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ISSUE 206 | NOVEMBER 2019 | thebathmag.co.uk | £3.95 where sold

WATCH OUT

On-screen dramas, thrillers and biopics at FilmBath Festival

GOLDEN BOY

Lee Young explains the mysteries of Tutankhamun’s tomb

CREATIVE CAMPUS

Bath Spa Uni’s brand new art and design facilities

BAND OF BROTHERS

Bath Rugby’s Levi Davis on top form with X Factor

SWEET HOMEWOOD Chef Jamie Forman on country-house cooking

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O NTHLY GUIDE TO LIFE AND LIVING IN BATH


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74

24

Contents 5 THINGS

46

November 2019

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10

Essential events to look forward to this month

SOUNDS LIKE RUGBY

HEADING HOMEWOOD

74

Melissa Blease escapes to a secluded country house hotel and talks to executive chef Jamie Forman

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24 BATH AT WORK

We chat to Bath Rugby’s Levi Davis about X Factor: Celebrity

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Neill Menneer’s portrait of Estevan Mortensen

FILM BONANZA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 A TIME TO SPEAK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80

A selection of new films being shown at FilmBath Festival

WHAT’S ON

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36

Our guide to the top events happening around the city

CREATIVE CORE

GOLDEN BOY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Lee Hooker unravels some of the mysteries of the tomb of Tutankhamun ahead of a new touring exhibition

ONLINE DREAMS

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Jessica Hope asks author Gabrielle Malcolm about why Mr Darcy has become a global phenomenon

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Melissa Blease chooses her top ten films with food at their heart

ESCAPE TO THE COUNTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Jessica Hope dines within the historic charm of The Old Crown Inn

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Interior choices in the chalky shades of the morning sky ..........................................................

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Jane Moore explains her approach to winter pots and containers

THE PROPERTY PAGES

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More content and updates online: thebathmag.co.uk

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Andrew Swift follows in Jane Austen’s footsteps and looks out over Beechen Cliff

WINTER LIGHTS 60

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EAT’S A FILM THING

Simon Horsford investigates the new Locksbrook campus for Bath Spa University’s Schools of Art and Design

TRANQUIL SHADES

The latest art exhibitions from around the city

LOVING MR DARCY

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A CHANGING VIEW 50

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Melissa Blease talks to director Michael Boyd about his production of Wild Goose Dreams

CITY ARTS

Emma Clegg reports back on her visit to TEDxBath, an event designed to spark ideas and spread conversations

Bath’s finest homes to buy or rent

ON THE COVER

Image from the short film 7 Planets, directed by Milda Baginskaite, part of the Shorts Showcase at the FilmBath Festival on 10 November at 7pm

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine

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EDITOR’S PICKS FLUID FIGURES

The fluid lines of Matisse’s etchings show the artist’s exceptional mastery of the graphic line, with his technique of drawing directly on the copperplate from the model in the studio. The Holburne Museum’s Matisse: Master of Line exhibition runs until 5 January and on page 52 Sylvie Broussine looks in detail at the piece shown here, Figure with Cropped Face Seated in an Interior. holburne.org

from the

EDITOR Editor photograph by Matthew Sterling

M

ust be funny in a rich man’s world”, sang ABBA. Well indeed, big money is certainly useful and I guess we’d all like to try it out. In fact wealth has great relevance to our themes this month. Take Tutankhamun. As the 11th pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Ancient Egypt he would have been super rich. The golden treasures discovered in his tomb in 1922, including a solid gold coffin, face mask and thrones, said it all. While these treasures were material, the belief was that the mass of funerary objects would assist Tutankhamun’s journey to the afterlife. Lee Hooker gives us an insight into what the tomb told us about the young pharaoh on page 46, ahead of Egyptologist Lee Young’s talk at BRLSI this month. Mr Darcy – of Pride and Prejudice fame – had an income of £10,000 a year in 1797, which roughly translates as £450,000 today. He also had a big pad called Pemberley with 60,000 acres, which would have made him a very eligible catch in the marriage market. Elizabeth Bennet was not initially impressed by Mr Darcy, illustrating her worthy unmaterialistic perspective, but also her prejudice. They end up together, though, we imagine living the dream, rich both in money and good character. Jessica Hope talks to Gabrielle Malcolm about her new book There’s Something About Darcy on page 60. As you’d expect, Colin Firth is mentioned, several times. Meanwhile Bath Rugby’s Levi Davis is rich in both sporting prowess and more unexpectedly in singing talent as he forms a rugby group trio for X Factor: Celebrity (see our interview on page 24). And Bath Spa University’s new art and design campus, Locksbrook, is now up and running, offering a rich selection of facilities and resources for the young creatives studying in our city – Simon Horsford tells us about it on page 90. In the culture stakes, FilmBath Festival, which launches on 7 November, has an impressive programme of new films – see our overview on page 32, and reviews on page 42. And Melissa Blease talks to director Michael Boyd about his Wild Goose Dreams production at the Ustinov Studio on page 50. Melissa also meets Jamie Forman, executive chef at Homewood, on page 74 as he revs up his kitchen for the winter season. And get your present lists ready because the Christmas festivities officially start this month, with Brussels sprouts being harvested (see right) and the Christmas market building up the city’s usual seasonal cheer from 28 November. Enjoy taking part in the riches this month. Emma Clegg Editor

All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

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VINO EXTRAVAGANZA

Great Western Wine is running an evening of festive tasting In association with The Bath Magazine on 27 November from 7–9pm in the relaxed setting of their Bath shop in Wells Road. Tristan Darby, our wine columnist, will be the host, guiding you through gloriously luxurious drinks of all varieties from enticing wines and fizz to warming spirits and liqueurs. Tristan will also give hints and food-matching tips ahead of the festive preparations. Tickets £10 greatwesternwine.co.uk/events

BRUSSELS SPROUTS Brussels sprouts were first made popular in Belgium where they’ve been grown since about 1200. A classic among winter vegetables in cool temperate climates, they taste better when harvested from the garden after being frosted than when bought from the shop. Britons eat more Brussels sprouts than anyone else in Europe.

ILLUSTRATION BY ANNABEL TRECHMANN The Bath Society of Botanical Artists; bsba.co.uk

All we have to do is peel the shrines like an ❝onion, and we will be with the king himself. HOWARD CARTER (1874–1935)


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ZEITGEIST

Now in its 29th year, the Bath Mozartfest is back from 8–16 November, providing a glorious celebration of classical music with the works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart at its heart. Some of the world’s leading musicians will be bringing these classic works to life around the city including a Mozart String Quintet from The Nash Ensemble, an all-Beethoven concert by The Belcea Quartet, and an epic festival finale from the BBC National Orchestra of Wales showcasing three masterpieces from the Romantic era. Full programme available online; bathmozartfest.org.uk

See Fondly recognised for standing on Bath’s street corners, capturing the city at its brightest and bleakest moments during the changing seasons, Peter Brown (locally known as Pete the Street) is opening a new exhibition at Victoria Art Gallery this month celebrating Bath’s streets and green spaces, as well as far-flung places. Showing from 30 November – 9 February, Bath Is It features more than 100 new oil paintings and drawings including atmospheric scenes of some of the city’s most-loved views such as Widcombe, Hedgemead Park, Lansdown and Milsom Street. £5/concs/free for Discovery Card holders; victoriagal.org.uk

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The legendary Sir Lenny Henry is embarking on a new tour this autumn following the publication of his memoir, Who Am I, Again?, last month, and is coming to The Forum on 28 November, 7.30pm. In part one of the show, Lenny will take the audience through a session of stories both funny and sad, from growing up in the Black Country, puberty, school, friendship, family secrets and unashamed racism. In part two, listen to more insights into Lenny’s life and career when he is interviewed by friend, broadcaster and author Jon Canter. Tickets from £29.50; bathforum.co.uk

Explore For the very first time at Stourhead the tree tops will glisten and the gardens will sparkle as an illuminated trail will take over the National Trust site this festive season. It’s definitely the most wonderful time of the year to wander beneath unique tree canopies drenched in seasonal colour and dripping with shards of light, frosty snowflakes, stars and baubles. Open from 29 November – 30 December, listen to the mesmerising voices of the Singing Trees in the distance, step into a Laser Garden, and stop at the scented Fire Garden for a moment of reflection. Tickets from £12; nationaltrust.org.uk/stourhead

Listen

Head coach of the England national rugby team since 2015, Eddie Jones is a gigantic yet enigmatic figure in the sporting world. Hot off the back of the 2019 World Cup campaign in Japan, Eddie is coming to Christ Church in Bath on 21 November, 8pm, to talk about his career as a player – which spanned four World Cups – and as a coach, to coincide with the launch of his honest autobiography My Life in Rugby. £30, redeemable against the book and includes £10 to spend at Toppings bookshop; toppingbooks.co.uk n

Lenny Henry: Jack Lawson/BBC NOW: Betina Skovbro

Reflect

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Laugh

The BBC National Orchestra of Wales will close the festival

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The city

ist

THE BUZZ THE BUZZ

My BATH

She is only 19, but local musician and singer Isobel Holly has performed widely, including at The Bath Festival in 2018 where she opened for Paloma Faith. She is about to bring out her debut album

New name for city church

Bath City Church, which meets in The Forum in the city centre, has changed its name to Life Church Bath. Growing from a small prayer group that started in 1968, the church purchased the former art deco cinema, The Forum, in 1988. Now a group of around 500 people meet there on Sundays. After five decades, leader Dan Reynolds says, “As a church community we want to remain focused on being radical and relevant to all generations in a fast-changing world. “The name of the church has changed,” Dan said, “in line with the life that the gospel of Jesus Christ inspires. Our heart and new name reflect a longing for our city to come to life.” lifechurchbath.com

Building at risk

Bath is such a beautiful city and I couldn’t have asked for a better childhood. The size of the city was ideal for a girl to grow up in; not too big but plenty going on. It’s also perfectly placed in the middle of so much lovely countryside that I was able to explore.

Performing at the 2018 Bath Festival was incredible. It was overwhelming being able to perform on the main stage, but I felt so comfortable up there. I could’ve played all day. I also got to perform there this summer with my band, too, which was wonderful.

Kingsmead Square is one of my favourite places in Bath because it’s always buzzing. I particularly love Society Café (the best hot chocolate!). Royal Victoria Park and the Royal Crescent are also favourites – my family and I do our frosty Christmas morning walk there with the dogs, and I’ve spent many summer evenings in and around the Crescent.

I don’t always get nervous before I perform. I get more nervous anticipation with gigs in front of people I know, rather than for crowds of strangers. My nerves usually disappear once I start singing.

Music has always been in my life, but I remember writing my first song with my sister at the age of 7. That’s also when I started singing lessons and joined the school choir, and realised how much I enjoyed it.

Image © Tom Burrows

When I started secondary school I started going to open mic nights around Bath. As I got older and played more of my own music, I began to get proper, paid gigs off the back of these nights. That’s where it all started, really. My mum came with me to all my gigs and acted as a manager for me, scouting for opportunities and sending my music to people that might be interested. I can’t thank her enough for her support throughout the years...

It has been announced that Beckford’s Tower has been put on the Historic England at-risk register, and a fundraising appeal to support its repair and development has been launched. Beckford Tower Trust and its trustee Bath Preservation Trust have prepared a £3m programme of works to the Grade 1-listed tower and are awaiting the result of a bid to the National Lottery Heritage Fund (NLHF). Despite regular maintenance, the weather and the timber construction of the tower lantern together with the fragile metal window frames have resulted in some water penetration and associated risk to the building. beckfordstower.org.uk

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I listen to a lot of modern country like Carrie Underwood and Brett Young. Fleetwood Mac and Joni Mitchell are just some of the songwriting legends I admire. The vocal queens Aretha Franklin, Etta James and Whitney Houston will always find a place on my playlists, too. I love music from the late 1960s to the 1980s. That’s where the true masters of songwriting lie, and it’s the root of that fantastic disco music that never fails to make me feel good. I’ve seen Paloma Faith at The Forum, which has some fantastic artists and it’s always a good show. For something more intimate I go to the Chapel Arts Centre and St James Wine Vaults. I often find an undiscovered musical gem performing there.

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Making my debut album has involved recording and arranging the songs, making videos, and promotion in anticipation of the album’s release. I’ve raised money via Kickstarter for photography and the tour. My producer, Corben Lamb, has been a wizard in helping me achieve the sound I want and giving a meaningful life to my ideas. My favourite songs from the album are Everything and Atticus. They are such fun to sing with the band, with roaring guitar solos and huge drum parts. Everything was inspired by personal experience so it means a lot to me. Recording Atticus was rewarding as we had so much time to perfect the arrangement and come up with instrumental parts. I am studying at the Royal Northern College of Music (RNCM) in Manchester. A huge part of this is performance and technique, but we also learn music theory, improvisation, production and the business side of the industry. Our lecturers are so inspiring and the musicians around me make me want to do the best I can every day. My dream is to be able to travel with my music. To play in new places, entertain and meet new audiences and to have people from all over the world connect with my lyrics. I’m looking forward to where this album and tour takes me. Some of these songs have been a long time in the making and I can’t wait to show everyone what we’ve been working on. I’m looking forward to having another year at the RNCM under my belt, and all the new connections and memories that will be made. ■ isobelholly.com


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CITY | NOTEBOOK

Richard Wyatt:

Notes on a small city

Columnist Richard Wyatt celebrates another decade and rejects the idea of retirement. Illustrations by Brian Duggan

A

h, November! Won’t be long now before our somewhat soggy golden autumn leads us into winter. For me, passing a couple of minutes of personal reflection in front of the shaving mirror is a reminder that this particular man’s life calendar has reached what so far has been more mellow fruitfulness than acid reflux. It’s time to admit it, I have turned 70. I have rarely stopped to look back on life. It’s too much like leaning over the stern railings of an ocean-going liner – watching the long trail of propeller-churned wake stretching behind you. A marine vapour trail that melts into the sea soon after you’ve disappeared over the horizon. Cheer up old chap. Think of the benefits that come with grey hairs and liver spots. There’s a slight reduction in ticket prices to enjoy at the cinema and free travel on the buses – after 9am. These little pluses do help make up for some of the negative aspects of all these accumulated years.

This decade-turning birthday brought an invitation from my doctor’s surgery in Great Pulteney Street to take advantage of a free health check. It was during this 30-minute procedure that a very pleasant and efficient young nurse gave me more of a mental and physical lift than a week’s worth of multi-vitamins: “You don’t look or act your age,” she said, while mopping blood off my freshly pricked finger. This little bit of flattery set me up on a personal high (and indeed the cholesterol test also registered ‘low’ as a risk factor).

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Having left the clinic with a grin on my face and a ‘good for a few more years’ health MOT certificate in my pocket. I got to thinking... what was it she meant exactly about acting my age? How should a 70-year-old behave? We live in an age when the internet seems to have the answer to everything. If in doubt, ask Google. One online newspaper story claimed that 70 is the new 50. Another listed the positives and negatives of being three score and ten. The bad news was sagging skin and everything else, joint troubles, failing eyesight and hearing. I skipped to the positives where keeping active, with a sensible diet and positive state of mind, can ward off the inevitable for some time. I don’t like to use the word ‘retired’, because I still work as a journalist – I just don’t get paid for it. I prefer to re-invent myself and show that having a ‘reason for being’ – even without payment – was a good way of carrying life with meaning forward. You don’t stop being a journalist. Chop me up and it’s written right through me like a stick of Weston-super-Mare rock. Many of you may have seen me out on my bike looking for stories for my own online presence – bathnewseum.com is a sort of daily newspaper of history and heritage.

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After all, this city is a living museum where everything from Roman remains to Georgian architecture and social history keeps the wheels of commerce turning. My bike is a deliberate form of transport for getting around the historic World Heritage city centre. I am at street level and so I can get down and personal with people. I am a big fan of electric bikes to help you out over some of Bath’s steeper residential areas. I am on my third such machine. There was in fact a slight hiccup when I ordered a German-built device bespoke from a catalogue and then found – when it came – l couldn’t lift the darn thing over the kerb because of its weight. All this activity keeps brain and body on the move. Another Google gem led me to a report that said, based on recent research, that you are now actually middle-aged until 74. When I left my NHS MOT, I said, “See you in ten years.” “No,” she said, “when you are 74 – we don’t do them after that!” n

Richard Wyatt runs the Bath Newseum: bathnewseum.com


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N I G H T W E A R

Work experience don’t pay the rent Our roving reporter meets the bright young graduates trying to launch their careers

T H E

F I N E S T

I N

L I N G E R I E ,

B E A C H

&

B

R O O M 7 Quiet Street Bath BA1 2JU T: 01225 330563 E: info@dressingroombath.com www.dressingroombath.com

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ath is full of them. The bright-eyed, hard-working twentysomethings, recently graduated (possibly from one of the city’s two universities) setting out on their brilliant careers. Although, of course, so many of them aren’t. You’ll have come across them in your daily business: they’ve served you coffee, guided you through the so-called self-service tills at the supermarket, or taken your order in a restaurant. And if you talk to them you’ll find out that these young men and women are working two jobs, while also beavering away on achieving their actual career aspirations. That’s the career dream that their parents and teachers have actively encouraged them to strive for as long as they can remember. It was sustained by well-meaning pep talks – “you can be anything you want to be, darling.” All these life-coach talks urging them on to do their studying and the world would be theirs to conquer, their talents one day recognised and rewarded. No wonder so many of our young graduates suffer from anxiety. They’ve dutifully jumped through the hoops of GCSEs and A Levels, done the long haul to get a degree and now what? Employers don’t even bother replying to tentative emails looking for work. Or they demand experience. And how do you get experience if no one will give you a break? Volunteer, they said. Apply for an internship, they said. Try offering yourself up for nothing just to get some experience, they said. So, they are working shifts in the bar or the Co-op to pay the rent on an expensive bedroom in a shared house and now they are supposed to find the time and the money to be able to go and work for someone for no pay. This whole business of internship, of asking people to work for nothing, smacks of exploitation. In some careers it means that only the privileged, well-off young people can make headway, since they can be supported by the Bank of Mum and Dad while they serve their internships. Let’s not forget that these sought-after internships are usually in London, so that means parents digging deep to find rent and transport for their offspring. This leaves the majority of young people, i.e. those whose parents can’t afford to bankroll them, deprived of the chance to go for the careers they desire because they simply can’t afford it. When I was in my 20s, back when we all lived in black and white and women wore petticoats, if you came from a less well-off family, as I did, you got a full grant to go to university. And after university I worked in bars and as a lowly member of a recruitment agency until – after more than 20 letters of rejection – I got a job as a trainee on a local newspaper. Junior reporters were signed on for indentures, which were like apprenticeships. The newspaper promised to fund your onthe-job training, pay you a salary and in return you signed up to work for them for a set number of years. It gave both parties peace of mind and the young apprentice security. Even after all these years of earning my living from writing there are still publications which will offer me work for no fee. They tell me it will be good experience and that it will look good on my CV. I don’t know if you’ve ever tried to get a plumber out to fit a new bathroom and suggested that you’re not going to pay them as it will be good experience for them. Personally I’m not really up for working just for the ‘feels’ as they say. A by-line don’t pay the bills. Employers benefit from having the enthusiasm, the hard work and the creativity of young graduates. They can bring something fresh to an organisation. The least you can do is pay them for it. And for all the weary employers who say that graduates are not fit for the workplace, well whose fault is that? If we, the older generation, haven’t taught them the grammar, spelling or practical skills they need to survive and shine in the workplace, then that’s our fault, not theirs. n


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Bath is best at Christmas

JOIN US IN CELEBRATING

4O YEARS ELLIS AND KILLPATRICK STYLING OPTICIANS

Allison Herbert CEO Bath Business Improvement District

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t’s like stepping into a Christmas film set: Twinkling lights and stunning chandeliers grace the streets illuminating Bath’s stunning golden architecture. We have the majesty of the Abbey surrounded by beautifully decorated wooden chalets during the Christmas Market. The chestnuts roasting, the mulled wine aromas and music in the air with carollers joyfully singing. So romantic; so picturesque; blockbuster movie material, but actually it is real – and it is ours. Some like to think that many of the traditions of Christmas started here. We gather that Charles Dickens began his work on A Christmas Carol in 1843 when he was in Bath and, in the very same year, the world's first commercially produced Christmas card was made by Henry Cole of Bath. Undoubtedly the Georgians liked to party at this time of year, exchanging presents, feasting on plum pudding and embracing under the kissing boughs. Saturnalia was the ancient Roman festival in December, a period of general merrymaking and the predecessor of Christmas and, reputedly, festive markets have been happening in Bath since the middle ages. All-in-all Bath can surely lay claim to being an original destination for festive fun.

9TH NOVEMBER ALL DAY IN STORE AT ELLIS AND KILLPATRICK BATH UP TO

UP TO

50%

25OF% F

OFF SECOND PAIR

Drinks, food, raffle and goodie bags 18 New Bond St, Bath BA1 1BA www.ellisandkillpatrick.com 01225 466954

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So it comes as no surprise that Bath is popular at Christmas. The place is just gorgeous. There are fantastic places to eat, drink and be merry and the city has the best combination of high street, high-end and independent shops that any shopper can desire – all within a short walking distance. Bath certainly can’t be accused of offering an identikit shopping experience. We all know now that shopping locally is key to keeping our economy vibrant. Nothing beats seeing and touching goods to be sure they’re perfect. Every year the festive season offer evolves in the city with interesting pop-up shops and chalets so there’s something new for everyone to enjoy. This year, look out for the entertainment stage on Milsom Street and book to see the Father Christmas Workshop, the immersive musical experience for all the family. Glam up your presents by taking advantage of the free luxury gift wrapping service on Union Street – just make a donation to Julian House. If you’re local, beat the crowds by shopping early on weekday mornings or later in the evening, when parking charges fall. The Park & Ride will be running later services over the festive season and if you haven’t tried it, we recommend the First Bus Group Ticket for great value. The Residents’ Preview Evening for the Bath Christmas Market is just for you and don’t forget to check out the Discovery Card offers for B&NES residents. It’s our city, let’s enjoy it. n


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9ct white Gold and white Topaz pendant, £335 Matching earrings available ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING RINGS HANDMADE BESPOKE JEWELLERY REPAIRS AND REMODELLING

9 Abbey Churchyard, Bath BA1 1LY 01225 460072

The Designer Collections 15 Northumberland Place, Bath BA1 5AR 01225 448823

jody@jodycory.co.uk | www.jodycory.co.uk

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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

See more online www.thebathmag.co.uk

Contact us: Publisher Email:

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Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bath Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


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PEOPLE | FOUR THINGS

Philip Raby: Photograph by Neill Menneer

Four things

Philip Raby is the FilmBath Festival organiser and the chair of the Bath Bridge advisory group who are concerned with positioning Bath as a place with a dynamic, inventive future. Here Philip selects four objects that have personal significance in his life

Grandfather clock winder

Electric Ladyland CD

Electric car keys

On a small landing halfway up the stairs in our house sits a grandfather clock that was made in 1815 by Samuel Jackson – not, I hasten to add, Samuel L Jackson. I have to wind the clock up at least once a week, or it will stop. It keeps the time pretty well for something that’s over 200 years old, but we ensure it doesn’t ring too loudly at night with a piece of blu-tack inserted between the donger and the bell. The clock has been in my family ever since it was built, and before it came to Bath my parents had it in their London home. About 10 years ago, it was carefully wrapped and driven down to Bath. Here it will stay till it’s time for us to go, and then it will be passed on to the next generation. It’s beautiful and it works.

Jimi Hendrix produced a double album 51 years ago of extraordinary genius (with a hideous cover, which was not of his choice). I have never been without Electric Ladyland in my collection in those five decades, and I listen to it regularly. It is simply an indispensable piece of music. You can pick from the better-than-theDylan-original All Along The Watchtower, the shorter version of Voodoo Chile (a mere five minutes); or any other of the mind-bending tracks which add up to nearly 75 minutes of music like you’ve never heard before. If I had to choose one track for Desert Island Discs, it would have to be the full-length Voodoo Chile, clocking in at just under 15 minutes (so Desert Island Discs wouldn’t allow it).

I’ve always thought of cars as noisy, expensive, dangerous and – in an ideal world – redundant. Then, this time last year, I bought a very good-value electric car: the Renault Zoe. It’s fully electric (not hybrid) with a (theoretical) range of 200 miles. I can charge it at home, at a fraction of the cost of petrol, from sustainable electricity. I pay no road tax. It is quiet, not only to the passers-by but also inside the car, so that you can hear everyone speak – even in the back seat. You’d be amazed by what a difference that makes to all the passengers. The most unexpected added benefit is that I drive more calmly and safely and slowly than ever before. I’d still like a car-free world, but until then this is the next best thing.

“Edward is the only relic of my childhood and precious for that reason.” Teddy bear Although it is a number of decades since I had an active relationship with my teddy bear – aka Edward – he now lives in the kitchen on the top shelf of the dresser, looking out over the world, and keeping an eye on life. I lived many years without him as an adult, but about 20 years ago my mother repatriated him to our house and I positioned him as far away from the hands of small children as possible; he’s in no fit state to be played with. He’s the only relic of my childhood, and precious for that reason. More than that, whereas every cell in my body has changed since I was a child, along with most of my thoughts and opinions, Edward (my middle name) is exactly the same. n 22 TheBATHMagazine

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MUSIC CITY || INTERVIEW INTERVIEW

Try Star: Thom Evans, Levi Davis and Ben Foden

Levi Davis in action on the rugby field

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CITY | INTERVIEW

Band of brothers Take a rugby player and add two more rugby players. What do you have? A band of three, and a musical phenomenon. Well, that’s what we’re hoping as Bath Rugby player Levi Davis takes time out from the rugby ground, picks up a microphone, and sings his heart out on the new X Factor: Celebrity both, so that’s just awesome,” he says. Levi has been focused on rugby since he was young. “I started with football but went across to rugby at around 12. I have a natural ability, but I’ve also worked very hard and have been in and out of the academy systems. Actually it was only when I was 16 when things really fell into place for me. I knew I really wanted to do it when I was 14, and at 17 I realised that it could be a realistic goal. And now I’m living it.” Levi earned himself a rugby academy contract in December 2017, having played for Bath United while he was a fresher at the University of Bath studying for a foundation degree in sports performance. “I came to Bath for university and I haven’t left since, it’s been great. I live in the city centre and still have all my uni friends here.”

Like all rugby players, I’d love to be a regular starter in the premiership and I have the dream of playing for the full England side

D

ancer Brendan Cole, presenter Ricki Lake, The Chase quizzer Jenny Ryan, journalist Martin Bashir, Love Islander Wes Nelson, plus size model Hayley Hasselhof and Glee star Kevin McHale. What do this random assortment of celebrities have in common? Why, they all have the X Factor. Or rather they are hoping to, as The X Factor has now reinvented itself with a celebrity version, which kicked off last month. The X Factor format – which sees aspiring amateur singers audition and perform in front of the viewing nation – has broadcast annually since 2004, but the programme has lost some of its lure in recent years, so the celebrity focus, which features a line-up of 14 celebrity acts, is a welcome refresh. Presented by Dermot O’Leary and with Simon Cowell, Louis Walsh and Nicole Scherzinger as judges, our Saturday evenings have given us a new opportunity to scrutinise familiar faces out of their comfort zone. There is added excitement with the appearance of our very own Levi Davis, the explosive Bath Rugby winger. He has joined musical forces with Thom Evans, former Scottish international rugby union player, and Ben Foden, who plays for Rugby United New York and gained 34 caps for England. Together they have formed a group called Try Star. Levi didn’t know Thom or Ben personally, but before the band was put together had seen them both play rugby and admired their game. What will the group’s music be like, though? Is it worth listening to? After initially meeting in London, and later at Simon’s luxurious home in LA along with the other contestants, and finding that the three of them had a good connection, they have been working together for months. “We were thrown together, but it worked,” says Levi. “We’ve done quite a bit of practising in London and hopefully this will be apparent in our performance. The great thing is we all complement each other in terms of our roles within the band.” Billed as the real musical talent within the group, Levi describes his music as “a bit of neo-soul with a funk swing to it, but whatever comes out that I think sounds good really.” He has always adored music and used to be part of a band called Majesti, so the boy band format was not a strange one to him. “I was in choirs and did performing arts as a boy, within secondary school and also at primary school. Rugby always took centre stage in my life, but now I’m doing

He has represented England at under-18s and under-19s level and made a try-scoring debut for the senior side against London Irish in the Anglo Welsh Cup in November 2017. “I played for England when I was 18. The year before I’d just missed out on the counties, so I was going one step further with England, so it was a dream come true – and obviously it’s special when you represent your country no matter what age group.” As part of the Bath Rugby team, Levi trains at Farleigh House, Bath Rugby’s elite training ground. With its two full-size natural pitches and a half-size 4G artificial pitch, state-of-the-art gym and technology, a medical centre and rehab space, the facilities there are exceptional. “Farleigh House is second to none,” says Levi, “It’s a beautiful place to train, a very special place and we’re so lucky as not many clubs have this advanced level of facilities.” What was Levi’s experience when he first joined Bath Rugby and how hard was it to get used to the regime? “Geoff Williams and

Anthony Watson are players who really helped me when I came in as a young academy boy,” says Levi. “They helped me develop. I couldn’t have done a lot of what I’ve done without their help.” Levi’s plans for the future are based in Bath, but international rugby is always a priority: “Like all rugby players, I’d love to be a regular starter in the premiership and I have the dream of playing for the full England side. If you play rugby at this level then you always hold that close. I’m just going to carry on playing for Bath or another premiership side, but you have to bear in mind that there is always a lot of competition. I don’t want to go anywhere from where I am now, so we’re all good.” Might there may be any conflicting loyalties between his professional rugby career and his music? “I have my sight absolutely set on rugby as a career but our involvement as a band on X Factor: Celebrity is something that will benefit all of us. Doing both definitely allows me to live the dream at the moment, but there will come a point where they do clash. But I do think it really helps you develop as an individual if you have a life outside of rugby. “Meeting the other contestants on the programme has been so refreshing, meeting a range of people who are all successful within their own fields. It’s a great way of broadening your horizons. They all bring something different to the table and it’s important to have these experiences.” n X Factor: Celebrity airs on Saturdays, 8.35pm on ITV

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SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

Gifted individuals While Christmas may not be fully upon us – the sound of Springsteen’s seasonal airplay reminds us to start checking that list – apparently Santa’s coming to town. Here’s a few ideas to help with your planning

❼ 1. Personalised coloured tennis balls, tube of 3, £17, or 4 for £21, Price of Bath; priceofbath.com 2. Cognac Ragnaud-Sabourin VSOP Alliance 10 NV £77.10, Le Vignoble; levignoble.co.uk 3. 18ct white gold diamond-encrusted necklace, £4,515, Nicholas Wylde; nicholaswylde.com 4. Beautiful pet portraits, painted in oils, commissions from £250, I do Pictures; idopictures.co.uk 5. Medium Bath gift box, £32, Taste of Bath; taste-of.co.uk 6. Harvey Nichols 200g confectionery, £3.95; harveynichols.com 7. Molton Brown advent calendar, £82.50 (outlet price), Clarks Village; clarksvillage.co.uk 8. Creative makeup classes, gift vouchers from £50, Bath Academy of Media Makeup; bammakeup.com 9. Baking classes at One Mile Bakery, gift vouchers from £50; onemilebakery.com

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Take advantage of our early-bird Christmas offer 10% off new commissions. Quote code Xmas10 to claim Offer ends 31st October

18ct yellow Gold, Diamond and Cabochon Ruby Ring. £950

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Hatidze Muratova in Honeyland

Movies with the times

This year’s FilmBath Festival from 7–17 November features 37 feature films and 46 short films. Here are some of the highlights to whet your appetite. See also the reviews on page 42

N

ow in its 29th year, FilmBath Festival has a reputation for catching the biggest films of the awards season before they officially hit the big screen. So this year’s festival, running from 7–17 November, is the chance to see the blockbusters before anyone else. FilmBath Festival is also known for pioneering the F-Rating classification, where films are recognised for being directed by and/or written by women, therefore supporting women in the film industry and addressing the issues around gender imbalance in this sector. Here’s just a few of the festival’s highlights for 2019... THE REPORT n 7 November, 6.30pm, Odeon For his directorial debut, Scott Z Burns tackles the true story of US Senate staffer Daniel Jones (played by Adam Driver) and his investigation into the CIA’s use of torture following the September 11 attacks. Jones’ efforts and tenacity are tested by the CIA’s determination to keep the truth in the dark. A detailed political thriller that plunges the audience into a world of high-ranking intrigue and subterfuge. 32 TheBATHMagazine

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THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF DAVID COPPERFIELD n 7 November, 9pm, Little Theatre Director Armando Iannucci takes an irreverent attitude to this Charles Dickens adaptation. Dev Patel stars as David Copperfield, a young man of no means in Victorian England, who rises up society’s ranks through a series of comical adventures. The larger-than-life supporting characters are played by an all-star cast of British actors. ROCKS n 8 November, 6.30pm, Odeon Director Sarah Gavron, along with writers Theresa Ikoko and Claire Wilson, has created a magical piece of cinema centred on Shola (aka Rocks) and her younger brother Emmanuel who are faced with a foster home and separation, unless they can escape the clutches of social services. The Guardian described this as the best film at this year’s Toronto Film Festival. BY THE GRACE OF GOD n 8 November, 9pm, Little Theatre François Ozon approaches historic sex abuse in the Catholic Church from the victims’

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point of view. Alexandre (Melvil Poupaud) is a devout Catholic with a wife and five children, who was abused as a boy by a priest. When he discovers that priest still works with children, he becomes determined that the church address this scourge. A magnificently angry yet composed film that’s based on a true story. CHILDREN OF THE SNOW LAND n 10 November, 4pm, Chapel Arts Centre This beautiful documentary is an account of how four-year-old Nepalese children from remote parts of the country are sent to school in Kathmandu, after which they will not see their families again for 12 years. Here we see how the children, who have been raised in the modern world, come to terms with the separation as they return to a place they have never really known: their home. CALM WITH HORSES n 10 November, 6pm, Odeon Set in contemporary Ireland, Nick Rowland’s debut feature was recently shown at Toronto to huge critical acclaim. Douglas ‘Arm’ Armstrong (Cosmo Jarvis) is an ex-boxer with an ex-wife and a son on the autistic


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FILM | FESTIVAL

Tom Burke and Honor Swinton Byrne in The Souvenir

Roman Griffin Davis and Taika Waititi in Jojo Rabbit

spectrum. He’s trying to make a living, but the only work he can find is as muscle for the Devers family, the local drug mafia. While the plot may sound familiar, the setting and execution are unique. ANIARA n 10 November, 7.30pm, Rondo Theatre Climate change has left the Earth uninhabitable, and the last human survivors are on a three-week journey to a new life on Mars aboard the spaceship Aniara. When an unexpected event threatens the security of their voyage, the passengers must learn to cope with the sudden uncertainty of their fate in this prescient Swedish sci-fi film. HARRIET n 11 November, 8pm, Odeon Harriet Tubman was one of the greatest women of the 19th century, whose influence on the Underground Railroad in the United States is beginning to be recognised. This film tells part of her story, as she escapes from slavery in the south, then returns to rescue other slaves at great risk to her own life. Directed by Kasi Lemmons and starring BAFTA Rising Star nominee Cynthia Erivo.

THE SOUVENIR n 11 November, 8.50pm, Rondo Theatre Joanna Hogg’s fourth feature is a semifictionalised account of her own experiences as a film student in the 1980s. As Julie (Honor Swinton Byrne) attempts to make her way through a male-dominated world, she develops an intense relationship with an older man whose casual charm belie a flawed and controlling character. Her mother (Tilda Swinton) can do no more than stand by and watch as her daughter learns some painful life lessons. LA BELLE ÉPOQUE n 12 November, 8pm, Odeon This thought-provoking French comedy shows jaded and disillusioned Victor (Daniel

Children of the Snow Land

Auteuil) yearning for the passionate, simpler days of his youth. His son’s best friend (Guillaume Canet) offers him the chance to recreate the most meaningful experience of his past: the day he first met his wife. A cross between The Truman Show and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. HONEYLAND n 13 November, 6.15pm,Chapel Arts Centre In a remote corner of the former Yugoslavia, a woman tends her wild bees on a clifftop away from the world, with no equipment to protect herself and no fear of being stung. However, there is a threat on the horizon from nomadic beekeepers who have none of her expertise or care for the preservation of bees. This amazing documentary follows the clash of past and present. AND THEN WE DANCED n 14 November, 6.30pm, Odeon Merab has dedicated his life to the Georgian Dance Ensemble. He has always danced with his partner Mary, and when a charming newcomer appears on the scene, Merab sees him as his rival. He discovers that his feelings stem from desire as well as competition, but a man loving a man is unacceptable in a culture emphasising the virtues of stereotypical masculinity. ORDINARY LOVE n 14 November, 8.30pm, Odeon Tom (Liam Neeson) and Joan (Lesley Manville) have been married for many years. When she is diagnosed with cancer, their whole relationship has to undergo a change. Neeson takes a step back from his action hero roles and allows Manville to show the full range of her talent as a woman coming to terms with the news everyone dreads. JUDY AND PUNCH n 15 November, 6.30pm, Odeon A married couple of puppeteers entertain the common people on stage. But off-stage he abuses her, culminating in an act of such bizarre cruelty that revenge is the only justifiable option. Mia Wasikowska stars as Judy and Damon Herriman is the unlovable Punch. With echoes of The Crucible and

Terry Gilliam, director Mirrah Foulkes has pulled off a remarkable piece of cinema.

MAKING WAVES n 16 November, 10.45am, Little Theatre Cinema This authoritative and compelling documentary presents a wide range of examples from films you love and films you’ve never heard of, illustrating the importance of sound and revealing the means by which it is achieved. Those appearing are the crème de la crème, such as Spielberg, Lucas, Lynch, Nolan, Redford, and Streisand. You’ll never listen to films the same way again.

JOJO RABBIT n 17 November, 6pm, Odeon This wacky satire from Taika Waititi was the most popular film at this year’s Toronto Film Festival, but critics were harder to please. Set in Nazi Germany, it stars Roman Griffin Davis as Jojo, a ten-year-old whose imaginary friend is Adolf Hitler (played by Waititi). Jojo’s commitment to antisemitism is set back when he discovers a Jewish girl is being sheltered by his mother (Scarlett Johansson). Also starring Sam Rockwell, Stephen Merchant and Rebel Wilson. n

RELAXED SCREENINGS n Relaxed screenings at the egg are designed for those on the autism spectrium, people living with dementia and anyone who would benefit from a relaxed cinema environment. Showings during the FilmBath Festival include The Peanut Butter Falcon (Sunday 10 November, 5.30pm) and A Minuscule Adventure (Monday 11 November, 11.30am)

FilmBath Festival takes place from 7–17 November. For the full programme, visit filmbath.org.uk

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The Future is in our Lands A University of Bath Institute for Policy Research (IPR) public event series

Wednesday 6 November 2019 The future is in our lands Craig Bennett (CEO, Friends of the Earth)

We are experiencing a climate crisis that is destroying our planet. Here in the UK we are living witnesses to a globally repeated pattern of; the extinction of wildlife, habitats and biodiversity, and the decline in the health and species range in our oceans and soils; to more frequent and intense extreme weather events, such as

Tuesday 19 November 2019

flooding and drought. We must make changes now to halt this spiral of destruction before the tipping point

The future of UK farming

- the point of no return, is upon us. Amidst the tumultuousness of our climate crisis, here in the UK, we face a

and food production

second unprecedented situation – Brexit. If the UK leaves the EU one of the many significant changes will be the end of the EU funded Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The impending loss of this subsidy to UK farmers has significant implications for UK farming practices and the future of farming.

Patrick Holden (Sustainable Food Trust), Joanna Lewis (Soil Association), Jo Edwards (Castle Farm Organics),

Alongside this, the prevalent current practices of UK farming contribute to our carbon emissions – from

and Jack Farmer (LettUs Grow)

methane production from livestock, through to the use of pesticides, herbicides, slurry production, and so on. Yet our agricultural industry has the unique opportunity to be transformed from a net carbon producer to a carbon sink, through, among other things, carbon sequestration, precision farming, or rewilding areas back

Tuesday 11 February 2020

to natural habitats. There is an ambition, amongst some pioneering UK farmers, to move towards net zero

Born to rewild!

farming emissions by 2040, and to do this whilst remaining financially viable and producers of high welfare,

Professor Alastair Driver

nutritious food.

(Rewilding specialist)

Here at the IPR we are holding a new event series to contribute to these conversations by engaging with experts, advisors, policymakers, the farming community and the public.

Register for the events at https://bit.ly/2pBpdas or

Now is the time to take action, for the protection of our environment for now and for future generations.

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WHAT’S ON in November

Jodie Prenger stars in A Taste of Honey at Theatre Royal Bath

Rick Stein showcases his new cookbook at Christ Church

A TASTE OF HONEY n Until 2 November, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath The National Theatre brings Shelagh Delaney’s ground-breaking British classic to Bath prior to the West End. Jodie Prenger (Oliver!, One Man, Two Guvnors) leads the cast as Helen in a bold new production that follows feisty teenager Jo who takes up with Jimmie, a sailor who promises to marry her, before he heads for the seas. Tickets from £24.50; theatreroyal.org.uk BATH PHILHARMONIA: 20 PIECES TO CELEBRATE 20 YEARS n 1 November, 7.30pm, The Holburne Museum Acclaimed pianist Charles Wiffen plays 20 short pieces for piano composed across 20 years (between 1820 and 1840) by Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Chopin and Liszt. The proceeds from this recital will go towards Bath Phil’s anniversary season, supporting performances and creative learning delivery. £20; bathphil.co.uk BATH FIREWORKS DISPLAY 2019 n 2 November, 7pm, Bath Recreation Ground Wrap up warm, get the family together and watch the spectacular annual fireworks display, hosted by the Bath Rotary Club; bathboxoffice.org.uk FAURÉ REQUIEM: SHADES OF REMEMBRANCE n 2 November, 7.30pm, Bath Abbey The principal work of this autumn concert will be the consoling Fauré Requiem. It will be complemented with Remembrance music including Taverner’s Song for Athene, There is a Country by Parry, Elgar’s They are at Rest and Towards the Unknown Region by Vaughan Williams. Shean Bowers will 36 TheBATHMagazine

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conduct the choir and Bristol Ensemble. £5–£30; bathboxoffice.org.uk FRESH ENCOUNTERS: CONTEMPORARY SCULPTURE AND THE PUBLIC REALM n 4 November, 1.30pm Assembly Rooms As part of the The Arts Society Bath lecture series, Anna Moszynska will look at how sculpture plays an important role in our cities, how sculpture parks have grown exponentially since the mid-20th century, and how water attracts artists to make exceptional works. Visitors welcome, £10 at the door, no booking required; theartssocietybath.com CLIFFORD ELLIS: THE FOUNDING OF BATH ACADEMY OF ART n 4 November, 7.10pm, BRLSI Manager of Victoria Art Gallery Jon Benington will explore the life of Clifford Ellis, who was head of Bath School of Art, which moved to Corsham Court after the Bath Blitz of 1942, and will present many of the gems from the Ellis family archive. Arts Society members £5, non-members £8. Wine, coffee and tea served from 6.30pm; theartssociety.org/bath-evening AN EVENING WITH RICK STEIN n 5 November, 8pm, Christ Church, Julian Road Chef Rick Stein is back in Bath to share stories and flavours from his new cookbook and BBC Two series Secret France. Rick will reveal some of his favourite dishes from across France, as well as tales of fun, food and laughter. £26 includes book, standard £8; toppingbooks.co.uk THE FUTURE IS IN OUR LANDS n 6 November, 5.15pm, Chancellors’ Building, Room 1.12, University of Bath

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Willows are coming to Chapel Arts Centre

Too often we talk about the climate crisis and the ecological emergency as if they are separate issues. But in reality, they are both symptoms of the same problem. So what does this mean for the future of our land? Craig Bennett (chief executive of Friends of the Earth) will explore the essentials of solving the climate and ecological emergency. Part of the IPR Public Lecture series. Free; bath.ac.uk/events U3A IN BATH: BATH AT WAR 1930–1945 n 7 November, 10am–12.30pm, The Pavilion David Lassman will explore the city’s experience during the Second World War, covering what the conflict was like for those on the Home Front incorporating memoirs, official records and newspaper accounts from the time, including discussions on the Bath Blitz and the influx of American GIs. £2/free for U3A members; u3ainbath.org.uk DEMYSTIFYING DIGITAL MARKETING n 7 November, 6pm, Weston Studio, The Edge, University of Bath Marketing has always been a powerful force and it affects everyone’s lives. Dr Donald Lancaster takes a rapid romp through the digital marketing landscape, highlighting several key pillars of practice. He aims to illustrate some of the tools and techniques used and, if there’s time, see what may lie ahead for marketers. Part of the Minerva Series of Lectures. Free; bath.ac.uk/events GREAT WESTERN WINE ANNUAL PORTFOLIO TASTING n 7 November, 5.30–9pm, The Assembly Rooms There’s more than 150 wines to taste, as well as premium spirits, and the opportunity to learn from Great Western Wine’s winemakers at this popular tasting event. Three rooms


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FILM SCREENINGS n Throughout November, The Little Theatre Cinema Marking the 500th anniversary of his death, this month the Little Theatre is showing Leonardo – The Works, which presents every single attributed painting in Ultra HD quality. Also on this month is the National Theatre’s Hansard, Met Opera’s Madama Butterfly, and a screening of 42nd Street filmed live in the West End in 2018. Full programme online; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little

will be packed with producers such as Lucien Lurton et fils, Quinta do Crasto, Hattingley Valley, Chateau Ste Michelle and more. £25, with £2 from every ticket donated to Dorothy House Hospice Care; greatwesternwine.co.uk ROMAN BATHS WEDDING OPEN EVENING n 7 November, 7–9pm, Roman Baths Enjoy a drink on arrival and soak up the atmosphere alongside the torchlit waters of the Great Bath before heading to the terrace and reception hall where you can see the venue set up for a wedding celebration and speak to local suppliers. Registering essential; bathvenues.co.uk HERITAGE TALK: BATH AND THE PICTURESQUE n 8 November, 6.45pm, Weston Studio, The Edge, University of Bath An evening of short talks exploring the picturesque in Bath and Bristol to accompany The Edge’s latest exhibition Playing The Picturesque. Confirmed speakers include: Dr Amy Frost from Bath Preservation Trust; head gardener of Prior Park Landscape Garden Alice Palfrey; and The Gardens Trust’s Margie Hoffnung. £5/£4; edgearts.org BATH MOZARTFEST n 8–16 November, times and locations vary This critically acclaimed festival celebrates the music of W. A. Mozart, as well as other notable classical composers and musicians. Attracting the finest international musicians, highlights this year include the English Chamber Orchestra and La Nuova Musica with the soprano Lucy Crowe, featuring a Mozart concerto and operatic arias respectively, and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales with pianist Yevgeny Sudbin. Full programme and tickets online; bathmozartfest.org.uk THE FABULOUS POODLES n 8 November, 8pm, Widcombe Social Club Four decades ago The Fabulous Poodles were one of the hottest live acts on both sides of the Atlantic. They toured almost constantly in the UK, Europe, the USA and Canada. Now they are set to return with a special pre-London warm-up show in Bath, bringing their onstage mayhem, pithy lyrics and exploding ukuleles with them. £15; bathcomedy.com CHRISTMAS LIGHTS SWITCH-ON EXTRAVAGANZA n 9 November, 5–8pm, Clarks Village The festive season launches in style as Clarks Village will be surprising its guests to a spectacular Christmas lights switch on with musical performances and an amazing LED stage show before a mystery performer will turn on the lights and signal the countdown to Christmas. Plus all stores will be open until 8pm and restaurants even later; clarksvillage.co.uk BACH: CANTATA NO.8 n 9 November, 7.30pm, St Luke’s Church Bach’s unreservedly playful cantata, Liebster Gott, wenn werd ich sterben is the focal point of an unmissable evening of music by the Continued page 38

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WHAT’S | ON

Bath On Ice returns to Royal Victoria Park

Mudibu and The Jezebel Sextet perform the music of Otis Redding at Chapel Arts Centre

The Fabulous Poodles will be playing at Widcombe Social Club

THE WILLOWS n 9 November, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre Following their critically acclaimed third album Through The Wild, get ready for an exhilarating live show and a new line-up featuring some of the foremost musicians on the UK roots scene. £14/£16; chapelarts.org A ROOF OVER MY HEAD n 13 November, 6.30pm, Komedia Behind the beautiful Georgian facade of Bath, homelessness is a problem facing a growing number of people There are over 4,000 on social housing waiting lists in the region and house prices are 14 times average earnings. But there is help available. This film, commissioned by St John’s and created by Meaningful Films, shows the realities of homelessness and the incredible work that is being done by local organisations to help. Film screening followed by a Q&A. Pre-screening networking from 5.30pm. Free, ticketed; komedia.co.uk MY COUSIN RACHEL n 13–23 November, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath Helen George stars as the alluring and unconventional Countess Rachel Sangalletti who travels to the Ashley Estate in Cornwall, home of her recently deceased husband. Her presence arouses dark suspicions and uncontrollable desires, not least in young Philip, cousin and heir to the Ashley home. Feverish passion battles reason in this classic Gothic romance set in the wild landscape of the rock-ribbed Cornish coast. Tickets from £24; theatreroyal.org.uk FARROW & BALL COLOUR WORKSHOP WITH AFTERNOON TEA n 14 November, 12pm, Royal Crescent Hotel The Royal Crescent Hotel has partnered up with Farrow & Ball to bring guests an

insight into the use of colour in the home, as well as an introduction to Colour by Nature, a new collection of 16 nature-inspired paint colours created in collaboration with the Natural History Museum. This will be followed by a Champagne afternoon tea. £55; royalcrescent.co.uk PHENOMENAL WOMEN SERIES: KALPNA WOOLF n 14 November, 6pm, Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel As part of the hotel’s Phenomenal Women series, Kalpna Woolf will talk about her time as the head of production at the Natural History Unit, as well as her current position at HungryGap TV Productions. £15, includes prosecco, canapés and networking; thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk

and discover how to turn your property dreams into reality. Tickets from £8; homebuildingshow.co.uk/somerset THE FUTURE OF UK FARMING AND FOOD PRODUCTION n 19 November, 5.30pm, Chancellors’ Building 1.11, University of Bath A panel debate by Patrick Holden (Sustainable Food Trust), Joanna Lewis (Soil Association), Jo Edwards (Castle Farm Organics), and Jack Farmer (LettUs Grow) addressing questions around the transformation of UK farming and food production. Part of the IPR Public Lecture series. Free; bath.ac.uk/events

ALL WRAPPED UP n 14 November, 7pm, Milsom Place Designer of hand-painted silk Carole Waller and luxury shoe designer Chanii-B combine their unique styles to create a stand-out seasonal fashion event with a party outfit inspired catwalk and Christmas gift shopping. £12; wallerandwood.co.uk

WORLD AFFAIRS THROUGH OUR EYES: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA n 19 November, 7.30pm, BRLSI The Minister-Councillor Jennifer Gavito will cover the most critical aspects of world affairs from the perspective of the United States of America and will focus on key current and future policies. The talk will provide an insight into how the USA perceives its role and responsibilities as a global actor. £7/£4; bathboxoffice.org.uk

BATH ON ICE n 15 November – 5 January, times vary, Royal Victoria Park Now in its eighth year, the magical Bath On Ice returns with a whopping 1,000 square metres of ice, as well as festive food and drinks and glow in the dark mini-golf. There will also be penguins and sleighs galore for young kids, with friends and families being able to watch all the action with a hot drink from the rink-side Moguls Alpine Bar; bathonice.com

NICOLA TALLIS ON MARGARET BEAUFORT n 19 November, 8pm, Topping and Co. Booksellers Historian Nicola Tallis will explore the extraordinary life of Margaret Beaufort – the young teenage mother of Henry Tudor, who battled and plotted for years to secure her son on the throne, and consequently became one of the most influential women in the land. £20 includes book, standard £7; toppingbooks.co.uk

THE SOUTH WEST HOMEBUILDING AND RENOVATING SHOW n 16–17 November, Bath and West Showground The essential homebuilding and renovating event in the South West, perfect for those looking for some inspiration for developing their homes. Get advice from the experts, learn about new products and services,

FERGUS GARRETT: SUCCESSION PLANTING IN THE MIXED BORDER n 20 November, 7.30pm, University of Bath Gardening Club, East Building, University of Bath Multi-award-winning Fergus Garrett, head gardener at the world famous Great Dixter garden, will provide inspiration for our own gardens in this talk, where you can discover Continued page 40

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The Fabulous Poodles: Steve Ullathorne

Masters. Accompanied by period instruments, Lucis Choir will also be singing Schubert’s Mass in G as well as the eternally popular setting of the Ave Verum by Mozart. £10–£15; bathboxoffice.org.uk


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Historian Nicola Tallis will be talking about Margaret Beaufort at Toppings

how to prolong the beauty of your borders. £6 for visitors, £20 membership; ubgc.org RAMOS PINTO PORT TASTING n 21 November, 7pm, Le Vignoble Enjoy a guided tasting of wines from Ramos Pinto, Douro, Portugal and learn about the history and production methods. Booking essential. £20 per person, with £10 returned on a wine card; levignoble.co.uk MUDSLINGERS CERAMICS GROUP CHRISTMAS SALE n 22–24 November, opening times vary, Walcot Street Chapel Discover beautiful ceramic gifts handmade in local studios direct from nine potters. Bath’s Mudslingers will showcase a wide range of affordable work such as one-off bowls, mugs, teapots, vases, jugs, tugboats, quirky animals and unusual garden ceramics, as well as Christmas decorations. FASHION, BEAUTY, EDITORIAL MAKEUP TASTER DAY n 23 November, 10.30am–4.30pm, Bath Academy of Media Makeup A one day workshop designed to inspire you into creating makeup worthy of any red carpet event. Starting with the basics to achieve beautifully flawless skin, moving on to recreating iconic celebrity looks with an understanding of how the camera and the use of filters effect makeup. This is an interactive hands-on course for aspiring makeup artists and those who have a love of all things makeup. £80; bammakeup.com BATH CANTATA GROUP n 23 November, 7.30pm, St Stephen’s Church, Lansdown Bath Cantata Group launches its 2019–20 season with one of the greatest masterpieces of the Romantic era, Brahms’ Ein deutsches Requiem. The group will be joined by soloists Julia O’Connor and Timothy Dickinson. £5–£15; bathboxoffice.org.uk THE MUSIC OF OTIS REDDING BY MUDIBU AND THE JEZEBEL SEXTET n 23 November, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre 40 TheBATHMagazine

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Experience the incredible sound of Otis Redding’s music as two of the UK’s most exciting raw soul acts join forces to celebrate the King of Soul. £20/£22; chapelarts.org THE FIVE MUSKETEERS n 27 November, 2pm, The Holburne Museum An afternoon recital of 19th-century chamber music for winds on original historical instruments by The Five Musketeers. £10; holburne.org

READER EVENT: THE BATH MAGAZINE CHRISTMAS EXTRAVAGANZA n 27 November, 7–9pm, Great Western Wine Join our wine columnist Tristan Darby for an evening of festive tasting at Great Western Wine at this special event for readers of The Bath Magazine. Tristan will guide you through a range of drinks, from enticing wines and fizz, to warming spirits and liqueurs and more. There will also be some food matching tips ahead of your festive preparations. £10; greatwesternwine.co.uk

LADY MAISERY n 28 November, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre Described by The Guardian as “some of the most exquisite, thrilling vocal harmony work in the English folk scene,” Lady Maisery provides thoughtful arrangements of both traditional repertoire and original compositions. £14/£16; chapelarts.org BATH CHRISTMAS MARKET n 28 November – 15 December Get ready as the city begins to get in the festive spirit as the annual, award-winning Christmas market takes over the city centre with stalls brimming with beautifully crafted, locally made gifts and produce. This year there’s more than 150 stalls and plenty of food and drinks outlets to try; bathchristmasmarket.co.uk

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Helen George stars in My Cousin Rachel at Theatre Royal Bath

THE SPARKLE MAKEUP WORKSHOP n 30 November, 10am–2pm, Bath Academy Of Media Makeup The party season is nearing and this one-day Christmas workshop is designed to teach some wonderful Christmas makeup techniques. Delight your friends and family with a festive makeover and make them the one everyone remembers from the Christmas party. £50; bammakeup.com QUIZ NIGHT n 30 November, 7.30pm, Bathampton Village Hall Get your friends together and test your knowledge. Teams of six accepted, individuals welcome to join a team on the night. Cash bar and raffle. All proceeds to the Village Show. £10, includes hot supper. PLANNING AHEAD... RAT PACK OF OPERA n 3 December, 7.30pm, Homewood The number-one selling classical vocal trio Tenors Unlimited present their Rat Pack of Opera at the inaugural Christmas dinner concert at this country hotel, bringing their own blend of wit, humour, charm and vocal arrangements. £85 per person, includes three-course meal, half a bottle of wine and welcome drink; homewoodbath.co.uk BEN ELTON: LIVE n 4 December, 7.30pm, The Forum The Godfather of modern stand-up returns with a new stand-up show which promises to try to make sense of a world which appears to have gone stark raving mad. £29.50; bathforum.co.uk SCIENCE SHOWOFF n 5 December, 6pm Arts Lecture Theatre, The Edge, University of Bath Science and comedy might seem like a strange mix, but Science Showoff is here to prove that science can be just as funny as any other topic. Hear from four of the funniest scientists around as they perform their brilliant stand-up sets. An opportunity to hear about the lighter side of research. Free; bath.ac.uk/events n

Nicola Tallis: Joey Menghini/My Cousin Rachel designed by Bob King Creative

The Five Musketeers will perform at the Holburne Museum


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Bathampton Art Group Exhibition Saturday November 16th 2019 10am - 5pm Bathampton Village Hall, Holcombe Lane, Bathampton BA2 6UL

www.bathamptonart.co.uk

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CINEMA | HIGHLIGHTS

Take two: films

The Little Theatre Cinema is hosting a range of films from the FilmBath Festival this month. Here we review two – one an insight into social injustice within a glamorous hotel, the other a zombie comedy with a strong female hero, says Georgina Southam

The Chambermaid Mexican actor turned director Lila Avilés makes a confident feature debut with her film The Chambermaid. The action follows Eve (Gabriela Cartol), a 20-something chambermaid in an upscale Mexico City hotel, as she makes her way from room to room in this unnerving story showing the upkeep of a five-star hotel by the unseen working classes. Avilés has adapted her stage play with the help of Juan Carlos Marquéz, having taken inspiration from the 1981 photographic installation project L’Hotel by French artist, Sophie Calle. With Eve having to leave her young son behind in the care of a neighbour, we see her in her day-to-day work as she has bizarre encounters with hotel guests who see her just as part of the hotel. The exception is a privileged Argentinian woman who asks Eve to care for her baby while she showers, a job that becomes a daily responsibility filled with the hype of faux friendship and the promise of full-time employment – a ruse to keep her

Little Monsters Writer/director Abe Forsythe effortlessly blends genres in his new Australian zom-com production of Little Monsters, a winning juxtaposition that combines comedy and unabashed sweetness. Using many familiar comic devices, what makes this film more unusual is the unreal world setting populated by zombies. Man-child Dave, played by Alexander England, is a self-absorbed rock guitarist

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doing this extra unpaid work. The film depicts the emotional cost of submission, and how the monotonous job impacts on Eve’s feeling of self-worth – such as when her supervisor scolds her and reminds her of the need to be invisible to guests. The supervisor interacts with Eve in their exchange, but the scene only serves to emphasise her sense of isolation from the world. We stay within the confines of the hotel for the duration of the film, lurking in the hidden corridors and the lifts that lead to the bowels of the building, showing a clear distinction between the opulence of the lives of the guests and the monochrome context of the under-appreciated workers. Shining a light on the concealed workforce with both compassion and anger, this is a social satire delivering a commentary on the emotional pitfalls of the low-wage working class. The class tensions and cultural misunderstandings within the hotel, the film’s only framework, also evidence Cartol’s bubbling frustration with this status quo and the treatment of the lower classes. who, having recently become single, moves in with his sister and his five-year-old nephew Felix (Diesel La Torraca). The real star is the Oscar award-winning Lupita Nyong’o who plays Felix’s bubbly and fearless kindergarten teacher, Miss Audrey Caroline, who seems to have all the physical skills, character and mental acuity to face the onslaught of zombies that awaits. Nyong’o escorts her class on a field trip to a farm – with a smitten Dave in tow – when an influx of zombies stream in from a nearby military research base. As they descend on the farm, heading towards their prey – the tasty kindergarten pupils – Miss Caroline fearlessly leaps into action, soothing the children with Taylor Swift covers on her ukulele one moment, and fending off the undead with a pitchfork the next. She convinces the children that it is all a game, that the bloodstains on her dress are a result of a strawberry jam fight, and uses all of her child-herding tricks to keep them safe. Josh Gad performs well as the incorrigible children’s TV host Teddy McGiggle, a sex addict who is always drunk and hates children, despite his profession. Working well with England’s morose Dave, they become a comic duo that causes more chaos for Miss Caroline and the children. Whereas Teddy McGiggle doesn’t seem to learn much

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We see this pent-up frustration release when Eve is overlooked for a promotion, but then, conditioned to defer, she quickly reverts to stoicism, accepting her professional alienation on top of the other working injustices. from his interaction with the undead, Dave comes to realise that being around children can be a source of strength. Nyong’o earns the biggest laughs from Miss Caroline’s attempts to keep the children calm and shielded from the reality of the zombie outbreak. She is idolised as the hero from her first appearance, with the film firmly rejecting the trope of the beautiful women either as damsel in distress or hysterical nuisance; instead, Audrey is the capable, intelligent hero. Beyond the comedy and the swarming mass of zombies, Little Monsters works on a human level because it explores the idea of positive communication and the need to work together in adversity. n

SHOWING TIMES Little Monsters 9 November, 10pm The Chambermaid 10 November, 10.45am Little Theatre Cinema, St Michael’s Place; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little


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SLOW RETREATS in the beautiful Forest of Dean millendmitcheldean.co.uk | bordellobanquets.co.uk | facebook.com/events

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CULTURE

Golden boy

A touring exhibition to mark the centenary of the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun arrives in London this month. BRLSI has marked the occasion by inviting Egyptologist Lee Young to unravel some of the mysteries of the boy king and his tomb. By Lee Hooker, BRLSI’s convenor of antiquity

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anding in London at the Saatchi Gallery this autumn, the Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh exhibition represents the pinnacle of Ancient Egyptian culture. It celebrates Howard Carter’s discovery of the glittering contents of the pharaonic tomb of Tutankhamun, the young ruler of Ancient Egypt, on the west bank of the Nile in 1922, a golden treasure trove of jaw-dropping beauty, fine craftsmanship and luxury. The new touring exhibition, which runs at the Saatchi Gallery until early May, shows 150 artefacts from the pharaoh’s tomb, 60 of which have never been seen before outside Egypt. The forthcoming talk at BRLSI by Egyptologist Lee Young, illustrated with photographs taken at the moment of the tomb opening and the drawings of Howard Carter, gives the background to the boy king and tells the fascinating story of the finding of the tomb. Carter wrote, as he recorded the opening of the tomb, “At first I could see nothing, the hot air escaping from the chamber causing the candle flame to flicker, but presently, as my eyes grew accustomed to the lights, details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues, and gold – everywhere the glint of gold.” Nearly 100 years later, what is it that continues to fascinate us about this longago king? Well, Tutankhamun’s tomb is by far the most intact Ancient Egyptian pharaonic tomb ever to be found. The tomb of a king born around 3,300 years ago preserved the context and meaning of

ancient royal burial practices of the time, and offered an unprecedented insight into Egyptian culture and life during this era. More than 5,000 exquisite items – including Tutankhamun’s famous golden death mask, a chariot and a dagger made from meteorite iron, along with furniture, clothes, weapons and 130 of the lame king’s walking sticks – were crammed inside his small tomb, demonstrating the staggering wealth and importance of this New Kingdom pharaoh. Although Tutankhamun is our touchstone to the ancient past, it was his royal father, Pharaoh Akhenaten, who was the king who changed history and his son’s destiny. After succeeding his own father Amenhotep III around 1352 BC, Akhenaten lost no time in making changes to his vast empire, building a new capital at Amarna where he implemented widespread political and religious reforms. He overturned a centuries-old religious system involving the god Amun and the state pantheon of deities and stripped the priesthood of wealth and power in favour of a religion worshipping a single deity. While Tutankhamun’s own rule was notable for reversing these unpopular religious reforms of his father, his legacy was largely negated by his successors, and his name was little known until Carter’s 1922 discovery of the tomb. Like his father and grandfather, Tutankhamun’s life was short. He succeeded to the throne of Egypt at the age of nine and died around the age of 19. He left a wife (who was also his half sister), but no living heirs, just two poignant mummified foetuses within his tomb. Failure to leave an heir

brought his bloodline to an end. This situation may have sprung from a tradition of kings marrying their sisters: Akhenaten and his own sister were the parents of Tutankhamun. Tutankhamun’s regnal years oversaw a massive swing back to polytheism. Why would Tutankhamun have permitted this? A restoration decree formally records Tutankhamun’s decision to revert to the old religion because the gods no longer heard the prayers of the people. As a nine-year-old taking the throne we may conjecture that he was steered towards this re-instatement of the old pantheon of gods. After his death, with no bloodline heirs, his vizier (high official) Ay became pharaoh. The King List in Abydos records every pharaoh of Ancient Egypt, but significantly omits the names of three pharaohs who followed Amenhotep III, Akhenaten’s father: Akhenaten, his son Tutankhamun and his vizier Ay. In this list, Amenhotep III is succeeded by Horemheb, who was not of royal blood but legitimised his rule by erasing all evidence of these men and their successors. Name erasure such as this deprived the Amarna kings of their full deathright, a passage into the afterlife, and left an almighty problem for chronologists attempting to reconstruct the era’s timelines. But Horemheb’s efforts failed because the first traces of the existence of Tutankhamun had come to light on a small cup, along with gold fragments bearing the figures of Tutankhamun and his wife. Carter’s determination to find more evidence resulted in the finding of the tomb. Here was first-hand evidence of the intricate embalming preservation process and the rationale behind it – to accurately preserve the appearance of the deceased to ensure safe progression into the afterlife. Ancient Egyptian belief regarded death as the opportunity for rebirth. Despite the efforts of Akhenaten’s detractors to expunge these dynastic names from history, the tomb of Tutankhamun restored his family honour. Surrounded by funerary objects to assist his journey to the afterlife, this king has become immortalized in our time. n • Tutankhamun lecture, 20 November, 7.30pm, BRSLI, £4–7 • Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh exhibition, 2 November – 3 May, Saatchi Gallery, London, £16.50–£28.50 • Akhnaten, a live screening of Philip Glass’s opera, 28 November, Little Theatre Cinema

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THEATRE

Directing dreams

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t’s a complicated tale but ultimately it could be perceived as being incredibly romantic,” says director Michael Boyd as he starts to explain the storyline of his directorial adaptation of Korean playwright Hansol Jung’s 2014 digital-age drama Wild Goose Dreams, which premieres in the UK at the Ustinov Studio on 21 November direct from an acclaimed off-Broadway run. “It’s a wonderful interrogation of the concept of love.” Now I hadn’t expected our conversation to open on such a lighthearted tone. While I’m well aware that one should aim to distance the artist from the art (you wouldn’t turn down an offal’n’chianti supper with Anthony Hopkins, would you?) I was wholly prepared for Boyd – whose illustrious CV includes a decade-long stint as artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company and who is known for confronting theatre-goers with some assiduously thought-provoking dramas – to be a bit, erm, serious? But while he’s clearly serious about his work, the man who was knighted in 2012 for services to drama is, IRL (and it’ll become clearer why I’m using internet chatroom parlance here later on), as friendly and buoyant as theatre front of house staff ten minutes before curtain up. “You have to maintain an appropriate distance from whatever piece of work you’re working on,” he says. “If you’re doing Macbeth, you don’t want to be living like a murderer for five weeks, do you? But with all plays, you have to dive straight in and swim under the water of it when you’re in

Michael Boyd

rehearsal, but when you leave rehearsal, you need to surface into fresh air. And it’s actually quite interesting to notice that the points in rehearsal where actors get the giggles are quite often the most appalling moments of emotional intensity – it’s a safety mechanism, I think; relief that it’s not you, it’s just your character. It’s important to be able to leave it all behind at the end of the day, just like the audience has to leave it behind when you exit the theatre – most people leave ready for a giggle, but a squabble can work equally well.”

While Wild Goose Dreams digs deep into the heart, it’s painted with a lighter touch – a lighter, keener Asian brushwork

Two lonely people from two divided cultures meet on an online dating site. What ensues is an unforgettable 21st-century love story. Melissa Blease talks to director Michael Boyd ahead of the Ustinov Studio’s production of Wild Goose Dreams

But as our conversation turns back to the Wild Goose Dreams storyline, it becomes clear that, this time around, the giggling or squabbling might be replaced by the need to wipe the odd tear away from our eyes... “The play focuses on two very lonely people,” Boyd explains. “Nanhee is lonely because, as a defector from North Korea now living in the US, she feels like a fish out of water. She’s done really well for herself, she has a good job, but she still somehow feels that she doesn’t necessarily totally fit in; she’s missing home, and she’s worried about her family. And then she meets Minsung on the internet: he’s married, he’s living in South Korea, and he’s what’s called a ‘Gireogi Appa’ – a Goose Father. Basically a Goose Father is somebody who has a good job and quite a lot of money but lives very poorly while his children and wife go abroad, usually to an English-speaking country, to further their education. Minsung’s family are in the United States, so he’s lonely too. But these days, in the midst of all the online malaise, with all the conversations that we can have on social media and all the ways to talk to other people on the internet, you can’t imagine that anyone could ever be alone... and these two don’t have to be alone. So they start an online affair, but partly because it’s an

internet romance and partly because of their circumstances, they’re both quite suspicious of this love. And of course, in a way, it’s about typical opposing behaviours in the north and south of Korea. The mismatch is ridiculously funny – on one level, it’s a classic ‘odd couple’ comedy. But without giving too much away, I admit that it’s got quite a bit of a sting in the tale...” Ah, see: I wondered where the sting in the tale would come in. Or did I? While Boyd’s 2018 production of Christopher Marlowe’s Tamburlaine was one of the most seductively savage dramas I’ve ever seen, he was also responsible for first bringing Matilda, one of Roald Dahl’s best-loved characters, to on-stage life at Stratford on Avon back in 2009, during his RSC stint. Is Boyd the ultimate protean dramaturge? “You’re very right in saying that I tend to direct plays that focus on the underlying unease or hostile dynamics that are often only just beneath the surface of relationship connections,” he says. “Of the plays I’ve directed at the Ustinov Studio, The Big Meal (2014) was about a family falling apart over the years but still looking for ways to hang on to each other. The Harvest (2015) was an extraordinary tale about keeping relationships warm – can we look after ourselves and each other as we would like to look after an orchard? And Right Now (2016) was a deeply disturbing psychodrama. But while Wild Goose Dreams digs deep into the heart, it’s painted with a lighter touch – a lighter, keener Asian brushwork, if you like.” I wonder if Boyd’s latest work could perhaps be a reflection of where he’s at in both professional and personal terms right now. There’s a distinctly carefree cadence in his response to a question about how he likes to spend his downtime (“nothing particularly spectacular, really; I just enjoy being with my family, my kids and my wife, or cooking, or reading, or walking – I like walking, and thinking”), and a similarly refreshing attitude to the freelance pace that’s replaced the responsibilities of his RSC hot-seat position (2002–2012). “I have more of a dilettante role these days than I had at the RSC, where I was responsible for a large company,” he says. “Now I’m just the hired gun coming in to work on the piece in hand. But I’ve been very lucky to have the support of the Ustinov Studio, where I’ve been allowed to do pieces of work that an awful lot of other theatres would have been just too scared to do, not because of questionable content or contentious politics, but just because they weren’t


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The Big Meal, which ran at Theatre Royal Bath in 2014, was about the erosion of a family

necessarily commercial beasts; several have been international works that don’t necessarily present entirely familiar scenarios to people. Ustinov Studio’s artistic director Laurence Boswell has allowed a really important body of international work to see the light of day.” So who is Wild Goose Dreams most likely to appeal to? “I’m not sure that there’s a particular target audience really,” says Boyd. “I mean, it speaks to me as a man of 60+, but the author is only just 30, and she’s talking about a very contemporary world. But I think that the loneliness of the two central characters and their story of finding love has universal appeal. To be very specific, it’ll resonate with everybody who

uses the internet but particularly, perhaps, people who are uncomfortable with that world, or get lost in it, or get addicted. And it’d certainly be a right old hoot for anybody who’s done internet dating.” Swipe right on tickets for Wild Goose Dreams; they’re likely to fly away fast. n

Wild Goose Dreams, The Ustinov Studio, 21 November – 21 December: theatreroyal.org.uk

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INSIDE | ART

Figure with Cropped Face by Henri Matisse

Matisse’s etchings are remarkable because they so beautifully preserve the vivacity and clarity of his drawing. Sylvie Broussine, assistant curator at the Holburne Museum, explores one of the etchings on display in the gallery as part of the Matisse: Master of Line exhibition, which runs until 5 January Figure with Cropped Face Seated in an Interior, etching with chine collé, printed on velin d’Arches paper, Henri Matisse, 1929 On loan to the Holburne Museum from John Kasmin. Photography Jamie George, Courtesy Lyndsey Ingram Gallery. © Succession H. Matisse/DACS 2019

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One must always search for the desire of the line

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elebrated as one of the great colourists of 20th-century painting, Henri Matisse (1869– 1954) was also an exceptional draughtsman, and it is in his prints that we see his mastery of the graphic line. Indeed, such etchings as Figure with Cropped Face Seated in an Interior reveal the artist’s remarkable ability to describe opulent interiors and the movement and poise of the human form with just a small number of marks. Matisse did not have a continuous interest in printmaking throughout his career, instead producing etchings and other print forms (including monotypes, linocuts, aquatints and lithographs) in intermittent bursts during intervals from his painting and sculptures. Matisse created almost all of his etchings using a printmaking technique called chine collé. In this process, tissue-thin paper is combined with a heavier support paper below. Together they are run through the printing press to form a two-layered paper support that creates a subtle backdrop to the image. The first important group of prints by Matisse date to 1914–15, when his painting ceased due to the outbreak of the First World War and he instead turned to producing around 50 sketch-like etchings of his friends and family. These intimate portraits are characterised by spontaneity and fluency as Matisse captures each sitter’s essence with only a few dashes across the copperplate. His second significant period of printmaking dates to 1929, when the artist

was struggling to paint due to ill health and the impact of poor reviews of an exhibition. During this time Matisse’s printmaking flourished and he produced more than 100 plates in just a few months. The majority of these share the same subjects, notably nude studies, a goldfish bowl and North African objects and textiles. Matisse created all of his prints from this period by drawing directly on the copperplate from the model in the studio. In a letter from Paris, his daughter Marguerite notes the ease in which he drew these images: “They’re astonishing, incredibly full of life – it’s as if you used the etching point and copper like pencil and paper.” Figure with Cropped Face Seated in an Interior is a fine example of the vivacity and immediacy of Matisse’s graphic line as described by his daughter. In this image a half-dressed woman sits crossed-legged in a pose that simultaneously conceals and exposes her body, her cheek leaning into her upright knee as she tilts her head to allow one eye to peer out at the viewer. Her body seems to fold into itself, most likely an allusion to the sleeping female nude in Michelangelo’s Night (1520–34) from the tomb of Giuliano de’ Medici in San Lorenzo, Florence.

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Matisse, 1913, by Alvin Langdon Coburn Matisse had found a plaster cast of this work in Nice in 1918, igniting a fascination with the Florentine sculptor that can be seen in his depictions of the human form throughout the 1920s. In this work, Matisse’s model sits on a patterned carpet, most likely part of his collection of textiles and objects from North Africa, which the artist used as a backdrop to many of his 1929 prints in evocation of a harem. A goldfish bowl – a common feature of his work since the early 1910s – and an ornate Venetian lamp are placed by the sitter’s side. Illustrating these decorative furnishings with seeming simplicity, Matisse creates in monochrome a highly ornate scene that suggests an interior full of colour. Perhaps this work is best encapsulated by what Matisse once advised his students: “One must always search for the desire of the line, where it wishes to enter or where to die away.” n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street, Bath BA2 4DB Open daily from 10am – 5pm holburne.org


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THE ARTS SOCIETY BATH Lecture Series 2019/2020

‘Fresh Encounters: Contemporary Sculpture and the Public Domain’ Why does sculpture play such an important role in our Cities?

1.30pm on Monday 4th November 2019 in The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath at

Lecturer : Anna Moszynska Visitors welcome £10 at the door (No Booking required) Visit our website for membership benefits and other information www.theartssocietybath.com

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART With gallery pop-ups, local artist showcases and renowned names from the art world, there’s plenty to see at Bath’s galleries and museums this month THE BATH COLOURISTS BRLSI, Queen Square, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am–4pm PAINT-PAPER-METAL-CLAY 6–12 November

Five artist friends come together to present a celebration of new work in their chosen media featuring Lynne Roche’s still lives and en plein air oils, Sylvia Owen’s sculptural studies of human and animal figures, Henrietta Smith’s transcriptions of old masters, Tony Wilson’s expressive sketchbooks with scenes from everyday life, and Beata Høst’s enviable one-off jewellery designs. Free entry. Left, The Harvesters by Henrietta Smith

VICTORIA ART GALLERY By Pulteney Bridge Open: Daily, 10.30am–5pm Tel: 01225 477233, web: victoriagal.org.uk

MODERN ARTBUYER AND ROSTRA GALLERY POP UP

RICHARD TWOSE: EXPERIMENTS WITH FLYING Until 24 November Richard Twose, who won second prize at the 2014 BP Portrait Award in the National Portrait Gallery, undertook a three-month residency at Elisabeth Frink’s former studio in 2018. Inspired by Frink’s themes, such as the Bird Man, horses and bulls, he extended them, helped by acrobats from CircoMedia, Bristol. By directing the acrobats he was able to test their limits – balancing, falling and flying – incorporating energetic marks into his images to convey continuing motion.

Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel, Beau Street, Bath Web: modernartbuyer.com; rostragallery.co.uk CONTEMPORARY ART AT THE GAINSBOROUGH 8–10 November

After their hugely successful summer show, two online Bath-based galleries are joining forces again in an exciting collaboration to showcase contemporary artworks from a selection of emerging and established artists. Modern ArtBuyer and Rostra Gallery will bring together a range of limited edition prints, contemporary paintings, mixed media works and sculpture with new works from local, national and international artists.

Solstice by Paul Minott for Modern ArtBuyer

BATHAMPTON ART GROUP Bathampton Village Hall, Holcombe Lane, Bathampton Web: bathamptonart.co.uk Widcombe Canal by Moira Anderson

WINTER EXHIBITION

JAMES TOWER: A CENTENARY CELEBRATION Until 24 November As one of Britain’s most important 20th-century studio potters, James Tower was also a highly respected art school lecturer, initially at Bath Academy of Art. This loan exhibition marks the centenary of his birth and features 40 large sculptural ceramics as well as numerous paintings, drawings and documents demonstrating his artistic influence.

16 November, 10am–5pm

The Bathampton Art Group’s winter exhibition will be judged by Steve Hall (stevehallartist.co.uk) and visitors will have the opportunity to vote for their favourite painting. Some artists will be demonstrating throughout the day. Most of the artwork will be available to purchase, as well as greeting cards, homemade savouries and cakes. 54 TheBATHMagazine

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ART BAR Work by Pippa Wrigley

The Abbey Hotel, North Parade, Bath WINTER EXHIBITION 12 November – 5 January Grab a cocktail, enjoy a bar snack and see the work of four local artists – Emma Taylor, Emma Rose, James Nunn and Lucy Saunders – adorn the walls of the bar in The Abbey hotel. There will be affordable pieces of art, prints and cards for sale. Right, Beautiful Sea by Emma Rose

44AD ARTSPACE 4 Abbey Street, Bath Open: Daily, 11am–5pm, web: 44ad.net

Left, Caterpliiar Dawn by Nick Cudworth

CLIMATE CHANGE 13–17 November Four artists have come together to raise awareness of climate change. Paintings by Ruth Davies depict heat, flooding and protest. Ceramic sculpture by Teresa Hughes illustrates the devastation caused to coral, while Sarah Kniveton illustrates the critical importance of water with her installation Tipping Point. Pippa Wrigley looks at how climate change could impact on Bath and what can be done to mitigate it. Also featuring artworks from local schools.

NICK CUDWORTH GALLERY London Street, top of Walcot Street, Bath. Closed on Mondays Tel: 01225 445221, web: nickcudworth.com

THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM

HENRI MATISSE: MASTER OF LINE Until 5 January One of the undisputed masters of 20th-century art, Henri Matisse (1869–1954) is renowned for the exquisite delicacy of his drawn line as much as for the intense brilliance of his colour. His etchings are remarkable for the fact that they preserve the vivacity and clarity of his drawing, giving them an immediacy that is especially striking in dialogue with the Jeune Femme le Visage enfoui dans les Bras by Henri etchings of Rembrandt. This Matisse, etching, 1929, on Chine collé, Artwork display, commemorating the 150th anniversary of Matisse’s © Succession H. Matisse/ DACS 2019 birth, focuses on around 20 of his works.

Throughout November The November exhibition at The Nick Cudworth Gallery features original paintings and prints of Bath and the surrounding countryside, and includes giclée prints of the welcoming row of trees on top of a hillside known as Freezing Hill.

© Tristan Fewings, Getty Images for RIBA

Great Pulteney Street, Bath Open: Daily, 10am–5pm (11am Sundays), tel: 01225 388569, web: holburne.org

THE EDGE REMBRANDT IN PRINT Until 5 January As well as being an undisputed master of the Dutch Golden Age, Rembrandt was also one of the greatest printmakers of all time. He used a characteristic scratchy fine line to create images remarkable for their power of expression. He also reworked some of his plates, demonstrating his pursuit of atmosphere in his images and a canny recognition of the financial potential of the print. This selection from The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford – one of the world’s greatest collections of Rembrandt’s etchings – will include many of his most iconic images. It will juxtapose works of different scale and feeling, and a variety of subject matters, from self-portraits through religious scenes to female nudes. 56 TheBATHMagazine

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Andrew Brownsword Gallery, The Edge, University of Bath Open: Tuesday – Saturday Tel: 01225 386777, web: edgearts.org PLAYING THE PICTURESQUE Until 14 December, 11am–5pm Experience an interactive installation exploring the boundaries between virtual and physical space. Using video game technology, this exhibition explores architectural designs showcasing historical landmarks. All the artworks have been designed by You+Pea and commissioned by RIBA. Free admission.


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

GALLERY NINE 9b Margaret’s Buildings, Bath Open: Monday to Saturday, 10am – 5pm Tel: 01225 319197, web: gallerynine.co.uk WINTER EXHIBITION Throughout November

Gallery Nine’s winter exhibition features the highly acclaimed Egyptian-born studio potter Ashraf Hanna and his wife Sue. His ceramic forms are hand-built vessels and his work is in the permanent collections of several museums around the world. Drawing Earrings by Leoma Drew inspiration from tribal art, Sue’s work is decorated with slips made from locally dug clays, and then raku or saggar fired. Featured jewellers are Rachel Butlin and Leoma Drew. Artist and printmaker Merlyn Chesterman specialises particularly in woodcuts and her work can be found in the Hong Kong Museum of Art and galleries in London and the South West.

DAVID SIMON CONTEMPORARY 37 High Street, Castle Cary Tel: 01963 359102 Web: davidsimoncontemporary.com

GRAY M.C.A 5 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath Open: Wednesday – Saturday, 10am–4pm, Monday and Tuesday by appointment Tel: 01225 422117, web: graymca.com

NEIL PINKETT: COLOURS OF THE COAST 2 – 28 November Pinkett has concentrated largely on the coastal landscape around Sennen Cove in Cornwall for this exhibition. In this collection of some 30 paintings, Pinkett has excelled himself, capturing the dramatically volatile weather conditions in this part of the world. From powerful storms hitting the rugged coast to the peaceful, almost still condition of blue skies mirrored in the wet sands, this is a place that constantly offers visual challenges and a wealth of beauty.

THE AUTUMN SHOW Throughout November Fresh from the catwalks of Paris Fashion Week S/S 2019, Gray MCA is excited to present The Bil Donovan 2019 Series: Original Signed Works For Luxure Magazine. See beautiful original fashion illustration in watercolour and wash by the artist in residence at Christian Dior in New York, Bil Donovan. Above, Maison Rabin Kayrouz S/S 19 for Luxure Magazine, watercolour and wash on paper, signed

THE FRAMING WORKSHOP 80 Walcot Street, Bath Tel: 01225 482748 Web: theframingworkshop.com

Right, Treen Sands by Neil Pinkett

Throughout November

George Weeks works with a variety of wood veneers using marquetry techniques to produce pictures, frames and small objects.

BEAUX ARTS 12–13 York Street, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am–5pm Tel: 01225 464850 Web: beauxartsbath.co.uk

Below, Bella by George Weeks

WINTER EXHIBITION Throughout November In the run-up to Christmas, Beaux Arts welcomes back artists of renown such as John Maltby and Sarah Gillespie, as well as showing fresh faces like Alex Callaway and Rachel Ross. Jane Muir’s quirky ceramics add to an impressive array of work that is well worth a look during the holiday season if you’re on the look-out for unique gifts. n

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Hebrew Character Moth by Sarah Gillespie


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nick cudworth gallery

The Caterpillar and The Rainbow Oil on linen original–prints available 14 x 10 inches

NOVEMBER EXHIBITION 1 – 30 November

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

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CULTURE

THE DARCY EFFECT

Badges, bags and life-sized cardboard cutouts of Colin Firth… How has Jane Austen’s Mr Darcy become such a global phenomenon? Jessica Hope talks to local writer Gabrielle Malcolm about Darcy’s enduring legacy, and the controversy around that famous wet shirt scene

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Jennifer Ehle as Elizabeth Bennet and Colin Firth as Mr Darcy in the BBC’s 1995 production of Pride and Prejudice

following. You just have to head into the gift shop at the Jane Austen Centre in Bath to see the shelves full of Darcy-related products. From bookmarks to posters, coasters to socks, it’s all there. And it’s the mass merchandising of this particular character that first inspired Malcolm to begin researching the global fascination with Mr Darcy. “Seeing people around Bath with the I ♥ Darcy bags, I wondered what other 19th-century character would have that? You wouldn’t have a T-shirt that says ‘I love Scrooge’ unless you were particularly crazy about Dickens. The I ♥ Darcy items struck a chord with me because why would you take the step of making this merchandise about this figure?” she asks. It was this that pushed Malcolm to explore Darcy’s legacy further and write her latest book, There’s Something About Darcy, which investigates Darcy’s impact on popular culture over the past two centuries. The answer as to why the love for Darcy has continued is multifaceted. “Austen’s work, particularly with Pride and Prejudice,

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creates an intersection of very dramatic, romantic and funny satirical tales together. Darcy is both mocked and praised in the book. He is a snob and a prig, but also goes through that transition. “The reason why we come to like him is because of Austen herself, as she mediates all the characters through her prose style. She was really funny, sharp, and using the kind of origins of folk-tale, fairy tale, and the social elevation of a young woman. Yes it is rags to riches, it is Cinderella, but there’s more to it because of what Austen does.” As well as Austen’s style of satirical writing, the interest in Darcy’s character is influenced by the accessibility of the story itself. “It crosses boundaries and cultures. Yes it’s a bubble of English middle-classness but that’s not the point – it’s a limited scope to deliberately dissect human nature and relationships closely. With Austen [her characters are] her next-door neighbours and the people she saw opposite her in the Assembly Rooms,” says Malcolm. And for a character that doesn’t actually

Moviestore Collection/Alamy

e all know the scene: Colin Firth jumps into a rather murky pond on the Lyme Park estate in the Peak District, breeches and all, before strolling back to his stately home in his wet shirt and consequently walking into the hearts of the nation’s period drama lovers, becoming a household name overnight. It’s a scene that has carved a firm niche in television history, and has become a cultural reference point. Before this, Mr Darcy was more often than not considered a background character in Pride and Prejudice. Jane Austen’s contemporaries in particular paid more interest to the likes of the nonsensical Mr Collins, preferring the satirical comedic character of the silly clergyman over Elizabeth’s quiet love interest. While Firth perfects the Mr Darcy saunter as he wanders back after his dip in the pond, little did viewers know that the antics on the set of the 1995 BBC production of Austen’s Pride and Prejudice could have meant that this illustrious scene may never have actually made it into the final cut… While we think we see Firth diving into the pond, it is in fact a stunt double, and the shots of Firth swimming underwater were instead taken in a tank at Pinewood Studios. “On the day of filming this scene, which was very early in the filming schedule, someone had left half of the pool cover on, so when Firth came up to the surface, he smashed the front of his face on the cover. There was blood everywhere,” local writer Gabrielle Malcolm tells me. “The first thing that Simon (Langton, the director) was worried about was whether the insurance would cover this and if it would delay the schedule, because he didn’t know at the time that Firth was going to become so huge. He said that if he had recast Darcy at the start of the shoot, no one might have noticed and we might not be in the same situation as we are today…” So the Darcy-mania we still see almost 25 years following the series release may never have happened. Luckily, Firth was patched up and filming continued, and the allure of Mr Darcy has continued ever since. Despite the novel having been published more than 200 years ago, it’s difficult to pinpoint another 19th-century fictional character that has harnessed such a loyal


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CULTURE

appear very often in the novel, why are we drawn to Mr Darcy? “He just wants to help Elizabeth’s family because of what they have at stake,” says Malcolm. [Spoiler for those unfamiliar with the story: Elizabeth’s 15-year-old sister Lydia runs away with the notorious baddie George Wickham without any certainty that they will get married. Potential family ruin is on the cards. Darcy quietly saves the day behind closed doors. Happy endings for all.] “Austen explored the idea of the women and the dislocation, inability and disenfranchisement of being a woman [in her novels], but also looked at what it was like for men in contrast; to be a gentleman there was a call on their resourcefulness and their sense of responsibility – and that’s the test that Darcy passes because he does it [saving the day] all in a completely disinterested way. He only acts because of Elizabeth and her family. He says ‘I only thought of you’.”

...when Firth came up to the surface, he smashed the front of his face on the cover. There was blood everywhere...

For Malcolm, who lives in Bradford on Avon, her personal interest in Mr Darcy first began when she picked up a copy of Pride and Prejudice for the first time aged 11. “There was a language in my family where they had read Austen’s books and so there were these frames of reference that would be made and I didn’t want to miss out,” she says. Then came the 1980 BBC adaption starring Elizabeth Garvie and David Rintoul, where Malcolm found her original Mr Darcy. “Rintoul was just gorgeous. And then I got to meet him years later at a Shakespeare conference. We all had to pitch in and read a few lines and when I got to my bit, I totally fluffed it. I was sat opposite the Mr Darcy, I was so tongue-tied and blushing. I was old enough to know better. But he was exactly the same, he had so much poise.” The variety of adaptions of Pride and Prejudice is almost endless: there have been multi-million pound film adaptions (think Bollywood, vampires, Bridget Jones’s Diary), modern day takes such as Pride and Prejudice: Atlanta with an all AfricanAmerican cast on US channel Lifetime, murder mysteries, and plenty of fan fiction – all of which Malcolm completely engrossed herself in during her research for her new book.

But can a story that’s been retold so many times continue to attract such a large audience? “I’m optimistic about future adaptions. People who haven’t even read Austen are familiar with her world. I think there are still ample opportunities available for people to engage with it. There’s a brilliant range of characters such as the Hursts, Miss Bingley, the militia, all that side that you could explore,” she says. Malcolm, who received her PhD from the University of Kent in 19th-century literature and worked as an academic for 15 years, now writes full-time and teaches a creative writing class at Bath College. When she’s not writing, you can find her chairing talks at the Jane Austen Festival and other literature events around the world. One of her festival highlights was hosting a talk with the 1995 adaption director Simon Langton at the Masonic Hall in Bath. “It was a huge sell out. I said to the audience that if there’s one person for all of us to be here for apart from Jane Austen, it’s Simon Langton. And then they all gave him a standing ovation. I said to Simon ‘they love you, for what you did, you made that series’,” says Malcolm. “He’s truly a brilliantly gifted TV creator. He works with his instincts, but simply says that the source material was so good. But he’s created something that is so universally loved. It’s such a gift that he has given.” It’s certainly true that Langton and the rest of the cast and crew created an adaptation that has influenced the popular culture surrounding Austen’s work indefinitely. And it is this that has encouraged Malcolm to spread the word of Austen further afield with her work. “My goal is to give people these interesting and informed reads, but for the popular readers. My intention is to try and bridge that gap, and this book is my first real push to do that.” With more adaptions of Austen’s work on the cards, sell-out events and festivals, as well as enthusiasts like Malcolm promoting her work, it looks like Austen’s characters will be sticking around for a while longer. “The fact is that her work is only getting more and more popular,” says Malcolm. “Where you see other people from the 19th century and the interest gets to a kind of plateau, Austen is getting more popular – more younger readers are picking up her novels.” And may the Austen, and the Darcy, legacy live on, we say! ■

There’s Something About Darcy by Gabrielle Malcolm is out on 11 November, published by Endeavour Quill, rrp £9.99

OUR FAVOURITE SPIN-OFFS OF PRIDE AND PREJUDICE

DEATH COMES TO PEMBERLEY by p.D. JaMeS This murder mystery sequel from award-winning crime writer p.D. James follows Fitzwilliam Darcy and elizabeth bennet in the immediate years after their wedding day. all seems to be rather pleasant at home until lydia arrives screaming that her husband has been murdered. This bestseller was then made into a bbC series in 2013 starring anna Maxwell Martin, Jenna Coleman, Matthew goode and eleanor Tomlinson.

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE AND ZOMBIES by SeTH graHaMe-SMiTH “it is a truth universally acknowledged that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains.” elizabeth is determined to wipe out the zombies in Meryton, but the arrogant Mr Darcy arrives on the scene. expect romance, swordfights and rotting corpses. This parody novel became the inspiration behind the 2016 film adaption starring lily James, Matt Smith and Charles Dance.

BRIDGET JONES’S DIARY by Helen FielDing First published in 1996, Helen Fielding has stated that austen’s most famous work was a big influence in the creation of this much-loved tale. This multi-million selling novel follows a 30-something single woman living in london through the ups and downs in her career and relationships. The first film in the bridget Jones franchise came out in 2001, with renée Zellweger as bridget, Colin Firth as Mark Darcy and Hugh grant as love rival Daniel Cleaver.

LONGBOURN by Jo baker This is a reimagining of what life is like below the stairs at the bennet’s family home. Domestic life, ruled with a tender heart and an iron will by housekeeper Mrs Hill, is about to be disturbed by the arrival of a new footman, bearing secrets and the scent of the sea. a film adaptation directed by Sharon Maguire (Bridget Jones’s Diary) and produced by random House Films and StudioCanal is on the cards apparently, so there’s enough time to tuck into the book first…

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SELLING VINTAGE WINE BY CHRISTOPHER CHANTER NEW WINE EXPERT AT LAWRENCES I am delighted to have joined Lawrences as their Wine Specialist and I am really looking forward to spending time in Bath and Bristol which is where my early career in wine began. In the 1970’s I had the great good fortune to be trained by the late great John Avery, one of the UK’s first Masters of Wine. Interest in wine as an investment has never waned and it continues to show remarkable appeal at auction as witnessed in the last few sales at Lawrences which saw some spectacular prices especially for good quality claret. I once had a case of Chateau Petrus 1961 cross my way, so I rang a London expert to ask if I should buy it. The asking price was £4,000, a huge sum in those days (late 1970s). I was advised to proceed with caution as the price could go down. I didn’t proceed, and looking back it was a mistake, as it would easily fetch more than £50,000 now, possibly upwards of £80,000. Nowadays, coverage on the internet ensures that anyone interested can easily find out about wines coming up for sale and with good cataloguing they don’t even have to visit the saleroom, which is especially useful for faraway markets. The Chinese are very keen for certain wines for example. The red wines of Bordeaux have some great wines that can command huge prices but it isn’t all about France. Some Penfold wines from Australia and some Robert Mondavi wines from California also have a following and can too command high prices. Sweet wines (Tokajj ) form Hungary and good Tuscans have also been great movers in recent years and one must not forget vintage port which consistently sells for good prices. So, if you want any help or advice or maybe just want to come along and chat about your cellar, then do pop into the next valuation day which is being held as always at the Holburne Museum in Bath on Friday 29th November. If you would rather I came out to see you at home, then just contact us to arrange a home visit. I look forward to meeting you.

Brandy Warmers For Christmas and beyond ENTRIES ARE NOW INVITED FOR FORTHCOMING SALES. IF YOU WOULD LIKE MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: enquiries@lawrences.co.uk

Lawrences AUCTIONEERS The Linen Yard, South Street, Crewkerne, Somerset TA18 8AB. T 01460 73041

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DOCUMENTARY

FA M I LY PHOTOGRAPHY NEWBORN | DAY IN THE LIFE | PORTRAITS

YOUR EVERY DAY LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL hithere@jesscheetham.com Instagram: @jess_cheetham www.jesscheetham.com 07802200295 Facebook: @jesscheethamphotography

The Framing Workshop has been trading as an independent family run business on Walcot Street for over 28 years. We treasure you, our client, and spend time helping you to ďŹ nd the best way to display and protect your cherished objects, artworks and memorabilia. Creativity and respect for each artwork are core to what we do. Every picture tells a story. Come and share yours.

80 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BD Tel: 01225 482748 www.theframingworkshop.com framing@theframingworkshop.com

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Mr Scrooge and the wooden sheds DUNCAN CAMPBELL HAS BEEN DEALING IN ANTIQUE SILVER SINCE 1986

A view through my shop window

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t this time every year I start to make plans for how to spend the long hours of loneliness and tedium that are a feature of the pre-Christmas shopping season in Bath.

As a local shopkeeper, I am far from alone in my depression about the garden sheds, also known as the Christmas Market. It may sound counter-intuitive, but for this frantic period in Bath’s retail year, business falls off a cliff. There must be some local businesses that benefit from the influx of shoppers that the market brings, but I suspect that the real winners are either in the sheds or collecting rent from them. A quick glance at recent chain store closures shows how difficult it must be for retail businesses to compete with their online competition. Left unchecked, the high streets of England will eventually turn into barren wastelands, decorated with graffiti and unsanitary plastic bags. A smart strategic vision is required to avoid the slow but inevitable death of our city centres. Putting my cards on the table, I fail to understand why we have so enthusiastically embraced the very Teutonic tradition of Weihnachtsmärkt. It seems to me to be the very epitome of tacky commerciality – no doubt for similar reasons to the importation of the turbo-charged commercial opportunity that is Halloween. Dumping a group of rates-free traders in the most prime retail area at the centre of Bath, regardless of the rent generated, appears a cruel way to treat the city’s shopkeepers. Bath has a fantastic reputation as one of the best retail centres in the country, supporting a vast range of independent shops. I have friends who travel from London to shop because it is so (comparatively) easy to park and get around. I fully realise that I may seem rather grumpy and humbug about this. This is partly because I’d rather spend Christmas in a ditch than venture into the shed zone but also, being a proud resident of this fine World Heritage City, I do feel that it does our reputation no good and may even jeopardise the longer-term prospects for our city centre. n beaunashbath.com; 01225 334234

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FOOD | ON SCREEN

Eat’s a film thing As the FilmBath Festival approaches, Melissa Blease gets nostalgic over films that stand out because of their imaginative use of food – from Willy Wonka to Eat Drink Man Woman, food becomes linked with magic, obsession, seduction, family loyalty, morality and passion

J

ason Bourne – in every one of his Bourne films – doesn’t appear to eat anything or to ever take a toilet break. He might be fictitious, but he’s using up a fair bit of energy as he jumps across rooftops, shimmies along walls, drives down acutely angled steps, pancakes cars and engages in mortal combat with secret agents. Introducing a teensy weensy element of realism, wouldn’t bananas, fatty fish and brown rice all be good options to give him plenty of energy, protein and vitamins for his superhuman endeavours? What a ridiculous suggestion, I hear you say, because of course suspending reality is the order of the day in such action films. To be fair, we do see Jason using a toaster in The Bourne Supremacy, but only to use a magazine as a fuse to light up an

open gas main after shoving it in said toaster. Jason is clearly not the only screen hero to never waste time eating, or dealing with other regular body functions, since this would detract from the plot. Eating is essential to our survival, however, so isn’t it comforting and uplifting when a movie takes time to dwell on the preparation and savouring of food? Where the presence of food gives meaning? When characters take pleasure in shopping for ingredients, using their kitchen in a real-time way and enjoying the eating experience? Well here’s my top ten list of films that do just that, as you start to think about booking tickets for the FilmBath Festival, which takes place later this month.

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistlestop Café

Goodfellas

Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY (1971/2005) The idea of a film version of Roald Dahl’s tale of Charlie Bucket’s visit to Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory is so good they made it twice: Mel Stuart’s version hit the blockbuster charts in 1971, followed by Tim Burton’s 34 years later. Whether you prefer Gene Wilder’s wild, witty Willy or Johnny Depp’s slightly sinister Wonka is a matter of personal taste, but in both films the main attraction is candy in all formats, from everlasting gobstoppers and WhippleScrumptious Fudgemallow Delight to experimental gum to replace a three-course meal, lickable wallpaper, fizzy lifting drinks... and the fabulously fantastical factory in which it’s all created. Craving the ultimate sugar rush? Watch both versions on the same night. On the menu: packs of Haribo Starmix and several litres of Orange Tango.

Like Water for Chocolate

GOODFELLAS (1990) Super-stylish though it is, Martin Scorsese’s 1990 mob movie chronicling the trials and tribulations of USA Mafia family life from 1955 to 1980 can’t be described as an easy watch; mobsters aren’t tender, polite or compassionate towards those who cross them. But wow, these guys ate well! “In prison, dinner was always a big thing,” says narrator Henry, before a scene in which Paulie, cooking dinner in a cell, slices garlic so thinly that it liquefies as it hits the oil. Elsewhere, the crew take time out to stuff their faces with Tommy’s mother’s meatball marinara before borrowing a shovel for ‘waste disposal’, massive coils of Italian sausage are cooked on a backyard grill while the gang plot a ‘hit’. Even when Henry is being tracked by FBI helicopters, the spaghetti sauce for a family dinner gets 66 TheBATHMagazine

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priority: “I told my brother to keep an eye on the stove,” he says, “I didn’t want the sauce to spoil.” On the menu: Don’t mess with classic Italian family food. Capeesh?

FRIED GREEN TOMATOES AT THE WHISTLESTOP CAFÉ (1991) Based on American author Fannie Flagg’s bestselling 1987 novel, Jon Avnet’s 1991 film tells the moving story of an American Depression-era friendship. The characters are despondent middle-aged housewife Evelyn (Cathy Bates) and forthright Ninny (Jessica Tandy), an elderly lady who shares tales of her life and the people who once lived in the now-abandoned town of Whistle Stop with Evelyn in an effort to broaden her friend’s emotional horizons. The top-layer narrative runs in conjunction with the parallel tale of Ruth and Idgie, who opened the Whistle Stop Café many years ago: a Mecca for wholly authentic American deep south soul food that represents the heart and hearth of the American deep south... and safeguarding a backstory that’s far more fascinating than a recipe for fried chicken, grits and biscuits. On the menu: surely you can work that out?

LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE (1992) Alfonso Arau’s rich adaptation of Laura Esquivel’s bestselling book (each chapter of which begins with a Mexican recipe connected to an event in the protagonist Tita de la Garza’s life) takes us to a tumbledown ranch near the Mexico/US border in the early 20th century... and turns the heat up on the hob. Tita isn’t allowed to marry her true love Pedro because, as the youngest daughter in the family, she’s destined to care for her mother. So, Pedro marries Tita’s


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FOOD | ON SCREEN

Eat Drink Man Woman Chocolat

RATATOUILLE (2007) Alfred is a young, gauche kitchen porter at Gusteau’s Restaurant in Paris. Little chef Skinner is his nasty little boss, Colette is Gusteau’s chef de partie, Anton Ego is a dour, uppity food critic and Remy is a witty, ambitious, tenacious rat with a highly developed palate, superior kitchen skills and a dream of becoming a chef just like the restaurant’s original owner Auguste (RIP). Pixar’s most gloriously tender computer animated production is thoroughly engaging; the moment when Anton Ego (voiced by Peter O’Toole) tastes Remy’s

Super Size Me

ratatouille and is transported back to the comforts of his childhood, saying much about the deep-rooted connections that link food with memory and personal identity. On the menu: layer green and yellow courgettes, aubergines, potatoes, red peppers, tomato and béchamel sauce. Season with plenty of imagination and a soupçon of sheer magic.

JULIE AND JULIA (2009) In 2002, New York food blogger Julie Powell undertook the mammoth task of recreating all 524 recipes in 1960s American chef and author Julia Child’s 1961 twovolume book Mastering the Art of French Cooking... in 365 days. Starring Meryl Streep as Julia and Amy Adams as Julie, this

Chef

CHOCOLAT (2000) Fluffier than the inside of a Walnut Whip, Lasse Hallström’s British-American romantic drama based on Joanne Harris’ 1999 novel of the same name hits the sweet spot on many levels. When young single mum Vianne (Juliette Binoche) opens a little chocolaterie in the tiny little village of Lansquenet-sous-

SUPER SIZE ME (2004) The negative effects of McHighStreet fast food is hardly news. American independent filmmaker Morgan Spurlock 15 years ago voluntarily undertook a 30-day fast-food binge, eating three meals every day only from McDonalds, and ‘super-sizing’ his order every time he had the opportunity. The resulting documentary logged and recorded the physical and psychological effects of Spurlock’s regime on his overall wellbeing; by the end of the project, he’d gained 24lbs (11.1kg) in weight, drastically increased his cholesterol and experienced drastic mood swings and sexual dysfunction... and it took him 14 months to get back to his former self. His point? Don’t do it, kids! Weird, sad, funny, drastic and, at times, quease-inducing, Super Size Me is an uncomfortably compelling experience. On the menu: green salad, hold the dressing.

Julie and Julia

EAT DRINK MAN WOMAN (1994) Prickly widower chef Chu lives at home in Taipei with his three distinctly different, headstrong single daughters: airline executive Jia-Chien, broken-hearted chemistry teacher Jia-Jen and Jia-Ning, a student who works at a fast food chain. Chu’s girls may not be as traditional as Chu would like them to be but he staunchly maintains certain customs, such as an elaborate family dinner every Sunday. Sumptuous though the banquets are, this is not just food: for Chu, every dish is an expression of the love, affection and compassion he can’t otherwise articulate, while for his daughters, it’s food for their body, minds and souls as they navigate their way around the hazards and complexities of modern love. On the menu: have your local Chinese takeaway on speed dial.

Tannes, she stirs up all manner of magic for repressed customers, gets right under the skin of the village’s residents, and becomes rather close to Romany ‘river rat’ Roux (Johnny Depp in full-on smoulder mode). It’s charming, it’s whimsical, it’s daft – and for chocaholics it offers the ultimate fix, featuring multiple variations on a white, milk, dark, soft-centred, hard-centred, cake, biscuit and liquid theme in pretty much every key scene. On the menu: Vianne’s hot chocolate with chilli, roast quail in chocolate sauce, Johnny Depp.

Ratatouille

older sister Rosaura instead. Unable to express her turbulent emotions, Tita lets her cooking do the talking, serving up fabulous dishes seasoned with all the passion, desire and anguish locked within her soul. On the menu: a Fajita kit just won’t do.

classic “dreams can come true” kinda tale (the project escalated the former blogger to publishing superstar status and posthumously put Child’s books back on the bestseller charts) holds massive appeal to foodies who can follow Julie every step of the way as she burns beef bourguignon, troubles herself with tartines, bullies bruschetta, simpers over shrimp scampi and avoids carpaccio calamity. On the menu: a rather complex array of classic French/Cordon Bleu dishes, timeless only if you’ve got plenty of time on your hands.

CHEF (2014) Amazingly for a film written, directed by and starring one of Hollywood’s most fascinating actor/director/producer/ screenwriter/super-foodies Jon Favreau, Chef kinda slipped under the radar. But for fans of foodie films, it really is a veritable feast. Carl Casper (Favreau) is the innovative head chef at LA’s Gauloise restaurant. The restaurant’s owner Riva (Dustin Hoffman), however, wants Carl to play it safe at all times. Frustrations boil over when a social media meltdown between Carl and a restaurant critic goes viral, inspiring Carl to pack his job in, flee to Miami, refit a vintage food truck, cook up a new recipe for living life on his own terms – and take his family in a whole new direction, not least of all emotionally. On the menu: pretty much all the delectable dishes featured in the film have been published online – go to it, chef! n

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FOOD&DRINK NEWS CHEER FULL TAVERN

The Bird, Bath on Pulteney Road is to open a new Christmas Tavern on 28 November, to coincide with the start of the Christmas Market. The relaxed festive retreat will be the place to gather with friends for afternoon tea or food and drinks. Complete with tree-lined walkways and snow-capped mountain scenes, the focal point will be a cosy wood burner with decorations and fairy lights. The food will range from seasonal snacks to Christmas afternoon teas, sourdough pizzas and sweet treats such as warm mince pies with Bailey’s cream, while cocktails will take their cue from the classics with a Christmassy twist. The Christmas Tavern will be open until 31 December. thebirdbath.co.uk

BIG CHEESE IN KELSTON

Her Royal Highness, The Duchess of Cornwall, recently visited The Bath Soft Cheese Company at Park Farm in Kelston. The Duchess congratulated the cheese makers on their recent success at international cheese awards and saw the new café and viewing facilities that will allow the public to watch the cheese making and the milking of the cows. Her Royal Highness also met with a group of children from St Mary’s Primary School in Bath who were taking part in one of the free educational visits that are run at the farm. parkfarm.co.uk

CHOICE AWARDS FOR BATH

Condé Nast Traveler’s annual Readers’ Choice Awards have recognised three of Bath’s hotels in the top five best hotels in the UK. Lucknam Park Hotel and Spa was in second place, The Gainsborough Bath Spa was in third place and The Bath Priory was in fifth place. More than 600,000 Condé Nast

PIZZERIA REVAMP

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Traveler readers across the globe rated their travel experiences to provide a snapshot of where and how we travel today. The Readers’ Choice Awards are the longest-running and most prestigious recognition of excellence in the travel industry. cntraveler.com

PizzaExpress has unveiled its new brand proposition in Bath, making its Theatre Royal and Southgate Centre pizzerias on Barton Street and Southgate Place two of the first in the UK to showcase the new look. The format of the newly styled restaurants builds on the vision of founder, Peter Boizot – who first introduced pizza to the UK in 1965 – to bring people together over great pizza. Both pizzerias feature the kitchen at their heart and festoon lighting highlights the expert pizzaiolos as they flare the dough, with striking timber borders framing them hard at work. pizzaexpress.com

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WORD ON THE SQUIRE

Lucknam Park Hotel and Spa has introduced a four-bedroom country property to its site. Squire’s Cottage has all the advantages of a home from home, while enjoying the service of a five-star hotel: the ESPA Spa, Michelin-starred restaurant, The Brasserie, renowned equestrian centre, cookery school, room service, housekeeping, concierge and even a private chef. Guests can also choose to stay on a self-catering basis. The property can be found within the 500-acre private estate, a short walk from the hotel. It sleeps up to eight people, with three en suite double bedrooms and one en suite twin. This follows the opening of Keeper’s Cottage, which launched in 2018. The hotel plans to introduce a further two cottages in 2020. lucknampark.com

SMART APPLES

Bath Rugby and Thatchers Cider have toasted the renewal of their partnership agreement with a special edition cider, pressed from apples grown in an orchard at the team’s training ground, Farleigh House. The rugby campaign marks an eighth year of partnership between the Blue, Black and White and the fourth-generation Somerset cidermakers. The apples were handpicked by the Bath Rugby players and the Thatchers team, led by farm manager Chris Muntz-Torres, from the trees planted at Farleigh House at the start of the partnership in 2011. Thatchers has made a limited run of 120 bottles of Farleigh Cider. The bottles will be signed by the squad and auctioned, with all proceeds donated to the Bath Rugby Foundation and Thatchers Foundation to help raise money to support local communities in Somerset. n bathrugby.com; thatcherscider.co.uk


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FOOD | AND | DRINK

Bread to bake

“All you need is flour, water, salt and an oven,” says Becky Mears, who has set up One Mile Bakery in Paulton. The concept is good food made with quality ingredients for the local community, delivered by electric bike. Here she tells us about the new business... You have just launched One Mile Bakery in Paulton. What’s the idea behind the business? The idea behind One Mile Bakery (OMB) is to offer good food with great ingredients to the local area, specifically within a mile’s radius. The business was the idea of Elisabeth Mahoney who set up the first OMB in Cardiff. The idea is something I’d love to see across the whole of the UK. It’s a simple, back-to-basics concept and I like to think it brings back the traditional idea of sharing recipes and techniques. We aim to deliver great bread in an eco-friendly way and teach others how to make their own in a home environment. All you need is flour, water, salt and an oven. What were you doing before you set up OMB? I’ve worked in a corporate environment for many years, at the forefront of online community building. So lots of sitting down at a desk in an office with my keyboard of rage. Some of those years working for other people were really tough, with a young family and the lack of freedom to be as creative as I wanted to be. I wanted a job that brought me joy and that would fit around a busy family.

Has the business required a big outlay? The outlay is what you make of it. You can get away with a domestic oven and basic equipment. I have chosen to go for a bigger Rofco oven to make my life easier. I also use mainly organic ingredients, but even great flour doesn’t break the bank. How strict are you about the one mile radius? Very, I have a pretty high demand locally with a waiting list so everyone is within the mile. The business sounds very streamlined and eco-friendly... Yes! I think we can all contribute towards the bigger picture and I’m very proud to be doing my bit. How many loaves of bread can you make in a week? In theory, I could make a thousand loaves if I baked all day, every day, but that isn’t the idea. I deliver to 25 households around Paulton and host at least one cookery class a week, so I bake about 30 loaves and teach others to bake around 20 loaves. It is very much a conscious decision to not max myself out with baking, markets and delivering to shops. I hate food waste and want to provide

food where I know it will be eaten and enjoyed. The real pleasure comes from showing someone how great it is to bake. You offer bread, preserves and soups. How do the orders work? Subscribers pick a type of bread: sourdough, classic or a mixture of the two. Every week is something new – I have a different soup, classic loaf and sourdough loaf each week. Are the recipes you use your own? The recipes in the classes are written by Elisabeth but are all adaptable and flexible. The weekly recipes are mainly mine, dependent on the season or what ingredients I come across. I recently went to Wells Food Festival and bought some black garlic that I will be adding to this week’s sourdough, for example. Tell us about some of your favourite loaves, soups and preserves... You can’t beat a really well done classic white loaf. Once you nail that perfect fluffy white, you can make almost anything by adding ingredients, and changing the liquid and the flours. I love a brioche, a good olive bread and the family favourite is a chocolate sourdough. Caramelised onion chutney is my personal favourite and blackberry jam with berries from the local hedgerows. The soup I’ve had most feedback on was a lovely basic but tasty potato and leek soup. How do you cope with hills and a full bike load of deliveries? Ha! I enjoy the freedom of a good bike ride but it’s never really been my thing. I have an electric bike that helps with the hills. It is very much pedal-powered, but gives you the umpf when you need it. What sort of reception have you had from your customers? Amazing. I was hopeful that people would like the idea but I wasn’t expecting to have a waiting list before I’d started. The local people are very warm and I've heard shouts of “There’s the bread lady!” a few times now as I whiz past on my bike. What cookery classes do you offer? There are at least four classes a month, often more. You can choose from Introduction to Baking, Italian, French, Vegan, Sourdough, Festive and Breads of the World. n

Becky Mears in her kitchen and on her electric bike

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The unveiling of Nelson’s plaque in Pierrepont Street in 1904


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RESTAURANT | REVIEW

The Old Crown Inn Kelston Road, Kelston, BA1 9AQ. Tel: 01225 423032; oldcrownkelston.com

R E V I EW

Jessica Hope discovers a cosy country pub that is taking the traditional up a notch

W

e’re rather lucky in this part of the country that when we’re on the search for a good pub, there’s an abundance of choice at our fingertips. In Bath’s city centre, there are watering holes on offer around every corner. But when the nights begin drawing in and the rain comes lashing down as November appears, there’s nothing better than finding salvation at a country pub in front of a warm open fire with a proper pint or glass of red, cracking food and good company. And an escape to the country is definitely something you will find at the Old Crown Inn at Kelston. Just a hop, skip and a jump from the city, this pub has been pouring pints for centuries, and in the last couple of years it’s had a big rejuvenation courtesy of the brains behind the The Inn at Freshford, The Cross Guns at Avoncliff and The Griffin Inn on Monmouth Street. It’s retained its historic charm with its flagstone flooring, wooden beams and log fireplaces, while the bar has had a freshen up and there have been big changes in the garden – in the summer the place was bustling with punters at the outdoor bar watching Wimbledon on an outdoor screen. (I’m also reassured that you’ll still be able to make the most of this in the winter as there will be hot mulled wine and an almighty fire pit burning.) Back inside you will find cosy corners perfect for couples dining, spacious tables for groups of families and friends, and you’ll always find the regulars propping up the bar, sometimes with a faithful pooch sat at their feet. As word has spread about the Old Crown’s revamped food and drink offering, 72 TheBATHMagazine

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it was unsurprising to find it humming with people for a Friday night on our visit. The pub prides itself on a local offering of beers, ales and cider on tap and by the bottle, plus there’s a varied wine list (bottles from £18–£35) and an extensive selection of gin. Turning our attention to the food, we were spoiled for choice. For starters, I couldn’t not choose the Cornish mussels. Fresh, plump and cooked in a deliciously light cider, cream and leek sauce, these went down a treat with the toasted pumpkin seed bread (£7). My dining partner, Russell, went for the homemade scotch egg with barbecue-like sauce (£8), assuring me it was nothing like those halfempty excuses of scotch eggs you find in supermarkets – oh no, this was filled to the brim with well-seasoned sausage meat, with a crispy coating, perfect for dipping. Moving on to the mains, I chose the smoked haddock fish cakes with shaved fennel salad and onion crisp (£14). Beautifully presented, the delicately smoked fish contrasted well with the tangy herb sauce, and the deep-fried onion crisp, which took the guise of a flat onion bhaji, added a savoury moreishness to the dish. For a more traditional approach, there’s also some serious pub classics on offer here, done exceptionally well. Fish and chip Friday is a particularly popular night with customers (enjoy an enormous fish, chips, crushed peas and house tartar with a drink for £12), and there’s chunky beef and bean and lentil burgers, plus a butter poached rump steak that makes us start salivating at the thought… Russell went for the Darcy pie (named after

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the owner’s daughter), filled to the brim with venison, steak and kidney and served with chips, tenderstem broccoli and gravy (£11). With crisp, buttery pastry and rich, tender meat, this was an instant winter warmer on a plate. The pies, which change quite often on the menu, are made by Freshford FoodCo, which was launched by the pub group’s owner Jack De Bruin at the end of September. The pies, as well as the other homemade baked goods, sausage rolls, chutneys, hotdogs et cetera on the menu have been going down so well at the pub that you can now order them through the Freshford FoodCo to take home – that means a Darcy pie in front of Strictly for a Saturday night treat might just be on the cards soon… If you’ve somehow got room for dessert (the portions are seriously worth the money here) the gooey espresso brownie with vanilla ice cream (£7) is a serious indulgence. Or if you fancy something a little more cleansing, the passion fruit and coconut cream sundae with sorbet and toasted almonds (£7) is light, fruity and sharp – and definitely one that you could order with two spoons. And if you can’t manage any more food, then an espresso martini or liqueur coffee (from £7) could be a good bet to round off the evening. Set on the outskirts of the beautiful Cotswold countryside, and just half a mile from Kelston Roundhill, The Old Crown Inn is an ideal retreat after blowing the cobwebs away on an appetite-inducing winter walk. The colder months are making themselves felt, and this little pub could just be the warming hearth you need this season. n


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READER EVENT 

Hotel & Restaurant

Festive tasting with Tristan Darby

The Watersmeet Hotel in Woolacombe is a four star hotel on the water’s edge with an indoor and outdoor pool & spa. Our two restaurants include a bistro and a fine dining option, both with stunning views to the sea.

Christmas Extravaganza at Great Western Wine Thursday 27th November In association with The Bath Magazine, Great Western Wine are thrilled to invite you to an evening of festive tasting in the relaxed atmosphere of our Bath shop. Your host for this Christmas extravaganza will be Tristan Darby, The Bath Magazine's wine columnist – he’ll guide you in this informal event through gloriously luxurious drinks of all varieties from enticing wines and fizz, warming spirits and liqueurs and more besides. What’s more there will also be some great hints and food matching tips ahead of your own festive preparations. We look forward to seeing you there! Tickets : £10 Thursday 27th November, 7–9pm Buy your tickets now at www.greatwesternwine.co.uk/events

Great Western Wine

Wells Road Bath BA2 3AP www.greatwesternwine.co.uk

Christmas Package Eat, retreat and be merry at the Watersmeet Hotel. Give yourself a gift this year and retreat to the coast to stay under our 3 night Christmas package full of festive treats and delights! The Watersmeet is just magical at Christmas time with our log fires and cosy lounges. The surrounding beaches are quiet and invigorating and the South West path offers a wintery ramble. Everything is taken care of so you can focus on relaxing and feeling merry. Classic double sea views room available from £1140 for a 3 night package for two adults.

Luxury for Less Offer Escape to the coast for one night of luxury. Stay in one of the Watersmeet’s luxury suites and a bottle of Champagne to start your stay with a toast. Indulge in 3 courses in our Pavilion Restaurant and enjoy breakfast with a sea view. Available on selected dates throughout November, December and January, £280 per room per night – perfect for those romantic nights away from it all!

01271 870 333 watersmeethotel.co.uk The Watersmeet Hotel, EX34 7EB enquiries@watersmeethotel.co.uk THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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Jamie Forman

On the home front Escaping from the urban thrum, Melissa Blease finds solace in a secluded country house hotel in Freshford and talks to the head chef, Jamie Forman, about what makes Homewood’s offering so special

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t’s a typically autumnal late Friday afternoon in Bath: ominous storm clouds are gathering overhead, a gaggle of tourists are following the wrong umbrella into a tiny sandwich shop instead of the big restaurant next door and a broken-down bus is blocking one of the main cross-town intersections, bringing the rush hour traffic to a total standstill. “Don't worry, you’re heading for Homewood,” says my cheerfully optimistic taxi driver; “we’ll be leaving all this behind any moment now.” While he was wrong about the ‘any moment now’ prediction, he was certainly right about eventually leaving the big city thrum behind. Within moments of being freed from the snarl-up by an efficient traffic cop, we hit the A36 proper... and relaxed. It wasn’t long before leafy lanes, honey coloured cutesy cottages and cusp-of-harvest fields bathed in deep golden sunlight kicked all memories of urban mayhem to the kerb. And just 10 minutes later we were slowly cruising up a driveway that seemed to be taking us into some kind of magical fairyland. There’s a sculptured, graffitied horse grazing on the manicured lawn. 74 TheBATHMagazine

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There’s a topiary giraffe standing by a beautifully lit tree. We’re pulling up at a main entrance bathed in soft pink neon light – yes, the magic starts here. Hoteliers Ian and Christa Taylor have a big reputation for their wonderful ways with hotels in need of some serious TLC. In Bath alone, they’re the duo responsible for transforming The Abbey Hotel from fusty boarding house to urbane eat/drink/sleep city centre oasis. They thoroughly revitalised the dead zone that was The County Hotel and flew The Bird – now arguably one of Bath’s most characterful merrymaking/sleepover zones – in instead. They turned Great Pulteney Street into one of Bath’s most fashionable thoroughfares again, courtesy of a hugely imaginative revamp of a collection of former Georgian townhouses now thriving as one under the uniquely elegant No. 15 Great Pulteney brand. Having sold The Abbey Hotel last year and recently passing No.15 on to new owners, Homewood – acquired by Ian and Christa, also known as The Kaleidoscope Collection, in 2018 – could be described as the couple’s biggest challenge to date: a grand pastoral pile built to user-friendly

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scale, Georgian in essence but featuring plenty of delightfully idiosyncratic Victorianera ‘updates’ on foundations that boast 13th-century origins. Okay, we’ve established that we’re in country house hotel zone here. But while such a phrase can summon up visions of posh frocks, snooty waiters and panic-attack inducing prices, there be no such dragons lurking around the artfully stylish corners at Homewood. For sure, there’s a subtle aura of glamorous elegance imbued into the property’s fabric and it’s already highly regarded as a magical wedding venue, but it’s equally accessible to those in search of an uplifting experience on a ‘just because we want to go somewhere lovely’ whim too. Meanwhile, in the kitchen, Homewood’s new owners could be described as head chef


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Jamie Forman’s old friends. “I worked for Ian before, when he and Christa had the Cotswold House Hotel in Chipping Camden,” he tells me, over coffee in the hotel’s smartly quirky reception lounge. Indeed, Jamie brings a rather illustrious CV to his new kitchen home. He was head chef at Adrian CampbellHoward’s Dial House hotel in Bourton-on-the-Water, before the name Campbell-Howard became synonymous with the Society Café coffee shops. He’s enjoyed a stint as executive chef for the New Forest Hotels portfolio too, and a major hob role at Holbrook House in Wincanton... but hang on; the man sitting in front of me only looks about 19. “I’m 42!” Jamie laughs. “I’d like to give Nivea for Men the credit, but even when I was 18 I still looked about 10 years old, which wasn’t great. Back in the day, as a first-time head chef, it worked in my favour in some respects. But it can get a little bit difficult looking like one of the boys when you’re trying to be the boss; it’s harder to take the reins, especially if you’ve got a calm personality!” Calm: it’s an ageless look, you see. And taking to the reins at Homewood, however demanding, must be quite a calming

experience for a chef used to overseeing a large brigade: “There are only four of us in the kitchen here,” says Jamie. “I like it that way; it’s more personal having a small team, and it keeps me at grass roots level.” While the Taylors have said that they expect their transformation of Homewood to take two years to fully complete (there are all manner of exciting plans in the pipeline across the whole site) and Jamie has only headed up the kitchen brigade for five months, he’s already established solid ethos foundations on the grass roots he’s tending so lovingly. “In terms of our food offering, my key words are locally sourced, seasonally-led and high-quality product-driven,” he says, with a quiet air of authority that lends gravitas to a statement that’s in danger of becoming careworn. “I don’t have a signature dish as such, as that’s a bit of a dated concept these days. But basically, I don’t put anything on the menu that I wouldn’t want to eat myself. We’re in talks with the best local producers in the area, and we’ll use products from the best of the bunch. I’m not into swipes, or foams, or suspensions – my kitchen will simply be respectful of the ingredients, and let them sing for themselves. We have a

vision to create our own farm-to-fork menus – the land around the hotel lends itself perfectly to that, and I want us to grow our own vegetables to utilise the space we have in a beautiful and useful way. I’d like to do our own honey, and grow some borage around the hives, and then we can all have borage honey for breakfast – that sort of thing; just lovely stuff. But I have loads of ideas going on in my mind every day.” But where did the inspiration for Jamie’s cheffing career begin? “My mum was a really good cook who always cooked really well for the whole family, so I guess she started me off,” he says. “And then, as an apprentice and a commis chef in late 80s/early 90s, Gary Rhodes was a massive role model; he still is, because he’s an absolutely fantastic guy who can be credited for so much. I was looking at one of his books just last night – his recipes have never dated, they’re still contemporary, and they’re simple, but always focused on good-quality produce. I’m a Jamie Oliver fan too; despite the hiccups that have gone on in his business life lately, his food ethos is solid, and his recipes always work. And I love Yotam Ottolenghi for the same reasons. But overall, I’d say Gary is my go-to guy.” Rhodes: OBE, TV presenter, multiple restaurant owner, author of some 18+ cookery books... and recipient of multiple Michelin stars. Meanwhile, the kitchen that’s recently become Jamie’s gastro-playground was itself, many moons ago, dusted with Michelin stardust. How important are accolades to the Homewood kitchen’s contemporary head boy? “Oh, I think every chef would love to earn a Michelin star,” he says. “But these are really early days. I’d love to see us rated in all the guides, and going for rosettes, and that kind of thing. But I don't believe that anybody should cook for awards – we cook for people. While it’s good to be recognised for doing a good job, acclaim has to be earned by hard work and dedication. If we work towards it, and go in the right direction, it’ll come. We’re a rising project but we’re already at a really nice level. I can’t help saying that I’m very excited about the future.” n Homewood, Abbey Lane, Freshford, Bath BA2 7TB. Tel: 01225 723731; homewoodbath.co.uk

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TRISTAN DARBY With the big day soon approaching, Tristan selects wines for the Christmas table

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“really delicious food, I would recommend this company for your event” - 250 guests Mayflower Hall, Southampton University - Aug ‘19

Bernard’s

Mobile plant-based street food and catering service Bath Delicious vegan food made with love for all occasions 01225 446867 www.bernardskitchen.com 76 TheBATHMagazine

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et’s start with festive fizz. Guaranteed to get any occasion started with a swing, Ruggeri, Prosecco Spago Frizzante (£12.75, Great Western Wine) is a real crowd-pleaser that bursts with delicious fresh apple fruit aromas and flavours. With gentle bubbles (frizzante is a semi-sparkling style), a nip of sweetness and a refreshingly dry finish, it’s quintessentially quaffable and the perfect party popper. For a special toast or sparkling gift, I’d opt for Champagne Jacquart, Mosaïque Signature NV (£39.50, GWW). Bottle matured on its lees in Jaquart’s cellars for an extended period of five years, it’s an elegant mellow and complex take on their fantastic Brut Mosaique at more-or-less the same bottle price. With notes of stonefruit, brioche, caramel and honey, it’s a top pick for even the most discerning fine fizz fans. When it comes to turkey, whites can be easily overpowered by rich trimmings, so I’d opt for a fullerbodied wine with decent acidity to stand up to stronger flavours. Reasonably bold chardonnay is the classic choice and my personal preference. Burgundy taste-a-like Les Mougeottes, Chardonnay (£9.95, GWW) would do the job at a very reasonable price point, but for something a little more special look to richer Puligny or Meursault wines from Burgundy such as Jean-Michel Gaunoux, Meursault (£43, GWW) – it’s rich and complex with bold fruit flavours and a crisp finish to help cut through the food and clean the palate between forkfuls. For red, remember that turkey is ‘dry’ meat so there’s nothing much to soak up tannin, therefore, it’s best to seek out smoother wines. Pinot Noir, top-notch Gamay or wellaged Rioja, Bordeaux or Chianti work best. For pinot try and avoid lighter styles that may get overwhelmed, and opt for bolder, fruitier wines from Australia, Chile, USA or New Zealand such as the wonderful Yealands Estate Pinot Noir (£15.95, GWW). Packed with flavours of plum and dark cherry, it would also be a hit with duck or lamb. If you’re seeking Bordeaux, and especially if you’re opting for beef or lamb instead of the traditional bird, then try Vieux Chateau Brun, Pomerol 2013 (£36.50, GWW), a smooth right-bank merlot with a packed palate of plums, damsons and blackcurrants alongside more mature earthy, tobacco box, truffle and leather notes. For after-dinner and fireside options I’d recommend Papale Oro Primitivo di Manduria, Varvaglione (£22.50, GWW), which hails from a sub-region of Puglia in Italy that’s renowned for its intense complex reds, and it’s the perfect wine for after-dinner digestion. Dark, sultry and complex, there are flavours of ripe plums and black cherry, a touch of warming spice and luscious creamy chocolatey notes. A touch of sweetness makes it a great partner to cheese, too, so grab a slab of mature Cheddar, some creamy blue and hunker down on the sofa with a glass, or indeed the whole bottle. A real Christmas cracker. n Join Tristan and The Bath Magazine for a very special Christmas Extravaganza wine tasting in the shop at Great Western Wine in Wells Road, Bath on Wednesday 27 November to taste wines specially selected for the festive period as part of a relaxed, fun and informal tutored evening. For tickets (£10) visit greatwesternwine.co.uk/events


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PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151


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Bath @ work

Our series of photographic portraits by Neill Menneer shows Bath people at work. View a gallery of Bath@work subjects at: thebathmag.co.uk

Estevan Mortensen

Street artist

I

come from Latacunga in Ecuador, South America. My father was a farmer but for some reason he had to sell his large estate. We went to Spain where I finished my schooling. After studying at art school in Madrid I got a job doing huge murals in Las Vegas, paintings of the Grand Canyon and other American landscapes. I love all forms of art – I love to create ceramics and sculpture and have a life-long fascination with puppets. In fact, they were my first love. I used to do puppet shows for children in Madrid. My voices for the characters were too loud, though, and I was asked to stop. A friend showed me how to get around the noise issue by introducing me to static sculptures. These are very big in Madrid, typified by high-end, sophisticated and elegant street performances. I created my Travelling Man, a static sculpture I have often done in Bath, and this has provided me with a good living. The character is in some ways responsible for getting my family here. When we decided to leave Spain because of the economic crisis we got in a van and travelled through Spain and France. I earnt money on the way, via Zaragoza, Pamplona and Paris, by performing The Travelling Man. We left with 90 Euros and eventually got to London in 2012. In Paris they were stuck-up and London was too busy and expensive, so we went to visit my wife Gloria’s sister in Newport. We settled in Cardiff for a while, but my wife kept telling me “Go to Bath”. I went to Oxford. Then I went to Cambridge. Eventually I arrived in Bath. I couldn’t believe it. Wow. I loved it straight away. My daughter found a house to rent and within a week we had moved. Although I paint in my workshop as much as I can, I spend most of my time earning a living on the streets of Bath. It takes me nearly three hours to get ready to appear as The Cyclist (shown opposite), which is my latest incarnation. Most of this time goes on making up my face as the clothes are pre-prepared. There are many techniques I had to learn to be a human sculpture. I practice yoga so that I am fit and can relax my muscles even when they are in active positions. I focus on breathing through my diaphragm and sometimes chant quietly to myself. I love what I do, especially people’s reactions. They can’t believe I’m a live person. They say, “Look, look, look!” I don’t blink. If I do, they shout “He is real!” We still love Bath and its beauty but it’s the people that make it special. I never get any aggression or disrespect, even from teenagers. The work and its quietly meditative qualities is certainly a great contrast to the crazy home life we have with our two young kids. Thinking of the future, I accept what will happen in my life, however it turns out. One day I hope to have an exhibition of my work. This might even one day be possible here in Bath, my new home. n

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151 THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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Larkhall

Dr Shawn Sobers

James Shone and his balloon of self-belief

OLD MEETS NEW: Cameraman in front of David Garrick in Richard III by Francis Hayman

Harpinder Collacott

The unveiling of Nelson’s plaque in Pierrepont Street in 1904


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CITY | CULTURE

A time to speak

TEDxBath recently invited ten speakers to the Brownsword Gallery at the Holburne Museum. With themes including musical algorithms, forensic DNA and the importance of data, the audience left reeling but inspired, says Emma Clegg

Photography by David Gillett, Sam Page and Jenny Stephens; images © TEDxBath

The children received a letter from Sue towards the end of her illness thanking them all for her time with them, explaining that she thought she was going to die soon, that she was going on to a new adventure, and telling them that there is always fairy dust to be found in any situation, however difficult. In response to the letter, the whole school community came together with strength, the children made 1,000 flowers for the funeral and drew pictures to decorate the coffin. And so the lesson that Sue had suggested – that joy and good comes from the hard times and that there is strength in dialogue – brought the school together.

Encourage them to dream dreams and learn to reflect on their setbacks

F

rom music coding to bioarchaeology and circular fashion to the warmth of a school community in adversity, the themes of the TedxBath Echoes of the City talks in September were deliberately broad in their spectrum. TEDxBath is the local community version of TED’s mission to organise events that spread ideas and spark conversations. Where better to do this in Bath than in the Brownsword Gallery at the Holburne Museum, watched over by works by Gainsborough, Constable and Zoffany? Each speaker had just 10 minutes, making each commentary direct and focused. A talk with a strong regional and global link came from Dr Shawn Sobers who explained the close connections between Ethiopia and Bath through Haile Selassie’s time of exile at Fairfield House in the 1930s after Mussolini’s troops invaded Ethiopia. Selassie, still considered as a messiah by Rastafarians, spent his years in Bath writing his 90,000 word life story. When he returned to Ethiopia in 1941, he left Fairfield House to the city of Bath and was given the Freedom of the City in 1958. Sobers pointed out that Selassie’s association with the city served to broaden the sense of the history of Bath and those of its citizens. A moving local story came from Jayne Rochford-Smith, headteacher at St Andrew’s Church School. She talked about Sue East, the school’s previous inspirational headteacher, who was diagnosed with terminal cancer last year. She said to Jayne then, “Don’t let my illness be wasted. Use it as a gift to learn about life and take the children on that journey with you.”

Global issues were taken up by Lynn Wilson who specialises in zero waste fashion. With a projected world population of eight billion in 2025, she explained that the increasing demand for raw materials in the fashion industry has to result in a more sustainable approach. An incredible 65% of clothing today uses the same plastic that makes bottles, and this needs as much urgent attention as that which is now being directed at plastic packaging in the food industry. Cat Jarman gave an insightful presentation on her work as a bio-archeologist, using

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Lynn Wilson, Jo Dolby, Harpinder Collacott, Doug Laughlen, Dr Shawn Sobers, Nish Parkar, Cat Jarman, Conor Whelan (the Bard of Bath) and Jayne Rochford-Smith

forensic techniques to untangle the past. People, Cat explained, are living diaries of the places where they have lived. Every time we eat something, it becomes part of our travel history. A scull was found in Walcot Street a few years ago, she said, and the DNA indicated that it was a woman of medieval origin. From the musical world came a concert pianist and software developer called Larkhall who uses algorithms to interpret musical notes and send visual data to a computer. He played three pieces on an electric keyboard, each with an animated visual treatment projected on the screen, ranging from twinkling constellations in the sky to a series of coloured blocks travelling across and down the screen. Algorithms, Larkhall emphasised, can be a creative act, not just something to bolster our qualifications in STEM subjects. Other speakers included Doug Laughlen, who spoke of the many things that make Bath special, from its classic architectural heritage to William Harbutt’s invention of plasticine. Jo Dolby, hub leader at Oasis Hub Bath, talked of her belief that an effective way of dealing with urban problems is not to fill a need, but to take advantage of strengths: “Start not with what’s wrong but with what’s strong,” she said. Nish Parkar discussed the impact of technology, how it has shaped us, and how we need to pledge to use it for good. And Harpinder Collacott gave her perspective on why using data is essential to eradicate global poverty – if there is no record of a person, then they don’t exist to be supported. Conor Whelan, the Bard of Bath, also shared some inspiring words. A lively presentation came from the final speaker, James Shone, who seven years ago was diagnosed with a brain tumour and after 27 hours of brain surgery lost the majority of his sight. Previously a teacher, he has reinvented himself as an educational speaker supporting young people in a challenging world. He understands the strain of social media for young people and the intense pressure they have to succeed academically and how both these things often result in young people battling their sense of self-belief. “Everyone,” James said, “is good at something. We all have a balloon and it’s just finding the right element to inflate the balloon. Encourage them to dream dreams and learn to reflect on our setbacks so we have an arrow in our quiver and not an arrow through the heart.” n Talks will be uploaded to the TEDxBath website: tedxbath.co.uk

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CITY | NEWS

CITYNEWS CELEBRATING 30

NEW KEYS IN THE QUAYS

Cobb Farr Estate Agents is celebrating an amazing 30 years of business this month. The Bath office opened in October 1989, and was followed 11 years later by the opening of the Bradford on Avon office. As an independent estate agency, Cobb Farr offers flexible marketing packages to clients, along with a friendly, reliable service from the excellent team of staff.

Philip Cobb, managing director Cobb Farr

SPEEDING AHEAD Great Western Railway is preparing to speed up its timetable, offering faster journey times, more seats and more frequent services to key locations. Additional services will help reduce the fastest train times between London and Bristol Temple Meads by as much as 17 minutes and reduce the fastest journey times between London and Bristol Parkway to just 68 minutes when GWR introduces its timetable change from 15 December. The journey time improvements will also benefit customers travelling from Taunton, Westonsuper-Mare and Avon Valley. gwr.com/timetable2019

Did You Know? Bath consistently attracts high-spending visitors – about 24% more than the national average.

Leading legal firm Mogers Drewett is relocating its Bath office to Bath Quays. It is the first professional services firm to put down roots adjacent to the Bath Quays development, the city’s new enterprise quarter for local businesses. The new office’s open-plan design, in keeping with the firm’s other offices in Wells and Sherborne, is proven to support greater collaboration between teams, strengthening its services for clients. The move follows previous service innovations that include the introduction of artificial intelligence across its conveyancing process. mogersdrewett.com

THERAPEUTIC CITY The Therapeutic City Festival, organised by local collective Architecture Is, took place in September and brought together residents, architects, designers, economists, health professionals and educators to share thoughts on how we can make our cities more people and nature-friendly for improved health and wellbeing. Closure of Milsom Street and the ‘What If...’ design workshop inspired people to offer views on how our city spaces should be designed. The week culminated in a conference with 21 separate speakers. Architecture Is will follow on with direct action projects. architectureis.org.uk; therapeuticity.org

Architect Andrew Grant discussing the benefits of spending time in nature

REJUVENATION SERVICE GroutGleam is a recently launched local business providing an expert grout-cleaning and colouring service, also offering silicone replacement and shower-glass restoration. Part of a nationwide network, Bath business owner Andy Vickery brings this revolutionary new service to Bath and the surrounding areas including parts of Bristol, Chippenham, Wells, Shepton Mallet and Trowbridge. groutgleam-bath.co.uk n

BATH BUSINESS BAROMETER UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 2019

provided by

High Street Footfall (Month on month % change)

n As with the rest of the nation, average footfall in Bath declined in September. However the city was in a better situation than the whole of the south west. Towards the end of the month Bath footfall was increasing, in contrast with the national trend. Sawclose was especially resilient in September with a significant rise year-on-year, especially in week 38 when it experienced nearly 30% increase in footfall when compared to the year before. Additionally, sales over the month in Bath averaged +1% over the previous year, bouncing back from a negative change in August. n EVENTS: There’s never a shortage of events in Bath and it’s no different this November. Highlights include the FilmBath Festival from 7–17 November, overlapping with Bath Mozartfest which runs from 8–16 November. Naturally the festive season officially starts when the award-winning Christmas Market opens on 28 November, running until 15 December.

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Bath

-7.9% South West UK

-4.3%

-10.3%


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ocl A C C O U N TA N C Y

141 Englishcombe Lane, Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

IR35 – on going! It appears that a large number of contractors who have been providing services to GSK had received correspondence from HMRC demanding a response by mid-September. These letters appear to be the latest “one to many” campaign - a tactic adopted by HMRC designed to push taxpayers to review their tax position and implied they were the subject of a specific enquiry, although these letters were definitely not the start of a formal HMRC investigation. Despite the tone, this was simply HMRC information gathering. Contractors receiving these letters had been understandably concerned about their situation, but were encouraged not to rush to take action as it could have increased their tax liabilities. The approach was not a formal notification of a compliance review nor was it notification of an enquiry into the company; it wasn’t even a formal request for information. The letter had no formal legal underpinning and although it referred to a reply deadline, there was no legal obligation to respond. Often such letters simply state that a contractor “may” be subject to a compliance review - true of any contractor at any time. It was entirely the contractor’s decision whether to reply to HMRC or not, perhaps wondering whether HMRC would be more likely to formally investigate a company which didn’t respond - or to investigate a company that did! Our advice is to constantly review your working practices & contracts and, if uncertain, consider getting a written opinion from a specialist third party giving you evidence from an independent external organisation, with a professional opinion on whether you are within or outside of IR35. HMRC may have disagreed with that opinion but you will have been seen to take all reasonable steps to meet your obligation & armed with that independent opinion, you could make informed decisions. HMRC may have proposed using their CEST tool to assess the situation but this would have been inadequate, as widely criticised for its poor approach and failure to address the fundamental legal principles; in fact HMRC themselves attempted to argue that a taxpayer couldn’t rely on the CEST tool result in a Tribunal. Keep alert to developments – and in the meantime we have partnered with tax specialists Markel Tax to provide contract reviews for clients.

For tax saving tips contact us – call Marie Sheldrake, Tom Hulett or Jacqui Bates on 01225 445507

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FAMILY | EVENTS

Family diary IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO WITH THE CHILDREN THIS MONTH SUPER PIRATES n Every Friday during term time, 10.30am, Komedia Super Pirates will be transforming Komedia’s dance floor into a fun-filled playroom. Build dens, play crazy games and let off confetti cannons for a wild time. Playmats, toys and plenty of space for running around. Suitable for babies and toddlers, £4 per child, adults and newborn babies go free; komedia.co.uk LIGHT UP LANSDOWN n 1 November, 5–9pm, Bath Racecourse The popular Lansdown fireworks display and bonfire night returns. Bigger and better than before, the spectacular display is set to a blockbuster Disney soundtrack. A large bonfire, reaching 10 metres high, will be lit and there will be plenty of entertainment to keep the family busy at the lively funfair. Suitable for all ages, £4–£300, under 3s go free; bath-racecourse.co.uk

THE LITTLE PRINCE FAMILY WORKSHOP n 2 November, 10am–12.30pm, The Edge, University of Bath Led by Protein Dance, a playful and interactive workshop begins by warming up with the Little Prince himself. Explore the universe and land on different planets to meet the other characters with dances and games. Sing along with the Rose, fall asleep and wake up with the Lamplighter, receive commands from the King and learn how to dance with the Fox. Suitable for ages five and above, £6; edgearts.org FIREWORKS TO MUSIC n 3 November, 5.30–9pm, Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park The hugely popular annual fireworks party is back with a ban, hosting a fireworks display, funfair and an explosive megamix of music, spanning from 1989–2019. Suitable for all ages, £4.50–£50; avonvalley.co.uk 86 TheBATHMagazine

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FRIENDS OF RHS FAMILY FIREWORKS EVENING n 5 November, 5–7pm, Royal High School Bath A fun-filled evening of professional fireworks from Firemagic. The fireworks start at 6.30pm, and hot food and drinks will be available. Suitable for all ages, £4–£16, under threes go free. Booking essential; royalhighbath.gdst.net I BELIEVE IN UNICORNS n 7–10 November, times vary, the egg Tomas hates school, hates books and hates stories. He is happier clambering in the mountains like a goat. Until the Unicorn Lady comes to town and reels him in with her irresistible magic tales. Disaster strikes, putting everything that matters most in Tomas’ life in terrible danger. Suitable for ages five to 11, £8 children, £9 adults; theatreroyal.org.uk FORTNIGHTLY TAKEOVER n 9 and 23 November, 11am–2pm, The Edge, University of Bath Artist Victoria Willmott will be hosting a series of fun and informal creative activities that explore The Edge’s current exhibition with special themes. Drop-in for just 10 minutes or stay for the duration and get creative. Suitable for ages four – 12, free event; edgearts.org THE FESTIVAL OF LIGHT n 9 November – 5 January, 10am–7pm, Longleat Head to Longleat on a thrilling odyssey on selected dates, as The Festival of Light

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showcases Myths and Legends. Don’t miss the ever popular Enchanted Christmas Tree Show and Flight Before Christmas flying owl display, plus much more. New for 2019, gaze in awe at the breathtaking choreographed light projection on Longleat House – the iconic frontage of the stately home will spring to life as never before. Book online and save up to 10%. Suitable for all ages, £26.20–£34.95; longleat.co.uk/festival-oflight HELPING HANDS n 13 November, 7pm, the egg Hector needs a friend and Florence needs a tutor. Two different teenagers struggling with two different types of loss are brought together by a GCSE English exam. Through their tutoring sessions, Florence and Hector become fast friends and help each other to come to terms with their grief and work through it. From time to time, everyone needs a helping hand. Suitable for ages eight and above, £6 children, £8.50 adults; theatreroyal.org.uk POP! n 15 November, 11am and 2pm, Pound Arts Centre Join Flo and her daughter Ebb as they explore a bubbly, balloon-y bathtime. A gently interactive first adventure into the theatre. Suitable for babies to three year olds; poundarts.org.uk BATH ON ICE n 15 November – 5 January, 10.30am–10pm, Royal Victoria Park Take to the ice and enjoy an hour of skating.

POP!: 274 Industries

THE LITTLE PRINCE n 1 November, 6.30pm, The Edge, University of Bath Find out how the Little Prince leaves behind his tiny asteroid and beloved Rose to journey through the universe, coming face to face with the baffling world of grown-ups. Once on planet Earth, the Little Prince is welcomed by a mysterious snake and a truly wise and friendly fox before encountering the lone pilot. Together they discover the power and beauty of friendship and the complexity of love. Suitable for ages five and above, £12.50 children, £15 adults; edgearts.org

Longleat’s Festival of Light


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FAMILY | EVENTS

Pre-booking is not required but it is advised, especially in the evenings and on weekends. Skate aids are available for £5 per session. Suitable for all ages, £10–£37; bathonice.com THE MYSTERY OF THE RADDLESHAM MUMPS n 16–17 November, 11.30am and 3pm, the egg When seven year old Crispin de Quincy de Faversham Clumps inherits his ancestral home – Raddlesham Mumps, he finds himself with only an ancient butler for company. As Kenilworth begins to tell him about the bizarre and hilarious deaths of his eccentric ancestors, the story takes flight on darkly comic wings. Suitable for ages eight and above, £8 children, £9 adults; theatreroyal.org.uk CHRISTMAS AT CHEDDAR n 16 November – 24 December, times vary, Cheddar Gorge and Caves Visit Cheddar Gorge and Caves with the whole family, including your dog this winter. On selected dates from 16 November you can see the elves preparing for the big day from within Gough’s Cave. Meet Father Christmas, receive a present, sing some songs and marvel at the magic of Christmas at Cheddar. Book online and save 15%, also dogs receive a treat. Valid with a day ticket; cheddargorge.co.uk

POP! at Pound Arts Centre

BIG FISH LITTLE FISH FAMILY RAVE: THE GREATEST SHOW n 17 November, 1.30pm, Komedia Get your glowsticks at the ready as awardwinning family rave crew Big Fish Little Fish returns for a circus-themed party. Grown-up dance music will be playing on the multisensory dancefloor with glitter cannons, bubbles, balloons and giant parachute dance. There will also be craft tables, a giant colouring mural, and a playdoh table, as well as tents and tunnels and baby chill-out space with mats and a ball pool. Dress up in a circus-themed costume if you fancy. £8, infants free; komedia.co.uk

COLLECTED GRIMM TALES n 21–23 November, 11am, 3pm and 7pm, the egg A contemporary take on the much loved fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm, revealing the dark and mischievous side of the original stories. Wit and enchantment combine to bring to life the colourful and strange world of the child’s imagination. Suitable for ages six and above, £9; theatreroyal.org.uk ART MASTERCLASS: ABSTRACT SCULPTURE IN CLAY n 24 November, 11am–4pm, The Holburne Museum Create small wired sculptures inspired by both the natural form and the Holburne collections. Sketch from selected artworks in the museum, explore the galleries for ideas, design and make your 2D or 3D drawn form using wirework techniques and specialist tools. Suitable for ages 11–18, £30; holburne.org SALLY MUIR: THE DOG SHOW n 30 November – 9 February, 10.30am–5pm, Victoria Art Gallery Drawing dogs all her life, Sally began using adventurous materials, such as wire drawings, pen, paper cuts and potato prints, to create masterpeices. Explore the exhibition filled with renditions of the canine world. Suitable for ages five and above, free entry; victoriagal.org.uk n

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EDUCATION NEWS ALL ABOUT THAT BASSOON Xavier Raynes, principal bassoonist at KES, has won the prestigious title of Bath Young Musician of the Year. Rupert Drury, director of music at KES, said: “All five performers played with such technical assuredness and commitment in wonderfully varied and entertaining pieces and songs. “Xavier performed the first two movements of Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto K.191 accompanied on the piano by Maria Garcia. After an exquisitely articulated opening, it was their intense expressivity in the slow second movement that highlighted Xavier’s beautiful and individual singing tone. Throughout he reacted wonderfully to not only the emotional needs of the music, but also to the reactions of the resonant acoustic of the Pump Rooms and the audience with an assured stage presence. This award is a huge accolade to Xavier’s intense musicianship and depth of preparation, and we look forward to supporting and following Xavier in his exciting musical future.” Over the years Xavier has been principal bassoonist with the National Performance Children’s Orchestra, and a member of both the National Chamber Orchestra and Junior Royal Academy Symphony Orchestra. kesbath.com

STONAR FINDS A WAY Stonar has welcomed Matthew Way as its new headmaster of the school. As an historian, former international hockey player, housemaster and head, Matt joins Stonar with vast experience. He comments, “I have felt the special atmosphere here since the first time I came up the drive, past the paddocks and playing fields, and I enjoy telling our story. This is a school where the staff give so much of their time to individual pupils ensuring exceptional academic outcomes and happy, confident pupils achieving in a trusted environment.” stonarschool.com

BIATHLON PERFORMERS

The Prior Park Schools’ Biathlon took place in October with 450 competitors from 60 state and independent schools across the south of England. Prior Park College and The Paragon School run this annual event in conjunction with Pentathlon GB. In recent years, the biathlon has taken place at the University of Bath, allowing competitors to use its elite athlete facilities. Encouraging the competitors were members of the GB Pentathlon team, including Joe Choong, Charlie Follett, Myles Pillage, Tom Toolis and Jamie Cooke. The age categories for the competition range from U10 to U19, with the run and swim distances varying. Each competitor’s run and swim times are combined and the scores are added to the national rankings list – the top performers qualify for the British Modern Biathlon Championships and the British Schools’ Modern Biathlon Championships. n priorparkcollege.com 88 TheBATHMagazine

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ouse rated Calder H fsted have just row. a in e tim STOP PRESS! O for the third 9) 01 (2 ng di an as Outst

• Co-educational day school for pupils aged 5-13 with

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The main interior of the Locksbrook campus

Redefining Locksbrook

Striking and ingenious architecture is in Bath’s DNA – The Royal Crescent, the abbey and the Roman Baths are obvious examples, but how about something more modern, such as the new campus for Bath Spa University’s Schools of Art and Design? Simon Horsford investigates

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pening in late September, the sleek, low-rise, creamcoloured building on Locksbrook Road, beside the River Avon, cleverly repurposes the iconic Grade II listed former Herman Miller factory, which Historic England described as “an important early work by one of Britain’s foremost contemporary architects, and expresses many of the key features of the British High Tech Movement.” When it was built in 1976 – with Herman Miller moving their European base across the river from their original site on the Lower Bristol Road (now home to Lidl) – it was groundbreaking. Architect Sir Nicholas Grimshaw followed a tight remit from Max De Pree, CEO of the American furniture manufacturers. Grimshaw had told De Pree that we “must not foul up this wonderful city. You may own the property along the river, but you don’t own the river. Everyone who lives here has the right to enjoy that.” The 90 TheBATHMagazine TheBATHMagazine || SepTeMBeR nOVeMBeR 2019 20

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American’s response was to provide what is now known as the philosophical ‘Bath Brief’, which asked that the building should “focus on people and human activity…encourage open community” and be designed as an adaptable and indeterminate space that can “change with grace”. Grimshaw did all that and more with a building that, when it opened 43 years ago, was known for its gridded structure and a moveable system of fibreglass, louvres and glazing enabling the occupants to freely rearrange the position of the window and facade panels to suit their needs. The remodelling of the factory into Bath Spa University’s new Art and Design School, which began in January 2018, was undertaken once again by Grimshaw Architects and what’s more it turns out that the original brief perfectly suited the needs of the schools of art and design too. Ben Heath, principal at the award-winning architecture firm, which is also involved in the refashioning of the Rec for Bath Rugby, says:

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“I have worked closely with Sir Nick on the redevelopment of the campus, and our hope for the new building is to offer an inspiring state-of-the art environment for students. “We have retained and built upon the original Herman Miller factory building’s principles of flexibility and adaptation with the key architectural elements such as the yellow beam superstructure and the completely demountable cladding system of fibreglass panels and glazing remaining the same, whereas the internal spaces are now fit for the needs of 21st-century learning.” Dan Allen, head of the Bath School of Art, takes up the story. “This is a quite an extraordinary building and one of the first industrial units to be modular where you have a large blank canvas – so it is adaptable. The factory has been at the heart of the community and I think there was lot of sadness that the building has been a little unloved in recent years.” [Herman Miller moved from Bath to Chippenham some years ago and more recently to Melksham].


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CITY | ARCHITECTURE industrial space has been celebrated in the redesign. Outside, the original 1970s wall panels have been cleaned, restored, insulated and repainted. Inside, the existing concrete flooring has been finished with a clear varnish seal so the history of the building, including trench marks, can clearly be seen underfoot, and the past can also be seen in the steel-work and colour scheme inside the building.” To maintain the link the schools have struck a deal with Herman Miller so that there will be a healthy selection of its furniture around the building.

We have retained and built upon the original Herman Miller factory building’s principals of flexibility and adaptation

Meanwhile, Bath School of Design head Kerry Curtis, adds, “We always had an eye on the building but didn’t expect to get it. People have come up to me asking when it will open and can they see student work. To have something of an arts centre in Bath, which has been lacking, is very exciting, and although I wouldn’t want to undermine cultural places such as the Holburne Museum and the Victoria Art Gallery, this is a new space. For us it’s a game changer.” And what a space it is – inside this large site there’s a rugged, industrial feel with those exposed steel girders, lots of concrete and distinctive original flooring. But it’s hugely contemporary too, highly sustainable and eco-friendly and with technical workshops surrounded by open, flexible studio spaces and numerous break-out areas giving the students the opportunity to work collaboratively; the ‘presentation space’ is fun too with bleacher-style seating. The ground floor is designed around more heavy duty disciplines, such as metalwork and sculpture, while the mezzanine level will focus on fine arts. The building has also seen the creation of an opaque glass rooftop pavilion (with a balcony overlooking the river) to encourage co-operative working. The building’s distinctiveness was something that the new owners were keen to retain. As Martin Crandon, projects manager at Bath Spa, says: “This remarkable

To strengthen its credentials of being part of the community, the ground floor will house a café and an art shop, both open to the public. The new campus, therefore, offers the chance for the schools of art and design to be more proactively engaged in community life by opening up its resources to the public. The south side also has outside seating on a landscaped area adjacent to the river and the Bristol and Bath Railway Path. Aside from the café and art shop, summer and evening classes will be a regular feature. Allen adds: “We want to connect to professionals by offering high-quality digital and photographic print production and there’ll be an art gallery showing student work and some extraordinary exhibitions.” One being discussed is to work with The Edge arts centre (at the University of Bath) on putting on a touring Hayward Gallery

exhibition called Slow Painting in April 2020. “It will allow the community to be a living and breathing part of the building,” says Curtis. Bath Spa University’s schools of art and design were based at Sion Hill with outlets at five other sites (Corsham Court, Palace Yard Mews, Dartmouth Avenue, the Circus and Newton Park). But the creation of the Locksbrook, which covers a sizeable floor area of 8,480 m2, will reduce this to just two with Sion Hill continuing as the home of fashion and textile classes; around 800 students will be based at the new campus. At a cost of around £36 million (including buying, renovating and fitting out), the Locksbrook Campus also compares favourably with art and design facilities at other universities,” says Crandon. The issues addressed during the construction process include planning permission for the river and canal corridor – habitat for many different bat species – and installing internal timber louvres on the windows so there is no excess light spill onto the river, the water’s edge and banks. What students need now and what they might need in the future has clearly been part of the thinking. “The new campus is an exciting opportunity to reflect on what art and design has been for us in recent years,” says Allen, “but also gives us a blank canvas to design a school that is going to serve the needs of students long into the future. “We were actively involved with the architects throughout the project to help them understand our teaching practices and we spoke to students and graduates. It’s required us to think quite differently about the way we work and to challenge ourselves to design a campus that offers them a greater chance of working collaboratively, working across different disciplines and giving them spaces where they can come together.” The idea is that painters, fine artists, ceramicists, photographers, animators, furniture and product designers, digital animators, sculptors and the like can start

The new Locksbrook campus

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CITY | ARCHITECTURE

Royale), Nelson Bubble lamps, and has been a trendsetter with a knack of recruiting trendsetting designers. They were also known for introducing the ‘Action Office’ in the early 1960s – flexible, semi-enclosed workspaces, now known as the cubicle.

The creative industries are part of a growing and buoyant industry in the south west, and we see Locksbrook as a hub for increasing that

talking and thinking and potentially working together. A blueprint then for what a creative educational space should look like. Allen, whose background is as a ceramicist, adds: “We believe passionately that students should be experts in their specialist areas, but also be exposed to creativity outside of that, and the campus has been designed to allow that, offering social and dynamic environments that we haven’t had before.” Curtis, a former textile designer in the fashion industry, agrees: “There’s been a huge amount of research around ‘T-shaped students’, which means to survive and get good careers you need to understand and master your discipline and then understand and collaborate in other areas.” Although Bath Spa University only gained university status in 2005, the Bath School of Art dates back to 1852. Esteemed alumni include Axel Sheffler (who illustrated the Gruffalo books), painter and printmaker Howard Hodgkin, sculptor Laura Ford, cinematographer Roger Deakins and the illustrator/artist Mr Bingo. It seems appropriate then that the art and design schools should be taking over the building from a company long known for its creativity. Founded as the Star Furniture Company in 1905 in Zeeland, Michigan, Herman Miller is known for its iconic designs such as Eames, Mirra and Aeron chairs (the latter have been seen in TV shows such as Question Time and films like Casino

“The creative industries are part of a growing and buoyant industry in the southwest,” says Curtis, “and we see Locksbrook as a hub for increasing that. The rooftop pavilion will provide a wonderful space to hire out to industry speakers and to liaise with creative industries. At course level, we already have a lot of industry involvement and now we can take that to another level. We also have a course in furniture and product design that is a direct response to understanding how important this building is to us and it already has really strong links with Herman Miller. This region has lots of

other great furniture makers and we think we can add something to that.” Back in the 1970s when De Pree said “our goal is to make a contribution to the landscape of aesthetic and human value,” he may well have been talking about the opening of the Herman Miller factory, but his aim reflected the whole philosophy of his company. Nearly half a century later, these values look set to be continued at Bath Spa’s innovative art and design campus. And Locksbrook is definitely opening at an opportune moment. “We live in interesting times,” says Allen, “and there’s never been a time when we don’t need artists as provocateurs to challenge the way we see things and to question everything.” n bathspa.ac.uk/be-bath-spa/campuses/ locksbrook-campus The original interior of the Herman Miller factory

The distinctive industrial space has been transformed into a 21st-century celebration of the arts

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Foreign Languages Centre UNIVERSITY OF

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We offer a wide range of foreign languages at beginner through to advanced level. To find out more about the courses available, or to enrol, visit our website www.bath.ac.uk/flc and apply online or call 01225 383991.

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

Get hands-on

As the winter draws in, isn’t it about time you took some time out and gave yourself a few treats to keep you physically and mentally rejuvenated? Fortunately Frontlinestyle Hair and Beauty Spa is on hand to help...

W

hatever the pace of your daily routine, Frontlinestyle Hair and Beauty Spa knows the importance of making space in an often jam-packed schedule for a bit of well-deserved ‘me time’. Massage therapy, one of its specialisms, is increasingly recognised as a method to alleviate depression and anxiety, improve sleep quality and promote overall wellbeing. Frontlinestyle know the benefits of the balance between mind, body and spirit and looking and feeling beautiful from the inside out. That is why its range of branded and bespoke massage and facial treatments are an integral part of many of its clients’ beauty routines. From relaxing and soothing to uplifting and energising, the therapists are professionally trained to deliver the very best experience you can have in the peace and comfort of the Grade II listed, luxurious and nurturing space in Monmouth Street. Offering Clarins facial and massage treatments, the salon’s team will focus on your individual needs and requirements. Using products from Clarins – the premier skincare brand in the UK – throughout your appointment, your treatment will be a deeply relaxing and uplifting experience, making your skin feel nourished and rejuvenated. The times mentioned below reflect the hands-on treatment times. The Clarins Hot Stone Massage (£62) for women is a personalised treatment that incorporates the use of nine smooth marble and slate stones which release heat when used in harmony with the therapist’s massage techniques. The Clarins massage gel used during your 50-minute session is infused with aromatic essential oils, intensifying the power of this treatment. You will leave feeling deeply relaxed, with a calm mind and body, while your tense and aching muscles are soothed, and any toxins harboured within the body eliminated. With unique sensorial experiences, tensionrelieving massage movements and plantpowered products, the 70-minute Clarins Wellness Treatments (£70) promote a feeling of infinite wellbeing for the body and mind, leaving your skin looking more radiant and soothed. Clarins Rebalancing Massage (£64) is a wonderfully luxurious way to relax mind, body and spirit on a deep level. This 75minute rhythmic full body massage uses slow movements and pressure point techniques tailored to your specific points of tension. An essential oil blend of basil, chamomile and petit grain intensifies the experience. 94 TheBATHMagazine

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This treatment is also adapted for restoring vitality and energy with an uplifting combination of rosemary, mint and rosewood, along with a sequence of energising massage movements. The unique and unforgettable Lava Shell Massage (£62) is a 60-minute treatment that uses 100% authentic tiger clam shells which are heated in a fusion of natural minerals and water. It’s amazingly effective at relieving joint pain and releasing tension from tight and tense muscles and added benefits include improved circulation and skin and intensified stress relief. A soothing and relaxing back massage may be just what you need to ease stressed and tired muscles and uplift your spirit. Phytomer (the number-one spa brand in the USA) offers a range of Wellness massages including the Phytomer Detox Back Massage (£45). Using transformative marine ingredients including Phytomer’s unique Self Heating Mud which is applied to the body gently, this 45-minute treatment eases tension by massaging the nerve endings, detoxifying the tissues and remineralising the body. If you’re a fan of Caudalie skincare (a favourite of Victoria Beckham), a massage incorporating the use of their innovative and anti-oxidant products is the perfect way to enjoy their indulgent and luxurious benefits. Caudalie Vinothérapie® Spas has created slimming, toning and rejuvenating massage treatments which harness the healing and beautifying properties of grapes and grape vine in incredible formulas promoting

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healthy, glowing skin and restoring and rejuvenating you – perfectly. The gorgeous Caudalie Crushed Cabernet Body Treatment (£59) is a 55-minute exfoliation technique applied by a professionally trained therapist that promotes soft, supple and nourished skin, eliminates toxins and sculpts the body. It is ideal as an integral part of a slimming routine and will leave your skin feeling and looking refreshed and refined. For specific issues with your muscle tissue, or for luxurious relaxation, Frontlinestyle can also tailor your massage treatment to leave you feeling refreshed, rejuvenated and relaxed on an ongoing basis. For a one-off treat or if you are looking for the perfect Christmas gift, purchase a Frontlinestyle gift voucher, available to buy in store or online. n Frontlinestyle, 4/5 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2AJ. Tel: 01225 478478;


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36 Gay Street, Bath • Tel: 01225 466851 www.theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

HEALTH & BEAUTY NEWS We’re revving up for the festive season with glamorous gift box perfume sets and a beauty advent calendar. We also find a facial treatment using vitamin C, hydroxy acids and enzymes that speeds up cellular renewal

CHOOSE CHANEL You can now embrace the magic of CHANEL and the enchanting world of Jean-Paul Goude with three recently launched limited edition exclusive offers featuring CHANEL’s iconic frangrance No.5. Choose No.5 Eau de Parfum, No.5 L’Eau or Coco Mademoiselle Eau de Parfum as a gift set with the iconic CHANEL bottle taking centre stage in a theatrical gift box (100ml, £130). Alternatively choose a mini twist and spray with either No.5 Eau de Parfum or No.5 L’Eau, housed in a new lipstyle-style bottle that makes it easily portable (3 x 7ml, £66). Finally, No.5 Fragments d’Or in a glass bottle is a rich gel that scents your skin and enhances it with a shimmering veil of gold (250ml, £72). • chanel.com/en_gb

ADVENT TREE OF DREAMS Make the countdown to Christmas extra special this year with L’OCCITANE’s Luxurious Advent Calendar, a package containing 24 travel sizes of their most popular premium products. Each drawer opens to reveal a fragrance, a hand cream or a skincare product containing the secret to youthful skin, all infused with organic ingredients such as shea butter, almond, and immortelle. The advent calendar comes in a unique moving design. The two towers rotate to 360 degrees, revealing hidden drawers filled with everything you need for the ultimate preChristmas pamper session. Each day open a drawer and also uncover a tip to help nurture nature. From Immortelle Reset Serum to Almond Shower Oil and HERBAE par L’OCCITANE fragrance, this calendar will make counting down to Christmas Day even more special (£89). • uk.loccitane.com

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SIGNATURE FACELIFT An enzyme peel targets the outermost later of skin which can be dull, tired-looking and uneven and often needs a bit of a pick-me-up. So Hannah from Enhance Medispa explained when I visited recently for one of their signature facelifts. This results-driven treatment combines vitamin C, hydroxy acids and enzymes to speed up cellular renewal. The treatment is suitable for all skin types, for anyone who wants a speedy glow or for those who would like to target specific skin concerns such as rosacea, dehydrated skin and sensitive skin. I donned a hair net and settled into a prone position, ever grateful for the opportunity to do so. The first stage was the application of a degreasing prep solution to remove excess oil and bacteria to prepare the skin. The signature facelift solution was then applied – containing vitamin C, hydroxy acids and enzymes, this would speed up cellular renewal. Following this was an ageless total resurfacing mask, where an exfoliating blend of hydroxy acids and micro crystals resurface the skin, gently sloughing off dead skin cells. I identified a gentle tingling feeling during this stage, which showed that the cream was doing its magic. After this stage of the treatment, the signature facelift solution was repeated, and then a hydrating enzyme mask was applied. Containing papaya, vitamin E, L-ascorbic acid and hyaluronic acid, this is a creamy mask that gently exfoliates dead skin cells and adds essential antioxidants and minerals to improve skin health. It promotes more radiant, youthful looking skin and provides continuous hydration for hours after application. Stage six saw the introduction of a hydrating anti-ageing serum, which soothes the visible effects of environmentally damaged skin, and highly potent anti-oxidants nourish the skin to create a youthful glow. The treatment finished with a hydrating moisturiser, offering UVA/UVB factor 30 broadspectrum sun protection with timereleased hydration. After the treatment my skin felt vibrant and alive – and the benefits were still apparent weeks later. The Signature Facelift is £85 per treatment, or £450 for a course of six. • enhancemedispa.co.uk


The Orangery fp November.qxp_Layout 1 25/10/2019 12:55 Page 1

Established for over 25 years we are the experts in skin health, aesthetics and advanced beauty treatments in Bath.

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Let it glow, let it glow, let it glow! What’s the WOW all about? You’re invited to find out! Please join us to hear all about it on THURSDAY 5th December at 6pm. Enjoy a glass of bubbles and canapés with a chance to win a WOW Facial. Places are limited so please call to book.

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THE | WALK

A treeless Beechen Cliff around 1870

Looking over Bath from Beechen Cliff with Southgate in the foreground

A changing view

While firmly established as Bath’s literary heroine, Jane Austen was not the city’s biggest fan. Andrew Swift recreates one of her walks and tries to work out why she was so unimpressed by a view over the city from Beechen Cliff

A

guidebook to Bath published just over a century ago advised new visitors in the city to head for “the famous Beechen Cliff view which has ever afforded delight and surprise to the stranger,” adding that, “from this precipitous brow the marvellous view of the city is brought within optical range with a suddenness that partakes of the dramatic.” Today, however, Beechen Cliff is surprisingly little frequented. It may be one of the richest things that Bath has to offer, but its delights are shared by only the discerning few. Jane Austen, the tutelary deity of Bath’s tourist industry, may be partly responsible for this, having made Catherine Morland, the heroine of Northanger Abbey, climb its slopes only to reject “the whole city of Bath as unworthy to make part of a landscape.” Our walk for November is an attempt to recreate that fictional excursion, taken in 1797 or thereabouts, and to figure out why she was so unimpressed. The first part of her walk from Great Pulteney Street was ‘along the side of the river’, so we start by going down steps at the east end of Pulteney Bridge and heading south past the open space where boats leave for the trip upstream. 100 TheBATHMagazine

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The view here has changed beyond recognition. At either end of the weir – which then ran diagonally across the river – stood a mill. On her left, Catherine would have seen Spring Gardens, Bath’s original pleasure gardens, then in the twilight of its popularity. Beyond them lay green fields. On the right bank where Parade Gardens stands today were walks laid out almost 90 years earlier by Thomas Harrison, the proprietor of Bath’s first assembly rooms. Until North Parade Bridge was built in 1836, North Parade ended at the river. After going under the bridge, you will see steps leading down from South Parade. They served a ferry which closed after the bridge opened. Beyond South Parade, however, there was nothing except fields on both sides of the river. After going under the railway bridge, built in 1841, and crossing the canal, you come to Widcombe. Turn right along the road, cross the dual carriageway at the second set of pedestrian lights, and turn right and then left to head up Lyncombe Hill. In 1797, this area was undeveloped and Catherine could have struck out across open country to climb Beechen Cliff. The shortest route today is up a steep and narrow flight of steps with very little in the way of views.

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A pleasanter option is to carry on up Lyncombe Hill, past a succession of Regency villas and terraces, with views eastward through the gaps between them. When you reach the crossroads at the end, turn right up Greenway Lane, and after 75 metres go through a handgate on the right. As you walk up the track directly ahead, you can enjoy glimpses over the wide combe from which Widcombe got its name, until the trees close in and you are left with the illusion of being in the heart of the country. Follow the track as it curves away from the hedge, climbing the field towards a kissing gate in the top corner. Just before you reach it, turn to take a last look back. Although you are less than a mile from the city centre, the only building visible is Prior Park, high in the hills. Go through the kissing gate and turn left into Alexandra Park, where a viewing platform commands the prospect dismissed so peremptorily by Catherine Morland. The buildings below bear little relation to those she would have seen, of course, but an even greater transformation has taken place on the cliff itself. In 1797, this was a breezy down with only an occasional tree. Today, trees predominate, with only occasional gaps through which to enjoy the view.


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THE | WALK

Catherine rejected the view because it was unpicturesque – in other words, because it did not look like a picture, and in particular the landscape paintings in vogue at the time, where trees invariably framed the scene. As you continue along the edge of the escarpment, the view disappears, until, after 75 metres, the path curves right, and a gap in the trees provides the frame for a view which seems too perfect to be fortuitous – the railway curving across a bend in the river and leading the eye onward, with Bathampton Down to the right, Little Solsbury to the left, and the hills of Wiltshire in the distance. Here, although many of its elements would have seemed quite incomprehensible in 1797, is a view that is indubitably picturesque. A little further along, you come to a viewing platform commanding a view with the foreground dominated by the Southgate shopping centre. A much finer view can be found a little further on, but it is easy to miss. As you continue along the path, with houses on your left, look to your right after 100m to see the Royal Crescent and the hills beyond, with the intervening buildings blotted out by massed trees. Apart from that there are just stray glimpses, until you come to a toposcope presented to the council by Cedric Chivers in 1928. Several of the buildings marked on it have been lost to bombs or bulldozers.

information board. If you look up to the right you will see the skeletal remains of an Anderson shelter. Continue along the track through the woods, and, after steps lead down to a patch of grass, bear right to a road, head down to a T-junction and turn right along Alexandra Road. At the end, turn left down Lyncombe Hill, continue across two sets of pedestrian lights and cross a footbridge over the river. After going through a tunnel under the railway station, head along Manvers Street to return to the starting point. n

View towards the north west

Several more, though, are hidden by the trees that so picturesquely frame the view. A little further on you pass a viewing platform without a view – all that the trees frame here are more trees. Just beyond it, the path swings right down a flight of steps to Magdalen Gardens, a pocket park opened in 1902 and recently restored by a team of volunteers after years of neglect. It overlooks Holloway, the old road into Bath from the south, and the chapel of St Mary Magdalen, founded in the 11th century. Follow the path through the park, and bear right up steps to follow a path through the woods. After crossing a flight of steps, carry on past the site of ruined cottages until you come to a clearing with a newly installed

Two longer walks featuring Beechen Cliff are included in Andrew Swift’s Country Walks from Bath, available from bookshops or direct from akemanpress.com

FACT FILE n Distance: 2.5 miles n Time: 2 hours n Level of challenge: Straightforward, but with tracks through fields and woods which may be muddy, and steep steps and paths down from Beechen Cliff

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DESIGN | INTERIORS

Rugs in a period room

Etons of Bath, specialists in Georgian interior design – together with Silk Avenue, specialists in handmade rugs – design bespoke rugs to create, frame and accentuate the grand features of Georgian rooms. Here, Jeff Holtgen from Silk Avenue gives some advice on choosing rugs

I

f you’re lucky enough to live in a Georgian property, you may have large rooms that are used for entertaining. However, designing room layouts can be hard in these large-scale rooms in terms of achieving style and practicality and managing the space. When it comes to choosing rugs, there are many elements to consider. Etons of Bath’s recent collaboration with Silk Avenue has resulted in a fine collection of rugs that extend the options.

RUG SIZE Size is important as the rug has to ground the furniture it sits on, rather than floating in the room. If you have a central seating area, we recommend sizing the rug so the sofa, side tables and coffee table sits comfortably on top.

All the rug designs shown here are available from Etons of Bath, with prices from £365 per metre

COLOUR PALETTE

SOFTNESS AND COMFORT

The colour palette for rugs is important. If the soft furnishings throughout the room are relatively muted or pale, the rug is an ideal opportunity to add a pop of colour to enhance the space, just like this pineapple rug would do.

Since timber flooring remains on trend and is very common in Georgian homes, it is important to add softness and comfort onto the floor allowing another layer of luxury to be incorporated into the interior – rugs are the perfect way to achieve this.

TEXTURE AND LUSTRE

PATTERNS AND BORDERS

Similar to the idea of adding colour to the space, a rug allows another opportunity to add texture and lustre to a room. By adding silk, linen or bamboo silk yarn into the carpet composition you will automatically lift the rug design and allow it to become an important component within the overall interior aesthetic.

Design needs to incorporate colour, composition and pattern in relation to the overall design of the room. For more traditional interiors, fringing complements the overall look brilliantly. For more contemporary spaces, Etons of Bath like to frame or zone open-plan spaces through area rugs. If you go for a plain rug having a border can add a very subtle decorative element which assists in framing the various zones in a large room. n

Etons of Bath: etonsofbath.com Silk Avenue: silk-avenue.co.uk

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DAVINCI 430 PENDANT BY BELID, SWEDEN

LIGHTING SPECIALIST

8 BATH STREET, FROME. TEL: 01373473555 WWW.FIATLUX.CO.UK TUESDAY – FRIDAY 9.30AM – 5.30PM, SATURDAY 9.30AM – 5.00PM

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INTERIORS

Tranquil shades Dulux has chosen Tranquil Dawn, a colour inspired by the morning sky, as its colour of the year for 2020. Other colours suggested for the year include warm neutrals such as oatmeal and natural buff and soft accent colours. Here is our creative response – a selection of pieces in knocked-back shades that are chic, chalky and chilled

Lotus wallpaper in Farrow & Ball, £110, 10m roll; farrow-ball.com

Delicato Ocean Decorative Porcelain, from £119/m2, Mandarin Stone; mandarinstone.com

Little Cheese Footstool, £195, Loaf; loaf.com

Demelza Tin Talc Décor Ceramic, from £43.20 /m2, Mandarin Stone; mandarinstone.com

Egret made with steel wire, £750, Celia Smith; celia-smith.co.uk

Nantes three-drawer chest, £375, TR Hayes; trhayes.co.uk 104 TheBATHMagazine

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Medium stoneware planter by Libby Ballard, £35; libbyballard.co.uk


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SUSTAINABLE GIFTS Ideas for doing your Christmas shopping the low-impact way

Lemons, limited-edition print by Agnes Pollock, from £25

Candle-making workshops, Hazel & Blue, from £35

W

• Interior and exterior • Wallpaper specialist

• Ceiling repairs and lining • Working with designer paints • Free quotations • Over 20 years experience

ith the current media focus on sustainable living, it’s good to know that there are many ways to shop sustainably and buy gifts that are both lovely and unique. Here are a few ideas being showcased at interior and art specialist Verve’s boutique pop up shop with work by many talented creatives. Limited edition signed prints start from around £25 and most are designed to fit off-the-peg frames, such as local artist Agnes Pollock’s contemporary still lifes. Handmade porcelain pieces, recycled glass vases and handmade soy candles are also low-impact, low cost gifts. Verve is especially loving the Hazel & Blue collection this year – gorgeous scents in a variety of options. And launching this season is a candle-making kit. Becky, the maker behind Hazel & Blue, is also running candle-making workshops – check out hazelandbluecandles.co.uk for details. Buying antique, vintage or pre-loved items is right up there in the sustainability stakes and you can find fabulous pieces in Bath’s markets, shops and auctions, from trays, jugs and boxes to refurbished chairs, tables and cabinets. The trick is to find pieces with a shape or look that you like and then add a contemporary touch, such as a throw, cushion or light. For a casual look, use natural materials like rattan, wool or sheepskin. Another sustainability winner is the collection of throws from the Tartan Blanket Co., made using recycled wool they come in a range of designs and cost £40. Or for a more sumptuous feel, designer makers Lux & Bloom and The Tao of Cinderella offer luxury cushion collections that are created and made locally. Small vintage artefacts, and found or salvaged decorative pieces can be inspired gifts, as are pre-loved functional items, such as wooden artists boxes and easels, vintage trugs and baskets, sewing boxes, and vintage chopping boards. You can also buy new pieces made from sustainable sources. From tealight holders to furniture, manufacturers are using more sustainable and affordable materials without compromising on style or quality. Local furniture-maker Charlie Caffyn works exclusively with sustainable woods, Natajaq’s plywood lamps are another example and Colin Smith’s Copperstuff artisan lighting has all the right ecocredentials. We especially love his verdigris-aged tuba, which has been reinvented to enjoy a new life as a sculptural lamp. Verve’s Boutique Pop Up Shop is upstairs at Georges Larnicol Chocolate Shop, on the corner of Burton Street and Upper Borough Walls. Tel: 07785 332536; verveliving.uk

Verdigris-aged tuba lamp by Colin Smith, £245

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Viola

Winter heathers

Margaret Grant from Sheppards Gardens

Bright nerines help to cheer up the winter months

Hydrangea ‘Macrophylla’

Winter lights

Winter pots and containers can do a great deal to brighten the long dark days to come, says Jane Moore. A sentiment thoroughly endorsed by gardening compatriots Tamsin Westhorpe and John Leach

D

on’t gardeners get depressed in autumn?” my other half asked the other day, staring gloomily out at the rain. “After all, everything is dying!” But no, I don’t. Although I do miss the morning light and the corresponding lightness of being, there is something rather magical about the seasonal shutting down of things. Autumnal hibernation is how I think of it. It’s a rest period from the frenetic growing, weeding, watering and deadheading that has characterised the past few months. Listen hard at this time of year and I’m sure you can hear gardeners all over the country collectively breathing a huge sigh of relief. It’s not all over, however, and now that the season of mistiness, mustiness and murkiness is upon us, my pots, window box and containers are the focus of a veritable flurry of activity. Truth be told, I put way more effort into my winter pots and containers than I ever do in summer. I find I really need the cheerfulness that a few well-planted pots can bring over the next few months. I’m not alone either. Garden owner, and author Tamsin Westhorpe is so keen on her 108 TheBATHMagazine

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seasonal pots she starts off by talking me through her October scheme – a simple arrangement of individual pots of chrysanthemums and neon bright nerines – before getting stuck into November and December. “I’ve ignored chrysanthemums for years, but not any more,” she says, “They keep on going with so many flowers, it’s unbelievable. I always do a few nerines and they last an incredibly long time, too.” These bulbs have a reputation for being tender but actually they just love the sun and don’t compete well with other plants, which makes them ideal for pot cultivation. For a good autumnal show Tamsin plants them on their own in pots and then clusters a few different containers together to make an interesting arrangement. It’s easier then to pull a pot of something out as it goes over and replace it with something fresh. “I always treat myself to a new hebe for evergreen interest and a handful of ornamental cabbages,” she says. “My favourite combination of recent years was a mixture of cabbages and blue grass Festuca glauca – that’s it! Simple but very effective.”

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John Leach, the mainstay of Prior Park Garden Centre for more years than he cares to remember, is a big fan of grasses and evergreens, too. He favours silvery Helichrysum with the red browns of Carex and Uncinia and is also a fan of the less-ismore approach. “Keep it simple and remember that foliage is very important – it’s not all about flowers,” he says. “Hardy ferns and evergreens are essential for winter pots, as well as herbs such as sage and rosemary, to give them structure and interest. Ferns, especially, are great plants to use in the shady basements and courtyards of Bath.” I’m with him a hundred per cent as my front window box faces north and my classic winter look is a fern/cyclamen/viola combination. It always looks good and lasts well except for the cyclamen which only keeps going until Christmas. “They don’t last forever,” agrees John, “but there is nothing better for a real seasonal boost.” That’s true enough. In fact one of my favourite winter pot plantings I have done at the front door of The Bath Priory – also


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GARDENING

Cyclamen

annoyingly north facing – was white cyclamen, hardy ferns and banana cream violas. Rather classy I thought. “I’m not a fan of white in winter as it’s too cold,” says Tammy. I do know exactly what she means – white can be a little stark and I think the touch of yellow in the violas warmed the scheme. “Having said that I’m quite flighty with colours and will just go with whatever I’m in

the mood for at the time,” she adds. “I did a pot one year that I absolutely loved, with snowdrops dotted underneath a small Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’ dogwood.” One thing we all agree on is using statement shrubs and plants to add some drama to a winter scheme. While these plants won’t stay in the pots or containers for much more than a season, they still add invaluable substance and can be planted out in the garden afterwards. We all have our favourites: Tammy has her Cornus while John is a fan of winter heathers. “Winter heathers have dropped from favour in the past few years due to complete over-use,” he says. “Something like Erica arborea ‘Albert’s Gold’ is a great container plant that will stay happy in a pot for a number of years and makes a great backdrop for other plants, summer or winter.” I must confess that winter heathers have not featured on my shopping list for the past decade, but I think John is right about overuse. There was a time when winter heathers were ‘de rigueur’ for every garden and, as horticultural fashion, just like clothing fashion, tends to go in circles, it’s about time someone started reviving interest by using them cleverly. My pots nearly always feature Sarcococca. This humble little shrub has its moment in

the depths of winter with that shiny evergreen foliage which goes well with any colour or shape. But for me its overriding appeal is the fantastic scent those tiny midwinter flowers give off. It’s something like vanilla and is surprisingly unmistakeable – just ask the bumblebees as they home in on it. A pot of that right by my door provides an aromatherapy session every time I cross the threshold. That little pot is one of those things that gets me through the winter months still smiling and feeling cheerful. n Jane Moore is an award-winning gardening columnist and head gardener at The Bath Priory Hotel. Twitter: @janethegardener Listen to Tamsin Westhorpe’s podcast Fresh from the Pod on candidegardening.com

Ornamental cabbages

Create space with a garden room GARDEN OFFICES • LOG CABINS • STUDIOS • SUMMERHOUSES POSH SHEDS • TIMBER GARAGES • OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES

01225 774566 • www.gardenaffairs.co.uk Visit our Display Centre at Trowbridge Garden Centre 288 Frome Road, BA14 0DT THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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THE BATH DIRECTORY - NOVEMBER 2019.qxp_Layout 31 21/10/2019 17:24 Page 1

the directory

to advertise in this section call 01225 424 499

KEIKO KISHIMOTO

Electricians

Health, Beauty & Wellbeing Holistic Treatments for Wellbeing

Aromatherapy • Reflexology/Facial reflexology Japanese Cosmo Facelift • Deep Tissue Massage For more information, please visit:

www.keikokishimoto.co.uk 07739 827186 contact@keikokishimoto.co.uk

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We provide Bath Airport transfers to and from all major airports in the uk. We use only Hi spec vehicles and give a near on chauffeur experience at less than regular taxi prices.

60+ luxury properties for lets 2 nights to 5 months Holidays – For business – Friends & family – Temporary accommodation during renovation/relocation

Airport transfers • City to city travel • Hi spec vehicles 1-8 seat vehicles available • Account work considered • Free Wifi in selected vehicles Card payments taken with Izettle • Prices start from as little as £39

Contact: 01225 482 225 alexa@bathholidayrentals.com www.bathholidayrentals.com

Call or email us for a quote now!

Web: romanbathprivatehire.co.uk Email: Info@romanbathprivatehire.co.uk Tel: 01225 484346

Providing 4 & 5 star self-catering properties since 2006

Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

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Independent family run business with family values • • • • • •

New and Reconditioned Warranty Contracts Straight and Curved Stairlifts Services and Repairs Rental Stairlifts Removals

Call 01666 822 060

Email: info@simplystairlifts.co.uk 110 TheBATHMagazine

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Create your home for life

Web: simplystairlifts.co.uk


Cobb Farr PIF.qxp_PIF Full Page 21/10/2019 12:56 Page 1

PROPERTY | HOMEPAGE

A

superb grade II listed Georgian townhouse, fully renovated by the owners in recent years to a very high specification with beautifully presented accommodation. Currently used as a luxurious Airbnb the accommodation is laid out over 5 floors, whilst being used for this purpose this spacious house will accommodate 16+ guests with six bedrooms, 14 beds and 4 bathrooms. In addition this is a stunning first floor drawing room, wonderful ground floor high specification kitchen with breakfast room and on the lower ground floor cinema, games room and sauna. Alternatively the property would very easily provide the most attractive residential property using some of the existing bedrooms as additional reception rooms. The property is set in a wonderfully elevated position on a raised pavement with lovely views stretching across the city to the hillsides beyond. There is a pretty courtyard garden to the rear. This stunning property is a highly successful Airbnb and details of approximate turnover and occupancy are available upon request. All fitted carpets and certain other fittings are included within the price.

Belvedere, Bath • 6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms • Kitchen/dining room and separate utility • Cinema and games room • Sauna • Wonderful views • Courtyard garden • Approximately 3500 sq ft of accommodation

Guide price: £1,150,000

Cobb Farr, 35 Brock Street, The Circus, Bath. Tel: 01225 333332

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Cobb Farr November.qxp_Layout 1 21/10/2019 12:48 Page 1

Murhill, Limpley Stoke Guide Price £900,000

• • • • • • •

3 double bedrooms Dual aspect sitting room En suite facilities Harvey Jones kitchen Cellar/Studio Beautiful gardens Parking for 4-5 vehicles

01225 333332 | 01225 866111


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Bathwick Street, Bath £325,000 • • • • • •

Contemporary open plan living/dining/kitchen Immaculately presented accommodation Pretty private courtyard Ideal holiday let opportunity 1 bedroom Private parking space

01225 333332 | 01225 866111


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PROPERTY | DEVELOPMENT

Homes with heritage

Hope House, a development in the centre of Bath with a rich history, has been sensitively restored by Galliard Homes and Acorn Property Group over three years, and now offers a selection of stylish modern homes

A

garden party at Hope House on Lansdown Road marked the completion of the renovation and development of the house and its six-acre grounds, which has taken just over three years to complete. Working closely with heritage specialists and Bath City Council, Galliard Homes and Acorn Property Group have worked in collaboration with contractor JJ Rhatigan to restore the grand house and grounds to their former glory, in addition to creating new homes. Hope House can be found on one of the single largest plots of land in central Bath and as such the project has been of interest to local residents, historians and fans of Bath’s classic Georgian architecture. For many of those working on the project it has been a privilege to see at first-hand the meticulous restoration of the house and grounds and to see them returned to their original residential purpose. Over 350 guests celebrated the unveiling of the restored and imposing Grade II listed property, which provided a spectacular backdrop and setting for the garden party. Guests enjoyed food and drinks, provided by local catering specialist Strawberry Fields.

Younger guests had their faces painted and were entertained by magicians, while adults enjoyed live music with jazz trio The Hipcats. There was also the opportunity to see the results of the renovation and view the dressed town house and show apartment in the main house. Robin Squire, regional managing director of Acorn’s Bristol Region commented: “The completion of Hope House is a landmark triumph for the team, who have all worked diligently on this exceptional project, and we wanted to share that moment with everyone. It was a pleasure to have so many guests celebrate with us at the Hope House Garden Party and see the lawn and grounds scattered with people and children. It gave a real sense of how wonderful it will be for those making their homes at Hope House and how the community here will grow.” David Galman, sales director at Galliard Homes, comments: “Hope House offers a perfect balance between past and present, providing a rarely available setting and excellent location. Bath is a World Heritage Site and offers residents a unique cultural backdrop while also providing everything city life should. At Galliard Homes, in partnership with Acorn Property Group, we have worked hard to ensure the restoration The Hope House development

The garden party where the development was unveiled

of Hope House preserves the site’s rich history and restores it to a prestigious address. It has been our pleasure to welcome the public to Hope House to celebrate this achievement with us.” The property offers ten townhouses and 44 apartments, which are set in six acres of grounds, as well as providing allocated parking spaces, lift access, a concierge service and access to a residents’ only tennis court. The exceptional scheme has attracted considerable interest from buyers, with the scheme already 40% sold. Marketed by Savills, prices start from £325,000 for a one-bedroom apartment up to £2,400,000 for a four-bedroom apartment. Visitors can visit two beautifully dressed show homes within the development and take a tour of the formal lawn and parkland. n

Hope House is open daily from 10am – 5pm. To find out more contact Acorn Property Group: 01225 614 307; acornpropertygroup.org

An open-plan living room and kitchen

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[SOUTH WESTERN] LIMITED

Crafting beautiful homes

Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswolds | Dorset

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk

“We used Mardan following a recommendation from a friend. They moved us in and out of storage and then into our renovated house. I would highly recommend them. The service was super efficient and the guys were quick, polite and courteous. Nothing was too much trouble and all of our possessions arrived safe and sound” Emma Webster, Moon Client

DOMESTIC & COMMERCIAL MOVERS • PACKERS • STORERS • SHIPPERS

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The Apartment Co - October 19.qxp_Layout 1 25/10/2019 09:07 Page 1

Peter Greatorex Managing director of The apartment Company

Tenants: how to make your rental feel like your home

H

ome is where the heart is, but it’s more than that. We all long to find a place where we belong, and it doesn’t matter whether that’s for a few months or several years. When renting, you can feel in a temporary state, and yet as you end a long day at work, you still need to know that you will return to a place that feels warm and loved. It needs to feel like home. Your rental apartment may not be perfect, but a home is more than a building; it’s an emotional connection. It’s not about creating an Instagramworthy place, filled with designer interiors from a stylish magazine. You need to create a space that expresses who you are and how you live, a place that your friends and family describe as being, “so you”.

Show your love We all have pieces that we love, from artwork to sculptures, from rugs to light fittings, so make sure you display your favourite pieces.

Bring your garden inside Plants and flowers can transform any room – even a potted plant or herbs can make your apartment come alive.

Find solutions You may not be able to put up shelves or even change the colour scheme, but you can add your personal style. Rugs, free-standing mirrors, artwork, and room-dividing furniture can add style without breaking your rental contract.

It’s your choice It’s easy to get swept up in trends and what friends and family say, but the only voice you need to listen to is your own. If you trust your instinct then your personal flair will be expressed in the choices you make.

What brings you joy De-cluttering expert Marie Kondo says you should only keep hold of things that bring you joy. You may be a book lover and have your own library, collect figurines, or have a massive vinyl collection. Don’t be scared to display what brings you joy. Why hide your passion?

Simplify your home Although you should keep things that make you feel good, don’t hold on to stuff that you no longer need, want or use. The more things you have, the more your home can frustrate you. Keep things simple.

Add luxury Rich tones and tactile textiles can make a space feel elegant and luxurious. You can uncover inspiring finds in many places, from the home ranges in your local supermarket to designer collections. Mix and match products and styles to create a look that is truly yours.

Spend on what matters We often think that we need to spend on investment pieces, those one-off, high-cost items that catch your eye. But although you may love it, it won’t make your apartment feel truly like home. Put your money into lifeenhancing things that you use all the time, such as gorgeous bedding, or a beautiful dining set.

Finding the right match An emotional connection can begin when you find the right apartment to rent. As experts in the niche apartment market, we can translate your list of requirements into a place that you will want to make your home. Don’t waste time on endless viewings – we can swiftly find you the right match, one that you will want to call home. The Apartment Company Pg@theapartmentcompany.co.uk or call 01225 471144

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Central

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Grosvenor Place, BA1 £650,000

01225 809 571

This fabulous detached coach house is situated to the rear of Grosvenor Place adjacent the Larkhall area of the city. The home is now a little dated however offers 1588 square feet. Kitchen dining room, spacious lounge and four bedrooms. Parking potential and lovely garden. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

central@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Camden

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Eastbourne Avenue, BA1 £550,000

A well-proportioned Victorian terrace house with attractive period features, south facing garden and further potential. Energy Efficiency Rating: TBC

01225 809 868 camden@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews November.indd 1

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

21/10/2019 12:47


Newbridge Andrewsonline.co.uk

Rosslyn Road, BA2 ÂŁ550,000

A beautiful, three bedroom end of terrace house offering flexible family accommodation. This characterful home has, three bedrooms, two receptions, a west facing garden and driveway parking. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

01225 809 685 newbridge@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bear Flat

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Victoria Terrace, BA2 OIEO ÂŁ240,000

A beautiful, one bedroom garden apartment in Oldfield Park with a private entrance, open plan living, contemporary fitted kitchen, double bedroom, shower room and external storage. Energy Efficiency Rating: C

01225 805 680 bearflat@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews November.indd 2

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

21/10/2019 12:47


Savills Column FP.qxp_Layout 1 25/10/2019 16:00 Page 1

CITY | BUSINESS

GEORGIAN BATH LUKE BRADY

Head of Savills Bath office and southern residential division

T

he Georgian period gave our country some of its most beautiful architecture. Protecting its legacy is paramount and this is the endeavour of The Georgian Group. Last month the conservation charity shone a spotlight on the restoration and creation of Georgian buildings and landscapes across the UK at its annual Georgian Group Architectural Awards. Sponsored by Savills, the Awards gave recognition to exemplary conversion and restoration projects nationally. Being the most complete Georgian city in the UK, it came as little surprise that two individual Bath schemes were selected as winners. The Bath World Heritage Enhancement Fund was awarded for its initiative to restore the city’s original incised and painted street signs. Thanks to the project, 52 historic signs have been painstakingly restored to their former glory since 2010. Also awarded a top prize was the work by the Pulteney Estate Residents’ Association to reintroduce the area’s original lantern and overthrow lighting. When Great Pulteney Street began to be built in 1798, each house would have been lit by a lantern in an iron overthrow; by 2010 only a few fragments of these structures remained. Instructed by the Association, Harrison Brookes Architects designed a beautiful new lighting scheme for the entrances of the famous buildings. These projects highlight the hard work and commitment of many to ensure Bath’s architectural heritage is given the future it deserves. Clearly, such conservation is of fundamental importance in terms of Bath’s status as a World Heritage Site and its global appeal as a tourist destination, but what about buyers? As part of a national and global business, our local team represents buyers from across the world and it is safe to say that Bath’s Georgian heritage is as important today as it has ever been. The vast majority of in-movers are looking to buy Georgian, and it continues to be the preferred style for those who are moving within the area, especially if they are moving from a period home. Bath’s property hotspots include the likes of Queen Square, Royal Crescent and The Circus. Representing the most iconic work of

Georgian Bath’s architects, John Wood the Elder and his son, John Wood the Younger, they comprise the some of the city’s finest architecture and are internationally revered. Here, demand usually outstrips supply and properties often sell in excess of guide prices. However, the Bath market offers an excellent choice of Georgian property across the breadth of the city, and comprising a range of property types from one bedroom apartments through to large detached villas. Georgian townhouses are the quintessential property associated with Bath. The finest houses were generally built over four or five storeys, with classic proportions and large sash windows. The usual layout was to have the kitchen and servants’ quarters in the basement, the ground floor would have an outer hall, inner hall and often a dining room and parlour. Living accommodation was usually situated on the first floor, with a drawing and withdrawing room, and bedroom accommodation located on the upper floors. Many of the city’s townhouses still retain this layout, along with original features including feature fireplaces, panelling, sweeping staircases and ornate cornice work, and the majority are now listed. A good number of townhouses and villas have been adapted and refined so that they boast modern creature comforts, such as underfloor heating and even contemporary glass extensions, as well as the period details they are known and loved for. As a result of a movement during the 1950s, 60s and 70s to convert townhouses into apartments, the choice is good, with the best examples offering truly incredible views of Bath’s famous cityscape. In recent years, we have seen several Georgian-style new build schemes come to fruition. Developments, such as Hope House in Lansdown and Weston Park, can be a good fit for buyers who appreciate the beauty and grandeur of the Georgian era but prefer the convenience of a contemporary home. n Luke Brady, Savills Bath. Edgar House, 17 George St, Bath BA1 2EN Web: savills.co.uk

From left to right: 23 Bathwick Hill, 10a Great Pulteney Street, 18 Park Lane are just a taste of the variety and of quality Georgian and Georgian-style property on the market.

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Gables, Warminster Road A striking, newly built 4 bedroom family home located on the eastern outskirts of Bath, a short walk from the city centre and a handful and excellent junior and senior schools. The property offers contemporary open plan living and is finished to an exceptional standard throughout.

Rent: ÂŁ3,250 pcm* Beautiful open plan kitchen/dining room | bi-fold doors open out into a small private garden | granite kitchen work surfaces, integrated appliances and a large central kitchen island | spacious living room | separate utility room | spacious master suite, comprising a large double bedroom, dressing room and stylish bathroom | 3 further good sized double bedrooms (2 en-suite) | family bathroom | ample off-street parking

Reside Bath | 24 Barton Street Bath BA1 1HG | T 01225 445 777 | E info@residebath.co.uk | W www.residebath.co.uk

*A Holding Deposit equivalent to one week’s rent will be payable.

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Equus House

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£2,750 pcm

An exceptionally beautiful three bedroom apartment, occupying one of Lansdown’s premium positions on Baths popular Northern slopes. This stunning contemporary accommodation has been finished to the highest standards. EPC: B

T D LE EE R AG

Lime Grove

£1,800 pcm

EW

Sydney Lawn

01225 471 14 4 The Apartment Company November.indd 1

£1,800 pcm

A stunning luxury refurbished one bedroom apartment, furnished to a high standard, located in the highly sought after Royal Crescent. The apartment benefits from a rental to include electricity, gas, water, council tax and internet. EPC: E

Great Pulteney Street

£1,500 pcm

£1,400 pcm

EW

St Lawrence House

EW

Camden Crescent

£1,650 pcm

An impressive and stunning three bedroom second floor Apartment in a recently refurbished Grade II listed Georgian townhouse situated on the northern slopes of Bath. A fine example of Bath’s iconic Georgian architecture. EPC: D

T D LE EE R AG

We are delighted to bring to the market this beautifully decorated Georgian apartment. Situated in one of the most prestigious locations in Bath and being just a short walk from the city centre, this property is not one to miss. EPC: D

N

Luxury second floor apartment with superb outlook. Close to local parks and amenities is this superb two bedroom apartment, with triple aspect views in the sitting room it creates a spacious ambience. Set inside a Georgian style new build. EPC: B

SALES

Royal Crescent

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T D LE EE R AG

A rare opportunity to rent a Victorian three bedroom maisonette situated close to the river and within easy walking distance of the railway station and city. Immaculately presented this beautiful garden apartment. EPC: E

N

EW

Park Lane

Stylish second floor Grade II listed apartment in a prime residential location close to Royal Victoria. The apartment benefits from a private garage, communal garden and is within walking distance of the City Centre. EPC: E

N

£1,200 pcm

This modern and contemporary two bedroom apartment is situated in the much sought after location of Southgate. The property has been perfectly designed to combine city living with a quiet relaxing environment. EPC: B

£1,100 pcm

EW

The Academy

£875 pcm

We are delighted to bring to the market this fabulous one bedroom apartment built within The Academy, a private gated. This modern property also boasts an allocated parking space and use of communal gardens. EPC: B

LETTINGS

01225 303 870

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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The Tramshed

SO

O.I.E.O

£525,000

The Apartment Company are delighted to bring to the market this stunning two bedroom apartment located in the highly sought after Tramshed development located in the heart of the city. Addition of a private balcony.

SO

LD

Kensington Chapel

£435,000

A unique penthouse apartment that is sure to impress with its excellent use of space and design. The property is convenient for Bath life, there are excellent links close to the property along with a range of local shopping.

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LD

Paragon

Palladian

O.I.E.O

£335,000

O.I.E.O

£465,000

LD

Park Street

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£430,000

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Claremont Mew

Park Lane

O.I.E.O

£250,000

O.I.E.O

£450,000

LD

Bennett Street

O.I.E.O

£400,000

This excellent courtyard apartment is situated in a highly desirable location. There is a modern open plan sitting room and kitchen, two double bedrooms and a generous bathroom. The rear courtyard is a superb addition.

SO

Fabulous one bedroom apartment which boasts beautiful South West facing views over Bath. Located just a short walk from the city centre and a bus stop and benefitting from secured gated parking and private entrance.

LD

This fabulous two bedroom maisonette has been recently finished to an excellent standard and is located perfectly with views of Victoria Park and is a short level walk to the city centre. Highly sought after location.

SO

A beautifully presented courtyard apartment located in a much sought after location just off of St James’ Square. Externally there is a charming private courtyard. A super apartment that is likely to attract considerable interest.

SO

A newly refurbished one-bedroom apartment. Boasts its own entrance and communal garden. Situated just a short level walk from the city centre, this stylish apartment combines contemporary design and period features.

SO

Luxury two bedroom penthouse apartment in the prestigious Riverside development. Boasting both front and rear balconies, this property enjoys a sunny south facing aspect whilst also giving the owners a fabulous view.

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O.I.E.O

LD

LD

Lamont House

O.I.E.O

£220,000

A two bedroom ground floor apartment situated in Lamont House. The apartment benefits from well-kept communal gardens, a private garage and is situated close to the lovely area of Larkhall. Early viewing is recommended.

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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Profile for MC Publishing Limited

The Bath Magazine November 2019  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath

The Bath Magazine November 2019  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath