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THE

Issue 163

I

january 2018

MAGAZINE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

PLUG IN BABY The wheels of change are in motion as we meet the city’s clean-living e-bike adopters, hit ‘refresh’ and look at everything to come in 2018

GAME OF TONES The worlds of video gaming and classical music collide at Colston Hall

MIDWINTER MURMURATIONS Where to watch the balletic spectacle of the starlings

CAPITAL OF COOL Unmissable Bristol events to get down in the diary this year

HOME AND DRY Jazz up January with cocktails you won’t believe are booze-free

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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Classic Carpets January.qxp_Layout 1 21/12/2017 18:05 Page 3

Visit us in Gardiner Haskins to see our fantastic new range of rugs by Mastercraft Rugs

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Bristol, BS16 7AE (next to Costa Coffee)

Tel: 0117 930 4045

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KutchenHaus January.qxp_Layout 1 20/12/2017 13:53 Page 1


Knight Frank January.qxp_full page 18/12/2017 12:12 Page 1

Guide price £1,350,000

SOLD

Guide price £1,095,000

SOLD

Clifton

Henleaze

Immaculate six bedroom Victorian townhouse with parking and gardens at the rear.

A generously proportioned seven bedroom family home with a south facing rear garden 100 ft in length.

Move. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,095,000

SOLD

OIEO £1,000,000

SOLD

Leigh Woods

Clifton

Immaculate four bedroom former lodge house with ample gardens and parking.

An impressive four/five bed family home in one of Clifton's most desirable locations.

Guide price £1,250,000

SOLD

Guide price £995,000

SOLD

Cotham

Clifton

A regency Grade II listed family home with double garage, parking and gardens to front and rear.

Contemporary four bedroom town house with stunning harbour views with roof top garden and two balconies.

Guide price £865,000

SOLD

Guide price £699,950

SOLD

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £585,000

SOLD

Leigh Woods

Sneyd Park

Westbury Park

Immaculate three bedroom coach house within a historical botanical garden setting.

An impressive four bedroom upper maisonette with views across The Downs.

An immaculate three bedroom Victorian family home with easily maintained gardens within close proximity of The Downs.

Guide price £635,000

SOLD

Guide price £875,000

SOLD

Guide price £1,195,000

SOLD

Bristol Harbourside

Redland

Leigh Woods

Beautifully presented three bedroom town house situated close to the floating harbour and City Centre.

A beautiful four bedroom Victorian family home in one of Redland's most sought-after locations.

Immaculate four bedroom family home within established gardens with garage and parking.


Knight Frank January.qxp_full page 18/12/2017 12:12 Page 2

Guide price £2,000,000

SOLD

Guide price £1,795,000

Move.

SOLD

Litton

Bower Ashton

A stunning five bedroom farmhouse with outbuildings, swimming pool/pool house, tennis court. About 10.2 acres.

A substantial six bedroom house with two bed cottage and one bed annexe with garage, summer house, gardens. About 1 acre.

Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,200,000

SOLD

Guide price £1,125,000

SOLD

Chew Magna

Dundry

Beautiful five bedroom converted former outbuilding with double garage, gardens, pasture. About 4.3 acres.

Contemporary five bedroom house with terraces, gardens, double garage, paddock. About 2 acres.

Guide price £1,800,000

SOLD

OIEO £1,250,000

Clapton in Gordano

Stoke Bishop

An impressive five bedroom oak framed home with gardens, woodland, terraces, swimming pool. About 2.8 acres.

A private and spacious five bedroom detached home with double garage, ample parking and enclosed gardens.

Guide price £1,395,000

SOLD

Guide price £1,000,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

SOLD

SOLD

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £850,000

SOLD

Portishead

Barrow Gurney

Wrington

Superb six bedroom home in a private wooded setting with mature gardens and summer house.

A private and spacious five bedroom home with home office, garage, gardens, stables. About 1.8 acres.

Attractive farmhouse with planning to create a six bedroom, three bathroom house with views to the Mendip Hills. About 4.47 acres.

Guide price £740,000

SOLD

Guide price £625,000

SOLD

Guide price £1,000,000

SOLD

Clevedon

Wraxall

Horton

Immaculate Grade II Listed four bedroom house with pretty gardens and off-street parking.

Stunning three bedroom house with outstanding views, parking, terrace and garden.

Newly renovated five bedroom barn conversion with gardens and grounds, four car ports, parking, large south facing sunken entertaining terrace.


Knight Frank January.qxp_full page 21/12/2017 09:42 Page 3

Move. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,100,000

Redland An exceptional six bedroom Victorian family home (approx. 3,265 sq ft) with gardens, parking and superb views. 6 bedrooms (1 en suite), 1 family bathroom, guest WC, 3 reception rooms, kitchen and cellar. EPC: TBC.

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £2,950,000

Guide price £950,000

Harbourside

Clifton

An immaculate city centre penthouse (approx. 1,286 sq ft) overlooking the floating harbour. 3 bedrooms (2 en suite), bathroom, open plan kitchen/ breakfast/dining and sitting room. Sun terrace, allocated parking. EPC: B.

An impressive Grade II listed and beautifully presented Victorian house (approx. 5,757 sq ft). 7 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms (3 en suite), 5 reception rooms, 1 bed annexe. Off street parking, store, large gardens totalling 0.32 of an acre.

Guide price £750,000

New Instruction

Guide price £1,495,000

Long Ashton

Sneyd Park

An immaculate detached family home (approx.1,791 sq ft). 4 bedrooms, family bathroom, guest shower room, living room/dining room, kitchen/ breakfast family room. Garage, sunny gardens, off street parking. EPC: TBC.

Grade II listed home (approx. 3,927 sq ft) with spectacular views across the river Avon towards Leigh Woods. 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 4 reception rooms, kitchen, integral garage. Parking, gardens, woodland. About 1.6 acres.


Knight Frank January.qxp_full page 18/12/2017 12:13 Page 4

Move. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £725,000

New Instruction

Clifton An immaculate Grade II listed penthouse (approx. 1,280 sq ft) with allocated parking and exceptional views. 2 bedrooms, bathroom, living room/kitchen/breakfast room, roof terrace, communal gardens, parking.

Guide price £1,750,000

Guide price £895,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Coming Soon

Chew Magna

Hunstrete

Grade II listed house (approx. 4,844 sq ft) with stunning views of Chew Valley Lake. 4 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, 5 bedrooms (3 ensuite), bathroom. Gardens, 2 paddocks and 2 garages. About 6.31 acres.

Staddlestone Cottage is a very well-presented cottage (approx. 2,712 sq ft) situated at the centre of the idyllic village of Hunstrete in the Chew Valley. 4 bedrooms, bathroom, 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. EPC: D.

Guide price £750,000

Guide price £1,000,000

Bishop Sutton

Nr Regil and Winford

A spacious Victorian House (approx. 3,505 sq ft) with a large garden in the centre of the village. 7 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 4 reception rooms, music/playroom, kitchen/breakfast room, study and garage. EPC: E.

Former farmhouse (approx. 3,553 sq ft) in an elevated setting with views. 5/6 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 4 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. Gated entrance, drive, garage, gardens, paddock. About 2.4 acres. EPC: D.


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44

Image from David Lloyd Clubs

ii

Contents

January 2018

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

FOOD & DRINK

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14

Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Tasty tidings from our local eateries and producers

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16

RECIPES

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48

We meet Paul Alexander of Soultrain Radio and catch up on local news

Comforting winter warmers from David Tanis

BARTLEBY

DRY COCKTAILS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

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20

...Has had cause to consider canine winter couture since the cold snap

Author, chef and publican Clare Liardet shares booze-free beverages

THE CULTURE

HEALTH, BEAUTY & WELLBEING

THEATRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 & 36

TRENDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii

We review Bristol Old Vic’s The Little Matchgirl and chat to Wicked’s costume designer ahead of the hit show’s return to the Hippodrome

Kim Ingleby shares some of her favourite feel-good ideas for the year

WHAT’S ON & HAPPENINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

BOOKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv

Get the diary out!

Reads to restore the balance in Charlotte Pope’s enriching reading list

MUSIC

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38 & 44

SHOPPING

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The worlds of gaming and classical music collide at Colston Hall, while Jenny Hayes explores the issues facing our wonderful indie venues

Beauty and wellbeing buys to get 2018 off to a super-fresh start

EXHIBITIONS

Local businesses to help you on your way to feeling tip-top in 2018

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42

What’s on at our local galleries this month?

FAMILY DIARY

DIRECTORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii GROOMING

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54

vi

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xiv

City fun for the younger ones

Head to Bristol’s lovely Harbour Inlet for the royal treatment at Kings & Queens’ hair salon

FEATURES

HABITAT

THE YEAR TO COME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

WILD BRISTOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

A look at exciting events and developments planned for 2018

Keep an eye out for hungover waxwings, says Pete Dommett

MOTORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 An exceptionally good drive and a beautifully built SUV: the new Mazda CX-5 is beating most expectations says Chris Lilly

LIFESTYLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 The wheels of change are in motion thanks to the heroic e-bike

SPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 A chat with Bristol-born Olympic hockey champ Lily Owsley

THE GREAT OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Andrew Swift on the acrobatic starling spectacles of Avalon

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GARDENING

84

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Green-fingered folk; take your passion a step further this year

PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 News from the industry plus hot homes on the market

ON THE COVER

The wheels of change are steadily coming into motion on the subject of inner-city transport – flick to p62 for our feature on ebiking around Bristol (image courtesy of Brompton Electric, available at Mud Dock Cycleworks at The Grove, Bristol)


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There’s plenty to inspire you through January – from balletic starling searching in Somerset to music, theatre, delicious dry cocktails, wellbeing ideas and everything to come in 2018

THIS MONTH WE’VE BEEN... Appreciating...

...All the thoughtful gifts we had for Christmas. This hand cream trio from Jo Malone has been a bit of a godsend so far, moisturising our dehydrated digits and parched palms during the cold snaps. We’re fans of the English pear and freesia in particular... • jomalone.co.uk

from the

EDITOR

Supporting...

“I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes. If you make mistakes you are trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world...” – Neil Gaiman

H

itting ‘refresh’ and saying hello to a new year can be pretty satisfying; mentally penning everything we’ll improve, burying hatchets, and looking ahead to a blank canvas. And a new calendar to fill with everything to come – there’s plenty of change afoot in the city for 2018, and as well as all the exciting events to scribble in, there are several major developments on the radar. Take a look at what’s in store with Jessica Hope on p22. As the pressing of the reset button prompts the customary thoughts of betterment in many of us, this month’s cover feature puts the spotlight on a current clean-living hero, the e-bike. Going by steadily increasing sales figures, there’s soon to be a boom, and already they seem to be quietly taking over the South West, tackling traffic, health, finance, parking and pollution issues facing the majority of us inner-city dwellers in the modern world. Meet some early adopters on p62 and find out about the wheels of change already set in motion. In our wellbeing special, we consult with mind and body coach Kim Ingleby, who shares feel-good ideas she’s liking this year. And we’ve already bought half the books on Charlotte Pope’s enriching reading list for January – we definitely need the recommended 101 things to do instead of playing on our phones, and are intrigued by the concept of ikigai. (It translates as the happiness of being busy – seemingly the secret of the long-living Japanese.) For those staying home and dry this month, Clare Liardet’s also hooked us up with some homemade cocktails you won’t believe are booze-free – so hunker down and rehydrate... Elsewhere, in music, the worlds of video gaming and classical are set to collide, intriguingly, at a live play-through at Colston Hall (see p44) and as the rising tide of development threatens more than one legendary live mainstay, Jenny Hayes explore the hot topic of Bristol’s independent venues (p38). Anyway, we’re off in search of the balletic midwinter spectacle of the starlings (tips on where to see the murmurations from Andrew Swift on p76). Peace and love...

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR Editor’s image by Paolo Ferla; ferlapaolo.com

@thebristolmag

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

thebristolmag.co.uk

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JANUARY 2018

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@thebristolmag

...Beat The Streets, a new charity music festival taking place on 28 January and donating all proceeds to Caring In Bristol – a local organisation dedicated to bettering the lives of homeless and vulnerable people in our city. • @beat_thestreets

Fiercely debating... Imagery: byswans.com

...Pantone’s cosmic colour of the year, ultraviolet. We have a Marmite situation on our hands, we have to say. As interiors schemes go, it’s bold, but then so are a great many Bristolians... The squabble rages on – let us know what you think of the purple reign... • pantone.com


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ZEITGEIST

Top Image: Matt Crockett

5

things to do in JANUARY Image: James Beck

JOURNEY OUT OF THIS WORLD With shorter days and clear nights, winter can be the best time of year to look up at the night sky. Science centre We The Curious is putting on special planetarium nights throughout January, allowing visitors to explore the sky and space around us. Enthusiastic presenters will take you to far-away planets, tell you stories of ancient stargazers, and inspire you to look at the night sky in a whole new way. This combines incredible visuals from the most advanced planetarium in the UK with the most up to date images from around the universe. Dates and times vary, check online for more information. Tickets: Adults £7.50, concs £6.50.

DEFY GRAVITY The record-breaking production of Wicked is coming to Bristol this month, promising to take audiences on a spell-binding trip to the world of Oz. The musical tells the story of an unlikely but profound friendship between two young women who go on to fulfil their destinies as Glinda The Good Witch and the Wicked Witch of the West. In the run up to the show’s opening, Tony Award-winning costume designer Susan Hilferty revealed to us what inspired her to create the incredible costumes for this production – read more on page 36. Wicked will be at Bristol Hippodrome from Wednesday 31 January – Saturday 3 March, times and ticket prices vary.

• wethecurious.org

DANCE FROM BROADWAY TO HOLLYWOOD Join the nation’s favourite ballroom couple – Anton du Beke and Erin Boag – as they return to Bristol with an exciting new show that celebrates the golden age of Hollywood. Featuring dazzling new choreography, sparkling costumes and a sensational 25-piece London Concert Orchestra performing timeless songs including Mr Bojangles, New York, New York and Cry Me a River. Anton and Erin will be performing at Bristol Hippodrome on Saturday 20 January at 2.30pm. Tickets from £27.40.

• atgtickets.com/bristol

• atgtickets.com/bristol

BE CLASSICAL

Image: BuggyFit

FEEL FABULOUS We may have overindulged a tad over the festive season – we just couldn’t help it, the cheese board was far too good! With a view to getting back into shape – in our own good time, mind – we consulted with mind and body coach Kim Ingleby about the latest wellbeing trends (page ii), and discovered plenty of fun ways to feel good in and around Bristol this year, even with the kids and the dog in tow.

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The Bristol International Classical Season continues until June at Colston Hall, and this month audiences will be treated to a very special performance by one of the world’s greatest chamber orchestras – The Academy of St Martin in the Fields. Kick off the year with Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons plus a new composition by bassist Edgar Meyer and Beethoven’s iconic Symphony No 2, on Thursday 25 January. There will be a free pre-concert talk with conductor and music educator Jonathan James at 6.25pm, before the concert commences at 7.30pm. • colstonhall.org

Music director Joshua Bell Image: Alan Kerr


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THE CITY THE BUZZ

BRISTOL

Winter cheer from the likes of Jo Brand this month

Meet Paul Alexander, chairman of the city’s new Soultrain Radio and co-founder of Soultrain Events

Slap-up comedy fun Back from 25 – 28 January, Bristol’s fabulous Slapstick Festival looks set to be the perfect antidote to the winter blues with its programme of silent and classic film comedy. The UK’s biggest celebration of its kind, 2018’s 14th edition will see celebrity guests, including Barry Cryer, The Goodies, Tim Vine, Lucy Porter, Lee Mack, Christopher Biggins and Jo Brand – the latter three making their Slapstick debuts – introducing their favourite comedies and comedians of yesteryear. While staying as true to silent movies as ever, for 2018 the team are making sure there’s lot more music involved, with the scheduled films accompanied by live and, in all likelihood, new scores, thanks to musicians from Bristol Ensemble and European Silent Screen Virtuousi. Bill Oddie will also be re-opening The Goodies songbook (remember Funky Gibbon?); there’ll be excuses to get back into bustiers and fishnets for The Rocky Horror Picture Show; and Rowland Rivron will remember his time in French and Saunders’ house band Raw Sex; while Ade Edmondson and Nigel Planer reminisce of their roles in the spoof rock band Bad News; Ronnie Golden combines his rock ‘n’ roll memoirs with a rock guitar masterclass; and a oneman musical about Buster Keaton premieres. The festival will also be showcasing some new ‘clowns’ on the Thursday and Friday – among them, comedians from Europe, never before seen in the UK, and the British silent/visual comedy act The Kagools with their words-free live stage show which includes interactive film. Events take place at Watershed, Bristol Old Vic, Arnolfini and Colston Hall, where awardwinning punster Tim Vine is to host the festival’s flagship gala – a triple-bill of laughout-loud screen comedy classics, accompanied live by top-class musicians.

• slapstick.org.uk

16 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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No 163

So Paul, are you originally from Bristol? I am a Bristolian – born and bred. I have only ever worked and lived in Bristol – I never felt the desire or need to move away.

What are you listening to right now? I like my rare grooves and jazz funk. My number one soul artist is Luther Vandross and my number one soul band is Maze.

Tell us about what you do. Soultrain has been around for 25 years – it started as one event and we haven’t stopped since. It’s a DJ collective that has regularly attracted loyal crowds and gained a real following from events in and around the city, in addition to Soultrain stages at Glastonbury and Love Saves The Day festivals. This year we hosted Shalamar and The Real Thing live in concert, and in September we held our inaugural Soultrain Ibiza Weekender – over 200 people flew out from the UK.

Favourite local venues? I love the café culture but wish there were more of the late-night DJ bars which are huge in Ibiza. My favourite restaurant is The Mint Room for Indian fine dining and I like Opa as a watering hole.

What’s planned for 2018? We’ve just launched a DAB radio station. (Love soul, love Soultrain Radio!) This is a dedicated new Bristol station playing soul 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Are there any other projects you’re personally working on at the moment? The launch has been my main project, but we are looking to double the numbers for Ibiza 2018 – such was the success of our inaugural event, we had people booking flights and accommodation for this year within weeks of returning.

Evening in or evening out? I always want to go out, my ideal evening out is going for a meal then taking in a live gig – ie. James Morton (the local artist and sax player). I also like to head up to Ronnie Scott’s London for the finest in soul and jazz. What are you up to this month? I am looking to attend the Blackpool Luxury Soul Weekender where Kenny Burke, Linda Clifford and Shirley Jones are performing. What other interests will you be pursuing? I like football and so I will continue to follow Bristol City FC!

• soultrainradio.co.uk


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THE CITY

All about Joanna The legendary Joanna Lumley is heading to Bristol later this year, as part of her first ever live tour. Taking audiences through adventures from her incredible career, spanning more than four decades, and recounting some never-heard-before stories, It’s All About Me will see Joanna joined on stage by friend and producer Clive Tulloh, who will put questions to her that members of the audience have always wanted to ask. The national treasure, activist, adventurer and comedy actress has been pretty much a permanent fixture on our screens since being cast as Purdey in The New Avengers in 1976. She will take fans through the random journey that started in London in the swinging ’60s as Jean Muir’s muse, progressing to becoming a photographic model, featuring in toothpaste commercials, and developing into an acting career including On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, in which she was a Bond girl, and later, of course, Absolutely Fabulous as a degenerate role-model for a generation. “The thought of this tour, travelling across the British Isles and Ireland, has completely taken over my waking hours,” said Joanna. “It’s utterly thrilling to start planning the stories I can tell, and the rapture (and gratitude, to be fair) with which I shall greet the audiences. Nothing like this has come my way before, and I may have to be dragged off with a hook at the end of each show. Oh people! This is especially for you from me, with masses of love.”

BRISTAGRAM Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your Bristol pics using #thebristolmag

We love this shot of D wintry undry by @michae lbuckle

a ful Victori The beauti @russjfinch by s, m Roo

• atgtickets.com/bristol

The doors of reflection An innovative local art project has been seeking to unlock debate on homelessness. Last year, 10 reclaimed and recycled front doors were hung on walls across the streets of Bristol and left to organically gather their own identities from the life happening around them. Nine months later, the doors were detached from their urban dwellings and are now part the first of many residencies of a very different nature; in galleries across the country. The project was orchestrated by conceptual artist Beau, who had little idea what was to be made of it when he began, but felt a front door symbolised having a place to live – something many people across the UK do not have. “I wanted to challenge our perceptions of beauty and worth,” he said. “The ‘Outdoors’ project shows how we interact with the world around us. The doors were hung in plain view; many largely ignored by passers-by. Street art culture adopted some of the sites, integrating them into artworks; others were completely neglected. “Cuts to housing, mental health and social services are driving more and more people into critical homeless situations which is more than rough sleeping. The hidden homeless community is often out of sight – sofa surfing, crashing with friends, staying in squats or communal homes, hostels and longterm B&B residences are all forms of homelessness experienced, often for years,” said Beau. “There are twice as many people on the streets in Bristol than there were this time five years ago. This is happening right around us, yet we walk on past.” The doors have been framed and are on display until 20 January at 44AD in Bath. They will appear across the UK on a tour of venues this year, culminating in an auction in December, where 100% of profits will be donated to charities supporting those in critical need in the South West.

Buckets of Campari @theforgebr istol

r morning Frosty harbou errick40 igd ra @c captured by

• ayearoutdoors.com

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THE

B R I S TOL MAGAZINE

Cold-snap canine couture

S

hould our dog be wearing a jumper? This is a question that has been provoking quite a lot of debate at Bartleby Towers over the past few weeks, as a cold snap coincided with Jarvis Cockerpoo’s biannual trim. Mrs B even went so far as to dig a couple of old toddler cardies out of the loft, but neither of them worked. Young humans and dogs may be similar in some ways, but not when it comes to fitting woollens. Besides, the whole idea is ridiculous. People don’t put clothes on dogs because the poor mutts need them, but because we can’t help thinking that if we’re cold, our dogs must be cold – there’s a technical term for this, but it eludes me. Dogs come with clothes already included. They are furry and, boy, is that fur warm. If you ever want to feel just how warm dog hair is, try this little experiment. Get hold of a good handful of the stuff, preferably not still attached to a dog, and put it in a hat. Then put the hat on your head. Instant warmth. In fact you can combine dog hair with other fibres and spin it into yarn, and thus make a hat from your pet’s fur. You could conceivably make a hat for your dog from his or her own hair. Or a jumper, come to think of it. There are probably people in Certain Bristol Neighbourhoods who do that every year as a matter of course. Like, recycling, obvs. But we’ve already established that the whole thing is nonsense. Or is it? There are some breeds – whippets, for instance – that do seem illsuited to cold weather. With their short hair and zero body fat they have almost nothing to protect them from the icy blasts of winter. Surely these guys need woollies! But hang on a minute. There are whippety-type dogs on medieval tapestries. And Jack Russells (another breed often seen in pullovers) have been around forever. Are you saying that people in the uncivilised and brutal past dressed these dogs too? And if not, how did the pooches survive all that time? With that brilliant historical analysis I’m fairly sure I’ve proved that my dog does not need a jumper. On the other hand, just think of the little fellow, trotting through the frost in the altogether! Logically the idea of a dog in a jersey is absurd. But emotionally I feel a bit like the mother battling on the doorstep with her toddler. You must put on your mittens! It’s cold! No mittens, no park! Now, last time I looked we weren’t living in the wastes of Siberia. Frostbite is not often encountered in BS3. But to let your child out unprotected seems wrong, and so it is perhaps with a dog. Most of us have to look after somebody at some point: children, elderly relatives, husbands with man-flu. And sometimes the urge to protect and nurture makes us do strange things, like fighting on the doorstep over mittens, or putting carrot sticks in a teen’s packed lunch. When it’s not you dealing with that day’s storm in a teacup it’s easy to say, you know, don’t worry about cold hands, and let them eat pizza! But when the responsibility is on your shoulders, it’s different. Right now I feel I’m neglecting the dog, because he hasn’t had his walk yet. Of course he’s the one curled up in a chair while I do what passes in my world for work, but every now and then he sighs sadly (or so it seems) and I feel a pang of guilt. Actually I’m partly waiting for the frost to melt on the roof of the house opposite, because then surely it will be warm enough outside to take him for a walk, wearing only his birthday suit. ■ 20 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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LOOKING | AHEAD

A BIG YEAR FOR BRISTOL Jessica Hope rounds up the exciting events, anniversaries and celebrations to look out for around the city in 2018

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hether you’re a theatre buff, history enthusiast or a dedicated festival goer, 2018 is set to be a busy one in Bristol. There’s an abundance of significant anniversaries to celebrate as well as commemorate, and major changes are happening in our most-loved theatres and concert halls, as well as programmes chock-full of incredible productions. Plus there will be new additions to the city that everyone, young and old, will be able to enjoy. Here’s just a snapshot of some of the big things to look out for…

Opening of SS Great Britain’s Being Brunel museum Bristol was named ‘Museum Destination of the Year’ for 2018 by the Luxury Travel Guide Awards late last year – recognising the pride we take in our heritage and in engaging visitors. Adding to our city offering, and opening this March, is a brand new museum dedicated to the life and work of Isambard Kingdom Brunel, next to the grand old SS Great Britain. The major attraction, the first of its kind in the UK, will reflect on Brunel’s extraordinary impact on Bristol, industry and scientific and technological advances, through interactive exhibitions, never-beforeseen personal possessions and audio-visual experiences. Visitors will have access to a variety of incredible objects from the National Brunel Collection of more than 14,000 items, many of international importance, including a cigar case containing a cigar stamped with ‘I.K.B Athenaeum Club Pall Mall’ – a poignant item reflecting an iconic image that many are familiar with, of Brunel proudly standing in front of the chains of the SS Great Eastern, puffing on a cigar. As well as getting up close to Brunel’s personal possessions, visitors will be able to read his school report, and explore recreations of the interiors of his offices, as well as climbing on board a juddering 1830s broad gauge railway carriage. Adults and children alike will be able to find out more about Brunel and his importance on the world stage at the new museum, as well as exploring one of his most famous ships – the SS Great Britain –next door. 22 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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100 years of women's suffrage To mark the centenary of some women in the UK being granted the right to vote, there will be a variety of events happening around Bristol to mark this historical milestone. On Tuesday 6 February, the official anniversary of the Representation of the People Act 1918, there will be an evening lantern parade down Park Street, organised by Bristol Women’s Voice, that will feature a choir of 100 girls from local schools, singing a specially composed new song for the anniversary. Author Jane Duffus will be hosting a launch for her new book The Women Who Built Bristol, a collection of stories of more than 250 women from Bristol’s history who shaped the city. The launch, entry to which is free, will take place at St George’s Bristol, from 6pm – 8pm, when the book will be on sale at a special price. Bristol Women’s Voice will also be holding a variety of workshops, talks and events to celebrate International Women’s Day on Saturday 3 March. Visit bristolwomensvoice.org.uk for the full programme. In addition, the West of England and South Wales Women’s History Network will commemorate the anniversary on Saturday 19 May at the M Shed, where there will be a free event featuring talks, walks, gallery tours, film, performance, craft activities, and a ‘meet the experts’ stand where you can find out about researching the suffrage movement and plenty more.

Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal trail returns The third major arts trail of Wallace and Gromit sculptures will return to Bristol this summer as part of The Grand Appeal, helping to raise money for Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the Special Care Baby Unit at St Michael’s Hospital. More than 60 giant sculptures of Aardman’s popular characters will be dotted around the city from Monday 2 July – Sunday 2 September, and this year Gromit will be joined by his best friend Wallace, as well as arch nemesis, penguin Feathers McGraw. Families will be able to explore the city, picking out their favourite Aardman characters, while helping to raise funds and support the sick children and hard-working medical staff at the hospital.


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LOOKING | AHEAD

EXCITING TIMES Opposite: Bristol International Balloon Fiesta (image: Paul Box) This page: an artist’s impression of the new entrance to Bristol Old Vic (image: Haworth Tompkins); Miss Saigon comes to Bristol Hippodrome (image: Johan Persson); Wallace, Gromit and Feathers McGraw will be popping up around the city in the summer

Big changes for Bristol Old Vic After its multi-million redevelopment project, Bristol Old Vic will finally be able to reveal its brand new front of house and studio theatre to the public in September, as well as putting on a programme of reflective, poignant productions throughout 2018 under the banner Year of Change. The theme is inspired by the 50th anniversaries of the assassination of Martin Luther King and the Black Power salute, and the 70th anniversary of the voyage of the Windrush, as well as the centenary of women’s suffrage and the bicentenary of the birth of the abolitionist Frederick Douglass. BOV will be reflecting on Bristol’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade and has announced a major new play, The Meaning of Zong by Giles Terera, jointly commissioned by the National Theatre, which will be presented in workshop form in October before being fully staged in 2019. BOV will host a series of conversations alongside these performances on topics related to the city’s connections and commemorations of the slave trade. A brand new translation of The Cherry Orchard by Russian playwright Anton Chekhov will kick off in March, directed by former RSC artistic director Michael Boyd. In May, Bristol Old Vic will show the first stage adaptation of

Patrick Ness’ A Monster Calls, which will form part of the 200th anniversary of its mother theatre company, The Old Vic, London. Tom Morris will be directing the first stage adaption of Joe Simpson’s memoir Touching the Void, an international bestseller and BAFTA-winning film, which will be on show in September; while Shakespearean comedy Twelfth Night will take to the stage in October, directed by The Lyceum’s associate director Wils Wilson; before the theatrical year closes with the appropriately Dickensian tale, A Christmas Carol.

Upfest turns 10 Europe’s largest live street art and graffiti festival will return to Bedminster in July, marking the festival’s 10th anniversary. Over the years, the festival’s growing reputation has made it the must-attend event for street artists from around the world and now attracts an average 50,000 visitors. In 2017, a record-breaking 700 artists applied to the festival, with more than 350 artists selected to attend from 43 countries. Artist registration for the 2018 festival opens on Tuesday 2 January for artists, graffiti writers and budding amateurs across all disciplines, from graffiti to fine art and stencils to abstract. Visit upfest.co.uk to find out more and to register.

The launch of MetroBus We may love this city, but oh do we know the struggles we have with congestion on the roads in Bristol. In order to help tackle this issue, 2018 will see the launch of the first phase of MetroBus – the rapid public transport system that will hopefully speed up journey times, relieve traffic around the city, and cut emissions. There will be three MetroBus routes: from Cribbs Causeway to Hengrove, which will start in the summer; from Long Ashton Park and Ride to the city centre via Temple Meads and Cabot Circus, which will begin in the spring; and a route from Emersons Green to the centre, which will start in the spring. Passengers will be able to buy tickets before they board the bus from the cashless information points at each stop, or online or on an app in order to speed up boarding. To find out more, visit travelwest.info/metrobus

Remembrance at Bristol Cathedral To mark the centenary of the end of the First World War and the first steps towards women gaining the vote in the THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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LOOKING | AHEAD

UK, Bristol Cathedral will be holding a series of exhibitions and events to mark these two significant anniversaries. Bristol Women at War, on show from Monday 15 January – Saturday 24 March, examines the types of work performed by women from the local area during the First World War and charts the shift in the workplace as women took on roles traditionally performed by men. On show from Friday 6 April – Sunday 1 July, exhibition No Man’s Land will offer rarely seen female perspectives from the First World War, featuring images taken by women who worked as nurses, ambulance drivers and official photographers, as well as contemporary artists directly inspired by the conflict. Also at the cathedral, following the retirement of Rt Revd Mike Hill, the 56th Bishop of Bristol in 2017, it is expected that a new bishop will be appointed in May, with an inauguration in the autumn. To mark 100 years since the official end of the First World War, the ceremony at the Cenotaph in the city centre will be the second biggest remembrance ceremony outside London in November. Other events coinciding with this will be announced by the cathedral nearer the time.

Balloon Fiesta’s 40th anniversary Our skies will be full of more than 100 hot air balloons again in August when the Bristol International Balloon Fiesta celebrates its fourth decade. Now established as Europe’s largest annual hot air balloon festival, the wonderful creations – stalwarts of Bristol’s summer skyline – will take off at dawn and dusk at Ashton Court Estate from Thursday 9 August to Sunday 12 August, plus there will be the famous night glows, when the balloons light up the sky in time to music.

Musical mania at Bristol Hippodrome As theatre programmes for the year go, Bristol Hippodrome is winning it in terms of musicals on offer. Kicking off the year is the UK tour of Wicked, on until early March. Then you better get your dancing feet ready for the smash hit musical comedy Hairspray, followed by Cilla – The Musical, based on the hit television series that starred Sheridan Smith as singer and Blind Date presenter Cilla Black. In April, Bristol audiences can experience the award-winning Beautiful – The Carole King Musical, which tells the true story of King’s remarkable rise to stardom. Take That’s new musical The Band, starring BBC’s Let it Shine winners Five to Five, also arrives in Bristol for two weeks in April. Featuring the music of Take That, The Band is the fastest selling musical theatre tour of all time – we guess ’90s die-hard boyband fans are quick off the mark! Then the spectacular Miss Saigon will grace the stage for six weeks in May and June, before Flashdance takes over in June. For a fortnight over the summer holidays, families can lap up the musical adaption of Oscar-winning Shrek, starring X Factor’s Amelia Lily as Princess Fiona. Keep an eye out for more productions at a later date.

Transforming Tobacco Factory Theatres This month, Tobacco Factory Theatres will embark on a £1.5million 24 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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building project to completely transform the layout of the first floor of the building. The project will feature a multi-purpose, 84-seat studio performance space, refurbished backstage areas to provide three new dressing rooms, as well as an improved and extended front-of-house and bar space to transform the audience experience. This project will allow the theatre to welcome 30,000 more people through its doors and enjoy over 360 more performances. The new spaces launch in October. As well as this, the theatre will present its inaugural Factory Company season from February to May, when a new resident professional ensemble will create unforgettable new productions of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Arthur Miller’s A View From the Bridge.

St George’s Bristol expansion Following its closure over Christmas and January, the concert hall will be reopening in February to show off its new two-storey extension to the public. There are plans to put on a special opening weekend on 24 – 25 February, with Bristol’s brilliant country-soul singer/songwriter Yola Carter booked to perform alongside Scottish folk musician Ewan McLennan. The opening week will also see the premiere of a newly commissioned opera called The Hall On The Hill, which charts the story of the 195 year-old building. The new extension will feature a modern café/bar which will be open during the day, plus a permanent heritage exhibition that will tell the story of St George’s from its inception as a chapel-of-ease in 1823, through its years as a beloved parish church, and its evolution into a world-class music venue. Tickets for events from February to the summer are already on sale, with more being added over the coming months.


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LOOKING | AHEAD

A YEAR TO REMEMBER Opposite: Munitions workers at Thrissell Engineering (image from Bristol Cathedral’s new WW1 exhibition); The British Dal Festival comes to Bristol (image: Jenny Chandler); what the new interior of St George’s Bristol is expected to look like This page: Fatboy Slim will be appearing at Love Saves The Day; and artwork on display at Upfest

Dish up at The British Dal Festival Something a little different that is sure to get your taste buds tingling this spring... The very first British Dal Festival will celebrate – you guessed it – all things dal in Bristol from Monday 19 – Sunday 25 March. The festival is an initiative of the British Edible Pulse Association’s Pulse Promotion Group, and will be a free event taking place across the city. It will feature a dal trail around the city’s restaurants and eateries, and venues will be serving up signature dals of all varieties, with one eatery being named the dal champion at the end of the week. Award-winning community organisation 91 Ways will work with diverse Bristol communities to source many different variations of dal and reveal the history behind them; and the project will result in an online library of dal recipes. Bristol Farmers’ Market will also invite local chefs to demonstrate how to cook different dal dishes. The festival will have a grand finale fun-day on Sunday 25 March at Paintworks, where there will be street food, market stalls, children’s activities and more.

Feeling the love Hugely popular music event Love Saves The Day has announced that chart-topping, DJ royalty Fatboy Slim and Mercury Prize-winner Sampha will be headlining on Saturday 26 and Sunday 27 May. As Fatboy Slim’s first ever Bristol festival, it’s a real coup for LSTD, based at Eastville Park with 12 stages for festival goers to choose from. Tier one and tier two weekend and day tickets are sold out, but tier three day tickets are available for Saturday and Sunday at £38.50 with tier three weekend tickets available at £71.50 (all prices inclusive of booking fees).

The evolution of Colston Hall While we had great fun celebrating Colston Hall’s 150th birthday last year, the music hall has had no major refurbishment for six decades. Therefore the hall will go under the second phase of its transformation plan in 2018 (the first of which was the redesign of the foyer which reopened in 2009). This second phase will be completed in 2020. The £48.8million redevelopment project will see an exceptional classical and contemporary music venue built

with a new, larger and more flexible stage and new balconies, provide greater comfort for audiences with new seating and air-conditioning, and improved backstage facilities for artists. The Lantern will be developed, creating a better performance venue and conference facility, and the historic Victorian cellars will be opened up to create a third performance space and provide a new education centre for Bristol Plays Music, which works with 30,000 young people every year. There are also plans to restore the beautiful Bristol Byzantine style historic foyer building and reanimate the Colston Street façades with a new restaurant and new windows to The Lantern above. To find out how you can help to transform the hall, visit colstonhall.org

Indoor skydiving comes to Bristol iFLY Indoor Skydiving is currently planning the opening of its fifth UK vertical wind tunnel for the new leisure development at Cribbs Causeway, set to open in late 2018 or early 2019. The 12-foot tunnel, at ground level, will offer an experience to remember for both flyers and spectators. Visitors to iFLY Bristol will be able to enjoy the full range of flying experiences, including the latest 360 virtual reality experience, described as the nearest thing to jumping out of a plane. The centre will also introduce competition flying at an early stage, allowing outdoor skydivers the opportunity to use the tunnel for further practice.

Get on your bike with Great Weston Ride Looking for a challenge for 2018? Then the Great Weston Ride might be one for you. Participants will cycle from Long Ashton Park and Ride and ride through the Mendips and across the Somerset Levels for 57 miles before reaching the seafront in Weston-super-Mare on Sunday 15 July. This isn’t a race – it’s a huge, inclusive riding event where people of all ages and abilities are encouraged to get on a bike and enjoy the ride. There will be refreshment stops along the route for riders to take a break, and the event is registered with British Cycling. The official charity partner for the eighth year is Prostate Cancer UK. To sign up there’s an entry fee of £29.50 for adults, and £16 for under 16s. Visit greatwestonride.com to find out more. n

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THEATRE

STRIKING A CHORD There’s still time to see Bristol Old Vic’s thoughtful seasonal production, created in conjunction with Shakespeare’s Globe. Words by Amanda Nicholls; photography by Steve Tanner A new story is conjured with the strike of each match

Iberian beetles that break into song go down a treat with us

The excellent Katy Owen

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f you’re up for more than the standard of straightforward, facile fun from your family entertainment choices this season – by way, say, of some more meaningful, socially conscious theatre encouraging empathy for those less fortunate during these shiversome months – then The Little Matchgirl and Other Happier Tales at Bristol Old Vic is just the ticket. Directed by Emma Rice, written by Joel Horwood and co-created with Shakespeare’s Globe, the production begins with an unsettling scene introducing our titular ‘impoverished heroine’ – a homeless puppet girl deftly and heartbreakingly brought to life by Edie Edmundson – and does away with the customary happy ending, instead reminding us that for all the light there is always the dark; imbalances in the world that shouldn’t be ignored. Shuddering in the winter air while selling matches to soldiers and passersby, she strikes a few in hope of a moment of warmth – each one conjuring a magical, barmy new world to escape into, based irreverently on Hans Christian Andersen folk tales. The first stars the feisty yet vulnerable Thumbelina (the excellent Katy Owen), a lonely, orphaned war refugee who speaks to us in comical rhyming couplets while searching for a place to call home. Avoiding advances and brute force from male characters – controlling toads, malevolent moles – who seem to think she owes them something; she finally falls in love with a beautiful man-sparrow, as you do. There’s another stand-out performance from Niall Ashdown as Ole Shuteye, the somewhat anarchic owner of the vaudevillian show troupe that frames the show and the stories within it. There’s a touch of the Jim Broadbent/Harold Zidler about him, or Mark Gatiss whenever he plays a rich, old buffoon. His second star-turn, as a vain ruler presiding over terrified, gullible subjects (fertile ground for witty contemporary asides), provides us with a few rip-roaring moments after another strike of a match sees The Emperor’s New Clothes unfold before us. With dreams of being the face of Facebook, the twit of Twitter (but, wait; that position has already been filled, hasn’t it?), he unwittingly enlists a ridiculous pair of charlatan German tailors, who enter and exit the stage like the love children of Eric Morecambe and Austin Powers, and trick him into parting with his cash to fund the ultimate fashion creation. This middle tale is a real highlight, concluding with the shocking naked truth that prompts peals of laughter from the very oldest to the very youngest in the room. More memorable moments come courtesy of the Iberian beetles that break into song and dance à la The Mighty Boosh; and the exquisite 26 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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live soundtrack from the musicians following the characters round the stage like a group of travelling minstrels. All the while, our heroine looks on – Edie Edmundson’s level of skill meaning we rarely register the puppeteer’s presence, with all eyes on the silent but oh-so expressive Little Matchgirl. After her last strike sparks a story of broken trust and lost love – The Princess and the Pea – we’re back to reality with a bump as her homeless cohorts huddle round a fire lit in an old oil barrel, and as the smell of spent matches fills the auditorium, her own flame slowly fades to black on the freezing winter streets. As a real mishmash of music, laughter, puppetry and magic, there’s more than enough festive fun here, but the hint of darker themes also at play, asking us to think of those in need and how we can help them, raises The Little Matchgirl to a more rounded and balanced piece of theatre. (It should probably, however, come with a caveat to prepare families with young children for the sorts of issues addressed.) “Remember that child poverty is not consigned to the story books. It is all around us, knocking at our borders and at our hearts,” says director Emma Rice at the start of the programme – an especially necessary reminder after the excess of holiday season. We should be challenged by our theatre, as should the status quo, and we’d expect nothing less from the ever-brilliant Bristol Old Vic. ■ • The Little Matchgirl runs until 14 January; bristololdvic.org.uk

There’s magic, laughter, puppetry and music


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Complimentary silk shade with all Moorcroft lamps

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LOCAL | EVENTS

WHAT’S ON

Hitchcock’s North By Northwest at Curzon Cinema

twinnings and the historic and recent connections between them. No admission fee, donations welcome. Visit: bristolmuseums.org.uk/bristol-archives

FROM 1 JANUARY TUESDAY 2 JANUARY, 1.15PM AND 3.30PM

A Conscientious Concert, Bristol Cathedral To accompany the cathedral’s exhibition Refusing to Kill: Bristol’s World War One Conscientious Objectors this concert showcases some of the compositions of Frank Merrick, Professor of Music and First World War conscientious objector. It will be introduced by a member of Remembering the Real World War One and one of Merrick’s children. Visit: bristol-cathedral.co.uk THURSDAY 4 JANUARY, 7.30PM

North by Northwest, Curzon Cinema, Clevedon One of the most entertaining films of Alfred Hitchcock’s career, this glamorous romantic thriller returns to cinemas as part of the BFI’s Thriller season. Bristol-born Cary Grant plays Roger O Thornhill, who falls victim of a deadly case of mistaken identity and struggles to prove his innocence. Tickets: £7.40, £6 concs. Visit: curzon.org.uk SUNDAY 7 JANUARY, 9.30AM – 2PM

New Year’s ramble, Bath Skyline The National Trust Skyline ranger will be leading a brisk New Year walk around the Bath Skyline to burn some of those Christmas calories (but with a minor diversion to Prior Park for a sneaky hot drink and snack). Booking essential, tel: 0344 249 1895. £10 per person.

In 1947, Bristol began formal friendships with two twin cities, Hannover in Germany and Bordeaux in France. Since then, Bristol has shared cultural, artistic and sporting exchanges with both cities. This exhibition celebrates the 70th anniversary of the

JANUARY 2018

Sunset Boulevard, Bristol Hippodrome Don’t miss the UK and Ireland tour of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s award-winning musical Sunset Boulevard, starring Ria Jones as the iconic Norma Desmond. This production is a compelling story of romance and obsession, based on Billy Wilder’s legendary film. Tickets from £18. Visit: atgtickets.com/bristol WEDNESDAY 10 JANUARY, 6.15PM

The Terminator, Bristol Cathedral Part of the electric shadows in the cathedral film series. Disguised as a human, a cyborg assassin (Arnold Schwarzenegger) travels from 2029 to 1984 to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). Tickets: £9, includes a glass of wine or juice and nibbles. Visit: bristol-cathedral.co.uk

Royal Charter Tours, Brunel Institute, SS Great Britain

70 years of twinning: Bristol-Hannover and Bristol-Bordeaux, Bristol Archives

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TUESDAYS – FRIDAYS AND THE FIRST TWO SATURDAYS OF EACH MONTH, 3PM

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Learn more about the wreck of the Royal Charter, the half-sister ship to the SS Great Britain, which was pushed onto the rocks of Dulas Bay one stormy night in 1859. Free tour, arrive at the front desk on the day and sign up. Visit: ssgreatbritain.org THURSDAY 11 JANUARY, 10.30AM – 2PM

Adult Workshops: System Earth, We The Curious We hear a lot about climate change, but what does being green actually mean, what is the science behind it all and why should

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Lee Mack’s Laurel and Hardy Classics at Colston Hall

we care? This workshop includes a 3D planetarium show and offers first-hand experience of the science behind the headlines – examining the causes and consequences of climate change and the contribution we can each make. Measure the warming effect of carbon dioxide in the lab. All course fees include general admission to the main venue, £9.70 per person. To book, tel: 0117 9517777. THURSDAY 11 JANUARY, 7.30PM

Winter lecture: Empire and memory, Priory Road Lecture Theatre, University of Bristol, Woodland Road When we think of the British Empire we tend to picture it in its Victorian and Edwardian heyday, when Britain was the richest and most militarily powerful country on earth. But how accurate is this? Historian and broadcaster David Olusoga will analyse the early stages of the empire and reveal how it was far more fragile than we might think. Free admission, but must book in advance, visit: bristolmuseums.org.uk. Part of the events related to Bristol Museum and Art Gallery’s exhibition Empire Through the Lens, on until August. SATURDAY 13 JANUARY, 10AM – 4PM

Bristol Bach Choir Come and Sing workshop, St Monica’s Trust, Cote Lane, Westbury-on-Trym Join Bristol Bach Choir for a day-long workshop which will focus on Rachmaninov’s Vespers (All-Night Vigil). Sing, explore and enjoy the sumptuous sonorities under the direction of conductor Christopher Finch and language coach Alexandre Naoumenko. Open to all. £20 per person, £10 for students and under 25s. To book, tel: 0117 214 0721 or visit: bristolbach.org.uk


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UNTIL SUNDAY 14 JANUARY, TIMES VARY

Beauty and The Beast, Tobacco Factory Theatres Deep in the forest lives a very unusual figure, suffering under a terrible curse. In a poky farmhouse on the edge of town, three daughters and their weary father are struggling to make ends meet. But everything changes when Belle dares to enter the forest… This re-telling of this classic fairy tale is brimming with surprises and delights to remind us that beauty – and beastliness – are only skin deep. Suitable for ages five and above. Ticket prices vary. Tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: tobaccofactorytheatres.com

FROM 15 JANUARY MONDAY 15 – WEDNESDAY 17 JANUARY, TIMES VARY

The Russian State Ballet & Orchestra of Siberia, Bristol Hippodrome Russia’s acclaimed ballet company returns to Bristol. Over three days, The Russian State Ballet of Siberia will perform productions of The Nutcracker, Cinderella and Swan Lake. One of Russia’s leading dancers, Dmitry Sobolevsky, soloist of the Moscow Stanislavsky Ballet, has been confirmed to appear as special guest principal dancer as the Prince in The Nutcracker and Prince Siegfried in Swan Lake. Tickets from £20.40, visit: atgtickets.com/bristol

on wines from Bourgogne Rouge right through to Grand Cru Burgundy – all in their very early stages straight from the barrel. There will also be some bread and cheese tastings. £25 per person. Visit: averys.com

are available at the Bristol Ticket shop for both the Friday and Saturday as well as a weekend pass for just £20, so you won’t miss a moment of the music. Visit: jellirecords.com

WEDNESDAY 17 – SATURDAY 20 JANUARY, 7.30PM, (PLUS 2.30PM SATURDAY MATINEE)

SATURDAY 20 JANUARY, 2.30PM

The Wedding, Bristol Old Vic Gecko’s latest creation is inspired by the complexities of human nature; the struggle between love and anger, creation and destruction, community and isolation. In a blur of wedding dresses and contractual obligations, their extraordinary ensemble of international performers guides audiences through a dystopian world in which we are all brides, wedded to society. Tickets: £12 – £24. Visit: bristololdvic.org.uk THURSDAY 18 JANUARY, 10.30AM

Historical walk: Old City, M Shed Discover a millennium of history on this 1.8 mile walk around the heart of Bristol’s old city. Expert walk leaders will point out locations which saw the birth of the city, its growth and later decline as a major seaport and centre of commerce. The walk is at a gentle pace on level terrain and is suitable for participants of all levels of fitness. Pay what you think. To book, tel: 0117 352 6600.

Closer Each Day: The Improvised Soap Opera, The Wardrobe Theatre This is world’s longest improvised narrative having run at The Wardrobe Theatre fortnightly for more than six years and over 125 episodes. The show is a live, spontaneous and unique theatrical experience performed fortnightly by Closer Each Day Company. Think Twin Peaks meets League of Gentlemen via Eastenders; a soap opera packed with drama, comedy, romance and farce – hilarious and uplifting and the cult hit of Bristol. Tickets: £7. Visit: thewardrobetheatre.com WEDNESDAY 17 JANUARY, 6PM

Burgundy 2016 En Primeur Tasting, Averys Cellars, Culver Street, Bristol Averys Cellars’ first tasting of 2018 will focus

Join the nation’s favourite ballroom couple Anton du Beke and Erin Boag when they return with an exciting new show as they celebrate the golden age of Hollywood. Featuring dazzling new choreography, sparkling costumes and a sensational show band performing timeless music. Visit: atgtickets.com/bristol SATURDAY 20 JANUARY, 7.30PM

Henleaze Concert Society: Mozart & Schubert, Trinity-Henleaze URC Waterford Road, Bristol Schubert’s celebrated masterpiece, the Octet for wind and strings, takes centre stage, alongside Mozart’s sublimely beautiful Clarinet Quintet. Tickets: £13.50 members, £16 non-members, £5 under 25s. Visit: bristolensemble.com or call the Opus 13 music shop: 0117 923 0164. SATURDAY 20 JANUARY, 8PM

Jazz Dames, Redgrave Theatre THURSDAY 18 JANUARY, 7.30PM

MONDAY 15 AND MONDAY 29 JANUARY, 8PM

Anton and Erin – From Broadway to Hollywood, Bristol Hippodrome

Gin Masterclass, Bordeaux Quay, V-Shed, Canons Way, Bristol Learn more about this splendid spirit in a fascinating masterclass on its most popular serving incarnation, the gin and tonic. Discover what gin is, how it's made and hear some of its long and illustrious histories, alongside tasting a diverse range of gins. Early booking is advised. £35 per person. Tel: 0117 2140 262 or visit: bristolwineschool.co.uk

Back by popular demand, the Jazz Dames will celebrate the life, music, composition and spirit of American jazz singer Ms Peggy Lee, whose career spanned six decades. She composed more than 300 songs, wrote music for films, acted and conceptual albums that combined poetry and music. Musical director Rebecca Nash will guide a stellar line up of musicians from Bristol for this performance. Tickets: £18. Visit: bristoljazzandbluesfest.com SUNDAY 21 JANUARY, 9 – 10.30AM

FRIDAY 19 AND SATURDAY 20 JANUARY, TIMES VARY

Bristol Acoustic Festival, The Louisiana This much-anticipated festival is renowned for showcasing new and exciting artists from across the city. This year is no different with a line-up that includes The Funkensteins, Moody Will & the Roll, Daisy Chapman and plenty more great music. Individual tickets

Winter wellness walk, Prior Park Landscape Garden, Bath A peaceful walk through the gardens at the historic Prior Park with head gardener Alice to take in the early morning atmosphere. Booking essential, tel: 0344 249 1895. £7 per person. Visit: nationaltrust.org.uk/prior-parklandscape-garden Continued on page 30

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EDITOR’S PICK... OPEN DAILY UNTIL TUESDAY 16 JANUARY

Millennium Square Winter Fair, Millennium Square The festivities may be over, but you can still enjoy a winter playground on Bristol's Harbourside this month. Put your skates on and try your hand on the ice rink outside We The Curious, before grabbing something delicious to eat from one of the food and drink stalls, or visit the Après-ski bar for a tipple or two. You can also take a trip into the skies on the big wheel, where you can see the beautiful views over Bristol’s harbour. Jon Craig Photography

• Visit: wethecurious.org

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LOCAL | EVENTS

Rocky Horror Picture Show at Colston Hall

Swan Lake at Bristol Hippodrome

FROM 22 JANUARY WEDNESDAY 24 JANUARY, 10 – 11.30AM

Adult Workshops: Atoms to Astrophysics, We The Curious This is the journey from the centre of the atom to the cosmos, told in particles, waves and energy. Amazing practical activities and demonstrations culminate with the brand new paintball particle accelerator, to show how the really small stuff helps to understand the really big stuff. To book, tel: 0117 9157777. Visit: wethecurious.org WEDNESDAY 24 JANUARY, 2 – 5PM

Heart Failure Patient Day, The Vassall Centre, Gill Avenue, Fishponds Do you know anyone with heart failure? Dr Yasmin Ismail, a cardiologist from the Bristol Heart Institute, and a team of experts will be answering questions and giving practical advice at this open afternoon event. Includes sessions on managing medication, safe exercises, diet tips and new treatments. All welcome, no booking required. Tel: 0117 342 6691 if you would like to attend.

FRIDAY 26 JANUARY, 10.30AM – 4.30PM

SATURDAY 27 JANUARY, 8PM

Art History Day School: An Unsuitable Job for a Woman? Royal West of England Academy

Griff Rhys Jones, Redgrave Theatre, Percival Road, Clifton, Bristol

In association with the Women with Vision and Women of the RWA exhibitions, this day school explores the achievement of female artists in sculpture and portrait painting – both considered until recently the prerogative of the male hand and gaze. £30 per person. Visit: rwa.org.uk

Join Griff Rhys Jones, star of Not the Nine o’clock News, Smith and Jones and Three Men In A Boat, as he airs stories, anecdotes, reminiscences and outright lies, from 40 years of travelling – down rivers and up mountains, into Africa, out of India, and across the arid wastes of the BBC canteen. Tickets: £19. Visit: redgravetheatre.com

FRIDAY 26 JANUARY, 7PM – 1AM

SATURDAY 27 JANUARY, 9.15PM

Murder Mystery Night – Burns Night Special, Bristol Museum & Art Gallery

The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Colston Hall

Watch as the storyline unfolds, quiz the characters about their motives and find the clues to help solve the murder. Can you unravel the mystery? The evening will include a whisky cocktail on arrival, live bagpiper to pipe in the Haggis, three course Scottish themed dinner and disco until 1am. £49.95 per person, book in advance. 18+ only. To book, call: 0117 922 2127 or email events.bmag@compass-group.co.uk

Enjoy this late night big screen experience of the classic cult musical comedy The Rocky Horror Picture Show, as part of Bristol’s Slapstick Festival. Along with the screening of the film, original cast member and Transylvanian party guest Christopher Biggins will reveal his fascinating behind-the-scenes anecdotes before the film commences. There will also be pre-show live entertainment in the foyer. Tickets: £10 – £60. Visit: colstonhall.org

FRIDAY 26 JANUARY, 7.30PM

WEDNESDAY 24 JANUARY, 7PM

Winter warmers wine tasting, Averys Cellars, Culver Street, Bristol Taste a great selection of full flavoured and complex reds (and some whites) to help keep the long nights at bay during the winter months. The wines will also be paired with cheeses from the Arch House Deli. £25 per person. Visit: averys.com THURSDAY 25 JANUARY, 7.30PM

Academy of St Martin in the Fields: The Four Seasons, Colston Hall

Silent Comedy Gala, Colston Hall

SUNDAY 28 JANUARY, 2PM

Bristol’s stand-out annual comedy celebration returns for a 14th edition at Colston Hall – a unique celebration of the best onscreen classic silent comedy and live music. The host of this year’s gala is award-winning Tim Vine, who will introduce an incredible triple-bill of laugh-out-loud comedy classics all accompanied by world class live music. Tickets: £10.50 – £60. Visit: colstonhall.org

Jo Brand’s Top Comedy Moments, Bristol Old Vic

SATURDAY 27 JANUARY, 7PM

Our Life with Birds, 1532 Performing Arts Centre, Elton Road, Bristol

Lee Mack’s Laurel and Hardy Classics, Colston Hall

One of the world’s greatest chamber orchestras, the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, will be bringing a sprinkling of iconic Vivaldian seasoning, as well as Beethoven’s iconic Symphony No. 2 and a new work by basset Edgar Meyer. Free pre-concert talk with conductor and music educator Jonathan James at 6.25pm. For tickets, call: 0117 203 4040 or visit: colstonhall.org

Comedian Lee Mack will be hosting this special, one-off event celebrating two of his top comedy heroes – Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy – as part of Bristol’s Slapstick Festival. Complete with full comedy shorts and live music, Lee will bring the timeless Laurel and Hardy back to the big screen. Tickets: £10 – £25.50. Visit: colstonhall.org

As part of the Slapstick Festival writer, actor, director and comedian Jo Brand (Absolutely Fabulous, QI, Have I Got News for You) will be choosing her top comedy moments from television and film. Discover what makes her laugh and who her comedy heroes are. £20 per person, visit: slapstick.org.uk SUNDAY 28 JANUARY, 7PM

It’s not often you see birds on stage in a theatre and even more rare to see one flying over the audience, but Our Life with Birds promises to give audiences a rare opportunity to meet golden eagles, peregrine falcons, hawks, owls, starlings and many more - all raised and trained with the utmost care by bird handlers Lloyd and Rose Buck. Tickets: £12. Visit: 1532bristol.co.uk Continued on page 31

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LOCAL | EVENTS

The Planetarium at We The Curious, image: Ben Bisek

Beauty and The Beast at Tobacco Factory Theatres

FROM 29 JANUARY TUESDAY 30 JANUARY, 10.30AM

How Methodism became an international movement: Talk by Gary M Best, The New Room Warden Gary M Best will explore why and how the Methodist movement spread to America initially in the 18th century without the official support of the Wesleys. Tickets: £3 including refreshments. Visit: newroombristol.org.uk TUESDAY 30 JANUARY – SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY, 7.30PM (PLUS 2.30PM SATURDAY MATINEE)

A Passage to India, Bristol Old Vic The advice was harsh but clear, and Aziz ignored it. Now he lies in jail on a charge of sexual assault. Forster’s masterpiece poses a question more urgent today than ever: how can we love one another in a world divided by culture and belief? Multi award-winning ensemble, simple8, transport us to Imperial India, conjuring up the elephants and caves, courthouses and temples with the simplest and boldest means. Tickets: £10 – £29. Visit: bristololdvic.org.uk WEDNESDAY 31 JANUARY – SATURDAY 3 MARCH, TIMES VARY

entire audience to create a truly astounding experience. £15 per person, recommended for 16+. Book online, visit: wethecurious.org

FROM SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY, 11AM – 4PM

As the title suggests, TV panel host and stand-up comedian Jimmy Carr revisits some of his favourite jokes from the last 15 years and repackages them alongside brand new material for his epic tour. Tickets: £29.56. Tel: 0117 203 4040 or visit: colstonhall.org

Spectacular Snowdrops, Newark Park, Gloucestershire See the spectacular snowy white carpets of snowdrops Newark Park. Blow away the winter cobwebs and enjoy the fresh air and stunning views of the Gloucestershire countryside on this estate walk. Free, normal admission charges apply for the venue. Dogs on leads are welcome. Sturdy footwear and warm, waterproof clothing suggested. Visit: nationaltrust.org.uk/newark-park SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY, 7.30PM

St John Passion: Bath Camerata, St Mary Redcliffe Church Alongside Bath Camerata, James Gilchrist leads a line up of some of Europe’s great soloists and players in Bach’s dramatic masterpiece, retelling the story of Jesus’ last days. Tickets: £10 – £28, VIP tickets: £45. To book, visit: bathcamerata.co.uk SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY, 7.30PM

Wicked, Bristol Hippodrome

All Night Vigil: Bristol Bach Choir, St James Priory, Bristol

Winner of more than 100 international awards, Wicked has been casting its magical spell across the world for over a decade. It tells the incredible untold story of an unlikely but profound friendship between two young women who first meet as sorcery students. Their extraordinary adventures in Oz will ultimately see them fulfil their destinies as Glinda The Good and the Wicked Witch of the West. Tickets: £22.50 – £87. Visit: atgtickets.com/bristol

Rachmaninov’s All Night Vigil, also known as his Vespers, has been lauded as his ‘greatest achievement’ and as ‘the greatest musical achievement of the Russian Orthodox Church’. This extraordinarily inspirational work can be considered as the finest a cappella choral works of any era. Tickets: £15 – £20, £5 for students and under 25s. Visit: bristolbach.org.uk TUESDAY 6, 13 AND 20 FEBRUARY, TIMES VARY

NEXT MONTH

Dark Side of the Moon: The Fulldome Experience, We The Curious

THURSDAY 1 FEBRUARY, 1.05PM

Sean Shibe: YCAT Lunchtime Concert, The Lantern, Colston Hall In 2012 musician Sean Shibe became the only solo guitarist to be selected for the BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artists scheme and to

32 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

receive a Borletti-Buitoni Trust Fellowship. At this lunchtime concert he will be playing JS Bach: Lute Suite No.4 or 2 and Villa-Lobos: Selection of Preludes and Etudes. Tickets: £5.50, tel: 0117 203 4040 or visit: colstonhall.org

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An audio-visual extravaganza, inspired by the music of Pink Floyd, featuring the entire 1973, Dark Side of the Moon album in glorious 5.1 surround sound, with spellbinding abstract projections on the full dome enveloping the

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WEDNESDAY 7 FEBRUARY, 8PM

Jimmy Carr: The Best Of, Ultimate, Gold, Greatest Hits Tour, Colston Hall

FRIDAY 9 FEBRUARY, 8PM

Miranda Sykes, 1532 Performing Arts Centre, Elton Road, Bristol Miranda Sykes, the acclaimed singer and bassist is returning to her roots. After a career spanning over 20 years, during which she has played with many of the top musicians and singers within the folk world, she will be touring as she started out: one woman, one bass, and one guitar. Borrowed Places is a project that draws its inspiration primarily from the songs and landscapes of her native Lincolnshire but seen through the eyes of someone who has lived away for many years. Tickets: £12. Visit: 1532bristol.co.uk TUESDAY 13 – WEDNESDAY 14 FEBRUARY, 2.30PM AND 7.30PM

Pacifists and Protesters: The lost story of resistance to World War One, The Redgrave Theatre, Percival Road, Bristol The Gloucester Theatre Company’s new piece of theatre to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War. Features a new play called A Dangerous Woman (shortlisted for the Adrian PaganNew Writing Award) and a devised presentation, inspired by the words of poets, pacifists and other protesters. A Dangerous Woman tells the incredible story of Alice Wheeldon, a suffragette and singlemother, who sheltered conscription-evaders from arrest. Tickets: £13/£12 concs, visit: thegloucestertheatrecompany.co.uk n


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THEATRE

Wicked: the Wardrobe

Costume designer Susan Hilferty discusses the inspirations for her Tony Award-winning costume designs with David Cote, ahead of the smash hit show’s return to Bristol

Amy Ross as Elphaba (all stage photography by Matt Crockett)

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n Susan Hilferty’s bustling studio workshop on West 24th Street in New York, you’ll find shelves overflowing with books and drafting tables covered in papers. This is the designer’s invaluable “image library” where she finds pictures that spark her imagination. Anything will serve: newspaper clippings, magazine photos, or illustrations in books. For the intensive research and visualisation needed to create the astonishing costumes of Wicked, she searched far and wide, from the contemporary fashion design of John Galliano to the Edwardian couture that she “twisted” to create many of the unique Tony Award-winning costumes. “In many ways, I consider myself a historian, a sociologist and an art historian – in addition to all the other things I do with clothes,” she says. “To me, what was so exciting about Wicked was trying to understand a world that had a connection to the turn of the century as we know it. But I also had to incorporate the idea that animals talk, there is magic, and that there are Munchkins in this place called Oz. So the design process meant researching history and creating a parallel universe...”

The Wizard “My research focused on the period in which Baum wrote the books, from 1900 to about 1920. So in a way, it’s centered on the Wizard, who is our representative in Oz. He is somebody from 1900 who has gone up in a balloon and somehow drifted over to Oz. So I created a style I call ‘twisted Edwardian’. It’s Edwardian-era suits and dresses, but asymmetrical – the collar might be off centre, or the cut of the dress twists around crazily.”

Shiz University “For the student uniforms at Shiz University, I played with things that you recognise in school uniforms, but I put them together in different ways. Somebody has one type of shirt, or their tie is out, or they’re wearing a crazy sweater with one arm in a sleeve and the other bare; men in skirts. Basically, I came up with the idea of a Shiz school store, where you can mix and match different tops and bottoms to suit your personality, even though everything still has the same Shiz pattern of blue and white stripes. That’s really at the heart of the play: the struggle between individuality and uniformity. It’s also a fashion issue in general. People think they’re renegades, but they’re actually just following a trend. Back in the ’50s, leather jackets became a symbol of rebellion because bikers wore them. Now, of course, it’s a fashion thing.”

Emerald City “Of the whole show, the costumes in the Emerald City were the easiest thing to do, because it was just no-holds-barred, delirious dressmaking. It was like an imaginary runway show, where I could be 20 different designers in the Emerald City. One element I wanted to work in – besides all the different shades of green, the extravagant hats, and more of the twisted Edwardian formal wear – was the use of animals. If you look

closely, many of the costumes have fur and feathers. Thematically, I thought it was important to show how people in the Emerald City, who have money and live the high life, have animal remnants in their couture. Obviously, that fits into the political issues of the play. Animals’ rights are being taken away, but the people of Oz let it happen because the Wizard keeps them wealthy and entertained. Politics are at the heart of this play – it was really important for all of us designers to hold on to it, instead of simply telling a funny story. It’s one of the reasons the show moves people: they’re recognising a struggle between good and bad.”

Glinda “Glinda is the epitome of good, so I did research by asking little girls what goodness looks like. They said like a princess, like a bride so I studied pictures of Queen Elizabeth II from her coronation, Lady Diana’s wedding dress, and all of the dresses that are emblematic of ‘perfect femininity’. When you look at any of the English coronation images, it’s hysterical, because it’s all about impressing in a certain way. Even Queen Elizabeth, in the 1950s, wore a crown and a long robe and held her sceptre, and I wanted to tap into that. Glinda is also connected to the sky, sun and stars. That influenced her tiara and wand. The sparkles on her dress are all about that, too. She symbolises lightness, air, bubbles.”

Elphaba “Elphaba is exactly the opposite. I see her as connected to things that are inside the earth. So the patterns and textures I wove into her dress include fossils, stalactites or striations that you see when you crack a stone apart. I mixed different colours into her skirt, so everything is literally twisted. Now, by the time she gets to the Emerald City, she feels she belongs. I change her shoes to a lighter pair. We take her glasses away, her hair comes down, and she’s wearing a lighter colour. Suddenly she feels accepted and even, you could say, fashionable. Glinda tells her not to be afraid at the end of act one and she answers, “I’m not.” ■ • From Wicked: The Grimmerie, published by Hyperion. The show runs at Bristol Hippodrome from 31 January to 3 March

Wicked factfile • The production features 350 costumes, 140 wigs, 244 pairs of shoes, 110 hats, 125 pairs of gloves and 30 prosthetic masks. • Elphaba’s ‘wicked witch’ dress uses 40 yards of fabric and the skirt alone takes three weeks to construct. There are nearly 50 layers of gathered ruffles in the skirt, which is made from 45 different fabrics. • Glinda’s ‘bubble’ dress is made up of 45 petals, each of which takes three days to bead, and a day and a half to hand sequin. There are 20 types of sequins and almost 100,000 sequins used in this one costume. • 2,000 metres of ribbon are used in the Emerald City costumes Helen Woolf as Glinda

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Original wicked witch dress – costume sketch by Susan Hilferty

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Why is it that places which contribute so much to the cultural and economic lifeblood of the city are coming under threat?

SOUND OF THE CITY

As the rising tide of development threatens more than one legendary local music mainstay, Jenny Hayes explores the issues facing Bristol’s independent venues and their importance to our city

Exchange has become a multi-faceted space with a coee shop, record store, recording studio and events including punk-rock yoga (image by Harriet Elder)


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MUSIC & CULTURE

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ristol is the rebel city of the UK. Embedded within the rolling hills of the West Country, it’s a place teeming with culture, creativity and spirit. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the rich and diverse music scene, which over the last 40 years has given rise to internationally acclaimed artists that range from Massive Attack, Portishead and Tricky in the 1990s, through to artists like George Ezra, The Fauns and Idles in more recent years and up to today. Instrumental to this success are the city’s grassroots music venues. These are the places that give local artists their first break – providing them with a supportive space to experiment, a platform on which to perform, and an opportunity to build their fan base. From these small venues, our unique music scene has grown and flourished, bringing deserved fame to the city, and with it a hefty boost to the local economy. A census carried out by UK Music, an industry-funded body, and Buckinghamshire New University showed that live music generated £123million in revenue for Bristol in 2015. Yet that same year, 50% of our music venues were affected by development, noise or planning issues. So what’s going on? Why is it that the very places which contribute so much to the cultural and economic lifeblood of our city are coming under threat? The latest in a slew of venues across the city facing the negative impact of Bristol’s development boom is Thekla. This mighty cargo ship has been a landmark on the Bristol harbourside for 34 years, but as many of us are sadly aware, in early November 2017 Bristol City Council approved a planning application for 36 flats to be built on nearby Redcliffe Wharf which calls into question the future of this local cultural icon. Alex Black, general manager at Thekla, explains that inadequate sound assessments lie at the root of the problem. “The developer undertook an initial assessment at a reasonable time on a Friday,” he says, “but it was a night when only one of our two rooms was open. That means it didn’t give a true representation of our full output.” Because of this, the flats are likely to be constructed without enough soundproofing, which could result in complaints from residents affected by noise from the venue later down the line. With an estimated 30% of the UK’s live music venues closing over the last decade as a result of similar issues it’s likely that these complaints would lead to the same fate for Thekla. To raise awareness of the issue, the venue launched its #SaveThekla campaign, which is urging people to share their photos of Thekla and the experiences they’ve had on the boat under the hashtag on social media. “Already we’ve had a fantastic response to the campaign,” says Alex. “The support from people across Bristol, national and international artists, as well as industry magazines, has been really overwhelming.”

...Grassroots music venues should be held in the same esteem as art galleries or theatres for the contribution they make to the culture and economy of the UK... The campaign has also proved a catalyst for further discussions between the venue and the developer, Complex Development Projects. “They’ve expressed an interest to work with us on the matter,” says Alex, “and hopefully they will. But we’re still asking everyone to get behind us and share their stories under #SaveThekla. We want to stay in the minds of the people and the property developers so that they will honour their word in working with us. After all, it’s best for us and for future residents if another sound assessment is carried out when we are at our peak operating capacity, to ensure the right amount of soundproofing is used.”

Let’s hope the pledge comes to fruition, as Thekla occupies a unique and vital place within the Bristol music scene. With a capacity of 500, this mid-size venue is perfectly positioned to draw national and international artists on the brink of super-stardom to play in the city, and with them music fans from across the South West. Just across the water from Thekla stands another of the city’s legendary music mainstays. For over 30 years The Louisiana, an intimate grassroots venue with a capacity of 140, has been a stalwart of the local scene and a barometer for the future success of local and national bands.

...As a business, we aren’t against development, and having all those students on our doorstep is potentially good for us – all we ask is that developers take the necessary measures...

“There are certain promoters who will put on shows here to see how the Bristol audience reacts,” says owner Mig Schillace. “If a band does well, the promoters know they are capable of going on to play a much bigger venue.” This certainly rings true, with headliners such as Super Furry Animals, Placebo, Coldplay and The Chemical Brothers all performing at The Louis early on in their careers. As well as attracting upcoming nationals to Bristol, the place has played a pivotal role in nurturing home-grown talent through the years. “We try and do as much as we can to support local artists,” says Mig. “It’s venues like us that provide a platform for bands to work through, play a few songs and build up a fan base. Then they can go on and play bigger venues. “What we try and do is encourage these bands to learn how to put on a show, so they can do it themselves and not have to rely on other people. We’ll help out with things like advertising, provide the room and top engineers, but it’s up to them to get people through the door. It’s something that a lot of venues around the city do because it motivates young bands and gives them valuable understanding of the work that goes into organising a good night.” It’s a method that works, with Bristol groups such as Idles, Lice, The Shimmer Band, and Scarlet Rascal all taking the stage at The Louis in recent years, and going on to forge a name for themselves in the music industry. With support from local live haunts, upcoming artists have room to rise, develop and become the next generation of Bristol’s musical pioneers, furthering the city’s reputation as an epicentre for culture and creativity. “Culturally, the independent music scene is really important – at a local and national level,” says Mig. “This is something that venue owners have recognised for years, and now organisations like UK Music and Music Venue Trust are getting behind us to lobby the idea that music venues, especially those at grassroots level, should be held in the same esteem as art galleries or theatres for the contribution they make to the culture and economy of the UK.” The importance of the emergence of Music Venue Trust in 2014 is reiterated by Matt Otridge, co-owner of Exchange in Old Market. “When I was first made aware of the work of Music Venue Trust I thought it made complete sense,” he says. “Until it was established, venue owners had no support but now there is a community where we can come together to talk about issues and exchange ideas and all of a sudden we don’t feel so alone.” It seems only fitting that, finally, our owners and promoters have a forum of their own and a platform on which to join together to effect change. For years the venues that they have run have been places where people can come together to enjoy shared experiences, swap ideas, and forge relationships that strengthen the social and economic fabric of the THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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city – and that is why Matt and his business partners decided to run Exchange as a community interest company from April 2017. “What we do has a community and cultural impact,” he explains. “No-one becomes a venue owner to become rich, we do it because we believe in the value music brings to people’s lives.” It’s a model that is being adopted by an increasing number of venues across the UK and one that is proving a strong weapon in the fight against development as more and more people begin to recognise that live music is culturally relevant as opposed to a noisy nuisance. Matt and his team at Exchange are dedicated to finding ways to move beyond live music and offer more besides, with the aim of further enriching life for the surrounding community. “We opened the coffee shop about a year ago and then soon afterwards friends of ours moved in upstairs and started the record shop. Now we have a recording studio downstairs as well as the live music room at the back. “Moving forward, we’d like to make even more of the facilities we have here – particularly the live music room, which is empty for most of the day. Already BIMM [the Bristol branch of the British and Irish Modern Music Institute] use it for assessments and auditions and we also have jazz band practice here once a week, theatre group rehearsals and punk-rock yoga on a Saturday. “But we want it to become a real community space. There’s no hire fee to use it during the daytime, and we’d like to encourage people with ideas to come forward and share them with us. If the idea is fully formed they can just come in and get going. If not, we’ll work with them to get their idea off the ground. It’s our natural evolution as a community interest company.”

...No-one becomes a venue owner to become rich, we do it because we believe in the value music brings to people’s lives... Despite the venue’s contribution to the character, wealth and success of the city, Exchange, like Thekla, exists in the shadow of development. In September 2017, five years after the venue opened, a vast block of student flats was built directly behind it. “I wouldn’t say it’s forced us to change what we are doing,” says Matt, “but we are more wary about what we put on. We chose this location in Old Market because it was away from residential areas and now we’ve got a consideration that wasn’t here when we moved in. “As a business we aren’t against development, and having all those students on our doorstep is potentially good for us. All we’re asking is that developers take the necessary measures to provide adequate soundproofing so residents and venues can live side by side without worry.” It is a simple request, and one that – thanks to initiatives such as UK Music and Music Venue Trust, as well as the continued tenacity of our independent venues – seems to be gaining traction. Earlier this year, an ‘agent of change’ principle was added to the planning bill that states new developments must shoulder responsibility for compliance if they are situated near an existing music venue. While it is yet to be seen how effective this principle will prove in reality, it is a definite step in the right direction. In Bristol, it’ll hopefully bolster a wider movement toward smarter urban planning that preserves the unique blend of culture, community and creativity that defines the city and allows our independent music venues to thrive. ■ • Independent Venue Week is back this month, from 29 January to 4 February. What better way to beat the winter blues than to get out and listen to top local acts in the city’s finest grassroots venues? Find out who’s playing where at independentvenueweek.com 40 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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The team at The Louisiana teach young bands as much as they can about how to put on a good night (image by Ania Shrimpton)

Bristol band Idles started out at grassroots venues and had a great 2017, even supporting Foo Fighters

Tiger Cub at The Louis (image by Laure Noverraz)

The Shimmer Band: another promising local group who have appreciated the platform provided by the likes of The Louisiana, Thekla and Exchange


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Record Breaking Auction Results in 2017

Chippendale design chair

Rolex Explorer Ref: 1610

Chinese Lanterns

George VI’s Dress Jacket

£11,400

£8,650

£25,500

£7,150

2017 marked a record breaking year for Clevedon Salerooms with the March Specialist Sale breaking the record for the highest sale total for one of the firms Quarterly Specialist Sales. The sale included a consignment of furniture and decorative items originally at Ston Easton Park. Two weeks later yet another record was broken with the highest sale total achieved at one of the regular Antiques and Interiors sales. Every lot sold at Clevedon is illustrated and offered with live internet bidding which has pushed prices ever higher with successful bidders located around the globe. A full calendar of sales is planned for 2018 and the Salerooms will be strengthening the valuation team in the spring with a new appointment. The successful Specialist Watch and Jewellery Valuation Days will be held at various locations throughout the year If you have items you may be thinking of selling, why not take them to one of the Salerooms Free Valuation Days? Alternatively, email images to info@csrauctions.com. Every lot, in every auction, illustrated and sold with live internet bidding.

Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers The Auction Centre Kenn Road, Kenn Clevedon, BS21 6TT

Free Valuation Days 2nd, 15th, 16th, 29th, 30th January --------------------------------------------------

At the Salerooms 9.30am – 1pm & 2pm – 5pm No appointment necessary – Ample free parking Alternatively for a free no-obligation valuation, email images to info@csrauctions.com

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

Tel: 01934 830111 www.clevedon-salerooms.com

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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Arnos Vale Cemetery

Rooftops and Archways: Susie Ramsay, Christmas Steps Gallery, 30 January – 11 February Local fine artist Susie Ramsay’s new exhibition, at 11 Christmas Steps, features a new collection of paintings continuing her focus on Bristol’s architectural landscapes. Building upon her most recent exhibition ‘Streets, Lanes and Skylines’ (2016), Susie will be presenting work that captures the city’s viewpoints and hidden corners, each painting providing a fresh perspective of the city. “The aim is to present a bold and contemporary vision of Bristol,” says Susie. “This collection offers a freer series of paintings than previous exhibitions, capturing the spirit and vibrancy of the city. My work is inspired by how the natural world impacts on our built environment; how a change in light, weather or season can transform our daily city landscape. ‘Rooftops and Archways’ is about revealing the hidden parts of Bristol and presenting the city in a new light.” The show includes paintings of Bird Cage Walk, Colston Street, Cliftonwood, the Granary Building and more. • susie-ramsay-artist.com

Women with Vision, Royal West of England Academy, until 11 March The RWA is marking its 160th birthday by sharing the work of ground-breaking women artists, past, present and future. Across four major exhibitions, the gallery will bring together important artworks by Turner PrizeHelix (detail), Sandra Blow, 1990, acrylic nominated Cornelia Parker, Dame on canvas (image © Sandra Blow Estate) Elisabeth Frink, Sonia Lawson, Sandra Blow and others, to explore their profound impact. Coinciding with the Vote100 British Women’s suffrage celebrations, Women with Vision will celebrate these artists and how their work shaped the world, featuring painting, drawing, collage, print and sculpture. The RWA owes a lot to women artists, and from its foundation to the present day, has had them at its heart. The building cost £2,000 to build, money that was donated by philanthropist Ellen Sharples when she died in 1849, and it was the first Royal Academy of Art to have a female president. The RWA also has a female director and many female academicians. This diverse exhibition takes a walk through the RWA’s fascinating history and shines a light on the people that shaped it. • rwa.org.uk

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EXHIBITIONS

Brave Poor Things: Reclaiming Bristol’s Disability History, M Shed, until 15 April A landmark exhibition exploring the previously hidden histories of deaf and disabled people in Bristol. It’s estimated today that there are one billion disabled people in the world, yet their history continues to be overlooked, even while their stories are intrinsic to the environments we live in and around every day. This show tells the unique story of The Guild of the Brave Poor Things; a pioneering social and educational space for disabled people, founded in Bristol in 1896 by local philanthropist Ada Vachell. The Guild set new benchmarks for disabled people, affecting the ways they were treated and viewed by society, and more importantly, how they viewed themselves. The Guild’s 1913 building was exemplary in its design, often described as the first purpose-built building for disabled people; it played a unique role in bringing together people with physical impairments in order to socialise and enjoy themselves in a place free from judgement or stigma. It also offered routes back into work by enabling apprenticeships and teaching members to make items that were then sold. The exhibition displays artefacts made by these members, archive material and photographs depicting life at the Guild. There are also interactive elements including a digital game, and a film created by young people in Bristol. • bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed

Native Color, Rainmaker Gallery, until 25 February This exhibition celebrates the range and depth of colour investigation flourishing within 21stcentury Native American art; and masterful colourists including Nocona Burgess, Billy Hensley, Dan Lomahaftewa, Debra Yepa-Pappan and Cara Romero. The focus is the work of artist and curator Tony Tiger, who is inspired by the expressive use of colour in the traditional ribbonwork appliqué designs of Sac and Fox tribal regalia and in Seminole patchwork. Other highlights include the paintings of Yatika Starr Fields, who describes his canvases as “sensation through color and movement”; Comanche painter Nocona Burgess who has perfected a method of applying vibrant pigments onto dark backgrounds that he describes as “painting outward”; and the late Hopi and Choctaw artist Dan Viets Lomahaftewa. • rainmakerart.co.uk

Red Dirt Dreaming by Tony Tiger

● Tipping Point, The Box at We The Curious, 19 January – 18 March The Box celebrates the synergy between art and science, and features exhibitions and artists that occupy the exciting space where art and science meet. Kathy Hinde invites us all to consider our relationship with water, and the necessity of balancing how we use the world’s water resources. The installation is created using a delicate combination of glass, water, audio feedback and lighting. Free with standard admission. • wethecurious.org

Image by Kathy Hinde

● Take exhibition at The Vestibules, City Hall, 15 – 19 January ‘Take’ meaning ‘bamboo’ in Japanese, is a collaborative exhibition that explores the ways we respond to poetry, featuring works by Biba and Laurie Cole and an animation by Leo Gavin. The works showcased have been developed from a large game of poetry consequences called The Mother Stem that took place at SPACE and Arnolfini earlier this year. In the game, the public used large bamboo dip pens and brushes to write poetry and draw, responding to each other’s words and pictures. Artists Laurie and Biba have collected this chain of responses and used them to form new paintings and films that carry the concept further. Biba has created an experimental film that explores every single response through the act of movement and soundscape while Laurie has constructed paintings that play with the words and visuals of the chain and highlights small and intricate moments from within the responses. Collaborator Leo’s animation takes the same concept of responding to poetry but over a longer time period; responding to a piece of music composed in 1958 that features and responds to poetry from 780 years ago.

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MUSIC | GAMING Developers replaced shocks and scares with wonder and discovery, elevating the game to a piece of artwork

GAME OF TONES Dear Esther Live is an ambitious, real-time show that sees a video gamer play out a unique path to which live musicians respond with a haunting score, meaning no two visits to the game’s Hebridean island setting are the same. Mike Diver finds out more from the game studio’s Dan Pinchbeck and BAFTA-winning composer Jessica Curry

E

xploring the derelict buildings, forests and shimmering catacombs of a virtual island shrouded in mystery, in a live performance that blurs the boundaries between video game, ghost story and film screening. Sound good? We think so. It’ll certainly be different, at the very least. Guided through a deserted landscape, as fragmented memories of a fatal car crash and the island’s history converge, Dear Esther’s audience hover in a halfimagined world between life and death, before the story moves towards an emotional climax. When award-winning developer The Chinese Room first created the ground-breaking video game, it replaced shocks and scares with wonder and discovery, elevating it to a piece of artwork. Now, inside Colston Hall, it will be taken one step further, becoming an affecting live experience that lingers in the minds of the audience, long after it’s over. MD: I suppose the first question has to be the simplest, and the most pertinent: why take this show, this game, on the road? Jessica Curry: It’s the fifth anniversary. So we did the ‘Landmark Edition’ for console (PlayStation 4 and Xbox One) in 2016, and we’d not really been thinking much about Dear Esther for the last couple of years. But going back into it, we were really nervous – was it going to stand the test of time? Would it not have aged particularly well? We all sat down with much trepidation to discuss this fifth anniversary edition, and we were so proud of it. I’d been invited to do a week in London with the British Council, and talking to really exciting people like HOME in Manchester and the British Film Institute, about sound and image, and about how you successfully marry them. I thought: hang on, we’re missing a trick here with Dear Esther, in terms of playing it live. It 44 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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has so many advantages that way. The show is comprised of a string quartet, piano and singer, so that’s really manageable in terms of touring. It’s one actor, which is fantastic. And it’s such a beautiful game. The visuals are so rich and exciting, and the writing is so good. I had this light bulb moment: why isn’t this a thing? Let’s make it a thing. Did you always feel that Dear Esther could be more than ‘just a game’? JC: As creators, you’re always moving on. But what kept Dear Esther alive was the feedback we were getting from other people. We employ a young team at The Chinese Room, and they were coming back from Rezzed [London’s biggest games event] and saying: “Dear Esther’s been referenced in five of the 10 talks I’ve been to today.” It has had a life for other people, and for the industry, I think. Dan Pinchbeck: It’s been amazing, seeing how far it’s filtered. People are writing PhDs on the game now. When we started working in games, we came at it with the sort of same approach that we’d come to other mediums we’d worked in – we wanted to tell stories through text and music. And it just seemed to be a really good fit. But the gap between our expectations for Esther, and what it’s become, they couldn’t be further apart. We’ve always been really proud of it but we would never, in a million years, have thought it’d have this kind of cultural impact. To see it now held up, and referenced endlessly, it’s extraordinary. Would you say that the live experience isn’t explicitly for ‘gamers’? That, much like the game itself, it’s ticking more than that single box? JC: I’m really passionate about expanding audiences, and that’s one of the reasons why I do my Classic FM show, High Score. There’s a whole world of people who don’t know about the extraordinary panoply, and


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MUSIC | GAMING

rich and diverse world, of video game music. And I want people to be able to experience that. Not to show them something, to say: see, I told you it was good. But to gently say: you’ve probably never heard this before. And I think it’ll be similar with Dear Esther Live. One of the things the Barbican were especially pleased with, when we had the show there, was the percentage of people coming that represented a new audience for them. I think it was 64%. They’d never stepped through those doors before, but they found something that they felt really comfortable going to. These can be intimidating spaces. It’s like an art gallery – if you’ve never been to one before, you sort of imagine what it’s going to be, and that it’s not for you. What were your nerves like before the first show, at the Barbican? JC: There’s nothing as nerve racking as live. That instant feedback when something goes wrong – you’re there, the audience is there. DP: You can’t patch a performance halfway through if you discover something’s gone wrong. JC: The tech was the biggest worry on the night. We had world-class players and singers, so they weren’t going to go wrong. We were only wary of: is the computer going to blow up halfway through? DP: There’s quite an elaborate backup plan with two PCs running the game simultaneously, with feed going out to six monitors from each. We’ve adapted the game now to dump in a whole load of invisible walls, but at the first Barbican performance there was a point where I was controlling the camera and walking very slowly backwards, and Jess was sat there in the audience going: “cliff edge, cliff edge”! There are now things in place to prevent an accidental tumble to your death halfway through the show. JC: That was enormously stressful. What we’re going to make more of on this tour is that not everyone realised that it was actually being played live. DP: That gives the show a special edge. The music is so haunting and so immersive. There was a point in the second concert, at the London Games Festival, where the conductor just hung a little longer on the last note, and being able to stop and let that play out before the camera moved again, you couldn’t do that with something like a live soundtrack to a film – you’ve got to be constantly driven by the visuals. But to have the visuals respond to the music is really exciting.

How do you feel about anyone using the music from your games in a new context? JC: A piece from Rapture was used on Top Gear, for a rocket launch in Kazakhstan. And it was brilliant. It was great to see it recontextualised. We were just sat there giggling, because the Rapture music is so filmic, and the music supervisor from Top Gear loves it. So I personally like it when it gets reused, because it gives it a new life, and brings it to new people. I’m not too precious about it. Get it out there. Do you feel there’s still some snobbery about game music, versus that found in film and TV? JC: It’s really variable. Some places like the Barbican and Classic FM are welcoming games music with open arms, realising that it’s bringing in new audiences. They’re genuinely enthusiastic about the music that’s being played. But I think there’s still snobbery about games. This has been an ongoing conversation with BASCA, who run the Ivor Novello Awards, and the British Composer Awards – there’s no category at either of those for games music. And they are very anti-games music. So are the Proms. When we were nominated for 10 BAFTAs for Rapture, I got in touch with Front Row on Radio 4, thinking they’d be excited that a British company had achieved this; but they just said, “it’s games,” and they weren’t interested. But I think it’s changing. The groundswell of influential people, like the London Symphony Orchestra, one of the top orchestras in the world, they’re recording games music and playing it live. And that sheer weight will bring the last detractors around into the 21st century. ■

• Dear Esther Live takes place at Colston Hall on 1 February; colstonhall.org; thechineseroom.co.uk Jessica won a BAFTA for her gaming music

What’s the preparation been like for the live show? JC: The most beautiful thing, for me, is that the players on this tour played on the original soundtrack, so there’s a direct relationship there – they were there five years ago. There was a frenetic day at the Barbican, the day before the show. I look back now and if I’d have known how much work was needed to get the show up and running, I might’ve had second thoughts about it. Obviously we had to do a special build of the game that contained the triggers for the conductor and the actor, and the musicians are triggered by the conductor. That was a hell of a lot of work. And the cabling! The Barbican is world class, and it gets every kind of show in. I said to the producer there on the day of the rehearsal, “You must have had far more complicated shows in than this.” And she said: “Well actually, not really...” DP: There must have been three miles of cables on that stage. It was coiled everywhere. It really brought home how much this is a live performance – it’s not just playing along to a soundtrack. Have you found that people have come to some of your games because of their music? Given how Rapture’s soundtrack won a BAFTA. JC: Definitely. We hear from people who tell us they’ve never played one of our games, but they have all of the soundtracks. DP: We get quite a lot of mail from much older people. We heard from one person in their 90s. Often, people will play the soundtrack to their parents, and that’s a way into it for them. It helps them understand that games are not just all shooting and killing. Gaming is a shared language. A lot of people are yet to realise that games can engage you emotionally. When you’re using music as a route in, that’s a great way of showing that there is something you can relate to. It breaks down that barrier. JC: What I wanted for Rapture was this message of love and hope, and that we only have each other. I actually get contacted by people asking to use the music at their weddings. And, of course, they can.

Audiences will watch the live gaming journey as a narrator and live musicians react to what unfolds on screen

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FOOD & Drink

TASTY TITBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS The new-look Chequers in Hanham

CHEQUE IT OUT The Chequers Inn in Hanham Mills, set in one of our favourite Bristol spots on the edge of the River Avon, has undergone a huge refurbishment courtesy of Young’s, and is looking all the finer for it. Split into the Avon View room, which has bi-folding doors opening onto a heated outside terrace with panoramic views over the water; and dog-friendly spot The Snug, which features comfy fireside sofas, the pub is offering a fresh, seasonal British menu. There’s everything from spiced pumpkin soup; baked duck egg, tomato, pepper and chorizo stew; and chilli Dorset crab mac ‘n’ cheese; to 28-day-aged Angus steaks, wild boar sausage, and Sunday roasts with all the trimmings. Behind the bar, you’ll find rotating local beers such as Maiden Voyage; craft ales including Siren and Laganitas; cocktails shaken by expert bartenders; a variety of gins and vodkas; and 25 wines in addition to the list of champagnes and sparkling wines. • thechequershanhammills.co.uk

CIDER US UP!

BANKS IN BRISTOL Adam Banks, the new head chef at Jamie Oliver’s social enterprise restaurant Fifteen Cornwall, will be bringing a taste of the North Cornish coast to Bristol this month when he cooks a four-course gourmet feast in Long Ashton village hall. The popup, on 27 January, is being organised by Feast with a Chef, a venture run by food writer Clare Hargreaves since October 2013 with the aim of bringing fine food to a wider audience in a relaxed and informal setting. Adam is known for his nose-to-tail, root-to-tip ethos and Italian-influenced cooking using local ingredients sourced directly from producers; and his menu will showcase homemade pasta and favourite Cornish ingredients including fresh fish and Rodda’s cream and butter. Tickets cost £48.

• feastwithachef.co.uk

Two new ciders have been introduced into the Thatchers Cider Barn range. The series of special vintage ciders features small batch runs, with each cider demonstrating a particular attribute or story about the apple varieties chosen. Thatchers Redwood is blended from bittersweet and culinary apples including Katy, Harry Masters, Dabinett and Yarlington Mill, with a subtle vanilla note; a golden cider with a rich, intense character. The second to be introduced, Dabinett, is a soft, full-bodied single variety crafted from the Dabinett apple – discovered in the 1900s – to create a medium-sweet, amber cider with a full, rounded mouthfeel. “Being able to produce batch ciders with some of our favourite apple varieties of each harvest is a real joy,” says Martin Thatcher, fourth generation cidermaker. “The Dabinett apple has long been recognised as an outstanding English cider apple. The cider is bright and golden, and will appeal to those who like a fine, robust, traditional cider.”

• thatcherscider.co.uk

OUT OF THE BOX Are you one of the lucky folk who got a ticket for Harvey Nichols Bristol’s foodie collaboration with Wapping Wharf’s Box-E restaurant? They’ve teamed up to kickstart February in the most delicious way; with a night celebrating fine food at the department store’s Second Floor Restaurant. On 1 February, Box-E’s Tess and Elliot will not only be thinking out of the box as they usually do, but leaving their shipping container surrounds to create four courses championing the freshest seasonal produce in a modern British feast, starting with a cocktail and canapé reception. Attending? Tag your pictures with #thebristolmag for the chance to be featured. • harveynichols.com; boxebristol.com

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EXPERIENCE THE REAL GREEK IN BRISTOL Now open in Cabot Circus, The Real Greek is offering 25% off main menu food to anyone showing a valid cinema ticket for the same day as dining (T&C’s apply).

BRISTOL

The new restaurant embodies the relaxed Mediterranean experience of eating in Greece. Guests can choose from a selection of cold and hot mezes, grilled skewers, marinated meats and Souvlaki wraps, alongside a selection of hand sourced wine from Greece

25% off

84A Glass House, Cabot Circus, Bristol, BS1 3BX www.therealgreek.com/bristol • Tel: 0117 990 2170

main food menu if you show valid showcase cinema ticket for day of booking

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FOOD | RECIPES

We also love David’s dramatic-looking dish of spicy black beans with chorizo and squid – you can find this recipe in his new book, too

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FOOD | RECIPES

THE JOY OF MARKETING Acclaimed author and chef David Tanis shares a few recipes from his beautiful new cookbook

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e haven’t put the New York Times columnist’s latest collection of recipes down over the past few weeks. Taking us, ingredient by ingredient, through the market, letting all the natural flavours shine and encouraging intuitive, spontaneous cooking, it’s a lovely kitchen companion conducive to the ancient practices – foraging, sourcing local and organic produce – that have returned to the fore.

Tuscan pork roast (serves 6) Porchetta, that beyond-divine traditional Italian roast pork speciality, is usually made with a whole small pig, generously seasoned with wild fennel, rosemary, sage, and black pepper. This version uses a pork loin or shoulder roast. The loin is leaner, and a bit more expensive; ask the butcher for a front loin piece that has both a fat and a lean end to satisfy all tastes. But boneless pork shoulder makes a succulent roast too, and it has the perfect ratio of fat to lean throughout. (Lamb shoulder makes a fine substitute for those who don’t care for pork. Or use the seasoning for a roast capon or chicken.)

Ingredients: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 boneless pork loin or shoulder roast (about 4lb) 8 garlic cloves, grated or crushed 1/2 cup roughly chopped fennel fronds, preferably from wild fennel 2 teaspoons fennel seeds, crushed in a mortar or spice mill 1 teaspoon fennel pollen (optional) 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest 2 tablespoons roughly chopped rosemary, plus a few extra sprigs 2 tablespoons roughly chopped sage, plus a few extra sprigs 2 tablespoons roughly chopped marjoram, plus a few extra sprigs 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil Salt

Method ❶ Season the pork generously on all sides with salt. In a small bowl, combine the garlic, fennel fronds, fennel seeds, fennel pollen (if using), lemon zest, the chopped rosemary, sage, and marjoram, the crushed red pepper, black pepper, and olive oil. Rub and pat the mixture all over the meat. Press the rosemary, sage, and marjoram sprigs against the roast, and use a few lengths of butcher’s twine to secure them. Cover the roast with clingfilm and refrigerate for several hours, or preferably overnight. Bring to room temperature before roasting. ❷ Heat the oven to 200°C. Place the roast in a shallow baking dish and cook, uncovered, for about 1 hour, until the meat is nicely browned and a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the roast registers 55°C. Let rest for at least 15 to 20 minutes before slicing. ❸ Serve the porchetta, thinly sliced, warm or at room temperature.

Red onion soup with cheese toasts (serves 6) Onion soup is an excellent antidote to blustery, cold weather. Though often made with beef broth, Jacques Pépin showed me this frugal version, made with onions and tap water (his mother made it that way, he said). His wise counsel: Don’t overcrowd the pan, or the onions won’t brown. Keep the heat high but not too high, so the onions don’t cook too fast and burn. Be generous with the salt and pepper. Bay leaf and thyme are essential, everything else is negotiable. A little red wine is welcome, a splash of cognac couldn’t hurt.

Ingredients: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Olive oil; salt and pepper 3lb red onions, sliced 1/8 inch thick About 10 cups water 1 cup dry red wine 2 bay leaves 1 small bunch thyme, tied with string 8 garlic cloves, roughly chopped 2 tablespoons Cognac or other brandy (optional) 6 slices day-old bread, lightly toasted 6 ounces Gruyère cheese, grated 1 tablespoon chopped sage 1 teaspoon chopped thyme

Method ❶ Set two wide skillets over medium-high heat (if you have only one pan, work in smaller batches). When the pans are hot, put 1 tablespoon oil and a large handful of the sliced onions in each pan. Season the onions with salt and pepper and sauté, stirring occasionally, until they are a ruddy dark brown, about 10 minutes. ❷ Transfer the onions to a soup pot and return the pans to the heat. Pour 1/2 cup of the water into each pan to deglaze it, scraping with a wooden spoon to dissolve any brown bits, then pour the deglazing liquid into the soup pot. Wipe the pans clean and begin again with more oil and sliced onions. Continue until all the onions are browned. ❸ Put the soup pot over high heat, add the wine, bay leaves, thyme, and garlic, and cook for 5 minutes. Add 8 cups water and bring to a boil, then turn the heat down to maintain a gentle simmer and cook for 45 minutes. ❹ Remove and discard the thyme. Skim off any surface fat, taste the soup, and adjust the seasoning. (The soup can be prepared to this point up to two days in advance and refrigerated; bring back to a simmer before proceeding.) ❺ Just before serving, add the brandy, if using, and simmer for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, make the cheese toasts: Heat the grill. Place the toasted bread on a baking sheet. Mix the grated cheese with the chopped sage and thyme, along with a generous amount of pepper. Heap the cheese mixture on the toasts and grill until the cheese bubbles and browns slightly. ❻ Ladle the soup into wide bowls and top each with a toast. ■ • Extracted from David Tanis Market Cooking by David Tanis (Artisan Books, copyright © 2017). Photographs by Evan Sung.

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The Coach House laid for diners at The Talbot Inn

The book itself is a pleasure to hold and read, with each recipe accompanied by photography by Jason Ingram

Creations from Dry

Chef and writer Clare

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FOOD & DRINK

HOME AND DRY Georgette McCready talks to author, chef and country publican Clare Liardet about her new book, dedicated to non-alcoholic cocktails. Our cosy, dry January never looked so good...

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visit to the Somerset village of Mells is like stepping into a Merchant Ivory film. Above and between mellow stone walls and avenues of mature trees, you catch glimpses of fine old farmhouses and the ancient parish church. You half expect a horse-drawn carriage to roll up in the lane, decanting women wearing buttoned boots, fur wraps and elegant hats. This timeless English country scene is completed by the presence of a charming old stone pub – the former coaching inn, The Talbot Inn. Its coat of arms bears the noble hound himself on the pub sign, a breed of ‘good mannered’ hunting dog that’s now extinct, bred out by other hunting breeds. The owners, Matt Greenlees, business partners Charlie Luxton and Dan Brod and Matt’s wife Clare Liardet, have renovated the inn to create a welcoming and stylish, modern yet classic venue. Clare and Australian-born Matt met when she was managing The Engineer in Primrose Hill, back when the term ‘gastro pub’ had just been invented. Over the succeeding years, Matt spent time as general manager at über cool Babington House, while Clare’s career included a spell as a chef at the Bradford Photography Museum in Yorkshire, running her cookery school Kitchen Table Cookery with partner Jo Weinberg and, in recent times, being publican of this popular country inn. Clare has honed all those skills to write a book, Dry, dedicated to delicious non-alcoholic cocktails, cordials and clever concoctions. This stylish little hardback is filled with recipes for imaginative, grown-up alternatives for people choosing not to imbibe, whether as a designated driver, a mother-to-be, or simply as someone who prefers not to drink alcohol. “I felt there was a gap in the market for a book of inspirational drinks for people who choose not to drink,” says Clare, of the book’s inception. “There are so many reasons why they may have made this decision – for health reasons and a dry January, for financial reasons or for religious reasons. “Imagine you’ve arrived at a dinner or a party and your host greets you with a delicious drink to sip, a drink with many more layers of flavour than a standard soft drink. What could be nicer? There shouldn’t be the feeling that you’re depriving yourself, or that the nonalcoholic drinks shouldn’t be as delightful. Set a big glass jug, with lots of ice, on the side and let people help themselves.” Clare used her culinary knowledge to create her own cocktails, using everyday ingredients such as rosemary, fruit, spices and herbs. Mindful of the adult palate, she has come up with creations that have the taster wondering what the mysterious ingredients are that give it a pleasant kick, or a smoky back note. “I experimented with lapsang souchong tea and came up with a syrup – quite intense so you don’t need much – to provide a hint of the smoky, caramel taste of a Highland single malt whisky,” she tells me. That syrup becomes an ingredient in a Smoke and Ruby Tumbler, which combines the bright, citrus of ruby grapefruit juice with fresh lemon juice, all with that underlying hint of smokiness. As Clare writes in the book: “It’s delicious to drink by a bonfire when your cheeks are hot and your feet are cold.” Another winning element of Dry is that the book itself is a pleasure to hold and to read, with each recipe accompanied by photography by Jason Ingram. There is an equipment list at the beginning and the good news is that you don’t have to spend a lot of money on shiny kit. If you don’t have a cocktail shaker, a large jam jar with a screw-top lid will do just as well. And fruit syrups made with herbs or berries, water and sugar, can be kept in sterilised jars in the fridge for a week or two. Clare has set her recipes out according to mood or occasion. There are chapters for Friday nights (how about a blood orange and sage margarita served with lime and salt in a chilled coupette?) and for lazy Sundays (a cooling yet spicy watermelon Mary with a gazpacho vibe) or quiet fireside moments when you gaze into the flames, perhaps with an espresso mint Martini, served in a chilled Martini glass, naturally. These drinks bring with them a sense of occasion and ritual lacking

in the pouring of a plain old orange juice or a diet cola. But, as Clare says: “You can have fun with them. Use everyday ingredients to make those layers of flavour.” She had a bit of fun with customers at The Talbot Inn when she was creating her Drivers’ Pimm’s Cup, whose hidden ingredients number black tea and a clever ginger and black peppercorn syrup. “We served this in a big jug with borage flowers, cucumber and orange slices and most people genuinely couldn’t tell whether it contained alcohol.”

Pear & Rosemary on the Rocks You will need: • A tumbler, a shaker and a strainer • 60ml pear juice from two small pears, or good quality shop-bought pear juice (but not from concentrate) • 30ml freshly squeezed lemon juice • 25ml simple herb syrup made with rosemary • Ice cubes • Sparkling water • A sprig of rosemary and a slice of pear to garnish To make a simple herb syrup, put 200g sugar into 200ml water in a pan and gently heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar dissolves. Bring the syrup to a simmer, add two sprigs of rosemary, then continue to simmer for 5-10 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool. To keep the rest of the syrup, put it into a sterilised jar in the fridge. Combine the pear juice, lemon juice and rosemary syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake well. Strain into a rocks glass and top with a splash of sparkling water. Garnish with rosemary and pear.

Pomegranate Negroni You will need: • A tumbler • 20ml pomegranate juice • 2 teaspoons Montmorency cherry concentrate • Ice cubes • 3 good dashes of Angostura Bitters • A twist of orange peel Pour the pomegranate juice and cherry concentrate into a glass of ice, then stir well before shaking in the Angostura Bitters. The drink should have a bitter-sweet tang, so add more Angostura if needed. Twist the orange peel on top of the drink to release the oils. The cherry concentrate gives an extra layer, but isn’t essential.

Hot buttered spiced apple You will need: • A heatproof glass or mug • 250ml cloudy apple juice • Juice of half a lemon and half an orange, and a strip of zest from each • ½ cinnamon stick • 1 clove • 2 allspice berries • ¼ teaspoon fennel seeds • Small whole red chilli (optional) • ½ teaspoon unsalted butter, softened • Cinnamon stick for garnish Add the apple, lemon and orange juice, zests, spices and fennel seeds to a pan. Simmer over medium heat for 20 mins; do not allow to boil. If adding chilli, do so halfway through and keep tasting. Remove if it starts to become too spicy. Ladle the liquid into a heatproof glass, leaving the zest and spices in the pan if you wish. Add about half a teaspoon of butter – it adds a lovely savoury depth – and serve. • Dry is published in hardback by Bantam Press, £9.99. THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Often they eat berries fermented in the frost and accidentally intoxicate themselves – so some may well have woken up with a hangover on New Year’s Day too (image by Dan White)

The New Romantic of the bird world (image by Mike Trew)

WAXING LYRICAL Watch out for rare visitors from the east this month, says Pete Dommett

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axwings: gorgeous, aren’t they? With their peachy, air-brushed plumage, dark eye-liner and flamboyant quiffs, they are the New Romantics of the bird world. One of those species that – as wildlife writer, Simon Barnes, puts it – can turn anyone into an ‘instant birder’. You might not consider yourself a bona fide birdwatcher, but a chance encounter with one of these exotic-looking beauties will leave you with little choice. So where can you see them? Well, Tesco is a good place to start. Let me explain... Waxwings only come to Britain in the winter (and not even every winter at that). They breed in northern Scandinavia and Siberian Russia, but when stocks of the berries that they love to eat in the colder months run out, they visit us. The first arrivals are usually seen on the east coast, from Scotland to East Anglia, but then, as their food supplies are exhausted and more birds arrive from the continent, they gradually spread across the country. Only in the worst (or best, if you’re a bird-lover) of winters do they come as far west as Bristol. But when they do, the best place to find them is at the supermarket. Supermarket car parks are a well-known, favourite hang-out for waxwings. They’re often planted with berry-bearing bushes and trees, like cotoneaster, hawthorn and mountain ash, which prove irresistible to these hungry birds. I’ve seen waxwings at Morrisons in Weston and posh waxwings at Waitrose in Henleaze. At the end of January last year, the Tesco Extra store in Bradley Stoke had a special offer on waxwings: ‘See One Get 14 Free’. A flock of 15 birds based themselves near the car wash for over a month, drawing a daily crowd of birdwatchers, photographers and bemused shoppers as they

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raided the rowans and called to each other constantly with their high-pitched, tinkling trills. Apparently, a waxwing can eat two or three times its own body weight in berries every day (that’s 800 to 1,000 individual fruits). And – though I’ve never seen it myself – they sometimes gobble up those that have fermented in the frost, intoxicating themselves in the process and becoming temporarily incapable of flight. Ornithologists believe that these birds have evolved highly efficient livers that enable them to recover quickly from these boozy binges. Somewhere, a scientist is surely working on a waxwing-inspired hangover cure. They’re not big birds – about the size of a stocky starling. But what waxwings lack in stature, they more than make up for in style. There’s that ridiculous crest of course, the striking black mask on its face and the bright yellow bar on the tail that looks like it’s been coloured in with a highlighter. And what about those weird red bits on the wings? The unusual scarlet tips to the ends of the bird’s flight feathers resemble tiny blobs of sealing wax and give the bird its name, but their precise function is still something of a mystery. During most winters, fewer than a thousand waxwings will come to our shores, but during a so-called ‘waxwing winter’ 10,000 or more may arrive. These ‘irruptions’ (as they’re known) have become more common over the last 20 years, so keep an eye out for waxwings during your weekly shop. Be careful though – one glimpse of these glamorous creatures and you’ll become a birder for life. ■ • Check for local sightings of waxwings on the Bristol Ornithological Club’s ‘Avon Birds’ website: avonbirding.blogspot.co.uk


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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

FAMILY DIARY Image: Daniel Watkiss

Ideas for things to do with the little ones in Bristol this month

Winter Kitchen Until Friday 23 March, throughout the day, The Kitchen at We The Curious The kids can fire up their taste buds in the kitchen this winter and explore the science behind warming winter treats at We The Curious. They can learn how to create sunflower oil, make their own spice mix to use at home, and discover how to make flatbreads in less than 20 minutes. Included with a general admission ticket.

Top pick...

• wethecurious.org

DON’T MISS... Snow Globe Until Sunday 7 January, The Lantern at Colston Hall, dates and times vary All Kid Carpet wants for Christmas is snow... So he’s hired Gary Barlow’s super-massive Snow Globe to guarantee a white festive season. But the Snow Globe is a whole new, weird world and his Christmas plans are diverted by a gang of ridiculous characters, power ballads, silly dancing and a cheeky talking refrigerator. Suitable for three – seven years. Tickets: £13 adults, £8 children. Visit: bristololdvic.org.uk Beauty and The Beast Until Sunday 14 January, times vary, Tobacco Factory Theatres Deep in the forest lives a very unusual figure, suffering under a terrible curse. In a poky farmhouse on the edge of town, three daughters and their weary father are struggling to make ends meet. But everything changes when Belle dares to enter the forest… This re-telling of the classic fairy tale is brimming with surprises and delights to remind us that beauty – and beastliness – are only skin deep. Suitable for ages five and above. Ticket prices vary. Tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: tobaccofactorytheatres.com Cinderella Thursday 4 – Saturday 6 January, 7.30pm, Redgrave Theatre, Percival Road, Clifton Indulge in the joyful journey of this new adaptation and witness the marvellous wonders of magical godparents, majestic parties and mighty heroes. Will Cinderella find her happy ending? Tickets: £10 adults, £7 concs. Performed by members of the Old Cliftonian Drama Society. Charity proceeds to go to Above and Beyond. Visit: redgravetheatre.com or tel: 0117 3157 602. 54 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Junior Drawing School Tuesday 9 and Tuesday 23 January, Tuesday 6 and Tuesday 20 February, 4.30 – 5.30pm, RWA, Queen’s Road, Clifton Be inspired by the gallery’s Women with Vision exhibition and learn about different artists, media and techniques, take part in drawing activities and games. £30 for four sessions, includes materials. Children to be accompanied by an adult. Suitable for ages eight and over. Visit: rwa.org.uk Bring Your Own Baby Comedy Tuesday 9 January, 12pm, Komedia, Bath Head over to the UK’s premier baby friendly comedy club featuring the funniest comedy stars from the circuit and TV. There will be soft flooring, toys and buggy parking so that baby is happy and you can relax, have a drink and be entertained. Tickets: £5/£10. Visit: komedia.co.uk or tel: 01225 489070. Toddler Takeover: Crazy Creatures Friday 12 January, 10am – 5pm, We The Curious Bugs, bears, birds, badgers, bats, and butterflies. Assemble your little ones for this day devoted to toddlers at the science centre. There will be storytelling with Ursa and Leo, bug-inspired accessories making, and a full day of Space Explorers shows in the Planetarium. Suitable for ages up to five. Book in advance. Visit: wethecurious.org The Little Matchgirl and Other Happier Tales Until Sunday 14 January, times vary, Bristol Old Vic Inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s spellbinding tale, this also weaves The Princess and the Pea, The Emperor’s New Clothes and Thumbelina with the Little Matchgirl’s devastating story. Tickets: £7.50 – £35.50 . Suitable for ages eight and above. Visit: bristololdvic.org.uk

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The Ugly Duckling Until Sunday 14 January, times vary, Tobacco Factory Theatres Frost. Ice. Quiet. The farm is sleeping, snuggled up for warmth. Suddenly the peace is shattered by the arrival of… a duckling. Scruffy, clumsy and nothing like his fluffy yellow siblings, our unlikely, gangly and slightly wobbly hero sets off on an epic adventure to find the place where he truly belongs. Hans Christian Andersen’s muchloved story comes springing to life with Travelling Light’s trademark joyful and moving storytelling. Tickets: £12 adults, £9 concs. Tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: tobaccofactorytheatres.com Ice skating sessions with We The Curious Open daily until Tuesday 16 January, Millennium Square Don’t miss the impressive 450m² ice rink underneath the iconic chrome-plated Planetarium building at the science centre, making Bristol’s harbourside a winter playground for young and old alike. There will also be a carousel, a Skyview Wheel, an Après-ski bar and stalls selling delicious hot food and drinks. Plus, there will be special At The Movies film screenings on Big Screen Bristol. Ice skating tickets from £6.50, book online for discounted tickets. Feeling wobbly? Children can use a skate aid in the shape of a penguin at an extra cost, or there are bananas that can seat two children and a standing adult. Visit: wethecurious.org Rocketship Adventure Dates throughout January, 2pm, We The Curious Join Stella the bear on an adventure around the earth. Hurtle out to the moon, fly past the sun, and shoot out into the stars to discover what lies beyond our little planet. Suitable for ages four – six. Visit: wethecurious.org


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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

Snow Globe at The Lantern, Colston Hall

Children's Festival – Noah and the Flood Saturday 20 January, 11am – 3pm, Wells Cathedral Head to the cathedral’s annual one day festival of family-friendly activities open to four to 11 year olds. This year the theme is Noah and the Flood and features activities including circus skills, crafts, music, live animals from Puxton Park, reflection and a global workshop with Christian Aid. Book in advance, tel: 01749 674483. Visit: wellscathedral.org.uk Adventure Bureau Sunday 28 January, 2pm, The Wardrobe Theatre, West Street, Bristol Jump on this rollercoaster journey of storytelling with Katie Storer and Simon Panrucker, as they bring you a totally improvised story complete with an improvised soundtrack and songs. The audience decides what elements go into its bursting melting pot, but who knows what will come out? Suitable for ages three – eight. Tickets: £7, under threes free. Visit: thewardrobetheatre.com Farm Tots Wednesdays, 10.30am – 12pm, Lawrence Weston Community Farm, Saltmarsh Drive, Bristol Parents and children under five can help look after the animals and gardens at this community farm. £2.50 admission, or £2 if a member of the farm, includes a drink and snack. Call: 0117 938 1128 before visiting to check session is running on the day. Visit: lwfarm.org.uk Wonderful windows Daily, Bristol Cathedral A new children’s trail that helps families discover exciting parts of the cathedral. Spot the animals in the windows and children can have a go at designing their own. Free for all, download the trail online or pick up a guide at the welcome desk. Visit: bristol-cathedral.co.uk n The Ugly Duckling at Tobacco Factory Theatres Image: Joe Roberts

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EDUCATION NEWS UPDATES FROM THE CITY’S SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES Mixed sixth form establishments have often been more successful

HERE COME THE BOYS

JEWEL IN THE DOWNS SCHOOL CROWN TAKING THE REINS Jim Walton has joined Clifton College Preparatory School as head, having held the role at Elizabeth College Junior School on Guernsey for three years. “I am thrilled to be given the opportunity to lead a school with such a great reputation,” he said. “From my first visit I was struck by the warmth of the whole community, the passion for learning and the excitement about offering such an amazing all-round experience for the pupils. My family and I are very excited to have joined a co-educational prep school with boarding at its heart. We are looking forward to getting to know the children, parents and staff and to immersing ourselves in the life of the school.” • cliftoncollege.com

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The Downs Preparatory School, Wraxall, is opening a new nursery on 8 January. In the parkland of the former Tyntesfield Estate, Bertie’s Nursery School aims to offer finest early-years provision for 80 children from six months to four years. It will deliver a broad curriculum with a focus on traditional values, and specialist teaching in the performing arts, dance, drama and languages, as well in its forest school, outdoor treehouse classroom, and pets’ corner. “We believe that creating Bertie’s Nursery School in such an exceptional and safe environment will encourage all our children to love and respect the great outdoors and give them skills they will need for the future,” said Marcus Gunn, headmaster of The Downs Preparatory School. • bertiesnursery.com

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Colston’s Girls’ School is set to expand its sixth form from September 2018 and for the first time in over 100 years, it will be co-educational. The new sixth form, to be called V6, will welcome ambitious 16 to 18-yearolds and aims to focus on science, technology, engineering, the arts and maths as well as developing skills for the workplace. Like CGS, it will be part of Venturers Trust, which is sponsored by the Society of Merchant Venturers and the University of Bristol. Sixth-form girls and boys will have a dedicated base in the Georgian building next to CGS, although they will also have access to the specialist science, music and other facilities in the main school. Principal John Whitehead said the time was right to give teenage boys the same opportunities that are open to CGS girls and made the point that some of the highest-attaining sixthform colleges are co-educational. “Our sixth form is a unique provision, combining high standards, specialist teaching and individual support,” he explained. “Our students follow a range of high quality pathways to future success. The school has a strong emphasis on community action and students have developed and delivered a number of impressive projects in recent years. “CGS is an inner-city school with students from across the city and beyond. We pride ourselves on our ethnic and social diversity – now we will have a gender mix too.”

• colstonsgirls.org


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By Dr Andrew Daniel, Headmaster of Monmouth School for Boys

MAKING A POSITIVE DIFFERENCE TO SOCIETY

Thinking of advertising your business Our 2018 media pack can be viewed online

At Monmouth, we are renowned for developing talented young men with a refreshingly grounded attitude to life and a belief in the importance of community. We give pupils at Monmouth School for Boys the freedom to make decisions, and their selfless drive and generosity always comes to the fore in their fund-raising activities. Reflecting on 2017, our students have worked together to organise and tackle spectacular challenges in support of causes close to their hearts. Three friends pushed themselves to the limit, pedalling 450 miles in less than 100 hours across the Pyrenees to raise more than £2,700 for Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY) and almost £5,000 for the Syrian Hands Up Foundation. Another intrepid teenager, Rowan Saxton, showed a remarkable sense of adventure, scaling Mount Kilimanjaro in East Africa to highlight the importance of Canine Partners for Independence. Fourteen-year-old Ben Morgan cycled 212 miles to London in memory of his grandad to raise £1,500 for the British Heart Foundation. Now bitten by the bug, Ben is determined to tackle further challenges. He also joined his rowing team-mates to crawl through mud, run across fields and wade through water in support of the Royal British Legion’s Poppy Appeal. Locally, students dressed in Team Pudsey onesies and cycled to school for Children in Need, and a group of friends joined together for a series of events to help elderly people in Monmouth maintain their independence. We believe our educational experience helps to inspire our students to make a positive difference to society and, in 2018, we will be encouraging more boys to explore their sense of adventure. n *The Schools have an established bus route covering the Thornbury area.

FOR A COPY OF OUR 2018 MEDIA PACK EITHER VISIT THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE WEBSITE THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK OR CONTACT US ON 0117 974 2800 or EMAIL: SALES @ THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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For more information, visit habsmonmouth.org, call 01600 710433 for Monmouth School for Boys or 01600 711104 for Monmouth School for Girls.


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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

THAT’S A MAZDA An exceptionally good drive and a beautifully built SUV. The Mazda CX-5 is getting so many good reviews, it’s beating most expectations. Motoring correspondent Chris Lilly takes one for a spin

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azda doesn’t have a large line-up, but it must be said that each model is a good one; certainly a case of quality over quantity. The Mazda CX-5 was one of the models that set the Japanese firm on its way to this high-class portfolio, but now there’s a new one. With big boots to fill, it will be interesting to see how the new CX-5 measures up. There will be few who disagree with me when I say that things bode well from the outset, since the Mazda CX-5 is a stylish machine. Making good use of its Kodo design language, Mazda has created one of the best looking cars in its class. Narrow light clusters help the CX-5 look low despite its relatively high ride height, and the car has an athletic stance to it rarely found in the SUV market. It certainly looks like an SUV, and a sporty one at that. The interior complements the exterior design nicely, using similar themes to help visually stretch the car and make it look wider than it is. The dashboard is a nicely set-up and cleanly designed affair, with a grouping of three dials telling the driver what’s going on, and a decentsized infotainment screen dealing with other systems. Mazda’s control for said infotainment system might not be the most sophisticated around, but it works well and is intuitive in its operation, aided by some shortcut buttons surrounding the main dial. It means that the only elements to remain fitted to the centre console are air-conditioning controls, keeping the whole affair fuss-free. Build quality feels solid, and the materials used are high quality, confirming the feeling that Mazda sits somewhere between mainstream and premium – the sort of territory held by VW. The CX-5 won’t challenge the likes of BMW and Jaguar, but it feels a much nicer machine than those offered by Renault and Nissan. The driver in particular will be happy with the state of affairs inside, since the driving position is good, and the controls are well laid out around them. Other passengers will have few complaints either, as head, leg, and shoulder space is good throughout, and you can easily cart three adults as passengers without any problems. Load space at the rear is good, though not class leading. You will have to be looking for a real family workhorse to complain about the boot space, but rivals such as the Skoda Kodiaq offer more. It is behind the wheel where the CX-5 excels though, with a fine choice of naturally aspirated petrol and diesel engines, and a well sorted chassis. Mazda’s use of non-downsized engines has gone against the trend for some time now, but few have complained at the logic of fitting an engine that has enough about it to deal with the vehicle’s size easily. This is in contrast to downsized units that that work well most of the time, but struggle when the going gets tough. As such, Mazda offers one 2.0 litre Skyactiv-G petrol unit which produces 165hp powering the front wheels via a six-speed manual gearbox. It’s a good powertrain, but one unlikely to sell in big numbers in the UK. Instead, it’s probable that the diesels will prove more popular, with Mazda’s 2.2 litre Skyactiv-D engine providing either 150hp or 175hp. Both are available with manual or automatic transmissions, but the higher powered version is only available with

four-wheel drive – the 150hp offering has an option for front or allwheel drive. Performance figures range between 9.0 seconds and 10.4 seconds in the 0-62mph dash – the petrol being the slowest in the line-up – while fuel economy figures available stretch from 44.1mpg for the petrol to 56.5mpg for the 150hp diesel with a manual gearbox. The engines are just part of the package though. Mazda’s engineers are good at creating a well balanced car – one that handles well but is comfortable too. They’ve pulled off the same trick here, offering well controlled body roll and precise steering with a good level of feedback when undertaking some enthusiastic cornering. Keep everything at a more sedate pace though, and the CX-5 settles down to a relaxing and refined cruise at motorway speeds, and will shrug off all but the worst of any pot-holes you might encounter thanks to the SUV’s high ride height. My pick of the range would be the CX-5 Skyactiv-D 2.2 150hp, which will cover 0-62mph in 9.4 seconds, and has the highest fuel economy figure. It’s plenty powerful enough for the CX-5, with any more oomph a luxury rather than a necessity, and it will prove the cheapest to run too. Out of the two trim levels – SE-L Nav and Sport Nav, the former is better value with plenty of equipment, while the latter would simply be nice to have. Standard equipment is good across both trim levels, and though the CX-5 is slightly higher priced than some rivals, it feels good value for it. Again, it comes down to that middle space between mainstream and premium, and the Mazda is priced to match. The CX-5 is one of the best driver’s cars in its class then, and a good pick for a practical SUV too. There are more economical, faster, and more practical rivals, but none can offer similar driving dynamics, and few are as well rounded a package as the Mazda. ■ • mazda.co.uk

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ELECTRIC-BIKES | 2018

Riese & Müller ‘s New Charger and Supercharger models. Available from 50Cycles

Easily transportable, rechargeable and seemingly a cure-all for 21st-century inner city traffic problems (imagery courtesy of Brompton Electric)

WHEELS OF CHANGE Huge advances in e-bike technology mean that this odd-ball of the cycling world is having a moment. We find out why they might be a key part of the solution for Bristol’s traffic problems and meet the city’s early adopters

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ristol is a city well-known for its hilly terrain – from the aptly named Totterdown, where residents of Vale Street have almost a 22-degree gradient to contend with, as well as the occasional skier in particularly wintry weather, to Marlborough or ‘Heart Attack’ Hill, connecting Kingsdown to the city centre. For those trying to forego the car and commute in and out by foot or bike, the local landscape can be far more exercise than they bargained for; especially if you live in Lodge Hill, our highest point at 369 feet. But now the next generation of electric bikes – lighter, cheaper and even more energy efficient – are making the idea of biking through the city, even up its steepest hills, feel like a breeze. “Traffic jams, parking, pollution and ill health are four key problems facing us all in the modern world,” says Philip Adkins, director of the annual city-centre cycling race Bristol Grand Prix. “There are few tools that can take on all of these problems with aplomb, but the e-bike is most definitely one of them – providing a city-wide commuting and travel option that is cheaper, faster and cleaner than a car.” Over the last two years, e-bikes have seen a dramatic increase in popularity, accounting for more than one in 10 of all bikes sold across Europe (according to pedelec.com), an increase in sales of over 20% year on year (statistic courtesy of bike-eu.com). “Alistair Machardy of Atmosphere Electric Bikes, Bristol’s first e-bike specialist, was inspired to start selling them 10 years ago, by the daily traffic queues outside his shop at the bottom of Jacob’s Wells Road,” continues Philip. “The ‘traditional’ e-bike manufacturers, such as Haibike, still retain the majority of the market with commuter-style, functional bikes. However, other, more well known, bike manufacturers, including Trek, Specialized and Giant, have seen the way that the wheels of change are spinning and have advanced e-bikes dramatically.” Cycling’s biggest players have mountain, road and commuter e-bikes as part of their range. 2017 even saw Team Sky’s bike sponsor, 62 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Pinarello, launch an e-bike that is not that different in appearance to their standard models as ridden by none other than Chris Froome. “While dodging traffic jams is the prerogative of the cyclist, arriving at work dishevelled and needing a shower is not so practical,” adds Philip. “The e-bike takes away some of the harder work of Bristol’s hilly streets, providing a healthier, less sweaty and more practical transport option for even the beginner cyclist. “They’ve been championed by many members of the city council as low-cost, healthy transport options, including ex-Bristol mayor George Ferguson,” he tells us. “Leonardo di Caprio is also well known for riding an e-bike, although he hasn’t yet been spotted on Jacob’s Wells Road or Park Street...” With as little as four pence worth of electricity covering 120 miles, ebikes are also far healthier for the environment. Detachable batteries are a useful security feature and mean that you can charge your bike wherever you are, without the trouble of finding a parking space. “Ebikes can also provide great physical and mental therapy for rehabilitation and lifestyle change,” says Philip. “The motor assists the rider, encouraging muscle movement and adventure with only part of the effort required for a normal bike. It can also be a useful back-up should your fitness fall short of your ambition.” Finding alternatives to using the car in our city centre is something we need to tackle head-on, with levels of nitrogen dioxide pollution often exceeding the legal limits in several parts of Bristol, according to reports; and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs putting out a warning that the city was to reach its highest level of air pollution back in September 2017. But there are positive signs. “We’ve had an average 30% increase in sales every single year since we opened seven years ago,” says David Tod, owner of e-bike specialist Take Charge Bikes. Stocking more than 70 models and able to order in most brands, he’s sold battery-powered cycles to people from all walks of life and thinks parts of the South West


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ELECTRIC-BIKES | 2018

are set to embrace the new technology in a big way. “Earlier this year we sold six e-bikes to Bristol City Council for their workplace travel programme,” Jake Voelcker at Bristol Bicycles tells us, “and workplaces in the city can borrow an electric bike for free for up to six months to encourage their staff to cycle (check out bristolbicycles.co.uk/for-business). Bristol Bicycles e-bikes are ideal for this kind of workplace use because they look pretty smart, understated and business-like, and they are lighter than most e-bikes. Even if you need to carry a heavy laptop or lots of paperwork, it’s no problem because the electric motor helps with the weight. The scheme has proved so popular that the council ordered another 10 e-bikes from us a couple of months ago.” Also pushing for change is transport minister Jesse Norman, who’s contemplating an e-bike version of the incentive given to those who buy electric cars; at present people buying electric cars receive up to £4,500 off the purchase price. But many locals are already converted, citing health benefits as just as key as the ecological ones. E-bikers will burn, on average, 350 calories an hour, and a recent Norwegian study, undertaken to better understand the intensity of exercise a cyclist gets from pedalling an e-bike, found they were almost as active as conventional cyclists, even when resting. Of course, going via peddle also means you don’t have to negotiate the city’s parking charges. “Once people try them, the benefits are so huge that they never look back,” says David Tod. “Who knows, in five years’ time we could give Amsterdam a run for its money.” If it all sounds too good to be true, there are opportunities for you to find out for yourself. Better By Bike (betterbybike.info) and the Create Centre (createbristol.org) can both help you get involved with trying an e-bike, and there are even salary exchange schemes to help you get your first bike on the road. The e-bike makes cycling more practical and accessible than ever before and may even be able to turn your commute into a traffic free, money saving, health boosting pleasure. So leave the car at home and enjoy the freedom of the city... ■

Need to know • As a rule, the more you pay for your e-bike the longer your battery will last. So a full charge will take you between 25 and 70 miles. Of course, how you use your bike (i.e. how much you peddle, your weight and how many hills you encounter) will impact the number of miles a fully charged battery will do. • You can buy one for as little as £600, for a no-frills commuter bike (expect a 25-mile run on a six-hour charge) to a to a limited edition Blacktrail BT-01 for a touch under £60,000. • For a stylish ride, try the Faraday Cortland. Built to look like a Dutch roadster, it has an unobtrusive 306-watt-hour battery behind the seat and is lightweight at 42lbs. If you’re a fold-up fan, Brompton have just released their first electric bike with prices starting at £2,595. • Riding an e-bike cost costs just 0.4p per mile, while a mediumsized diesel car costs 34p per mile. They can travel at up to 15.5mph with the motor on, and some bikes can cover 70 miles on a single charge. • An e-bike is like a normal bike, with the addition of a built-in electric motor and battery. Riders still have to pedal, but the motor will kick in to help. E-bike batteries are much lighter in weight than they used to be, thanks to the introduction of lithium batteries. • With the modern systems on e-bikes, you can choose how hard you want to work yourself and how much assistance you want from the bike. The electric motor won’t assist you when you’re travelling more than 25km (15.5mph) making it no more dangerous, speed-wise, than a conventional bike.

THE ANATOMY OF AN E-BIKE 1/ Weight Most e-bikes are heavier than traditional pedal bikes due to the added weight of the motor and the battery. On the road this is not a problem as the motor assists your ride. However it may be worth spending more on a lighter bike if you need to lift the bike regularly. e.g. if you live in an apartment.

2/ Controller Sensors constantly communicate ride data to a built in computer that calculates how and when torque is required, and then activate the motor to assist the rider.

3/ LCD Display, and power indication Depending on the bike, the power options, digital displays and switching will vary. Most now have a digital dashboard that will display things like speed, distance, power and battery life. 5/ Lights Many e-bikes now come with lights as standard built in equipment, powered directly by the main battery.

4/ Battery Top of the range e-bikes are now incorporating the latest Li-ion battery technology housed into the frame. Some can be charged in under two hours, and will have a range of 75Km on a single charge. 7/ Gears Most e-bikes have gears. These are either traditional manual pedal bike gears operated by a gearshift on the handlebars, or fully automatic.

Model shown is the Trek Super Commuter 8+. One of the latest generation of e-bikes. Featuring the new Bosch 500 wH Powerpack battery and a powerful 250w CX motor which is fully integrated into the frame, RRP: £3,800. For details visit: Mud Dock 40 The Grove, Bristol BS1 4RB. Tel: 0117 929 2151 Web: mud-dock.com

6/ Brakes Like traditional bikes, the braking options are generally disc or calliper. The latest in e-bike technology senses when the brakes are engaged and will cut the e-bike motor motor to increase safety.

8/ Motor There are two main types of motor: hubdrive and crank-drive. Hub driven motors deliver power to the front or back wheel. Crank driven motors are housed in the frame and deliver power to the pedal crank.

9/ Connectivity The trend is now integrated connectivity with bluetooth chips built in and smartphone apps starting to become available, such as a find my bike app, map tracking and remote central locking and anti theft control.

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E-BIKES | WHERE TO BUY 2018

50 CYCLES 12-16 Bond Street, Bristol, BS1 3LU Tel: 0333 900 5050 Web: 50cycles.com 50cycles has been at the forefront of the electric transport movement, selling specialist high-end electric bikes for 15 years. Initially started in 2003 by two brothers with a business idea, it has now evolved into the biggest e-bike specialist in the UK, with five locations across the country including their huge flagship store in the heart of Bristol. They stock a vast range of different electric bikes to suit every requirement. Whether that’s a comfort-orientated, step-thru model like their very own Beat Bike brand (£1,695) or a top of the range e-MTB like the Scott E-Genius offerings (£3,595-£5,895). They stock Cube, Kalkhoff, Riese & Muller and Scott as well as several other market-leading e-bike brands so they’re confident they’ll have the perfect e-bike for all customers. If you’re looking for a handy way to get around the campsite during caravan holidays or a helping hand on your daily commute, head over and try one of the demonstrator models on a leisurely ride through Castle Park.

Riding high The Cube Elly Cruise Hybrid 50. £2,195

MUD DOCK CYCLEWORKS AND CAFÉ

An elegant commute The Electra Townie Go! £2,300

40 The Grove, Bristol BS1 4RB Tel: 0117 929 2151 Web: mud-dock.com Mud Dock has chosen to specialise in only one high-end brand of electric bicycle and that’s Trek. Having worked with them for over 20 years, they are confident in the quality of build as well as having Trek’s full backing on sales, maintenance and customer service. There are several models of Trek electric bikes on display and more available to order; from fully equipped commuter bikes to trail mountain bikes, weekend leisure and town cruisers. All with either Bosch or Shimano pedal assist electronic motors, giving reliable power and proven electronic systems. The most popular model is the Electra Townie Go! 8i ladies’ bike. It’s a classic American beach cruiser in its look, with the advantage of Trek’s flat foot technology frame. This, combined with a lower centre of gravity and 26” puncture-resistant Schwalbe balloon tires, makes for an upright and comfortable ride. All customers are offered a first free service with their electric bike purchase and Mud Dock recommend regular visits to their mechanic for the most up-to-date software for your electric bike, ensuring you have all the benefits of current software improvements. Pop down for a test-ride...

Red hot The Trek Super Commuter 8+ £3,800

BRISTOL BICYCLES (At Jake’s Bikes) Unit 6A Haymarket Walk, Bristol, BS1 3LN Tel: 0117 329 7363 Web: bristolbicycles.co.uk Visit Jake’s Bikes to check out the Bristol Bicycles electric bike. Like all Bristol Bicycles’ bikes, this lightweight, good quality e-bike is hand-built right here in Bristol and the powerful motor makes everything, from the the daily commute to uphill cycling, a piece of cake. You get a long range on a single charge, and with a full array of Shimano gears, you will find cycling in the city is amazingly easy. Features: Fully automatic, very easy to ride. Lightweight (including battery): 21kg. Average range of 25 to 40 miles. 18-month battery warranty. Full Shimano 24-speed gear and brake system. Puncture-resistant tyres come as standard. 0% finance available. Save up to 40% using the cycle scheme. You can even design your Bristol Bicycles e-bike online with their bespoke frames – there’s a wide range of options and sizes available. Visit: bristolbicycles.co.uk/ebike

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Made in Bristol The electric bike from Bristol Bicycles From £1,095


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E-BIKES | WHERE TO BUY 2018

BIKE SCIENCE 184 Whiteladies Road, Bristol, BS8 2XU Tel: 0117 927 3444 Web: bike-science.com

German technology The Focus Jarifa 2 Street Pro. Call for prices

Bike Science Bristol has seen a rapid increase in demand for e-bikes over the past six months, reflecting what is happening on the continent. Andy Sexton comments: “E-bikes make financial sense for commuting. In other parts of Europe, e-bike sales are now outgrowing sales of conventional bikes. The technology has opened up commuting to a new group of people – not the lycraclad serious cyclists often thought of when talking about cycling to work.” Situated at the top of Whiteladies Road in Clifton, Bike Science has a unique approach to bike retail which involves each customer visiting the store for a pre-purchase sizing session and free bike fitting on every new bike. This session ensures that every bike they supply fits its rider perfectly. The e-bike brand Focus from Germany offers a huge range of electric bikes from hybrid models aimed at leisure riders and commuters to award-winning off-road machines. “It’s quite hard to describe to people what riding an e-bike is like,” says Andy. “The best thing to do is to come into our store and have a go on one of our demo bikes. E-bikes are available on Cyclescheme so there is financial help available if you are looking to commute in style in 2018.”

CYCLELIFE BRISTOL Straight Street, Broad Plain, Bristol BS2 0JR Tel: 0117 925 5084 Web: cyclelife.com/bristol/home CycleLife Bristol is part of a national network of independent bike shops supplying a range of e-bikes from Raleigh, Haibike and Diamondback brands and a complete range of accessories. Located next to Gardiner Homecentre, CycleLife is able to meet all your e-bike needs. Manager Lee Salter says: “More and more of our customers are getting into the idea of e-bikes, and we have seen a huge increase in interest over the last few years. You typically find that it’s not until the customer actually tries an electric bike out for themselves that they truly realise how easy, uncomplicated and user-friendly they are. Electric bikes mean that our customers go places and distances that they may not have ever thought about going before.” We also caught up with Pippa Wibberley, sales and marketing director for Raleigh UK, who have a huge range on display and available to order at CycleLife. “The latest electric bikes from Raleigh really seem to have caught people’s imagination,” she tells us. “Whether it’s for fun and leisure or just getting to work, especially along Bristol’s hilly roads, quickly and reliably. Modern electric motors and batteries are getting lighter and more durable all the time and we know that looks really matter, too. The increasing popularity of these models seems to be down to the viral nature of this trend. Happy customers tend to tell their family members and work colleagues how much happier and healthier they feel.”

Puncture proof tyres by Gecko Rubber

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here are many benefits to having your own ebike, whether you’re touring the hills around Bath and Bristol, commuting to work without sweating, or simply out with the family around the cycle routes or canal and forest tracks. However, even if you rarely get a puncture they are always inconvenient, particularly on an e-bike where changing the wheels has added problems. Even with the most puncture resistant tyre, you never know when disaster might strike. You also need to keep your tyres pumped up to ensure good and consistent battery range. And if pneumatic tyres are left to go flat, this may lead you to needing a replacement as the tyre sidewalls might have also cracked. For complete peace of mind, and to be 100% puncture proof and low maintenance, why not try the new airless bicycle tyre – the Gecko Rubber Bicycle Tyre. There have been airless/solid tyres in the past but they have mostly been manufactured from foamed plastic-type materials and often come with the penalty of poor ride quality and grip, both in the dry and particularly in cold and wet tyre you can be puncture proof and low maintenance but have true ride quality and excellent grip in all conditions. The reason for this is that Gecko is using a patented real cellular rubber technology based on similar materials used in a good quality rubber pneumatic tyre. Now you can commute to work, tour or just go out with your family and not have to worry about punctures or having to pump tyres up beforehand and with a comfortable true ride quality and a consistent battery range. What’s more, Gecko tyres are British made (in Wiltshire) and come from a company with over 30 years of experience in tyre manufacture. Most importantly, they are a made from a sustainable material which can be recycled back into the making of a new tyre. Why not call into to one of the following local dealers with your e-bike (or new e-bike purchase) and ask for the Gecko Rubber puncture proof tyre option? – Gary Harris Cycles (North Bristol); garyharriscycles.com (parking right outside) – Take Charge Bikes (Bath); takechargebikes.co.uk – Avon Valley Cyclery (Bath); avonvalleycyclery.co.uk – Tyres are currently £49.20 (including VAT) plus fitting.

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Thinking of advertising your business Our 2018 media pack can be viewed online

FOR A COPY OF OUR 2018 MEDIA PACK EITHER VISIT THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE WEBSITE THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK OR CONTACT US ON 0117 974 2800 or EMAIL: SALES @ THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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HEALTH, BEAUTY & WELLBEING | 2018

PERSONAL

best

Our guide to health, fitness and wellbeing in 2018

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he pressing of the reset button each new year prompts thoughts of betterment – of myriad kinds – in many of us, whether it’s the desire to be more mindful, to step away from the smartphone and connect with real life a little more, to practice a favourite physical discipline and put aside more time for play, or even find some natural remedies for frequent ailments. Over the next few pages, we’ve collated some ideas focusing on improving wellbeing throughout 2018 – from combining a daily run with a community task for those who want to be more helpful towards others this year; to DNA testing for those looking to tailor a fitness plan or be smarter about their nutrition choices; to books of humour, balance and calm; and the places we rate when it comes to personal grooming and feeling tip-top. We hope you’ll find something to inspire, whatever your goal – but whatever you do, don’t put too much pressure on yourself... In the words of Rag’n’Bone Man, we’re only human after all (sorry, not sorry, etc.)

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HEALTH & WELLBEING Pop the pram in the boot and find a designated BuggyFit location in one of Bristol’s green spaces if you want to incorporate Baby into your fitness routine

HIT ‘REFRESH’ We consulted with mind and body coach Kim Ingleby on a few of this year’s feel-good trends

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appy 2018! May it be filled with fine health, joy, and the courage to action dreams and feel good. But where do you start? Every new year we are bombarded with messages promising us a fitter, healthier and happier mind and body, and it can be overwhelming knowing ‘what’s right’ for you, so we’ve pulled together a couple of emerging trends in case you fancy trying something a little different.

Who are you, anyway? As we know, our genes dictate how we respond to diet and exercise, and consequently, DNA testing is becoming a bit of a thing. A fast and accessible tool for all, it can facilitate personalised fitness plans or inform on individual health benefits, smart nutrition and exercise choices that can reduce the risk of injury, and improve recovery and performance. Genetic testing tells you specifically about your make-up, so that you can tailor your lifestyle to fit your biology and ultimately change up your fitness routine to get the best results. Personally I have found this to be invaluable, and my clients have seen impressive results by training less, training smarter and recovering for longer. It has helped provide clarity on the ‘best’ nutrition plan too. Combined with DNA testing, personalised blood testing and food intolerance testing is also proving to enhance wellness. Bristol nutritionist Rosie Letts offers specialised testing, South West organisation Forth does local blood testing, and anyone booking a test and consultation with me can save £50 at DNA Fit – just mention this feature.

think you’ll love and release your inner child. Family fitness classes are on the rise too – here in Bristol you can pop the pram in the boot and find a designated BuggyFit location (the Downs, Eastville Park, Horfield Common, Oldbury Court Estate, for starters) if you want to incorporate Baby into your routine. According to David Lloyd Clubs, as efforts are made to reduce screen-time, over a third of families now exercise as a unit, combining fitness with bonding, and in response to this growing appetite for active togetherness, they’ve launched Synrgy 360. Essentially a fun playground to work out in, participants as young as eight can crawl, play, dangle, jump and sprint their way round an interactive environment with mum or dad, and there’s even a ‘Slopercise’ session to get families shaping up and ski-ready. Meanwhile, Street Envy in Eastville has a high-octane class called GloEnvy that sees over 18s plunged into darkness, save for the light of the glow sticks they move about with to a fun, nightclub-esque soundtrack – we’re definitely taking Mum to that one. (No dance experience required, thankfully...) Not forgetting four-legged family members, one trend we are particularly loving is pet-inclusive fitness. DogFit and Aspire Events are hosting ‘Canicross’ running events of varying lengths throughout 2018 in locations including Bath Skyline, Avon Valley Railway, River Avon Trail and Ashton Court, and with Ruff Hounds doing yoga courses just for dogs in Chipping Sodbury, surely it’s only a matter of time before we can legitimately take Rover to yoga and downward dog together...

Care mail Play time With more and more emphasis put on the delivery of immediate results and responses in our pressured society, the power of play to get ourselves fitter, refreshed and refocused, is coming into focus. Aerial acrobatics, couples’ yoga, stand-up paddle boarding – anything that gets you moving differently and having fun. Seek out something you II THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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The desire to keep things simple and save on our ever-precious time has seen bespoke subscription boxes on the up, from workout selections packed full of training plans, tips and goodies (just don’t eat them all at once), to recipes, spices and beauty products. Most can be tailored exactly to your preferences and trialled for a few months first – so, worth a go, we think!


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New Bristol-based company Active Monthly is hoping to improve mindsets with regard to fitness this year – set up by George Fry, who was diagnosed with type-one diabetes at the age of 24, it’s a platform where subscribers can try products for themselves before committing to a full-price purchase, and stay up to date with the innovations in the industry. Meanwhile, over in St Philips, The Spicery is helping Bristolians cook up healthy feasts to reduce inflammation and boost immunity, or simply for a great date night – with subscriptions including ‘Meat-Free Magic’ for those keen to eat well and feel good.

Ye olde digital detox Okay, this isn’t such a new idea but it always bears repeating because it’s ruddy important to remind ourselves to switch off from all those nagging notifications. In our busy lives, as mental health and stress levels rise at a worrying rate, the health benefits of taking the time to focus on reconnecting offline are proven, from improved sleep and reduced anxiety to increased creativity and happiness. Achieving clarity and perspective is a whole lot harder if that headspace is full of digital junk you feel compelled to action, so start by switching off your devices for a whole day (or a few hours to begin with) once a week and notice the difference. To support this, sign up to a meditation or mindfulness course, practise the art of kindness and get in tune with your breathing, posture and overall inner happiness. Bristol Meditation is a good place to start.

#GlobalGoals This year’s trends are about balance. On one side, it’s about mastering your inner calm and wellness, taking the time to pause; and on the other side, it’s about striving to complete a challenge and make a difference. Why not take up a charity task that makes a global impact, and improve your wellbeing while providing a helping hand in a big way? Impact Marathon Series – a social business designed to harness the power of running marathons to build sustainable communities and bring people together – offers such challenges. The goal for each of the races, which take place across the globe, is to fundraise £250,000 to go directly to the projects identified in partnership with the UN’s global goals for sustainable development initiative. Closer to home, you could join the guys at GoodGym Bristol, who have completed 7,244 kind deeds so far, while running around the city on their fitness-meets-philanthropy missions. You can sprint to community jobs including can-sorting at food banks and tree-planting, or to assist older or isolated people in Bristol with one-off tasks that they are no longer able to do on their own – anything from changing a lightbulb to helping with gardening. It gives you natural variety in your running routes, a more concrete form of motivation that’s often absent when running purely to meet your own fitness targets, and the chance to make a positive impact on the lives of others. Perhaps choose one thing for January, another for February and March and see how you get on. And remember, if you are setting new year’s resolutions, get really clear on what you want to achieve, write it down, be consistent, get support and commit. If we can help at all, tweet @kimingleby #make2018brilliant. ■

Situated in Bristol’s beautiful Queen Square, we offer state of the art treatments and exceptional long term anti-ageing and optimising skin care products. Come and enjoy a FREE skin consultation, using a digital imaging system called “Visia”. We also offer a wide range of treatments including; HydraFacial, EndyMed Skin tightening or resurfacing and EDS Micro Needling – full details can be found on our website.

Lisa McBride, Medical Aesthetician

Kim is an award-winning mind and body coach, author and TEDx speaker (image by Sean Malyon)

58 Queen Square, Bristol BS1 4LF 0117 910 2409 | info@bristolaesthetics.org.uk www.bristolaesthetics.org.uk

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE III


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NEW YEAR READING

LITTLE BOOKS OF CALM Charlotte Pope scours Foyles bookshop for top publications to restore the balance

YOGA BABIES, BY FEARNE COTTON

“We’re the Yoga Babies, look what we can do.” Family life can be hectic at times, but the little ones in Yoga Babies are chilling out and you can, too. With cute and eye-catching illustrations to guide you through various yoga positions, this is a wonderful book to help introduce the soothing practice of yoga to your baby or toddler. The story itself has a lovely gentle rhythm, introducing the reader to various children who are all trying out different yoga poses, and encouraging them to give yoga a try for themselves. The Yoga Babies practice the calming art form at home, in the garden and even before bedtime to ensure they have a peaceful night’s sleep. Fearne Cotton is a big advocate for yoga as a family activity – a passion which has prompted her to write this lovely and engaging picture book. If you want to start off 2018 with both yourself and your young child feeling more relaxed and refreshed, this is a book to put at the top of your reading list.

PEOPLE AT WORK: THE ROCK STAR, BY JASON HAZELEY AND JOEL MORRIS

January can be difficult. All the fun and festivities of the holiday period are long behind you, the kids are back at school and you’re back at work, there are fad diets everywhere and you’re struggling to sell your unwanted Christmas gift on eBay. Sometimes in life, you just need a good laugh; and perhaps now in particular. People at Work: The Rock Star is part of the hilarious, best-selling Ladybird for Grown-ups series and, we reckon, it’s just what you need to keep the January blues away. This little book pokes fun, in a teasing, loving way, at all of our favourite stars – namedropping such musicians as Adele, Kate Bush, Sting and Bono – and features lovely old-school illustrations from the original Ladybird children’s books. It takes minutes to read, and personally I find it’s perfect for whenever I need a quick pick-me-up. IV THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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IKIGAI: THE JAPANESE SECRET TO A LONG AND HAPPY LIFE, BY HECTOR GARCIA AND FRANCESC MIRALLES

What is the secret of a long and happy life? It is a question that has been pondered over for centuries. Ikigai may hold the answer. The Japanese concept of ikigai roughly translates to ‘the happiness of always being busy’, or your meaning/purpose in life. The concept seems to be one way of explaining the extraordinary longevity of the Japanese: for example, there are more centenarians on the island of Okinawa than anywhere else. How does ikigai inspire and motivate people to continue to keep active until the very end? And if ikigai has the answers, how do you get it? This beautifully presented little volume explains the concept in a way that is easier to understand, allowing the reader to find their own personal ikigai; their own reason for getting out of bed every morning. Incorporating science-based studies and case studies, this lovely little guide is a fascinating and well-informed read that is sure to be popular.

POETRY PHARMACY, BY WILLIAM SIEGHART

William Sieghart is a great believer in the potential to find great solace in works of poetry. He is the force behind the Forward Prizes for Poetry and is the chief pharmacist of the poetry pharmacy, offering poetic prescriptions for all sorts of ailments, from lethargy to depression, to low self-esteem. Within these beautifully clothbound pages – described as “triedand-true prescriptions for the heart, mind and soul” – you will find such world-renowned poets as Rumi, Philip Larkin, Maya Angelou and Seamus Heaney, all offering up a balm in times of trouble. It can be kept on the shelf and consulted in emergencies, when you need a comforting realisation to know that you are not the only one to have ever felt like this. This slim little volume packs a punch, and is just the thing for those wanting to develop a new appreciation of poetry.

101 THINGS TO DO INSTEAD OF PLAYING ON YOUR PHONE, BY ILKA HEINEMANN

Do you seem to spend every spare moment fiddling with your mobile phone? Does the thought of leaving the house without it bring you out in a cold sweat? From news at the touch of a button, to addictive apps and games, smart phones have become a constant distraction in our day to day lives. They provide an alarm clock to wake us in the morning; a quick way to check the football scores: and most of us would feel naked if forced to part with them. But if you think it’s about time you relinquished your tech addiction and got back to the real world, this book is a great place to start. From mindful activities designed to encourage calm, to fun little doodles and brain teasers to keep your mind active, this snappy little book is just the thing to keep in your bag for when you feel the urge to check your texts or watch a cat video on YouTube...


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Taking the pain out of exercise As many Bristolians will no doubt be making New Year’s Resolutions this month to get fit and be more active, Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield offers some advice on how to prevent sports-related injuries.

I

n the last two decades, more and more people of all ages have started to realise that the key to a long and healthy life is exercise. While this can offer considerable benefits to our health, for some there may be a price to pay; an injury related to their chosen sporting activity. There are two kinds of sports injuries: acute and chronic. Acute injuries occur suddenly when playing or exercising. Sprained ankles, twisted knees, and various fractures are acute injuries. Chronic injuries tend to happen after you exercise for a long time. These are often overuse injuries and include most painful tendon conditions, but also stress fractures. What’s so special about sports injuries? Of course there are injuries that are very specific to certain sports. A good example is a small stress fracture that occurs in the lower back of fast bowlers in cricket. However, in general there is nothing particularly special about sports injuries compared to those that occur outside the sporting environment. In the vast majority of cases, the damage that occurs is exactly the same, and quite often the treatment will also be the same. There may be circumstances where treatment would be different in high level athletes, but your surgeon or physician will apply the same principles when he or she considers what type of treatment will be most appropriate.

Is there anything people can do to prevent sports injuries? • Choose a sport that is right for you. Be realistic about your body shape, your strength, and how flexible you are. • Always warm up before you play any sport. • Learn how to do your sport the correct way, get some lessons, especially in the more technically challenging sports such as swimming and tennis. • Use safety gear where appropriate. • Make sure you have the appropriate equipment for your sport. The wrong racket can contribute to you developing tennis elbow. Inappropriate shoes can contribute to painful conditions such as plantar fasciitis, shin splints, and other overuse tendon problems. If you are participating in sports that involve a lot of landing from a jump or a lot of pivoting movements such as netball and hockey, it may be worthwhile seeing a physiotherapist who can teach you the correct landing techniques. This will minimise the risk of serious knee injuries such as patellar dislocations, and anterior cruciate ligament ruptures. This is especially important in young female athletes, who have a high incidence of serious knee injuries, often up to five times higher than their male counterparts.

Also, avoid excessive hill running (both up AND down) as this tends to significantly overload the front of the knee. Know your limits Build up your exercise tolerance levels gradually. This will not only make it less likely that you will get injured, but also make it much more enjoyable. There is not much joy in exhausting yourself in your first ever session, only to find that you have to take two weeks off to recover. If you have a medical condition that may interfere with certain sporting activities, talk to your GP, physiotherapist, or consultant. Nuffield Health is the UK’s largest not-for-profit healthcare provider, and its core aim is to make the nation healthier. For more information about the full range of services available at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, including physiotherapy and treatments for sports-related injuries, call us on 0117 911 5339 or visit our website: nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE V


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SHOPPING | BEAUTY & WELLBEING

START AFRESH ...As if you were stuck for ways to spend the Christmas cash...

ESSENTIAL OIL BLENDS (10ML), £7.50

FOOLPROOF BROW POWDER, £20

Launching this month and ideal to clear the head post-Christmas – there’s ‘Sleep’, ‘Energise’, ‘Revive’, ‘Focus’, ‘Relax’ and warming ‘Festive’. Amphora Aromatics; amphora-retail.com

Aiming for a soft, full, natural look, it turns sparse brows to full beauties with its light-to-dark shade – mimicking the gradual look of natural brows and avoiding any awful, harsh lines. Benefit; benefitcosmetics.com

BODYBOOM COCONUT COFFEE SCRUB, £16 THE HANDSTANDING YOGI, £14.99

If your skin needs a post-party boost, a scrub with this should do the trick – full of robusta coffee to reduce cellulite and toxins. Harvey Nichols; harveynichols.com

What’s the deal with handstands? What are the benefits of learning to do them? Acrobat Gabrielle Parker and Wiltshire yoga teacher Ash Bond approach the powerful pose from their two complementary perspectives. A fun, unashamedly geeky yoga companion. Waterstones; waterstones.com

MAKE WAVES, NOT WRINKLES KIT, £48

Do your Skin Laundry! The revitalising brand’s hydrating cream face wash and brightening serum work together to leave skin glowing. Harvey Nichols; harveynichols.com

FLORAL STREET FRAGRANCES, 50ML, £55

Respected beauty industry figure Michelle Feeney has launched a range inspired by Covent Garden, to bridge the gap in the market for an accessible range for the ‘younger, more inquisitive luxury consumer’. We’re fans of Modern Goddess and Mockney Sass! Harvey Nichols; harveynichols.com

THE POREFESSIONAL PEARL PRIMER, £27.50

A fabulously silky face primer that minimises the look of pores, locks on your makeup and brightens the visage with a hint of pearly pink. Benefit; benefitcosmetics.com

STUNNA LIP PAINT, £19 HOURGLASS AMBIENT BLUSH ETHEREAL GLOW, £32

Hourglass has carved a niche for itself as an innovative, luxurious, vegan beauty brand in LA. This gorgeous blush uses photoluminescent tech to diffuse harsh light. Ooh la la! Harvey Nichols; harveynichols.com

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We must say, Fenty Beauty’s long-wear fluid lip colour is a genuine joy to apply with its soft wand and head-turning, high-impact colour. Harvey Nichols; harveynichols.com


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

What are your health and career goals for 2018? CNM’s Open Day on 20th January will be packed full of inspiring natural health tips to help you achieve your health goals in 2018. It’s also a chance to find out more about CNM’s Diploma Courses if you are interested in a career in natural health.

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he ‘naturopathic’ approach to health taught at CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine), is founded on ancient principles which are more relevant than ever in today’s health-challenged society: • Prevention is better than cure. • Our bodies have an in-built capacity to selfcorrect, such as when a wound heals or a bone mends, but we need to provide the right conditions to stimulate the process. • Illness starts when ‘toxicity’ or ‘deficiency’ interrupts our self-correction mechanism. • Contributing factors to ill health may be physical, mental or emotional. • Without identifying and addressing the causes of ill health, problems can recur. • Simply suppressing symptoms can cause other problems. • Naturopaths view each person holistically, not as a set of symptoms. • Each person is unique and will respond in different ways. One size does not fit all. • Therapies should do no harm. • Health should mean abundant vitality rather than just the absence of symptoms. • A Naturopath is an educator, empowering people to take responsibility for their own health.

Saturday 20th January 2018 10.00am – 5.30pm CNM Bristol Open Day 10.00am Natural Health for Immunity - Linda Sims Protect your health with immune-boosting nutrition.

11.30am CNM Training Concept - Linda Sims How to become a successful Natural Health Practitioner by training with CNM.

1.30pm Gut Health - Does it really matter? - Anna Mapson Learn why the beneficial micro-organisms in our digestive system are essential to our health and wellbeing.

3.00pm Food for the Nervous System - Milda Elena Enhance strength and resilience with the power of nutrition.

4.30pm Nutrition & Anti-Ageing Secrets - Hannah Braye Discover the link between nutrition and skin ageing. Tickets: £10 Venue: CNM Bristol, Almondsbury, BS32 4LB. Book on line at www.naturopathy-uk.com

Attend a FREE Open Evening to find out about part time training with CNM Bristol for a career as a Naturopathic Nutritionist or Naturopathic Acupuncturist.

10th January at 7pm.

Geoff Don

Please book online at:

www.naturopathy-uk.com 01342 410 505 CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine) is the UK’s leading training provider in a range of natural therapies, including Naturopathic Nutrition, Herbal Medicine, Acupuncture, Homeopathy, Naturopathy, and Natural Chef and Vegan Natural Chef training. Colleges across the UK and Ireland.

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE VII


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THE HEALTH & WELLBEING GUIDE | BRISTOL 2018

BRISTOL AESTHETICS 58 Queen Square, Bristol BS1 4LF Tel: 0117 910 2400 Web: bristolaesthetics.org.uk

Situated in Bristol’s beautiful Queen Square, all treatments are carried out in Bristol Aesthetics’ outstanding clinical facilities, set in comfortable and restful surroundings. Why not go and enjoy a free skin consultation with Lisa, a medical aesthetician, which includes a ‘Visia’ assessment. Visia is a state of the art digital imaging system, which looks at eight key areas of your complexion to determine where your skin might need extra help. Bristol Aesthetics can measure and monitor the improvements in the condition of your skin over time, enabling you to see the results in the most scientific and measurable way.

MY BODY POSITIVE

SOUL PILATES

Tel: 07753 686 426 Web: mybodypositive.co.uk

57 Queen Charlotte Street, Bristol BS1 4HQ Tel: 0117 214 1655 Web: soulpilates.co.uk

Are you always dieting or worrying about food? Do you feel like you ‘should’ lose weight but can’t stop eating? Do you feel that you are failing at dieting? Lisa from My Body Positive offers workshops and one to one coaching for those who are ready to take a different approach to their relationship with food, helping to address what is really going on. With Lisa you can learn to understand what drives your eating behaviour and to trust your body again, resulting in a more peaceful relationship with food ‘Food Freedom’ as she calls it. My Body Positive teaches you to appreciate your body, rather than fighting against it. My Body Positive’s next “Food Freedom and Body Acceptance” course starts from 18 January 2018, every Thursday evening for 8 weeks, in Henleaze.

Soul Pilates is one of Bristol’s leading Pilates studios. The studio is owned and run by Nic Conroy and her team of dedicated and highly trained teachers. It goes far beyond the mat with specialist machines, props and precision training to improve movement and function in every client. The 33 mat, equipment and barre classes run every week, teaching you to take a more contemplative and focused look at the way your bones and muscles work together to move your body better and more efficiently. You may well end up with a healthier and leaner body, but your mind will also benefit from these calm and mindful classes.

UNDERCOVER ROCK St Werburgh's Church, Mina Road, Bristol BS2 9YT Tel: 0117 941 3489 Web: undercover-rock.com Inside a dramatic fifteenth century church you’ll find Undercover Rock - Bristol’s original roped climbing centre. Whether you’re completely new to climbing or want to continue to improve your skills and technique, Undercover Rock offers a range of classes for climbers of all abilities. There are even courses for kids of all ages that run each term, the next of which is starting now so make sure you visit their website to book spaces. Climbing is not only a fantastic physical workout but it’s brilliant for your mental health too, helping you to clear your mind and focus solely on the act of climbing. Undercover Rock also hosts weekly climbers’ clubs, including a women’s only club, which are a great way to meet like-minded people and share skills in a social environment. Want to give climbing a try? Check out their taster sessions this new year!

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THE HEALTH & WELLBEING GUIDE | BRISTOL 2018

SARAH LATHAM SPORTS MASSAGE The Climbing Academy, Charlton Street, Bristol, BS5 0FD Tel: 07732 775759 Email: Latham.sarah@yahoo.com Sarah is an experienced enthusiastic sports massage therapist. She has put her body and mind through the stresses of being a national gymnast, studying for a biochemistry degree, rock climbing, skiing and flying trapeze. The aches and pains from these activities were relieved by sports massage. Regular sports massage helps prevent injury and helps to improve endurance and performance. Deep tissue massage is tailored to individual needs. Sarah offers one hour sports massage treatments tailored to your needs every Tuesday and Wednesday at The Climbing Academy for £38. Daytime and weekend appointments are available on request.

NICOLA HARKER COACHING Bristol Road, Wraxall, Bristol BS48 1LH Web: nicolaharkercoaching.com Email: nh@nicolaharker.plus.com Do you feel something is missing in your life? Do you dream that your life could be different or more fulfilling? Do you wonder how to get balance in your life, as there seem to be so many competing demands on your time? Dr. Nicola Harker has 16 years experience as a GP and advisor for Macmillan Cancer Support, and now works as an intuitive coach. Nicola uses gentle but incisive coaching techniques to help you to gain clarity, build inner resilience, and to find your true purpose. You leave feeling calmer, more focused, and energised, and she will help you to discover your strengths and your potential, and hopefully no longer feel overwhelmed or stuck.

BODYSTREET CLIFTON 98 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2QY Tel: 0117 422 8229 Web: bodystreet.co.uk Bodystreet Clifton is a personal training studio that can offer the same health and physical benefits in one 20 minute weekly session as four visits to the gym, simply by using electro muscle stimulation to send impulses to your muscles. This causes them to contract in the same way that your brain does when you’re working out. Bodystreet Clifton work out more of the muscle fibre in this way and work all of the muscle groups at the same time, meaning only one session per week is required, all done in a standing still position. While the technology has been around for over a century and was famously used by Soviet elite athletes in the 1960s, the concept of sending electric impulses through muscles and forcing them to contract has recently had a bit of a renaissance. Over the years, celebrities like Madonna and sport superstars like Usain Bolt have publicly incorporated EMS into their workout routines. Why not give it a try?

LAVISH SALON & SPA Bristol Marriott Royal Hotel, Narrow Quay, Bristol BS1 5TA Tel: 0117 927 3389 Web: lavish-spa.co.uk Lavish Salon & Spa is very excited to be the newest stockist of Aveda in Bristol. Aveda’s mission is to care for the world we live in. The vision is of connecting beauty, environment and wellbeing and of only using ingredients of the highest integrity, naturally derived and organic wherever possible. This is a mission Lavish Salon & Spa truly believe in, which is why the Aveda range of skin, body and spa treatments has been introduced to the beauty service menu. To celebrate Lavish Salon & Spa becoming Bristol’s newest Aveda Salon, it is offering The Bristol Magazine readers a complimentary service upgrade to a sixty minute Aveda facial when you book a thirty minute Aveda facial during January 2018, Monday to Friday. To take advantage of this introductory offer, please call to book your appointment. Please mention The Bristol Magazine when booking to receive your complimentary upgrade.

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THE HEALTH & WELLBEING GUIDE | BRISTOL 2018

THE CLIMBING ACADEMY Charlton Street, Bristol, BS5 0FD Tel: 01179 072 956 Web: theclimbingacademy.com

COLLEGE OF NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE

Bouldering is currently taking the UK by storm. This form of climbing is performed on low-level walls above crash mats, without the need for harnesses or ropes. Because of this, it’s an incredibly accessible sport and beginners can turn up to The Climbing Academy and give it a go straight away, without needing to attend an induction course. So what makes bouldering great for your health and wellbeing? Well to begin, it’s a physical workout. But don’t be fooled - it’s not all about being the strongest! It comes down to developing a good technique that encourages you to climb without exerting yourself. Bouldering is also brilliant for your mental fitness. With its imaginative problems and great atmosphere, TCA should be at the top of your hitlist this new year!

Ash Ridge Road, Bradley Stoke, Bristol BS32 4LB Tel: 01342 410 505 Web: naturopathy-uk.com Whether you are planning a healthy new you or a career change in 2018, the open day at CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine) in Bristol could be just what you need to kick-start your plans. In a day of talks packed full of tips about natural health, you’ll be inspired by how nutrition can be used to boost our immunity, keep our nervous system on track and slow-down ageing. You can also find out more about CNM’s full range of diploma courses, which in Bristol includes Naturopathic Nutrition and Acupuncture. The event is on Saturday 20 January 2018, costs £10 and runs from 10am – 5:30pm.

COMFORT HEALTH

BRISTOL PILATES STUDIO

11 Alma Vale Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2HL Tel: 0117 373 1053 Web: comforthealth.co.uk

Monarch House, 1-7 Smyth Road, Bristol BS3 2BX Tel: 07722 044117 Web: bristolpilatesstudio.com

Comfort Health is a beautifully presented physiotherapy & health clinic situated a stone's throw from Whiteladies Road in Clifton. It has an experienced, friendly team of professionals in a range of fields allowing clients the opportunity to improve their physical, psychological and emotional wellbeing. With a range of treatments available, the team at Comfort Health offer a high-quality and expertly tailored service with the patient’s needs being top priority. Whether an elite athlete with a sports injury, an office worker with a bad back, or just struggling with your mental health and wellbeing, they’ve got you covered!

Elle from Bristol Pilates Studio explains her passion for Pilates. “Pilates gives you freedom and I love that. Over 10 years I’ve come full circle from learning Pilates to understanding and being able to teach it in a way that makes a positive difference for people. I’m here to guide my students to be more comfortable in their own bodies. I see them improving their range of movement, living without pain, ageing gracefully and above all enjoying doing it. Teaching feels like a privilege, it’s a very personal thing. When they walk into the room it’s all about them, not me. I simply want to give my students the best service I can. It makes me want to continue learning and keep developing the studio. Last year was a great first year but 2018 is going to be very exciting!”

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THE HEALTH & WELLBEING GUIDE | BRISTOL 2018

EF MEDISPA 10A Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 1PD Tel: 0117 9114913 Web: efmedispa.com/bristol Winter weather and New Year celebrations can really take their toll on your skin, which is why January is a great time to make some skin resolutions. EF Medispa Bristol offers a selection of award-winning therapies including: bespoke peels and facials, anti-wrinkle injectables, advanced acne and anti-ageing laser treatments, permanent pain-free hair removal, tightening and weight loss led body treatments. EF Medispa Bristol is combining cutting edge aesthetic treatments. Alongside being famous for fitness classes, wellness and nutritional services, this latest clinic opening develops a lifestyle centre concept for the vibrant city of Bristol and surrounding areas.

NUFFIELD HEALTH FITNESS AND WELLBEING GYMS Bristol: 83 Queens Road, Bristol BS8 1QS Bristol North: Hunts Ground Road, Stoke Gifford, Bristol BS34 8HN Web: nuffieldhealth.com Membership at Nuffield Health entitles you to a host of great benefits. They make membership as simple as possible, with a range of easy payment methods, flexible membership agreements, plus the ability to join and manage your membership online. There are 2 locations in the Bristol area and you can take advantage of a free trial at your chosen gym so you get to experience the facilities first hand. Download your free day pass which is valid for seven days from download and you’ll be able to join up with the onsite membership advisers after your visit. Nuffield clubs are holistic in their approach to fitness and wellbeing. Membership gives you access to on-site experts including physiotherapists and personal trainers, as well as option to use multiple clubs across the UK. There are options to suit everyone and the ability to join online 24/7.

TRAINHERS

THE GOSSIP NAIL BAR

22 Kellaway Avenue, Bristol BS6 7XR Tel: 0117 944 6650 Web: trainhers.co.uk

49 Old Market Street, Bristol BS2 0EX Tel: 07791 968032 Web: thegossipnailbar.co.uk

TrainHers is a ladies only gym offering a 30 minute workout. They strive to provide a friendly, comfortable and encouraging environment for ladies of all ages, shapes and abilities, offering a more personalised journey to a healthier body. They are a very friendly team and want everybody to feel welcome and not intimidated about joining a gym, so offer a free introductory trial giving you a workout to suit your own individual needs. One of four fully qualified personal trainers is always around to encourage and motivate you, and regular reviews of your workout will ensure you reach your personal goals. You can also book in for 1:1 sessions in boxing, dancing, abs and cardio all within your membership. TrainHers can also offer support with antenatal and postnatal programmes and medical exercise referrals. A BANT qualified nutritional therapist is available to help with nutrition advice in order to help with mood, health and figure. Throughout the year there are various social events for members including a curry night, book club and themed party nights! So just get in touch; membership costs from just £30 per month with no contract and no obligation to join. Minimum age is 14.

The Gossip Nail Bar is an exciting new nail salon in one of Bristol’s trendiest parts of town. YouTuber and stylist Emily Fisher, AKA Mermaid Gossip, wanted to launch her new collaboration at Glitch salon in a fresh and funky setting. Offering the latest nail trends, you won’t find basic nails here; it’s all about cute manis and fierce nail acrylics. Emily has been practicing nail art privately and for friends for many years, with her nail videos on YouTube being popular across the globe. After receiving many requests from her followers, Emily has moved her passion from hobby to business to answer the demand. What better place to open this cool new nail bar than in her hometown of Bristol. Glitch is a concept space with industrial and Scandinavian influences. This is the first salon where you can get your hair done whilst listening to live music, enjoy art exhibits from local Bristol artists, and enjoy a chilled drink and live your dream in a little urban jungle.

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THE HEALTH & WELLBEING GUIDE | BRISTOL 2018

NUFFIELD HEALTH THE CHESTERFIELD HOSPITAL 3 Clifton Hill, Bristol BS8 1BN Tel: 0117 911 9376 Web: nuffieldhealth.com Nuffield Health’s The Chesterfield Hospital brings patient service to a new level. Nuffield has invested £20million in the 30 bed private hospital which has 11 consulting rooms and 3 fully digital operating theatres and so combines leading edge clinical facilities with an outstanding customer experience. The hospital offers an extensive list of services including cosmetic surgery, orthopaedics, radiology as well as a private GP service. They hold regular events covering a variety of healthcare topics; in January and February experts will be available to discuss subjects as diverse as eye health, hip and knee replacement surgery and female pelvic problems. Visit the website for dates and full details.

THÉA PAYNE PERSONAL TRAINING Brunel Lock Development, Smeaton Road, Bristol BS1 6SE Tel: 07817 495008 Web: tpaynefitness.com If you’re saying “I’m too old for this” Théa will help you to realise the potential you have to strengthen your mind and body, prevent falls in later life and eliminate aches and pains. Théa provides personal training in a private, non-intimidating space with a holistic approach to long-lasting good health. With a background in elite gymnastics, Théa has a great deal of experience in training and coaching. She is extremely client focused and not only will she plan progressive sessions to achieve your goals but assess other areas of your life and build a manageable routine of effective exercise and nutrition habits into your everyday schedule. You will have more energy and feel great. Expect to stay looking younger for longer with improved posture and balance. You will be strong and confident, have more energy and feel great.

PACIFIC YOGA Ground Floor, The Brewhouse, Georges Square, Bristol BS1 6LA Tel: 0117 321 5445 Web: pacificyoga.co.uk Pacific Yoga, on the water in the heart of Bristol, is the newest studio in town. Opened just months ago in the historic Brewhouse on the edge of Finzels Reach, two stylish studios offer all sorts of yoga. The facilities are excellent with state of the art heating with fresh, oxygenated air, beautiful showers and changing rooms. Customers can relax with friends in Pacific’s own Cafe Matariki. The app (Pacific Yoga) and the website let you choose any class. Smiling, skillful staff are on hand if you need to know more.

TURNERS OPTICIANS 57 Henleaze Road, Bristol BS9 4JT Tel: 0117 962 2474 Web: turnersopticians.co.uk For almost 80 years the Turner family has been focused on giving each and every one of its patients thorough and in-depth eye care. A visit to Turners Opticians is much more than a normal sight test. Its specialist clinical equipment means that Turners are able to examine the health of your eyes with a fine detail not even dreamt of when lead optometrist Peter’s grandfather Harold started out in the 1930s. Turners Opticians run the successful Bristol Dry & Watery Eyes Clinic as well as offering treatments for blepharitis and minor eye conditions Clinics for those of you with eye or vision concerns. If you’ve not been to Turners Opticians recently, you can now choose an extended eye exam or eye clinic appointments, available to both NHS and private patients, in Henleaze or Fishponds or book via the website.

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THE HEALTH & WELLBEING GUIDE | BRISTOL 2018

SACRED THERAPY YOGA Clifton Village Library, Princess Victoria Street, Bristol BS8 4BX Tel: 07954 187 442 Web: sacredtherapyyoga.com Michele Henderson has been practising yoga since 2006 and has trained as a teacher of kundalini yoga which she finds to be transformative physically, mentally and spiritually. Kundalini is often referred to as ‘The Yoga of Awareness’ and this form of exercise and meditation is said to fuse science with spirit for a comprehensive approach to wellness. Sacred Therapy classes are held at The Alma Vale Centre ad well as Clifton Village library and as well as the regular classes there are specific programmes focussing on specific issues such and anxiety, fertility and meditation for manifestation.

BLOGGS SALON 288 Gloucester Road, Bristol BS7 8PD Tel: 0117 924 4006 Web: bloggssalons.com Award-winning British hairdessor Joe Hemmings is a well renowned stylist, known for offering an array of different services at his salon ‘Bloggs’ in Bristol. The salon was recently awarded Salon of the Year 2 at a prestigious ceremony at the Park Plaza Westminster Bridge in London which was hosted by comedian Rob Beckett. The Salon Of The Year 2 category recognises smaller salons which personify a forward-thinking business, with inspiring marketing, strong customer relations and an engaged and inspiring team in place. Treat yourself to the Bloggs experience at Gloucester Road or their newest salon now open on the Harbourside.

CLIFTON REVOLUTION Guthrie Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 3EZ Tel: 07939 403 049 Web: cliftonrevolution.com

SEANHANNA

With Christmas a distant memory and the festivities and excesses still hanging around, many of us often ask "how can we get in shape quickly?” Being in shape is not about quick gimmicks or magic lotions and potions, it's about hard work, making the correct food choices and most importantly having fun whilst doing it! Introducing Clifton Revolution - Bristol's newest venue for indoor cycling. Suitable for all abilities and confidence levels, Clifton Revolution offer 45 minute sessions that burn on average between 400-600 calories. Enjoy the gamechanging experience of MyZone cardio tracking for a safer and more fun ride; and enjoy the specially tailored sessions that will help you to get the results you want faster by tracking your heart rate during work outs and giving accurate calorie burn data.

13 Quakers Friars, Cabot Circus, Bristol BS1 3BU Tel: 0117 934 9393 Web: seanhanna.com Seanhanna has long been the ‘go to’ salon for The Bristol Magazine fashion shoot stylists. Creative and on-trend, the salon is lead by manager Adam Vincent whose team provides clients with the best possible experience though a combination of excellent hairdressing skills and customer care. This funky salon holds soiree evenings to keep you up to date with the latest trends and products and is also home to stylish Noel Halligan. Noel is an established member of the L’Oreal ID Artist Program which involves travelling around Europe sharing his ideas though seminars and shows. You can be sure that Seanhanna offers the very best in hair extensions, permanent blow-dries, cutting, colour, men’s styling and of course retail therapy for your hair.

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE XIII


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HEALTH & BEAUTY

THE ROYAL TREATMENT Barnet in need of some attention? Head to Harbour Inlet hair salon, Kings & Queens Words by Amanda Nicholls

The location is a major selling point – such serene views

The minimalist, industrial-style interior

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ike pretty waterside settings? (Yes, yes we do). Like being pampered? (Well, obviously). Okay, but do you like prosecco? (Now let me think...) In that case, you ought to try that hair salon in that lovely little corner of the city called Harbour Inlet, opposite SS Great Britain, so we were told. So off we went. Kings and Queens, at the end of Millennium Promenade, is one of a group of businesses that make up this burgeoning, self-contained spot – the more tranquil cousin of Wapping Wharf you could say, and just as stylish with hang-outs including cool eateries Spoke & Stringer and Broken Dock, and The Spin Bar – where you can get a good workout followed by a bite to eat. The location is a major selling point – the scene was beautifully serene when we wandered down from busy Temple Meads one Friday night after work – and next time we could certainly imagine ourselves booking in nearby for lunch after sorting ourselves out with a fresh ’do, or going for a morning spin and juice beforehand. Gina Tigwell – the friendly owner of the salon, and a policewoman before she decided to start her new chapter – greeted me, taking my heavy winter coat and hanging it beside a gorgeous old Chesterfield. Business has been good since launching 18 months ago, with the team steadily expanding, and invited to style at special events such as Harvey Nichols’ shoppers’ evenings. Gina’s space is minimal, with an industrial feel; sparse foliage; trendy wall crates rather than shelves; giant, framed playing cards (kings and queens, of course) and simple bulbs suspended from the ceiling by way of lighting. My stylist for the evening, the lovely Bryony, sat me down for a consultation – I’m trying to grow my hair so we decided not to take much off, but to tidy up the raggedy ends and breathe some life into my severely faded locks with warm browns and ashier tones than I’m used to. After sourcing me a flute and filling it up with bubbly (there are plenty of soft choices if you don’t want to get boozy), Bryony began the dye job while I got stuck into a stack of magazines. After letting the colour set in, and the customary shampoo and head massage over at the sinks, where the delicious smell of the Milkshake products got me oddly peckish, Bryony chopped my tresses into shape with expert precision. Meanwhile I warded off the hunger with several fizz top-ups from Gina (well, it was Friday night, and if they wanted to treat us like royalty, that was alright with us). XIV THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Having achieved exactly the look I wanted (some stylists prefer to achieve exactly the look they want, don’t they?), Bryony applied some Incredible Milk leave-in conditioner (I held my hair to my face to inhale the aroma all the way home). Finishing with a big, bouncy blow-dry to set me up for the weekend, she sent me on my way. If you do decide to head down to Harbour Inlet next time you need some mane maintenance, may you soak up the salon’s relaxed feel and enjoy its calming harbour views; may your cup overfloweth with prosecco and may you, like us, leave feeling like kings and queens... • kingsandqueensbristol.com

Before: raggedy, faded locks

After: bouncy brunette tresses


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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE XV


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BRISTOL UPDATES BITE-SIZED BUSINESS AND ECONOMY NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY Image © Jon Craig

BROAD APPEAL Businesses in Bristol and Bath could now benefit from grants of up to £3,000 to get gigabit broadband installed as part of a £2million trial taking place in four areas around the UK. Suppliers will be offering vouchers worth between £500 and £3,000 to local businesses which can then be used to pay for the installation of gigabit speed connections. The aim of the pilots is to encourage the market to extend full fibre infrastructure in the UK by increasing demand and reducing customer cost. “Top notch broadband is essential to compete in the modern world,” said minister for digital, Matt Hancock. “Faster and more reliable connections are transforming the way we live and work, and better broadband supports businesses to grow and become more productive. So we’re introducing gigaspeed vouchers to help businesses get connected to the next generation of broadband technology. This is testament to our ambitions for full fibre infrastructure across the UK to underpin our digital economy.” This programme comes as part of the government’s £23billion National Productivity Investment Fund aimed at improving productivity, which is key to raising living standards. This fund has already earmarked £740m specifically for improving Britain’s digital infrastructure, ensuring the UK is match-fit for the future. Two million pounds has been made available for vouchers for the test phase which will end when the money has gone or by the end of March 2019, whichever comes first. • gigabitvoucher.culture.gov.uk

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TIME TO REBOOT The National Trust has collaborated with Hunter Field for the first time, on a womens footwear collection comprising of a Norris tall boot, Chelsea boot and gardener’s clog. Made to protect in both rural and urban environments, they’ve been designed in navy blue with a tonal acorn and oak leaf print from the National Trust’s archive. The National Trust looks after more than 250,000 hectares of countryside, 775 miles of coastline and hundreds of historic houses, pubs, whole villages, churches and a gold mine. Proceeds of the collaboration will contribute towards the Trust’s ongoing conservation commitments. “Hunter Field and the National Trust are quintessentially British establishments that share a love for the outdoors and history,” said creative director Alasdhair Willis. “It seemed a harmonious and natural choice to collaborate.” Clare Brown, for the National Trust, agreed: “This partnership aligns with our ambition to inspire members, supporters and the wider public to connect with nature, for its long-term protection. We hope it will appeal to the whole family, encouraging them to spend time together enjoying the great outdoors.” • shop.nationaltrust.org.uk

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FLEX YOUR ETHICAL MUSCLES The South West Fairtrade Business Awards 2018 are now welcoming applications from organisations large and small all over the region. Now in their sixth year, the awards recognise the contribution that businesses, organisations and institutes in the South West make in support of Fairtrade by purchasing certified Fairtrade products for the workplace and raising awareness of ethical trade issues among their staff, customers and peers. The awards are free to enter, and will culminate in a high profile ceremony in March. For the first time, the judging panel is seeking entrants for Best South West Fairtrade Product. The category is open to any company in the South West making a Fairtrade certified product, and will be awarded to the applicant that makes best use of Fairtrade ingredients and marketing to create a special or innovative ethical product. “This is a really exciting time for Fairtrade in the South West,” said Danni Rochman, coordinator of Bristol Fairtrade Network which administrates the Awards. “The region is a hotbed for organisations going that extra mile to put ethical trade at the heart of their business.” Organisations flexing their ethical muscles to meet the award criteria will be rewarded with bronze, silver or gold certificates, e-logos, a year-long online listing and a free ticket to the ceremony. Winners will receive their own Bristol Blue Glass trophy to take away. “Winning a South West Fairtrade Business Award has been a brilliant way of getting the word out about our commitment to ethical retail,” said Lucy Gatward at ethical food retailer Better Food, who have held the award for several consecutive years. “We know our customers choose to shop with us because of our values, and the award is a clear demonstration of what Better Food stands for.” • bristolfairtrade.org.uk/fairtradebusiness


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CITY | BUSINESS

CAN YOU REALLY HAVE A ‘GOOD’ DIVORCE? JIM GRIDLEY

If you’re looking to call time on your relationship, you may want to consider how you could take a more flexible and friendly approach and possibly avoid the stress of going to court. Jim Gridley, family partner at Barcan+Kirby explains what makes a ‘good’ divorce, and the alternative ways of ending a relationship.

A

s we begin the New Year, many couples will have spent Christmas together trying to make their relationship work and will rely on January to start afresh. Yet, so common is the surge in divorce enquiries that the first Monday of the New Year is known as ‘D-Day’ – or ‘Divorce Day’ – amongst family lawyers.

When couples file for divorce, many would assume that the concept of an amicable break-up doesn’t exist, but that’s not entirely true. Attitudes towards divorce are changing, with more couples becoming more open to having a negotiated separation.

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What are my options? If you are considering separating from your partner, there are other options than filing for divorce straight away. It is often preferable to focus on finding solutions regarding your future financial and children arrangements before doing this. If you want to co-operate with your ex-partner post-divorce, you should consider family mediation. In contrast to attending court, mediation is more cost-effective, flexible and enables you and your expartner to work through any terms amicably. Mediation isn’t marriage counselling, rather it helps you both to discuss any financial or child-care arrangements in a relaxed and informal setting. Mediators don’t ‘take sides’, they keep both you and your partner focused on finding a practical and achievable solution to any problems. However, mediation isn’t for everyone. If you still want to avoid going to court, collaborative law may be another option.

What is collaborative law? With collaborative law, instead of having a mediator, you’ll work with your solicitor, your ex-partner and their solicitor to reach agreements faceto-face, including decisions regarding finances, children, divorce and who the children will live with. Collaborative law will only work if both you and your partner are willing to disclose all information and have a genuine desire to reach an agreement that is fair to both of you and your family. The process will only be a success if you approach it with transparency, a willingness to listen and co-operate together. n If you and your partner are looking for an amicable break-up, contact Jim Gridley at j.gridley@barcankirby.co.uk or on 0117 325 2929. Barcan+Kirby will be able to assist you through all aspects of your separation including divorce + finances, children, mediation and collaborative law.

www.thebristolmag.co.uk/subscribe or Tel: 0117 974 2800

THE

B R I S T OL MAGAZINE

www.barcankirby.co.uk

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New year, New goals?

Part-time MSc Strategy, Change and Leadership

Designed for busy managers to fit around a demanding management role, this part-time programme will help you to: • enhance your impact as a leader • understand organisational complexity and issues affecting success • improve your ability to manage change and uncertainty • make better choices about growth and strategic direction

Email Cheralyn Dark at efim-scl@bristol.ac.uk or Tel: 0117 954 6694 for details www.bristol.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/2018/ssl/msc-strategy-change-leadership/ Come along to our Open Evening on Wednesday 21 March 2018 between 6-8pm. To register, please email Cheralyn at efim-scl@bristol.ac.uk

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 71


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

You can have a positive start to the New Year…even in divorce

T

he decorations have been taken down and the house is returning to a vague sense of normality. After the Christmas and New Year festivities there is another life event on the horizon for many at this time of year – divorce. It is a sad fact that for many family lawyers the number of new client enquiries will increase in the month of January. This may be for a number of reasons: couples who opted to hang on through the holidays to make sure the children’s Christmas (both now and in the future) is not ruined; those who had not made up their minds before but now realise that, after the intensity of Christmas, divorce is inevitable. Whatever the reason behind the decision, the end of a personal relationship can be the beginning of traumatic and unfamiliar emotional feelings, family disruptions, financial changes and legal processes. Friends and family will want to help. Whilst well-meaning, their advice may fill you with more anxiety as you hear about battles fought in court rooms over months, sometimes years. However, a court battle does not have to be the case. There are alternatives and seeking initial expert advice about them may set you on the right path in the New Year. At Sharp Family Law we have experienced collaborative lawyers who help separating and divorcing couples reach resolutions

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respectfully, in private and without the threat of court action Here are some of the questions we will ask you to consider: • Do you want to end your relationship with dignity and respect for one another? • Do you want to protect your children from any potential negative impact of the separation? • Is taking a rational and fair approach more important than pitching yourself as a winner and your spouse as the loser in the whole process? • Is protecting your money for the benefit of your children more important than spending it on spiraling legal fees? • Do you want to be a role model for other family members to show them how the most difficult of challenges can be managed? If these questions resonate with you then a collaborative divorce may be the answer. There are other alternatives, such as mediation or constructive negotiation, which can also help you reach agreements centred on your most important goals for the future. So, if you seek a positive way forward in the New Year, despite the inevitable challenges that you may face, then contact one of the specialist family lawyers at Sharp Family Law. Our solicitors will spend time upfront understanding your situation and listening actively to your hopes and concerns. By

Nº 163

doing so we can help you select the right option for handling your separation, divorce or family issue in order to find the most secure, long-term outcome for you and your family. For more information contact Clare Webb on 0117 9055 055 or email her at clare@sharpfamilylaw.com. 26 Orchard Street, Bristol BS1 5EH website: www.sharpfamilylaw.com Clare Webb

Clare Webb


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The AMD Solicitors Private Client T H E

BR I S T O L M A G A Z I N E

EVERY MONTH THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE IS PERFECTLY DELIVERED TO OVER 20,000 HOMES AND BUSINESSES

AN INSERT IN OUR MAGAZINE WILL REALLY REACH GREAT QUALITY READERS

CALL FOR DETAILS 0117 974 2800

department presents a Spring workshop on

The Snakes and Ladders of Life

AMD Solicitors invite you to join us for a practical afternoon workshop on The Snakes and Ladders of Life. This workshop will cover:

• Who pays? - Care Fees and Inheritance Tax

• Bank of Mum and Dad – The Lenient Lender • Where there’s a will there’s a way • Incapacity – who’s in charge?

We will be holding the workshop in both Redland and Henleaze as follows:-

Redland

Wednesday 28th February 2018 - 3pm to 4pm Tyndale Baptist Church, Whiteladies Road, Bristol, BS8 2QG

EMAIL: SALES @ THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK WE CAN ALSO HELP WITH GREAT DESIGN AND PRINT SOLUTIONS

Henleaze

Thursday 1st March 2018 - 3pm to 4pm Leonard Hall, Trinity-Henleaze United Reformed Church, Waterford Road, Henleaze, BS9 4BT The workshop will begin with talks by two of our Solicitors, Florence Pearce and Andrew Jack, and will be followed by a question and answer session. Florence and Andrew are experienced specialist private client solicitors. Florence is also a full member of STEP (the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners), the leading professional association in this field. Refreshments will be provided. There is no charge but a donation to our charity of the year, Guide Dogs For the Blind, would be appreciated. To book a place at one of our workshops please telephone: 0117 9621205, email probate@amdsolicitors.com or call in to one of our four Bristol offices: 100 Henleaze Road, Henleaze BS9 4JZ 15 The Mall, Clifton BS8 4DS 139 Whiteladies Road, Clifton BS8 2PL 2 Station Road, Shirehampton BS11 9TT

© AMD Solicitors

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Lily loves her hometown of Bristol and spends time off brunching in Clifton and training with her Bristol and West Athletic Club family

GOLD STANDARD International field hockey player Lily Owsley has another big year ahead. Rod Gilmour meets the Bristolian Olympic champion

G

et Lily Owsley talking about her love for Bristol and she’ll extol the virtues of her home city with the same unstoppable pace and freedom she is currently using to terrorise rival opponents on hockey pitches across the globe. “Bristol just has that special feeling, with it being home,” the 23-year-old says passionately. “It has its own unique feel and I can’t see myself settling down anywhere else when I’m older.” Whenever the opportunity presents itself, the bubbly gold medalwinning Olympian will drive the 100 miles back from her training base at Bisham Abbey, in Berkshire, to Bristol for a long weekend, taking in anything from family roast dinners and backgammon tournaments to watching her beloved Bristol City play football. “It is a city with so much fun and with some great sports sides,” she adds. “I go back mainly to watch City as I’m a season ticket holder but I tell my parents it’s to see them!” That’s when time allows, of course, and she isn’t flying off to tournaments as an England and Great Britain hockey player. After being voted junior player of the tournament at December’s World League Final in New Zealand, featuring the world’s top eight sides, she is now regarded as one of the most feared forwards in world hockey as she heads into a key year for the sport, with England hosting the Vitality Women’s World Cup in July. Such has been Owsley’s professional ascent, one could even make comparisons with Constitution Hill – her home sits beside the steep gradient in Clifton – given that she first picked up a stick aged 13. 74 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Before her hockey exploits, she was a multi-talented sportswoman in football and athletics; in her early teens she played with Bristol City Ladies and was a rising 800-metres runner on the track with Bristol and West Athletics Club. “I trained every day,” she recalls. “With Bristol Academy it was on Tuesdays and Thursdays and I played on a Saturday; the athletics was in between all that and I tried to fit hockey in during the day as well.”

...As she heads into a key year for the sport, she is now regarded as one of the most feared forwards in world hockey...

As the London 2012 Olympics loomed, the former Clifton College student was running in the English Schools Championships in Gateshead, competing in yet another national final. It proved to be her last athletics meeting as she soon joined GB hockey’s junior programme. Since being offered a coveted centralised contract at England Hockey after the London Games, Owsley has simply lived and breathed the


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SPORT

sport. This April she heads to the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, where England will hope to atone for the heartache of missing out on gold to Australia in 2014. Owsley scored in the final before their fierce rivals equalised with 11 seconds left and then won on a shoot-out. But she didn’t have to wait long before a first major success, with European gold in 2015. The natural ups and downs of elite sport then saw her struck down with potentially fatal disease meningitis. She spent several days in hospital but never doubted her recovery. “I’m young and fit so I knew I’d make a pretty speedy recovery!” she says confidently. This was followed, famously, by Team GB’s stunning success against Holland in the Rio 2016 Olympic final. Owsley scored in normal time before the BBC 10 o’clock news was delayed so that the British public could watch the thrilling conclusion as the women’s team won gold in another edge-of-the-seat shoot-out. The Dutch were going for a hat-trick of Olympic titles, yet Team GB matched their brand of hockey to brilliant effect in the final. For Owsley and co, it was testament to the squad’s collective spirit and togetherness – honed from hours of practice at Bisham Abbey – which put the fear into their Dutch rivals. That much was down to the brilliance of goalkeeper Maddie Hinch, who had proved the hero a year earlier when she shut out the Dutch in an equally enthralling shoot-out at the European Championship final in London. By the time the two sides confronted each other at the Olympics, Great Britain had the mental edge as the Dutch tried various mind games to unsettle the second favourites.

...Lining up in the tunnel, there was such a quiet confidence; we were looking into each other’s eyes with the utmost belief... “We had a lot of quiet confidence and we didn’t need that external energy,” recalls Owsley. “Whereas, for the Dutch, it was like they could still intimidate us being the number one ranked side in the world. “It was never going to get us. We were in such a bubble. We built such a wall and we were in that moment. They were shouting, screaming. It was weird – it was like a battle when everything is going on around you and there is so much noise. Lining up in the tunnel, there was such a quiet confidence; we were looking into each other’s eyes with the utmost belief.” The rest is history and life changed inextricably for Owsley and her team-mates thereafter. There were talk shows, public appearances and New Year’s honours, with Owsley receiving her MBE at Buckingham Palace last March. She invited her grandmother, and remembered going up to London to visit her as a child; climbing on the railings to take in the Palace facade. Then there she was, collecting her honour in a second visit to the Mall. “I used to think one day I might get inside, thinking probably more that I might break in or something,” she jokes, “so to be invited in more than once was an incredible feeling. It was great that it was Prince Charles giving the MBEs, as he was the last of the royals we hadn’t met. What an experience.” Yet for all the shoulder rubbing at high-profile events, Owsley remains as grounded as they come. The competitive edge remains too – and for that she would thank her dad, Richard, and mum Jen, who heads the education and safeguarding department at Bristol City FC. Whenever the Owsleys go on holiday – her sister, Emily, also plays hockey while her brother, Freddie, is a talented sprinter – there will always be competitions over board games or other activities. And when Lily returns home she will often head, with her father, to Bristol Backgammon nights at Rainbow Casino on a Thursday. “It’s great to have pastimes outside of hockey,” she adds of the pressures she sometimes faces at Bisham Abbey.

In an autumn backgammon tournament, Owsley found herself drawn against one of the UK’s best players. “It stayed tight all match. He was getting so rattled,” she remembers. “There is an element of luck and probability but I ended up winning, then losing to my dad in the semis. “Of course, there is the competitive side with him. The loser has to walk home while the winner gets to drive!” Owsley’s love of all sports is entwined with our city’s own vision thanks to Bristol Sport, the foundation set up by wealthy businessman Steve Lansdown and which links community programmes across the city through football, rugby, cricket and beyond. “All the major city teams all come together and it’s a great feeling,” says Owsley. “It’s a fantastic project and it means anyone can get behind every sport.” The sportswoman can one day see herself working within these projects when she eventually winds down her career. “Bristol Sport means so much to me. They have been brilliant in supporting me and I have made a lot of friends through them,” she says. “I love where it’s going. Every city or tight community should have something like this project. It gives everyone a sense of belonging through a range of sports, from grass roots to elite level.” For now, Owsley and her team-mates are intent on giving back to the sport on a national scale. Heading into World Cup year with several new faces and on the back of a huge rise in popularity, tickets for all of England’s matches at the 10,000 capacity stadium on the Olympic Park have already sold out. “It’s all about 2018,” adds Owsley, who is currently studying sports science at Birmingham University. “We are still developing and still learning.” The same can be said for the attitude towards women’s sport too. “With success in recent years of the England rugby, football and cricket girls, it feels like everyone is taking a real step forwards,” she smiles. “We are now a big factor for pushing it on and not just for settling for where it has come to now.” And all the while you sense that she is also concocting ways to get one over her dad on the backgammon board. ■

Lily’s perfect weekend Saturday: We are woken up at 8am by mum to watch her in a Park Run event (she has completed over 100 of these). We jog down to Ashton Park and if I don’t have hockey I will participate or grab a coffee. We brunch at Primrose Café in Clifton and then go down to Ashton Gate again to watch Bristol City. If it’s this season, we will all come home beaming. Sunday: I would have a kick about on the Downs or maybe go to Bristol and West Athletic Club where I still train. It’s like a family whenever I go down there, still. Then it’s back home for a fabulous roast cooked by Dad. • You can follow Lily on Twitter @LilyOwsley

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GARDENING

The aeronautical displays are currently best witnessed from Ham Wall Reserve and Shapwick Heath Reserve

MURMURATIONS OF AVALON January is the best time to see the balletic midwinter spectacle of the starlings, says Andrew Swift

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THE GREAT OUTDOORS

E

very winter, the Avalon Marshes near Glastonbury play host to one of Britain’s most spectacular natural phenomena as, late each afternoon, the sky darkens with tens of thousands of starlings coming into roost. Far from being a decorous settlingdown for the night, this is one of the most cacophonous and breathtaking sights you are ever likely to encounter, as flock after flock sweep in, merging into the mass of birds wheeling about the sky. The sheer audacity of it takes your breath away. That something so sublime can be generated out of activity so frenetic, with never a mid-air collision, seems incredible. You may, if you’ve ever encountered one, be put in mind of a whirlwind, albeit a whirlwind of infinite beauty and grace, accompanied by the whispering rush of countless wings. The setting for these twilight murmurations is a landscape of strange and haunting beauty. Some 6,000 years ago, it was a vast expanse of open water and reed beds, but over time the reed beds silted up, forming raised peat bogs. In the 1960s, demand for horticultural peat led to industrial-scale excavation. After the worked-out land had flooded once again, large tracts were acquired by conservation bodies and became nature reserves. Today, the Avalon Marshes are one of the largest lowland wetlands in Britain and an internationally important wildlife site. The starlings use the reed beds only to roost, heading off at daybreak to forage in small flocks miles away, leaving the marshes to their other inhabitants and to seasonal visitors. On a visit in mid-December, goldcrests, long-tailed tits, lapwings, shovelers, widgeon and teal were spotted, along with a kestrel, a cormorant, a great white egret, and an elusive glossy ibis. Marsh harriers and bitterns were also said to be around, as well as otters, but these proved yet more elusive. As the light begins to fade, though, all attention turns to the starlings. Eyes scan the distant horizon, and, as the minutes tick by, the thought that tonight will be the night they abandon their accustomed roost and go elsewhere starts to nag, until a few trailblazers – a flock of no more than a couple of dozen – sweep past. Then, in the distance, you spy a larger flock performing desultory aerobatics, before another, having swept in low and unseen across the levels, brushes past, slicing through the air as a prelude to the murmuration to come. These aeronautical displays have been called murmurations since the 15th century, and it is an apt term, for their sound is twofold – a vast sibilant, sweeping rustle, accompanied by a deeper muttering grumble. You may also, if the starlings wheel directly overhead, detect another sound – of soft drops pattering down – which is why it is advisable to wear a hat. The sound, though, is cast into the shade by the balletic groupings and regroupings, at breakneck speed, and with sudden changes of direction, above. WH Auden wrote of the ‘patterns a murmuration of starlings rising in joy over wolds unwittingly weave’. It is like watching waves or eddies swirling around the sky – not so much a vast assemblage of individual creatures as a single organism controlled by a vast and infinitely playful intelligence. That is, of course, if you turn up in the right place at the right time. Having witnessed spectacular murmurations – including one which felt like being in the eye of a starling storm, with the sky all but blotted out – I also know what it is like to watch the birds drop down to roost with hardly a by-your-leave. And there is always the chance that tonight is the night they may decide to roost elsewhere. With a bit of planning, though, the chances are you will end up witnessing something spectacular – but don’t delay. The murmurations are a midwinter spectacle, with the greatest number of starlings roosting in December and January. The most striking displays take place on dry, bright, still and relatively mild days. If it is raining, windy or bitterly cold, the starlings still come in to roost but any aeronautical displays happen just above the reed beds before the birds drop down for an early night. Before setting off, a call to the Starling Hotline on 07866 554142 will tell you where the starlings roosted on the previous evening. Although they do not always return to the same site, this is the best indication of where you are likely to see them. So far this winter – at least up to mid-December – the starlings have roosted in two locations: Ham Wall Reserve, administered by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, and Shapwick Heath Reserve,

The elusive, glossy ibis at Ham Wall

administered by Natural England. These reserves are adjacent, and the main paths through them follow the trackbed of the old Somerset & Dorset Railway, running alongside the Glastonbury Canal. For Ham Wall Reserve, turn south off the B3151 CheddarGlastonbury road in the village of Meare, and follow Ashcott Road for one mile. Just past the Railway Inn, turn left into a car park which has an information kiosk where you can pick up a map of the reserve. There is another car park on the right just past the Railway Inn, with access to Shapwick Heath Reserve. However, this is some distance from the roosting sites, so for Shapwick Heath it is better to turn south off the B3151 in Westhay, following signs for Shapwick. After one mile, you will see the Avalon Marshes Centre, with a cafe and information centre, on your left. You can park here, although the entrance to the reserve is 350m further on, where there is limited roadside parking. The car parks can get full, especially at weekends, so it is advisable to arrive no later than 2pm, which gives time to look round before the starlings arrive between 3.30pm and 4pm. It’s worth noting that dogs are allowed on the main paths through Ham Wall Reserve but not on Shapwick Heath Reserve. Finally, be sure to wrap up warm, because the temperature on the marshes soon drops as the light fades, and you may find a torch handy when heading back to your car after sunset. ■

• Avalon Marshes Centre, Shapwick Rd, Westhay BA6 9TT; avalonmarshes.org • Ham Wall National Nature Reserve, Ashcott Road, Meare BA6 9SX (01458 860494) • Shapwick Heath National Nature Reserve, Shapwick Rd, Westhay BA6 9TT (01458 860120) • Railway Inn, Ashcott Road, Meare (01458 860223). Open from 4.30pm Mon, Tue, Thu & Fri; from noon Wed, Sat & Sun. Beer, local cider and filled rolls available. THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Hans J. Wegner Elbow Chair, designed 1956. Dining Table, designed 1960

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hughes carpentr y

Visit orientalrugsofbath.com or call 01761 451764 at Bookbarn International, Wells Rd, Hallatrow, Bristol, BS39 6EX

DOMESTIC & COMMERCIAL CARPENTERS Specialising in bespoke kitchens, cupboards, shelving and wardrobes For a quote call us on 01275 844899 or info@hughescarpentry.co.uk

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 83


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GROW YOUR PASSION Elly West on how to take your love of gardening a step further in 2018

I

t’s cold outside. The garden is dormant, and it’s the time of year when we, all too often, feel like hibernating. But once January arrives, it’s time to start making plans and thinking what the future might hold. Any time of year is, of course, a good time to make changes for the better, but the poignancy of the start of another year can be fertile soil for reassessing and deciding what your year will look like. Moving to the Bristol area from west London was a time of new beginnings for me. I’d worked on the editorial team at BBC Gardeners’ World magazine, and had long been passionate about plants and gardens, but a career in garden design had seemed out of reach. Raising children, and life in general, meant I never took the plunge. It required some big life changes to make me really understand the old adage that you only live once, so I bit the bullet, retrained, and haven’t looked back. That’s why this month, I’m going to talk about the benefits of learning a new skill. If you’re reading this, the chances are you already have an interest in plants and gardening, so why not take things further? There are lots of courses out there, locally and further afield. Of course, there is also distance learning, made much more accessible with today’s technology. However, I believe you can’t beat sitting in a classroom with other like-minded individuals in terms of motivation and immediacy, and being with and learning from others makes the experience far more enjoyable. I studied at the Cotswold Gardening School in Gossington, Gloucestershire, where I gained a diploma in garden design, followed by another in plants and planting design. These courses were perfect for me, as they involved one day a week in the classroom, combined with home study and assignments to fit around my other commitments. I was lucky in that I 84 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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already had some experience in design and had worked for a number of years in the gardening industry, but this was by no means a prerequisite. Attending the courses were people of all ages and from a diverse range of backgrounds, including IT and the police force, many of whom were considering a change of career. The tutor and founder of the school, Caroline Tatham, has a wealth of experience and knowledge, and her approach is inspiring. I still hear her voice in my head when I’m designing gardens now – and I also came away with plenty of practical advice on the nitty gritty of how to run a successful business. Gardening is one of those subject areas where you can never stop learning and being inspired, and Caroline’s own passion is evident in her teaching. The Cotswold Gardening School runs a whole range of courses, some a year long, and others lasting just a day; from courses for students seriously considering a career in design, to those dipping a toe in the water purely for personal interest and pleasure or to learn new skills they could implement in their garden at home. They also run regular open days where you can visit with no commitment to enrol. The RHS level two certificate in horticulture is another course I would personally recommend. The course is aimed at career gardeners and keen amateurs, and is available locally at The University of Bristol Botanic Garden. It covers basic plant botany and science, as well as practical skills such as propagation and pruning. Diving into the unknown can be daunting, but doing a course can be a good way to test whether an area of interest is right for you. The choice is yours, from planning your garden, to growing your own food, to wildlife gardening and ecology, or rural crafts such as willow-weaving and willow-sculpture.

Above: Nothing beats a taste of the tropics in the depths of winter, and Fatsia japonica – also known as the castor oil plant – proves that evergreen structure doesn’t have to be staid and formal Opposite: Reckon you’d like to try your hand at garden design?


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GARDENING

By acquiring further knowledge or practical skills you might even turn your interest into a potential new career. Keeping the brain active and learning new skills may also be a good way to help protect ourselves against degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s, and it’s never too late to learn and indulge in a passion and take your knowledge further. So if you’re sat indoors keeping warm but wanting a new project and some focus, why not consider some part-time study in an area you love? At the very least, you’ll meet some new people and learn some new skills, and it could be life changing.

Where to study (without travelling too far!)

✿ Garden Design School, Bristol University Botanic Garden, (gardendesignschool.co.uk) ✿ Stoke Lodge, Stoke Bishop (bristolcourses.com) ✿ City of Bristol College (cityofbristol.ac.uk) ✿ Pickard School of Garden Design, Create Centre, Bristol (pickardschool.co.uk) ✿ Cotswold Gardening School, Gossington, Gloucestershire. (cotswoldgardeningschool.com)

• ellyswellies.co.uk

PLANT OF THE MONTH: FATSIA JAPONICA Nothing beats a taste of the tropics in the depths of winter, so this month Fatsia japonica takes the limelight, proving that evergreen structure doesn’t have to be staid and formal. Also known as the castor oil plant, it has huge, glossy leaves, like great big hands, and can reach more than two metres tall, but the stems are quite soft and are easy to chop back if they’re getting out of control. They’re quite fun to mess about with in terms of pruning, and look particularly good with the lower branches removed to make a single-stemmed tree. Despite its exotic appearance, this evergreen is surprisingly hardy and tough, thriving in most soil types and in sun or shade, so it’s a great contender for a tricky corner. If leaves do become frost damaged, or when they start to turn yellow and die back, trim them off close to the main stem. New growth appears in spring. The balllike umbels of white flowers appear from late autumn, turning into attractive black berries that are loved by birds. With year-round tropical good looks and reliability, this strong performer is well worth making space for in the border, in a container, or you could try growing it as an evergreen screen.

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JANUARY 2018 | THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 85


Colourfence fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/12/2017 12:19 Page 1

Now’s the perfect time to get your garden ready for the weather ahead. I’ve wasted countless days and a small fortune, trying to maintain tired wooden fences that looked dreadful and always required yet more work. Discovering Colourfence has changed things forever!

It’s scientifically tested and rated to ensure when professionally installed it can withstand wind gusts of up to 130mph. This year when my neighbours are wasting precious leisure time treating their fences with a variety of preservatives, I’ll be giving my Colourfence a quick hose down then sitting back to enjoy my garden. As the Colourfence system offers a lasting solution to fencing woes it’s easy to see why many regard it as the premier fencing solution on the market. Colourfence won’t rot and it resists weather that quickly damages wooden fences, it has none of the drawbacks of wood but plenty of added bene ts and it’s better value too! High quality AND

great value – it’s a customisable product with a variety of colours and styles offering a first rate finish. The materials and fitting are so good that Colourfence is guaranteed† for 25 years!

To find out how Colourfence might benefit you and arrange your free no obligation quote, I strongly suggest you call one of their helpful experts. THE COLOURFENCE PROMISE Virtually maintenance free Saves time and money – no annual treating required Guaranteed for up to 25 years† Unbeatable value compared to other fences Versatile range of colours & sizes No risk professional installation


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Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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PROPERTY NEWS UPDATES FROM THE SECTOR

POWERING A NEW WAVE

The building was opened in 1899 to supply power to the massively expanding tramways network

THE MASTERPLAN The latest round of consultation events on emerging plans for a major South Bristol housing scheme have begun, with Bristol City Council inviting commentary on the preferred masterplan for what could become the city’s largest housing regeneration scheme at Hengrove Park and Hartcliffe Campus. The updated plans have been informed by opinions given at previous consultations, and the fresh round of events offers an opportunity to shape the final outline planning applications before they are submitted in spring 2018. “We have been listening closely to all the views and opinions,” said Cllr Paul Smith. “It’s essential we take the local community on a journey with us throughout this process, which is why we have developed the preferred masterplan, taking into account local people’s views. This next round of events provides another opportunity to have your say as we develop the final proposals. This scheme has the potential to benefit generations to come and revitalise this area of Bristol, providing a significant new park alongside much-needed homes.” Events to canvas opinions will now take place in the local community from 3 – 10 January. Staff will be on hand at Hengrove Leisure Centre on 6 January (2pm-4pm), where a model of the scheme will soon be available to view; and will be available at Whitchurch Library (10am-1pm) and Hartcliffe Library on 6 January (11am-2pm). • bristol.gov.uk/plansforhengrove

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MAKING A SPLASH Regeneration company Urban Splash has released 16 apartments at Lakeshore in Bristol, with speedy sales exceeding expectations and just a few homes now available to buy. Prices for the remaining properties start at £175,000, with the government’s Help to Buy initiative available to eligible buyers. The new homes can be found in the east wing of the Grade-II building – the former home of Imperial Tobacco which sits in 10 acres of green space, with its own lake. The one-bedroom apartments offer extra high ceilings, full-height glazing and generous balconies. A new incentive has also been launched by Urban Splash – offering buyers a contribution towards legal, survey and IFA fees worth £1,500. “We’ve been working hard to transform what was the disused premises of Imperial Tobacco, turning it into a contemporary community,” said Urban Splash director Guy Ackernley. “There’s so much on offer, from spacious, well-designed homes, to the 10 acres, barbecue areas and nature trails – not to mention the broader appeal of South Bristol, thanks to a new transport interchange, new leisure amenities, a school and hospital in the vicinity.” • urbansplash.co.uk

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The striking red brick and stone building, which originally housed the generator for Bristol's tram system, is set to get a new lease of life as offices for a new wave of tech and media businesses. The Generator Building on Finzels Reach will be extensively renovated, with repairs to the limestone ashlar stonework and dramatic windows, to bring it back to its former glory. The original 1890s arched front entrance on Counterslip, with its grand Venetian window, is currently sealed off and will be re-instated with new glass doors at street level. These will open into a double-height foyer space beyond, allowing people to enjoy the original scale of the internal spaces for the first time in 30 years. Inside, there will be five storeys of quality office space, designed to make the most of the harbour views as well as meeting current British Council of Offices standards. Interior finishes will complement the fabric of the building and appeal to businesses in the burgeoning creative sectors. The £12m conversion of the Generator Building will create workspace for up to 300 people. Bristol was the first British city to build an electric tram service and the Generator Building was opened in 1899 to supply power to the massively expanding tramways network. The architect, William Curtis Green, later became better known for designing buildings such as Scotland Yard and Park Lane’s Dorchester Hotel. The Bristol power station contained four steam engines coupled to four generators and supplied power to the tramway system until 1941, when a bomb hit St Philips Bridge and cut power cables. "This striking building is likely to attract companies looking for an inspirational environment in the heart of the city,” said Gavin Bridge, director of developer Cubex. “This building has a fascinating history as the place that powered 20th-century transport innovation, and it's good to think it could become home to some of the companies at the forefront of today's technology revolution." • finzelsreach.com


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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

H

artington Park is one of Redland’s most popular residential roads and number 14 is in a prominent position within easy reach of both Whiteladies Road and Gloucester Road with the Downs and Clifton Village also close by. There are three floors of accommodation as well as a basement providing extensive cellarage. Most of the ground floor has exposed wood flooring, attractive sash and front bay window, feature fireplaces and traditional plasterwork, creating a truly elegant interior. The two downstairs reception rooms both have a dual aspect giving an abundance of natural light. The generously sized kitchen has access to the rear garden and there is also a separate study on the ground floor and an almost fully-glazed sunroom. Upstairs are four consistently sized bedrooms and a luxurious family bathroom while on the second floor are two further bedrooms, one a master suite with access to plenty of storage in the eaves. Both of the top floor bedrooms have panoramic views across the city to Dundry and beyond. There are gardens to the front and rear of the house as well as a generous area of flat roof which could be turned into a spectacular roof terrace subject to consent. This spacious and versatile Victorian home is for sale with agents Knight Frank of Clifton.

Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

14 HARTINGTON PARK, REDLAND • Detached Victorian family home • 6 bedrooms • 2 bathrooms plus cloakroom • Spectacular views • Potential for roof terrace

Guide Price £1,100,000

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 89


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

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Burston Cook January.indd 1

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• New flexible leases Great space…

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

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THANK YOU TO OUR CLIENTS & FRIENDS FOR HELPING US TO HELP OTHERS Jakes Wheels Jake, an amazing young man suffers from muscular atrophy and needs to urgently upgrade his wheelchair to aid his mobility – we are proud to help Jake and his family

Bristol Down Syndrome Trust Helping to advance the development and education of children with Down Syndrome in Bristol – www.bristoldownsyndrometrust.org.uk

Julians’ 400 miles in 4 days £8,500 raised for local Charities

Lord Mayor’s Children Appeal Helping Bristol’s poorest children at Christmas.

A ‘Life for a Cure’ Meningitis Appeal Working with Michelle Bresnahan (founder of this amazing Charity) to raise money to save lives. www.ryanbresnahan.org

BURSTON COOK LOOK FORWARD TO CONTINUING THEIR SUPPORT OF LOCAL CHARITIES THROUGHOUT 2018 Burston Cook January.indd 2

18/12/2017 12:35


Longwell Green Andrewsonline.co.uk

Greenore, Hanham, BS15 8ER Offers in excess of ÂŁ289,950

A well presented three bedroom semi-detached home situated in a popular location, less than half a mile from Beacon Rise Primary School. The property benefits from the addition of planning permission for a two storey extension to the side. A fantastic family home with great potential. Energy Efficiency Rating: N/A

0117 932 8335 longwellgreen@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bishopston Andrewsonline.co.uk

Nevil Road, Bishopston, BS7 9EQ ÂŁ575,000

0117 944 4400

Andrews December.indd 1

A well presented, four bedroom end of terrace Victorian home offering flexible accommodation with lots of original charm and character throughout. Downstairs the accommodation comprises a living room with bay window, fourth bedroom or second reception room, separate dining room and kitchen with an open plan feel leading to the rear garden. Upstairs, to the front of the property is the master bedroom benefiting from an en-suite shower room, bedrooms two and three and the family bathroom. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

bishopston@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

20/12/2017 12:11


Westbury-on-Trym Andrewsonline.co.uk

Rectory Gardens BS10 7AQ £574,950

Have you been searching for a perfectly tranquil home to retreat to? With highlights including a stunning enclosed garden, separate kitchen, garden room to outhouses, and garage, this enchanting detached bungalow is 0.7 miles from Blaise Castle could be the one you’ve been looking for. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

0117 405 7685 westburyontrym@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Downend

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Cleeve Road, Downend, BS16 6AD Guide Price £460,000

0117 957 0647

Andrews December.indd 2

Stunning cottage situated within the heart of Downend offering the perfect blend of old and new. Comprehensively updated by the current owners, the accommodation comprises: four bedrooms -master bedroom with en-suite and dressing room, lounge with feature fireplace and a sitting/family room opening onto a fabulous kitchen/diner, parking for 4/5 cars to the front and a 59’ x 16’ rear garden.

downend@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

20/12/2017 12:11


Redland ÂŁ400,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

Two bedroom flat

A wonderful opportunity to acquire a spacious and well-proportioned 2 double bedroom garden flat located on a quiet one way street just off Whiteladies Road. The property offers a private entrance, versatile accommodation and a wealth of period features. EPC - TBC.

oceanhome.co.uk

Ocean January.indd 1

Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Gainsborough Mews ÂŁ400,000 Four bedroom house

Ocean are delighted to present to the market this wonderful mews home, in the delightful Gainsborough Mews on the desirable Repton Hall development. Originally the stable block, the mews development sympathetically merges modern accommodation, with part of the Georgian architecture. EPC - C.

19/12/2017 13:56


Clifton £365,000 Two bedroom flat

A beautifully presented and spacious 2 bedroom courtyard garden flat set within a highly sought after Georgian terrace in Clifton Village. This stunning property benefits from a private entrance, communal storage area, private rear courtyard with southerly aspect and is set within the Clifton Village residents’ parking zone. No chain. EPC - D.

John Repton Gardens £525,000 Four bedroom house

This beautifully presented four bedroom detached family home is positioned within a quiet cul-de-sac in the sought after John Repton Gardens. The ground floor accommodation offers welcoming hallway, downstairs w/c, and two reception rooms, with the dining area providing access to a conservatory. EPC - D.

Ocean January.indd 2

19/12/2017 13:57


P96.qxp_Layout 23 21/12/2017 12:40 Page 49

WEALTH | MANAGEMENT

BUY-TO-LET PROPERTY INVESTING BY JEFF DURANT OF OTIUM PARTNERS

I

n 1975, in her first speech as leader to the Conservative party conference, Margaret Thatcher declared her belief in a "propertyowning democracy". Since then, as a nation, we have become somewhat obsessed with property ownership, albeit this is a concept that feels totally out of reach for many young people today. For many investors, property has a unique physical appeal that shares and investment funds just can't match. Much like stock-picking, where and what to buy, for income return or for capital growth, has become a skill for the very best investors. But, the Government has been attempting to dampen down enthusiasm for this form of investment as it looks to exert some control over the housing market. The tax position of buy-to-let investing is therefore changing. Buy-to-let is subject to several taxes, regardless of whether you own a single investment property or 100 properties and there are four taxes that your investment in a BTL property will possibly incur; 1. Stamp Duty – this is payable when you buy any property in the UK. It's set in tiers, depending on the price of the property. From April 2016 Stamp Duty rates increased by 3% at each tier over and above those set for main residence purchases. 2. Income Tax - The income you receive as rent is taxable. You need to declare any rent you receive as part of your Self-Assessment tax return. The tax on your income is then charged in accordance with your income tax banding although certain “allowable expenses” can be used to offset the tax charge. An accountant can help you make the most of your allowable deductions so that you don’t pay more tax than you have to. 3. Capital Gains Tax - is payable when you sell a buy-to-let property at a profit compared to when you bought it. It isn't payable if you make a loss. You get an annual tax-free allowance of capital gains that you can make each tax year before capital gains tax is charged. Again, an accountant will be able to advise on these charges and how they may be reduced by deducting certain expenses. 4. Inheritance tax - You may be liable to pay inheritance tax on buyto-let properties. Typically, if an individual's estate exceeds £325,000 (or up to £650,000 for married couples or civil partners), inheritance tax is charged at 40% on everything above this threshold (other than on estates passing to the spouse or civil partner, which are free of inheritance tax). This isn't nice to think about, but very important to plan for as your buy-to-let properties will form part of your estate for inheritance tax purposes. Many investors use Limited companies to own their buy-to-let properties through and although there are some benefits to be had, this may not be the right vehicle for everyone. This is where the right advice, from a good solicitor or accountant, is absolutely vital for investors. How to finance purchases or how to go about refinancing a portfolio of properties is also important, not just to ensure you have the cheapest deal, but that you have one that works for you and your longer-term investment objectives. Please talk to us at Otium Partners about this or any property investment-related matters. n

8 UNITY STREET, BRISTOL BS1 5HH LONG LEASEHOLD OFFICE

• • • •

18 VIEWINGS BEST BIDS 4 OFFERS ONE SALE

★★★★★

review

5.0

NC (Vendor) ‘We were delighted at the way you handled the sale of our office, your market knowledge, network of contacts and sheer determination enabled you to achieve a great result within a very short timescale. We would thoroughly recommend you to others.’

For further information on sales/letting advice please contact:

Jeff Durant is Managing Director of Otium Partners, pictured here with Lifestyle Director, Katie Moss.

Phil Morton MRICS T: 0117 973 63 99 M: 07921061198 E: phil@mortonpc.co.uk W: www.mortonpc.co.uk

For further details on the variety of Wealth Management and Concierge Services they offer, please call 0117 226 2101 or visit: otiumpartners.com

Morton Property Consultants 68 Oakfield Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2BG 96 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

JANUARY 2018

|

Nº 163


P97.qxp_Layout 23 18/12/2017 14:15 Page 1

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

JANUARY 2018

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 97


Happy New Year Leasehold

Clifton

Clifton Guide Price £699,950

Leasehold

CJ Hole Clifton selling apartments like yours

Sneyd Park

Redland Guide Price £425,000

Leasehold

SO

SO

LD

Leasehold

LD

Guide Price £515,000

SO

SO

LD

Leasehold

LD

Guide Price £590,000

Leasehold

SO

SO

SO Redland

Guide Price £550,000

LD

Guide Price £410,000

LD

Leasehold

LD

Guide Price £475,000

FREE NO OBLIGATION valuation City Centre Leasehold

Leasehold

SO

SO

SO Central

Guide Price £410,000

LD

Guide Price £450,000

LD

Leasehold

LD

Guide Price £350,000

Clifton

Wapping Wharf

Central

Clifton Sales: 203 Whiteladies Road, Clifton Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton January.indd 1

t: 0117 923 8238 Email: clifton@cjhole.co.uk

18/12/2017 12:37


Happy New Year Freehold

Kingsdown

Redland Guide Price £755,000

Freehold

SO

SO

LD

Freehold

LD

Guide Price £950,000

Freehold

SO

SO

SO Redland

Guide Price £995,000

LD

Guide Price £419,000

LD

Freehold

LD

Guide Price £1,050,000

CJ Hole Clifton selling houses like yours

Redland

Guide Price £575,000

Freehold

FREE NO OBLIGATION valuation

Cotham

Stoke Bishop Freehold

Freehold

SO

SO

SO Stoke Bishop

Guide Price £625,000

LD

Guide Price £595,000

LD

Freehold

LD

Guide Price £605,000

SO

SO

LD

Freehold

LD

Guide Price £895,000

Redland

Central

Failand

Clifton Sales: 203 Whiteladies Road, Clifton Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton January.indd 2

t: 0117 923 8238 Email: clifton@cjhole.co.uk

18/12/2017 12:37


Henleaze 108 Henleaze Road, Henleaze

t: 0117 962 9221 Email: henleaze@cjhole.co.uk

COOMBE LANE, STOKE BISHOP Guide Price £625,000 This 1920’s characterful detached property offers versatile accommodation and is marketed with no onward chain. To the ground floor there is a central hallway, open lounge/diner with dual aspect double glazed bay windows, separate kitchen, downstairs bathroom and there are three bedrooms also on this floor. To the first floor there are an additional two bedrooms, separate WC and office. The property benefits from a private rear garden which is mainly laid to lawn, ample front garden with private driveway providing off-street parking. The property is positioned within close proximity to the shops and amenities of Westbury-on-Trym with good access to the M4 and M5 motorway networks. EPC D.

Westbury-on-Trym 25 Canford Lane, Westbury-on-Trym

t: 0117 950 0118 Email: westbury@cjhole.co.uk

COOMBE BRIDGE AVENUE, STOKE BISHOP Guide Price £650,000 A significantly extended, semi-detached four bedroom family home including loft conversion with ensuite, three additional bedrooms and modern family bathroom. The ground floor has a welcoming hallway with dual aspect, living room with bay window and open fire, second reception/dining room overlooking and leading to 23m family garden, extended modern kitchen with triple aspect which also overlooks garden and downstairs cloakroom/WC. To the front of the property is a double driveway in tandem format and garage. EPC D.

Other offices also located across Bristol and Somerset

CJ Hole January.indd 1

18/12/2017 12:37


Rupert Oliver FP.qxp_Layout 1 18/12/2017 12:42 Page 1

lot Last P e bl Availa

Coombe Dingle, Bristol | Guide Price £1,150,000 “The Willow” is the last available home in a development of just 4 luxury detached family houses, situated on the edge of 650 acres of open park and woodland. Photos show the interior and finish of a similar property situated in the same development | Detached family house | Gated drive and covered car port | Stylish bespoke kitchen by Intoto Kitchens and open plan dining room | Sitting room with a multi-fuel wood burning stove | Study / play room | Master bedroom with dressing room and en-suite shower room | Three further double bedrooms | Two further bath / shower rooms (1 en-suite) | Professionally landscaped gardens | High specification and exceptional finish throughout | Ready to move into in early 2018 | EPC: TBC Circa 1945 sq. ft (181 sq. m).


Rupert Oliver FP.qxp_Layout 1 18/12/2017 12:42 Page 2

Coombe Dingle, Bristol | Guide Price £1,150,000 “The Willow” is the last remaining available home in a development of just 4 luxury detached family houses, situated on the edge of 650 acres of open park and woodland. Photos show the interior and finish of a similar property situated in the same development | Detached family house | Gated drive and covered car port | Stylish bespoke kitchen by Intoto Kitchens and open plan dining room | Sitting room with a multi-fuel wood burning stove | Study / play room | Master bedroom with dressing room and en-suiter room | Three further double bedrooms | Two further bath / shower rooms (1 en-suite) | Professionally landscaped gardens | High specification and exceptional finish throughout | Ready to move in to early 2018 | EPC: TBC Circa 1945 sq. ft (181 sq. m).


Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

City Centre - SOLD

Clifton - SOLD

City Centre - SOLD

A selection of properties sold by the proactive Bristol Team who collectively have over 60 years experience.

City Centre - SOLD

If you would like to have a free, no obligation market appraisal please contact us on 01173 226 362 to arrange a convenient appointment.

Clifton - SOLD

Cotham - SOLD

Clifton - SOLD

Clifton - SOLD

Clifton - SOLD

Clifton - SOLD

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 369 1004 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

Hamptons January.indd 1

18/12/2017 12:40


Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

Clapton in Gordano

Guide Price ÂŁ2,200,000

A magnificent and awe-inspiring 5 bedroom detached contemporary style family home, built by The Coyne Group to an exceptionally high level of specification. Set behind automated entrance gates, the property occupies a commanding, elevated plot of around 2.241 acres with uninterrupted views across open farmland to the Severn Estuary and Welsh hills. EPC: C

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 369 1004 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

Hamptons January.indd 2

18/12/2017 12:40


RichardH arding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

SOLD REDLAND

SOLD guide £875,000

SOLD

SOLD

guide £325,000

REDLAND

KINGSDOWN

SOLD

SOLD guide £725,000 REDLAND

SOLD guide £1,175,000

CLIFTON

REDLAND

SOLD guide £650,000 SNEYD PARK

guide £530,000

REDLAND

guide £395,000

COTHAM

guide £975,000

WESTBURY PARK

guide £975,000

SOLD guide £525,000

HENLEAZE

guide £730,000

MONTPELIER

guide £695,000

STOKE BISHOP

SOLD STOKE BISHOP

guide £340,000

SOLD

SOLD

guide £435,000

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD guide range £700,000 - £725,000

REDLAND

guide £599,500

SOLD guide £975,000 BISHOPSTON

ST ANDREWS

SOLD guide £1,100,000

SOLD

guide £435,000 REDLAND

SOLD REDLAND

CLIFTON

SOLD guide £595,000

SOLD GUINEA STREET

HOTWELLS

SOLD guide £595,000

SOLD guide £625,000

SOLD guide £1,275,000

SOLD REDLAND

guide £315,000 WESTBURY PARK

SOLD

STOKE BISHOP guide range £1,000,000 - £1,100,000 COTHAM

CLIFTON

SOLD

STOKE BISHOP

guide £832,500

SOLD guide £635,000 COTHAM

SOLD

guide £975,000

SOLD guide £1,450,000

CITY CENTRE

guide £285,000

If your New Year’s resolution is for a fresh start, then perhaps the place where you live should be at the centre of that decision. With the whole year ahead of you, January is the ideal time to take stock of where you live currently and where you might hope to be by the end of 2018. If you are reading this and thinking that it is time for a move or if you would just like some sage property advice, then please call us and we will be delighted to give you the benefit of our knowledge to help you plan, prepare and make the right decisions. We have successfully sold an interesting and wide array of homes for our vendor clients throughout 2017, with a small selection above.

Richard Harding January THIS ONE.indd 1

19/12/2017 16:23


RichardH arding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

SOLD CLIFTON

SOLD guide £425,000

SOLD REDLAND

SOLD

REDLAND

SOLD

BISHOPSTON

WESTBURY PARK

guide £450,000

BISHOPSTON

£450,000

SNEYD PARK

SOLD guide £465,000

REDLAND

guide £795,000

HENLEAZE

guide £695,000

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

REDLAND

guide £1,850,000 HORFIELD

BISHOPSTON

guide £335,000

SOLD CLIFTONWOOD

SOLD guide £435,000

REDLAND

guide £960,000

SOLD

guide £1,300,000

guide £995,000

SOLD guide £1,195,000

SOLD

SOLD guide £550,000 STOKE BISHOP

SOLD guide £1,050,000 REDLAND

SOLD guide £625,000

SOLD

SOLD guide £345,000

CLIFTON

guide £635,000 ST ANDREWS

SOLD

SOLD CLIFTON

REDLAND

SOLD

guide £835,000

guide £595,000 HARBOURSIDE

SOLD

SOLD guide £475,000

CLIFTON guide range £1,200,000 - £1,400,000

SOLD WESTBURY PARK

COTHAM

guide £275,000

SOLD REDLAND

SOLD

guide £850,000 STOKE BISHOP guide range £1,100,000 - £1,250,000 BISHOPSTON

SOLD guide £1,050,000

SOLD REDLAND

REDLAND

guide £730,000

guide £415,000

SOLD guide £800,000

CLIFTON

guide £1,250,000

Professional, Reliable, Successful 0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP

Richard Harding January THIS ONE.indd 2

19/12/2017 16:24


LEESE

NAGLE

I N D E P E N D E N T E S TAT E A G E N T S

TEL: 0117 974 1741 LD

SO

BISHOPSTON

LD

LD

SO

SO

CITY CENTRE

HARBOURSIDE

D

L SO

A Happy New Year to all of our clients past, present and future.

HENLEAZE

LD

SO

REDLAND

LD

SO

STOKE BISHOP

Leese & Nagle January.indd 1

LD

SO

WESTBURY PARK

LD

SO

SOUTHVILLE

21/12/2017 09:43


Here to accommodate

www.leeseandnagle.co.uk

TEL: 0117 962 2299 LD

SO

WESTBURY PARK

LD

SO

LEIGH WOODS

LD

SO

SNEYD PARK

D

Are you thinking of moving in 2018? For an informed opinion of the current market value of your home, tips on how to improve its potential to achieve the optimum price and a marketing strategy designed around your objectives one of our partners or experienced team will be delighted to assist. The properties on these pages represent a wide range of different property types, styles and areas that we have successfully marketed and sold on behalf of our clients in 2017. Selling through both good markets and tougher times we offer sensible, professional and approachable advice backed up by many years of experience from our offices in Clifton and Westbury.

L SO

WESTBURY-ON-TRYM

LD

SO

CLIFTONWOOD

LD

SO

SNEYD PARK

Leese & Nagle January.indd 2

LD

SO

COOMBE DINGLE

LD

SO

COTHAM

21/12/2017 09:43


Nuffield Health fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/12/2017 16:15 Page 1

The Bristol Magazine January 2018  
The Bristol Magazine January 2018  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol