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THE

Issue 170

£3.95 where sold

a n o i nat

a t s c e elebrates i F n o o l l a fou lB

r de

f o s de

t h g i l f s u o i glor

Bris t o l In t e r

FRENCH CONNECTION The city’s burgeoning Gallic community

ca

A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT Local dock-dwellers on the life aquatic

THE BEAT GOES ON Veteran dance duo Orbital on The Downs

AuGusT 2018

MAGAZINE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

CATALONIA TO CLIFTON Top tapas joint joins the Village set

I

THE BIG

40

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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Image by Eva Watkins (@peas_photgraphy)

Contents

August 2018

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

ARCHITECTURE

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14

Meet a local YA author and catch up on Bristol goings-on

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Reflections on an uncharacteristically long, hot summer...

64

TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Are you a serial conferencer or event organiser? Check out the English Riviera’s offering for visiting professionals

FOOD & DRINK NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Tasty tidings from our local eateries and producers

MOTORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Chris Lilly weighs up Alfa Romeo’s new girl Giulia

REVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Take the pressure out of dinner party hosting with Dine Indulge...

BRISTOL UPDATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Bite-sized business and community news from across the city

TALK OF THE TOWN

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60

From Catalonia to Clifton via Cardiff; it’s new Iberian joint Bar 44

THE CULTURE MUSIC

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Modernist style characterised many Bristol buildings after WW2

Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

Image by Paul Box

HEALTH & BEAUTY

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34

Back in orbit: one veteran dance duo is returning to Bristol very soon

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Snippets from the sector

WHAT’S ON & HAPPENINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

REVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

A cross-section of the city’s wide and varied events scene

Crystal Rose tries out Bristol’s new Trevor Sorbie salon

EXHIBITIONS

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44

Q&A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

What’s on at our local galleries this month?

A chat with the founder of a women-led natural skincare company

SPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

HABITAT

James Crawley on BCFC’s season and coming Championship challenges

THE GREAT OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

FAMILY

Andrew Swift embarks on one of Britain’s most surreal country drives

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78

Fun seasonal activities to get involved in

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

FEATURES

A well-maintained garden is an investment that literally grows

FOLK ON THE WATER

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WILD BRISTOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Meet some of Bristol’s diverse boating community

Badgers: they may be unpopular beasts, but Pete Dommett loves those stars in stripes and now’s a great time to spot them

BALLOON FIESTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

PROPERTY

The beloved local event turns 40 this month, so we prepared a few facts for the occasion...

A look at Airsorted’s handy property service, plus news and finds from the sector

FRENCH CONNECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Bristol has a burgeoning Gallic contingent; we met a few French residents to learn how they’re finding life here

HISTORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Jessica Hope visits Bristol’s 200-year-old Clifton Club

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ON THE COVER

This month we’ll be joining in the 40th birthday celebrations of the world-renowned Bristol International Balloon Fiesta – craning our necks for the best view of the annual spectacle along with the rest of the city. See p30 for a few things you might not know about it... Image by Paul Box

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A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT: Turn to p20 for more on Bristol’s boating community (image by Tom Hambridge)

THIS MONTH WE’RE... Getting to...

...The Heart of the Matter, at the RWA until 19 August. It’s an exhibition bringing together art and medicine through reflection on the human heart, which has been used to symbolise romantic love and the centre of human emotion, while also being the engine room of the body and an intricate piece of machinery. Through artworks inspired by patients with heart conditions, learn about the extraordinary nature of this fragile yet resilient organ.

from the

EDITOR

F

ooooolk on the water, fire in the sky... We’re focusing on the local boating and hot-air ballooning communities both, this issue; craning our necks and squinting upward to take in the quintessentially Bristolian sight that is the annual aerial spectacular, and looking down past where Arnolfini legs dangle to the dock-dwelling set. See p20 for the feature on the life aquatic and turn to p30 for a flurry of facts to celebrate four decades of the world-renowned Bristol International Balloon Fiesta – although the city’s pioneering wicker basket-based aviation history stretches further back than that; all the way to the 18th century. We’d say life begins at 40 but we reckon the Fiesta and its intrepid pilots have probably seen several lifetimes’ worth of adventure already. Another community we’ve found out more about is Bristol’s French (p52), fresh from their World Cup victory. We’ve seen a fair bit of them recently; first while checking out a CAST jewellery making session (see p12 for the next, if you’re keen) and then – during a quiet post-footie drink on the King Street cobbles – when a grinning Gallic group roused us from our table to revel with tricolore face-paints and flags. The third edition of local shindig The Downs Bristol is almost upon us, bringing festival headliner Noel Gallagher to our fair grasslands, plus Paul Weller and more including veteran dance duo Orbital. We chatted with one half of the Hartnoll brothers on p34 and can’t wait for the new live show. Later in the mag there’s tapas talk from city newcomer Bar 44 – which has been a success over the water in Wales and will be showcasing the merits of trendier-andtrendier tipple sherry as well as its take on Iberian bites – while Jessica Hope reports from the mysterious and historic Clifton Club where, we hear, the food is also pretty great. Meanwhile, Crystal Rose plays it straight at the new Trevor Sorbie salon; we check out the English Riviera, as it’s known, as a destination for visiting professionals; and James Crawley cracks on with the sport report, looking at BCFC’s season and Championship challenges to come... See you in September.

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR

@thebristolmag

10 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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@thebristolmag

Chuffed... It’s Goldney season. On 5 August there’s the Amnesty International party (1pm – 5pm) in Bristol’s own secret garden at Goldney Hall (top of Constitution Hill) with entertainment, games and cake in the Orangery. Then on 7 August there’s another chance to explore the gorgeous, ornate grounds – rarely open to the public and including an 18th-century underground shell grotto. There are 29 Bristols in the US but Fionn wants people to visit the best (ours)

Interested... ...In the Anglo-American ‘connections’ project Bristol is now part of, promoting inbound tourism through itineraries centred around ancestral tours, faith, wartime and the ‘special relationship’, and the Great Migration period. Travel journalist Fionn Davenport is visiting sights with strong US links to create the content – such as St Mary Redcliffe Church and SS Great Britain – so visitors can find out about the first sail time of 14 days to New York, supersonic flights with Concorde, the origins of the first Thanksgiving and start of Methodism.


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ZEITGEIST

fab things to do in AUGUST

PIVOT!

ALL ABOARD Escape from the city to the idyllic, leafy location of Beese’s Riverside Bar this summer where there will be live music every Friday. Take a leisurely evening cruise from Welsh Back in the centre, grab a gin and tonic on board and soak up the sun as you drift along the water. Hop off the boat at Beese’s and enjoy a delicious dinner by the river before listening to some great tunes from a live band. Reggae band Dappa Don and the Playaz will be gigging on 17 August, soulful group Natty Daps takes to the stage on 24 August and indie/rock band The Jumps will perform on 31 August. £20 per person. • beeses.co.uk; bristolferry.com

Dan The Hat

HAVE A LAUGH

• friendsfest.co.uk

WORK IN WAX How about making jewellery in your own design? If you like the thought of having a bespoke piece of bijouterie but don’t fancy getting grubby while hammering and filing away at a piece of precious metal, here’s an idea… Recently we discovered CAST which takes jewellery-making out of the traditional workshop milieu and puts it in a chic, social setting with delicious food and drink. The session we checked out at gorgeous Anna Cake Couture in Clifton was a wonderful, serene experience that saw guests carve out their ideas into specialist jewellers’ wax in various shapes and sizes to accommodate ring, pendant and earring designs. The team then finish it off for you using the process of lost wax casting in 925 sterling silver, gold or platinum. Check out the next Bristol workshop at Amoeba cocktail bar on King's Road on Tuesday 28 August. • experiencecast.com

Colston Hall’s flagship family festival Hooha! returns from Thursday 16 – Saturday 18 August, bringing a huge line-up of fun and festivities to enjoy together. This year’s programme showcases more free activities than ever before, including shows, arts and crafts and comedy. You can expect a mixture of serious skills, stupid stunts and off-thewall improv comedy from Dan the Hat; get some top drawing tips from much-loved children’s writer and illustrator Nick Sharratt (best-known as the illustrator of Jacqueline Wilson’s books); and laugh your socks off with new show It’s Time To Play, from CBeebie’s Sid and Rebecca, plus much, much more.

SUMMER OF SONG Some big names in the music world are heading to Bristol this month for the Skyline Series concerts. X Factor winner and multi-million record selling James Arthur will take to the stage on Friday 24 August, while British pop rockers The Vamps will perform on Sunday 26 August, with both events to take place at the Harbourside Amphitheatre. Scottish rock band Texas and Irish singer-songwriter Imelda May will headline Friday 31 August the 02 Academy while punk-rock band The The will conclude the concert series on Sunday 9 September at Ashton Gate Stadium. • skyline-series.com

• colstonhall.org

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

Could we BE any more excited?! Comedy Central UK’s FriendsFest is heading for Bristol’s Blaise Castle Estate on Friday 24 August and staying until Sunday 2 September – we just can’t wait to have a cup of Joe on the orange sofa in Central Perk. Friends fans can Take a seat on the snoop around Monica and iconic orange sofa Joey’s apartments, hang out in the corridor and even recreate the fan-favourite “PIVOT!” scene on the staircase to Ross’ apartment. Visitors can dress up in some of the characters’ most memorable outfits, get a snack from the themed food stalls and take part in a superfan quiz. Tickets are selling fast, £27.50 per person.

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Texas is at the O2 Academy


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ist

THE CITY THE BUZZ

My

BRISTOL

Photography by Martin Chainey

Meet local author and editor Nikesh Shukla

A combination of love, grief and wanting to be able to afford to live in a city brought me to Bristol –I was born and raised in London. What made me stay in Bristol was its sense of playfulness and inclusion. My new book Run, Riot is a thriller for teenagers, about gentrification and set in real time. It follows four teenagers on the run from the police and trying to stand up for their community. The One Who Wrote Destiny is about immigration and the effects of racism, fate and grief on three generations of an immigrant family.

The edges of perception Luke Jerram, the artist known for installing the giant waterslide on Park Street in 2014, the flotilla of fishing boats in Leigh Woods and the street pianos across the city, has created a new set of experimental sculptures at the University of Bristol Botanic Garden. ‘The Impossible Garden’, running until 25 November, is inspired by visual phenomena and aims to enhance our understanding of vision. Visitors can discover 12 art exhibits designed to stimulate debate about how visual impairments can affect perception of the world around us. The idea came about after Luke’s nine-month residency at the Bristol Eye Hospital, which he applied for together with Cathy Williams, consultant in paediatric ophthalmology at the hospital. She hopes it will encourage greater understanding about the many processes involved in ‘seeing’, because families tell her that lack of understanding is often a barrier to getting support for children with impairments. Luke worked with researchers from Bristol Vision Institute and spent time with visuallyimpaired children to increase his knowledge. “As someone who is red-green colour blind, I’m fascinated by the processes of visual perception,” he said. “Many of my artworks have explored the processes and limitations of vision but The Impossible Garden has allowed me to test new ideas.” • lukejerram.com

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I have been working at the Watershed for the last four years on a youth project called Rife Magazine where I mentored young people to create digital content and hone their voices. I was inspired by how politicised they were and how underrepresented they felt in YA (young adult fiction). One of them even told me they felt that YA was written by YA authors for other YA authors and not for teenagers. So I sat down and wrote a book that the people I’ve worked with would want to read. Right now I’m re-reading ZZ Packer’s excellent short story collection, Drinking Coffee Elsewhere. I’m also enjoying Chip Zdarsky’s run on The Spectacular SpiderMan. I recently finished the brilliant Crudo by Olivia Laing as well as Problems which is by Jade Sharma.

What’s next for 2018? I helped to set up a literary agency for marginalised writers and we’ve only just got going so I’ll be reading submissions for that and developing writers. I’m working on my second YA, which is about boxing, and I also have some secret screen-related projects that haven’t been announced yet. Vanessa Kisuule, Bristol city poet: I love her work a lot. There’s also a writer/poet called Solomon OB, who does interesting things. I really love the work of CJ Flood. I also love some of the far-ranging projects working alongside me in the Pervasive Media Studio at Watershed. It’s a diverse community exploring creative technology, a home for early ideas and companies, and a studio offering space, events and opportunities. If I were in charge of this city, I’d improve the public transport. Access to good, efficient, thorough public transport directly correlates with social equality in cities. It gives people access to job opportunities, ownership of parts of their city and also makes people explore a bit more. For good food, I love Fi Real in Old Market. It does vegan Carribean food and is so delicious.

• Follow Nikesh on Twitter @NikeshShukla


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ist

THE CITY

BRISTAGRAM

National Trust Images/Andrew Butler

Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your Bristol pics using #thebristolmag

Secrets of Tyntesfield Local National Trust site Tyntesfield is to star in Channel 5’s second televised series of Secrets of the National Trust, which sees Alan Titchmarsh get a behindthe-scenes look at Britain’s intriguing historic homes and gardens. Joined by some familiar faces, he uncovers tales of high society, life below stairs and the trials, triumphs and scandals of our great estates. The South West’s Kingston Lacy and Corfe Castle are featured on 1 August, followed by Tyntesfield on 8 August. At Tyntesfield, Alan learns about the rise of William Gibbs, who became the richest non-aristocrat in 19th-century Britain through the trade of guano – otherwise known as bird droppings. Meanwhile, chef Tony Singh and presenter Miriam O’Reilly explore beyond the Victorian Gothic house to discover the estate’s gardens. Tune in at 9pm to see him uncover the stories behind this favourite Bristol location. • nationaltrust.org.uk

Love this St shot from Paul’s Carnival @piccyped s

Lion’ ‘Alex the ptured Gromit ca ly by ul rf de on w er tt po b. ro @

Real talk The People’s Republic of Stoke Croft has begun a campaign to present what it believes is a more multi-faceted impression of the city for visitors – in addition to go-to images of the Suspension Bridge and Harbourside – through a new series of postcards. “The imagery that a city chooses to portray itself is of the utmost importance,” says the PRSC. “Those images define the soul of the place and aspirations of its people. We call on the Bristol public to help us create a new series of postcards depicting the best and worst of our fair city. “The spirit of a place resides in its people and its culture, much of which comes from the everyday, from the streets, from the backstreet music venues, from the walls of the city. Much of the energy that drives this city comes from below, from those who are unheard, who struggle for voice. “The people of Bristol have always been a difficult mutinous lot so PRSC proposes a rethink. This city of street art, pirates, guerrilla gardening and St Paul’s Carnival is richer and more complex than the old set of clichés on offer.” So, what images do truly represent the city? A free competition has opened and anyone can submit images for consideration; they may represent buildings and scenes just as they are; offer social commentary; or celebrate the people of Bristol in all their diverse, colourful glory. Email images to projects@prsc.org.uk with your name, age, image title and up to 50 words about it. Consider the postcard format; but landscape or portrait format are acceptable as are text captions, montages and manipulated images. There will be two overall winners (under 18 and over 18, £250 prize), chosen by a panel of judges, and all submitted images will be included in an autumn exhibition. Deadline is midnight, 30 September.

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The city was full of love for @bristolprid e

We love cinemati c bridge shots from @chill1983

‘Sunset in Southville’ by 0 @craigderrick4


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THE

B R I S TOL MAGAZINE

DON’T DREAM IT’S OVER

I

’ve never forgotten the first time I saw someone forecast the weather with their phone. It wasn’t so much the novelty of the occasion, although it was pretty exciting. We’re going back maybe a decade to the dawn of Internet 2.0 or 3.4 or whatever, the era when our phones evolved from communication devices to portable electronic brains. Those were revolutionary times, but there was nothing especially modern or radical about the setting for my first experience of on-phone meteorology. In fact we were standing in a field, in a persistent Welsh drizzle. Breakfast time on day three of a week’s camping holiday just outside St David’s, and parents asking each other whether there was any health risk attached to a child just staying in their wetsuit for a week. It can’t hurt can it? As usual the weather was coming in from the Atlantic, with occasional gusts ensuring that the rain, light though it was, penetrated everything. But was the sky perhaps lightening to the west? Was that a gleam of sunlight? As I write this, the whole idea of summer rain seems laughably oldfashioned. Oh yes, summer used to be rubbish, but not anymore! As of 2018 we have proper summers, with real sunshine. How we have earned this, let’s face it, European model of summer I’m not sure – perhaps it’s someone’s idea of a joke – but it’s been nice to leave the house without a raincoat. However the general prognosis at Bartleby Towers is that this new, ironically timed Euro-summer will come to an abrupt end on or around the first of August, and that we will find ourselves, as so often in the past, battling with wind and rain. Is it masochism that makes us return every year to endure modest physical discomfort? Or is it a misguided optimism? Actually the first time we visited Pembrokeshire we enjoyed two weeks of uninterrupted continental-style sunshine and sea temperatures tolerable to mammals other than seals. As we drove home on changeover day, the clouds swept in behind us and we pitied the people heading steadfastly west into the rain, little knowing that every year for the next decade that would be us. But we have seen St David’s basking in warm sunshine and perhaps it is this memory that makes us keep coming back despite vowing, on numerous occasions, not to do so. There was the time a gale blew up overnight and ripped through the site. Our tent stood up pretty well but one unfortunate dad was found, in the grey light of dawn, clinging to his tent as the gale tried to carry it away, along with two toddlers who somehow slept through the whole thing. Could any of us really say, as we surveyed the chaos wearily the following morning, that we were enjoying our holiday? Probably not, but it was certainly memorable. You may come home from a week in the sun rested and happy but, 10 years down the line, which holiday gives more pleasure? Which stories do you retell over and over again, embellishing them a little bit every time? Like the time our friend forecasted the weather – I can picture exactly the huddle of figures in red, blue and yellow kagouls, peering hopefully into the wind and rain for a glimpse of sun. “It’s clearing,” someone said. “Look, it’s brighter over there.” “I’ll check the weather on my phone,” said a friend. “Then we’ll know.” “You can do that? On a phone?” “OK, here we go… Are you ready?” We crowded expectantly round. “Let’s see… 10am: light rain… 1pm: light rain… 4pm: heavy rain… 7pm… Are you sure you want to know?” “It’s probably wrong,” someone said. “There’s a real microclimate here.” We peered into the murk. Surely, somewhere out there, the sky was brightening. ■ 18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Follow us on Twitter @thebristolmag

See more online thebristolmag.co.uk

Contact us: Editor Tel: Email:

Amanda Nicholls 0117 974 2800 amanda@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Assistant Editor Email:

Jessica Hope jessica@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Health & Beauty Editor Email:

Crystal Rose crystal@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

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For advertising enquiries please contact us on: 0117 974 2800 Email: sales@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Financial Director Email:

Jane Miklos jane@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

The Bristol Magazine is published by MC Publishing Ltd. An independent publisher. The Bristol Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout the city. We also have special distribution units in the following stores and many coffee shops, hotels and convenient pick-up points.

THE

BRISTOL MAGAZINE Bristol and Exeter House, Lower Approach, Temple Meads, Bristol BS1 6QS Telephone: 0117 974 2800 www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk © MC Publishing Ltd 2018 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bristol Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


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COMMUNITIES

A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT Bristol’s boating community is as diverse as its land-based neighbours; Georgette McCready met some of the lucky few who live and work on the water. Photography by Jacob Little

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any people enjoying a stroll along the Bristol dockside in the sunshine will have paused to admire the variety of boats moored in the Floating Harbour and thought wistfully that living on the water looks very appealing. But before you rush off and buy a Dutch barge or narrow boat, the bad news is that mooring space in the harbour and docks is so limited that Bristol Harbour Authority has had to close its waiting list to applicants. “There’s a long waiting list for residential moorings which is currently closed,” the Bristol harbour website clearly states. “The residential berths are currently fully allocated and rarely become available, and no other residential use of vessels is permitted.” There is also a limited number of leisure, that is temporary, moorings and these too are currently running at full capacity. But what is it like to live or work on a boat in the very heart of Bristol, so near all the city’s attractions and yet in a peaceful environment, with traffic confined to a few passing boats and ducks? Philippa Bungard is operations manager for Bristol Ferry Boats, which she runs with her husband Ian. Ian founded the ferry company in the late 1970s and the couple returned to the business in 2012 when a dramatic bailout bid saw the five-strong ferry boat fleet bought by a group of benefactors the Bungards nicknamed The Rescuers. The story has been told, many times, of how the ferry boat business was saved and resurrected in 2013 as a community-based operation with hundreds of shareholders, which is now run with Ian and Philippa at the helm and a staff of around 35 part-time workers and 11 skippers. Philippa has lived on boats for many years, from her early days as an art student in Banbury – before coming to Bristol at the age of 22. She is a champion of the local boating community, believing that more should be done in the city to encourage boat life as a viable and affordable option for people living and working in Bristol. “There’s no doubt that the harbour is the jewel in Bristol’s crown,” she says, perched on one of the Bristol Ferry Company’s veteran wooden boats, which are painted in the distinctive blue and yellow livery. “And we’re delighted that we’re now able to run an outreach programme which means we can get people who live in Bristol but would never think of coming down here, to enjoy trips out on the water. Continued on page 22 20 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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WATER FEATURES: Emily, one of Bristol Ferry’s veteran wooden boats, in her yellow and blue livery; and below; people head to The Apple for holiday vibes, good music and superb cider

...Bristol Ferry runs an outreach programme which means we can get people who live in Bristol but would never think of coming down here, to enjoy trips out on the water...


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COMMUNITIES

Dr Tom is converting the Excalibur into a twostorey home with remote controlled drawbridge

Find fine, sea-worthy specimens on Bristol’s harbourside, bedecked with bright and beautiful distractions

Sure-footed pooch Margot doesn’t have a lifejacket but she’s only fallen into the drink the once so far

Philippa returned to Bristol Ferry in 2012 after the fleet was bought by a group of benefactors she nicknames The Rescuers

Web designer Pete Johnson operates on a very different type of time; ‘boat time’

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Tim Hatcher, manager of 1930s Dutch barge The Apple, which is moored up on Welsh Back

We’ve been able to bring isolated people and community groups out on boats and they love it.” The Bungards’ current floating home is the palatial Ellen, which as Philippa says, gets many admiring glances for its colourful floral displays. “People come down to the water and they want to see all these diverse and bright boats. They love strolling along and looking at the houseboats. I’d really like to see more done to let more people live on boats. More pontoons could be put out to allow more moorings.” Philippa’s graduate daughter Tilly was born on a boat and, following her parents’ example, has bought a narrow boat which they are all working on restoring. Tilly is going to take her boat to London, travelling along the Kennet and Avon Canal and, from there, navigating the River Thames, to a mooring in London so she can continue to work and live in the capital. Pete Johnson, a freelance web designer, loves his city centre home, floating not far from King Street, on Welsh Back. He lives aboard a 72ft narrow boat with his dog Margot, spending some of his time working from home. “I’ve lived on the boat for two and a half years,” he says. “I’d spent ages looking for one to rent and was lucky to find this one. A lot of people have lived on this boat before and it’s a great space with a great location. In the summer evenings I take the little rowing boat out and enjoy the freedom of being about to roam about. It’s just nice to be here, gently rocking on the water with the ducks and swans going past. “Margot seems to enjoy it,” he says as the small dog makes her sure-footed way along the roof of the boat. “I’ve not got her a lifejacket but she’s only fallen in once and that was when she slipped on the ice on deck in the winter.” Pete likes the fact that living on a boat is cheaper than renting a flat and he finds the boating community very friendly and supportive. He sold his car and so has to have the wood delivered for his woodburning stove. There must be some disadvantages to living on a narrow boat, I ask? Continued on page 24 22 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Looking for a perfect Gift?

Stunning Engagement rings, Wedding bands and tailor-made rings

The Clifton Club, founded in 1818, continues to be Bristol’s most exclusive Private Members Club. Overlooking the Mall Gardens in Clifton Village, the magnificent, historic club building radiates comfort, luxury and charm. Idyllic private event spaces suitable for weddings, functions and corporate events make The Clifton Club the perfect choice of venue, whatever your occasion.

Beautiful Gift Ideas for the bridesmaids, mother of the bride and for the groom A 10% discount on any pair of rings purchased & off any further gifts for your wedding when you mention The Bristol Magazine We also offer Bespoke Jewellery • Silver Jewellery • Watches Jewellery Repairs • Gold purchased (old jewellery & coins)

Exclusive Private Members Club Extensive Social Events Calendar Bespoke Wedding Service Dedicated Meetings and Functions Team Fine Dining Experience

History, Tradition & Quality the only Kemps Jewellers since 1881

KEMP J EWELLERS

For Membership, Event or Wedding Enquiries, please do not hesitate to get in touch Tel: 0117 9745039 Email: enquiries@thecliftonclub.co.uk

1881

9 Calton Court, Westbury on Trym, Bristol, BS9 3DF

@cliftonclub

@thecliftonclub

@thecliftonclub

www.kempsjewellers.com • 0117 950 5090

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be, what with being a steel container. I just have to make sure I leave the windows open. And in winter it gets very cold. It’s quite annoying when the water pipes freeze.” He also cites the nuisance of having a very small toilet – and it needing to be emptied – but says the advantages outweigh the inconveniences. “We have a thing called boat time,” he laughs, having illustrated this earlier on by setting out to walk Margot, bumping into Jacob the photographer and me on the quayside and then realising that yes, today is Tuesday, the day we agreed to meet. “You get quite chilled on a boat.” Tim Hatcher, manager of The Apple cider boat which is moored permanently on Welsh Back, agrees. He’s worked on the boat for eight years and says its location and relaxed atmosphere put customers in holiday mood. On a sunny evening, with a carefully curated and much-loved soundtrack floating across the air – visit on a midsummer weekend and you might catch the soulful vinyl sounds of DJ Nev – it’s easy to see why this laidback bar is so popular. His onboard office is where the old Dutch barge’s engine room used to be. Now, when the boat has to be moved for cleaning or painting, it has to be towed as it can no longer move under its own steam. The vessel dates back to the 1930s and was a gentlemen’s club before becoming a bar, which explains the mirrors on the ceilings in the gents... In a previous incarnation it served as a clubhouse for Hell’s Angels and certainly the boat has a raffish charm, with its shady canvas roof, old church pews and trestle tables.

Inside Pete’s wonderfully quirky abode

...I’d like to see more done to let more people live on boats; more pontoons could be put out to allow more moorings...

Not far from the Apple boat, the sound of drilling and metalworking can be heard. We’re invited onto the Excalibur, a hulk of a substantial metal houseboat, by owner Dr Tom Bailward, a GP in Montpelier. He took on the project to convert the shell of the three-year-old vessel a year ago following the breakdown of his marriage and has thrown himself into the technical and practical challenge of making a two-storey home in the space. “I was hoping to buy a Dutch barge in Amsterdam and bring it over, but I couldn’t get permission from the Harbourmaster to do that, so I bought this, which came with a residential mooring licence. I’ve already cut a hole for a door at one end and am currently cutting to create portholes.” Tom says as an experienced DIY-er he feels confident about tackling many of the jobs on board Excalibur and he will enlist his daughter, an architecture student, to help with the design for the upper deck, which will incorporate an open-plan living and kitchen space, plus a conservatory where he plans to grow tomatoes. It all sounds like a inspirational project and Tom hopes he will have it finished – complete with remote controlled electric drawbridge – by next year. One of the challenges Tom faces is the need to move the boat to dry dock every few years, and this will mean passing through Redcliffe Bridge, which has had issues over its opening and closing mechanism. “I’m seriously contemplating designing the second storey so it can be folded down to get under the bridge,” he says, planning for the worst-case scenario. Visitors to the harbourside can look forward to seeing the doctor’s tomato crop ripening in future summers, joining the other fascinating attractions and distractions to be found at this sparkling jewel of Bristol’s crown. ■

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This could almost be a postcard from Amsterdam


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SHOPPING

GET THE GOODS If you’re looking for some sparkling diamonds, unique artwork or ceramic homeware, might we suggest a few of the city’s independent emporiums...

Room 212 An Aladdin’s cave of artwork, gifts, jewellery and cards, all by Bristol artists. The gallery is at the heart of the arty part of Gloucester Road and definitely worth a trek up ‘Pigsty Hill’ for its regularly changing window displays reflecting themes such as Frida Kahlo, the Bristol Balloon Fiesta or Indian summers. Different artists help to run the shop, along with owner Sarah Thorp who organises community events such as the Gloucester Road Central Mayfest and the North Bristol Arts Trail. Describing herself as “independent to the core!” she sees Room 212 as a way to bring great local art to local people at affordable prices. 212 Gloucester Road, Bristol BS7 8NU 07702 598090

Artemis

Image: Bridget Williams

Artemis is another veritable treasure of an independent business, opened by Catherine Amesbury eight years ago as the home of her jewellery workshop. Here, her unique designs are handmade by her wonderful team; any item in the collection can be bought as seen or customised. Otherwise, a bespoke piece can be created – they particularly love designing for weddings. The glistening cove that is Artemis today is also filled with a beautiful variety of hand-picked feminine gifts from trusted suppliers and, downstairs, Catherine houses a permanent exhibition selling local artwork by Cath Read. 214 Gloucester Road, Bishopston, Bristol BS7 8NU 0117 924 1003; artemisbristol.co.uk

Potters Founded in 1996, Potters exhibits and sells high quality ceramics, as a cooperative shop. The team has now grown to 25 talented members who showcase a diverse range of functional and artistic pieces. Together, they work to promote the best of British ceramics in Bristol and the surrounding area, offering a friendly atmosphere in which to browse and the opportunity to discuss the work with the potters who make it. Every month Potters holds contemporary guest potter exhibitions, inviting skilled ceramic makers to come and exhibit their work within the shop. Alongside the fantastic work on display, they also offer specialised commissions, information on ceramic courses, weddings lists, gift vouchers and friendly advice. 9 Perry Road, Christmas Steps Arts Quarter, Bristol BS1 5BG 0117 330 8445; pottersbristol.com 26 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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SHOPPING

Glass Designs & Gallery Glass Designs & Gallery has been a part of the thriving community of indie shops on North Street, Bedminster, for 15 years. The shop is owned and managed by stained glass designer and maker Claire Dadswell who actively supports local artists and makers, selling their unique and quirky prints, jewellery, ceramics, textiles and cards. She also stocks Bristol Blue Glass and Stokes Croft China and offers a bespoke framing service. There’s always something to tempt different tastes and pockets, from a lucky dip to a handmade Tiffany lampshade. Claire designs and builds bespoke stained glass panels and mirrors for the home in the workshop on site. 261 North Street, Bedminster, BS3 1JN 0117 378 9227; glassdesignsgallery.co.uk

Diana Porter Passionate about keeping the manufacturing of her jewellery in the UK, Diana Porter has her workshops located behind the store. Since starting her own business, making jewellery in her front room in 1993, Diana has gone on to be awarded UK Jewellery Designer of the Year and has received the seal of approval from the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths as well as being invited to join Who’s Who in Gold and Silver – the company’s prestigious directory of the leading jewellers, silversmiths and art medallist working in the UK. All gold pieces of jewellery are made in Fairtrade gold, something that Diana is very proud of. Diana Porter collections are in galleries and shops all over the country and beautiful work from other designers is exhibited in the shop. 33 Park Street, Bristol, BS1 5NH 0117 909 0225; dianaporter.co.uk

Toyville We always catch ourselves peering in at the myriad delights as we stroll past family-run, independent store Toyville in Bedminster. Local couple Lindsay and Joel opened the shop in October 2016 after feeling there was a real shortage of nearby stores in which to buy nice things for their young son. Since opening, their range has grown in response to customer needs and they now stock a huge selection of carefully chosen toys and games, for newborns right up to teens and adults. Try a board game from the extensive library or have that special present gift-wrapped for you. It’s just what a real toy shop should be. 20 North Street, Bedminster, BS3 1HW 0117 953 2876; toyvilleshop.co.uk

Kondi Gifts This much-loved gift shop is located on the vibrant Henleaze High Street. “We try to provide a real alternative to the large, multi-chain, high-street stores and aim to offer a far more personalised customer service experience than that found online,” says co-owner Ian Shenton. They have a wide range of gifts and cards suitable for all ages, along with a blend of items by independent Bristol-based suppliers, designers and artists together with some recognisable high-street brand names. “We know how important independent shops are to the Bristol community,” says Ian, “and equally how vital their continued support is to maintain a healthy and diverse high street.” Quite right! 103 Henleaze Road, Henleaze, BS9 4JP 0117 962 5464


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SHOPPING

Julie Anne Palmer A highly skilled design consultant with extensive technical knowledge, who understands about design, durability and beauty of form, Julie Anne Palmer has over 35 years of experience. Producing unique pieces of jewellery, created from scratch within her fully equipped studio workshop, Julie has spent years restoring antique jewellery and objets d’art, as well as exhibiting her own designs in museums and galleries in New York, London, Edinburgh, Manchester, Bristol and Bath. Offering bespoke jewellery design, she works with her clients’ wishes to produce unique pieces of jewellery and create their dream pieces. 129 Stoke Lane, Westbury-on-Trym, BS9 3RW 0117 962 1111; julieannepalmer.com

Amulet Boutique A popular fixture on Cotham Hill since 2010, Amulet has steadily grown to become one of Bristol’s best loved boutiques; an award-winning shop retailing women’s clothing, accessories, jewellery and shoes. The focus at Amulet is on finding the best fashion that is all ethically sourced, beautifully designed and crafted, with something to suit women of all ages. With many of the brands exclusive in Bristol to Amulet it really is a place where you can escape the high street and find something unique. The emphasis here is on customer service, with one-to-one styling advice available to assist with finding the perfect piece for a special occasion, or creating a classic capsule wardrobe to flatter, inspire and empower. 39a Cotham Hill, Bristol BS6 6JY. 0117 239 9932; amuletboutique.co.uk

Kemps Jewellers

Movement Boutique

One of Bristol’s longest running businesses, established in 1881, Kemps has earned a reputation for quality and service and is proud of its continuous family ownership since the late 19th century. A wide range of wedding and engagement rings, bespoke and silver jewellery is available, with the option of having a piece of jewellery handmade from your own design or a remodel of an existing piece into your design. A selection of Rotary and Pulsar watches is also available in store. In need of some TLC? Kemps also offers repairs on your pieces, ranging from a simple chain repair to a total remake of a ring. Stone replacement and sizing are all part of the service too. They also purchase all unwanted gold, silver and platinum if you’re looking to rehome a few pieces.

Nestled on Alma Road, just off Whiteladies Road in Clifton, is Movement Boutique Bristol. This is a beautiful, independent lifestyle store selling womenswear, menswear, accessories, apothecary and homeware. Described as ‘Bristol’s hidden gem’ by its most loyal customers, who have plenty of faith that they will find something different and unique to Bristol on their visits, its two floors offer carefully curated pieces from brands from the UK, Europe, Scandinavia, Australia and other countries around the world. Many of the stylish products are from ethical and sustainable sources, with clothes made from organic cottons and linens, coloured with natural dyes. The homewares add stylish touches to any dwelling, and the aromatherapy scented candles and diffusers are made from essential oils and soy wax.

9 Carlton Court, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol, BS9 3DF 0117 950 5090; kempsjewellers.com

66 Alma Road, Bristol, BS8 2DJ 0117 373 7675; movementboutique.co.uk

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SHOPPING

Turners Opticians For almost 80 years the Turner family has been focused on giving each and every one of its patients thorough and in-depth eye care. A visit always means much more than a normal sight test, with specialist clinical equipment meaning that Turners is able to examine the health of your eyes with a fine detail not even dreamt of when lead optometrist Peter’s grandfather Harold started out in the 1930s. Turners Opticians also runs the successful Bristol Dry & Watery Eyes Clinic as well as offering treatments for blepharitis and minor eye conditions and clinics for those with eye or vision concerns. If you’ve not been recently, you can now choose an extended eye exam or eye clinic appointments, available to both NHS and private patients, in Henleaze or Fishponds. 57 Henleaze Road, Bristol BS9 4JT 0117 962 2474; turnersopticians.co.uk

The Electric Bike Shop

Nicholas Wylde

Passionate about its line of work, this top shop offers a range of e-bikes that make for a perfect alternative mode of transport. Sometimes referred to as pedicels, e-bikes are ridden like conventional bikes but with a faster speed and the ability to travel up hills with ease. Using a battery and a motor to give the rider a helping hand, e-bikes typically either use pedal assistance technology or power on demand to help suit the needs of each rider. The team offers a range of bikes including mountain, leisure or that all-important folder e-bike for the commuter.

Training as a jewellery designer and goldsmith at the prestigious Birmingham School of Jewellery, Nicholas Wylde first opened shop in 1987 in Bath at the age of 24. He has since created jewellery for famous TV and sports personalities and members of the royal family. Since opening a second shop in Clifton in 2010 – situated in the Georgian quarter that’s home to many independent shops – his unique and customised jewellery all have the hallmark of excellence. Launching his unique, registered and patented Wylde Flower Diamond® in 2012 to mark his 25th anniversary, he’s now placed among the top diamond designers in the world. The Wylde Brand has blossomed over 30 years to become an internationally recognised and respected name. From pushing the limits of artistic expression with bespoke commissions to ensuring all customers have a day to remember when they enter the store and browse its sparkling range, Nicholas Wylde provides quality service to suit many a pocket.

Gepida Reptilla 900 Nexus 8, £2099

116 Coldharbour Road, Bristol BS6 7SL 0117 403 1103; theelectricbikeshop.co.uk

No 6 The Mall, Clifton, BS8 4DR 0117 974 3582; nicholaswylde.com

Amphora Aromatics Amphora Aromatics is one of the UK’s largest suppliers of essential oils and aromatherapy products. Combining traditional formulations with exotic herbs, spices, perfumes and oils inspired by the souks and markets of near eastern countries, it is one of aromatherapy’s best kept secrets – the company philosophy is to create high quality products at the best possible price and all essential oils are 100% pure, from one botanical source, unless otherwise stated. The shop on Cotham Hill is also home to the company’s award-winning natural skincare brand, AA Skincare. Providing naturally effective, specific beauty or well-being solutions, AA’s creams, gels, balms, hair and body care products – and there’s an extensive range – as well as gorgeous natural beauty and skincare gifts, are available at very competitive prices, with knowledgeable staff on-hand to recommend the ideal product. 36 Cotham Hill, Bristol BS6 6LA; 0117 904 6232; amphora-retail.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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ANNIVERSARY | SPECIAL

FIESTA, FOREVER When people think of this neck of the woods, they think of hot air balloons. Fact. Having been a silky part of the city fabric for decades, Bristol International Balloon Fiesta celebrates the big 4-0 this month – but how clued up are you on the eventful history of this staple summer event?

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ep, Europe’s largest annual meeting of hot air balloons is having a gert big birthday party this year, and we’re all invited. Here are a few things you mightn’t have known about the famous event...

40 factoids for 40 years 1

The idea of the Fiesta first came about over a beer in a pub between members of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, including Don Cameron.

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The very first one took place from 7 – 9 September 1979.

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Fiesta founder Don Cameron once delivered post to Malta, taking off in his balloon from the deck of an aircraft carrier.

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Don was also the first person to cross the Sahara and the Alps by hot air balloon.

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All balloonists carry landing gifts in their baskets to offer to landowners when they touch down.

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Although regularly shortened, the Fiesta’s full title is Bristol International Balloon Fiesta.

7

In 1979, on the Tuesday before the Fiesta, a pre-event flight took place from College Green to build anticipation for the coming weekend – this is a tradition that continues today.

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The founding principle of the Fiesta was that it was free for the people of Bristol and remains so even now.

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The inaugural Fiesta saw just 27 balloons in attendance, making more than 100 flights over the city.

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By 1980 the Fiesta had grown significantly, with more balloons and more than 50,000 people visiting.

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1982 saw the number of balloons participating increase once more; at one point, 42 balloons flew in a mass ascent. This was the largest number of balloons ever seen over Bristol.

12

In 1985, due to the growth of the event, a barrier was installed around the launch field for safety.

13

In 1987, pilots from nine overseas countries took part. A total of 256 balloon flights were made on the Saturday, 129 within 65 minutes during the morning launch, setting a new world record.

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In 1989, HRH Prince Edward visited the Fiesta. Unfortunately, poor weather made for a tethered event.

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World records have been broken at Bristol’s fiesta, for mass landings and more

You never quite know what you’ll see from summer to summer

Must be a sweet view from the ferris wheel, hey?


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ANNIVERSARY | SPECIAL

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The first night glow was held on Durdham Downs the weekend before the Fiesta in 1990. A big hit with the crowds, it wasn’t until seven years later that it was incorporated into the main event.

16

The ‘special shapes’ launch was introduced as the first flight of the Fiesta in 1997, showcasing the skill of the balloon designers who had made flying vessels in the form of floating cars, food and drink and even toilet rolls. Floating over the city, they signal that the Fiesta has begun. Try and spot the new birthday cake this year! Continued on p32

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ANNIVERSARY | SPECIAL

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In 1998, Thomas the Tank Engine joined the growing number of special shapes for which the Fiesta was becoming famous.

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The Fiesta is twinned with ballooning events in Switzerland, France and Belgium.

18

The next year, the Breitling Orbiter 3, a Rozière balloon built by Cameron Balloons, made the first non-stop flight around the globe.

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It takes a full year to plan the Fiesta; planning literally starts the day after the event closes.

19

Also in 1999, a vintage balloon tether featured eight balloons from the original Fiesta, including the first-ever balloon built by Cameron Balloons, the Bristol Belle.

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The Fiesta costs more than £750,000 to stage each year.

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The event is organised by a committee of 12 volunteers, supported a team of two full-time staff.

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It takes a team of 800 volunteers to make the Fiesta happen, that’s a massive 32,000 hours of volunteer time given freely.

33

The Fiesta has hosted plenty of famous faces, from the Tellytubbies to Richard Branson and Michael Eavis.

34

Members of the event team function on an average of 16 hours of sleep over the four days.

35

In 2016 Melissa Joan Hart (aka Sabrina the Teenage Witch) attended the Balloon Fiesta during a break from filming.

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On average, 580 flights happen during the Fiesta.

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Fast-forward to 2017 and the Bristol Belle made a grand return to the Fiesta to make visitors smile once more. New European ballooning records were set at the Millennium Fiesta which attracted more people than ever before. On a single day, 150,000 people attended on the Saturday, bringing the total attendance to almost half a million. The same year, 132 balloons launched in 55 minutes, breaking the 1987 record. The European density record was also broken, with 117 balloons taking to the skies in just 30 minutes. A second night glow was introduced on the Saturday night in 2002 and attracted crowds of 100,000. The Fiesta staged the final flight of the famous BBC world balloon, star of the TV idents.

37

The Bristol Balloon Fiesta broke the record for the largest number of balloons alighting in a single field in 2014. 90 balloons landed at the site of the old Cadbury Factory in Keynsham.

52,000 rolls of toilet paper are used over the course of the Fiesta.

38

A total of 4,500 bacon rolls are served to balloonists and visitors during the Fiesta.

In August 2015 Fedor Konyukhov broke the record for a non-stop global balloon flight in a Roziere 550 built by Cameron Balloons.

39

30,000 pints of Thatcher’s cider are pulled during the event.

40

Every £1 spent putting on the Fiesta generates a further £20 being spent in the local economy, equating to a whopping £15m net economic benefit to the city! ■

26

In the history of aviation, only three balloons have ever completed this round-the-world flight, all three were built by in Bristol by Cameron Balloons.

27

To celebrate Bristol’s status as the European Green Capital, the 2015 Fiesta saw the maiden flight of a unique creation, the hybrid solarpowered hot air balloon.

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• bristolballoonfiesta.co.uk


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MUSIC

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MUSIC

“Even if we’re travelling around in separate cars and never talking, we’ll still carry on,” Paul says now. He’s detemined not to let things “dissolve” as they have done before

THE BEAT GOES ON The Hartnoll brothers, AKA Orbital, are back – and in Bristol next month as part of The Downs’ all-star festival line-up. Having spent three decades making music, the veteran dance duo have been on quite the journey since those Halcyon days...

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MUSIC

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amed after the M25, for many the route to illegal raves in those late 1980s, early 1990s years when dance music emerged from the shadows in a burst of love and technicolour, Orbital are approaching 30 years of amazing live shows. The fact they’re in their third decade, and have a new album in the works, is a testament to the band’s love of their craft in the face of family feuds (the brothers spent years apart after one row) and the passage of time. But dance music fans can rejoice that Orbital will be playing at The Downs Bristol on Saturday 1 September and are still as hungry to perform as they were back in the days when tracks like Chime and Halcyon had them dancing from Dundee down to Dorking. The Bristol Magazine grabbed the chance to talk to Paul Hartnoll, one half of the band, about their love for Bristol, fear over the current state of the world, Star Wars and...morris dancing.

What can you tell us about the new album and its theme? It came about quite quickly on the technical side. It started around October 2017, pulling in ideas and tracks that I’d had hanging around. As soon as you start thinking about making an album you have all these bits and pieces that you feel belong on it. I’ve always got loads of tracks, loads of half written things and so on. The album came together under its title Monsters Exist and things started falling into place after that. As far as an instrumental album can have a theme, that’s it – monsters exist. Rather than preaching to people about what the monsters are, it’s more of a road sign, do you know what I mean? “Warning – monsters ahead!” just to remind people because I think at this moment in time, especially politically, we are living in a world of monsters. Whether that’s Brexiteering idiots like Boris Johnson or Nigel Farage or Victorian lunatics like Jacob Rees-Mogg, we’re in a funny place. Then you’ve got Donald Trump and Kim Jong-Un like two schoolboys having a pissing competition over nuclear weapons. How futile is that? So there you are, Monsters Exist. Now I’m telling you who I think the monsters are but I’d rather not do that because everyone has their own monsters don’t they? When Orbital started in the late 1980s it felt like something was changing for good, with green politics entering the mainstream and things like the Berlin Wall coming down. It feels like we’ve suddenly gone backwards, is that how it feels to you?

One thing I have noticed, having been on this planet for 50 years, is that things go in cycles, they do come around again. Sadly that means facism and right wing-ism comes into fashion again and then disappears again. Misogyny comes and goes – well, mostly it goes, hopefully. All of a sudden in England it seems okay to be racist – what? When did that become acceptable again? It’s ridiculous. There was an element of fighting against that sort of thing in the 1980s as the rave generation appeared. Not that we were having much influence, aged 18 to 19, but it was part of a wider movement of tolerance and alternative thinking which I think is still there and I still have faith in it. I still see a twinkle in peoples’ eyes, people who I call the ‘post-rave people’. It must be like being in California and seeing post-hippy people, they’re still living a slightly alternative lifestyle. So if there’s one good thing that came out of that late 1980s/early 1990s then it’s the legacy of those people. Do you still get nervous when you’ve made an album and you’re in the period between finishing it and it going on sale? No, it’s exciting. If I’m nervous then I know the album’s bad! I really like it and I’m interested to see what people think of it. To be honest, if everyone hated it I wouldn’t mind because I like it and I’m happy in my own skin that I like it. That’s the key, you’ve got to be happy in yourself. It’s the book that was written – that’s what we’ve got. After a while apart, does it feel different being back in the studio? It feels different regarding the brothers dynamic, the human side of it. We’re working with other people in ways that we never have before, which is really nice. We’ve never had studio assistants but now we’ve got a guy who comes in and you think ‘ah, brilliant, someone else can do that bit’. As brothers we’ve decided that whatever happens over the next few years, if we clash or fall out, the one thing that can’t be allowed to happen is the band being dissolved. Even if we’re travelling around in separate cars and never talking, we’ll still carry on. Do you know what it is; after having five years off from Orbital I realised that I’d trained and learned to do one thing really well, so why wasn’t I doing it? With Orbital I’ve got this amazing situation where I can do whatever I want and I can do it in these lovely, great big forums like The Downs. Why wouldn’t you do that? Why stop using the name and struggle to start again? The only thing that was stopping that joyous explosion of art was falling out with my brother so it was time to get back on it again. And so far, so good!

Image credit: Gavin Batty

The live show is developing well; the duo constantly add new elements

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Technology has evolved as the band’s career has progressed, has that changed the sound or any other element of the band? I think instruments evolve and it always helps what you’re doing, that’s what happened in the late 1980s/early 1990s. We could suddenly afford to buy all this equipment that before was only for the likes of Kraftwerk or Jean-Michel Jarre and Yellow. Normal kids could afford it so it hit the streets, basically, and that’s where this big explosion came from, starting with electro and then house music was the big change. Technology is still progressing but it’s a slow process. We’re at the point where you can pretty much do anything but it’s often when people find cracks in the system, where something does something it wasn’t intended for, that interesting stuff happens. Acid house, for example, came out of what was essentially a crap bassline machine. I think the biggest problem now, because the door is so wide open as regards technology, is knowing when to stop, when not to overcrowd a song or album. Back in the day you’d have five synths and a drum machine or two, 16 channels on the desk and when all those things were full that was it, you’d finished because you couldn’t do anything else and that limitation was a good thing. Now it’s important to listen to the composition and not obsess about technology, it’s about making the right piece of music and knowing when it’s done. It’s a really big skill for people who write and produce music – knowing when to stop. People who are good at that are normally prolific. What are your impressions of Bristol? It’s one of those cities that’s always been really vibrant and good for Orbital. I don’t know why it is but we can go on tour around the country and do some really good gigs elsewhere but you can guarantee Bristol will be sold out and they just ‘go up to 11’ here a bit more than in other places. It’s always a good gig and the last time we came, to the O2 Academy, was just stunning. It was full and that’s a really interesting venue because it feels like everybody is completely surrounding you. I think the only time we haven’t sold out was in the early days when we played the Thekla but it would have been around 1990 and people were still trying to wake up to dance music. Can you give us any hints about what we can expect at The Downs? I can guarantee we’ll play everybody’s favourite tunes and three tracks from the new album. We want to tease the new material but what I don’t want to do is turn up to a festival and play all the new songs. The live show is developing well and by the time we come to Bristol we’ll be gearing up for our own shows later in the year so it’s likely there will be some new things that I haven’t even thought about. We’re constantly working on the show, adding new elements.

...Morris dancing has become a ritual now; if anyone sees me looking like I’m picking up a bucket with my foot, that’s what it is...

Do you have any pre-show habits or rituals? For an hour before the gig I can’t talk to anyone. Well I can, but I’m not listening to what they’re saying or what I’m saying. I just nod. I’ll go and watch a band if I can, I like that mirror thing of feeling what it’s like to be in the audience, to get a real feeling of the other side. I also nearly always go on stage when the crew are doing the changeover because I like to get a feel for the stage so I’ll sneak on, minding my own business and maybe tune a synth or something. The other thing I’ve started doing recently, because I’ve always liked to stretch a bit or run on the spot before a gig, is morris dancing. So I practice my Bledington morris dancing, and that has become a ritual now; I feel a bit weird if I haven’t managed to do it. So if anyone sees me doing something slightly strange that makes me look like I’m picking up a bucket with my foot then that’s what it is.

We assume you don’t put the full outfit on? No, but the guys tell me it’s not quite right if I’m not wearing it, that’s what my fellow dancers tell me. Do you have a preference between working in the studio or playing live or are they just two parts of the same job? It’s variety, it’s nice to do different things. If we’ve been doing loads of live shows I can’t wait to get back into the studio. If we’ve been in the studio for a while I can’t wait to go on the road again. How good is that? We’ve just finished working on our DJ set for later this year; I’d done the live set and the album had been finished and mastered. I’m now trying to stay out of the studio and rest my ears for the summer. As we talk now I’m standing in my garden, soaking up the sun.

...These days I feel like Yoda, sat in his little hut on a funny planet, rather than Luke Skywalker trying to find his place in the universe. I’ve made my peace with that...

That’s my intention, to have a break, but I know that after a few days I’ll start obsessing about tracks I can remix or something else. We’ve just done a track with Professor Brian Cox which is almost like The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, background music with Brian delivering this epic speech about the state of the world and the universe and everything. I kept listening to it and thinking “ooh, you could make a great house track out of that”. I can’t keep myself away sometimes. But for 30 years I haven’t had to ‘work’ a single day. It’s been brilliant. I’m doing what I love. If you give me two weeks off I’ll spend it writing music. Is there anything you’re listening to in your spare time right now or any collaborations you’d like to make happen? We’re planning on doing some re-recordings of old tracks next year to mark 30 years of Orbital. There will be a celebratory album with new material as well. Because we play certain tracks live they become different over time in the live arena compared to how they are on the record. So we’re planning for the album to be a mixture of the original version and the live version. It won’t be like Kraftwerk’s The Mix where they really changed everything but there will be new versions of the greatest hits, if you like. What I’d really like to do is get some top-drawer remixes done, from our peers and people that were heroes of ours. Mobilising people into that sort of thing is like herding cats however, so we’ll see. Where do you think Orbital’s place is in the dance music sphere now? I feel like Yoda rather than Luke Skywalker these days, and I’ve made my peace with that. For most of the time I’ve felt like Luke Skywalker, the bloke bumbling around trying to find his place in the universe, knowing there’s something good out there but not quite grasping it. Now I feel like Yoda, sat in his little hut on a funny planet with not that many people paying attention but anyone who does maybe finding some gold there. When I walk onto stage now I’m still nervous – you’d be mad not to be – but I feel comfortable, I know how to do this. ■ • Orbital play The Downs Bristol on Saturday 1 September with Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, Paul Weller, Goldie, Basement Jaxx and many more. For tickets and more information see thedownsbristol.com

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LOCAL | EVENTS

WHAT’S ON IN AUGUST James Arthur at Harbourside Amphitheatre

An Officer and a Gentleman The Musical Until Saturday 4 August, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome The world premiere of a new musical to simply sweep you off your feet. Based on true events, An Officer and a Gentleman The Musical follows the Oscar-winning film starring Richard Gere. When Zack Mayo rolls into the US navy pilot boot camp with a bit too much swagger, drill Sergeant Foley doesn’t make life easy for him. After he falls for a local girl and tragedy befalls his friend and fellow candidate, Zack realises the importance of love and friendship. The feel-good soundtrack includes the hit song from the movie Up Where We Belong, along with ’80s classics Girls Just Want to Have Fun, Livin’ On A Prayer and The Final Countdown; atgtickets.com/bristol Tales of the Vales: Stories from A Forgotten Landscape Until Friday 31 August, Bristol Archives The immense floodplain of the River Severn has been shaped over millennia, first by the Severn’s extraordinary tides and then by human activity. Adapting to its geology and rich natural resources, generations have lived their lives in this ever-changing landscape. No admission fee, donations welcome; bristolmuseums.org.uk/bristol-archives

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Imelda May at O2 Academy Bristol

Planetarium Nights Thursday 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30 August, times vary, We The Curious The popular series of night-time planetarium shows continues with a mix of ‘Summer Stargazing’, ‘Exploring the Solar System’ and ‘Exploring the Galaxy’, all in impressive 3D. Grab a drink and explore the Space Gallery too. £6.50 – £8.50; wethecurious.org

Bristol’s Burning! 1831 Riots Sunday 5 August, 3pm – 5pm, M Shed Explore the sites and learn about the causes of the citywide riots of 1831 on this walking tour. The riots were one of the most dramatic events in 19th-century British history – Bristol was in tatters, with hundreds of protesters either dead or dying and dozens of buildings in flames or fallen into heaps of rubble. The M Shed’s expert guides will vividly retell the history of this tragic episode, exploring places that played a prominent role in the unrest. Pay what you think. Book in advance; 0117 352 6600; bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed

Dark Side of the Moon: The Fulldome Experience Friday 3, 17 & 31 August, times vary, We The Curious An audio-visual extravaganza, inspired by the music of Pink Floyd, featuring the entire 1973 Dark Side of the Moon album in glorious surround sound, with spellbinding abstract projections on the full dome. £5.50 – £9.95; wethecurious.org Murder, Mayhem and Mystery Tour Friday 3 and 10 August, 7.30pm – 9pm, Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bath Road Uncover some of the more unusual and outrageous stories buried in Arnos Vale, where an expert guide will share stories of murder, rioting, adultery and more. You will visit beautiful memorials in this amazing listed landscape and hear terrible tales and sinister stories. Not suitable for children. £10; arnosvale.org.uk

Rex The King Wednesday 1 – Friday 3 August, 8pm, The Wardrobe Theatre, The Old Market Assembly A blind man walks into a village pub and tells anyone who will listen that he was once the king of darts. An adaptation of the Greek tragedy Oedipus Rex – reimagined in the world of pub darts and disco, and featuring live music, flying arrows and a portable dartboard. Rex The King is the story of a Somerset darts champion who ruled the world, but lost it all. £10; thewardrobetheatre.com 38 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

An Officer and a Gentleman at Bristol Hippodrome

An Evening with Roddy Woomble, John McCusker & Friends Saturday 4 August, 7.30pm, Folk House, Park Street The award-winning folk musician John McCusker – who has been enviably described by The Guardian as “one of the UK’s most gifted and versatile musicians in any genre” – along with Idlewild frontman Roddy Woomble, presents a unique evening of folk music, including the critically acclaimed record Before The Ruin. £15.50; colstonhall.org

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John Moreland Sunday 5 August, 8pm, St George’s Bristol Across his four solo albums, Oklahoma altcountry singer-songwriter John Moreland has wrestled with love, failure, happiness, and broken faith. This concert is part of Rivertown 2018 – Bristol’s Americana festival. £16.50; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk Mix Night Open Decks Thursday 9 August, 6pm – 8pm, M Shed Get together with friends and join other musical women as part of this fantastic informal platform – play some records and have a boogie. The event aims to encourage female DJs to experiment and hone their skills in a fun, easy-going environment. Vinyl provided but bring your own too; bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed Bristol International Balloon Fiesta Thursday 9 – Sunday 12 August, Ashton Court Estate, Long Ashton Now celebrating its 40th birthday, Bristol International Balloon Fiesta offers four days of fantastic, free family fun. Europe’s largest annual meeting of hot air balloons, attracting more than 130 from across the globe. There will also be trade stands, fairground rides and entertainment; bristolballoonfiesta.co.uk


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EDITOR’S PICK... MAKE MORE NOISE THURSDAY 2 – SATURDAY 4 AUGUST, TIMES VARY, BRISTOL OLD VIC

In honour of the centenary of the Representation of the People Act being passed in Britain and giving some women the right to vote, Bristol Old Vic Young Company present their love letter to the women and girls who campaigned for the vote. Exploring the stories of women’s suffrage, alongside experiences of being female today, a mix of women from Bristol Old Vic Young Company and Adult Company, aged 11 – 67, will perform a play which celebrates just how far we have come, while highlighting what still needs to be done. £10 – £14, 11+. Associate director Maisie Newman will also be holding a free workshop on 4 August exploring feminism and the female voice in contemporary performance; bristololdvic.org.uk

Nachos Thursday 9 – Sunday 12 August, 8pm (6pm Sunday), The Wardrobe Theatre, The Old Market Assembly On the Mexican border with the USA, one man is making millions; a modern-day Robin Hood to his countrymen and an enemy to the United States. Everyday his empire grows and grows, and with it so does the body count. The Nachos Kingpin will stop at nothing until his legacy is assured. On the other side of the border, a rough-round-the-edges but diligent DEA agent is given the assignment of a lifetime: stop the flow of illegal tasty nachos flooding Stateside, end the murderous crisp

war once for all, and take down the Kingpin. A satirical exploration of globalisation, neo-colonialism and consumerism, in the classic silly Wardrobe Theatre style. £12; thewardrobetheatre.com Feel Good Friday: Tyntesfield Run Friday 10 August, 10am – 12pm, Tyntesfield Blow the cobwebs away with a morning run round the Tyntesfield estate, and enjoy spectacular scenery along the way. Route will be both off and on road. Open to all abilities. Led by members of the Nailsea Running Club. £3 per person, price includes a cup of tea or

coffee afterwards in the Cowbarn restaurant. No need to book; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield BRSCC Caterham Race Weekend Saturday 11 – Sunday 12 August, 8.30am – 6pm, Castle Combe Circuit, Chippenham Caterham racing is some of the most hardfought and spectacular in club motor racing, and Castle Combe Circuit will dedicate an entire weekend of action from the skeletal racers that will wow crowds across two days of fast-paced action. Weekend tickets: £15/£20, Saturday £7.50/£10, Sunday £10/£15; castlecombecircuit.co.uk Continued on page 40

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Motown’s Greatest Hits: How Sweet It Is at Bristol Hippodrome

English wine tasting at Harvey Nichols

Desert Island Books: Books, Religion & Ethics Tuesday 14 August, doors 6.45pm, start 7pm, Redland Library, Whiteladies Road Life can be full of ethical dilemmas. How can our faiths and beliefs help us meet these challenges? What lessons can be drawn from books, whether fictional tales, biographies or religious texts? The Friends of Redland Library group is hosting another Desert Island Books event where a panel picks out its favourite books. The panel includes muslim chaplain at University of Bristol, Kalsoom Bashir, and senior lecturer at UWE, journalist and priest-theologian Rev’d Dr Tim Gibson. £3 admission. Mothers Who Make Wednesday 15 August, 10am – 11.30am, Bristol Old Vic Mothers Who Make is a support group and creative session for mothers who are artists – professional and/or passionate writers, painters, actors, dancers, filmmakers, photographers… Every maker welcome; and children too. Free; bristololdvic.org.uk Garden Tour and Afternoon Tea Thursday 16 August, 2pm, Berwick Lodge, Berwick Drive, Bristol Enjoy a jolly British summer afternoon with a sumptuous afternoon tea on the lawn of the beautiful grounds of Berwick Lodge, followed by a guided tour of the impressive gardens with the expert head gardener Robert Dunster, former gardener to the Prince of Wales at Highgrove. £27.95 per person. To book, call 0117 958 1590 or email info@berwicklodge.co.uk English Wine Dinner Thursday 16 August, 7pm, Second Floor Restaurant, Harvey Nichols A long, long time ago, English sparkling wine wasn’t really worth talking about. Fastforward to 2018 and it turns out us Brits know a thing or two about making this delicious tipple. To bring you up to speed, The Second Floor Restaurant at Harvey Nichols has created a four-course tasting menu to

complement the flavours of some of the best English wines. The resident wine expert will introduce you to each drink between courses. £49 per person. To book call 0117 916 8898 or email reception.bristol@harveynichols.com

plantation and reads a selection of More’s poems. Weather appropriate clothing and walking boots recommended. £8 per person. Tel: 0344 249 1895; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield

Cinema Rediscovered presents Get Carter Thursday 16 August, 7.30pm, Curzon Cinema & Arts, Clevedon Michael Caine takes the leading role in Get Carter as a cold-blooded London gangster, and not the sort of man you want to cross. When Carter’s brother winds up dead, he travels to Newcastle to arrange the funeral. Convinced that his brother was murdered, Carter questions local thug Eric (Ian Hendry), who eventually leads him to kingpin Kinnear. From there, Carter carves a bloody trail of revenge through the seedy underbelly of Newcastle in search of his brother’s killer. Projected on beautiful 35mm film as it would have been in 1971. £5.50 – £7.80; curzon.org.uk

Motown’s Greatest Hits: How Sweet It Is Tuesday 21 August, 7.30pm, Bristol Hippodrome The ultimate celebration of the sweet sound of Motown is back. This show combines firstclass music together with slick choreography and a brilliant live band. You’ll be toe-tapping to songs by legendary artists such as Lionel Richie, The Temptations, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, The Jackson Five and many more. £23.90 – £30.90; atgtickets.com/bristol

John King Trips Saturday 18 – Sunday 19 August, M Shed Take a trip on the harbour on the John King – a 1935 diesel tug built to tow cargo ships from Bristol city docks to the mouth of the River Avon. Buy tickets on board on the day, £4/£6; bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed Seasonal food and craft market Sunday 19 August, 10am – 3pm, Tyntesfield From freshly baked bread and fine cheeses to handmade jewellery and ceramics, there are plenty of seasonal treats for you to discover from an array of local food and craft producers at Tyntesfield’s market; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield Little elevations: Walk and talk in Hannah More's poetic landscape Sunday 19 August, 2pm – 4pm, Tyntesfield In this afternoon walk and talk, Dr Samantha Matthews from the University of Bristol will talk about Hannah More’s life and work before Tyntesfield’s poet-in-residence, Holly Corfield Carr, leads a guided walk through the

The Bristol Job Fair Wednesday 22 August, 10am – 4pm, Colston Hall The Bristol Job Fair hosts more than 30 exhibitors looking to recruit for vacancies in the local area. Job fairs are unique recruitment experiences where you can talk to local and national employers face-to-face, in order to get a better idea of their roles and your own suitability. Free entry; thejobfairs.co.uk Kevin Bridges: The Brand New Tour Thursday 23 – Saturday 25 August, 8pm, Bristol Hippodrome Scottish comedy export Kevin Bridges is back with his hotly anticipated live stand-up tour. Recognised for his appearances on the likes of Mock The Week, 8 Out Of 10 Cats Does Countdown and The Last Leg, Kevin is no stranger to breaking box office records on tour. Tickets from £31.65; atgtickets.com/bristol PRIDE Cymru’s Big Weekend Friday 24 – Sunday 26 August, City Hall Lawns, Cardiff A mega mash-up of Pride and Cardiff’s Big Weekend which was last held in 2011 for a massive weekend of carnivals, funfair rides and entertainment from some of the UK’s biggest names in music, celebrating and promoting the importance of LGBT in the Continued on page 42

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LOCAL | EVENTS

See The Vamps at Harbourside Amphitheatre

Alt-country singersongwriter John Moreland will play St George’s Bristol

community. £5 entry; pridecymru.co.uk James Arthur Friday 24 August, gates open 6pm, Harbourside Amphitheatre After taking the X Factor crown in 2012, James Arthur’s winner’s single Impossible became the most successful debut single from the show’s history. He has gone on to have chart-topping singles and albums including the multi-platinum number one single Say You Won’t Let Go. Supporting Arthur at this open-air concert are JP Cooper, Nina Nesbitt and Callum Beattie. £33.05 – £151.20; skyline-series.com YARD: Open Air Club Saturday 25 August, 1pm – 4am, Motion Kick off the bank holiday weekend with a collaboration between some of the city’s most established dance music institutions as Yard brings outdoor spaces to life by fusing music and art. The line-up includes Ame, Ellie Stokes, Rodhad and Andrew Weatherall. 18+. Yard: By Day tickets (from 1pm) £16.50, Yard: By Night (from 10pm) £6.50; motionbristol.com Story Slam Sunday 26 August, 2pm, The Wardrobe Theatre A hugely popular community-driven storytelling event, Story Slam offers the chance to hear people’s amazing true stories told live on stage. All tales are told by volunteers from the audience in just five minutes. Put your name in the hat for a chance to tell a story, or just head along and enjoy everyone else’s. £5/£8; thewardrobetheatre.com The Vamps Sunday 26 August, gates open 6pm, Harbourside Amphitheatre Following supporting the likes of McFly, Demi Lovato and Little Mix on tour, The Vamps have achieved great success and they also topped the charts in 2017 with their album Night & Day. Special guests at this gig include HRVY, YouTube star and DJ Jack Maynard and New Hope Club. £39.20 – £168; skyline-series.com 42 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Combe Countdown Race Day Monday 27 August, 8.30am – 6pm, Castle Combe Circuit, Chippenham This is where the racing season heats up at the circuit, featuring the penultimate rounds before the Castle Combe champions are crowned. Advance tickets £10/£15, includes paddock pass; castlecombecircuit.co.uk Texas & Imelda May Friday 31 August, gates open 6pm, O2 Academy Bristol Scottish pop rock band Texas have had so much success following the release of their 1997 album which featured the international hit Say What You Want, selling millions of records worldwide. Irish singer-songwriter Imelda May is known for her rockabilly influences and has performed at the Grammy Awards. Her album Life Love Flesh Blood reached number four in the UK charts in 2017. £47.61 – £168; skyline-series.com

PLANNING AHEAD Bee and Pollination Festival Saturday 1 – Sunday 2 September, 10am – 5pm, University of Bristol Botanic Garden, Stoke Park Road A world without strawberries and chocolate would be bleak indeed – these and many more foods rely on insect pollination. Find out how you can help bees and other vital pollinators at this festival. Main exhibitors include the Bristol Beekeepers Association, Mad Apple Cider and the Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Talks will range from beekeeping techniques and the workings of a live hive, to research projects about urban pollinators, how to build skeps and weave enchanting willow sculptures. Don’t miss the glasshouses, home to the giant Amazon waterlily, tropical fruit, medicinal plants, cacti and the unique sacred lotus collection. £5.50/free for cons. Tel 0117 428 2041; bristol.ac.uk/botanic-garden Gina Miller, Rise: Life Lessons in Speaking Out, Standing Tall and Leading the Way Tuesday 4 September, 7pm, We The Curious Gina Miller came to prominence when she

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successfully challenged the UK government’s authority to trigger Article 50 – the formal notification to leave the EU – without parliamentary approval. Miller became the target of not just racist and sexist verbal abuse, but physical threats to her and her family. Talk: £6/£8; wethecurious.org Jurassic Park in Concert Monday 10 September, 7.30pm, Bristol Hippodrome Colston Hall presents one of the most thrilling science fiction adventures ever made projected in HD with The Czech National Symphony Orchestra performing John Williams’ magnificent score live. £28.75 – £56.25; colstonhall.org Autumn Yoga Retreat Friday 21 – Sunday 23 September, The Orchard Retreat, East Forde Farm, Cheriton Fitzpaine, Devon Get away for the weekend to the awardwinning yurt and cottage site, The Orchard Retreat, where guests can totally relax among the beautiful setting of 15 acres of meadows, wood, orchard and lawn. With a hatha yoga teacher that can cater for all abilities, a meditation session, plus home-cooked meals by a local caterer, these are all the ingredients you need for a weekend of unwinding. Yurts and private rooms available, weekend from £335 per person. Early-bird discount of 10% if booked before 20 August. Tel 01363 866058; theorchardretreat.co.uk Hillside Studios Open Day Saturday 29 – Sunday 30 September, 11am – 4pm, Hillside Studios, Berwick Lane, Compton Greenfield The artists at Hillside Studios are opening the doors to their workshops, where there will be lots of original artwork for sale from these established local creatives. Get an insight into the courses on offer including printmaking with Jacqui Watkins, stone with Rosie Musgrave, ceramics with Liz Vidal and glass with Bridget Birse. Book your your workshops for the winter in pottery, jewellery, printmaking and much more. Vouchers also available to buy; hillsidestudios.space n


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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART In Relation: Nine Couples who Transformed Modern British Art, RWA, until 9 September For the first time, the RWA has brought together artworks from some of history’s greatest artistic partnerships under one roof. From passionate love affairs to life-long friendships, ‘In Relation’ takes a peek into the relationships that have shaped modern British art. Featuring major loans and works from RWA’s permanent collection, the show includes some of Britain’s most influential couples, including Ben Nicholson and Barbara Hepworth; Laura and Harold Knight; Dod and Ernest Procter; Eric Ravilious and Tirzah Garwood; Robert MacBryde and Robert Colquhoun; Rose and Roger Hilton; Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant. This unique exhibition considers how love, lust and rivalry impacted the work of each of these famous artists. Can art and the heart ever be happy bedfellows? The partner to the historic exhibition is ‘Togetherness’ – an original exhibition of collaborative creativity in contemporary art. Far from the romantic notion of the artist alone in their garret, modern artmaking is often about sharing ideas. ‘Togetherness’ considers how skills and styles are combined, how we navigate being and working together. Featuring Turner Prize-winning collective Assemble, John Wood and Paul Harrison and more, this show raises questions about group dynamics, activism and authorship. • rwa.org.uk

Woman’s Hour Craft Prize, Bristol Museum & Art Gallery, until 2 September This exhibition from the Victoria and Albert Museum marks the 70th anniversary of BBC Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour, created in partnership with the BBC and Crafts Council and showcasing the most innovative and exciting craft practice in the UK. Twelve finalists were selected from 1,500 applications by a panel of experts, and the chosen pieces indicate the broad spectrum of craft Snuff boxes by Romilly Saumarez Smith for the The Survivors by Karen Knorr practice today, from woven willow and darned jumpers to a bespoke Woman's Hour Craft Prize – image courtesy of bicycle and intricate jewellery boxes. The show explores the decline of UK Victoria and Albert Museum, London manufacturing, advances in medicine and stories of loss and memory. Alongside, a ‘make space’ will showcase work by Bristol makers and host an ever-changing series of mini displays and events. There will be opportunities to meet makers, watch demonstrations, browse and buy locally made work, and have a go at something creative. Several artists featured will also be running sessions and talks. Exhibition tickets are reuseable so visitors can return for free as many times as they like. • bristolmuseums.org.uk

Clevedon Art Club Open Exhibition, The Science Atrium, Clevedon, 18 – 27 August The Clevedon Art Club Open Exhibition has a long history of success and enjoys a high reputation in the south-west area. The 2018 Annual Open Exhibition will see the creations of both members and non-members exhibited. These have all been presented before a selection committee of three artists of standing, including at least one Royal West of England Academician. Over 300 works (paintings and drawings, etchings, screen prints, lithographs, collages, enamels, ceramics and sculptures) are typically hung, drawn from an entry of over 600 works. • clevedonartclub.co.uk

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Summer Refresh August 3 - 31 Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol BS8 4UB

Tel 0117 929 2527 • www.limetreegallery.com

Commission a portrait in oils Robert Highton 07939 224598; rhighton@mail.com; robhightonart.com

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EXHIBITIONS Girl With Butterflies

Marla Allison: Painter From The Desert, Rainmaker Gallery, until 11 August This solo exhibition showcases recent works by contemporary Native American artist Marla Allison. It presents acrylic paintings produced in her Laguna Pueblo desert studio alongside canvases painted during a 30-day artist residency in Bristol. As an artist from New Mexico, Marla is proud of her Laguna Pueblo identity and heritage, but also counts Pablo Picasso and Paul Klee among her influences. She combines all these elements to produce her own fresh, contemporary style. “I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered,’ she says. “I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started… My art is what lets me connect the past to my future. My paintings are based on the contemporary, which borrows from the past. I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.” • rainmakerart.co.uk

Summer Open Exhibition, Clifton Arts Club, 4 – 19 August Head to The Undercroft, Victoria Methodist Church (next to the Royal West of England Academy) for paintings, ceramics, sculpture and digital works by a diverse range of artists, from across the South West. An esteemed panel of selectors guarantees this year’s exhibition will be exciting and innovative. With over 400 pieces on show, emerging artists are displayed alongside professionals, award-winners, club members and non-members, and all works are for sale at affordable prices. Clifton Arts Club was founded in 1906 by four artists, who later became academicians of what then became the Royal West of England Academy, with the first president Jacques Emile Blanche having been a pupil of Manet. The annual exhibition works to highlight the constantly evolving nature of the club through the display of contemporary pieces alongside more traditional. The Undercroft exhibition space provides a rarely seen, yet centrally located, backdrop for the show. • cliftonartsclub.co.uk

Summer Show, Coldharbour Framery & Gallery, throughout August Presiding over a summer show packed with waves, waterfalls and coastal scenes is Renee Kilburn’s exuberant ceramic Spirit of the Sea. Alongside are wonderful woodcuts of Atlantic rollers by Merlyn Chesterman, as well as high seas and waterfalls by Rod Nelson, a fellow master of the traditional art of woodcuts. Local artists including Laura Howarth, Catherine Williams and Abigail McDougall also contribute original paintings of seas and rivers, each in their own distinctive style and medium. • coldharbourgallery.co.uk

● Inner Spaces, Natural Light: Still Life Paintings by Lynne Cartlidge, Clifton Contemporary Art, throughout August Clifton Contemporary Art is excited to be showing a new collection by Lynne Cartlidge RCA. In the luminous, beautiful works, everyday objects, fruit, flowers and apparently ordinary interiors are transformed by natural light. Each painting has an inner life and layered poignancy; a cohesive sense of space, atmosphere and compositional strength that is uniquely intriguing and engaging. Pink Hellebores in Afternoon Sun by Lynne Cartlidge

• cliftoncontemporaryart.co.uk

● Summer Refresh, Lime Tree Gallery, 3 – 31 August The work of Julie Ellis is being exhibited for the first time at Lime Tree Gallery. One of the most exciting younger talents in the South West, Julie predominantly creates oil paintings which convey the ambiguous, atmospheric and ethereal qualities of the land. A continuous theme of ‘place’ and ‘a sense of belonging’ have dominated her practice. • limetreegallery.com

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Phthalo Blue Horizon by Julie Ellis


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FURTHER LEARNING

ONE MORE STRING... Who said old dogs can’t learn new tricks? Here’s a few adult courses available around the city if you’re in the market to discover a new talent and add to your bow

RWA DRAWING SCHOOL

CONTEMPORARY RELIEF PAINTING AT SPIKE PRINT STUDIOS

Set in the beautiful RWA gallery, the RWA Drawing School is a hub for adult creativity in the centre of Bristol. Led by brilliant tutors, be inspired by the opulent Grade-II building and changing exhibitions. Try your hand at sketching from a live model at portrait and figure drawing (starts 17 September) and the life drawing drop-in (starts 19 September). Dip your toe into a range of shorter workshops for all abilities, including ‘Landscapes: Drawing to Monotype Printing’ (12 – 13 September) and ‘From Feather to Figure’ (26 October) – a unique chance to draw a live eagle in the studio.

Beginning this year, this innovative course focusses on all aspects of relief printmaking; featuring linocut, woodcut and wood engraving as well as fabric printing. With several friendly and supportive tutors – all experts in their field – there’s never a dull moment and the team have structured the course using a contemporary approach with the focus on printing in the studio. This is a great opportunity to learn in the superb facilities of Spike Print Studio, after working hours, on Mondays from 6pm – 9pm. The one-year course ends with a joint exhibition and begins in September 2018 with 30 weekly sessions, led by Christine Howes with Lisa Takahashi, Ben Goodman and Jacqui Watkins. Get in touch with the team for further details.

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PAPER STRUCTURES AT SPIKE PRINT STUDIOS A one-year course on simple paper structures, culminating in the production of a series of new works for exhibition. Initially, the course, based at Spike Print Studio, will furnish you with the tools to design and carry out your own projects, plus a more highly developed understanding of your own practice. As you progress you will cross the perceived divides between two and three dimensions (and fine art and applied art), allowing your practice to become more experimental and open, whatever your artistic background. Together with the team, you will look at the relationships between form and meaning, and images and narrative within your own work. This course is set to open doors, enable you to discover new approaches and find ways of working with more freedom.

LANGUAGE CONNECTED

• 0117 9290135; info@spikeprintstudio.org; spikeprintstudio.org

Jo Hounsome Photography

An independent language school in the heart of Bristol, specialising in teaching English to adults from all over the world, Language Connected’s team love to meet new and interesting people and to coach each and every one to become better, more fluent and confident English speakers. They not only focus on teaching academic ‘textbook’ English, but also natural English – the type you hear every day around the city. (Cheers drive!) They offer general English lessons as well as exam preparation (PET, First, Advanced, IELTS) and an exciting social programme. The weekly conversation club is by far the most popular; students can practise in a local café over coffee and cake. Take a free level test and chat with the team about the best course options for you. • 0117 9259339; info@languageconnected.co.uk; languageconnected.co.uk

LITTLE KITCHEN COOKERY SCHOOL Providing a relaxed, well-equipped environment with a range of affordable, hands-on cookery workshops, Little Kitchen will get you learning all sorts of culinary skills. The street food course: four weeknight evenings. You’ll cook up delicious street food from around the world, all in a fun environment. Indian kati rolls, Vietnamese banh mi and pulled chicken tacos all feature, along with lots of tasty snacks and plenty to eat as you go. Next course: 17 October – 7 November, £170. The baking masterclass: those with a sweet tooth will learn techniques to get the best from their baking while creating delightful lemon and rosemary meringue tarts, mocha Viennese whirls, mini orange cakes with cardamom cream cheese frosting and parmesan and chilli gougères. Next date: 13 October, £105. A Thai cookery day and chocolate course are also available and both make great gifts – there are vouchers available too.

CREATIVE GLASS GUILD Creative Glass Guild in Bristol offers a wide range of courses in glass art. Whether you’re looking for a new hobby or hoping to develop your existing skills in glass, they’ve got a course for you. From introductory sessions in stained glass, copper foiling, glass fusing and slumping, glass painting and bead making to masterclasses and guest courses with internationally celebrated tutors, there are more than 40 courses to choose from. All courses run from the studios in St. Philip’s and range from taster days and weekenders to longer five-day and monthly classes. Give the team a call to find out more information or request a brochure and take a look at their website. • 0117 9588820; info@creativeglassguild.co.uk; creativeglassguild.co.uk

• 07783 334 881; hello@little-kitchen.co.uk; little-kitchen.co.uk Image by Leo Griffin


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FURTHER LEARNING

BRISTOL FLOWER SCHOOL Jointly owned and run by Jill and her daughter Clare, this school runs several courses, the most popular being the 10-week fast-track floristry. Jill has over 35 years’ experience and has been twice awarded the Dame Margot Fonteyn Cup for bridal bouquet designs. In the past, she has run a successful Bristol shop, was a lecturer at City of Bristol College and has run courses at Bristol University’s Botanic Gardens. She continues to work with top floral designers in the UK and abroad to keep up with current trends, and offers beginners’ courses and wedding workshops. Brides-to-be, take note! The school offers attractive discounts on wedding flowers created by students on the course. • 0117 9623834; bristolflowerschool@gmail.com; bristolflowerschool.co.uk

THE SHOWGIRL ACADEMY Feeling brave? Or looking for a confidence boost? Based in Bristol and Bath, The Showgirl Academy offers unique workshops, hen parties and six-week dance courses specialising in various forms of dance including burlesque, the ’20s Charleston, cabaret/music hall, the can-can, swing and jive, showgirl style, musical theatre, jazz and Disney. You do not need to be an experienced dancer to attend classes as adults of all ages, shapes and sizes are welcome and the emphasis is always on fun and fitness. • 0117 9232358; info@theshowgirlacademy.co.uk; theshowgirlacademy.co.uk

BRISTOL PILATES STUDIO Together with instructors Emma and Evie, Bristol Pilates Studio owner Elle Morrison teaches small group classes and private one-toone lessons on mat and reformer. Based in Bedminster, with no more than 12 in a class, they teach a variety of styles to suit everyone. Mr Pilates wanted everyone to practise Pilates (or contrology, as he called it) daily, and the team at Bristol Pilates Studio want their clients to do that too. Elle teaches everyone the systematic movement skills so that they can practise daily at home each morning – “an hour then a shower” as Joseph Pilates would say. Beginners’ classes start on 8 October and there’s space for private lessons too. All new clients must attend a consultation to chat, with the instructors, about their body and what type of teaching will suit them best. • 07722044117; hello@bristolpilatesstudio.com; bristolpilatesstudio.com

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE IH Bristol is part of a worldwide group of more than 150 language schools that are passionate about providing excellence in language courses. With over 25 years’ experience, International House guarantees a professional service, with modern foreign language courses designed for students of all ages, levels and learning styles. Courses are based in Queen’s Avenue in Clifton and are taught in an immersive style, with little or no English spoken during classes which has been proven to be the best way to learn. There are various ways to study including conversation classes, book clubs and group classes or a combination of methods. The school also offers one-to-one classes, study abroad and in-company learning. So whether it’s Mandarin, Arabic, Portuguese or Welsh that takes your fancy, new worlds await... • 0117 9067660; info@ihbristol.com; ihbristol.com

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THE MAKERSHED The Makershed is a creative space for doing, making and learning new skills. The workshop is situated within the St Pauls Learning Centre in the city centre and whatever your level of experience you’re assured a friendly welcome within a supportive learning and making environment. Go and take part in workshops and courses in traditional hand-tool woodworking, furniture making, tool maintenance, palletwood making, upholstery, upcycling or DIY. The Makershed welcomes complete beginners and more seasoned makers alike. There are courses on weekdays, evenings and weekends, with concession rates available for weekday classes if you are in receipt of income-related benefits. Course dates for September – December 2018 are available now for booking through the website.

CLIFTON WINE SCHOOL Clifton Wine School is a local, independent wine education company which specialises in hosting wine tastings and wine courses in Bristol and Bath. Courses are open to everyone and no previous wine tasting experience is necessary. The school is owned and run by Ruth Wiles DipWSET., who has completed the WSET Diploma qualification and is a qualified educator and assessor with the Wine and Spirits Education Trust. Wine courses and wine tastings focus on learning about the tipple in a fun, relaxed and informal environment. There are numerous courses taking place throughout the coming months, during the evenings and at weekends in central locations in Bristol and Bath. Options include introduction-to-wine evenings, food pairing, the chance to focus on individual wine regions, WSET awards and eight-week ‘World of Wine’ courses. An oenophile’s delight!

• 07599670365; hello@themakershedbristol.co.uk; themakershedbristol.co.uk

• 0117 3706576; info@cliftonwineschool.com; cliftonwineschool.com

THE BRISTOL BREWERY SCHOOL Try your hand at brewing craft ales at The Bristol Brewery School, where you will receive the highest quality training in a fun, unstuffy and practical way with inspiring beer tastings and a full range of beer courses. Naturally there will be plenty of opportunity get to taste some of the finest beer with the head brewer and expert tutors who make it in the tap room. There’s a variety of courses of different levels and lengths, from fun tasting sessions, crash-course brewing for beginners, and how to set up your own microbrewery, right up to a five-day, internationally recognised qualification in general brewing. • 07837 976 871; info@bristolbreweryschool.co.uk; bristolbreweryschool.co.uk

CAST Ever fancied making your own jewellery but in need of the knowhow? Head to Amoeba cocktail bar on King’s Road in Clifton Village on Tuesday 28 August for an evening workshop with CAST (£60). You’ll design, file, carve and create your own bespoke piece of bijouterie. Taking jewellery-making out of the traditional workshop milieu and putting it in a chic, social setting alongside a bit of delicious food and drink, CAST is all about letting guests be creative and experiment with their own ideas. From 7pm – 10pm, you’ll focus on your piece alongside a few cocktails to get the creativity flowing. When you’re happy with it, it will be finished off by the team in 925 silver and will then be delivered to your door. • experiencecast.com

Image by Cat McCabe

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CITY LIFE

INTERNATIONAL BRISTOL: (Clockwise from top) They’ve settled all over the city but a popular choice for many French expats has been Clifton Village; Janetta, who lives on the harbourside; cosmetics manager Cécile; CHS has a strong Gallic community and curriculum; we met local French folk at one of CAST’s jewellery sessions

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CITY LIFE

FRENCH CONNECTION You might know of Bristol’s twinning with Bordeaux, you’re probably painfully aware of France bossing the World Cup, but did you know there’s a burgeoning Gallic community from across the Channel contributing to city life here?

B

ristol is home to a hotch-potch of nationalities, faiths and walks of life and that’s a big part of what makes it so great, so interesting and so receptive to new ideas or ways of doing things. Recently we visited Anna Cake Couture in Clifton for a jewellery making class with CAST (for more, see p12) and happened to meet a few lovely members of the local French community while we were at it – here we chat to them about life in Bristol. TBM: So, why this city?

Cécile: My husband and I wanted to have a family living experience outside our native country. He had a work opportunity, so we followed. Frédéric & Isabelle: We chose Bristol especially for Clifton High School which combines both the English and the French curriculum. Janetta: I landed last August, with my family. Our goal was to settle in a new place fit for family life and new discoveries – Bristol came top! Helene: My partner was needed for business so we all came as a family. Capucine: After living in London, Birmingham and Cheltenham, we came to Bristol 26 years ago, following my Jordanian husband who had been offered his first job with Unilever. Franck: We decided to move to Bristol two years ago as my wife was offered a great job opportunity. Which area do you live in and why did you choose it? Cécile: Clifton Village because it is close to our kids’ school; we fell in love with the area, its cafés, little shops and magnificient Brunel bridge! Frédéric & Isabelle: Frenchay Village. It’s perfect for getting to the M4 and commuting to work and there are some nice areas to walk our dog. Janetta: Harbourside. We were impressed with the variety of nice restaurants, excellent views and the proximity of the shopping zone... Helene: Clifton Village because it’s within walking distance of the school where our older son Raphaël goes – the only one, we were aware of, that was offering French classes in addition to the UK curriculum. Capucine: Also Clifton. We’ve moved five times, discovering each corner of it and each time feeling welcomed and building friendly ties. Franck: We settled in Redland. Gloucester Road and Cheltenham Road are so distinctive, I love it. Congratulations on France’s World Cup win; where did you watch it? Janetta: Many of us went to the stadium where there were songs and French tricolore flags! An excellent moment spent together, watching the match on the big screen, singing Allez Les Bleus and finishing with champagne. It was awesome to watch it in the UK; we discussed the victory with the locals, who so sincerely congratulated us. Isabelle: We watched the semi-final at our British friends’ houses and shared their sadness when the English team was eliminated. Frédéric watched the final in Frenchay; the kids and I were in France. Cécile: My husband saw it in the fan zone near Ashton and I watched it with girfriends from home. I’m glad it was against Croatia rather than England; I didn’t want any tension with friends or colleagues! We’re proud of the team. They stayed focused and adapted their game throughout the tournament. What do you like best about this city? Cécile: Its energy. Lots of students, kids; people are always out, even in bad weather. I love St Nicholas Market and its world food and that Bristol is a big city but so close to the beautiful English countryside. Franck: Live music and festivals, cuisine from around the world and excellent bread – essential! Bristolians are proud of their city and eager

to share experiences which is appreciated when you’ve just arrived. Frédéric & Isabelle: It’s dynamic and eco-friendly; our children don’t want to leave. We appreciate its artistic side and always attend Upfest. Janetta: It’s convenient and there’s always something going on. Helene: The huge parks, the number of restaurants, the buildings, the street art, the canal and lively harbour, the music scene. Capucine: It is big enough to have amazing cultural events such as the Grayson Perry exhibitions but small enough that local creativity has still a place and when you are a newcomer you quickly have a feeling of belonging. The ethos is very welcoming to foreigners. I feel the city embraces differences. What is Bristol’s French community like? Franck: There are strong links via social media where we share tips, experiences and places to visit. We also enjoy inviting people for a good homemade dinner and a nice bottle of French wine: it’s important for us to stick to these kinds of traditions. Janetta: It’s growing fast, people with different profiles and interests find their place and integrate easily here. Cécile: It’s associated with the local schools. It’s a bit like a family... Frédéric: We only know the French community connected to Clifton High School as we aim to meet English people first and do our best to be integrated within the Bristolian community. Over the last three years we have organised picnics with French and English people. It’s also an opportunity for us to help people discover amazing organic and natural wines; those my wife and I sell through our company NFizz Wines. Capucine: I have long-term English friends but also try to welcome French people arriving; I want the expatriates to settle quickly and appreciate the amazing city Bristol is. For five years I worked at Clifton High and helped to set up the double curriculum for expatriate pupils. Integration is the key to a worthwhile experience. What do you do for a living? Cécile: I work for a local company as a cosmetics manager. As a hobby, I organise jewellery making sessions with British start-up CAST. Frédéric: I’m a French engineer. Currently an outage specialist and synergy manager for EDF energy. Isabelle: I use to be a podiatrist, practising in my own surgery in the south of France. Frédéric and I started NFizz (‘natural fizz’) out of sheer passion for good wine. As we feel concerned for sustainability and ecology, we are ardent defenders of organic, natural, biodynamic wines. Franck: I spent my first months here as a ‘house-husband’ coping with all the novelties you can imagine for a father of three non Englishspeaking children… I spent a lot of time cooking and started my business Sucrés Secrets; baking and selling biscuits and cakes. Everything is homemade in a traditional way originating from the distinctive eastern part of France where I was born. I sell at the Country Market in Westbury-on-Trym. Janetta: My husband and I work in the centre of Bristol on a multicultural project which is an excellent opportunity for discovering other ways of thinking, other people’s experiences. Helene: I’m director of a medical device company developing deep brain and spinal cord stimulation devices, based on Hotwell Road. Capucine: I was originally an intellectual property lawyer. When I came to Bristol, I focused on my children. Clifton High later offered me the post of international student coordinator; after the programme became more established, I left to support the business that we had set up with my husband, in student accommodation.

Ú

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CITY LIFE

Where do you like to go in your leisure time? Franck: I like to stroll along the wharfs; you can feel how this city has been and is still connected to the seas. And at this time of year you have all these people paddling and kayaking which is amazing. Frédéric & Isabelle: The Downs, Bedminster and basketball venues; our three teens play basketball for Bristol Storm. Capucine: I still love the feel of places like Primrose Cafe or Anna Cake Couture but I also like the Cargo development and the docks. I am particularly interested in the theatre; everywhere from Bristol Old Vic to the Tobacco Factory, the Wardrobe, Circomedia and the Everyman. What do you think of the French restaurants here? Cécile: I know a few but I must say I enjoy English cuisine and follow local habits: I can’t miss a Sunday roast in a pub like The Lansdown. Janetta: We’ve been happy to discover the local cuisine! But there are a couple of French bistros we’ve visited and they’re very good, indeed. Helene: We prefer testing other foods and love Indian restaurants here so we don’t really look for French restaurants! Wilks was very good. Do you mix with any other expat communities? Helene: I play volleyball with a Bristol team which is multi-national (Polish, Greek, Russian, Mexican); I work closely with a Greek and a German and we have another German friend. So quite a lot actually! Frédéric & Isabelle: Yes. Especially through the basketball; we have met Hungarian, Romanian and Spanish people. How have your children settled into the local youth scene? Cécile: The first year was challenging in a good way. The academic programme is very different from what we know in France; demanding and result-focused while fun/creative. It is really a chance for them to learn a new language properly and understand another culture. Helene: Really easily. I’m sincerely impressed by how much the museums and restaurants are kid friendly, way more so than in France. Frédéric & Isabelle: They struggled a bit when we arrived but almost all their friends are English teenagers and now they have better English accents than us! Janetta: It was a nice surprise, how fast our two kids adapted. There’s no doubt their British friends and teachers helped a lot with this adaptation process, we’re very thankful for that. ■

Frederic and Isabelle started NFizz to offer Bristolians natural, delicious wines

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Franck (pictured below) launched his own baking business after moving to Bristol


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FOOD & Drink

TASTY TIDBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

THE BREAKFAST CLUB According to ‘The Future of Breakfast: An Insight Report 2017’, six million adults in the UK now eat out of home between 10am and midday, up from approximately 1.3 million adults in 1974. Citing this statistic at its inspiration, Bristol eatery Buttermilk & Maple has launched a new breakfast club designed for morning catch-ups with friends. You can now waffle on there over pancakes with maple and bacon, lobster and eggs Benedict, chia fruit bowls, shakshuka baked eggs and more, including – for breakfast club members – a special off-menu dish. Located on Welsh Back, Buttermilk & Maple attracts visitors from both the professional and student communities who the B&M team believes want sociable, diverse morning fare which can also be eaten at all times of the day. Healthy yet still slightly indulgent is the name of the game and, naturally, Insta-friendly... Buttermilk & Maple is serving breakfast until 4pm every day to appeal to what have been dubbed ‘breakfastarians’ – those who look for breakfast or so-influenced dishes throughout the day. The Breakfast Club will be a monthly sociable indulgence from 10-11am, when members can taste-test new dishes and juices.

Buttermilk & Maple’s breakfast club offers shakshuka baked eggs, chia fruit bowls and more

BRISTOL THE URBAN FOOD HUB A successful bid from the Discover England Fund has recognised Bristol as a food and drink destination with international ambitions. Visit England has announced the latest successful applicants to receive funding from the £40million fund for tourism product development; with Destination Bristol one of 11 successful regional bids to each receive awards of up to £250,000. Bristol’s remit is in ‘developing the urban food hub’: an initiative which recognises the city’s growing national and international reputation as a centre of excellence in food and drink – from its Michelin-starred restaurants to inventive micro-breweries. “The Bristol region is bursting with incredible food and drink and it is so much more than just somewhere to eat,” says Kathryn Davis, Destination Bristol’s head of tourism. “Often the everyday offer of Sunday roast, afternoon tea or a pint in the local can seem like a fascinating and quirky custom to international visitors. This initiative is about uncovering those experiences – tours, tastings, chefs’ tables, opportunities to meet producers and getting into kitchens to learn skills. “Our aim is to help bring these experiences to market, working with the professional travel trade to ensure they are bookable before travel and are used as motivators to visit the city and create special memories.” In the third and final year of funding, the projects are designed to showcase destinations and experiences across the country to overseas markets, driving inbound tourism and boosting the domestic market. According to Visit England, the Bristol project will “focus on food and beverage products and activities from businesses that might normally be considered outside the tourism landscape, promoting Bristol as well as the rural area surrounding the city, as a destination of excellence in food and beverage experiences.” • visitbritain.org/discover-england-fund

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• buttermilkandmaple.com

HOP TO IT Bath Ales recently opened a state-of-the-art brewery in Warmley, combining traditional artisan methods with advanced, modern brewing equipment to bring drinkers more of what they know and love, plus some exciting new beers too. As well as a full guided tour of the brewhouse, pre-booking visitors will be treated to a beer sampling session and two complimentary half pints in the new taproom. There are plenty of freshly-brewed beers on draught to choose from, including Bath Ales’ light and refreshing first lager, Sulis, brewed with Lemon Drop and Hüll Melon hops.

• bathales.com


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WHERE INDULGENCE BLOSSOMS Deep in the heart of the South West, nestled within the exquisite surroundings of the British countryside with views that reach across to Wales, is Berwick Lodge – a hidden secret just waiting to be discovered. Call us now to start your story.

Berwick Lodge, Berwick Drive, Bristol BS10 7TD Tel: 0117 958 1590 www.berwicklodge.co.uk

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 57


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FOOD | DINING IN

COME DINE WITH EASE Dinner parties don’t have to be stressful with a helping hand from Dineindulge, as Jessica Hope discovers

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he notion of a private chef, for a long time, has been associated with the likes of A-listers and yacht lovers sailing around the The French Riviera. However in recent years, with many people preferring to entertain their guests at home rather eating in a restaurant, and with the rise of Airbnb group-style holidays among friends and hen parties, there has been a significant growth in the demand for private chefs to provide a personal yet relaxed dining experience at home. Two and a half years ago, private chef Rod could see this market growing and decided to co-found Dineindulge – an easy to use online private chef booking service where chefs offer a range of menus for parties at the host’s own home. So rather than you having to fuss with simultaneously tidying your home, cooking and entertaining your guests, Dineindulge – whose head office and test kitchen is based in Henleaze, north Bristol – takes the stress of cooking off your hands with a personal chef. They will use your kitchen’s facilities, crockery and maybe some of your pots and pans to create beautiful dishes for you and your party to enjoy. The host needs only lay the table, get the wine in and keep those glasses topped up, so they can really take the time to catch up with friends. One scorching summer evening, we took over one TBM team member’s flat for a dinner party to remember, and were lucky enough to have Rod as our chef for the evening. Prior to setting up Dineindulge, Rod worked for most of his career in the catering world, either in hotels and restaurants or as a private chef. The Dineindulge menus are tried and tested by chefs across the country, and offer a wide range of dishes to suit all tastes, celebrations and budgets. When making our booking, we used the straightforward website to choose a menu to suit our guests. We agreed on one of the deluxe tasting menus, which includes nine dishes, and then it is down to the chef to bring all the ingredients, so you don’t have to worry about whether you’ve forgotten to pick up some basil or run out of butter. While we popped the prosecco and chatted in the living room, Rod quietly and efficiently prepared the dishes. 58 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Once we were seated, he presented us with an amusebouche of gazpacho – a cool tomato soup shot with a touch of chilli, cucumber and olive oil. On one of the hottest days of the year, this was a refreshing start to our meal. Served with a parmesan and fennel crisp, and a warm bread roll with salted butter, it was an ideal hit of savoury and saltiness on our palates. Next we enjoyed a simple, delicious starter of seared shiitake and portobello mushrooms with peashoots and dill, topped with delicate poached egg yolk; the fresh herbs and creamy yolk complementing the meaty, woody mushrooms. For the fish course, Rod pan-fried Scottish scallops and served them with baby gem lettuce, shelled peas and a milk foam. The scallops were impressively sized, soft to cut through, and had a hint of caramelisation. Even those around the table who had never had a scallop before raised their eyebrows in surprised appreciation for the molluscs. Our next course was an absolute winner. Rod plated up fresh white truffle tagliatelle with shaved celeriac and truffle oil. With silky pasta and the earthy yet subtle taste of the truffle, this was a perfect palate cleanser after our previous courses, and had us all yearning for Italy. Throughout the evening, Rod was the epitome of professionalism. Friendly, adaptable and laid-back, he answered any questions about the food and his work with good humour, impressively remembered all six of our names, made us feel very relaxed and able to chat freely around the dinner table, even when the conversation turned to last night’s antics on Love Island. Up next was the main course of lamb noisette with micro broccoli, caramelised feta cheese and carrot puree. The lamb was lightly pink, succulent and, importantly, didn’t have any of the chewy bits that poorly cooked lamb is prone to. There were sighs around the table as fellow guests all shared a mutual love for the caramelised feta – simply blowtorched before plating, the bursts of salty-sweet cheese were wellmatched with the juicy meat and fresh veg. As a vegetarian alternative, two guests tried the parmesan and pine nut polenta which was raved about, and the

DINNER TIME: This page, left to right, an amusebouche of gazpacho with a parmesan and fennel crisp, warm bread roll and salted butter; the pasta course of truffle oil tagliatelle with shaved celeriac; all hosts have to do is dress the table and top up those wine glasses Opposite, co-founder of Dineindulge, Rod, cooking up a storm in the kitchen


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generous helping of toasted pine nuts went down especially well. We were then treated to a pre-dessert – how have we been living without pre-desserts for this long? We tucked into a lightly whipped peppermint cream layered with a sprinkling of sesame brittle and dark chocolate covered mint leaves. For dessert, we eagerly delved into spiced pears with a walnut butter biscuit crumb and a sweet cider sabayon, topped off with pretty edible flowers. Thoroughly poached, the pears didn’t contain any of that graininess that can sometimes occur, and the light, spicy flavours contrasted nicely with the sweet pear and creamy, rich sabayon.

With silky pasta and earthy yet subtle truffle, this was an ideal palate cleanser... Contently full, our palates were refreshed after a shot of orange and caraway seed granita, before we attended to a carefully selected cheese board to round off the night. The summer’s evening made for the perfect temperature to taste this fine selection, including a rich and mature Godminster vintage cheddar, a Cashel Blue from Ireland, which was almost like a Roquefort, and a soft and tangy Trevarrian Cornish brie. We gobbled these up with pickled veg, charcoal crackers, sweet and decadent fig and date chutney, as well as sharp pickled walnuts. While we waxed lyrical about the final course, Rod was away washing the dishes, packed up and cleaned the kitchen before he left us to polish off the last of the cheese. The idea of nine courses could be a bit much for some, however each dish was perfectly proportioned and Rod had impeccable timing between courses, giving the guests enough time for their stomachs to settle and to top up their wine glasses.

If a tasting menu isn’t for you, Dineindulge also offers two and threecourse menus, as well as barbecue and platter selections for more casual dining. The chefs can cater for any event to suit the client, so if you’re looking to get dolled up for a romantic dinner for two, for foodie fun with a hen party or for a relaxed catch-up or celebration with lots of friends – you could even climb into your pyjamas for the occasion – the Dineindulge team are happy to accommodate all. Whether you’re an A-lister or not, Dineindulge offers a smooth and efficient service that will have your guests talking about that dinner party for a long time. n • Dineindulge menus range from £24.99 – £69.99 per person; visit dineindulge.co.uk

We offer you a range of delicious wines produced from healthy grapes grown on vines sustainably farmed by passionate wine makers. Our wines are organic, biodynamic, natural and authentic. FREE DELIVERY IN BRISTOL • WWW.NFIZZ.CO.UK

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 59


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TALK OF THE TOWN

Good old gambas The menu is eclectic, inspired by research trips across Spain

Expect extensive sherry options – the most food-friendly wine there is, according to Owen

FROM CATALONIA TO CLIFTON (VIA CARDIFF!) All the authentic Iberian background behind the Village’s latest opening, Bar 44. Words by Velimir Ilic

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or food, Spain is one of the best countries in the world at every level, from local, mama-style cooking to that casual, modern tapas bar style, and right at the top, the gastronomic end.” So says Owen Morgan, co-founder (with brother Tom and sister Natalie) of Cardiff and Vale of Glamorgan-based tapas restaurant group, Bar 44. An ardent Hispanophile, he should know what he’s talking about. Never happier than when extolling the virtues of his favourite country, and fuelled by an unbridled passion for Spain’s colourful food, drink and culture, he and his siblings have poured heart and soul into the project, combining artisan ingredients from the finest independent suppliers and producers, both Spanish and local. The restaurants have been a real game-changer for the food scene in South Wales. Cowbridge, a small, traditional market town seven miles or so west of Cardiff – where the Morgans grew up – might seem like an inconspicuous place from which to start a Spanish tapas business, but since opening their inaugural venue there in 2002, the trio have carved out quite a reputation for their modern, authentic and imaginative take on time-honoured Iberian dishes, winning a heap of awards and plaudits in the process. Recently, there was yet another award to put on the shelf, with Owen voted renowned drinks industry website Imbibe’s Restaurant 60 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Personality Of The Year in recognition of his standing among his peers, and of Bar 44’s remarkable ascendency. The journey, and the brothers’ love affair with Spain, started early. “It comes from growing up in a food-crazy family, and eating together on a regular basis,” says Owen. “On family holidays, we would often go to different parts of Spain – the ‘non-package’ areas – which fuelled our passion hugely. Then when I was older, summer jobs in Spanish bars and restaurants just kept feeding the bug.” They’ve been wholly committed to the cause, mucking in and doing whatever it took to succeed. Owen clearly remembers their inauspicious beginnings in Cowbridge, and getting the keys to their first site. “The restaurant was in a derelict social club on the High Street, and a tapas bar seemed completely alien to people,” he recalls. “It was on the first floor, with no real shop front or presence. Everyone thought we were crazy. Three times, in that first month, the chef didn’t turn up, so we were in the kitchen ourselves, doing all the cleaning and the toilets, washing the pots, doing the bar, cashing up at the end of the night, and starting again the next morning. That’s how we cut our teeth – you just grow by your mistakes.” And grown they have; what seemed like a huge risk back then has paid off handsomely. Having also opened their Penarth outpost and flagship Cardiff restaurant in recent years – plus their northern venue,


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Asador 44, grilling meat, fish and veg over charcoal and woods – they’ve proved those early doubters wrong. With their latest branch in Clifton Village opened in July, showcasing their take on Spanish food to a new clientele, another chapter beckons. Having spent their formative years in Bristol, studying at Clifton College, Owen and Tom are clearly still in love with the place; there’s a definite sense of unfinished business. “It’s just a great city, full stop,” says Owen. “We’ve always wanted to open in Bristol, because we have a personal connection from living here in the past – we very much see it as our second home. Clifton Village, in particular, is a big draw for us because it’s such a beautiful part of the city.” It helps, of course, that they’re already immersed in Bristol’s vibrant independent food scene, with well-ensconced fellow Spanish eateries such as Paco, Poco, Muiño, Pata Negra and others. “We have a lot of friends here,” says Owen. “We know a lot of restaurateurs, chefs and suppliers, and always love coming to eat and drink. There are so many interesting areas and neighbourhoods, which have allowed a lot of start-ups to set up bricks-and-mortar restaurants. Bristol’s always been a creative city, whether that’s arts, culture or music, and the food scene is an extension of that. Cardiff’s food scene is great, but it’s much further ahead in Bristol, and we really want to be part of that mix – it seemed like a logical next step to come over the Severn Bridge.” There’s a palpable excitement about the space they’ve inherited on Regent Street. But their ambition, says Owen, is not driven by taking shortcuts. Despite Bristol being their fifth restaurant, don’t expect a chain mentality or formulaic roll-out. “Rather than simplify and compromise, we’re very conscious of not standardising,” Owen insists. “If anything, we’ll be pushing harder to be even better in quality and process.” As with the other Bar 44 venues, Bristol has its own unique character and theme. Having undergone a redesign, it has a striking feature wall by Stokes Croft-based Spanish artist Andy Rivas – think urban street art meets rural Spain. There’s also a new bar and, for special occasions, two private dining rooms downstairs in the old bank vaults, one of which will be entirely based around sherry... The Bristol menu is eclectic, inspired by Owen and Tom’s regular research trips across Spain and featuring both small-plate grazing and larger sharing plates (‘raciones’). Expect Galician beef, chorizo and different types and grades of jamón (there are even plans for a special ‘jamón room’) plus unique shellfish and Sanlúcar king prawns, prized cuts of Ibérico pork (served rare, like a steak) and other such epicurean goodies. “Our modern take on the Spanish classics,” says Owen, “that a cosmopolitan Spaniard, walking in, would appreciate. We’d like to think that our offering could sit comfortably in Madrid or Barcelona.” Vegetarians and vegans are well catered for, with dishes based on Spanish staples such as broad beans and different tomato varieties, plus vegan wines, sherries and even the odd vegan dessert. “At Asador 44, we do a blackberry ripple vegan ice cream made with avocado, which you need to make it creamy,” says Owen. “It comes with a chocolate gazpacho, and we do a blood orange salad with it.” Presentation, meanwhile, is typically simple. “The further we go, the more things get pared back to the ingredients on the plate,” he adds. “Two or three elements, maximum – no fuss. If you’re doing an asparagus dish, that ingredient should be the star, with one or two accents.” As with the Bar 44 restaurants in Wales, head chef Tom Maynard – who has worked with Stephen Terry at The Hardwick in Abergavenny, and at Scott’s and J Sheekey in London – will create new dishes every week. “Tom is exceptional, really strong on fish and seafood,” says Owen. “He has a really light touch and creates great flavours. Our relationship is great – he understands us, and how we work.” That understanding takes in an array of food influences that chime with them both; a roll-call of Spain’s cutting-edge chefs, restaurateurs and gastronomic innovators trip off Owen’s tongue, including Ferran Adrià (El Bulli), whose influence has rippled down through all levels of cooking; the Roca brothers; Andoni Luis Aduriz at Mugaritz; Juan Mari Arzak in the Basque Country; and down south, Ángel León’s three-Michelin-starred Aponiente, to name a few. The more Owen speaks, the more you realise how well-connected he is. He cites “amazing Spanish chefs in London that we get on really

well with” such as José Pizarro, Nieves Barragan [ex-Barrafina chef, who recently opened her Sabor restaurant in Mayfair] and Angel Zapata Martin at Barrafina itself. “We’re sending some people up to him in a couple of weeks,” he says. “The scene is really inclusive – they’re not too protective about Spanish gastronomy, and just want to spread the word. They’re a great inspiration.” The Morgans promise family-friendly event days in Bristol, such as the big fiesta they had in Penarth for International Sherry Week last year, or a calçotada, a Catalan-style barbecue during which piles of giant green onions (calçots) are grilled over a hot fire. “They’re just so much fun,” laughs Owen. “It’s all about getting your hands dirty, making a great romesco sauce to go with the onions, and washing it all down with a glass of good Catalan wine.” Talking of wine, as one of only a handful of certified sherry educators in the UK, Owen is also a leading authority on this most versatile of tipples, having trained in Jerez, southern Spain. Forget about the much-maligned stuff your nan used to drink at Christmas – sherry has evolved into an altogether more alluring drink. Along with good jamón, says Owen, it’s an ingrained part of Spanish life – “‘last meal’ food and drink,” as he calls it. “People have learnt to trust us about sherry – through our tasting menus, for example, with six or seven plates and sherry samples,” he says. “We cook a lot with it and also serve sherry cocktails, which are huge around the world now – we’ve been doing them since we first opened. You can have sherry in a mojito, different types of Martinis, or in an Old-Fashioned. I’ll eat my hat if can’t find a sherry to suit everyone, whether it’s sweet and sticky, or super-light and dry, and the best food to go with it – it’s just the most food-friendly wine in the world.” So, while Bar 44 Cardiff is the only venue in the UK to pour three different sherries from full-sized aged barrels behind the bar, plans are afoot for some sort of ‘sherry museum’ in Bristol, featuring old historic sherry bottles and labels sent over from Spain. Naturally, there’s a huge sherry list – including a selection of rare ones – with wine preservation systems to keep them at the perfect temperature. It forms part of a broader drinks list, featuring an extensive selection of gin tonicas and infusions, bespoke cocktails, Spanish vermouth (‘vermut’ – very fashionable right now) and interesting organic and biodynamic wines from all corners of Spain. “There won’t be Champagne or prosecco,” says Owen. “If you’re coming here, it’s Spain all the way! Sparkling Spanish wine is incredible, and a fraction of the price of Champagne.” And so, with this hot new opening, the future looks rosy. Success in Bristol, says Owen, would be a “busy, buzzy, ‘go to’ tapas bar – a real hub of the community. If you want something enough, you just have to put everything into it and back yourself to make it work.” Success is never guaranteed, of course, but given the Morgans’ previous form – driven by that forensic attention to detail, total dedication and hardened willingness to win – you probably wouldn’t bet against them... ■ • bar44.co.uk Owen’s something of an authority on trendy tipple sherry

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HISTORY

THE SECRET SOCIETY

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f we turned the clock back a couple of centuries, Bristol’s elegant suburb of Clifton would look remarkably different to how it is today. Many of the beautiful crescents that define the village’s architecture, such as Royal York Crescent or Cornwallis, would still be under construction, while Brunel’s iconic suspension bridge wouldn’t be built for another four decades. In 1818, Bristol was a hub for industry, maritime work and banking, with a population which was growing rapidly year on year. As wealthy professionals moved to Bristol to pursue new ventures, and former armed forces personnel looked for somewhere relaxing to retire to, there was a greater demand for more fashionable, genteel homes and entertainment away from the buzz of the city centre, and so Clifton quickly became the go-to place.

FOUNDING FATHERS By the early 19th century, private members’ clubs were increasingly popular among society’s elite, especially in London. These exclusive clubs allowed men to socialise, read, play billiards and enjoy time away from their work. As more professionals moved to Clifton, a group of 51 men – including merchants, solicitors, doctors, bankers and members of the clergy – came together to establish their own club in 1818. They quickly negotiated the leasehold on a plot of land behind Royal York Crescent and, within just 10 months, construction was well underway, and it was reported that two billiard tables would then be installed into the interior. Initially the club was very profitable and became popular among the residents of Clifton and visiting gentlemen who could purchase a shortterm membership for the duration of their stay in Bristol. Just as nearby Bath became renowned for its thermal waters, elegant balls at the Assembly Rooms and Bath stone architecture, Clifton quickly caught up with the tastes of the day and members of the nobility and gentry were lured to the village as a resort for fun and respite. However, just as many private members’ clubs struggled with competition from other clubs during the 19th century, The Clifton Club was forced to close on Princess Victoria Street in 1850 and was re-opened two years later as a school for local working-class children. Clifton Library now occupies the building. NEW BEGINNINGS Following the closure of the nearby Clifton Hotel and Assembly Rooms on The Mall in 1854, a group of men behind the Clifton Improvement Association (an organisation determined to preserve the beauty and running of the village) purchased the building in 1856, fearing that the premises would be converted into flats or houses. Quickly they began

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Photography by Evoke Pictures Photographers

Behind the closed doors of Clifton’s private members’ club, Jessica Hope explores its 200-year history


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CLUB NIGHT: Opposite, the exterior of The Clifton Club on The Mall; inset, the club’s ornate interior decoration and lighting This page, clockwise from top left; the D-Day planning staff based at Clifton College in 1944, who enjoyed respite at The Clifton Club during the war; a dapper-looking chap enjoying a drink at the club’s bar; a signed photograph of General Omar Bradley, who was given honorary membership to the club

altering the hotel into public rooms to socialise in, billiard rooms to play in and places for a spot of refreshment, and re-established the private members’ club under the name of Clifton Subscription Rooms Association. NOTABLE NAMES The club began to thrive again, and many of the members turned their interests to supporting the local area. Two of the club’s chairmen, surgeons John Colthurst and John Burroughs, were involved in the formation of Clifton College in 1862, and consequently 70 per cent of the college’s provisional committee were members of the club. In the 19th century, while some London clubs gained notorious reputations for the raucous behaviour of their members, which featured elites from high society, politicians, and big names from worlds of arts and literature, The Clifton Club continued to attract local professionals and merchants as its members. The club’s biggest names from its 200-year history include founding member Vincent Stuckey who built a great banking empire and helped advise the government on the Bank Charter Act 1844, where the Bank of England became the sole printer of bank notes in England. Member Nicholas Roch, a manufacturer who helped introduce none other than Isambard Kingdom Brunel to the Bristol Dock Company, supposedly rowed Brunel along the River Avon while the famous engineer surveyed the route for his vision of the Great Western Railway. The club also elected renowned cricketer WG Grace as a permanent member when he lived in Victoria Square while playing for Gloucestershire and practising medicine nearby. Grace regularly competed in the annual billiards competition and he was a runner-up in the handicap competition in 1898. A CALL TO ARMS When the First World War broke out in 1914, much of the function and running of The Clifton Club remained unchanged. Although, as around 40 members enlisted, membership numbers depleted and the club relied on generous donations to keep its doors open. However, following the establishment of flying schools nearby, the RAF requisitioned the club in 1918 and young officers and pilots are believed to have been billeted to nearby homes in Clifton. Many of the members who were

deemed too old to fight in the war worked directly in local industry, helping Bristol’s factories to provide essential war supplies and the transportation of goods. During the Second World War, the club was lucky to escape any damage during bombing raids from German planes, although there were occasions where members and staff had to climb onto the roof of the club to remove incendiary devices. The club provided entertainment for officers and members of the civil service during the conflict, although rationing did mean a scarcity of wine and spirits at times.

Club (noun): an assembly of good fellows – FROM A DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH

LANGUAGE BY DR SAMUEL JOHNSON, 1775 –

In 1943 discussions began to take place regarding an armed invasion of Europe, and the planning staff behind what later became known as the D-Day landings were based at Clifton College. General Omar Bradley, who later ordered the First United States Army during D-Day, and many of his staff took up memberships with the club and enjoyed respite there. In recognition for his work and leadership, Bradley was given honorary membership to the club after the war. 200 YEARS YOUNG Following the austerity of the post-war era, the club toyed with the idea of selling the premises altogether and moving to a new location. Following the recent financial crisis, the club sold part of the building overlooking Waterloo Street for commercial use, and in the early 2000s the two squash racquet courts were sold to help to finance the recent renovation of the main building. Having been founded as a private gentleman’s club, it began accepting women as members in 2008 and there has been a notable change in the demographic in recent years – more and more young professionals and students are now joining. As well as holding socials and events throughout the year for members, the club, which now has a much more contemporary feel, can also be hired out for private events, corporate functions and weddings – it hosts a mean garden party and the food, we’re told, is to die for. It might be celebrating its bicentenary this year, but The Clifton Club certainly isn’t showing its age. n • To find out how to become a member or to enquire about a private event, call 0117 974 5039 or visit thecliftonclub.co.uk

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ARCHITECTURE

MODEST & MODERNIST Ray Newman looks at the dominant architectural style that characterised many Bristol buildings after the Second World War

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alls of glass, flat roofs, frames of steel and concrete, straight lines on straight lines. These are some of the hallmarks of modernism, the approach to architecture that defined the mid-20th century, showing no deference to the past, embracing today without shame. And Bristol, because it was so much rebuilt after the Blitz, has plenty. One of the most important pioneers of architectural modernism was the Swiss-French genius Le Corbusier whose Cité Radieuse in Marseille was a great influence on the design of post-war tower blocks. He didn’t design any buildings in the UK but did visit Bristol in 1947 as part of a delegation of international architects. The blocks built by the city’s inhouse team after 1950 along the waterside at Redcliffe are reminiscent of his style, especially in their slab (rather than tower) form. Waring and Francombe houses, by Albert H. Clarke, share an entrance with a waving concrete canopy and stylish ceramic tiles. At the centre, Colston Tower, designed in 1961 by Moxley Jenner and Partners, betrays another influence: the big city American buildings of German-born architect Mies van de Rohe and his disciples. With its tower balanced on a flat base it specifically echoes Lever House in New York City, albeit on a smaller scale and with less blank glass. At the top of Park Street, Clifton Heights, also designed by Raymond Moxley, is similar in style. Look out for quieter, more discreet public buildings – job centres, Christ The King, Knowle West

primary schools, libraries, and so on. Few are thrilling in their own right but they demonstrate the extent to which modernism became the norm in the 1950s and ’60s. To pick just one example, the former Brislington Fire Station, designed in 1961 by the City Architects and now a mechanic’s workshop, is a neat, low-lying building of pale brick in a concrete frame brought to life by the drill tower that shoots up behind. Churches, too, got the modernist treatment. St Stephen’s at Glencoyne Square, Southmead (Gerald Wills, 1958) is a striking example in the same red brick as the houses that surround it, with an open concrete bell tower, and pointedly non-traditional throughout. The former Methodist Church at Redcliffe, now the Faithspace Community Centre, is another, designed by Alec French and Partners in 1962, with the most striking feature of the building being the spaceage, box-like hall in pale concrete and glass. And the Catholic Church of Christ the King at Knowle West (1952) is an astonishing sight, all austere, angular white stone and minimalist detail. At the small domestic level a notable modernist enclave can be found at Pitch and Pay Lane at Sneyd Park where, in the mid-1960s, 44 vaguely Scandinavian houses were built in partnership with Span Developments Limited. They combine the sharp lines of modernism with concessions to homeliness and suburban liveability. And in the municipal realm, the large estate at Lockleaze is practically a museum of post-war prefabricated construction – modest modernism on the tightest of budgets. ■ St Stephen's, Southmead

Methodist Church, Redcliffe

Colston Tower was influenced by the big-city American buildings of Mies van de Rohe

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FOOTIE FEVER Still riding high from England’s sensational run at the World Cup, we look – a little closer to home – at the challenges ahead for Bristol City as the new Championship season kicks off this month. Words by James Crawley

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shton Gate Stadium is traditionally known as the home of Bristol City (and, since 2014, the newly named Bristol Bears rugby team) but for the best part of a month this summer, it became known as the place to watch the World Cup. With England’s run all the way to the semi-finals, it felt like the nation collectively held its breath, cheered and ultimately sobbed when it all came to an end, during their last performance against Croatia. Anyone watching news coverage of various fan parks around the country couldn’t have failed to see the jubilant beer-throwing moments of celebration when England scored, and Ashton Gate was no exception. A FAN-FILLED AFFAIR The transformation from car park to fan village was astounding and meant that, despite the off-season, the stadium was bursting with activity. Indeed, the fan village, sponsored by Gorilla Grass, was such a success that it welcomed more than 30,000 fans to BS3, with the last few England games ticket-only affairs. With a choice of two enormous permanent screens (one inside and one outside) it meant that fans could opt for sunshine or shade (who would have thought we’d have such good weather for watching the World Cup for once?!) and the event underlined the stadium’s reputation as the place to watch the big sporting moments. 66 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Of course, just as the World Cup kicked off so did Bristol’s Gromit Unleashed 2 trail; once again Ashton Gate is proud to play to host to one of the memorable sculptures. Visitors to BS3 are now able to spot Gromit sporting a Rockin’ Robin theme to ensure he settles well into his surroundings just outside the sports store.

A RIGHT KNEES-UP: (Main image) Beers go flying as fans celebrate at the England v Sweden game at Ashton Gate’s fan village during the World Cup

FORWARD THINKING With the World Cup over for another four years, attention has now turned to what promises to be another actionpacked campaign for Bristol City. The new season arrives with Lee Johnson’s squad fresh from their highest league finish for eight years, having fought in a season-long play-off challenge during 2017/18. Of course it was a year of ups and downs but what the City head coach achieved in only his second full-season at the club was more than admirable. In fact the style and tempo of the football played suggests bigger and better things may be on the club’s horizon. Away from the Sky Bet Championship, City made history as they reached the semi-final of the Carabao Cup for the second time since 1989. Eventual Premier League winners Manchester City proved a step too far but the Robins more than matched their opponents over the two legs in January, which included a first-ever packed-out away end at the Etihad Stadium. The memorable cup run saw Bristol City dispatch four

Opposite, clockwise from top left; the outdoor section of the fan village; Bristol City playing against Real Balopédica Linense during the Spanish pre-season tour; the club showcased the new white away kits against Shrewsbury Town in a pre-season match in July Inset; The Grand Appeal’s Rockin’ Robin Gromit outside the sports store at Ashton Gate (imagery: JMPUK)


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SPORT

Behind the scenes, the staff said goodbye to head physio Steve Allen and welcomed two new experienced additions to the medical team in Andrew Rolls, who recently departed Arsenal, and Andrew Proctor from Oxford United. Andrew Rolls brings with him almost two decades of experience with clubs in the top flight, while Andrew Proctor played a significant role in the development of the medical department at United, which saw the League One club share promotion and two Wembley finals. INNOVATION There have also been more exciting developments off the pitch with the launch of a new, bespoke club mobile app which will both enhance fans’ matchday experience and bring the traditional matchday programme to life in the forthcoming campaign. The app offers the club’s in-house video interviews and breaking news at the swipe of a finger, as well as making use of augmented reality which will work in conjunction with both the programme and elements of Ashton Gate as fans walk around the stadium on a matchday. other Premier League opponents en route to the semi-final, not forgetting a magical night at Ashton Gate as the team overcame Jose Mourinho’s Manchester United in the quarter-final round; Korey Smith’s 90th-minute winner will no doubt be replayed many times in the years to come. NEW ARRIVALS As the curtain closed on the 2017/18 season, the club said goodbye to the likes of Gary O’Neil, Aden Flint and Bobby Reid, but swift summer business saw the arrivals of no less than five new first-team recruits, at the time of writing: Marley Watkins (Norwich City), Adam Webster (Ipswich Town), Hakeeb Adelakun (Scunthorpe United), Andreas Weimann (Derby County) and Jack Hunt (Sheffield Wednesday), respectively.

…The style and tempo of the football played suggests bigger and better things may be on the club’s horizon... They bring a wealth of Premier League and Championship experience and arrived for the beginning of pre-season, giving them time to adjust to new surroundings and bond with teammates ahead of the 2018/19 season opener against Nottingham Forest at Ashton Gate on Saturday 4 August.

NEW GEAR The summer of exciting launches didn’t end there either, as the club has unveiled new-look home, away and third kits. As the purple and lime colours switched to become City’s third strip, the club revealed a freshlooking white strip for away trips in 2018/19. This kit, alongside the anthem jacket and training wear, exclusively welcomes the return of the Robin crest. It hints at the kit of the late 1980s, an era which saw City lift the Football League Trophy in 1986, followed by promotion from the old Third Division in 1989. So there is plenty to be excited about as football returns to the red half of Bristol, and everybody at City – the fans, players and staff – are relishing another promising adventure. The club will look to learn the lessons from last season but knows it has the capabilities to compete with the best. If Bristol City can figure out that perfect formula, which they are more than capable of doing, they could just be about to make yet more club history. n • bcfc.co.uk

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TRAVEL

Calming stroll around the marina?

The view from the observation wheel

All work and no play... Torquay’s a stimulating environment for networking and discussion

Delegates can bond over wine tasting tutorials or wildlife experiences

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TRAVEL

GO, TEAM Planning a business event or conference? Check out Torquay’s offering for visiting professionals

T

hose of us that go on away days and travel to conferences, whether out of requirement or choice, do so to learn, to share and to network, for the most part, and those things are inevitably a whole lot easier to achieve if the event is enjoyable too. One West Country venue that really seems to get this can be found along the ‘English Riviera’ in the bayside bucketand-spade town of Torquay. Home of the likes of Agatha Christie, Peter Cook and of course the farcical, fictitious Fawlty Towers just to mention a few, it’s also now the domain of a state-of-the-art conference centre with sprawling sea views, fine ‘farm to fork’ Devonshire produce and wildlife experiences on the doorstep. Quick and easy rail links from Bristol make it an enticing, accessible destination; we travelled down to the South Coast with GWR, which has collaborated with Conference English Riviera and the Riviera International Conference Centre to offer special rail fares for delegates travelling to pre-approved events. We made good use of on-board wi-fi but were pleasantly distracted more than once by the sea practically lapping against the side of the train, the track is so near to the shore. Torquay has been starting to undergo something of a style revival in recent times, with Michelin-starred restaurants and swanky yachts beginning to populate the local landscape. With Brixham just around a coastal corner, big-name chefs are keen to set up shop in the area too, and make use of the superb local ingredients and top artisan producers nearby, as well as the UK’s biggest fish market by value. Alighting from the train, we needed only to wheel our travel cases a few steps before coming across our accommodation; Torquay’s Victorian hotel The Grand, with traditional British charm, a spa, AA rosette eatery and spacious suites overlooking the bay as part of its 132room offering – observe carefully of a morning and you might even spot some of the increasing number of dolphins out at sea, during your stay. Once bags were checked in, we headed to our event at Riviera International Centre, passing the town’s medieval monastery Torre Abbey and 800-year-old Spanish Barn on the way. RIC is a flexible, multi-faceted venue with 10 meeting rooms, a 1,500-capacity conference hall, banqueting and exhibition spaces, break-out rooms for up to 400 delegates and a leisure centre with pool in addition to the roster of event coordinators, in-house chefs and audio-visual partners. They regularly welcome everyone from the young farmers’ federation and the World Scrabble Championship, to medical associations, motorbike meets and prosecco festivals. Lunch there came with a wine pairing – is there a better teambonding activity? – with the guys from local independent Tolchards; the food a cut above what you would expect from a conference centre thanks to chef Steve Pask who has had plenty of time to hone his offering over his 28 years with the crew. In fact, while there’s a decent amount of new blood among them, most of the staff at RIC are longterm members, which is a pretty good sign; experience and professionalism at the core of a stable team. The platter of local lobster, crab and smoked salmon with horseradish cream was particularly decent, as were the generous portions of giant wild mushroom tortelloni, and the local cheese. To be sure, Torquay isn’t short of other, tee-total relationship-building opportunities if you’d prefer to abstain from the booze, especially with Living Coasts just down the promenade. A natural ‘coastal playground’ which lends itself to group activities with a zoo and aquarium forming

part of the educational, scientific and conservational charity, it’s dedicated to protecting global wildlife heritage and inspiring a respect for animals, plants and the environment. Get to know Tuna the seal while you fling over a few fish at feeding time, or see the otters scramble to their trainer for treats before queuing up to accept snacks from you with their (weirdly long) eager fingers. The observation wheel within the famous Pavilion Gardens is a nice extra, should you fancy it, operating until late September and offering tranquil vistas of the town and harbour. Feeling invigorated, with appetites piqued by the sea air and afternoon activity, we freshened up back at The Grand before joining cohorts at Michelin-starred chef John Burton-Race’s nearby restaurant, which opened recently following substantial renovations. There, feast on the likes of white crab meat with watermelon, soy chilli dressing, sesame peanuts and coriander – Asian flavours set off with a Tasmanian pinot gris, if you can be tempted – or beef fillet; confit duck leg; brill butting up against broad beans, asparagus, spinach and crab meat dumplings. With pretty much everything event planners and delegates could want within spitting distance, Torquay is a convenient, relaxing location ideal for conferences and, we found, a stimulating environment for discussion – it’s all about business in the bay. ■

Serene vistas left, right and centre

Meet Tuna the seal at Living Coasts

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

HEY, GIULIA The Italian badge, born over 100 years ago, still stands for something original today. A passion for motoring, performance and the simple pleasure of power and poise, that Alfa Romeo has packed into its new Giulia, underpins its heritage Words by Chris Lilly

I

n the world of cars, few names are more evocative than Alfa Romeo. The legendary Italian badge is often attached to cars with classic Italian style and performance, attracting interest from motoring fans and those with barely an ounce of interest in the automobile alike. Alfa Romeo’s Giulia is one of its most important new cars in years, taking the Italian marque back into the highly competitive executive saloon market. With plenty of promise beneath its sharp Milanese tailoring, how does the Giulia stack up? There is a headline-grabbing Quadrifoglio model, with the cloverleaf-wearing performance version effectively a more practical Ferrari in terms of style and performance. But it is the conventional models that are more important, and although it lacks the power or prestige of the Quadrifoglio, the Giulia’s 2.2-litre turbo diesel is in core executive territory. Under the bonnet of the Alfa on test, it produced 180hp and was matched to an eight-speed automatic gearbox that dealt with a fairly hefty 450 Nm of torque. To put that into layman’s terms, the Giulia diesel might not be a 500+ hp V6 petrol, but it still packs a punch. An acceleration time of 7.1 seconds 0-62mph backs up that statement, with a top speed theoretically reached at 143mph. In the real world the engine is silky smooth and everything you might want from an executive saloon. There is always power on tap, seemingly in any situation, and the automatic gearbox is rarely caught in the wrong ratio. The diesel might not have a flat torque curve for effortless driving that the likes of an Audi or Mercedes Benz does, but the engine practically encourages enthusiastic driving. The whole powertrain package is a strong one, and a match for anything the Germans or British have to offer – though crucially different too, giving the Giulia its own character. What’s even more impressive is that the Giulia tested returns more than 67mpg according to official figures, so should be frugal to run too. During my time with it, the Alfa Romeo regularly recorded mpg figures in the high-50s, and only dipped into the 40s with a run of very enthusiastic driving. So the engine will not only put a smile on your face, but keep you away from the petrol station too. Sure to get you grinning is the handling on offer from the Giulia. Up against stiff opposition from the likes of BMW and Jaguar, the Alfa Romeo more than holds its own with a well-balanced set-up that leans towards the dynamic end of the market. For optimum comfort pick a Merc, but for something that can both be thrown down a twisty country road – responding enthusiastically – yet is comfortable cruising at motorway speeds, it’s between this and a Jag. I really don’t know which I’d pick, but would relish the need to make a decision were I in that situation. The suspension could be sharper or softer, but then it would move the Giulia towards being a specialist, and a jack-of-alltrades in this market is no bad thing.

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Where the Giulia does lag behind its rivals a bit is the interior. Make no mistake, it’s still a lovely place in which to sit, but the established rivals in the Giulia’s class offer some of the best cabins around. The entertainment and information system is perhaps the biggest downside of the Alfa, markedly behind its peers. It’s easy to use and clear to understand, but compared to the competition, it doesn’t stack-up. The feeling of quality from the materials used by German, British and Japanese rivals can’t be matched either. The rest of the interior though is much closer to executive standards, with good levels of space both for occupants and in the boot. The driver in particular is well catered for, with an excellent driving position, made better still by the driver focused instruments and – on the model tested – the optional performance pack. This helps make the Giulia a special car to drive, with aluminium gear select paddles on the steering wheel that feel as though they’ve come from the Ferrari and Maserati parts bin, aluminium pedals, a limited slip differential, and active suspension. It’s a case of putting the driver first, since they are likely to be covering some serious miles in the Giulia. To make sure those miles aren’t too strenuous, the seats are both comfortable and supportive. I had a launch event to attend while the Giulia was in my care, with a cross-country jaunt adding more than 300 miles to the odometer in 24 hours alone. The Giulia never even hinted at being uncomfortable on a long trip, yet also made me choose the slower, but more interesting route across the Cotswolds on my way home. The Alfa Romeo saloon encourages you to drive it, not merely be driven. In short, the Giulia is a driver’s car; a model picked by those that are interested in being behind the wheel. A BMW or Mercedes Benz might be almost the default choice, but I would whole-heartedly recommend looking at an Alfa Romeo Giulia. The Italian saloon isn’t an outright class-leader, but to even compete with a return to the executive saloon market after a long hiatus is impressive enough. And I haven’t even really talked about the styling either, with good reason. I think it’s one of the best looking cars on the road – certainly one of the most stylish accessible models – and I could fill up half of this review just banging on about the swooping lines, athletic stance, and classic Alfa features. So I’ll spare you that and instead sum up. The Alfa Romeo is good value with prices starting from £30,000, and it performs well across the board. In the executive car market, those attributes bring in buyers. In short, the Giulia is a sensible choice but an enjoyable one; a choice made with the heart, but one that will keep the head happy too, providing an overall package that is really quite outstanding. ■

• For further information visit alfaromeo.co.uk


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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

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BRISTOL UPDATES

BITE-SIZED BUSINESS AND COMMUNITY NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY

FUEL-GOOD FIESTA

CONGRATS IN ORDER

A GREAT FIT

UWE has awarded the honorary degree of ‘doctor of business administration’ to Rob Law MBE, in recognition of his contribution and commitment to enterprise and entrepreneurship. Rob is the founder and CEO of Trunki, the brand behind the popular ride-on suitcase for tots. After one of the most famous rejections on Dragons’ Den in 2006, he built a team to pioneer a new retail category of children’s travel products, creating a range of innovative solutions to help families on the go. Since Trunki launched, the company has sold 3.8 million suitcases in over 100 countries. Trunki employs 25 people at its funky head office in Bristol, called The Mothership, and a further 55 people at its UK manufacturing and distribution facility in Plymouth. The company has won over 120 awards within the design, trade, consumer and business sectors including reaching 42nd on The Sunday Times Fast Track 100 and winning The National Business Awards SME of the Year.

Bristol-based design, build and installation play company TouchWood Play has begun a charity partnership with Children’s Hospice South West with the donation of hand-crafted den building kits to be enjoyed by parents and siblings of children at the hospice during respite stays. For more than 10 years, CHSW’s Charlton Farm in Wraxall has been caring for children with life-threatening conditions through specialist palliative care and respite for the whole family. TouchWood designs innovative playgrounds and adventure play areas for schools, councils, leisure complexes and attractions throughout Europe and, with children at the heart of its work, the partnership was a natural fit. “I came to an open day for CHSW and was hugely impressed,” said MD Tim Harms. “I learnt that when families are staying at the hospice, the parents are often a little unsure of how to relax and engage with other parents. We thought the kits would be a great excuse to get out together and explore the beautiful grounds at Charlton Farm.”

• trunki.co.uk

• touchwoodplay.co.uk

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Bristol International Balloon Fiesta has partnered with Bristol Energy for the 40th anniversary event, and has been running an online competition to win a special balloon flight in its solar hybrid balloon over the course of the weekend (9 – 12 August). For every dual fuel switch to Bristol Energy during the balloon fiesta that uses the code FUELGOOD, Bristol Energy will also donate up to £30 (£15 per fuel) to its Fuel Good Fund, helping keep people warm and well in their homes. It is estimated that four million people live in fuel poverty in the UK, with around 250,000 homes affected in Bristol. That means more than one in eight households in Bristol have to decide, during the winter months, whether to heat their home or eat a cooked meal. Bristol Energy was set up to support energy-vulnerable houses in the city and the Fuel Good Fund will help provide fuel vouchers, basic home repairs, budgeting advice, efficient light bulbs and help with energy bills for families who are struggling. Created in 1978 by Don Cameron, owner of the world’s largest balloon manufacturer Cameron Balloons, and friends, the fiesta is now firmly established as Europe’s largest annual hot air balloon festival. A free event, the 2018 edition will once again see more than 100 hot air balloons taking off at dawn and dusk, as well as the famous and hugely popular nightglows on Thursday and Saturday night, followed by fireworks. With this year’s event marking four decades of the event, plans are underway to make it a Bristol International Balloon Fiesta to remember, with extra special balloons, displays and entertainment being lined up. The solar hybrid balloon flight competition closes at 8pm on 8 August.

• bristol-energy.co.uk/fuelgood1; bristol-energy.co.uk/balloon1


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What happens when you don’t secure that new job? Humans, it seems, are hardwired to fear failure – a lover deciding you’re no longer ‘the one’, a flat that you fell for going to another, months spent working on a new project only for it to flop, coming last in the 100m sprint on sports day and applying for your dream job, committing yourself to it and then not getting it. We can all relate to at least one of the above and we know how it make us feel; heartbroken, despondent, bruised. Our confidence dented and no silver medal.

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I can’t offer advice on what to do to recover from a dumping, gazumping or a sporting thumping, but here are my thoughts on dusting yourself down when you don’t manage to secure that new job you so desperately wanted. • Celebrate the fact you put yourself in the mix. You got up, prepared a CV, went through the interview process and took a bold step by acknowledging your desire to seek a new challenge. Taking those first steps, particularly if you’re comfortable where you are, can be difficult. • Go over your strengths – what are you good at? Run over the evidence to support your strengths and polish everything up for next time. • Ask for feedback. If you’ve gone all the way through the recruitment process and fallen at the final hurdle you are owed that much. Don’t just request generic feedback, ask specific questions. • Find out what was missing and work to fill in the gaps. Seek out experience or training that will mean you can tick even more boxes next time. • We all know house sales can fall through – and sometimes job offers fall through too. Stay in contact and should the company’s circumstances change, they might well come back to you or indeed put you in touch with someone else. Take every opportunity to build your network. Be brave and apply for that new position, don’t idle in a job that is no longer fulfilling because you’re paralysed by the fear of rejection. Charlize Theron was tipped to play Roxie Hart in Rob Marshall's Chicago and eventually lost out to fellow blonde, Renée Zellweger. But rather than cry over spilled milk, Theron went on to get the lead role in Monster and pick up a Best Actress Oscar. Skilling Gate is a Bristol-based professional services recruitment firm. www.skillinggate.co.uk

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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

FAMILY DIARY Ideas for things to do with the little ones in Bristol this month

“Not the gumdrop buttons!”

Shrek the Musical Wednesday 8 – Sunday 19 August, times vary, Bristol Hippodrome

Image: Helen Maybanks

Enjoy a Shrek-tacular show as the record-breaking UK and Ireland tour returns, larger than life in Bristol. Based on the story and characters from the Oscar-winning DreamWorks Animation film, this production turns the world of fairytales upside down in an all-singing, all-dancing, must-see musical comedy. Join Shrek (Steffan Harri) and his loyal steed as they set off on a quest to rescue the beautiful Princess Fiona – played by X Factor’s Amelia Lily. Add in a fire-breathing love-sick dragon, the vertically challenged Lord Farquaad plus a gang of fairytale misfits and you’ve got an irresistible mix of adventure, laughter and romance to delight audiences of all ages. Recommended for ages five and up; running time two and a half hours. Just remember to keep hold of those gumdrop buttons! • atgtickets.co.uk/bristol

Top pick... DON’T MISS... The Lightbulb Moment Throughout August, We The Curious Celebrate unusual ideas and new questions and explore how these thoughts could change the world. Watch out for unexpected demonstrations that will inspire you to think new thoughts. Free with standard admission. Twice daily on weekends and during school holidays. Check times upon arrival; wethecurious.org TYNTEfest 2018 Wednesday 1 August, 10.30am and 1.30pm, Tyntesfield Celebrate National Playday at Tyntefest; a brand new event for two to five year olds and their families. There’ll be storytelling, events, crafts and games inspired by favourite nursery rhymes. Booking is essential; tiny tots are welcome free of charge when accompanying an older sibling or companion. Adults £3 or free if a National Trust member. Children £8; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield Puppet Making Workshop Saturday 4 August, 10.30am – 4.30pm, Royal West of England Academy, Queen’s Road Design, draw and paint characters inspired by the forthcorming theatrical show MathildaMathilda. Make 3D puppets from foam and paint and then decorate them any way you see fit with fabric, paint, collage, 78 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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beads, buttons, string and pens. The workshop will finish with a group performance sung and danced by all the puppets. Take along decorations such as fabric, beads and buttons for your puppets. Suitable for children between seven and 11. Children must be accompanied by an adult and lunch is not provided. £20; rwa.org.uk Detective Project Kids Workshop Tuesday 7 August, 1 – 3.30pm, Arnos Vale Put your sleuthing skills to the test and find out how 21st-century criminal investigations are conducted. Collect and analyse evidence, interview a witness or two and compete with other teams to solve a crime. Working with ex-police detective Jenny Williams, you’ll complete an investigation and take your CSI suit home. Suitable for eight – 12 years. Duration: 2.5 hours. £15 per child; arnosvale.org.uk Victorian Explorers: Tyntesfield Through Time Wednesday 8 August, 10.30am – 2.30pm, Tyntesfield Get into nature and see the Tyntesfield estate through a Victorian’s eyes at this immersive kids-only day camp. You’ll take part in activities such as growing and tasting food, clay modelling, woodland games and creating your own diary to take home. Suitable for seven – 12 years. Packed lunch required. Other dates available: 14, 19, 23 and 31 August; nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield

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Nick Sharratt’s Drawalong Thursday 16 August, 11.15am, Folk House Join much-loved children’s writer and illustrator Nick Sharratt (creator of charactors such as Tracy Beaker and Timothy Pop) for a fun-filled draw-along. Bring your own pencils, paper and something to lean on as you learn ways to invent your own crazy creatures while you draw along with him. Meet Nick himself after the show and get one of your favourite books signed by the man who brought them to life. Suitable for over fours. Tickets £8.60; colstonhall.org It’s Time To Play with CBeebies’ Sid & Rebecca Friday 17 August, 1.30pm, Colston Hall As part of the Hoo Ha! Festival the popular CBeebies TV show Let’s Play is hitting the stage. Packed full of games, songs and music including a groovy Simon Says and musical bumps with a super twist. It’s stacked full of comedic playfulness and spontaneous interaction, plus don’t miss the chance to meet Sid and Rebecca after the show. Free; colstonhall.org Aardman Model Making Workshops Saturday 18 August, 10am, 12pm and 2pm, SS Great Britain Learn how to make your own Gromit (10am), Morph (12pm) or Shaun (2pm) from the very best. Led by one of Aardman’s expert model makers, you’ll create your pieces while getting the opportunity to ask questions about the


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EVENTS | FOR KIDS Nick Sharratt and his illustrations are coming to Bristol

Make Aardman models just like the pros at SS Great Britain

tricks of the trade. While you’re there, check out the Brunel-themed Wallace on Brunel Square. £8 for under 18s, suitables for ages six plus. £10 for adults; ssgreatbritain.org Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Monday 20 August, 4pm, The Wild Place Meet a whole host of colourful characters – from the concerned White Rabbit to the eccentric Mad Hatter and join Alice as she stumbles into the magical world of Wonderland. Enjoy an open-air performance of the classic tale presented by Chapterhouse Theatre Company. Explore the park beforehand, and spend the evening just a

stone’s throw away from all the animals. Pitch up your blanket or chair and settle in for a trip down the rabbit hole. Tickets include entry to Wild Place Project from 3pm. Performance begins at 4pm, please arrive 15 minutes before. Advance booking is essential; wildplace.org.uk How to be a Roman Wednesday 29 August, 10am – 1pm, M Shed Find out all about the Romans, from the towns and homes they lived in to their favourite foods. Taste Roman recipes, dress up, play Roman games, make crafts and

handle real artefacts. Suitable for ages seven to 10, children over eight can take part unaccompanied. Adults can also join in. Tickets: £10; bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed Kids holiday cookery classes Throughout August, Cooking It 20 August, 9.30am – 12.30pm: Mexican food cookery class. 21 August, 9.30 – 11.30am: sushi class. 21 August, 2.30 – 5pm: Yankee doodle cookery class. 22 August, 9.30am – 1.30pm: baking class. 28 and 29 August, 9.30am – 1.30pm: touring around the world in one day. 28 and 29 August, 2.30 – 4pm: mini chefs; cookingit.co.uk n

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HEALTH & BEAUTY WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE LOCAL SPHERE?

GOT YOUR BACK

BLUSH CRUSH

Most of us are partial to soaking up the summer sun but, as we know well by now, it’s essential to keep your skin safe. A 2018 survey conducted by Boots found that 53% of British sun-seekers have ended up with painful sunburn after not protecting their backs properly – this being one of the most common sites for melanomas. It’s also vital to keep an eye on moles and watch out for any changes. Take snaps and monitor them closely. With all this in mind, Boots is encouraging sunbathers to have each other’s backs and work together to keep skin safe and apply that essential SPF. The company is now offering an instore mole scanning service whereby a scanner is used to capture images of five components of the skin across different layers. The images are then sent over for expert analysis at ScreenCancer UK and it’s then established whether the mole is at risk and if so a dermatology specialist will contact you.

This summer blondes can enjoy being a pastel shade lighter with Schwarzkopf Professional’s new Blondme blush wash. Choose from the silver, lilac, apricot or strawberry shades to add a delicate touch to your barnet. It’s sulphate-free too and easy to apply at home. Being blonde just got a little bit more fun...

• schwarzkopf-professional.co.uk

PETROWHAT?

• boots.com

AND, IN OTHER STORIES... Thanks to the folks responsible for the likes of Monki, COS and H&M, & Other Stories is coming to town. With the initial idea to create a standalone beauty brand, it launched in 2013 and now offers women’s clothing, shoes, bags, accessories and beauty products, with a focus on high quality across a wide price range. Stacked full of fashion and beauty must-haves, & Other Stories should have an exciting impact on the Bristol shopping scene. It’s set to land in Cabot Circus in autumn alongside the arrival of Bershka in winter, so we’re going to be truly spoilt for choice. Beauty arrivals such as the body soufflé, Havana Blues hand wash and epic French Riviera-inspired lipsticks having just landed, we can’t wait to get our mitts on a few fab buys. • Fig fiction body soufflé £10, lipstick £17, Havana Blues hand lotion £5; stories.com

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New skincare brand Abnomaly, from the guys that brought us the likes of The Ordinary and Niod, has launched a lip and skin ointment. Eschewing petroleum jelly in favour of an army of cruelty-free, vegan, plant-based ingredients and natural flavours, Deciem is all about saying goodbye to clogged pores and hello to natural, fresh ingredients that are skin-friendly. Available in four flavours, each of the balms is filled with amino acids to help out whenever skin becomes a little lacklustre. • deciem.com


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HEALTH & BEAUTY

DAMN STRAIGHT

Andy Tyler Photography

Spending too much morning snooze-time ironing the barnet, when you could be in bed? If it’s time to lay off the GHDs and really tame those unruly curls, head to Trevor Sorbie... Words by Crystal Rose

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self-confessed straightener addict, I find my mop of curls often has a mind of its own and is increasingly hard to manage. Unless I’m on holiday or having a lazy Sunday, my hair needs to be slick, straight and set in place. Facing daily heat damage and frequent colouring to satisfy my blonde ambition, my hair was suffering in more ways than one, so I decided it was time to do something about it. Walking through the doors of the newest arrival to Queens Road, I’m met with an interior of exposed brick walls chosen to reflect the city’s industrial roots. “We didn’t want to bring Londo n to Bristol, we wanted to embrace the city’s culture and heritage,” salon manager Gerald Smith tells me. Somerset-born Gerald set the wheels in motion for this new location two years ago, after managing Trevor Sorbie salons in London for over seven years, and knowing it would be a great fit here. “I always knew I wanted to come back here; it’s my home,” he says. His life has changed drastically compared wi th the travel to and from London every day; he now rolls out of his Clifton home and skateboards to work in style. Not bad for a commute, eh? Shown to the outdoor sun-trap at the back of the salon, I’m given glossy mags, the Trevor Sorbie story including the history of the man himself, the science behind a few treatments and an extensive drinks list. A great opportunity for me to read about the Kerastraightening treatment ahead and learn more about the process. It’s yet to become the in-demand treatment in Bristol but Londoners can’t get enough of the three to four-hour treatment that tames curls and gives damaged hair the recovery it

needs. Adding a large dose of protein – mostly keratin and amino acids – to the hair disrupts the natural curl pattern and smoothes, reinforces and straightens the hair without ruining it. With a shelf life of around three months, there should be a reduced need for straightening out those entwined tresses and, in turn, your hair should be happier. The process begins with a quick consultation by Gerald as he assesses my hair and determines exactly what I need. (He varies the generic matrix of this treatment depending on the result wanted and the hair type of each customer.) I’m then greeted by Molly, the salon assistant, who gives my hair a quick pretreatment cleanser shampoo to remove any build-up and open my cuticles. This is an essential part of the process as it prepares the hair follicles. As Molly begins tackling my messy mane, she eases each knot and assures me that subsequently my hair will be a lot more manageable and frizz-free; music to my ears! My hair spritzed, Gerald sets to work meticulously applying the serum all over. With no breakage involved, the Kerastraightening solution adds to what you have and re-aligns your cuticles to sit alongside each other, making them lose their velcro-like element which can often leave your hair in a matted mess. A stylish plastic hood – Dot Cotton, eat your heart out – is then applied to keep the moisture in, followed by a 45-minute interval.

Throughout my visit the drinks come rolling in. From an expertly made latte to a T2 pomegranate iced tea, there’s a wealth of beverages on tap – refreshing compared with the usual one-drink policy in most places. Plastic cap off, the serum is washed off and a low pH conditioning mask applied, followed by a beautiful express head-and-neck massage. My hair blow-dried, Gerald sets to work with the final stage of the treatment. As he begins ironing my hair, he informs me that the key part of this is how many times the hair passes through the irons. Referred to by experts as the ‘popcorn effect’, this part enables the protein molecules to puff up and lock into the hair. All ironed out, I’m more than ready to let the fuss-free hair commence. Looking in the mirror at my glossy mane, it’s hard to believe the difference already. That shine, not to mention the silky texture. The result, a week on? My hair is still beautifully soft and knot-free. A brush glides through it, my frizzy bits have completely gone and, with a quicker drying time, my need to pick up my much-loved straighteners has also reduced significantly. This treatment has transformed my hair and has given me the locks that I’ve always wished for – without the extreme heat damage. It’s such a common thing for curly haired folk to want a seriously straight barnet and vise versa. And with the Kerastraightening solution, and a pair of expertly trained hands, I’ve achieved what I’ve always wanted and gained back the time spent ironing out those unwanted kinks each morning. • The Kerastraight Style Solution costs £235 at Trevor Sorbie, 65 Queens Road, Bristol BS8 1QL; 0117 363 4185; trevorsorbie.com

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Q&A RARE BEAUTY Meet Corinne Thomas, founder of the women-led natural skincare company

What’s next for the second half of 2018? Lots of exciting plans hatching for pop-ups in Bristol in partnership with like-minded entrepreneurs and shop owners. What are you reading and listening to at the moment? I’ve been getting inspiration from fellow female founders such as Jo Malone in My Story and How to be an Overnight Success by the CEO of Rodial, Maria Hatzistefanis. I am currently listening to You, Forever by Sam Evian which is a really beautiful summery album with heartfelt melodies. BBC 6 Music is my inspiration for all my new music and is always the soundtrack in my office. Which other Bristol businesses do you rate? I recently met Steve King, founder of F-Works, for some sage advice and wisdom, having worked with him in a previous role and I would highly recommended their finance director services. I am a proud member of This Mum Runs and can often be seen running with fellow mums in one of their running groups, or wearing their sweats! They offer fab courses and supportive groups for mums wanting to run for the first time or get back into running after children (that was me) and their CEO Mel Bound is yet another female entrepreneur who I look to for inspiration.

What brought you to Bristol? I moved from London nearly eight years ago with my husband as we both had opportunities to explore here – he did a post-grad course at UWE and I set up a social purpose consultancy with a friend in London. We loved the pace of life and the beautiful green spaces Bristol offered while still having a vibrant city centre. We now have two little girls and live in Knowle. Tell us a little about your new project In May this year I founded Rare Beauty, the UK’s first women-led natural beauty store. We have an online store and run pop-up events across Bristol throughout the year. What are its main objectives? Rare Beauty reviews and showcases effective, high-quality natural skincare products made by female skincare entrepreneurs in the UK. We are an ethical beauty business which offers a luxurious shopping experience without compromising on values. Our products are cruelty-free and shipped responsibly using recyclable packaging. We have many vegan options and a growing zero-waste/minimal packaging range. The mainstream beauty industry is led by men and is rife with ‘greenwashing’ – Rare Beauty offers an alternative for those looking to switch up their skincare.

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What would you improve about this city if you were in charge? Yikes. I am a bit of a do-er so I find the inertia in terms of decision making frustrating sometimes. I would throw caution to the wind and just go for some big infrastructure projects to create jobs and get the city buzzing a bit. But I really don’t envy those in charge at the moment. Which local spot is your current favourite hang-out? I always head to Harts Bakery if I am in the area or jumping on the train and I had the pleasure of trying one of their lunchtime pasties the other weekend as a trader at their Starts at Harts market. It was truly delicious; their bread and pastries are to-diefor. Harts has also embedded itself into the Bristol community by running evening events with other local businesses and supporting start-ups (as Laura said, she was once there herself) through Starts at Harts which I feel really sets them apart as a valued destination in Bristol. Surprise us with something about yourself When I was just 18 I went travelling around South Africa on my own and did (what was then) the world’s highest bungee jump. I think I’ve been jumping into the unknown ever since, really!

• Follow on Twitter and Instagram @rarebeautyco; rare-beauty.co.uk


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

3D PRECISION PROSTATE DIAGNOSTICS - IMPROVES CANCER TREATMENT P

rostate cancer affects one in eight men and is the second most common cancer in the UK. Men who are worried about their cancer risk or fear treatment can take reassurance from a highly accurate fusion biopsy service now being offered at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield. Prof Raj Persad, consultant urologist is leading the way in Bristol with a new 3D urological diagnostic tool, recently developed in London. The state-of-the-art minimally invasive technique of targeted prostate biopsy represents a paradigm shift in the accuracy of diagnosing prostate cancer, a reduction in overtreatment and improves both the experience and treatment options. Having accuracy levels of 90% compared with 30% previously, where other diagnostic methods are used, the precision technology is made possible by fusing MRI scans with ultrasound to pinpoint and investigate areas of concern in the prostate. The prostate gland, just over the size of a walnut, is notoriously difficult to access and to assess accurately, so this represents a revolution in improving diagnosis, large scale reductions in unnecessary treatment and the associated side effects plus resulting in improved survival rates. Being so recent, currently only 10% of men are benefitting from this UK innovation.

Professor Raj Persad, consultant urologist leading precision prostate diagnostics in Bristol

Prof Persad explains, “I am very excited about the onsite fusion biopsy service we have started here in Bristol in partnership with Nuada Medical. It is fantastic news for patients. The technique has a scientific base and proven effectiveness. Clinical trials, such as PRECISION and PROMIS have shown the effectiveness of targeted biopsies and the fusion technique takes developments one step further. There are so many good things to say about this day case minimally invasive procedure. There is a reduction in infection risk, less discomfort, a huge improvement in accuracy and it gives urologists the ability to precisely locate the cancer and to determine anatomically the location and aggressiveness to inform whether it requires targeted treatment or can just undergo active surveillance. It is very reassuring for patients, reducing their anxiety and helping them to better understand prostate cancer and the implications, enabling them to be more informed and improving their quality of life.” Treatment for prostate cancer very much depends on the size, stage and aggressiveness of the cancer. To avoid unnecessary treatment, active surveillance of the slow growing prostate cancer can be appropriate. Other options for more aggressive forms include removing the prostate gland, called prostatectomy – nowadays often involving the advanced method of robotic technology or, in other or more advanced cases, radiotherapy may be the treatment of choice. Private patients under Prof Persad’s care are now booked in from August for fusion biopsy at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield. Technology partner Nuada Medical has been at the forefront of fusion biopsy for several years, working with the developers of the technique at UCLH, including consultant radiologist Dr Clare Allen who prepares the biopsy plans for all of Nuada’s clients. Raj Persad and his team will use this plan to guide the biopsy procedure ensuring each patient receives an accurate and precise biopsy and from this a personalised treatment plan. Where cancerous, the resulting 3D model and biopsies allows the urological surgeon to make an accurate assessment of exactly what type of treatment options are best suited to the individual patient. Currently across the UK there is a very good mammography breast screening service

MRI and ultrasound fusion biopsy technology for prostate cancer detection, with Brian Lynch CEO Nuada Medical and Prof Hashim Ahmed, Imperial College, London

for women. Whilst desirable, the new prostate fusion biopsy service brings men’s early diagnosis of prostate cancer into line but it has yet to be adopted in a widespread manner nationally. Prof Raj Persad has worked as a consultant urologist since 1995, with NHS posts at Addenbrookes, Bristol Royal Infirmary and Southmead Hospitals. He has expertise in early detection of prostate and bladder cancer, erectile dysfunction, male infertility, minimally invasive procedures on the prostate (urolift, greenlight laser and rezum) and robotic radical prostatectomy. For more information or referrals to Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, please ring 0117 906 4870 or see www.bristolurology.com

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Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

Eat for your body type By Nutritional Therapist Atiya Khan for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine)

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ne size does not fit all! We can see this very clearly with food; for example, one person loses weight or gets clear skin by following a diet, exercise or routine but annoyingly it doesn’t work for you. There can be many reasons for this, including that you are not eating the right foods for you. Naturopathic Nutritional therapy adopts ancient traditions alongside modern nutritional science. We take a personalised approach, by thorough case taking, asking about family history and getting to know you – all with the aim of finding the root cause of the imbalance or issue. Ayurveda, known as ‘the science of life’ from India, recognises that each person is an individual, while classifying people broadly into three constitutions, or ‘doshas’, based on physical, psychological and emotional disposition. There is a lot more to this than outlined in this article, so I would recommend seeing a Practitioner for detailed advice. As a starting point, there are three main ‘doshas’: Vata, Pita and Kapha.

Vata Vata types tend to have: - a small slender frame - dry skin, hair and nails - irregular appetite and digestion, tending towards constipation - tend to be very active physically and mentally - can be anxious, fearful and uncertain - have restless sleep Ideal foods to balance: - warm, cooked foods and spices with regular routine - include cooked apples, most juicy fruits, not dried - cooked vegetables rather than raw - avoid dried foods such as muesli, rice cakes and crackers - include all lentils

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- olive oil particularly beneficial - plenty of spices - avoid coffee but include grain chai (hot spiced milk, which can be made with almond/oat milk)

Pitta Pitta types tend to have: - medium frame - warm rosy skin, with oily hair and skin, healthy nails - strong appetite and quick digestion, tend towards loose bowels - moderately active, physically and mentally - can be jealous and quick to anger - have short but decent sleep Ideal foods to balance: - avoid heat, oils and salt - eat cooling, non-spicy foods and drinks - sweet fruits such as apples, berries, grapes, tropical fruits - sweet and bitter vegetables such as carrots, broccoli, celery, herbs, cucumber - avoid dry oats and muesli - includes all beans - coconut oil particularly beneficial - avoid dry ginger and chilli but include fresh ginger and mint - avoid coffee but black tea in moderation

You may find that you sit between one or more types – this is normal! The important aim is not to find the ‘right’ classification, but find a way of eating that suits you as an individual – and being able to adapt this for different times of day, seasons and changes in your life to allow you to live your life most fully. Save the date! Atiya Khan will be speaking further on this subject as part of a day of inspirational natural health talks at CNM Bristol on 15th September. See CNM’s website.

Kapha Kapha types tend to have: - a larger frame, tending to more overweight - thick oily skin, with thick curly hair and strong nails - slow and steady appetite with slow, sluggish digestion - tend to be more sedentary and slow mentally - tend to be calm yet attached to things - they have a deep and long sleep Ideal foods to balance: - eat light, dry foods, avoiding heavy foods - exercise and be active - fruits such as berries, grapes, peaches - pungent and bitter vegetables like broccoli, carrots, herbs, greens, onions, peppers - avoid cooked oats - include all beans and dahls, minimal soya - flax oil particularly beneficial - avoid salt but include all other spices - avoid orange juice but include spiced black tea

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Nutritional Therapist Atiya Khan

Attend a FREE Open Evening to find out about training with CNM Bristol for a career in Naturopathic Nutrition or Naturopathic Acupuncture.

15th August at 6.30pm Please book on line at:

www.naturopathy-uk.com 01342 410 505 CNM is the UK’s leading training provider in a range of natural therapies. Colleges across the UK and Ireland


Trevor Sorbie fp.qxp_Layout 1 20/06/2018 15:19 Page 1

PERSONALISED ARTISTRY HAS ARRIVED IN BRISTOL We believe in combining artistry with technique to create fearless and original hairdressing. Art is at the heart of everything we do and we personalise the artistry for every salon guest. WELCOME DISCOUNT

SAVE 25%* We’d love you to experience ‘personalised artistry’ for yourself. To celebrate coming to Bristol, we’re offering a 25% discount off all services on your first visit (please mention when booking).

BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT 0117 363 4185 FIND US 65 Queens Road | BS8 1QL trevorsorbie.com/salons *T&Cs apply: subject to availability with selected team only. Discount only valid off hair services on your first visit. Available until 31.08.18


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GARDENING

THE LONELIEST VILLAGE IN ENGLAND Every August, if you pick the right day, you can head south from Bristol for what may well be the most surreal country drive in Britain, says Andrew Swift

It’s difficult to make out what’s heading towards you in a cloud of dust, until it clears to reveal a London Routemaster bus – and the sinister turns into the surreal

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THE GREAT OUTDOORS

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t starts off uneventfully enough, as you head south along the A36 before turning off to follow the B3414 through Warminster town centre. Then, after passing an Esso service station, you turn left along Imber Road (ST878448; BA12 9DB). Nothing untoward here, you might think – just a typical suburban byway – but as you start to climb, razor-wire fences, checkpoints and a tank parked beside the road leave no doubt that you are entering an army zone. The signs ahead, ordering you to proceed no further, are pretty unambiguous as well. Except that today, you can simply ignore them and carry straight on to follow a dusty track across Salisbury Plain. Even so, it is difficult, as you pass a burnt-out tank half-hidden in the undergrowth, to shake off the feeling that your rear-view mirror will suddenly reveal a military convoy in hot pursuit. Difficult, too, to make out what that is, heading towards you in a cloud of dust, until the dust clears to reveal a London Routemaster bus – and the sinister turns into the surreal. Stranger still is to come, as you drop down into a fold of the downs and find yourself in the main street of a village whose houses are empty shells. This is Imber, once said to be the loneliest village in England. Its high point, population wise, came in 1851, when 440 people lived there. By 1931, however, that figure had fallen by almost two-thirds, to 152. By then, as the agricultural economy that sustained communities such as Imber had collapsed, the army had taken over vast swathes of the surrounding plain for training. As another war loomed, the army started buying up the freehold of the land and buildings in Imber as well. Not that the villagers were that perturbed, especially as four blocks of council houses were built in 1938 to replace tumbledown cottages. On 1 November 1943, however, they were summoned to a meeting in the school and given notice to quit. By the week before Christmas, the last of them had gone, and a community, whose roots stretched back over a millennium, was no more. Imber really had become England’s loneliest village. Although there were vague promises that they could return, they never did. The government decreed that the needs of the army outweighed those of the displaced villagers and that was that. They did not give up without a fight. In 1961, a convoy of over 700 vehicles headed to Imber for a rally, where around 2,000 people agreed to form the Association for the Restoration of Imber. Over the next two decades, appeals, rallies and public enquiries continued to be held, but each time the official position only became more entrenched. Access was increasingly restricted, and in the 1970s, far from scaling down their operations, the army built a new row of buildings along the main street to train soldiers destined for Northern Ireland in urban combat techniques. Even so, the army was obliged to allow access to the church for up to 50 days a year. The number of days usually falls far short of this, however, and whether you drive, cycle or walk to Imber, you have to stick to the roads across the plain. Not only that; when you get there, you can only visit the church. All other buildings and all the surrounding land are strictly off limits. Yet, when Imber is open, the attraction of driving through an army range to visit a ghost village ensures a steady stream of visitors – which brings me to those buses. Ten years ago, a group of bus owners and enthusiasts came up with the idea of running a vintage traction service to Imber on one day every year. And, as the service starts from Warminster station, it is now possible to get to Imber even if you do not drive. However you get there, it is certainly worth the trip to see one of the strangest – and saddest – places in England. Not surprisingly, the internet has lots of information on Imber’s history. What struck me most forcibly when I visited, however, was something hardly touched on by most of the websites. Having looked around the village, braved the crowds in the church and around the fleet of buses, I decided to walk along the road leading south from the village. The buses do not take this road and nor, because of potholes, do many other vehicles, so I had it more or less to myself. After climbing steeply past copses, it emerges in open country, with a view similar to other parts of Salisbury Plain where access is still is unrestricted – but with one crucial difference. On other parts of the plain, industrial fertilisers, pesticides, herbicides and agricultural intensification have increased productivity at the expense of ecological diversity. Here, apart from limited grazing by cattle,

selective clearance of scrub and – of course – military exercises – the land has lain untouched for three-quarters of a century. The army takeover of much of the plain has had the unintended consequence of conserving the best and most extensive area of unimproved grassland in England. This is not something you have to take on trust – walking the road south of Imber, it strikes you like a revelation. Looking out across these chalk downlands is like looking at a Pre-Raphaelite tapestry; gazing across those parts of the plain where monoculture rules is more akin to surveying a dull swathe of factorymade cloth. Flowers are everywhere. In less than a half a mile, I came across autumn hawkbit, birdsfoot trefoil, cinquefoil, common cow wheat, knapweed, mallow, poppy, purple vetch, red bartsia, scabious, scarlet pimpernel, thistle, toadflax, viper’s bugloss, wild carrot, yellow vetch and yellow clover. Some I recognised, some were photographed for identification later. And, as the grassland is out of bounds, these were only what could be seen in the roadside verges. Meanwhile, skylarks sang overhead, bees droned and crickets chirped in the drowsy grass. Yet this was no rose-tinted vision of a time that never was, but a reminder of what much of England looked like within living memory. With even the most cautious environmentalists now talking in terms of ecological collapse, the verges of Imber are a benchmark for what we’ve lost and what we somehow need to regain. ■ • Imber church is open from 18 August to 23 August 2018, 11am – 4pm (18 August 10am to 6pm). Buses from Warminster station to Imber run every 15 minutes from 9.45am on 18 August; imberchurch.org.uk; imberbus.wordpress.com The old Imber school

A roadside sign of the village’s army occupation

Imber church

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GARDEN | ENTERTAINING

WHAT’S COOKING Would you like to take your garden barbecue to the next level? Matt Chylewski of kitchen company Stephen Graver explains why an outdoor kitchen will give you versatility and an unparalleled outdoor experience

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e all love barbecue and pizza ovens, but what’s the attraction of having an actual outdoor kitchen? We know that people want to spend more time outside and make the most of their gardens. The ability to have a sink, a fridge and a barbecue in a contained area makes life easier if you want to make the most of your outside space. What we’re offering is more of a lifestyle choice, not just a product for a garden. Could you have a basic style outdoor kitchen in a small garden? The concept we use, at three metres long and one metre deep, was designed with asmall garden in mind. Is an outdoor kitchen a significant financial investment? The price depends on the client’s individual preferences. Barbecues can range from between £50 and £5000 and more, so an outdoor kitchen has to be tailored around what the exact needs are. The size of outdoor kitchen that we have built, shown here, has a cost of around £20,000, excluding the fitting. How practical is an outdoor kitchen? The beauty of this outdoor kitchen is that the door doubles as a roof, so should the elements not be on your side, you’re protected. Our outdoor kitchen was specifically designed to offer a solution where an individual could cook outdoors in any weather.

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Can you choose a seating area with table and chairs to fit with the kitchen’s style? It would make sense to match any table and chairs with the style of the outdoor kitchen and Stephen Graver can help with that, perhaps producing a range of furniture to suit. We could also match the style to that of the inside kitchen in a house, bringing continuity to both cooking areas.

technical requirements. We would recommend having a site survey first to determine what can be achieved. In order to have a sink, there would need to be suitable drainage in the desired location, and access to mains water for the accompanying tap. Electricity could easily be run from the main house and a gas bottle would be required for any gas barbecue or grill.

How does the outdoor kitchen look in a garden when it’s not being used? We decided to match the ‘look’ to that of any typical outside building – the cedar cladding we’ve used can be found on many garden summer houses or sheds. The kitchen can, however, be finished in any way that fits with the style of the house. So, for example, the cladding used could feature a more contemporary material.

Is there anything that cannot be installed in an outdoor kitchen? Domestic fridges are not designed to be outside – they have to be of a certain type to be installed and work outdoors. Also, any outdoor water supply would need to be isolated for the winter.

Is an outdoor kitchen just designed for barbecues and grills? No, a number of different appliances would work in an outdoor kitchen. Apart from fridges and freezers, it would be easy to fit an induction hob with under-counter oven. Our appliance partner Sub-Zero & Wolf do a great gas cooktop that would fabulous in an outdoor kitchen. What are the technical requirements before you can start installing an outdoor kitchen? Location is key when considering any

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How do you see outdoor kitchens progressing in the future? Is it a phenomenon that will grow? Cooking outdoors in general is tremendously popular. We all love barbecues, and an outdoor kitchen is taking the outdoor eating experience to a really sophisticated level. It’s also true that there are limits to how we can extend our homes – so the addition of an outdoor kitchen provides extra versatility to your home and could increase its value. n

Stephen Graver, Elmsgate House, Edington Road, Steeple Ashton, Trowbridge. Tel: 01380 871746; Web: stephengraver.com


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THE LITTLE EXTRAS A well-maintained garden is said to add between five and 20 per cent to a property’s value and it’s an investment that literally grows, says Elly West

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ummer holidays are here, and hopefully good weather will mean we can spend lots of time in our gardens relaxing, eating, entertaining – with maybe the odd G&T or two. The concept of the garden as another room is not a new one, but it’s at this time of year that we can really appreciate outdoor living. It’s a sad fact that gardens often come last on the list in terms of budget allocation for home improvements, and yet a well-maintained garden is said to add between five and 20 per cent to a property’s value, not to mention the hours of pleasure it can bring. And it’s an investment that literally grows. Look after your plants well and they will mature year on year so the garden just keeps looking better. Now is a good time to assess the garden and decide what works and what doesn’t. Start planning now, and there will be plenty of time to come up with a design and find a landscaper, so that by next summer you could have the garden of your dreams. But there are still improvements you can make to maximise your space this summer. It may not be a great time to plant new borders, lawns, trees or hedges – the soil will be dry, the water table low, and they will struggle to get established, even with diligent watering. But it’s the perfect time to think about adding garden accessories. Think of the garden as an outside room and plan your added extras accordingly, considering colour, texture, shape and repetition, just as you would any other aspect of home design. At this year’s Chelsea Flower Show, the LG Eco-City garden was one of my favourites. I loved the colours and the hard landscaping, but also the attention to detail, not least because of the way the designer accessorised the space, perfectly co-ordinating the cushions with the planting (see image above), which included lemon-yellow lupins, with coppery verbascums, orange trollius and geums. While we 92 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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may not all take things to this extreme, it shows how sticking to a simple colour theme throughout creates a space that is restful to the eye. Summer brings with it evenings spent outdoors, so a good place to start is with garden lighting. If you’re lucky enough to have an outdoor power source, then electric lights give you the most choice and reliability, but there are also some great solar lights available now. Solar fairy lights are a cost-effective way to give your garden an instant boost, and can be remarkably bright and long-lasting after a sunny day. String them through trees and shrubs, along a fence, or over an arch or pergola for a bit of instant holiday magic. Outdoor candles, whether real or battery-powered LEDs, also give a soft and atmospheric effect for very little cost. Think about up-lighting any feature plants. A glowing light underneath a yucca or palm will throw the most amazing shadows on the wall or fence behind. Lights can also have a practical purpose, lining a driveway or for security. Accessorising your garden is a fun way to revamp and update your space, and another quick and easy way to do this is by looking at your containers. Many gardens I see include a mishmash of pots in different styles, glazes and colours, collected and added to over the years. However, choosing containers that tone with each other will add a calmer appeal. Consider painting them all the same colour with a suitable acrylic paint for an instant facelift. Or why not think about encouraging wildlife to the garden with bird baths and bird feeders? Choose a bath or feeder in an attractive stone or metal, and it will make an interesting stand-alone feature, with the added bonus of bringing in our feathered friends. Just remember to keep them clean and topped up. Think about what is in your line of view from where you

Above: This garden shows how sticking to a simple colour theme throughout creates a space that is restful to the eye Opposite: The hydrangea ‘Annabelle’ is such a reliable, easygoing performer; and Elly’s summer-flowering clematis weaving in and out of an old ornate bird cage


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GARDENING

like to sit in the garden, or perhaps from a vantage point indoors, such as the kitchen window. Perhaps this area could be improved with a focal point such as a statue? Try salvage yards for unusual finds. The Greek and Roman gods are a common inspiration for garden statues, but if you want something more contemporary there are also lots of free-flowing shapes available in stone, bronze and other materials. Just a simple stone sphere, or ideally a few dotted around the garden, adds another point of interest and will fit with most garden styles. Or you may wish to create your own garden sculpture from a piece of driftwood or other interesting find. If you’re out and about this summer, or away on holiday, it’s always nice to have a memento that will remind you of your travels. This is the way we bring our personality into the garden, with finishing touches and unique details. I like to collect things from places I’ve been for my garden, whether it’s an interesting rock or collection of shells, metalwork to hang on the fences, or an old ornate bird cage supporting a summer-flowering clematis (image below). ■

PLANT OF THE MONTH

• ellyswellies.co.uk

Hydrangea ‘Annabelle’ finds its way into many of my planting schemes, as it’s such a reliable, easy-going performer that fits in well with many different garden styles. Its large white pom-pom flowers last well from July onwards, glowing out from the border particularly in the evening as the light starts to fade. Newly planted specimens may flop with the weight of the flowers, so will benefit from some support. As a white variety, it’s unaffected by soil pH, unlike many of its pink and blue cousins. Hydrangeas are woodland dwellers by nature, so cope well with drier, shadier spots, but are also happy in full sun. Leave the flowers to form crisp seed-heads and you can enjoy them in winter too, with a sprinkling of sparkly frost. As with all hydrangeas of this type, keep them to the size you want by cutting them hard back in spring as they start to come out of dormancy and new growth begins, trimming back to plump buds. This will keep them rounded and bushy.

Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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WILD BRISTOL

STARS IN STRIPES This month, Pete Dommett is watching Bristol’s shuffling, snuffling badgers

Badgers can be found all over Bristol but Stoke Bishop is said to be a stronghold

M

y soft spot for old Brock goes back a long way. A cherished wildlife memory from childhood is going badger-watching with my mum and Aunty Eve. Once or twice a year, on a summer’s evening, we’d climb the hill on the edge of our Somerset village, sit at the fringes of a small copse and wait. Often we’d see nothing, but on other occasions shuffling, snuffling grey shapes eventually emerged from underground and, as the sky dimmed, those familiar, black and white-striped faces appeared to glow. Now is a good time to go looking for badgers: the light nights making them easier to spot. By August, cubs that were born at the end of winter are starting to find food for themselves (mostly earthworms – eating as many as 200 per night), gradually putting on weight until they are fully grown in autumn. Some then stay with the family group (or clan) while others disperse and establish new territories. Contrary to popular belief, badgers don’t hibernate during winter but are far less active and spend most of their time in their subterranean setts. There are estimated to be between 250 and 400 thousand badgers in Britain (of which, around 15% are killed on the roads each year). Most of these are in the countryside of course, but the number of animals living in towns and cities is thought to be on the up. It’s not clear whether badgers are actively moving into our neighbourhoods or if increasing urbanisation means that we’ve simply spread into theirs. Whatever the reason, it’s inevitably brought them into conflict with humans. Urban badgers occupy smaller territories than their country cousins and live in smaller clans, but have still made a strong case for 94 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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themselves as the UK’s least popular mammal by digging up lawns, raiding allotments and disturbing graves in churchyards. Controversial creatures they may be, but badgers are also heavily protected; it’s illegal to kill or harm them or interfere with their setts. Love them or loathe them, badgers can be found all over Bristol – wherever the soil is suitable for digging and foraging – but Stoke Bishop is said to be something of a stronghold. For easily accessible animals, take a trip to Avon Wildlife Trust’s Folly Farm site where there’s a dedicated badger-watching platform overlooking an extensive sett. A couple of years ago, I discovered a sett in the corner of a cemetery just a few minutes’ walk from home. Badgers are extremely wary of people and, while their eyesight is poor, they have an acute sense of smell. However, stand downwind so that your scent is carried away from the animals and you can enjoy some incredibly close encounters. One memorable evening, using an ornate headstone as a hide, my eldest son and I watched a group of six badgers feeding peacefully just a few feet in front of us. But the kids’ favourite – and frequently re-told – anecdote about our local badgers was when we stopped by the sett one afternoon in the summer holidays. As we peered into the dark burrow, I patiently explained to the children that, as badgers are nocturnal animals, there was no chance we’d see them during the day. At that precise moment though, a snoozing grey form rolled across the entrance hole and mooned us with a big, furry backside. ■

• Visit avonwildlifetrust.org.uk for guided badger-watching events


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PROPERTY

Neil and Mehjabeen own and rent out this three-bed property in Cliftonwood when they are away

Janek and Lydia’s lovely flat in Clifton

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PROPERTY

HOSTS WITH THE MOST Most of us are aware of the two-way benefits of renting out a living space through the likes of Airbnb but there are now businesses making it even easier to make some extra cash

T

here are a number of reasons why you might decide to short-let your property – whether you’re away or relocating for work, looking for extra income to fund your travels or wanting to make sure your home is in safe hands while you’re away. This spring, host management specialist Airsorted, opened its new Bristol office and, since, has been offering its hassle-free hosting service to property owners and landlords across the city. The Bristol-based team directly handle the management of properties in collaboration with the owner to provide a 24-hour hosting solution. They create and market listings on travel websites including Airbnb, Booking.com and HomeAway, provide hotel-quality linen for every guest, ensure a high standard of cleaning, manage all guest communications and use their property management expertise to ensure the correct pricing strategy for each listing. They basically amalgamate and service all bookings to a property on behalf of the owner for a small percentage of the property’s earnings. As well as holidaymakers or business travellers who let their home for short periods throughout the year to earn while they’re away, property owners who use their house for extra income include retirees who live outside the city, and only use their city-centre bolthole from time to time; expats who have left the UK for work or to travel but don’t want to sell their home; and full-time landlords who want a higher return or a less time-consuming way to manage their properties. “Home-sharing continues to grow in popularity and is one of the key contributors to the ever-growing sharing economy, because it is a great solution for both the host property and those looking for a night, a weekend, a few weeks or a few months’ property let,” said Bristol manager William Caiger. “Launching an office in the South West with a Bristol team of property management experts has been an exciting step for Airsorted. We are the first host management service to have a physical presence in the city, meaning we can provide a very personalised and flexible service to professional landlords and those who want to flexibly share their home from time to time.” Founded by James Jenkins-Yates in 2015, Airsorted has attracted top talent from some of the biggest players in the tech industry such as Uber, Google, TransferWise and Deliveroo. The tech start-up’s aim is to grow into 38 different cities globally by 2019, with the current roster including London, Dublin, Edinburgh, Paris, Brighton, Bath, Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Auckland. “We’re committed to making a tangible impact here in the South West and we’ve started as we mean to go on, using local suppliers to deliver housekeeping, laundering and more,” continued Will. “We look forward to hearing from locals who are looking to make some extra income on a flexible basis, and those looking for a consistent, manageable solution for their property portfolio.” Bristol-based hosts Neil Patrick and his wife Mehjabeen let out their property using Airsorted earlier this year. Mehjabeen is a CFO while Neil runs his own ad agency; both have jobs which mean their plans rarely coincide. “I might be away, she might be,” Neil explains, “we can both be abroad for one month but maybe not at the same time.” The pair are based in Clifton Wood. “A lot of people visit this part of town – it’s near the bridge and near the city centre, so it’s a great location in Bristol,” he says. “We also recently had a garden extension done. We absolutely love the house but also go away quite a lot, so with the advent of Airbnb, we realised there was a great opportunity. “While our daughter was away for university, we decided to put our

property on Airbnb. The timing of it was perfect, and because Airsorted take care of it all for you, we could move forward with listing our property without worrying. We wouldn’t be on Airbnb without Airsorted.” The service is designed to take the stress out of hosting, from creating listings to vetting guests, something Neil and Mehjabeen were able to find out first-hand. “We were on-site with a week, everything was really smooth,” says Neil. “The big thing for us was getting it listed in the first place, a lot of the heavy lifting was done by Airsorted. Not having to worry about dealing with anything when the guests are here, cleaning, top quality bedding and linen, at a consistent quality too. It’s a more reliable service than what we could provide anyway; it means we can switch off and gives us peace of mind.” Some of the biggest worries when short-letting your home for the first time can include whether or not it’s going to be taken care of, or whether it’ll be rented at all. “It’s a great house and, combined with what Airsorted bring to the table, it looks very professional,” Neil explains, “plus, everytime we list it, it’s rented. We’ve had 100% occupancy. We’re now able to go away more because it covers our weekend trips away.” More freedom? Sounds good to us... “Not only does it give us the opportunity to take more breaks, it contributes to the cost of the house,” says the couple. “We recently were able to go to Milan because of it. My wife was there for work and so I listed the property and within 24 hours there were two requests to book. This meant we could travel together, knowing it was all covered.”

Janek & Lydia Janek is in the army and Lydia is a biology teacher. They live together in Clifton. How long have you been a host? We hosted for the first time last August while we were on holiday. Is the property your home or a second property? It is our home. How long, on average, per year do you let it out for? This year we are hoping for 8-10 weeks including weekends. What are your average monthly earnings through the lettings? We made £1,700 in the three weeks we were away last year, despite only deciding to list at the last minute – less than one week before we went on holiday – hence why we have decided to have another go this year! It has been a thoroughly pleasant experience so far. From the initial questionnaire to the listing going live, we have been expertly guided through the whole process and no question has gone unanswered. We like having Sarah as our account executive, she knows the flat and the area, so we feel confident that there is continuity for each guest. The online dashboard is a superb innovation too – we feel like we can have as much or as little control as we want. • airsorted.uk

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PROPERTY NEWS

BITE-SIZED UPDATES FROM ACROSS THE CITY’S BOOMING SECTOR Last spring, Hubb acquired this 19th-century, Grade-II house in Bathford and renovated it into a modern family home

HURRAY FOR HUBB

CONGRATULATIONS! Bristol developer Cubex, with its funding partner Palmer Capital, has bought the former headquarters of Avon Fire and Rescue in Bristol city centre and plans to transform it into homes and offices. The deal follows fierce bidding from across the UK for what is one of the last regeneration sites remaining in Bristol’s central business district. The £136million mixed-use scheme planned for the site incorporates a 100,000 sq ft office building, with over 300 homes, likely to be for the rental market. 20% will be affordable, to meet the council’s threshold and be fasttracked through planning in order to start on site as soon as possible. Funding has been secured to develop the office building speculatively and work is set to begin soon after planning consent has been secured with the aim of being on site within 15 months. The office building is likely to follow the sustainable design principles of Aurora at Finzels Reach. Once complete, the site will accommodate more than 1,500 people and continue the regeneration of the area.

Two Redrow site managers from Bristol have received ‘Quality Awards’ at the National House Building Council’s annual Pride in the Job Awards. Nathan Coltman and Andy Baxter are among 18 Redrow site managers recognised across the country. Nathan is currently overseeing work at the Frenchay Park development built on the former site of Frenchay Hospital, while Andy is working at the Lawrence Green development in Stoke Gifford. Now in its 38th year, Pride in the Job celebrates the contribution site managers make in creating homes of quality. With more than 16,000 site managers competing for the awards, this year’s Quality Award winners were hand-picked for their excellent standards on site. Following 12 months of rigorous judging, these winners were seen to have excelled. “I am delighted to have been recognised,” said Nathan. “With the launch of our new three-storey houses, I feel that this is a really exciting time for myself and my team.” Andy added: “Receiving this award is a great honour as it highlights how much effort goes in to constructing these developments. With sales surging at the Lawrence Green site, this is a final bonus to the work we have carried out.”

• cubex-land.com

• redrow.co.uk

IN THE PIPELINE

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A Bristol-based property company, which enables people to invest in the property market, celebrated the completion of its first property recently. Hubb Property Group launched last year, offering the chance to invest in property for relative sums in order to gain good returns. The company completed its first project in Bath, rewarding investors with an 18 per cent return less than a year after their investment. The residential property investment and development business secures under-utilised properties in emerging and high-demand locations across the South West by pooling aspiring investors before transforming the property. Last spring Hubb acquired a 19thcentury, Grade-II, semi-detached house in Bathford which was in need of complete refurbishment. The company assembled investors and got to work on renovating the property into a modern family home with period charm. “The potential for this property was obvious, however there is always a risk of uncovering unknown issues with any property of this age, not least one that is listed, which inevitably makes it less desirable to potential buyers who may not have the experience or contacts to take on a project of this scope,” said MD Oliver Hawthorne. ‘’Historically property is a proven investment that can deliver great returns. Our clients recognise this but typically don’t have the time to find a suitable property and manage the project on a day-to-day basis. At Hubb we live and breathe this, day in day out, so we make it easy for our investors to benefit from the gains of residential development or buy-to-lets without the day-to-day involvement.’’ Upon completion, the property was re-marketed and sold by Andrews Property Group. The company is actively looking for more development, buy-to-let and restoration properties, with new investment opportunities due to launch soon. For information on how you could invest, visit the website or follow the company @HubbProperty on Twitter. • hubb.co.uk


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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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lat 24 North Contemporis is arguably Clifton’s finest modern penthouse. The accommodation is arranged over the top two floors of this much sought after building and the apartment has breathtaking panoramic views across the city. There are luxurious contemporary finishing touches which include under floor heating and air conditioning throughout as well as surround sound and electric blinds. The south and south westerly orientation of the main living space means an abundance of natural light and direct sunshine throughout much of the day. There are several access points to the spectacular sun terrace which makes an extremely impressive area in which to entertain. The superb bespoke kitchen/breakfast and dining area has granite work surfaces and a granite central island with integral appliances and this area is served by a useful utility room with wine fridge. The three bedroom suites occupy a separate level and each has access to the wraparound sun terrace. The master suite is fully glazed to one side allowing far reaching views and the en suite is fitted with his and hers vanity units, a corner Jacuzzi bath and separate shower. The outside space is what really sets the penthouse apart, offering views of Brandon Tower to the east and Dundry due south. Ashton Court and the Suspension Bridge are all within view. There is the is the added bonus of parking for two cars. This utterly desirable apartment is offered for sale by agents Knight Frank of Clifton.

THE PENTHOUSE 24 NORTH CONTEMPORIS, CLIFTON • Generous living room/study • Kitchen/breakfast/dining room and utility room • Generous master suite plus 2 guest suites • Large wraparound sun terrace • Parking

£ Price on Application

Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

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CITY | BUSINESS

PROPERTY | UPDATES

PROPERTY IN FOCUS

Troy Budd joins Knight Frank’s Bristol Residential Department

OAKHURST, 3 CECIL ROAD, WESTON SUPER MARE GUIDE PRICE: £1.100,000 Fancy a sea view? This spectacular W-S-M Edwardian Villa is the perfect family home Oakhurst is a large Edwardian villa dating from 1903 and lovingly restored and refurbished. The house was designed by architect Hans Price, who was responsible for much of the development in Weston Super Mare at the time. With more than 5000 square feet of accommodation, laid out over three floors, there is a great sense of light and space in the house and period features abound, with lovely cornice work and intricate roses to the ceilings. Oak flooring runs through much of the ground floor where you’ll find the drawing room which has a triple bay window with far-reaching views, the bright sunny dining room and the fully fitted kitchen and breakfast room. There are French doors leading out onto a south facing paved terrace. At the rear is a gym room, bathroom and good sized utility room. On the first floor the master bedroom suite has a luxurious walk in shower room and his and hers sinks as well as a separate dressing room (or additional bedroom). There’s also a sitting room and additional bedroom served by a family bathroom. The upper floor houses four more bedrooms, a bathroom and a study. The real wow factor at Oakhurst are the ever changing spectacular views from many of the rooms from where you can look out over the Bristol Channel. Outside, there are fully enclosed landscaped gardens from which to enjoy the surroundings and parking comes in the form of an attached double garage. n For more details or to arrange a viewing contact Rupert Oliver on 0117 428 6464. Rupert Oliver Property Agents. Bristol. Visit: www.rupertoliver.co.uk

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K

night Frank have appointed Troy Budd as a Senior Negotiator, in the firm’s Bristol Residential Sales Department.

Troy brings a wealth of experience to the role, having worked within the Bristol property market for over 7 years. Bristol born and now living in Southville, where Bristol has seen a huge increase in demand and prices over the last 5 years. Troy has been brought on to help expand our coverage across the city including areas such as; Henleaze, Westbury Park, Westbury on Trym, Bishopston, St Andrews and Southville. If you are looking to buy or sell in any of the above areas, or other parts of Bristol, please do get in touch with Troy and the team at Knight Frank. James Toogood, Head of Knight Frank Bristol Residential, commented, ‘I am delighted to welcome Troy to the team. We are excited about the expansion of the team to increase the areas we cover within the City of Bristol’. Troy will be based in the Knight Frank’s Residential office in Clifton, Bristol.

For further information, please contact: Knight Frank Bristol, bristol@knightfrank.com +44 117 317 1999


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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

Fae and Howard enjoy city life at The General

W

ith retirement on the horizon, Fae and Howard Kinsey were looking to balance their idyllic rural home on the Gower Peninsula with a taste of vibrant city life. The couple have family in Bristol and with the prospect of more spare time on their hands, they wanted a weekend retreat in the city to enjoy all that it has to offer. Fae explains: “At this stage of our lives, the chance to enjoy more of one of the most exciting British cities was too good to miss. We wanted to live in the centre of the city so that we could experience everything Bristol has to offer within easy walking distance.”

Their aspirations were realised when they discovered The General, the Grade II listed former Bristol General Hospital that has been meticulously restored and converted by heritage expert City & Country. A Bristol landmark, The General’s historic façade faces the waterfront, whilst inside contemporary homes blend style and comfort. Discussing the historic building, Fae says: “The conversion of The General is very luxurious, from the décor and furnishings to the stunning quality of the workmanship and design. We felt that this amazing undertaking was unique and the opportunity to buy a new apartment in a historic building with unique architectural features was highly attractive for us. When people ask me about my apartment, I encourage them to look up The General knowing that they will be really impressed with a truly unique restoration. I feel proud to belong to such a beautiful part of Bristol’s heritage.” The couple’s top-floor apartment overlooks the Bathurst Basin, offering them tranquil views and a space to relax after a long day exploring Bristol’s bustling streets. They are now looking forward to making the most of the central location and enjoying all that Bristol has to offer. “We are looking forward to being spontaneous and experiencing everything Bristol has to offer in the way of theatre, restaurants, local attractions, museums and shops. At the same time, our apartment is in a quiet location which suits our needs perfectly.” says Howard. He continues: “The best aspect of buying from City & Country was the competence they portrayed – their professionalism as renovators of historic and interesting buildings and their attention to detail is second to none. They show such dedication and have such confidence to deliver what they are ultimately going to achieve that we simply felt exhilarated and excited to be a part of this unique development.”

For more information, visit www.cityandcountry.co.uk or call 0117 925 5333

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Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

SOUTH PARADE MANSIONS, OAKFIELD ROAD, CLIFTON

HARVEYS CELLARS DENMARK STREET, BS1

• Superb HQ offices

• An iconic restaurant / bar

• 1,890 sq ft

• Fully licensed with kitchen

• 2 car spaces • New lease – Rent o/a

• Excellent location

HIGH STREET – WESTBURY ON TRYM

NEW STUDIO OFFICES

• Large retail unit (formerly McColls)

• High quality refurb

• Only £24,000 pax

• Located in BS5

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• New lease – rent o/a

• New lease

FREEHOLD FOR SALE UNIT 501 CENTRAL PARK, BS14 9BZ

TO LET / MAY SELL UNIT 200 CENTRAL PARK, BS14 9BZ

• C 1,830 sq ft

• Industrial unit + yard

• Office building

• 21,442 sq ft

• 1,500 sq ft + parking

• Development potential

• Only £8 per sq ft or ‘FOR SALE’ – o/a

• Price o/a

CLIFTON VILLAGE

STUDIO / OFFICE SPACE BS14 9BZ

• Prime retail / office unit

• 3,486 sq ft + parking

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• 1st floor suite • Only £8 per sq ft

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BS1 OFFICES

• Adj A38 Patchway

• High quality refurb

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• 2,500 – 3,600 sq ft • 4 car spaces

• 15 Car spaces Price o/a

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Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon

Burston Cook August.indd 1

MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

20/07/2018 13:51


Yate

Andrewsonline.co.uk

The Knapp, Yate Bristol, BS37 7YB £599,950

This executive 4 bedroom detached family home is a show stopper! Tucked away in a lovely private spot overlooking the park and lake, this property has been lovingly renovated and has a wonderful side extension providing a superb new open plan layout. Pure class is oozed throughout this property. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

01454 837914 yate@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Southville Andrewsonline.co.uk

Somermead, Bedminster Bristol, BS3 5QR £285,000

A well-presented end of terrace family home with two reception rooms, three bedrooms and a first floor bathroom also with the advantage of a large rear garden complete with decked and patio seating areas great for al-fresco dining, a lawn bordered with various plants and shrubs, a child’s Wendy house and storage shed with gated access from a side lane. The accommodation briefly comprises: entrance hallway, lounge dining room kitchen; to the first floor, three bedrooms and a bathroom. Energy Efficiency Rating: N/A

0117 405 7683 southville@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews August.indd 1

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

20/07/2018 13:46


Bishopston Andrewsonline.co.uk

St Andrews Road, Montpelier, BS6 5EJ £499,950

0117 405 7662

An absolutely stunning Victorian mid terraced home on St Andrews Road in Montpelier. This four bedroom property has been wonderfully maintained and has the perfect blend of period features such as ornate cornicing and fireplaces with modern conveniences such as the superb kitchen/diner. Energy Efficiency Rating: C

bishopston@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Westbury-on-Trym Andrewsonline.co.uk

Westbury Road, BS9 3AH Offers in excess of £299,950

A beautifully presented hall floor apartment set within a wonderful period building benefiting from its own balcony and shared off street parking space. The apartment briefly comprises entrance hallway, lounge/kitchen 21.6’ x 12.9’max, two double bedrooms with fitted wardrobes and a modern bathroom. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

0117 405 7685 westburyontrym@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews August.indd 2

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

20/07/2018 13:46


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CITY | BUSINESS

PROPERTY | UPDATES

FORMER CAPTAIN DROPS ANCHOR AT BRANDON YARD, BRISTOL

A

fter more than 19 years in their home in Langford, Kevin Slade and his wife Jane decided to make the move to a waterside home at Brandon Yard, Bristol. Kevin, a former personnel director of a ship management company in Glasgow previously spent 22 years at sea, serving on a variety of ships as Captain. Now retired, the couple chose to downsize from their five-bedroom old barn conversion in the small village of Langford, to a new two-bedroom apartment in Bristol harbour. The Brandon Yard site was previously part of the Canon’s Marsh gasworks, which closed in the 1960s and has been derelict since the 1970s. Having previously spent 16 years living in Clifton, the couple were keen to see what other areas of Bristol might suit their lifestyle, as Mr Slade comments, “We have always kept an eye on the gasworks and thought about moving back into Bristol – it all seemed to come together with the development of Brandon Yard.” The couple chose Brandon Yard due to its excellent location, modern specification and waterside views. Their new home will be a south facing, two-bedroom apartment on the ground floor of the converted Oculus House. With its own separate entrance and large patio, it offers fantastic views of the water and SS Great Britain. Kevin commented, “Being so close to the city centre, we can easily go to the theatre, shops, or visit our old friends.” Another draw for the couple was the proximity to Temple Meads train station via a short ferry or bus journey, as Kevin regularly travels by train into London to conduct his role as Chairman of the Merchant Navy Training board. When reflecting on the buying process Kevin stated, “The Acorn team have been helpful and informative throughout the buying process.” The couple’s new home will be ready in Summer 2019.

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About Brandon Yard Brandon Yard is a new waterfront development on Bristol’s harbourside. Located on Lime Kiln Road just off Anchor Road, the scheme offers 58 homes, including 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments and two 2 bedroom homes. Situated opposite Brunel’s SS Great Britain, the development is the final piece in the regeneration of the northern section of Bristol Harbourside. Brandon Yard includes the redevelopment of Grade II listed stone buildings, West Purifier House, renamed Oculus House and Engine House, together with a collection of carefully designed new build apartments. The residences will enjoy a rare position on the harbourside with views over the water. The site is in close proximity to the cultural highlights of Bristol including the Hippodrome, Colston Hall, and Bristol Museum and art gallery. The University of Bristol is also under a mile away. Over the last 40 years Bristol Harbourside has been transformed from a working port and shipping gateway into a new mixed use destination, buzzing with an array of bars and restaurants. The water is lined with original cobbled pathways and various remainders of the area’s industrial heritage – including the impressive cargo cranes from the city’s 1950s trading heyday. The scheme not only offers high quality new homes, but also a thoughtfully designed courtyard for residents, plus secure bicycle storage. Enhancements will be made to the harbourside path that runs alongside the site, allowing residents to enjoy the waterside location and access the city centre through cycle paths and walking routes. Trains from Bristol Temple Meads reach London Paddington in less than an 1 hour and 40 mininutes, with electrification due to make this even quicker. The city is therefore ideal for those looking for a family base or second home. Access to London is also easy for commuters via the M4. Selected homes at Brandon Yard are available to purchase using the Government’s Help to Buy scheme. Prices at Brandon Yard start from £295,000 - over 50% now sold. For further information or an appointment in the marketing suite, please contact Knight Frank on 0117 317 1999 n


COOMBE LANE, STOKE BISHOP A substantial, executive family home boasting five family bedrooms; master with dressing room and ensuite, open outlook to rear onto garden and views towards Stoke Bishop cricket ground. EPC - C

2

2

5

Guide Price £835,000

DOWNS COTE PARK, WESTBURY-ON-TRYM Filled with character and with extensive views, this four bedroom semi-detached 1930’s family home offers two receptions; rear with French doors onto a delightful garden. EPC - D

2

2

4

£680,000

CJ Hole August.indd 1

20/07/2018 13:53


Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com I was recently watching a student rental property turn over (students out, paint and tidy, prepare for new) and wondered if the landlord had any idea of the kind of job the letting agent was doing - and let’s just say, it wasn’t top notch? As a rental property owner myself, I believe the nature and quality of the work we do for our landlords, and our tenants (and even their neighbours, especially when it comes to student property) is paramount. What do landlords, who are investing their savings/pensions in bricks and mortar, actually want from the people who manage their property for them? Surveys consistently show that it’s three key things: the

REDLAND

TO LET £2,750 PCM + FEES

A rare opportunity to rent a five bedroom semi-detached family home within close proximity of Redland Green School. This property has off street parking for several vehicles and a separate seating areas in the stunning private rear garden. An internal viewing is highly recommended. EPC TBC

CLIFTON

TO LET £1,700 PCM + FEES

A superior two double bedroom maisonette with private roof terrace, enjoying views directly over Durdham Downs. Externally there is an allocated parking space and a private roof terrace. Available now on an unfurnished basis. EPC E

ability to deal with maintenance and issues, good rental valuations, and transparency of fees. We are one of the oldest names in the business, and when people think Bristol property they often think CJ Hole. That doesn’t mean we’re complacent: we work hard to have one of the highest landlord retention rates in the country. Given that you have choice in who you hire to manage your investment, especially in this bit of Bristol, make absolutely sure you’re getting great value and service. It will matter to your tenants and your neighbours, and let’s face it - it’s what you’re paying for. Howard Davis MD Clifton

REDLAND

LET AGREED £2,670 PCM + FEES

An attractive, bay fronted Victorian family home offers a well presented and versatile interior over three floors. Currently arranged as a 6 bedroom home with an up to date HMO licence the house would also be very suitable as a family home. EPC E

HARBOURSIDE

LET AGREED £900 PCM + FEES

A double bedroom third floor apartment in the highly popular Steamship House development on Bristol’s Harbourside. The vibrant location offered is ideal for those wanting a waterfront life style, perfect for a short morning commute to the city centre and the apartment directly overlooks Brunel’s SS Great Britain. EPC C

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CJ Hole Clifton August.indd 1

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CLIFTON

Guide Price £445,000

REDLAND

Guide Price £425,000

A generously proportioned two bedroom, hall floor apartment with a tandem garage in Clifton. Offering a spacious lounge/diner with triple sash bay window, high ceilings and period mouldings, kitchen, a utility room, master bedroom with en-suite shower room, second bedroom, an internal study, plus a family bathroom. EPC E

An impressive and beautifully presented three bedroom apartment occupying the entire first floor of this fine Victorian building. This large character building comprises of just four apartments with a lovely communal hallway and communal front gravelled garden area. EPC E

HOTWELLS

HARBOURSIDE - GUIDE PRICE £390,000

Guide Price £335,000

The Colonnade is a select address of a 2 star listed unique cottages at the foot of the iconic Clifton suspension bridge. Originally built as a shopping arcade for spa visitors in 1786, it is all that remains of the old Hotwell complex. The owners have restored and upgraded this two bedroom house to a high quality standard. EPC F

A most impressive two bedroom apartment with beautiful views directly over the harbour. Light and spacious living area, open plan kitchen/dining space, a master bedroom with an en-suite and built-in bespoke wardrobes, the second bedroom features a built-in wardrobe, a contemporary bathroom, and parking available. EPC B

STOKE BISHOP - GUIDE PRICE £585,000

CITY CENTRE Guide Price £485,000

A most impressive family home with a warmth of character and beautifully presented throughout. It offers: Entrance hall, dining room with direct access to the rear garden, lounge, kitchen and utility room overlooking rear garden, four bedrooms, two bathrooms, rear garden and front paved driveway. EPC E

A unique opportunity to live in a contemporary and stylish three double bedroom duplex apartment in this cleverly converted grade 2 listed historic Bristol building. Located close to the heart of the city and the Harbourside. There is also one allocated parking space and no onward chain. EPC D

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CJ Hole Clifton August.indd 2

20/07/2018 13:53


Spike Island ÂŁ335,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

Two bedroom apartment

A stylish 2 double bedroom second floor apartment with secure allocated parking and lift. This attractive property offers a spacious open plan living area with a balcony with views over the harbour. EPC - B.

oceanhome.co.uk

Ocean August.indd 1

Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Westbury-on-Trym ÂŁ225,000 One bedroom flat

A modern one bedroom garden apartment with the rare benefit of a private entrance, set within Westbury on Trym village with access to the shops and amenities as well as being within 200 metres of Canford Park. The property has an open plan sitting room/kitchen, double bedroom and shower room. EPC - C

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Redland £425,000

Two bedroom apartment A wonderfully spacious ground floor apartment with secure allocated parking. The generous living room allows also for a lovely dining area and leads directly on to the private courtyard garden. EPC- TBC

Combe Dingle £425,000 Four bedroom house

This semi-detached family house is located in the popular suburb of Coombe Dingle on Arbutus Drive. The location benefits from having local shops just a stone’s throw away. The property is in need of modernisation & comes to the market with no onward chain. EPC - E

Ocean August.indd 2

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Rupert Oliver FP August.qxp_Layout 1 20/07/2018 13:57 Page 1

Hannover Quay, Bristol | Guide Price £750,000 An exceptional 1500 sq. ft lateral apartment with outstanding harbour views and a private entrance, two generous terraces and two allocated off-street parking spaces. Private entrance on the ground floor | Two allocated off-street parking spaces | Circa 1500 sq. ft of lateral accommodation | Superb harbour views | Stunning 45’ open plan family room and kitchen | Two double bedrooms | Two bath / shower rooms (one en-suite) | Study / bedroom three | Underfloor heating and useful storage throughout | Circa 500 sq. ft of private terraces with harbour views | EPC Rating: B

Circa 1520 sq. ft (141.2 sq. m) of accommodation and circa 500 sq. ft (46 sq. m) of private terraces.

clear and effective property sales Fixed commission of £5,000 + VAT that you pay only on successful Completion Professional photography, floor plans and marketing included Transparent on-line tracking of your sale from valuation through to completion Our fee is fixed. Everything else is about moving To discuss your property sale or purchase requirements, please call or email Rupert, or visit us in our central Clifton office.


Richard Harding August.qxp_Layout 6 20/07/2018 13:57 Page 1

Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

A handsome, large (3,040 sq. ft. incl. basement) 5 bedroom, 2/3 reception Victorian semi-detached family house with impressive lateral accommodation arranged predominantly over 2 floors plus additional basement games room & valuable storage, off street parking for 2 cars & 35ft x 45ft max width level lawned rear garden. Prime location for families within a level walk of Durdham Downs and Redland Green Park. EPC: F

Within a short stroll of Christchurch Green and Clifton’s iconic Suspension Bridge a beautiful large 6 double bedroom, 2 reception room, end of terrace Victorian town house arranged over three floors, circa 2,800 sq. ft., with driveway parking, 35ft rear garden and useful cellar rooms. A fabulous, light filled and elegant Victorian period town house situated within the highly desirable Clifton Village central area. EPC: F

An elegant & well-proportioned, 5 double bedroom, 2 bath/shower room, Edwardian period end of terraced family house, of circa 2,370 sq. ft., with good sized kitchen/ breakfast room, level rear garden & tandem double garage. A fine period residence (circa 1909) of character both internally and externally, retaining most of its original features - covered balcony, stained glass windows, fireplaces and simple moulded cornicing. EPC: E

REDLAND

REDLAND

WESTBURY PARK

guide £1,200,000

guide £965,000

Professional, Reliable, Successful

CLIFTON

guide price range £1,250,000 - £1,350,0000

A rare opportunity to purchase a gracious and very civilised 4 double bedroom, 3 bathroom, 3 reception Victorian period semi-detached family house with off street parking for 2 cars and a charming south-westerly facing rear garden directly accessed from a generous 21ft kitchen/diner. Stylishly decorated and presented with a wealth of character, high decorative ceilings, generous proportions and period fireplaces. In a prime location & to be sold for the first time in 18 years. EPC: E

guide price range £1,095,000 - £1,150,000

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


Bristol’s Independent Estate Agents

Redland £925,000

Clifton £630,000

Substantial Victorian semi-detached six bedroom family home in Redland within 510m of Redland Green School. With accommodation arranged over four floors the house is perfectly arranged for family life. Offered for sale with no onward chain. EPC - F

An exquisite two bedroom hall floor flat in a highly regarded location overlooking Clifton College playing fields. College Road is sought after due to its proximity to Clifton Village and Durdham Downs. EPC - F

Horfield £585,000

Clifton £475,000

A charming four bedroom, 2 bathroom family house set in a highly desirable spot within 300m of Henleaze infants school and within the 2017 entry area for Redland Green school. Phoenix Grove is enjoys an enviable location tucked away off the main road. EPC - TBC

A grand, spacious (circa 1400 sq/ft), 2 double bedroom, two bathroom elevated hall floor apartment with high ceilings, big windows and period features. EPC - D

TEL: 0117 974 1741 61 Apsley Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2SW

Leese & Nagle August.indd 1

sales@leeseandnagle.co.uk

20/07/2018 13:54


www.leeseandnagle.co.uk

Stoke Bishop

NEW INSTRUCTION

Guide Price £799,950

A fabulously presented and creatively extended 4-bedroom Edwardian family home of over 2000 sq. feet including its integral garage. It is located in a most enviable position within a quiet cul-de-sac just off Coombe Lane and retains a great deal of its period charm blended with contemporary additions. EPC - D

Coombe Dingle Guide Price £739,500

Westbury on Trym Guide Price £610,000

Stoke Bishop Guide Price £445,000

A fine example of a detached modern townhouse set in a very popular road in Coombe Dingle. The house is arranged over three floors and lends itself as a lovely lifestyle property and would be perfect for a growing family or potentially a local downsizer looking to maintain a high level of living in a more manageable home. EPC - C

A very well presented 4 bedroom semi detached house located on a quiet cul-de-sac in a prime location. The house would suit a range of buyers including a young family looking for great local schooling or potentially a downsizer looking for a more manageable house within level walking access to amenities. EPC - D

A lovely family home is this 1950’s very light and airy 3-bedroom semi-detached house located on this highly sought-after road. The property is just around the corner from Stoke Bishop Primary school and within walking distance to a good range of local shops, Stoke Lodge playing fields with its own children’s playing area and Sea Mills Station. EPC - E

TEL: 0117 962 2299

125 Stoke Lane, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS9 3RW

Leese & Nagle August.indd 2

wot@leeseandnagle.co.uk

20/07/2018 13:55


Mallory fp.qxp_Layout 1 26/07/2018 15:40 Page 1

The Bristol Magazine August 2018  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol

The Bristol Magazine August 2018  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol