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ISSUE 214 | OCTOBER 2020 | thebathmag.co.uk | £3.95 where sold

More time indoors?

HOME COMFORTS PLAN YOUR NEXT PROJECT WITH OUR A/W HOMES AND INTERIORS GUIDE PLUS...

THE POWER OF COLOUR Light, space, psychology and interior design

SPACE TO BUILD

Planning a home on a reclaimed site

COOKING UP A FESTIVAL

Exclusive interview with entrepreneur Charlie Bigham

EIGHTEEN YEARS OF TBM It’s our birthday – so where did it all start?

A N D S O M U C H M O R E I N T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B AT H


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Contents october.qxp_Layout 1 25/09/2020 18:03 Page 1

18 68

84

Contents October 2020 5 THINGS

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10

Essential events to look forward to this month

WE ARE ALL GROWN UP NOW

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44

Architect Richard Asbury explains how to build on disused sites

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18

Emma Clegg takes TBM for a walk down memory lane and finds an ipod with a touch-sensitive wheel and wedge flip-flops

TAKE 5 INDIES

HOME DEVELOPMENT

24

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TALKING HEAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Meet Rosie Allen, the new head at The Paragon

UP, UP AND AWAY

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60

Catherine Pitt takes a look back at flying high in a balloon

Sample our Take 5 selection of independent shops, from tea to teddy bears

WHAT’S ON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Check out this month’s top virtual and socially distanced events

TAKE TWO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Millie Bruce-Watt profiles two films at The Little Theatre Cinema

ALL THE WORLD’S A STAGE

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30

...said someone quite famous – but it’s more fun when you’re sitting in the audience – Melissa Blease tempts us with TRB’s autumn offerings

CITY ARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

FORAGING FOR COLOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Three local textile artists collaborate on a creative project that starts with natural dyes and ends with handmade garments ..........................................

FLAVOUR OF THE MONTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Emma Clegg takes a trip to Bouvardia restaurant at Bathen House

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I CAN SING A RAINBOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Take a look at these multi-coloured products for the interior

THE POWER OF COLOUR

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68

Emma Clegg researches the challenge of using colour effectively in a home space and discovers it’s not just a matter of taste

INTERIORS DIRECTORY

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LOW-ALLERGY GARDEN

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Does hayfever cramp your style in the garden? Fear not, there is a solution...

38

Food entrepreneur Charlie Bigham chats to Emma Clegg

More content and updates discover: thebathmag.co.uk

Andrew Swift takes a walk to a plateau east of the Avon Valley

72

If you’re making design changes in your home, use this essential guide to our local suppliers and specialists

Find out what our city’s much-loved art spaces have on show

VIRTUAL BUT VERY TASTY

NATURE ESCAPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62

ON THE COVER

Forget the neutrals and go with this Funk Triangles rug, available from TR Hayes in 100% New Zealand wool, from £319

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine

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KutchenHaus October BATH.qxp_Layout 1 24/09/2020 15:22 Page 1

• • • • •

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Contact

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Monday - Saturday: 9.30am - 5.30pm Sunday: 10.00am - 4.00pm

Email: showroom@bristol.kutchenhaus.co.uk Tel: 0117 213 0896

5 Saracen Street, Bath BA1 5BR

STORES NATIONWIDE

Email: showroom@bath.kutchenhaus.co.uk Tel: 01225 634 025


Editors Letter oct.qxp_Layout 1 25/09/2020 18:07 Page 1

FROM THE EDITOR Below: Alma shallow velvet armchair in turquoise, £950, from Blue at The Loft

Editor photograph by TBM

I

t’s our birthday this month. And it’s a special one, the big 18. In human terms this is the age when you can vote, marry without parental consent, buy alcohol, drive a lorry, stand for election, or get a tattoo. In magazine terms it’s just a crazy moment in time from which to look back fondly to the year we first brought out this publication – all about the city we love best, for the eyes of those who live here – and reminisce over a selection of magazine covers, one chosen from each year. That’s what we’ve done – and appropriately you’ll find this on page 18. This issue we’ve chosen colour as our big theme for our interiors special. Colour is a very personal choice, people always say, but it can feel hard to get right in a room or interior space. In fact there is a wealth of practical advice to do with the direction of natural light that allows us to make colour choices that will suit where we live, guidance that if followed will make our spaces sing. There are also hidden forces – historical associations, emotional connections, and the lure of fashion – that draw us to one colour or scheme over another. We explore this theme on page 68 in consultation with our local design gurus, and showcase a selection of products with a rainbow colour vibe on page 66. You’ll also find an interiors directory on page 72 with details of our regional designers and retailers and services – dip into this to animate all those newly inspired plans to revamp, redecorate and reinvent. We follow another colour path on page 36, where a group of craftspeople – including three from our local region – have collaborated on a foraged colour project, using natural dyes, constructing fabrics and designing and making garments, which will culminate in an exhibition. Our Take Five independent retailers feature returns this month with five specialist shops which make a point of raising the customer experience to a level way beyond what we find in many high street stores – that’s why we love them – so prepare for a journey from fashion to jewellery and silver to tea on page 24. Theatre Royal Bath is back for real very soon with their triple-production autumn bill and Melissa Blease takes a look at the three classic productions that are in store on page 30. We’re glad to see them back and feel sure that wearing a face covering won’t mask the wonder of a live performance. Our columnist Richard Wyatt may be sceptical, though (see page 16). We also discover how we can mastermind our own house developments with architect Richard Asbury on page 44, talk to Charlie Bigham on page 38 about his pre-packed meals and the forthcoming virtual Wells Food Festival, and drop in to Bouvardia at Bathen House Hotel to try out the menu – see page 40. Do wish us happy birthday by reading our October issue!

I sit beside the fire and think of all that I have seen, of meadow-flowers and butterflies in summers that have been; Of yellow leaves and gossamer in autumns that there were, with morning mist and silver sun and wind upon my hair.

JRR TOLKIEN (1892–1973)

LOCKDOWN QUILT

This quilt was made out of 500 pieces of fabric by 91-year-old Anne Rossiter to help raise money for the Royal United Hospital in Bath. Anne started Rossiters Department Store with her husband Michael in 1961. The current owner, Peter James, has put the quilt on display in Rossiters, Broad Street, Bath, where raffle tickets can be bought. Tickets are £5 for a chance to win the quilt. All proceeds go to the RUH Bath. rossitersofbath.com

Emma Clegg Editor All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

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5

ZEITGEIST

October

Book

Avon Valley Pumpkin Patch

Keane by Jon Stone

After a six-year hiatus, Keane finally returned to the charts last year, with a triumphant sell-out UK tour and their latest studio album Cause and Effect. Now, much to the delight of fans, the band will be appearing at Westonbirt Arboretum as part of Forest Live’s summer concerts. On 11 June 2021, Keane will take to the stage with special guests Flyte, plus support from Michael Ryan. Forest Live is a major outdoor live music series that introduces forests to new audiences in unique, natural woodland arenas around the country. Tickets from £44.50; forestryengland.uk/music

Pick Avon Valley’s Massive Pumpkin Patch Festival is set to return for weekends and half term throughout October. Roam through the Covidsafe patch and pick your pumpkin in time for Halloween. Book an entrance time slot with free car parking on site between 11am to 4pm, tuck in to the local food vendors and enjoy a warm mug of hot chocolate while you hunt for the perfect pumpkin. Visitors can also enjoy fair rides, Pumpkin Paintball and Pumpkin Slingshot as well as soaking up the autumn atmosphere. avonvalley.co.uk Travel through food this month

Eat

Search This Halloween, children’s book character Wally – wearing a red-andwhite striped shirt and black-rimmed specs – will be travelling the country, appearing in museums including the Roman Baths. Families will be able to join the search for Wally at the Roman Baths as part of the Where’s Wally? Spooky Museum Search, organised by Walker Books and Kids in Museums, to celebrate the release of the new book, Where’s Wally? Spooky Spotlight Search. The activity will run from 9 October to 1 November and will be tailored within each museum to comply with their physical distancing measures. romanbaths.co.uk

Sami and Tara

As we are unable to physically travel around the world to enjoy our favourite cuisines this month, why not hop through some of Bath’s mosttreasured restaurants, offering authentic renditions of our favourite cusines. If you fancy tucking in to a Thai green curry one evening, check out the Thai Balcony’s excellent array of traditional bites. The popular Chaiwalla Indian Street on Monmouth Street is a go-to for a quick taste of India. Or Chez Dominque’s modern French menu continues to be a firm local favourite, offering you the chance to feel as though you’re holidaying in le Midi. chezdominique.co.uk; thaibalcony.co.uk

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Join On 15 October, Toppings & Co will welcome the co-authors of Jerusalem and Ottolenghi: The Cookbook and Ottolenghi SIMPLE, Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley. The authors will be demonstrating and sharing stunning Palestinian-inspired dishes from their

latest book, Falastin: A Cookbook. Taking place at Toppings & Co. from 7.30pm, Sami and Tara will take you on a journey through Bethlehem, East Jerusalem, Nablus, Haifa, Akka, Nazareth, Galilee and the West Bank. The food is the perfect mix of traditional and contemporary, with recipes that have been handed down through the generations and reworked for a modern home kitchen. With stunning food and travel photography plus stories from unheard Palestinian voices, this innovative cookbook will transport you to this rich and complex land. toppingbooks.co.uk n


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Our shelves are half empty

Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

See more online thebathmag.co.uk

Contact us: Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Editor Tel: Email:

Emma Clegg 01225 424592 emma@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Assistant Editor/Web Editor Millie Bruce-Watt Email: millie@thebathmagazine.co.uk Financial Director Email:

Jane Miklos jane@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Contact the Advertising Sales team tel: 01225 424499 Advertising Sales Email:

We need silver can you help?

Liz Grey liz@thebathmagazine.co.uk

MC Publishing Ltd. is an independent publishing company and publishes The Bath Magazine and The Bristol Magazine.

The Bath Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout Bath and the surrounding area. We also have special distribution units in the following city centre stores and coffee shops

2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Telephone: 01225 424499. Fax: 01225 426677 thebathmag.co.uk Š MC Publishing Ltd 2020 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bath Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.

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The city

ist

THE BUZZ

THE BUZZ

Creating change for teens

The co-founder of Bath-based charity Jamie’s Farm is publishing a book, which documents her 30-year career working with vulnerable teenagers. Tish Feilden co-founded the charity with her son, Jamie, in 2009, to support young people who are struggling at home or school. After securing their first residential farm in Box in 2010, the charity has grown to run five farms nationwide and supports thousands of young people around the country. Tish’s book titled Creating Change for Vulnerable Teens showcases how the farms help young people to thrive academically, socially and emotionally. Publishing on 21 October; jamiesfarm.org.uk

Reduce carbon emissions

My BATH

As lead organiser of TedxBath, Rhodora Baguilat has dedicated her time to connecting communities in Bath and beyond, sharing ideas and helping create equal opportunities for all I have lived in Bath for more than 10 years. In 2009 I became involved with Bath City Church, and moved to Bath from Chippenham. I felt the community ‘adopted’ me, and I adopted Bath as my home. I was born in the Philippines, came to Britain in 2004, and have now settled in the UK and Bath is now my home. What I find really special about Bath is the diversity. While Bath is a city, there is a real sense of community which is not lost within it. As a key worker in the NHS, I have been at the forefront of the whole Covid-19 care strategy. It has given me a unique perspective on how Covid has affected all kinds of people. The view of Pulteney Bridge and the river is my most favourite part of Bath. It is beautiful and the area opens up the iconic views, where you see many different connections across the architectural landscape. The most important qualities that underpin my philosophy are empathy, compassion and inclusivity. “Embrace everyone whatever their status, history and circumstance.”

Are you part of a community organisation that wants to shrink its carbon footprint or address the issues of fuel poverty and climate change? Or, as people work together to recover from the Covid-19 crisis, will your project increase the resilience of communities in a way that reduces carbon emissions? If so, you could apply for up to £5,000 through the Bath and West Community Energy Fund (BWCE Fund) grant programme. Award-winning BWCE was set up in 2010 to own and develop renewable energy projects and has since become one of the largest communityowned energy companies in the UK. Applications for grants of up to £5,000 are invited before 2 November. quartetcf.org.uk/grant-programmes

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As a community nurse, I have the privilege of visiting patients in their own home environment, which keeps me busy outside of TEDxBath. I am fortunate to usually practise during daytime hours, which means I can pursue TEDxBath commitments as others might pursue a favourite pastime. Organising TEDxBath in my spare time offers so much variety in terms of meeting people across all walks of life, from across the world, together with the expertise and specialisms individuals bring to the event. I helped run All Nations Bath, an international organisation which offered lessons in English, in addition to hosting social gatherings and small events. Meeting a friend and fellow TEDx event host inspired me to consider bringing the TEDx brand to Bath, which was a natural progression and offered skill transference to create something special for the city. Seeking new ideas and innovations is a key driving factor which I most enjoy, bringing

people together under the umbrella of TED, and the ethos of sharing ideas to create conversations from grass roots upwards. We operate an open invitation process where anyone can apply to speak, while also considering recommendations for individuals who we invite to apply. The curation process is key to creating a broad and balanced speaker programme, which offers diversity of themes, ideas and demographic. It is important to seek ideas, and the ability to present them in a comprehensive way, which enables an audience to reflect on the aspects which can empower knowledge and bring about change. TEDx events at a local level offer the opportunity to explore and examine ideas within the community, at all levels, which could expose something relevant to Bath, and create opportunities across the board. Our Speaker Programme promises to bring a fresh and diverse lineup, which offers a range of talks based on community experience embracing our theme ‘Inter-connected’. In the light of Covid-19, which has impacted all cultural activities across the UK, TEDxBath has had to face the challenges this has brought to organising the event. We are currently evaluating the position for a live or virtual event. The virtual aspect would incorporate audience participation. One of the most viewed TED Talks is by Sir Ken Robinson, who has sadly passed away. His passion to create change within the education sector to ensure creativity was at its heart has resonated with so many people, and will do for years to come. TEDxBath looks to see how our curated talks impact the city through action across time. We see our events as seed planting for small achievable change in the local community over a few years. TED also conducts an official anonymous audience survey, which we use to help us to move forwards. TEDxBath viewing figures have reached 150,000 viewers. We were delighted for our second event in 2019 – Echoes of the City to live stream our ideas to Japan. ■ tedxbath.co.uk


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CITY | NOTEBOOK

Richard Wyatt: Notes on a small city Columnist Richard Wyatt reflects on our new reality as a bespectacled member of society – and finds much-needed joy in what is now our everyday. Illustration by Brian Duggan

P

unch the word ‘masks’ into Google’s search engine and at the top of the listings that appear on my screen is a link to the World Health Organisation and guidance on when and how to use masks. There are also some helpful videos on how to wear them – even a step-by-step guide on making your own – but none of the people modelling these fabric or medical protective necessities are wearing glasses. Thereby hangs the problem. One l think l share with many spectacle wearers. Despite all the tips about smearing washing up liquid on your lenses or putting folded loo roll tissue into the top of the mask – once I fasten the device to my face I cannot stop my glasses from steaming up. It’s usually worse when I’ve done my shopping and approach the

I am getting stressed and the fogging in front of my eyes is reaching pea-soup proportions.

supermarket check-out to tap my debit card on their electronic machine. I am getting stressed and the fogging in front of my eyes is reaching pea-soup proportions. I have to politely feign ignorance when helpful supermarket staff suggest l check myself out with a ‘scan and go’ machine l could carry with me around the store. I just wouldn’t be able to see the screen to benefit from this latest example of self-service. You can imagine the feeling of relief when l finally find the exit. I should be humming the words to Johnny Nash’s 1972 number one hit I can see clearly now. Yes – once l am out in the fresh air – it’s going to be a bright, bright sun-shiney day. I have a collection of face coverings that almost rivals my collection of hotel-stamped free biros – and yes, some have wire you can bend around the nose, but none of them as yet have cleared the mist that forms in front of my eyes. Maybe – if, God forbid – this goes on for very much longer – lens manufacturers will come up with optics that stay clear whatever the temperature. While we are on the subject, isn’t it interesting how masking up makes us realise how we have always read people by their faces. Now, we cannot see – in conversation with our fellow masked homo sapiens – whether the corners of their mouths are turning up or down. That ‘pleased to see you’ smile with which friends or family members usually greet us is hidden from view. We are left with the eyes as emotional guidance but – apart from a wink – is it enough to read a person’s expression? Human interaction has gone haywire. Now masks are quite literally a must-have accessory I suppose the problem can be relieved by buying one that has a smile on the front. Or there’s another that has ‘I am actually smiling’ printed on it! Some manufacturers have gone much further. You can print your own face on to the material or that of an animal – even a vampire.

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Put your own logo onto it or, like members of Her Majesty’s government, just wear a plain black one with a subtle Union Flag in the corner. Online, you can select the most outrageous coverings. I turned up everything from a very realistic cabbage leaf to the teeth-gritting bottom half of the Incredible Hulk. Like the emotional emoji’s we have got used to seeing on emails, Tweets and What’s App – the mask has taken on the job of conveying how the wearer feels beneath it. Here’s the thing. This simple protective device has also been transformed by the fashion industry. In fact, this year’s Paris Fashion Week elevated them to the heady heights of haute couture. Material-wise they are promoted as a coordinating accessory and come in every brand from Liberty to Burberry – though l am told gingham, tie-dye and floral styles top the popular prints in the UK. There’s even a matching pair with Bride and Groom written on them. I know Covid-19 is NOT a laughing matter but I can see how people crave humour in any small way they can to help them through this nightmare. A look that raises a smile – even if you cannot see it. PS. Damn. The facial recognition device on my smart phone won’t work while l am masked. n Richard Wyatt runs the Bath Newseum: bathnewseum.com


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ANNIVERSARY

We’re gonna celebrate

It’s a year to remember – but can you identify it? Emma Clegg goes back in time to when Jimmy Carter was awarded the Nobel Prize, wedge flipflops were in, and Bath City were beaten by Yeovil Town

C

an you guess the month and year? Michael Schumacher won the season ending the Japanese F1 Grand Prix for his record 11th victory of the year. England opened their Euro 2004 qualifying series with a 2–1 win over Slovakia in Bratislava, with David Beckham and Michael Owen scoring. Former cricketer Imran Khan was elected to the Pakistani Parliament after winning the seat of Mianwali-I. The European Union announced ten new members, including Poland, Hungary, Slovenia and Cyprus. President George Bush argued for action against Iraq in a national address, outlining the threat posed by Saddam Hussein. North Korea admitted to developing nuclear arms in defiance of an international treaty. Former United States President Jimmy Carter was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Here are some other clues. Givenchy for Homme cologne was launched along with Glow by JLo. Robbie Williams signed a new six-album deal with EMI for £80 million, the most lucrative contract ever signed by a UK musician. Britain was buffeted by 100mph winds in the worst gales since 1987, itself the most severe storm in 200 years. British Digital terrestrial television (DTT) service Freeview began transmitting in parts of the UK, and London Weekend Television closed forever. Closer to home Bath City’s worst fears of an opportunity missed came at the end of

October at Huish Park as they were beaten by three goals to one by Yeovil Town in their FA Cup 4th qualifying replay. Oh yes, and the people of Bath read the first issue of The Bath Magazine. It was October 2002. So take yourself back and imagine listening on your MP3 Player – the first iPod with Windows compatibility and a touch-sensitive wheel – to the strains of Complicated by Avril Lavigne, There by the Grace of God by Manic Street Preachers, or Dilemma by Nelly with Kelly Rowland (“No matter what I do, all I think about is you”), all top ten singles that month, with Dilemma becoming one of the bestselling singles of all time. Rewind 18 years as you peruse recently published books such as The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold, The Life of Pi by Yann Martel, Sahara by Michael Palin and Forever Summer by Nigella Lawson. Visualise calling a friend with your Nokia 6610 – a top-selling mobile phone that year with downloadable polyphonic and monophonic ringtones and Xpress-on covers – as you take a sip of your Coca-Cola Vanilla, perhaps suggesting to them a shopping trip to find the latest velour tracksuit with matching zip hoody and some statement platform flipflops. Or maybe a visit to the cinema to see Ken Loach’s Sweet Sixteen with a (very fresh-faced) Martin Compston (Line of Duty as yet undreamed of) as a teenager with a troubled background; Red Dragon, with Anthony Hopkins reprising his role as Dr Hannibal Lecter; or Possession, the mystery drama based on AS Byatt’s novel starring Gwyneth Paltrow and Aaron Eckhart, the latter showing at the Bath Film Festival. On the tech front, the new Apple wonder was the iMac G4 with a thin flat panel display floating upon a cantilevered, fully

poseable metal arm and a hemispherical base, cramming a full computer, drives, and power supply under a 10.6-inch diameter dome. It even incorporated a small, quiet fan that sucked in cooling air from the bottom. A range of Bluetooth earpieces were launched from Jabra, Motorola, Nokia Plantronics and Sony Ericsson, allowing those who invested to walk around like secret service agents. PC games saw the arrival of The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind, with fantastic vistas and a depth of content still remembered as astounding, and the issue an absolute classic. The Sims Unleashed had also launched that year, allowing Sims families to introduce pets and an expanded neighbourhood with parks, pet stores and markets to explore. Woo-hoo! On TV, depending on your tastes, you may have been following Foyle’s War, Footballers’ Wives, The Forsyte Saga (with Damian Lewis, Gina McKee and Rupert Graves), or The Osbournes (with the Osbournes), which all launched that year. There was also a TV movie documentary in October charting the rise, fall and rise again of DJ Tony Blackburn who had been announced as the first-ever winner of I'm A Celebrity in the previous month. If you were young and on the fashion pulse with a crotch-skimming corset and low-slung jeans with no back pockets, you may not have seen Liza Goddard in the sellout tour of Alan Bennett’s Single Spies at Theatre Royal Bath – silk cargo pants and a pashmina scarf may have been more likely.

ABOVE: Dilemma and The Life of Pi LEFT, from left: the iMac G4 with its cantilevered metal arm; the Nokia 6610 mobile phone; and the 2002 MP3 Player, with its touch-sensitive wheel OPPOSITE RIGHT: Sweet Sixteen with Martin Compston; and The Forsyte Saga with Damian Lewis, Rupert Graves and Gina McKee OPPOSITE FAR RIGHT, from top: Christian Dior by John Galliano Spring Summer 2002 printed corset; Christian Dior by John Galliano jeans Autumn Winter 2002; Pointed Pump 2002, Gucci by Tom Ford 18 TheBATHMagazine

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This production was followed by Richard Briers as Prospero in The Tempest before it appeared in the West End (think sequinned top for her and Rockport boots and a dress shirt for him). Another theatrical option was Heretic at the Rondo where a woman fills a tank with tears to repent for her misdemeanours (opt for an olive green fatigue jacket, beret, and a T-shirt with a red star in homage to Che Guevara). The Bath Magazine readers could also buy tickets for The Mozart Festival taking place the following month, with performances at the Abbey, Assembly Rooms and the Guildhall, and listen to a concert by pianist Rolf Hind at the Michael Tippett Centre at Bath Spa University College. In dramatic contrast, Houdini the Musical was soon to show at the Kingswood Theatre in Lansdown performed by the Bath Operatic and Dramatic Society. There was also the opportunity to book for the year’s pantomime, Robin Hood and Babes in the Wood, with the always-there-at-Christmas Jon Monie as a wily robber. On the arts scene you might have been preparing for a weekend trip to the V&A’s major retrospective of the work of fashion designer Gianni Versace, which featured the most comprehensive collection of originals ever exhibited from the Versace archives, or to Spotlight on Euan Uglow at The Hayward Gallery, which then toured to The Black Swan Guild in Frome in 2003. At the Holburne was the exhibition Treasures from the West of England, with works of art from 50 private collections, and at Victoria Art Gallery was Ben Hartley – a retrospective, showing the work of the post war painter who had died two years before. Another highlight was the work of Philip Davies on show at Six Chapel Row Gallery, with his painting Aperitif forever memorialised on The Bath Magazine’s first front cover. October provided plenty of fun for families during half term including the Wacky Festival of Theatre at Theatre Royal

with a concluding orchestral performance of Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf and SaintSaen’s Carnival of the Animals. There was also glassmaking for children at Bath Aqua Theatre of Glass and some spooky stories told in Prior Park Landscape Garden for Halloween. Many congratulations to those businesses who appeared in our first issue and are still going strong today, including Rossiters, Mandarin Stone, Cooper’s Electrical, Yum Yum Thai, The Francis Hotel, Las Iguanas, Aquaesulis Dental Practice in Lower Weston, Dr Philip Pettemerides’ dental practice in George Street and Juice Recruitment. Also Savills, whose property offering that month included a fivebedroom semi-detached Regency town house in Macaulay Buildings, Widcombe for £775,000 – properties in this area are now valued around the £1,500,000 mark. The editorial in the first 32-page issue was eclectic, including a piece on collecting tea caddies by Duncan Chilcott of Bonhams Bath, and one on the ancient art of fencing by Reginald Channon of the Bath Sword Club, which met every Thursday evening at Kingswood School. There was also a history of crime and punishment in Bath by Kirsten Elliott, uncovering some dark shadows in the city’s history, and a health and beauty review of a Detox for the Skin treatment at The Health and Beauty Centre in Queen Street. The Tramshed regeneration project on Walcot Street was reviewed, a building that once housed the city’s trams and a site where Roman mosaics were discovered before the development started. The shell of the red-brick building was left intact, while the interior was ‘scooped out’ in a major engineering feat. The central atrium was framed by a series of lofty red brick arches, creating an aquaduct effect in subtle homage to the site’s Roman heritage. The finished development included residential accommodation, retail space, a large restaurant (now Neptune store) and craft workshops, hoped to be a new vibrant work hub for independent crafts practitioners. In the intervening years our magazine has changed in character, design, content and pagination, but the common denominator is that it has always striven to be relevant, informative and thought-provoking. We hold that thought always. So, 214 issues later, it’s now our 18th birthday and we’re celebrating each and every year. Cat’s eye, the stone for an 18th anniversary, is a gemstone polished into a cabochon that displays a narrow band of concentrated light going across the width of the stone. This effect is known as chatoyancy, or cat's eye effect. We feel the cat’s eye phenomenon sums up our role in Bath – we aim to light the way, look forward (as well as checking in the back mirror), give focus, make connections and take our city readers on a noteworthy ride. We hope you’ll continue the journey with us. Meanwhile turn the page for a summary of those 18 years... n

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ANNIVERSARY

Eighteen years of The Bath Magazine

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

• Loraine Morgan Brinkhurst becomes Mayor of Bath. • The Queen and Prince Philip come to Bath in May as part of their visit to the west country for a tour of the Roman Baths, the Pump Room, the Guildhall and the Abbey. • The first issue of The Bath Magazine is published.

• The Three Tenors sing at a concert in Royal Victoria Park in August to mark the opening of the Thermae Bath Spa, although the spa didn’t open for another three years. • 2003-2004 – Bath Rugby tops the Zürich Premiership (now the Aviva Premiership).

• Bath’s architecture is used as the scenic backdrop of the film of Thackeray's Vanity Fair. • The 10th Bath Literature Festival takes place on dates in February and March.

• Bath Spa University gains full university status in March, becoming the second university in the city. • The Egg theatre opens in October. • Michael Tippett and William Glock direct their final Bath International Music Festival.

• The Thermae Bath Spa opens in August. The project received £7.78 million of Lottery funding, but the final cost far exceeded this. • Plans for a new £21 million Student Village at the University of Bath are approved.

2007

2008

• Milsom Place opens in February – the shopping area was previously called Shire’s Yard. • The first Bath Festival of Children’s Literature launches in September. • The old Southgate shopping centre is demolished. • Work starts to pump the 18th-century stone mines used to build the city of Bath full of concrete to stop them collapsing.

• Bath is used as a location for the film The Duchess, starring Keira Knightley. • The Beau Street Hoard is discovered on the site of what was to be the Gainsborough Hotel and Thermal Spa. • 104 decorated pigs are displayed around the city in a public art event. • Komedia opens in November. • Bath Rugby wins the European Challenge Cup.

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2009

2010

• Bath bus station opens in June, after two years of work. • The first phase of SouthGate shopping centre opens. • Woolworths in Moorland Road closes when the national chain goes bust. The store had been on Moorland Road since 1956. • The Bath Magazine is one of the UK’s first city magazines to adopt a digital ‘flippable read’ for free on the zmags platform.

• Bath City gains promotion to the Conference Premier. • 100 lion sculptures are displayed all over the city and are then auctioned. • The Abbey’s Footprint project launches, to repair the historic floor, create new spaces, install a new heating system, and create a Discovery Centre. • Theatre Royal Bath is closed for refurbishment. • Our website: thebathmagazine.co.uk is launched.


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ANNIVERSARY

2014

2015

• Plans are revealed by Bath Rugby for a new stadium, to provide a world-class arena. • The floor of the 500-yearold abbey building is collapsing, and huge voids are discovered beneath where graves have settled. • The Destructor Bridge in Midland Road closes in April for regeneration work.

• Primark opens in Bath. • Bath’s world famous Moles nightclub goes up in flames on a Saturday morning in March. • Jolly’s department store has a £4 million refurbishment. • The Museum of East Asian Art celebrates 20 years since its opening and undertakes its first oral history project.

• Don Foster announces he is stepping down as MP for Bath ahead of the 2015 General Election after 23 years. • Ben Howlett becomes Bath’s MP. • The Gainsborough Bath Spa opens in September, the first and only hotel in the UK to offer its visitors access to natural thermal waters.

2017

2018

2019

2020

• Wera Hobhouse becomes Bath’s MP. • The East Baths area of the Roman Baths, adjacent to the famous Great Bath, are updated in early 2017, with new interactive displays. • The city of Bath World Heritage Site turns 30. • The Archway Project receives Lottery funding to deliver a World Heritage Centre for Bath. • The Royal Crescent celebrates its 250th anniversary.

• Following on from the pigs and the lions, Minerva's Owls arrive in Bath, with profits donated to charities including the new RUH Cancer Centre and the Roman Baths Archway Project. • The Bath Half Marathon is cancelled due to freezing conditions. • A blue plaque dedicated to Mary Shelley, author of Frankenstein, is unveiled by Sir Christopher Frayling – it was first proposed in 1973!

• The online Community Radio Station BA1 Radio launches. • The Royal National Hospital of Rheumatic Diseases, known as The Min, closes, with the RNHRD moving to a new location at the Royal United Hospital. • The Bath Festival celebrates 70 years. • Elizabeth Park at Bath Riverside opens in July. • Bath and North East Somerset Council offers discounted parking permits in the city centre for zero emissions vehicles.

• The city plans to introduce a Clean Air Zone by the end of the year. • Covid-19 and lockdown hits the city and The Bath Magazine documents the haunting, silent streets with a film. • Our summertime edition was a special moment of publishing. Over 30 of the city’s brightest minds helped us to document the effect the pandemic had on life in Bath and ways we might rethink the future.

2011

2012

• Construction of the Bath Western Riverside residential development on the former Stothert & Pitt crane factory site begins. • The University of Bath is named University of the Year by The Sunday Times. • The Holburne Museum’s new extension opens. • The city population recorded by the census is 88,859.

• The Olympic Torch comes through Bath carried by Eleanore Regan, who is pregnant, just hours before her due date. • The Bath Riverside project’s landscaped riverside area is completed. • The Theatre Royal Bath announces its first summer season.

2016 • A 400-tonne replacement Destructor Bridge is installed at the third attempt in August, opening to pedestrians in December. • Hundreds of homes are evacuated in the Lansdown area of Bath in May, after an unexploded WW2 bomb is discovered during redevelopment work at the former Royal High Junior School. • In April, archaeologists begin digging up two hidden Roman baths which had never been fully excavated and recorded underneath York Street and Swallow Street.

2013

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ANNIVERSARY

Property values: 2002–2020 We looked back to our first issue in 2002, and found a page with four properties on sale that October. We asked Savills to find four equivalent properties on the market now. Not unexpectedly there’s a marked difference in the asking prices... 2002 properties from issue 1 of TBM 23 Queen Square Guide price £3,500,000 An iconic townhouse, 23 Queen Square is a handsome Grade I listed property in one of Bath’s most iconic squares. The accommodation, arranged over five floors, is both contemporary and elegant in design. Offering good access to outside space in a central location, the property enjoys a unique roof terrace and landscaped gardens as well as a detached coach house.

10 Marlborough Lane Guide price: £1,600,000 A beautifully presented three-story family home in a sought-after central location, just below Royal Victoria Park. Number 10 Marlborough Lane is an attractive Victorian property and combines modern living with character features. As well as a generous living space the property enjoys a rear terrace and garden which offer good access to outside space and a wonderful place to entertain during the summer.

Belvoir Lodge Guide price: £1,150,000 A detached family home, Belvoir Lodge has been significantly extended and remodelled to offer a well-presented family home with versatile living accommodation arranged over three floors. Set in a popular residential area of Bath, close to Bear Flat, the property benefits from off-street parking and enjoys a terraced rear garden.

35 Henrietta Street Guide price: £1,750,000 Situated in central Bath, 35 Henrietta Street is an elegant five bedroom townhouse with origins dating back to 1793-1800. Recently restored, the property is beautifully presented and enjoys a two-storey glass-fronted stone extension as well as an excellent size garden that enjoys a sun terrace and Bath stone walls. The property also benefits from a self-contained apartment which offers income potential. savills.co.uk

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TAKE 5

Take

5

independent shops

Our second series of Take Five puts the spotlight on five of Bath’s independent shops, celebrating the big contribution they make to the city’s economy and to the lives of those who live here

The Silver Shop

Kimberly

This little gem of a shop continues to be one of Bath’s favourite gift and jewellery stores and has been a family-run and independent business for 65 years. You’ll find it tucked away in Union Passage, close to Bath Abbey and the Roman Baths. The shop is a firm favourite with visitors and residents alike and has a reputation for great customer service. Holding Bath’s largest selection of silver jewellery with prices ranging from £5 to £500, the staff work hard to source a wide selection of pieces with some ranges, such as their best-selling Daisy Collection of jewellery, handmade by local jewellers. The shop forms two parts, the jewellery room, consisting mainly of silver jewellery, and the gift area in the front area of the shop offering a teeming variety of gift ideas or treats. The owners put all their efforts into ensuring that the shop retains its traditional feel and offer a friendly, warm and professional service. With a small workshop on site, The Silver Shop offers a charm soldering service for customers, as well as alterations and repairs. Make this your first stop if you’re looking for a gift for someone special or just to treat yourself to something, such as a clock or a candle, a christening gift or even a Charlie bear. The Silver Shop is open 9.30am-5pm, Monday to Saturday.

Kimberly in Trim Street, Bath, has stocked some of the world’s finest designers for over 37 years. The shop has established itself as a must-go-to store for everyday wear or for that special occasion. Current designers include Amina Rubinacci, Max Mara Studio, Max Mara Leisure, Boutique Moschino, Fabiana Outfit from the Filippi, Schneiders and Fabiana Filippi many more. collection Kimberly is known for her series of professionally choreographed in-house fashion shows in the store at the beginning of each season – and while these are currently on hold to enable social distancing, her loyal customers continue to visit this glorious hideaway store, exploring the rails and their clusters of rich garments in search of an outfit or single piece that will become a flexible and stylish ally for years to come. The Italian brand Fabiana Filippi is described as “proposing an elegance far from uniformity; a sense of timeless beauty meant to be interpreted through the wearer’s personality.” This description is a resonant summary of the Kimberly philosophy, too – classic and unforgettable. Kimberly selects her stock from designer showrooms, and has an unwavering instinct for the styles and garments her clients will love, but she hasn’t lost her joie de vivre for her design brands and for keeping her customers looking their very best. “The Italians are into sparkle at the minute. So am I! Girls like sparkle!”, she says. So for elegance, timeless beauty and a subtle sparkle, you know where to go. Kimberly is open 10am–5.50pm, Monday to Saturday.

25 Union Passage, Bath BA1 1RD Tel: 01225 464781; thesilvershopofbath.co.uk

Trim Street, Bath BA1 1HB Tel: 01225 466817; kimberly.co.uk Triple Daisy Necklace, £37

5 great quotes from our indie shops 1 “We stock and import our teas from all over the world and we know our suppliers in person.”

2

3

4

5

“I select all our garments personally and I choose them knowing that they will suit the loyal market who have supported us for so many years.”

“Our best-selling Daisy Collection is made by a local jeweller – many of our makers are from the region and we take pride in supporting local talent.”

“Whether it’s a piece of fine jewellery, a watch or a simple repair we endeavour to make your memories last forever.”

”Our ice dresses are made with ice-dyed fabric, which is dyed in the designer’s back garden – it’s better to do this on cold days because the ice takes more time to melt.”

The Silver Shop

Mallory

Up To Seven

The Teahouse Emporium

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TAKE 5

Teahouse Emporium When did you last make a cup of tea using loose-leaf tea? The Teahouse Emporium founders and owners Tim and Lenka Stoneham are on a mission to show that loose-leaf tea offers much more than a conventional teabag. Unfortunately, most of the tea bags on the market are made from a mix of paper and plastic and are filled with tea dust or small broken particles of tea leaf called fannings. They believe that loose leaf tea is better value and better for the environment. The Teahouse Emporium offers a wide selection of a different types of tea ranging from black teas, green teas and oolong teas to flavoured and decaffeinated teas, as well as naturally caffeinefree Rooibos, fruit and herbal infusions. You can buy a filter teapot here, but the easiest option for a single cup is an £8.90 stainless steel infuser. I tried it with the Earl Grey Imperial and was amazed by the delicate flavour that performed above and beyond my standard teabag. And while the packet price for this tea is £5.20 per 100g it will make up to 50 cups of tea! Their bestselling tea is the single estate Indian Assam Mangalam, a rich and malty tea. The perfect British brew! They also stock a variety of their own-brand handmade artisan hot chocolate including Dark, Chai, Orange, White, Strawberry and Vegan. For coffee lovers there is a choice of single origin and flavoured coffees of which the most popular are the Organic Peruvian and the Belgian Praline. Open from Monday to Saturday, check the opening times on their website.

22a New Bond Street, Bath BA1 1BA Tel: 01225 334402; teahouseemporium.co.uk

Platinum Tanzanite, Aquamarine and Diamond Halo Cluster Ring, £6,750

Mallory Mallory’s history began in 1898 when Edward Palmer Mallory took over Routley, the jewellers at No. 1 Bridge Street in Bath. Edward and his wife ran the company that would soon forge a reputation as Bath’s premier jeweller. Now in its fifth generation, Mallory is one of the country’s oldest family-owned and run jewellers. Today it boasts one of the largest in-house workshops in the UK, employing designer goldsmiths trained to the highest calibre, who create the most exquisite bespoke-made jewellery, as well as two fully accredited watchmakers and a technician, who are qualified to maintain the finest of timepieces. Inside the showroom you will find a majestic emporium of fine and contemporary jewellery, watches, and luxury gifts and accessories from the world’s most exclusive brands. The imposing frontage may look daunting, yet Mallory’s offerings encompass something to suit all pockets, with international names such as Patek Philippe, Rolex, IWC, Fabergé, Pomellato, Chopard, Montblanc, Tag Heuer, Longchamp, Longines, Breitling, JaegerLeCoultre, Georg Jensen, Fope and Mikimoto, and an extensive collection of jewellery designed by Mallory. Open 9.30am–5.15pm Monday to Friday and 9.30am–5.30pm Saturday.

1–5 Bridge Street, Bath BA2 4AP Tel: 01225 788800; mallory-jewellers.com

Up To Seven

Ice-dyed dress, from 18 months to 7, £39–£50

Have you found this beautiful shop on Pulteney Bridge yet? Many of the clothes and accessories sold here – suiting ages up to seven – are designed and handmade in their studio workshop, and cannot be found elsewhere. Up To Seven offers a variety of dresses, reversible dungarees, hand-knitted woollies and the store’s famous and incredibly cute hats; take your pick from strawberry, Christmas pudding and a new dinosaur. The handmade crafts ethic runs very strong, with artists creating fabrics and making them up into garments and accessories including dresses, trousers and bags. The ice-dyed dress shown here is a wonderful example – the fabric is dyed in the designer’s back garden, using cold dye and plenty of ice, and because the textile is a oneoff, every dress or bag is a unique piece.

The longer the ice takes to melt, the better the effect, owner and knitwear designer Mary Dawson tells me. To complement Up To Seven’s own ranges, the shop is also a major stockist of Frugi, Kite and Toby Tiger, organic cotton, fairly traded clothes for babies and children and has plenty of of appliqued T-shirts, dresses, hats and baby gifts and dinosaurs. If you haven’t been in, or if you are looking for a baby gift, a frock for a special occasion or comfy clothes for everyday then pop in to find the perfect solution. Up To Seven is open 10am to 4pm Monday to Saturday, and Sunday 10.30am to 4pm. n

6 Pulteney Bridge, Bath BA2 4AX Tel: 01225 422333; uptoseven.co.uk

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WHAT’S ON in October Bath Theatre School shown in their Cats performance

David Attenborough’s Life On Our Planet is showing at The Little

Humm, who are performing at Moles

ALEX WHEATLE AT THE READING IS MAGIC FESTIVAL n 1 October, 11am, via website Guardian Award-winning author Alex Wheatle brings a vital part of British and Jamaican history vividly to life in his latest novel Cane Warriors, which follows the truelife slave rebellion known as Tacky’s War in 18th-century Jamaica. readingismagicfestival.com TANYA’S HOME CLEARING CLUB n 1 October and 28 October, via website Tanya’s Home Clearing Club, run by The Girl Who Simplified, is 49 days of gentle guided support as part of a group of ambitious and driven female business owners, all ready to clear the excess ‘stuff’ in their homes to create more space within themselves. Tanya’s clients have found that they are able to reclaim their identities, gain clarity, grow in confidence and set boundaries in work, family life and relationships as they clear their houses. The programme costs £250; thegirlwhosimplified.com BATH THEATRE SCHOOL n Throughout October, term time Saturdays, Oldfield Baptist Church Bath Theatre School is inviting dramaenthusiasts aged 6–18 years to join the multi-award winning Bath Theatre School for a free taster with action-packed lessons in singing, dance and drama. Participants will learn a range of performing skills while working towards nationally recognised exams in musical theatre. baththeatreschool.com SIT-IN SESSIONS AT MOLES n Throughout October, 14 George Street This month, Moles will be hosting a wide 26 TheBATHMagazine

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FILM SCREENINGS n Throughout October, The Little Theatre Cinema This month, The Little welcomes Kenneth Branagh’s highly anticipated adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Death on the Nile. David Attenorough: Life On Our Planet will feature on 1 October, followed by the stunning ballet Matthew Bourne’s The Red Shoes on 4 October. Phyllida Lloyd’s Herself is set to appear on the big screen on 8 October and Bolshoi Ballet: Romeo and Juliet on 11 October. I am Greta, plus an exclusive Q&A is one not to miss on 18 October. A film about the life and work of Mexican-German painter Frida Kahlo will appear on 22 October, and just in time for Halloween, Hithcock’s The Birds is set to terrify audiences on 25 October.

range of socially distanced seated events. Hosting bands such as Beefywink + Fraulein, Humm, Medway and Ben Hutcheson, audiences can enjoy the buzz of live music in a safe and secure environment once again. Prices are from £3 to £6 and can only be bought in groups of 2, 3, 4 and 6. Book in advance. moles.co.uk

England, inviting foodies nationwide to discover the best of Britain’s finest produce and buy direct from makers. wellsfoodfestival.bighams.com

CALM ABIDING MEDITATION n From 6 October, Museum of Bath at Work The Bath Sakya Buddhist Group, run by students of Lama Jampa Thaye, will open its doors again on 6 October, 8pm, at the Museum of Bath at Work, welcoming anyone new to, interested in, or familiar with meditation and Buddhism. As the venue is a big space they are able to distance physically but be socially together. sakyabristol.org/bath

BIGHAM’S BANQUET n 10 October, 6–9pm, via website At the heart of the Wells Food Festival’s food programme is the Bigham’s Banquet – a live streamed ‘cook-along’ where ticket-holders can cook alongside top chefs Thomasina Miers, Henry Harris and Merlin LabronJohnson, as well as Bigham’s head chef Rupert Willday. Hosted by food critic William Sitwell and Charlie Bigham himself. Limited to 1,000 places. £20, with all proceeds going to Chefs in Schools. At home festivalgoers can also sign up to cookery masterclasses and flower arranging workshops. wellsfoodfestival.bighams.com

CHARLIE BIGHAM’S WELLS FOOD FESTIVAL n 10 and 11 October, via website Charlie Bigham’s is collaborating with Wells Food Festival to host a unique virtual food event, giving artisan food producers from the South of England a platform to sell their produce online. The festival will showcase over 150 artisans from across the South of

INNOX MILLS MARKET n 18 October, 10am–4pm, Trowbridge Held on the third Sunday of each month, the Innox Market in Trowbridge offers a range of products, from handmade arts and crafts and vintage clothing to street food, fresh produce and West Country ale and cider. All against the backdrop of live music. Social distancing measures will be in place. n


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CINEMA | HIGHLIGHTS

Take two: films

After a long wait, we are beginning to see our favourite faces back on the big screen. This month, we look forward to getting lost in Kenneth Branagh’s Death on the Nile and Phyllida Lloyd’s Herself, says Millie Bruce-Watt

Death on the Nile Following on from his first appearance as Hercule Poirot in Murder on the Orient Express, which took the box office by storm in 2017, Branagh returns to don his perfectly coiffed moustache in the equally exhilarating sequel, Death on the Nile, which will appear in cinemas on 16 October. This time, the famous literary detective is enjoying a cruise in Egypt when his holiday is inconveniently interrupted by the violent death of socialite and newly wed, Linnet Ridgeway-Doyle (played by Gal Gadot), who boarded the glamorous river steamer with her besotted husband, Simon (Armie Hammer) just days prior to her tragic murder. As Branagh, who also directs for the second time in this film series, explains, “People in the grip of extreme passions do dangerous things” and, in this opulent and oppressive environment, it is the job of the esteemed sleuth to uncover the disturbing truth. Set against an epic landscape of sweeping desert vistas and the majestic Giza pyramids, the tale of passion, lust and incapacitating jealousy features a cosmopolitan group of impeccably dressed travellers and an all-star cast, including Annette Bening, Russell Brand, Ali Fazal, Emma Mackey, Jennifer Saunders, Sophie Okonedo, Dawn French and Letitia Wright. Tom Bateman returns as Poirot’s trusted friend, Bouc, and together they embark on another thrilling adventure with enough wicked twists and turns to leave audiences guessing until the final, shocking denouement.

homelessness and discrimination in a society that seems to work against her at every turn. Her love for her two daughters (Molly McCann and Ruby Rose O’Hara) and her sheer strength of will helps Sandra to enlist the help of a collection of some of society’s misfits to try to build a better life for her and her young family. With connections being made to the independent filmmaking spirit and political commentary of directors like Andrea Arnold and Ken Loach, Herself is in equal parts unsettling and uplifting. It never shies away from the horrors of life but always remembers the simple pleasures that can be found in people and things. ■

SHOWING TIMES

Herself Herself is Phyllida Lloyd’s latest in a career of highly acclaimed box office hits. In 2008, the theatre director’s big-screen debut, Mamma Mia!, stood as the highest grossing live-action musical of all time, until it was surpassed by 28 TheBATHMagazine

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Bill Condon's Beauty and the Beast. Three years later, her biographical drama, The Iron Lady, earned Meryl Streep an Oscar and, now, her latest release has been classed as a standout at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. The Irish drama set in Dublin focuses on Sandra (played by Clare Dunne), a young mother fighting against her abusive husband,

Death on the Nile Running from 14 October Herself Running from 8 October Little Theatre Cinema, St Michael’s Place; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little


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Bored to Tears DUNCAN CAMPBELL HAS BEEN DEALING IN ANTIQUE SILVER SINCE 1986

In this case quite literally

F

or obvious reasons - too boring to go into - we have seen fewer people in the shop this summer and have been shipping much more silver out to customers than we usually do. While carefully packing up items the other day, I was reminded of an incident I witnessed years ago that still makes me laugh every time I think about it. I was drinking tea in a well known West End antique shop towards the end of a slow Friday. While listening to laments about the dearth of customers, in walked a wealthy looking American collector, already known to the shop owner. After some preliminary chat, the American gentleman was drawn to a set of six 17th century Venitian wine glasses. As they had been in stock for some considerable time, a price was eagerly agreed, the glasses were paid for and instructions were left for them to be shipped back to the US. As the customer left, the gloomy mood in the shop lifted and Friday drinks were served as a member of staff began to pack the glasses. As she reached into the display cabinet to pick up the last glass, she fumbled and dropped it, breaking it into five pieces. The shop went silent and the high spirits evaporated instantly. Scarlet faced, the assistant sought advice from the owner. To his great shame, the order was given to pack the glasses anyway and blame the shippers for the damage. A few days later the phone rang and the American collector asked to speak to the owner. The collector reported his disappointment that the glass had broken so the owner of the shop feigned anger, sympathised and promised to make an insurance claim. This however, did not satisfy the collector’s complaint, in fact he became rather irritated with the dealer. The gentle American queried the dealer’s excuse. “If the shippers broke the glass as you say, why then would they wrap each of the 5 broken pieces separately in your branded tissue paper?” The end of a fruitful relationship, nobody likes being lied to. n beaunashbath.com; 01225 334234

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THEATRE

The Theatre Royal Bath’s Welcome Back season “The weeks leading up to reopening have been very intense, but we’ve made it, and the three plays on the opening programme are all plays that I absolutely love” DANNY MOAR

Harold Pinter’s Betrayal (14–31 October) In a nutshell: Intense exploration of issues around secrets, lies, deceit, trust and, of course, betrayal within a long-term relationship, said to be inspired by Pinter's 7-year extramarital affair with TV presenter Joan Bakewell and told in reverse chronological order. Starring Olivier Award winner Nancy Carroll, Joseph Millson, Edward Bennett and Christopher Bianchi.

Michael Frayn’s Copenhagen (4–21 November) In a nutshell: Fictional account of a real life WWII meeting between physicists Werner Heisenberg, Niels Bohr and Bohr’s wife Margrethe, who meet again after their deaths to discuss the ramifications of harnessing nuclear power to create an atomic bomb. Starring Haydn Gwynne, Michael Gould and Philip Arditti.

The 1994 film of Oleanna was directed by David Mamet and starred William H. Macy and Debra Eisenstadt

Danny Moar: “We’ve produced Betrayal before, back in 2003 – it was one of the first plays that Peter Hall directed for us. It’s fabulous because it’s got all of Pinter's traditional terseness, and all the famous Pinter pauses, and all the technical pyrotechnics. But it also incredibly moving, much more so than you’d expect from most Pinter plays.”

Danny Moar: “Copenhagen was one of the first plays that showed how silence on stage could be interesting and dramatic.”

David Mamet’s Oleanna (25 November–12 December) In a nutshell: Richly provocative, immensely affecting power struggle between a male university professor and a female student whose accusation of sexual harassment threatens the professor’s tenure. Stars to be announced soon.

“We’re incredibly happy and excited to be reopening. We have a very loyal audience who I know have missed coming because they’ve told us – and we’ve missed putting on plays for them.” DANNY MOAR

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Danny Moar: “David Mamet liked the idea that we were going to be one of the first theatres in the UK to reopen and gave us the rights to a amazing play that I’ve wanted to put on in Bath for a very long time. It’s the ultimate ‘Me Too’ play, based around the story of an American academic accused of sexual harassment by one of his students. Did he, or didn’t he? Is she right... or not? It’s one of those plays where the audience’s sympathies swing between the two characters all the way along. I saw the first production at the Royal Court 30-odd years ago with David Suchet and Lia Williams and it was... well put it this way: I’ve never been in an audience like it! People were literally shouting at each other and apparently, on several occasions, fist fights almost broke out. It’s a controversial one for sure!”

For further information about the autumn programme (including full details of the theatre’s health and safety guidance) visit theatreroyal.org.uk

Paul Jesson, Patricia Hodge and Charles Edwards in Copenhagen at the Chichester Theatre in 2018

Samantha Janus and David Michaels in the Theatre Royal Bath’s 2004 production of Betrayal

Melissa Blease outlines the classic dramatisations that are ahead this autumn...


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David Ringsell

Art Prints

nick cudworth gallery

A contemporary take on classic Bath architecture A2 - £120, A3 - £90, A4 - £75

ey at the Abb Exhibition 13/12/20 hotel until

Brunel in Bath Oil on canvas-prints available

Affordable custom Giclée prints of original paintings Email: david@real-images.com • Call 01225 469127 Prints, originals & exhibitions

www.real-images.com

OCTOBER EXHIBITION 1 – 31 October

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART As we continue to crave moments of peace and serenity, we look forward to welcoming an array of enchanting art fairs and exhibitions to some of the city’s most-loved museums and galleries this month BEAUX ARTS 12–13 York Street, Bath BA1 1NG Tel: 01225 464850 Web: beauxartsbath.co.uk HELEN SIMMONDS EXHIBITION Throughout October During October Beaux Arts Bath host an eagerly anticipated exhibition by local artist Helen Simmonds. Fifty of her highly sought-after still life paintings will adorn the walls of this prestigious gallery, situated within two Georgian townhouses near the Abbey. Predominantly small and modest, Helen’s evocative, emotive paintings mainly feature home-grown seasonal flowers and items from the artist's beloved collection of ceramics, bottles and enamel vessels. Her work is the antithesis of our voracious, image-hungry, hand-held digital zeitgeist. They engender tranquillity and privacy. She is capable of re-enchanting the everyday utensil, revivifying and suspending for us the short precious lifespan of a flowering plant. Contemplating her work is to be guided from a viral, hurried world to a quiet essence. As Patrick McGuinness put it, “Less is not always more. Sometimes it is everything.” A new short film by Emmy award-winning Bathonian Michael Pitts and his son Ollie is to be released to accompany the exhibition.

Enamel Bowl with Cosmos Striped Bowl and Plate by Helen Simmonds

AMERICAN MUSEUM AND GARDENS Claverton Manor, Bath BA2 7BD Open: 10am–5pm, Tuesday–Sunday Tel: 01225 460503 Web: americanmuseum.org NIGHT AND DAY: 1930s FASHION AND PHOTOGRAPHS Until 20 December The American Museum & Gardens has launched one of its most glamourous exhibitions yet. The Night and Day exhibition was organised by the Fashion and ‘Pure Hollywood’: A floor-length Textiles Museum in London and gown featured in takes visitors on a journey through the exhibtion sumptuous city tableaux. Visitors can expect to see a range of glamorous eveningwear and floorlength gowns created in satins, velvets and crepes. As part of the opening, the museum will also host music featuring local jazz musicians, provide entertainment from The Natural Theatre Company and hand out American-style treats. As well as the museum’s special exhibition, the New American Garden, the Mount Vernon Garden, and the Garden Café (takeaway only) have also reopened for business. The museum’s main collection inside Claverton Manor will be opening in due course. 32 TheBATHMagazine

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BATH CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS’ FAIR Green Park Station, Green Park Road, Bath BA1 1JB Open: 10am–5pm Web: bcaf.co.uk AUTUMN FAIR 11 October Bath Contemporary Artists Fair is committed to bringing the best of contemporary art from the city and beyond right to the heart of Bath. On 11 October, visitors can browse the brilliant works of local artists and admire fine art, photography, sculpture and textiles, all under the vaulted glass roof of Green Park Station.


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

44AD ARTSPACE 4 Abbey Street, Bath BA1 1NN Tel: 07753378325 Web: 44ad.net THE BIG NET AND OTHER CONCERNS 13–18 October Sally Pollitzer’s exhibition of paintings, prints and stained glass include themes inspired by her visit to Japan and allotment life. Although she has always painted, before moving to Bath from her stained glass studio in Somerset, Sally concentrated on commissioned work. Her glasswork Reaching Out can be seen at the Royal United Hospital’s Spiritual Centre. A visit to Japan in 2018 greatly affected her style of painting. This can also be seen from her allotment paintings. Image: Sally Pollitzer

NICK CUDWORTH 5 London Street, Bath BA1 5BU Tel: 01225 445221 Web: nickcudworth.co.uk OCTOBER EXHIBITION Open now It is fifty years since the rusting carcass of the SS Great Britain was returned from its abandonment in a Falkland Isles swamp to its original dry dock in Bristol. Today, the magnificent restoration attracts thousands of visitors every year and stands as a glorious tribute to the great man. The Homecoming is oil on linen; 30x20 inches; prints and cards available.

ABBEY HOTEL BATH THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM Great Pulteney Street, Bath Tel: 01225 388569 Web: holburne.org GRAYSON PERRY: THE PRE-THERAPY YEARS Until January 2021 One of the Holburne’s most eagerly anticipated shows of the year, this follows a successful public appeal to source Perry’s early ceramic pieces, made between 1982 and the mid-1990s. Here are a broad range of Perry’s early works, including pieces from the artist’s own collection and works not seen publicly before. For his legions of fans, The Pre-Therapy Years will bring a new perspective to the 2003 Turner Prize-winner’s influential and inspiring outlook. Essex Plate by Grayson Perry

North Parade, Bath BA1 1LF Tel: 01225 461603 Web: abbeyhotelbath.co.uk RUH HEROES Until 1 November A new exhibition in The Abbey Hotel’s ArtBar celebrates the incredible work of the NHS staff at the Royal United Hospital. The exhibition is an opportunity to raise money for the RUH as well as a way of marking the remarkable work and sacrifice staff at the hospital have made for us on a daily basis. The exhibition includes work by many local artists including Royal photographer Joe Short; Bath’s ever-popular Peter Brown, also known as ‘Pete the Street’; architectural studies by David Ringsell; artist and printmaker James Nunn; local scenes by Jane Riley; and an image of an angel of peace by artist Rob Highton. All work will be for sale and the Abbey Hotel has agreed to donate 40 per cent of all sales – its total share of the proceeds – directly to the RUH’s Forever Friends Appeal with the remaining 60 per cent going to the artist.

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Bridge of Shadows by David Ringsell

Rhyannon Boyd, head of fundraising for the Forever Friends Appeal comments: “We have all been through such tough times recently, so it is wonderful to see our local community getting back on their feet and working through these new ways of living. This art exhibition is such a thoughtful way of acknowledging the remarkable work of the RUH staff over the past months.” ■

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Lawrences AUCTIONEERS

A LARGE PRIVATE COLLECTION OF OVER 300 BOTTLES...

RECEIVE THE BATH MAGAZINE BY POST To Be Sold in Our October Fine Art Sale

If you are thinking of selling any wine now is a good time

Interest in wine as an investment has never waned and it continues to show remarkable appeal at auction as witnessed in the last few sales at Lawrences which saw some spectacular prices especially for good quality claret. Nowadays, coverage on the internet ensures that anyone interested can easily find out about wines coming up for sale and with good cataloguing they don’t even have to visit the saleroom, which is especially useful for faraway markets. The red wines of Bordeaux have some great wines that can command huge prices but it isn’t all about France. Some Penfold wines from Australia and some Robert Mondavi wines from California also have a following and can too command high prices. Sweet wines (Tokajj) form Hungary and good Tuscans have also been great movers in recent years and one must not forget vintage port which consistently sells for good prices. Entries are invited for this sale so, if you want any help or advice or maybe just want to come along and chat about your cellar, please contact us on 01460 73041 or email enquiries@lawrences.co.uk FREE VALUATIONS AVAILABLE: If you what to find out about the value of an item in your home, feel free to contact them and a specialist will guide you through their valuation process. Online | Phone | Email | Whatsapp

lawrences.co.uk T: 01460 73041 enquiries: enquiries@lawrences.co.uk The Linen Yard, South Street, Crewkerne, Somerset TA18 8AB

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NEVER MISS OUT We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family, we offer a magazine mailing service.

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FROM JUST £30 SUBSCRIBE ONLINE AT thebathmag.co.uk/subscribe or Tel: 01225 424 499


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Jewellery After 23 years it’s the end of an Era! Beginning with a gentle wind down in October

Discounts of up to 50% off

October opening hours: Wednesdays, Fridays & Saturdays 11am - 4pm Monday, Tuesdays & Thursdays by appointment only To book a “Jewellery Lock-in” appointment with Alexandra please call 07500 868 535

23 BROCK STREET BATH BA1 2LW • WWW.ALEXANDRAMAY.COM • 01225 465 094

Ma San Auction In Bath

SPECIALISTS IN ORIENTAL WORKS OF ART A Chinese White Marble Buddhist Votive Stele – Northern Wei / Qi. SOLD £1875

A Large Chinese Jade / Hardstone Cong. SOLD £2500

A Chinese 17th Century Dehua / Blanc de Chine Porcelain Lion-Mask Censer. SOLD £3000

A Set of Eight Chinese Painted Pottery Tiles Depicting The Eight Immortals. SOLD £1875

A Chinese Han Dynasty Painted Pottery Horse & Rider with Oxford TL Test. SOLD £1200

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A Tall Chinese Neolithic Banpo Pottery Amphora with Oxford TL Test. SOLD £1625

Free valuations and home visits • Over 30 years experience • Competitive commission rates • Direct contacts in Hong Kong and China • Sales every month 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Tel: 01225 318587

www.masanauction.com THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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FASHION | AND | SUSTAINABILITY

Foraged colour

Natural dyes are sustainable by definition, derived from products sourced from our natural environment, such as leaves, bark, fungi and flowers. Linda Row has developed the concept into a collaborative project involving four textile artists and the results can soon be seen in an exhibition called Foraged Colour, says Emma Clegg

Frances Westerduin designed a twill check using natural fleece colour yarn as a contrast to the dyed yarns

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and mahonia. I started to trial leaves, barks, fungi and flowers and the collection turned into boxes and boxes of dried materials. “As a sustainable designer in 2020, I have decided to confront the issue of endless air-miles that current clothing production involves and set a challenge to limit fibre, colour and making to the UK.” The wool was sourced from British sheep and has been spun in the United Kingdom. Gill, Penny, Eve and Frances have created unique, handmade woven and non-woven textiles from the dyed wool. Linda then designed and constructed garments from the artisan textiles. The touring exhibition – with full details still to be announced – will show audiences the surprising range of materials that can be sustainably foraged to create colour using traditional dyeing practices in a modern context. Visitors will be able to experience some of the making process with touch samples of textiles and a film offering a commentary on each artist’s involvement.

I became fascinated with the colours that could be achieved [from local plants], such as marjoram, hollyhock, gunnera, beech, oak and mahonia

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hree local textile artists have collaborated on an Arts Council funded project investigating local, sustainable, and contemporary garment production. Gill Hewitt, who specialises in needlepunch textiles, and weaver Penny Wheeler, both based in Bath, and Eve Kumari from Bradford-on-Avon are textile artists who have collaborated with weaver Frances Westerduin from the North West Highlands and Linda Row who works with sustainable clothing and textile production. This project, which will culminate in a touring exhibition called Foraged Colour, is a development of Linda’s vision of fashion as a closed-loop, sustainable industry using locally grown and foraged materials for dyeing yarn and utilising local production. The project exemplifies a closed loop system – where the same materials are used over and over again to create new products for purchase – addressing the issues surrounding fast fashion and the energyrich transport system of global fashion. The exhibition will also encourage conversations on themes such as climate change, localism, embodied energy, ethical consumption and sustainability. The starting point was the creation of hand-dyed wool with natural dye colours made from locally foraged plants and fungi. Linda Row explains, “This project is a culmination of research that I have carried out, looking at the myriad of natural sources to obtain colour from, some of which are documented and others pure experimentation. “I started with Brunello’s (1973) comprehensive list of plants that he recorded from historical dye documents and I identified the ones that could be found locally. This led to a fascination with the colours that could be achieved by simply walking outside the front door, such as marjoram, hollyhock, gunnera, beech, oak

Gill Hewitt’s inspiration often comes from sources within the structures and rhythms of nature, particularly the degradation of materials over time and the transient effects of light and shadows. It was the autumnal reflections of trees in the river that influenced the colour palette for the Foraged Colour Coat shown opposite, and its texture was inspired by lichen growing on coastal rocks. “The Foraged Colour project particularly appealed to me as sustainability has always been an important part of my working practice – I keep even the smallest scraps of fabric and use them in more detailed pieces of work, and nothing is wasted. I loved learning the processes involved in making and using natural dyes,” said Gill. Weaver and artist Penny Wheeler, who works on a countermarch loom, pushes the

Eve Kumari designed her woven fabric to work alongside Linda Row’s unique pattern for the garment, which was constructed in six sections of woven panels

boundaries of weaving to explore ideas of landscape and loves to experiment with a variety of yarns and three-dimensional woven structures. Penny took her initial inspiration from the idea of foraging and its timelessness, reflected in European folk and fairy tales. For this collaboration, Penny’s initial drawn designs and Linda’s fashion drawing led to the idea of juxtaposing autumn and spring forest colours in the different panels of the dress. In total Linda dyed over 50 natural and foraged colours, and Penny had to weave two exactly matching drops of fabric. Penny explained, “The project enabled me to think much more deeply about making my practice more sustainable through my experimentation with British wools, the range of natural and foraged dyes available, and a greater awareness of waste.” Eve Kumari incorporated her extra weft technique into the project, which achieved a modern take on natural dyeing. By precisely working out the amount of yarn needed and weaving narrow strips, there was very little waste. Workshops to accompany the exhibition will offer examples of eco-dyeing and upcycling; extending the concept of foraging to include used items in charity shops. Workshops at Westonbirt Arboretum will be taking place – check for updates on the website. n The Foraged Colour exhibition will tour in 2021 (details to be announced); foragedcolour.org


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MAIN: The autumnal reflections of trees in the river influenced the colour palette for Gill Hewitt’s coat, and its texture was inspired by lichen growing on coastal rocks

LEFT, top to bottom: Penny Wheeler’s textile designs juxtaposed autumn and spring forest colours in the panels of the dress designed by Linda Row; After trialling leaves, bark, fungi and flowers, Linda hand dyed the yarn for each artist and designed garments from the textiles created by them; Eve Kumari wanted to convey a springtime mood by using a subtle, yet fresh, colour palette; Frances Westerduin wove with a British worsted yarn, blended from Blue Faced Leicester and Masham fibre spun in West Yorkshire, achieving a soft and lustrous cloth

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FOOD | AND | DRINK

Real food; virtual setting It’s not unusual to hear business owners talking about the sustainability of their company and their responsible approach to its workings, but this can come across as a politically correct chant. Not so with Charlie Bigham, whose love of the environment and of his local community is clear in every business decision he makes, discovers Emma Clegg. His sponsorship of a virtual version of the Wells Food Festival on 10-11 October is his latest collaborative enterprise

C

harlie Bigham is very modest about his food expertise, surprisingly considering the success of his business Charlie Bigham’s, which he set up in 1996, with the aim of creating really delicious, top-quality dishes. “I’m a cook not a chef. I would be hopeless in a restaurant, however I have cooked for a long time and I’ve picked up a few skills on the kitchen front over the years,” Charlie says. His meals are freshly cooked and packaged ready to prepare in the oven or on the hob. While convenient, these are not ready meals, he is at pains to emphasise: “Why compromise by putting things in the microwave and settling for something that doesn’t taste so nice? We just make nice food – that’s our objective. “Our consumers write into us all the time,” Charlie explains, “and say, ‘I never buy ready meals, I love cooking, most days I cook from scratch myself, but every now and again I just want a night off and your food is home-cooked and it’s really tasty.” It all started with Charlie leaving his job and taking time off in 1995 to travel to India. Captivated by the tastes, colours, textures and aromas of the cuisine, he decided to set up a food business. After perfecting three Two of Charlie Bigham’s meals with their distinctive packaging: Chicken Tikka Masala and Pilau Rice, and Fish Pie 38 TheBATHMagazine

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dishes in his home kitchen – Caribbean Lamb, Cajun Chicken and Salmon with a Dill Sauce – he went knocking on doors and managed to find some upmarket London food shops who were up for stocking him. Then Waitrose were interested. Then Sainsbury’s. Then Tesco. Another element that makes Bigham’s meals so distinctive is the wooden packaging. “Long before David Attenborough did the commendable job of bringing plastic packaging to the forefront of everybody’s minds, we knew plastic was not right and wanted to avoid it as much as possible.” The food parcels certainly stand out on the supermarket shelves as being different. “Most people decide what to buy in a nano-second, and so our packaging sends a signal to consumers that maybe we are a bit different,” says Charlie. Bigham’s has two kitchens, one in North London and the other near Wells, where

Charlie lives. Here the meals are prepared at Quarry Kitchen, in a former quarry in Dulcote. Quarry Kitchen was named RIBA’s South-West Building of the Year in 2018, for its technological functionality and environmental transformation of a disused landscape and in June this year, more than 900 solar panels were installed. “It’s quite a big quarry, about 20 acres of hole in the ground,” says Bigham, and we’re surrounded on most sides by 120 foot cliffs. We have peregrine falcons flying around and badgers foraging and 20 acres of wildflower meadow outside our door. It’s a pretty unusual location. It makes a difference, if you’re making a high-quality product, start with a high-quality environment. We make some of our best-selling dishes here including our Fish Pie and Chicken Tikka Masala. Because of their ready supermarket channels, the business kept on operating successfully in lockdown: “We’ve had lots of feedback from consumers who have seen us as quite a saviour during lockdown – we are a bit of light relief and we have appealed to consumers who perhaps haven’t heard of us or used us before,” says Charlie. “So there have been positives, but I would far rather it hadn’t happened.” Charlie explains how many artisan producers have had their business taken away since the period of lockdown, but reflects that some food outlets have benefitted: “Some small retailers and producers have had quite a busy time. We don’t have enough diversity in the whole way our food market works so if it’s made this a bit better that’s something to celebrate.” Charlie is a man of ethics – he cares about the environment and about his close community, and this philosophy and sense of responsiblity runs strongly through the mechanics of the business. “I have always had a view that business has an important role to play in society – it’s there to make a


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FOOD | AND | DRINK

The Quarry Kitchen in Wells is sited in Dulcote Quarry and in 2018 was named RIBA’s South West Building of the Year

profit and provide employment, but businesses should be responsible players in society, so we want to have a positive impact on the world, whether that’s from an environmental point of view or by engaging with the local community.” The company’s community involvement is ever-present. Since the Quarry Kitchen opened in 2017, Bigham’s has employed more than 300 people locally and contributes to a number of local initiatives, including the Cheddar Valley Food Bank, Wells SOUP and Wells Carnival. Bigham’s also hand-delivered 1,500 lasagnes to its neighbours during the height of lockdown, to spread a little comfort and warmth amongst those living nearby. Another collaboration saw them working with The Swan in Wells in August, providing free meals for the Eat Out to Help Out scheme – with a donation from sales made to mental health charity Heads Up, who they have started supporting. Wells Food Festival is now in its eighth year and has made a name for itself as one of the busiest and most successful food festivals in the UK. Charlie Bigham’s has supported the festival for four years, but this year the company has become the headline sponsor, with the plan of helping the festival reach another level. While the physical festival has sadly been cancelled, on the calendar instead is a virtual two-day food event. “It was obvious quite a few months ago that holding the festival in its normal physical guise could be a challenge, so we thought, ‘well are we going to let that defeat us or should we have a plan to run a standalone virtual festival?’. “I haven’t come across another festival quite like ours, so we are sticking our necks out, but early signs have been really encouraging. There are a lot of small artisan

producers who have had a really, really tough time over the last few months, because they haven’t been able to go to their normal markets to sell their produce.” The virtual festival is already live and visitors are now able to peruse the wares, with orders being generated online. The website brings all the enthusiasm of the outdoor food market to the screen, with a captivating image by illustrator Emily Sutton, showcasing the different parts of the festival: the artisan food market, liquid refreshments in Brewed, Chilled and Distilled, music on the bandstand, competition corner, the story of Wells, and tent talks. “It’s all an experiment,” says Charlie, “but it’s really exciting – normally it’s a local event, so people come from the region, and not much further afield. But once you go online your potential audience increases.” There are around 150 producers involved and many of them are new to the festival. They include the Incredible Brewing Company from Bristol and The H’eggs

Company, Bath Culture House and the Wild Flour Cake Co. from Bath. At the heart of the festival’s food programme is the Bigham’s Banquet – a live streamed ‘cook-along’ where ticket-holders can cook alongside top chefs Mark Hix, Thomasina Miers, Henry Harris and Merlin Labron-Johnson, as well as Bigham’s head chef Rupert Willday. The event will be hosted by food critic and MasterChef judge William Sitwell and Charlie Bigham himself. Limited to 1,000 places, tickets for the banquet on 10 October (6–9pm) cost £20, with all proceeds going to Chefs in Schools – a charity working to transform food in primary schools across the country. In advance of the cook-along, participants will receive a Bigham’s goodie bag containing an apron, a Wells Food Festival tea towel, a banquet recipe booklet, plus a voucher for a free Bigham’s dish of their choice. At-home festival-goers can also sign-up to further cookery masterclasses and talks by Charlie and his team of master chefs, flower arranging with Georgie Newby, artisan florist and flower farmer at Common Farm Flowers, ‘no dig’ gardening tips by Charles Dowding, as well as music by the Harlem Rhythm Cats and a photography competition. The site proclaims, “Let’s make 2020 the year we fill our baskets with the very best produce, made by the small, most passionate businesses who make our country the home of fantastic food.” The baskets are virtual, but the food is real. Come along on 10–11 October and soak up the thrilling atmosphere without leaving home. n

Wells Food Festival with Charlie Bigham’s runs from 10–11 October and is free to attend. For regular updates or to book a place at the Bigham’s Banquet visit wellsfoodfestival.bighams.com

The opening page of the Wells Food Festival’s website uses this characterful illustration by Emily Sutton, who also creates illustrations for Charlie Bigham’s packaging THEBATHMAG.CO.UK THEBATHMAG.CO.UK || october january 2020 2010

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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

The Elder has arrived in Bath T he Elder is the place to enjoy authentic, honest and timeless British cooking, created by restaurateur Mike Robinson and Group Head Chef Gavin Edney, our focus is on sustainability, seasonality, locally-sourced and wild produce.

With the British countryside and sea as our larder, guests can enjoy wild and seasonal dishes such as Warm Dorset Crab Tart with Lemon Mayonnaise & Chimichurri; Gloucestershire Fallow Deer Red Cabbage PurÊe, Heritage Beetroot & Sauce Grand Veneur and sumptuous desserts such as Blackberry Tart, Vanilla Cream, Salted Almonds and Blackberry Sorbet. Open for lunch and dinner Wednesday to Sunday our a la carte menu is enhanced by a beautifully curated wine list. In the bar - and the south facing terrace in the warmer months – our guests can also enjoy a selection of small plates alongside precisely-made classic cocktails and Somerset ciders. The Elder creates an exceptional experience for diners with intimate

and welcoming historic spaces. Sympathetic to its Georgian roots, the restaurant, bar and private dining room each has its own charming character, and all under one roof. The gorgeous Elder bar has immense appeal as a wonderfully relaxed drinking destination. There is a selection of beautifully crafted classic drinks and cocktails, doing away with unnecessary frills and using seasonal ingredients alongside a carefully selected range of spirits and liqueurs from smaller, bespoke producers. Here at The Elder, we are sticking rigidly to government guidelines in order to protect your safety and ensure all of our guests feel safe and comfortable. The Elder South Parade, Bath BA2 4AB enquiries@theelder.co.uk www.theelder.co.uk

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RESTAURANT | REVIEW

Bouvardia Restaurant Bathen House, 88 Newbridge Hill, Bath BA1 3QA; Tel: 01225 805549; bathenhouse.co.uk

R E V I EW

Emma Clegg trips the light fantastic at a restaurant within a new luxury boutique hotel and enjoys some strawberry dust

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he months since mid-March have been quivering, despite their mainly sunshine-infused character, from an electric shock of pandemic proportions, and they took us back to basics, not least on the food stakes. We made the most of it, cooking en singleton or en famille, boosted by masked, socially distanced trips to grocers and food stores. While the lockdown experience had its positives – more time for cooking, and even sharing meals around the family table – we’ve all been pleased to move on, and rediscover a foodie joie de vivre that doesn’t involve a home oven, a cheese grater or a carrot. Thankfully, heavenly, escape-thedomestic-fray food destinations are now back on the menu (an inside out metaphor) and they can’t be dismissed by the rule of six. Take Bouvardia at the luxury boutique hotel Bathen House on Newbridge Hill. The hotel and restaurant had a challenging start – launched in January this year, and then dislocated a couple of months later into the familiar territory of no customers, no serving of food, no business. The hotel and the restaurant have been back since early July, and – for those of us who were surviving on meals with a what’s-left-in-the-fridge vibe – dining here really is a refreshing shot in the arm. If you’ve seen the Bathen House website with its uber-luxurious accommodation with large rooms with a glow of light-filled serenity and shimmering with film star magic and rainbow showers, your expectations will be high. The styling is there – Bathen House and its restaurant Bouvardia has a dreamy sense of out-of-this-world. Its interiors are pale, luminous, bathed in light and warmth, thanks to its large windows and in the case 42 TheBATHMagazine

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of the restaurant a single-storey rear extension with roof lanterns and mirrored walls. Light aside, its styling is classic, with glistening chandaliers, densely buttoned upholstery and draped, tasselled curtains. The restaurant almost feels as if it’s hung on a sunshine cloud, with its infusion of reflected light, poetic flower arrangements, tables with starched white cloths and, as a finale touch, a large white rose nestling inside an upright glass dome on each table (I did actually want to set it free). Let’s get to the food. Robert Zalus, the executive chef behind the menu, who has most recently been masterminding the offerings at Bill’s and Brown’s in Bath, draws his food style from his travels. He describes it as traditional British, but with twists of Asian or northern Europe, or any of the other regions in his armoury. The menu is seasonal, and compact, but covering most preferences. Vegans are catered for – there was vegan bruschetta with rocket, radish, cherry tomatoes and artichokes and for mains a tartine with shallots, tomato, vegan blue cheese, rocket and red pesto. I can vouch for the latter, which was an uplifting light summer dish to have on a sunny evening. The service was solicitous and smooth, managed by an unassuming waiter who did appear to glide from table to table. For starters, we both opted for mini pots of deliciousness – a smoked mackerel mousse, dill mustard sauce and pickled cucumber, and a confit garlic and shallot chicken terrine with apple and cider brandy relish, each served with organic rye bread. (Both incidentally served on plates with three curved sides that defied the balancing of a

knife… interesting.) Crispy skin seabass was our other main, with cauliflower tabbouleh and chilli lime mango sauce, which I could see delivered on presentation and I’m advised by the eater of fish scored high on gastronomic impact too. The carnivorous could choose from duck breast with fondant potatoes and marinated pear, wine and raspberry sauce, or herb and Parmesan pork tenderloin with beetroot purée and goat’s cheese mousse. The plates were poised and beautiful, I’d say nouvelle plus (not that that’s a thing), artistic and not stinting on content or flavour. We also enjoyed a Flagstone 2017 'Longitude' Shiraz Cabernet Sauvignon Malbec (£27) with a pleasant flavour of dark berries and spices – the wine list isn’t extensive, but this fitted nicely. The end of the evening brought dulce de leche sundae with mascarpone, summer fruits, whipped cream and crackers – which arrived in a dramatically angled glass dish that looked as if it was defying gravity – and strawberry semifreddo with caramel sauce and strawberry dust – for visual impact think a Rothko painting in the round – and both dishes were dressed with colour coordinating violas, no less. There were no sharp edges to our evening. Finishing a meal in a cloud with strawberry dust and freshly brewed coffee might feel all up in the air, but it was a real experience on a Thursday evening and the kitchen, thank goodness, was out of bounds. n Two courses: £24.50; three courses £34.50 Bouvardia Restaurant is open from Tuesday to Saturday from 6pm, with last food orders taken up to 9pm.


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ARCHITECTURE | COMMENT

A sustainable urban future?

How can we develop our city without detracting from its existing heritage? Richard Asbury, director of Bathbased Maack Architects, talks sustainable development, well-designed homes and conserving our green spaces Richard Asbury

T

he economy is on the brink of collapse. Climate change is an existential threat to humanity. The planning system is broken. We need more houses. Whether you agree with these desperate cries or not, the government’s recent response to these crises has been to slash planning red tape and encourage us to “build, build, build”. This summer, Boris Johnson announced sweeping reforms to the planning system and issued a white paper entitled Planning For The Future, which started a consultation period to look at how to make it easier to build better homes in England. While this announcement was music to the ears of developers and investors, it struck fear into the hearts of conservationists, preservationists and assorted guardians of our green and historic land.

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So should we be concerned? Bath and its surrounds are perhaps some of the greenest and most historic in the land. Surely, if we are being encouraged to build more, won’t it threaten our unique architectural and environmental heritage? Well, as ever, it’s not what you do, it’s the way that you do it. Some of us embrace progress, while others find it hard to accept changes to tradition. When it comes to building in our own backyard, however, it seems our inner NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) is often awoken. We wish they’d just leave things alone, and if something has to be built then we want lots of rules and conditions to make sure that it doesn’t change the view from our window. But, as anyone who has sought planning permission knows, the rules can be complex and cumbersome. The current system is slow, unpredictable, and perhaps more importantly, has not encouraged the supply of better quality, better-designed, sustainable homes. This is partly what the government reforms are trying to address. Likewise, this is where there are opportunities for individuals and small independent developers to change the way things are done. If we want to retain control of our cherished urban and rural environment, we need to lead by example to create a better

BELOW AND RIGHT: This proposed new dwelling is situated on a sloping site on North Road. The two storey house is designed to Passive House standards and built into the site to minimise impact on the views from adjacent properties

environment – this means we should be involved in developing it ourselves. While the proposed changes to the planning system are arguably the most radical since the introduction of the Town and Country Planning Act in 1947, it’s interesting to remember that most of Bath and the surrounding towns and villages were built before any national planning policy even existed. We all know that Bath’s origins lie, according to legend, with its founding around 860BC when Prince Bladud (the ‘real-life’ father of Shakespearean King Lear) had his leprosy cured by the mud of the hot springs. The Romans, who loved a good mud treatment, saw the benefits and subsequently built a settlement around 50AD called Aquae Sulis. The Romans also liked nice regular streets laid out on a grid and used strict architectural codes for the design of their buildings – perhaps the first planning restrictions that Bath had seen. When the Romans eventually left, their regular street pattern gave way to less well-planned medieval streets. Buildings were packed closely together and designed more according to need and available skill and materials – architecture without architects. The medieval market town then smartened up itself up for the tourist trade and


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ABOVE AND LEFT: This innovative three bedroom new-build town house occupies a previously disused alleyway that was only three metres wide. It has been designed using sustainable materials and construction throughout. The super-insulated house is designed to radically reduce energy consumption and is built with a

reinvented itself into a fashionable Georgian health spa. New innovative and radical forms of town planning were used focussing on harmony, views, and a formal uniform architectural style. These grand elegant buildings were designed to look like single palatial residences but were often actually purpose-built lodging houses, divided, subdivided and subdivided again according to function – and purse! Tourists and visitors could rent a room, a floor, or perhaps even an entire house and be looked after by the communal staff. To maintain a uniform appearance many of these buildings were constructed according to a masterplan by small-scale, speculative developers who made and lost fortunes by leasing plots from the landowners and building on them. The great expansion of the city into the suburbs came when the development of private housing was supercharged during the inter and post-war years. A national review of housing identified the inadequate state of

breathing wall construction system that uses natural, low-carbon renewable materials to ensure there is very low waste. The external finish is Douglas Fir cladding, a UK-grown durable softwood treated with a lowmaintenance environmentally sound stain which gives the house its striking appearance

dwellings in much of Bath, which had turned into insanitary slums. This led to the wholesale clearance and development of large areas of the city – the so-called ‘Sack of Bath’. The redevelopment of the city in the 1960s and 1970s was said by some to have inflicted more damage on the city than the Bath Blitz of 1942. Development spread beyond the city boundaries, facilitated by long-term financing and mortgages, to incorporate surrounding villages such as Twerton, Combe Down and Weston in a post-war style, and has since been kept in check by the Bath and Bristol Green Belt. This hasty romp through Bath’s fascinating architectural history can be explored in more detail by a trip to the Museum of Bath Architecture – Covid-19 restrictions allowing– and I’d strongly urge you to visit – but now back to the present. Tourists may love the identical classical frontages and homogenous honey-coloured Bath stone, which, despite the different architectural styles, creates so much of the

city’s character. But they are just that, a façade. The real interest and story is what lies behind the façades: at the back of houses, between buildings, in the mews, gardens, alleys and side streets. This is where you really begin to understand how Bath developed – the spaces between, the spaces behind and the spaces above. And just like the medieval merchants who adapted their Roman predecessors’ spaces to suit their lifestyles and need, it is these leftover spaces in the present city that provide the opportunity to develop and continue the evolution of the city in a sustainable way. New sites to build on aren’t always easy to find, and although sometimes they are hiding in plain sight, over the last 60 years the easiest sites have been developed. So now it’s time to look at how we could use the backlands, the badlands, the derelict sites, the brownfield sites, the gardens, yards, roads and alleys. These forgotten, unused or difficult sites are the ones that commercial developers and house builders often overlook because they

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ARCHITECTURE | COMMENT

ABOVE: This new build five-bedroom family house is designed to fit within the historic context of a Conservation Area. The house redevelops an existing brownfield site, and completes the elegant Victorian frontage. Inside, five bedrooms, four bathrooms, and large reception and entertaining spaces are laid out over three floors

require too much investment or time to unlock their potential, but we have found that it is exactly these gaps and the voids in our urban fabric sites that offer opportunities for development on a small scale. I have learned from experience to spy a site, unnoticed or discarded as too challenging, too expensive. The owners of such sites may not know what an asset they have, but with the help of an architect’s skill and creative thinking such sites can be unlocked to release value for owners while going some way to meeting the housing need. The optimum situation should be a win-win situation where owners receive a cash windfall whilst individual self-builders, small independent developers or perhaps a housing co-operative are encouraged to build decent quality, sustainable new homes. We know that Bath is particularly sensitive to redevelopment, being rightly proud of our unique architectural heritage and UNESCO World Heritage Status, so any new development needs to be sensitive and sustainable – adding to a legacy of good domestic architecture and continuing the great architectural heritage of our city. As architects our experience has shown us that small new developments perhaps need to take even more care about how, where and what is built than large developments. New buildings need to engage with the community, to listen and address concerns. They need to take a sustainable approach to the environment and materials such as looking at using Passive House design principles, which are designed to attain a quantifiable and rigorous level of energy efficiency to reduce energy use. Of course it is vital to consider involving an 46 TheBATHMagazine

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architect at an early stage to help find the best solution for unlocking the potential of such sites and leaving them in a better state than we found them. I believe that small one-off buildings and new developments have great potential to lead by example and create exemplary homes that make a positive contribution to the city. Individual and small developers maintain a strong presence on ground and in the community so it’s within their interest to build the best possible houses they can. At Maack Architects, we have created many new homes on challenging sites: alleys,

Concept proposal to reuse a derelict brownfield site in Bath to create two new low-energy apartments

gardens, garages, derelict buildings and wasteland, so I know that there are opportunities to build providing you have enough vision, tenacity and patience. It’s not a quick or easy journey, but it is infinitely rewarding and increasingly vital. ■ Richard Asbury is director of Maack Architects and an architect who also develops houses. He has helped private clients and developers to maximise the potential of their land and properties by creating new sustainable homes; call for a free consultation: maack.co.uk


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Machine Bidder fp.qxp_Layout 1 25/09/2020 12:55 Page 1

397 Lots, including: CNC EQUIPMENT: YAMAZAKI Slant Turn 25 Universal 1500. XYZ 4000 CNC Turret Mill with Proto Trak AGE 3 Axis. DRILLING: QUALTERS & SMITH Model R3 Radial Arm. RICHMOND SR2 Radial Arm. ELLIOTT Pillar Drill. GRINDING: SNOW 72” x 15” Vertical Spindle Surface Grinding Machine. DORMER ZBM80 Drill Point Grinder. LATHES: DEAN SMITH & GRACE SB 1810 x 72” Hardsgyde Straight Bed. COLCHESTER Triumph 2000 x 30” Gap Bed. COLCHESTER Triumph 2000 x 50” Gap Bed. 2 x HARRISON 12” x 24” Straight Bed. COLCHESTER Bantam 2000. MILLING MACHINES: RAMBAUDI MS3P Horizontal/Vertical Turret Mill with Newall DRO. CINCINNATI Turret Mill with Newall DRO. Rambaudi Versamill 12 Milling Machine with Newall DP700 DRO. SAWING MACHINES: MEBA Eco-line Model 335 DG Horizontal Bandsaw. RUSCH Horizontal Bandsaw. TRENNJAEGER ST251 Cold Saw OSMOND Chop Saw with Mitreing. WICKSTEED Power Hack Saw. SPEEDAX 20” Vertical Bandsaw. SLOTTING: SACHMAN SYNCHRON 225mm Slotting Machine. BUTLER 10” Slotting Machine. SHEET METAL: KEETONA Hydroform 2540mm x 3mm Folding Machine. WELDING EQUIPMENT: ESAB LAX320 Mig Welder with ESAB MEK Wire Feed Unit. ESAB LAR500 Mig Welder with ESAB Wire Feed Unit. ESAB LAW 410 Mig Welder. KEMPPI Master TIG MLS 3003AC/DC. KEMPPI FastMig M420. OXY Acetylene Set with Gauges, Hoses & Trolley. INSPECTION: FARO Gage Plus Inspection Arm (2007). Large Selection of Inside/Outside Micrometers MISCELLANEOUS: SWEENEY & BLOCKSIDGE No.8 Flypress. PELLOBY Free Standing Jib Crane 1.6 Ton SWL. Several Jib Cranes. FORKLIFTS: 4 x LANCER BOSS Side Loaders. COMPRESSORS: HYDROVANE Model V11 ACE084035V400 Screw Compressor complete with Air receiver. HYDROVANE 711 Classic Screw Compressor. HYDROVANE 60 Screw Compressor. GENERATOR: DORMAN/STAMFORD Diesel Generator


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CITY | NEWS

CITYNEWS TOP RANKING Private Client Partner at Mogers Drewett, David Hill, has been recognised by the prestigious Chambers High Net Worth Guide for the second year in a row. Published every July, Chambers independently researches lawyers across the UK by interviewing clients and accessing the quality of work and then ranking the top performing lawyers in its High Net Worth Guide. Hill’s practice includes estate and succession planning matters, and a client says he “gives the impression that nothing is too much trouble”. A professional adviser says: “From my personal observation he relates well to his clients and expresses himself to them in a written form which is comprehensive and fully understandable.” md-solicitors.co.uk

TOP-LEVEL HOME CARE Abney & Baker, a care at home company providing support across Bath, North East Somerset and West Wiltshire, has been awarded the prestigious homecare.co.uk Top 20 Home Care Group Award 2020. The award is recognition that Abney & Baker is one of the most recommended Home Care Groups in the UK based on over 14,000 published reviews between 1 May 2018 and 30 April 2020 from those receiving home care as well as their friends and family. Abney & Baker’s West Wiltshire branch ranked 9.8 and their Bath & North East Somerset branch ranked 9.6 from client reviews. The company prides itself on the way it treats all its employees, with the respect and support they deserve to deliver the best service possible to their loyal clients; abneyandbaker.com

MACHINERY ONLINE AUCTION Machinebidder – who offer an online auction platform for the sale of industrial assets – is running an auction for the sale of plant and machinery in early October further to the retirement of the directors of RHG Stone Engineering Ltd. Each lot has a photograph and a technical description and appears online for bids from the UK and worldwide. Once buyers have completed the registration process, bids can be placed 24 hours a day from anywhere in the world. The auction includes lots such as a Swing Beam Hydraulic Guillotine (see right), a Vertical Machining Centre, a Universal Grinding Machine and a Hydraulic Downstroking Pressbrake. View the works at 121 Main Street, Walton, Somerset BA16 9QL, strictly by appointment; tel: 0161 345 3000. machinebidder.com

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DOUBLE TREE OPENS ITS DOORS DoubleTree by Hilton, Bath will finally open its doors on 1 October 2020 after a major £10.1 million redevelopment programme. Located on Walcot Street, the hotel boasts a unique position overlooking the River Avon and the weir from which the refurbishment of all 176 hotel rooms and public spaces has drawn its inspiration. The new-look hotel now boasts the intimate Secret Garden, a unique orangerie which overlooks the river, the perfect spot for visitors to experience two of Bath’s favourite past times – taking in the view and Afternoon Tea. Other hotel facilities include a stylish Bar and Restaurant and a separate café area, complete with an outdoor terrace dining area, as well as a private gym and state-ofthe-art meetings and events space. Chris Cottam, General Manager, said: “These are exciting times for Bath and for our staff who have been eagerly awaiting this hotel’s transformation. The DoubleTree by Hilton Bath is now one of the biggest hotels in the city with 176 Scandi-style rooms, private gym and an impressive meetings and events space that can house up to 200 people theatre-style. dtbath.doubletreebyhilton.com

NEW NAME, NEW GROWTH Leading south west commercial property consultancy Colston & Colston has rebranded as CSquared. The rebrand better reflects their modern, forward-thinking and dynamic approach. Started in 2008 and head quartered in Bath, CSquared is a multi-disciplinary practice offering commercial property agency, valuation, building surveying, and property management. The company’s recent growth includes the opening of a new office in Bristol, plus a further one in Cheltenham before the end of the year, and expansion of their service offering. The business prides itself on providing a tailored, personal client service. CSquared focus on getting to know their clients and the challenges they face with their property requirements so that they can deliver partner-led, bespoke solutions that produce tangible results. Partner Allan Lloyd said: “Our re-brand represents our modern and innovative ways of working. While we deal in commercial property, it is people that drive the market – no two clients are the same and it is our personal service and connection with our clients that has made our business a continuing success story.” csquaredre.co.uk

UPDATE YOUR WILL The Forever Friends Appeal is running its annual Will Writing initiative during November. RUH Will Month raises awareness of the importance of making a will and generates funds to support patients and staff at the Royal United Hospitals, Bath through its charity. Legal firms, Helen Starkie solicitor, Mogers Drewett solicitors, Royds Withy King, Bath Wills and McClure are those who will offer their time and expertise. Waiving the original cost of a will, they are offering their services at a discounted price of £125 for a single will or £175 for a joint will and donating their fees directly to The Forever Friends Appeal to support the work of the RUH. foreverfriendsappeal.co.uk


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ocl A C C O U N TA N C Y

141 Englishcombe Lane,

Should you Equity Release?

Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

When is a van a car? The Court of Appeal has finally ruled on the tax status of certain vehicles and the result can significantly change the tax liability of the drivers. In the Coca Cola case the Court upheld HMRC’s opinion that vans with windows and a second row of seats behind the driver are not goods vehicles but cars for tax / benefit purposes. Going forward if the ruling is unchallenged by Coca Cola it could set a legal precedent which may result in drivers paying higher tax and national insurance than they would if the vehicles had been classed as ‘goods vehicles’. The legislation defines a goods vehicle as one of a construction primarily suited for the conveyance of goods. The tax tribunal determined that modified VW Kombi vans failed this text and it has subsequently been decided that the Vauxhall Vivaro should also be taxed as a car for P11d benefit in kind purposes. The result is that where the vehicle is available for private use, the driver will have a taxable benefit based on the original list price multiplied by a percentage based on the vehicle’s CO2 emissions. Employers may need to reconsider providing such vehicles going forward, together with reviewing their P11d reporting. To make matters more confusing, the benefit in kind rules are not the same as the rules for the recovery of input VAT on vehicles and we would all benefit from a common definition for tax purposes. For tax saving tips contact us – call Marie Sheldrake, Tom Hulett or Mike Wilcox on 01225 445507

The last few months have seen many people furloughed or sadly being made redundant and therefore struggling financially. As a result, equity release has risen in popularity as an option to provide financial relief. What is Equity Release? The equity you hold in your property is the difference between the property value and the amount of debt you have secured against the property. An equity release plan will allow you to access some of this equity. How does it work? An equity release provider will provide you with either a lump sum or an income in exchange for part of the value of your home. This is achieved either using a type of mortgage, or by selling that portion of your home on the condition that you can continue to live there as long as you wish. The minimum age for applying for an equity release plan is 55 and the debt only needs to be repaid from the sale of the property either on death of the last applicant, or the last applicant entering a care home. Why release equity? You can use the funds released from an equity release arrangement for a variety of different reasons and could include: • • • • • • •

Topping up your income Helping children and grandchildren Renovating or refurbishing your property Buying a second property Paying for holidays Adapting the home Funding hobbies and interests

Equity release is not for everyone Make sure you speak to an independent financial adviser or mortgage broker specialising in equity release to receive unbiased advice on whether it really is the best option for you and to ensure you are protected from pitfalls like negative equity. What to do next Get in touch, call 01225 308333 or email Sean.McCabe@mogersdrewett.com, our advisers all have the required equity release qualifications and are accredited by The Society of Later Life Advisers.

Call Marie Sheldrake, Tom Hulett or Mike Wilcox on 01225 445507 to arrange a no-obligation meeting

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MUSIC | INTERVIEW

Photograph by Suzy Slemen

Rising to the challenge After the first month of the new academic year, we speak to the newly appointed head of The Paragon School, Rosie Allen, who tells us how she’s adapted to the role during these extraordinary times and why The Paragon’s staff and students have a buzzing sense of optimism for the coming year Q: You’ve had a period of months – since June this year – of working with Andrew Harvey, The Paragon’s previous head, to adapt the school around the challenges of Covid-19 to make it a safe place to study and work. How rewarding has it been to work with Andrew over that time? I was appointed way back in February, when HS2 was still dominating the headlines and there were only three confirmed cases of Coronavirus in the UK. I don’t think it is an understatement to say that we are now in a very different world. From the moment it became apparent, in early March, that Covid was going to have a significant impact on education, Andrew and I agreed that we needed to work together to steer The Paragon through. Like everything else in the past six months, the plan was developed as we rolled it out, helped enormously by the fact that Andrew was and is held in such high esteem by the pupils, parents and staff at the school. Some time around July the baton naturally passed from Andrew to myself, by which point his partnership and guidance had put me in a very strong position in terms of my knowledge and understanding of the school. I can’t thank him enough. Q: What was your most recent position before arriving at The Paragon and how long were you there? 20 52 TheBATHMagazine

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My experience as part of the founding team of Radnor House, a co-educational independent school in Twickenham, has certainly prepared me for dealing with the impact of Covid. Setting up a school was an amazing experience and required nimble leadership, alongside the need to delve regularly into the operational while keeping a clear focus on the ‘big picture’, plus lots of hours in a day. The skills I’m drawing on at the moment feel very similar! I was head at Radnor until 2018. Prior to accepting the headship at The Paragon I had been working at a number of schools and across the education sector more widely as a nonexecutive director and school governor. This period of part-time work allowed me to settle my young family into the Bath area after our move from London, while waiting for the right job to come up. Q: What were your first impressions of The Paragon, and how much has the school been transformed by the arrival of the pupils this month? One word – magical. There is something incredibly special about the whole site and I would challenge any first-time visitor not to be captivated by it. It really does feel like being immersed in a wonderful, cherished childhood; a safe haven full of adventure and love. Having all the children back this month has only added to this – the sense of joy is

palpable. There is also a real sense of purpose too, something which the children, and staff, now value more than ever. Q: What sort of adaptations have been necessary at The Paragon school to make everyone – teachers and children – safe and secure? We have kept things simple with the three core principles of regular hand washing and sanitising, effective social distancing and an enhanced facilities cleaning regime. We regularly reinforce and repeat these messages as, if everyone plays their part, then what we offer to the children day to day can be as close to ‘normal’ as possible. We are very fortunate to have small class sizes and plenty of space at The Paragon, so really it’s just been a case of tightening up our systems and ensuring that bubbles do not cross in the playground, school hall or other areas of the school. We’ve adapted our clubs and activities so there is minimal mixing of bubbles and, where it does happen, we ensure social distancing is maintained between groups. We’ve also moved to an incar drop off and pick up for parents at the start and end of the school day to limit adults on site. Parents have been incredibly proactive in doing their part – it really feels like we are all working together to ensure the children have the most positive experience possible.


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Q: How affected to do you feel pupils have been by the pandemic and by lockdown? Are any of them nervous about coming back? And how can you reassure them? Lockdown was difficult for everyone, and naturally for some children and their families it has brought anxiety. But there’s a real sense at The Paragon of the opportunities lockdown brought as well, and most of our children already have some very happy memories from this time. There were certainly a few nerves on the first day back, but the children have settled back into their old routines brilliantly, as well as getting used to new ones. We are very proud of them. Additional support is in place for those who have needed it, but so much of this comes from the exceptionally positive relationships which the teachers already have with their charges. Time is a great healer, as is a listening ear and a few encouraging words. I have found that every teacher at The Paragon understands deeply this important part of their role in the children’s lives. Q: Tell us about why you like living in Bath. How does it compare to London? We live to the south east of Bath on the way to Bradford on Avon. Having moved here in early 2018 from south west London we haven’t looked back. It’s the perfect combination of country and city living, exactly the environment my husband and I hoped for to raise our family. We met one another when we were both living and working in Sherborne, Dorset, and have very fond memories of our time there. Coming back to the south west was always the plan after the ubiquitous stint in London.

Q: You have a young family – do you ever find it hard to draw a line between school and personal time? Any working parent will tell you that compartmentalising is something you have to be able to do if you’re going to make it work. Once I’m home with my kids each evening, my phone goes in a drawer and my mind switches off from work. As you can imagine, with a six-year-old and a one-yearold, the dinner, bath and bedtime routine is joyful chaos. Therefore getting the laptop back out once they’re in bed to clear emails and reconnect with school matters feels like downtime. Q: What measures have you been able to put in place to support pupils who have lost crucial classroom time over lockdown, and may therefore feel less able to cope with the curriculum? We were fortunate that the whole of Reception, Year 1 and Year 6 were back in school full time from the 1 June. For the other year groups we ran a special holiday Learning Programme two days per week during July. This focused on getting them reacquainted with the classroom and curriculum, as well as the more social aspects of their learning. Our focus since term started in September has been on ensuring children feel happy and settled. It is no secret that happy children learn best, meaning any gaps in learning are quickly bridged. Q: Will the school still have assemblies? What’s your technique for keeping your children’s attention in assembly? Assemblies are the highlight of my week! Every Friday each class ‘bubble’ tunes in to a live streamed celebration assembly which

involves me running round the different classrooms and distributing awards to those pupils who have demonstrated one or more of our Paragon values in their work or conduct. It’s great fun racing around the school hearing the children clapping and cheering for one another, and the sense of anticipation about which classroom I will be popping up in next certainly holds their attention. The best part of the assembly is announcing the house point totals, which I do from the middle of playground surrounded by classrooms. Hearing cheers and groans emanating from every window as the placings are revealed is great fun. Q: What subject did you previously teach and do you still take some lessons? I qualified as a history teacher after completing my degree – I love the subject and really miss teaching, although I’ve also taught geography, RE and of course maths and English at preparatory level. For now, I’m not in the classroom in a teaching capacity, but as soon as there are fewer limitations on staffing and mixing bubbles I will be looking for any excuse to get back there. Q: Is there a good balance of male and female teachers at the Paragon and do you feel that this is important? The priority is having the best teachers, male or female. Boys and girls all need a diverse range of positive role models and I feel they certainly get this at The Paragon. We have scientists, professional musicians, two exOlympians and a capped rugby player on our staff – but I’m not going to tell you their gender. ■ paragonschool.co.uk

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Beechen Cliff An exceptional and traditional all-round education for boys A vibrant, unpretentiously academic mixed Sixth Form Prospective Parents’ Evening | Sixth Form Open Morning See school website for details of the virtual experiences for prospective parents, pupils and students “We can only thank the school for turning a shy young boy and developing him into a confident, respectful and well-rounded young man, which is a tribute both to him and the school; whose whole ethos and the opportunities it has provided him, has made this possible....... This is a school that celebrates excellence in all areas, whether you’ve joined the million word club, climbed the three peaks or achieved some of the fantastic academic results. My son and his friends all think that working hard and doing their best is ‘cool’ and it is this attitude that is priceless.....Beechen Cliff is a great school and I wouldn’t send my son anywhere else.” Parents of Year 9 pupils “There is a significent focus on improving positive mental and emotional health. The prositive impact of this initiative on the school and wider community is remarkable.” Ofsted 2020 WWW.BEECHENCLIFF.ORG.UK

@BEECHENCLIFF


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EDUCATION

EDUCATION NEWS BEN’S FOUNDATION

CYBER CHAMPIONS

Shortly after starting his Year 13 studies at Saint Gregory’s, Bath, Ben Saunders faced a challenge no one could have predicted. Diagnosed with a rare form of cancer sarcoma attached to his heart and later spreading to his lungs, instead of a typical final year at school with his friends, Ben began a journey that included intensive chemotherapy and major surgery. Devastatingly, last month, Ben passed away leaving behind a lasting legacy in his charity, the Ben Saunders Foundation, set up while receiving treatment himself, to raise money to support other young people with cancer. To date Ben’s foundation has raised almost £50,000, bringing his ambition of buying a holiday home to offer respite and sanctuary to families going through a similar journey, within reach. Director of Sixth Form at Saint Gregory’s, Lucy Butler, said: “Ben is an inspiration to us all and he will be forever remembered by everyone at school for his smile, energy and generosity. He was a passionate sportsman who loved the performing arts. His ability to make those around him laugh and smile was infectious and his talents both on the football field and on stage ensured that, when with him, you would never forget him!” bensaundersfoundation.org

Staff and students at 50 rural schools in the Bath and North East Somerset and Somerset local authority areas are set to benefit from free ultrafast broadband connectivity for life, courtesy of Bath-based full fibre infrastructure provider and ISP Truespeed. A community-focused business, Truespeed provides schools passed by its network with a free Gigabit-capable service. This ensures school-age children have fast, reliable internet access to support their education. Marksbury School, Abbot’s Way School and Churchill Academy are already connected to Truespeed’s gigabit-capable broadband service. And all 31 schools that make up the Bath and Wells Multi Academy Trust will come on stream soon, ensuring 7,800 pupils and over 1,400 staff benefit from this award-winning service. Reliable, ultrafast broadband is now a must-have for schools as they rely on digital technologies and cloud-based storage and services to plan and teach the curriculum. Many schools also rely on email as a cost-effective and efficient way to keep in touch with parents. truespeed.com n

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Sarah Wringer Kaplan International Languages Bath, 5 Trim Street, Bath, BA1 1HB Direct Line (01225) 473502 Email: sarah.wringer@kaplan.com

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BALLOONS | IN | BATH

Up, up, and away! As a city with no shortage of them, we are still captivated by the uplifting sight of a ballooned-filled sky. Catherine Pitt investigates the history of hot air ballooning in Bath, taking us back to the very beginning...

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Hot air balloons fill the skies of Bath

Aeronauts without deep pockets or a wealthy patron had to rely on the good will of the public to fund their ballooning. Before Dinwiddie’s launch in 1784, he had exhibited the balloon in the Lower Assembly Rooms charging two shillings per person. The aeronaut Joseph Deeter’s balloon cost him an estimated £200 – £18,000 today – and en route to the launch in Bristol he tried to cover its costs through exhibitions. At the Upper Assembly Rooms, Deeter charged one shilling admittance. It would take several hours to inflate the balloon’s envelope and crowds would gather to witness this as part of the ‘show’. While

Landing in a field of cows, local farmers attacked the ‘strange creature’ thinking it was a monster

oaring gracefully above the rooftops, the countryside stretching for what appears like forever, what thrill and what terror the first balloonists must have felt when first ascending into the ‘great unknown’? The first unmanned demonstration of ballooning was in Portugal in 1709, but it is the Montgolfier brothers, Joseph-Michel and Jacques-Etienne, who are remembered as the innovators. The brothers launched their first balloon in Paris in September 1783, but it was two months later on 21 November 1783, in front of a vast crowd, that a Montgolfier-built balloon first ascended with pilots. Jean-François Pilatre de Rozier and François Laurent le Vieux d'Arlandes became the first humans to travel untethered in a hot air balloon. In the UK, the first manned balloon flight was by Scottish aeronaut James Tytler in August 1784, but this achievement was quickly overshadowed by the flamboyant Vincenzo Lunardi’s success in London a month later. Lunardi’s ascent was well promoted and witnessed by thousands. The craze for ballooning had begun. Bath and flight were no strangers. According to the legend of King Bladud – the alleged founder of the city – it was he who flew from Bath to London wearing a pair of wings that he had built himself. However, the first attempts at ballooning in Bath began a few months after de Rozier and Laurent’s success in Paris. At midday on 10 January 1784, Caleb Hiller-Parry, local doctor and the son of Arctic explorer Admiral Sir Edward Parry, launched a small hydrogen-filled balloon from Crescent Park – now Royal Victoria Park. A few hours later, James Dinwiddie launched his own balloon from Mrs Scarce’s Riding School on Julian Road – or The Museum of Bath at Work as we know it today. Hillier-Parry’s attempt was to be a one-off experiment, but Dinwiddie persevered and 10 days later he launched another unmanned balloon from Bath. On descent into Dorset, his balloon caused a sensation. Landing in a field of cows, local farmers attacked the ‘strange creature’, thinking it was a monster. The first manned balloon flight in the city was made in Sydney Gardens on 8 September 1802, piloted by the Frenchman André Jacques Garnerin (1769–1825). In his memoirs, Garnerin recalled the throngs of people in the garden, streets, and even clambering onto rooftops. It was described in a local paper as ‘the most sublime spectacle ever exhibited here’.

this was happening, the pilot would talk to the enthralled public. Ticketed green spaces such as Sydney Gardens were perfect for launches as both park owner and aviator benefitted from the gate fees. In addition, Sydney Gardens had great facilities – food, drink, music and amusements – which would draw in a crowd. The cost of witnessing these spectacles varied. Garnerin’s 1802 ascent was advertised at five shillings with another five shillings for seating on a specially built viewing platform. A few weeks later, Garnerin launched a Night Balloon Gala at a cost of three shillings per ticket that included illuminations, a concert, and a balloon that “would rise majestically (like)…a luminous meteor”. By the mid-19th century ticket prices had reduced. An ascent by Mr Green in Sydney Gardens in July 1846 was advertised for onee shilling per person. At the height of the obsession with ballooning, ‘Balloon Coaches’ ran between London, Bristol and Bath bringing in enthusiastic spectators. Alongside the launches came songs, books, and souvenirs. Trinkets such as snuff boxes were adorned with ballooning images, and even clothing was embellished with aeronautical prints.


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BALLOONS | IN | BATH

ABOVE: The evolution of hot air balloons over a century, starting with the Montgolfier brothers’ original design in 1783

Not all launches were a success. In October 1823, George Graham twice failed to inflate his balloon in Sydney Gardens, forcing him to postpone. It was discovered that the gas pipes opposite in Pulteney Street were clogged with dirt. An additional site was sought and found on Upper Bristol Road in an empty field next to and owned by the Bath Gas Works Company. It also wasn’t uncommon for pilots’ families to accompany them on their escapades, leading to successful generations of aeronauts. One famous female aeronaut was Margaret Graham (c.1804–1880). She was born and lived in Walcot, Bath and Below: A cigarette box after Vincenzo Lunardi ‘s first balloon ascent in London

became the first British woman to make a solo balloon flight on 28 June 1826. She was also the first woman to make a night flight in 1850. Her husband was the aeronaut George Graham and their daughters later followed in their parents’ footsteps and took to the skies. Another renowned Bath balloonist was Patrick Young Alexander (1867–1943), who moved to the city in the 1890s. His family were flying enthusiasts and his father helped found the Aeronautical Society in 1866. Initially, Alexander lived in Combe Down and built a small factory to construct his balloons on Midford Road. This building still stands today and is now used to house the Cross Manufacturing Company’s museum. In 1900, Alexander moved to The Mount in Batheaston where he built a workshop in his garden and installed a direct gas supply. In 1902, Alexander re-created Garnerin’s 1802 balloon launch in Sydney Gardens, joined by some of his aviator friends, including the American Samuel Cody, Charles Rolls (of Rolls Royce) and Major Frank Trollope (of the Royal Engineers Balloon Factory at Aldershot, Hampshire). Some Bath residents considered ballooning to be a nuisance rather than a thrill. It wasn’t unknown for unmanned balloons to occasionally drop onto rooftops and start fires. In a newspaper report in July 1913, Bathford resident, Mr W. T. Humphries complained of significant financial losses after his pony became spooked by a lowflying hot air balloon and ran off, dragging and destroying the cart it was attached to, and killing the poultry that were caged on the cart. In the experimental days of ballooning, aeronauts were considered daredevils. Manned balloons were launched in all weathers, some reaching speeds upwards of 90mph, which in an era before motorised vehicles must have seemed equally exhilarating and terrifying. Some aeronauts even tried parachuting from their balloons

and although precautions were taken, tragedies did occur. One such catastrophe was that of Saladin, a hot-air balloon launched from Bath in December 1881. It carried Captain James Templer, Walter Powell – MP for Marlborough in Wiltshire – and Lieutenant James Agg-Gardener. The trio found themselves heading towards the Devon coast, but realised it would be too dark to attempt a Channel crossing. Templer jumped out by the cliffs to secure the balloon, but couldn’t find an anchor. Agg-Gardener jumped from the basket to assist but broke his leg upon landing. The struggling Templer still had grasp of the valve line and shouted to Powell, still in the basket, to slide down it. However a gust of wind caught the balloon and Templer lost his grip and the balloon with Powell still on-board headed out to sea. Despite searches and reported sightings, only Powell’s hat was recovered from the waters. It wasn’t until 1888 that the remains of Saladin were discovered, at the foot of the Pyrenees. No human remains were ever located. The passion for air balloons began to wane by the early 20th century with the success and subsequent development of aeroplanes as a form of transport. Balloons continued to be used for meteorological purposes, and during the First World War for military observations. The era of modern ballooning began in the 1960s. New recordbreaking attempts were made, including by local aeronaut Sir David HemplemanAdams. By the 1970s, hot air balloons began to grace Bath’s skies once more. Today recreational trips often launch from Royal Victoria Park, where you can feel the same thrill, but hopefully not the terror, that the 18th and 19th century pioneers once did. Human flight still continues to captivate us – there is a compulsion to stop and look to the sky when we hear a balloon burner or see the shadow of a balloon silently gliding overhead. n

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THE | WALK

Nature escapes

For October’s walk, Andrew Swift guides us from Bath to the plateau east of the Avon valley, a little-known corner of Wiltshire, with green lanes, ancient villages and, on a clear day, distant views of the high downs ringing the horizon The climb out of the Avon valley leads through the back lanes of Bathford, past abandoned quarries, to a Victorian folly on the edge of the escarpment, while the return leg follows a muddy bridleway which was once part of the Old Bath Road. You can either start the walk in Bath or – to cut five and a half miles off the distance – in Bathford. If starting in Bath, head to Sydney Gardens, go through the gate to the canal, turn left through a tunnel and carry on along the towpath for 2000m. After passing the George Inn at Bathampton, continue under a bridge and after another 150m, when you come to a gate by a house, head over to the lane on the left and carry on in the same direction (ST779665). At the end, go through a kissing gate (KG) – if the light is green – and cross the railway line. Go through a KG on the other side, head down steps and through another KG to follow a track across a field towards a pylon. High in the woods ahead, you will see a tower. This is Brown’s Folly, which you will soon be getting a much closer view of. Just past the pylon, go through a KG, follow a path up the embankment and carry on across the railway bridge. At the road, cross and turn right, following the pavement

across a footbridge. Cross the road and go up Ostlings Lane to the right of the Crown Inn (ST787669). At the top, with St Swithun’s church ahead, turn left to walk along Church Street, lined with 17th and 18th century buildings. Facing you at the end, behind a high wall, is Rock House, built around 1723. Turn right and head up to the right of the Village Shop and Café. Carry on up a footpath, cross a road and continue up Dovers Lane, which may date from Roman times. After passing Chapel Lane and the Baptist schoolroom, as the lane dwindles to a track, take time to survey the superb views behind you. The cottages hereabout were built for the men who worked in the quarries higher up. When you come to a lane, carry straight on uphill using the rough track on the left. After 300m, just past a car park, turn right through a KG to follow a footpath into the woods (ST797663). The path forks immediately, but keep straight on with the fence on your left. These woods are riddled with quarries, many of them underground. After 400m, you emerge on the edge of the escarpment with stunning views over the Limpley Stoke valley. Bear left to follow a

The avenue at Monkton Farleigh

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FACT FILE n Distance: From Bath 11.5 miles; from Bathford 6 miles. n Level of challenge: Some rough and muddy paths, and a steep ascent and descent; five stiles. n Map: OS Explorer 155 & 156.

rough path along the escarpment and after 175m you come to Brown’s Folly, commissioned in 1848 by Wade Browne to provide work for local quarrymen laid off due to lack of orders. As you continue along the escarpment, trees hide the view but there are some spectacular excavations (if you have a dog, you may want to put it on a lead at this point). After 225m, when you come to an information board, turn left to follow a footpath between moss-covered walls leading from Somerset into Wiltshire. Go through a gate (ST795658) and carry on along a strip of greensward. Deep underground lies a labyrinth of underground quarries, covering over 100 acres. After quarrying ended in the 1930s, the tunnels were used by the War Office as a vast ammunition dump. When you come to a lane, turn right and after 50m turn left along a footpath. If it is clear, you should be able to make out, 11 miles to the south, the Westbury White Horse. The industrial buildings on your left, as you pass through a handgate, stand on the site of Sheep Drove Quarry, where a vertical shaft drops down to tunnels far below. At the end of the track, cross a stile onto a lane, and carry straight on across another stile to follow a path past a conduit which supplied water to a nearby Cluniac priory. After crossing a stile at the end (ST805657), carry on past Home Farm and bear right along a lane. At a T-junction, bear left past a lodge with an ornamental chimney. Carry on through Monkton Farleigh, past old stone cottages and a house with a shell porch and a 1736 datestone. The church, a little further on, has a 12th-century doorway and a 13th-century tower, although the rest of it was rebuilt in 1844. After another 100m, turn left, following a signpost to Kingsdown. After 300m, when you come to a bench, look up to the left to


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THE | WALK

Looking east from Monkton Farleigh

see the manor house, which includes fragments of the Cluniac priory and commands a view along the avenue of trees stretching 2000m eastward. Carry on and, when you come to a T-junction, take the right fork to carry straight on (ST810660). After 250m, turn left along a tree-lined road built in the mid20th century. After 200m, turn right to follow a

footpath alongside a row of young beeches. Continue along a path with woods on your right, cross a stile at the end and head diagonally right to another KG which leads into a field with cows. Towards the end of the field, when the hedge swings right, follow it towards a fivebar gate and cross a stile. Follow a track with a hedge on your left and carry on as it curves between trees.

When you come to a busy road, cross and climb a flight of steps (ST812671). Head for a clump of trees ahead, follow a path through it and turn left downhill. Continue as the path narrows and enters woodland. At the bottom, carry straight on along a lane leading steeply downhill and after 175m turn right along Wormcliffe Lane (ST809671). Carry on for 250m, before turning left along a bridleway signposted to Bathford (ST808673). This was once a busy road; after 600m, when a footpath joins from the left, it was one of the most important roads in England, for this muddy byway was the Old Bath Road, along which stagecoaches rattled in the days of Beau Nash. Eventually, mud gives way to tarmac. Just before you reach Bathford Hill, look for the ghost sign on the blocked-up widow of No 3 on the right, dating from when it was a beerhouse. As you turn right down Bathford Hill, look out for the old lock-up across the road, opposite the turning to Portals Paper Mill. To return to Bath, retrace your steps across the footbridge, over the railway bridge, through the field and along the canal – although there is a bus service should you wish to make use of it. n Andrew Swift’s books include Country Walks from Bath and On Foot in Bath, a new and revised edition of which has just been published by akemanpress.com.

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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

“Eliminating gluten cleared up my health issues” Christina Colligan, CNM Graduate in Naturopathic Nutrition

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rom aged three, I suffered from severe atopic dermatitis. In my teens, I developed asthma. My gut health was compromised, often causing me to be constipated. I saw several doctors and specialists, as well as herbalists and homeopaths. I underwent some blood tests when I was 15 and I discovered that my vitamin and mineral status was low. I removed dairy from my diet and took the supplements that were prescribed by my homeopath. In 1999/2000 I had unexplained weight loss. Then in 2001, I was severely ill and anything I ate gave me diarrhoea. My local GP didn’t know what was wrong with me; however, through my own research, I learnt about gluten intolerance and coeliac disease. I was experiencing the exact same symptoms that presented with these conditions. I eliminated all gluten products for four days and I felt so much better. A blood test later confirmed I had coeliac disease. I was advised to also exclude dairy from my diet for six months to allow my intestines to heal. After doing this, my eczema and asthma

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disappeared and my gut health improved; I also gained weight. After seeing how food impacted my body and affected my symptoms, I developed a keen interest in nutrition. Unfortunately, after many years of compromised absorption, I was left with low cortisol levels and unbalanced gut flora. I only wish I’d met a nutritional therapist after my diagnosis who could have explained the 5R gut healing protocol to me. Simply cutting out gluten is not enough when you are diagnosed with coeliac disease; you also need to heal your gut which has been damaged by the gluten. I used to be a project manager for a large corporate. Starting a family made it impossible for me to continue with my demanding role. Instead, it was an opportunity for me to immerse myself in a big interest of mine and study nutrition. I decided to study Naturopathic Nutrition at the College of Naturopathic Medicine (CNM) as I was attracted by their hands-on approach to learning and the fact that the lectures are taught by experienced practitioners. I loved the variety of teachers and learning about their experiences. The diversity of students in my class was amazing and I was blown away by how generous everyone was in sharing their knowledge and experience. My time at CNM prepared me for setting up my own business and it was a great platform for networking and opportunities. Having recently relocated to Sweden, I now work at the Nordic Clinic in Stockholm three days a week. I see a variety of clients, supporting them with a wide range of ailments including pre-diabetes, autoimmune conditions, IBS, hormonal issues and optimising performance through nutrition. CNM has totally changed my life. I love my work now. I’m passionate about what I do as it feels meaningful and I’m making a difference

to other people’s lives. I don’t ever see myself stopping work; it’s my way of life now. I love that the learning never stops; every client is unique and I’m continually expanding my knowledge

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INTERIORS

Red and yellow and pink and green... Yes, we’re singing a rainbow this month, finding interior products that celebrate the seven colours, and actually loads more (just look at Coopers’ colour chart below). Choose one to fit with a new interior scheme or just as a one-off treat, because it’s fun, vibrant, cool and it has the potential to lift your interior and your mood...

Ilve Majestic cooker, 1500mm, £12,695 with complimentary RAL choice of colours (see below), offer also available for 900mm Ilve cookers, from Coopers Stores; coopers-stores.com

Handmade Afghan veg-dye kilim cushion (45 x 45cm), £45 , Oriental Rugs of Bath; orientalrugsofbath.com

Easy Knit Throw Range in pink, teal, grey, yellow, sage and blue, £135, Loaf; loaf.com

Careful Whisper art print by Ben Lowe, £375, Loaf; loaf.com

Dachshund Print, set of two, £60, Homefront Interiors; homefrontinteriors.co.uk

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INTERIORS Coolicon lampshade in deep yellow and teal, from £125, Loaf; loaf.com

Lighting package from The Outdoor Bar Company– comission a garden bar and install a lighting package, controlled from your iPhone to change the night scene into almost any colour; outdoorbarco.co.uk

Newgate Fancy Numbers Clock, 60cm diameter, £169, from Blue at The Loft; theloftbath.com

The Peta traditional column radiator from House of Radiators, available in a range of finishes including Copper Lacquer, Black Nickel and Rose Gold. The Peta can be ordered in any RAL colour in a matt or gloss finish. Many sizes available, prices start from £100 and go up to £3000; houseofradiators.co.uk

Footstool by Sarah Millmore Upholstery, from £210; sarahmillmoreupholstery.co.uk

Reef Shapes Multi and Kite Shapes Multi, hand-tufted rugs, Bath Contract Flooring; bathcontractflooring.co.uk

Chloe Chair in Brussles fabric, £295, TR Hayes; trhayes.co.uk

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CITY | INTERIORS

The art of colour Science • psychology • local perspectives

THIS PAGE: A palette of soft blues with accents of green and ochre is an example of using three hues close to each other on the colour spectrum. Design by Woodhouse and Law;

woodhouseandlaw.co.uk

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CITY | INTERIORS

Is colour a complete mystery to you? Well, the good news is there are plenty of rules to guide the effective use of colour in the interior – you just need to tune into your room, and then you can emphasise its best qualities and minimise any detracting factors with your colour choices, says Emma Clegg, who also asks our local interior experts for their advice

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ainting a wall has a transformative quality. It lifts a familiar space into another dimension. It recharges your memory, it forces you to remove everything from the room, and rethink it. It sounds simple. But what colours to use? And how to use colour within the furnishings to complement the walls and create a connected whole? Colour is a powerful tool and it has a central place at the heart of our culture and our language. The expressions ‘white as a sheet’, ‘green with envy’, and ‘paint the town red’ are just a few examples of how we use colour descriptively. The English language is peppered with colour terms – we have 11 specific words for colour as well as all sorts of associative terms such as aubergine, peach, terracotta and rose. Yet in our homes many of us treat colour with nervousness, sticking to neutrals over more adventurous choices. Cartoonist Osbert Lancaster once said, when asked what his favourite colour was, “That’s an idiotic question to ask anyone who’s an artist. Colours only have any reality in conjunction with other colours.” Suddenly the whole issue of painting a wall becomes more complex – no colour is right or wrong until it is considered alongside an interior. The distinctive shape of a room and the quality of its light and how it is to be used will point to the effective use of colour.

Colour and light Colours take on a different appearance within different climates because of the varying qualities and strength of sunlight. Individual parts of the world are known for colour schemes that suit the conditions: the Indian continent for example is associated with intense saturated colour hues heightened by the high levels of sunshine, or white colours that reflect the natural light. Scandinavia and the UK, by contrast, are associated with cool colours more sympathetic to the overcast northern climate and that maximise natural light and space in small rooms. So bright, strident hues in grey, damp Britain will be subdued and act as darkening agents in our homes. Light in our region, because of our temperate but often overcast climate, is often grey, usually tinted with green once it has reflected off fields, trees and grass. Think about the quality of light in your home, and how it changes throughout the day – this depends on the direction your windows face, because the quality of light will affect how different colours are seen and experienced. Light direction While colour choice will be affected by personal preferences, there are useful guidelines based on the quality of light in your interior. Take an eastern window. This THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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creates a warm, bright light with morning sunshine creating long shadows and will lose direct light from the sun later in the day. So use subtle, warm colours such as yellow or muted orange which will enhance the warmth of the sun and still provide a glow as the day progresses and the sun moves away. Southern windows have the best light qualities: a warm light that constantly changes throughout the day, in winter reaching deep into the living space and in summer brighter but with a shallower reach. The brightness of the midday light from the south, closest to pure white light, can be strident and flatten out elements in a room. Here you have the most flexibility with your colours. Cool midtones and neutrals can work well, because southern light will make any colours seem lighter and more saturated. Or if your southfacing room has uncomfortably strong levels of light, use dark and unsaturated colours to absorb more light and help balance glare. A northern window will get very little direct sunlight, offering a clear, consistent light with no brilliant glare, but it will have a cold edge. This light is preferred by artists as it is most reliable and creates no distracting shadows. So for these rooms, the coldest rooms with the least available sunlight, warm colours give a more welcoming quality. If light and saturated warm colours are used, then more light is reflected into the room. West-facing windows get sunlight at the end of the hottest part of the day in the early afternoon and this light can create glare. The later afternoon sunlight from the west then shifts to a softer illumination and the long shadows increase the feeling of depth. West light can benefit from a cool scheme of light values in colours ranging from blues to violets. If an east- or west-facing room is used

mainly in the morning, decorate it in the same way as you would a south-facing room or a room to the west as if it were facing north. The same is true in reverse if the room is mainly used in the evening. If the room is used all day, a balance of warm and cold colours should complement the changing light. Many houses are not built directly facing these main points of the compass, so observe how the light changes throughout the day in your rooms, and remember that sky conditions vary constantly, affecting the quality of daylight that reaches your home. Here we start to understand how colours are perceptions around the light in a space – a colour is not a standard, unchanging given, but has a fluid, ever-changing quality. This is the magic that the interior designer deals with. Colour perception Certain colours can be used to alter a room’s perceived dimensions. Colours towards the red end of the spectrum (red, orange and yellow) with longer wavelengths tend to ‘advance’ towards the observer. Those towards the violet end of the spectrum (violet, indigo, blue and green) with shorter wavelengths tend to ‘recede’ away from the observer. How strongly colours do this depends on their intensity, so the purer a colour the more advancing qualities it has (such as pillar box red). This advancing quality can be a useful device in a room that is an odd proportion, for example elongated where you can use advancing colours on the two shorter walls to balance out the perception of a room’s proportions. Or in a room with a very high ceiling, an advancing colour on the ceiling will bring the perception of it down. Or a receding colour in a small room will make it feel larger.

The aquamarine blue tiles in this elongated bathroom balance out its proportions. Design by Architect Your Home; architect-yourhome.com

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Colour and psychology There’s no doubt that shades of colour also have powerful psychological influences. Ancient mystics in China believed that each person has a distinctive aura that changes colour to correspond to their current emotional state. Colour healing, still practised today, treats seven energy centres or ‘chakras’ representing different parts of the body with particular colours to address mental or emotional imbalances. Colour healers believe that colours have individual energies and this basis of this spiritual belief does fit with the scientific explanation of colour having different wavelengths. Research has also shown clear changes in the human heart rate and brain activity when enclosed in rooms of different colours, with the red and orange end of the spectrum proving to be more stimulating and the blue and green end more calming. The saturation RIGHT: A simple, white interior – historically associated with the privileged classes who could afford to keep it clean – creates  a striking visual statement

Design by Joel Bugg; joelbugg.co.uk

Sofa and throw by Loaf, loaf.com

Cushions by Sarah Millmore Upholstery; sarahmillmoreupholstery.co.uk

BELOW, top to bottom: An acid green sofa is brought to life by cushions in similar and contrasting hues; a chalky pink sofa and a plaster-coloured wall keeps things neutral but warm; a white kitchen has warm elements added with a wooden table and a glowing yellow cupboard

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of a colour seems to have more impact than the actual colour, so intense colours are more arousing and low-intensity colours more relaxing, whatever the hue. These emotional effects tend to be short term, so any stimulation or calm would ease off once the viewer has got accustomed to the space. This does mean, however, that colours can be used in entrance ways, hallway, reception rooms and offices to create a noteworthy first impression for guests or associates. Fast-food outlets tend to use shades of red, orange and yellow, longer wavelength colours that are believed to make you eat more. Farrow and Ball have colours called Eating Room Red, Picture Gallery Red and Day Room Yellow, all colours popular in the middle of the 19th century and associated with particular rooms. Casinos also use red as it imitates the colour of evening light and makes you less aware of the passing of time. The colour blue is associated with calm and can be a powerful atmosphere creator, often used in prisons to reduce stress. Hospitals use white and other cool colours to create a fresh, healing, restful environment. It has also been shown that people feel warmer in red and orange rooms and colder in violet, blue and green rooms even when the temperatures are equivalent. Despite all this we cannot deny that we all have very personal colour associations that may not fit with the science of light or the discoveries of colour psychologists. Many of these will be linked to our culture, upbringing and personal history. It also seems that many of us prefer colours that suit our natural skin type, hair and eye colour and choose such colours for our homes and our clothes. Choosing a scheme Establishing a colour scheme for a room requires the right balance of colour values in the same way as a painting or a textile design. Some interior designers think of a room as a natural landscape, imitating the balance of tones from floor to ceiling from earthy browns and dark tones to mid distance greens and mid tones to pale blues, white and light tones on the ceiling. Designers often use colours that are chromatically and tonally weighted, creating a harmonious balance between neutral, midway and intense, and between the lights and darks within a space. Having different levels of light and dark values with middle values can serve to provide visual pathways between them, which opens up a person’s experience of a room. An easy way to do this is to use colour families or analogous hues (three or more colours that are adjacent to each other on the colour wheel), focusing one colour as the dominant hue and the others as accents. COLOUR COMMENTARIES Here are some enlightening commentaries from a few of our local interior experts. Architect Your Home “The ability to see colour is a sense that has a dramatic effect on our lives. It has a close connection to our emotions and can help us feel calm or energised, quiet or boisterous.

Design by Architect Your Home; architect-yourhome.com

CITY | INTERIORS

It can be stimulating or subduing but it inevitably creates an emotional response. This is the main reason why many architects and designers shy away from using colour as it invariably elicits a reaction and it takes confidence and experience to ensure that reaction is a positive one. “There are many factors to consider when adding colour to a room. The size of the room, the height of the ceiling, the amount of natural daylight, the function of the room, the aspect of the windows. Then you need to think about what feel do you want. Cosy, minimal, cool, eclectic, traditional? And then how do you want to add the colour? Paint the walls, wallpaper, curtains, furniture, carpet, soft furnishings? “Finally you need to draw on your own confidence to make a colour statement. I always advise starting gently with soft furnishings and colour on one ‘feature’ wall or a significant piece of furniture. But primarily your home should be a reflection of you and your personality, a place that gives you pleasure. It is not a show home to please visitors and so if you like mixing many colours or prefer to keep to a more select palette that’s fine, just so long as you love it.” Woodhouse and Law “Recent years have seen a noticeable move towards multiple layers of similar colours. Here a more impactful sophistication, particularly in monochromatic schemes of rich, saturated tones, is achieved through combining differing textures and materials, providing nuanced layers of interest. “What has been particularly exciting to see within those schemes is a greater willingness from clients to explore a stronger use of colour and pattern. Homeowners seem to worry less about second-guessing what the next buyer might want, instead thinking more about the here and now; what appeals to them personally and what best reflects their character and style. Lockdown seems to have reinforced this further – if we are going to be spending more time at home, we should be embracing and enjoying every part of it. “That’s not to say that clients aren’t looking to the future. We are finding however that people are turning their backs on throw-away culture, keen to create an aesthetic that is


Design by Etons of Bath; etonsofbath.com; photograph by Chris Wakefield Photography

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The Pink Room, Queensberry Hotel, Bath, designed by Etons of Bath, uses a scheme of dusky pinks, chalky blue and peach

more timeless and lived-in. Antiques and mid-century pieces therefore are falling back in favour; not only will they stand the test of time, but they effortlessly hold their own alongside those bold, moody paint hues.” Etons of Bath “The colours used in traditional Georgian houses are generally quite ‘toned-down’ or ‘muted’ colours – sage green, blue-grey and burgundy, usually in a sheened finish. As the style evolved over the Georgian era, new colours were introduced – dusky pinks, soft greys, pea-green, sky or Wedgwood blue, beiges and stone shades in matte finishes. Many of these colour combinations work really well in Georgian houses today. “Georgians often mixed gilding or marble effect paintwork into their interiors, so don’t be afraid to add some touches of gold gilding or gold-framed pictures to really add the BELOW: This interior features charcoal grey walls and a sultry green sofa from Loaf – there is plenty of natural light from the window to lift the darker scheme

authentic feel. Gold metallic paint can be picked up fairly easily nowadays and is a lot cheaper than real gold leaf gilding! “If you are after a more classic contemporary look and feel, then add pops of colour into your schemes through bolder fabric choices or wallpapers.” Joel Bugg “As designers of bespoke fitted furniture and interiors, colour is a determining consideration for any project we produce. It is important to establish early on a client’s wishes on colour and materials, because it has a bearing on the detailing we would include on the furniture. We would treat the design of a painted kitchen very differently from one using natural wood. A painted kitchen, for example, is likely to have more open moulding details to allow paint to fill the gaps and joints, whereas a natural timber design needs to take into account grain directions. Likewise, if we were to plan two contradictory colours into a painted kitchen, we would design the cabinetry differently to

give greater distinction between the colours. Accent colours on one item of furniture, like an island or freestanding larder cupboard, are a great tool in creating focus in a kitchen. “We use colour in our space planning of kitchens too. By incorporating differing colours, we create zonal areas of use, important when planning large spaces. And it is not just a paint colour – we’re advocates of using a palette of natural materials in our designs; stone, marbles, woods, finished brasses all work to create these separations and are a great tool for lighting darker areas and vice versa.” We never shy away from incorporating dark colours into designs. A solid block of dark paint on a panelled wall can work just as well in adding depth to a room – like staring into an abyss, it can give an illusion of space. And with a well-executed lighting plan, colours can be illuminated and concentrated on or pared back in equal measure.” Loaf “A few years ago, it was all about neutrals, but I think now with sites like Pinterest and Instagram there’s plenty of good inspiration out there making it easier to get stronger colours right. We’re noticing that our customers are becoming much bolder with colour and gone are the days of ‘greige’. You can really lift a room by introducing a new hue and we’re seeing warming rust and clay tones as well as mustards and blues coming through. This season, we’ve adopted colour across our smaller accessories, including colourful ceramic mugs and knitted throws, and even our first collection of scented candles. These smaller loafing supplies are perfect for adding colour into your space.” n

architect-yourhome.com; sarahmillmoreupholstery.co.uk; woodhouseandlaw.co.uk; etonsofbath.com; joelbugg.co.uk; loaf.com THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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Inside stories

This year we have all spent a little more time at home, appreciating the good things but also dreaming of making improvements. Our A/W guide features all the best trades and services to help spruce up your house and garden. Whether it’s a small decorating touch or a major project, this directory offers a great range of expert services to make all those home, interior and garden ambitions become reality.

KELLY MARIE KITCHEN INTERIORS 8 Pulteney Terrace, Bath BA2 4HJ Tel: 01225 481881 (Mobile: 07796 554466) Web: kellymariekitchens.com Kelly Marie has more than 15 years experience in the kitchen design industry. She has had the pleasure of working on many luxury kitchen projects in the Bath area and now owns her own unique and creative business based on a constant list of word-of-mouth recommendations. Her technical designs with intrinsic creativity allow spaces that are functional yet beautiful. With a vast portfolio of luxury German kitchen projects, Kelly works with each client’s budget, providing personalised attention throughout the design process. Kelly believes that it is all about the little details and her approach combines purposeful variations of colour, textures and finishes. The careful selection of these elements endow the home with a sense of harmony, while reflecting the individual style of the client.

FIAT LUX 8 Bath Street, Frome BA11 1DH Tel: 01373 473555 Web: fiatlux.co.uk Let there be light... Fiat Lux opened its Frome showroom in 2003, and since then it has been the go-to place to see a huge range of superb lighting, from traditional fittings and shades to the most up-to-date trends in contemporary lighting designs. For interior lighting projects there are fixtures and fittings, bulbs, coloured cords and cables in every possible combination, as well as a full display of exterior lighting ideas. Fiat Lux works with leading manufacturers such as Vita, Original BTC and many more and is an established favourite with property developers, architects, interior designers and all lighting aficionados, professional and domestic. Whatever your style, mood or interior desire, then a trip to Fiat Lux will really light up your ideas.

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BATH RECLAMATION Tel: 07983 556757 Web: bathreclamation.co.uk It was a sad day when Walcot Reclamation and Walcot Architectural Salvage had to move out of Bath, but the good news is that former manager and director, Cary Morgan, is now the owner of Bath Reclamation, based just outside Bath in Newton St Loe. Bath Reclamation stock and source all types of reclaimed materials, with a special focus on building materials such as Bath stone ashlar, paving, flooring, roofing and bricks. All other types of salvaged materials and salvaged items – from windows to sleepers, curbs and resawn pine – are kept in stock when available. A visit to its helpful, new website is a must.


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ASPECT WINDOW STYLING 1 Saracen Street, Bath BA1 5BR Tel: 01225 469559 Web: aspectwindowstyling.co.uk Aspect Window Styling is a local family business that specialises in high-end made-to-measure window furnishings. These include blinds, powered blinds, shutters, curtains and awnings. Based in the centre of Bath, the team provide a full design, measuring and fitting service for both small and large design projects across the South West. The showroom is full of the latest products and its highly experienced staff are on hand to provide expert advice both for design and technical queries. Aspect Window Styling understands every window is unique, and aims to provide its customers with specialised solutions to bring out the best in their home.

BONITI

GARDEN AFFAIRS

Dunsdon Barn, West Littleton, Wiltshire SN14 8JA Tel: 01225 892200 Web: boniti.com

Trowbridge Garden Centre, 288 Frome Road, Trowbridge BA14 ODT Tel: 01225 774566 Web: gardenaffairs.co.uk

Run by Giles and Simon Lunt, Boniti is a high-quality interiors (and exteriors) business. The showroom is a destination for all types of natural stone, porcelain and timber flooring, as well as decorative tiles, stoneware, Kadai firebowls, garden furniture, homeware accessories and the highly desirable Everhot range cookers. Boniti has an impressive client list of property developers and offers a specialist bespoke service that will supply and fit worldwide. For large and small projects, the Boniti team are masters of their profession and it shows in every detail. The showroom is easily reached from J18 of the M4.

Create space for home working, hobbies, a growing family or even a new business venture with a cost-effective, versatile, fullyinsulated garden room. Garden Affairs offer a huge range of high quality, sustainable garden buildings and will help you get the design, the installation, the quality and the price spot on. Visit their extensive display centre at Trowbridge Garden Centre in Wiltshire to see garden offices, art and craft studios, teenage dens, granny annexes as well as a range of ‘posh sheds’ and summerhouses.

LOAF Unit 1D, Centaurus Road, Cribbs Causeway, Bristol, BS34 5TS Tel: 020 3141 8300 Web: loaf.com Brit-brand Loaf makes laid-back furniture for people to kick-off their shoes and to help them lead happier, more relaxed lives. The comfy sofas and upholstered beds are hand-produced in Long Eaton, Derbyshire – the heart of British upholstery making. And the mattresses are handmade in Wiltshire. Loaf opened its eighth ‘Shack’ last year at Cribbs Causeway, Bristol. The 5,000 sq ft showroom includes a mattress testing station, oodles of squidgy sofas and arcade games for little (and not-so-little) Loafers to enjoy, making it a haven for kicking back and relaxing. There’s even an old-school ice cream parlour where visitors can lap up their favourite scoop!

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WOODHOUSE & LAW 4 George’s Place, Bathwick Hill, Bath BA2 4EN Tel: 01225 428072 Web: woodhouseandlaw.co.uk Woodhouse and Law is a well-established full service interior and garden design partnership. From the showroom and studio on Bathwick Hill, the company offers every component necessary in the delivery of a project from concept to completion, ensuring the highest quality throughout. The unique service combines the expertise of in-house interior and garden designers with that of a highly skilled team of local craftsmen and technicians. So, whether your project is residential or commercial, the team at W&L can help with a wide range of services to transform your space. From making up soft furnishings to a full design service and project co-ordination, everything is delivered with exceptional attention to detail. To arrange an initial consultation, get in touch or pop in to meet the team.

SCHMIDT BATH

HOUSE OF RADIATORS

1 Park Road, Bath BA1 3EE Tel: 01225 337276 Web: schmidt-bath.com

22 Wellsway, Bear Flat, Bath BA2 2AA Tel: 01225 424199 Web: houseofradiators.co.uk

Providing bespoke made-to-measure solutions in Bath for over 30 years, the Schmidt Bath team, headed up by Leroy McKenzie, can transform every room of your home. Specialising in kitchens, bedrooms and bathrooms, Schmidt Bath, formerly Interior Harmony, has highly skilled in-house installers headed up by Colin Bevan, and can now offer complete renovation projects including extensions. The growing design team based at Park Road in Bath can help you create your dream kitchen, advising on the best layouts and appliances from brands including Neff, Siemens and Miele. If you’re looking to upgrade your kitchen, revamp your bedroom or design the perfect home office, give the team a call to book your free quotation.

House of Radiators sells traditional and designer radiators that can be off-the-shelf sizes/finishes or bespoke sizes and colours. This popular, family-run business opened its Bear Flat showroom in 2011 and not only sells to Bath areas but throughout the UK and overseas. Following a recent re-fit, there are over 100 radiators on display and due to increasing popularity the traditional cast iron and column radiator range has expanded. With over 45 years experience in the heating and radiator industry they offer a friendly and high level of customer service. This is key in helping customers choose the right radiator for their home that will not only look amazing but will heat their room and do its job. Because the team work with 20 of the leading manufacturers and distributors in the radiator industry, there’s always something to suit all budgets and styles. Locally the company offers a free, at-home consultation where they’ll measure up and work out the correct heat requirements and size up radiators accordingly.

HOMEFRONT INTERIORS 10 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath BA1 2LP Tel: 01225 571711 Web: homefrontinteriors.co.uk The eclectic Homefront Interiors has an ever-changing selection of homewares, gifts and cards. This little independent store may be small, but it has a wide range and a regularly updated stock of new and vintage homewares and follows a simple ethos of sustainability. This could mean recycled materials, Fairtrade origins, small-scale production or simply showing a little love and care to vintage finds. It is the clever mix of vintage and contemporary alongside an ever-growing selection of handmade pieces from local artists, including textiles, ceramics, jewellery, art prints and cards, that makes Homefront such a great destination. Ideal for gifts and unique finds for your own home.

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NEWMAN’S JOINERY 3 Broadway Court, Miles Street, Bath BA2 4HX Tel: 01225 318378, Web: newmansjoinery.co.uk In April 2015, Roland Newman took over the thriving Hulin & Hudson joinery firm following the retirement of Mike Hulin. Based in Widcombe, the joinery shop was a well-established local business providing highquality joinery for houses in Bath and the surrounding areas. Chris, the foreman, worked with Mike for almost 20 years and continues to run the workshop, so the wealth of experience and local knowledge has been retained. The company deals with everything from timber windows, staircases, doors and frames to alcove cupboards, panelling, timber conservatories and shop façades and they have a specialist knowledge in listed buildings. Contact Newmans for a free, no-obligation initial visit to discuss your requirements.

AVONVALE CARPETS 37 Kingsmead Street, Bath BA1 2AA Tel: 01225 427057 Web: avonvalecarpets.co.uk

KUTCHENHAUS 5 Saracen Street, Bath BA1 2NN Tel: 01225 634025 Web: kutchenhaus.co.uk Kütchenhaus is the UK arm of company Nobilia – the largest manufacturer of fitted kitchens in Europe, making up to 3,000 kitchens daily. This means Kütchenhaus can not only keep prices competitive but still deliver high quality, German-engineered kitchens. They provide a wide selection of kitchen styles and can create both traditional and contemporary looks in matte and gloss textures. With their free design service, they can come up with superb, photo-realistic images giving a clear visual of a customer’s ideal kitchen. They also supply a full range of appliances including Bosch, Neff, CDA and Miele. Buying a kitchen is a big decision, and the Kütchenhaus team work closely with every single client to give them complete confidence in their important new purchase.

TRADITIONAL UPHOLSTERY SCHOOL Unit 2, Holt Holdings, East Lane, Holt, Wiltshire BA14 6QU Tel: 07505 651030 Web: traditionalupholsteryschool.co.uk

The choice of flooring is vital in transforming any room and the range of options can sometimes overwhelm. Luckily Avonvale Carpets is on hand to assist. It has served homeowners and businesses throughout the city of Bath and Wiltshire for 48 years, providing an excellent choice of flooring, in-depth expertise and perfect fitting. An independent, family-run business, Avonvale Carpets only works with trusted, local, professionally trained fitters, and deals directly with major manufacturers. The extensive selection of quality flooring is second to none: woollens, naturals, eco-friendly alternatives, vinyls, hard flooring and tailor-made options, too. You will be amazed at the variety on offer in the shop, found just off Kingsmead Square.

In its new home surrounded by rolling Wiltshire farmland near Bradford on Avon, The Traditional Upholstery School is recognised as one of Britain’s top craft training centres. The School offers courses for everyone, from fun one-day hobby classes to professional training for prestigious Association of Master Upholsterers and Soft Furnishers (AMUSF) diplomas. Students travel from all over the UK for acclaimed classes ranging from creative lampshade-making to deepbuttoned footstools. Some want a creative day out – others are looking to train for a new career or lifestyle. All are expecting free cake... and they are never disappointed. This small, friendly school is owned and run by local upholsterer, lampshademaker and author Joanna Heptinstall, as well as her team of expert tutors and Nellie the dog. But mostly by Nellie.

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MANDARIN STONE 15–16 Broad Street, Bath BA1 5LJ Tel: 01225 460033 Web: mandarinstone.com Renowned for its comprehensive natural stone collection, Mandarin Stone has gained quite a reputation for its on-trend and beautifully designed porcelain. Ranging from tiles that cleverly mimic materials such as wood, concrete and marble to striking glazed and patterned tiles, the collection has endless surface design possibilities. Established for over 25 years and with 10 inspirational UK showrooms, it offers dependable specialist knowledge as well as technical expertise. Almost the entire natural stone and porcelain collection is held in stock in the UK, so lead times are short.

THE BATH FRAMER 14–15 Walcot Buildings, London Road, Bath BA1 6AD Tel: 01225 920210 Web: thebathpictureframer.co.uk

ANNA DESIGN BESPOKE FABRIC COMMISSIONS Tel: 01761 471663 / 07779 951691 Web: anna-design.uk

The Bath Framer, owned by Kelly, is a friendly boutique picture framers that has a beautifully quirky front of house and an amazing naturally lit workshop. Both are a joy to work in and to visit for customers wanting to see how frames are created. Since opening, the business has gone from strength to strength, building a client list of local residents and businesses based in Bath, Bristol and beyond. A bespoke framing service, tailored to suit all individuals’ needs runs alongside a gorgeous selection of cards, gift wrap and stationery.

Anna Fraenkel has been fulfilling textile commissions since she was 17 and for the last decade has been working with national interior design company Jayne Clayton. She specialises in textiles for the home and events. Whether you’re looking to transform a village hall into a beautiful wedding venue, want something really unusual, or simply need some curtains, blinds or cushions for your home, Anna will visit, advise and bring your ideas to life.

BATH KITCHEN COMPANY 7–9 North Parade Buildings, Bath BA1 1NS Tel: 01225 312003 Web: bathkitchencompany.co.uk Established in 1990, Bath Kitchen Company is a well-regarded family business based in Bath. With vast experience, the company takes pride in its close attention to detail and its understanding of what each client requires. Whatever an individual client’s tastes, the team will find a bespoke kitchen that strikes a perfect balance between aesthetic and practical requirements. Consequently every kitchen is unique, beautifully designed and perfectly functional. Handmade using premium materials and to the highest standards, a beautiful kitchen can be carefully crafted to make the most of available space, existing features and the latest technology. Whether designing for Bath’s oldest private homes or cutting-edge city apartments, the principle is the same – Bath Kitchen Company will create a place that enhances your lifestyle.

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ETONS OF BATH Tel: 01225 639002 Web: etonsofbath.com Founded in 2006, Etons of Bath is a specialist interior design practice focused on refurbishing, renovating and reinvigorating period homes and hotels. Their team of 12 interior designers, planners and project managers help you plan, design and deliver classically inspired interiors that add value, turn heads and improve the use of space. They cover projects of all shapes and sizes from large country estates to Bath townhouses, small apartments and cottages, boutique hotels to bijou boltholes, combining creative flair and solid experience together with a passionate and friendly team.

REVITATILE Tel: 01225 800232 Web: revitatile.co.uk Whether it’s walls, floors, your bathroom or your kitchen, Revitatile provides a range of revolutionary services to help bring your tiled areas back to life. A cheaper, cleaner and quicker solution to a complete re-tile, Revitatile can clean or recolour your grout, giving it a new lease of life. Other services include silicone sealant replacement and shower-glass restoration. The company also provides a glass and tile protective coating service that helps keep these areas cleaner for longer. Displaced or cracked tiles that require replacement can also be fixed.

JOEL BUGG FURNITURE & SPACES Tel: 01225 583520 / 07779 236242 Web: joelbugg.co.uk

ORIENTAL RUGS OF BATH

Joel Bugg Furniture & Spaces designs and creates elegant, bespoke fitted furniture and interiors, which are architecturally thought through to seamlessly fit and suit your property. Joel and his team offer a fully managed service from initial space planning and concept designs, using teams of skilled cabinet makers in their manufacture through to final installation. They will also recommend, source and provide lighting, flooring and other finishing touches as required. Their expertise spans all interiors from kitchens and bathrooms to libraries and boot rooms, and as well as working directly with clients they work collaboratively with architects and interior designers to deliver a truly tailored solution.

Bookbarn International, Hallatrow Business Park, Wells Road, Hallatrow, Bristol BS39 6EX Tel: 01761 451764 Web: orientalrugsofbath.com Oriental Rugs of Bath is home to an eclectic collection of authentically handcrafted rugs, kilims and furnishings from the Middle and Far East. Personalised on approval services are offered as standard and all stock is available to order easily online (with free nationwide delivery). Expert advice is readily available for all rugrelated enquiries and bespoke orders can be successfully organised. The specialist cleaning and repair service provided is renowned, restoring the most valuable of antique and modern oriental rugs.

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ARCHITECT YOUR HOME Tel: 0800 849 8505 Web: architect-yourhome.com Architect Your Home’s service kicks off with an initial design consultation – this is where your project starts. The consultation will include an indepth discussion to fully establish your requirements and aspirations. You will also be provided with sketch drawings of a properly considered and collaborative design proposal. The practical implications of your design will be explained in detail and you will be equipped with the necessary tools so that you can move your project forward confidently to the next stage. You will also receive advice on issues with planning permission, listed building consents and structures. At the end of the session you will have an agreed proposal and recommendations on the next steps and how to move the project forward.

RECLAIMED RADIATORS Tel: 07540 978 408 Web: reclaimedradiators.co.uk Reclaimed Radiators sell a comprehensive range of antique and period cast iron radiators. Each original radiator is thoroughly tested and sympathetically restored before it is primed, hand-painted and returned to ‘as good as new’ condition, ready for installation. These original cast iron radiators combine form with function – they are vintage classics that will enhance a period property, and with a core residual heat output they offer a superior efficiency and performance to modern pressed-steel radiators. With a large choice of vintage radiators in stock and a wealth of knowledge and expertise, the specialist team at Reclaimed Radiators are happy to help and advise customers find the perfect pieces as well as assist property owners looking to restore their own radiators.

CATRIONA ARCHER Tel: 07823 884945 Web: catrionaarcher.com Catriona Archer believes that interior design should be accessible to all, which is why providing inspiring and practical working solutions is at the heart of what she does. Catriona starts by making the most of your existing items, storage and space. This is a wonderfully quick and inexpensive way to refresh and update your interior before discussing and sourcing any further additions you may require. So, if you are looking for a complete design and styling experience from start to finish, or simply an introductory half/full day consultation to spring-board or fine-tune your existing ideas, then contact Catriona to discuss what works best for you.

KINDLE STOVES Glenavon Farm, 331 Bath Road, Saltford BS31 3TJ Tel: 01225 874422 Web: kindlestoves.co.uk At the heart of your home should be the perfect stove. Kindle Stoves is a local specialist in clean burning, Eco Design Ready stoves approved for burning wood in Bath, with a wood-burner to suit every home and every style. The team stock the super-efficient Woodwarm, Contura and Rais models as well as many more, offering a full installation service – from fireplace alterations, to slate hearths and stone fireplaces. The lovely showroom, situated just outside Keynsham, has one of the largest displays of wood-burners in the South West and is open seven days a week. Pop in for advice and brochures or to book a home survey. Seasoned logs, gas fires, and the Big Green Egg outdoor cooker are also available.

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HEIDI REIKI

BATH CARPETS AND FLOORING

BALANCING ENERGY IN PLACES Tel: 07776 255875 Web: heidireiki.com

4 Kingsmead Street, Bath BA1 2AA Tel: 01225 471888 Web: carpetsandflooringbath.co.uk

What people say about Heidi Reiki : “We really appreciate the work Heidi did for us; energy clearing the space after we had moved into our new clinic in London. Heidi is lovely, and has a very professional and healing nature. We had been recommended by a friend and are so glad we did. Heidi gave us Reiki sessions individually with specific advice for each of us to feel as good as possible. Our clinic space feels so clear and peaceful now, thanks to Heidi’s extensive and thorough work on the area. Heidi also gives you a full report explaining everything she did and what she found, which she also talks through with you, giving you tips to enhance the energy in the area. It honestly all made such a difference and our clinic has been thriving ever since. Thanks again for all your work Heidi, and we look forward to our next session in the future. Highly recommend to everyone.” Chiropractic Alchemy, London.

Supplying and fitting flooring throughout the South West since 2004. Bath Carpets and Flooring (BCF) offers a wide selection of carpets, all made from a variety of different materials including wool, polypropylene, nylon and sisals. With the combined experience of more than 90 years, the team’s extensive knowledge and expertise puts you at ease as they match your needs with the perfect flooring solution. BCF pride themselves on only giving impartial advice and hassle-free measuring and estimating, so there will never be any sales pressure or confusion. As the city’s largest Karndean flooring specialist, BCF’s luxury vinyl tile showroom will give you the freedom to create impressive floors, where the only limit is imagination. With showrooms over two floors offering an even greater selection of homely carpets, vinyl’s, LVT’s and modern rugs. Commercial flooring from all leading manufacturers is available through Bath Contract Flooring Ltd. So if it’s flooring for your home or your business BCF have got it covered.

A peaceful place to live and work: Major life changes, such as a new job, a new relationship, a new home, or an illness are all times when you and your home could benefit from energy clearing. Does something feel 'out of kilter' or not ‘quite right’ in your living space? Sometimes energy flows need to be restored in places where there has been emotional upset, also other environmental factors can disrupt the flow of energy to a space. Moving through grief and other obstacles, with healing, can bring a sense of wellbeing to you and your home – Heidi’s process can help support to resolve these challenges and bring calm to you and your surroundings. And it’s not just at these times either; for the general health of your home, a yearly process of energy clearing can be beneficial. In addition to Feng Shui, Heidi will offer Reiki to those living/working there, to help achieve a peaceful, relaxing, calm feeling for you and the space itself. If your home or work place would benefit from some balancing, contact Heidi for an informal chat and more information. To find out more contact Heidi Lerner Rearden. heidi@heidireiki.com

MARDAN REMOVALS AND STORAGE Tel: 01225 313233 / 07899 847857 Web:mardanremovals.co.uk Mardan work with both home and business owners directly and all work is of the highest standard, reliability being paramount. The team are highly experienced in moving fine arts and antiques giving you the confidence that your most prized possessions will be moved safely and carefully. All your effects will be packed to European standards. Mardan offer a full packing service and all packing materials are free of charge with every move. The company also provides secure storage hire in Bath with around-the-clock access and CCTV security and with flexible rental periods and storage size at competitive rates. Whatever your reason for needing storage, if you’re looking to store all your household goods or just a couple of items, look no further. Mardan Removals can take the stress away and arrange it all for you in Bath.

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HOMES, INTERIORS & GARDENS | GUIDE 2020

STUART JONES INTERIOR DESIGN & RESTORATION Tel: 01454 603947 Mobile: 07484 693095 Web: sjrestoration.co.uk Stuart Jones Interior Design is a design and restoration company covering all aspects of interior design with over 20 years’ experience. They have formed an exceptional reputation priding themselves in transforming interior spaces, from renovating Georgian townhouses to assisting with new build projects. Using 3D design software brings the design process to life, creating room designs which help inspire and encourage their clients to visualise the finished space. Stuart Jones collaborate with other design-led professionals including architects and contractors to assist with room designs, layouts and product sourcing whilst sharing their knowledge and expertise to ensure a project is finished to the highest standard. As we go to press, we have just heard that Joanne Jones has achieved ‘Accredited Designer’ status by The Society of British International Interior Design. Excellent.

COOPERS STORES 13–15 Walcot Street, Bath BA1 5BN Tel: 01225 311811 Web: coopers-stores.com Coopers is a highly acclaimed and award winning appliance retailer with over 70 years of continuous trading. With a large showroom in the centre of Bath, you can see a fantastic display of kitchen appliances including range cookers, refrigeration, laundry, dishwashing and built-in appliances. Coopers has a dedicated, expert team always on hand to help choose the right product for you. They aim to be competitively priced with other high street players and online sellers too. They can deliver throughout the South West and offer flexible delivery slots to fit with a customer’s needs. They have also established links with a great team of expert installers to offer a complete advise, buy, deliver, and install service. This is independent retailing at its best – values driven and a superb customer service – which is a real tonic to the spiritless online experience and for many years running, a popular entry in our ‘Best of Bath’ list.

TRUESPEED BROADBAND SERVICE PROVIDER Tel: 01225 300370 Web: truespeed.com TrueSpeed delivers futureproof connectivity to some of the South West’s hardest to reach areas, and is a full-fibre broadband and infrastructure company with a difference. Across the region TrueSpeed have built an entirely new network (going where other broadband service providers refuse to go) in order to provide residents and businesses with a solution to all their online needs. Delivering 200Mbps guaranteed speed broadband into every property it connects, TrueSpeed provides reliable round-the-clock connectivity. And, driven by its community focused ethos, TrueSpeed invests in the areas it works by providing local schools and community hubs with free broadband for life. Allowing entire communities to benefit from the service for generations to come.

The Bath Magazine Homes, Interiors & Gardens Guide can also be found on our website: thebathmag.co.uk If you are a business or have a service you would like listed in the guide then please get in touch. Tel: 01225 424499 or email sales@thebathmagazine.co.uk

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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

How to create the perfect home office

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ver the last few months many of us have been working from home in less than ideal conditions, with the expectation that we would be heading back to the office pretty soon. Today, though, the outlook seems less certain. Working from home for all or part of the week looks likely to be here for the foreseeable future. So creating the right home office environment can make the difference between a frustrating day at the laptop and a highly productive one. With this in mind, it makes sense to iron out those work-from-home niggles, perfect your home working environment shipshape and maximise your work-time effectiveness. So here are some top tips to create your perfect home office. Decide on a dedicated work space Now that working from home is a more permanent fixture, it’s time to find a proper space for your home office. It doesn’t need to be a fully fledged book-lined study - but it does need to be somewhere you can ‘go’ to work and where there are minimal distractions. Think creatively. A spare bedroom, a Harry Potter-esque desk under the stairs – it can be anywhere that allows you to properly separate your ‘home’ and ‘work life’ so you can switch off and switch on effectively. Find a schedule that works If you are an early riser and tend to do your best work in the mornings then allocate these hours to those more brain-intensive tasks and schedule online meetings later in the day. It’s also good to set clear expectations with other members of your team and to understand their preferred routines. This goes for people you live with as well – if they are aware of your work schedule, there is a much lower risk of getting interrupted in an important Zoom call. Take a break When you’re in the office, it’s easier to take breaks without even realising it – having a quick chat by the water cooler or popping out to grab a coffee. When you’re at home, though, it can be harder. Carve 82 TheBATHMagazine

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out time every day to get away from your computer, go for a lunchtime walk or sit outside with a cuppa so you’re away from your computer and other screens. You’ll be more productive throughout the day if you allow yourself to recharge and give your eyes a rest. Decide what home office kit you really need It’s very easy to browse stationery and office equipment and be tempted to splash the cash on things you might not actually use. Start with the basics – and check what your company will pay for. For example, your firm may pay for a new computer if the one you have is slow and unreliable. A printer is useful but if you only need to scan items occasionally then consider using the scanning facility on your smartphone instead. Make sure your broadband is up to the job. Having ultrafast, reliable broadband connectivity is a must for anyone working from home. Lots of providers advertise ‘fibre’ broadband but actually ‘subdivide’ the optical fibre coming out of your local phone cabinet and then share it between multiple homes, which can lead to digital traffic jams at peak periods and slowing down your service. So If you’re tired of fighting with spinning wheels and drop-outs, and Zoom calls that constantly freeze, it’s time to move away from substandard, part-copper and fake fibre broadband and switch to an ultrafast, supremely reliable connection. By choosing a full fibre (aka Fibre To The Home/FTTH) broadband provider for a fibre-optic connection that runs right to your door. This way, you’ll get exactly what you pay for 24-7 without frustrating drop outs or slowing down of service at peak times. Connect multiple devices at the same time and have the peace of mind you can use the internet how you want, when you want. The great news is, Truespeed is live in multiple villages across the South West so you could be enjoying 200Mbps guaranteed speed, full fibre broadband sooner than you think. Simply visit truespeed.com or call our friendly Bath based team on 01225 300370.


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ADVERORIAL FEATURE

BRINGING THE BOUTIQUE HOTEL BAR TO YOUR BACK GARDEN Bespoke lifestyle-oriented social solutions

The Outdoor Bar Company is a new and exciting Bath-based business which brings the style and vibe of a custom-made Boutique Hotel Bar to your garden. www.outdoorbarco.co.uk The Outdoor Bar Company specialises in delivering beautiful build solutions coupled with the high design that you expect to find in some the of the world’s best boutique hotels – right in your own garden. Behind the venture is Chris Jones, who draws on twenty years of experience in the Boutique Hotel Industry, having created numerous lauded hotels throughout the United States. “Out of the adversity of the past months, comes opportunity” says Chris, who normally spends his time between Barcelona and Bath. “I think the “New Normal” has led to lots of folks having an enhanced appreciation of what we have on our own doorstep – and being able to socialise in our own gardens has provided a great relief for many. Taking that a step further, having the charm of a boutique hotel bar creates a great alternative that I think will “stick” even when the world starts to free up again. We also see an opportunity for the many local Pubs to enhance their gardens, with the addition of a stunning Outdoor Bar and accompanying revenue opportunity.” The bars are already creating a buzz. The recently completed project in Bath has a feel of a New York hotel bar, with stools pulled up to a copper bar top fronted with reclaimed wood. A piped rear back bar with vintage teak and a custom canvas roof completes the look and the bars have their own mini beer kegs, plus LED lighting controllable from your smart phone. Each of the bars is individually designed and equipped with a host of amenities, but design takes

centre stage, with customers able to incorporate everything from beer and wine taps, to pizza ovens, heater units and a DJ booth. Currently in design is a new outdoor bar for a soon to be announced “favorite local pub” - who are looking to make more of an already beautiful beer garden. “Our design speaks to the pubs considerable history combined with Baths railway heritage - using reclaimed wood from the roof of a train yard, and materials traditional to the pubs name and narrative”. There’s even an off-grid solar option for more remote locations – using solar and cell storage to run the lights and equipment. “No two bars will ever be the same” says Chris, who believes this to be a central core value to the company. Customers can also name their bars and through partnerships with local companies, the Outdoor Bar Company intends to promote curated Wine, Beers and Spirits from local purveyors and of course, given the Barcelona connection, some Catalonian Cava. Prices will vary depending on the size and scope but start at £6,500. Typical time from inception to completion is under a month, so order now and catch the Indian Summer, or have the Vin Chaud on tap for the cooler months! Chris Jones 0770 200 5040 info@outdoorbarco.co.uk Instagram - @theoutdoorbarco Facebook - @theoutdoorbarco Twitter - @bar_outdoor

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ANNIVERSARY

Creating a low-allergen garden Above, left inset: © Dorling Kindersley: James Young; Above, right inset © Dorling Kindersley: Mark Winwood/RHS Wisley

The recently published RHS The Wellbeing Garden, by Professor Alistair Griffiths and Matthew Keightley is an eye-opening practical guide to making your garden good for you. Themes include how plants can form a barrier against air and noise pollution, which birdsong alleviates anxiety and how plants can help to save energy – this excerpt is about how you can create a low-allergen garden

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ith the right plants, your garden can be a haven – even for allergy-sufferers – all year round. Although it’s not possible to eliminate all pollen-producing plants from a garden – or even desirable, since they are beneficial to bees and other pollinating insects – some plants will actually remove pollen from the air by trapping the grains. Other plants produce much lower levels of pollen, and so, with careful design and planting, allergy-sufferers can enjoy their gardens throughout the year. POLLEN AND ALLERGIES As any hayfever sufferer knows, not all plants bring a sense of wellbeing. For the estimated 10 to 30 per cent of adults and 40 per cent of children globally who suffer from hay fever, being outside when the pollen count is high is not always an idyllic prospect. Pollen is produced by the male reproductive parts of a plant and transferred, either by wind, water, or via insects and animals, to the stigma, the female part of a plant, for pollination. Fertilization then takes place and the plant produces seeds. Sex matters Perfect-flowered plants, such as some foxgloves, lilies, and roses, have both male and female parts together in the same flower. Monoecious plants, such as birch and hazel, have separate male and female flowers on the 84 TheBATHMagazine

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same plant, while dioecious plants, such as holly, juniper, and some grasses, have male plants with only male flowers and female plants that have only female flowers. Male dioecious plants produce pollen, and the female plants produce fruits or seeds but no pollen. Some plants produce much less pollen than others (see opposite), and sterile plants, which have no male or female flowers, produce no pollen at all. Sterile plants, low-pollen producers, and the females of dioecious plants are the best choices for a low-allergen garden. Blowing in the wind Some wind and water-pollinated plants produce large quantities of pollen in order to be successful in reproducing and surviving, whereas many animal- and insect-pollinated plants produce less pollen to reproduce and survive. However, even within animal- and insect-pollinated plant groups, some produce less pollen than others. US horticulturist Tom Ogren created the Ogren Plant Allergy Scale (OPALS), which measures allergenicity of plants. A rating of one is the lowest and 10 is the highest. Birch, for example, has an OPALS rating of nine, while a foxglove’s rating is just two. Use this scale to help you to select plants for your garden with low amounts of pollen. A HAVEN FOR ALLERGY-SUFFERERS Allergies don’t have to prevent you enjoying your garden. With a few clever strategies, you

can design a space that will minimize pollen levels and ease allergy symptoms. Pick your flowers Colourful, eye-catching flowers, such as peonies, violets, and pansies, produce very little airborne pollen and these, along with flowers that attract bees and other pollinating insects, such as penstemon and antirrhinum, are generally the best choices for hayfever sufferers. Most double flowers also produce little pollen, and while they do not provide much food for pollinators, some, such as climbing roses, offer refuges and nesting sites for other wildlife. Plants with hooded or tubular flowers, including foxgloves and agapanthus, have low OPALS ratings. Ornamental grasses, singleflowered daisies, and chrysanthemums, on the other hand, should be avoided. If you really love the look of ornamental grasses, try female grasses or strappy-leaved foliage plants such as Libertia or Phormium, which have insect-pollinated flowers and a lower OPALS rating. Intensely scented plants such as wisteria and jasmine may trigger sensitivities to smell, so steer clear of these too. Lose the lawn Lawns can be great for wildlife, but are not ideal for allergy sufferers, so consider other ground cover or opt for gravel or decking. Hard surfaces can help to keep pollen airborne, so choose greenery to trap pollen


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GARDENS

grains from the air. Interlace paving with groundcover plants, such as creeping thyme, that will trap pollen grains and soften hard edges. If you can’t bear to lose your lawn, make sure that it is kept short to prevent the grass from flowering. Choosing a hedge It’s impossible to banish all pollen from your garden, but you can ensure that it is easily blown away by installing permeable boundaries, such as trellis, to increase air flow. You could also try planting a lowallergen hedge along the windward side of your garden to capture pollen before it reaches you. Opt for hedging plants that produce flowers, rather than catkins, and that have scaly or hairy leaves to trap pollen and pollutant particles, such as hawthorn, Choisya, Pittosporum, and Escallonia. Female forms of dioecious plants, such as a berry-producing female holly plant, are also attractive and effective, but steer clear of privet, which has an OPALS rating of nine. Your tree options While many trees, including birch, hazel, and junipers, are wind-pollinated and best avoided, there are some beautiful flowering species, such as apples, cherries and rowans, that produce little airborne pollen and are perfect for small to medium-sized gardens.

LOW-ALLERGEN PLANTS These plants all have a low OPALS rating, making them good choices for an allergy-friendly garden. 1 Snapdragon (Antirrhinum) has two lipped flowers that come in a range of colours (see main image opposite). OPALS rating: 1. 2 Female silver-margined holly (Ilex aquifolium ‘Argentea Marginata’) bears bright red berries in autumn. OPALS rating: 1. 3 Whitebeam (Sorbus aria) is a deciduous tree that produces clusters of white flowers in spring and red berries in early autumn (see left inset opposite). OPALS rating: 3. 4 Clematis (Clematis armandii) bears scented, star-shaped, creamy-white flowers in spring. OPALS rating: 3. 5 Garden pinks (Dianthus) have small sprays of fragrant, saucer-shaped flowers in a range of colours (see right inset opposite). OPALS rating: 3. 6 African lily (Agapanthus) bears spherical heads of trumpet-shaped blue, occasionally white, flowers in summer (see image above right). OPALS rating: 2.

RHS Your Wellbeing Garden by Professor Alistair Griffiths and Matthew Keightley is published by Dorling Kindersley. Hardback, £16.99

Create space with a garden room GARDEN OFFICES • LOG CABINS • STUDIOS • SUMMERHOUSES POSH SHEDS • TIMBER GARAGES • OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES

01225 774566 • www.gardenaffairs.co.uk Visit our Display Centre at Trowbridge Garden Centre 288 Frome Road, BA14 0DT THEBATHMAG.CO.UK THEBATHMAG.CO.UK || october january 2020 2010

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the directory

to advertise in this section call 01225 424 499

Care Home

Handy Man

Electricians

House & Home

Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

ONEMAGAZINEONECITYONEMONTH Email: annadesign@btinternet.com

KEIKO KISHIMOTO Holistic Treatments for Wellbeing

Aromatherapy • Reflexology/Facial reflexology Japanese Cosmo Facelift • Deep Tissue Massage For more information, please visit:

www.keikokishimoto.co.uk 07739 827186 contact@keikokishimoto.co.uk

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IS AVAILABLE TO PICK UP FOR FREE AT

CENTRAL


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Traditional Building Material

Exterior Features

Traditional Timber and Flooring

Interior Features

Mirrors

Reclaimed Roofing

Traditional Stone Flooring

Miscellaneous

Traditional Building Material

Bath Reclamation Originally of Walcot Reclamation and then former Co-Director of Walcot Architectural Salvage Ltd, Cary Morgan has over 30 years experience in the Reclamation and Salvage business. Based just outside of Bath in Newton St Loe, Bath Reclamation stocks and sources all types of Reclaimed materials, focusing in particular on Traditional Building Materials.

www.bathreclamation.co.uk

IG OR

TO RS

Home Farm Yard, Newton St Loe, Bath, BA2 9DA 07983 556 757 | info@bathreclamation.co.uk

IN AL C

AS T I R O N R A

A DI

Original cast iron radiators, lovingly restored and ready to plumb straight into your exisiting central heating system.

We are a local Bath-based business with a huge choice of stock available now. Call David Lucas on 07540 978 408

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PROPERTY | HOMEPAGE

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handsome detached family home tucked away at the end of a quiet cul de sac. This attractive ‘Scandi’ style property has been comprehensively refurbished throughout and sympathetically extended by the current owners and provides a perfect blend of energy performant accommodation with lovely contemporary ‘Green’ finishes, which include seasoned Oak double glazed windows and a Sedum roof. The property has been architecturally designed and extended to provide a beautifully presented, open plan 4 bedroom family home with an adjoining self-contained 2 bedroom annexe. Both the house and annexe have pretty well stocked mature gardens and off-street parking along with a large timber framed garden store and an attractive garden pod that is currently being used as an at home office. The main body of the house has a wonderful double aspect sitting room which is linked to a large, well equipped, light and airy kitchen and dining room with handsome bi fold doors that span the width of the property and lead onto the pretty gardens. In addition, there are 4 lovely bedrooms, the master has an en-suite wet room and there is also a family bathroom. The annexe which can be independently accessed to the side of the property is linked via the main entrance hall and is entered into a large open plan dining room, kitchen and at home office space. Leading from the kitchen there is generously proportioned family room which leads through to 2 bedrooms and a bath and shower room. This is a quite exceptional property and a viewing is strongly recommended by the sole agents Cobb Farr.

Woodland Grove, Bath • Detached ’Scandi’ style family home • Four bedrooms, two bathrooms • Garden office pod • Off street parking • 2 bedroom self-contained annexe • Highly sought after residential area close to excellent amenities OIEO £1M

Cobb Farr, 35 Brock Street, The Circus, Bath. Tel: 01225 333332

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** FANTASTIC INCENTIVES AVAILABLE ON THIS LAST REMAINING PLOT AT FULL ASKING PRICE. COME AND VIEW ON SATURDAY'S BETWEEN 11.00AM-3.00PM NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY** Mulberry House is a fabulous 5 bedroom detached property with a sitting room with French doors leading to the rear garden, separate dining room, kitchen with French doors leading to rear garden, cloakroom, utility room and study. On the first floor there are 5 bedrooms, the master bedroom has an en-suite and dressing room, bedroom 2 has an en-suite and there are a further three double bedrooms and a family bathroom. Externally; an integrated double garage and gardens.

01225 333332 | 01225 866111


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Bailbrook Lane, Bath £1,950,000

A stunning detached 5 bedroom property with ¾ acre landscaped gardens arranged over 2 floors with superb living accommodation throughout with an open plan luxury kitchen/dining/living room with doors opening onto the balcony overlooking meadow grass land and separate family room. • Contemporary detached house, 3465 sq ft

• 5 double bedrooms

• Fabric first approach to energy efficiency • ¾ acre of landscaped gardens

01225 333332 | 01225 866111


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2020

PRINT & DIGITAL MEDIA PACK

“Founded in 2011 by Marcus Spanswick, who already had 20 years’ experience in the industry, Mardan Removals and Storage Ltd is a, family run, professional full service removals and storage company based in Bath. Marcus wanted to build a company that he and his team would be proud of. The key to the company’s success is providing a personalised service, treating each customer as an individual to ensure they get an excellent removal service. Mardan have a fleet of vehicles allowing them to offer; commercial moving, local to international moves and storage”.

BATH’S BIGGEST MONTHLY

MAGAZINE

Thinking of advertising your business

Our 2020 media pa ck can be viewed online

MAGAZINE • HOMES & INTERIORS •

HEALTH & BEAUTY • WHAT’S

CITY

ON • ARTS & CULTURE •

MONTH

FASHION • FOOD • GARDENS

• MOTORS • CITY LIVING

FOR A COPY OF OUR 2020 MEDIA PACK EITHER VISIT THE BATH MAGAZINE WEBSITE THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

DOMESTIC & COMMERCIAL MOVERS • PACKERS • STORERS • SHIPPERS

Southwinds Farm, Woolverton A superb development of six beautifully crafted, individual homes in an eclectic mix of designs, located within easy reach of Bath.

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OR CONTACT US ON 01225 424499 EMAIL: SALES@THEBATHMAGAZINE.CO.UK


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Peter Greatorex managing director of The apartment Company

How to style your balcony to appeal to buyers

B

alconies are a wonderful outside space that we know apartment owners cherish, a place where you can enjoy a coffee in the morning, or a sip of a tipple in the evening. With stunning views all over the city, they are a little haven that you can make your own. Although enjoyed often, these areas, which are an extension of your home, can get ignored when people are decorating their home. It doesn’t matter the size of the space you have to play with, at The Apartment Company we have put together some ideas on how to style your balcony to appeal to buyers.

A little lighting: As the night starts to set in and the light begins to fade, you may still want to remain sitting outside to finish some pages of a good book, or just to relax. There are an abundance of light choices available. Fairy lights look lovely draped around the walls and railings, and you can create a warm ambience with lanterns placed in groups in a corner. You can add more light into specific areas by placing stakes in large flower pots where you can position hanging lights. Don’t worry about having cables trailing along your little outside space, with a variety of solar lights available you don’t have to compromise on style.

A little bit of green: It doesn’t matter how much space you have, every single place can be transformed with a little touch of something green, whether that’s flowers or a lovely leafy plant. Hanging planters are a great idea for adding some colour to railings and can also add some texture to those balconies that are on the smaller side. For larger spaces, adding planters will allow you to add a wealth of foliage and colour; contrasting shades will create a calming environment, a perfect place for you to relax. You can also use a shelving unit in the corner or against a wall to create a mini garden – or what about a living wall? These are great ways of adding colour without taking up precious space.

A little rug: There is so much choice when it comes to decorating your outside space these days, and one thing we have seen a lot of is adding a rug – this can really transform the area and make it elegantly cosy. You can purchase specific weatherproof outdoor rugs that are hardwearing, which means no matter what the season or the weather, your balcony will always look stylish.

A little comfort: Now we know that you want to make the most of your balcony, and that means making it a space where you can relax. Furniture can take up a lot of room, which is why collapsible pieces are probably a better choice; plus, they can be stored away neatly in the winter months. You can also purchase sets that hook over railings, which again are a great space-saving solution. Alternatively, you may wish to add a statement chair – your chair, the place where you sit and watch the world go by, in your own little luxurious haven.

A little appeal: When you add style to your balcony, you are truly increasing the appeal of your apartment to potential buyers. For more advice on how to style your home and grab buyers’ attention, give our team a call on 01225 471144. The Apartment Company theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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Best of both worlds: Hope House offers tranquil parkland living within walking distance from Bath city centre

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ituated in six acres of parkland within walking distance from Bath city centre, Hope House is proving popular with a recent flurry of sales agreed following the ease of lockdown restrictions. Developed by Galliard Homes and Acorn Property Group, the scheme comprises a magnificent restored Georgian mansion alongside newly-built apartments and townhouses, providing 58 homes within the landscaped grounds. Buyers have been attracted to the development’s unique offering of a rural lifestyle within a city location. Hope House has formal landscaped gardens and countryside views as well as being walking distance from the Bath’s vibrant centre and connections into London, with this balance creating a fantastic environment to call home. There is also a residents-only tennis court, seating and mature trees for residents to enjoy. The transformation of Hope House was undertaken in partnership with heritage specialists Nash Partnership, with specification by award-winning design house Lambart & Browne and landscaping by Matthew Wigan Associates. The Grade II listed Georgian mansion now provides seven luxurious 2 and 4 bedroom apartments overlooking the scheme’s formal lawn and parkland beyond. Next to the Hope House listed building is Park Row, an elegant terrace of 3 and 4 bedroom townhouses with the Show House styled by Andrew Henry Interiors. Lining the new entrance road to the scheme is Hope Place, two terraces, providing six, classic 3 bedroom townhouses and 20, 1 and 2 bedroom apartments Honey-coloured Bath Stone, sash windows, quality paving and handcrafted metalwork have been incorporated into the new build elements of the scheme, enabling them to complement the listed mansion. The scheme is now almost 70% sold overall, with many residents enjoying the lifestyle on offer. Prices at Hope House currently range from £325,000 for a 1 bedroom apartment, from £795,000 for a 2 bedroom apartment, from £995,000 for a 3 bedroom townhouse, and from £2,350,000 for a 4 bedroom apartment. The Show Homes at Hope House are available to view Tuesday to Saturday, 10am – 5pm. To view the virtual tours or for more information on Hope House please call Tel: 01225 614 307 or visit: acornpropertygroup.org/development/hope-house-bath


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Central

Andrewsonline.co.uk

James’s Park BA1 £850,000

01225 809 571

A beautiful, detached home near St. James’s Square in central Bath, with lovely gardens parking and garage. Set in an elevated position with lovely views, the property is well presented, has mullion windows and parquet flooring and planning approval for further extension. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

bath@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Camden

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Grosvenor Villas BA1 £900,000

The current vendors have done a wonderful refurbishment to create a very special and unique property with bespoke, contemporary design finishes throughout that enhance the period features and character of the original 1920’s house. Offering four bedrooms, extensive beautiful gardens, parking and a garage. Energy Efficiency Rating: TBC

01225 809 868 bath.camden@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


Newbridge Andrewsonline.co.uk SOLD STC

Newbridge Road Weston BA1 £549,000

Recently sold - subject to contract. This four bedroom Victorian home offers a beautifully retained and restored character features with a modern blend for family living. Complete with restored fire place in the sitting room and decked seating areas to the side and rear of the property in the private garden. Energy Efficiency Rating: TBC

01225 809 685 bath.newbridge@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bear Flat

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Flat 2, Bloomfield Road, BA2 £495,000

This substantial three double bedroom Grade II listed maisonette has it’s own beautiful private garden and is one of two properties within this converted semi-detached Victorian villa. Positioned on Bloomfield Road Bear Flat the elevation of the property offers far reaching views over Bloomfield Green situated directly opposite. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

01225 805 680 bath.bearflat@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


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Attwood Apartment

O.I.E.O

£650,000

A unique and beautifully appointed three bedroom apartment set within charming mature gardens with south facing private terrace. The apartment boasts a large open plan living area with high spec stylish kitchen and space to dine. Contemporary build · Ground floor apartment · Two double bedrooms · Study room/third bedroom · Allocated parking space · EPC rating: B · Approx. 1029 Sq. Ft. · Two acres of beautiful communal gardens

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Northanger

O.I.E.O

£530,000

This unique city centre apartment is located in the highly sought after Northanger Court. This apartment is located just off Great Pulteney Street and is a short level walk into the local amenities, shops and restaurants. Three bedroom apartment · Riverside living · Three communal gardens · Second floor apartment · Lift access · EPC rating: C · Approx. 906 Sq. Ft. · Allocated parking SALES

01225 471 14 4

LETTINGS

01225 303 870

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk


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Suffolk House

O.I.E.O

£435,000

Nestled within Suffolk House is a charming, light and airy apartment, benefitting from its own private entrance and private courtyard garden. This apartment would make a wonderful family home and investment property. Victorian apartment · Three bedrooms · Study/dressing room · Private patio area · Allocated parking · Spacious property · Approx. 1,216 Sq. Ft. · Communal gardens

EW N

St Peters Court

O.I.E.O

£255,000

The Apartment Company is delighted to bring to the market this fabulous ground floor one bedroom apartment. Formally being part of the Victorian Church, this property has been perfectly converted to combine city living with a quiet relaxing environment. Victorian conversion · Ground floor apartment · Private patio · Allocated gated parking · Spacious living area · Short walk into the city centre · Approx. 592 Sq. Ft. · One double bedroom

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk


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Profile for MC Publishing Limited

The Bath Magazine October 2020