__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Bristol Cover April 21.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 09:32 Page 1

Issue 197

THE

I

APRIL 2021

MAGAZINE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

MEET THE BRISTOL FACES 60 YEARS OF INNOVATION

A look back at Arnolfini’s six decades as a key cultural hub

LOCAL HERO

University of Bristol professor recalls a lifetime of extraordinary adventure

CRACKED IT

Clarence Court dishes out three egg-inspired recipes in time for Easter

BORED OF THE BARD?

Do we still feel connected to Shakespeare four centuries on?

AND SO MUCH MORE IN THE CITY’S BIGGEST GUIDE TO LIVING IN BRISTOL


Wren DPS.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 10:50 Page 1


Wren DPS.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 10:50 Page 2


12

By Andy Goodman

Clarence Court’s Easter hot cross buns

Delissa Quilt from Anthropologie

Bristol Contents - APRIL.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 19:30 Page 1

34 Contents April 2021 66

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

BORED OF THE BARD?

........................................................................

8

Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

..................................................

30

Gerie Herbert debates whether we still feel connected to Shakespeare

...........................................................................

10

FEATURES STRIKE A POSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Catch up on local news and meet gallery owner Sarah Brown

Milliner Annabel Allen imparts wisdom on how to find the perfect hat

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

LOCAL HERO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

A brighter future ahead

University of Bristol Professor, Jonathan Bamber, lets us in on an extraordinary life of adventure

BRISTOL UPDATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Business and community news

EDUCATION NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 The latest from the city’s schools and colleges

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

BEST LAID EGGS

............................................................

34

Emma Clegg discovers Clarence Court’s fabulous range of eggs and shares three of their egg-inspired recipes in time for Easter

FOOD & DRINK FEEDING THE LOCALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Elly West promotes sustainable outdoor space personalisation

Melissa Blease chats to fifth generation food producers about a more optimistic future

CULTURE

ALL ABOUT THE VEGGIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 RED LORRY YELLOW LOLLY

.......................................

12

Bristol artist Andy Goodman opens an exhibition at Southmead Hospital in attempt to raise the spirits of staff and visitors

60 YEARS OF INNOVATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Michellin-starred chef Rob Howell of Bristol’s popular restaurant Root, shares a selection of recipes from his new cookbook

HABITAT

As Arnolfini turns 60, Melissa Blease looks back at its six decades as an iconic cultural hub

ROOMS FOR REFUGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

A BRUSH WITH IMMORTALITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Emma Clegg looks from comfort, cosiness and character as we spend more time at home

Local artist Helen Wilson Roe is commissioned to create Britain’s first public sculpture of a Black woman made by a Black woman

PROPERTY

......................................................................

News from local estate agents and developers

A CITY OF COLOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Andrew Swift unearths rare colour photographs of pre-war Bristol

WHAT’S ON

.....................................................................

26

A round-up of the city’s upcoming events

BEAUTIFUL BROWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Clevedon Salerooms’ Chris Yeo offers his expert opinion

4 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197

ON THE COVER A print titled Shirley Temple Meads from Andy Goodman’s new exhibition, Red Lorry Yellow Lolly. Browse more of Goodman’s visual playfulness on p.12.

74


Gardiner Haskins.qxp_Layout 1 25/03/2021 09:06 Page 1


Editor's letter – april.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 17:28 Page 1

The Arnolfini team in 1971

THIS MONTH WE’RE...

Admiring...

A brand new Bristol-based ethical men's grooming brand, ECOMOFO, has launched a huge range of vegan, plasticfree, cruelty-free products. The brand has also committed to plant a tree for every order over £20 made on its online store. So, whether you're a hippie or a brickie, a craftsman or a draughtsman, a landscaper or a manscaper, they've got you covered.

from the

I

t’s a great honour to be saying hello as I briefly step into Amanda’s shoes this month. Incomparable shoes, I know, but stay with me now – these pages are full of our city’s creative minds and daring souls that are here to instill hope within us all. Our April cover is blazoned with colour, character and joy. It may at times seem premature to speak of a bright future but, as Bartleby puts it so well on p.14, it’s on the horizon in many ways. We should take comfort from the abundance of energy and innovation on the city’s streets, with local artist Andy Goodman being a shining example of this. Our cover star, Shirley Temple Meads, will be appearing at Andy’s latest exhibition at Southmead Hospital this month. The visual playfulness in his Red Lorry, Yellow Lolly exhibition, featured on p.12, is hard to resist. Arnolfini is also celebrating its 60th birthday this year and, on p.24, we look back at its phenomenal history as an iconic cultural hub. As we delve into its archives, our faith in the resilience of the creative spirit is restored, making the future ever more exciting to imagine. Creativity remains the cornerstone of all that we do in Bristol. Later this year, a new installation is set to appear as artist Helen Wilson Roe prepares to unveil Britain’s first public sculpture of a Black woman by a Black woman. On p.22, we look at the life and death of the heroine, Henrietta Lacks. From global heroes to local ones, I had the pleasure of speaking to University of Bristol Professor Jonathan Bamber (p.32), who has in his time epitomised the meaning of courage and resilience in Touching the Void-like circumstances. From Antarctica to the Indian Himalaya to the snowy trails of the Alps, Jonathan lets us in on his extraordinary life of discovery. This April, of course, brings springtime celebrations – ones where we can indulge in the sweeter moments in life. On p.34, Emma Clegg discovers the fabulous eggs sold at Clarence Court, from ostrich to emu, the farmers there undoubtedly being eggsperts on the matter! They share three egg-inspired recipes to enjoy alongside some choccy replicas. This month would also have been Shakespeare’s 457th birthday. On p.30, Gerie Herbert wonders whether we still feel connected with the Bard four centuries on. In the hope that spring will bring more announcements, we continue to dream of seaside getaways and summer plans. We look at Burgh Island’s Art Deco hotel for inspiration on p.50 and, trust us, it delivers. In among all of this, we welcome with open arms our new columnist, Chris Yeo, BBC Antiques Roadshow expert, who brings his considerable expertise to our pages. In food, Rob Howell, Michelin-starred chef and the brains behind the popular restaurant, Root, also shares a selection of fine dishes from his brand new cookbook. As ever, the city offers some joyful inspiration this month – indulge and escape... MILLIE BRUCE-WATT ACTING EDITOR

6 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

thebristolmag.co.uk

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

@thebristolmag

Credit: Bhagesh Sachania Photography

EDITOR

@thebristolmag

ECOMOFO’s new range of eco-friendly products

Excited...

Helen Wilson Roe at the unveiling of her portrait of Henrietta Lacks

... To see the unveiling of Helen Wilson Roe’s bronze sculpture of Henrietta Lacks on the University of Bristol’s campus later this year. Lacks has indirectly contributed to some of the world’s greatest medical breakthroughs.

Joining...

Ellie Crawley, founder of Feel Fit

Sustainable fitness brand, Feel Fit, is launching the South West’s first ecopowered fitness studio in Bristol this month. Offering a 360-degree approach to sustainable, holistic fitness and wellbeing, the studio and sustainable retail space on Regent Street in Clifton is the perfect place to build strength and fitness.


Original Cottages FP.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 10:51 Page 1


zeitgeist – april.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 09:19 Page 1

5

ZEITGEIST

top things to do in April

Listen

Image by Jenny Urquhart

Enjoy

Room 212 is relaunching with an exhibition, Bristol in Springtime. The windows of this Gloucester Road gallery were kept bright and beautiful throughout lockdown as so many people are looking for original artwork. The shop and exhibition space inside will give even more choice. Expect paintings, prints, jewellery, cards and ceramics by local artists inspired by our city and the surrounding countryside. Owner Sarah Thorp has plans for a Gloucester Road Art Fair in July and painting classes in the garden – keep an eye on the website. • room212.co.uk Dudes & Dog Walk restarts on 3 April

St George's Bristol has launched a new series of digital concerts this springtime, all featuring performances from brilliant young local artists. All the concerts have been filmed from the St George's Bristol rooftop and gardens, recorded in a live, covid-safe format. The performers play exciting new music with either a panoramic backdrop of the city behind them, or a view of the beautiful concert hall gardens. Each concert will also be followed by a live Q&A on Zoom where audiences can meet and interact with the artists. Look out for the likes of Ellie Gowers, Kit Hawes and Aaron Catlow, ISOLDÉ and Jack Salt and enjoy some of Bristol’s best vocal harmonies, eclectic bassladen beats and inventive arrangements. • stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

Ceramics by Lucy Turner

Admire

For people living in or visiting Bristol, the Ken Stradling Collection has a treat in store with its latest exhibition of ceramics by emerging artists from Cardiff School of Art and Design. It’s best seen at dusk or night (or dawn for the early birds) as the exhibition includes a mesmerising film shown in the first floor windows – just like an environmentally friendly walk-in movie. The exhibition is a testament to the creativity, resilience, and tenacity of this particular group of students. It tells the story, through objects, of an exploration, created in an extraordinary time, in response to this astounding collection. The exhibition is running throughout April and May, with three students showcasing their creations each month. Each phase has a different theme – March was 'Intuitive', April is ‘Reflective’ and May will be 'Adaptive'. This month, visitors can enjoy the works of Lucy Turner, Faye Green and Rebekah Barnett. • stradlingcollection.org; studiogeist.co.uk/toradicallyreconfigure

Walk A local Dudes & Dogs Walk has relaunched this month, encouraging Bristol’s men to walk and talk every weekend in both South and North Bristol. Dudes & Dogs is an initiative that supports men’s mental health through weekly walks across the country. Trained ‘dog dudes’ host walks, accompanied by a dog or two. The dog dudes are also internationally accredited mental health first aiders. Following the government guidelines, the walks will restart on 3 and 4 April at 10am and will take place every Saturday and Sunday from then on. Anyone wanting to join can book a slot using the D&D website bookings page.

Join

• dudesndogs.co.uk

• lyrafest.com

8 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

Listen to Ellie Gowers on 9 April

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

Lyra Festival – the annual Bristol Poetry Festival – is set to return digitally this year with an exciting series of readings, writing workshops, panel discussions, film screenings, and poetry slams running from 14–25 April. The festival, themed around reconnection, features local, national and international poets, celebrating the unique culture and creativity of Bristol. Look out for big names on the bill this year including Dizraeli, Malika Booker, Phil Kaye, Travis Alabanza, Caroline Bird, Edson Burton, Vanessa Kisuule, Will Harris, Bristol’s City Poet Caleb Parkin, and many more. ■ Join Phil Kaye’s writing workshop on 17 April


P9.qxp_Layout 23 26/03/2021 17:01 Page 1

Discover our

newsletters

Stay well informed. Stay well entertained. Our weekly newsletter, The Weekend Edition is a specially curated mini-guides to help you get the best of your time in Bristol. Bulletins of news, commentary and culture, as well as lifestyle ideas, things to do, great reads and so much more delivered direct and free to your inbox just in time for the weekend

It’s like a mini Bristol Magazine! Subscribe for free at:

www.thebristolmag.co.uk

IT’S THE NEWSLE TTER

YOU’LL ENJOY READIN G

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 9


cityist.qxp_Layout 2 26/03/2021 17:06 Page 1

ist

THE CITY

My

BRISTOL Meet Sarah Brown, Director of Clifton Contemporary Art

Bouncing back After 28 years, Bristol Cultural Development Partnership has officially changed its name to Bristol Ideas. The news comes with the launch of two new citywide projects – Film 2021 and a series on the future of democracy and freedom of expression. The projects are set to run alongside Bristol Ideas’ much-loved festivals – Festival of Ideas, Festival of Economics and Festival of the Future City. Film 2021 is a year-long programme of activity, celebrating the many aspects of Bristol’s film and moving image credentials. Launched by Bristol Ideas and Bristol City of Film, the project is supported by Bristol’s film studios, cinemas, filmmakers and festivals. Marking the centenary of the death of Bristolian inventor William Friese-Greene (1844-1921), a pioneer of early motion pictures, Film 2021 will include film screenings across the city, walking tours exploring cinema buildings, photography exhibitions, talks and panel discussions, and the launch of a special publication recounting the public’s memories of cinema-going throughout the past century. Andrew Kelly, Director of Bristol Ideas, says: “For a long time, William FrieseGreene’s contribution to film had been downgraded and dismissed. The centenary of his death seems the perfect time to reassess his considerable achievements as new scholarship has revealed new material and Friese-Greene is now increasingly recognised as one of the pioneers of British cinema and a major figure in the early development of moving pictures.” The new series on the future of democracy and freedom of expression is also set to run as part of the Festival of Ideas programme. It will include sessions on new thinking, citizens’ assemblies, the future of liberalism and conservatism, women and freedom of speech, how to deal with strongmen leaders and will debate with the candidates for both the city and WECA mayor.

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

“The creativity that co-exists in Bristol is striking.”

I have been an exhibiting landscape painter for many years but have also worked in design, retail and gallery management since leaving Bath Academy of Art. An ideal combination when the opportunity came to open my own art gallery, which had always been a dream. The shows at the gallery have all been so different and exciting in their own ways. Curating Singing Colour in 2019 was a high point, hosting work by greats such as Patrick Heron, Sir Terry Frost and Dame Barbara Hepworth. But perhaps most enjoyable are the shows with our gallery artists, as I love visiting their studios and making plans together.

glamour and go for a gilding by Secessionist artist, Gustav Klimt. He is one of my favourite artists and the ‘golden phase’ portraits are some of his most iconic pieces.

My most memorable moment at Clifton Contemporary Art was having the gallery chosen as a film location: not once but twice. Firstly for the ITV series, Unforgotten and secondly, as the venue for a glamorous 1960’s private view in the BBC drama, The Trial of Christine Keeler.

We have been so lucky having the Downs to enjoy during lockdown, with a take-out coffee. But I can’t wait for things to open again so I can swap the take-out for a sunny table at Bar Chocolat and a catch up with my Clifton neighbours. This will be closely followed by a visit to the Lido and then down to Mud Dock.

The creativity that co-exists in Bristol is striking. The city is the home of street art as much as it is a hub for musicians and landscape painters. There seems to be a determination here amongst artists of all kinds to create something distinctive and unique.

At the moment I'm reading English Pastoral by James Rebank, a beautifully written account of his farming heritage in the Lake District, but I've also revisited books by classic children's author, Penelope Lively. As for watching, I'd thoroughly recommend the chilling series The Terror, with the key character played by Jared Harris. I'm lucky to live with an avid music lover, so listening has included everything from analogue synths to Pharoah Sanders.

Lockdown has given me an opportunity to spend more time on my own work but I have missed the day-to-day life at Clifton Contemporary Art. Our website has worked hard and helped make some good sales, but nothing replaces an open, lively gallery. If I could take home any of the paintings from our last exhibition, Closer to Home, I would have taken home Towards the Gorge by Elaine Jones. It is an atmospheric oil painting that perfectly captures the essence of this special place without being proscriptive or too detailed. However, it was snapped up before the exhibition started! If I could have any artists living or dead to paint my portrait, I would take this opportunity to indulge in some fin de siècle

• bristolideas.co.uk

10 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

My family moved here from London during the 1960s so Bristol is where I was brought up. With all the advantages of a city and its proximity to wilder places, Bristol is a very difficult place to leave and I am pleased to call it my home.

Being a keen birder, I've really enjoyed having more time to observe the local characters. We are treated to a daily flypast by our resident hungry sparrow hawk. For our opening in April we’re featuring Salcombe Scene by Rose Hilton: it’s a rare chance to enjoy this renowned Cornish artist’s work up close. During May, we have new collections by many of our artists including contemporary British landscape painter, Hannah Woodman. For high summer we have a Sally Stafford show of meadow paintings. Also planned is an exhibition of work by Andrew Bird. An exciting year ahead…


cityist.qxp_Layout 2 26/03/2021 19:16 Page 2

Remembering Diana Porter Diana Porter, award winning jewellery designer and champion of women’s rights, has died, aged 78. A prolific creative mind, she was not only renowned for her innovative design but creating work with integrity and honesty. She fought tirelessly to raise awareness and promote gender equality and became a leading light for women within the jewellery industry. In 1990, Diana went to the University of Central England at the age of 47 to do a three-year full-time degree course in Jewellery and Silversmithing. Diana focused her time at college on inequality within the arts. She researched ancient images of strong women and her stylised women pendants, which she called Sibyls developed from this. Her degree work was about women and empowerment and she designed the Sibyls with words to give the wearer something positive to focus on. The Sibyl pendants have continued to thrive in popularity and are worn by thousands in Bristol and beyond, often acting as an amulet for many people. Students are said to often identify a fellow Bristolian by their Sibyl necklace. Over 1700 Sibyl pendants have been sold in the past year alone. On equality Diana said: “I am concerned to express my perception of the qualities of women in the pieces I make – not as adjuncts to men, but as strong, peace loving, creative, intuitive, magical human beings.” Shortly after graduation in 1993, Diana created a jewellery studio in her living room and began to develop her collections, which included the Sibyl pendants. As the popularity of her work grew, new silver collections such as the ‘on and on’ range were designed and produced. A request for a set of hand etched partnership wedding rings to be made in gold sparked the creation of a selection of new designs in platinum and gold. In 1999, Diana won British Jewellery Designer of the Year. As popularity for these designs grew, the demand for her bespoke commission pieces grew. Diana wanted to ensure her work could be created as ethically as possible. After a research trip to the Fairtrade Goldmine in Cotapata, Bolivia, Diana was one of the first jewellers to create all her jewellery in Fairtrade Gold. When talking about her longevity Diana said: “I started this lovely little business in my front room... I’ve been lucky enough to be surrounded by strong women who have helped to grow the business into a beautiful shop and workshop in the heart of Bristol. It is astonishing to think that from our humble Sibyl beginnings we now specialise in unusual, unique engagement and wedding rings.” Diana’s Bristol gallery showcases not only her own collections but also the collections of over 80 British and international designers. Her aim has been to promote an eclectic mix of modern work – from a wide range of stunning engagement and wedding rings to experimental pieces by emerging new talents. It was Diana’s wish for Diana Porter Jewellery to go on. “You can't kill the spirit. She is like a mountain. Old and strong. She goes on and on and on.”

WELL VERSED Inspired by the true history of Brunel’s SS Great Britain, Nicola Skinner is set to release her third novel, Starboard, this month. The inspiring new novel from the rapturously acclaimed author tells the story of Kirsten, an apparently happy and successful 11year-old YouTube star who meets a ship that comes alive. The ship claims Kirsten as its new captain and breaks free from its dry dock. Before being inspired to write her first children’s novel, Bloom, which was longlisted for both the Blue Peter Book Award and Branford Boase Book Award and won the North Somerset Book Award, Skinner worked as a copywriter and journalist for the likes of the Guardian. Skinner was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where she spent an idyllic early childhood, mostly watching some very dramatic telenovelas, reading comics and going to the beach. When she was nine, she swapped it all for a few strict British boarding schools, which she says “weren’t nearly as fun”. Skinner now lives near Bristol with her family. Liam Tolhurst, Head of Retail and Visitor Experience at Brunel’s SS Great Britain said: “We are thrilled that Nicola has chosen Brunel’s SS Great Britain to take the starring role in her latest children’s novel, a twenty-first century adventure story which captures the majesty of this nineteenth century ship and the hopes and fears of those who sailed in her. “While the ship remains closed for now, would-be visitors can imagine themselves on a great voyage in this magical tale and learn much about the ship at the same time.” If you can’t wait to get your hands on this extraordinary story, limited edition signed copies are available online for pre-order via the SS Great Britain’s online shop. • Starboard is out on 1 April; ssgreatbritain.org

• dianaporter.co.uk

Blooming into spring Following the success of the debut store, which launched in Edinburgh in November, Dobbies Garden Centre has opened a brand new format store in Bristol – Little Dobbies. Located on Whiteladies Road, Little Dobbies Clifton core offering is horticulturally focused with a carefully curated range of convenience gardening products, ideal for those in urban areas with a compact gardening space. This is complemented by a range featuring houseplants and pots; a small selection of gifts; and selected seasonal ranges. Freshly-ground takeaway coffee is also available. • dobbies.com

Image: Team member Thomas Lyford

Nicola Skinner

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 11


Andy Goodman.qxp_Layout 2 26/03/2021 18:45 Page 1

GARDENING COVER STORY | EXHIBITIONS

Red lorry, yellow lolly

A new exhibition that has opened at Southmead Hospital profiles the work of Andy Goodman, who hails from Bristol. The artful visual playfulness in his work is hard to resist; the hope is that the images will raise the spirits of staff and visitors

A

ndy Goodman studied an art foundation course in Cambridge and a graphic design BA at Maidstone College of Art in Kent before moving to London where he worked as an editorial designer and art editor for Vogue, Condé Nast Traveller, House & Garden, The Observer and The Independent on Sunday. “Aside from commissioning art for these magazines,” Andy explains, “my interest in illustration grew from the children’s books of Bob Gill, Bruno Munari and David Mckee. These artists inspired me to write and

ABOVE: Red Lorry, Yellow Lolly; BELOW: Bristol Faces: Wills Memorial Building as The Lion King; BELOW RIGHT: Bristol Faces: SS Great Britain

illustrate books such as It Was So Quiet I Could Hear a Pin Drop and This is the Cheese, published by Edizioni Corraini and Princeton Press in New York. “It wasn’t until I moved to the west country seven years ago that I started to focus solely on graphic illustration and began working on a variety of editorial and advertising commissions with my agent Siobhan Squire. These include Routledge, Northbank Design, The Guardian, The Evelina Children’s Hospital in London and, most recently, a series of prints for the new Therapies Centre at Bath’s Royal United Hospital. These prints were based on themes of well-being, mindfulness and rehabilitation and it was this work that led to my current project with North Bristol’s NHS Fresh Arts programme, run by Ruth Sidgwick.” Entitled, Red Lorry, Yellow Lolly, the exhibition will feature a series of graphic prints that aim to bring a smile to staff and patients at Southmead Hospital. Using fine line and bright colours, each print is underpinned by everyday phrase and language and has a general tone of light-heartedness. Many of them are part of a series called Bristol Faces where Andy has used a selection of Bristol’s familiar buildings as a graphic image of a recognisable face. “What really matters, what’s essential to my process is seeking out the ‘eureka’ moment, that ‘click’ when the idea resonates”, says Andy. “I’ve always been attracted to shape and form, and to clean lines and strong, geometric imagery.” Andy also takes creative inspiration from artists who paint: “Top of the list is William Scott, a Royal Academy artist. I

I’ve always been attracted to shape and form, and to clean lines and strong, geometric imagery always have postcards of his paintings of pears (from the 1960s) on my mantelpiece. I also love the naive art of Alfred Wallis’s boats and the sculptures and paintings of Barbara Hepworth and Ben Nicholson who flourished in the unique light of Cornwall. “I was asked a few years ago by the Royal Academy Magazine to photograph some works by the landscape artist, Richard Long, at Houghton Hall in Norfolk. Since then I’ve been fascinated by large-scale work in which the landscape is a participant.” The Red Lorry, Yellow Lolly exhibition is a great opportunity to introduce a whole new audience to art, as many people visiting and working at the hospital may have never bought a picture or even been to a gallery. “In these uncertain times, I hope my work provides a welcome distraction for those walking up and down the corridors and racing to appointments.” ■ • Red Lorry, Yellow Lolly is in the main atrium of Bristol’s Southmead Hospital. Limited edition prints from the exhibition are available at fivebargatestore.myshopify.com

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197


Aria - Retallack.qxp_Layout 1 25/03/2021 16:59 Page 1


BARTLEBY.qxp_Layout 7 24/03/2021 13:45 Page 1

THE

B R I S TO L MAGAZINE

Contact us:

The future is bright

I

’m not running for election as Mayor this year, you’ll be sad to learn, but if I were I would focus my campaign on the city’s everworsening transport chaos. Where I live, good people of Bristol, new houses and flats pop up seemingly overnight – like so many breezeblock mushrooms. In many ways this is fantastic. More people in a neighbourhood generally means more shops, pubs, cafes and so on. But more people also tends to mean more traffic, which slows everyone’s journey down while increasing their stress levels. Since the tram system was scrapped during World War Two and the regional train network given a severe trim in the 1960s, the main solution mooted for this seemingly insoluble problem has been the bus. Or Bertie, as every bus was known in the days when our family life revolved around Thomas the Tank Engine and friends. All helicopters were likewise Harolds, as were (by association) the winged sycamore seeds that fell from the sky magically each autumn, but I digress… There are now a bewildering number of different Berties buzzing about the place, some of which you need to buy tickets in advance for – why?! – and others you don’t. All have one major flaw, which is this: most of us don’t live and/or work next to a bus stop. So every journey involves walking, waiting around and generally wasting time, and who’s going to do that voluntarily if they have a nice cosy car to crawl around the city in? Bear with me, good people of Bristol… Hear me out… Because the future, I am happy to say, is much brighter. So bright, in fact, that we may all – as the song suggests – be forced to wear dark glasses against the glare. My plan, my scheme, my Wizard Wheeze will give everyone the freedom to travel where they like, when they like. It will cut congestion faster than a cockerpoo can down a stolen pain au chocolat. It will be cheap. AND it will – if local investors and manufacturers are quick on the uptake – create work for people to do. People of Bristol, I give you the Nifty Electric Vehicle. What, you say, you mean like one of those scooters you see standing around with green or red lights glowing weirdly in the dusk? Or like the mobility scooters that were always parked (in the days before Covid) outside certain Bedminster pubs, with a little dog standing guard? Or like… the milk float that used to wake us up at 5am every morning when we used to have milk delivered? Yes, yes and yes again. All of the above, and more. NEVs will be available in all shapes and sizes. There will be lightweight vans for deliveries, and then two-person vehicles like a Smart car but lighter and, well, niftier, in which commuters will be able to travel comfortably to work. And smaller, extremely nifty versions: an array, in fact, of scooters and skateboards and dodgemtype mini-cars. Once people realise that traditional cars are big and boring there will be a flowering of imaginatively designed NEVs – buggies modelled on moon vehicles or pirate ships, scooters that resemble gondolas, you name it! Looking further into the future we will obviously be flying everywhere in our pedal-powered kite-planes, but for now let’s focus on getting those old gas-guzzlers off the roads, and replacing them with something less wasteful and more fun. For too long we’ve been thinking big about transport, when the solution lies in thinking small. Don’t worry about all the Berties – they can be parked up somewhere and converted into cheap-and-cheerful accommodation for anyone who needs it. Parking ticket machines can be upcycled into charging points. Traffic noise and petrol fumes will be things of the past, like steam engines and smog. And, no, there won’t be a unicorn in sight (except for the unicorn-themed electric buggies parked outside the nursery schools). The future, as I said, is bright. The future’s electric. ■

14 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Financial Director Email:

Jane Miklos jane@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Editor Tel: Email:

Amanda Nicholls 0117 974 2800 amanda@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Assistant Editor/Web Editor Millie Bruce-Watt Tel: 0117 974 2800 Email: millie@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales

Liz Grey liz@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

For advertising enquiries please contact us on: 0117 974 2800

Email: sales@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

The Bristol Magazine is published by MC Publishing Ltd. An independent publisher. Every month The Bristol Magazine is hand delivered to more than 15,000 homes in selected areas. We also deliver direct to companies and businesses across the city. Additionally there are many places where we have floor-stands and units for free pick-up:

The Bristol Magazine Tel: 0117 974 2800 www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk © MC Publishing Ltd 2021

2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bristol Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


P15.qxp_Layout 23 25/03/2021 17:12 Page 1

HISTORY,TRADITION & QUALITY

Kemps is a fourth generation family jeweller offering a beautiful selection of both new and pre-loved pieces

since 1881

We will be pleased to be reopening on the 12th of April

KEMPS J EWELLERS

1881

9 Calton Court, Westbury on Trym, Bristol, BS9 3DF www.kempsjewellers.com • 0117 950 5090

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 15


ARNOLFINI V2.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 15:13 Page 1

ARNOLFINI

Arnolfini: 60 years later

Set up in 1961 as a bookshop on Clifton Triangle, Arnolfini has grown from humble roots to become a pioneer of interdisciplinary contemporary arts, with an ambitious and eclectic programme of visual art, performance, dance, film and music. As the arts centre celebrates its 60th anniversary, Melissa Blease asks for past, present and future perspectives of this iconic institution

16 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197


ARNOLFINI V2.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 15:21 Page 2

ARNOLFINI

I

n 1961, Bristol artists Jeremy and Annabel Rees opened a tiny art gallery above a bookshop on the Clifton Triangle, naming it after Jeremy’s favourite painting The Arnolfini Wedding by Jan van Eyck and promising that the Arnolfini would ‘seek out challenging, controversial and sometimes relatively unknown, artists and provide a vital showcase for their work’. Having relocated to a formerly derelict 19th-century warehouse at the apex of Bristol’s harbourside in 1975 (taking in a couple of temporary homes along the way), the Arnolfini is today an ambitious, inspirational, internationally renowned pioneer of interdisciplinary contemporary arts that maintains an innovative, engaging programme of visual art, performance, dance, film and music curated to appeal to a broad audience of over half a million visitors each year. This year the gallery is celebrating its 60 year anniversary. We asked some of the key figures at the Arnolfini for their perpectives on what the gallery now represents, its history and development and its plans for the future.

Over the decades, Arnolfini has become a key hub in contemporary cultural networks, locally, nationally, and internationally

Jeremy Rees in the 1960s and Gary Topp today

PRESENT VIEW Gary Topp, Arnolfini’s executive director “In some ways our remit remains very similar to the one that Jeremy Rees initiated in 1961: to create a place for the contemporary arts in Bristol and the South West that everyone can enjoy and feel they are part of. We also recognise that we have become a more established ‘institution’ over the years – a status that carries multiple responsibilities and opportunities. Our ambition is to keep evolving as a centre that welcomes the best international contemporary arts to the city in parallel with our commitment to work closely with local communities and local talent. Our partnership with UWE Bristol puts talent development and community engagement firmly at the centre of our work, and we continue to develop our exhibition and cultural programming to embrace everything from the amazing creative work of our local communities to exhibitions, performances and events from some of

the most high profile names in contemporary arts. We always want to show and share more art than we have space and resources for. Since 1961, Arnolfini has shown the work of tens of thousands of the best contemporary artists from all over the world to tens of millions of people. Our programme has been cross-disciplinary since the start, including visual art, performance, music, literature, film, and craft, showcasing experimental works which have helped to redefine these mediums. Our talks, workshops and community-based activities have helped to facilitate deep engagement and debate. Over the decades, Arnolfini has become a key hub in contemporary cultural networks, locally, nationally, and internationally. We continue, as we always have done, by wanting to make the best new art a positive part of people’s lives.”

Angelica Mesiti, Assembly, 2019 Opposite: detail from a poster for New British Sculpture at the Arnolfini in 1968 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 17


ARNOLFINI V2.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 16:00 Page 3

ARNOLFINI

ABOVE LEFT: Arnolfini founders Annabel Lawson, Jeremy Rees and John Osborne in the 1960s in front of a painting by Peter Swan ABOVE: Poster for the Arnolfini Cinema, 1975 and promoting the Gay Bristol Festival in 1985

PAST VIEW

BELOW: Avinash Chandra, 1963

Phil Owen, Arnolfini projects producer and archivist When Arnolfini founders, Jeremy Rees (a graphic designer), Annabel Lawson and John Osborn (a painter) opened the doors to their bookshop on Clifton Triangle in 1961, more than 200 people crowded in to the simple, white-cube gallery to see the inaugural exhibition of paintings by Josef Herman and Peter Swan. None of the founders were older than 25, and they’d each contributed £100 to secure the lease to the space. It’s difficult to encapsulate Arnolfini’s long and varied 60year history from that point as there have been so many incredible moments throughout; what you read here is just the tip of the iceberg. In 1965, American Beat Poet Allen Ginsburg performed at the Clifton Triangle bookshop. In 1970, Arnolfini moved to Queen’s Square and established an extensive music programme, beginning with a concert of music by Michael Tippett with the composer in attendance, and in 1972 it was one of only three UK venues to host ‘phase and pulse’ music creator Steve Reich. In 1973 Arnolfini moved to the W-Shed on Bordeaux Quay, the extra space available allowing for a 106-seater cinema adding a new film strand to Arnolfini’s programme. Bush House on the harbourside’s Narrow Quay became Arnolfini’s permanent home in 1975. The first annual Gay Film Festival (part of Bristol’s inaugural Gay Pride) was staged in 1977, and Arnolfini hosted a collaborative film screening and performance by Peter Greenaway and the Michael Nyman Band in 1979. In 1981, Arnolfini's Video Art library opened and community activities expanded to include more workshops with schools and regular Saturday workshops for children; by 1983: Arnolfini’s visitor numbers exceeded 200,000 a year. In 1985, Arnolfini curated the first exhibition of graffiti art in a mainstream UK gallery and the Lesbian and Gay Creativity event included a screening of The Times of Harvey Milk, in the middle of the darkest days of AIDs paranoia. Having won the 1989 Turner Prize, Richard Long exhibited at the Arnolfini in 1990; Richard Wilson, Giuseppe Penone and Paula Rego – all three of the artists he had been shortlisted with – had all also recently shown at Arnolfini. In 1992 Trophies of Empire – a collaboration between Arnolfini, Bluecoat Gallery, Liverpool and Hull Time-Based Arts – explored issues such as the Atlantic Slave Trade, Third World exploitation and the diaspora of black communities and in 1993, Disrupted Borders bought artists from across Europe, Asia and North America together to question Eurocentric ideas and assumptions.

18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197

In 1995, Patrick Heron’s Large Paintings and touring show Minky Manky (including Sarah Lucas, Tracey Emin and Damien Hirst) demonstrated the shifts that were taking place at that time, as the socalled ‘Young British Artists’ injected a bold – and at times, shocking – irreverence to the international art scene. Between 2003 and 2005, a major renovation of Bush House allowed Arnolfini’s spaces to increase to include a double-height gallery on the first floor, flexible studio spaces and a study area on the second floor, and a new café bar designed with artist Bruce MacLean. In 2017, Arnolfini enjoyed the phenomenal success of Grayson Perry’s The Most Popular Art Exhibition Ever! Galvanised by a new team in 2019 led by Executive Director Gary Topp, Arnolfini’s Arts Council England funding was reinstated and the partnership with UWE Bristol, custodians of Bush House, strengthened as an integral part of Arnolfini’s success moving forward. In 2020, just before the first Covid lockdown, exhibitions from Bristol artist Amak Mahmoodian and Angelica Mesiti followed by Hassan Hajjaj and Chantal Joffe all garnered mass critical acclaim. Today, Arnolfini remains at the heart of the community as an international centre of contemporary art, mindful of founding director Jeremy Rees’ principle to Enjoy Yourself. Much more of Arnolfini’s history and archive can be found at arnolfini.org.uk and Bristol Archives; the team would also love to hear any Arnolfini memories you have to share via archive@arnolfini.org.uk.


ARNOLFINI V2.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 15:42 Page 4

ARNOLFINI

FUTURE VIEW Gemma Brace, Keiko Highashi and Phil Owen, Arnolfini’s programming, engagement and projects team

Image: Lisa Whiting

“Not only are we looking forward to reopening our doors and sharing the final weeks of exhibitions A Picture of Health and Jo Spence: From Fairy Tales to Photo Therapy, but we’re also celebrating our 60th anniversary year with a programme that encompasses names known and new. One of the many highlights is our summer exhibition Frank Bowling | Land of Many Waters, exploring the pioneering painter’s ongoing experimentation with material, colour and surface and featuring much of Bowling's new and unseen work. This will be followed by acclaimed Bristol-born photographer Stephen Gill’s major retrospective in the autumn (part of Bristol’s very own Photo Festival) exploring the poetry in urban and rural landscapes. We’ll also be featuring work by returning artists Ian Breakwell, Keith Piper, and Sutapa Biswas, celebrating their ever-growing reputation since last showing at Arnolfini; hosting a seminal performance by performance artist Bobby Baker; launching a new publication by writer in residence Melissa Cheman exploring the histories of African and African diaspora artists at Arnolfini; and seeing the welcome return of the much loved BABE (Bristol Artists Book Event) with our partners UWE, this year entitled The Lost Weekend, bringing over 100 international artists’ work together online. We’ll also be reinstating our second floor gallery and the ever-popular Reading Room, creating new spaces to explore and opportunities to engage with work from a host of our creative community partners, including projects developed during lockdown with creativeShiftCIC, Bristol Photo Festival and Fresh Arts. We’ll have creative workshops in our studios as part of our ongoing wellbeing work, and we’ll be transforming the light studio into a colour laboratory during Frank Bowling’s exhibition with fun and experimental workshops playing with colour, light and texture.”

ABOVE: Karima Stylin’ from Hassan Hajjaj: The Path, 2000. BELOW: The In Between Time Festival emerged as part of the live programme at Arnolfini between 1997–2009

OPENING PLANS Rosie Ashby, head of visitor services “Arnolfini will open up again in a couple of stages, in accordance with government guidelines around Covid. The Harbourside Bar is scheduled to reopen with extended seating and a newly-installed canvas roof from 12 April. Arnolfini Bookshop is due to open from 15 April and we hope to reopen the galleries from 18 May. While Arnolfini’s been closed, we've taken the opportunity to reconsider the foyer and public spaces. We’ve made improvements to signage to enable everyone coming into the building to navigate their way around more easily, and the team will be in a more visible space to greet and assist visitors. We’re also planning to introduce specially designed seating around the building, with an exclusive area for families in the coming months. Visitors will also have the opportunity to explore Arnolfini’s history through a series of images and texts taking pride of place on the lift shaft that runs centrally through the four floors of the building. We are keen for Arnolfini to be a warm, inviting and safe space in which everyone feels welcome.” ■ arnolfini.org.uk THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 19


Millinery.qxp_Layout 2 26/03/2021 17:06 Page 1

Jessica hat, £325

Talk hat talk

Photograph by Steve Lee Photoworks

We’ve been short of major events recently, but as opportunities open up and we are able to gather once again to celebrate life’s special occasions, it’s time to find the hat that will give you an uber-stylish factor – let us introduce milliner Annabel Allen

C

ertain hats keep your ears warm; others are designed to raise you up to another level. The hats of Annabel Allen Millinery offer the latter. She uses traditional millinery techniques to transform the finest quality materials in her Bristol studio into highly elegant, original and easy-to-wear statement hats and headpieces. After training as a pattern cutter under the Saville Row Apprenticeship Scheme in London in 2007, Annabel embarked upon an early career in the fashion industry, working for brands such as Pringle of Scotland, Temperley London and The Gucci Group. It was not until moving to Sydney in 2010 that Annabel was introduced to millinery, a discipline that allowed her to combine traditional tailoring skills with highly intricate and imaginative design concepts. Upon returning to the UK and moving to Bristol in 2013, Annabel continued her millinery training, subsequently setting up Annabel Allen Millinery. Here she tells us more. 20 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197

TBM: Do you have a physical shop or do people come to you for private consultations? Annabel: I don't have a physical shop, so I operate by appointment only from my studio, online or over the phone. For people who would rather not come to the studio in person but would like a face-to-face consultation the online appointments work really well – I am in my studio and can pull out all the different hats and communicate design ideas visually with the materials to hand. For those who would rather visit, there is plenty of space to maintain Covid-safe guidelines and clients are welcome to try on a variety of pieces from my collection so that we can work out which styles they feel most comfortable in and which best complements their outfit, if they have one. I can create most pieces in any colour, whether it is bespoke or a design from my existing collection.


TBM: Do you have a preferred fabric or medium to work with? Annabel: I love working with traditional millinery materials such as straw, felt, feathers and silk as their natural properties provide endless inspiration for both classic and contemporary designs. However, recently I was introduced to thermoplastics, which I am getting very excited about. They are a group of plastics that can be manipulated with heat to create some really interesting designs. They are very robust yet lightweight (hence they are often used for theatrical pieces) and they can be heated and re-used so people could bring back their old hats and have them re-created into something new.

Photograph by Steve Lee Photoworks

Millinery.qxp_Layout 2 22/03/2021 10:57 Page 2

TBM: Who or what are your inspirations and how would you define your style? Annabel: Growing up in the nineties I was obsessed with Alexander McQueen and I still have books of his designs close to hand when I am in need of inspiration. His scrupulous attention to detail both in the aesthetics of his designs as well as the workmanship in creating them was phenomenal. I am also a details person and spend hours dissecting designs to create interesting variations on a theme, while simultaneously using my millinery skills to ensure that the resulting piece not only looks beautiful but is comfortable to wear. TBM: How long does each creation take from design to final piece? Annabel: The process of designing and making a hat varies hugely depending on the design and the materials being used. For bespoke pieces we usually come up with an overall design during the consultation which I then follow up with a sketch and a written description to confirm. I then usually allow 3–4 weeks for the creation of the hat, often sending photos throughout the process to make sure that the client is happy with the direction of the design; allowing them to request any changes or additional fittings before I have finished. TBM: What are the considerations when buying a special occasion hat for the first time? Annabel: Staying true to yourself is really important as you want to feel confident in what you wear – however, don’t let pre-conceptions hold you back from trying new styles. If you are able to, then try a variety of shapes, sizes and colours to work out what suits you and makes you feel amazing – this often turns out to be a style that you hadn't considered before. Don’t fall for the myth that you need to go big to make an impact; some of the simplest designs are the most striking. Photograph by Steve Haddon Photography

Ottolie headpiece, £195

Photograph by Steve Lee Photoworks

Alisa hat, £395

Finally, make sure it fits! You don't want spend all that money on your outfit for all the photos to be of you holding your hat on, or having to take it off early to stop the headaches. It is worth spending a little more to make sure that it sits on your head effortlessly while you focus on enjoying your day. ■ • info@annabelallenmillinery.co.uk; annabelallenmillinery.co.uk Photograph by Steve Lee Photoworks

Jemima hat, £285

Dulcie hat, £295

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 21


helen wilson roe.qxp_Layout 2 26/03/2021 18:43 Page 1

GARDENING CITY NEWS

A brush with immortality The University of Bristol has commissioned Britain’s first public sculpture of a Black woman made by a Black woman. It will celebrate the ‘mother of medicine’, Henrietta Lacks, whose cells led to crucial medical advances

T

he University of Bristol has commissioned local artist Helen Wilson Roe to create a bronze sculpture of Henrietta Lacks, a Black American woman whose human cells were the first living human cells ever to survive and multiply outside the body. The piece will be the first public sculpture of a Black woman made by a Black woman in the UK and will be installed on the university campus later this year. The commission follows the exhibiting of two of Helen’s portraits of Henrietta Lacks and Cllr Cleo Lake, Bristol’s first Black female Lord Mayor, which have been on display in the Wills Memorial Building since October last year. Henrietta Lacks was a young mother who died of an unusually aggressive form of cervical cancer at the age of 31. During surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, a sample of cells was taken from the tumour and sent to a laboratory, where they were found to be the first scientifically defined ‘immortal’ human cell line. Henrietta’s cells changed the course of modern medicine, making possible some of the most important medical advances of all time including the development of the polio vaccine, chemotherapy, gene-mapping, IVF and cloning. They became known as HeLa cells and, today, they are used in almost every major hospital and science-based University in the world. Incredibly, Henrietta’s cells were on board the first missions to space in an attempt to see what would happen to human cells in zero gravity. HeLa cells are also currently being used in the University of Bristol’s own Covid-19 research. Working in collaboration with the Lacks family, it is hoped the unveiling of the sculpture will be accompanied by an exhibition in October of vibrant, compelling portraits by Helen Wilson Roe. The exhibition, ‘A Brush with Immortality’, will feature Henrietta Lacks and her family. A widening participation education project and a Henrietta Lacks Masters Scholarship are also being planned.

Credit: Karen Brett

Henrietta Lacks was a devoted mother of five and worked as a tobacco farmer in Virginia, USA. Tragically, Henrietta died of cervical cancer on 4 October 1951. During treatment, a hospital doctor took a piece of Henrietta’s tumour, without obtaining her or her family’s consent. Whereas all previous human cells died within a few days, Henrietta’s cells were unlike any others ever seen: where other cells would die, Henrietta’s cells doubled every 20 to 24 hours. Since then, they have been used extensively in medical research. While pharmaceutical companies have profited from their use of HeLa cells, the Lacks family have struggled with access to basic healthcare and remained unaware of Henrietta’s contribution for some 20 years after her death. In 2010, Helen met 24 members of the Lacks family and began collaborating with them to make visible the image of a woman who unknowingly had an incredible impact on medical history.

22 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

The announcement of the commission coincides with a year-long celebration to mark the centenary year since Henrietta’s birth. This year also symbolises 70 years of the use of HeLa cells. Jeri Lacks, Henrietta Lacks’ granddaughter, said: “This International Women’s Day, my family proudly supports the University of Bristol’s historic commission of artist Helen Wilson Roe to create a sculpture of Henrietta Lacks. “As the world celebrates Henrietta Lacks’ centennial, my family eagerly anticipates the unveiling of this tribute to Henrietta Lacks the woman - and her phenomenal HeLa cells. It is incredible to see our Hennie rightfully honoured for her worldwide impact.” Artist Helen Wilson Roe said: “To have the University of Bristol commission me as a Black female Bristolian artist to create a lifesize bronze statue of an iconic Black woman to be placed in the University of Bristol’s grounds, will be history in the making. “This is the University offering more than lip service or tokenistic gestures, but actually committing to supporting a Black female artist by sustaining my art and recognising Henrietta Lacks. “As a child growing up in Bristol there were no statues of Black women that I could identify with, so knowing that my children and their grandchildren and great grandchildren will be able to see Henrietta’s statue in Bristol is just fantastic, especially at this time when Bristol is starting to address its past.” Professor Jeremy Tavaré, Dean of the Faculty of Life Sciences, added: “As someone who has benefited from Henrietta’s cells in my own research, I am honoured to be able to announce this commission. “The unveiling of the sculpture will coincide with an educational plan that will mark the start of the Faculty of Life Sciences working on the decolonisation of our curriculum which will include an acknowledgement of the invaluable contributions Black people have made to science over the years.” ■ • helenwilsonroe.com; bristol.ac.uk

|

No 197


P23.qxp_Layout 23 26/03/2021 15:29 Page 1

CLAVA DINE UMAGE, DENMARK

LIGHTING SPECIALIST 8 BATH STREET, FROME. TEL: 01373473555 WWW.FIATLUX.CO.UK

New Build Extensions Renovation

Say hello. 0117 259 1591

Visit our design studio at: 23 Chandos Road, Redland, Bristol BS6 6PG www.halbuild.co.uk info@halgroup.co.uk

Building excellence by design

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 23


Photography/history.qxp_Layout 7 22/03/2021 11:01 Page 1

HISTORY | PHOTOGRAPHY

City & colour

Herbert Postlethwaite roamed the city streets in the summer of 1939, recording scenes that would soon be lost forever. Words by Andrew Swift

O

ld photographs of Bristol have appeared in numerous books over the years, and many more can be found online. Almost all of them, though, are in black and white. This is hardly surprising. Although colour photography has been around for a long time, it was not only technically demanding but very expensive. Even when Kodak and Agfa started producing 35mm colour film in the mid-1930s it was beyond the reach of all but the most dedicated amateur photographers. As a result, although many people will be familiar with what Bristol looked like before the Second World War, their impressions will almost certainly be of a black-and-white city. A handful of colour photographs of pre-war Bristol do survive, however, and coming across them unexpectedly can be a revelation, bringing a city which is so different, yet so strangely familiar, to life for the first time. Among the handful of early photographers who captured Bristol in colour was Herbert Postlethwaite. He roamed the city streets in the summer of 1939, recording scenes that would soon be lost forever. After his death in 1970, his son donated over 250 of his photographs to Bristol Museums, and they can now be viewed on the council’s websites. A selection of them also appears in a recent book published as a tribute to his pioneering work. There are many gems among the collection. One of the most striking is of workmen digging air raid shelters on Brandon Hill. Not a hard hat or hi-vis jacket is in sight, and the only tools in evidence are spades – yet the semi-rural simplicity of the scene is undercut by an awareness of how soon Bristolians would be cramming into these shelters as the bombs rained down.

The semi-rural simplicity of the scene is undercut by an awareness of how soon Bristolians would be cramming into these shelters as the bombs rained down The storm clouds of war may have been gathering when the photographs were taken, but the streets of the city glowed in sunlight, and life went on. Some scenes are immediately recognisable. Park Street and St Michael’s Hill, for example, have hardly changed at all. A view of High Street from Bristol Bridge, however, is identifiable only from the churches, which still survive, although just about all the other buildings are long gone. Several of the photos were taken around Bristol Bridge, including a fascinating study of horse-drawn wagons on Welsh Back. While the bridge remains a familiar landmark today, the extent to which the area to the east of it was built up still seems incredible, as does the scale and speed of its destruction. These photographs are a stark reminder of how much was lost. The importance of the collection is not just historical, however. As a member of both the Bristol and the Royal Photographic Societies, Herbert Postlethwaite had an unerring eye for what makes a good picture. Over 80 years on, the photographs he took in the summer of 1939 can still be an inspiration for anyone prowling the streets of Bristol armed with a camera – or a smart phone – today. ■ • The photographs in the Bristol Museums collection can be viewed at museums.bristol.gov.uk – search term Herbert Postlethwaite. Many of his photographs also feature on the ‘community layer’ of Know Your Place, which can be found at maps.bristol.gov.uk/kyp/?edition=. Details of a new book, Bristol’s Photo Pioneer: HA Postlethwaite, can be found at henleazebook.com 24 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

Park Street

Digging air raid shelters on Brandon Hill, August 1929

High Street from Bristol Bridge


Photography/history.qxp_Layout 7 22/03/2021 11:01 Page 2

HISTORY | PHOTOGRAPHY

Bristol Bridge and, above, horse-drawn wagons on Welsh Back

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 25


what's on – april.qxp_Layout 1 25/03/2021 13:22 Page 1

LOCAL | EVENTS

WHAT’S ON in April Big Jeff Johns

Toby Jones

Rachel Holmes

Red Lorry, Yellow Lolly n Throughout April, Bristol’s Southmead Hospital An exhibition of graphic prints by artist Andy Goodman will be on show at Bristol’s Southmead Hospital this month – organised by Bristol’s NHS Fresh Arts Programme. Goodman is an independent designer and illustrator at Fivebargate Studio and creates children's picture books and original designs for prints and greetings cards. fivebargatestore.myshopify.com Arnolfini: A Year in the Field n Throughout April, online In March 1981, Arnolfini hosted a multidisciplinary project based on the creative documentation of a ‘year in the life of a field’ by artist Lizzie Cox. The piece was eventually presented as an eight-foot square fabric box, hung with textiles printed with motifs recalling the changing seasons. Forty years on, when successive lockdowns have meant that the slow, steady observation of the natural world has taken on a whole new significance, the Arnolfini has invited another local artist, Sam Francis, to spend a year investigating Cox’s project. The project will be part of the Arnolfini’s 60th celebrations. arnolfini.org.uk Big Jeff Johns: Welcome To My World n Throughout April, online Prolific Bristol music fan Big Jeff presents his debut exhibition of artworks entitled Welcome To My World. In this inspirational collection, a total of 34 paintings will be released in three phases and aims to surprise and challenge the viewer. bristolbeacon.org 26 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

RWA: Easter Egg Painting n 2–18 April, online This workshop is for all the family to enjoy together. Follow a step by step video to create beautiful painted eggs to decorate your home for spring and Easter. Have fun preparing your eggs and learning how to paint with enamel paints, which will ensure your decorations will remain beautiful for years to come. rwa.org.uk The Parking Lot Social n 14–15 April, Bristol Airport In keeping with the local restrictions, The Parking Lot Social is now set to go ahead at Bristol Airport on 14–15 April. The drive-in tour brings with it a host of entertainment, including classic movies, car-aoke, bingo, quizzes and more. As well as a unique kids event and a live comedy night, this year’s event also features a screening of Harry Potter and Prisoner of Azkaban, a brand new Easter Panto and DriveTime Drag show with the stars of RuPaul’s Drag Race UK. Attendees will be entertained in their cars from a vast custom-made stage, with shows broadcast across two 60ft screens. theparkinglotsocial.co.uk Festival of Ideas: Paul Nurse n 15 April, 6–6.45pm, online Nobel Prize-winning scientist Paul Nurse explains the fundamental ideas in biology and their uses today. In the event titled, What is life?, Nurse sets out to describe what it means to be alive by exploring five great ideas that underpin biology. He introduces the scientists who made the most important advances, and, using his personal experiences in and out of

the lab, shares with us the challenges, the lucky breaks and the thrilling eureka moments of discovery. bristolideas.co.uk Desert Island Theatre with Toby Jones n 19–28 April, online Toby Jones is stuck on an imaginary island. He’s taken seven pieces of theatre with him, and he wants to explain why. The first guest in Bristol Old Vic’s new series titled Desert Island Theatre is Toby Jones in conversation with long-term collaborator and friend Tom Morris. Jones recalls, and attempts to recreate, seven moments of theatre which have had a profound effect on him and his career. bristololdvic.org.uk Festival of Ideas: Rachel Holmes n 19 April, 1–1.45pm, online Rachel Holmes discusses how today’s campaigners can emulate the success of the Suffragettes in extending democracy in the event titled, What Can We Learn from Sylvia Pankhurst and the Suffragettes? Sylvia Pankhurst was a natural rebel, a talented artist, prolific writer and newspaper editor. A free spirit and radical visionary, history placed her in the shadow of her famous mother, Emmeline, and elder sister, Christabel. Sylvia Pankhurst was the most revolutionary of them all. bristolideas.co.uk Festival of Ideas: Ruth Ben-Ghiat n 20 April, 6–6.45pm, online In the event, How Do We Deal With Strongmen Leaders?, Ruth Ben-Ghiat looks at how strongmen leaders rise and fall and the lessons for democracy. bristolideas.co.uk n


P27.qxp_Layout 23 25/03/2021 17:10 Page 1

THE

B R I S T OL MAGAZINE

THEBESTOFBRISTOL PERFECTLYCOVERED TOADVERTISETEL: 0117 974 2800

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 27


Chris Yeo Antiques Column .qxp_Layout 7 26/03/2021 09:34 Page 1

COLUMN | CHRIS YEO ON ANTIQUES

Expert opinion Meet our new columnist, Chris Yeo, expert on BBC Antiques Roadshow, Valuer at Clevedon Salerooms and Curator of the Ken Stradling Collection in Bristol

Beautiful Brown

I

RECEIVE THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE BY POST

clevedon-salerooms.com; @chrisyeo_antiques (Instagram)

www.thebristolmag.co.uk/subscribe

n 30 years of happily working in antiques, the question I am asked the most is what will be the next Big Thing to buy and collect? Modesty and the absence of a working crystal ball normally leads me to side-step this question but today, just for you, I am going to stick my neck out: Right now, antique furniture represents outrageous value for money and you should buy it while it is still going for a song. You’re welcome. Admittedly, this is not so much a prediction, more a statement of the patently obvious. Georgian and Victorian “brown furniture” (the rather derogatory term used by the Trade to describe honest, workaday furniture made from oak, mahogany or walnut) used to be the bread and butter of the antiques trade but, as the iron-grip of minimalism took hold its popularity went into freefall, and prices have been in the doldrums for years. Now, after 20 years of being in thrall to MDF and on-the-cheap Scandi chic, there are signs that the pendulum of fashion is starting to swing again and prices may soon be on the rise. And for good reasons. For over 200 years the British made the best furniture in the world, nobody came close. The cream of it might now be in stately homes but there are still beautiful pieces to be found that are well-made and will last several lifetimes. One of the biggest misconceptions I hear – and it’s a huge bugbear is that antique furniture is “so expensive”. I challenge anyone to find a brand-new piece of furniture for the same price you would pay at auction for a similar antique version. And there is more good news: brown furniture is green. Alongside carbon footprint considerations, with most mass-produced furniture destined for landfill, buying second-hand really is the best option for the environment. There is a phenomenal choice of furniture out there – much of it to be found online. My advice would be to think carefully about your needs, look around and only buy something you really love – not for any potential investment. Unless, unlike me you have a reliable crystal ball. You will be rewarded with years of service from furniture that brings pleasure into your life every day. ■

or Tel: 0117 974 2800

THE Image: Pixnio.com

B R I S T OL MAGAZINE

28 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197


P29.qxp_Layout 23 26/03/2021 12:55 Page 1

Ma San Auction In Bath

SPECIALISTS IN ORIENTAL WORKS OF ART

A Chinese porcelain ‘phoenix & bats’ tea caddy, Qianlong mark and period (1735-96) Chinese sang-de-boeuf monochrome porcelain dish, Qianlong mark and period (1735-96)

A pair of Chinese doucai porcelain wine cups with six-character mark of Yongzheng (1722-35)

Chinese blue and white porcelain ‘bajixiang’ ewer, mark and period of Qianlong (1735-96)

A Chinese wucai ‘dragon & phoenix’ porcelain bowl, Jiaqing mark and period (1796-1820)

Free ns atio valu epting Acc s for Item Sales re Futu

Free valuations and home visits • Over 30 years experience • Competitive commission rates • Direct contacts in Hong Kong and China • Sales every month 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Tel: 01225 318587

www.masanauction.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 29


Shakespeare Bristol.qxp_Layout 2 22/03/2021 10:56 Page 1

THEATRE & LITERATURE

The problem with Shakespeare Gerie Herbert wonders why a writer who died four centuries ago still holds such a big place in the nation’s heart and considers why many people don’t connect with his work and yet find this hard to admit to. Look for the magic and the poetry, she advises

E

ach 23rd of April my local Shakespeare Society hosts a delightfully eccentric celebration of William Shakespeare’s birthday. This festivity, open to everyone, is marked by a lecture, with the promise of lively questions to follow and the enthusiasm on display during the after questions might lead one to believe that despite finding ourselves hurled headlong into a digital age where we profess to hold the attention span of gnats, everyone still reads Shakespeare nightly. Shakespeare remains central to our cultural idea of ourselves and a lack of visibility isn’t really the issue. In recent months alone England’s national bard made not only a rather surprising appearance in Grazia magazine’s Chart of Lust (number ten and tumbling downward); he also featured in numerous newspaper articles on the pandemic, became a central character in Branagh’s All is True and Maggie O Farrell’s Hamnet, and was given his own sitcom, Upstart Crow. And that might have been room for celebration enough, except when the questions are over this event, and the murmuring has died down about how wonderful the speaker was and how you had never really looked at it like that before, and in the interval you quietly absorb the existence of a rather surprising recruitment drive for the Richard III society, the much anticipated moment arrives when the trolley fetches in the cake (which is enormous and wears the features

Although Shakespeare might

enjoy cultural currency, is it of importance if we aren’t really reading or watching him any more?

and full garb of one William Shakespeare) and let us not dismiss this, the alcohol. And grateful attendees toast a writer who died over 400 years ago but whose work is still proving an enormous floor filler, before singing him Happy Birthday as if still alive. Always as the cake gets portioned out, I think that there is just the tiniest whiff of Victoria Wood in the rituals surrounding the sharing of the cake which feels English in all of the lovely ways, ways which are warm and inclusive and none of the less desirable ones. In short as an afternoon, it wears Shakespeare with a little s, the Shakespeare of magic and poetry and all the deadening stuff about significance and statistics and St George don’t even get a look in, and that is what keeps the same happy crowd coming back. But there is little doubt most people look of a similar demographic to me, white and middle-aged plus, and it’s the same whenever you see Shakespeare whether that be in the theatre or at a live screening. The truth remains that many people continue to feel alienated from everything Shakespeare with a capital S stands for. And though he might enjoy cultural currency as a conduit of certain themes and issues, is it of importance if we aren’t really reading or watching him anymore? Because in a broader cultural sense there is certainly something about the threading of Shakespeare not only with our sense of national

Henry V at Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory in 2018. Photograph by Craig Fuller.


Shakespeare Bristol.qxp_Layout 2 22/03/2021 10:56 Page 2

THEATRE & LITERATURE

Much Ado About Nothing at Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory in 2019. Photograph by Mark Douet

identity but with a certain kind of cultural weight meant to validate us intellectually, that invites ambivalence at best and abhorrence at worst. For many it begets a sort of social embarrassment whereby if you don’t like Shakespeare or feel you fully understand him, or even if you do like him but not everything in equal measure it is very hard to admit to. But liberate yourself from shame immediately and take comfort because, for a start there might be some lying going on and plenty of exceptionally clever people didn’t like Shakespeare either. In Shakespeare and the Drama, Tolstoy comically unfolds his utter bewilderment at the preposterous plot of King Lear and the fact it makes no sense. And amongst those who do love Shakespeare, who can’t imagine how you could exist in the world without knowing that ‘grief boundeth where it falls’ or loving ‘When to the sessions of sweet silent thought’ it doesn’t mean they love it uncritically or in equal measure. I am sure there are plenty of Shakespeare lovers who find comedy doesn’t travel well down the ages or find the tragedies too bleak for their taste. And for every transformative live performance experienced, there will have been plentiful nights spent in unspeakable misery watching productions where all the verse was spoken in perfect rhythm but without a single note of genuine feeling. All the while wishing they had not dragged along their teenage child for whom they probably just killed Shakespeare for life. A further reason people don’t thirst for Shakespeare could be that they learn in an accidental kind of way that Shakespeare while supposedly representing the whole of English culture, simultaneously doesn’t appear to speak for them. By the time they learn the conspiracy on why Shakespeare couldn’t possibly be Shakespeare, it’s perhaps no wonder they think they are on a hiding to nothing. Bolder casting decisions are important, humanizing Shakespeare through

There is no reason why you should love Shakespeare, but it would be wonderful if you felt you could drama or literature helps, but if clever men insist on telling poor kids that poor kids should strive to read Shakespeare while not being thought clever enough to write it, it’s little wonder perhaps they fail to engage. But of course, Shakespeare was clever enough to be Shakespeare! And not just clever but magical! There are plenty of complete bores well versed in Shakespeare and there are plenty of people who never read a book in their lives brimming with emotional delicacy and intelligence. And there is no reason why you should love Shakespeare, but it would be wonderful if you felt you could. Every person who loves it would probably like to force feed you Ben Whishaw as Richard II or make you sit down on your bed and read sonnets end to end when you’ve a broken heart, but it would do no good. If you want to make a start somewhere then you could do little better than join your local Shakespeare Society where members sit and work the play out together without any social embarrassment and for the sheer love of stories and words. ■ • Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory have a short perfomance planned for 26–28 May at Tobacco Factory Theatres. Keep an eye on stftheatre.org.uk and tobaccofactorytheatres.com for announcements. THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 31


JONATHAN BAMBER. FINAL.qxp_Layout 2 24/03/2021 16:21 Page 1

Challenge the limits

On the 200th anniversary of the discovery of Antarctica, University of Bristol Professor, Jonathan Bamber, Millie Bruce-Watt Bruce-Watt speaks speaks was among those honoured with a new place name in the Territory. Millie to Bamber about his extraordinary life of discovery

“In my half-conscious state I really thought I was in limbo waiting for my journey to the next life.” 32 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197


JONATHAN BAMBER. FINAL.qxp_Layout 2 24/03/2021 16:23 Page 2

ADVENTURE

T

o mark the 200th anniversary of the discovery of Antarctica last year, the Government of the British Antarctic Territory honoured 28 scientists, explorers and logisticians with a new place name. The recipients were all people who have contributed to our greater understanding of the frozen continent. One of them was Jonathan Bamber, Professor of Physical Geography at the University of Bristol, who had the Bamber Glacier named after him. Bamber graduated from the University of Bristol with a degree in Physics in 1983, before going on to first complete a PhD at the Scott Polar Research Institute at the University of Cambridge and then to work in the Department of Space and Climate Physics at University College London. He returned to Bristol in 1996. His work spans three decades and has been used by thousands of scientists and explorers around the world. His digital maps of Antarctica have also been published on the front cover of prestigious scientific journals including Nature and Science, National Geographic’s Satellite Atlas of the World and The Times’ Millennium Atlas. Bamber Glacier is situated on Adelaide Island and is 9km long and 2km wide. On learning the news that a glacier had been named after him, Bamber said, “It’s a fantastic honour and comes as a complete surprise. I have been working on understanding and mapping Antarctica for many years and have produced data-sets that define the surface and bed properties of the ice sheet that covers the continent. However, I never imagined that part of this amazing and remote landscape would be named after me! The UK has a long and established record of pioneering research in Antarctica and I am very proud to be able to contribute to and continue that record.” Bamber’s innate interest in the world around him has unquestionably led him down a path of extraordinary discovery. He has both pushed the boundaries in his own field of work and challenged the limits of the human spirit with remarkable results. A keen mountaineer and ultramarathon runner, Bamber has overcome adversity and seemingly impossible odds while daring to see how far he can go. In 1992, Bamber was put in a position nothing short of horrific. While climbing in the Kashmir region of the Indian Himalaya with his climbing partner, Angus Atkinson, Bamber was struck by a falling rock, which left him with catastrophic injuries just metres from the summit of the unclimbed peak, Tupendeo. “I watched a rock ricochet off a ledge above before crushing my lower leg halfway between my ankle and knee,” says Bamber, recalling the moment. “The impact sheared through both bones and removed a big chunk of my leg. Mountaineering was my passion but I wasn't a raving lunatic. For 12 years I’d climbed in Scotland and the Alps and made it up and down the north face of the Eiger, all without incident. But now I found myself hanging from a rope, 1,600m off the ground, in excruciating pain. The rock had nearly severed my leg and, watching it loosely flap around, I was afraid it might just drop off.” Unable to abseil down to base camp, the two quickly realised that the only way Bamber was going to survive was if Atkinson went in search of help. This meant, however, that Bamber would have to lay strapped to the side of the mountain, alone, until Atkinson returned with a team.

The nearest village was a two-day walk away and time slowed to a glacial pace. As Bamber’s leg began to show signs of serious infection, his condition deteriorated. After 50 hours, Bamber started to take photos of what he thought were his last moments and contemplated rolling off the edge to save his partner the hassle of rescuing him. In a final attempt to save his life, Bamber began to shout for help. After just a few minutes, he heard a voice from below. It was Atkinson, who replied with the hopeful words: “We’re two pitches below.” “It took six days to get me off the mountain and to a hospital in northern India,” Bamber explains. “By which time I had acute frostbite, gangrene and had lost a lot of blood. The hospital was basic and, while lying on a stretcher on the floor, there was a power cut. Staff were walking around holding candles and in my half-conscious state I really thought I was in limbo waiting for my journey to the next life.” Bamber underwent a series of excruciating reconstructive surgeries in an attempt to save his leg. Four years later, he took his first unaided steps. His leg was two centimetres shorter, he couldn't bend his ankle, his foot was rigid but, with adapted shoes, he was making progress. Then, 10 years after the accident, and two days before his 40th birthday, Bamber entered a local half marathon. Determined to beat the demons within him, he ran as hard as he could, and won the race by two seconds. “The headline in the local paper read ‘Miracle Man Wins Marathon’”, says Bamber. “My son got hold of one of the billboards with the headline on it and I have it hung in my room to remind me of the power of mind over body.” Since then, Bamber has competed in a number of marathons, ultramarathons and alpine races across the world and continues to push himself in the sport to this day. The story does not end there, however. In 2015, 23 years after he was rescued from the mountain, Swiss climbers Stephan Siegrist, Dres Abegglen and Thomas Senf mapped out a first-ascent on Tupendeo. Due to political unrest in the Kashmir region, the area had been cut off from tourists and alpinists for over 20 years. This meant that Siegrist, Abegglen and Senf would be the next climbers after Bamber and Atkinson to attempt the summit. While clearing space to pitch a tent at the base of the mountain, the climbers discovered a rope attached to a belay device buried in the snow. It quickly became clear that they were not the first to scale the walls of Tupendeo and the Swiss climbers were eager to unearth the events of 1992. Three years later, the five climbers were brought together for a film made by Swiss multinational mountaineering and trekking company, Mammut. Tupendeo: One Mountain Two Stories tells the extraordinary tale of the two attempts to reach the mountain’s summit. It was first shown at the Kendal Mountain Festival in the UK before featuring at Trento, Banff and many other mountain film festivals across the world. Bamber’s story of miraculous survival highlights the true power of the human spirit. But, ultimately, Bamber’s life accomplishments show us mere mortals that there are no limits to what can be achieved. ■ • Watch the full film on Bamber’s YouTube channel: Jonathan_Bamber

Tupendeo in India's Kashmir Himalaya

At the edge of the Antarctic ice sheet looking across the calving front of the vast floating Filchner Ronne Ice Shelf that stretches some for 700km

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 33


eggs spread 1.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 15:02 Page 1

FOOD | & | DRINK

Extraordinary eggs “An egg is always an adventure; the next one may be different”, said Oscar Wilde. There’s no doubt that eggs are a constant adventure at Clarence Court in Lacock who offer the widest range of eggs sold in Britain, from Burford Brown and Old Cotswold Legbar to ostrich and quail. Their traditional breed birds are free to roam from dawn to dusk and enjoy a maize enriched diet formulated to include wheat, sunflower, seashell, soya, paprika and marigold. Here we look at a selection of the eggs on offer at Clarence Court and they treat us to some eggy recipes so we can celebrate this Easter with real eggs, as well as chocolate ones 1 Ostrich eggs Available from April to September, these eggs weigh in at nearly 2kg each – one ostrich egg is roughly equivalent to 24 large hen’s eggs for cooking in recipes. With a distinctive light flavour and texture they are ideal for cooking. 2 Rhea eggs In season from March to June, Rhea eggs are lighter and fluffier than hen’s eggs but have a stronger flavour. Rheas are often called the American ostrich so their eggs are large and good to share. 3 Emu eggs Emu eggs are milder in taste compared to a hen egg and they are much fluffier in texture. They boast a high ratio of yolk to white, allowing impressive results when used for baking. Emus lay their eggs throughout winter so the eggs are available from November to May. 4 Goose eggs Goose eggs are mouth-wateringly rich and creamy and if you softboil them they’re perfect with shavings of truffles or fresh, seasonal asparagus soldiers. One goose egg is the equivalent to 2.5 medium hen’s eggs. 5 Turkey eggs Clarence Court turkey eggs are a luxurious treat with their creamy big yolks. Turkey’s eggs, unlike Turkey meat, are a rarity because

1

34 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

2 |

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197

they simply do not produce very many eggs each year and, as they are big birds, required a lot of feed. Available from April to June. 6 Cornish Blues With lovely light-greenish blue coloured shells, Cornish Blue duck eggs taste as beautiful as they look. The creamy yolks lend themselves fabulously to bakes and cakes, and are simply delicious as a morning treat fried or boiled. 7 Leghorn White eggs Leghorn White eggs have beautiful bright white shells. Once cracked, the signature vibrant golden yolks stand proud. The golden yolk when soft boiled against a bright white shell will leave your mouth water and the creamy taste won’t disappoint. 8 Old Cotswold Legbar eggs Clarence Court Old Cotswold Legbar eggs have a distinctive pale blue shell. Its deceivingly delicate outer shell colour hides a rich creamy yolk with a dense flavour. Old Cotswold Legbar eggs have plump and upstanding yolks and are delicious when fried. 9 Braddock White Duck eggs From their translucent, ivory white eggshells to the light, creamy yolks, these duck eggs bring a new meaning to ‘go large’ for recipes. These eggs are made for exceptionally light baking. Some people once they have had duck eggs never go back to hens’ eggs for breakfast.

3

4

5


eggs spread 1.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 15:03 Page 2

FOOD | & | DRINK

10 Burford Brown eggs Burford Brown eggs have a hard, glossy, deep brown shell that’s good for poaching and boiling as they retain their farm freshness. They have a delicious, dense golden yolk and a rich flavour. 11 Bantam eggs As small hens, Bantams produce small eggs. The intense dark yolk is richer, so is perfect for scrambling and making quiche. The ratio of eggs yolk to egg white is much higher than a standard hen’s egg at 50/50, giving the egg a much deeper colour. 12 Pullet eggs Laid by young birds, Pullet eggs are much smaller in size, around a third of the size of older hen eggs. Prized for their high yolk to white ratio by chefs, the wonderfully rich flavour and strikingly deep coloured yolks make for the perfect mayonnaise, pastry or crème brulée. 13 Guinea Fowl eggs Available from spring to later summer, Guinea Fowl eggs have a thicker, oatmeal-coloured shell and a rich flavoursome yolk. Originally native to Africa, these eggs are a delicate and elegant treat. 14 Pheasant eggs In season from April to June, these eggs are delicious. They have deep yellow yolks, larger than a quail egg, but about half the size of a regular hen’s egg. Their shells are a sophisticated olive green and brown. 15 Quail eggs Quail eggs are a quarter of the size of hen’s eggs. Their small speckled shells hold delicate little eggs with pale yolks which need just 30 seconds to soft boil. Although fiddly to shell they are worth the bother to make wonderful bite-sized scotch eggs. A range of Clarence Court eggs are available from Waitrose, or to find your nearest stockist of Burford Browns, Old Cotswold Legbar or Leghorn Whites, put your postcode in the store locator on the Clarence Court website; clarencecourt.co.uk

ABOVE, from top: Burford Brown hens at Clarence Court and Braddock White ducks roaming freely

6

7

8

9

10

11

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

13

12

|

APRIL 2021

|

14

15

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 35


eggs spread 2.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 15:12 Page 1

FOOD | & | DRINK

Spring Salad Take ham and egg a little further with the addition of crunchy British asparagus, griddled gem lettuce and a caper dressing. Frying ham may sound a little odd but it works and it’s all topped off with a glorious soft boiled hen’s egg. Prep time: 5 minutes; cook time: 15 minutes; serves 1 INGREDIENTS 150g British asparagus spears 1 large hen’s egg 1 piece good quality ham ½ little gem lettuce 1 teaspoon baby capers 1 tablespoon cold pressed extra virgin rape seed oil 1 teaspoon cider vinegar Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper Handful of rocket METHOD 1 Place a large frying pan or griddle pan on a high heat. Place a small pan of water on to boil. Click the woody stem from the asparagus and griddle the spears for about 5–7 minutes until just soft. Boil the egg to your liking, cool and peel. 2 When the asparagus is nearly cooked, add the ham slice and fry until golden and crisp. Add the lettuce to the pan cut side down and cook this too for around 2–3 minutes. 3 To make the dressing, mix the capers, vinegar and oil in a large bowl and season. Add the rocket, cooked asparagus and little gem and toss well. Transfer to a plate and top with the egg and ham, and spoon over any remaining dressing.

Easy Stove-top Eggs A quick lunch or supper that can help use up what’s left in your fridge. Serve with fresh crusty bread. Prep time: 10 minutes; cook time: 35 minutes; serves 2 INGREDIENTS 350g new potatoes 100g chorizo, sliced 1 red onion, sliced 1 yellow pepper, deseeded and sliced ½ red pepper, deseeded and sliced 4 hen’s eggs A few sprigs fresh parsley, leaves picked and chopped METHOD 1 Place a saucepan of water on to boil and cook the potatoes for 10 minutes or until nearly cooked through. Drain and place to one side. Place the chorizo in a frying pan and fry for 5 minutes on a medium heat or until starting to crisp and release oil. Transfer to a bowl and place to one side leaving the oil in the pan. 2 Add the onion and peppers to the pan and fry on a medium heat for 10 minutes or until softened. Add the cooked potatoes and fry for a further 5 minutes until start to brown. Return the chorizo to the pan and stir everything together. 3 Make an indent in the vegetables for each egg and crack them into the gaps. Place a lid on the pan and allow to cook for 5 minutes or until the white is cooked. Scatter over the parsley, season with pepper and serve.for the other slices of bread. 36 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197


eggs spread 2.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 15:12 Page 2

FOOD | & | DRINK

Easter Hot Cross Buns Classic Easter treats that are so worth the time to make. Plump mixed fruit and spice spiked buns are coated in an apricot jam glaze and perfect toasted with lots of butter. Prep time: 5 minutes; cook time: 15 minutes; serves 1 INGREDIENTS 500g strong white bread flour 10g fine salt 2 tsp ground cinnamon 2 tsp ground mixed spice 1 orange zest, finely grated 1 lemon zest, finely grated 300ml semi skimmed milk 60g unsalted butter 10g fast action yeast 1 large hen’s egg, beaten 150g sultanas 50g dried cranberries 50g chopped mixed candied peel Vegetable or flavourless oil 75g plain flour 100g Bonne Maman Apricot Conserve

METHOD 1 Place the strong white bread flour in a large mixing bowl. Stir in the salt, mixed spice, ground cinnamon, orange and lemon zest. Make a well in the centre. 2 Gently heat the milk until lightly steaming and stir in the butter until melted. Pour the milk and melted butter into a jug, check that it’s lukewarm and then stir in the yeast. Mix until frothy then pour into the well and add the beaten egg. Mix with a dinner knife at first bringing the flour slowly into the milk mixture and forming a rough dough. 3 Transfer to a freestanding mixer with a dough hook, spoon in the mixed fruit and knead to a smooth dough for about 5 – 10 minutes. Tip into a lightly oiled large bowl and cover with clingfilm. Place in a warm cupboard or by a radiator for 1 hour or until it has doubled in size. 4 Meanwhile line two baking trays with greaseproof paper. When the dough is ready turn out on to a clean lightly floured work surface and ‘knock back’ divide the dough into 12 equal sized balls, using a weighing scale helps make sure they are all even. Place 6 balls on each tray fairly close to each other. Place each tray in a large food safe bag (large roasting bags work well) and secure with an elastic band making sure the bag doesn’t touch the buns. Place the trays back in the warm place and allow the buns to double in size (about 45 minutes). 5 Pre-heat the oven to 200c/ Gas Mark 7. Mix the flour with 75ml water and spoon the paste into a small icing or piping bag. When the buns are ready, remove them from the bags and pipe a cross over each bun. Place the trays in the oven and bake for 15 – 20 minutes or until golden brown. Turn the trays halfway. 6 Meanwhile, melt the jam in a pan and pass through a sieve. Once the buns are cooked remove from the oven, brush over the glaze and allow to cool a little. Serve fresh or toasted with butter. You can freeze the buns, just cool completely and glaze after defrosting and reheating. n

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 37


lovejoys.qxp_Layout 1 25/03/2021 17:36 Page 1

FAR LEFT: Jack Rose started hauling coal from Chippenham train station to customers in the village of Bromham where he started a small market garden in the 19th century; the company later became Lovejoys LEFT: Neil Mortimer who represents the fourth generation of the family business has now been joined by his sons George and Ben


lovejoys.qxp_Layout 1 25/03/2021 17:36 Page 2

FOOD | AND | DRINK

Feeding the locals

You might not have heard of Lovejoys, but it’s likely you will have eaten their produce – from fruit and vegetables to eggs, bread, herbs, cooking oil and ice cream – in those nostalgic times when you went out for a meal. Melissa Blease chats to Ben Mortimer, representing the fifth generation of the family business, about a more optimistic future

Main image: AdobeStock.com

A

s the UK tentatively starts to venture out from Covidenforced hibernation, hospitality industry folk are keeping their fingers crossed that the light at the end of the tunnel shines brightly enough to send all notion of restrictions into the shadows. As we the public – hungry for eating (and drinking!) out again – dust the mothballs off our goingout clothes, news headlines, documentaries and social media threads continue to put hospitality business owners in the spotlight as questions around survival and support rightfully continue to dominate the menu. But as has always been the case, there’s an unseen, often unsung army who have been struggling as much as those on the frontline throughout the fraught year we finally seem to be waving goodbye to. Without the local growers, producers and suppliers who underpin the foundations for the success of any contemporary restaurant or food business, there would literally be no food on the table for our coming out party feast – and long-established local produce specialist Lovejoys (based just up t'road from Bath, in Melksham) represents the cream of the food service crop. “The last year has presented many challenges to Lovejoys, with the closure of the majority of our customers’ businesses for long periods at the forefront of the troubles we’ve endured,” says Ben Mortimer, who, alongside his brother George, works closely with their dad (and business founder) Neil to manage operations in what’s now a fifthgeneration, family-run business. “The open/shut, open/shut nature of the 2020 lockdowns precipitated extraordinary changes in trading patterns; during the Eat Out To Help Out scheme, for example, we were as busy as we would have been over any regular Christmas... and then it all stopped again. It’s really incredible, though, how resilient our customers – nearly all of whom are local, independent businesses – are. The chefs we work with have been inventive in founding new ventures and have remained positive, and our staff have been supportive throughout, responding and adapting brilliantly to the many changes we’ve had to make. Most of our team have been working over the past year but we’re really looking forward to welcoming everybody else back from furlough over the next few months, so finally things are starting to look up again!” When it comes to the businesses that the Lovejoys team so diligently dig for, there’s a whole range of customers who rely on the Mortimer family’s services from five-star luxury hotels such as Lucknam Park to village shops and nursery schools, taking in pubs, museums, local food manufacturers and tiny cafés along the way. And the range of necessities that Lovejoys supply isn’t only farmed from great green growing stuff, either; there’s eggs and local dairy produce on the menu too (all sourced from farms in Wiltshire, Dorset, Devon and Somerset) alongside fresh bread, ice cream, herbs, cooking oil and all kinds of everything else in an ever-expanding larder with plenty of storage for chilled and frozen foodstuffs too. Essential? It’s all there! And it’s all local, local, local. “Bath Quinoa, Lacock Ice Cream, Wiltshire Duck Eggs, Bromham vegetables – we love local!” says Ben. “We also have a team that goes to Bristol Market three times a week to look for more exotic items or good deals – we like our customers to rely on us to source a rare product or send an emergency delivery. And that service didn’t stop throughout any of the lockdowns; we continued to deliver six days a week with no minimum order, adapting our product range and developing new methods of communication to connect with our customers even more than before,” says Ben. And a connection that wasn’t all and only about

commerce made a big impact on our local community too. Lovejoys recently collaborated with The Longs Arms pub in South Wraxall to support the Kinder Kitchen initiative, providing free, vegetarian, freshly cooked meals to local people in need in Bath and West Wiltshire. “Many thanks to our drivers David and Nick who have volunteered their time to support us in that, too,” says Ben. But let’s not forget that, while Covid ruled the waves, the UK went through further huge changes that, after all the In/Out/Shake-it-allabout furore, almost got kicked to the kerb. “Brexit? Oh, that!,” Ben laughs. “It’s funny how we were concerned about the impact of Brexit for years but then Covid came along and affected the hospitality side of the food industry in a much more serious way. In effect, we’ve encountered only minor changes to the importing of goods so far. But our ethos and priority is to source and promote local, British, seasonal produce anyway, which of course is unaffected.”

My father Neil’s experience as a grower and the personal contacts he forges with others in the region remains of the greatest value to our business. Sustainability is high on the agenda for the Lovejoys team too: solar panels on the warehouse keep Lovejoys’ lights on throughout most of the year, plastic packaging is kept to a minimum and recyclables are collected back from customers. “99% of our customers are within an hour’s drive of our base and we’re planning on moving our entire fleet to electric vans as soon as the technology is there for refrigerated vehicles,” says Ben. So, taking all this into account: does the coolest food supply business in the UK happen to be right here, on our doorstep? “My father Neil’s experience as a grower and the personal contacts he forged with others in the region who have a real knowledge and passion for the industry remains of the greatest value to our business today, and the secret to any longstanding success we’re lucky enough to maintain,” says Ben. “And right now, we really are lucky to be where we’re at, despite everything that’s been thrown at us this past year. We’re very optimistic about a busy spring and summer season for our customers, and thus our business too. And we want to grow! We’re really looking forward to working with new customers as the world starts opening up again – we supply a lot of nurseries and local junior schools but would love to work with more secondaries and independents in the area, for example, who often use national suppliers; we can supply their kitchens with produce grown just a stone’s throw away, which of course is more sustainable and invests money back into the local economy – and the very word Lovejoys should become synonymous with local.” And so it came to pass that a business started by coal hauler-cummarket gardener Jack Rose over 150 years ago is today responsible for feeding many generations to come. Lovejoys: we love you! n Lovejoys; lovejoyswholesale.com The Kinder Kitchen initiative; kinder-kitchen.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK 2021 |2010 THE|BRISTOL MAGAZINE 51 39 | APRIL THEBATHMAG.CO.UK TheBATHMagazine | january


Recipes.qxp_Layout 7 25/03/2021 17:13 Page 1

FOOD & DRINK | RECIPE

Making veggies the main act Michelin-starred chef Rob Howell, at popular Bristol restaurant Root, shares a couple of recipes from his brand new cookbook. Photography by Alex Collins

A

mong the many city restaurants we’ve been massively missing a sit-down meal in is the award-winning Root in Wapping Wharf; in fact it’s right at the top of the list. Lately its Michelin-starred head chef Rob Howell has been busy working on his debut cookbook so that we can try and whip up some of his signature flavours for ourselves, in veg-centric small plates designed to reflect a changing national attitude towards meat consumption. Known for quality produce, playing with convention, and an ethos centring on sustainability, Rob and the Root team make sure veggies are the main event rather than being relegated to the side dish, though there are always a couple of top-quality meat and fish options for the hungriest carnivores. The cookbook presents over 100 achievable yet elegant seasonal dishes – from cauliflower bhajis with pickled orange and cashew butter, to tempura spring onions with sweet chilli sauce, and doughnuts with carrot jam – to mix and match to suit large parties or cosy dinners for one. First though, we’re following Rob’s instructions for creating these delights...

Buttermilk-fried celeriac with Korean-style sauce (serves 5)

Forget fried chicken, this celeriac is all you will need to satisfy your KFC cravings. The sauce is easy to make and demands just a few specialist ingredients, though nothing you can’t find in a large supermarket, and will help transform all sorts of dishes. It also keeps very well.

For the sauce: 150g gochujang paste 100ml dark soy sauce 50g light brown soft sugar 25ml mirin 75ml rice wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves 50ml sesame oil 50g stem ginger and 1 tbsp syrup

• Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas mark 6. • Rub the celeriac with the teaspoon of oil and then rub over a good amount of sea salt and wrap the celeriac tightly in foil. Cover with a further 4 layers of foil – this helps the celeriac almost steam itself and leaves it with an amazing texture. Bake for about 1½ hours (the exact time will depend on the size of your celeriac), until tender when pierced with a sharp knife. Then, remove it from the oven and leave it to cool in the foil for 2 hours or so. • Remove the foil and then, using a knife, remove the celeriac skin, taking as little flesh away as possible. Using your hands, tear the celeriac flesh into small chunks – different sizes is best, so you end up with some nice, small crispy bits alongside some lovely large pieces. • Pour the cooking oil into a deep pan until two-thirds full and heat the oil to 180°C on a cooking thermometer or until a cube of day-old bread turns golden in 60 seconds (or preheat a deep-fat fryer to 180°C). • Get 2 mixing bowls: put the buttermilk (or oat milk) in one of them and the dredge in the other. Using your hands, place the celeriac pieces into the buttermilk or oat milk first, then into the dredge. Make sure the celeriac pieces have a good coating on them. Fry the pieces in batches, for about three minutes per batch, until golden and crisp. Set aside each batch to drain on kitchen paper, while you fry the next. • Once all the pieces are fried and drained, place them in a clean mixing bowl, season them slightly with salt and coat them in the sauce. Finish with a sprinkling of chopped coriander and toasted sesame seeds.

Dredge

Our chef Josh Gibbons brought this fantastic recipe with him when he joined us and it’s been used with most things imaginable ever since. In the book I’ve used it with the celeriac dish on page 26 and the chicken recipe on page 210, but don’t stop there and be free to use it as you wish.

1 celeriac 1 litre cooking oil, for frying, plus 1 teaspoon for rubbing the celeriac 200g buttermilk (or oat milk for a vegan version) Dredge (see below) 2 tsp chopped coriander 2 tbsp sesame seeds, toasted Sea salt

400g strong white bread flour or gluten-free flour 40g corn flour 2g baking powder 6g garlic powder 8g onion powder 10g white pepper 6g smoked paprika 5g cayenne pepper 3g ground turmeric

For the sauce, simply place all the ingredients into a food processor and blend until smooth. Add a little water if needed to reach a nice, saucy consistency. Keep in the fridge in sealed container until needed.

Combine the ingredients in a large bowl, then transfer to an airtight container and store in a dry place. The dredge will keep for 6 months or more.

For the fried celeriac:

40 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197


Recipes.qxp_Layout 7 25/03/2021 17:13 Page 2

FOOD & DRINK | RECIPE

Buttermilk-fried celeriac – who needs KFC?

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 41


Recipes.qxp_Layout 7 25/03/2021 17:13 Page 3

FOOD & DRINK | RECIPE

Jersey Royal potatoes with peas, wild garlic and crème fraîche (serves 4) This dish is a joyous celebration of the arrival of spring. The winter months are a fast passing memory and green shoots are showing all around. Jersey Royals are such beautiful potatoes with a unique flavour. If you can’t be bothered to make the pea purée then the Jerseys will still be great simply served with good butter, fresh peas and some locally growing wild garlic – a true spring feast. 1kg Jersey Royal potatoes 2 bay leaves 2 thyme sprigs 2 mint sprigs 2 garlic cloves, crushed 10g salt 2 tbsp cooking oil 2 shallots, diced 200g fresh peas 25g unsalted butter 2 tbsp chopped chives 2 tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley 2 handfuls of wild garlic 4 tbsp crème fraiche

For the pea purée 50ml rapeseed oil 1 shallot, sliced 1 garlic clove, sliced 600ml vegetable stock 375g frozen peas Salt and freshly ground black pepper

This Jersey Royals dish is a celebration of the arrival of spring

• Place the potatoes in a large saucepan with enough cold water just to cover them. Add the bay, thyme and mint sprigs, and the crushed garlic and salt. (Feel free to use other aromatics, if you wish – just any that you have available. For example, parsley, rosemary and oregano would all work, too.) • Place the pan over a medium heat and bring to a low simmer. Cook the potatoes gently for 20-25 minutes, until just tender to the point of a knife. (They will continue to cook a little once you’ve drained them, so you don’t want them too soft.) Drain and leave to cool in the colander. • To make the pea purée, heat the rapeseed oil in a large saucepan over a high heat. When hot, add the shallot and garlic, season with a touch of salt and fry for 2-3 minutes, until softened. Add the vegetable stock and bring to the boil. Add the peas and season again with salt and this time pepper, too. Take the pan off the heat and drain the peas, reserving the stock. • Set aside 100ml of the reserved stock in a jug. Put the peas in a food processor, add a little of the remaining stock liquid and blend. Keep adding stock through the feed tube little by little until you have a lovely, smooth pea purée. If you want an extra-smooth consistency, pass the purée through a sieve, but it’s not essential. • Check the seasoning and cool the purée as quickly as possible – transferring it to a bowl and setting it inside a larger bowl filled with

42 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

ice and placing in the fridge is a good way to do this. Chill until needed. (It also keeps well for 2-3 days in the fridge and freezes well.) • Heat the cooking oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. When hot, add the shallots and fry for 30 seconds, then add the cooled potatoes and season with salt and pepper. Add the fresh peas and the reserved 100ml of stock, and bring to the boil. Reduce to a simmer, then add the butter, herbs and wild garlic (reserve a few wild garlic flowers for garnish). • Stir through the pea purée, adding enough to coat the potatoes and to create a nice saucy pan of green goodness (you can use any remaining purée as a soup or to serve with fish). Check the seasoning one last time and transfer to a serving bowl. Garnish with wild garlic flowers and serve with the crème fraîche on top. ■ • Root is out now (Bloomsbury Absolute, £26); follow @robjhowell/ @rootbristol on Instagram


Homewood Bath fp.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 14:10 Page 1


SW Lakes Bristol.qxp_Layout 7 22/03/2021 13:58 Page 1

FILMMAKING

By the lakeside

Wimbleball Lake

Camping, walking, fishing, sailing, kayaking, paddleboarding, watching wildlife and finding scenic retreats by the shores of a lake offer many options for a magical spring break for visitors to the south west

A

fter the dark, cold days of winter, the first signs of spring are always a welcome sight. Warmer temperatures, budding plants and the sweet glimpse of new life are just a few of the long-awaited moments revealing spring is finally in the air. It’s the time of year when nature is changing, full of the promise of new life, and offering a breath of fresh air and an overload of the senses. It’s the perfect time to escape the hustle and bustle, immerse yourself in nature and experience the endless benefits of being outdoors. Those lucky enough to live in the south west don’t have to venture far to find some of the most beautiful lakes in the UK. From moorland gems nestled amongst rolling hills to the atmospheric waters set in Cornwall’s iconic mining landscape – these much-loved beauty spots provide a restorative escape. Lakes include the breathtaking Wimbleball on Exmoor (less than a two hour drive from Bristol and Bath), the idyllic Roadford on the edge of Dartmoor and the Cornish lakes of Tamar near Bude, Siblyback near Liskeard and Stithians near Redruth. These are places where you can relax and observe the resident wildlife, stretch your legs, embrace a moment of calm or enjoy a scenic retreat and a well-deserved café break.

Put a spring in your step Visiting the lakes on bike or foot is a great way to experience this beautiful time of year. Watch as winter transitions into spring and witness the landscape changing into a kaleidoscope of colour, a natural blanket of yellow, green, blue and crisp white. Admire the spectacular flowers blooming around the lakes. Some traditional favourites to spot are daffodils, snowdrops, primroses, bluebells, wild garlic, wood forget-me-not and cuckooflowers. The lakes are also home to an abundance of wildlife, from wildfowl, hedgehogs and weasels to bats, deer and the illusive dormouse. Don’t forget to look out for the flashes of colour in the sky as the butterflies emerge and spot one of the most iconic signs of spring, frogspawn, within ponds and along shorelines.

Take to the water Those wanting to dip their toes in can hire a variety of watersports equipment, including kayaks, canoes and paddleboards and those who have their own kit can use it on the lakes. South West Lakes also offer qualified instructors so you can take part in a ‘Have a Go’ session or sign up to a course.

Camping breaks The spectacular lakes of the south west are perfect locations for campervan and motorhome owners to escape to, relax and unwind. You’ll relish outdoor barbecues, stargazing and the opportunity to explore three national parks, Cornwall's clay country as well as the spectacular coastlines. From the soothing sounds of water lapping against the lake shore and the relaxing dawn chorus on a spring morning to the rustling of leaves as a gentle breeze passes through the impressive woodland canopy above, waking up to nature’s soundtrack truly is incredible. Now is the time to detach yourself from modern life and connect with your natural surroundings on your next lakeside break. 44 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

Canoeing at Siblyback Lake


SW Lakes Bristol.qxp_Layout 7 25/03/2021 17:15 Page 2

LEISURE

Hook, line and sinker Roadford, Siblyback, Stithians and Wimbleball are all popular trout fisheries and perfect spots to begin an angling adventure. South West Lakes also manages 14 coarse fisheries across Devon and Cornwall including Tamar Lakes, voted as the second-best still water coarse fishery in the country in the Angling Times Magazine’s National Angling Awards.

Natural wellbeing Research shows that ‘blue space’ including sea, rivers and lakes can have a positive impact on health and wellbeing. The lakes of the south west provide an abundance of opportunities for people of all ages and abilities to engage with the outdoors and get active. They are havens not just for wildlife but for walkers, runners, cyclists, families, sailors, birdwatchers and anglers, all searching for their own piece of tranquility. So discover the beauty beyond your doorstep, head to the lakes this spring and experience an unforgettable adventure. Ready, set, spring! swlakestrust.org.uk/activities ■ .

South West Lakes are operating their activities and camping in line with government guidelines. Safeguarding visitors and employees is priority and therefore certain measures have been put in place to limit the spread of coronavirus and maintain the safety of everyone. Please do check the South West Lakes website prior to visiting to make sure you are up to date with information for your trip and ensure you maintain social distancing when visiting.

Siblyback Lake near Liskeard

Camping at the lakeside

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 45


Great Brit Breaks Bristol.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 08:57 Page 1

TRAVEL | EXPLORE

Walking, cycling, swimming, exploring gastronomic delights, relaxing on a beach or in a heavenly spa - there are so many things to make a UK holiday the perfect choice, and whatever the weather, it is the most enjoyable way to support our economic recovery. Your best holiday yet, can be found here.

THE WATERSMEET HOTEL WOOLACOMBE, NORTH DEVON The Watersmeet Hotel in Woolacombe, North Devon has recently won in the Best Waterside Hotel category in the UK and Ireland Conde Nast and Johansen’s awards for excellence. The luxury four star boutique hotel has one of the finest coastal locations in the whole of the West Country, with stunning sea views across the waters of Woolacombe Bay. The hotel overlooks Combesgate Beach and North Devon's rugged coastline with its own private steps down to the sandy beach. With an array of facilities such as an award winning twoAA rosette restaurant, informal bistro restaurant, indoor and outdoor pool with spa facilities, it is the perfect choice for couples, families or groups alike. The hotel staff take pride in their high standards and traditional values and you’ll find the hotel to be exceptionally comfortable and the staff friendly and helpful. visit: www.watersmeethotel.co.uk Tel: 01271 870333

46 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197

Main image: Surfing at Woolacombe Bay – courtesy of The Watersmeet Hotel

Great British breaks


Great Brit Breaks Bristol.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 18:41 Page 2

TRAVEL | EXPLORE

CARY ARMS & SPA BABBACOMBE BAY, SOUTH DEVON Owned by Peter and Lana de Savary, the Cary Arms & Spa sits in a spectacular bay, romantically nestled between the cliffs. Originally a historic seaside inn, now known affectionatlely as ‘The Inn on the Beach’, the Cary Arms has been completely transformed by the de Savarys to create a warm and friendly guest experience coupled with sublime luxuries such as a boutique spa, a selection of beautifully styled rooms and cottages and a superb restaurant serving locally sourced food such as lobster, crab and Devon farmed beef. Perfect for couples and families there’s always plenty to do and something for everyone from sailing, paddle-boarding, fishing, walking, to exploring rock pools or just lounging and enjoying the bay views. And, there’s also that Famous Five book or two that might need a re-read. With a choice of accomodation from luxury seaview rooms, beach huts and a range of feature packed cottages that can sleep up to nine people, all with spectacular views, the Cary Arms offers an elegant option for couples and family getaways. For more details, booking information and availability, visit: www.caryarms.co.uk Tel: 01803 327110

BLUESTONE NATIONAL PARK RESORT

PEMBROKESHIRE, WALES

If you are looking for somewhere a little different for a getaway, try Bluestone National Park Resort in Pembrokeshire on the south westerly coast of Wales. Nestled in 500-acres of rolling countryside, and within 20 minutes of Pembrokeshire’s National Park coastline, Bluestone is a place off the beaten track where you can turn your staycation dreams into a reality. Bluestone’s resort has miles of private walking and cycle tracks through woodland and meadows, along with adventurous activities for all ages including a subtropical water park and a lake for watersports. The luxury, modern accommodation offers you the space to relax away from the world too. All lodges and cottages include an outdoor area, ideal for barbecues, or just sitting and enjoying the sunshine. Book your escape. www.bluestonewales.com

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 47


Great Brit Breaks Bristol.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 08:58 Page 3

TRAVEL | EXPLORE

ORIGINAL COTTAGES A SUPER SELECTION OF PROPERTIES ACROSS THE SOUTH WEST AND UK Original Cottages has an extensive range of coastal and countryside cottages, from cosy boltholes for two to country style properties which can accommodate large family gatherings. Take St Docwin near Port Isaac, North Cornwall (shown here). Converted from a former chapel built in 1821, the main living room and kitchen have high beamed ceilings, stone walls, and slate floors with the use of reclaimed wood and stone in the remainder of the modern addition tie the whole together beautifully. Trequite is a small hamlet, a short distance away from the delights of the North Cornish coast and within easy reach of the award-winning St Kew Inn and Port Isaac, where Michelin Star chef, Nathan Outlaw has his Fish Kitchen. Rock, Polzeath and Padstow are all a short drive away. St Docwin sleeps nine in four bedrooms, with two bathrooms and the added bonus is that the family pooch can come too!

For more details, booking information and availability, visit: www.originalcottages.co.uk Tel: 03332 020899

GARA ROCK HOTEL SALCOMBE, SOUTH DEVON Accessed at the end of a twisting narrow lane and perched on a bluff of a cliff overlooking the Salcombe estuary, with the splendid North Sands beach just over a mile away, the Gara Rock hotel is one of the coolest getaways for travellers who are looking for a laid-back, remote, romantic retreat where rugged coastlines slope into sunny, quiet sandy beaches. Salcombe itself (on the other side of the estuary) is just a short walk and ferry ride away, and is a bustling harbour town complete with sailing, boutique shopping, people spotting and a host of trendy cafés to lunch in and some great pubs and bars to enjoy. But it’s the much slower pace at Gara Rock where the calming spa with a whirlpool tub, sauna and steam room, heated indoor and outdoor pools, a little cinema, and excellent restaurant and lounge bar are the real attraction. And it’s all so casual and luxurious, the rooms are chic, super cosy and all have balconies or patios to make the most of the spectacular views. Visit: www.gararock.com 48 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197


Great Brit Breaks Bristol.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 18:42 Page 4

TRAVEL | EXPLORE

LYMPSTONE MANOR EXMOUTH, DEVON Lympstone Manor is a splendid Grade II listed Georgian manor house built by the Baring merchant banking family in 1760s that has now been completely transformed with the vision of Michelinstarred chef Michael Caines MBE, into the most luxurious and delightful country house hotel. Situated in the heart of Devon on the foreshores of the Exe estuary the hotel has 21 of the finest rooms and suites - each one named after birds that inhabit the Exe - and complete with original artwork by local artist Rachel Toll, they feature deep bathtubs, fabulous views, there’s even a complimentary G&T tray. Within the 28 acre grounds there are also a fine range of beautifully decorated Shepherd’s Huts nestled in the woodlands, each one having great facilities and some even have private outdoor bathtubs on decked areas. Lympstone Manor is the perfect base for long walks, boating on the Exe, and exploring the local beaches such as the dunes of Dawlish Warren and the south Devon coastline. And, with a working vineyard and Michael Caines at the helm as patron you can expect a truly exquisite dining experience. Visit: www.lympestonemanor.co.uk Tel: 01395 202040

FIVE VALLEYS APARTHOTEL STROUD, COTSWOLDS Staying at Five Valleys is less about staying in, but more about getting out and embracing the change of scene. Enjoy near-endless footpaths and pretty little villages when you get away to the heart of the Cotswolds for a rural break, it couldn’t be easier. Book a stylish apartment and take the opportunity to explore the dramatic scenery on the doorstep. There’s so much going on, too, learn about the rich local history, indulge in the fabulous foodie and café scene, perhaps take an art course, a tour of Woodchester Valley Vineyard with wine tasting, or get active with a guided off-road bike ride or why not play a round or two of golf at one ... (or all) of the five local courses. Perhaps a visit to Stroud Brewery, down by the canal, for organic beer and pizza. If you want some pampering then the Calcot Manor and Spa is the place to unwind and relax. At the aparthotel there’s a bike store, on site parking, free wifi and an accessible apartment too. It’s the perfect place to stay for your next adventure. A three-night weekend starts from less than £230. Visit: www.5va.co.uk Tel: 01453 764496

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 49


Burgh Island Bristol.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 11:09 Page 1

FOOD | & | DRINK

Escape to Burgh Island

It is easy to see why Agatha Christie thought Burgh Island and its magnificent Art Deco hotel is the perfect setting for many of her murder mysteries, especially during the dramatic winter months. But come the summertime, there’s a very different adventure to be experienced. This is a tale of romance, luxury, and the perfect British seaside getaway.

A

s we look towards the reopening of hotels and indoor hospitality on 17 May, dreams of travel are unsurprisingly topping our summer plans. After many months of isolating, remote working and home schooling, the chance to escape is the welcome break so many of us are craving. For those seeking respite, peace and solace in Britain’s natural beauty, it is no surprise that the iconic Burgh Island will be among the most sought-after retreats. The secluded tidal island off the South Devon coast is home to the beloved Burgh Island Hotel, known in the 1930s as the ‘Ritz of the West’ and today that glorious ‘white palace’ built by socialite Archie Nettlefold remains a luxury landmark of Art-Deco architecture and history. An escape in more ways than one, today’s guests walk in the footsteps of esteemed guests including Noel Coward, Amy Johnson, Josephine Baker and Winston Churchill. Famously, Agatha Christie stayed on the island to write two of her novels in a private beach house. Almost a century later, the hotel, part refurbished in 2019 and brought to new heights of luxury by further renovations during lockdown, has been a highly coveted staycation retreat and is ready to reopen its doors once more for the quintessential seaside escape much loved by travellers in the decades before us.

An escape from the everyday Cut off from the mainland at high tide, the private island provides the true peace and seclusion that many of us are craving amid the highs and lows of the pandemic. In fact, the journey to Burgh Island alone is an adventure, with access twice a day only possible via the hotel’s historic sea tractor, which carries guests across the sea (at a social distance, of course). The rich history of the island is enough to transport guests to a different time entirely and original Art-Deco architectural and design features from plush velvet chairs to the authentic stained-glass Crittall skylight, serve as a romantic reminders of the hotel’s wild

50 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

and luxurious past. Infamous in the 1930s for its raucous parties, the hotel maintains all the glamour and glitz of its past, with black-tie dining in its Grand Ballroom and a decadent bi-annual ball. There are also plenty of legends to be found at the Hotel’s Pilchard Inn, an ancient smuggler’s pub dating back to 1336, which has welcomed many a guest for a drink by the warm fire or served pints to holiday makers on the adjacent Bigbury beach. But as well as being the perfect place for celebrating the high days and heydays of life, it is a wonderful spot for relaxation. Set apart from the mainland, the private island offers the chance for real calm, with a boutique spa and a unique mermaid pool for natural sea water bathing, secured during the second World War by a sluice gate and surrounded by rocks for utter privacy.

New adventures on the Devon coast Set on the rugged shoreline of the Jurassic Coast, guests have unrivalled access to Devon’s natural beauty, from private local hiking, fishing experiences and even shark conservation trips. Hugely popular Murder Mystery evenings, aptly set in the Grand Ballroom where Agatha Christie also took inspiration for her own work, have also become a much-loved entertainment for regular guests. For the more artistically inclined, the hotel offers tutoring sessions for all abilities from its resident island artist, Emma Carter Bromfield. The food, too, is an escape far from normality. From tasting menus at the Grand Ballroom to the more intimate setting of the hotel’s recently opened Nettlefold restaurant, guests are able to taste the freshest produce of the local seas. Passionate about sustainable and seasonal local foods, head chef Tim Hall sources 80% of the hotel’s goods from within a 10-mile radius of Burgh Island. For a postpandemic escape, it’s surely not one to miss. ■

Burgh Island Hotel, Bigbury-on-Sea, South Devon. Tel: 01548 810 514 www.burghisland.com


Burgh Island Bristol.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 11:09 Page 2

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 51


Bristol updates.qxp_Layout 1 24/03/2021 13:43 Page 1

BRISTOL UPDATES NEWS FROM LOCAL BUSINESSES AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS

Residents at Abbeyfield

GRAND REOPENING After adhering to the strictest guidelines across its supported-living houses for a year, Abbeyfield Bristol & Keynsham has now officially reopened its doors for house tours. During the Covid pandemic, securing the safety and well-being of residents and staff was the primary concern. Abbeyfield offers a wonderful alternative for older people and is ideal for those now finding it difficult to manage in their own house. Residents continue to enjoy their independence but benefit from the reassurance of some support and a community of like-minded people. The private, en-suite apartments are available to rent and fees are inclusive of utility bills and delicious home cooked meals. As part of its Safe Hands campaign, Abbeyfield is offering all new residents one week free! Vacancies in Redland, Henleaze and Easter Compton. • abbeyfield-bristol.co.uk

CHAMPIONING START-UPS A group of successful entrepreneurs from the Bristol area have set up a mechanism to provide seed-funding for early-stage start-up businesses in the south west. It is a new venture for Bristol Private Equity Club (BPEC), which previously only invested in established enterprises with growth potential. BPEC Seed is sourcing the businesses to fund through established links with organisations such as SetSquared, TechSpark and Tech South West, with around 20 per cent of BPEC members looking at supporting startups. Heading up BPEC Seed is Peter Lockett, active BPEC member since 2018, supported by colleagues Ben Cooper and Sam Simpson. All three volunteers have had extensive experience and success with their own early-stage companies and are active Business Angels in the south west. BPEC has invested around £8 million in local businesses since it was founded four years ago and now has over 100 members. Sam Simpson

• bristolprivateequityclub.com

52 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

THE FIRST OF MANY International legal practice, Osborne Clarke, has advised investment fund, Science Creates Ventures, on its first seed investment into University of Bristol biotech spin-out CytoSeek. The SCV fund focuses on Erika Jupe technologies with the potential to improve healthcare, quality of life, and the environment. It is supported and backed by several successful Bristol-based entrepreneurs, including Dr. Harry Destecroix, who sold his company, Ziylo, in a deal potentially worth £623 million in 2018. CytoSeek was established to develop next generation cell therapies using artificial membrane-binding protein technology. The start-up has raised £3.5 million, led by SCV, and is seeking to get its technology to cancer patients who are currently underserved by existing treatments. The Osborne Clarke team on the CytoSeek investment was led by London-based partner Matthew Edwards. Bristol-based partner Helen Parsonage led on the fund formation, assisted by Erika Jupe, also based in Osborne Clarke's Bristol office, on tax. Osborne Clarke is a leading European law firm for companies operating in the life science and healthcare sector. Its sector team has a strong track record of providing highly sophisticated advice to investors and life science and healthcare clients on cutting-edge issues, across multiple service lines. It works with blue chip venture capital firms, the biggest pharma, medical devices, medtech and digital health companies in the market. Dr. Carolyn Porter, CEO at CytoSeek, says: “This funding round led by SCV will enable us to succeed in scaling up our R&D efforts and advance our mission to develop nextgeneration cancer cell therapies. Our ambition is to get our technology into cancer patients who are currently underserved by existing treatments and work with partners to make their cell therapies better.” SCV has been working closely with CytoSeek since its inception and led a syndicate of new investors that included Parkwalk Advisors, Meltwind, Luminous Ventures and several angel investors in this funding round. Dr. Harry Destecroix, co-founder of Science Creates Ventures, says: “We have really enjoyed working with Osborne Clarke on the set up of Science Creates Ventures and this, our first investment. Both Helen Parsonage on the fund formation side and Matt Edwards who has advised us on our investment in Cytoseek, have been responsive and commercial, and invaluable partners in guiding us through all the processes. We look forward to working with them as we invest the rest of our first fund and on raising more money in the next few years.” • osborneclarke.com


P53.qxp_Layout 23 25/03/2021 17:15 Page 1

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 53


Clifton High School fp.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 11:10 Page 1


P59.qxp_Layout 23 26/03/2021 15:53 Page 1

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 55


Education News.qxp_Layout 1 24/03/2021 14:06 Page 1

EDUCATION NEWS UPDATES FROM THE CITY’S SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION Bristol’s first 48 Hour Film Challenge is open for registration for students from schools and extra-curricular clubs from across the area. Endorsed by IMDb and hosted by Redmaids’ High School and film education charity Into Film, participants are invited to register in teams of up to five. Following the format of the international 48 Hour Film Challenge, seen annually at the Cannes Film Festival, teams must shoot, edit and submit a short film within 48 hours on the weekend of 14 May 2021. The countdown begins at 4:30pm on 14 May when each team is given a character, prop and line of dialogue which must be included in the film. Completed films must be submitted by 16 May at 4:30pm. Awards will be given by key stage group and judges include Encounters Film Festival director Rich Warren, IMDb CEO and Into Film trustee Col Needham and Cathy Johnson, writer of Mamma Mia. Teams must have a designated adult to complete registration and oversee the day and there is a fee of £5 per team, which will be going to the charity partner, Babbassa. • redmaidshigh.co.uk/bristol48hourfilmchallenge

A WARM WELCOME

AMBITIOUS PLANS

Badminton School is delighted to announce the appointment of Ms Heidi Pedlar as the Head of Badminton Junior School. Ms Pedlar will join the independent day and boarding school based in Bristol in September. She moves from Bristol Grammar School where she is currently assistant head (pastoral and daily operations) and designated safeguarding lead. Prior roles include head of juniors and head of preprep at Walhampton School, Hampshire and head of juniors at Norman Court Prep School, Hampshire. Ms Pedlar has both a BSc (Hons) in physical education, sports science and recreation management and a MSc Recreation Management from Loughborough University in addition to a PGCE in Primary Education (specialising in science) from Warwick University. Her keen interest in sport, both in the school environment and as an enhancement to pupil wellbeing and development, exemplify her excellent fit for the Junior School community. Ms Pedlar said of her new appointment: “I am thrilled to be joining the team at Badminton. During my previous visits to Badminton for sporting events, I have always been taken aback by the warm and friendly nature of the school. I am really looking forward to becoming part of the school community and getting to know the girls and their families. Our adventure is just beginning, in the words of Dr Seuss, “We are off to great places, today is our day.”

One of Bristol's leading independent schools has announced ambitious plans to expand their Year 5 provision from September 2021. Colston's Lower, a co-educational day school located in Stapleton, will be opening an additional class for children entering Year 5 following an increase in demand, enabling the school to maintain an average class size of 18. Mr Edwards, Head of Colston's Lower said: "We are really excited to be in the position to welcome additional Year 5 students from September, and whilst an ambitious move, are confident that the interest we've already seen will continue. This past year has been far from easy, in particular for parents, and I believe that the homeschooling provision we were able to deliver for all our pupils has highlighted one of the many benefits an independent education can bring. Plus, parents for whom Colston's may have been a destination for Year 7 may wish to take advantage of this opportunity to help us support pupils ahead of the entrance assessments sat in Year 6. We are confident that any pupil who joins us for Year 5 will thrive in our nurturing and supportive environment." Colston's is holding a virtual whole school open event on 30 April from 9.30am, which will include a session with Mr Edwards to discuss Year 5 opportunities.

• badmintonschool.co.uk

• colstons.org

56 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197


Badminton School fp.qxp_Layout 1 25/03/2021 09:52 Page 1


P58.qxp_Layout 23 22/03/2021 17:22 Page 49

58 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197


P55.qxp_Layout 23 26/03/2021 15:54 Page 1

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 59


CNP fp April 1.qxp_Layout 23 24/03/2021 10:04 Page 1

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

‘I’m now able to support and empower clients to make positive changes’ Izzy Walton, CNM Health Coach Graduate

M

ost people already know the answers and what changes they need to make, but they don’t know how. As a Health Coach, I help facilitate change using all my coaching, nutrition and fitness knowledge. I’ve always had a strong interest in natural health which evolved alongside my interest in yoga. Many years ago, I studied complementary therapies, reflexology, reiki and aromatherapy. These therapies bought me closer to my interest in nutritional therapy and where I am today. I was already working in the wellness industry running corporate wellness events, yoga retreats and wholefood catering, so studying to become a Health Coach was another step towards practicing naturopathic wellness. I wanted to do a course that offered a holistic health offering, comprising of both of food, nutrition and mindful movement for both physical and mental health support. For the first time, I feel like I’ve found where all my previous studies and qualifications have been leading me to. I always knew I wanted to help people achieve

60 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

NO¯ 197

optimum health, whether that be through their diet or through yoga practice. Now with all my competencies, I have the skills and knowledge to do this with health coaching. The content on CNM’s Health Coach diploma was very in-depth and each module explored all parts of heath coaching, including business, marketing and promotion modules; this is something that other courses didn’t seem to cover. The course was immersive and I got to experience everything first-hand. When we explored a topic, such as fasting, cleansing or fitness routines, we completely embedded ourselves in that topic and we were encouraged to experience and practice it for ourselves. This learning experience was invaluable and helped cement the knowledge for me. Since graduating, I’ve been working with clients remotely in my practice and I have a few collaborations lined up for the next few months. I’m also still teaching my regular yoga classes. What I love most about practicing is being able to offer my clients’ space. Many people just don’t honour themselves the time to

really enquire into their own health and understand why they are manifesting their symptoms. As a Health Coach, I help facilitate change, and use all my coaching, nutrition and fitness knowledge to best support and empower them towards achieving their health goals. CNM’s Health Coach diploma is a unique course which has naturopathic principles at its heart, something most health coaching courses don’t offer.

Become a Health Coach – enrolling now! Turn your passion into a career. CNM Health Coaches are trained in nutrition and health, Geoff Don fitness and exercise, how the body works, coaching, marketing and business promotion.

Visit cnmcourses.com

or call 01342

777 747 to find out more

CNM has an exceptional 22-year track record training successful natural health practitioners online and in class. Over 80% of graduates are practising.

To book, call 01342 777 747


NHS fp.qxp_Layout 23 25/03/2021 17:19 Page 1

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 61


HN Beauty.qxp_Layout 7 24/03/2021 09:19 Page 1

Spring beauty

The days are getting longer, the temperatures are rising and we’re optimistic for a long post-lockdown summer. Harvey Nichols Bristol shares its top picks for revamping your make-up bag and skincare routine this Spring.

1

Hourglass Equilibrium Restoring Essence 120ml, £64

Founded in 2004 by industry veteran Carisa Janes, HOURGLASS cosmetics has carved a niche for itself as an innovative and intensely luxurious beauty brand, famed for its make-up, the Hourglass brand has now also launched a skincare range at Harvey Nichols. A radiance-enhancing essence that conditions, protects and restores balance to skin as it increases the effectiveness of skincare that follows. The Restoring Essence from Hourglass is formulated with the Hourglass Cell Balancing ComplexTM, a powerful blend of youth lipids (phospholipids and prolipids) that rebalances, restores and renews the skin barrier. A vital step in the Equilibrium ritual, this ultra-hydrating essence balances skin and forms a protective barrier against environmental pollutants.

2

Slip Pure Silk Scrunchies Desert Rose, £39

Traditional hair ties can tug on delicate hair which can lead to damage and breakage. Slip® scrunchies are made with slipsilk™, the same silk used in the awardwinning slip® pure silk pillowcase. Specially commissioned and made to exacting standards, slipsilk™ has been developed and refined for over ten years to provide the ultimate combination of shine, thickness, softness and durability. Its wide surface area and high-grade silk means the slip® scrunchie is designed to be gentle on your delicate hair and to reduce those annoying ridges caused by regular hair elastic.

3

Revitalash Advanced ® 2ml, £87 This advanced RevitaLash® formula contains a proprietary blend of proven functional cosmetic ingredients pioneered by Athena, combined with an infusion of powerful peptides and soothing botanicals, designed to both beautify and nourish the eyelashes. A cult beauty favourite to achieve long lashes.

62 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

4

Fenty Skin Flash Nap - Instant Revival Eye Gel Cream + Eye Massage Tool, £36

Puffiness and dark circles – chill: Fake a flash nap and instantly wake up tired-looking eyes with this 2-in-1 eye cream and concealer primer. The cooling mini eye massage tool rolls on an extra boost of eye revival. Give off well-rested vibes anytime, anywhere with this unique gel-cream that brightens, soothes, and fights the look of puffiness over time. This eye cream helps Rihanna look fresh after frequent late nights.

5

Amanda Harrington London Perfect Body Ultimate Gradual Tan 180ml, £28

Perfect Body, Ultimate Gradual Tan is Amanda Harrington’s illuminating, hydrating and tanextending primer, use alone as a gradual tan, or as a primer for the Body Mousse. Innovatively formulated with a blend of mild tanning agents and lightreflecting particles that work to create a subtle base colour and extend the wear of your sunless tan, while skin soothing ingredients help to boost hydration and suppleness. Collagen and hyaluronic acid plump and firm the skin working to improve elasticity, while aloe vera hydrates, softens and replenishes moisture levels. An antioxidant and omega-rich blend of shea butter and almond oil soothe and enrich skin health, helping to rejuvenate and smooth the appearance of fine lines.

6

Iconic London Prep-SetGlow - Glow 120ml, £22

This wonder spray has extracts of cucumber and chamomile, not only does it give you a stand out gloss, Prep-Set-Glow also soothes and calms sensitive skin. If that isn't enough it’s also rich in antioxidants, green tea and vitamin E which helps to condition your skin and not forgetting caffeine to combat dark circles around your eyes. This hero product is going to leave your skin revitalised and glowing. This gorgeous multiuse spray can be used to prep the skin before applying make-up, set a finished look or add a stunning gloss to a bare face.

7

Sol de Janeiro Brazilian Bum Bum Cream 75ml, £18 Sol de Janeiro’s award-winning, deliciously scented body cream is the ultimate Brazilian Beauty Secret. Pronounced “boom boom” in Brazil, the bum bum is a nation-wide obsession. It’s ALL about the booty, which is why Brazil has the smallest bikinis and bestfitting jeans. But beautiful Brazilian bottoms have a secret – a cream, created with caffeine-rich Guaraná. Brazilian Bum Bum Cream helps visibly smooth and tighten the appearance of your skin thanks to potent, caffeine rich Guaraná Extract.

8

Olaplex No. 3 Hair Perfector 100ml, £26

This is a weekly at-home treatment, not a conditioner, that reduces breakage and visibly strengthens hair, improving its look and feel. This global bestselling formula repairs damaged and compromised hair, strengthening and protecting its structure. It works to restore a healthy appearance and texture to the hair.

9

Laura Mercier Translucent Loose Setting Powder, £33.50

Cult favourite and winner of multiple major awards, Laura Mercier's "best in beauty", number one setting powder is your go-to powder. Pros love the super smooth application, which goes on evenly, blends effortlessly and provides great wear. A touch of sheer coverage with a soft matte finish sets makeup flawlessly for 16 hours. This lightweight, finely milled powder doesn't add weight or texture to skin. It doesn't settle into fine lines and never looks cakey. This noflashback formula is perfect for photos and creates a softfocus effect to subtly blur the look of fine lines and imperfections. All products featured are available at the Beauty Hall in Harvey Nichols Bristol, or online harveynichols.com


Nuffield April.qxp_Layout 1 24/03/2021 08:54 Page 1

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

IS KNEE PAIN HOLDING YOU BACK?

We all know that keeping active is one of the key ingredients to living a healthy life. In the last year, the recurrent closure of gyms and leisure facilities has made an active lifestyle more difficult, but for some it is a painful knee that prevents exercise. When knee pain interferes with normal activity, it is time to act and seek medical help - but before you do, here are some things you need to know.

A

visit to an orthopaedic surgeon can help you get a diagnosis and treatment. The surgeon will determine if your knee pain is caused through injury or a more long-term issue, such as osteoarthritis. When people talk about knee arthritis, it is usually osteoarthritis to which they are referring. Osteoarthritis is characterised by inflammation and ‘wear and tear’ damage to the knee. It develops over time, and can sneak up on you. When symptoms first appear, much of the damage has already been done. The process of damage and wearing out of the joint cartilage surface eventually results in the bone grinding on bone in the knee, which is a painful and disabling condition. Up to 25% of people with knee arthritis will retire early due to the pain it causes, and in Bristol alone, there are around 9000 people with severe knee arthritis. Any of the three main parts of the knee – the inner (medial) compartment, the outer (lateral) compartment, and the knee cap (patellofemoral) joint can be affected by osteoarthritis. There are several risk factors for osteoarthritis, including your genes, lifestyle factors, previous injuries, hypermobility and obesity.

Symptoms of knee osteoarthritis The predominant symptoms of knee arthritis are pain and stiffness, which lead to a loss of mobility. Symptoms range from mild to severe. There can be a mild background ache in the knee, which might interfere with sporting activities or a long walk. In more severe cases, it can be a constant severe disabling pain, which makes walking very difficult or impossible. Pain may also be so severe that sleep can be disturbed and there is pain at rest. The normal activities of daily living may become difficult to perform. Roughening and fragmentation of the knee joint surface may also lead to catching, clicking, clunking or similar symptoms. Swelling of the knee joint is often seen, and in severe cases, the shape of the knee may change. In the worst cases, loss of mobility can lead to poor cardio-respiratory fitness.

Treatment of knee osteoarthritis Following a diagnosis of arthritis, you may receive some form of treatment before you see a surgeon. Non-surgical treatments may include simple painkillers, anti-inflammatory tablets, weight loss treatments, modification of activities, or physiotherapy. If there are symptoms of mechanical locking in the knee, or stiffness, then keyhole surgery (arthroscopy) of the knee may improve this. However, knee arthroscopy treatment cannot reverse the arthritis damage. For those patients who might be suffering with arthritis but are hoping to avoid surgery, there are less invasive, non-surgical options available, such as injection therapy. This can prove beneficial in managing joint pain to the point whereby the need for surgery is delayed. Steroid injections are an example of this. Another new technique available is Platelet Rich Plasma treatment (PRP), which uses a patient's own anti-inflammatory cells to promote the healing of injured joints. If the arthritis pain is severe and you have exhausted non-operative treatment, then you may decide to proceed with a knee replacement. Knee replacement surgery has evolved, with innovative, state-of-the-art robotic-arm technology now available to assist the surgeon with the procedure. This brings a range of enhanced benefits for the patient, including even greater surgical precision, which in turn leads to decreased post-operative pain and faster recovery.

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital is currently the ONLY hospital in the city to offer robotic-arm assisted knee replacement surgery, highlighting Nuffield Health’s commitment to providing our patients with the best possible treatment. The decision to proceed is made with your surgeon, so that you fully understand the benefits and risks of each procedure. Since March 2020, Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital has been supporting the NHS through the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional safety measures are in place to make our hospital COVID-19 secure, and our team of Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeons continue to hold regular clinics. Consultants specialising in knee surgery include Mr Jonathan Webb, Mr Richard Baker, Mr Damian Clark, Mr Hywel Davies, Mr Sanchit Mehendale and Mr James Robinson. Call our Enquiries team on the number below, who will be able to assist you in booking a consultation. Some of the treatments we offer for arthritis:

• • • • •

Physiotherapy Steroid injections PRP Injections Weight loss therapies Knee replacements

It doesn’t matter if you want to climb a mountain (travel restrictions permitting!) or simply tidy the garden, any symptom that prevents or limits your ability to do the things you love is cause for concern. With a little help, a bad knee doesn’t have to impact your quality of life. If you would like to book an appointment with one of our Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeons, call 0117 911 5339, or visit our website: www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital 3 Clifton Hill, Bristol BS8 1BN nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 63


History_architecture.qxp_Layout 7 22/03/2021 11:12 Page 1

CITY HISTORY

Rosewell House in Bath in the 19th century

Hobbs’ houses

How one sail maker, copper smelter, property developer and place maker helped make the River Avon navigable. Words by Andrew Swift

A

t the south end of Prince Street, just off Queen Square, lies one of Bristol’s most historic pubs. The Shakespeare has been welcoming customers since at least 1775 and its wood-panelled walls and magnificent staircase speak of an illustrious past. It wasn’t built as a pub, though, and the clue to its original owner lies in the armorial emblems on its imposing facade. They depict falcons, otherwise known as ‘hobbies’, a punning reference to the man who commissioned it back in 1725 – John Hobbs. What little we know about him comes mainly from a handful of surviving deeds and documents. By 1702, he had established himself as a sail maker and landed a lucrative contract to supply sails to the navy. He was also a deal merchant. Deal – or pine – shipped in from the Baltic, was used extensively in house building, and, as Hobbs seems to have been the biggest deal merchant in Bristol, he was ideally placed to make a killing from the building boom fuelled by profits from the slave trade. Around 1720, he turned his hand to smelting copper, taking over a former lead works on the west bank of the Avon, just north of where the Clifton Suspension Lost gardens of Bishop’sBridge Knoll was later built. Most of the copper he produced was supplied to nearby brass mills, to be used in the making 64 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

of brass kettles, pots and manilas for the ‘African trade’. Hobbs was also a major property developer, funding projects in Queen Square, Redcliffe and elsewhere in the city. In 1717, however, he made what was probably the biggest gamble of his life, leasing a large tract just of land just outside the city walls in Bath to build lodging houses for wealthy visitors. Bath’s popularity as a fashionable spa had been growing for years, but there had been little new building. As a result, it had acquired a reputation for being crowded, expensive and run-down. On the face of it, anyone building new lodging houses in the city would be onto a winner. There was a snag, however. For centuries, the River Avon, upstream from Hanham to Bath, had been unnavigable because of the weirs built across it to provide power for watermills. This meant that everything and everyone travelling into and out of the city had to travel by road – a daunting prospect in the days when roads were muddy, potholed dirt tracks. It also meant that, although Bath was well supplied with building stone, other materials, such as timber and glass, cost so much to transport into the city that putting up new buildings was prohibitively expensive. For decades, Bath Corporation had tried to get parliamentary approval to make the river navigable by building locks to bypass the


History_architecture.qxp_Layout 7 22/03/2021 11:13 Page 2

CITY HISTORY

The lock at Hanham

weirs, but fierce opposition from landowners, mill owners and those with a vested interest in maintaining the high price of produce stood in the way. In 1712, however, the Duke of Beaufort had finally used his clout to get them the go ahead they needed. When John Hobbs leased land in Bath five years later, he was probably banking on the work starting sometime soon. As a seasoned entrepreneur, he would have realised that, as soon as work started, land prices in Bath would rocket as other developers rushed to get in on the act. Seven years later, however, those with vested interests were still persisting in their opposition to the scheme, and Bath Corporation were still twiddling their thumbs. Hobbs decided he could wait no longer, and in 1724 persuaded the corporation to hand the project over to him and a consortium of wealthy and influential shareholders. Work got underway, and on 27 December 1727 the first boat from Bristol – carrying deal, lead and corn – docked at the new quay in Bath. Hobbs wasted no time in getting John Strahan, the architect who had designed his house on Prince Street, to get Bath’s building boom rolling. Kingsmead Square, Kingsmead Street, Monmouth Street, Beaufort Square and – to link the development with the new quay – a long thoroughfare called Avon Street soon arose on the riverside meadows where visitors had been accustomed to take the air.

As for Bristol, without the Avon Navigation, it would have had to make do with brick covered in stucco for most of its buildings

Although John Hobbs got Bath’s development rolling, others soon joined in. When he heard that the river was being made navigable, an architect called John Wood, working in Yorkshire, decided to move down to Bath. His first commission was building lodging houses for the Duke of Chandos, but he soon struck out on his own, building Queen Square on a greenfield site north of Hobbs’ development. The opening up of the river didn’t just benefit Bath, however. One of the shareholders was Ralph Allen, a Bath entrepreneur who probably helped to persuade the corporation to hand over the project to Hobbs. No sooner had boats started plying between Bristol and Bath than he took over quarries at Combe Down, high above the city, and built a tramway to carry Bath stone down to a wharf on the Avon, from where it was shipped to Bristol. This was almost certainly part of a grand plan that the two men had agreed well in advance. Up to this time, very few of Bristol’s grand houses were built of stone. Most were of brick. By the early 1730s, however, Allen was shipping over 1,800 tons of Bath stone a year to Bristol. The price plummeted, and Bath stone was soon as common in Bristol as it was in Bath. Not all of it stayed in Bristol, however. Much of it was loaded onto ships bound for London or farther afield, and Ralph Allen, who was already rich, grew so wealthy that he commissioned John Wood to

The Shakespeare

build him a Palladian mansion at Prior Park near his quarries, high above the city. John Hobbs could not have foreseen how successful his kick-starting of Bath’s development would be. Within less than a century it went from being a small provincial town to the 10th largest city in the country. The development he had commissioned Strahan to build was soon overshadowed by Wood’s ever more spectacular architectural extravaganzas, however, and it rapidly went downhill, with Avon Street becoming notorious as Bath’s red-light district less than 30 years after it was built. Although most of it survived into the 20th century, Second World War bombing and redevelopment has since put paid to much of Hobbs’ development. Most of Beaufort Square, however, survives as one of the most evocative hidden corners of the city, while Kingsmead Square boasts Rosewell House, once home to the Bishop of Bristol, and the most fantastically decorated building in the city. Hobbs’ initiative, according to the building historian James Ayres, enabled Bath ‘to expand as the most fashionable watering place in England. The incoming visitors and the outgoing Bath stone generated the means needed to pay for the imported building materials, and finance the developments these materials were used to construct.’ As for Bristol, without the Avon Navigation, it would have had to make do, as Cheltenham did, with brick covered in stucco for most of its buildings. Like many who grew rich in Bristol in the 18th century, John Hobbs may not have been directly involved in the slave trade, but he certainly supplied and profited from those who were. He also radically influenced the way both Bristol and Bath developed, and, while his name is almost totally forgotten, the survival of the house he built with the proceeds of his various enterprises gives us a unique insight into the legacy of one of Bristol’s key entrepreneurs at a pivotal moment in the city’s history. ■

Avon Street, Bath, in the 19th century

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 65


Bristol interiors.qxp_Layout 7 26/03/2021 16:09 Page 1

CITY HISTORY EDUCATION

Give space and attention to the things you do every day

ILSE CRAWFORD

Photograph by Gaelle Marcel; unsplash.com

Lost gardens of Bishop’s Knoll

34 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

SPRING 2021

|

No 196


Bristol interiors.qxp_Layout 7 26/03/2021 16:09 Page 2

CITY | INTERIORS

Rooms for refuge

Comfort, cosiness and character are now the three driving forces in the home interior, says Emma Clegg, as she ponders the idea of how where we live is no longer somewhere where we spend just part of our lives

F

rom the first primitive dwellings where caves provided shelter, warmth and refuge, and the first idea of ‘home’, the built environment has continued to work around these human needs, to protect those living within from the natural world, its stressors, and the multifarious dangers beyond. It’s got more complex and hierarchical – interior products and style options are now mind-boggling and there’s no even playing field as we can’t all afford or have room for a hot tub or a summerhouse or a gym or yoga retreat. And yet our homes still provide answers to these essentials that make us feel safe and secure. Whatever our experience in the last year, we’ve all been spending more time at home. For those on furlough or working principally from home – especially for the lucky ones with a decent amount of space and a garden – there was a thrill of excitement: no need to get up so early, more time for yourself, for our loved ones and animals, for cooking, for things that had been put off for too long. So our interiors have been more on our minds and have got more attention, whether it’s cleaning, reorganising, painting walls or deciding on a new sofa. The idea of feeling safe is integral to having a space that’s yours. There is an architectural school of thought called ‘prospect and refuge’ that says that people prefer environments where they can easily survey their surroundings and quickly hide or retreat to safety if necessary. These are perceived as safe places to explore and dwell and are seen as more aesthetic than environments without these elements. It all goes back to our evolutionary history where environments with good outward surveillance and refuge increased the likelihood of survival, like a medieval fortress with a moat and drawbridge. But these ideal aspirations nowadays, for the common people at least, mostly link to the style of architecture we live in. We might not have a scenic view and we probably don’t yearn for an internal safety chamber for moments when we feel under threat. Ultimately what we do have control over is our allotment of living space and – without the outside

distractions of shops, restaurants, pubs, cinemas, theatres et al – the home has become the centre of entertainment, the workspace, the dining space, the sleeping space, and so how we experience it matters more than ever. It’s no longer somewhere where we spend part of our lives. It’s our main context. This focus on remodelling the home interior to suit the change of circumstance has unsurprisingly been much emphasised this year. The resulting interior trend has been the customisation of our spaces into comfortable havens. It seems our fantasy homes are now characterised by warmth, cosiness and personality. The choices we’re making in our home refuge also have a definite sustainable emphasis – vintage furniture, upcycling, green credentials, bolstering resources. We’ve even seen (welcome) new government legislation encouraging homeowners to fix their white goods appliances rather than replace them because it’s a more economical option. The need for comfort has resulted in the decline of previously popular interior styles. Mid-century modern, a style initiated by Bauhaus architects and designers, is characterised by simplicity and functionality and what were then ‘new’ materials such as plastic, but it is not the sort of style that you can throw yourself on at the end of the day. There is talk of minimalism also being in retreat. A swept-clean interior might not hold our attention all day and it’s possible we may spend so much time tidying and sweeping that we don’t actually have much left over for anything else. It’s not about becoming maximalist and cluttered, though, it’s finding carefully selected pieces that animate and ground us. It’s also likely that thoughts will turn to durability and resilience, perhaps tiled floors with natural materials over carpets? So we’re recommending some serious thought about comfort and refuge – and a rawer, less tidy, more casual aesthetic. Think about making your home textural and layered with warmth and purpose – even though we may be able to fly the nest more often in the months ahead, it can’t be at the expense of our essential hideaway. n

Scandi White Porcelain tiles from Mandarin Stone; mandarinstone.com. Porcelain tiles sum up what chilling is all about; style them simply with a statement chair to achieve a minimalist Scandinavian style

RIGHT: This Delissa Quilt from Anthropologie is a fabt spot to lounge on with a laptop. And the useful stylist’s tip is to unmake the bed a bit after it’s been made. £148–168; anthropologie.com

➲ THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

SPRING 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 35


Boniti Everhot.qxp_Layout 1 19/03/2020 16:47 Page 1


P69.qxp_Layout 23 24/03/2021 15:51 Page 1

Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934

THE

KI TC HEN PAR TNER S

Remote Kitchen Design Service Available

DESIGN STUDIO

Call or email for further details 01179 466433 • studio@thekitchenpartmers.co.uk

make your kitchen your own by personalising it with your choice of door colour*

Your kitchen, your colour...

FREE UPGRADE WORTH £1000 *Any RAL, NCS or Farrow & Ball colour on selected painted kitchen ranges. Ask in store for more details

www.thekitchenpartners.co.uk 102 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2QY | 01179 466433

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 69


Gardening.qxp_Layout 2 22/03/2021 11:18 Page 1

GARDENING

Life recycle

The mirror maze at Royal Fort Gardens. Sculpture is a great way to add your own personality to the garden, whether it’s a stone figurine or something upcycled and rustic

From composting to pallet-pimping, Elly West is promoting sustainable outdoor space personalisation

T

wo things have got me thinking this month about recycling opportunities. The first is some building work on my house, at the end of which I was left with a skip loaded with rubbish, including five or six pallets to get rid of. The second is the introduction in North Somerset of a paid-for green waste collection, as I live in the minority of council districts that have offered this service for free up until this year. We all know how important recycling is, and most people who love their gardens tend to be ecologically aware and take this on board without question. However, while we may not get a lot of pleasure from dutifully sorting out our recycling bins ready for the weekly collection, recycling in the garden can be a much more positive and enjoyable experience. I love seeing ideas on social media, and elsewhere, for garden projects that upcycle unwanted objects. It’s fun to personalise your outdoor room. Everything gets softened by planting and you can move things around and experiment with colour in a way that you may not want to in your indoor space. I advertised my leftover pallets on a local WhatsApp group and they were snapped up within the hour by people wanting to use them in their gardens, which makes me much happier than putting them in the skip or going to the effort of chopping them up for firewood. But I couldn’t resist keeping one to use in my own garden; I’m just not sure how yet. Maybe a planter? Or perhaps a bench? A table? A pallet is ideal for a rustic planter when stood on its side. With very little adaption it creates natural shelves for plant pots that are ideal for herbs and trailing plants in a sunny spot. Paint in whatever colour you like, or leave it natural then hang it on a wall or simply lean against a hard surface. 70 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

Ladders are another good find for upcycling and reusing in the garden. A small wooden stepladder is ideal as you can place pots directly on the treads, or you could hang plants from the rungs to create a tiered display. So if you’re looking for an Easter project to get your garden ready for summer, why not try local giveaway groups such as Freegle or Freecycle for items you can repurpose in the garden? One man’s junk is another man’s treasure!

A pallet is ideal for a rustic planter when stood on its side. With very little adaption it creates natural shelves for plant pots

Just about any durable item that holds soil can become a garden planter, and I’ve seen tin cans, old sinks, and even boots and wellies used to create quirky displays. Just make sure there are holes in the base to provide drainage, and remember: the bigger the container, the less often you’ll need to water it and the more likely your plants are to thrive. Having said that, sedums and other succulents, plus many Mediterranean-type plants, can survive poor soil and little water, so make good candidates for smaller containers.’The ultimate in garden recycling, though, is composting. With the letter from the council about the introduction of green bin fees came information about composting to encourage us to recycle green waste at home rather than through the


Gardening.qxp_Layout 2 22/03/2021 11:18 Page 2

GARDENING

council’s collection service. And it totally makes sense on every level. By creating your own compost you get a free, nutritious growing material to use around the garden that will improve your soil’s texture and the health of your plants. And you’re also using up your kitchen and garden waste without having to rely on the council to take it away. Wildlife loves a compost heap, with thousands of mini-beasts and tiny organisms working away to break down your waste, and other larger creatures also benefit from its shelter and warmth, such as hedgehogs, slow worms, frogs and toads. Compost heaps come in all shapes and sizes. North Somerset Council is offering cheap plastic bins as part of the new initiative, but there are more attractive wooden ones on the market or you can make your own from recycled timber – including pallets! Gaps in the sides will enable wildlife to get in and out, but will also mean your heap could dry out more quickly so you might want to water it now and again if it’s looking parched. A bin can be positioned anywhere, although decomposition is slower in the shade. Anything that will rot can be composted, but some items break down more quickly than others. Fruit and veg peelings from the kitchen can go on the heap, but avoid cooked food and meat or fish, as you won’t want to attract rats. A mix of materials creates the best compost, so if you produce a lot of grass cuttings, for example, try to mix them up with more carbon-rich material such as dried leaves and chopped up prunings and stems, or even shredded paper or cardboard. Turning your heap with a fork will add oxygen, which will speed up the composting process. Depending on what you put in your compost bin and how you tend to it, you could have a rich, crumbly, brown, friable compost within a few months or it may take up to a couple of years. • ellyswellies.co.uk; Instagram: @ellyswellies1

Plant of the month: Heuchera

The softly scalloped leaves of heuchera, also known as coral bells, make a beautiful foil in the spring garden for bulbs and the fresh growth of early perennials such as geraniums and euphorbias. The sprays of flowers held on airy stems generally appear slightly later in the year, but the leaves are particularly noticeable while the borders are relatively quiet and before summer’s full fanfare of flowers begins, especially when glistening with raindrops. Heucheras are mainly grown for their foliage, which comes in shades of green, burgundy, red, orange, pink, and yellow. Some are mottled or veined with silver or red. Variety ‘Marmalade’ is particularly striking with its peachy-bronze shiny leaves that have vivid pink undersides, or if you prefer something dark and dramatic, try ‘Obsidian’ or ‘Black Pearl’ for almost black leaves. A slightly shady spot in well-drained soil suits them best as winter damp in a clay soil can cause the roots to rot. Keep them happy and they are more or less evergreen, and are great for the front of a border, planted in a swathe to create a leafy edging, or for underplanting trees and shrubs.

Create space with a garden room GARDEN OFFICES • LOG CABINS • STUDIOS • SUMMERHOUSES POSH SHEDS • TIMBER GARAGES • OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES

01225 774566 • www.gardenaffairs.co.uk Visit our Display Centre at Trowbridge Garden Centre 288 Frome Road, BA14 0DT THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

|

APRIL 2021

|

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 71


Ursell fp.qxp_Layout 1 25/03/2021 16:16 Page 1


Redland Court fp.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 12:15 Page 1


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

7 QUEEN SQUARE, BS1

WATERFRONT OFFICE SUITES

• Prime office space • Whole office building 2,898 sq ft • Or suites of 913 sq ft, 1,067 sq ft, 1,618 sq ft • Terms on application

• Penthouse 1,800 sq ft

WHITELADIES RD – OFFICES

CHANDOS ROAD, CAFÉ

• First Floor 2,375 sq ft • 7 car spaces total • Stunning views

• Established and busy

• 1st floor suite of offices

• Fully fitted to walk in and trade

• 1,000 sq ft + 2 car spaces

• 766 sq ft

• Contemporary refurb New lease – rent on application

• New lease

83 ALMA ROAD CLIFTON

HIGH STREET SHIREHAMPTON

• Two small office suites

• Fantastic large retail / showroom unit

• Suite 1 – 240 sq ft Suite 2 – 157 sq ft

• Established high street pitch

• 1 Car space

• 4,105 sq ft + customer parking

• No premium

• New flexible tenancy 30 QUEEN SQUARE BS1

HAMPTON LANE GARAGE

• Top spec boutique office suite • 1,651 sq ft • Open plan & full fit out • Self contained own ground floor access • New lease – rent on application

• Garage / car repair workshop • Suit other industrial & commercial use • 2,956 sq ft • To let – flexible terms

RHUBARB TAVERN, BARTON HILL, BS5

ST GABRIELS COURT, BS5

• 1,296 sq ft + cellar

• Brand new units for sale • Units from 710 sq ft up to 5,800 sq ft + parking • Use Class E – suits many commercial uses • For sale – Prices on application

• A4 Drinking Establishment use • Suit other commercial uses • New flexible lease

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977 25/27 CLARE STREET BS1

49 HENLEAZE ROAD • Shop to let • Busy retail pitch

• Landmark office building

• 926 sq ft (large unit)

• 2,651 sq ft

• Suit shop and other uses

• Prime city location New lease – rent on application

WHITELADIES ROAD CLIFTON

4 QUEEN SQUARE, BS1 • 1,805 sq ft + 1 car

• Large retail unit

• Self contained building

• 1,200 sq ft + 397 sq ft ancillary

• Under refurbishment

• Busy frontage & pitch

• Lease & rent on application

• New lease – only £20,000 pax

278 GLOUCESTER ROAD BISHOPSTON

COMMERCIAL PREMISES + 3 BED FLAT BLAGDON, NORTH SOMERSET

• Corner retail unit + rear interlinking warehouse • Shop 894 sq ft leading to warehouse 2,028 sq ft • New lease – only £23,500 pax

Comprising former coach depot, garage, office, storage + yard, in all c 11,455 sq ft. Suit other commercial uses – to let (might sell).

CRUSADER HOUSE BS1

CLIFTON – TO LET

• Two ground floor office units

• Showroom / office unit

• New refurbishment

• 982 sq ft

• Unit 1 – 1,293 sq ft Unit 2 – 440 sq ft

• Great space New lease

• New lease – rent on application CITY CENTRE OFFICES • New contemporary refurbishment of a fine office HQ • 4,200 sq ft – 8 car spaces

SHOPS * BARS * CAFES We are marketing a wide selection throughout BS1, BS6, BS7, BS8 & BS9 PLEASE CALL HOLLY BOULTON

• New lease – rent on application

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice


Fox and Fox.qxp_Layout 7 24/03/2021 09:15 Page 1

TALKING PROPERTY

Meet the property expert

PROMOTED CONTENT

The Bristol Magazine catches up with Bristol property experts Fox & Fox and puts a few questions to business owners Tom Derrett and Eva Callaghan about the current market in Bristol and how the events of the last 12 months will shape the city’s rental market TBM: How long has Fox & Fox been operating in Bristol? Fox & Fox has been operating since 2019 in Bristol. Before, the owners ran a property management company based in Wales that they built up from one to a 1000 properties over eight years. They sold their shares in order to have a business which is entirely their own. Both owners feel very passionate about the property industry. They love the challenges, the rewards of providing a good service for both investors and tenants, and that no two days are the same. Tell us about the people behind the business? Fox & Fox is a family-run business owned by Eva Callaghan and Tom Derrett. Eva is a qualified accountant and experienced businesswoman with a proven track record in the property industry. She is also a personal coach, which comes in handy when guiding landlords and tenants through the maze of lettings regulations. She is a mum to two girls and she has a thing about sparkling wine, Teslas and Quentin Tarantino movies. Tom is a qualified barrister and brings a depth of legal knowledge to Fox & Fox Property. Tom started out deciding deposit disputes for the Deposit Protection Service in Bristol, before going on to become a property business entrepreneur, building a property management company and starting one of the UK’s premier property insurance brokers. He is a father to two girls, a music lover and has won a gold medal playing underwater hockey for England. “Of course, the company could not run without the amazing staff that we have worked with for years,”comments Tom. What are the main services you offer and what makes you stand out? Fox & Fox is much more than a letting agency. We actively work with our landlords to ensure they make the most out of their property. That includes: • getting them the best deals on finance products so they don’t leave too much capital tied up in their portfolio • finding them new properties to buy that suit their requirements, whether they are looking for income or capital growth • reviewing their portfolio and their options at least annually • and working with Fox & Fox Accounting Ltd, to prepare their landlord tax returns. Do you work just with established landlords? We work with many experienced landlords but also with new investors who particularly benefit from our expert advice, many of whom we have helped to build a portfolio. 76 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

APRIL 2021

|

No 197

getting harder and harder for individual investors and small agents to operate legally. With full regulation of the industry just around the corner, we have made the decision to invest in the best software that will guarantee our landlords are not at risk of falling foul of the law.

Eva Callaghan and Tom Derrett

What would you say are the main services that landlords and tenants are looking for in an agent? Landlords are looking for help to buy the right property to achieve their goals, whether that be income or capital growth. They are looking for an agent they can trust to provide a comprehensive advice-rich service and excellent communication where they can sleep at night confident that their investment is in good hands and their tenants are safe. Landlords also want to know that their agent is doing everything they can to ensure that their property is let to a responsible tenant. As a family-run business, we care about each individual landlord’s needs. As qualified and regulated professionals we can be trusted with our clients’ investments. We make all our landlords a cast-iron guarantee that will never put a tenant in their property that we wouldn’t put in our own. Tenants need to feel safe, be communicated with efficiently and know that their maintenance queries will be dealt with in a timely manner. Are there any innovations or new ways of working coming into the industry? It’s fascinating to see the advances in technology taking hold in the industry over the last decade. From spreadsheets and paper application forms ten years ago, now we have open banking, artificial intelligence software and online viewings, just to mention a few innovations. The regulation across the lettings sector is becoming tighter than ever before. There are so many checks on applicants, safety regulations, property licensing requirements and paperwork to file to be fully compliant with the law. It’s

Is this a good time to invest in rental property post Covid and with new and current government regulations – how do you see the market performing in the short to medium term? This is a great time to invest thanks to the stamp duty holiday and increased rental demand, however, there are a great many more obstacles to profitable investment than there were ten years ago. It’s important for investors to get good advice on which sectors of the market are performing and how they are likely to perform in the future. Property remains an excellent investment but there are pitfalls for the unwary. Luckily, Bristol remains an exceptionally buoyant market and there are some fabulous opportunities for those in the know. How has COVID-19 affected your business? Covid affected so many industries and it is heart-breaking to see how many businesses are struggling. We maintained the value of our clients’ assets by increasing the amount of resources we put into rent chasing, especially at the beginning of the lockdown. We even went as far as to have one member of staff become an expert in Housing Benefit and Universal Credit claims to be able to help the tenants through a difficult situation which was no fault of their own. The same as everyone else, we felt the initial shock of the lockdowns. Recognising that the business environment had changed dramatically, we decided to take the confident (or at the time it felt crazy) step to acquire two Bristol-based property businesses. The larger of the two acquisitions completed on the 1 December 2020, just in time to scupper our plans for a quiet Christmas with the children. Although we had a busy festive period, it’s been an amazing experience for us. We have really enjoyed getting to know so many new people and we very much appreciate all the positive feedback and support that we have received. ■ Fox and Fox Property, Tel: 0117 2141411 foxandfoxproperty.co.uk


CJ Hole fp.qxp_Layout 1 26/03/2021 11:28 Page 1


Rupert Oliver FP April.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 11:20 Page 1

Flax Bourton, Bristol | Guide Price £695,000 An exceptional detached four-bedroom family house with a stylish and contemporary interior, fabulous fully enclosed family garden, off-street parking and an integrated double garage. Stunning family house of circa 2045 sq. ft | Walking distance to an “outstanding” local primary school | Beautifully refurbished by the current owners | Sitting room with a wood burning stove | Open plan dining room and kitchen | Separate utility and further store room | Four bedrooms and two bath / shower rooms | Integrated double garage and off-street parking | Extensive fully enclosed circa 100’ family garden

In all circa 2045 sq. ft (190 sq. m)


Rupert Oliver FP April.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 11:20 Page 2

Redland, Bristol | Guide Price £1,200,000 A beautiful four bedroom semi-detached Victorian townhouse in a sought-after location with a selfcontained one-bedroom flat and a charming south-easterly facing rear garden. A beautifully appointed semi-detached family home in Redland | 22’ family kitchen and open plan dining room | Sitting room and a separate study / playroom | Master bedroom suite with dressing room and en-suite bathroom | Two further double bedrooms and a family bathroom | Versatile lower ground floor layout presenting a self-contained one bedroom flat if required | Fully enclosed south-east facing rear garden | Beautiful retained period features throughout | Catchment area for St. Johns Primary School and Redland Green (Secondary) School | EPC: E

In all circa 2610 sq. ft (242 sq. m).


ASHLEY DOWN BS7

GUIDE PRICE

WINTERBOURNE BS36

£435,000

GUIDE PRICE

£795,000

An exquisite two bedroom Victorian Terraced house, with a beautifully presented garden. Excellent location close to Ashley Down Primary School, and to the buzz of Gloucester Road. Viewing highly recommended.

A substantial detached four bedroom family home set within extensive grounds. The original cottage has been extended to offer a well presented and versatile interior. Sizable front driveway with ample parking leads to the detached garages. Original one bedroom ground floor annex incorporated within the current accommodation. The property is freehold and offered with no onward chain.

CENTRAL BS1

CLIFTON BS8

GUIDE PRICE

£450,000

A superior apartment offers a spacious, well presented interior, with two double Bedrooms and an occasional third bedroom/home office. Extensive balcony with open out look of the surrounding area and harbour. Allocated, SECURE PARKING. Viewing is highly recommended.

0117 923 8238

GUIDE PRICE

£265,000

A well-presented one double bedroom first floor flat. An excellent location close to Clifton Village. Open outlooks enjoyed from the front and rear elevations. NO ONWARD CHAIN. Viewing is highly recommended.

www.howard-homes.co.uk

hello@howard-homes.co.uk


CLIFTON BS8

SSTC

£1,500,000

CLIFTON BS8

SSTC

£1,500,000

A four bedroom detached family house set within generous gardens in an excellent Clifton location. Recently built studio/annex, off street parking and scope for development, subject to planning. .

An individually designed five bedroom stone built detached house, with additional three bedroom annex, a secluded location tucked away at the end of a private Clifton mews, double garage, parking, courtyard and mature gardens, superb Clifton location. Similar properties required.

REDLAND BS6

REDLAND BS6

SSTC

£985,000

An impressive family home offers a versatile and generous interior. Boasting a great deal of original character throughout. Well presented interior arranged over four floors. Driveway, parking and beautiful enclosed garden. Similar properties required.

SSTC

£950,000

An elegant Victorian gable fronted family home. Boasting a great deal of original features throughout. Versatile and well-presented interior set over four floors. Six bedrooms, four bathrooms, kitchen/breakfast room, three reception rooms and enclosed rear garden. Similar properties required.

203 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2XT


Ocean DPS.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 17:03 Page 1


Ocean DPS.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2021 17:04 Page 2


Mallorys fp.qxp_Layout 1 24/03/2021 13:26 Page 1

Profile for MC Publishing Limited

The Bristol Magazine April 2021