, Chippenham All makes, all ages, all action at Castle Combe! Featuring more than 1,500 club cars, public track time, vintage buses, a KitCar village, trade village, show and shine competition and more; castlecombecircuit.co.uk Footnotes to the Great War Saturday 7 July, 7.30pm, St George’s Bristol Gurt Lush Choir and Bristol Man Chorus commemorate the centenary of the end of the First World War with a musical tour that dares to tread the discomfort of the era’s social, political and emotional excess –


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EDITOR’S PICK... SAM PALLADIO MONDAY 23 JULY, 7.30PM, ST GEORGE’S BRISTOL

Actor and musician Sam Palladio grew up in south west England but it was in Nashville, Tennessee where his big break happened playing the role of soulful, country songwriter Gunnar Scott on ABC’s hit drama Nashville. Since then he has immersed himself in the worlds of Americana, folk and country. His blend of modern Americana is influenced by the folk and rock sounds of the 1960s and 70s and classic storytellers like James Taylor and Paul Simon. Tickets: £23.25; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

from a stampede of shameless triumphalism to the cold despair of the trenches. Ruthless recruitment marches, sardonic soldier laments, war poetry and other musical curiosities of the age mingle with courage, death, loss and resistance. £2 – £10; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk Birdsong Tuesday 10 – Saturday 14 July, times vary, Bristol Old Vic Marking the centenary of the First World War, Birdsong is the critically-acclaimed stage show based on the novel by Sebastian Faulks. In pre-war France, a young Stephen Wraysford embarks on a passionate and dangerous affair with the beautiful Isabelle Azaire that turns their world upside down. As the war breaks out over the idyll of his former life, Stephen

must lead his men through the carnage of the Battle of the Somme and through the sprawling tunnels that lie deep underground. Faced with the unprecedented horror of the war, Stephen clings to the memory of Isabelle as his world explodes around him. 12+. £12.50 – £33.50; bristololdvic.org.uk

retelling of Shakespeare’s epic Henry V. With just two actors and an original score performed live, watch as the Siege of Harfleur and Battle of Agincourt come to life among the bookshelves of your local library. £5 – £8, suitable for all ages. Full list of libraries can be found online; librariantheatre.com

Librarian Theatre presents Henry V Tuesday 10 – Friday 20 July, times vary, various libraries around Bristol “Cheerly to sea; the signs of war advance: No king of England, if not king of France…” Bristol-based company Librarian Theatre, who specialise in turning libraries into temporary theatres for their regional tours, launch their fourth project at the Bristol Shakespeare Festival with a brand new rapid

Pop-up Opera Wednesday 11 July, 7.30pm, The Assembly Rooms, Bath Sit back and enjoy two delightful one-act comedies by this innovative opera company where a pair of actresses battle it out to be the prima donna, and a pair of lovers tease and test their feelings for each other. Showcasing Mozart’s gorgeous music and sense of playfulness, the first written in the last years Continued on page 38

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Pop-up opera at The Assembly Rooms in Bath

Birdsong at Bristol Old Vic

of his life and the second when he was just 12 years old. Two lively and engaging stories to delight you either side of an interval. Tickets: £20/£22, hospitality packages from £29.95; bathvenues.co.uk/popupopera Far Cry Theatre presents Henna Night Wednesday 11 – Thursday 12 July, 7.30pm, Paintworks, Bath Road, Bristol A black comedy written in 2001 by awardwinning writer Amy Rosenthal, performed by Far Cry Theatre. An evening of emotion, combined with subtle humour, ensues that will conclude with two women, despite their differences and rivalry, finding friendship and gaining something positive from each other. Tickets: £5.50 – £8.50; farcrytheatre.com Parlour Games Wednesday 11 – Saturday 14 July, 8pm, The Wardrobe Theatre, The Old Market Assembly It’s 1848 and Europe is revolting. As foreign royals topple at an alarming rate, how long will it be before the whispers of revolution reach the proud shores of old Blighty? With an isolated, postnatal queen intent on playing solitaire, can the future of the British monarchy be saved before those dastardly working-classes start uprising or will it all end in a real-life wink murder? A right royal romp through British history, exploring politics, passion and parlour games. £10; thewardrobetheatre.com Don Giovanni Opera live Thursday 12 July, 6.30pm, We The Curious Big Screen, Millennium Square Pack a picnic and head over to the We The Curious Big Screen as Mozart’s enthralling opera Don Giovanni will be live screened from the Royal Opera House in London. Take along a chair and a blanket, plus remember to dress for the weather. Free for all. Planetarium Nights Thursday 12 and 19 July, 7pm and 8.15pm, We The Curious Explore the different stories of ancient stargazers, fly your way to far-away galaxies and discover distant and newly discovered planets in this evening planetarium show.

Grab yourself a drink from the bar and enjoy the exhibits in the space gallery before the show. The ‘Exploring the Solar System’ show takes place at 7pm, and ‘Summer Stargazing’ kicks off at 8.15pm. 16+. £7.50/£8.50; wethecurious.org An Indian Abroad – Pariah Khan Thursday 12 July, 7.30pm, The Theatre Shop, Queens Square, Clevedon What if someone from India took a gap year to Britain? In his debut one man show, An Indian Abroad writer and performer Pariah Khan takes the trope of white adventurers exploring ‘foreign’ lands and spins this concept on its head, as he visits the exotic island of Great Britain. Sacred places. Mythical structures with healing powers. Nando’s. Stifled by life in middle-class India, Krishnan is desperate to see more of the world. 14+. £11; theatreshop.org.uk BRSCC TCR Race Weekend Saturday 14 – Sunday 15 July, 8.30am – 6pm, Castle Combe Circuit, Chippenham The busiest weekend of car action at Castle Combe in 2018, indeed one of the busiest and best value for money race-weekends in UK club motor sport, with Top Level Touring Car competition making its long awaited debut at Combe; castlecombecircuit.co.uk The Shakespeare Heptet: Death Love & the Sonnets Saturday 14 July, 7.30pm, The Anglican Chapel, Arnos Vale Cemetery Think Shakespeare’s sonnets are all about love? Think again! An ensemble dedicated to setting all 154 sonnets to music is returning to Bristol to explore the Bard’s obsession with death and the macabre. The Shakespeare Heptet’s musical style blends many influences – everything from folk-blues to latin rhythms to delicate ballads. Suitable for ages 10+. £13; bristolshakespearefestival.org.uk Sing for Water West Sunday 15 July, 12pm and 4pm, Brunel’s Old Station, Temple Meads Two free concerts where up to 1,000 singers from more than 20 choirs from Bristol and the West will be converging to raise their voices –

and money for WaterAid. The fifth concert of this kind, the choirs are aiming to pass the £250,000 mark in sponsorship and raise funds for a clean water project in Rwanda. The concerts will include hits from the ’60s and ’70s as well as songs from South Africa and Central Europe and a choral setting of Dvorak’s New World Symphony. Free entry on the day. Riff Raff Paint The Town Red… and Pink and Orange Sunday 15 July, 2.30pm and 7pm, St George’s Bristol The colourful Riff Raff Choir is back with two performances, singing a kaleidoscope of pop and rock songs from across the decades. There’s something for everyone from ’70s funk to power ballads in glorious a cappella harmony, including many original arrangements of popular songs being heard for the first time. £3 – £10; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk The Play That Goes Wrong Monday 16 – Saturday 21 July, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome It’s Fawlty Towers meets Noises Off in this multi award-winning smash hit comedy. The Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society is putting on a 1920s murder mystery, but everything that can go wrong does! As the accident-prone thesps battle on against all the odds to reach their final curtain call, hilarious results ensue. Tickets £16.90 – £37.40; atgtickets.com/bristol BLAHBLAHBLAH: Imaginary Advice – A live podcast Monday 16 July, 8pm, The Wardrobe Theatre, The Old Market Assembly Launched in 2014 as a way to explore new forms of storytelling, the Imaginary Advice podcast has recorded love monologues in the middle of drum-and-bass raves, made cut-up poetry out of the Today programme, and cross-bred Jay-Z’s Black Album with the Tate Modern’s audio guide. Written and presented by Ross Sutherland, featuring support from art writer and curator Gemma Brace and spoken word artist Saili Katebe. Presented by Bristol Old Vic. £8; bristololdvic.org.uk Continued on page 40

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Smoked & Uncut Festival at THE PIG

Planetarium nights at We The Curious

The Shakespeare Heptet at Arnos Vale Cemetery

Matt Haig: Notes on a Nervous Planet Thursday 19 July, 6.30pm, We The Curious The world is messing with our minds. Rates of stress and anxiety are rising. A fast, nervous planet is creating fast and nervous lives. After experiencing years of anxiety and panic attacks, Matt Haig, number one bestselling author of Reasons to Stay Alive, began to look for the link between what he felt and the world around him. He now offers a personal and vital look at how we can rehumanise ourselves in this age of anxiety and feel happy. Part of Bristol Festival of Ideas. £6/£8; ideasfestival.co.uk Bristol Harbour Festival Friday 20 – Sunday 22 July, times vary, Bristol Harbour Bristol’s largest cultural event with a three-day extravaganza of dance, music, theatre, food, circus, ships and boats. Free admission; bristolharbourfestival.co.uk Chocolate Cake Tuesday 24 – Saturday 28 July, times vary, Bristol Old Vic “When I was a boy, I had a favourite treat. It was when my mum made chocolate cake!” Follow the adventures of two brothers and the night-time disappearance of a chocolate cake in this scrumptious new play with songs adapted from Michael Rosen’s much-loved poem – now gorgeously illustrated picture book, Chocolate Cake. A wonderful piece of family theatre by the people who created We’re Going on a Bear Hunt and How to Hide a Lion. Ages 4+. £12/£40 family ticket; bristololdvic.org.uk Victorian explorers Various dates from Tuesday 24 July – Friday 31 August, 10.30am–2.30pm, Tyntesfield This day camp for seven to 12 year olds invites children to see the Victorian gothic revival house of Tyntesfield through the eyes of its past visitors. The day includes a range of activities across the estate including growing and tasting food, clay modelling and taking part in some exciting games in the woodland. 40 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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£15 per child. Booking essential. Tel: 0344 249 1895; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield An Evening with Gary & Lee Johnson Thursday 26 July, 7pm, Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol A night of fundraising for Bristol Heart Institute with Above & Beyond where guests can meet the manager of Cheltenham Town F.C. and his son Lee, head coach of Bristol City F.C, hear them talk about their lives in football, and take part in a candid Q&A. Comedian Mark Watson will be on hand for plenty of laughs, and there’ll be music from singer Tim Pitman and motown band Mission Blue, plus a charity auction and three-course meal. £120 pp; aboveandbeyond.org.uk Funzing Talks: Murderers, Mafia Hitmen and US Prison Thursday 26 July, 7pm for 7.30pm, Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bath Road As a Brit incarcerated in Arizona’s highestsecurity prisons including supermax, Shaun Attwood lived for six years in the company of killers, ranging from Mafia mass murderers to Aryan Brotherhood prison gang members. Join Shaun to hear his most shocking stories. 18+, £12; arnosvale.org.uk Cinema Rediscovered Thursday 26 – Sunday 29 July, various cinemas across Bristol The third edition of Cinema Rediscovered brings the best in digital restorations, contemporary classics and film print rarities back where they belong on the big screen at cinemas including Watershed and Clevedon’s Curzon Cinema & Arts with support from BFI awarding funds from National Lottery. Full festival pass £90, cons £65. For the full programme, visit: watershed.co.uk/cinemarediscovered Tyntesfield nature at night walk Friday 27 July, 8.30 – 10.30pm, Tyntesfield Area ranger Darren will lead an evening walk around the Tyntesfield estate to find out about the wonderful wildlife that lives onsite, including great crested newts and bats. Sturdy

walking shoes and bringing a torch are recommended. £10 adults, £5 children. Tel: 0344 249 1895. The first Briton in space: An Audience with Helen Sharman Saturday 28 July, 2.30pm, We The Curious The first Briton in space, Helen Sharman, will talk about her experiences on a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, which launched in May 1991. She spent eight days orbiting the Earth, living and working on the MIR Space Station. Hear the story of her incredible journey – from answering the job advert, learning Russian and the meticulous training, through to launch and landing. Get an idea of how weightlessness feels, the importance of team spirit, and how you re-adjust to life on Earth. £18/£20, includes entry into We The Curious; wethecurious.org Portishead Flower Show & Country Fair Saturday 28 – Sunday 29 July, Flower Show Field, Clapton Lane, Portishead Visit one of the largest flower shows in North Somerset, with more than 500 horticultural and handicraft classes. Being opened by Emma Britton from BBC Radio Bristol, the arena events include Oreo and Friends Animal Encounters, Falconry, M&M Gundogs, Sperrings Ponies, Punch and Judy and the North Somerset Samba Band. There will also be music from the Harlem Rhythm Cats and Chicken Teddy’s, plus a vintage dairy display and a companion dog show. £5 adults, free for under 16s; portisheadflowershow.com Said and Done Monday 30 – Tuesday 31 July, 8pm, The Wardrobe Theatre, The Old Market Assembly Two women sit at a table at a wedding. They hate everyone here. They hate themselves. And, although they are the very best of friends, they probably hate each other. Dark comedy with snippets of original music and dollops of cheesy pop – a snapshot into the lives of two women who are far too close, by Sugarscratch Theatre. £10; thewardrobetheatre.com n


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Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers

June Specialist Sale Results

Marble Venus Aphrodite

African neck rest

Gold pocket watch

Portrait: Mary of Modena

Pair bronze pedestals

Zsolnay eosin vase

C.F.A. Voysey blue print letter

Transitional period Chinese vase

Godwin table

Diamond clip

Meissen figure group

Caucasian wool carpet

£5,200

£4,300

£3,700

£8,000

£4,950

£6,200

£2,700

£13,600

£4,950

£7,400

£11,400

£6,200

Let Our Expertise Combined With Internet Bidding Technology Achieve Similar Results For You

Mark Fraser ASFAV Senior Valuer & Cataloguer 40 years experience

Marc Burridge ASFAV Auctioneer & Valuer 44 years experience

Toby Pinn MRICS Chartered Arts & Antiques Surveyor 21 years experience

Mark Huddleston ASFAV Catalogue & Valuer 21 years experience

For a free verbal valuation why not attend one of our free valuation days at the Salerooms on the 9th, 10th & 23rd, 24th July from 9.30 - 1pm and 2pm - 5pm, or alternatively email images of items to info@csrauctions.com.

Next Quarterly Specialist Sale 6th September | (Closing date for entries 7th August)

Every lot, in every sale, illustrated and sold with live internet bidding

Tel: 01934 830111 or 0117 325 6789 The Auction Centre, Kenn Road, Kenn, Clevedon, Bristol BS21 6TT

www.clevedon-salerooms.com


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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Thirteen, Diana Porter, throughout July

Salt -and-pepper rose-cut diamond with nine-carat Fairtrade white gold

Freeform hand-cut diamond shard in 18-carat Fairtrade yellow gold

Another Way of Telling, Fox Talbot Museum: Lacock Abbey, until 9 September Lacock’s second exhibition of 2018 to celebrate the work of women photographers features works from two photographic series that focus on Japanese and Indian interiors in temples, shrines and palaces occupied by animals – bringing folk tales and fables to life in a mesmerising manner. Since 2012, artist and photographer Karen Knorr has been visiting India and Japan to research and reflect on traditions connected to Mughal period palaces in India and Shinto and Buddhist heritage sites in Japan. Her research into structures, colours, textures, nature and local fables has led to these images infused with the intense feelings of past history and sanctified spaces, inhabited not by people but by animals reflecting the traditions of storytelling. Lions, tigers, peacocks and cranes inhabit and somehow re-animate the rooms they occupy. These creatures, symbolic of legends and myths, lounge in Mughal palaces and stand majestically against distinct Japanese interiors and architecture. • nationaltrust.org.uk/lacock

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This July, Diana Porter, the creative jeweller based on Park Street, will be bringing Bristol her latest collection of one-of-a-kind diamond rings. Crafted using the finest Fairtrade gold, they feature DP’s unique, hand-etched textures and finishes. All bespoke, each design is led by the diamond choice in this exhibition. Alongside the 13 ring designs, the team will be showcasing a selection of their most unusual freeform, rose-cut and hand-cut loose diamonds. Radiant and and forever a favourite, the perfectly imperfect stones will be available for browsers to develop their own special design, as the team aim to celebrate creativity and individuality. If you’re looking for something different to decorate your digits or an unusual choice for an engagement or special ring, this is the exhibition for finding such delights. Join Diana and co for this dedicated showcase exhibition throughout the month of July for a chance to view or purchase one of the distinctive, one-off artworks.

• dianaporter.co.uk

The Survivors by Karen Knorr


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EXHIBITIONS

Marla Allison: Painter From The Desert, Rainmaker Gallery, until 11 August

Ancient Layers of the Earth by Marla Allison

This solo exhibition showcases recent works by contemporary Native American artist Marla Allison. It presents acrylic paintings produced in her Laguna Pueblo desert studio alongside canvases painted during a 30-day artist residency in Bristol. As an artist from New Mexico, Marla is proud of her Laguna Pueblo identity and heritage, but also counts Pablo Picasso and Paul Klee among her influences. She combines all these elements to produce her own fresh, contemporary style. “I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered,’ she says. “I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started… My art is what lets me connect the past to my future. My paintings are based on the contemporary, which borrows from the past. I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.” • rainmakerart.co.uk

Summer exhibition, Coldharbour Framery & Gallery, July – August Over the summer holidays, this Redland gallery will be celebrating the big outdoors, with a focus on waves, waterfalls and woodcuts of the sea by acclaimed artists such as Merlyn Chesterman and Rod Nelson (one of his woodcuts is pictured, left), as well as paintings and prints of our own Bristol Harbourside and other favourite haunts by local artists including Abigail McDougall and Jenny Urquhart. Outdoor sculptures also feature heavily in the show, from Christine Baxter’s irresistible collection of iron resin hares to Jill Dunmore’s quietly contemplative clay figures, just perfect for nestling in a shady little corner of the garden. • coldharbourgallery.co.uk

● Diverse, Bristol Guild Gallery, 21 July to 11 August Head to the Guild Gallery this month to see new work from the So What Art Collective – a successful collaboration between former students of the Bristol School of Art. Now nine years old, the collective invites guest artists to join the Guild show, bringing with them new and different styles and techniques. In the ‘Diverse’ exhibition they will show beautiful stained glass, blown glass, oils, ceramics and other media. Expect ceramic pots by Fiona Barr, plus work from Di Brothers, Margaret Byron, Sarah Davis, Denise Howe, Jo Waltera and Christine Cook (pictured is her collage of acrylic painted torn and cut paper of Bristol Harbourside). • bristolguildgallery.co.uk Waiting for Emily by Christine Cook

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One to one.qxp_Layout 7 20/06/2018 10:02 Page 1

TV & FILM

Look familiar? It’s the set for Wade Watts’ hometown in Ready Player One

Guy is also producing his own stuff here in Bristol

READY PLAYER Hopping from Hollywood blockbuster to Hollywood blockbuster and back to Bristol again: local actor and producer Guy Potter

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ou might have seen Steven Spielberg’s recent cinema box office hit Ready Player One but did you know one of the cast lives and works here in Bristol? Guy Potter spoke to us about projects past, present and future, his own production company, city life and the importance of diversification for him as an actor...

TBM: First and foremost, what was it like working with Sir Spielberg? GP: Well he’s probably the pinnacle when it comes to people for actors to work with! It was an out-of-body experience initially, but after spending 14 hours a day with someone you’re on first name terms quite quickly. Although I certainly never called him ‘Steven’, it was always ‘Sir’. I learnt more in that summer than I have in all the years previously. Every direction you looked, there were people at the top of their game, just working away quietly with a few Oscars under their belt and it’s all totally normal… It’s a different world. What did your work involve and how did you prepare? On Ready Player One I was rehearsing for Tye Sheridan, so everything you see Tye do I did also – I was like a second Wade Watts [lead character]. That meant working first-hand with Spielberg and the crew, getting the scene ready for the cameras to roll. As an actor you have to be ready for anything, completely free and have as much professional and life experience as possible. As well as constantly learning acting technique, I’m climbing, surfing, kayaking, doing Judo – trying new things as much as I can so when I’m auditioning I can deliver straight away if necessary. The biggest help when I was starting out was having a motorbike licence, for example; you just try and obtain what others don’t have in order to get the job. Tell us about some of your other career highlights so far... I filmed on Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation back in 2015 – I was a stand-in for Jeremy Renner and got to do a few scenes as one of the bad guys in the bike chase when they were doing re-shoots at the studios. I ended up rehearsing with Tom Cruise and Simon Pegg; that then led to Ready Player One as they shared much of the same team. 46 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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What’s on the cards going forward? I had my first lead in an independent feature film last year in Italy – that should come out this year and I’m really looking forward to it. I also have a motion capture role coming up soon although that’s quite under wraps – I haven’t signed the NDA yet so even I don’t know what it is! I won’t until I get in the room or meet the director, which can sometimes be the way and if that’s the process then it’ll be quite big hopefully. After that I have my directorial debut I’ve co-written. Tell us about your production company I started High Sierra Films in 2015 after I worked on Mission [Impossible]. That was my first real involvement in a big production and I saw the bigger picture of how the industry works – actors also producing and sometimes getting involved with the direction. I saw it was very collaborative. Just being an actor was going to limit me, so I branched out and diversified. I’ve found myself really studying cinematography lately, getting a better feeling of what makes a film. Have you done anything Bristol-based or set? The first short I produced was set in Bristol; Whatever the Weather. Now I have another film with a proper budget and crew, cinema cameras and a real progressive collaboration that I’m filming here over the summer. The more Bristol I can feature, the better – it always gets a better reception than elsewhere. It’s definitely part of the reason for filming here; that and the people involved. In other cities you wouldn’t get half the attention and support that you do when filming here. Why did you decide to move here? I moved here from London as I’m from Devon. Although I loved London and what it gave me, it was quite stifling. I’m very active and like the outdoors so it was killing me creatively. Initially I needed a good in-between and Bristol just fit perfectly, but since I’ve moved here I discovered a thriving film community; I’ve really landed on something special.


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TV & FILM

How do you mean? It’s so inclusive and great to be involved in at any level. Everyone wants to contribute. An actor or director, for example, is just a small cog in this huge machine; I remember Ridley Scott’s The Martian had a message at the end saying it employed 15,000 people, which is crazy. Everyone is contributing to an end product and specialising in their field in the meantime, it’s a great industry to be a part of. What can you reveal about what you’re planning to film here? The short is an action thriller. It’s got components borrowed from things I’ve previously worked on, and hopefully both some crew and cast from Mission Impossible and Ready Player One. It’s an exciting script and even better that we can film in and around Bristol. We’ve got some fantastic locations lined up; I’m looking forward to filming. What’s your process when you get a script? Read it thoroughly, all the way through and many times. I read that Anthony Hopkins will read a script 250 times out loud before filming. You’re essentially learning all these lines and moments through huge amounts of repetition and then performing them as if it’s the first thing that’s come into your head. Whatever you have to do to look like you’re spontaneously responding, do it. I find that the car journey to the set or audition can be more useful than any rehearsal space!

effect on how you conduct yourself and raise your game. The experiences I’ve had on big sets with people like that have been more of a masterclass than money can buy. Watching Christoph Waltz do his thing, rehearsing with Tom Cruise, being directed by Spielberg – they’re hard to top. Once I was in a small scene with Christopher Walken on Eddie the Eagle, which didn’t get used, but when Walken came onto the set the room went totally quiet. He did the scene in one take and it was like watching acting royalty. Favourite Bristol place? Gloucester Road currently! The Watershed is also great for community; they’re happy to have screenings there; it’s something I’ll think about for our film. Who would you like to play if you were to star in a biopic? David Bowie. I don’t think I’m right for a role like that at all but what a fascinating individual. That statue they made of him recently where he was his ‘normal’ self, looking at his alter egos performing in front of him: that’s a very interesting visual. Actors are all doing that, to some extent, and it would be great to play with that. ■ • Sir Follow Guy Spielberg withon starsTwitter: of the film @guypotter_

What role has felt most special to you? Taking on the role of a real person – I did that for Siegfried Sassoon as I was starting out and really enjoyed that process of trying to capture the essence of a real person. I’d love to do that on a bigger scale; really lose myself and become someone real; getting their traits and habits down to perfection. Seeing Christian Bale in The Fighter awoke that. Dream co-star? Again, Anthony Hopkins – one of the finest actors around. Being in the presence of an absolute master of their craft has an enormous

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Architecture.qxp_Layout 7 15/06/2018 16:25 Page 1

ARCHITECTURE

Saw waves and diamonds cover the bulk of Prince Street car park: a much-admired example among concrete fetishists

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ARCHITECTURE

BRUTALIST BRISTOL There’s both power and beauty in the concrete jungle, says Ray Newman

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s you may know, Brutalist architecture isn’t so called because it is harsh or bullying but because it emphasises the use of raw concrete, via the French béton brut. Bristol’s brutalist buildings, as well as being a pragmatic response to the post-war need to build quickly and cheaply, are powerful, sometimes even beautiful presences in the cityscape. At first glance the Shot Tower on Cheese Lane might be mistaken for a Cold War watchpost. Its actual purpose was the manufacture of lead pellets. Designed by Underwood and Partners in 1968, it succeeded the world’s very first shot tower which occupied a nearby site. It also demonstrates how varied and interesting concrete buildings can be – the chunks from which it is constructed given texture by the casting process, and used to create futuristic forms. It reminds me of the Discovery from Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey but it is perhaps also somewhat phallic. In any case, it is now part of an office complex. Concrete fetishists are about the only people who get excited by multistorey car parks – which offer plenty of opportunity for bold design and abstract forms. NCP Prince Street, designed to serve the hotel next door by Kenneth Wakeford Jarram & Harris in 1966, is a much-admired example, made mesmerising by the saw waves and diamonds that cover its bulk, and brought alive by the shifting of light and shadow. Another of note is NCP Rupert Street, the first multi-storey car park in the city, designed by R. Jelinek-Karl in 1960, which sits above the street like a coiled concrete python.

Among Bristol’s most exciting buildings of any style or vintage is the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul in Clifton by Percy Thomas & Son. The thrusting spaceship-like spire can be seen for miles around and the more-or-less hexagonal church was apparently unpopular with conservation-minded locals and worshippers when it arrived from its home planet in 1974. It was built using especially fine, pale concrete and so hasn’t aged as poorly as some similar buildings. Nobody can have missed Castlemead, the tower that rises over Castle Park. It is part of the last gasp of brutalist building, conceived by A.J. Hines in the early 1970s but not finished until 1981. It looks like the kind of building evil corporations in Hollywood films choose for their bases but there is at least a little humour in the concrete battlements at the top of the tower. The Arts and Social Sciences Library of the University of Bristol on Tyndall Avenue (Twist and Whitley, 1975) is another building often described as ‘fortress-like’. Its windows, angled to control the entry of light, and its top-heavy structure, do give the impression that it is peering down on passing pedestrians. I’m going to finish with something of a leftfield suggestion: the next time that you find yourself at a loose end, why not take a closer look at the M32 motorway from beneath, at somewhere like Stapleton, where the song of the traffic between concrete columns almost brings to mind the interior of a cathedral, with mile after mile of the rawest béton around... ■

The Arts and Social Sciences Library gives the impression it is peering down on passing pedestrians

Castlemead, finished in 1981 and part of the last gasp of brutalist building

The thrusting, spaceship-like spire of Clifton Cathedral, built using especially fine, pale concrete

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Food News.qxp_Layout 1 22/06/2018 12:26 Page 1

FOOD & Drink

TASTY TIDBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS xx

BIG APPLE EXPERIENCE You mightn’t necessarily think to match a cider with an evening meal – wine usually being the more common choice. With this injustice in mind, Thatchers Cider visited Redcliffe restaurant Pasture recently to give a masterclass in how to taste a cider (no, not on a park bench, contrary to outdated belief) and pair one with food. Kicking off with the formidable Thatchers Katy, paired with diver-caught South Coast scallop ceviche, pickled gooseberry, lime, tiger’s milk and coriander, the evening saw guests learn the merits of the many different apples used by the cidermaker. Also showcased were the globally popular Thatchers Haze, Vintage, Old Rascal and Red Streak – combined with onpoint dishes including Pasture’s ‘forgotten onions’ en croute with summer squash; cured duck breast with juniper and orange marmalade; and hazelnut eclairs with praline creme patisserie and fresh raspberries – depending on the tasting notes of each apple-based beverage. Want to find out more for yourself? Chat to the team at 2018’s Harbour Festival or Bristol Balloon Fiesta.

Not a prosecco fan? Celebrate a special occasion with the applebased Family Reserve fizz

• thatcherscider.co.uk

ALL HAIL THE ALE Local heroes and international heavy hitters are to feature at the 2018 Bristol Craft Beer Festival which will take over the Lloyds Amphitheatre from 14 – 16 September. Honouring the up-andcoming from the city’s beer scene, there will be an all-new can and bottle bar with brews from the likes of Electric Bear, New Bristol and St Werburghs’ Noble & Fierce which offers a small but powerful range of canned beers. New Bristol is very much a family affair; head brewer Noel James running the modern brewery with his partner, brother and a team of self-confessed beer-loving geeks. Featuring for the first time ever at the festival is Denmark’s Dry & Bitter, Belgium’s Alvinne and France’s La Brasserie Du Mont Saleve which is renowned for its eco approach, while making the trip from Norway is Olso’s largest brewery Amundsen; now one of the largest growing breweries in all of Norway. • bristolcraftbeerfestival.co.uk

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FROM ACROSS THE BRIDGE The family behind the Bar 44 tapas venues is bringing its modern Spanish dining to Clifton Village. Siblings Tom, Owen and Natalie Morgan established the first Bar 44 16 years ago, offering seasonal dishes and a 100% Spanish drinks list featuring rare sherries, cocktails and wines. “We all spent our formative years here in Bristol and have always wanted to bring our version of modern Spanish hospitality to the city,” said Tom. “After a complete redesign, we will open in July.” Sherry educator Owen, a leading authority on the fortified wine, added: “I cannot wait to launch our sherry wine list in Bristol, traditionally the home of sherry outside Spain. Bristol is the perfect place to continue driving the renaissance of this much-misunderstood drink.” • bar44.co.uk


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We offer you a range of delicious wines produced from healthy grapes grown on vines sustainably farmed by passionate wine makers. Our wines are organic, biodynamic, natural and authentic. FREE DELIVERY IN BRISTOL • WWW.NFIZZ.CO.UK

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Food review July Sign of the Angel.qxp_Layout 1 22/06/2018 12:27 Page 1

RESTAURANT | REVIEW

SIGNS OF THE TIMES Emma Clegg journeys to historic, chocolate-box village Lacock – with rather good reason

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et’s go back to 1480 – nearing the end of the Plantagenet period. Edward IV was on the throne. Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile had initiated the Spanish Inquisition. And The Angel Inn was built in Lacock. The ‘angel’ was an English gold coin introduced by Edward IV – so iconic that many pubs were named after it. Later rebranded as Sign of the Angel, this ancient inn does, literally, transport you back in time. The timber-framed exterior, the leaded oriel windows, the wonky beams, the moulded stone fireplaces and the stone floors have seen five centuries of use. Since 2014, Sign of the Angel has been run by two entrepreneurial brothers, Jack and Tom Nicholas (who also run another local business, the Whitley Golf Club), in collaboration with chef Jon Furby who oversees the kitchen and the day-to-day operations. When the brothers first arrived, the inn was looking run down after a long winter when it had been left empty and cold, so they refurbished the building, stripping back and decorating simply and subtly around the sturdy ancient features. The food, too, had a makeover. Defined as ‘modern rustic’, it’s fresh, seasonal and assiduously sourced from the West Country. The vibe is casual dining – although, dining in front of the substantial stone fireplace, there’s the slight anxiety that Arya Stark might arrive at any moment with the family sword or a masked disguise. But that’s all 52 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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part of the powerful period backdrop. The lunch menu looks honest and downto-earth – including sea-salted fish and chips, Cheddar cheese ploughman’s or ‘Angel’ pie with creamed potato, seasonal vegetables and gravy. There are vegetarian and glutenfree options, too, and an evening tasting menu, £40 for seven courses and £18 for drinks pairing. There are also monthly events where the tasting menu is based around three items – July, for example, features rabbit, bass and apricot. Having taken our order, waitress Erin came back with a selection of home-baked, hardto-resist character breads – curry and coriander; raisin; and smoked salmon and sesame seed. Having eaten way too much of all three, I had next a starter of lobster arancini – creamy risotto rice balls, breaded, fried and stuffed with lobster meat, avocado, cucumber and mango. Edward IV, or one of his Lacock nobles, might not have encountered arancini, certainly not with avocado or mango, but that wasn’t the point, as the avocado ooze and the fresh tang of mango were sublime. Rob – AKA Drogo – went for a more traditional meat option, duck liver parfait with watercress, plum, crackling and whisky. Waiting for the main, Drogo and I were taken aback when Erin brought us a cooling blackcurrant sorbet. Night’s Watch recruit Hot Pie would not have approved. It was a palate cleanser. Hot Pie would still not have approved, but the sorbet was totally,

angelically divine. I transferred from the food of the sea and the fruit of the hedges to the food of the air – with guinea fowl, pea bubble squeak cake with beetroot, raisin, orange and mustard dressing. It was simple and stylish, with circular daubs of pale mustard dressing creating a decorative surround, the thick slices of poultry melting softly into the bubble squeak cake. Drogo – who rarely has truck with a light main – chose the lamb rump served with minted potato, broad beans, celeriac and mint sauce. It was a juicy, textured spectacle, succulent lamb piled on glistening minted potato with cubes of celeriac absorbing the jus. Eschewing my favourite brûlée option for dessert – and it did sound wonderful, vanilla brûlée with pecan and shortbread – I enjoyed gin and lime parfait with meringue, jelly and cucumber. Served on a matte black plate, the mini white meringue cakes and the bleach of the parfait creached a suffusion of brightness, only dimmed by its consumption. Drogo – normally a crumble man – unexpectedly chose the West Country cheese platter. With an exotic selection of crackers, a walnut concoction and yellow cherries balancing elegantly on the cheese, this was cheese and biscuits with attitude. Go then to this ancient inn – find your character, take off your sword, warm yourself by the fire and tuck in. n • signoftheangel.co.uk


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BRISTOL UPDATES

BITE-SIZED BUSINESS AND COMMUNITY NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY

FEEL THE FORCE

Mr Anthony Koupparis

NEW TO BRISTOL

NICE ONE, NUFFIELD

A branch of hypnotherapy company LCCH International has opened in the city, offering training courses for local people interested in becoming therapists. Often thought of as a method to help smokers quit or for weight-loss, hypnotherapy is being increasingly used to help aid a wide range of conditions. Used for centuries, it often involves being placed into a deeply relaxed trancelike state, during which an experienced therapist encourages positive changes to help tackle your problem. There are many problems people might not realise that hypnotherapy can help with: dealing with stress; coping with IBS; healing trauma; as well as overcoming phobias and setting positive goals. “A hypnotherapist will never work against the advice of a GP – we would only complement what they do,” says Peter Mabbutt of LCCH International. “But there are many ways we can help people feel better and more comfortable.” LCCH International has training centres across the UK, offering a variety of courses.

Nuffield Health has been named Private Hospital Group of the Year for the second time at the Health Investor Awards 2018. The award is designed to recognise outstanding contribution to healthcare over the past 12 months, through innovation and excellence in healthcare products and services. With a network of 31 hospitals across the UK, including Bristol hospital The Chesterfield, Nuffield has concentrated on enhancing patient satisfaction and care across the organisation. An independent report naming the best medical specialists in the UK also recently celebrated the work of consultant knee surgeon Andrew Porteous and consultant urologist Anthony Koupparis who practice at The Chesterfield. The list of top consultants was compiled by The Daily Mail using recommendations from other doctors who were asked to identify which consultant they would want to see a member of their own family, if the family member needed treatment in that area. It sought views from more than 260 specialists.

• lcchinternational.co.uk

• nuffieldhealth.com

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The Bristol Friendship Force – one of several travel exchange clubs in the UK and a member of Friendship Force International, a global nework of more than 360 clubs in over 60 countries – urgently needs ambassadors and hosts, otherwise it may have to cancel an incoming group from Northern Colorado this September as well as an outgoing trip to Brazil in May 2019. Ambassadors travel ‘to make a friend from another culture’ and hosts achieve exactly the same by offering hospitality in their own homes. No money changes hands, apart from your travel costs and a fee to Friendship Force International in Atlanta, Georgia – who ‘broker’ the worldwide programme. Apart from that small staff in Atlanta, unpaid volunteers round the world do the real work! The Friendship Force is a not-forprofit global organisation started in 1977 by Dr Wayne Smith, a Presbyterian minister from Georgia. His friend Jimmy Carter, then governor, said that he would launch the programme from the White House if he won the presidency – and the rest is history. The aim is simple: make the world a kinder, safer place through the power of friendship achieved through staying in private homes. The Bristol Friendship Force has been established over 35 years and has exchanged with everywhere from Russia to Japan, Chile, Canada and Romania plus many US states. “We are victims of our own success,” says founder Geri Phillips-Hughes. “Most people now in our club – like me – have been everywhere and hosted everyone and don’t need any more international friends! We really must now recruit new members who are just starting out on this amazing adventure. If you are a friendly person with a sense of adventure, you’ll love it!’ If you would like to apply, or just find out more information before committing yourself, contact Geri by emailing her: gphillipshughes@gmail.com or (by phone) on 0117 9621416.


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Be careful what you wish for

Alison Dukes of AMD Solicitors considers the recent Court of Appeal case of Waggott v Waggott on spousal maintenance

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wife is likely to be regretting her decision to appeal against a spousal maintenance award of £175,000 made against her former husband. He was due to have to pay her maintenance until the death of the first of them or until her remarriage. When the wife appealed the decision and sought an extra £15,000 per year plus a share of the husband’s bonuses from his employment, the husband himself put in an appeal against the decision of the first Judge. He sought a clean financial break so that he did not have to pay any further maintenance at all after a fixed period of 5 years. The Court of Appeal dismissed the wife’s appeal while the husband’s appeal was allowed. In short, this means that having previously expected to receive maintenance from the husband for life (or until she remarries), the wife’s maintenance will now end in 2021 after a five year period. The Court took account of the wife’s capital settlement of £9.76million. Some of those monies had been used to purchase a home in this country and a holiday home abroad but there was a substantial balance remaining. In capital terms, the Court calculated that the shortfall in the wife’s income if a five year term was imposed equated to around £950,000. The wife had free capital of £4.6million after purchase of her properties. The view of the Court of Appeal was that even if the wife used £950,000 of those monies to plug any gap in her income she would still have substantial free capital in addition to her two properties. She would be able to adjust “without undue hardship” to the termination of her maintenance and the outcome would not be unfair in all the circumstances. The wife had worked as an accountant early in the marriage but had not worked since 2003. The parties had one child who was born in 2004. The Court of Appeal made the further point that the wife would also be able to obtain employment to supplement her other income. Applications to vary maintenance or to appeal Court orders should be considered very carefully before proceedings are issued. For advice on all aspects of Family Law, Alison Dukes or her colleague Jo Morris can be contacted at AMD’s Henleaze office at 100 Henleaze Road, by telephoning 0117 9621205 or by emailing Alison at alisondukes@amdsolicitors.com. © AMD Solicitors

Interview preparation First; do your research. Read about the company; what they do, where they’ve come from, what they sell or what service they offer, who their clients are, their ethos and values. Make sure you’re up to speed on their industry and sector. Interview styles vary hugely from one company to the next, from the informal chat to the formal, structured panel interview, but the one thing that you are likely to come up against at some point, no matter the style of interview, is the competency-based question. This line of questioning is designed to make the job application process as objective as possible, removing any conscious or subconscious bias by the interviewer, ensuring each candidate is presented with the same questions. Often the interview questions will start with a variation of, “Tell me about a time when…” This may sound straightforward, but in the heat of the interview, it's easy to give an unstructured answer, miss out key details, or let the story fizzle out. The simplest way to answer competency-based questions is by using the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) acronym to structure your response. Example “Tell me about a time that you solved a problem to a tight timescale.” SITUATION Set the context for your story. For example, “We needed to get an important delivery to a retailer by midday but our delivery driver Stan called in sick” TASK What was required of you. For example, “It was my responsibility to find an alternative method of delivery, so it didn't reflect badly on the company and we didn't waste the opportunity.” ACTIVITY What did you do? For example, “I spoke to the retailer and reassured them that their delivery would arrive in good time, however it would arrive with a courier rather than our usual driver. I contacted three local courier firms, found one who could meet the deadline and agreed a price.” RESULT How well the situation played out. For example, “The delivery driver struggled to locate the retailer, but after some telephone guidance he made the deadline with a couple of minutes to spare. The retailer received the great level of service we are renowned for.” It’s important to prepare for these questions ahead of your interview. Review the role profile and identify the key skills required. Then identify several scenarios from your experience where you can demonstrate each of the requisite skills. It doesn’t need to be professional experience; you can use examples from education, sports or voluntary work too. And practice, practice, practice. This will help build confidence. When answering there are a few things to note: speak in specific rather than general terms and quantify your success. In the example above, we mentioned the name of the delivery driver, how important the delivery was and that it presented an important opportunity for the business. From a listener’s perspective, this makes the story more interesting and helps the interviewer gauge your success. Skilling Gate is a Bristol-based professional services recruitment firm. www.skillinggate.co.uk

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Motoring - Audi A8 BRS.qxp_Layout 1 19/06/2018 14:45 Page 1

MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

THE ULTIMATE IN LUXURY Looking for a limo that is reassuringly understated, is technically and mechanically highly advanced, but above all oozes class? Chris Lilly enjoys everything the new Audi A8 has to offer

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udi’s A8 has long been the marque’s flagship model, representing just what the German manufacturer can do with a car when let off the leash. This new version returns the A8 range to its roots, promising a technological tour de force for buyers, with advanced kit both in the cabin and under the surface. Before anyone sits in said cabin though, they must first be tempted in, and the A8 certainly has the style to do that. The large saloon is an early example of Audi’s current design language, with a prominent nose, sleek shape and sharp creases to highlight certain design elements. Most importantly though, it’s understated in a way that few, if any, of its competitors can be. In the luxury saloon class, many buyers are looking for a classy, refined look that doesn’t ‘shout’ about anything. When pitched up against the Mercedes S-Class for example – which has long been the yardstick for large saloons in Europe – the Audi’s design is elegant, while the Merc is a bit lumpy. Jaguar’s XJ is a little too brutish to be classed as refined, while BMW’s 7 Series is the closest to the A8’s sense of style, but the Audi is a better-looking machine. It’s inside that everything becomes important, however. An A8 is expected to be able to complete a cross-country trip with no greater strain on the driver (or occupants) than if they were simply having a bath. Part of the large saloon experience these days is what goodies are available, and Audi doesn’t disappoint. The feature that immediately grabs your attention inside is a double stack of touchscreens to control essentially every element of the car’s systems. Audi’s previous MMI system was a very good one, using a rotary dial to select options, switch between functions and the like. In my experience, it is always easier to control infotainment systems in a car with a separate interface – such as a dial – than with a touchscreen setup. However, Audi’s new MMI Touch Response is so good, it almost reaches the same level of usability; and looks much cleaner and more high-tech for it. The screens operate different functions, but both are touch-responsive; the top screen displaying elements such as satellite navigation; the bottom for heating controls, driving mode, etc. Both can offer a variety of displays though, and the bottom screen acts as a touchpad to draw out letters when inputting a destination for the (upper) navigation system for example. Both can also give haptic feedback, and have to be controlled as if the user is actually pushing a button. Trying to lightly brush the screen often results in nothing happening, whereas ‘pushing’ the screen with the same sort of force as one would use a physical button results in a ‘click’ that lets you know you’ve actually done something. It’s got all the sophistication of a digital system, but with much of the user friendliness of an analogue set-up. It works very well and means that you spend less time looking at the screens concentrating on what you are trying to select, and more time with your eyes on the road. Other elements to the A8’s cabin tech include door handles that use switches as well as mechanical linkages, so that opening a door requires just a tiny pull of the handle. The interior also sees a touchscreen airconditioning system built into the end of the centre rear armrest, and Audi’s virtual cockpit which enables the driver to toggle through a wide range of instrument displays – prioritising navigation or dials, plus a range of other options. Essentially, despite the myriad technological elements, the A8 cabin’s interior design and build quality are up to the company’s usual excellent standards. The test model featured elements of matt dark wood across the cockpit and the tops of the seat backs, and a gloss piano black fascia on the dash to break up the leather trim. The air vents hide behind some of these wooden screens when not in use – with individual fan settings controlled using a touch panel – and the whole

interior feels beautifully built. It’s a great place in which to sit, both for the driver – and potentially more importantly for this type of car – at the rear. Here there is leg space aplenty for anyone, and the head and shoulder room available shouldn’t see complaints from anyone. Seat comfort is top quality too, and they are squashy enough to cosset occupants, plus supportive enough to prevent aches and pains come the end of a long trip. The A8 is never going to be a true driver’s car, but Audi has done plenty to make sure someone behind the wheel doesn’t just feel like a chauffeur, as the car can be enjoyed too. Tested was the A8 50 TDI, which sees a 3.0-litre TDI mild hybrid diesel engine provide 286hp and a luxurious 600 Nm of torque. This makes for effortless driving in ‘efficiency’ or ‘comfort’ modes, and rapid progress in ‘dynamic’ – certainly more than quick enough for any car weighing over two tonnes has any right to be. The engine is refined when warm after a slightly rattly start, and settles down to a whisper at motorway speeds, which helps make the Audi a very quiet car to drive. The A8 50 TDI will get from 0-62mph in just 5.9 seconds when needed to, and there’s a certain fascination in setting the car into dynamic mode and treating it like a hot hatch. However, it performs far better wafting along effortlessly, relying on an eight-speed tiptronic automatic transmission and all that torque to quietly get on with business. The suspension runs along similar lines, both in terms of technological focus and driving dynamics. The springs – or lack thereof – mean that the A8 runs smoothly on all but the very worst road surfaces. Underpinning this ride quality is new standard adaptive air suspension, that changes damper settings with driver modes. Predictive air suspension is available as an option, which actively raises or lowers each wheel depending on driver settings, making for a more dynamic drive or comfortable ride depending on the situation. The standard system tested is very good though and provides a soft ride – but not a bouncy one – for the majority of the time, firming up nicely when put into dynamic mode. There is plenty of grip – thanks in part to the quattro all-wheel drive system – a fair amount of weight to the steering, and a sense of solidity from the handling and suspension set-up, so you feel as though the A8 could cope with just about all you have to throw at it. Although not tested off-road, even greasy conditions failed to unsettle the big Audi, and the suspension combats excessive lean with aplomb. It’s a big potential trap to fall into for makers of luxury saloons, but Audi have avoided it nicely. Anything else? Ah yes, I still need to mention bits and pieces of technology used under the skin. For example, all engines available in the A8 range are 48-volt mild hybrid units. This sees a beefed-up integrated starter motor assist in powering the A8’s auxiliary systems – such as air-con – improve engine stop/start efficiency, and help with coasting at motorway speeds when off the throttle. There are also driver training aids to improve fuel-efficient driving, and the car, though longer and taller than before, is only a little heavier thanks to the use of a combination of lightweight materials. All this together helped me return more than 51 mpg during my time with it – not at all shabby considering the official figure is 50.4 mpg. The A8 is an extremely accomplished machine, with the driving experience well pitched – comfortable but with a hint of dynamism – and a combination of style, equipment, and refinement that are topnotch. It’s instantly one of the picks of its class. ■

• Bristol Audi, Lysander Road, Cribbs Causeway, BS10 7FF; 0117 958 1450; bristolaudi.co.uk THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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GARDENING

Rob and Jak Ollett of Habu, which works with most of Bristol’s co-working providers

LET’S WORK TOGETHER Bristol is part of an exciting, global co-working trend that is changing the way we graft. Serena Ralston finds out more

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hile demand for traditional offices is declining, stylish coworking space in Bristol is thriving – and supply is struggling to keep up. According to local commercial property agents Cushman & Wakefield, there is around 410,000 sq.ft of serviced/co-working space in 44 premises in Bristol’s city centre alone. This is set against unmet demand for around 250,000 sq.ft from co-working providers. The firm’s research found that demand for flexible workspace across the UK saw record growth in 2017. Co-working spaces are generally considered to be communities where members such as freelancers, other independents and remote workers work flexibly together in a physical building and share resources.

...We have a long history of independentmindedness here – something to do with being a port city perhaps... The social aspect of co-working is one of its biggest attractions, especially for sole traders. Once the novelty of working in a onesie has worn off, juggling deadlines at home, with only the cat for company, can be lonely. Instead, co-working space offers a place to get up and go to, and other people with whom to share experience. Friday beers, 58 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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office dogs and coffee and cake can all be part of the mix. An authentic community is vital. Alexis Butt, marketing manager at Redbrick House – a not-for-profit coworking space in Stokes Croft – says: “Redbrick is an ever-growing community of like-minded individuals who enjoy working collaboratively. We encourage everyone to share ideas, make new friends, and ask other members for support and advice.” Co-working can be good value for money. Utility bills, coffee, tea, high-speed internet and printing are usually thrown in. It’s also a better bet than ‘café-squatting’, where guilt-coffee purchases soon mount up. For a start-up or freelancer, co-working’s flexibility is a big draw – many spaces have no contracts, instead offering month-to-month billing. This allows businesses to scale up or down to suit their needs. A space’s success is often down to the community manager. Brothers Jak and Rob Ollett are co-founders of workspace management software business Habu. “The role is similar to a gardener’s,” says Jak. “They don’t make plants grow but they can create the conditions that facilitate a flourishing community.” Habu works with spaces around the world, including most of Bristol’s co-working providers. Based in the creative environment of Hamilton House, Habu recently launched a major update, enabling members to engage with their workspace in a different way, from making bookings and changing plans, through to a community discovery tool to help members learn more about each other. But what is it about Bristol that makes for such a strong co-working scene? Start-ups, in particular tech businesses, are fuelling demand.


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Bristol has the second highest ranking for new start-ups in the region (Start Up Cities Index 2017). It’s also a young city, with a high retention rate of students after graduation. Mike Zeidler is founder of the Bristol-based charity Happy City and manager of the Happiness Hub co-working space at 38 Victoria Street. He also runs the Funky Spaces website funkyspaces.co.uk and coordinates the network to help build happier economies. The website,

For Robert Ollett, ‘nichification’ is key to sustained co-working success: “What’s so important is a focus on your niche – creating spaces that suit different markets. Bristol examples include Bristol VR Labs (bristolvrlab.com) for the virtual reality community.” Bristol’s co-working scene looks set to evolve and flourish further: let’s take a closer look at just some of Bristol’s funkiest spaces...

Pollen Place

...Our role is similar to a gardener’s – they don’t make plants grow but can create the conditions that facilitate a flourishing community... which showcases alternative, community and affordable workspace in the UK, lists 40 spaces in Bristol. “Bristol is unorthodox,” he says. “We have a long history of independent-mindedness here – something to do with being a port city perhaps. There are lots of people who say, ‘I can do stuff in Bristol.’” Such is Bristol’s success that bigger players from out of town are sizing up the city. Runway East, which has three spaces in London, will this summer open its first outside the capital, Runway East Bristol (runwayea.st/locations/bristol) at 1 Victoria Street. Overlooking Bristol Bridge, the space, for start-ups, is in a prime location. “There is a place for both big players and the small independents to expand,” says Andy Heath, partner at Cushman & Wakefield. “Our quirky nature is cherished as it makes Bristol stand out, as evidenced by Channel 4 shortlisting the city for its new HQ.” A lack of scale-up space, though, for growing businesses means they are having to stay longer in serviced/co-working areas. According to Mike Zeidler, the big challenge for independent operators is finding landlords and leases that have security of tenure, particularly for those running maker spaces.

Where: 5-17 Backfields Lane, Bristol BS2 8QW Who owns and runs it? Husband-and-wife team Cat and Roger How. What’s on offer: A relaxed vibe tailored to developers and creative professionals, with access to a green screen and photographic studio. Inhouse branding and design agency Pollen specialises in branding for start-ups and uses co-working members on projects. Community: Creative professionals, architects, Bristol City Yoga team. Its event space holds networking nights and meet-ups plus Friday beers. How much? Packages and prices include £170 for a full-time desk, £55 for part time. • pollenplace.com/workspace

Redbrick House Where: 6 York Court, Wilder St, Bristol BS2 8QH Who owns and runs it? One of the only not-for-profit co-working spaces in Bristol, it is owned by social enterprise PAPER Arts. What’s on offer: Three floors of co-working space both for solitary and interactive working, including open-plan art studios and fixed desk floors for enterprises from freelancers, entrepreneurs, small teams and start-ups. All profits from the professional workspaces go towards supporting PAPER Arts youth projects. Community: Hosts social events including bi-monthly business workshops, monthly brunches and members’ pub drinks, plus weekly cake and coffee networking. How much? Flexible packages start from £60 per month for 30 hours; £100 for 60 hours, £140 for unlimited time. £160 for a permanent desk. • redbrickhouse.org.uk

Engine Shed is a collaboration between the University of Bristol and Bristol City Council; with 30 per cent of profits going into projects around inclusion, growth and innovation in the local economy

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...Friday beers, office dogs and coffee and cake can all be part of the co-working mix... Pollen Place (image by Max McClure)

Desklodge Bristol Where: 1 Temple Way, Bristol BS2 0BY Who owns and runs it? DeskLodge, founded by Tom Ball. What’s on offer: 400 desks and spaces over two floors, from hotdesking to private offices. Quirky and fun spaces include a (quiet room) Tardis space and indoor garden. Community: Tech, journalists, start-ups, recruitment agencies, transport, PR, film makers, PHD students. Also supports minority groups and meet-ups. Women’s Tech Hub meets there every Friday. How much? Super flexible, with a wide range of options including drop-in hot-desking from £3 an hour/£20 a day; unlimited hot-desking during office hours for £150 a month, through to a fixed desk at £260 a month, and private offices for four or more people. • desklodge.com/bristol-coworking-office-space

Engine Shed Where: Station Approach, Bristol BS1 6QH Who owns and runs it? A collaboration between the University of Bristol and Bristol City Council. What’s on offer? A business lounge that staff and members of multiple organisations can access, as well as an incubator and accelerator, and strategic tenants such as BoomSatsuma and TechSpark. Thirty per cent profits go into projects around inclusion, growth and innovation in the local economy.

Community: Connecting with exciting people is a bonus. The incubator, accelerator and Boxworks container facility host some 40 hi-tech, creative and professional service firms. The SETsquared incubator is the virtual home of around 60 of some of the most exciting hi-tech businesses in the country, such as Ultrahaptics and Neighbourly. How much? Co-working space is £20 a day including VAT, or £3.80 an hour. If you join one of the business lounge’s member organisations, then access to the lounge is free. • engine-shed.co.uk

Spike Design Where: 133 Cumberland Rd, Bristol BS1 6UX Who owns and runs it? Part of Spike Island Artspace, an arts charity. What’s on offer: Spike Design is a creative industries incubator, 40-desk space that offers support services such as training events, business advice, careers guidance, networking and knowledge exchange. Community: Creative community includes designers (graphic, product, digital and interactive), architects, journalists, illustrators, filmmakers and photographers. Access to extensive creative networks, free meeting rooms, tenant clubs and socials and 24-hour access. How much? Full membership £175 pcm ex. VAT. Range of flexible memberships from £20 ex. VAT. • spikeisland.org.uk/spike-design

Redbrick House hosts business workshops, brunches and members’ pub drinks, plus weekly cake and coffee networking

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SUSTAINABILITY

THE ROAD TO CARBON NEUTRALITY Building and managing its own large-scale wind turbines; setting up the UK’s first municipal energy company for social good; Bristol is taking action against climate change and doing its best to work towards a greener state of affairs

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ack in 2015, Bristol became the only UK city to receive the prestigious accolade of European Green Capital – a testament to our collective passion and energy when it comes to sustainability. Our mayor, Marvin Rees, has now committed Bristol to becoming a carbon neutral city by the year 2050, a big ambition that will mean a cleaner, greener place to live for local people. As one of the largest employers in the city, Bristol City Council is at the forefront of our action against climate change with a dedicated energy team responsible for delivering projects that benefit the social, economic and environmental health of our city. In recent years the council has become the country’s only local authority to build and manage its own large-scale wind turbines; and reduced its own carbon emissions by 60% including reductions across museums, schools, offices and libraries. It has delivered a multimillionpound solar investment programme on corporate and community buildings; and launched the first section of a new low-carbon and lower-cost heat network in Temple Quarter as well as a number of mini heat networks serving social housing across the city. Additionally it has set up Bristol Energy, the UK’s first municipal energy company for social good, supporting local renewable generation, SMEs and addressing fuel poverty. 62 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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The council has big plans to keep us on target for 2050, including supporting community groups to build and manage their own energy projects and increasing the number of charging facilities for electric vehicles, but there are also things that Bristol people can do to help save money and cut carbon at home. What can I do at home? One of the most effective ways of reducing our own carbon footprints is by making sure that our homes are as energy efficient as possible. This has the added bonus of reducing energy consumption and could save hundreds on energy bills. The council has launched an energy home improvements scheme to help homeowners and private landlords to do this, supported by trusted installers, project management expertise, affordable finance options and occasional grant funding to help cover the cost. The Warm Up Bristol scheme has already helped over 1,500 local households to become cosier and cheaper to heat, by offering solar panels; boilers and heating systems; cavity, loft and solid wall insulation; windows, doors and draught-proofing. The team also offers free energy-saving advice and a few top tips to help cut costs. To find out more, get online and visit warmupbristol.co.uk or give the team a call on 0117 3521180.


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Marvin Rees has committed to Bristol becoming a carbon neutral city by 2050 – which will make the city a yet more beautiful prospect (all images courtesy of Bristol City Council)

xxxxx What can I do in my local community? There are a number of community energy groups operating across the city – make contact with your local group to get involved with projects in your area. There’s a full list of groups on the Bristol Energy Network website at the end of this article; there you can also register for the organisation’s open meeting on 3 July at Easton Community Centre if you fancy hearing from these community collectives. The meeting will be a celebration of the fifth anniversary of the Bristol Community Strategy for Energy – reviewing progress, celebrating achievements and updating strategy to reflect the changing energy environment, building on work carried out by the Smart Energy City Collaboration. There will also be an opportunity to learn more about REPLICATE (Renaissance in Places with Innovative Citizenship And Technology) with Bristol Energy Network and the local council. A European research and development project, it’s earmarked Bristol as one of three lead cities (Smart City ‘Lighthouses’) along with Florence and San Sebastian – each to deploy smart integrated energy, mobility and ICT solutions. In Bristol, the Ashley, Easton and Lawrence Hill Neighbourhood Partnership area was chosen for the pilot, exploring

Some of the interventions being piloted include energy efficient refitting of Bristol homes

how smart technology could be used to reduce the cost, and amount, of energy consumed; use more local renewable sources of energy; enable greater sustainable mobility to increase health and wellbeing and enable better access to training and employment; and engage citizens in their energy use and travel patterns to change behaviour. Some of the interventions being piloted include energy efficient refitting of homes; development of local renewable energies; the introduction of 32 e-bikes and six electric car club vehicles; and electric vehicle charging infrastructure. Where can I find out more about the council’s energy projects? There’s a website dedicated to the city’s energy projects and our journey towards becoming a carbon neutral city. Find out more about Bristol’s green progress at energyservicebristol.co.uk.

A giant leap for Bristol’s green future The council, in partnership with the University of Bristol, UWE, Invest Bristol and Bath, Bristol Green Capital Partnership, Bristol Energy and Bristol is Open – a collaboration between the tech, media and telecommunications industry, universities, communities, and government – has just published a range of investment and partnership opportunities called ‘City Leap’. The aim is to create a series of energy and infrastructure investment opportunities to help create a healthier and fairer city for Bristol residents, helping create jobs, maintain economic competitiveness, decarbonise the city, build strong partnerships and empower communities to take their future into their own hands. The City Leap is outlined in a prospectus with a call-out to organisations, investors and innovators – an opportunity to deliver something truly transformative for Bristol, building a citywide energy system that will protect the environment and improve the quality of life for people in local areas. An expression-of-interest window is open until 31 August. More information and the full City Leap prospectus document can be found on the council’s Energy Service website. Get involved... • bristolenergynetwork.org; energyservicebristol.co.uk/prospectus THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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FAMILY

SCHOOL’S OUT! Take a leap of faith, see the last Concorde ever to fly, enjoy a stage show full of chocolatey goodness: we’ve got plenty of ideas for a fun-filled family summer

Clevedon Pier

Bristol Old Vic

The only Grade-I listed pier in the UK is now in its 149th year! Take in unrivalled views of Clevedon’s historic seafront, Wales and The Severn Estuary this summer – watching the rise and fall of the second highest tidal range in the world. Enjoy the hands-on museum with exhibits based on Clevedon and the pier or visit the Porthole Room, with its outlook under the pier, then stop off at the visitor café which offers a seaside-inspired menu – or visit at night if you want to try Clevedon’s only seafood restaurant. You can also find bespoke gifts in the shop and browse the 14,000 plaques while promenading. There is a full events programme throughout the year, including live music, dancing, yoga and seasonal events – plus family half-term activities in-keeping with the environment all year round. For full listings, visit the website.

This summer, Michael Rosen’s much-loved poem, Chocolate Cake – also a gorgeously illustrated picture book – is transformed for the stage by Polka Theatre, a UK theatre dedicated exclusively to children. It’s the latest wonderful piece of family theatre from the people who created We’re Going on a Bear Hunt and How to Hide a Lion, don’t you know? Following the adventures of two brothers and the night-time disappearance of a chocolate cake, this five-star “deliciously moreish” show (The Stage) is a delight from start to finish, chock-full of music, songs, film and animation, and sure to have the family shouting “more please!” on the way home. Tickets £12; family ticket £40 (two adults, two kids or one adult, three kids). • Chocolate Cake, Tuesday 24 – Saturday 28 July at Bristol Old Vic. To book visit bristololdvic.org.uk/chocolatecake or call the box office on 0117 987 7877. Bristol Old Vic, King Street, Bristol BS1 6ED.

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Leap of Faith

Photograph by Daniel Watkiss

We The Curious What if we could change the world? Be inspired at We The Curious this summer. Launching on the 26 July, the summer programme at Bristol’s science centre is all about the wonderful things that can happen when we work together, try out new ideas and pause to think about what impact we could have on the world. The excitement begins with the Festival of What If (26 – 31 July) with six actionpacked days of making, creating, music, theatre performances and pop-up cafes. Highlights include model-making workshops run by Aardman and a visit from Britain’s first astronaut, Helen Sharman, on Saturday 28 July. All summer long, the inspiration continues with chain reaction workshops, a 3D planetarium show that puts the audience in charge, a brand-new studio show all about great ideas and plenty of making and doing with visiting artists and researchers. • For prices and to book tickets, visit: wethecurious.org or tel: 0117 915 1000

Located in Wild Place Project is Leap of Faith, one of Bristol's finest outdoor activity centres. Ideal for all ages, the whole family can climb up to 25ft on any of the climbing routes, brave the exhilarating ‘leap of faith’ from which the centre gets its name, or take the plunge on Bristol’s only giant swing! It’s within walking distance from The Mall at Cribbs Causeway, so you can head over just to climb, or make a day of it and explore everything the park has to offer: animals from across the globe, forest trails and lots more. Leap of Faith is open to the public for days out and birthday parties, at weekends and all through the summer holidays from 10am – 5pm. If you have some over-energetic kids (or adults!), take them down to the course for a fun-fuelled day on the adventure course. This summer there’s 10% off if you book onto a morning session too. • Visit: leapoffaith.co.uk or tel: 0117 373 7531

Blaise Castle House Museum Housed in a late 18th-century Grade-II listed mansion, Blaise Castle House Museum tells the story of how some people lived in Bristol once upon a time, from what they wore to the toys they played with. Situated in 500 acres of beautiful parkland, it’s a lovely spot to enjoy the sunshine and a picnic and there’s free onsite parking too. The very popular fairy door trail has been extended to run on over 20 dates during the summer holidays. Don’t miss the Brilliant Archaeology Festival on 28 July – a whole day of family fun including medieval re-enactors, mini excavations, archery, craft activities and much more. • Blaise Castle House Museum, Henbury Road, Bristol BS10 7QS Tel: 0117 903 9818; bristolmuseums.org.uk

Aerospace Bristol Have you visited Bristol’s newest family attraction yet? Aerospace Bristol offers an ideal day out with the kids this summer. The new museum is home to the last Concorde ever to fly and gives you and your family the chance to step aboard as part of an exciting handson journey through time. From WW1 biplanes to modern fighter jets, helicopters, rockets and satellites, Aerospace Bristol takes you on a flight through aviation history, including fun, interactive games and children’s trails to enjoy along the way. Visit between 2 July and 2 September to see Gromjet, the highflying Gromit brought to life by Rolls-Royce as part of the Gromit Unleashed 2 trail. • Tickets include free return visits for 12 months and are available to purchase at the museum or at aerospace.org. Book online and print at home to enjoy ‘speedy boarding’ and avoid queues at the admissions desk. Tel: 0117 931 5315

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Ultimate Activity Camps Ultimate Activity Camps provide activity days for four to 14-yearolds in the school holidays, where the children’s welfare and having fun are at the heart of everything they do. Every day, the gang will enjoy a brilliant mix of sports, games and creative activities led by inspiring staff at amazing locations. This summer they are heading for Badminton School in Westbury-on Trym. With great savings if you book early, they offer great value for money with the option to pay by childcare vouchers. For flexibility, book by the day or week and change dates for free up to 14 days in advance. It’s Ofsted registered and all staff are DBS cleared and qualified teachers or instructors. Camps run Monday to Friday during summer holidays with drop off from 8am and collection until 6pm. • Visit: ultimateactivity.co.uk; tel: 0330 111 7077

The Holburne Museum Explore Colourscape at The Holburne Museum in nearby Bath from 20 – 29 August. From 11am until 4pm, enjoy different programmes of music and performances each day. This 10-day arts festival takes place within a sculpture and provides a unique experience of the most intense colours that you could imagine. Put on a coloured cape and step into a new world where there are no horizons, just soft curved edges and intense colour and light. Turn a corner and another fabulous view opens up. Become lost in colour and space and explore until you discover live musicians and dancers leading you on a journey of music and colour. • Tickets: £5, available on the day. Tel: 01225 388569; holburne.org

Escape Hunt Escape Hunt is a great way to keep your kids’ brains ticking over this summer holiday. Rather than sitting in front of gaming screens, challenge them to help you crack codes and solve riddles in Bristol’s most exhilarating escape the room game yet. For one hour you can enter the world of WWII espionage agents or Samurai warriors – either way you’ll be racing to escape from impending doom. Adults and children (aged 10 or over) can put their mental dexterity and quick thinking to the test in these totally immersive games from this global leader in escape games. From Sydney to Paris, Escape Hunt has sites across the world and recently launched in Bristol’s Cabot Circus. With opportunities to play from 10am – 9pm every day of the week, this adventure will bring the whole family together and get the adrenaline pumping. • Cabot Circus, Bristol BS1 3BX. Visit: escapehunt.com/bristol; Tel: 0117 927 2222

Children’s Scrapstore Children’s Scrapstore runs a vibrant programme of creative sessions during the school holidays. You’ll find the team in St. Werburghs among a mountain of colourful scrap and craft materials, with activities dreamt up especially for the summer break. Think everything from dinosaurs to robots, flying machines, small worlds, dreamscapes, birds of paradise and slime. This summer sees Stay & Play sessions (aimed at ages five – 10) and creative workshops for ages 8+, alongside the regular under-fives’ Make a Mess programme. The team will be running Stay & Play throughout the holidays on Friday afternoons, planned with children with SEND in mind. With two sessions a day, Children’s Scrapstore has packed in a mix of quiet and loud, big and small, exploration and more structured processes. These guys even run adults sessions too. • Visit: childrensscrapstore.co.uk; Tel: 0117 914 3002 66 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Image: Richard Bryant

FAMILY

M Shed

• Princes Wharf, Wapping Road, Bristol BS1 4RN Tel: 0117 352 6600; bristolmuseums.org.uk

National Trust Tyntesfield From picnics in the garden, to tennis and croquet on the lawns, outdoor theatre in front of the house and writing workshops in the woodland, there’s something for everyone at National Trust Tyntesfield this summer. Looking for something new to do with your little one? This summer sees the first ever TYNTEfest, a brand new festival for two – five year olds and their families with activities and games inspired by favourite nursery rhymes. Ever thought about writing? Tyntesfield’s poet-in-residence, awardwinning Bristol poet Holly Corfield Carr is leading writing workshops once a month throughout the summer with a new guest writer every time. Just fancy stretching your legs? With 540 acres of gardens, woodland and parkland, there’s plenty of space to do just that. You can even follow in the footsteps of Tyntesfield’s Victorian owners on the new woodland poetry walk, inspired by the legacy of 18th-century Bristol writer Hannah More. • Visit: nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield

SS Great Britain Visit SS Great Britain this summer, where Brunel is looking for his next apprentice. Grab an engineer’s satchel, filled with all the tools you’ll need, and enjoy exciting activities in the dockyard and onboard the ship. Explore the SS Great Britain, solve problems and learn the variety of skills that make a great engineer. Discover more about engineering in the amazing summer science show Brunel: Building the Impossible. Hosted by Mr Brunel himself, the performance will be filled with fascinating facts and daring demonstrations, celebrating 2018’s Year of Engineering. Apprentices young and old, from primary school age to adults, will be inspired by SS Great Britain and the extraordinary man who made her. Performances will run three times a day, every day between 23 July – 3 September. Brunel: Building the Impossible lasts 20-30 minutes and is included in the price of admission.

Image: Bristol Culture

• Visit: ssgreatbritain.org

Bristol Museum and Art Gallery Discover Bristol’s world-class collections, from dinosaurs and gems to magnificent fine art and Egyptian artefacts at Bristol Museum and Art Gallery. Find out about the last billion years of Earth’s history and explore the region’s natural wonders. As well as two beautiful new exhibitions (Woman’s Hour Craft Prize and Fabric Africa), a range of children’s workshops will take place during August including Egypt Explorers, Dinosaur Detectives and African Fabrics. The café serves delicious homemade, Fairtrade and organic food, and the shop is stocked with gorgeous local gifts to satisfy all tastes and budgets. • Queens Road, Bristol, BS8 1RL Tel: 0117 922 3571; bristolmuseums.org.uk THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Image: Alana Wright

M Shed is a one stop shop for entertaining the kids this summer. Bright, interactive displays tell the story of Bristol’s unique history, and on the weekends you can ride M Shed’s largest exhibits – the train, cranes and boats. Special summer activities for children include Print It and How to be a Roman. M Shed’s harbourside location boasts one of the best views of the city and the current Bristol Music exhibition is a treasure trove of nostalgia. If you get peckish, the new Grill Shack BBQ and revamped bar on the ground floor is likely to hit the spot.


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FAMILY

Old Down Country Park With summer fun and fresh air a-plenty there is lots on offer for the family at Old Down Country Park. There are 66 acres to explore and lots for the children to explore including the pets’ corner, the animal park, toddlers’ play area, and the adventure playground. Included in the price of entry is a programme of special feature days running throughout the summer holidays with The Adam Allsorz Show a regular fixture on a Tuesday, featuring magic, games and interactive party dances around the park. Other events include the Where’s Wally Day on 12 August and the large dog show on 18 August where you can take along your furry friend and enter them into one of the 10 categories. It’s only £5 per person for park entry on dog show day plus £2 per class for your dog. • olddownestate.co.uk

Castle Combe Summertime at the circuit is quite possibly the best time at the circuit! If you’re stuck for plans on 11 – 12 August, make your way down to the BRSCC Caterham Race Weekend, or perhaps you might prefer to head to the Combe Countdown meeting on bank holiday Monday 27 August. If two wheels are more your style, why not go along to the Castle Combe Grand National Motorcycle meeting from 1 – 2 September to see corners taken at over 100mph. Plus, there are car shows, driving experiences, giant car boot sales, Startline under 17s experiences and much more. • Castle Combe Circuit, Chippenham, SN14 7EY Tel: 01249 782417; castlecombecircuit.co.uk

Family Fun Day Sunday 15th July

Frenchay Cricket Club, Frenchay, BS16 1QN

12 - 5pm Free Entry! • Kids Game Zone • Bouncy Castle • Raffle top prize weekday champagne balloon flight for two!

• • • • • • • •

Bar Live Music Stalls and demonstrations BBQ & Picnic area Glitter Tattoos Dog show Cognitive Board Games ...........& much more!

100% of all profi ts will go towards the He adway Bristol Carers and Comm unity Support Fund

Please email fundraising@headwaybristol.org.uk if you would like to book a stall or request raffle tickets 0117 4142 222 | www.headwaybristol.org.uk Headway Bristol Brain Injury Association Limited A Company Limited by Guarantee Registered in England No. 2659120. Registered Charity No. 1007207. Affiliated to Headway UK, the brain injury association, a Registered Charity.

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SUMMER | FUN

NEW HEIGHTS Jessica Hope defies gravity, goes all Bear Grylls and masters axe-throwing at Leap of Faith’s Survival Situation challenge – perfect for teams and parties PUSHED TO YOUR LIMITS: Image above left; the team putting together a paw-print puzzle on the Situation Survival course, testing their animal tracking skills Centre and right; taking to the ropes up Leap of Faith’s climbing wall

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s we got strapped into our harnesses, we craned our necks to look up at the challenge before us. Looming above was an almighty climbing wall, a towering climbing totem pole, and what looked like a punch bag hanging metres away from a jumping platform. Out of our depth would be an understatement as to how we were feeling about the trial ahead. The Bristol Mag team assembled, we had arrived at Leap of Faith – the high ropes adventure course based at Wild Place Project, next to Cribbs Causeway – raring to go, but with a pang of nerves in our stomachs at the heights we were going to have to master. We were trying out Leap of Faith’s Situation Survival course, which is ideal for groups such as stag ’dos, hens and workmates looking for a team-bonding activity. The scenario is that your hot air balloon has crashed deep in the woodlands and it is the team’s task to locate the items that you threw out of the balloon as it was descending in order for you to survive in the wild. First you must scale the heights of the climbing wall and poles to find codes that will help you unlock the box with the maps that will help you find the items scattered around the woods. After being guided through the safety tips with our instructor Jack, with almost too much confidence I stepped forward to be the first person to climb the wall, thinking this was going to be piece of cake. The cake quickly crumbled as I got part of the way up the wall before the fear of having to come back down from a great height kicked in. After a gentle pep talk from my teammates, I gently descended via my safety rope back down to earth, adrenaline pumping, and was glad for giving it a try. In search of an important clue for cracking the code, my teammate Crystal ascended the steep totem pole with impressive ease. Gathering up her courage, she hoisted herself to stand up, pole wobbling slightly in the wind, and grabbed the code before jumping off the pole to a rapture of applause as she softly landed back on the ground. Cohort Josh then scrambled up the climbing wall to collect the final code, with a big smile as he jumped down from his success.

Equipped with our codes, we cracked open a box full of maps, clues and walkie talkies – everything we needed for the next part of the challenge. We followed the map to scout out the most important survival items. We explored the woodland for various clues, questions, and tasks we had to complete to gain necessary items like a first aid kit, water, flint and, obviously, marshmallows; along the way we got to see the Wild Place Project’s wonderful wildlife enclosures featuring the giraffes, zebras and geladas. With our time for exploring up, we arrived at the crash site of the hot air balloon where Jack greeted us with the items we successfully scavenged. After collecting plenty of firewood, he guided us on how to make a roaring fire from some cotton wool and hay, using a flint and a bit of encouragement from the oxygen in our breath. While we waited for the kettle to boil on the fire, we indulged in a casual axe-throwing contest – an unusual way to spend your afternoon, but a whole lot of fun nonetheless. Some of us discovered we have surprising talent for this skill, and there is an extraordinary feeling of satisfaction when the axe makes a thud into the target. With our water boiled, we ended the day by sitting beside the fire, drinking a cup of tea and toasting marshmallows while reflecting on the fears we overcame on the high ropes and our success in navigating the woodland. Leap of Faith’s Situation Survival caters for everyone – it’s not just physical, there’s plenty of logic and skill that come into each task, making it great for a large team to work together and use their different talents. Plus you get to learn a thing or two about survival along the way. If you’re planning a stag, hen do or birthday party, or reckon your workmates are in need of a top team-bonding day, then send them up the high ropes and into the wild – they won’t regret it. n Activities for adult groups start at £29pp. Corporate events, birthday parties and school visits are also available • Leap of Faith, Wild Place Project, Blackhorse Hill, Bristol, BS10 7TP; leapoffaith.co.uk

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CREATIVE BRISTOL

Clockwise from top left: Concrete Jungyals is an all-female Bristol collective promoting female and non-binary creatives and specialising in safe-space events; Jo Bligh’s ‘Thorny’ agenda reframes audience understanding of Bristol’s artistic identity; poet, rapper and event organiser Craft-D; Julia Head is now contributing to the theatre-making systems which have helped her thrive; Chanté Joseph runs Bristol Is The New Black

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CREATIVE BRISTOL

GENERATION DIY Meet some of the bright young things at the forefront of the city’s creative arts scene

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new five-part series of short films has been profiling extraordinary young people under the age of 25 who are said to be ushering in a new era for the UK ‘eventscape’ and its nightlife. Ticketing and event tech platform Eventbrite, which supports hundreds of thousands of creatives and events folk, travelled up and down the country in search of ‘disruptors, pioneers and creators’ putting on special events in London, Birmingham, Glasgow, Manchester and Bristol, to doff their caps to them and share their stories. Events culture is changing, with today’s generation of promoters operating among fewer spaces within a tougher legislative climate. They’re quite often multi-disciplinary creatives carving out safer, more inclusive spaces for their peers, and some are even activists putting the politics into partying and using events to bring about social change. Dubbed ‘Generation DIY’, this new wave of intrepid young creatives includes record label owners, theatre directors, comedians, foodies, art curators, independent club promoters, DJ collectives, spoken word artists, LGBTQ+ campaigners, activists and philanthropists around Britain who are tearing up the rulebook when it comes to events. The Bristol edition of the film series, released last month, is a celebration of the pervasive industrious spirit among today’s independent promoters; the ‘artivists’ making art and theatre accessible to marginalised and underrepresented communities; the female collectives making dancefloors a less potentially dangerous space; the rise of conscious clubbing including people using events to power social revolution. Here are a few you might not have met before...

Julia Head As part of the Bristol Old Vic’s young directors scheme, Julia (21) is becoming a driving force in the city’s experimental theatre community. She is an associate artist at Fen – a creative interdisciplinary collective of South West theatre makers interested in “producing exciting and challenging work embedded in the shared cultural and natural heritage of our region.” Having benefited from the city’s infrastructure to support young theatre makers, Julia is now contributing to the systems which have helped her thrive. Through her platform with Bristol Old Vic, she is interested in the real-life power of theatre as a creative outlet – working closely with the engagement department to help create opportunities for disengaged young people in the South West. She’s currently working as a director with Headlong Theatre Company, one of the UK’s most celebrated touring theatre establishments.

Chanté Joseph Profiled by Dazed in their “guide to the black Brits doing cool things in 2017” and described as a “21-year-old who is proving that she can make political change while being very black and very female,” Chanté (22) is a writer and events organiser whose Bristol Is The New Black collective offers discussions and networking opportunities to young people of colour in the city. Outside of that, Chanté’s endeavours as a critic and commentator on topics of race, technology and popular

culture have made her a highly influential voice. Graduating from the University of Bristol this summer, where she is president of the Bristol University Afro-Caribbean society, Chanté is committed to open dialogue and furthering social justice and is sure to continue to disrupt, enlighten and inspire.

Concrete Jungyals Headed up by Amy Glover (23) and Tiffany Lefuke (24), this is an allfemale creative Bristol collective who produce parties and events to create a sense of solidarity and mutual promotion for other female and non-binary creatives in the city. With a monthly radio slot on local station 10 Twenty Radio, an eye-catching and increasingly popular merchandise range and sets at some of Bristol’s biggest clubs and festivals, visibility and platform is crucial to who they are and what they represent. Recently, they delivered an event featuring dubstep, UK-funky and futuristic club tracks for International Women’s Day – an event which implemented a strict safe-space policy. Donations were sent to The Circle, an NGO founded by Annie Lennox, supporting disadvantaged women around the world.

Craft-D Twenty-three year-old Craft-D – real name Danny Padolfi – is a poet, rapper, event organiser and formidable battle MC whose focus on lyrical aptitude and razor-sharp wordplay has set him on a path of creativity. While the takedowns and punchlines of battle rapping have formed part of his journey, he’s also become a curator and promoter of some of the country’s best spoken word talent. His Raise The Bar night in Bristol has offered a spotlight to some of the city’s finest young poets and spoken word artists as well as open mic slots for less established names to find their time. Now bringing his spoken word and music night to the capital in the form of ‘Out-Spoken’ as well as taking on a post as a resident artist at the Roundhouse, his story is unfolding fast.

Jo Bligh With a background in music, Jo Bligh’s curatorial skillset and artistic gaze spans theatre, visual art, dance, comedy and club culture. Bligh’s ‘Thorny’ event brand has blossomed into a bright, playful platform for lesser heard voices in Bristol and beyond. It began when Bligh (24) saw a lack of spaces and parties for communities in Bristol’s margins so took control of the situation. As an organisation, Thorny creates loud, inclusive spaces where entertainment and tolerance are paramount. Having welcomed guests like Klein, Skinny Girl Diet, Lone Taxidermist and Elysia Crampton, the platform is now at the centre of the city’s experimental artistic community. Bligh splits their time between programming Thorny, overseeing creative digital projects and maintaining a regular presence at panel discussions in the city. Confronting marginalisation with energy and vibrancy, the Thorny agenda continues to reframe audiences’ understandings of Bristol’s artistic identity. ■

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The ‘will, you, won’t you?’ bell ceremony

ART AT THE HEART Lizzie Lloyd looks at the valuable creative work Foreground has been doing with Bristol schools lately. Photography by Jamie Woodley

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ver the past two years a council-funded arts initiative has been taking place at primary schools across Bristol. The projects include nationally and internationally renowned artists such as 2009 Turner Prize nominee Roger Hiorns, Peter Liversidge, Wood and Harrison and Daphne Wright, both of whom are based in the city. Simon Morrissey, director of Foreground – one of the organisations involved in commissioning the projects – talked to us about the importance of bringing art to primary schools. Lizzie Lloyd: Can you begin by introducing us briefly to the project? Simon Morrissey: The idea is to work with leading contemporary artists to make permanent works for schools, working directly with their communities – teachers, pupils and parents. Foreground is used to commissioning art for unconventional gallery spaces; what appeals to you about working with schools in this case? Well, the way we describe what we do at Foreground is that we make new art for new audiences and the way we do that is by locating art in the physical and social structures of a community, which is precisely what a school is. There is no more important place to do that than in a school where the impact might have a lasting effect, allowing future generations the opportunity to encounter art in their ordinary lives and everyday environments. What really interests me is the timing of this programme; I’m thinking of the much-reported squeeze on creative subjects in the national curriculum at a primary and secondary state school level Absolutely, and as it happens, although the schools programme takes place across the city, lots of the schools are located in poorer areas of

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the city where visual arts are less accessible. In fact, lots of the children in these neighbourhoods have never been to an art gallery. Can you give us an idea of the physical outcomes of the projects? They range massively from mobile perspex sculptures, paintings, library furniture and signs to choreographed performances. How do you define ‘permanent’ artworks? In a very broad sense. We don’t commission the kind of public art you find in city centres across the country. We’re not interested in creating something monolithic. It’s more about how a community like a school can own a piece of art that is meaningful for them in the long term for the whole community of the school. Is it difficult to anticipate what might constitute ‘meaningful’? Yes, so one of the things that we like to do is make sure that our commissions are active rather than passive. We’re always very keen not to take a one-size-fits-all approach but instead to marry up artists that we commission with the particular priorities of each school. In most cases this is driven by its teaching or social philosophy. At Kingfisher School in St Anne’s Wood, which is a really economically deprived part of the city, the school wanted to make a demonstrable statement about art’s importance within their community. So we’re commissioning Richard Woods to make a big intervention within the structure of what is a new, multi-million pound, school building. He’s doing a decorative tiled facade at the front entrance of the building so everyone will see this as they take their children to school; day in, day out. How have your other commissions developed? We began by visiting each school. Through these visits we got a feel for the physical context which will give us some sense of the form that


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EDUCATION

a potential project might take. But we also speak with the senior management team and specific teachers to get a sense of how each school sees itself and its specific interests, needs and priorities. Through those discussions we get an idea very quickly about which artist it would be good to work with. How much did these discussions vary from school to school? Interestingly, given that the nine primary schools are coming out of the same city, they had very different atmospheres and approaches, each dealing with particular social and financial pressures. Can you give us an example? We’re also working with Easton Academy which is something like 90% black or minority ethnic and 85% muslim but within a Church of England managed school. Many of these children are firstgeneration immigrants who have come from conflict zone areas and speak English as a second language. So there’s really specific texture to the children’s experience. You mentioned that sometimes the project develops as a result of the particular interests of the school too? Yes, Bishop Road School is very committed to how stories open up experiences for children; it’s key to the school’s pedagogical approach. They have a brilliant library and employ a school librarian, which is very unusual for a primary school – every subject is taught through stories. We needed to find an artist equally interested in what stories can do which is why we suggested they work with Heather and Ivan Morrison who build really rich worlds in their work around the idea of narrative. After you have seen the school, what happens next? Again, it varies. At Bishop Road, Heather wanted to meet and talk to every single class. It was directly through these conversations that Heather and Ivan developed their idea. So what was the physical outcome in this instance? The school is an old Victorian building with an empty bell tower which Heather and Ivan decided to make a new bell for. There are

Artist Olivia Plender used string games as a basis for her project

lots of interesting things at play with this project. The bell is a sculpture – a physical and quite traditional object too. It’s functional – rung twice a day (you can hear it for about a mile around the school). And, though you can see it from the playground it’s not physically accessible to the children but it’s got all sorts of stories for the children embedded in it. What do you mean by ‘embedded in it’? Heather and Ivan are really good at spinning ideas and stories around the objects they make. The conversations around the bell are as important as the making of it. Heather’s talking to the classes in the school was a way to fold the children into the work’s narrative. The bell itself was cast in Loughborough by the last remaining bell foundry in the UK so we did a trip to the foundry with about 30 children from the school council and watched the bell get cast. This was an amazing experience which the children relayed to their classmates through an assembly to the rest of the school. When the bell was finally brought to the school, Heather led two ‘welcoming ceremony’ assemblies. She told the children about a French folklore which says if a bell is right for a place it will grow wings and fly to it. She followed this with what she called a ‘bell dressing ceremony’ taken from an old English tradition, bringing herbs and wild flowers, and the children processed round the bell, laying flowers and garlands. Heather told them they had to call to the bell, and if it speaks it means that it’s the right bell for the place. So then we had 300 children calling out ‘Will you won’t you, will you won’t you?!’ until Heather gave the bell a big whack with a lump hammer. The resounding of the bell at this moment left the children speechless – it was magical! So what I mean is this is all part of the work. Through the story of the bell’s making and arrival the children gain this incredible attachment to it. How does this compare with, say, Olivia Plender’s project in Easton? Olivia wanted to work directly with a small group of children in a workshop situation to create an idea together. Coincidentally this project ended up being about stories too. Olivia wanted to find a structure on which the children could project their own stories so we did a workshop with string games; cat’s cradle and the like. Almost every culture has a version of string games because these games spread throughout the world, partly passed on by sailors learning them on their voyages and taking them to new places, creating variations of the games. So there was a neutral universality to this structure that felt really apt… Especially as English wasn’t the first language of lots of the children? Exactly. But what was really interesting is that this project took on its own momentum and direction. We thought that it was going to be a book, like an instruction manual, full of string games that the children had invented themselves. In fact most of them weren’t really games at all but more abstract… ...Abstract tangles?! Sometimes with four hands just sticking out of them! But the children started to give them these amazing names like ‘The Hexi Monster’ and ‘The Rainbow Knot’. Olivia started to realise that the project wasn’t really about these string games or objects per se but a springboard for something else. So THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Olivia worked on the Easton Fables project at Easton CE Academy with school staff

the children came up with six or eight ‘games’ but through follow-up workshops they began to make up stories around them which we later compiled and turned into an illustrated book as well as two large appliqué banners that are hung in the school’s main hall. What were these stories like? Well sometimes really surreal and dark, like fables or fairy tales. There was one – I’m paraphrasing here – about a cup and how you could fit the whole world in the cup and when you did the world felt safe. That was it, just a few lines but they were incredibly moving; about how to make a world that feels incredibly vulnerable, safe. You’ve talked a lot about the ongoing impact of these projects to the schools; what steps have you taken to ensure the projects’ legacies? I think the important thing here is the emphasis that we put on embedding the projects within the lives of the children and schools. Daphne Wright, for example, was determined that her work for Cabot Primary would be useful to the school on an everyday basis. She is making what she calls ‘speaking sticks’. These brightly coloured ‘sticks’ are cast in a high-density rubber material – they’re very tactile – and sets of them are kept in each classroom. They look like microphones, wooden spoons or Barbara Hepworth sculptures. Daphne was particularly interested in the structures in place in

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schools, to get the children participating in lessons. The ‘speaking sticks’ are intended to legitimise and focus on the activity of speaking and listening. This is what I mean about a work becoming part of the everyday; if it’s used in the daily activities of the school and is core to the behaviour and pedagogical ethic of the school this artwork will be used for years to come. So what’s next for the schools programme? This series of commissions is drawing to a close in the autumn but the project has received a lot of interest across Europe and the UK for its uniqueness as the largest coherent commission of contemporary art for primary schools in Britain. We’d love to continue our work at other schools across the city and also in other areas of the South West, but this is all very dependent on funding. In a couple of years’ time there is going to be a programme of secondary school renewal in Bristol with major new schools being built. If the council still has the same commitment to culture and contemporary art then there is the potential for another series of schools projects to unfold, focused on older children and that would be a really exciting challenge we’d love to be involved in. ■

• foregroundprojects.org.uk/projects/primary-bristol


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SPORT | HOCKEY

PICK UP STICKS Olympic medallist and hockey ace Alex Danson on getting more people into the sport, fond memories of playing for Clifton Robinsons and this month’s hockey World Cup

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ockey has enjoyed a popularity surge over the past five years, with Olympic medals at London and Rio helping to drive 10,000 new people to join clubs. The number of girls playing the sport has doubled since 2012 and there have been over 100,000 ticket applications for the World Cup at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park this month. England and GB captain Alex Danson, who has over 100 international goals and has played for Clifton Robinsons in Bristol, told us more...

First, we’d like a bit of background please! I grew up in Hampshire; my older brother spurred me on to try different sports – I was always trying to catch him up! I joined Alton hockey club at 12 and then moved to Trojans in Southampton, which is where I received my first England under 16s cap. I’d never been out of the country at that stage and remember going to Lyon with the team. I won my first senior cap when I was 16 in 2001. Women’s sport and hockey is unrecognisable from when I first played for England. To go from where it started, with no funding or central programme, to winning bronze at London 2012 and then gold at Rio is just incredible. What brought you to Bristol? My best friend Sarah Ellis, who was playing at Clifton Robinsons in the Investec Premier League, and I had played hockey together since we were 13 years old and after the Rio Olympics we realised it would be the last chance we’d have to play together so she talked me into coming to play in Bristol. To be honest it didn’t take long to persuade me as throughout your playing career you get a sense of different clubs and Clifton Robinsons was just one of those places with a lovely vibe.

that a sport should. It requires a mixture of intelligence, athleticism, toughness, skill; for me the way these attributes create different styles and tactics makes it the best sport to both watch and play. What I remember about Bristol and playing for Clifton Robinsons was what a warm and friendly environment it was. Bristol’s a big, beautiful city but it’s also incredibly welcoming. Where’s good to play hockey in Bristol? Obviously Clifton Robinsons but Firebrands is another excellent club where my teammate Lily Owsley used to play. What are your health and fitness tips? Find a friend to work out with. If it’s more enjoyable you’re more likely to stick with it and a good friend won’t let you give up! I’ve been a vegetarian since I was a kid so I’m a big advocate of a plant-based diet but either way, lots of fresh veg. Set yourself small targets. If you aim for the overall goal it sometimes seems unachievable and means you’re more likely to give up. Set small goals, reach them, move onto the next. Celebrate the goals you reach! It’s ok to have a rest day and treat yourself. Find the exercise you enjoy. The gym isn’t for everybody and a lot of the time I’d rather be outside walking or cycling. Which other Bristol sports people do you rate? I really like Jenny Jones’ story, starting on the West Country dry ski slopes before a long journey to Olympic bronze in Sochi. I’ll also get in trouble if I don’t mention my teammate Lily Owsley. I’m sure she could have gone into athletics but we’re very pleased she chose hockey! ■ • fih.ch/events/world-cup

Any World Cup goss for us? The whole squad is so excited, to have the opportunity to play in a home World Cup isn’t something a lot of players are lucky enough to experience and it can’t come fast enough. The England matches are sold out but I’d still encourage anybody to come to the Olympic Park and watch a match. There is so little to choose between the top teams in the world and in particular I’d look out for Stacey Michelson (New Zealand), Lidewij Welten (Netherlands) and María José Granatto (Argentina) who are some of the world’s best players. Why are there so many more girls playing the sport now? I think it’s a combination of things. The success of the national side through London 2012 and Rio means hockey’s profile has risen and we’ve had some fantastic role models like Kate Richardson-Walsh. On top of that, England Hockey has been excellent at making sure girls that are interested get the chance to play. The hockey family is an amazing network of clubs and volunteers, and without them giving up their time we wouldn’t have been able to capitalise on the international success. Inspiring kids to pick up sticks is one of the biggest joys of my job. I started The Alex Danson Hockey Academy last year to give 10,000 primary school kids the opportunity to pick up a stick and give hockey a go by 2020 because I believe so much in the power of sport and what it can do for young girls’ confidence. Is it just youngsters getting involved? Not at all, England Hockey’s Back to Hockey campaign – getting girls who played the sport to give it another go as adults – has been a great success. Since 2012 they’ve had a 54% rise in over 46s giving it a go. Why did you personally choose hockey to pursue over other sports? It was always going to be hockey as it encompasses almost every aspect 76 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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THE | GETAWAY

The converted barns house guests at Lee Byre

Guy, far left, takes guests on guided tours around Dartmoor National Park

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THE | GETAWAY

UPON ENGLAND’S MOUNTAINS GREEN Jessica Hope dons her hiking boots and discovers the perfect countryside retreat for walkers, just a stone’s throw away from Dartmoor National Park

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s I opened the gate to the car park and chickens scurried around my feet, I could immediately see why people are drawn to this idyllic countryside retreat. With the sundrenched green hills rolling into the distance, new-born lambs bleating nearby, and birdsong surrounding us, the strains of William Blake’s Jerusalem rang through my head. We had, indeed, arrived in England’s green and pleasant land. In need of some R&R and invigorating fresh air, Russell and I travelled to Dartmoor for a long weekend at Lee Byre. This award-winning bed and breakfast is based on what was once a working farm, and is perfectly located for exploring Devon, Dartmoor National Park and Cornwall. Run by Guy and Kathrin, Lee Byre is a series of barns dating from the 18th century, which were lovingly restored to their present glory by Guy’s father, John. Converted to include three charming bedrooms, the barns feature exposed beams and original stonework, as well as modern bathrooms and king-sized beds. We stayed in Dart, the superior double, which has incredible views over the luscious landscape, plus fluffy dressing gowns, comfy slippers and tea and coffee facilities, as well as homemade chocolate and peanut cookies. There’s also fresh water provided – all the water at Lee Byre is sourced from the nearby spring, so whether you are making a cuppa or having a shower, it comes from the well. When you need to quench the other type of thirst there is an honesty fridge in the dining area where you will find cider and wine selected by a local expert, in addition to sparkling soft drinks. Pick your tipples, mark them off on a tally and they get totted up at the end of your stay – it’s all very relaxed. We enjoyed a fruity bottle of Sharpham Dart Valley Reserve from Totnes while sitting on the patio, watching the sky turn to hues of pinks and blues as the sun began to move below the hills. Food is taken seriously here. Everything is homegrown on site, sourced locally or homemade by chef Nina. On our first night, we demolished warm bread rolls with salted butter and the most incredible pesto made from wild garlic picked from the lane – you can even purchase a jar to take home. This was followed by shortcrust pie filled with slow-cooked lamb and mint, served with buttery new potatoes, fresh garden peas, and a salsa verde made from foraged herbs and a sharp tang of vinegar. We then tried Nina’s homemade caramel and sea salt ice cream with a warm chocolate brownie for dessert – dark, smooth and sweet, it hit just the right spot. Feeling energised, we ventured outside for a guided night walk with Guy around Dartmoor. As the sun set and the light began to change, we were able to explore the hills of the national park in a whole new way. While our eyes adjusted to the dark, our other senses became

heightened – the sound of the river racing beneath us and the wings of bats swooping overhead suddenly became more evident. Throughout the tour, Guy stopped to tell us about how Dartmoor’s landscape has changed over the centuries due to granite mining and deforestation. We then enjoyed a spot of star gazing while walking in the moonlight. There were no head torches needed – a novelty when we’re so used to the light pollution of city life. As well as night tours, Guy provides guided day walks through the national park. These trips are designed to give guests the opportunity to explore more remote areas, with homemade packed lunches and car transfers included. After falling asleep looking at the stars through our room’s skylight, we awoke feeling well rested. Before setting off to explore Dartmoor on our own, we enjoyed an almighty breakfast to prepare ourselves for the day. With homemade granola, fruit salad, yoghurt, fresh bread and muffins made by Guy’s mother Judy, there’s plenty to please everyone. There’s also a cooked breakfast made from local ingredients and eggs from the site’s chickens, and the fruity banana and cinnamon porridge will go down a real treat. Guy kindly plotted a day out for us to see some of the highlights of the national park. We began with an amble to the atmospheric Wistman’s Wood at Two Bridges. With the twisted tree branches, mosscovered rocks and thick vegetation, it looked like a landscape from The Lord of the Rings. Then we headed to Postbridge to see the medieval clapper bridge before arriving at the Hound Tor, thought to be the inspiration behind Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles. With its unusual rock formations and incredible views over Dartmoor, you can see why it’s so popular with both abseilers and rock climbers. Back at Lee Byre, our room’s ensuite was a welcome sanctuary after our busy day of hiking with its roll-top bath, power shower and Bramley toiletries. Having worked up an appetite, we dined on delicate mackerel fishcakes with a hint of warming horseradish on a bed of spinach with a mussel and cream sauce, topped with a plump poached egg and served with broccoli and carrots tossed in toasted almonds. Dessert included a cleansing raspberry sorbet with crunchy pistachios and fresh, sharp raspberries. The following morning we were crestfallen at the idea of leaving the tranquil setting of Lee Byre. This is an ideal getaway for walkers wanting to traverse Dartmoor’s incredible landscape, with the addition of outstanding food, friendly owners and comfortable rooms. Like Blake, we left with an undying passion for England’s pleasant pastures and a need to explore them some more. n

Superior double room at Lee Byre starts at £85, standard doubles or twins from £75, includes breakfast; leebyre.com

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HEALTH & BEAUTY WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE LOCAL SPHERE? The Wild & Well festival will be taking place this autumn around Bristol

GET IN LIME Your barnet can now smell as good as your bod thanks to Jo Malone’s new lime, basil and mandarin hair and body oil (£42). The brand’s first ever multi-purpose oil is launching this month and helps to moisturise, protect and soften the skin and hair and leave you satinsmooth and delicately fragranced. • jomalone.co.uk

HELLO, SORBIE STYLE

YOU DO YOU

News just in: joining the Bristol hair scene, Trevor Sorbie has opened a new set of doors on the stylish Clifton Triangle. Offering a variety of treatments by its expert team, it looks to be a great addition for the city. Somerset-born salon manager Gerald Smith is returning to the South West after managing Trevor Sorbie salons in London for over seven years, and is very much looking forward to getting back to his roots (pun very much intended). As a city with art, creativity and selfexpression at its heart, Bristol – the brand decided – was deemed the perfect location for the new store, which will continue to take pride in personalised hair artistry for every customer. From Kerastraight solutions, colour maintenance and express treatments, the choices and opportunities are vast and we can’t wait to see what’s in store.

A new wellness weekend is taking place in the city over 20 and 21 October in venues around the harbourside. The Wild & Well festival is based around four themes; move, eat, connect and explore, with venues including M-Shed, We The Curious and Arnolfini. The focus of the ‘eat’ events, a yurt on Brandon Hill will have a shuttle bus linking the festival to Ashton Court for the ‘explore’ programme. Meanwhile ‘move’ events will emphasise feel-good fun with classes from drum-andbass workouts to ballroom dancing, HIIT sessions and paddle boarding on the river. Music will play a big role with soundtracks for classes curated by AAA Badboy (Big Swing Sound System, Boomtown head of music) and live DJs accompanying workouts from ’80s aerobics to vogueing. Wild & Well has also teamed up with Bestival to bring Spinbox to Bristol – a unique spinning studio, created by Rob Da Bank and former Olympian Tim Weeks. The festival will also have two dedicated yoga venues while wild cooking, sustainability and communal eating will be the focus for the ‘eat’ strand, with talks, demos on fermentation, cooking over fire, butchery and growing produce. You can also enjoy tales of wonder from the universe around us and inspiring stories about people who are breaking down barriers to change the world at the Wild Film Festival, which will be taking over the former IMAX theatre for the weekend. A limited number of early bird tickets are now available from £25.

• trevorsorbie.com

Andy Tyler Photography

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• wildandwell.org

AHH...LOKI Bristol-based luxury start-up brand Ahloki caught our eye this month – its ethos centring around the creation of natural, sustainable and eco-friendly home fragrance products that are also free from pollutants. The story began in the kitchen, a most creative of spaces, where founder Sue Kaur hand-poured her first Ahloki candle made from natural plant wax, vegetable oil blends, herbal and botanical ingredients. Combining a love for opulent fragrances with a desire for toxinfree products, the candles are all inspired by notions of wanderlust, memories and romance and, to be sure, we’re in love. • ahloki.co.uk


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PERSONALISED ARTISTRY HAS ARRIVED IN BRISTOL We believe in combining artistry with technique to create fearless and original hairdressing. Art is at the heart of everything we do and we personalise the artistry for every salon guest. WELCOME DISCOUNT

SAVE 25%* We’d love you to experience ‘personalised artistry’ for yourself. To celebrate coming to Bristol, we’re offering a 25% discount off all services on your first visit (please mention when booking).

BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT 0117 363 4185 FIND US 65 Queens Road | BS8 1QL trevorsorbie.com/salons *T&Cs apply: subject to availability with selected team only. Discount only valid off hair services on your first visit. Available until 31.08.18


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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

Natural help for mature skin By Gemma Hurditch for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine)

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ydration inside and out is very important for our skin. Aim for 2 litres of water per day: try caffeine-free, skin-loving herbal teas such as nettle, rooibos and rosehips. Red clover tea is also lovely for mature skin, it contains phytoestrogens so can be supportive of those going through menopause and beyond. Red clover tea needs to be steeped in hot water for about 30 minutes to extract full flavour, so use a teapot with a tea cosy and 2 teaspoons of the herb per cup for best results. If unwanted facial hair is a concern, spearmint and green tea can be a useful addition for supporting hormone balance. Reduce alcohol intake, particularly if redness or rosacea is a concern. If you do enjoy a tipple, organic red wine is preferable to white wine, beer or spirits.

orange, dark green and yellow coloured fruit and vegetables. Avocado and almonds are great for vitamin E. Eat lots of organic fresh vegetables and fruit. Go whole grain and limit processed foods. When washing, water should be warm not hot, hot water will strip natural oils and dry out the skin. Finish your shower with cool water. Use only gentle natural care products. Do not use soap on the face. A microfibre cloth and warm water is often all that is needed to cleanse the face of dirt and makeup. Use a fresh cloth each time you wash to avoid contaminating skin with old bacteria. (They are washable.) Moisturise directly after showering. A gentle circular motion is best. Be particularly mindful not to pull at or drag the skin of the face, neck and décolletage, which can be very fine and sensitive.

Good fats

DIY serum

Good fats are also important to keep our skin healthy and lubricated, try 1g of good quality fish oil daily, or even better eat oily fish a few times per week; sardines, mackerel and anchovies are great choices. A couple of tablespoons of fresh ground flaxseeds or an algae omega 3 supplement can be substituted if preferred. Cold pressed, organic olive oil is excellent to add at the table. For cooking, a little coconut oil is preferred. Avoid margarines, frying in seed oils, and processed meat. These all contain nasties that are ageing for our skin and the rest of the body, too. Ensure adequate nutrition for repairing and renewing skin. To get your vitamin A, opt for

Make your own skin support night serum from jojoba oil or rosehip oil for the face, and coconut oil for the body. Add 6 drops of essential oil per 20ml of jojoba/coconut or other carrier oil. Great choices for mature skin to combat signs of ageing include; Frankincense, Rose, Geranium, Lavender and Sandalwood. Body brushing once or twice a week with a natural loofah brush before showering can remove dead skin and stimulate repair. Avoid the face, neck and décolletage. Firm but gentle exfoliation with the microfibre cloth is ample for these areas. When outdoors it is important to protect the skin. Put a couple of drops of Red Raspberry Seed oil in your palm and mix with an equal amount of your night serum to boost its UV protection factor for day wear. Don’t forget your lips! During summer months avoid midday sun particularly to the face and hands. Try natural zinc oxide based sunscreens, although shade is preferable to sunscreen.

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Naturopath Gemma Hurditch lectures at CNM.

Attend a FREE Open Evening to find out about training with CNM Bristol for a career in Naturopathic Nutrition or Naturopathic Acupuncture.

11th July at 6.30pm Please book on line at:

www.naturopathy-uk.com 01342 410 505 CNM is the UK’s leading training provider in a range of natural therapies. Colleges across the UK and Ireland


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Train in Clinical Hypnotherapy • Practitioner Diploma in Hypnotherapy •

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Anna Pudaruth Shiatsu and Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) Practitioner

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Supporting women to achieve their aspirations with Natural Health. Shiatsu is a wonderfully relaxing treatment that aims to get your body back into balance and EFT allows you to overcome emotional obstacles, fears and phobias. Together they can be very effective in helping a variety of physical and emotional health issues that can hold women back from realising their full potential. The Old Rectory Clinic, Iron Acton

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HEALTH | & BEAUTY

TREAT those TROTTERS We might be preaching to the converted but Icon Beauty pedicures are something else... Words by Amanda Nicholls

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onsidering my feet have carried my great hulk around without complaint for three decades, it would probably be judged a crying injustice in some (Sex and the City-esque) circles that I’d never in my life treated them to anything anywhere near a proper pedicure. With an Italian wedding to attend in a few days’ time, and having recently got over my long-standing discomfort at the idea of having my toes touched by another human being, it felt like high time to celebrate with a foot-themed treat and Icon Beauty at the top end of Gloucester Road was the place picked out for the job – specialising in luxury beauty and wellbeing treatments. Having been furnished with a giant mug of coffee in the waiting lounge – all chic floor spotlighting and Swedish sauna wood to match the rest of the space – I was met by hardworking, dedicated salon owner Lucy Bamber and soon hopping up onto her super-comfy treatment couch to soak my feet in a bowl of warm, bubbly water. While I perused the nail colours available, Lucy got to work on my cuticles, and quickly and efficiently filed my nails to my preferred length, explaining the various elements to the process ahead. I’d had no idea there were so many and so, pleased it wouldn’t be a flying visit, settled back with a magazine and started sinking all that hot coffee. The next step was an assault on any hard skin to be found on my soles. Lucy was as surprised as I was to find there wasn’t much to deal with but nevertheless worked with a larger file to ensure they were super smooth – a lovely sensation only bettered by the next step to come. I’m a fan of a vigorous exfoliation – none of your namby-pamby little grains for me – so the foot and lower leg massage using large crystals to buff away any remaining old skin cells was something of a dream. Lucy has had the salon for around nine years now, having converted it from the town house that the building was previously. It’s a great space, with a calm, chic feel and plenty of treatment rooms to cater for the large and loyal customer base – many of whom are coming in at the moment for the new CACI Synergy facial machine that’s unique to Icon in Bristol. It’s a non-invasive anti-ageing facial technology using light therapy to combat everything from eye bags to acne and jowls, and is one of those red-carpet treatments all the celebs seem to be raving about. It’s clear to see Lucy is committed to offering her clients the most advanced services available just from our brief chat, and how proud she 84 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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is to be part of Gloucester Road and among the fantastic businesses that make up this part of Bristol. The team is seven-strong now that she has expanded the salon – it’s doubled in size over the last few years – and over the next six months she has further plans to develop the upstairs area into more treatment rooms for pregnancy therapies, deep tissue massage and the like. While we chatted, Lucy applied a cream masque to my quickly softening hooves, popped a plastic bag around each and left the masque to work its magic while she dug out the deep teal shade I’d chosen for my nails. After the best foot massage (why had I denied myself experiences like this for so long?), Lucy rinsed and dried my feet and set about painting my toes and applying different sprays to seal in all the products and help my nails dry as quickly as possible – by the time she’d finished I’d never seen my long-neglected trotters look so well-groomed and cared for. Toes matching my also-green fingernails, feet feeling lighter than air, I was 99% Tuscan wedding-ready. Now all there was to do was track down a dress to match... • The Pamper Pedicure is priced at £42.50 (book online at iconbeauty.co.uk or phone 0117 924 5566 and be sure to bring some flip-flops or open-toed sandals along to head back home in)


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Knees are really put through their paces

NEW KNEE SPECIALIST AT NUFFIELD - Bringing Expertise from Across the Globe!

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nee specialist Damian Clark, 40, has recently joined the 24 strong orthopaedic team at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield. The Bristol knee surgeon specialises in ligament reconstructions, partial and total knee replacement, arthroscopy, osteotomies and patellofemoral surgery. As a result of experience gained through fellowships in Australia, Canada, India and the UK, he brings a research and evidence based approach to sports injuries and arthritis care. During his training, he has worked with several professional sports teams in both North America and Australia, ranging from Australian rugby players and American Footballers to UK Strongmen and more. At Nuffield Health, Mr Clark has teamed up with an expert panel of consultant knee surgeons. His NHS post is as a knee and trauma consultant surgeon at Southmead Hospital, where he also trains new surgeons. He has produced multimedia applications for patient education and there is even an app to help patients on their treatment journey through surgery, recovery and rehabilitation. At no additional cost to the patient, the knee specialists work with specialist physiotherapists and the two Nuffield Health Fitness & Wellbeing gyms in Bristol to get people back on their feet faster. Having attended primary school in Brazil, Damian Clark is also fluent in Portuguese.

This was followed by secondary education in the USA and Clifton College Bristol, before medical school at King’s College London. Then he undertook postgraduate training at the University of Calgary, University of Swansea and the University of Bristol. In Canada, he was the most highly awarded fellow of his cohort receiving two fellowship prizes for best surgeon research. In 2013, he was awarded both Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons and the European Fellowship exam. Damian Clark explains about his specialist clinical knee practice, “I bring a modern approach to orthopaedic surgery. To get the best possible results for my patients here in Bristol, I apply the lessons learned whilst working with world class surgeons and professional athletes across the globe. I care for those with soft tissue and bone injury, sporting injuries and arthritis. I perform surgery for various knee ligament injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament rupture and various meniscal cartilage injuries. In cases where damage is irreparable, we may undertake partial or total knee replacement surgery. I use only the most reliable implants; those that perform well on the National Joint Registry.” Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton. 0117 906 4870 or nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/Bristol

Internationally trained Bristol Consultant Knee Surgeon Damian Clark

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN

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A NEW ERA Andrew Swift detangles the mystery of the manor above the motorway and its much-debated future

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erched high above the M32, like something out of a Gothic fantasy, the Dower House is one of Bristol’s most instantly recognisable buildings, even if many of the motorists who drive past every day have no idea what it’s called. In its 18th-century heyday – when it was called Stoke Park – many compared it to Windsor, yet for all its fortress-like impregnability, there was never a castle here. Its story starts in the mid-16th century when Richard Berkeley built a house – called Stoke Lodge – on the escarpment above the Frome valley. It was not his main residence and it seems to have been designed as a grand hunting lodge. Hence the massive revetment, which raised it high above the surrounding land, giving his guests a panoramic view of the chase. In 1736, it was inherited by Norborne Berkeley, who rebuilt it in Strawberry Hill Gothick style, renamed it Stoke Park and engaged the landscape architect Thomas Wright to transform the parkland into something resembling Lord Cobham’s estate at Stowe. Carriage drives and woodland walks were laid out, leading visitors past a succession of viewpoints. Temples, tombs and tunnels added variety to the scene, along with a rotunda, a large pond and an obelisk to the memory of Berkeley’s niece, killed in a riding accident. Berkeley invested most of his fortune in William Champion’s brass works at Warmley and, in 1768, when Champion went bankrupt, so did Berkeley. He fled the country, ending his days as governor of Virginia, and Stoke Park passed to his sister, the Dowager Duchess of Beaufort – hence its change of name to the Dower House. After her death in 1799, the estate entered a twilight period, being leased to tenants, with little in the way of alteration or improvement. In the late 19th century, it was briefly the home of the Duke and Duchess of Beaufort, before being sold in 1909 to the Rev Harold Burden, who, with his wife Katherine, converted it into a hospital for children with mental health issues and learning difficulties, which was later taken over by the NHS. The 20th century saw an acceleration of the genteel decline that had characterised the estate since Norbert Berkeley’s hasty departure. The follies and monuments crumbled away and in 1939 the obelisk collapsed after being struck by lightning. That same year, an antiaircraft battery was built on Purdown at the south-west end of the park. It was decommissioned in 1944, but in 1970 a telecommunication tower was built near the former battery, its pagodalike profile a worthy successor to Berkeley’s follies. 86 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Then, in 1968, came the most devastating change of all – the construction of the M32 through the park, directly below the Dower House. The tranquillity it had enjoyed was shattered forever, and Duchess Pond, in whose still waters it had been reflected for over two centuries, was unceremoniously drained. Gradually, however, came a reawakening of interest in the estate. In 1985, the Purdown Landscape Protection Group was formed. The following year, it was added to the English Heritage Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. An archaeological survey was undertaken, and in 1990 a report by the restoration trust established what would henceforth be a guiding principle – that the overriding aim of restoration should be to return the park to its 18th-century layout. In 1993, Duchess Pond was partially reinstated, and in 1998, following the closure of the hospital, a consortium acquired the estate. Its aim was to develop the former hospital site for housing and convert the Dower House to luxury apartments, while agreeing to maintain and restore the parkland. In 2012, after a string of consultations, reports and feasibility studies, the park was acquired by Bristol City Council. One of the council’s first priorities was to draft a plan to reverse years of neglect. Since livestock had stopped grazing the park in 1997, scrub and woodland had colonised areas of former pasture. This not only blurred the outlines of the 18th-century design, but also reduced the acreage of wildflower-rich grassland. In the 18th century, Thomas Wright had laid out three woods on the escarpment north of the house – Barn Wood, Hermitage Wood and Long Wood. Tongues of grassland ran between them, creating enclaves of rolling plateau bounded by trees. On reaching the end of these enclaves, panoramic views across the valley, with the great house raised high above it, would suddenly open up. Since 1997, Barn Wood has been allowed to extend westward along the escarpment, to join up with a hitherto isolated copse called Pale Plantation. From there, a near-continuous line of scrub and woodland continues south-westward, creating a natural corridor stretching for almost a mile and a half. This has, inevitably, led to the loss of Wright’s carefully-designed viewpoints. Yet Wright never envisaged that a motorway would one day be their most prominent feature. And, while it may be possible to recreate the lineaments of Wright’s design, the aural integrity of the landscape he created – that pastoral quietude so beloved of the Georgians – is lost beyond recall.


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THE GREAT OUTDOORS

Although the spread of woodland has blurred the outlines of the 18thcentury design, it has also created a much larger area screened from the outside world and – more importantly – from the noise of traffic. The establishment of new woodland is also in line with an initiative launched by the council on 4 June 2018, in association with various environmental agencies. Called Taking Trees, it aims to double the number of trees in the city by 2050, in order to cut pollution, increase biodiversity and provide ‘natural corridors for birds and insects’. At Stoke Park, however, the council has instigated another initiative, part-funded by Natural England, to clear the woodland established over the last 20 years and restore the area to grassland, leaving only a few scattered trees. Not surprisingly, the plan has received widespread criticism. While there is general agreement that livestock should be reintroduced and selective thinning of vegetation undertaken, many say that destroying one wildlife-rich habitat to recreate another is misguided. Work has, however, already started at the south-western end of the park. Clearance of scrub from the anti-aircraft battery – now a designated ancient monument – was indeed long overdue, yet campaigners claim that the area around it, now denuded of trees and other vegetation, looks ‘like a wasteland’. The area to the east is due for the same treatment later this year. Faced with this, local residents are campaigning to save the woodland. A petition has already attracted over 3,300 signatures and councillors have agreed to hold a public meeting in July. Unlike most environmental campaigns, this is not a battle between conservationists and developers, but between rival visions of how best to manage the environment. Stoke Park may long have been something of a Cinderella among Bristol’s open spaces, but the outcome of this debate seems likely to have implications for environmental policy in the city for years to come. ■ • bristol.gov.uk/stokepark • bristol.citizenspace.com/neighbourhoods/stoke-park-future-plans • savestokeparkwoods.wordpress.com • bnhc.org.uk/festival-of-nature/talking-trees-bristol

Stoke Park has long been the Cinderella of Bristol’s open spaces – perhaps no more

Looking south-west from the Dower House to the telecommunication tower

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Gardiners fp.qxp_Layout 1 19/06/2018 15:58 Page 1


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11 Zetland Road, Redland, Bristol BS6 7AG Tel: +44 (0)117 942 4949 www.disney-flooring.com

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FABULOUS FUSCHIAS Elly West firmly believes there’s a place for this divisive bloom in contemporary border schemes

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sually associated with exuberant summer bedding schemes and hanging baskets, fuchsias can be slightly Marmite in their appeal. Big, blowsy and bright has a place in many, but not all, gardens. Modern breeders and showers have worked hard to create bigger and showier flowers, which perhaps hasn’t helped. Although they are not necessarily the most cutting-edge choice in terms of fashion, I think they are long overdue a revival. Go back to some of the original species varieties and you’re more likely to find a hardy plant that can create backbone and structure in a modern border, along with attractive flowers for months on end, and what’s not to like about that? Case is proven by the fact they continue to sell well year after year in garden centres, so there must be good reason for their persistent popularity. Like dahlias and even gladioli, which also fell out of favour but are now grown in the smartest gardens again, I firmly believe there’s a place for fuchsias in contemporary border schemes. If something has once been popular – the Victorians loved them – there’s usually a good reason why (in gardening terms anyway; there was no excuse for the mullet haircut). Plants and gardens are subject to fashion just like anything to do with our home, and we can often date gardens by looking at the choice of hard landscaping materials or planting styles. Crazy paving was everywhere in the 1960s and ’70s, along with conifers and heathers, the latter of which are being seen again in increasing numbers at RHS Chelsea Flower Show and elsewhere. Fashion rules are made to be broken in my view, and I’ve always been an advocate of growing plants because you like them, rather than because someone has decided they are in vogue. So if fuchsias are not strictly on-trend right now, they may well be about to enjoy a resurgence in popularity; then you’ll be ahead of the game. 90 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Despite the somewhat kitsch reputation, there are plenty of people who remain faithful to these classic flowers. The British Fuchsia Society was formed in 1938 and is still going strong. Fuchsia shows are held up and down the country year after year, and there are several Facebook pages dedicated to fuchsia enthusiasts. The main thing that these blooms have in their favour is sheer flower power. They keep going right through the summer and up until the first frosts, providing much-needed colour into November and even December in mild areas. And although often associated with flouncy hanging baskets, with ballerina-skirt petals in vivid shades of crimson and purple, there are also plenty more varieties to choose from – some exuberant, others more sophisticated and calming in deep shades of burgundy, or palest pink and white. They are also easy to grow and propagate. And who hasn’t enjoyed popping open the distinctive buds (or ‘dancing ladies’) when they were young, or not so young? The beautiful cascades of colour are well suited to containers and baskets; they can be trained as standards (with large mops of flowers on clear stems), used as hedging, or slotted into the border. There really is a fuchsia to suit every situation, from low-growing ground-cover types to larger shrubby plants several metres high. A drive through Cornwall in summer pays testament to this, where the crimson and mauve flowers of fuchsia magellanica are a common sight in hedgerows. Hardy fuchsias – the varieties that will survive our British winters outdoors – mostly originate from mountainous South America, with a few species from New Zealand, which gives them their exotic look, but also their resilience. They appreciate sunshine and are happy in most soil types, particularly if it’s fairly free draining, as they don’t like cold, soggy winter roots. Those in the border will appreciate a

Above: If you love big, blowsy, bright blooms, grow them! Elly has always been an advoate of choosing flowers because you like them, rather than because someone has decided they are in vogue


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GARDENING

A FLOWER WITH STAYING POWER Fuchsia ‘Delta Sarah’ is a fantastic example of a hardy fuchsia that can be grown in the border as a permanent feature alongside your other shrubs and perennials, where it will happily flower for months on end, year after year. It has unusual white and mauve-blue flowers that are semi-double in form, and will reach around 90cm in height and spread. Like other fuchsias, it is happy in shade or sun, although it will appreciate some shade during the hottest part of the day. And, like other hardy varieties, it should be happy outside all year round in all but the very coldest of winters. A thick layer of winter mulch will help see it through.

mulch of extra compost or other organic matter in winter, to deepen the roots and ensure they come back with healthy vigour in spring. Once flowering is over and the leaves have fallen, in late autumn, it’s a good idea to cut plants back to about half their size to keep them compact and encourage a bushy shape. Good plant partners are late-summer grasses and any silvery foliage, such as senecio or artemisia, which act as a fantastic foil for the rubytoned fuchsia flowers. John Lockyer, of Bristol-based Lockyer Fuchsias, is passionate about these plants and has been growing them all his life. The award-winning, family-run nursery in Coalpit Heath just outside Bristol, has been around for 60 years, and is a regular exhibitor at garden shows up and down the country. Chatting to him at RHS Malvern Spring Festival in May, he agreed that fuchsias can certainly hold their own with other more ‘contemporary’ plants in the right setting. “I’ve seen a trend towards the darker varieties such as ‘Soila’ and ‘Blackie’, which always sell well at shows,” he said. “In the lighter colours, you have pure-white ‘Hawkes Head’ and the very pale-pink ‘Alba’. Slender, pale-pink ‘White Knight’s Pearl’ is also popular. “I say it’s all about the right variety in the right place. There is a variety for every location, it’s just about getting the right one. One of the main merits is that they grow beautifully in shade or semi-shade, so will provide colour in darker areas of the garden. “Contrary to popular belief,” he added, “fuchsias come in a wide range of colours. There is even a yellow form of the low-growing Fuchsia procumbens. It’s not all about mauve and red.” The hardy varieties, of which there are more than 50 to choose from in the Lockyer’s catalogue, tend to have narrower and slightly less showy flowers, although there are plenty of blowsy varieties in this category too, such as ‘Garden News’ (one of John’s bestsellers) and ‘Delta Sarah’. The nursery is open to the public. Visit lockyerfuchsias.co.uk, or call 01454 772219, to find out more. • ellyswellies.co.uk

Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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JULY 2018 | THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 91


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WILD BRISTOL

TROOPING THE COLOURFUL In July, birdwatching makes way for butterfly-spotting says our wildlife writer Pete Dommett

Small Copper: image by Iain Cowe, Butterfly Conservation

Large White: image by Ann Collier, Butterfly Conservation

Common Blue: image by Martin Warren, Butterfly Conservation

I

n the summer months, when all’s quiet on the avian front (because the birds are too busy breeding and moulting to show themselves much), we birdwatchers turn our attentions to other winged things. So on the first day of the season, I took myself off to Troopers Hill in St. George – one of the best sites in Bristol for butterflies. I’d already spent an uncomfortably hot morning burning the back of my neck at my youngest son’s sports day and the sun was showing no mercy when I arrived at this popular, local nature reserve at midday. Walking uphill through an area of long grass, the signs were promising: a Large White (or was it a large Small White?) fluttered purposefully by and, a little further on, a pair of Common Blues tumbled over each other like two windblown scraps of denim. A flight of steps took me to the top of Troopers Hill with its Grade II-listed, leaning chimney and far-reaching views across the city. As I surveyed the scene from a park bench, a bold, yellow Brimstone bimbled past. The sulphurous colour of the males gives this species its common name, but is also thought to have inspired the name for the whole order of these insects by putting the ‘butter’ into ‘butterfly’. Brimstones are among the first butterflies to appear, usually in early spring, but I realised that this was only the second I’d seen this year. The unseasonal weather in March (remember the snow?) meant a slow start for these, and other, invertebrates. Turning off the main route around the reserve, I slipped beneath a shady stand of still-blossoming hawthorns. The path ahead was dappled in sunlight and sprinkled with petals, as if I’d just missed a summer wedding in the woods. It was a perfect place for Speckled

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Woods and, sure enough, I soon spotted one of these chocolate-andcream beauties basking on a nettle. The males are feisty little fellas: I spent a few minutes watching one chase off several rivals that dared to venture too close to its territory. I retraced my steps to the chimney and then clambered down the steep slope on the hill’s south side. The ground was sculpted here by humps, grooves and gullies – the result of mining and quarrying activity from the 18th and 19th centuries. Patches of Pennant sandstone, from which the chimney is built and that forms much of Troopers Hill, were exposed and the acidic soil had encouraged a wealth of plants (that are found nowhere else in the city) to flourish. Later this summer, the golden glow of gorse and broom will give way to a swathe of purple heather. Just then, a flash of orange caught my eye. It was a Small Copper, flickering through the dry grass like a tiny, bright flame. My fifth species (out of a possible 24 that have been recorded at the reserve) in less than a lunch-hour. Ok, so there’d been no Peacocks, Red Admirals, Marbled Whites or Meadow Browns and the only Orange Tip I’d spotted was an easyJet plane passing overhead, but I knew they’d all be on the wing here at some point soon. A return visit to this wonderful, urban oasis is definitely on the cards then this summer – before the birds take centre stage again. ■

• Join in with The Big Butterfly Count from 20 July – 12 August; bigbutterflycount.org. For more information about Troopers Hill, visit troopers-hill.org.uk


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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 95


KF PIF full Page May 18.qxp_PIF Full Page 21/06/2018 13:27 Page 1

BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

N

orth Green Street is a quiet enclave to the south of Clifton bordering Hotwells Road and within half a mile of Clifton Village. Albert Hall South forms part of an old chapel which has been converted to provide a characterful family home. The accommodation ranges over three floors and has plenty of fine architectural features recalling the building’s history. The ground floor features solid wood flooring throughout and comprises a contemporary, bespoke kitchen with integrated appliances, flowing though to a bright, chic sitting room with arched patio doors to the sunny courtyard garden. The first floor offers a master suite with fitted wardrobes and an en suite bathroom. There are two further bedrooms featuring lovely arched windows with bespoke handmade shutters. These bedrooms are served by the family bathroom. The lower ground floor has been excavated to create an additional bedroom with contemporary en suite shower room and a separate playroom or family room/study. The property also has a garage. To view this charming an unusual home, contact agents Knight Frank Clifton.

Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

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ALBERT HALL SOUTH NORTH GREEN STREET • Part of a former chapel • Attractive architectural features • 4 bedrooms • Bathroom and 2 en suites • Courtyard garden • Garage

Guide price: £725,000


Rupert Oliver FP July.qxp_Layout 1 15/06/2018 17:10 Page 1

Grove Road, Coombe Dingle | OIEO ÂŁ995,000 A stylish New Build family home finished to a high specification enclosed in an expanse of landscaped gardens; with gated off-street parking and a covered car port. LAST CHANCE with Plots 2, 3 and 4 sold / reserved | An exclusive New Build detached family home in a desirable location | High Specification including underfloor heating and engineered oak flooring to the ground floor | Stunning open-plan kitchen and dining room by Intoto (Clifton) Kitchens | Spacious sitting room with a wood burning stove and Bi-fold doors to the landscaped garden beyond | Two en-suite shower rooms and a generous family bath and shower room | Gated off-street parking for several cars and a covered car port | Fully enclosed gardens perfect for families of all ages | Close to 650 acres of open public park and woodland on the Blaise Castle Estate Circa 1947 sq. ft (181 sq. m)

clear and effective property sales Fixed commission of ÂŁ5,000 + VAT that you pay only on successful Completion Professional photography, floor plans and marketing included Transparent on-line tracking of your sale from valuation through to completion Our fee is fixed. Everything else is about moving To discuss your property sale or purchase requirements, please call or email Rupert, or visit us in our central Clifton office.


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

FREEHOLD FOR SALE

EAST BRISTOL, BS15

• Adj A38 Patchway

• High quality offices

• 3,000 sq ft office building

• 915 to 2,327 sq ft • Only £12.50 per sq ft

• 15 Car spaces

• Viewing recommended

• Price on application

10A OLD STREET, CLEVEDON

OFFICE TO LET – BS9

• 1,062 sq ft

• 2,600 sq ft – 6 car spaces

• Westbury on Trym

• Prime retail pitch

• New refurbishment

• 2 car spaces

• Rent on application

• Only £14,000 pax

COLLEGE GREEN AREA – BS1

147 WHITELADIES ROAD

• Modern GF offices

• Prime Clifton shop

• Open plan +6 car spaces

• Valuable A2 consent

• 2,482 sq ft

• Large frontage with 945 sq ft sales

• New lease

• Rent on application

BS1 OFFICES

CLIFTON VILLAGE SHOPS

• High quality refurb

• The Mall – V prominent unit with A2 consent – Rare opportunity

• 2,500 – 3,600 sq ft • 4 car spaces • New lease • Rent on application

• Regent Street – Affordable lock up shop – Coming soon…

GOLDEN BOTTLE PUB – BS7

INVESTMENT FOR SALE • GF shop + 2 x 1 bed flats

• A4 Public House use • 900 sq m + flat

• High Street Kingswood

• New flexible lease

• Only £325,000 ONO

• Great opportunity

Julian Cook FRICS

Burston Cook July.indd 1

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

18/06/2018 15:42


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

FOR SALE DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY

FOR SALE UNIQUE CITY CENTRE OFFICE

FORMER CARE HOME WITH CONSENT FOR RESIDENTIAL CONVERSION

4,400 SQ FT WITH CONSENT FOR B1 OFFICE AND LEISURE USE

BARTON GRANGE, BARTON ROAD, WINSCOMBE, N SOMERSET, BS25 1DP

48 QUEEN CHARLOTTE STREET, BRISTOL, BS1 4HX (OFF QUEEN SQUARE)

(0117) 934 9977

• 19 beds with consent for 4 houses • Beautiful setting • ONLY £795,000

• Suit owner occupiers and investors • Close to Queen Square and the Waterfront • PRICE ON APPLICATION

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

PRIME RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY + RETAIL INVESMENT

3 GOOD QUALITY APARTMENTS + RETAIL SHOP

51 PARK STREET, BRISTOL, BS1 5NT

51 COLSTON STREET, BRISTOL, BS1 4AX

• Comprising prime retail / A3 unit + pp for 2 x2 bed flats, 1x1 bed flat + 3 bed coach house • Excellent location close to University • PRICE ON APPLICATION

Julian Cook FRICS

Burston Cook July.indd 2

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• Excellent location close to Bristol university, the BRI and Bristol city centre • Fantastic letting potential • PRICE ON APPLICATION

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

19/06/2018 12:59


Property news.qxp_Layout 1 21/06/2018 13:28 Page 1

PROPERTY NEWS

BITE-SIZED UPDATES FROM ACROSS THE CITY’S BOOMING SECTOR Becky Mason, right, with Hattie Dembo and Steve Mueller of Temple Homes

TOP RECRUIT

BULLY FOR BARRATT

GOOD WORK!

Planning has been secured for the first phase of a brand new community on the outskirts of Bristol. A total of 2,450 new homes, including more than 800 affordable homes, are to be built at Ladden Garden Village in North Yate by Barratt Developments, which includes Barratt Homes and David Wilson Homes. Work is already underway on the local infrastructure including roads and drainage and also includes a range of measures to protect wildlife. Construction on phase one begins this summer, including 160 homes to be launched in the autumn. Chris Burton, regional managing director for Barratt Developments believes securing planning for the new community at North Yate is good news for home buyers, the local jobs market and the wider community. “Approval for phase one is a major milestone,” he said. “Ladden Garden Village will create valuable new homes, provide a wealth of community facilities and employment space and will support 7,500 jobs.” A 10-year project, it will incorporate a new primary school, extra care housing, a local centre and public open space.

Over 80 senior local property professionals gathered recently to form South West Fundraising Board for LandAid, the property industry charity. The event, hosted by Osborne Clarke, saw LandAid chief executive Paul Morrish, Cllr. Paul Smith and Gavin Bridge of Cubex, rally the industry to come together and change the lives of young homeless people. Cllr. Paul Smith talked about the city council’s work to tackle homelessness and the ways in which businesses can help. The LandAid South West Fundraising Board is made up of 12 leading figures from the property industry tasked with raising money to fund local charities working with local homeless people. LandAid has established regional boards in the North West, West Midlands, and Yorkshire and the Humber, and chosen to locate its fourth board in the South West due to the rising need for housing and support for young vulnerable people in the region. It has funded a number of projects in the area and is working closely with Cubex on the innovative East Street Mews project. This project has brought property and construction companies together to create 11 brand-new bed spaces for young people in central Bristol.

• barratthomes.co.uk

• landaid.org

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Ethical lettings and property management company Temple Homes has secured one of Bristol’s most experienced young specialists as its new property manager. Rebecca Mason has joined the growing firm, which is newly based in Picton Street, Montpelier, following its recent acquisition of the portfolio of Ruben Property. The acquisition left Temple Homes, whose portfolio has now swelled to some 220 properties around the city, needing an experienced individual who could grow with the emerging business. Ms Mason has worked in property management for the past seven years – four years in London and three in Bristol – and, being ARLA qualified at just 26, is regarded as one of the most experienced property managers for her age in the city. She has a history of managing property asset portfolios larger than that of Temple Homes and therefore is capable of overseeing the anticipated growth in her department. She now joins Temple Homes’ two young directors Steve Mueller and Hattie Dembo in helping to further establish the company’s growing reputation in the city. “I am pleased to have joined a company where there is a real focus on the quality of service to both tenants and landlords,” she said. “It is clear from the quality of properties within the portfolio that our landlords provide their tenants with homes in very good condition and, in return, those homes are well looked after. “In terms of job satisfaction, I am really looking forward to working with tenants and landlords who are provided with a great service and who are not overcharged.” Mr Mueller, who founded Temple Homes in Stokes Croft four years ago prior to its move to Montpelier and its acquisition of Ruben Property’s portfolio, added: “Rebecca is one of a kind. For Temple Homes to have managed to attract someone of her experience and ambition shows that our company is moving in the right direction. • templehomes.co.uk


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Downend

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Mangotsfield Road, Mangotsfield, Bristol, BS16 £425,000

0117 911 3519

A wonderful traditional 1930s style semi detached that certainly has the ‘kerb side appeal’. With an abundance of character and features, this is sure to appeal to any buyer looking for well proportioned rooms and plenty of charm. Three bedrooms, bathroom with separate shower room, lounge, dining room, kitchen/breakfast room and cloakroom. Outside, there is a driveway to the front, a garage which has been converted to a workshop, carport, front garden and a wonderful terraced rear garden. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

downend@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Longwell Green Andrewsonline.co.uk

California Road, Oldland, Bristol, BS30 9PR £700,000

Planning permitted PK17/0530/F for sub-division of existing dwelling to form two separate dwellings and erection of one additional dwelling. Wonderful opportunity to create some unique homes in this sought after location. Call for further information and to arrange a viewing of this beautiful property. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

0117 911 6902 longwellgreen@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews July.indd 1

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

19/06/2018 15:09


Harbourside Andrewsonline.co.uk

The Keg Store, Bristol, BS1 6HL £349,950

0117 911 4749

A two bedroom apartment within this superb landmark conversion located in the heart of Bristol City Centre with Bristol Bridge, the River Avon and Castle Park all within walking distance. Open plan living area leading onto a large balcony, two double bedrooms of which one offers fitted wardrobes, a three piece bathroom suite with shower over the bath. Temple Meads train station is approximately a 10 minute walk away. Energy Efficiency Rating: C

harbourside@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Keynsham Andrewsonline.co.uk

The Barn House, Burnett, Bristol, BS31 2TF £ 1,900,000

Sat within over an acre of land is this stunning stone built detached house with an additional self-contained 1 bedroom annex. The main house has 4 double bedrooms, 3 en-suites, 3 reception rooms, kitchen with separate utility area, a grand entrance hall and a double garage all accessed via a sweeping gravel driveway. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

0117 405 8903 keynsham@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews July.indd 2

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

19/06/2018 15:10


Bristol Property column JUly .qxp_Layout 1 22/06/2018 12:06 Page 1

CITY | BUSINESS

‘THE APARTMENT COULDN’T BE MORE PERFECT’ Great location, great views, great reviews... Harbourside development – Redcliffe Place, continues to please

THE

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“The interior of the flat and the location couldn’t be more perfect.” That’s the view of new resident Arabella Gamble, who has just purchased a two-bedroom apartment at Redcliffe Place in Bristol. Beautifully appointed two and three-bed apartments at Redcliffe Place offer a home from home. With balcony or terrace, and located within a short stroll of Bristol’s Harbourside, this is definitely the Place to start a new style of living. Arabella says, “The layout of the flat is amazing, open plan kitchen/sitting room with the beautiful engineered oak flooring leading out to the balcony. This was the first thing that I loved when I walked in, it looked so smart compared to other flats that I had previously looked at. “The absolute bonus of this flat is the location and the gorgeous views!” The apartments at Redcliffe Place all feature spacious outside terraces and balconies, many with views out over the Bristol skyline towards the beauty of Ashton Court Estate. The family bathrooms and en-suites in these contemporary apartments have been designed with the highest attention to detail and the sleek Porcelanosa kitchens feature integrated Neff appliances, contemporary matt finished units and silestone work surfaces and splashbacks. Large ceiling to floor windows maximise light throughout the apartments. So close to Bristol’s Harbourside, Redcliffe Place is just a short stroll from the restaurants, cafes and bars, shops and cultural life of the city. With basement storage and allocated parking for selected apartments, the development has electronic gate access and secure cycle storage. Two and three-bedroom apartments at Redcliffe Place are available to move in now, prices start from £380,000. For an appointment to view the show homes, please contact: Knight Frank on 0117 317 1999 or Ocean Home on 0117 946 9838 or visit www.changeliving.co.uk Show home address: 3-8 Redcliffe Parade West, Bristol, BS1 6SP n


THE RIDGEWAY, WESTBURY-ON-TRYM Prestigiously positioned in a popular cul-de-sac surrounded by extensive mature trees keeping that rural feel throughout is this substantial 1990’s detached executive family home with delightful family garden and the plot itself is approximately 30m square. EPC - E 2

2

5

Guide Price £950,000

QUEEN VICTORIA ROAD, WESTBURY PARK Well-presented throughout and positioned within a quiet cul-de-sac in Westbury Park adjacent to Durham Downs, Westbury Park Infant and Junior School and within the RGS catchment is this extended Victorian family home boasting a landscaped garden. EPC - D 3

1

3

Guide Price £580,000

CJ Hole July.indd 1

18/06/2018 11:29


Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com I believe that owning a lot of belongings can interrupt your life. All those things tucked away in your attic are also in your head, banging about as psychological clutter. Over the years I’ve noticed that some of the most organised people I’ve worked with tend to have fewer belongings: fewer plates, fewer shoes, fewer stacks of ‘important’ papers in their homes. These are people who seem to know what they are doing, they seem to be travelling light, and they seem to travel a little more carefree. Is there a link?

I do know that when it comes to moving, some people will find it much easier to pack up their homes. So it’s always a good time to declutter. Take a fresh look at your house now: cleanse it, tidy it. Get rid of the ‘stuff’ you do not value or need, and hand it on to charity or maybe sell it. It will do you the world of good, your property will seem bigger and of course when the time does come to sell, it will be more saleable. Not only will it make life easier but you will also have enjoyed some zen-filled time in the space you call home now! Howard Davis MD Clifton

STOKE BISHOP Guide Price £585,000 A most impressive family home with a warmth of character and beautifully presented throughout. It offers: Entrance hall, dining room with direct access to the rear garden, lounge, kitchen and utility room overlooking rear garden, four bedrooms, two bathrooms, rear garden with side access to the property and front paved driveway with space for two cars. EPC E

HARBOURSIDE Guide Price £750,000 MORE LIKE THIS REQUIRED. An immaculate four double bedroom end of terrace house with direct views over the harbour and the city centre skyline beyond. The property offers: Open plan dining, kitchen, reception area, four double bedrooms, living room, three bathrooms, southerly facing rear garden and a double garage. EPC E

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton July.indd 1

15/06/2018 17:08


REDLAND Guide Price £850,000

CLIFTON Guide Price £345,000

An attractive, bay fronted Victorian family home with a well presented and versatile interior over three floors, offering; a living room, kitchen/breakfast room, dining room, five double bedrooms, four bathrooms, and private rear garden. A most convenient location close to Whiteladies Road and Clifton Triangle. EPC E

Occupying the front top two floors of a fine period building, this beautifully presented maisonette apartment is located on the corner of Whiteladies Road and Burlington Road. Offering: Entrance hall, living room, open plan kitchen diner, two double bedrooms and two bathrooms, offered with no onward chain. EPC C

HOTWELLS OIEO £600,000

CLIFTON Guide Price £325,000

A charming house situated on Dowry Parade which is believed to date back to Circa 1776 making this one of Bristol’s oldest terraces. Offering: Entrance hall, two receptions, dining room leading to kitchen which has French doors to the garden, four double bedrooms, two bathrooms and a walled garden. EPC D

An astonishing apartment in a recently converted chapel on the upper floor, with allocated parking. The entrance leads to a spacious and light open plan living room and kitchen, featuring a remarkable arched chapel window on one elevation, double bedroom and a beautiful tiled bathroom. No onward chain. EPC E

STOKE BISHOP - GUIDE PRICE £475,000

REDLAND - GUIDE PRICE £400,000

A spacious ground floor garden apartment in a most desirable area of Stoke Bishop. Nearby there are local shops and a regular bus service. Offers: Two receptions, kitchen, two bedrooms, study and two bathrooms, south facing rear garden and first come first served parking to the front. No onward chain. EPC D

An exquisite garden flat offering an extended and stylish interior which is beautifully presented to the highest of standards throughout. The property offers; Living room, kitchen, two double bedrooms, bathroom, attractive rear and front gardens, off street parking, no onward chain. EPC D

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton July.indd 2

15/06/2018 17:08


Westbury Park ÂŁ265,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

Two bedroom garden flat

A beautifully renovated and idyllic 2 double bedroom garden flat with private entrance and level access to the local shops, tucked away off of a lovely residential road in Westbury Park. EPC - TBC

oceanhome.co.uk

Ocean July.indd 1

Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Stoke Bishop ÂŁ475,000 Three bedroom house

This superb 1930s semi-detached family home situated in the desirable area of Coombe Dingle, the ground floor has two reception rooms, sun room and an kitchen which looks over a superb and well-tended gardens of over 100ft in length. The first floor compromises of two double bedrooms, one single bedroom and family bathroom. EPC - E

18/06/2018 09:47


Clifton Village OIEO ÂŁ595,000 Two bedroom garden flat

A beautiful and exceptionally spacious 2 double bedroom, Grade II listed hall floor garden flat with level access. Set within the highly sought after Royal York Crescent in Clifton Village this lovely property boasts a private rear garden, 47ft living area with high ceilings and many original features.

Stoke Bishop ÂŁ525,000 Four bedroom house

A stylish, well-presented and much improved, 4 double bedroom semi-detached family house with substantial enclosed rear garden. The convenient layout has accommodation over two floors briefly comprising; spacious and welcoming entrance hall, two original reception rooms and a fitted kitchen. EPC - E

Ocean July.indd 2

18/06/2018 09:47


Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

Burnham on Sea

Guide Price £525,000

This enchanting decommissioned lighthouse has been sympathetically converted into a phenomenal three bedroom home, spanning eight floors, offering exquisite water views and nautical charm in abundance.

REDUCED

Redland

Guide Price £400,000

Occupying a wonderfully convenient location in the heart of Redland, this deceptively spacious property benefits from access to a rear communal garden. EPC: D

Rudgeway OIRO £425,000

Steeped in history, this charming former coach house exudes character and charm in abundance with exposed stonework, an attractive bay window, mullion windows and a classic oak front door. EPC: D

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 369 1004 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

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Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

Olveston, Bristol Guide Price £750,000 Long Leaze, a handsome stone built Georgian family home, sits proudly within its generous plot. Retaining a host of period features, this fabulous five bedroom property offers character and charm in abundance. EPC:E • Georgian detached family home • Master bedroom with en suite • 4 Further double bedrooms • 3 Reception rooms • Wraparound garden • Outbuildings • Potential building plot subject to planning

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 369 1004 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

First release in this exciting new development of high quality apartments and houses. A choice of two immaculate 2 double bedroom apartments, finished to exacting standards within an attractive period building in a prime location in this sought after historic quarter, towering above the city and offering breathtaking cityscape views, nestled just above the BRI, with a short stroll down to the city centre, Bristol University areas and Park Street. High specification interiors include bespoke kitchens and bathrooms, triple glazed windows, video entry intercom system and are finished throughout with great attention to detail. Now ready for immediate occupation. First day of viewings - Saturday 23rd June - book a visit now. EPC: tbc

KINGSDOWN

guide £385,000 and £475,000

A superbly situated, modern 2 storey home with privileged views overlooking Bristol’s famous floating harbour. Offered for sale in excellent order with 18ft x 18ft L shaped kitchen/dining/living room with balcony, 3 bedrooms, accessible loft storage, off street parking and storage/garage. The property forms part of an elegant row of water fronting townhouses with interesting views, there is a formal well-stocked communal garden and striking gated entrance feature to the development. EPC: C

HARBOURSIDE

guide £695,000

Professional, Reliable, Successful

A charming and bright 2/3 bedroom, 2/3 reception room, Victorian family home situated on the well regarded Royal Albert Road within 200 metres of Westbury Park School and Durdham Downs, further benefiting from a south-westerly facing pretty rear courtyard garden. A wonderful location - situated on a sought after pretty road within close proximity of the local shops of North View/Waitrose supermarket. This attractive period property is certainly well located for families or perhaps for those wishing to downsize. EPC: D

WESTBURY PARK

guide £550,000

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

A beautiful bay fronted 5 double bedroom (1 with en suite), 3 reception room Victorian semidetached family home enjoying a wonderful location within just 600 metres of Redland Green School, as well as a truly glorious 54ft x 29ft south westerly facing rear garden and off street parking for 2 cars. An elegant yet homely period property in a fabulous location with a warm and welcoming atmosphere, many period features and a superb garden. EPC: E

CLIFTON

Enjoying elevated sweeping views towards the Blaise Estate; an extended and wellproportioned, 4/5 bedroom 1930’s detached house situated on a quiet cul-de-sac, having the benefit of driveway parking, garage and a sunny well-stocked rear garden (85ft x 35ft) with sitting out areas. To be sold with no onward chain. EPC: tbc

An attractive and bay fronted, 4 double bedroom, 2 bath/shower room, Victorian period townhouse (circa 1,850 sq. ft.) having a spacious semi open-plan kitchen/dining/living room and sunny rear garden. An elegant and good sized family home in an immensely popular location. EPC: D

REDLAND

WESTBURY-ON-TRYM

guide £1,100,000

guide £965,000

Professional, Reliable, Successful

Set in the heart of Clifton Village with green and pleasant vistas to the front and rear - an exceptionally spacious (circa 3,000 sq. ft) four storey Victorian period semi-detached family house with south facing balcony and garden. The accommodation is very flexible and can adapt to the various needs and requirements of families over many years. EPC: F

guide £1,000,000

CLIFTONWOOD

guide £775,000

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


Bristol’s Independent Estate Agents

Clifton £895,000

Waterfront/Hotwells £525,000

Magnificent Georgian Grade II listed townhouse in central Clifton arranged over four floors offering attractive and flexible accommodation. Built in 1820, the house is set back from the road, with a double metal gate, attractive wrought iron railings and stone-capped walls enclosing the front garden.

A three storey three/four bedroom townhouse requiring updating situated in prime waterfront position with expansive south facing views directly over the floating harbour. EPC - C

Clifton £475,000

Clifton £140,000

Stylish first floor 3 bedroom apartment set in an attractive building within a few minutes of Whiteladies Road. The flat also has an allocated parking space. No onward chain. EPC - D

One bedroom Second Floor apartment in attractive warden controlled purpose built block in central Clifton. Ideally suited to active retirees who wish to live in this convenient location. EPC - C

TEL: 0117 974 1741 61 Apsley Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2SW

Leese & Nagle July.indd 1

sales@leeseandnagle.co.uk

18/06/2018 10:26


www.leeseandnagle.co.uk

Stoke Bishop

NEW INSTRUCTION

Guide Price £975,000

A 1970’s unique, architect designed house which beautifully retains its authentic condition. Offering enormous scope to extensively enhance it further, the accommodation is just over 2300 square feet including the garage and is set in a quiet and very exclusive residential road in Stoke Bishop. EPC – E

Stoke Bishop Guide Price £785,000

Westbury on Trym Guide Price £775,000

Westbury on Trym Guide Price £465,000

A fabulous example of a 1930’s semi-detached family home situated in one of the very best positions in Stoke Bishop for both schools, shops and amenities. Kewstoke Road has always been highly sought after and this property is deceptively spacious being over 2400 ft including the garage. EPC - D

A fantastic 4-bedroom detached home on an enviable corner plot connecting Abbey Road and Newcombe Road. The property has been sympathetically renovated and extended by its current owner and lends itself as a great lifestyle property. Situated in such a prime location the house could easily suit a family or a local downsizer. EPC - C

This is a 1930’s 3-bedroom mid terrace home that has been in the same family for the last 35 years. The wonderful benefit of this lovely home is it has a fabulous aspect over the Canford Park which can be enjoyed through all its front windows. EPC - D

TEL: 0117 962 2299

125 Stoke Lane, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS9 3RW

Leese & Nagle July.indd 2

wot@leeseandnagle.co.uk

18/06/2018 14:46


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The Bristol Magazine July 2018  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol

The Bristol Magazine July 2018  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol