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THE

Issue 158

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

I

august 2017

MAGAZINE

FEELING SUPERSONIC Bristol prepares to welcome a multi-million pound museum with the West Country’s world-famous jet as its centrepiece

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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Knight Frank August.qxp_full page 19/07/2017 14:51 Page 1

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 1173 171 999 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,095,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

Henleaze A generously propertied (3,288 sq ft) 7 bedroom family home with a south facing rear garden 100 foot in length. 2 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, utility, pantry, bathroom, shower room, secondary kitchen. Parking. EPC E.

Guide price £365,000

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £395,000

City Centre

Clifton

An outstanding 2 bedroom lateral apartment (948 sq ft) found within the Cathedral quarter of Bristol with balcony and off street parking. Open plan siitting room/kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bathroom.

A beautifully presented apartment (666 sq ft) within this handsome Grade II Listed period town house. Drawing room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bathroom. With attractive communal gardens to front and rear.

Guide price £475,000

Guide price £995,000

Clifton

Cliftonwood

A generous 2 bedroom apartment (1,646 sq ft) with extensive cellarage. Drawing room, kitchen/breakfast room, 2 bedrooms, family bathroom, extensive loft area, cellar storage.

Contemporary town house (2,267 sq ft) with stunning harbour views. Dining room/kitchen/breakfast room, sitting room, 4 bedrooms (2 en-suite), bathroom, roof top garden, 2 balconies, parking. EPC C.


Knight Frank August.qxp_full page 19/07/2017 14:51 Page 2

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 1173 171 999 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,995,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

Clevedon Stunning contemporary house (4,322 sq ft) with views across the Bristol Channel. 2 reception rooms, kitchen, 4 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, study/bed 5. Indoor swimming pool, gym, terraces, balconies, double garage. EPC C.

Guide price £1,395,000

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £1,795,000

Alveston

Bower Ashton

A handsome Grade II listed house (4,440 sq ft) with separate 3 bedroom cottage. 4 receptions, kitchen/breakfast room. 6 bedrooms 3 bath/shower rooms. Garden and garage.

A substantial house (5,903 sq ft) with 2 bed cottage and 1 bed annexe. 4 reception rooms, breakfast kitchen. 6 bedrooms 4 bath/shower rooms. Garage, summer house, gardens. In all about 1 acre. EPC E, cottage EPC D.

OIEO £2,800,000

Guide price £1,495,000

Failand

Chew Valley

Substantial home enjoying amazing views. 4 reception rooms, kitchen. 5 beds with en-suites. Gardens, terraces, outbuilding with 10 stables and 109 ft store. Further stables, pasture, woodland. About 8.3 acres. EPC G.

A stunning Grade II* listed country house. 4 reception rooms, kitchen, cellar, master suite, 4 further bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, top floor kitchen. Garaging, workshop and garden room, beautiful grounds and paddock.


Knight Frank August.qxp_full page 19/07/2017 14:52 Page 3

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 1173 171 999 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £675,000

Clevedon A well-presented home (1,764 sq ft) with views across the Bristol Channel. 2 reception rooms, kitchen/dining/living room, office. 4 bedrooms (1 en-suite), bathroom. Garden, outbuildings, off street parking. EPC D.

Guide price £895,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £775,000

Winscombe

Bishop Sutton

An attractive country house on the edge of the village enjoying a rural outlook. 5 reception rooms, kitchen, 5 bedrooms (1 en-suite), 3 bathrooms. Gardens, stable block, double garage. In all about 1.86 acres. EPC F.

A spacious Victorian House (3,505 sq ft) with a large garden in the centre of the village. 3 reception rooms, music/playroom, kitchen/breakfast room. 7 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, study and garage. EPC E.

Guide price £850,000

Guide price £1,225,000

Wrington

Chew Valley

An attractive farmhouse approximately 1 mile from Wrington and Congresbury, in need of complete renovation, with planning permission to create a 6 bedroom, 3 bathroom house with superb south facing views to the Mendip Hills. In all about 4.47 acres. EPC E.

LOT 2 - Impressive country house (4,075 sq ft) enjoying a rural outlook. 3 reception rooms, kitchen, 5 bedrooms, 5 bath/shower rooms, tennis court, swimming pools, garaging. In all about 8 acres. EPC D.


Knight Frank August.qxp_full page 19/07/2017 14:52 Page 4

MOVE. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 1173 171 999 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,295,000

Cotham A regency Grade II listed family home (2,799 sq ft). 2 reception rooms, kitchen. 5 bedrooms (1 en-suite), bathroom, basement/cellar. Double garage, parking and gardens front and rear. EPC E.

Guide price £1,275,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £650,000

Redland

Harbourside

Substantial 6 bedroom family home (3,332 sq ft). Drawing room, kitchen/breakfast room. 6 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, guest shower. 2 bedroom self-contained apartment, bathroom. Garden. EPC E.

Beautifully presented 3 bedroom town house (1,456 sq ft) situated close to the floating harbour and City Centre. 2 reception rooms, kitchen, conservatory, 3 bedrooms, WC, garden, garage, parking. EPC D.

Guide price £465,000

Guide price £575,000

Clifton

Clifton

A Grade II Listed 2 bedroom (1,380 sq ft) top floor apartment in central Clifton with views across Victoria Square. Impressive drawing room, kitchen, dining hall, 2 bedrooms (one en-suite), bathroom. No onward chain.

A most impressive 2 bedroom balcony apartment (1,062 sq ft) with outstanding views, communal garden and parking. No chain.


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68

60

38

Contents

Image by Paul Box

August 2017

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

MUSIC

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14

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16

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

54

Bristol Dogs & Cats Home is 130: Jessica Hope delves into its history

Love a staycation? We strongly suggest an escape to St Ives

MOTORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

...In which he goes ‘secret camping’ .............................................................................

24

Charlotte Pope puts forward fab summer reads to take on holiday

WILD BRISTOL

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TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

We meet coach Caroline Arnold and report on local goings-on

BOOKS

34

We talk to Elbow bassist Pete Turner ahead of The Downs Festival

ARCHIVE

Five of the best things to do in the city this month

CITYIST

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58

Calling all petrolheads: Chris Lilly has another recommendation

HEALTH & FITNESS YOGA

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68

Learn more about the city’s much-maligned urban gulls

Emma Payne samples Sacred Therapy in Clifton

WALK THE WALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

WORKOUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Andrew Swift traverses the lonely plains of Wiltshire

Innovative exercise for the time-poor at Bodystreet

THE CULTURE

FOOD & DRINK

WHAT’S ON & HAPPENINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

EVENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Get the diary out!

Nominate community heroes for a seat at the Big Bedminster Banquet!

BALLOON FIESTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

We made ourselves a little checklist of special shapes to spot this year

Tidbits from our local eateries and producers

EXHIBITIONS

SHOPPING

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40

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What’s on at the city’s galleries this month?

Summer treat inspiration from Harvey Nicks

LGBT+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

HABITAT

Local author Darryl W Bullock is championing influential music-makers of the past century

GARDENING

PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80

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22

British Vogue has teamed up with John Lewis on a special edit

HERITAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 What to expect from new £19m museum Aerospace Bristol

THEATRE

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Actress Carrie Hope Fletcher on The Addams Family musical

10 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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It’s time to let the late-summer stalwarts take over, says Elly West

FEATURES FASHION

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30

Beautiful Bristol homes on the market

ON THE COVER

The Bristol-designed supersonic jet Concorde 216 is the centrepiece of a brand new aviation and engineering exhibition at Aerospace Bristol, image © Adrian Meredith, official Concorde photographer; concordephotos.com


KutchenHaus Aug.qxp_Layout 1 17/07/2017 13:56 Page 1

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Concorde looking rather formidable from the front

THIS MONTH WE’VE BEEN... Gorging...

...On gourmet h-dogs, smoked pulled pork, mackerel burgers and beers at the new Hubbox on Whiteladies Road – which combines beach vibes with some serious city sass

from the

EDITOR

Preening...

“...It is not unreasonable to look upon Concorde as a miracle...” – Brian Trubshaw; first British pilot to fly the jet in April 1969

N

ext month sees the culmination of a £19million heritage project celebrating Bristol’s aviation history and transport engineering industry, and with Concorde 216 – the very last Bristol-designed supersonic jet, and great source of pride for the city – at its heart. Having made its final flight over its hometown in 2003, the impressive aircraft will now form the centrepiece for a new exhibition due to open at the end of the summer at Aerospace Bristol in Filton. This issue, on p26, we’re taking a look at what’s to come, and enjoying a refresher course in Bristol’s pioneering past. Our attentions are also turned skyward, of course, in anticipation of August’s Bristol International Balloon Fiesta – which will feature a circus this year for the first time, as well as plenty of pretty new balloons. Find a checklist, with some special shapes to spot as they sail dreamily across the city, on p38. We figured all that neck-craning might have you in need of a yoga sesh, so Emma Payne has been seeing what Sacred Therapy has to offer – read on for her recent experience in Clifton. There’s fashion too, by way of British Vogue’s collaboration with John Lewis; a chat with Elbow’s Pete Turner ahead of the band’s headline slot at The Downs Festival; and theatre talk from actress and social media queen Carrie Hope Fletcher, who plays Wednesday in The Addams Family musical. And while Bristol Pride may be officially over for another year, we’re still celebrating via local author Darryl W Bullock, who’s written a new book championing influential LGBT+ music-makers of the past century. Then, on the foodie front, we’ve tidbits from the industry, summer treat inspo, and news of the banquet being planned in Bemmy to thank unsung community heroes and showcase the area’s internationality. Plus, there’s travel, arts and property picks, fitness, motoring, and more in between – enjoy!

Editor’s image by Paolo Ferla; ferlapaolo.com

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

thebristolmag.co.uk

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Excited...

For a jaunt out to Frome, where this year’s nautical-themed Shindig Weekender Feast is occurring on 2 & 3 September at Critchill Manor. We’re looking forward to entertainment from Crazy P, The Allergies and more; relaxed foodie fun with friends; and boutique camping!

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR

@thebristolmag

Since we discovered the ‘hi-shine’ lip and nail lacquers from Marc Jacobs Beauty (£22 and £15 respectively, at Cribbs Causeway’s John Lewis). Especially Marc’s personal fave ‘Jealous Glaze’ – reminiscent of glistening watermelon with its plump gel finish

AUGUST 2017

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Nº 158

@thebristolmag


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ZEITGEIST

Top

5

things to do in AUGUST

GET THE PICTURE

FUN OF THE FAIR Celebrate the very best of the countryside next month, as Frampton Country Fair returns on 10 September. A traditional Gloucestershire county event, Frampton highlights include the hunting hounds parade, falconry shows, terrier racing and the competitive bale push. Away from the action, punters can enjoy the finest local produce the shire has to offer, with the farmer’s market, country kitchen and food stalls. Tickets can be bought at the gate on the day, costing £12 for adults and £3 for children.

Image © 2016 winner Angelica Menchaca

Head to the Wills Memorial Building between 31 July and 9 August to see every photo from the University of Bristol’s photomarathon competition, which took place on 8 July. Entrants were tasked with taking 10 photos of 10 themes, all in the correct order over a five-hour period. The twist? If photographers got to the end but saw something that would fit theme two, they had to start all over again... Prepare to see your favourite city in a whole new light – for free! • bristol.ac.uk

HEAD TO THE VALLEY Set up camp in Chew Valley for a chilled weekend of lakeside respite from buzzing city life. Taking place from 4 – 6 August, Valley Fest will be offering up a diverse musical lineup spanning Meadowlark, Eva Lazarus, and Fat Suit as well as late-night DJ sets. There’s plenty on offer for little ones too, with junior discos, arts and crafts and Hogsnorts Farm Academy, where they can meet the animals and even learn how to train a sheepdog. Then there’s some top nosh to be found at the Chew Stage, with every morsel 100% organic and locally sourced, plus a wealth of culinary workshops from top chefs.

• framptoncountryfair.co.uk

• valleyfest.co.uk

WONDER ‘WHAT IF...?’ Image © Tristram Kenton

OH HAPPY DAY Casino lounge singer Doloris van Cartier (Alexandra Burke) has got herself into a sticky situation after witnessing a violent crime at the hands of her mobster boyfriend Vince. Forced to join a convent for her own safety, ‘Sister Mary Clarence’ must learn to curb her disco diva ways and blend with the simple life of her fellow sisters. Based on the 1992 smash-hit comedy film starring Whoopi Goldberg and Maggie Smith, Sister Act hits the Hippodrome stage from 7 – 12 August. Featuring favourite tunes including I Will Follow Him and original music from Oscar-winner Alan Menken, this is one madcap musical celebration of sisterhood that you won’t want to miss. Hold on to your habits! • atgtickets.com

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At-Bristol’s ‘What If’ festival celebrates our curious nature by exploring a world where insects take over, what it would be like to live on another planet and what would happen if we could see inside our own bodies. Special themed events throughout the summer include outdoor film screenings, LEGO robotics workshops, space house designing, edible facemasks and the opportunity for families to join school workshops for the first time. Take it from us, the grown-ups will have just as much fun as the kids – not least because At-Bristol’s panoramic rooftop bar (pictured) will be open every Thursday! • at-bristol.org.uk


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THE CITY THE BUZZ

My

BRISTOL

Photo by Sally Reay

This month we catch up with local career coach Caroline Arnold

Tinkle the ivories We don’t know about you, but our walk to work would be improved greatly with an impromptu ditty to accompany us. Luckily, 18 pianos will be livening up the streets of Bristol this month, each beautifully decorated by local artists. Local artist Luke Jerram’s ‘Play Me, I’m Yours’ project has seen over 1,700 uprights in 55 cities across the world, and will be coming to our city from 17 August to 7 September. “We have tried to design a trail that takes in popular Bristol spots, well-known musical destinations, as well as places in the wider community, where we have had the funding to do so,” said Luke. “We wanted to showcase the vibrant creative flair this city has to offer and also its incredible diversity. “This is a chance for Bristol’s creative community to be inventive and engage with the pianos in their own way. From impromptu performances by bands, solo artists and choirs of all genres, the pianos will be for everyone to use and enjoy. We can’t wait to see how the trail unfolds.” Bristolians can programme their own events around the pianos and keep an eye on the website to hear the latest plans. Do you fancy cycling from piano to piano to perform on all of them? Maybe you’d like to organise a late-night gig, dance event, or plan to discover the pianos with family or friends. It’s up to you! The list of locations includes At-Bristol Science Centre, Bristol Bus & Coach Station, Harbourside (next to the Watershed), Paintworks, St George’s Bristol, St Nicholas Market, Wapping Wharf, Windmill Hill City Farm, The Bearpit and more. Everyone is welcome to try the old Joannas, from virtuoso pianists and proud performers of the EastEnders theme tune, to total beginners. Maestro!

• bristolstreetpianos.com

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What brought you to Bristol? My partner’s work – he was setting up a new office. We hadn’t really thought about Bristol before but after 31 house moves, including living in the US, Paris, Tokyo and Hong Kong, I can honestly say I love Bristol. We were both ready to leave London and our three-hour commute, and Bristol ticked all our boxes. It is close to Saunton Sands, where we originally met, so we can go for a walk on the beach there, go paddleboarding at the Gower, and head to Devon where my family live. Tell us briefly about what you do Since setting up Caroline Arnold Coaching in 2015, my mission has been to help other women make their long-term career goals a reality. From female graduates who need early guidance to experienced women who long to venture beyond the confines of middle management, I’m passionate about making every woman’s career more meaningful and rewarding. What are you working on? Launching my book and online course to help women get confident and accelerate their career. What are you reading? I love reading and am very lucky to be a quick reader. On a recent 10-day holiday, I managed to read 10 books! But I tend to have four on the go – one by my bed, one in the lounge, one on my phone and one by the bath. My latest is by Carmine Gallo; The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs. I have read quite a few of Carmine’s books and recommend them all! What are you listening to? My go-to song, if I need pumping up, is Happy by Pharrell Williams. Favourite watering hole? I am lucky to live on the Harbourside and recently joined the local Bristol SUP club so a drink at The Cottage or the Pump House in the sun is the perfect way to end the evening after being out on the water.

Evening in or evening out? I enjoy going out for an early drink and dinner and then coming home and catching up on the latest Netflix series that we are watching. We have just finished Designated Survivor with Kiefer Sutherland which was really good! What film will you be seeing in August? I am planning on a girls’ cinema trip to see Girls Trip; it looks like a fun chick flick so a great excuse to get all the girls together. Which museum or gallery might you visit? I haven't been to Blaise Castle yet so plan to visit the museum and have a walk around the grounds before stopping for a cup of tea and piece of cake. What local event will you be attending? I love the balloon festival; if the wind is right they go straight over our flat. Favourite local walk? Harbourside; with a stop for a cider or green tea to watch the world go by.


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THE CITY A trip down memory lane

The owners of Weston-super-Mare landmark the Grand Pier, which has been welcoming visitors for over 110 years, recently asked people from around the world to come forward and share special memories of the attraction. The tourist hotspot first opened on 11 June 1904 and as a place of entertainment, seaside fun and even romance over the years, has been the setting for many memorable experiences that Michelle Michael and brother Kerry want to make sure aren’t lost in time. Many documents, photographs and memorabilia were lost in the devastating fire which destroyed the Pier in 2008, and now favourite memories, photos and video clips have been submitted, to be compiled and shared on social media channels. The submission with the most ‘likes’ on the Grand Pier’s official Facebook page is to receive an all-inclusive family package for four including entry for two adults and two children with unlimited ride wristbands and meal vouchers for the Boardwalk Café. “We know that so many special memories have been made on the Pier and we love hearing stories of how people have enjoyed their time here,” said Michelle. “There’ve been marriage proposals; celebrity visits and, of course, countless events and parties. So much has happened here during the Pier’s 113-year history, and I’m sure there are plenty of stories that we don’t even know about. We’re excited to be compiling this special project and we’re already thinking this could turn into an exhibition for people to come and enjoy.”

BRISTAGRAM Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your Bristol pics using #thebristolmag

@mikelaw tz loved the V Rooms’ Pride ligh ic ts as much as we did

• grandpier.co.uk

Hare ng of The Fab painti from et re St th on Nor atkins @michew

It’s hard to be

lieve you’re in Bristol, @madreonth emove!

Little ones bobbing along on the boat rides back in the day

’Appy days A new app has been created to enable sightings of Britain’s mammals to be recorded on the move, and allow wildlife charity People’s Trust for Endangered Species to identify changes in population numbers and help conservation. The free Mammals on Roads app has informative audio descriptions providing useful insights into the lives of the creatures. “Data gathered will be vital to conservation work,” explains David Wembridge at PTES. “The Mammals on Roads survey has been running for over 15 years, which allows us to compare data year on year, and identify where we need to focus conservation efforts. While recording roadkill can be a little gruesome, higher levels of roadkill can actually indicate a healthy population of mammals nearby. “We hope this new app will engage new audiences, who already have mobile technology at their fingertips, with wildlife conservation.” The survey takes place between July and September. The public are asked to record sightings of mammals – dead or alive – during car journeys of 20 miles or more, outside of built up areas, so it’s perfect for road trips or family holidays! Image courtesy of Jamie Hall/PTES

• ptes.org/mor 18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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bine d Upfest com When Nass an by @voyder c pi d an k or _ artw Typically stunn ing work from @josh.perrett


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CARLO &beauty M

MOROCCANOIL ®

hair

Stockists

Main stockists of REDKEN

Tel: 0117 968 2663 6 Rockleaze Rd, Sneyd Park, Bristol BS9 1NF

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Secret Green Belt Party W

hen we first started camping with the kids, we were invited by some friends to a get-together at a Secret Campsite. Actually that isn’t quite right. We were invited to bring our camping gear to a particular location (with directions scribbled, oldschool-style, on the back of an envelope) but were not given the name of the site. The name, it seemed, was so secret that it could not be written down or even said out loud. It was all rather exciting. Although the context was entirely different, it was a bit like one of those raves in the early 1990s, where you bought a ticket and then waited with breath suitably bated to be told which bit of unspoilt Green Belt was to be turned into a giant outdoor disco for the night – or at least that’s what I heard. On this occasion we knew where we were going – ie. about an hour in a certain direction from Bristol – but not what we would find when we got there. So city gave way to motorway, motorway to A road, A road to B road and B road to rutted track (“Are you sure it’s this way?”) until we pulled into a farmyard. A peeling wooden sign informed us that we had found some kind of campsite, but it was impossible to tell whether it was the right one. We motored around, looking for signs of human habitation, until we heard familiar voices and saw our friends and various other people happily sawing up a dead tree. Until that moment, I had rather prided myself on my camping pedigree, having spent part of every year under canvas for pretty much forever, but I had never encountered Bristol campers. These people didn’t just turn up, pitch their tent and put the kettle on. They didn’t camp so much as create an encampment, complete with kitchen tent and fire-pit worthy of Henry VIII. They wore belts from which were suspended knives, hammers and sundry camping gadgets. They brandished bow saws. I half expected another group to drag a dead deer out of the woods; instead, hot dogs and burgers for 40 people were conjured from somewhere. The fire blazed through the night. Two things were clear by the time we left on Sunday afternoon. First, we seriously needed to up our game, kit-wise. The cheap and cheerful nylon tent would have to go, as would the 1970s foldable kitchen unit inherited from my parents. And we had some shopping to do. To think, we didn’t even have a fire stick! Second, we really, really couldn’t tell anyone where we’d been. This was explained to us not only by our friends, but also by all of their knife-wielding friends. Nobody could know about the Secret Campsite. To anyone who knows the place I’m talking about, let me say – hand on heart – that no Bartleby, large or small, ever breathed a word. However, we did inevitably converse with fellow campers, and inevitably conversation would turn to the subject of good local sites. Quickly a pattern emerged. We would swap tales of this site and that, and then my interlocutor would assume a guarded air. Have you by chance been to… that campsite? “You mean,” I would say, raising an eyebrow; “the one nobody knows about?” I never told a soul about the Secret Campsite, for the simple reason that everyone knew about it already. Since then, word has continued to spread and – horror of horrors – the site has even found its way into the guidebooks. Or maybe it always was in the guidebooks. Maybe it had been a closely-guarded secret sometime in the distant past, and the cloak-and-dagger-ish spirit simply lingered. Or perhaps we’re like kids making a den behind the sofa – a secret place away from adult eyes that we know, deep down, is not secret at all. ■ 20 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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FASHION Universal pieces and customisation are key, says Lucinda – image by Toby Knott

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FASHION

SO COME ON... VOGUE John Lewis at Cribbs Causeway has teamed up with the iconic British Vogue on a fashion edit from Lucinda Chambers

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t’s rather an exciting collaboration, that will see ‘stories of style’ shared with shoppers from across the city. Part of the retailer’s ‘national treasures’ campaign, it’s a summer-long celebration of life, design and culture, including a curated selection of ‘Vogue Recommends’ looks, from JL’s womenswear department at Cribbs – now available to explore via personal styling appointments. The looks have been carefully selected by outgoing British Vogue fashion director, Lucinda Chambers, who is stepping down from her position after 36 years. Lucinda has spent time in-store at John Lewis, choosing timeless, universal, quality items that transcend seasons, serve as the building blocks of any wardrobe and can be effortlessly worked in – white shirts and floral dresses to statement earrings and shoes. The personal styling team at John Lewis is guiding shoppers through over 50 key pieces and advising on how to style them, and announcing, throughout the summer, further collections selected by British Vogue’s executive retail editor Ginnie Chadwyck-Healey and fashion features editor Ellie Pithers respectively. “At John Lewis we pride ourselves on being at the forefront of accessible fashion and this collaboration will offer the unique opportunity to see first-hand how some of the most influential people in fashion style the looks we all covet,” said Christine Kasoulis, fashion buying director. “The brilliant thing about fashion is to re-look, re-invent and then re-use,” added Lucinda. “Building a wardrobe full of clothes like these I have curated, means that it’s exciting to see each morning, effortless to wear and also affordable... That is one of the pleasures of life.” Here she offers some extra tips...

The key pieces There are certain pieces that work for everyone, regardless of age. For example, the bomber jacket makes a modern addition to every wardrobe and instantly smartens an outfit yet keeps it cool. John Lewis’s own-brand, Kin, provides a nifty navy number, while Parka London has a more contemporary khaki quilted option for a younger consumer. Other wardrobe staples include ankle socks, a white T-shirt, a Breton top, a biker jacket, wide-legged trousers and skinny trousers, not to mention a duster coat, white shirt and scarves.

remember you can play with lengths, swap the belt out for your own or customise the sleeves. Try buying a high-waisted skirt three sizes too big for a longer length if short isn’t your style or pair a Toast tunic with Whistles trousers – bright young things can always leave the trousers out.

Learn your foundations Whatever you want to invest in, there are always options. Make sure you pick a fabric, colour and neckline that suits your shape and colouring. Know which neckline flatters you and learn what your colours are for basics. One size and one colour does not fit all, so experiment and find what works for you.

Shop smarter When buying, think about longevity. Do you love the piece? Will it become an old friend to you and something you will reach for in five years’ time when all else fails? If yes, buy it. Buy better; why purchase four cheap T-shirts when you can buy one soft and gorgeous Whistles one that will improve with every wash for the same price? Fabric is a wonderful decider, especially as we age. Good-quality fabrics will always stand the test of time and be a valid investment.

Who’s afraid of the washing machine? This is where good-quality fabrics come into their own. The better the fabric, the better it will wash. Cut out dry cleaning by choosing a washed silk and purchase in a larger size so that you can pop it in the wash time and time again. Kin, And/Or and Modern Rarity use highquality fabrics that look better with every wear and each brand offers classic staples with a twist.

Make it your own Once the building blocks are in place, idiosyncrasies come into play. From belts to scarves, hats, earrings and beads, everyone has something – or a few things – that will make them feel like themselves. Pile it on, as it’s those touches that bring your style to the fore. ■ • johnlewis.com

Customise or cliché A duster coat or trench coat may seem like a fashion cliché, but

‘The Bag’ – AND/OR hobo bag, £59

‘The Earrings’ – Toolally The Peacock drop earrings, £45

‘The Jacket’ – Parka London Britt jacket, £87.50

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‘The Shirt’ – Modern Rarity palmer//harding, £130

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BOOKS

READ ALL ABOUT IT Off on holiday? Put down the touchscreens (the sun will be too bright anyway!) and pick up one of Foyles’ Charlotte Pope’s best beach-reads

ROOM BY EMMA DONOGHUE

Today is Jack’s fifth birthday. Ma has made him a cake, but there are no candles because they are not allowed any. Jack and Ma don’t live in a house – they live in Room, a tiny space, with a locked door and no windows, only a skylight. To Jack, Room is his home: it is all he has ever known since birth and he is unable to understand that there is a world outside. To Ma, Room is the prison she has been held captive in for seven years. It is just Jack and Ma, except for when Old Nick comes at night and Jack – whose bewildered innocence is beautifully conveyed – has to hide in the wardrobe and pretend to be asleep. Ma is desperate to keep her son safe, and has worked hard to build a semblance of an ordinary life for her child. But soon that’s not enough, Ma has to devise a daring escape plan and suddenly their fate rests on Jack’s young shoulders. Adapted into a critically acclaimed film, this haunting, heartbreaking novel is utterly gripping.

IT BY STEPHEN KING

With the brand new film adaptation due to be released next month, now is an excellent time to read this super-creepy classic. Children are going missing in Derry, a small town in Maine, USA. Beneath the streets a monster is lurking, and It’s hungry. Years ago, a gang of children battled and somehow defeated the beast, apparently for good. They all promised that should the evil ever rise again, they would return to vanquish it, and 27 years after the first incidents – with the disappearances happening all over again – it is time for the Losers Club to reunite. A jumble of outcasts, the bullied, the beaten and the vulnerable, they are now grown. They have not seen each other in many years, and most of them have blocked out the horrors they witnessed that dark summer of 1958. At a whopping 1,138 pages, this is the perfect book to keep you going on a long flight.

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SMALL ISLAND BY ANDREA LEVY

It is 1948 and England is slowly recovering from the Second World War. Queenie Bligh has no idea when or if her husband will return from the battlefield. To the horror of her neighbours, she takes in Jamaican lodgers in an effort to make ends meet. One of these lodgers is Gilbert Joseph, one of the thousands of Jamaican men who served for the British war effort with the RAF. Returning to England as a civilian, Gilbert finds himself treated very differently. No longer viewed as a hero who fought for the Mother Country, life as a black man in post-war London is fraught with casual racism and deep-rooted prejudice. His wife Hortense leaves Jamaica to join him, longing to see the country she was raised to idolise – but she is stunned to find the land of her dreams shabby and bomb-damaged as well as horribly unwelcoming. Even the man she married seems like a stranger. This is a fascinating look at life in a time of great change. The characters and plot are deeply engrossing, pulling you into their world effortlessly. A compellingly written story of race, friendship, love and survival.

LIFE AFTER LIFE BY KATE ATKINSON

What if there were second chances? And third and fourth chances? In fact, an infinite number of chances to live your life? Ursula lives over and over again. In one life, she dies moments after birth, in another she survives. In each life, individual decisions splinter into new outcomes: where she lives, who she meets, the path her life takes. She starts to develop an eerie sixth sense, a deja vu allowing her to in some cases control what will happen. If you could change the world’s inevitable destiny, could you? Would you even want to? Through the Edwardian era to the Second World War, Atkinson brings the world of her novel vividly to life. The scenes of the London Blitz are incredible in their detail: you can almost smell the smoke from bombed buildings, almost see the flames flickering on the page. This, the much-deserved winner of the Costa Novel Award in 2013, was my first foray into the works of Kate Atkinson and it will certainly not be my last.

THE TIME TRAVELLER’S WIFE BY AUDREY NIFFENEGGER Although this is a slightly older book (published in 2003), it’s one that I believe every bookworm should read. Henry has a rare genetic condition: he randomly and sporadically time travels, vanishing from thin air and reappearing throughout his own timeline. He can be gone for minutes, or days. His condition is incredibly dangerous and risky – he has no control over where or when he will go. Clare spends her life waiting, having to find a way to cope with her husbands frequent and persistent absences, each time terrified that he won’t be able to return to her. Their timelines are opposites: Clare first meets Henry when she is a very small girl, and he a grown man (who in his time, is already married to her adult self). Through the unusual circumstances, Henry and Clare forge a life together. A unique love story of a marriage that defies all the odds, and still one of my absolute favourite works of escapist fiction – absolutely perfect for hot summer days, poolside.


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Indoor Living Kitchen & Dining Outdoor Living New Designers

NISILIVING.CO.UK

10% off your first purchase. Enter ALFRESCO at checkout. Valid for one purchase only

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HERITAGE

FLIGHT OF THE CONCORDE A £19million industrial heritage museum is soon to open in Bristol – telling the story of more than a century of aviation history in the West, through insight into the lives of the people and communities that have contributed to the industry

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or many decades there has been an ambition to create a museum to recognise and celebrate the vast achievements of Bristol’s aviation industry and, over time, a heritage collection of Bristoldesigned aerospace exhibits has been established. The collection was given further impetus by the return of Concorde Alpha Foxtrot – the last Concorde to be built and the last to fly – when she landed for the final time at her birthplace of Filton in 2003. Since then, there have been plans to find a fitting home for Concorde at the place where the supersonic passenger jet was designed, built and tested. Aerospace Bristol – developed by the Bristol Aero Collection Trust – will celebrate more than 100 years of aerospace design and engineering at Filton, and while Concorde Alpha Foxtrot will make for a showstopper of a centrepiece, there will be much more to enjoy. Starting in the earliest days of flight, when Bristol Boxkite biplanes flew over Clifton Suspension Bridge, Aerospace Bristol will take visitors on a journey through decades of fascinating history and tell the remarkable stories of the people who made it all happen and the communities that grew up around the industry. Visitors can learn about everything from the earliest pioneers of powered flight to the vital role Bristol played in the two world wars, exploring the drama and technological advances of the space race, hearing the stories of the designers and engineers who made Concorde a reality and – moving on to the modern day – discover the latest achievements of today’s aerospace engineers. The museum aims to advance learning, skills and training, particularly in science, technology, engineering and design, and inspire the next generation of engineers while encouraging people to engage in the region’s world-class aerospace heritage. The exhibition will comprise of a combined audio-visual show and object display – containing 26 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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thousands of artefacts and Bristol-built aircraft including a replica Bristol Scout, replica Bristol Fighter, a Sea Harrier fighter jet and a Type 173 twin-rotor helicopter, as well as satellites, missiles and scaled models – that captures the passion and affection that the aircraft inspires. There’ll be tales of innovation and human endeavour, interactive exhibits that demonstrate the principles of flight, a static flight simulator and a virtual reality exhibit, and opportunities for formal and informal learning in partnership with local schools.

Where it all began As an early cradle of UK aviation, aircraft production began at Filton in 1910 – less than two years after the first recorded flight of a powered aeroplane in British skies – with the British & Colonial Aeroplane Company. Over a century of succession, mergers and takeovers has seen the creation of the British Aircraft Corporation, Bristol Siddeley and British Aerospace, through to the well-known industry names of today such as BAE Systems, Rolls-Royce and Airbus, still at the forefront of the world’s aerospace industry. The British & Colonial Aeroplane Company was the brainchild of Sir George White, entrepreneur and pioneer in electric trams. Two sheds were acquired at the top of Filton Hill, which became the first aeroplane factory in Britain to be run on a commercial footing. Within the first few months, the Boxkite biplane became a major success for the company, and steadily expanded over the next few years, until a large airfield was built in the early years of the First World War – when the company’s most famous product was the Bristol Fighter biplane, arguably the Spitfire of its day. British & Colonial was renamed the Bristol Aeroplane Company in 1920, and the factory continued to


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HERITAGE

Image courtesy of Airbus UK

design and build a diverse range of aircraft during the interwar period – notably the Bulldog fighter in 1927. The multi-role Bristol Blenheim of 1936 was a tremendous leap forward in aircraft technology, and became the backbone of the Royal Air Force early in the Second World War. The factory at Filton was the largest in Europe, and several shadow factories were set up around the country to support it. The Blenheim spawned several derivatives – the Beaufort bomber, the Beaufighter, the Buckingham, the Buckmaster and the Brigand. Early aircraft were predominantly designed with military activities in mind, but after the First World War, the company dabbled in civil conversions of existing models, including the Tourer, a Bristol Fighter that could carry one or two passengers, and the massive Pullman, a conversion of the Braemar triplane bomber that could carry 14 passengers in relative luxury. It wasn’t until the end of the Second World War that the focus switched to civil transport aircraft – the first new British aircraft postwar was Bristol product the Freighter. This rugged aircraft saw the company move towards commercial aircraft, while the huge Brabazon airliner of 1949 was another quantum leap in technology, providing invaluable knowlege that later went into the Britannia airliner, which became a worldwide success in the emerging holiday charter market of the 1960s. Meanwhile, also towards the end of the Second World War, The Bristol Aeroplane Company moved into helicopters, when Austrian-born Raoul Hafner joined the company. His pioneering research led to the Bristol Sycamore, the first British-designed helicopter. The prototype Sycamore – 180 of which were built at Filton and Weston-super-Mare – first flew in 1947, and was used by many military forces around the world for search and rescue, VIP transport and communications. In 1959, the company became a constituent of the British Aircraft Corporation pool of companies, which became a company in its own right in 1963. By this time, plans for a supersonic airliner were well underway and development began at Filton and Toulouse on the jointly ➲

An engineer back in the day – image courtesy of BAE Systems

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HERITAGE Aerospace Bristol is raising funds to bring this Freighter back to the UK

designed and built BAC/Aerospatiale Concorde. Concorde made its first flight in 1969, and 10 years later, the last Concorde flew out. In nearly 70 years, over 22,000 aircraft were designed and built by Bristol in the UK or licensed for production abroad. “Like many Bristolians, I have always been proud of Concorde and the achievements of all those that have worked, often their entire careers, in the aerospace industry,” said Iain Gray, chairman of Aerospace Bristol. “We will celebrate the innovation and endeavour of those generations who went before us but also look forward, to inspire the imagination of our young people through our learning programmes and encourage the school pupils of today to consider careers in our aviation industry. Creating a fitting new home for Concorde can only happen with the support of Concorde friends and admirers so we are asking everyone who remembers Concorde’s final flight, and shares our aim of keeping the spirit of Concorde alive, to please come on board by making a donation – any contribution will truly make a difference.”

See under the hood of a Bristol 403 classic car as part of the exhibition

Infinity and beyond Did you know about Bristol’s involvement in cosmic exploration? Space projects started in the Guided Weapons department of the Bristol Aeroplane Company in the early 1960s with Skylark, the high altitude sounding rocket, and the Anglo-American UK1 and UK2 university science satellites. In 1968, work began at Bristol on the design and manufacture of the structure for the UK’s Black Arrow technology satellite X3, which was launched as Prospero in 1971. It was and still is the only all UK satellite and launch vehicle combination. Also in 1968 a prime contract was won by BAC Bristol from the Science Research Council for UK4. This was the first time that an industrial company had been awarded a spacecraft Prime Contract in the UK. In 1971 the Filton-built UK4 (also known as Ariel 4) spacecraft was successfully launched on the US West Coast. Intelsat IV F-4 was built and erected in Bristol on behalf of the Comsat Corporation of the USA, and was the first to be launched into synchronous orbit over the Pacific Ocean – sending back live TV pictures of President Nixon’s visit to China in February 1972. Intelsat contracts led to dedicated space buildings at Filton and the construction of six complete satellites plus subsystems for eight more between 1971 and 1978. Later, on 14 March 1986, Filton’s GIOTTO intercepted Halley’s Comet, and survived – four years later it was steered to within 200km of Comet Grigg-Skjellerup.

On the ground The Filton site has also had a long association with road transport, from the earlier family businesses in electric trams, taxis and buses, to the car and bus body building in the early 1920s. At the end of the Second World War, Bristol Aeroplane Company took over Fraser Nash, and set up a car department in the factory. The first production car, the Bristol 400, was based on pre-war BMW designs, but with much higher performance, thanks the the manufacturing techniques of the aviation industry. The streamline 401 and the convertible 402 followed, with the company becoming world famous for the quality of its luxury cars. Bristol also developed a series of racing cars, the most famous being the Bristol 450, which took first, second and third place in both 1954 and 1955 Le Mans 24-hour races. Tragically, 94 spectators were killed when a Mercedes-Benz crashed during the 1955 race, and the Bristol team donated their prize money to the disaster fund. Later that year the racing department was closed down. Following the consolidation of the aircraft companies in 1959/60, the Bristol Car Division became an independent company. Shortly after, with the introduction of the 407, Chrysler V8 engines were used instead of Bristol engines. Then, in 1980, the company switched from numbered types to names, based on earlier Bristol aircraft. First was the Beaufighter, followed by the Britannia, Brigand, Blenheim and finally the two seat V10-powered Fighter sports car. The company went into administration in 2011, but was rescued by Frazer-Nash Group, and is currently developing a new car. Aerospace Bristol has already welcomed a 1953 Bristol 403 saloon car home to Filton – discovered in a barn in the South West, where it had been stored for over 30 years and had fallen into disrepair. “The 28 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Bristol 403 was actually tested in The Bristol Aeroplane Company’s wind tunnel and its aviation heritage can be clearly seen in the aerodynamic body design,” explained Linda Coode, collections manager. “The bonnet, doors, fuel filler cap and boot all open from the inside, to remove the wind resistance that would be caused by external handles. It’s a fine example of high performance engineering to come out of Filton; we’re thrilled to feature it in the exhibition.” The classic car was rescued by Bristol Owners Heritage Trust and restored to glory by volunteer apprentices from restoration experts Spencer Lane Jones. Now ready for public display, it has been delivered to the grade-II WWI hangar that will house the Aerospace Bristol exhibition when the museum opens. • Do you remember Concorde’s final flight over Bristol back in 2003? Have you sipped champagne while travelling faster than a bullet on the most glamorous airliner the world has ever seen? Have you seen the curvature of the Earth from 60,000 feet? As part of their appeal to support the new home of Concorde, Aerospace Bristol plan to start a digital archive and online map of Concorde memories – details to be published shortly on the website. The museum is also appealing for donations to help bring a Type 170 Freighter ‘home’ to the UK from New Zealand – visit aerospacebristol.org to support its journey

Concorde factfile First flight: 2 March 1969 Number produced: 20 (including 2 prototypes; 2 pre-production models) Flight crew: 3 Passengers: 92-128 Max speed: 1,320mph (Mach 2.02) Range: 4,500 miles (7,242km) Top altitude: 60,000 ft. (18,288m) During supersonic flight, the aircraft’s nose heats to 127ºC and the fuselage expands about 25.5 cm (10 inches) in length due to the effect of skin friction heating


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Christmas Eve 1985 - Four Concordes over Bristol celebrating 10 years of Concorde’s commercial flying, 1976 to 1986 Concorde’s last flight over Clifton Suspension Bridge - 26th November 2003

Concorde Photos Featuring work by the official Concorde photographer; Adrian Meredith, a large selection of breathtaking images as well as collectables and memorabilia celebrating the finest moments of Concorde history is available to purchase online at: Concordephotos.com

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THEATRE

Carrie Hope Fletcher has a legion of fans who call themselves ‘Hopefuls’ and closely follow her via her vlogs – photo by Matt Martin

THE KOOKIEST KID IN TOWN Jessica Hope speaks to musical star and internet sensation Carrie Hope Fletcher about playing a grown-up Wednesday in The Addams Family musical

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escribed as an “honorary big sister” by many, at the age of just 24, Carrie Hope Fletcher has enchanted audiences onstage with her incredible voice, given advice to hundreds of thousands of people through her YouTube channel, and made numerous readers laugh and cry with her best-selling books. In her latest venture, Carrie has taken on her most demanding part to date, playing a grown-up Wednesday in the musical version of the tale of everyone’s favourite kooky clan, The Addams Family. This production, which comes to Bristol Hippodrome in September, follows 18 year-old big sister Wednesday as she comes to terms with falling in love with – shock, horror – an American teenage boy from a respectable family. How will the Addamses be able to handle ‘normal’ people coming into their lives as the families meet over a fateful dinner? In the midst of a busy tour schedule I spoke to Carrie, who is from Harrow in London, about what first drew her to this unusual part. “I grew up watching the films (released in 1991 and 1993) and my mum loved the 1960s television version, so The Addams Family was always on in our household. I love the dark humour, which is similar to Tim Burton films like The Nightmare Before Christmas and Beetlejuice – I have always enjoyed that kind of genre.” This part is a world away from other characters Carrie has played in recent years – she performed as Eponine in Les Miserables in the West End and in Dubai, picking up the award for Best Takeover in a Role at the 2014 WhatsOnStage Awards, as well as playing Truly Scrumptious in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Jane Banks in Mary Poppins. “This is certainly the most challenging role I’ve ever played,” she says. “The physicality of the production has been a test, especially with the corset I have to wear, because of all the running around I have to do – trying to control my breathing while wearing it took a few shows to get used to.” Despite these challenges, Carrie says that the whole cast has thrown themselves into their quirky parts. “I’ve never seen a cast so in love with a show before,” she says. Playing alongside Carrie is ex-EastEnders star Samantha Womack as the family matriarch Morticia, and Coronation Street actor Les Dennis plays the utterly bizarre Uncle Fester. Meanwhile, musical sensation Cameron Blakely (Les Miserables, Peter Pan, Oliver!) plays Gomez, who struggles with trying to keep his knowledge of his daughter’s relationship a secret from his beloved wife. “Cameron Blakely is hilarious. We played father and daughter in Les Mis when he was Thenardier, and now he’s playing my dad in this production, so I think we’re meant to play father and daughter forever,” Carrie laughs.

The cast also includes a large ensemble with a difference. “Each member has their own individual part playing an ancestor of the Addams family,” Carrie tells me. “There is a ballerina and a matador, for example. It’s really rare in musicals as the ensemble are usually all dressed the same as villagers or something similar.” Audiences may fondly remember a young Christina Ricci’s portrayal of the melancholic Wednesday in The Addams Family films from the 1990s. With her familiar pale complexion and long black plaits, Wednesday is a young adult in the musical version, battling her emotions and her affinity to her family and the man she loves. “It is really strange for Wednesday because she’s usually so dark and torturous, and finds nothing better than tormenting her brother. But now she’s confused about being in love as this goes completely against everything dark that she loves and is used to,” says Carrie. Despite being performed in countries around the world, this is the first time that UK audiences will be treated to the musical as it tours across the country until November. “The good thing about being on tour means you get to perform in a new venue, so the show gets refreshed each time,” she says. “There will be new routes to organise how to get on and off the stage and props put in different areas, so the show never gets tired.” Away from the stage, Carrie regularly vlogs (for the uninitiated, that’s blogging, but with videos rather than writing) and her YouTube channel, ItsWayPastMyBedTime, has an incredible 646,000 subscribers with her videos viewed almost 100,000,000 times across the world since 2011. Her vlogs cover a variety of topics including music covers, backstage footage of her work in the theatre, and advice for her dedicated followers (who call themselves Hopefuls). “It was a happy mistake that I got into vlogging,” remembers Carrie. “I was unemployed and bored, so started doing a song cover each month and posting it online and it just snowballed from there. I never knew that there was such a big vlogging community.” The surge of video channels like YouTube in recent years has allowed younger people more access to celebrities and the chance to get to know their idols on a greater level. And for the stars of the videos, they can engage with their fans and give out advice to their viewers. But, as we are all too aware, there are the negatives that go hand in hand with these modern developments. Carrie tries to address the anxieties around body image for her young fans in her vlogs and fights back against keyboard warriors who make sly comments or attack others online about the way they look. “The people who make these cruel comments don’t get to see

It’s real love! Photo by Matt Martin

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the effect that it has on someone. I’ve grown a tougher skin than most over the years, but I want to highlight in my videos that if someone says something nasty to someone who isn’t as tough skinned as I am, then it can have lasting damage.” Similarly with her first book, All I Know Now, which was a number one Sunday Times bestseller, Carrie wanted to reassure her readers about those confusing and embarrassing moments that happen in your teenage years. “When I was a teenager, there weren’t any YouTube vloggers who could share those stories with you. So in my book I wanted to share stories about my teenage years that would help me get through those problems if I were that age now.” Carrie has also brought out two bestselling fictional books and her third one, All That She Can See, was released in July. They address subjects such as heartbreak, mental illness, death and romance – issues that Carrie believes are important to discuss with readers, young or old. Performing, writing, making videos and fighting keyboard warriors – that’s just a day in the life of Carrie Hope Fletcher... ■

Carrie’s top five books The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton Usually I can guess where a book is going to go by halfway through, but with this one I couldn’t figure it out. I was completely surprised with how it ended and I absolutely loved it. I became slightly obsessed with the book afterwards. Every Day by David Levithan This is such a clever book for young adults, telling the story of a soul which has to move to a different body each day in order to survive. But then the soul falls in love and has to spend its life trying to find its way back to the woman it loves. All My Friends Are Superheroes by Andrew Kaufman This is my all-time favourite book. My favourite superhero in it is The Spooner, whose power is that he knows when someone is in need of a hug. When that person is asleep, he goes into their house, spoons them for the night, and then leaves before they wake up, leaving the person feeling like they’ve had a little bit of comfort and love. This book was given to me by a fan after a performance of Les Mis and I began reading it on the train home and couldn’t stop

reading it. I finished it at around 3am and I held it to my chest and sobbed. Billy and Me by Giovanna Fletcher I love this story, and coincidentally it was written by my sister-in-law. It will leave you feeling all warm and fuzzy, and because I know the author, it meant I read it while imagining it in her voice. Wilde Like Me by Louise Pentland This is by one of my friends (and fellowYouTube vlogger). It came out in June and I’m absolutely loving it.

Carrie’s top five songs Shape Of You by Ed Sheeran I know it seems really conventional to choose something by Ed Sheeran, but I’m obsessed with this song because it’s such an ear worm and so catchy. It just makes you want to dance whenever you hear it. High Hopes by The Vamps Again, coincidentally, this song was written by my brother (McFly’s Tom Fletcher), and I love it because it has such a summery feel. How Far I’ll Go from the film Moana I watched Moana while flying to Florida and I cried on the plane watching it. This is a Disney film about a young, strong girl finding her way, and it’s such a refreshing take on a female Disney character. You Matter To Me from the musical Waitress I can’t stop listening to the soundtrack to this musical and this duet is beautiful. It’s quite a new musical to Broadway, but I hope it comes to the West End soon. Hawaiian Roller Coaster Ride from the film Lilo and Stitch This is by far my most played song on my laptop – I think the last time I checked it had been played around 428 times. It just makes you feel good whenever you listen to it, and I sometimes play it on a loop when I’m cleaning my house. • The Addams Family is on at Bristol Hippodrome from Tuesday 19 – Saturday 23 September. Visit atgtickets.com/venues/bristol-hippodrome Carrie stars alongside the likes of Samantha Womack, Les Dennis and Cameron Blakely – photo by Matt Martin

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MUSIC

It’s all gonna be MAGNIFICENT We take five with Elbow’s brilliant bassist ahead of the band’s headline slot at the Downs Festival

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ete Turner greets us with a comforting northern drawl that immediately allays any fears of prickly behaviour, when we pin him down for a quick chat before soundcheck for the band’s sold-out forest gig at Cannock Chase in Staffordshire. Although, we’re yet to meet a bassist with diva tendencies, we have to say. The lads have had a bit of a lazy day, he tells us (alright for some) but, to be fair, they’ve worked pretty hard over the past quarter of a century, and they deserve it. Elbow’s rise over the past two decades has seen them become one of the biggest bands in contemporary British music, and since their debut album Asleep At The Back, they’ve grown and grown in stature – with The Seldom Seen Kid winning the Mercury Prize in 2008 and 2014’s The Take Off And Landing Of Everything flying to the top of the album charts. They’ve a unique identity, a passionate fan base, mainstream success and critical acclaim – all the things a band could want, really. They may have graced the likes of Abbey Road with the BBC Concert Orchestra; reduced pretty much entire audiences to tears with euphoric sunset slots at Glastonbury; closed the 2012 Olympic Games; and this year released their seventh studio album Little Fictions. But are they ready for Bristol, in full festival mode, on the Downs on 2 September? Pete: Yes, can’t wait for that! We’ve played Bristol quite a few times; it’s always ace, and we’ve got friends there so we like to go out after. It’s a great town to go out and have some fun and shenanigans in. There’s actually something about Bristol that’s kind of similar to 34 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Manchester I think; the two places definitely have something in common. We know 3D from Massive Attack, so the last time we were down, we ended up at his place with him and his wife. I know they headlined the Downs Festival last year, which makes it all the more appealing. You get offered these things, and when you look at the history of the show and see Massive Attack have done it, you think; yeah, okay, that’s cool then! TBM: They managed to conjure a biblical storm when they played; it made for a dramatic gig! Ha, that kind of suits them though, doesn’t it? We’re sure this year will be similarly epic. You’re rather suited to alfresco shows aren’t you? Yeah we love them, but we did a show in Cork recently – called Live at the Marquee – which I really enjoyed too. At these shows, halfway through the gig it gets dark and it completely changes the atmosphere. I do love outdoor gigs but I love the festival tents and theatres as well. We feel like we can’t die until we’ve seen One Day Like This with the sun slowly descending behind the stage – fingers crossed for fine weather in Bristol... Yeah we’ve had a few gigs with really dramatic skies. There are certain songs like Switching Off, which we’ve been playing recently and which is quite an old song, that just suit those crazy red sunsets perfectly. It really adds to it, it’s brilliant.


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Quarter of a century is quite the lifespan for any band – how do you feel about that? It’s funny, I don’t think about how long we’ve been together – I just don’t question it. We’re just friends hanging out with each other and there’s a cycle to it all – we’ll spend a year in the studio and then have a year or so touring. It’s just how it is now, that’s how our lives are! But it’s not lost on us; we know how lucky we are. You cut your own path with determination and stamina; and you didn’t blindly chase America. Integrity seems to have always come first, do you think that’s partly your secret? It’s a difficult one because on one hand, you’re told that you need to appeal to a radio audience and all that, but you just have to balance it – which I think we’ve managed to do quite well. But there’ve been times where we’ve probably not done what we wanted to do when we’ve looked back on it.

...There’s something about Bristol that’s kind of similar to Manchester; it’s a great town to have some fun in... Your music tends to elicit quite an emotional response – is this something that you set out to achieve when writing? It just happens; there have been times where we’ve thought a song was sounding really epic and ‘stringy’, but also so obviously us. And then, you ask yourself; do we shy away from that? Magnificent was a little bit like that, but then we thought; “No, this song is going to this particular place; that’s where it’s naturally moving.” So to shy away from where something needs to be and is heading to, would be a little

bit churlish. There’s a kind of songwriting that we’re known for and we decided not to shy away from it. But we really try and experiment and that’s what keeps it enjoyable and fun; we’ve always done that. Your drummer Richard Jupp left the band recently. Has the dynamic changed a lot since you became a foursome? Oh, absolutely, completely. It’s just one of those things – it’s a really sad thing that’s happened, that he’s not with us anymore, but it kind of changed things and spurred us on. It’s happened before, in the past, where we’ve lost deals and stuff like that – you just get on with it. So we did work differently on the last record; I’d always work with Jupp, and I kind of worked in a similar way with Pott which was great. On Head for Supplies, we had this real nice, clockwork, cyclical thing going. Is there anyone you’d like to collaborate with? We’re talking about that now actually; there’s a bunch of songs that didn’t make this album because they would have stood out a little bit too much so we’ve been talking about doing an album and making it something that we get our friends in different bands to collaborate on. We’d like to make more dancey songs. There’s a song we have that really would have stuck out – it’s got a real LCD sound to it, and it wouldn’t have worked, but we absolutely love the song. We’re actually in the process now of doing a tune with – actually I can’t say who it is! – but it’s a duet so we’ve got a friend of ours in to do it. It’d be nice doing something like that before the next Elbow album, just to keep it interesting. What do you listen to when you’re on tour? Well last night on the bus we were listening to Melody’s Echo Chamber, and Beach House; a bunch of stuff really. We’ve been listening to Alt-J – their new album is ridiculously good! • thedownsbristol.com

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LOCAL | EVENTS

WHAT’S ON

Shindig Weekender Feast rounds off the festival season

Flying Lovers of Vitebsk comes to Bristol Old Vic, image © Steve Tanner

FROM 1 AUGUST THROUGHOUT AUGUST, TIMES VARY

Family Trails and Workshops, Wells Cathedral Take little ones on a self-guided family trail including a map of the cathedral and plenty of fun facts, or take part in one of the free craft workshops. Entrance is free; wellscathedral.org.uk 1 – 30 AUGUST, 11AM – 7PM

Up Market, Cabot Circus The UK’s most exciting makers, crafters and designers show their wares at this pop-up market from retail company Appear Here, including everything from fashion and food to lifestyle. Entrance is free; cabotcircus.com 2 – 5 AUGUST, 7.30PM & 2.30PM

T***k You, St. Brendan’s Sixth Form College Watch Bristol Old Vic’s Young Company sing, dance and shout about patriarchy, power and protest alongside St. Brendan’s Sixth Form College Performing Arts Academy. Tickets from £9 to £13; bristololdvic.org.uk 6 AUGUST, ALL DAY

Islamic Cultural Fayre, Eastville Park Celebrate Bristol’s vibrant diversity in the largest Islamic cultural event in the South West, including live performances, over 80 stalls, five-a-side

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football, funfair rides, refreshments and more. Entrance is free; bmcs.org.uk

FROM 8 AUGUST 8 AUGUST, 1.15PM

Christopher Jones, Bristol Cathedral Former organ scholar Christopher Jones returns to the cathedral for an afternoon performance, as part of the summer recital series. Entrance is free, donations welcome; bristol-cathedral.co.uk 9 – 12 AUGUST, 7.30PM & 2.30PM

The Flying Lovers of Vitebsk, Bristol Old Vic The picture of romance, Marc and Bella Chagall were lovers in life and on canvas – watch as they navigate the trials and tribulations of the Russian Revolution in this visual feast of a show. Tickets from £11.50; bristololdvic.org.uk

11 AUGUST, 7PM – 9PM

15 AUGUST, 10PM

An American in Paris, Averys Wine Cellar

Jackson, The Gallimaufry

As part of their Vintage Screenings series, Bristol Film Festival present this Oscarwinning romance starring Gene Kelly, accompanied by a guided wine tasting and selection of cheeses from Arch House Deli. Tickets cost £25; bristolfilmfestival.com

Bristol International Balloon Fiesta, Ashton Court Estate Bristol’s iconic event returns for its 39th year, bringing the early morning ascents and night glows we all know and love – be sure to stake your place at the best vantage points to see the balloons float across the city! Entrance is free; bristolballoonfiesta.co.uk

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Catch all-new original compositions as this seven-piece funk and soul group, led by keyboardist Jack Baldus, return for the launch of his third EP, Push Through, alongside fivetime UK DMC champion DJ Asian Hawk. Entrance is free; thegallimaufry.co.uk 17 AUGUST, 11AM – 3PM

13 AUGUST, 7.30PM

The Flaming Lips, Colston Hall Oklahoma experimental rockers The Flaming Lips bring their extravagant science-fiction space opera sound to Bristol, complete with the usual psychedelic stage show and immersive theatrics. Tickets from £32.50; colstonhall.org

FROM 15 AUGUST 15 – 19 AUGUST, 3.30PM & 7.30PM

10 – 13 AUGUST, TIMES VARY

Jackson and DJ Asian Hawk come to The Gallimaufry, image © Paulo Ferla

Side by Side by Sondheim, Hippodrome Piano Bar This classic musical revue, featuring songs from hit Broadway and film composer Stephen Sondheim, returns to Bristol for the first time in 25 years – complete with offBroadway speak easy-style props and staging at the Hippodrome’s Piano Bar. Tickets cost £20; ticketsource.co.uk

The Prince’s Trust Summer Fair, Bristol Cathedral Discover the work of over 40 young businesses, and marvel at the achievements of Prince’s Trust entrepreneurs. Cake, music, art and gifts available. Entrance is free; bristolcathedral.co.uk 19 – 22 AUGUST, 11AM – 4PM

Daughters of Igbo Woman, Georgian House Museum African writers respond to Bristol’s transatlantic slavery legacy by evoking the voices of three generations of women from one family through film and sound. Entrance is free; bristolmuseums.org.uk

FROM 22 AUGUST 23 – 24 AUGUST, 7.30PM

Much Ado About Nothing, Ashton Court Estate Acclaimed open-air theatre


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specialists Oxford Shakespeare Co. present the Bard’s muchloved witty romance, transported to 1943 war-torn Italy. Tickets from £15 to £20; oxfordshakespeare.co 25 AUGUST, 6.30PM – 8PM

Modern Craft Workshop, The Forge Learn about how to make and maintain a terrarium with London Terrariums, and discover the history of these selfcontained ecosystems. Tickets cost £45; theforgebristol.com 25 – 26 AUGUST, 7.30PM

Murder Mystery Supper, Hippodrome Piano Bar Follow the clues, listen to the rumours and try to figure out ‘whodunnit’ as you mingle with a cast of professional actors and enjoy a three-course dinner. Tickets cost £37.90; atgtickets.com 28 AUGUST, 5PM

The School of Jealousy, The Orangery Theatre Salieri’s witty 18th-century Italian opera comes to Westonbirt for one night only. Tickets cost £35, concessions available; bamptonopera.org 31 AUGUST, 7PM

Yerma, Curzon Cinema Billie Piper returns to her award-winning role as a 30-something woman desperate to conceive in NT Live’s spellbinding play set in contemporary London. Tickets from £8; curzon.org.uk

NEXT MONTH... 2 – 3 SEPTEMBER, ALL DAY

Shindig Weekender Feast, Critchill Manor Feast your eyes and ears at this

weekend festival with the likes of Crazy P, My Bad Sister and Late Nite Tuff Guy, plus a three-course, nautical themed feast in the evening. Boutique camping available, plus a variety of stalls and prosecco bar. Tickets from £49 to £79; shindig-events.co.uk 2 – 3 SEPTEMBER, 10AM – 5PM

Bee and Pollination Festival, University of Bristol Botanic Garden Learn how to keep a hive, hear talks on plants and pollinators from scientists and photographers and marvel at the university botanic garden. Entrance costs £6, students and staff go free; bristol.ac.uk

University of Bristol Botanic Garden hosts its Bee and Pollination Festival

3 SEPTEMBER, 8.30AM

Walk/Run for Parkinson’s, Ashton Court Bring family and friends along to support Parkinson’s by either walking or running your way around the beautiful Ashton Court estate. Registration costs £10 for the walk, £15 for the 10k run; parkinsons.org.uk 10 SEPTEMBER, 9AM

Support Parkinson’s with their walk/run event at Ashton Court, image © Andrew Thomas

Frampton Country Fair, Frampton Estate Enjoy a traditional country fair complete with horse and dog shows, falconry, local food and drink, fishing, craft and more. Tickets from £3 to £12; framptoncountryfair.co.uk 16 SEPTEMBER, 1.15PM

Opera Highlights, Lord Mayor’s Chapel Soprano Mimi Doulton, tenor Stephen Mills and baritone Wesley Biggs star in a concert of operatic highlights, presented by Paul Bambrough. Entrance is free, donations welcome; lordmayorschapel.org.uk

Oxford Shakespeare Company bring Much Ado to Ashton Court

EDITOR’S PICK... 18 – 28 AUGUST, 11AM – 6PM

Playback, Arnolfini Young artists aged between 16 and 25 present over 200 exciting short films in this innovative exhibition. Subjects cover everything from drag queens and job centres to zombies and snails, in genres including animation, comedy, drama and dance. Visitors can interact with the exhibition using touchscreens to choose films, and the hashtag #Playback on social media. Entrance is free, donations are welcome. • arnolfini.org.uk Image © George Torode

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EVENTS Simbaloo is making its way over from Longleat – image by Exclusive Ballooning

TAKING SHAPE As preparations for the Balloon Fiesta get underway at Ashton Court, we make up a checklist of some of the more unusual aircraft to be spotted in the skies this year

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t’s one of the biggest events in Bristol’s busy summer, with tens of thousands of people enjoying the sight of hundreds of colourful balloons gliding through the skies over the city. The Bristol International Balloon Fiesta returns this year from 10 – 13 August, with more than 130 hot air balloons scheduled to take off at dawn and dusk to float across our south-westerly skies. The special shapes category was first introduced to the fiesta in 1997 and has grown to become a firm festival favourite. Here are just a handful to look out for during 2017’s celebrations: Ricoh Cube Who said balloons have to be round? The giant red Ricoh cube was built in 2012 and is a fiesta stalwart with its bright red symmetrical sides visible for miles. Belvoir Balloon The Belvoir Balloon is fresh out the box as it flies over Bristol for the first time this year. We love its teardrop shape, offering an inverted take on the traditional form and certain to add a nice bit of extra variety. Bristol Energy Solar Balloon Make sure to catch the world’s first ever hybrid-solar balloon created specially for Bristol to celebrate the city becoming the UK’s first European Green Capital. Developed by Cameron Balloons, the balloon attracts and retains the sun’s heat to help keep it afloat. The hybrid is fitted with propane burners as well – just in case! Stuart the Minion Stuart the Minion has received a special makeover just in time for the fiesta this year. Over six metres tall, he was commissioned by Universal Pictures back in 2013 for the launch of Despicable Me, and is back this year with a brand new outfit, ready for his prison break as he escapes to the skies. Simbaloo The Longleat Lion will be returning to the fiesta following its launch for the 50th anniversary of the Longleat Safari park last year. The huge lion’s head is quite the sight when it roars above the crowds. • bristolballoonfiesta.co.uk 38 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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We’re told Stuart had got himself a new outfit for 2017 – image by Paul Box


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ARTS | EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Photo by Jack Offord

Submission open for the RWA’s 165 Annual Open Exhibition (closing 21 August) This year’s show runs from 1 October to 3 December, with artists of all ages and backgrounds, emerging and established, encouraged to submit their work. The Open will also include work by two prestigious invited artists – renowned painter and president of the Royal Academy, Christopher Le Brun, and photographic artist Tom Hunter RA – as well as the RWA’s own Academicians and other leading international artists. Artworks will be chosen by a panel including acclaimed curator Marie-Anne McQuay, and writer, curator and lecturer James Russell. Submissions must be for sale, and can be in any media – painting, sculpture, print-making, photography, textile, film, installation – as long as it has been created within the last three years. There is a range of prizes, including cash and a solo exhibition at David Simon Contemporary in Bath. • rwa.org.uk

Air: Visualising the Invisible in British Art, RWA, until 3 September

Solid Air III by Peter Randall-Page

Founded six decades ago by a small group of local artists, Clevedon Art Club has grown in size and stature to become one of the region’s leading arts groups. Each year the club has an open exhibition, inviting members of the public as well as established artists to submit work for selection. This August marks the 61st Open Exhibition, and promises to be as exciting as ever. Clevedon Art Club has worked ever more closely in the community, establishing close links with Clevedon School. The students’ work is judged and exhibited alongside the other works in the science atrium of the school. The club has now included digital artworks into its categories of work, and the chairman’s charity this year will be The Children’s Hospice South West. This years judges are nationally recognised artists Trevor Waugh and Rebecca Cains, along with Catherine Simons of Tinca Gallery.

A suitably summery exhibition celebrating the rich tradition in British art of finding inspiration in the skies above us and the air that we breathe. The show brings some of the nation’s masterpieces to Bristol, including Joseph Wright of Derby’s An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump, on loan from the National Gallery and believed to be visiting Bristol the first time. Other well-loved works include John Everett Millais’ Bubbles and J.M.W Turner’s The Thames Above Waterloo Bridge. See depictions of the earliest hot air balloon flights and celebrations the 18th-century’s ‘balloonmania’ in addition to the sinister shadows and trails left by warplanes and the ominous shape of bulbous barrage balloons in works by Eric Ravilious, Frank Dobson and Christopher Nevinson. • rwa.org.uk

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Clevedon Art Club 61st Annual Open Art Exhibition, Clevedon School, 19 – 28 August

• clevedonartclub.co.uk

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Yatika Starr Fields, Rainmaker Gallery, until 30 September Native American painter and muralist Yatika Fields – who last month became the first Native American artist to paint at Upfest – presents dynamic oil paintings rich in colour, movement and symbolism. Immersed in cultural practices from a young age, Field’s Indigenous sensibilities are integral to his art in powerful and often understated ways. His pictures are studded with references to tribal traditions, organic forms and aspects of contemporary life. “My work begins swiftly and intuitively as momentum shapes the composition on canvas,” he says. “I challenge myself to integrate the physical environment around me with its unseen emotional life.” • rainmakerart.co.uk

Botanical, Diana Porter Contemporary Jewellery, until 25 August

This summer, the team at Diana Porter Contemporary Jewellery are keen to take visitors and shoppers on a journey to fantastical locations as they explore the bountiful treasures in their dynamic exhibition. Expect warm hues of Indian summers, dancing alongside lush greens, and modern materials that are beautifully juxtaposed with fine porcelain and silks. Botanical influences run through each of the collections featured, and the beautiful designs include foliage pared back to its skeletal structure or layers of petals and fruit that create bold pieces of wearable art. The Botanical exhibition features the talented work of Alena Willwroth, Farrah Al-Dujaili, Holly Suzanna Clifford, Rachel Codd, Rebecca Wilkes and Vershali Jain. • dianaporter.co.uk

● Paul Needles: Moments, Guild Gallery, 12 August – 2 September (closed 28 August) It’s almost two years since Paul’s last and highly successful exhibition at Bristol Guild Gallery and he’s not slowed down. He continues to explore the landscape and seascapes of Britain and Spain and, for this new show, seeks to capture the moment when the land and sea change – when waves crash and dissipate and sunlight changes what we see and how we see it. There are interesting comparisons in the paintings: between the arid mountains of Mallorca and the lush forests of Gloucestershire; sun-soaked costas and the gentler English seaside; the architecture of British towns and Spanish villages. Working from sketches, collages and photographs, Paul works mostly in oils, from modest size to grand canvas. • bristolguildgallery.co.uk

● Clive Jebbett, Clifton Fine Art, 4 – 18 August Clive Jebbett was born in London in 1951. He left school at 16 in order to study Fine Art at Colchester School of Art, but left before completing the course. Finding the assessments meaningless, he said: "I left the college system in order to learn how to paint." He went on to cofound the Essex Arts Circus and become Exhibition Organiser at York Arts centre while continuing to exhibit in solo and group shows. In 1978 he gave up painting entirely in favour of photography, and it wasn't until twenty years later that he decided his creativity was limited by the camera and returned to painting and drawing. His compositions since 1998 hint at the influence of his time spent creating photographs, although his figures remain abstract. A strong sense of atmosphere pervades Jebbett's work and his graceful, mysterious figures continue to draw private and commercial collectors from all over the world. • cliftonfineart.com Audition by Clive Jebbett

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CULTURE

WE ARE FAMILY The official Bristol Pride celebrations may be over for another year, but we’re still celebrating. Here, we speak to Bristol-based author Darryl W Bullock, author of a fascinating new book on LGBT+ music

Opposite, clockwise: “I’m as perfectly capable of being swayed by a girl as by a boy,” said Dusty Springfield to The Evening Standard in 1970; London Pride 1974 (© LSE Library); Bowie’s death heralded an outpouring of grief from those whose lives had been affected by him. While others had gingerly tried to prise open the closet door, Bowie was the first rock icon to discuss his sexuality in open terms in the postWolfenden Report years (© Darryl W Bullock); written histories straightwashed the stories of blues pioneers including bisexual Ma Rainey; Joe Meek was wracked with shame after being arrested for ‘persistently importuning for an immoral purpose’ in 1963 (© Darryl W Bullock); Julian Eltinge’s feminine ‘illusions’ were so feted that King Edward VII presented him with a white bulldog at Windsor Castle

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ext month sees the publication of Darryl W Bullock’s latest book David Bowie Made Me Gay: 100 Years of LGBT Music – being launched at the British Library in London, with a panel discussion featuring broadcaster Simon Fanshawe – founder of LGBT+ rights charity Stonewall – and i-D’s Princess Julia among others. As the name suggestes, the book takes a look at the past century through the lens of LGBT music-makers, and how that music has helped shape our wider culture. Featuring interviews with the people who made the records, as well as those who saw changes take place from the front line, it’s is a collection of hidden histories, pulling back the curtain on the colourful legacy. The book – illustrated with seldom-seen images – also looks at LGBT influence on perhaps more unexpected genres including country and western, and rap, and shows how attitudes are being challenged through music in still-conflicted parts of the world. We had a word with Darryl to find out more...

TBM: In a nutshell, why is this book an important read? Darryl: There have been thousands of books on music, but very few which look at the history and influence of LGBT musicians outside of obvious genres like cabaret or disco. LGBT people have been massively important in the development of popular music, and it’s about time the pioneers were given due credit. Plus, we lost so many icons in 2016: I wanted to get people’s stories down on paper while they were still around to tell them. Who was the most fascinating person you spoke to? That’s hard. Possibly Ray Connolly, the journalist and author who conducted the interview in which Dusty Springfield outed herself back in 1970. He was a close friend of John Lennon’s and interviewed everyone who was anyone in music in the ’60s and ’70s. Otherwise I’d say Patrick Haggerty, who is responsible for the first ever out-gay country album, Lavender Country. There’s a man who has lived! Why do you think there was such a fixation on forcing artists such as David Bowie to commit to one sexuality or another? Prurience? People like to assign labels, to put people in boxes. One’s sexuality shouldn’t be important, but outing and normalising can make it easier for others to be comfortable about being out and to understand that their own feelings are perfectly normal. Also, thanks to programmes like Top Of The Pops, Bowie took ambiguous sexuality into people’s front rooms. In a Britain where most people thought of gay men as looking and acting like Larry Grayson or Danny la Rue; that was rife with racism and homophobia; that was outrageous!

Mainstream artists can be seen as a commodity, a brand and product to be bought and sold by marketing and record companies. Is there ever a danger of using an artist’s LGBT+ identity, rather than their music, to sell albums? Oh God yes, and it happens all the time. You only have to look at the way certain records were advertised in the gay press in the ’70s and ’80s to see that is nothing new. There have been plenty of mediocre bands who have been given a leg up by the LGBT+ community and more still who began their careers playing in gay clubs. Take That were originally marketed almost exclusively to a gay audience, for example.

...We lost so many icons in 2016: I wanted to get people’s stories down on paper while they were still around to tell them...

Music is often described as a ‘universal language’ – will we ever reach the stage where the music, rather than the image or sexuality of the artist, is the pure focus? Hopefully, but we’ll have to wait until people stop buying the kind of papers who fill their pages with scandal rather than news, or stop watching television shows that parade the vulnerable in society as early evening entertainment. It won’t happen in my lifetime! ‘Heterosexual Pride Day’ was trending on Twitter recently. How do you feel about this? It’s ludicrous. When one country in the world threatens straight people with death simply for being straight then you can – and should – have Heterosexual Pride events. Nowhere in the world is it illegal to be heterosexual, yet homosexuality is still punishable by death in at least 10 countries. Our government do business with Saudi Arabia yet you can be stoned to death there simply for being in love with someone of your own sex. Pride began as a political event; sometimes people need to remember that we still have a fight on our hands. The idea of Heterosexual Pride demeans the work that people have done over the years to win basic civil rights for the LGBT+ community, and the work we still have to do to secure those same rights for all individuals across the globe.

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CULTURE Why do you think there has been a broader acceptance of gay men within music? Transgender artists, for example, are rarely seen within the mainstream music industry That will happen: one of the biggest selling albums of the late 1960s was by a trans artist. But musicians should be judged on their merit; we need a society that values all musicians irrespective of their sexuality. If a trans artist makes a great record then we should value it as a great record, not as a curiosity by someone whose sexual identity makes them different. If audiences have been more accepting of gay men making music that’s simply because there are more visibly gay men making music. Visibility is the key here, and if there were more visibly trans artists making music – or being signed – then we would see them and hear from them more often. Has music helped change attitudes towards this community? Yes: having people prepared to be out and open has been invaluable. People are scared of the unknown: so when an artist you know announces that they are gay, or lesbian, or bisexual or trans, then the chances are that they will take a good section of their audience along with them. Did anyone stop listening to Elton John when he came out? Of course not. The first album Ricky Martin released after he came out sold better than his previous two.

...Artists like Rufus Wainwright, Sia, the Scissor Sisters, have shown there are no restrictions on what you can do... Thinking about the concept of ‘gay music’, genres like disco, musical theatre and Wham!-esque pop spring to mind. Are artists nowadays breaking these stereotypes and associations? Completely; artists are less confined, more willing to experiment and collaborate with others. Going back to John Grant, for example, his music embraces rock, folk, country, disco and electronica, and there are moments when, to me, his songs sound like they could have been written by John Lennon. The Pet Shop Boys have helped a number of gay and gay-friendly artists out of career slumps – they rescued Boy George from full-on career suicide – and LGBT+ artists like Anohni, Rufus Wainwright, Sia, Bright Light Bright Light, the Scissor Sisters and countless others have shown there are no restrictions on what you can do, who you can work with and in what genres you can succeed. It’s easier to see how LGBT artists have shaped more modern music and culture but what can you tell us about the way they shaped it in earlier eras, for example, during the growth of jazz and blues? LGBT+ acts were an essential part of the jazz and blues era. Tony Jackson, an out-gay black piano player and composer, was mentor to Jelly Roll Morton, who many consider to have been the father of jazz; Duke Ellington’s principle composer and arranger Billy Strayhorn was an out gay man too. During the early blues years, Ma Rainey and Bessie Smith were the biggest stars of the era, and both were bisexual. They laid the foundation for other queer jazz and blues artists including Billie Holiday, Janis Joplin, Nina Simone and Clare Teal. Disco music was closely associated with underground, gay club culture in the ’70s before it broke into the mainstream, where it was ‘straightwashed’. Does this practice still take place today? I think that happens less so now; disco went ‘straight’ when the major record corporations saw that they could make money out of it by selling it to middle America. There are certain genres, country especially, where artists are ‘encouraged’ to hide their sexuality if they happen to be LGBT+ but even in country music that is happening less and less. It saddens me when artists like Elton John cannot or will not record songs about their own lives, but you have some amazing up-and-coming talent happy to be honest and open. k anderson is a prime example of a gay man who writes achingly beautiful and honest songs about being a gay man. His song 14 Year Old Me is a masterpiece. 46 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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How did the appearance of music videos affect the issue of sexuality in the music industry? In all the wrong ways, I think. When you look back at some of the earliest videos shown on MTV, you had lots of creative, artistic stuff but also plenty of misogynistic and sexist videos too. I think the original video for Relax by Frankie Goes to Hollywood broke some taboos, and its influence can still be seen – the video for the Scissor Sisters hit Filthy/Gorgeous is pretty much a remake – but that wasn’t shown in the States; they had to come up with something less ‘in your face’. LGBT+ artists had to make safe videos that were palatable to the masses. Even as recently as 2002, the sight of two girls kissing in the video of t.a.T.u’s All The Things She Said was still seen as shocking. Which story in the book do you personally find the most interesting and inspiring, or troubling? The most interesting story was probably John ‘Smokey’ Condon’s, who went on tour with The Doors and hung out with John Waters’ Dreamland troupe. He recorded some incredibly ‘out there’ gay-themed records, and has some hilarious but potentially libellous tales of the excess of the ’70s record industry to tell. Despite the knock-backs, he’s a really lovely man who I can now class as a friend. The most troubling stories are still being written; the intense homophobia being faced every day by people in Jamaica, in Russia, in China, throughout much of Africa, the Middle East and elsewhere where they face persecution, beatings, imprisonment and even death just for being LGBT+. Was it the 50th anniversary of the decriminalisation of homosexuality act that prompted you to write the book now? Not really, although as I wrote more of the book, the political struggle LGBT+ people have faced over the last century became more and more important to the story. It was the death of David Bowie that really sparked this in to life. I had always been a bit of a fan but not at all obsessive, and I was amazed at how deeply affected I was by his passing. I hadn't been that moved, or saddened, by a celebrity death since the assassination of John Lennon when I was 16 – and I was obsessed with The Beatles. The idea for the book came from seeing how deeply others had been affected by Bowie, and realising just how massively influential he had been on much of what has happened musically in the last half century. Has the original message of Pride been lost somewhat in recent times? Yes; Pride and politics are inextricable for me. But things evolve. Sometimes I feel that people need to be reminded about the struggle we faced and that others still face, but then again, who doesn’t like a party? And even if you take out the politics, Pride is still important for our community’s visibility. Pride has a huge corporate element, but as Dale Wakefield (who set up Bristol’s Gay Switchboard back in 1974 and was one of the co-organisers of Bristol’s first ever pride in 1977) reminded me recently, Pride could not have happened in the first place without the support of the bars and clubs. What did you think of the #LoveHappensHere poster campaign? I think that some of the posters used in the campaign to promote Pride in London were misjudged, especially the ‘Homophobia is Sooo Gay’ one. Using ‘gay’ as a pejorative is always wrong, and whoever thought that was okay, that it would appeal to ‘da yoof’, was way off the mark. But again, things change and people evolve. People think of Katy Perry as an advocate for LGBT+ rights, yet her first hit was a song called Ur So Gay, which did exactly the same thing. If we’re going to castigate one person for making a wrong decision... Where do you start? How did you celebrate Pride this year? My husband and I joined a bunch of our friends on the march, as we do each year. We wear something loud, we drink some beer, have a few laughs and remind ourselves of how lucky we are to live in a fantastic city like Bristol with a brilliant, fortnight-long Pride festival that people work so hard on each year. ■ • David Bowie Made Me Gay: 100 years of LGBT Music is available to buy from 7 September


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SHOPPING | FOOD & DRINK

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CORBIÈRES ROSÉ 16, £11.50 Understated flavours of raspberry ripple, strawberry shortcake, and spices

If we ever need to get a luxurious little gift – you can’t go far wrong with food and drink – our first port of call is Harvey Nichols’ delicious Foodmarket. But this month we thought we’d indulge ourselves and see if we can’t jazz up our own summer suppering...

SALT BLOCK, £24.95 Himalayan salt to revolutionise your grilling

SICILIAN CHERRY TOMATO SALSA, £3.95 Made from ciliegino tomatoes grown on the coast in the Ragusa province

SECOND FLOOR RESTAURANT OFFER WINE, DINE & SUNSHINE: THREE COURSES AND A COCKTAIL FOR £22 Available until 31 August

The sun’s out, the weather’s (generally) lovely, and you don’t have to cook another thing if you don’t wish to! Be it for lunch or dinner, join Harvey Nichols Bristol for three courses perfect for summer and accompanied by either a Grey Goose Le Grand Fizz or Bombay Sapphire mint and ginger cocktail. Second Floor Restaurant, Harvey Nichols, Bristol Monday and Tuesday: Midday – 3pm • Tuesday to Friday: 6pm – 10pm To make a reservation, call 0117 916 8898 or email reception.bristol@harveynichols.com

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ABLEFORTH’S BATHTUB GIN, £39.95 Victorian apothecary vibes! Great in Collins recipes

PEAR AND CHOCOLATE MACARONS, £8.50 A whisper-light after-dinner favour


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FOOD & Drink

TASTY TITBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

MORE CHEESE, GROMIT! The partnership between Somerset’s Wyke Farms – the UK’s largest independent milk processor and renewable energy producers – and The Organic Milk Suppliers Cooperative – the UK’s largest producer of organic milk and organic cheese exporter – is developing to expand organic cheese production. They plan to more than treble their already extensive range of organic cheese, and the new arrangement will see Wyke Farms sourcing all the milk requirements from OMSCo, while OMSCo increases its range of specialist organic cheese made by Wyke Farms for export markets. The arrangement also allows Wyke and OMSCo to jointly own the maturing cheese stock so that cheddar stock can be built to supply a world market looking for longer matured cheddars with more flavour. “This arrangement means Wyke and OMSCo have a fit-for-the-future vehicle to supply the best quality organic cheddars to the world market,” said Rich Clothier, managing director at Wyke Farms. “Our combined scale and efficiency makes us the logical supply partners for organic cheddar. It gives us the capacity and milk supply necessary to expand organic cheese production rapidly, and access to OMSCo’s different milk types to produce organic cheddar with different attributes and with access to different markets. It will complement our existing business which currently produces over 14,000 tonnes of cheddar annually.” OMSCo’s managing director, Richard Hampton, added: “OMSCo has, for a long time, supplied raw milk to Wyke, and Wyke Farms have also produced organic cheese, skimmed milk and butter on our behalf using our specialist milk types for markets such as the US, where we have a unique accreditation and access. This new chapter presents an exciting opportunity to drive our joint business together.” • wykefarms.com; omsco.co.uk

NEW TO BRISTOL Yakinori, an independent, family-owned Japanese noodle and sushi bar based in Birmingham, has brought its take on Japanese food to Park Street – investing £750,000 into its opening, and creating 25 new jobs. The team behind Woktastic have installed an open kitchen at 78 Park Street, serving up noodles, sushi, sashimi, ramen, katsu curry, teriyaki, bento, sake and more, so diners can watch their food being cooked. Takeaways and delivery via Deliveroo are also available. “We’re thrilled to be opening a Yakinori in Bristol,” said managing director Ali Karakaya. “Many of our customers in Birmingham are originally from Bristol and either work or study here so they have expressed excitement at the prospect of our Park Street store. We think Yakinori will fit in perfectly with the Bristol vibe and we’ve already been met with a lot of enthusiasm on our social media!” The restaurant will be open from 11am-11pm Monday to Saturday and 11am-10pm on Sundays. • yakinori.co.uk

HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Bath Ales has collaborated with Colston Hall to launch a bottled ale to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the historic music venue. The 3.9% ABV limited edition beer – an easy-drinking pale ale now available from Colston Hall’s bars – has been specially brewed for the occasion. “What better way to celebrate,” said Karin Ashwell of Bath Ales. “ We hope the beer will be a fitting tribute to help toast the important role the hall has played in local history. With two of our food and drink offerings being based in Colston Hall – the Colston St Bar and Kitchen, and the Beerd restaurant opposite the box office – we feel very close to the celebrations, and it was only right that Bath Ales brewed the special beer.” • colstonhall.org; bathales.com

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FOOD & DRINK

EAT, DRINK, CELEBRATE: BEDMINSTER Don your bib and your best banqueting gear and prepare for a superb international feast south of the river

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ugust is set to be a special month for Southville and Bemmy, with the Bedminster BID’s plans for a series of globally themed events under the umbrella title ‘World of Bedminster’. From world musicians scurrying between venues, and a host of workshops and classes saluting international influences, to a massive street banquet showcasing flavours from around the planet, the celebrations will highlight the international diversity that exists south of the river. The party starts on 2 August with the ever-popular Musicians on the Run – a unique musical event that sees performers dash to and from numerous venues across Bedminster and Southville, in a bid to be crowned the top Musician on the Run. In previous years, this event has gone down a storm, featuring a hugely diverse array of music, from folk to pop, rock, soul and jazz, but this year it will take on even more of a global feel. “This will be the fifth Musicians on the Run and we wanted to do something a little different, that would tie into our World of Bedminster theme,” says organiser Tom Beard. “We want to see people with guitars, banjos, bongos, sitars, accordions and maybe even a few instruments you’ve never even heard of.” Then, throughout the month, a range of classes, workshops and participatory events will take place throughout the area; with the jewel in the crown being the Big Bedminster Banquet on 20 August, when the lower end of North Street – from Hebron Road to Cannon Street – will be closed and transformed into a globally inspired dining destination. No ordinary feast, the Big Bedminster Banquet will see 500 meals served up for free, as part of a wider initiative to honour the hard work and dedication of some of the area’s unsung heroes – nominated by the BID, which has been asking the public for the names of community-minded individuals that they feel deserve a seat at the table. However, you don’t have to be a meal ticket holder to get in on the fun – the banquet will be open to all, and people are encouraged to head down for a flavour of Bedminster. Local traders will also be dishing up special one-off dishes, there’ll be plenty of stalls and pop-ups to add to the market feel, and the street will be filled with live entertainment including music, displays and demonstrations from community groups and kids’ activities, all with international influences. “We want 500 people who have made a difference in the area through voluntary and community work to join us to enjoy a community meal for free as Bedminster’s way of saying thank you,” says Simon Dicken, BID chairman. “Everyone is welcome to come on down – there’ll be plenty of food and fun for all. We invite everyone across Bristol to join us for what promises to be a very special day.” • To get involved or nominate someone, visit bedminster.org.uk

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You can nominate unsung heroes to dine for free at the Big Bedminster Banquet

The street will be filled with live entertainment

Enjoy demos from community groups and plenty of kids’ activities


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An injured inmate circa 1929 – perfect ‘get well soon’ card material!

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BENEVOLENT BRISTOL To mark its 130th anniversary, Jessica Hope delves into the history of the Bristol Dogs and Cats Home

B

y the late Victorian period, the number of stray dogs and cats wandering around Bristol had become a great concern to much of the public. Worried about their welfare, a group of volunteers chaired a large meeting to determine how to solve this issue at Bristol’s Grand Hotel in February 1887. Quickly it was “unanimously resolved” that a home needed to be established, according to a report from the time. The Bristol Home for Lost and Starving Dogs was then built on Waterloo Street and opened in December 1887, making it only the second dedicated home for stray or lost dogs in the whole country, following Battersea Dog and Cat’s Home’s establishment in 1860. Now known as the Bristol Dogs and Cats Home, this centre is just a short walk around the corner from Temple Meads station and has been at the forefront of providing quality care and changing the attitudes towards animal welfare throughout its remarkable 130-year history.

Pioneering institution As the committee set up the centre on Waterloo Street, they began recruiting members of staff including veterinary surgeon Frank Leigh, who offered his services free of charge. A donation scheme was initiated for the public to provide funds for the charity, and soon the centre was open to accepting lost and stray dogs from across the city. Many Bristolians began donating what they could to help the centre soon after it opened. In 1891 the centre began distributing collection boxes around the city so that hotel proprietors and restaurants could donate any scraps of food to feed the animals, and what were the Thompson’s Hotel on Bridge Street and the Continental Restaurant on

the High Street were specifically mentioned in a report from the time, thanking the employees for their generous daily donations. As the concept of a seaside holiday became popular in the later decades of the 19th century, many domestic cats were being left to fend for themselves while their owners went off to enjoy themselves. As the centre became more aware of this issue, it decided to establish a cattery on-site in 1888, in order for owners to be able to leave their cats there while they could enjoy their “sojourn to the seaside”. This boarding service continued for several decades. By the 1890s, a number of improvements were made to the centre, including the construction of offices, a waiting room and keepers’ apartments – so that staff could be on hand at any time of day or night in case stray animals were brought in. An 1892 report records how children’s attitudes towards these animals had changed significantly compared to before the centre had opened, stating: “14 and 15 years ago, when a poor dog was seen in the streets, the boys generally chivvied and stoned it... Now in the district in which I live, I have seen a great change. No, instead of worrying every stray dog they come across, the children are only too anxious to catch it and take it to the police station, so that it might be sent to the Dogs’ Home.” The centre’s work was certainly not going unnoticed. Another report from 1895 notes: “There was no doubt about it that the Dogs Home had done an enormous amount of good for the city of Bristol.” And the centre’s reputation was certainly making an impact in other parts of the country as well. By 1894, between 10 and 15 large towns in the north of England had established similar centres for lost and stray animals. ➲

Christmas dinner with an audience for the dogs in 1925

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Owing to the increasing demand to protect these animals, the centre had outgrown its premises by the turn of the 20th century and a new site was founded on Albert Road in 1901, where the centre still operates from today. By 1909, a staggering 46,500 animals had passed through the Bristol Dogs and Cats Home’s doors, and several thousand people visited the centre every year.

A moggy being treated for a dislocated shoulder after falling 65 feet from the roof of the Western Daily Press and Bristol Mirror office

The impact of war With the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, fears arose over how the conflict would affect animals on the home front and funding for the Bristol Dogs and Cats Home. “The disturbed state of Europe and the call to arms has necessarily affected institutions similar to the Dogs’ Home,” says the 1914 report. “We all know that one of the first to love and cherish a pet, especially a dog, is the soldier or a sailor. Notwithstanding the public so liberally contribute to the many calls in connection with the war, the poor animals must not be forgotten.” As a result of large numbers of men signing up to fight in 1914, the Bristol Dogs and Cats Home chose to “board dogs free of cost for a reasonable time for a local soldier who was on active service and unable to pay for its keep.” As the war progressed and food sources dwindled, it became increasingly difficult for some parents to feed their families, let alone their pets. “In consequence of the rationing of the general public, a large number of dogs are being cast upon the streets, in many instances not by hard hearted people, but by those who have no food to feed them,” notes the 1917 report. The centre encouraged people to bring their pets to the centre itself, rather than leaving them on the streets to be collected, so that the animals could be cared for right away. While it was difficult for the centre to make ends meet with the ongoing conflict, it was reported in 1917 that many of the centre’s dogs were being used as mascots for army regiments and on naval warships as a consequence of the government setting up a War Dogs’ School at Shoeburyness in order to train four-legged friends as carriers. A report from 1918 says: “It is gratifying to know that the majority of the dogs that were forwarded from the Bristol Home have given a good account of themselves, and the Institution has been specially thanked by government officials for the great help it has given.” During the Second World War, the conflict came to the home front in Bristol when the city witnessed a series of bombing raids by the Nazis between 1940 and 1944. Blackouts at night made work at the Bristol Dogs and Cats Home difficult – many of the animals would have been frightened by the sounds of the bombs and aircraft, and the building itself sustained some damage during the raids. However, despite the terror of these bombings, a 1940 report highlighted “the bravery shown by men, women and children in saving dogs and cats in time of great difficulty.”

Innovation and expansion It was announced in 1954 that the Bristol Dogs and Cats Home was to be administered by the RSPCA, allowing the centre to help more animals in the local area, and by 1965 one report stated that “the Bristol branch has now become one of the leading RSPCA branches in the country.” The centre continued to be at the forefront of providing a high standard of animal care and innovation, and in 1976 four dogs from the centre were specially chosen to be trained as guide dogs. Following extensive rebuilding and the construction of a new extension in the 1980s, the centre opened a clinic in 1995, meaning more animals could be seen to and treated in emergencies at any time of the day or night. Since then, Bristol Dogs and Cats Home has opened its own charity shop on East Street in Bedminster and established a small animal unit in 2010 for the likes of rabbits, mice and ferrets. Work did not slow down at all for the centre last year – it re-homed 572 dogs, cats and small animals, performed 1,409 operations, undertook 4,536 consultations and 350 people volunteered their time at the centre. A further 130 years on and the Bristol Dogs and Cats Home continues to come to the rescue and help protect Bristol’s furry friends... ■ • To find out about adopting animals, volunteering or fundraising visit rspca-bristol.org.uk 56 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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We defy anyone who visits the home today not to fall hopelessly in love with at least one of the residents


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WILD BRISTOL

UPTOWN GULLS Bristol is one of Britain’s top spots for city ‘seagulls’ – Pete Dommett thinks we should learn to love them... đ&#x;Žś

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t’s silly season in the tabloid press. With politicians off on their summer jollies, the red tops are starved of stories of any substance and so fill their column inches with news ‘lite’. The wildlife of the West Country usually offers up a hyperbolic headline or two: ‘Maneating sharks spotted off Cornwall’; ‘Swarms of deadly jellyfish attack swimmers’; or ‘Evil seagulls terrorise town’. This last one might strike a chord. We have a lot of gulls in Bristol (gulls being the proper name for this avian family – there’s no such thing as a seagull) and they’re not exactly well loved. While gulls snatching ice-creams from the hands of terrified tourists is (thankfully) a rare sight on our streets, we’ve all seen them raiding the bins and making a noisy nuisance of themselves on our rooftops. The city council has spent millions trying to get rid of them, but Bristol is still home to one of the biggest urban gull colonies in the UK, with an estimated 2,500 breeding pairs of birds. So why have they relocated from coastal cliffs to live in the city?

...Warmer temperatures in built-up areas help town-loving gulls get a headstart in the race to reproduce... Most people might assume that it’s all about food. And yes, gulls will happily devour last night’s discarded doners, but Peter Rock – who has been studying Bristol’s gulls for nearly 40 years and is the country’s foremost authority on urban populations – tells me that our junk food is just a grab-and-go snack for them too. “To find more nutritious fare,� says Peter, “the gulls of Bristol go further afield.� An ongoing scheme conducted by Peter and the University of

Maybe it’s time we viewed these birds in a softer light – this one seems kind of sweet, doesn’t it...?

Lesser black-backed gulls like this one outnumber herring gulls – image courtesy of Peter Rock

Bristol, monitoring urban gulls fitted with GPS trackers, shows that they roam up to 30km outside the city into the surrounding countryside in search of a proper meal. Peter believes that what the birds forage for on farmland is far more nourishing, which is particularly important during the nesting season. And it’s for better breeding sites that gulls have been increasingly drawn to urban landscapes. Peter points out that the flat roofs of city offices and warehouses provide perfect substitutes for cliff-top crags and ledges. He also explains to me that warmer temperatures in built-up areas help town-loving gulls get a headstart in the race to reproduce and fewer predators means that they successfully raise more young. Take a moment this month to look for Bristol’s two main species. Lesser black-backed gulls (with dark grey wings and yellow legs) outnumber more familiar herring gulls (with pale grey wings and pink legs) by about two to one. Both birds can be seen around the harbourside (outside the Arnolfini is a good place to sit and watch them) and the upper level of the multi-storey on Trenchard Street provides an ideal platform from which to spot nests. You might well find one of the many gulls that Peter has fitted with a coloured legring (pictured above). In September, they’ll clear off for a couple of months, leaving the city decidedly quieter. Some soak up the sun in southern Europe, while more simply disperse to other parts of the UK. But they’ll soon be back. Come Christmas, Bristol’s gulls are parading about their rooftop territories again, pairing up and repairing nests in time for the new breeding season. Maybe it’s time we viewed these much-maligned birds in a softer light – they’re attractive, intelligent, adaptable, endlessly entertaining and ever-resourceful. ■• You can find out more about Bristol University’s urban gull study at uva-bits.nl

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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

FAMILY PLANNER What’s on in Bristol for little ones to enjoy this month?

Hoo-Ha! Festival, Colston Hall, Tuesday 15 – Thursday 17 August, times vary Fun for all the family is the name of the game at Colston Hall’s three-day summer festival. Dick and Dom will be bringing their usual dose of mayhem and mischief, while Lost and Found theatre explores the magical world of Moominvalley. Free activities in the foyer include the Junior Jungle Rave, face painting and an inflatable planetarium. Plus, you won’t want to miss Colston Hall’s 150th birthday bash, complete with disco lights, party games and tunes from DJ Cheeba. Ticket prices vary. • colstonhall.org

Top pick...

Mischief makers Dick and Dom come to Colston Hall’s Hoo-Ha! festival

DON’T MISS... Summer Family Fun, Blaise Castle, Wednesday 2 August – Wednesday 30 August, 11am – 3pm There’s plenty to keep young ones entertained at Blaise this summer, including a dressing up day, Victorian paper doll making, story writing with author Rachel Carter, weaving and more – plus an exciting visit from Avon Fire and Rescue Service! Meanwhile, the grown-ups can enjoy the splendour of Blaise’s 18th-century historic exhibitions, including the Roman Villa and Picture Room. Suitable for ages 3 – 10. Entrance is free, donations welcome; bristolmuseums.org.uk

Summer Art Attack! Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, Wednesday 16 August, 10am – 4pm Have you ever wondered what a museum looks like behind the scenes? Well now’s your The circus is coming to ss Great Britain!

Bristol Academy of Drama hosts summer workshops and term-time courses

chance to find out, as this summer Bristol Museum is opening its doors to creative youngsters eager to explore the objects and artefacts on show. Inspired by the museum’s fabulous collections, they can then create their own work of art, achieving a ‘Discover’ Arts Award certificate in the process. Suitable for ages 8 – 13. Tickets cost £25, including certificate; bristolmuseums.org.uk

The Lost World, The Old Town Quarry, Monday 28 August, 3pm Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic adventure story comes to Weston-Super-Mare for one night only this month, in an exciting show from Illyria Theatre complete with life-size dinosaurs. Four intrepid explorers travel to an uncharted plateau in South America and discover flora and fauna beyond their wildest dreams, as well as terrifying dinosaurs previously believed to be extinct. But once their camera breaks, the only way to prove they saw the monsters is to bring them back to London... Tickets from £9 to £13, £38 for a family of four or £45 for a family of five; illyria.uk.com

Victorian Summer Circus, ss Great Britain, until Sunday 3 September, times vary The circus is coming to town! On board the iconic ss Great Britain, a Victorian circus will be entertaining families, thanks to Bristolbased contemporary company Cirque Bijou. Inspired by the ship’s history and voyages, the original and impressive performances can be enjoyed every day throughout the summer holidays, alongside free circus workshops in Brunel Square from 12pm – 4pm. Entrance from £8 to £14, free for carers or under-4s; ssgreatbritain.org

Jurassic Shark!, Bristol Aquarium, until Sunday 3 September, 10am – 5pm Celebrate the masters of evolution with Bristol Aquarium’s shark-themed summer events. Discover how these masterful creatures have thrived from the distant past to the present day, watch fish dissections, dig for ‘prehistoric’ specimens, touch real shark teeth and watch them at feeding time – just don’t get too close! Tickets from £9.75 to £14.75; bristolaquarium.co.uk

Bristol Academy of Drama Sessions, BS8 1SR, every Saturday from 9 September, 9am – 11am Bristol Academy of Drama’s term time Saturday sessions offer students the chance to play drama games and learn many different theatre styles, from puppetry to shadow theatre, building to a final performance. Next term will see a retelling of James and the Giant Peach in February. Style-specific one day workshops and weeklong workshops are also available during the holidays. Suitable for ages 7 – 12. Fees are £150 per term; bristolacademydrama.wixsite.com

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TRAVEL

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TRAVEL

CORNISH COOL How does the idea of a sleek seaside paradise, complete with private cave, grab you? We thought so. Then consider getting away from it all at a very special property in St Ives...

Opposite page, clockwise from top left: There’s little between you and the deep blue, once you throw those curtains wide and fling open the double doors; sink into the bath, champers in hand, for a moment of ultimate decadence; the Eastern influences in the bathroom and bedroom blend beautifully with the elegant seaside chic of the lounge; we love the textured granite walls and stylish monochrome artworks; descend to the private cave – a fantastically unique feature – for a real sense of escape

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e’re all for the staycation – the only hesitation ever lying, inevitably, in what kind of wildcard the English weather might see fit to fling onto the table. Of course, one way to combat this variable is to book accommodation so ruddy gorgeous that you couldn’t care a jot if Zeus himself swooped down and conjured a meteorological horror show before your eyes. Enter Beachspoke and their boutique boltholes in beautiful British locations; namely Cornwall and the Cotswolds. Mighty impressed by the imagery online, we arrange a twonight stay at the sleek-sounding Black Moon – a onebedroom bayside apartment in St Ives, promising close-up sea views, and its own private cave, no less. The parking reserved for guests, a few steps down the road, is a godsend we realise, as we negotiate – snail-like – the tiny, twisting, beach-town roads that make up the final part of our journey from Bristol. Every bit the noisy tourists with our shiny cases rumbling down the street, we pass quaintly named cottages nodding to their harbourside heritage as we make our way to the seafront, where our accommodation is enviably positioned. But it’s the smell of incense, rather than catch-of-the-day, that first drifts up our noses as we pass the pottery shops, galleries and other crafty outlets very much at home in their uber-arty town, known historically for enticing creatives like Barbara Hepworth and Virginia Woolfe – whose novel To The Lighthouse was inspired by the view of Godrevy Lighthouse. Not far from a little residence selling houseleeks on its garden wall, we spot the door to our place – set in a charming, unassuming frontage. Yet, a turn of the key later, when the apartment comes into view, it’s a different story. Because while ‘sexy’ isn’t necessarily the first word we’d think to pair with a British seaside scene, Black Moon’s openplan interior – with big glass doors framing the ocean and opening straight out to it, if we don’t count the stretch of sandy beach a few metres below us – is. Seriously so. Think textured granite walls illuminated by subtle spotlighting; contemporary art works in chic mono; gorgeous handcrafted silver and earthenware in the kitchen; carved stone candlesticks ostensibly teleported from the boudoir of an ancient goddess. The elegant seaside vibe of the lounge – pristine white sofa with cotton throws and fat velvet cushions in oceanic blues and greens; coffee table chiselled from rock into a seashell design and decorated with ornaments in various other organic materials – blends surprisingly beautifully with the decadent Eastern influence of the bedroom, which makes the place really stand out. We fall instantly for the super-kingsize custom-made bed featuring oriental scenes etched on its dark wooden frame – and gleefully fall onto it to admire a nearby ornate chest and huge antique mirror in distressed gold. Sitting on the lounge floor – doors wide open, legs pendulous above the rocks, and nothing between us and our corner of the sea, bar the mugs of tea resting in our laps – we find ourselves switching off more swiftly than ever before. Soon enough, rumbling stomachs interrupt the reverie, reminding us it’s dinner time, and in record time we find ourselves a feed, thanks to Cornish Catch. Naturally, our

first hankering is for traditional fish and chips; but then we see the menu on the little truck set up beside the sea wall, featuring the likes of crab linguini and fresh mackerel salad – best devoured, we find, where the surf hits the shore, and already restaurant-quality just a month after being launched by tanned, twinkly-eyed young chefs Rob Newsome and Christian Perry. After a little Netflix and chill (see original definition) back at home, we descend the steps leading down from the trapdoor in the lounge, to make-believe we’re smugglers in our cave. Lighting up the bejewelled candlesticks – smugglers’ treasure, mind – curling up on the sprawling, furry throws softening the rocky surfaces, we crack on with a cosy game of cards before the complimentary bubbly kicks in and the vibe turns to ‘gentle cave rave a deux’. Nothing brings the outside in here quite as much as this inspired feature – rusty boat chains, driftwood and all – designed to offer unique and memorable moments of relaxation. Usually ‘sea sounds: eight hours’ is our go-to YouTube search when having trouble sleeping but, come bedtime, there’s no need with the real thing right outside – the sound of the inbound tide proving wonderfully soothing, especially with the sliding bedroom mirror-door kept open so we can see out across the water when we wake. Tearing ourselves away from said view when morning breaks, we collect a couple of fresh almond croissants from the grocer’s a few minutes’ walk away, and opt for a stroll around the reopened Tate Gallery – although weaving through the alleys en route with an ice cream is a challenge worthy of Tom Cruise, due to eagle-eyed gulls with frighteningly evolved strategems. We seek a meal uninterrupted at the Rum and Crab Shack – enjoying a 1960s soundtrack, friendly service and sensational fresh crab tacos, washed down with cocktails while we sit in an alcove overlooking the harbour, where youngsters race down to the water in their wetsuits. Heading back along the beach, to allow for a splash about in the crystal blue-green waters, and a wonderful encounter with tiny terriers Teddy, Bob, Lily and Ruby – forget people watching, we’re all about the pup-perving – we decide that catching a boat to Seal Island is the best use of our afternoon. While they aren’t basking on the rocks in their hundreds, as our friendly driver informs us they often can be, we spot plenty bobbing their heads up and down in the water and looking blankly at us in answer to daft requests for a rendition of Kiss From a Rose. Invigorated after all that sea air, it’s back to Black Moon for a long, hot bath of ultimate decadence, surrounded by all that granite and gold, and an artistic ensemble of shining sea shells dangling prettily from the ceiling – to take note of precisely how relaxed we feel before we head back to the city and undo it all. Exceptionally elegant and well thought out, with plenty of personality and one of the loveliest locations you could wish for, Black Moon is, hands down, the best place we’ve stayed in Cornwall. Bally good job, Beachspoke. ■

• beachspoke.com

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BRISTOL UPDATES BITE-SIZED BUSINESS NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY

TOAST TO A NEW PARTNERSHIP

Chris Milton with Commander Tim Berry of HMS Somerset

SETTING THE WHEELS IN MOTION

CONGRATULATIONS!

Partners from law firm Clarke Willmott LLP have completed a 100-mile charity bike ride in Bristol. Kate Gardner, Kevin Jones, Simon Thomas and chief executive Stephen Rosser took part in the Break the Cycle challenge in support of the Bristol Rugby Community Foundation. Break the Cycle is a primary source of funding for the Bristol Rugby Community Foundation and helps fund several programmes including one working with young people with special education needs and disabilities, as well as a project encouraging girls to get involved in ladies’ rugby. The team, which comprised of partners from both the Bristol and Taunton offices, raised a total of £800 for the charity. “Despite the hot conditions it was a beautiful ride and great to have been able to raise money for such an important charity as the Bristol Rugby Community Foundation,” said Kate Gardner. “We look forward to taking part again next year.”

Stuart Merry, customer service technician for Crest Nicholson’s South West region, has won the gold award in the Customer Service of The Year category at the company’s Customer Experience Awards. The gold award in the customer service category is presented to the employee who contributes to initiatives to improve customer satisfaction and gains the highest customer satisfaction scores based on feedback from Crest Nicholson customers. “I am really proud to have won this award, it’s wonderful to be recognised for my work with customers,” said Stuart. “The whole team in the Crest Nicholson South West region is committed to providing great customer service to everyone who comes through our door, and making the buying experience seamless for all of our future residents.” Stephen Stone, chief executive, added: “We host these awards to recognise our employees’ ongoing commitment to delivering first-class customer service. It’s an opportunity to celebrate the hard work and talent within our business.”

• clarkewillmott.com

• crestnicholson.com

Thatchers Cider and HMS Somerset have teamed up to promote the county of Somerset and bring a few home comforts to everyone on board ship. Chris Milton, off-trade and export sales director at Thatchers Cider, presented a Thatchers branded ‘RAS’ (Replenish At Sea) flag to Commander Tim Berry of HMS Somerset at a reception for 100 local dignitaries recently, while the ship was docked at Avonmouth. Chris had met members of the crew at a Yeovil Town football match in February and Commander Tim had asked if Thatchers would be prepared to make a flag that the ship could fly when replenishing at sea, or in and out of selected ports. Tim is Somerset born, bred and schooled, having attended Richard Huish School in Taunton; his grandfather having been a farmer in Chard and even made his own cider. Tim especially loves Thatchers Cider and is doing as much as he can, as captain of the ship named after his county of birth, to promote the county. The Petty Officers mess has also been ‘Thatcherised’ with glassware, drip mats and bar runners, after 30 of the officers and crew came for a tour of Myrtle Farm, to see the production process for the cider-makers’ tipple Thatchers Haze. “We have been absolutely delighted to team up with HMS Somerset and we hope that our relationship will flourish over coming months and years,” said Chris. “We supported the crew in the Royal Navy Beach Fires Rugby Tournament on 19 July, when the Thatchers logo featured on their shirts. We are proud to be on board HMS Somerset, and wish everyone safe travels.” HMS Somerset was ordered in June 1994 and has her home at the Port of Devonport just west of Plymouth. She is named after the Dukedom of Somerset and is the fourth ship named after the county to serve in the Royal Navy – the previous three all in service in the 18th century.

• thatcherscider.co.uk

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CITY | BUSINESS

SELF-EMPLOYMENT: WHAT ARE MY RIGHTS? SAMANTHA CASTLE

If you’re considering going freelance or setting up your own business, it’s useful to understand your employment rights. Samantha Castle, Senior Associate at Barcan+Kirby, has some advice for the budding self-employed.

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his month The Resolution Foundation – the think tank for improving standards of living – recommended that the government extend the minimum wage to self-employed workers. This raises an important question – what rights do the selfemployed have versus those in contracted employment? Currently the self-employed pay lower taxes in the form of National Insurance, but lack the rights or protection afforded to employees. In Bristol, 12% of workers are self-employed, including freelancers, contractors and small business owners. It’s a lifestyle that suits many people – with the chance to be your own boss, work the hours you want and, depending on the industry, even earn more money.

Discrimination rights Before going solo, it’s beneficial to know that the self-employed have the same rights as employees when it comes to discrimination. This relates to age, gender, marital status, disability, nationality and even pregnancy. If you’re self-employed, you won’t have access to a HR department or manager – so if there are instances of discrimination and it’s damaging your opportunities for work, contact a solicitor to act on your behalf.

Sickness & holiday pay If you’re self-employed, you’re not eligible for statutory sick pay. The same applies to holiday pay. However, if you work for a client that classes you as an employee or worker, you may be eligible for both sick and holiday pay at the same rate as an employee.

Umbrella Companies – are they useful? Another thing to consider before becoming self-employed is how you’ll be paid. Broadly speaking you have two options: becoming a director of your own limited company, or being paid through an Umbrella Company. There are benefits to both, but using an Umbrella Company essentially makes you an employee and makes you eligible for employee-related benefits, such as paid holiday and sick pay.

Pension and long-term planning Being self-employed excludes you from joining a workplace pension scheme, but you’re still entitled to the state pension – assuming you’ve paid the necessary National Insurance contributions. If you’re aiming for a bigger pension pot at retirement, you’ll need to make additional pension arrangements through a private plan. There are other benefits that you might want to consider – for example, if you’re pregnant and self-employed, you’re entitled to Maternity Allowance (MA). This is paid to those who have worked for 26 of the 66 weeks leading up to the baby’s due date and earn more than £30 a week.

Further information If you’re considering taking the plunge, being aware of your rights and benefits will help you make a more informed choice about whether selfemployment is right for you. n If you have any questions, or you’d like to speak to Samantha Castle, you can contact her at s.castle@barcankirby.co.uk or on 0117 325 2929. www.barcankirby.co.uk

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Sharp Family Law fp August.qxp_Layout 23 20/07/2017 14:39 Page 1

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

PROTECTING THE BANK OF MUM & DAD By Madison Fowler, Sharp Family Law –Bristol and Bath Solicitors. Protecting what matters most

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ecent research showed that more than a quarter of UK mortgages are subsidised by the buyer’s parents – the so-called ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’.

Enabling your children to get on the property ladder can be one of the greatest and most meaningful gifts that a parent can give. Often it is given to help a son or daughter buy a house with their partner. But relationships aren’t always stable, and when your son/daughter’s relationship breaks down, the joint properties will need to be divided, and gifts from parents can often become part of the matrimonial pot. This means that their ex-partner could potentially leave with some of your money – definitely not what was intended! Protecting your contribution The Bank of Mum and Dad is the ninth largest mortgage provider in the UK – but without the same protections as a major bank. So how do you protect family contributions when relationships breakdown? If your son/daughter is cohabiting When it comes to property, cohabiting (unmarried) couples are reliant on land and

trust law to sort out any disputes, and because these laws were never designed for the specific needs of cohabitants, the outcome of a relationship breakdown is often uncertain. With this in mind, it can stave off future conflict, and legal costs, if the couple’s intentions regarding the property are clearly recorded. Consider a Cohabitation Agreement – a private contract between the parties setting out in what proportion the property is owned, on what basis it will be held, and what the parties will do with the property if their relationship were to break down.

kids born, it will be far more likely that the pre-nup terms will be enforced than if they had been married for 30 years after and had three kids. Therefore it is advisable to review your pre-nups periodically. At Sharp Family Law, we are experienced in dealing with the emotional and practical complexities of relationship breakdown, and so we simply cannot overstate the value of taking early steps to prevent disputes arising where possible. Please feel free to contact us for further information and assistance with preparing formal documents to protect your contribution - giving both you and your son/daughter peace of mind for the future.

If your son/daughter is getting married Madison Fowler

Consider suggesting instead a Prenuptial Agreement (commonly known as a “prenup”). These are contracts made in advance of a marriage (preferably 28 days in advance!) between the two parties getting married, and here again you can record your contributions to the family home and how it will be divided in future. Pre-nups are not automatically enforceable in UK law – but they are highly persuasive factors when taken together with the other circumstances of the relationship. For example: if your son/daughter gets divorced two years after signing the pre-nup with no

26 Orchard Street, Bristol, BS1 5EH email: info@sharpfamilylaw.com t: 01179 055 055 website: www.sharpfamilylaw.com

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Motoring Bristol BMW 4.qxp_Layout 1 21/07/2017 14:54 Page 1

MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

MORE FOUR More dynamic, more agile and more comfortable than its predecessors, the new BMW 4 Series Coupé has been meticulously updated. With a thrilling blend of elegant design and breathtaking performance, there’s not much you can find fault with Words by Chris Lilly

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or many years BMW has made an excellent mid-sized coupé, and the 4 Series only adds to that heritage. Due to increasingly stiff competition, however, it has recently received a refresh, sprucing up the winning formula to make sure the new 4 Series continues to compete in a tough market. Based on the 3 Series, many of the 4 Series’ core strengths are shared by its more famous executive saloon stablemate. BMW’s famously excellent driving dynamics shine through, as does the 3 Series’ practicality, making the 4 Series more spacious than you might think. Add to that a flexibility which means you can have one of many different 4 Series configurations, and it would take an overly fussy buyer to not be tempted by a 3 or 4 Series. As many will know, the 3 Series has the saloon and estate markets covered, which leaves us to concentrate on the 4. Removing two doors from a 3 Series and adding a more rakish roofline, BMW created the 4 Series. Lopping that roofline off altogether created the 4 Series Convertible. Bizarrely, add two doors back into the 4 Series design and you don’t return to a 3 Series, but you get a 4 Series Gran Coupé – it’s confusing but it ultimately makes sense. Finally, hand the coupe and convertible over to the German manufacturer’s fearsome M Division, and you get the M4 – a supercarbaiting über-BMW. The M4 is a fearsome machine; brutal in its acceleration, aggressive in its braking, and pin-sharp in its handling. As driving machines go, there are few that can match it, and you often have to look at less practical alternatives to challenge its point-to-point ability. However, the M4 is both too expensive and a slight overkill for many buyers, and the 4 Series excels most in the more attainable reaches of the model line-up. One of the best-selling models is the 420d M Sport, which is the pick of the trim levels. The 420d coupe will get from zero to 62mph in a perfectly reasonable 7.3 seconds, yet returns 62.8 MPG, offering a great blend of affordability and pace. Of course, top-down motoring and five-door hatchback wrapping is available with the Convertible and Gran Coupé respectively, but however you surround yourself and fellow occupants, the 420d M Sport is one of the best BMWs on offer. The engine has plenty of torque on tap and pulls smoothly from low revs. It’s released at motorway cruising speeds, and the supple yet precise handling offers plenty of feedback and an enjoyable drive down twisty roads. In terms of design, the 4 Series looks good in any body style, having enough about it to prevent the range from being too fashionable – and therefore subject to looking dated in just a few years’ time. Design is an essential part of coupé ownership – or for convertible and salooncoupé buyers – as the cars need to look stylish. It’s the main reason for their existence, after all. BMW does this well, though the 4 Series is improved with the addition of the M Sport styling pack, giving it an extra hint of menace. The 4 Series’ engine range is a good ’un too. The 420d offers 190hp and 400 Nm of torque, with a slick six-speed manual transmission putting power to the road via the rear wheels. If you live in the region’s more rural parts, BMW’s xDrive four-wheel drive system is available across the 4 Series range. The superb eight-speed automatic is available in various 4 Series configurations too, improving efficiency and making driving in traffic easier.

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If you need more power but still want decent running costs, the 453d is a great pick, and comes with xDrive as standard alongside a 4.7 second 0-62mph time. More powerful still, the M4 will drop that sprint time down to a low of 4.1 seconds with the Competition Package specification. It’s the most popular M4 on offer, and rightly so. A power boost to 450hp, sharper styling, added kit, and tweaked suspension result in one of the best driver’s cars around. Petrol engines are rarer to see on the roads, but there are some good options nonetheless. The 420i is a strong entry-level petrol, but it can’t match its diesel alternative in many aspects of ownership. Pick the 430i or 440i models though, and you effectively have a demi-M4. This is especially the case with the 3.0 litre straight six 440i, which harks back to some of BMW’s greatest engines, and offers a unit configuration rarely seen these days. Dynamically speaking, the 4 Series is a good car to drive, but it’s also fairly comfortable. The agile suspension means you can easily use the 4 Series every day. This allows drivers to make the most of the spacious interior too, with the 4 Series able to seat four adults occasionally – more than can be said of some of its rivals – and not shake everyone about. It’s not especially spacious in the back seats, of course, but if you want greater practicality the 4 Gran Coupé is on offer. Buyers will get an interior that looks pretty good, but which can’t compete with the likes of Audi’s A5 in terms of design. That said, it’s nicely laid out, feels solidly built, and comes well equipped. BMW’s iDrive infotainment system is one of the best around, and comes as standard with sat-nav and DAB radio. Options include a larger screen, head-up display, top quality Harmon Kardon stereo, and driver assist systems. BMW’s updates have been minor but carried out throughout the car. The design front and rear have been tweaked, adding LED lights and revised bumpers to sharpen the looks a little. The changes are subtle to say the least, and you will have to compare a 2016 car to a 2017 model to really see the difference, but the overall effect works and hasn’t ruined the 4 Series’ looks. Under the skin, the changes take on more significance. The previously mentioned excellent driving dynamics are an improvement on the pre-update model – already setting a high standard – as BMW have given the 4 Series a wider track, revised suspension, and improved traction control settings. We’re getting into highly technical areas now, but essentially the new 4 Series has a lower centre of gravity and provides higher levels of grip than before, both off the line and when cornering. BMW has made the best handling car in its class better still. There are few negative points to cover, nonetheless. For example, the 4 Series lacks in terms of interior design and overall refinement when compared to some rivals. It can quickly become expensive too, so potential buyers should be sure to specify options with care. However, the BMW is the best overall package for a lot of people. Rivals might be more comfortable, offer greater levels of kit, be more economical, or look sharper, but none cover as many bases as the 4 Series. It’s priced from £32,130. Class-leading driving dynamics combine with other attributes that are close to the best in class, even if not the best outright, to provide an overall package that is outstanding. ■ • bmw.co.uk


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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

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HEALTH & FITNESS

SACRED HEALING Emma Payne enjoys an energising afternoon with Sacred Therapy Yoga

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nce thought of as the seemingly unorthodox pastime of hippies and new-age types, yoga is now a mainstay on gym timetables; ubiquitous among young and old fitness buffs alike. Widely recognised for its physical and mental health benefits, it appears in many forms, from traditional Hatha or Iyengar to yogalates, ‘doga’ and ‘broga’ (yoga for dogs and blokes, naturally). There’s a class on every corner in every suburb of our great city, with seemingly very little to tell between them – I, for one, have done my fair share of sun salutations and tree poses in village halls, parks and studios. From the outset, Sacred Therapy Yoga promises something different to the norm. Based on Kundalini, the ‘mother of yoga’, each class fuses meditation, chanting, breath work and traditional physical poses. Teacher Michelle Henderson is a savvy, spiritual yogi, who explains her interest in fusing ‘spirit and science’ in her lessons when we meet – something she knows a great deal about, given her current neuroscience and psychology studies at King’s College London. Eager to give it a go, I make a beeline for leafy Clifton, where Michelle holds her Sunday classes in the bright, top floor space of Clifton Library. The room is quiet, save for some ambient music, and I immediately start to feel the stress of the working week fading away. Our session is rather enigmatically titled ‘Opportunity and Green Energy Set for Prosperity’, which Michelle assures us will open our hearts and help us to attract new opportunities. Bring it on, I say… Comfortably settled on our mats, we begin with a simple chant to get the energy flowing, before moving into some spinal flexes and finishing with a ‘body lock’ – a technique of tensing and drawing the lower abdomen upwards. So far, so relaxing (despite my dodgy singing, of course). Things start to heat up with a series of ‘body drops’, where we use our arms alone to propel our bodies up and back down onto the ground. I, embarrassingly, fail to get my feet up off the floor, though the class is so laid-back that I find myself laughing with everyone else rather

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than worrying about my terrible fitness levels. One of the common misconceptions about yoga is that it’s not ‘fastpaced’, and therefore unlikely to be enough of a physical workout. Well, I challenge anyone to maintain three minutes of ‘crow pose’ – a deep squat with arms out straight and fingers interlocked – without feeling the burn. I huff, puff and tremble, attempting to master ‘fire breathing’ (a surprisingly demanding technique involving forceful nasal exhalation – Michelle describes it playfully as ‘blowing a candle out with your nose’). With the support of Michelle, who delivers the session in an upbeat yet peaceful manner, we make it through a series of increasingly demanding postures, interspersed with serene moments of meditative chanting. Keeping an open mind during the latter is essential, as is leaving your inhibitions at the door – whether you believe in spiritual energies or not, there is something undeniably peaceful in the sounds that wash over us. Like any physical activity, you get out what you put into yoga, and as the class draws to a close, I feel increasingly refreshed and energised. Michelle calmly instructs us to lie back on our mats for a period of rest, and there’s no need to tell me twice as I roll over, clutching my water bottle, before (legitimately) dozing off. With such a range of yoga classes on offer in Bristol, Michelle’s approach is refreshingly authentic, well-informed and, providing you’re able to stay awake for the walk home, a perfect workout for both mind and body – but don’t expect an easy ride!

• Sacred Therapy Yoga classes take place on Sundays from 4 – 5.15pm at Clifton Village Library, and Thursdays 7.30 – 9pm at The Alma Vale Centre. Sessions are £9 each or £40 for a block of five; sacredtherapyyoga.com


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s p i l r e full

Lip Fillers have become very popular recently, and many more woman and men are starting to see how simple lip enhancing treatment can dramatically transform your overall look. Lip Fillers are created with Hyaluronic Acid, which naturally occurs in our bodies in liquid form, making the product perfectly safe for use in lip augmentation. They can enhance the silhouette of your face, and smooth out fine lines and wrinkles around the mouth.

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Congenital breast problems and the possible solutions M

s Elena Prousskaia is a Consultant Plastic Surgeon at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield, who performs breast reconstruction surgery for breast cancer patients, but also for women with forms of congenital breast pathology. Elena is keen to raise awareness of this latter group of patients who are born with breast anomalies, and tell us about the treatments that are available to correct these conditions.

deformities, which can actually be resolved very successfully. I often have consultations with young girls who come with their parents after researching online to find a surgeon who specialises in breast asymmetry or the correction of a condition known as ‘tuberous breast’. Many of them tell me the difficulty they have experienced in simply finding a specialist for this particular problem, and information online can sometimes be controversial, as well as being confusing for the patients.

Elena, why did you decide to tell us about this particular problem? Elena: There is already a lot of public awareness about breast reconstruction for breast cancer patients. In my role as a patron of the breast cancer charity Keeping Abreast, I often deliver talks for patients who are looking at reconstruction following a mastectomy. However, when I see patients in my clinic, I realise just how little information is available about other breast 70 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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It must be very difficult for a young girl to discover that there is something wrong with her body. Would it be fair to say that when they come to you they are quite upset? Elena: Most of them tell me very similar stories, about how they started to realise in their early teens that their bodies may be different to those of other girls, and how it affected their confidence. Unfortunately,

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some of them do not feel they can share how they feel with their parents or friends, and they may not have a partner to confide in as they feel uncomfortable being undressed, or going to the beach. Their quality of life and personal happiness can be severely affected. What is the most common form of congenital breast pathology that you see in your clinic? Elena: The two that I see most frequently are breast asymmetry and tuberous breasts. Congenital breast asymmetry is the term given when a girl has developed two breasts of different size and shape. Tuberous, or tubular, breasts are when the breasts have developed in an incorrect shape, with a very narrow base and excessively large areola. It is called “tuberous” because it is similar in shape to a tube, instead of the normal teardrop breast shape.


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Is the surgery required to correct this type of problem complicated? How many operations might these patients need to restore their breasts to a more “normal” shape? Elena: Asymmetrical breasts can be corrected with a single operation. I always explain to the patient that the most important thing is to make them equal in terms of volume of breast tissue and skin. Once I have created a good match, the shape can be improved with breast tissue remodelling techniques or implants of the same size, and it can all be done in one operation. With tuberous breasts it can be slightly more complex as the breast tissue and skin are sometimes severely constricted from the inside. In most cases I manage to release this hard tissue from inside and correct the volume with implants in one stage. Areola reduction is done on the same day. However, in some instances, I also need to insert “tissue expanders”, which work like a balloon to stretch the skin and breast tissue with regular inflation sessions where I add around 55cc of volume each time, by gently stretching the tissue. This will sometimes be done over the course of a few months. Once a desired size of skin pocket is reached, I proceed with the second stage whereby I exchange the tissue expander for the breast implant, and perform further breast tissue remodelling to give the patient their desired shape and volume. These cases can be quite challenging, but ultimately also satisfying to see the change. Public opinion about plastic surgery nowadays is that it is mostly about vanity. When these patients come back to see you for follow up appointments, what do they tell you about the difference this surgery has made to their life? Elena: Before surgery, both the patient and their family can be quite anxious regarding the whole situation. After surgery, the patients have an air of confidence about them that they lacked before, which is very similar to what I see in patients after reconstructive surgery for breast cancer. As a surgeon I find this part of my work very rewarding.

Consultant Plastic, Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgeon, Ms Elena Prousskaia

Important questions to ask before Cosmetic Surgery At Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield, we work with professionals in all areas of Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery, and believe in giving our patients the individual attention they need and deserve throughout their treatment journey. To achieve the best results from any type of plastic surgery, it is important to do your research first. Here are some tips for what to ask before surgery. • Who will I see at my consultation? This should be your surgeon. After your consultation, you should also have a 'cooling off' period before your operation of at least two weeks to ensure you really have time to think through your decision. • What are the surgeon’s qualifications? Check your surgeon is on the GMC specialist register for plastic surgery in the UK. If your surgeon has a further qualification in plastic surgery you will see FRCS (Plast) after their name. Ideally surgeons will belong to one of the professional organisations: the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS) or the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS). Your anaesthetist should also be listed on the GMC specialist register.

well as what they can. Be wary of surgeons who say they have never had a complication. • Can I see before and after photographs? Not all patients want to be featured on websites, but most surgeons will have photographs of patients. However, ensure they are the surgeon’s actual patients. You may also be able to speak to previous patients about their experience. • Where will I have my procedure? This should be the hospital or clinic you are seen in. Having surgery close to home makes follow up care more convenient. Anywhere you have surgery should be registered with the health regulator, the Care Quality Commission. • What will my recovery be like? Ask about the typical recovery period, so you can plan time off work and childcare, if needed. Ask about bruising, swelling, and any specialist garments you need. Find out if they are supplied by the hospital or if you should bring them with you. • How much will my surgery cost? Ask if everything is included in the price, including your Consultant and anaesthetist’s charges, medications, dressings, and after-care.

• Is the surgeon and the hospital fully insured in case anything goes wrong? All Nuffield Health surgeons are fully insured, as are Nuffield Health hospitals. Any necessary revision surgery should be free. If you have surgery at Nuffield Health, post-surgery complications will be treated free of charge, without a specific time limit. • What is the surgeon’s experience in performing my procedure? Your surgeon should specialise in the type of surgery you are interested in, and perform your specific operation at least once a month. They should also be able to describe back to you what you have asked for, and tell you what they can’t achieve as

Nuffield Health is the UK’s largest not-forprofit healthcare organisation, reinvesting all of its profit in expert staff, technology, and facilities for the patients. For more information about the full range of Cosmetic and Plastic Surgery available at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield, visit www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol/ cosmetic-surgery or call 0117 911 5339 to book an appointment.

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN Tel: 0117 911 5339 • www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

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HEALTH & FITNESS

ELECTRIC FEEL We head to Clifton in search of the Bodystreet buzz

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n the past, the excuses I have given myself not to exercise have been wide, varied and sometimes, quite frankly, preposterous. However most of the genuine reasons I’ve had for wanting to skip a gym session have centred around not having enough time. Time is the most valuable commodity of all and we all know the feeling of not having enough of it in the day to get round to doing everything we want to do, so when I heard of a fitness studio in Bristol offering a workout that, by utilising EMS technology, takes only 20 minutes to complete, I headed over to find out more. EMS technology is big news in the fitness world but if, like me, you haven’t heard of it before then you can be forgiven as currently there are only handful of studios in the country that are offering it. Worldwide though, it seems this fitness style is not a craze, but a veritable success. EMS stands for electric muscle stimulation and sees electrodes placed at various points over the body, meaning a workout involving a variety of familiar strengthening exercises and poses becomes all the more effective due to the electric current stimulating the muscles. If this sounds a little out of your comfort zone, do not fear; the “buzz” starts off as a tingling sensation that can be adjusted to each individual and is increased only gradually with the guidance of your trainer. While I was intrigued, I felt that in order to get a proper assessment, I needed to take someone who was borderline sceptical and so recruited J, a willing participant. As he went through an initial consultation with his trainer for the session, Kieron, I tried to extract from owners Andrew and Christa who their typical client is – only to find that clients range in age 72 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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from 18 to 79, all with varying degrees of fitness. A common thread, however, is the desire to condense the time spent working out into a manageable 20-minute block. And these sessions certainly are efficient; with each so effective that they are the equivalent of three or four sessions in a gym, there is only one needed per week.

Electrodes are placed on the body to up your maximum output

With the assessment completed, it was time for the workout to begin. J changed into workout clothes provided for him – shorts and a top in a lightweight fabric and a vest containing the electrodes to be placed over the body. During the 20 minutes, a variety of exercises, including lunges and squats among

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others, were performed, with each movement executed slowly and purposefully while the electrodes buzzed away to intensify the movement of the muscles. This is not a fastpaced workout, although undoubtedly effective, as J commented throughout the workout that his muscles were being worked far more than if the exercises were just carried out conventionally. The level of intensity can be decided between participant and trainer, who will ease off when needed or work with you to push you to your maximum output. Devotees of EMS fitness technology will tell you that the average session burns up to 500 calories per 20-minute block, with regular sessions working to reduce overall body fat percentage and even helping to speed up the metabolism. While further sessions would be needed to see the long-term benefits, it was clear from the taster session that the workout was enjoyable, effective and, most of all, extremely efficient – making it the perfect lunchtime or after-work exercise for someone who wants to make good use of the time they have. The studio provides the ultimate in convenience; and with the clothes you use, towel, and water all ready and waiting for you at the start of each session, it may be that we have finally run out of excuses… ■ • Bodystreet is currently offering free trial sessions (usually £19.99). Memberships start from £25 per week with only one session per week needed. For more information, contact or visit Bodystreet Clifton, 98 Whiteladies Rd, Bristol, BS8 2QY; 0117 422 8229; bodystreet.co.uk


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Why is Nutrition SO Confusing.? By Gemma Hurditch for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine).

igh fat, low fat, lots of whole grains, no grains - the contradictions can be a recipe for extreme confusion. Why are there so many conflicting dietary approaches for health and weight loss?

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The hypothesis may not have been checked, or only have been tested for a short time, yet the assumed link is perpetuated indefinitely. We were told that red wine saved French people from heart disease, now it’s thought it could be the cheese.

Research One of the issues raised is who funds nutrition research. Do they have something to gain from a particular outcome? When funded by industry, some research may favour the desired company outcome, such as finding that something is not harmful to us after all!

Can research ever be correct, if it’s also conflicting? Yes, in essence.

Even with independent research, other problems can crop up. For example, we were told that saturated fat was harmful to us, so is it ethical to feed a subject group high amounts of it in order to see whether it really is? Repeating the findings is another hurdle. Most of the research that we rely on is not as rigorously tested as we may think. It may be based on hypothesis from animal studies, small samples, or on observational studies. Observational studies are where researchers observe populations, document what they eat and the conditions they are susceptible to throughout life, and then make the assumption that the associations are causal.

Nutrigenomics Clues as to why some people do incredibly well on a particular diet while others feel tired and lethargic have begun to be uncovered by ‘nutrigenomics’, the study of how nutrients interact with our genes. It looks at the effect of certain nutrients on our individual gene expression, and how our genes determine our eating behaviour; whether we metabolise certain food chemicals quickly or slowly; if certain pathways of detoxification are compromised, and so on. The science is still in its infancy, but the evidence is 100% clear that our diet influences changes in our gene, protein and metabolite expression throughout our lifetime, starting with our conception and foetal development.

Ancient wisdom In summary, there is no ‘one size fits all’ diet or supplement regime to deliver excellent health. We are unique individuals with unique responses, a principle long-held by practitioners of the naturopathic approach to health. CNM’s Diploma in Naturopathic Nutrition is based on this principle, and combines up to date nutritional research with traditional skills. Students are taught to assess a client’s constitution by paying attention to physical signs and symptoms. They observe the body’s response using traditional methods such as rotation and elimination diets, and utilise appropriate testing. They then tailor-make an entirely personalised plan to help clients achieve their individual health, weight and wellness goals. It looks like the sea of scientific information is only now starting to catch up to the ancient wisdom that ‘what is food to one is to others bitter poison’. Gemma Hurditch

Whilst as human beings we share a very similar genetic makeup, we are all subject to ‘snips’. These are single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and they refer to common genetic variations amongst the population. Different ‘snips’ can result in extreme variability in how we respond to certain foods. Understanding these variables can help explain some of the inconsistencies among previous studies that have linked nutrients, supplements, and other bioactives (such as caffeine) to health outcomes. It can also help inform us how to best address our very individual requirements in regards to diet and supplements.

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

Attend a FREE Open Evening to find out about part time training Geoff Don with CNM Bristol for a career as a Naturopathic Nutritionist or Naturopathic Acupuncturist.

31st August at 7pm. Please book online at:

www.naturopathy-uk.com Plus save the date for CNM Bristol Open Day: 30th September.

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WALK | THE WALK

ACROSS THE LONELY PLAINS OF WILTSHIRE... Andrew Swift wanders lonely, but you could take a friend...

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lthough this walk is not that long, and lies through a well-heeled part of Wiltshire, it is surprisingly challenging. Apart from a steep climb at the start and an even steeper descent at the end, it traverses a lost and lonely plateau, with views to the Westbury White Horse, some 15 miles to the south. This is a land of elusive manor houses, tiny hamlets, dry-stone walls, little-walked footpaths, overgrown stiles and tracks through fields of barley. En route, you also encounter a lost Roman road, the spot where a famous explorer met an untimely end and a medieval pilgrim’s chapel which became the lair of an 18th-century highwayman.

Directions

● To get to the starting point, head east from Bristol along the A420 or M4, before turning south along the A46 towards Bath. Instead of heading into Bath, carry on down the dual carriageway and continue along the A4. After three miles, when you come to Box, take the righthand lane for the A365. After another 300m, park on the right, cross to the left-hand pavement and continue along the road (ST827682). After passing an old turnpike house on the corner of The Ley, carry on for 125m before turning right up a drive to the hamlet of Washwell. After 200m, when the drive curves left, follow a waymark sign straight on up a narrow track. Follow it as it winds between buildings, before climbing steps to a well. Bear left and almost immediately right up a steep track. Carry on in the same direction and turn left along a lane at the top (ST826677). ● After 300m, you come to a T junction, with the site of Longsplatt Quarry, open between 1890 and 1920, ahead. Turn left past former quarrymen’s cottages, and, after passing a row of bungalows, turn right along a byway. At the road, cross and turn left for 50m, before turning right along a footpath (ST828672). ● At the end of the field, carry straight on, bearing to the right of the hedge ahead. After 150m, the track curves right alongside the hedgerow, before bearing left through 74 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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a metal arch to cross the course of the Roman Road from Londinium to Aquae Sulis (Bath) (ST828666). Head to the left of the hedge ahead, and after 150m follow the track as it bears right and then left to continue in the same direction. At the end of the field, turn right through a gap in the hedge, take the track on the left and cross a stile to carry on with a hedge on your left (ST828660). After 300m, follow the hedge as it curves left. At the end of the field, head along an overgrown track, cross a footbridge and go through a kissing gate (KG). Head over to a stile, and, after crossing it, turn left along a lane (ST830654). After 300m, you can glimpse, through a gate on the left, the entrance to South Wraxall Manor, dating from the 15th century and, according to legend, the first place Sir Walter Raleigh smoked tobacco in England. It is now owned by John Taylor of Duran Duran. At the main road, cross and go through a gate. Carry on beside a hedge, cross a stile at the end and go through a gate to the right of the pylon ahead (ST843658). A little further on, turn right along a farm track. After going through another gate, you pass Stonar School, which occupies a house built around 1778, whose castellated bays can be seen behind the outbuildings on your right. When the drive swings right, follow a track straight on through a gateway (ST850656) and turn left. After going through two squeeze stiles, follow a faint track across a field. Go through another squeeze stile and carry on alongside the hedge on your left. At the end of the field, negotiate an overgrown track in the corner and cross a stile (ST850662). Carry on for a few metres before bearing right alongside a ditch and carrying straight on through another field. Cross a stile by a metal gate and carry on with Cottles Wood on your right. At the end of the field, after crossing the course of the Roman Road again, go through a small metal handgate (ST848667) and carry straight on through a rough field.

This page: Memorial for African explorer John Hanning Speke, who died in this spot in September 1864 ‘by the accidental explosion of his gun’ Opposite page: Hazelbury Manor, parts of which date from the 14th century


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● At the main road, cross a slab stile on the opposite side of the road a few metres along to the right. Head for a stile in the opposite hedgerow, cross it and turn left. At the end, cross a lane to continue along a rough track between cottages (ST846673). ● Carry on across a field and turn left along a lane. After 100m, just past Chapel Cottage, turn left up steps by a parking area, go through a handgate and head across a field. After 150m, cross a slab stile ahead and, before carrying on, divert left for 250m to find a memorial to the African explorer John Hanning Speke, who died here ‘by the accidental explosion of his gun’ on 15 September 1864 (ST843674). He had come down to take part in a debate in Bath and was out with a shooting party when he attempted to cross the adjacent stile without breaking his gun. ● Retrace your steps and carry on alongside a fence, before crossing two stiles to emerge on a lane, with the old Bell Inn opposite (ST840678). Turn left, cross the main road – with care – and look back at the old inn. At the far end is a medieval chapel which, in the mid-18th century, was the lair of a notorious highwayman called John Poulter. ● Bear left along the verge for a few metres, turn right across the grass and go through a handgate beside the gates of Hazelbury Manor. As you walk along the drive, the manor, parts of which date from the 14th century, appears ahead. ● After passing the gateposts at the end, turn left, go along the track (ignoring a bridleway branching left downhill) and go through a squeeze stile beside a gate (ST834682). As you follow a track between fences, you pass an artificial mound on the right, raised in the 1980s in homage to the prehistoric monuments so prominent in Wiltshire. ● After crossing a stile, turn left, then right at a T junction and left across another stile. After crossing the next stile, steps mark the start of a precipitous descent. At the bottom, carry straight on across a stile, head along a track, cross another stile and bear right. After crossing a slab stile, carry on across a brook and follow the track as it curves up through a wild meadow. After emerging opposite the entrance to Washwell, turn right to return to the starting point. ■

At a glance... ■

Length; time, map: 7 miles, 3 hours, OS Explorer 156

Extra info: One steep descent, over 20 stiles, several overgrown paths and tracks through fields of crops. Hazelbury Manor Gardens are open on Wednesday 13 September (11am – 3pm)

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High Quality Craftmanship

Specialist

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GARDENING

TURN UP THE HEAT It’s time to let the warm glow of late-summer stalwarts in oranges, yellows and reds take over, says Elly West

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ummer is marching on, it’s holiday time and the garden has been in full swing for several months now. It’s a time when we want to be outside, relaxing and enjoying the fruits of our labours, but it’s also a time when many gardens are starting to look tired and lacklustre. Keeping the show going through summer* can be a challenge. The soil is dry, many plants are past their best, leaves are dying back – perhaps wilting in the heat – and we may be away on holiday so watering will fall by the wayside. (*Please bear in mind I’m writing this in advance, which is always a risk when mentioning potential droughts. This will almost certainly mean I’m tempting fate, and we’ll actually be looking out at a soggy sponge). However, unless the entire summer has been particularly wet, the ground will be dry nonetheless. Rain hits leaves and evaporates more quickly in warm weather, leaving little to soak fully into the deeper layers of the soil. Climate change is also playing its part. So, how can we keep the summer going in a blaze of glory, rather than a disappointing home firework that burns itself out with a tiny fizz? Despite an Italian garden designer once telling me that we don’t have the light for red flowers in the UK, I disagree. And the hot borders at the University of Bristol Botanic Garden hold testament to this. In my view, the long sultry days of summer’s end are the perfect time for a fanfare of rich colour. Warm glows of oranges, yellows and reds take over, and many of our late-summer stalwarts can be found in these fiery colours, following on from the fresher blues, pinks and whites of early summer when everything is galloping apace. Colour is to be enjoyed and played with – throwing in some splashes of bold, vibrant colour can be just what the garden needs to carry it through to autumn. Heleniums, achilleas, crocosmia, hemorocallis, sunflowers and rudbeckia all have that heady vibrancy the garden is crying out for right now. 78 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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I love growing grasses in swathes through borders. They mingle happily alongside the early summer fresh leaves and flowers of alliums, alchemilla and foxgloves, then add their calming movement to the late-summer trailblazers as well, providing a backdrop and a filler, rather than stealing the show. Most ornamental grasses flower naturally in late summer and autumn, so their seedheads add extra interest and often last well into winter as well. One of my favourite grasses is the unusual flame-tipped Imperata cylindrica ‘Rubra’. It’s easy to grow, but likes a sunny spot in freedraining soil. This variety dies back in winter, but will push up its fresh new leaves the following year. Pushing through the flat-topped panicles of Achillea ‘Paprika’, it provides a stunning combination of texture, colour and form. If you are going away for most of August, or don’t have time to water, then there are measures you can take to help your borders cope with the frazzle. Container-grown plants are another story – if they don’t get water, they will most likely die – but not many border plants in this country will die from drought. However, a healthy plant will put on the best show and this means starting at root level. So, assuming we have got the sunshine August should – in theory – bring, what can we do to help? Start with good ground preparation when you plant. Dig a large hole, fill in with some compost and mulch with organic matter as well. Improving the soil structure helps plants to grow strong roots that can find water even when we’ve not had rain for days or weeks. Sandy soil can be improved so it is better able to retain water, while organic matter will open up a clay soil so it doesn’t bake hard and crack. Think about mulching your borders with gravel or grit, as this will also improve your soil (especially if you are gardening on clay, as many of us around Bristol are), and will help to prevent evaporation. Over the first summer, keep

Above: How about a lovely bit of late-summer warmth courtesy of Achillea 'Paprika' and Stipa arundinacea?


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GARDENING

new plants well-watered during dry spells, and make sure you give them a thorough soaking; a light spray on the surface will only encourage roots to stay shallow. When you plant climbers, position them away from the base of the wall or fence, where not as much rain will fall, and train them back against their support with a cane. Think about installing an automatic irrigation system if you are going away and don’t want to come back to parched soil. This doesn’t need to be complicated. A trickle hose (a hosepipe with holes in) connected to a tap on a timer could make all the difference. Choose plants you love, but also remember: right plant, right place, and a good start to a successful summer is to choose drought-tolerant plants. Plants with silvery, hairy or thick and waxy leaves are designed to survive hot sun, as are plants with daisy-like flowers that open when the sun is on them, such as osteospermums. Mediterranean plants such as lavender, artemisia, helichrysum, rosemary and santolina are all built for dry conditions, although they don’t like our winter wet and hate soggy feet. When you’re buying new plants, always check the label to see what conditions suit them best, to save making expensive mistakes. Remember also though, that rules are made to be broken, and gardening is not an exact science. Throw caution to the wind, embrace colour and let your plants enjoy the sunshine. (Assuming we have some!)

Meanwhile, in Elly’s garden... It’s been a busy year in my garden at home, since the new extension was finished in December. It’s a small, enclosed plot on a modern housing estate, with clay soil and it faces east. The builders left a muddy rectangle behind them and it was the perfect opportunity to start again with new hard landscaping, artificial grass and borders that I could design and plant from scratch. There’s still a long way to go. This autumn I’ll be cramming in the bulbs, and next year I’ll be assessing the borders and filling in the gaps, but I’m really pleased with how it’s filling out so far. • ellyswellies.co.uk

Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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ithin a stone’s throw of Henleaze High Street, number 1 is an impressive Victorian semi-detached family home. In common with houses of the period, the reception rooms are well proportioned and suited to family life. The beautiful bay fronted drawing room has a lovely feature fireplace, ceiling cornicing and sash windows. This is mirrored by the dining room which overlooks the rear garden and flows into the kitchen. Here there are granite work surfaces and integrated oven and grill. Storage is enhanced by twin solid wood dressers framing the chimney recess. A useful utility room has French doors leading onto the garden and there is also a cosy study and butler’s pantry completing the space on the ground floor. Much of the flooring through the house is warm solid wood. The upper two floors offer an enormous amount of flexibility with 7 large, light-filled bedrooms each with its own charming outlook. The bay fronted master suite has a luxury en suite shower room and many of the other bedrooms have original fireplaces and individual features. There is a family bathroom on each of the upper floors and the kitchenette on the top floor could provide a level of independent living for a family member or guest. At the front of the house is an attractive easily maintained garden but it is the rear garden that really sets this property apart. South facing and sun filled it is approximately 100ft in length and combines level lawns with mature shrubs and is quiet and private. There is also off street parking at the rear of the house.This is a wonderful, warm and exceptionally flexible home with all the decorative and period features you could wish for. Contact agents Knight Frank for further details and viewing. Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

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AUGUST 2017

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Nº 158

1 CAVENDISH ROAD HENLEAZE • Beautiful Victorian family home • 7 Bedrooms • Period features • Glorious 100ft rear garden • Off street parking

Guide price £1,095,000


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market

(0117) 934 9977

comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk CITY CENTRE A3 CAFÉ

BOOTH ROAD – BEDMINSTER

• Full extraction fitted • Busy city centre location • New lease • £15,000 pax

• Workshop / industrial unit • B2 use (general industrial) - may also suit other commercial or employment uses • Gross internal area 3,061 sq ft (284.49 sq m)

REGENT STREET, BRISTOL

KINGSWOOD, HIGH STREET

• Excellent freehold investment opportunity • Ground floor lock up retail unit with parking • Net rent £15,500 pa, Exclusive • Quoting price only £175,000

• Lock up shop • 512 sq ft • Shop & office use • Only £9,000 pax

WORKSHOP / WAREHOUSE

HILL STREET, BRISTOL • Modern open plan space • Up to 6 on site car parking spaces and secure bike storage • 2,482 sq ft (230.5 sq m), plus shared meeting room

• From 1,600 sq ft to 7,000 sq ft • New leases • Rents from £10,400 pax

KINGSGATE HOUSE, KINGSWOOD

EDEN STUDIO • Superb modern offices • Easy access to Clifton & M5 motorway • 2,777 sq ft • Generous parking

Julian Cook FRICS

Burston Cook August.indd 1

Jayne Rixon MRICS

HOTWELL ROAD – BS8

PRIME CITY OFFICES

• Takeaway use • Suit shop / office uses • Prominent pitch • New lease O/A

• Newminster House BS1 • 3 suites: 922 sq ft, 1,900 sq ft and 2,724 sq ft • New lease

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

• Economical space to rent – only £10.50 per sq ft pax • 6 on site car parking spaces • Open plan office of 1,489 sq ft (138 sq m)

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte BA Hons

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

17/07/2017 14:21


Andrews - Bristol - August.qxp_Layout 3 17/07/2017 14:04 Page 1

Clifton Knoll Court, Knoll Hill, Bristol, BS8 1QX ÂŁ350,000

Bishopston College Road, Bishopston, Bristol, BS7 9LR ÂŁ285,000

Enjoy the stunning view from this top floor flat in Sneyd Park, whether sat in the cosy lounge or enjoying some sun on the balcony. Knoll Court benefits from communal gardens and this particular flat also has the advantages of parking for two cars and a good sized garage with power and light. There are three bedrooms, a lounge/diner (with access to the balcony) and a separate kitchen. EPC rating: C

A stunning 4th floor luxury apartment with 2 generous double bedrooms, one with en-suite shower room, in addition to a family bathroom. The living space is open plan, with duel aspect windows offering breath taking views over Bristol and the practice area for the cricket club. Few apartments can boast such a wonderful outlook. The property is also ideally placed for access on foot (if you are inclined) to Gloucester Road only 1 mile away. EPC rating: B

Clifton sales 0117 4057659 Bishopston sales 0117 944 4400


Andrews - Bristol - August.qxp_Layout 3 17/07/2017 14:05 Page 2

Westbury-on-Trym A wonderful example of a three bedroom family home in a lovely cul-de-sac position which is in close proximity to the beautiful Old Sneed Park nature reserve. With breakfast room and dining room, downstairs 2 Cavendish Gardens, BS9 1RQ shower room, and pretty enclosed rear garden. EPC rating: D £650,000

Harbourside The Custom House, BS1 6NE £430,000

A well proportioned first floor modern apartment in the superb well renowned The Custom House development. The property offers two double bedrooms and two bathrooms. The spacious and attractive open plan reception room has floor to ceiling windows that offers excellent direct water views. The kitchen is very well equipped. The spacious master suite bedroom that is dual aspect comes with a delightful en-suite shower room. The apartment benefits from having allocated underground parking. EPC rating: B

Westbury-on-Trym sales 0117 405 7685 Harbourside sales 0117 911 4749


P84.qxp_Layout 23 21/07/2017 19:33 Page 49

SELLING YOUR PROPERTY? Choose an estate agency that will promote your best interests If you are currently thinking of selling your property, then consider using one of The Bristol Magazine’s featured estate agencies to give you the best possible promotional coverage. Our estate agents advertise with us as part of a bigger selection of print and online marketing which means your property is presented to the highest standard and will reach the greatest audience.

Residential Lettings and Management

01179 118663

info@hopewellproperties.co.uk

84 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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AUGUST 2017

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Nº 158

Bristol’s Biggest Magazine


Property Concept August.qxp_Layout 5 17/07/2017 14:06 Page 1

MANAGEMENT • SALES • LETTING • CONSULTANCY

Clifton £450,000

Clifton £1,275,000

This is a unique top floor two bedroom flat conversion offering an interesting living space with mezzanine floor with access to the outside sun deck. Number 12 Royal York Crescent is Grade II* listed and is in our opinion in one of the best positioned parts of the terrace, benefiting from some of the better views on offer. The property is presented in good decorative order with a spacious sitting room with stairs up to a superb mezzanine floor which is currently used as a work from home office but could easily be an occasional third bedroom. The kitchen is modern with a breakfast bar. Both bedrooms are good sized doubles and there is a contemporary bathroom. The flat also benefits from storage cupboards and loft space. *(Please note that the sun deck is not included in the legal title but can only be accessed from this flat and which, historically, has been exclusively used by the owners of the property). Council tax band E

Property Concept are delighted to introduce to the market this elegant yet comfortable Grade II listed house in The Polygon. This charming property, with its wealth of period features, affords flexible accommodation, arranged over five floors, and incorporates: a self-contained flat on the lower ground floor, a kitchen and dining room on the ground floor, formal sitting room and study on the first floor, two double bedrooms on the second floor, two further bedrooms on the top floor and a family bathroom. There are pretty gardens to the front and rear of the property. The rear garden is accessed via the lower ground floor. An allocated parking space, on a first come first served basis, is located to the rear of the property (off North Green Street). This sought-after location is renowned for its strong sense of community, with houses rarely coming to the market, and benefits from being in the catchment area of highly regarded local schools. Council tax band G

Horfield £500,000

Harbourside £250,0000

Property Concept are delighted to market this well-presented family home which is situated in the popular and convenient location of Horfield. This four bedroom Victorian house has been totally refurbished by the current owners and affords a lovely light and airy feel throughout. A short walk to the lively Gloucester Road and Stokes Croft areas which boast independent cafes, restaurants and boutiques along with good transport links into the City Centre. The accommodation over three floors comprises entrance hall, large reception room through to a stylish kitchen, utility room and hallway through to the rear courtyard garden. The second floor consists of three bedrooms and a family bathroom, with the master bedroom on the top floor with en-suite bathroom. Early viewing of this lovely property comes highly recommended. Council tax band C. EPC tbc.

A delightful one-bed light and airy apartment in the Steamship House development. The property occupies an enviable position on the Harbourside situated alongside the historic SS Great Britain, Brunel's original steam works and within walking distance of the new Wapping Wharf development and its mix of independent cargo units which have an abundance of coffee shops and restaurants. Clifton village and Temple Meads Train Station are also easily accessed via the local ferries that run from the area. This third floor apartment consists of an open-plan kitchen/living/dining room, one double bedroom and a contemporary bathroom. The property is currently rented and would appeal to any investor or first-time buyer so early viewing comes highly recommended. EPC Rating C.

21 Princess Victoria Street

Tel 0117 970 6119

enquiries@propertyconcept.co.uk

Clifton, Bristol BS8 4BX

Fax 0117 970 6109

www.propertyconcept.co.uk


Property Concept.qxp_PIF Full Page 17/07/2017 14:51 Page 1

BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

T

ockington Court is a fine period manor house with a fascinating history, set in beautiful mature grounds of c.1.4 acres with ample parking. Situated in the heart of this popular village with good access to local and Bristol schools, Bristol Parkway station, local motorway connections, Aztec West Business Park and the out of town shopping Mall at Cribbs Causeway. With an impressive galleried hallway, over 6,000 sq feet of accommodation this is an elegant yet comfortable home. Along with three reception rooms, conservatory, kitchen breakfast room (planning granted for this to be extended into the garden), five en-suite bedrooms and a wet room. There is an outside garden office and workshop. The lower ground floor offers a large vaulted cinema/games room and wine cellar with an abundance of storage.The gardens are a real feature with an all weather tennis court tucked away at the back of the garden with views to open countryside beyond. The garden naturally splits in two giving any new owner the potential of separating off a building plot, subject to planning & all the necessary consents. There is ample parking and a sweep in drive with gate. This beautiful family home has been enjoyed by the current owners for over 25 years. Sold with no onward chain. EPC Rated G Council tax H. Property Concept, 21 Princess Victoria Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 970 6119

86 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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AUGUST 2017

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Nº 158

UPPER TOCKINGTON ROAD, TOCKINGTON • Five substantial ensuite bedrooms & wet room • Three receptions & kitchen/breakfast room (planning granted to create an extension) • Extensive gardens c.1.4 acre plot with all weather tennis court • Impressive galleried hall • In total, over 6,000 sq ft of accommodation. • Large cinema/gym room & wine cellar

£1,450,000


Henleaze 108 Henleaze Road, Henleaze

t: 0117 962 9221 Email: henleaze@cjhole.co.uk

COLDHARBOUR ROAD, WESTBURY PARK Guide Price ÂŁ775,000 A family home with four receptions, kitchen, utility, downstairs cloakroom/WC. Five double bedrooms, bathroom and separate WC and additional ample loft storage with potential for at least two more bedrooms. Double driveway, garage/workshop, positioned in close proximity of Waitrose, Redland Green Secondary School and Westbury Park Infant and Junior School. With many original features, this property is in need of updating throughout. EPC G.

Westbury-on-Trym 25 Canford Lane, Westbury-on-Trym

t: 0117 950 0118 Email: westbury@cjhole.co.uk

COTE LEA PARK, WESTBURY-ON-TRYM Guide Price ÂŁ685,000 Significantly extended and superbly presented throughout, this unique four bedroom property, master with ensuite and modern family bathroom, has a welcoming hallway to ground floor with two interconnecting receptions. Playroom/music room with French doors offering panoramic views via the veranda and garden. Kitchen/ diner includes granite worktops and island and bi-fold doors. Office, downstairs cloakroom/WC and utility cupboard. Tiered 100ft garden offering excitement and practicality with uninterrupted extensive views over Westbury-on-Trym. Positioned within a quiet cul-de-sac in the heart of Westbury-on-Trym village. EPC TBC.

Other offices also located across Bristol and Somerset

CJ Hole August.indd 1

18/07/2017 09:29


Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com What really strikes me in a property market like this is yet again, just how much first impressions count. The modern world is fast moving, very often people get their initial exposure to a new property on a mobile phone. That means you have seconds to make that first connection a good one: with great images and accurate description. Once a buyer or tenant crosses the threshold, presentation is again, key. If you can spend money on a fresh lick of paint or a garden tidy, do it. Years of experience tell us time and again that it matters. You’d be surprised how many people don’t even tidy up. You won’t be surprised to know that most buyers don’t want to see other people’s clothes on the dryer or dirty cups in the sink. However for some properties there won’t

be any advantage in spending extra cash and that’s why you need expert professional guidance on strategy. The first two weeks in a property’s marketing life are critical: price and presentation. Get it right and you stand the best possible chance. Get it wrong and you can be left with a property no one seems to want and a drop in the value. Maximising potential while remaining authentic and realistic is as important in the property market right now, as it is anywhere else in life. Howard Davis M.N.A.E.A Managing Director - CJ Hole Clifton

REDLAND Guide Price £1,050,000 – SSTC We have buyers waiting for a similar properties, if you thinking of selling and would like a valuation please call C J Hole Clifton on 0117923823. EPC E

HARBOURSIDE Guide Price £595,000 – SSTC Exceptional four storey townhouse, tucked away in a quiet part of Redcliffe, yet only a few paces from the vibrant atmosphere of the floating harbour. EPC C

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton August.indd 1

Other offices also located at: Bishopston, Clifton, Hanham, Henleaze & Southville

17/07/2017 14:07


SNEYD PARK Guide Price £590,000 – SSTC

STOKE BISHOP Guide Price £605,000 – SSTC

A superior Hall Floor Flat within this imposing property offering: Kitchen/Breakfast Room, Living Room, Shower Room, three double bedrooms plus garage. EPC D

Beautiful detached four bedroom house, two en suites, family bathroom, attic room, studio space, lounge, kitchen, dining room, utility, garage and walled garden. EPC B

CITY CENTRE Guide Price £515,000 – SSTC

FAILAND Guide Price £625,000 – SSTC

Centrally located apartment with stunning views across the city. The apartment offers: Open plan living space with terrace, three double bedrooms, three bathrooms and parking.EPC C

An extended and beautifully presented detached four bedroom family house located on a quiet cul-de-sac in Failand, with stunning gardens. EPC D

REDLAND Guide Price £699,950 – SSTC

REDLAND Guide Price £995,000 – SSTC

An extensive four bedroom Maisonette with rooms on three levels of this Victorian building, with a good size South West facing rear garden. EPC D

A delightful five bedroom Victorian semi-detached house ideally situated in a highly desirable road within a stroll of Whiteladies Road and The Downs. EPC E

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton August.indd 2

Other offices also located at: Bishopston, Clifton, Hanham, Henleaze & Southville

17/07/2017 14:07


Cotham ÂŁ335,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

Two bedroom garden flat Tucked away on tranquil Victoria Walk, Cotham, yet conveniently located for Gloucester Road and the City Centre. The flat is well laid out and both bedrooms are a good size with the 2nd having direct access to the front courtyard. To the rear is a private garden with access to the off street parking area. EPC - C

oceanhome.co.uk

Ocean August.indd 1

Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Westbury on Trym ÂŁ425,000 Three bedroom house

Fantastically positioned in the heart of Westbury-on-Trym village is this well-proportioned, 1930s family home. The accommodation comprises of living room, spacious dining room with an extension to the rear, the dining room opens to the kitchen. Three family sized bedrooms and bathroom. Further benefits include off street parking for two cars. EPC - D

17/07/2017 14:08


Redcliffe £350,000 Two bedroom flat

A simply stunning 2 double bedroom top floor flat set within an impressive period building on one of Redland’s most desirable Roads. The property has been fully refurbished to a high standard, and offers ample first come first served off street parking. Offered with no chain. EPC - G

Blaise £380,000

Four bedroom house This four bed link-detached family home comes to market with larger than average garden, the owners have modernised the property throughout. The accommodation comprises of entrance porch, hallway, downstairs cloakroom, fitted kitchen and an open plan sitting/dining room. Four bedrooms and family bathroom. EPC - D

Ocean August.indd 2

17/07/2017 14:08


Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

Clapton in Gordano Guide Price £2,200,000 A magnificent and awe-inspiring, newly built 4/5 bedroom detached family home, built to an exceptionally high level of specification. Set behind automated gates and occupying a commanding, elevated plot of around 2.241 acres with far reaching uninterrupted views across open farmland to the Severn Estuary and Welsh hills. Detached garage and option to add indoor/outdoor swimming pool. EPC: TBC

Longwell Green

Guide Price £830,000

Lower Failand Guide Price £1,150,000

Occupying the largest plot within this fabulously designed gated community, A recently renovated and extended family house with tranquil views of open farmland, nestled in one of North Somerset’s more sought after 1 Abbots Way infuses contemporary design with Arts and Crafts inspired flair. The bespoke finish, as with the rest of the development, means that it is addresses. EPC: C truly unique. EPC: B

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 322 6362 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

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Hamptons August.indd 2

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Fine & Country August.qxp_Layout 1 17/07/2017 14:10 Page 1

COUNTRY COLLECTION NEW INSTRUCTION

Barrow Gurney | Bristol

Guide Price: £550,000

A beautiful two bedroom house within a former substantial country estate Barrow Court, situated in a rural yet very accessible location in Barrow Gurney. The house is surrounded by superb gardens, grounds, a tennis court and parking. EPC: Exempt


Fine & Country August.qxp_Layout 1 17/07/2017 14:11 Page 2

CITY COLLECTION

Sneyd Park | Bristol

Guide Price: ÂŁ745,000

A stunning first floor apartment set in an imposing period residence located just a few hundred yards from the 400 acres of open space that the Downs has to offer. Three bedrooms, large reception room and dining hall with the further benefit of a further office/occasional bedroom. EPC: D


Richard Harding August.qxp_Layout 6 17/07/2017 15:38 Page 1

Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

STOKE BISHOP, Parrys Close guide £1,350,000

Offering peace & privacy with a touch of luxury. A distinctive and beautifully conceived 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom (2 en-suite), 3 reception room modern detached family residence of outstanding quality in a highly prized location that is quiet, secluded & neighbourly.

Stylish contemporary design excellence harmoniously combines convenience, comfort & character while providing exceptional high-spec accommodation & facilities. Stands in landscaped gardens with south-west facing rear aspect, double garage and driveway parking all within a secure, secluded location

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


Richard Harding August.qxp_Layout 6 17/07/2017 15:38 Page 2

Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

CLIFTON, Wellington Park guide £1,275,000

STOKE BISHOP, Rayleigh Road guide £1,300,000

CLIFTONWOOD, Randall Road guide £1,175,000

Career Opportunity Estate Agent

STOKE BISHOP, Coombe Lane guide £750,000

Are you a skilled estate agent? If you always strive to be the best, have real drive and ability and seek an important career move offering genuine and rewarding future prospects. This is a rare opportunity to build a fulfilling long term career in our highly professional and successful estate agency.

REDLAND, Harcourt Road guide £765,000

Please apply in strict confidence with CV plus handwritten covering letter to:Angela Harding Richard Harding Estate Agents 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP.

STOKE BISHOP, Roman Way guide £740,000

REDLAND, Iddesleigh Road guide £625,000

Alternatively email: angela@richardharding.co.uk but please then scan your handwritten covering letter.

KINGSDOWN, Somerset Street guide £595,000

WESTBURY PARK, Queen Victoria Road CLIFTON, Kensington Place guide £550,000 guide £525,000

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


LEESE

NAGLE

I N D E P E N D E N T E S TAT E A G E N T S

TEL: 0117 974 1741

STOKE BISHOP £1,100,000 A beautifully presented and attractively proportioned ‘Stride’ built 4 bedroom detached house boasting superb period features both inside and out. The house is set in wonderful mature and near level gardens of circa quarter of an acre and is set well back from the road ensuring privacy. For families and keen gardeners the gardens will undeniably be a major draw of the property. Driveway to the side of the house provides off street parking for several cars on route to the garage which sits to the side of the house. Under the house and accessed via the garden is a small cellar. EPC - E

TEL: 0117 962 2299

STOKE BISHOP £750,000 This is an impressive 1930’s 3 bedroom detached family home located within this highly sought after quiet cul-de-sac in Stoke Bishop. The rear garden is circa. 75’ being fabulously south west facing with a paved patio by the house and is extensively laid to lawn. This will make a wonderful long term family home and so we highly recommend a viewing EPC-D.

Leese & Nagle august.indd 1

17/07/2017 14:11


Here to accommodate

www.leeseandnagle.co.uk

6 1 A P S L E Y ROA D, C L I F TO N , B R I S TO L B S 8 2 S W | s a l e s @ l e e s e a n d n a g l e . c o. u k

PROPERTY OF THE MONTH

REDLAND £735,000

HOTWELLS £225,000

Opportunity to improve! A lovely four storey Victorian townhouse positioned in central Redland with garden and off street parking offering flexible accommodation arranged over four floors. EPC-D.

A modern contemporary 2 bedroom first floor apartment situated in a central location with partial Harbourside views to the front. EPC-D.

CLIFTON £310,000

CLIFTONWOOD £385,000

BISHOPSTON £1,100,000

This is a lovely contemporary one bedroom first floor apartment with courtyard garden situated in a prestigious position in the heart of Clifton village. EPC-C.

This magnificent hall and lower garden floor 2 double bedroom maisonette with accommodation to rival some of the family homes in the area. EPC-C.

Stunning refurbished Victorian family home in highly desirable location. Designed with modern living in mind this is effectively a new home and offers comfortable family orientated accommodation over four floors with large open plan kitchen/living area opening onto rear terrace. 2 further reception rooms, utility, cloaks, 5 bedrooms (master en suite) 2 further bath/shower rooms. Landscaped rear gardens, views to rear and off street parking for several cars, basement store rooms. Redland Green School. EPC - TBC

12 5 S T O K E L A N E , W E S T B U RY- O N - T RY M , B R I S T O L B S 9 3 R W | s a l e s @ l e e s e a n d n a g l e . c o . u k

PROPERTY OF THE MONTH

WESTBURY ON TRYM £575,000

BRENTRY £245,000

We are delighted to offer this 1950’s built 4 bedroom semi-detached family house located on this popular road for families. The house has been extended on the ground floor and has one of the early loft conversions and is generally particularly light and airy throughout. EPC-E.

A lovely 3 bedroom end of terrace house set in the popular location of Brentry with a SouthWesterly facing rear garden. The property would be suitable for a range of buyers such as young professionals with its proximity to local major employers, downsizers or young families.. EPC-C.

WESTBURY ON TRYM £650,000

WESTBURY ON TRYM £325,000

SNEYD PARK £725,000

An extended 4 bedroom semi detached family home in a prime position in BS9 with so much to offer. The house is to be sold with no onward chain.. EPC-D.

A wonderful period cottage in exceptional internal condition having been lovingly restored by the current owners and is also brimming with character and located moments from the shops in Westbury-on-Trym village. EPC-D.

This beautiful 1964 3 bedroom detached bungalow is a unique property that offers so much in that it is both substantial, spacious and exceptionally well located in one of Bristol’s most prestigious suburbs. There is ample parking and garaging with delightful, but not onerous, gardens which are easy to maintain. EPC-D.

Leese & Nagle august.indd 2

17/07/2017 14:12


Sofa Library fp April.qxp_Layout 1 17/07/2017 14:13 Page 1

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The Bristol Magazine August 2017  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol.

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