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ISSUE 189 | JUNE 2018 £3.95 where sold

SUMMER CLASSICS Discover Dutch Golden Age painting, get fashionably underdressed with hot accessories and brush up your ways with vegetables... the summer awaits CITY SPECIAL

TRAVEL FAR Dreaming of seven big sights

A LITTLE LOVIN’ STAYING AFLOAT WISE RIVER Dusty hits the Theatre Royal

Living on the water

The evolution of the Avon

A GRAND VISION The story of Bath Riverside

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I F E A N D L I V I N G I N B A T H


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Contents June 2018 5 THINGS

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Essential events to look forward to this month

GET SUMMER READY

SPECIAL FEATURE REGENERATING THE RIVERSIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

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How Crest Nicholson is transforming Bath’s riverside property market

Summer accessories fashion inspiration

RESTAURANT REVIEW LIFE ON THE CANAL

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Emma Clegg gets her taste buds tingling at Giggling Squid

Georgette McCready finds out if life afloat really is a dream

THE MUSICAL MAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Jessica Hope chats to Sir Cameron Mackintosh about Miss Saigon

WHAT’S ON

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36

Our guide to the top events happening around the city

LIFE IN SPRINGFIELD

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Melissa Blease talks to writer Jonathan Harvey about his new musical on the life of singer Dusty Springfield

BATH’S HISTORIC WATERS

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Catherine Pitt examines the history of the River Avon

YOUR DREAM DESTINATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Travel to new places with a big wow factor

ENGLAND’S GREEN AND PLEASANT LAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Discover the ideal countryside retreat for exploring Dartmoor

BATH AT WORK

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GOING DUTCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Neill Menneer’s portrait of fitness coach Zita Alves

Emma Clegg explores the wonders of the Holburne’s new exhibition

WALKING THE CAM VALLEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

FOR ART’S SAKE

Andrew Swift wanders past a tunnel of trees and plenty of locks

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A colourful look at what’s on offer at the local galleries

ESSENCE OF INDIA

HOT PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

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The finest homes to buy or rent

Meet an artist who is inspired by her travels

AMERICA AT WAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Explore the United States’ entry into the First World War with a unique exhibition at The American Museum in Britain

LEARN THE VEG WAY

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How two local companies are helping us get smarter with vegetables

Even more great content and updates online: thebathmag.co.uk

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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

ON THE COVER

A Still Life of Flowers and Fruit arranged on a Stone Plinth in a Garden by Cornelis de Heem, as featured in the Prized Possessions: Dutch Masterpieces from National Trust Houses exhibition at the Holburne Museum. Turn to page 50 for more. © National Trust Images/John Hammond

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine


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Editors Letter June.qxp_Layout 1 25/05/2018 14:34 Page 1

EDITOR’S PICKS A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT Have you ever wondered what it’s like to live on the river? Ask Ratty from Wind in the Willows and you get a straight answer: “There is nothing – absolutely nothing – half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” Ask some of the people who live a boating life on the River Avon, as we do on page 28, and you get much the same answer.

from the

EDITOR

T

here’s water water everywhere in our June issue. Quite naturally all our water features (journalistic ones) have strong links to our very own River Avon. So get your galoshes on, splash yourself down, take the plunge and get ready for a waterborne journey. Georgette McCready talks to those who live in the canal boat community on page 28 – there are plenty of creature comforts on board, it seems, and the view from your living room changes every day. Catherine Pitt has investigated the history of the River Avon on page 60, tracing how it has been used from era to era, ranging from providing a freshwater source for the first Celtic settlement to generating power for industry and providing a place to swim and boat. There’s also a special section on the Bath Riverside development from page 66, unravelling the story of the building of a new community by the river with strong connections to the city. Another water vision comes from the owners of Bath Water who created their very own mineral water using spring water from organic Mendip Hills’ land – Melissa Blease talks to them on page 72. Back on dry land, towel yourself down and try out some of our summer accessories fashion suggestions on page 20. (Mine’s the lemon quartz and diamond ring please.) All dressed up, and there are plenty of places to go – we’ve an action-packed schedule of events in our what’s on pages from page 36. We also have two fascinating insights into musical theatre as Melissa Blease interviews writer Jonathan Harvey on page 46 about Dusty, the new production about the life of Dusty Springfield at the Theatre Royal, and Jessica Hope talks to Sir Cameron Mackintosh on page 32 about his epic production of Miss Saigon at Bristol Hippodrome. We stretch out our hands to Europe without moving from Bath on page 50 as we preview the new exhibition at the Holburne Museum, Prized Possessions: Dutch Masterpieces from National Trust Houses. This celebrates the Dutch Golden Age of painting, including the work of Rembrandt and Albert Cuyp, whose View of Dordrecht is one of the National Trust’s most prized artworks – it was once cut in half, but was later joined back together. On a grander geographic scale, if you have plans to travel to exotic places any time soon (or just like to dream about it), we’ve got specialist advice on seven ideas for big sights that have been hiding in the shadows, from Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia to the Li River in Guangxi, China. Back in Somerset, here’s hoping that these pages prove useful as a spur for your June activities. Emma Clegg Editor

All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

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FAMILY FUN DAY If you like something more get-up-and-go than floating along the river, then try out a new sport. You can have a go for free on 16 June with Team Bath at the University of Bath in sports facilities used by Olympic and Commonwealth champions. Hockey, tennis, rhythmic gymnastics, netball, trampolining and football are among the many sports that visitors of all ages can have a go at. Other activities include a climbing wall, inflatables and prize challenges. There will also be 5km and 3km runs to celebrate Olympic Day. Free entry. Saturday 16 June, 11am-3pm; teambath.com ART AT THE RUH

The RPS 160th International Photography exhibition includes photographs from the artistic to the documentary and from portraiture to natural history. Entries are international and the exhibition is travelling to photo festivals and traditional gallery spaces and so engages a wide audience. You can see it at the Royal United Hospital in Combe Park, Bath in the central gallery from 20 June – 2 August. We love this photograph by Sara Cuce, entitled This Body is No-One’s Home.

also learned that secret from the river; ❝ Have you that there is no such thing as time? ❞ HERMANN HESSE (1877–1962)


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ZEITGEIST

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things to do in

June

See prized possessions An Officer Making his Bow to a Lady by Gerard ter Borch. National Trust Images: John Hammond

Swing Dorothy House Hospice Care is holding a Big Band music and comedy evening on Friday 29 June. The event features live music from The Park Lane Big Band and comedy by Geoff Whiting. Fabulous swing music from the Miller and Ellington era, from the Rat Pack to contemporary tunes, will be performed in a marquee at the Bath Recreation Ground along. Tickets: £26, including a drink on arrival. 7pm for 7.30pm start, finishing at 10pm. Visit: dorothyhouse.org.uk/events

Head to the pub

Go bazaar Bringing together vintage, antique and handmade stallholders, The Vintage Bazaar is coming to The Cheese and Grain, Frome on Saturday 30 June. From French brocante and antique textiles to beautiful handmade delights, the handpicked dealers will bring exciting new stock from all over the UK and Europe. Visit: thevintagebazaar.blogspot.com

For the first time at the Holburne Museum a selection of 17th century paintings by Dutch masters of the Golden Age are on display until 16 September. Prized Possessions will explore what made Dutch art so soughtafter among country house owners. Paintings in the exhibition have been taken from 12 National Trust houses and include luminous landscapes by Cuyp and Hobbema, intimate scenes of everyday life by Metsu and De Hooch, and the recently rediscovered selfportrait of Rembrandt from Buckland Abbey. Turn to page 50 for more. Visit: holburne.org

Melanie C wil be performing on Friday night

Pub in the Park is arriving in Bath this month for a glorious three-day feast. With a stellar line up of world-class chefs, Michelin-starred pubs, plus a selection of other top UK pubs and restaurants to serve up something special, it’s going to be a banquet you won’t forget. Combined with great live music, chef demonstrations and other festival fun it has all the ingredients for the best foodie experience. Friday and Saturday evening and Sunday tickets are still available. Taking place at Royal Victoria Park from 8 – 10 June, times vary. Visit: pubintheparkuk.com

Head over to Bath Spa University’s Sion Hill campus from Saturday 9 – Sunday 17 June, 10am – 5pm, as it opens its doors to the public for the annually celebrated Bath School of Art and Design Undergraduate Degree Show. Original works of art and design will be on show as three years’ worth of graduating students’ finest work will be displayed across the

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nine-day exhibition. With handpicked items from contemporary art practice, creative arts, fashion design, fine art, graphic communication, photography, textile design for fashion and interiors, threedimensional design and fashion and textiles courses unveiled, there will be something for everyone to enjoy. Visit: bathspa.ac.uk/art-and-design

Photograph by Hannah Ball

Enjoy


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ist

THE CITY THE BUZZ THE BUZZ ENDANGERED BUILDINGS? The Victorian Society is asking residents in Somerset and the South West to nominate threatened Victorian buildings for the 2018 Top 10 Endangered Buildings List. Now in its 11th year, the annual campaign encourages people across the UK to nominate Victorian buildings in their area that they feel are under threat, whether from neglect, insensitive redevelopment or even demolition. A shortlist of the 10 most endangered Victorian buildings in the country is then chosen, and the buildings are given publicity to help save them. Buildings must be in England or Wales and built between 1837 and 1914, and nominations must contain the building’s name and location, the year it was built, a brief description of its history and/or architecture, details of the threat you feel it is under, and at least one good photograph. Send your nominations by email to media@victoriansociety.org.uk or by post to The Victorian Society, 1 Priory Gardens, London W4 1TT

FANCY SOME FLORALS? Milsom Place is staging a spectacular Festival of Flowers, a new event in Bath, over the weekend of 16–17 June. Jon Wheatley, who has won 26 Gold Medals at the Chelsea Flower Show, will be creating head-turning displays, so come with your camera to get inspiration for your garden. Pops of colour from the National Dahlia Collection in Cornwall will be incorporated into the Bath planting designs. Share your photographs on social media using #MPFlowerFest

My BATH

The Theatre Bath Bus, also known as Minerva, is very well travelled and loves driving on the roads of Bath. Once a passenger bus, she was converted into a mobile theatre space and spends her time hosting productions around the city

Why did you become a theatre bus? Two humans called Luke John Emmett and Zoe Bailey had established that two of the biggest barriers to public engagement are the need to travel and being intimidated by unfamiliar spaces. So they were looking for a creative space that was affordable to use, and that could widen the engagement in arts and culture in Bath. My friends the city buses say that buildings are quite expensive and they are famously immobile, so it was important to think outside the box…less building, more bus.

Where is your favourite garage in Bath? Sainsbury’s garage is my favourite – it fills me up with much needed fuel when I need it.

Did you have a life before being a theatre bus? I was a passenger bus. I have worked in many places including Portsmouth, Southsea and all around Dorset. I used to ferry passengers on many different routes.

When are you happiest? When there is a performance or workshop on and I have a happy, engaged audience. Also when I’ve been freshly polished and am super shiny. I am most happy when I am full of smiling faces, people who are enjoying their journey through their imaginations within me.

What is your favourite place to park? I love Brunel Square. It’s so nice and spacey down there and I am always surrounded by lots of amazing businesses. Not to mention I get to beep my horn at my brothers and sisters as they come and go from Bath Bus Station. I’ve even had some old bus driver friends pay me a visit and say hello. Is it hard finding enough room in the bus? It is amazing what space there is inside a bus. I have a stage, comfortable cushioned bench seating for an audience of 24, a technical area, box office, bar, and dressing area. My stage can also be extended or seats removed to alter the space. I have hosted musical performances, workshops, theatre, talks, and all sorts of other art forms – all aboard me.

Photograph by Paolo Ferla for Milsom Place

Why are you called Minerva? After the Roman Goddess of Wisdom who was patron of the arts and has close links to the City of Bath. Minerva’s symbol is the owl – my original outside coat had a beautiful owl insignia flying in front of a moon along my shiny purple sides. What do you like about being a theatre bus? I have always been a big fan of the arts so I love getting a front row seat to lots of performances. I bring joy to people and they painted me purple – what’s not to love?

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Do you ever wish you were a more traditional sort of bus? I like to make an entrance and being a giant purple bus certainly gets me a lot of attention, which I thoroughly enjoy. I feel proud that I am able to provide performance opportunities to lots of different talented people and bring the arts to the heart of communities.

What bus do you most admire from history? I always liked the Play Bus from Playdays – there was always so much fun going on and you never knew where it was going to stop… Did you ever aspire to be a double decker? I like to think that size isn’t everything. Plus I can zip under lower bridges which means I can get to more remote areas that double deckers would struggle with. What projects are you involved with now? On 2, 3 and 7 June I will be at Brunel Square as part of Bath Fringe. There are 15 fantastic productions being performed over the three days, including film, comedy, performance poetry, theatre and music. What do you have planned this year? In August I will be helping to support Zenith Youth Theatre Company to take 40 young people up to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival – allowing the next generation the opportunity to perform at one of the largest festivals in the world. My little wheels will be tired by the time I get there though. n To book seats on Minerva for performances at the Bath Fringe Festival on 2, 3 and 7 June, visit: theatrebathbus.co.uk


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Century Casino Bath is Now Open.

Visit us for three floors of fabulous entertainment Cocktail lounge with terrace overlooking the Theatre Royal, private room also available

Saw Close Bath, BA1 1EY 01225 308 990 18+ BeGambleAware.org - DrinkAware.co.uk

Know your limits! For more information go to:

www.cnty.com/bath


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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

See more online thebathmag.co.uk

Contact us: Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Editor Tel: Email:

Emma Clegg 01225 424592 emma@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Financial Director Email:

Jane Miklos jane@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Health & Beauty Editor Email:

Crystal Rose crystal@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Assistant Editor Email:

Jessica Hope jessica@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Contact the Advertising Sales team tel: 01225 424499

vintage furniture contemporar y styling

Advertising Sales Email:

Liz Grey liz@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Email:

Jake Horwood jake@thebathmagazine.co.uk

The Bath Magazine and The Bristol Magazine are published by MC Publishing Ltd. The Bath Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout Bath and the surrounding area. We also have special distribution units in the following city centre stores and coffee shops

2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Telephone: 01225 424499. Fax: 01225 426677 www.thebathmag.co.uk verveliving.uk 15 WALCOT BUILDINGS. LONDON RD. BA1 6AD Free parking on London Rd, in Weymouth St & at Morrisons

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Š MC Publishing Ltd 2018 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bath Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


Y R’S DA E H T FA

Bespoke GIFTS

Give dad something that he will always treasure for Father’s Day this year. With this selection of luxury gifts from retailer Farrar & Tanner, you can engrave your own personal message or name and give dad something that will last a lifetime.

BRITISH MADE PREMIUM CUFFLINKS Luxurious oval cufflinks, crafted in Birmingham for the Farrar & Tanner collection. The 925 sterling silver and Birmingham anchor hallmarks are engraved on the back as a stamp of quality craftsmanship.

BRITISH CRAFTED, QUALITY PEWTER HIP FLASK. A PERFECT GIFT FOR A PERFECT DAD Crafted in Sheffield from high-grade pewter, this flask features a sleek, smooth silver finish. The flask is held in a handsome brown leather pouch, ideal for adding a personal touch with an engraved message. English Pewter Co. Pewter Hip Flask with Real Leather Sleeve £62 www.farrar-tanner.co.uk

Farrar & Tanner Solid Sterling Silver Oval Hinged Cufflinks £65 www.farrar-tanner.co.uk

ELEGANT GROOMING SET FOR A LUXURIOUS SHAVE Skilfully crafted in Sheffield by Edwin Jagger, this wonderful three-piece shaving set is the ideal gift for the dapper dad. This quality collection features a high performance Mach3 razor with a nickel-plated finish.

COTSWOLDS GIN IN A BEAUTIFUL GIFT BOX

Edwin Jagger Three Piece Shaving Set (Ebony/Nickel Plated) £80 www.farrar-tanner.co.uk

Say cheers to dad with this handcrafted Cotswolds Dry Gin. A smooth London dry style with a Cotswolds twist, this fragrant blend of nine carefully considered botanicals is left for 24 hours to allow full infusion of flavour. A classic, well balanced gin. Add your message on to the silk lined gift box lid.

BEAUTIFULLY CRAFTED SPORTS MEMORABILIA Robust enough to be played with and beautiful enough to sit on the shelf, this genuine leather rugby ball will please any sports enthusiast. A natural leather patina and hand stitching give a warm, traditional feel. A vintage-style piece that is as striking as it is decorative, this rugby ball is presented on a wooden plinth which can be engraved for an extra personal touch.

Cotswolds Dry Gin in Personalised Premium Wood Gift Box £60

Vintage Sports Genuine Leather Rugby Ball with Wood Plinth £52

www.farrar-tanner.co.uk

www.farrar-tanner.co.uk

LUXURIOUS GARDEN GIFT Endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society and packaged in a unique presentation box, this is a charming, practical gift to inspire green fingers. Add a personal touch with an engraved name or message on the knife blade. Burgon & Ball RHS Classic Pruning Knife Gift Set £50 www.farrar-tanner.co.uk

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ARE WE BEING SERVED?

Our roving reporter goes shopping, throwing caution to the wind by leaving her loyalty cards at home

W

orking in a shop or restaurant in Bath isn’t easy. You’ve got to be prepared for long periods of tedium (rainy Tuesday mornings) punctuated by spells of frantic activity (Saturday afternoons) wearing your brightest smile and your politely interested face while your customer dithers between the grey and the black, or interrogates you on the provenance of the soup of the day. It’s not easy being a customer either. Wander into a shop for a browse and you can be pounced on by an over-eager salesperson, like a lion in search of prey, whereupon, gazelle-like you take fright, forget what you came in to look for, and leap straight back on to the street. I prefer to be neglected when I’m shopping, unless I want to try something on, in which case I hope I won’t have to interrupt the two team members engaged in an absorbing conversation with each other by the till. I could also do without the dismissive top-to-toe look of disdain which says ‘we don’t do those in your size, lardy.’ Sometimes you can see why people prefer to shop for clothes online. There’s the freedom to spend as long as you like choosing, to pick the size you actually are rather than the one you’d like to be and you can have said item of clothing discreetly delivered to your front door with no judgement about whether you’re stylish or young enough to wear the brand. Home shopping means no struggling to try clothes on in a tiny cubicle – why is the lighting so relentlessly unflattering in changing rooms? – and nobody enquiring afterwards with fake sincerity whether you found what you were looking for today. I always think that’s a philosophical question which implies that if I had found the perfect pair of jeans I would feel spiritually enlightened and emotionally fulfilled. I also wonder why, when I’m buying a shirt from one of those nautical themed shops for women of a certain age who wished they lived by the sea, why they need my postcode and my birthday. Oh, I know it’s really for marketing purposes, but I don’t want a cheery email from a chain store to remind me I’m another year older, and it’s a breton t-shirt I’m buying for goodness sake, not a yacht. It’s tempting to give a fake postcode and date of birth – anyone tried that successfully? I’m about to go on a mission to buy a mother-of-the-groom outfit, a task which fills me with dread. I have asked my son and his lovely bride why they couldn’t have had a fancy dress wedding. I have ready access to a steam punk outfit or a Game of Thrones costume, while nude court shoes, a bodycon dress and matching coat in an ageappropriate shade of lilac or pistachio are much more of a sartorial challenge. As for the hat . . . I have a black tricorn, will that not do? Lots of shops in Bath will ask you to produce your loyalty card. I had so many of these, for national supermarket chains, coffee shops and said nautical themed shops for women of a certain age, etc, that I took to carrying a second wallet just for my loyalty cards. But recently, after losing my Nectar card, I ditched the loyalty card wallet. I’m freed from the burden of producing a Boots Advantage card, or Waitrose card every time I buy toothpaste or a banana. I’m sure they’ll tell me I’m missing out on all sorts of bargains, but that’s a risk I’m willing to take. The only one I have held on to is my Waterstones’ card – the one where points mean paperbacks. On another matter, Bath’s most successful industry – scaffolding – goes from strength to strength. A little while ago it was storming along Broad Street and it put on an impressive show at the Empire Hotel. At the time of writing there is a large installation in New Bond Street, which one wag suggested was part of the Bath Fringe. It made being a pedestrian more interesting as we slalommed our way between the poles and the yellow tape. Look out for the guys in their flatback vans cruising your neighbourhood with an eye on where they are going to put their next tower of metal poles. n

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The Vintage Bazaar

ready for

FESTIVAL Saturday June 30th

season?�

The Cheese and Grain, Frome, Somerset 9am-3pm The very best vintage, antique and handmade event www.thevintagebazaar.blogspot.com

Ellis & Killpartrick Optometrists 18 New Bond Street, Bath, BA1 1BA Tel: 01225 466954

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SUMMER | FASHION

Summer Accessories

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“It is always better to be slightly underdressed”

... So said Coco Chanel, and clearly there’s no better time to be slightly underdressed than in the summer. Here are a host of inviting ideas to further that intention, and to accessorise yourself with style, fun and colour – from lingerie and headwear to sunglasses and jewellery, we’ve covered every angle

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THIS PAGE: 1. Fiesta headdress, £11.95, from Graham & Green, 92 Walcot Street, Bath; grahamandgreen.co.uk 2. Lace collection scarf, £65, by Carole Waller, from Waller and Wood, 4 Abbey Green, Bath; wallerandwood.co.uk 3. White quartz and pearl necklace, £34.50, from Portman, 28 Milsom Street, Bath; nickieportman.co.uk 4. Round sunglasses with gradient lenses by Chanel, £550, from Ellis and Killpartrick, 18 New Bond Street, Bath; ellisandkillpartrick.com 5. Antique lemon quartz and diamond ring set in 18ct yellow gold and platinum, £2,875, from Mallory, 1–5 Bridge Street, Bath; mallory-jewellers.com 6. Chester satchel, £179, from Hobbs, 43 Milsom Street, Bath; hobbs.co.uk 7. Tasselled watermelon clutch, £88, from Anthropologie, 1–4 New Bond Street, Bath; anthropologie.com 8. Ruby Shoo Iris ochre shoes, £52, from Flock, 12–13 The Corridor, Bath; flockbath.co.uk OPPOSITE: 9. Ladies hat by Whiteley, £45, from The Bath Hat Company, 9–11 Walcot Street, Bath; thebathhatcompany.com 10. Juliet M sunglasses in rose gold by ic! berlin, £361, from Kathryn Anthony Opticians, 16 Pierrepont Street, Bath; kathrynanthony.co.uk 11. Daisy Print Swimsuit, £85, from Whistles, 1 New Bond Street, Bath; whistles.com 12. Bejewelled bangle, £45, from Portman, 28 Milsom Street, Bath; nickieportman.co.uk 13. Sam Edelman Raina embroidered embellished slides, £89, from Anthropologie, 1–4 New Bond Street, Bath; anthropologie.com 14. Marie Jo Nori lingerie set in pamplemousse, bras from £68 and bottoms from £37, from The Dressing Room, 7 Quiet Street, Bath; dressingroombath.com n


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SUMMER | FASHION

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Photograph by Chris Daw

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WISHLIST | WATCH SPECIAL

TEN OF THE BEST

There’s nothing that conveys good taste and personal style more than a fine luxury timepiece, whether it’s to complement an outfit, an occasion, or simply to be worn for pleasure. The world’s leading watch houses introduced new models for 2018, so we asked Mallory Jewellers to pick out 10 of the best.

BREITLING NAVITIMER 8 This year the entire Breitling collection has been refined and revamped, however inhouse chronographs still remain at the heart of Breitling’s DNA as demonstrated with the new classic design Navitimer 8 B01, which is based around early 1930/40s cockpit clocks that did not have the slide rule function. We look forward to the arrival of the 2018 collection at the Mallory watch showroom, as Breitling moves into new and exciting design territory. Model: AB0117131C1P1 Price: £5,900.00

IWC JUBILEE PILOT CHRONOGRAPH In celebration of their 150th anniversary, IWC have launched the ‘Jubilee Collection’ which consists of 27 limited edition models equipped with stunning new blue or white lacquer dials. This particular model, the Jubilee Pilot Chronograph, has a 43mm steel case which houses the practical day/date automatic mechanism and stays true to the iconic pilot design. A fantastic choice for the stylish man about town, or the collector as this reference is limited to 1000 pieces. Model: IW377725 Price: £4,650.00

For further details on any of the timepieces shown and many more, visit: Mallory Jewellers, 1 – 5 Bridge Street Bath BA2 4AP Tel: 01225 788800 mallory-jewellers.com

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ROLEX GMT MASTER II Reminiscent of the iconic ‘Root Beer GMT’ the never before seen GMT Master II Everose Rolesor has done nothing but impress since its Baselworld release. Housing the new technically advanced 3285 calibre, with 70 hour power reserve, this model is eye catching and stylish with all the qualities one would expect of this marque. Model: 126711CHNR Price: £10,350.00

TAG HEUER CARRERA CALIBRE 16 With 2018 marking the 55th anniversary of the Carrera, TAG Heuer has introduced the new Carrera Calibre 16 Chronograph, a very wearable sized sports chronograph, which is inspired by the world of motorsport in its design. Offering blue and black dial options, bracelet and strap configurations and the Calibre 16 movement means that TAG Heuer has given us a great new watch for anyone wanting a little retro cool from a quality Swiss manufacturer. Model: CV201AP.FC6429 Price: £3,500.00

TUDOR BLACK BAY GMT 2018 sees Tudor’s meteoric rise continue with the arrival of the Black Bay GMT. Demonstrating its iconic roots with the 1969 inspired ‘Snowflake’ hands the watch now has the practical advantage of displaying worldwide time zones by way of the in-house manufactured movement and the blue and red ‘Pepsi’ bezel becoming the perfect companion for the modern discerning traveller. Model: M79830RB-001 Price: £2,790.00


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WISHLIST | WATCH SPECIAL

MONTBLANC STAR LEGACY This year Montblanc has introduced the ‘pièce de résistance’ to their classic watch offering with the new Star Legacy Small Seconds. Inspired by Montblanc’s pocket watches which were made during the late 19th century and early 20th century. This ladies’ model offers both beauty and classicism whilst paying homage to the heritage of the brand. It is presented in two sizes, each showcasing elegant diamond and guilloché detailing on the dial. It is available on a stainless steel bracelet or on a variety of strap options. Model: 118533 Price: £4,200.00

CARTIER SANTOS PATEK PHILIPPE AQUANAUT LUCE Combining the perfect mix of sporty and chic, the Aquanaut Luce launches in the new ‘Misty Blue’ for 2018. Framed with 46 illuminating diamonds, a 120m water resistant case and a tropical composite strap, makes it extremely comfortable to wear and a truly versatile piece for any occasion. Model: 5067A-025 Price: £12,420.00

Last year we saw the return of the Panthère; this year Cartier has relaunched the iconic Santos in its collection. Available in medium and large size automatic options, the new Santos doesn’t fail to impress in terms of feel and functionality! The steel case shape has changed, making it even more comfortable and each watch has an interchangeable leather strap (as easy as pushing a button to change) and even the bracelet can be sized at home making it the perfect his and hers timepiece. Model: WSSA0010 Price: £5350.00

OMEGA DE VILLE TRÉSOR Slim, curvaceous and feminine, the new ladies’ 2018 Trésor range offers a strong and stylish collection set to inspire the next generation of watch fans. The Trésor is available in two case sizes, 36 and 39mm, with varying strap and dial options to invoke an individual feel. Every model is exquisitely set with diamonds around its beautifully shaped case, all powered with a quartz movement. Model: 428.17.36.60.04.001 Price: £3,280.00

PANERAI LUMINOR DUE 38MM This year Panerai proves that good things really do come in small packages with the arrival of the new 38mm Luminor Due 3 Days Automatic Accaio Panerai’s smallest ever wristwatch. Following on from the earlier success of the 45mm and 42mm versions of the Due, the sub 40mm sophisticated and slim case design, is set to appeal to both ladies and gentleman alike. Model: PAM00755 Price: £5,100.00

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RETIREMENT SALE

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Contemporary Nordic furniture from Carl Hansen and Son, Fritz Hansen and Swedese. Lighting by Louis Poulsen. Our homewares include Marimekko, Iittala, Rorstrand, with lots of Moomin mugs, fabric and throws from Denmark, Sweden and Finland.

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Helping women find their unique style

www.michellesanfilippo.com tina123@hotmail.co.uk

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CITY FOCUS | THE CANAL

LIFE ON THE WATER

The canal boat community is as diverse as its land-based neighbours. Georgette McCready went to meet boaters who live on board to find out if life afloat is as romantic as we might imagine. Photography by Shona Cutt

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n a sunny day life on a canal boat looks very appealing. Picture your floating home moored in some quiet rural spot, while you enjoy a cup of tea and watch a heron fish from the bank, safe in the knowledge that your bed, kitchen and bathroom are all under one neat roof – and that tomorrow you can be enjoying a fresh view from your armchair. But is the reality of being a boater quite so glamorous and carefree? We visited the Kennet and Avon Canal to talk to people who live permanently aboard their boats. THE RETIREES Peter and Elaine Cuff began their canal adventure when they hired a boat for a fortnight just before they retired to see how they’d enjoy life on the water. They loved it and very quickly decided to buy a craft of their own, falling for the charms of the 50 foot long traditional canal boat, Mettela. They left their home near Winchester for a trial period nine years ago and have been moving ever since. During that time, says 77-year-old Peter, they have explored most of the canals in Britain, but he is quick to point out the one flight of locks they’ve avoided: “We haven’t done the Rochdale locks, but that’s because there are 80 of them.” The view from the couple’s cosy sitting room

Colin and Sally Ogg on their boat with their well-stocked roof garden

changes every few days as they keep moving on. As Peter set out from his doorstep, or rather gangplank, to take Pies the dog for a walk along the towpath I asked him about the downside of living on a boat. “There aren’t any,” he insists. “We’ve got solar panels for electricity, we’ve got the coal-burning stove, a cooker and three radiators, hot showers and a fridge, although we only really need to put that on when it’s very warm outside.” On long dark evenings how do they entertain themselves? “We’ve got a TV but we don’t watch it much. We’ve got the radio and listen to Radio 4, then we’ve got our hobbies. I make matchstick models, dolls’ house furniture and enjoy drawing, while Elaine enjoys tapestry. We also like that there’s not as much housework on a boat as there is in a house.” The Cuffs are registered with a GP in Winchester and have recently bought a car to enable Peter to attend appointments, but he says up until now if they’ve needed a doctor during winter months they have registered as temporary patients. He tells me washing clothes is simple “you just dunk them in the canal” before admitting he’s teasing me. Elaine says she takes their laundry to the nearest launderette, which she searches for using the internet on her tablet. She says over the years they have tackled

Herons are the canal’s watchful companions some of the challenges of boat life, for instance having any necessary mail sent to her sister, which she’ll open on their behalf and a mobile phone keeps them in touch with family and friends. When Elaine broke her leg on board a couple of years ago, a nearby boater took her to hospital and the Canal and River Trust granted special dispensation for them to stay in one area during the time she was having hospital treatment. Generally the Cuffs stay moored in one spot any time between 48 hours and 14 days, the longest permitted stopping time, before going on to explore the next section of waterway. “You meet some interesting people,” says Peter, “but if you decide you don’t like your neighbours you can always move on.” THE BUSINESS OWNERS Colin and Sally Ogg have been living aboard their boat for ten years. Colin designs t-shirts which the couple sell online and at floating markets, under the brand name Ogg1.com. Sally also works as a postwoman in Trowbridge. She says: “You’ll find a lot of posties live on canal boats. Colin and I love this life. The furthest north we’ve been was Castleford, the furthest east was Boston in Lincolnshire, furthest west was Llangollen and the most southerly is Bath.” Sally says it’s a very physical life, carrying shopping, water and coal on to the boat and the long, cold winters can be tiring, but she says that’s more than made up for by its pleasurable aspects. The couple has a wellstocked garden on the 60-foot boat’s roof and grow herbs, salad leaves and carrots. “You can’t beat waking up in the middle of nowhere, seeing a kingfisher dart by, or Continued page 30

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Peter Cuff and dog Pies aboard their boat Mettela


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CITY FOCUS | THE CANAL watching a barn owl fly past my kitchen window while I’m cooking – that’s pretty magical,” she says. The couple say that the boating community is generally very friendly and helpful, lending a hand when it’s needed. “Of course there are people with mental health issues as well as people with drug and alcohol misuse issues, but that’s the same if you’re living in a flat on dry land. Generally speaking we find that the canals are the corridors of politeness as you glide slowly through cities. It’s a great way to see the country. Milton Keynes, for example is lovely by canal,” Sally adds. “I think the general advice to people is to go slow, go easy. Be a considerate boater.” THE FAMILY You’ll generally find Laura Darling serving tea and cake to hungry customers from the hatch of her floating café, The Wolf Kitchen. It offers a largely vegan menu and announces its opening times and constantly moving location via Facebook. Laura also works as a graphic designer and her partner Owen installs woodburning stoves in people’s homes. The couple have a son, who is twoand-a-half. At the moment, says Laura, the family enjoys the peripatetic lifestyle, but once their little boy starts school she would ideally like to be within radius of a regular school for him to attend. How does Laura enjoy canal boat life? “I’ve been living on a boat for over four years and it’s absolutely what I signed up for. I love the change of the seasons and the chance to meet all kinds of interesting people. There’s a great sense of community. And we’ve got a lot of creature comforts on this boat, like a fridge freezer and central heating. We even have a washing machine, although that uses up a lot of our precious water.” With the sun shining Laura makes boat life look an enviable choice, but she says the winters can take their toll on her mood. “The winters can be hard. It’s not the cold so much as the mud. After five or six months of mud, you can get a bit sick of it. And because I work from home it can be quite isolated.”

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A tranquil stretch of the Kennet and Avon Canal at Widcombe

THE SHOPKEEPER Steve Saunders runs a floating mobile shop, The Sweet Barge. This is his third year of running the business, but he’s lived on a houseboat for the past 12 years. “Unfortunately I couldn’t get a mooring this year, which means I’m in a different town every two weeks. I enjoy doing floating markets,” he says. “I think the biggest thing to get across is that this is a brilliant community to be part of.” Like Laura at The Wolf Kitchen, Steve uses Facebook to publicise his whereabouts.

or not. These have to be renewed every 12 months and require boat owners to provide evidence of valid insurance and a Boat Safety certificate, which is a like an MOT for cars. Demand for home, or long-term, moorings is very high and in some areas oversubscribed. If you are unable to get a home mooring your option is to keep continuously cruising, which means moving your boat at least every 14 days and covering a range of at least 20 miles in a year, which can be a challenge for boaters holding down permanent employment in one place. n

TAKING THE PLUNGE The nation’s 2,000 miles of canals and rivers are policed by the Canal and River Trust. Every boat on the waterways requires a leisure licence, whether it’s a live-on boat

Find out more about what being a boat dweller entails at: canalrivertrust.org.uk

BELOW: left, Laura Darling in her floating café; right, Steve Saunders on his sweet barge


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Mackintosh portrait by Chicago Tribune, Hamilton photography by Matthew Murphy, Miss Saigon photography by Johan Persson

THEATRE

WELCOME TO DREAMLAND Jessica Hope talks to theatre producer extraordinaire Sir Cameron Mackintosh as his epic production of Miss Saigon opens at Bristol Hippodrome

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ess than 24 hours after sweeping the board with seven gongs at the Olivier Awards for critically acclaimed hip-hop musical Hamilton, Sir Cameron Mackintosh is enthusing about the UK and Ireland tour of another of his world-renowned productions, Miss Saigon. For someone who has just equalled Matilda’s record from 2012 for a musical winning the most Oliviers, I am surprised to find that Mackintosh doesn’t have any signs of a sore head from too much celebrating the night before. Prior to our interview, I decide that, out of anyone, he certainly deserves to be feeling a little worse for wear after the incredible success he has had in co-producing the West End version of this ground-breaking musical about US founding father Alexander Hamilton, which originally premiered in New York in 2015. It only opened in the UK late last year and has quickly taken audiences and critics by storm. 32 TheBATHMagazine

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But Mackintosh, who is 71, tells me he just had a few drinks after the awards ceremony before heading home. And listening to him reel off the sheer number of productions he has opened in the last five weeks – including Les Misérables and Mary Poppins – as well as overseeing the 30-40 shows that he has in preparation or production, it sounds as though he probably can’t risk having a day in bed, nursing a hangover. When he isn’t scooping up awards or opening legendary musicals in the West End or Broadway, he is ardently promoting his touring shows. One such production is the critically acclaimed Miss Saigon, which opened at Bristol Hippodrome last month for a six-week run. Coming straight to the UK from an extraordinarily successful run on Broadway, this production is more souped-up than any Mackintosh’s other musical revivals. “This is the biggest scaled show I’ve ever done – it’s even bigger than Les Mis,” he tells me.

THE MUSICAL MAN: This page, Sir Cameron Mackintosh Opposite, top left, Jamael Westman as Alexander Hamilton with the West End cast of Hamilton; and right, Ashley Gilmour as Chris and Sooha Kim as Kim in Miss Saigon; below left, Sooha Kim and Gerald Santos as Thuy in Miss Saigon


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really looking forward to bringing it to Bristol.” Based on Puccini’s opera Madame Butterfly, Mackintosh’s Miss Saigon first premiered in the West End in 1989 and ran for 10 years, while the Broadway version – opening in 1991 – broke records for the largest advance ticket sales for a theatrical production at the time. Since then, the production has had unprecedented success with multiple revivals and several openings around the world. Why does Miss Saigon continue to draw in audiences by the thousands, across countries and generations? “There is such a sweeping and epic grasp to the story. It’s all about two cultures coming together and understanding one another,” explains Mackintosh. “Sadly because of the way the world is these days, the story is more relevant now than ever before. As it is based during the Vietnam War, we are looking at the story from a historic perspective. But it could be based in Afghanistan, Iraq or Syria today. It is about the tragedy of people in war-torn countries being separated. And it is about a mother’s sacrifice. It has a universal theme. “It is based on historic events such as migrants travelling across seas and storming the walls to the American embassy, which are unfortunately things we read about everyday now; it is terribly poignant.” Having worked in theatre for more than 50 years, and with a list of productions longer than anyone else in the business, Mackintosh certainly knows what is needed for a musical to take off. “The root to a successful musical is the story,” he says. “With any production I take on, the story has to grab me first. Just like with Hamilton, it is the story that draws you in. It holds your interest, and has such a brilliant cast in London. It is a testament to them; how they are able to use storytelling and grasp the lyrics to tell their stories.

“What playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda is doing is what myself and Andrew Lloyd Webber were once doing many years ago with our first big musicals. We were making something for the modern-day audience. “And in Hamilton so much understanding of what the characters are like and their life events comes from the use of rap, which is a unique and contemporary element of the story.”

Miss Saigon is about the tragedy of people in war-torn countries being separated. And it is about a mother’s sacrifice. It has a universal theme...

Miss Saigon follows the life of 17-year-old Kim during the last days of the Vietnam War. She is forced to work in a seedy bar in Saigon, run by a man with a notorious reputation, known as the Engineer. Kim falls in love with an American GI, Chris, but they are tragically separated following the fall of Saigon and the evacuation of US troops in 1975. Kim then embarks on an epic threeyear search for Chris, who has no idea that he has fathered a son. As with any large-scale production, Mackintosh and his team began the planning for this revival years ago. “You have to plan these things very far in advance. We have an incredible multi-race cast, which isn’t easy to put together as a lot of them are based internationally,” he says. “We went back to the Philippines around 15 months ago to find a completely new cast. Red Concepción is terrific – he’s unlike any Engineer we’ve ever had before. “This production has had phenomenal reviews across the UK already, and we’re

Born in Enfield, London, in 1946, Mackintosh recalls the exact moment he knew he wanted to produce musicals. “It all started with a writer from Bristol,” he remembers. “Julian Slade from the Bristol Old Vic wrote a musical as an end-of-year romp in the 1950s called Salad Days. I saw it when I was just seven years old. I loved it so much that when my aunt asked me what I wanted to do to celebrate my eighth birthday, I asked to go see Salad Days again. “So she took me to go see it in London and I was invited backstage by Julian, who showed me how the incredible piano prop worked and how the UFO could swoop in on stage. From then on I knew I wanted to produce theatre.” While attending Prior Park College in Bath during his teens, Mackintosh spent his free time going to new shows at Theatre Royal Bath and Bristol Hippodrome. ➲

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After finishing school, he landed his first job as a stagehand at the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane. He then got his next few jobs by running around the capital, persuading theatre productions to take him on. “I told myself that I wanted to be a producer by 25, but somehow I made it by 20 by making myself indispensable to others,” he says. But it hasn’t always been plain sailing. After going on stage tours with the likes of Camelot and Oliver! he launched his first show, Anything Goes, as a producer in 1969. It turned out to be a flop and closed after just two weeks.

In Hamilton so much understanding of what the characters are like and their life events comes from the use of rap, which is a unique and contemporary element of the story...

But this didn’t hamper his ambition. Having been inspired by his work when he was a boy, Mackintosh teamed up with Julian Slade in 1972 for an adaption of Trelawny, which premiered at Bristol Old Vic before transferring to the West End for a year – it was this that helped put Mackintosh on the theatrical map. After successful productions of Side by Side by Sondheim, My Fair Lady and Oklahoma! in the 1970s, Mackintosh joined forces with Andrew Lloyd Webber, who was

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already a big name in the theatre business by this time, to produce Cats in 1981, which would go on to be one of the longest-running musicals in the UK and US. His reputation catapulted in the 1980s and ’90s, making musicals such as Miss Saigon, Phantom of the Opera and Les Misérables into international brands, racking up countless awards and records for ticket sales in the process. Nonetheless, as Mackintosh experienced early on in his career, putting a new production out there is like stepping into the unknown. “When I first produced Les Mis, I thought it was only going to make it on the stage for two or three years. But it has had phenomenal success and we’re going to be launching a new UK tour of it at the end of this year.” Success is putting it lightly – Les Misérables has become the world’s longest running musical having been staged in the West End for 33 consecutive years. Mackintosh also helped produce the Oscar, Golden Globe and BAFTA-winning film version in 2012, starring Hugh Jackman, Anne Hathaway and Eddie Redmayne. With a net worth of £1.18billion according to the 2017 Sunday Times Rich List, Mackintosh has come a long way since his stagehand days. In 1996 he was knighted for his services to British theatre, and two years later a gala concert was held in his honour, celebrating 30 years of his career in entertainment, which was attended by the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh. Mackintosh was also bestowed with the honour of being the first British producer to be installed into the Broadway Theatre Hall of Fame in 2014. As well as creating the biggest musicals in the business, Mackintosh also owns eight theatres in the West End and has overseen the extensive refurbishment of each one. He tells me that his fascination with architecture

and the refurbishment of old buildings stems from his time at school. “Prior Park College is the most impressive Palladian example of architecture that you could wish for,” he declares. “The Victoria Palace Theatre in London [the latest addition to Mackintosh’s theatre portfolio] where Hamilton is based is the most beautiful theatre you will ever see, and the inspiration behind the refurbishment comes from my experiences of living in Bath.” And his love for architecture continues at home. While not in London or launching productions around the world, Mackintosh lives at the medieval Grade-I listed Stavordale Priory in Charlton Musgrove, Somerset, with his partner Michael Le Poer Trench, a theatre photographer. A world away from the glitz of the stage, the couple run a dairy farm with around 600 cows, and also own 14,000 acres in the Scottish Highlands. As well as juggling all these productions while running theatre licensing agency Music Theatre International and keeping an eye on his farm’s cattle, Mackintosh coyly tells me that he’s currently working on something special, but that we’ll have to wait a while to find out more. “This is something quite in advance,” he says. Whatever it may be, you can expect it to have the best creative minds in the business behind it. From the fall of Saigon to revolutionary Paris, and the American founding fathers to dancing alley cats, there doesn’t seem to be a topic that Mackintosh can’t take on. His musical empire continues to dominate the theatre scene, and it doesn’t look like our fascination with his productions is going away any time soon. n Miss Saigon is on at Bristol Hippodrome until 23 June. Box Office: 0844 871 3012; atgtickets.com/venues/bristol-hippodrome

Les Misérables photography by Johan Persson

Les Misérables in the West End


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WHAT’S ON in June Soprano Mary Bevan will perform with Bath Philharmonia at Bath Abbey

PACIFIC: OCEAN OF ISLANDS EXHIBITION On until Saturday 22 September n Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, Queen Square This summer exhibition focuses on items from the BRLSI collection with a connection to the Pacific Ocean: corals and shells, the ethnography of the many small islands, and natural history specimens. Prints from four renowned international photojournalists, highlighting the impact of environmental change on the wildlife and peoples of the Pacific, will also be on display. Free entry; brlsi.org

Image: Victoria Cadisch

IFORD ARTS: CANDIDE Friday 1, Saturday 2 and Tuesday 5 June, 7.30pm n Iford Manor, Bradford on Avon Hovering somewhere between opera and operetta, Candide – our innocent hero – is taken on a whirligig world quest, encountering unfortunate events, learning the lessons of life. Tickets from £126, gardens open for picnics at 6pm. For tickets, phone the Theatre Royal Bath box office: 01225 448844 or visit: ifordarts.org.uk ART WITH HERBS Saturday 2 June, 2.30 – 4pm n The Museum of East Asian Art, Bennett Street Be inspired by the museum’s new wellness exhibition at this family workshop where you can learn about the use of herbs as medicine. Create your own artwork with dried herbs and flowers and use them as a visual reminder of how herbs can support wellbeing throughout the seasons. £3 per child, booking required; meaa.org.uk BOWOOD HOUSE: PRIVATE WALLED GARDEN TOUR Wednesday 6 and Friday 15 June, 10.45am n Bowood House and Gardens, Derry Hill, Calne Tour Lord and Lady Lansdowne’s private walled garden and get an insight into the history and beauty of the award-winning gardens at Bowood. Includes a two course lunch. £34 per person, booking essential. Tel: 01249 810961; bowood.org Gabrielle Aplin and Tom Odell are taking to the stage at Pub In The Park

NO. MORE. PLASTIC. WITH MARTIN DOREY Wednesday 6 June, 7.30pm for 8pm n Topping & Co Bookshop, The Paragon No. More. Plastic. is the culmination of a lifetime on the beach and more than 10 years of picking up seaborne plastic litter. From £6.99 including book; toppingbooks.co.uk

The Lord Chamberlain’s Men perform Shakespeare’s The Tempest at Bowood House

COURAGE AND DARING Thursday 7 June, 11.30am n The Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel, Beau Street Mindfulness expert and courage coach Jonathan Ward guides his students into learning to lead with their heart in order to make fulfilling life choices. Includes lunch at Dan Moon at The Gainsborough Restaurant. £35; thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk JANE AUSTEN AND THE PIANO Thursday 7 and Friday 8 June, 1pm n Central United Reformed Church (7 June); Masonic Hall, Old Theatre Royal (8 June) You’ve seen the films and read the books. Now come and hear the music from Jane Austen’s personal collection with pianist Judith Gore. £5; bathboxoffice.org.uk

Lansdown’s Open Gardens

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AFTERNOON TEA WITH PARALYMPIAN STEPHANIE MILLWARD MBE Friday 8 June, 2.30 – 4.30pm n The Ivy Brasserie, Milsom Street Enjoy a Champagne afternoon tea and Q&A discussion with Paralympian swimmer Stephanie Millward MBE, who will discuss


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her athletic career, overcoming the challenges of multiple sclerosis and being an ambassador for Dorothy House Hospice Care. Tickets: £25, proceeds to the hospice. To book, email: pwatson@dorothyhouse-hospice.org.uk TOM KERRIDGE PRESENTS PUB IN THE PARK Friday 8 – Sunday 10 June n Royal Victoria Park Join Michelin starred chef Tom Kerridge for a festival of top tunes and amazing food. Razorlight, Tom Odell and Melanie C head the music line-up, and you can enjoy great food from pop-up pubs including Tom’s The Hand & Flowers and The Coach. See other top UK chefs including The Pony and Trap’s Josh Eggleton live on stage, plus there’s loads of foodie shopping; pubintheparkuk.com CON-FORM: UWE’S CREATIVE INDUSTRIES DEGREE SHOW Saturday 9 – Wednesday 13 June, weekend 10am – 6pm, weekdays 10am – 8pm n UWE campus locations at Arnolfini, Bower Ashton and Spike Island, Bristol UWE Bristol’s annual creative industries degree show, Con-form, is back showcasing work from more than 500 talented graduates from undergraduate and postgraduate art, design, film and journalism programmes. This year’s theme is inspired by students of the past who have protested for various causes; uwe.ac.uk BATH HOSPITAL RADIO OPEN DAY Saturday 9 June, 11am – 4pm n Bath Hospital Radio Studios, Manor Lodge (Building E2), Royal United Hospital, Combe Park, Bath Head to the RUH to find out how the Bath Hospital Radio works and meet the people behind the radio waves. Record and broadcast your own jingle, and find out more about becoming a member, volunteering and making a donation; bathhospitalradio.org.uk IFORD ARTS: THE PETO PROM Saturday 9 June, gardens open 6pm n Iford Manor, Bradford on Avon Get in the mood for summer with a fantastic line-up and cocktails in the Peto Garden. Listen to the cool sounds of acid jazz by James Taylor Quartet in the Casita, and enjoy Heidi Vogel’s incredible soulful voice in the Cloister. £35 per person; ifordarts.org.uk BATH CANTATA GROUP’S SUMMER CONCERT Saturday 9 June, 7.30pm n St Swithin’s Church, The Paragon Bath Cantata Group will perform Elgar Scenes from the Bavarian Highlands, Pergolesi Magnificat, and Parry Blest Pair of Sirens. Plus there will be the world premiere by Lois Wyatt, BCG Alto of Laudate Dominum. Musical director Neil Moore. Tickets: £15/£5. Tickets from Bath Box Office, tel: 01225 463362; bathboxoffice.org.uk

EDITOR’S PICK BATH IRON – FESTIVAL OF IRONWORK Thursday 14 – Sunday 17 June, 10am – 6pm n Parade Gardens and The Guildhall Live forging and blacksmithing action all day. Demonstrations and exhibitions of heritage and contemporary forged ironwork. Have-a-go forging sessions for all ages. Guided ironwork walks around the city. Live music from the Bath Folk team from 12–5pm every day. Seminars, talks and film screenings in the Guildhall. Street theatre, craft stalls, food and bar. All welcome. Free festival, entry into Parade Gardens applies (£1.50/80p), free for Discovery Card holders; bathiron.org.uk

Continued page 38

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LANSDOWN’S OPEN GARDENS Sunday 10 June, 2 – 5.30pm n Various locations in Lansdown, Bath Enjoy this year’s Lansdown Open Gardens featuring gardens in Sion Hill, a landscaped garden in Somerset Lane and two classic gardens in Richmond Road. There will also be a sale of herbaceous and vegetable plants, rhubarb and garden bric-a-brac on St Stephen’s Millennium Green. Tea and delicious homemade cakes will be available from St Stephen’s Centre. Tickets: £5, free for children, can be purchased on the day from the Millennium Green on Richmond Road, at the St Stephen’s Centre and at the gardens. All proceeds go to the upkeep of the Millennium Green; millenniumgreen.org.uk ANDY HAMILTON: CHANGE MANAGEMENT Sunday 10 June, doors 6.30pm, begins 8pm n Komedia Award-winning comedian Andy Hamilton is back with a brand new solo stage tour. Known for his appearances on Have I Got News For You and QI, as well as writing the hit BBC show Outnumbered, Hamilton will reflect on how things have changed over his 60 years on this planet. Ages 14+, tickets from £20; komedia.co.uk

PHENOMENAL WOMEN LECTURE SERIES: DR JACQUELINE CORNISH Thursday 14 June, 6 – 7.30pm n The Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel, Beau Street Appointed to the post of National Clinical Director Children, Young People and Transition to Adulthood in NHS England in 2013, Dr Jacqueline Cornish OBE strives to improve healthcare for children and young people. She will be discussing her career and aims for the future in this lecture as part of the Gainborough Bath Spa Hotel’s lecture series. £15 per person, includes prosecco and canapés. For tickets, tel: 01225 355329; thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk

FOREST LIVE Thursday 14 – Sunday 17 June n Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire Paloma Faith and George Ezra may be sold out, but there’s still time to get tickets to enjoy this popular outdoor concert season with performances from multi-million record-selling The Script on Thursday, and duo Paul Heaton and Jacqui Abbott on Friday. Tel: 03000 680400; forestry.gov.uk TASTE OF CORSHAM Saturday 16 June, 10am – 4pm n Corsham High Street From gin to ice-cream, pickles to chocolate cake, try and buy some of the best local produce at this foodie celebration. There will be sampling tents, masterclasses and guest speakers, and the chance to eat your way around Corsham as the local cafés, pubs and restaurants offer a free taste of what they do best; corsham.gov.uk THE TEMPEST Saturday 16 June, 6.30pm n Bowood House and Gardens, Derry Hill, Calne The Lord Chamberlain’s Men, the UK’s premier all-male theatre company, will be performing Shakespeare’s spellbinding masterpiece, The Tempest in the incredible setting of the East Lawn, overlooking Bowood’s mile-long lake and Doric Temple. A wonderful backdrop for a picnic before the enchanting performance. Tickets: £9.50–£40.50. Tel: 01249 812102; bowood.org Continued page 40

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Stu Goldsmith is coming to Komedia

Michelle John will peform at Iford Arts’ Midsummer Prom

A HANDFUL OF SINGERS Saturday 16 June, 7.30pm n Prior Park College Chapel, Ralph Allen Drive, Bath A Handful of Singers’ summer concert is a grand farewell to its musical director for the last 13 years, the award-winning Christopher Finch. The first half features work by French composers such as Poulenc’s Mass in G and Fauré’s ever-popular Cantique de Jean Racine. The second half includes John Tavener’s As one who has slept, Ben Parry’s inspirational Flame, and Philip Stopford’s Ave Maris Stella. Tickets: £15, £5 under 25s; bathboxoffice.org.uk THE FLAMING FEATHERS SUMMER CABARET Saturday 16 June, doors 7.30pm, begins 8pm n Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls The UK’s top showgirl dance troupe The Flaming Feathers return to Bath with their sell out cabaret show. As well as performing an array of popular numbers including The Copa Cabana, The Charleston, The Jive, The Samba and their famous Can-Can, joining them on stage for a top-class line up are singer Dave The Bear and burlesque star Tabitha Taboo. £20 per person; chapelarts.org KRATER COMEDY CLUB Saturday 16 June, 8pm n Komedia This session of Komedia’s popular Krater Comedy Club features Stu Goldsmith, Abigoliah Schuamann, Paul Myrehaug with MC Sally Anne. Stick around afterwards for Motorcity – a night of the best motown, soul, funk, and rock ’n’ roll anthems; komedia.co.uk FATHER’S DAY TEA Sunday 17 June, 3 – 5pm n Lucknam Park Hotel and Spa, Colerne, Chippenham Treat dad this father’s day with afternoon tea at Lucknam Park Hotel. Enjoy an array of sandwiches, scones and delicate pastries with a whiskey or local ale in the library, drawing room or on the terrace. From £29 per person; lucknampark.co.uk INDEPENDENT BATH MARKET Sunday 17 June and Sunday 24 June, 10am – 4pm n Abbey Green, Bath High-quality artisan products from independent family businesses, including cakes, bread, cheese, vegetables, jewellery and home accessories. SHORE TO SHORE WITH CAROL ANN DUFFY Sunday 17 June, 4pm for 4.30pm n Topping & Co Bookshop, The Paragon Poet and former UK Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy comes to Bath to celebrate independent bookshops and bring poetry to the heart of the community. From £10 including book; toppingbooks.co.uk SOULFUL MESSIAH: A CELEBRATION Sunday 17 June, 5pm and 8pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Hear Steve Gray’s contemporary interpretation of Handel’s Messiah 40 TheBATHMagazine

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WHAT’S | ON inspired by the 1992 album featuring big band, strings and the pick of the UK’s gospel singers. £20; wiltshiremusic.org.uk THE RISE OF THE FAR RIGHT IN EUROPE Tuesday 19 June, 7.30pm n BRLSI, 16–18 Queen Square University of Bath’s Dr Nicolas Startin explores the rise of support for radical right-wing parties in Europe since the 1980s including the French Front National, The Austrian Freedom Party and the Dutch Party for Freedom. £4/£2; brlsi.org BATH SPA UNIVERSITY CHOIR Wednesday 20 June, 7.30pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon American composer Christopher Tin’s work encompasses music for films and video games, and his Grammy Award-winning album Calling All Dawns features lyrics from both sacred and secular sources. The BSU Choir will be joined by Bath Spa Ladies Choir. Conducted by Francis Faux. £12/£10; wiltshiremusic.org.uk ARE WE REAL? CONSCIOUSNESS AND FICTION Thursday 21 June, 5.15 – 7pm n 8 West, 3.22, University of Bath University of Bonn’s Professor Markus Gabriel discusses fiction as a component of human thought and ideology. In this free talk, he’ll distinguish various forms of illusion about ourselves and argue that illusionism and fictionalism about the mental lives of humans are cases of a thoroughgoing ideological delusion; bath.ac.uk/events THE ENGLISH COUNTRY GARDEN FESTIVAL Friday 22 – Sunday 24 June, 10am – 5pm n The Bishop’s Palace and Gardens, Wells In its fourth year, The English Country Garden Festival reunites

garden-lovers with specialists from around the country. The impressive 14-acre grounds of the palace will feature guided tours, live music, expert speakers, BBQ food, crafts and more than 40 stalls, including a range of nurseries selling unusual and popular plants. For tickets, tel: 01749 988 111; bishopspalace.org.uk FABULOUSLY FERMENTED: AN INTRODUCTION TO FERMENTATION WITH BATH CULTURE HOUSE Saturday 23 June, 2 – 5pm n Combe Grove, Brassknocker Hill, Monkton Combe We’ve all heard of kimchi, kombucha and kefir but do we really know what they are, how they’re made and why they’re so good for our stomachs? Lucie Cousins of Bath Culture House will explore the science and health benefits behind fermented foods. Try your hand at fermenting and take away practical skills and recipes to continue at home. Members £55, non-members £60; combegrove.com IFORD ARTS: PARTENOPE Saturday 23, Tuesday 26, Thursday 28, Saturday 30 June, Tuesday 3 and Wednesday 4 July, 7.30pm n Iford Manor, Bradford on Avon Partenope, Queen of Naples, is single and a ruler in her own right. She seems to be toying with three very different lovers, whose motives and ambitions are revealed as the opera unfolds. One of them, the smooth tongued Arsace, has callously abandoned his former love, Rosmira, to court the queen. But Rosmira is bent on vengeance… Tickets from £126; ifordarts.org.uk BATH BACH CHOIR’S BAROQUE SUMMER: VIVALDI & HANDEL Saturday 23 June, 7.30pm n Bath Abbey Bath Bach Choir’s prestigious summer concert will feature two iconic Continued page 42

June Events The Bible in Africa 5 June • 7.30pm

Subduction Zone Earthquakes and Tsunami 7 June • 7.30pm

An Introduction to Hume 8 June • 7.30pm

2017/18 Lecture Series

Discovering New Cancer Treatments

The Promenade des Anglais: Artists in Nice

15 June • 7.30pm

The Rise of the Far Right in Europe 19 June • 7.30pm

In the early 18th Century Nice was a small fishing and fruit growing town in Southern France. In 1820 an English clergyman provided funds and the Promenade was built. Nice became very fashionable and its brilliant light and climate attracted and influenced many artists whose works we enjoy today.

Smoke, Shocks and Bellows Roger Rolls: Chairman of Bath Medical Museum

Lecturer: Christopher Herbert at

20 June • 7.30pm TICKETS SOLD ON THE DOOR

1.30pm on Monday 11th June 2018 in The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street Bath

Visitors welcome £10 at the door (No Booking required)

www.theartssocietybath.com

Celebrating 50 years of the National Association of Decorative and Fine Arts Societies

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WHAT’S | ON

Smoked & Uncut Festival at THE PIG near Bath

Photo by Simeon Thaw

Soulful Messiah at Wiltshire Music Centre

baroque works: the popular Gloria by Vivaldi, bursting with joyous melodies, and Handel’s uplifting psalm Dixit Dominus. The three outstanding soloists include former King’s Singer David Hurley, and Margaret Faultless and her period orchestra, Music for Awhile, will open the concert with a Suite from Handel’s all-time favourite Water Music. Tickets from Bath Box Office; bathboxoffice.org.uk DUSTY: THE MUSICAL Saturday 23 June – Saturday 7 July, times vary n Theatre Royal Bath The world premiere of this new musical about the life of Dusty Springfield, based on personal memories from those who knew her. Featuring many of her soulful pop hits, including Son of a Preacher Man and You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me. Starring Katherine Kingsley, Rufus Hound and Roberta Taylor; theatreroyal.org.uk TELEPHOTO PHOTOGRAPHY OF WILDLIFE AND FIELD TRIP TO CORSHAM LAKE Sunday 24 June, 9.45am – 4.30pm n Combe Grove, Brassknocker Hill, Monkton Combe Nick Upton will lead this workshop aimed at people who already enjoy photography using a Digital SLR camera and want to learn more or improve their technique, acquire some new tricks, or would like to photograph forms of nature they haven’t attempted before. Members £95, non-members £110; combegrove.com DARWIN AND THE BEAGLE Monday 25 June, 7.30pm n BRLSI, 16–18 Queen Square When HMS Beagle sailed in 1831, she fortuitously carried the young naturalist Charles Darwin. Although destined for the church, everything Darwin encountered on the voyage – from the primitive people of Tierra del Fuego to the famous finches of the Galapagos Islands – weaned the young naturalist from the Book of Genesis to the startling conclusions of the Origin of the Species. £4/£2; brlsi.org LUNCHTIME TALK WITH CANDACE BAHOUTH Wednesday 27 June, 1.10 – 1.45pm n The Guildhall This free talk with Candace Bahouth accompanies Victoria Art Gallery’s A Celebration of Flowers: Kaffe Fassett with Candace Bahouth exhibition. Artist Bahouth has a unique ability to express emotions in mosaics using material from nature as well as fragments of china and high-tech plastics; victoriagal.org.uk THE MAGIC OF THE BREATH: CONCERT AND WORKSHOP Friday 29 June, 6pm n The New Oriel Hall, Brookleaze Buildings, Larkhall Featuring students on flute, saxophone, piano and guitar. The second

half will explore Bach and Britten via Mozart and Richard Strauss, Alexandra Bass on flute, Suzie Shrubb on oboe and vocals by Evelyn Strasburger. £12/£6. Email: atokenichols@gmail.com BIG BAND SWING AND COMEDY LIVE Friday 29 June, 7pm for 7.30 – 10pm n The Marquee, Bath Recreation Ground Listen to swing performances from The Park Lane Big Band and comedy by Geoff Whiting, raising funds for Dorothy House Hospice Care. Tickets: £26, includes drink on arrival. All proceeds to the hospice. No dogs allowed; dorothyhouse.org.uk/events DAN CRUICKSHANK: 100 MOST IMPORTANT BUILDINGS Friday 29 June, 7.30pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Historian Dan Cruickshank will present a fascinating investigation into the hundred most important buildings in the world. Journeying from ancient Egyptian pyramids to the soaring skyscrapers of Manhattan, he will explore the most inspirational and characterful creations in world architecture. £15/£7.50; wiltshiremusic.org.uk FOLKLAW Friday 29 June, 8pm n Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls Supporting The Shires, Seth Lakeman, Mad Dog Mcrea and more, FolkLaw were catapulted on to their debut European tour with gusto. These rising stars of the folk, rock and roots scene bring their energetic, entertaining performance to Bath. Tickets: £10 advance, £12.50 on the door; chapelarts.org THE VINTAGE BAZAAR Saturday 30 June, 9am – 3pm n The Cheese and Grain, Frome The Vintage Bazaar is taking over The Cheese and Grain to bring visitors the very best vintage clothing and accessories, French brocante, antique textiles and beautiful handmade delights, handpicked by dealers who are bringing new stock from all over the UK and Europe. £2 admission; thevintagebazaar.blogspot.com DUTCH MASTERS: FLOWER ARRANGING WORKSHOP Saturday 30 June, 10.30am – 4.30pm n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street Create your own Dutch-inspired floral arrangement in this workshop inspired by Dutch masterpieces led by Rachel Wardley, founder of the Bath-based Talullah Rose Flower School. Learn how to condition the flowers, historic arranging techniques using pin cushions and wire, and photograph your final piece as if in a Golden Age painting. £70, includes flowers and vase, and entry into Prized Possessions exhibition; holburne.org Continued page 44

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Tony Law

Angela Barnes

Phil Nichol

TICKLE THAT FUNNY BONE Prepare to laugh your socks off as Komedia hosts The Edinburgh Preview Season this July

C

ancel your flights! Call off the seven-hour road trip! This year, the Edinburgh Fringe is coming to you. Throughout July, Komedia presents the very best in stand-up comedy, impressions and sketches, a whole month before they hit the worldrenowned Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Featuring a whopping 28 acts including the likes of Tony Law, Phil Nichol, Jayde Adams and Angela Barnes, Komedia has handpicked its favourite contemporary comedians exclusively for Bath audiences across 13 unique, surprising, hilarious shows this July. All shows will take place in Komedia’s Arts Café and, at £8 per ticket, audiences can experience the very best of the Fringe at a fraction of the price. Comedians will take to the stage for one night only, and with spaces limited to 70 seats per show, each night is almost guaranteed to sell out – so be quick to nab tickets. Highlights at this year’s Edinburgh Previews Season include Tony Law – a stupendously surreal stand-up comic who performed to a sold-out crowd at Komedia in March, Phil Nichol – a skilled improviser and musical comic with countless TV credits to his name, and comedian/writer/rapper and 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown star Jayde Adams. In recent years, these funny stars have won major UK comedy awards and have performed across the world. Now they’re ready to unleash their brand new shows and fine-tune their tried and tested material for Bath audiences. The Edinburgh Previews Season promises to be an unmissable opportunity for comedy fans to watch oodles of incredibly talented up-and-coming comedians, as well as established stars, in a series of intimate shows unlike any other. And with every comedian bringing their absolute A-Game ahead of the world’s biggest comedy festival, there’s never been a better time to head on down and discover your new favourite comedian in Bath’s unique comedy venue. n The Edinburgh Preview Season kicks off at Komedia on 3 July. Visit: komedia.co.uk to see the full programme and to book tickets.

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WHAT’S | ON

Kaffe Fassett will be speaking at The Assembly Rooms

JLS singer and Strictly star Aston Merrygold will be at The Frome Festival

SMOKED & UNCUT FESTIVAL Saturday 30 June, 12 – 10pm n THE PIG, Pensford near Bath Classic festi-food is order of the day across this festival, but if you fancy tucking into something a little heartier then head to one of the feasting tents. Chef Angela Hartnett and her culinary friends will be hosting long table three-course feasts in The Field Kitchen pop up, and chef Mark Hix will be paying homage to the British love of Indian takeaway. Make the most of the festival vibes and spectacular surroundings and sleep under the stars in your very own bell-tent if you fancy camping. Headlining the music side will be Paul Carrack, and Daisy Lowe will be the guest DJ; smokedanduncut.com

THE FROME FESTIVAL Friday 6 – Sunday 15 July n Various locations around Frome The Frome Festival has been the town’s biggest celebration of the arts for 17 years. This year’s event will feature nearly 200 events including a mix of opera, pop, choral, jazz and folk music, plus theatre, workshops, exhibitions, films and talks. Headline acts include JLS singer and Strictly contestant Aston Merrygold, Badly Drawn Boy and Scottish folk rockers Blazin’ Fiddles. The festival will be celebrating the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein with various events, including a talk on the works of film director Terence Fisher. To see the full programme, visit: fromefestival.co.uk

BATH PHILHARMONIA: HAYDN’S CREATION Saturday 30 June, 7pm n Bath Abbey Bath Philharmonia, featuring soprano Mary Bevan, baritone Benjamin Bevan and tenor James Oxley, will be joined by the distinguished Philharmonia Chorus to perform Haydn’s Creation. Tickets: £20–£35; bathphil.co.uk

KEVIN AND KAREN CLIFTON: THE LIVE TOUR Saturday 7 July 7.30pm n The Forum Following their sell-out debut tour last year, Kevin and Karen Clifton are back with a brand new show. Featuring music that has inspired them to dance, this will be a hip-swinging journey with heartpounding choreography filled with Cha Cha, Salsa, Tango and Paso Doble. Tickets: £42.50–£25. Tel: 01225 443114; bathforum.co.uk

PLANNING AHEAD... OPENING EVENING: THE SILVER RING CHOIR OF BATH Monday 2 July, 7.45pm n Manvers Street Baptist Church Hall Discover the joy of singing together. The Silver Ring Choir of Bath are a long-established mixed voice choir, renowned locally and with an international reputation, who have a talented and dynamic young musical director with an eclectic repertoire. New members are welcome. Meet the members, listen or join in with the music and make new friends at this open evening. GOODNIGHT MISTER TOM Tuesday 3 – Saturday 7 July, 7.30pm n Tithe Barn, Bradford on Avon September 1939, Britain stands on the brink of war and many young children are being evacuated to the countryside. In Little Weirwold, vulnerable William Beech is sent to live with reclusive widower Tom Oakley. The two develop an unlikely bond, but William’s mother is sick and wants her son back in London. Tom waves him off but can’t say goodbye to his young friend so easily... Presented by the awardwinning Bradfordians. Tickets: £8–£12.50; wiltshiremusic.org.uk IFORD ARTS: MIDSUMMER PROM Friday 6 July, 7.30pm n Iford Manor, Bradford on Avon An eclectic evening of music and cocktails. Enjoy the powerhouse vocals of Michelle John in the Cloister, and get funky with the best rhythm ‘n’ blues, jump-blues, and jazz of the 40s, 50s, and 60s with The Gin Trap Band in the Casita. Garden open from 6pm for picnics. Tickets: £35; ifordarts.org.uk

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RACE FOR LIFE Sunday 8 July n Royal Victoria Park Challenge yourself to a 5k or 10k Race for Life to raise money for Cancer Research UK and help beat cancer. Entry fees: £10 for children and £14.99 for women. To sign up go to: raceforlife.org IFORD ARTS: MADAME BUTTERFLY Various dates between 21 July – 4 August, 7.30pm n Iford Manor, Bradford on Avon The poignant image of the very young Japanese girl faithfully, but in vain, watching the sea, longing for her husband’s return, sits at the core of this beautiful opera; ifordarts.org.uk KAFFE FASSETT: COLOUR AND INSPIRATION Wednesday 25 July, 6pm n The Assembly Rooms This lecture links to Kaffe Fassett’s exhibition A Celebration of Flowers on display at Victoria Art Gallery. The presentation focuses on his latest projects including his patchwork quilts, needlepoint, mosaics, painting and knitting designs. £12/£11; victoriagal.org.uk BATH PRETTY MUDDY AND PRETTY MUDDY KIDS Sunday 23 September n Bath Racecourse A muddy obstacle course that women of any ability can climb over, crawl under, and charge through for charity. For the first time in Bath there will be Pretty Muddy Kids, a new exciting obstacle course designed just for children. £10 for children, £19.99 for adults. To sign up go to: raceforlife.org n


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FRINGE BENEFITS

The Bath Fringe, now in its fifth year, runs until 10 June – here are some of the events still in store... THE CUBICLE 31 May – 3 June, from 12 – 10pm, 94–96 Walcot Street, pay what you can Critically acclaimed Kilter Theatre invites you to step inside The Cubicle, a theatrical space in which to ponder and play with cutting-edge research on body image. Developed in collaboration with psychology researchers from the University of Bath, this free audience participation space will leave you head over heels with every part of you. Pop into 94–96 Walcot Street from 31 May to get involved. Visit: kiltertheatre.org

BEDLAM 1 June, from 1pm, streets of Radstock; 2 June, from 1pm, streets of Bath, free This festival is too wild to be confined within a building. Bedlam Fair has become an important rendezvous for the street art world. This year’s shows includes two locally made spectaculars, a bunch of careless gods, one end of the world, a fine silent movie hero or two, and a dozen brand-new pieces. Visit: bathfringe.co.uk

WASUREMONO 2 June, 8–10pm, The Old Theatre Royal, £5 This four-piece indie/dream-pop outfit from Bradford-on-Avon features intricate guitar styles and soundscapes, four-part harmonies, rhythmic drums and synths. Their debut recordings have been championed by BBC6 Music’s Lauren Laverne and Steve Lamacq. Bath Box Office: 01225 463362

THEATRE BATH BUS Various productions, 2, 3 and 7 June, Brunel Square, £6–10 The Theatre Bath Bus is taking pride of place on Brunel Square outside Bath Spa station. Productions include everything from sex ed at the back of the bus (The Big Oh!, 3 June, 8pm) to cinematic monsters who have escaped their retirement home (MONSTER!, 2 June, 3pm). Visit: theatrebathbus.co.uk; bathfringe.co.uk for the full programme.

CLUB CAIRO 2 June, 8pm, Kingswood Theatre, £15.68 Club Cairo are famed for performances that encompass a unique celebration of music, dance and theatre from the Middle East and beyond. Part of a UK tour, this performance features The Serpent Slayer a story where tough reality meets fairytale, followed by a live music set accompanied by a dazzling array of belly dancers. The show promises to transport spectators to exotic lands. Visit: clubcairo.co.uk

MECHANIMAL PRESENTS ZUGUNRUHE: MIGRATORY RESTLESSNESS IN BIRDS 5 June, 5pm; 6 June, 7.30pm, Mission Theatre, £10/8 Zugunruhe is the ornithological term for migratory restlessness in birds. From cages to planetariums, Zambia to the UK, quantum biology to magnetic fields, this solo show explores the wild migration flight of a marsh warbler. Rehearsing among Somerset wetlands, Tom Bailey creates a feast of bird

Mechanimal at the Mission Theatre explores the wild migration flight of a Marsh Warbler

Bedlam takes place on the streets of Bath and Radstock

behaviour alongside a digital sound map. Don’t miss this wild and inspirational piece. Visit: brownpapertickets.com THE INCUNABULA COLLECTIVE PRESENT #GUNSHOW 6 and 7 June, 8pm, Rondo Theatre, £10/8 Gabe is an aspiring YouTube star, filming her reviews of guns alone in her basement. Overnight, she becomes a viral sensation. Don’t miss this gritty one-woman exploration by Connor Macleod into the dangerous use of online language and our current YouTube generation. Visit: rondotheatre.co.uk 20:20 VISION – RETOLD 7–9 June, mystery location, 7.30pm, £10/8 This year’s 20:20 Vision immersive writing event, by Bath’s own Fake Escape Theatre, goes back to the past. Contemporary theatre performed in unusual locations, three new plays by writers under 30 feature innovative takes on Pride and Prejudice, Great Expectations and The Rivals. Retold will be an unmissable night of explosive, entertaining drama. Visit: ticketsignite.com

20:20 Vision – Retold presents contemporary theatre in unusual locations

BELLA CIELO 8 June, 8.30pm, The Bell Inn, 103 Walcot Street, £3 on the door Are you worried that your weekend isn’t camp enough? Then welcome to Walcot’s newest queer cabaret night with Bella Cielo. Tucked away at The Bell Inn’s Love Lounge Back bar, and hosted by Candy Flipp and Joshua Beau Jangles, there will be comedy, cabaret and camaraderie for all to enjoy. The aim is to bring a slice of fantastical, hedonistic fun to the Bath scene. n THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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THEATRE

A GIRL CALLED DUSTY

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amous for her peroxide blonde bouffant, slick ways with eyeliner and uniquely sensually soulful singing voice, Dusty Springfield dominated both the UK and US music charts throughout the 1960s. In 1966, she was officially the best-selling female solo singer in the world: I Only Want to be with You, You Don't Have to Say You Love Me, I Just Don’t Know What to Do with Myself, Son of a Preacher Man – the hits just kept on coming. Then they stopped. But then they started again... To call the life story of the woman born in Enfield as Mary Isobel Catherine Bernadette O’Brien in 1939 a compelling tale would be an understatement. We’re set to discover exactly how compelling it is when Dusty: The Dusty Springfield Musical – written by BAFTA and Olivier-nominated writer Jonathan Harvey, directed by Olivier Award winner Maria Friedman and starring Katherine Kingsley – celebrates its world premiere at the Theatre Royal Bath this summer season. “People have asked me, why Dusty Springfield?” says the musical’s writer Jonathan Harvey. “A more pertinent question would be, why not? She really was an incredible woman, and I’ve always thought there was a brilliant story to tell about her life. Even without all the fabulous music she made, her story is fascinating enough to make a really good play. So many know so little about her; a lot of young people don’t even know that she was British, or a lesbian, or how important she was in getting Motown off the ground in this country, or that she was deported from South Africa in 1964 for refusing to play to segregated audiences. Also, for a woman in the 1960s and 70s to be in charge in the recording studio was unheard of at the time. To put it simply, Dusty is incredible. I’m hoping we can re-introduce her to a whole new generation.” Jonathan’s working relationship with Dusty began several years ago when he was asked to ‘polish’ a different Dusty musical for an Australian production. Over the course of his research for that project (which never came to fruition) he fell in love with her story. “Stars from a bygone era often fade away slowly, and their stories can end up being quite tragic,” he says. “No matter how hard they tried, they never quite recreated the magic they had when they were younger. But Dusty got a second chance when the Pet Shop Boys chose to collaborate with her on their 1987 single What Have I Done to Deserve This. The song was a huge 46 TheBATHMagazine

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hit; it peaked at number two in both the UK charts and the USA’s Billboard Hot 100. Following the success of the duet, the Pet Shop Boys wrote and produced Nothing Has Been Proved and In Private for her, which were both included on her 1990 album Reputation. She went on to have a platinumselling greatest hit with that album – Dusty was back, big time! Unfortunately she died of breast cancer in 1999, so there’s a bittersweet ending to her tale. The musical is most definitely not, however, just a rags-to-riches story; Dusty had quite a glorious life, and the musical is a celebration of that life.” Understandably, Jonathan and his team (which includes Dusty’s close friend, former manager and authorised biographer Vicki Wickham as one of the show’s producers) spent many months ‘searching for Dusty’ before casting triple Olivier Award nominee Katherine Kingsley in the leading role. “Katherine is just wonderful,” says Jonathan. “We spent about two years seeing different actors: people who could really act but couldn’t sing, people who could really sing but couldn’t act. Katherine ticks all the boxes, over and above what we were searching for. She also made me laugh, which is a vital element to the role, too. Once we got Katherine, we knew we were in safe hands; we could relax and say it’s going to be good. It’s a tough role, though; she ages from around 24 to 59 in the play, and sings around 18 songs – it’s a massive job for anyone, but it’s perfect for Katherine.” But despite the glitz, glamour and success that it’s easy to associate an iconic star such as Dusty Springfield with, her life was not without personal challenges. “Her biggest challenge throughout her career was insecurity – she was emotionally crippled by it,” says Jonathan. “Her confidence was an artifice. She could do the most beautiful vocal in the world and think it was dreadful. But still, she was very, very ambitious, right from the start. I’ve seen photos of her from when she was younger; she was a dumpy hockey player with ginger hair and glasses – but she knew she had a good voice. She thought to herself, okay, so plain old Mary from Enfield isn’t going to be a great star, but this new persona with the eyes of Juliet Greco, Marilyn Monroe’s hair and the most uber-feminine name you can think of can be. But who did the audience love – Mary or Dusty? That insecurity stayed with her throughout her life and career; that, and her addictive personality, which led to all manner of problems with drink and drugs. Bizarrely, though, she didn't really have hang-ups about her sexuality – unusually for

the era, she was reasonably open about being a lesbian. It was performer’s anxiety that really got to her.” There’s a great deal of detail to share about Dusty Springfield’s intriguing life. Jonathan, however, is no stranger to sensitive, richly humane characterisations as his highly acclaimed canon of work to date, including multiple scripts for Coronation Street, award-winning plays such as Babies and Beautiful Thing and five successful contemporary novels, prove. Which writing process does he most prefer? “At the moment, I’m really enjoying writing for theatre again, for Dusty,” he says. “I love, for example, working on Coronation Street, but this is a very different process altogether; I’m at the centre of something creative in a very different way. Coronation Street is more of a collaborative writing effort and has to be much more immediate, but Dusty is much more in my own hands, and moves at a different pace entirely.” Unfortunately, Jonathan never got the opportunity to meet Dusty before she died. What does he think the woman herself would make of what he’s done with her story? “I think she’d be mortified!” he laughs. “I’m not sure she’d have liked the fuss, really. She was very fond of musicals – as she was growing up, her mum used to take her to late-night showings of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers’ movies, and she was obsessed with Lloyd Webber’s Cats. But I think she’d be quite bemused by the fact that someone thought her life story was interesting enough to put on stage.” “It’s marvellous to be popular, but foolish to think it will last,” Dusty Springfield told a Melody Maker journalist, just after the success of her first solo hit single I Only Want to Be With You in 1963. If only she could know how wrong she was. n Dusty: The Dusty Springfield Musical, Saturday 23 June – Saturday 7 July, Theatre Royal Bath. Tel: 01225 448844; theatreroyal.org.uk

Main photograph by Dominic Nicholls; inset photograph by Nathan Cox

A new musical charting the life of one of Britain’s most successful singers receives its world première in Bath this month. Melissa Blease talks to the musical’s multi award-winning writer Jonathan Harvey


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THEATRE

It’s a tough role; Dusty ages from around 24 to 59 in the play and sings around 18 songs – it’s a massive job for anyone

RIGHT: Katherine Kingsley as Dusty Springfield OPPOSITE: Writer, Jonathan Harvey

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There’s bound to be something for your home in our enormous collection of handsome, hand-selected, hand-made rugs, kilims, furniture and accessories, reasonably priced from £50 to £5000. Cleaning • Restoration • Valuation

The Framing Workshop has been trading as an independent family run business on Walcot Street for over 28 years. We treasure you, our client, and spend time helping you to find the best way to display and protect your cherished objects, artworks and memorabilia. Creativity and respect for each artwork are core to what we do. Every picture tells a story. Come and share yours.

80 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BD Tel: 01225 482748 www.theframingworkshop.com framing@theframingworkshop.com

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ARTS | EXHIBITIONS

GOING DUTCH

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The opportunity to see the painting here, face to face, is as uplifting for the curators as it will be for the public Many connections have been woven between the works. Take Gerard von Honthorst’s portrait of Elizabeth Stuart. Briefly Queen of Bohemia, a strong patron of the arts and a highly political figure, she was the eldest daughter of James I of England and Ireland (she was the young Elizabeth who those behind the Gunpowder Plot were planning to kidnap) and her grandson was George I. She was also Prince Rupert’s mother. Wearing a black mourning cap and a veil, the sober hues and her severe expression are offset by her luminous skin in shades of pale, and the way her pearl jewellery catches the light. Dunham Massey: Bird’s-eye View from the

ABOVE: A Still Life of Flowers and Fruit, Cornelis de Heem; OPPOSITE: clockwise from top left: View of Dordrecht, Albert Cuyp; St Catherine’s Church, Utrecht, Pieter Jansz Saenredam; A Blackbird, Butterfly and Cherries, Abraham Bosschaert; The Golf Players, Pieter de Hooch; Self-Portrait Wearing a White Feathered Bonnet, Rembrandt van Rijn South, 1697 by Adriaen van Diest, is the first painting you encounter. Now permanently displayed in the Great Gallery at Dunham Massey, it shows the early Tudor house with its formal garden and newly planted park. Intriguingly, Van Diest’s son, Johan, once worked for Ralph Allen as a painter in Bath. Cornelis de Heem’s A Still Life of Flowers and Fruit was originally bought by William Blathwayt for his house at Dyrham Park. The composition, notable for its animated colours, constantly unravels new surprises: slugs feasting on fruit, peaches showing signs of mould, pale peonies peeping around mossy bark and fragile butterflies in flight. Prized Possessions gives you revelatory insights into significant paintings held by the National Trust and acts as a mini homage to the detailed realism of the painters of the Dutch Golden Age. We are the paintings’ keepers – the National Trust looks after them for us, and exhibitions such as this allow us to keep them in our hearts. Following the exhibition at the Holburne Museum, Prized Possessions will tour to the Mauritshuis in The Hague and the National Trust’s Petworth House in West Sussex. So Prince Rupert will return home. n Prized Possessions: Dutch Masterpieces from National Trust Houses runs from Friday 25 May to Sunday 16 September; £10/£9/£7.50; holburne.org

Photography, clockwise from top: © National Trust Images\John Hammond; © National Trust Images/Christopher Hurst; © National Trust Images/John Hammond; © National Trust Images/Derrick E.Witty; © National Trust Images/Chris Titmus

typical of the Dutch Golden Age, including genre works, biographical portraiture, landscape, mysterious narratives and absorbing still lifes. Self-Portrait by Rembrandt van Rijn was bequeathed to the National Trust as a relatively low-value painting, thought to have been a later copy or the work of a pupil. In 2013 it was identified as a self-portrait by Rembrandt, and worth up to £20 million. Wearing a dark hat with a majestic feather and with the eyes and face heavily shrouded in shadow, it is painted in a ‘tronie’ style typical of the period. This sees the model – in this case Rembrandt – playing a role, dressed as a stock character rather than a real person. The painting has a dwelling resonance and a hardly there sardonic smile, perhaps in keeping with the idea that the sitter isn’t real. In fact Rembrandt’s work has a history of being difficult to identify because he had many pupils and was endlessly copied. There are fascinating stories captured in the canvases. View of Dordrecht by Albert Cuyp is one of the National Trust’s most beautiful paintings. It shows Dordrecht from the north-east, at the junction of the city’s busy waterways. The soft, hazy afternoon light; the angular silhouettes of the masts and buildings against the sky; and the resonant, shifting clouds create the Italianate serenity for which Cuyp was renowned. An unusual, long landscape format, it was at one time cut to form two paintings. You can still see the join, masquerading as a shaft of sunlight.

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rince Rupert of the Rhine, Duke of Cumberland (1619–1682) was the nephew of King Charles I and a prominent Royalist military commander in the English Civil War. His portrait in the new exhibition at the Holburne Museum, Prized Possessions: Dutch Masterpieces from National Trust Houses has a substantial physical presence with its elaborate, gilded frame swathed with raised golden details and clambering angels. Painted by Simon Pietersz Verels, the painting shows Rupert leaning languidly, his left arm dangling. His face, partly in shadow, looks out of the frame in a nonchalant, can-Ireally-be-bothered kind of way. The soft sheen of the rich red velvet in his outfit; the shimmer of the silk on his neck scarf; the plush, supersize golden tassels hanging from his waist are all captured in crisp, absorbing detail. His hands are less defined – one flopped in mid-air, the other softly enclosing a cane. It was customary for painters then to use clothed padded models as they worked on the details of the outfit. The hands here do look rather like those of a cloth dummy. Even the face only emerges hazily from the fuzzy circular mass of wig. This painting’s permanent home is at Petworth House in West Sussex, in the small dining room, above a doorway. So the opportunity to see it here, face to face, is as uplifting for the National Trust curators, David Taylor and Rupert Guilding, as it will be for the visiting public. Prized Possessions brings together some of the National Trust’s best-loved works of 17thcentury Dutch ar, celebrating the enduring appeal of Dutch Golden Age painting and the British country house. The National Trust has over a million paintings in its collection, so how inspired to extract examples in this way. The Dutch Golden Age was a period when the Dutch Republic was the most prosperous nation in Europe. It coincided with the end of the Eighty Years War for Dutch independence. This conflict – albeit interspersed with periods of peace – saw the Protestants rising up against their Spanish Catholic overlords. The war resulted in major shifts in population and a rejection of overriding Catholic traditions. Within Dutch art, the cultural re-delineations saw a massive fall-off in religious subjects and a new interest in the secular, and the evolution of a realistic style that had its roots in the work of the Flemish Primitives during the Northern Renaissance. The 22 paintings feature the work of artists such as Rembrant van Rijn, Albert Cuyp, Jan Lievens, Abraham Bosschaert, Sir Peter Levy and Pieter de Hooch. The picture types are all

© National Trust Images/John Hammond

The National Trust has a million paintings in its collection – a new exhibition at the Holburne Museum takes 22 of them to give visitors an insight into the detailed realism of the Dutch Golden Age, discovers Emma Clegg


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

SUMMER SOLSTICE

Bath’s art scene sees an array of colours, texture and sculpture arrive in June, as well as open studios and gardens DAVID SIMON CONTEMPORARY 3 – 4 Bartlett Street, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm, closed Wednesday and Sunday Tel: 01225 460189 Web: davidsimoncontemporary.com WALTER LINDNER: A RETROSPECTIVE EXHIBITION Throughout June Art collector Simon Hearnden unearthed the delightful, highly accomplished paintings and monotype prints of the enigmatic Berlin artist, the late Walter Lindner (1936-2007), while visiting Germany in 2006. This solo exhibition is a significant retrospective of Lindner’s work and includes some 35 of the very best available original monotype artworks. During four fruitful decades Lindner perfected his technique, hand-pressing monotype prints onto parchment from glass plates that he painted with oils. Capturing the character and humour of everyday observations, new bronze sculptures by Sara Ingleby-MacKenzie make a wonderful accompaniment to the work of Walter Lindner. InglebyMacKenzie, who trained at the Bath Academy of Art, portrays figures in everyday activities. Some pieces are patinated in striking colour, others finished in more traditional tones.

Right, Harlekin Tanz by Walter Lindner

THE ARTS SOCIETY BATH LECTURE SERIES 2017/18 THE PROMENADE DES ANGLAIS: ARTISTS IN NICE Monday 11 June, 1.30pm at The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath In the early 18th century, Nice was just a small town in the south of France relying on fishing, fruit growing and flowers for its income until it was discovered by English travellers on the Grand Tour. It was an English clergyman who, in 1820, provided the funds for the construction of the promenade, encouraging fashionable people including Queen Victoria to visit. By the 20th century the brilliant light and climate attracted many artists including Matisse, Dufy and others. This lecture traces the way in which Nice has influenced their work. Lecturer Christopher Herbert returns for The Arts Society Bath’s final lecture of the season. Visitors welcome, £10 at the door, no booking necessary. After a summer break, the 2018/19 lecture season will begin in October; theartssocietybath.com

THE EDGE The Edge, University of Bath, Claverton Down Open: Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 5pm Tel: 01225 386777, web: edgearts.org COLLECTED SHADOWS: THE ARCHIVE OF MODERN CONFLICT Until Saturday 16 June This exhibition of 200 photographs is drawn from the extensive collection of The Archives of Modern Conflict. The AMC was first established 25 years ago as a repository for vernacular photography and ephemera relating to the First and Second World Wars. It has since grown to a total of eight-million images. Spanning the history of the photography from the mid-1850s to the present day, the exhibition represents a variety of techniques, from early albumen and hand-tinted silver gelatin prints to the blue of the cyanotype. Free admission. 52 TheBATHMagazine

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Atomic Trial on Mururoa atoll, Tahiti, 1970

BATH SCHOOL OF ART AND DESIGN UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE SHOW Bath School of Art and Design, Sion Hill, Bath Open: Saturday 9 – Sunday 17 June, 10am – 5pm Web: bathspa.ac.uk/art-and-design Original works of art and design will be on show in June as Bath Spa University’s Sion Hill campus opens its doors to the public for the annually celebrated Bath School of Art and Design Undergraduate Degree Show. Three years’ worth of graduating students’ finest work will be displayed across the nineday exhibition, showcasing the school’s talented students. There are hand-picked items from a selection of courses: contemporary art practice, creative arts, fashion design, fine art, graphic communication, photography, textile design for fashion and interiors, three-dimensional design and fashion and textiles design skills.


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

NICK CUDWORTH GALLERY London Street, top of Walcot Street, closed on Mondays Tel: 01225 445221, web: nickcudworth.com Throughout June Nick Cudworth will be exhibiting a selection of his paintings and prints that reflect his interest in a variety of subjects including portraits, still life and landscapes. The buildings of Bath and the parks are of particular interest. Nick’s gallery is where he paints and welcomes visitors to view the gallery and discuss his work.

Henrietta Park by Nick Cudworth

Between You and Me VIII by Corinna Button RE

AXLE ARTS WALLER & WOOD 4 Abbey Green, Bath Open: Wednesday – Saturday, 11–5pm, and Sundays, 12–4pm Tel: 07803 033629, web: wallerandwood.co.uk CONTAINER: HOMEWARES & ART WORKS Throughout June This new exhibition focuses on utilitarian vessels for the kitchen and dining room by Gary Wood including jars for kitchen utensils, bowls, cups and plates, alongside new painted stoneware wall pieces. Purchase Large painted bowl pieces directly from the artists by Gary Wood who are often to be found in the gallery or commission them for bespoke pieces. Waller & Wood also specialises in contemporary jewellery in unusual materials.

Leighton Road, Weston, Bath Open: Monday to Saturday, 10am – 5pm by appointment Tel: 01225 461230, web: axlearts.com CORINNA BUTTON RE Throughout June Renowned painter-printmaker Corinna Button RE explores themes of feminine identity, her distinct practice being defined through her application of texture and patterning. Female portraits emerge through layers of paint and mixed media, with a rich yet playful sense of becoming; imprints of decorative fabric meld the language of painting and printmaking into a spontaneous and energetic exploration of movement and identity. Button employs a strong, confident use of line, reminiscent of the Cubist movement, to give form to her female studies. Her work is held in many high-profile collections including the V&A Museum in London, Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, Jiangsu Art Museum in China and the BBC.

MODERN ARTBUYER Sylvan Lodge, 1 Cliffe Drive, Limpley Stoke, Bath Web: modernartbuyer.com OPEN HOUSE POP-UP GALLERY Saturday 2 – Sunday 3 June, 10am–5.30pm Online art gallery and consultancy Modern ArtBuyer is opening its doors again for its bi-annual open house event. Visitors can browse a carefully curated selection of contemporary artworks, offering a unique opportunity to view works available for sale in a home setting and providing inspiration for displaying works large or small. There will be an exciting selection of works on show including limited edition prints from much sought-after artist Maria Rivans, urban prints and collages by Bonnie and Clyde, graphic monoprints by Bath-based Paul Minott, Elaine Jones’ captivating abstract landscape paintings, large paintings by Jane Emberson and Paul Bennett, and burntpaper works by Bath-based Kelly O’Brien, among others.

Left, Coastal Drift by Paul Bennett

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

MUSEUM OF EAST ASIAN ART

Tranquility by Georgie Mason

Bennett Street, Bath, open: Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 5pm; Sunday, 12 – 5pm Web: meaa.org.uk THE QUEST FOR WELLNESS Saturday 5 May – Monday 12 November The theme of wellness is the predominant theme of this city based on its origins as a Roman spa town. In this exhibition, artist Zhang Yanzi explores common frailties and shared humanity, investigating the nature and meaning of wellness in China: its history, and its modern counterpoints from a Chinese perspective. Works on display include Excess, a silk robe covered in pill capsules which portrays pills as a kind of physical and psychological armour in the modern world; Inhalation, a Chinese painting on analgesic plasters that explores the ability of beautiful objects to provide humans with psychological comfort; and Pure Land, an ink painting of Buddha’s portrait in the ancient Chinese Buddhist mural style that alludes to the concept of well-being from a spiritual angle.

GEORGIE MASON Somerton House, 30 Upper East Hayes, Bath Web: georgiemason.co.uk ASH + SUN Saturday 16 – Friday 22 June, 10am–6pm (10am–9pm on 22 June) Georgie is London-based, working from her studio in Stepney City Farm. Since graduating in 2015, she has exhibited internationally including in The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, The Battersea Affordable Art Fairs and the AAF in Goa, India. Georgie will be exhibiting a new series of around 30 paintings inspired by her recent travels in India. While her paintings to date exist somewhere between the figurative and the abstract, these works are based on memories of light and colour, resulting in more abstracted forms.

The Breathable, 2016, ink and cinnabar on gauze

EMMA ROSE Tel: 07885 235915 or 01225 424424, web: emmaroseartworks.com SHOWTIME 2018 Saturday 8 June, 11am–7.30pm, and Sunday 9 June, 11am–6pm, Knight’s Barn, Wellow, BA2 8QE Award-winning artist Emma Rose is throwing open the doors to her magical art studio in Wellow, alongside nine brilliant artisans all showing their work – featuring jewellery, sculpture (indoor and out), porcelain ceramics, woven pear-pods, designer fabrics and accessories, plus fabulous clothing. Showtime spreads from the Art Studio into elegant carpeted tents in a beautiful garden. Free parking and admission.

Emma Rose with her work in her art studio in Wellow

THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM Great Pulteney Street, Bath Open: daily, 10am – 5pm (11am Sundays) Tel: 01225 388569 Web: holburne.org BATH TO BAGHDAD: ELLEN TANNER’S COLLECTION OF MIDDLE EASTERN ART 14 June – 21 October From sumptuous textiles to delicate carved woodwork and lacquer, plus elaborately decorated metalwork, this collection is on display for the first time following a major conservation project generously funded through the Big Give Christmas Challenge. MADE FOR THE TABLE Until Sunday 1 July Featuring silver from the Goldsmiths’ 54 TheBATHMagazine

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Company Collection alongside other crafts, Made for the Table demonstrates how makers continue to be inspired to make beautiful objects for use and the sensory experience of the table, from taste and flavour to light and display. PRIZED POSSESSIONS: DUTCH MASTERPIECES FROM NATIONAL TRUST HOUSES Until Sunday 16 September This exhibition brings together some of the National Trust’s best-loved works of 17th century Dutch art to celebrate the enduring appeal of two great achievements of European culture: Dutch Golden Age painting and the British country house. Spread across the length and breadth of England, Wales and Northern Ireland, National Trust houses contain an extraordinarily diverse collection of almost one-million individual items. Displayed together for the first time at the Holburne

are 22 highlight Golden Age pictures from National Trust houses. Admission £10/£9, National Trust members £7.50. Damascened Peacock from the Bath to Baghdad exhibition


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

CELEBRATING ART IN THE GARDEN

Equilibrium by Edward Willis

Friday 22 June – Sunday 8 July, closed Mondays and Tuesdays Urchfont Manor, Wiltshire, SN10 4RF Tel: 01672 540180 Web: friendsofthegarden.org.uk The garden at the 17th-century Grade II Urchfont Manor is currently being redesigned by award-winning practice del Buono Gazerwitz. It provides a wonderful backdrop to an exhibition featuring more

Hummingbird by Jamel Akib

High Contrast Squares by Kaffe Fassett

VICTORIA ART GALLERY

GALLERY AND BARROW 118a Walcot Street, Bath Open: Tuesday to Saturday, 11am – 5.30pm Tel: 01225 311379 Web: galleryandbarrow.com

BUTTERFLIES, BIRDS AND BEES Throughout June An exhibition curated by Gallery and Barrow artists and competition winners.

than 100 pieces of contemporary sculpture. The mix of figurative and abstract work provides the final touch to a garden, parts of which now include alcoves, viewpoints, a maze and reflecting pool, all lovely settings for an artist’s work. Work by Bath artist Edward Willis will feature in one of the parterres. This major exhibition takes contemporary sculpture out of the gallery and into its proper setting. A café and popup shop are also on site. Admission £5. Hosted by voluntary organisation The Friends of the Garden.

By Pulteney Bridge Open daily, 10.30am – 5pm Tel: 01225 477233 Web: victoriagal.org.uk A CELEBRATION OF FLOWERS: KAFFE FASSETT WITH CANDACE BAHOUTH Until Sunday 2 September Internationally renowned colour expert and fabric designer Kaffe Fassett returns to Bath with a new exhibition at the gallery. When Fassett and Candace Bahouth last exhibited here in 2008, the gallery welcomed a recordbreaking 31,000 visitors. Inspired by flowers all his life, Fassett will demonstrate his full creative flair in A Celebration of Flowers.

With a bespoke dazzling colour scheme to match, the installation will transform the gallery using 40 of his vibrant coloured quilts and needlepoints. The show will also feature colourful mosaiced island gardens, benches, totems, mirror frames, shoes, flower encrusted candlesticks and a chandelier by one of Fassett’s long-term collaborators, fellow American Candace Bahouth, who is based in Somerset. Many of these works are on a large scale and extend the floral theme into three dimensions. A graduate in fine art from Syracuse University, Bahouth settled in rural Somerset, where she developed her unique expression in mosaics using found material from nature as well as china and high-tech plastics.

SCULPTURE TO ENHANCE A GARDEN Saturday 14 – Sunday 15 July, 11am–5pm The garden at 165 Newbridge Hill, Bath Web: thehiddengardensofbath.co.uk

Three local sculptors come together to showcase their dynamic sculpture within a garden setting. Wander around at your leisure and enjoy tea and homemade cake or scones from the terrace overlooking the garden. Entrance payable at the gate is £3. Proceeds from the refreshments to The Peggy Dodd Centre in Combe Down for those suffering from memory loss. For further information contact: helen@thehiddengardensofbath.co.uk or phone 07793085267.

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nick cudworth gallery 4 ABBEY GREEN BATH

The Box Room

photo : Chris Daw

JUNE EXHIBITION 1 – 3 June Pots : Gary Wood

An exhibition of paintings and prints by Nick that reflect his interest in a variety of subjects including portraits, still life and landscapes.

‘Container’ - Home wares & Art works Vessels, stoneware wall pieces, interior textiles, and more 24 May to 24 June 11 - 5pm Wednesday to Saturday 12 - 4pm Sunday Appointments : 07803 033629

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

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EXHIBITION | PROFILE

ART AT HOME

Gathering global inspiration, Georgie Mason creates hazy canvases of recollected landscapes that thrill with atmosphere and emotion – she talks to us ahead of her forthcoming show in Bath, which displays 30 canvases in her mother’s home Why do you paint land and seascapes? I was brought up in the countryside, and living in London has made me more drawn to open spaces and fresh air. I travel as often as possible to gather inspiration – Scotland, India, South America, Somerset and Suffolk have all influenced my work. How do you use travel and poetry? Some of the poems in this show were written in India, but the majority I wrote in the middle of the night a few days after I got back. I think I’d been dreaming about Varanasi, which I found extraordinary, and very emotional. I experienced the burning at the ghats by wandering into a ceremony, not quite realising where we were. I was nudged in the head by a stretcher carrying a corpse wrapped in gold cloth. I noticed two women sobbing in grief, and another woman shouting at them in Hindi to stop crying, saying, “he’s gone now”. Then the body cloths of the corpse were unwrapped, leaving the underlayer of white cloth. The man’s head dropped out of the cloths and they covered it back up. When the body started burning I realised I was breathing in ash, his ashes. The experience inspired lots of poems and paintings. The contrast

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between this side of India and the sunny, relaxed parts like Hampi or Kerala, is what I found striking. It gave me the show’s name, Ash + Sun. How do you plan your travels? I choose places to inspire a progression in my paintings. A solo trip around Scotland was one of my most inspirational – the moody skies and earthy colours are unbeatable. India was uplifting for its bright colours and bold shapes and structures. My new work is more abstract and less specific to sea and landscape. Which artists have inspired your work? I go through phases of not looking at other artists’ work to keep mine fresh and authentic, and then obsessing over other peoples’ work. I have been inspired by Turner, Dion Salvador Lloyd, and more recently Tapiers and Hughie O’Donoghue. When is a painting is finished? When I’m happy enough to put it in show! Sometimes I’ll think one is finished then come back to it in a few weeks and completely paint over it. Tell us about your exhibition I really enjoy the process of finding a great venue, building up interest and

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creating my own campaign for a show. I think it’s in keeping with the trend for shared community, the economical use of space and informality that is definitely on the rise. I’m very lucky as my mum has a lovely house in Bath with oldfashioned hanging rails so it’s great space for an art exhibition. n Ash + Sun, a collection of paintings and poems by Georgie Mason; 16–22 June; Somerton House, 30 Upper East Hayes, Bath BA1 6LP; open 16–21 June 10am–6pm, 22 June 10am–9pm; visit: georgiemason.co.uk

ABOVE: Georgie Mason with her paintings hung in her mother’s Bath home

BELOW LEFT: Footpath, mixed media on board, 60 x 42cm BELOW RIGHT: Red Morning, mixed media on canvas, 101 x 101cm


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SHOWTIME 2018 An idyllic summer artisan exhibition Emma Rose . paintings . prints . cards Indigo Island . bock printed shirts for men Lux&Bloom . designer fabrics/accessories Chapel Collection . women’s ethical attire Rachel Stormonth–D . bronze/resin sculpture Rebecca Wordsworth . porcelain ceramics Chris Kampf . garden ironwork . sculpture Pearpod . woven sculptural pods Emma Chapman Jewels

Knight’s Barn . Wellow . Bath BA2 8QE 8th June . 11am–7.30pm 9th June . 11am–6pm Free Parking and Free Admission emmaroseartworks.com

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SIDE | BY | SIDE

A prosthetic hand on display in the exhibition

THE AMERICAN PERSPECTIVE Jessica Hope explores the United States’ entry into the First World War with a unique exhibition at The American Museum in Britain

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African Americans experienced racism in the forces and were given lowly tasks such as grave digging and canteen work. In contrast, the exhibition analyses how the 369th Infantry Regiment from New York, made up of mostly African Americans, were welcomed by the French unit they were assigned to on the Frontline in 1918. Owing to their bravery during the six months of combat – the longest stationing of any unit during the war – the regiment became known as the Harlem Hellfighters, celebrated for their courage and dedication, and were awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French military. As a result of the life-changing injuries that many suffered during the war, the exhibition shows how prosthetics were developed further. The displays include the work of Boston sculptor Anna Coleman who set up a Red Cross studio in Paris and used her artistic skills to help those with disfiguring conditions by re-constructing facial features. The exhibition is interactive and suitable for all ages. You can select your opponent and play battleships, or test your medical knowledge in the Red Cross tent and see if you can diagnose patients’ symptoms. By focusing on the first-hand experiences of Americans, Side by Side provides a refreshing take on the involvement of the US in the First World War. The exhibition dispels the myth that the US simply stormed the war and won it for the Allies, showing how they cooperated with one another, exchanging ideas and materials that contributed towards victory. n Side by Side: America and World War I is at The American Museum In Britain, Claverton Manor, Bath until 28 October; americanmuseum.org

EVENTS TO LOOK OUT FOR Father’s Day Weekend: Petrol and Percussion n 16 and 17 June, 10am–4pm Expect classic American cars, lipsmacking food from the Spitfire BBQ, and good ol’ toe-tappin’ music throughout the weekend. An evening of songs from the Great War n 23 June, doors 6pm for 7pm Listen to songs from America’s Tin-Pan Alley as well as pacifist, recruiting and novelty songs that were enjoyed both in the parlours and on the Front during the First World War, performed by Patricia Hammond and Matt Redman. £10 per person, booking essential. Songs and Stitches n 23 and 24 June, 11am–4pm A weekend of living history where visitors can discover how injured soldiers were treated on the Western Front, and listen to the music that helped them recuperate. Hosted by historical reenactors Discover History. Knit for Victory n 24 June, 1–4pm The government asked Americans to knit woollen socks and sweaters during the war for soldiers at home and abroad. Join the museum’s volunteers and have a go at knitting. Beginner or expert, you’re sure to have fun and learn something new.

Poster by James Montgomery (1877-1960), American Lithographic Company, 1918. Photography by Peter Hall

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ollowing the opening of the UK’s only immersive exhibition to mark the centenary of America’s entry into the First World War, The American Museum in Britain is challenging the misconceptions about US troops’ contribution to the conflict. Side by Side: America and World War I tells the stories of ordinary Americans such as pilots, nurses, politicians and authors, and their remarkable wartime experiences. The exhibition examines how some Americans, determined to take up arms with the Allies before the US officially joined the war in 1917, volunteered overseas, a number famously becoming pilots in the Lafayette Flying Corps with the French Air Force. The exhibition features rare artefacts, diary entries, wartime footage and a life-sized replica of a French Renault FT17 tank. At the beginning of Side by Side, you can pick up an identity folder featuring the personal stories of Americans who lived through the conflict. As you move through the displays, you can use the folder to find out more about the real life experiences of each character at certain stages of the war. One extraordinary artefact on display is a watch that was salvaged from the wreckage of the RMS Lusitania. This British ocean liner was torpedoed by the Germans in 1915, resulting in more than 1,000 people losing their lives including 128 neutral Americans. The sinking of this ship arguably contributed to the decision for the US to declare war against Germany two years later. Side by Side also highlights the experiences of those often left out of the historical accounts of this period, including African Americans, Native Americans and women. It is astounding to discover how even in the middle of an international conflict, many


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CITY | READING

SUMMER READS

Kathleen Smith from Topping & Co picks out some engrossing reads for those moments when you slip into holiday mode and want to bury yourself in a book THE ORDER OF TIME Carlo Rovelli, hardback, £12.99, Allen Lane

What is time? Is there such thing as a present? What distinguishes past and future? Time as a concept is something that rarely gets a second thought. In this mind-altering exploration Carlo Rovelli uses poetic sentences that force the reader to reconsider their own concept of time. Discard your wrist watch, open up this small book and allow Rovelli to direct your gaze to a version of time that is far more accurate within space. By way of Newton, Aristotle, Boltzmann and other fascinating minds, Rovelli takes you on a 182-page time-travelling journey.

CONVERSATIONS WITH FRIENDS

Sally Rooney, paperback, £8.99, Faber & Faber Sally Rooney’s debut novel is one of the best novels of last year – a fresh, edgy, hugely funny story about the friendship between two girlfriends who become entangled with an older married couple. The women are compelling characters – Frances is clever, repressed and contradictory; Bobbie is hyperarticulate, glittering and passionate. The dialogue quivers on the edge of conversations withheld as well has those shared. A perfect novel, full of lust, ideas, identity and the dances between relationships.

CIRCE

Madeline Miller, hardback, £16.99, Bloomsbury Publishing Circe is the second novel from the Orange Prize-winning author of The Song of Achilles and another luxuriant dip into the mythology of Ancient Greece. Supple and intricate, it intimately traces the emotional life of a woman in dramatic, epic and often magical circumstances. The plot grips, with a fair number of twists and turns, and provides the perfect company on a warm summer’s day in the park.

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THE SPARSHOLT AFFAIR

Alan Hollinghurst, paperback, £8.99, Picador

Famed for his alluring style, and irony, Hollinghurst is often compared to Henry James. His engrossing, prize-winning novels (Line of Beauty, Swimming Pool Library) beautifully unravel rites of passage, desire and the fragility and the impossibility of love. Moving between Oxford and London, The Sparsholt Affair crosses generations, following the fortunes of two young men, Evert Dax and David Sparsholt, who come from radically different backgrounds and meet at Oxford University in 1940. Expect intimacies and scandals.

WHISTLE IN THE DARK

Emma Healey, hardback, £12.99, Viking Elizabeth is Missing, Emma Healey’s first novel, won huge acclaim. In this, her second novel, she has produced an engrossing and authentic portrayal of a mother and daughter relationship that is strained by mental health issues. Whistle in the Dark is a mystery novel. It’s not an obviously constructed caper with the usual tropes of murderers and detectives, but describes the mystery contained in those closest to us – the mystery of thoughts, feelings and experiences. It deals with what is withheld, and the anxiety that comes with caring. It is a novel that walks a tightrope of humour, of human drama, of love and suffering, and makes it all seem, not easy, but effortless. Not careless, but natural.

I’LL BE GONE IN THE DARK Michelle McNamara, paperback, £12.99, Faber & Faber

I’ll Be Gone in the Dark is a book ostensibly about terror, darkness and evil, but it’s full of compassion and humanity. Tracing one woman’s obsession with a real-life serial killer case that was at the time unsolved, Michelle McNamara’s story is both expansive and deeply personal. It could be argued that the explosive popularity of the book provided the impetus for California’s law enforcement to solve the case (which they did recently). McNamara unfortunately died before she could witness the arrest of the man she herself coined the ‘Golden State Killer,’ but this account of her investigation remains enthralling, entertaining and incredibly incisive. Topping & Co, The Paragon, Bath; toppingbooks.co.uk


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FOOD | AND | DRINK

LEARN THE VEG WAY

If you’re in touch with the food zeitgeist, vegetarian and plant-based food may already have a place in your kitchen. But is there room for improvement? Melissa Blease explores how two companies are helping us get smarter with vegetables

GET BOX CLEVER Many people associate Riverford Organic Farmers with well-priced home deliveries of top-quality, seasonal organic vegetables and fruit. But there’s far more to Riverford than convenience and an intelligent alternative to supermarket shopping. The Riverford Veg Fund scheme was originally established to help schools, charities and other groups to raise funds and promote healthy eating while encouraging families to eat well on a daily basis. For every family at a school with a regular

vegetable box delivery from Riverford, the company donates £25 to the school to support healthy eating and cooking workshops for children and parents. “Riverford Veg Boxes are a brilliant way to engage children with food,” says Vicki Mowat who, in partnership with her husband Alan, runs the Bath area of Riverford Home Delivery. “You can unpack the box together every week, and talk about where the vegetables grow and what you’re going to cook with them. We always did this when our children were small and reaching into the box to see what surprises were within felt like Christmas every week! “The Veg Fund – which has been really successful – takes that concept to the next level. In Bath, we’ve got Freshford and Winsley pre-schools and primary schools including Bathwick St Mary, Freshford, Widcombe and Moorlands on board, and Beechen Cliff secondary school too; the fantastic feedback we’ve received so far has encouraged us to keep expanding to more schools. The scheme includes assemblies and cookery workshops to inspire parents, and the schools already involved have raised hundreds of pounds with fairly little effort on their part. But to us, success isn’t just about raising funds; it’s also about inspiring children to give vegetables a go, and my heart has been warmed by responses from the children who’ve cooked with us. One little girl at a preschool who had previously refused to eat any vegetables at all was so proud of the salad she ate for dinner that she asked her mum to send a picture of it to me – her delighted mum captioned the pic

“a very positive change in attitude following your preschool visit.” Apparently I’m also known in some families as ‘Vicki Veg’”. Vicki Veg pops up at the Riverford evening workshops, too. “Our evening workshops with parents are great fun,” says Vicki. “We typically charge just £10 per ticket, and all of that goes to the PTA.

To us success isn’t just about raising funds; it’s also about inspiring children to have a go

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lthough the traditional time to start rethinking our eating habits is at the start of the year, following a healthier diet is perhaps easier when the sun starts to shine. Once we see seasonal salads and fresh fruit dominating markets and menus across the city, our attention naturally turns towards dishes with a lighter theme. Folk who have given up (or even just cut down on) the amount of meat and dairy products in their daily diet celebrate the new season’s eating, too. The best British, Mediterranean and Middle Eastern-themed menus tend not to involve very much flesh at all, concentrating on vibrant vegetables, a plethora of pulses and savvy ways with herbs and spices. But just because the weather is calling us out of the kitchen, few of us can take a break from domestic duties. If we’re reinventing our eating habits to move with the seasons, perhaps it’s time to consider upping our cookery skill set too?

We usually hold the workshops in the school hall, and I bring everything that’s needed with me – it’s like a mobile cookery school and restaurant, with everything from the necessary kitchen kit to aprons, plates, cutlery, all the ingredients, wine glasses and organic wines. The classes are interactive, and bring people together in a relaxed, friendly manner. We usually make three recipes, all of which are versatile and demonstrate what you can do with the contents of a veg box. Then everyone sits down to eat together at the end of the evening with a glass of wine. Even if people didn’t know each other at the start of the workshop, there’s something very bonding about cooking together.” Similarly, Riverford pop-up feasts (the most recent one was held at Freshford Village Hall) are swiftly garnering a cult following, and there’ll be a Riverfood team 64 TheBATHMagazine

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FOOD | AND | DRINK

RIGHT: Freshford Preschool making a rainbow salad at a healthy eating and cooking workshop, as part of the Riverford Veg Fund Scheme FAR RIGHT: Day-long cookery workshops at Demuths Cookery School take a maximum of 12 students – the courses attract people of all ages and from all walks of life

on site at the forthcoming Pub in the Park event (Royal Victoria Park, 8–10 June), on hand to say hello and introduce us to everything Riverford-related.

PLANT-BASED SKILLS

OPPOSITE PAGE: above, parents at Beechen Cliff School enjoying the fruits of their cookery labours during a Riverford evening workshop; below, a bumper veg box from Riverford Organic BELOW: left, a cookery course at Demuths Cookery School; right, a Japanese bean thread salad from Demuths

It would be impossible to discuss vegetarian cookery classes in Bath without mentioning Demuths Cookery School, run by one of the UK’s leading plant-based chefs Rachel Demuth and specialising in meat-free and plantbased ways of working with food. “Our eating habits and attitudes are changing drastically,” says Rachel. “More people than ever before are moving away from meat, dairy and other animal products, whether for environmental, health or ethical reasons. In the last three years in particular, the shift in interest has moved from vegetarian to vegan and plant-based diets. The number of ‘flexitarians’ – those who aren’t committing to a full plantbased diet but are reducing their consumption of animal products – are on the rise too, with the interest encouraged by everything from celebrity endorsements and Netflix documentaries to mouth-watering Instagram accounts. It’s as though people have properly woken up to the idea that vegetables are a fabulous resource and can be enjoyed in so many ways. Vegetable dishes look so bright and beautiful, too – and of course, we start eating with our eyes!” As an increasing number of people get with the plantbased programme, Rachel has seen a huge rise in demand for classes at the cookery school, where everybody from complete beginners to those who want to pursue a career in vegan cookery are welcome. “Our Fast and Delicious one-day and half-day courses are geared to simple recipes for complete beginners or those new to vegetarian food, while our 30-Minute Suppers evening classes offer loads of inspiration for everyday family menus,” Rachel explains. “On from that, those who want to take an

in-depth crash course in plant-free menus enjoy our fiveday Vegan Course which gives a good grounding in the basics, and you can move on to our two-week diploma course.” There’s simply no excuse to say that you don’t know where to start, or how far a journey that starts with a class at Demuths might take you; Rachel and her team have a way of making you feel right at home. “We aim to both share and inspire vegetarian and vegan ways of working with food,” she says. “I’m very proud of our cooking team and have been working with Helen Lawrence, Jan Berridge and Lydia Downey for many years. Helen has taught at the cookery school for 10 years and was head chef at my restaurant, Demuths (now Acorn Vegetarian Kitchen). Jan started the cookery school with me in 2000 having also worked with me at Demuths, and Lydia has been with us for four years. We’re all passionate about creative, healthy plant-based food, and our ethos is that food is a pleasure to cook, eat and share. Our intention is to impress students with the flavour and variety of plant-based dishes, and we hope to provide inspiration and ideas that are easily achievable.” But you don’t necessarily have to leave your own kitchen in order to take a course in marvellous meat-free menu inspiration. Riverford Recipe Boxes supply measured quantities of everything you need to cook seasonal meals from scratch, giving you a clear, step-bystep guide for each recipe. “If, like most people, you’re short of time, they’re a godsend because they take all the thinking out of planning out mealtimes – and stop you calling for a takeaway,” says Vicki. “The portion sizes are really generous and the recipes take you beyond your usual repertoire; they’re a brilliant way to eat well with very little effort.” Both Vicki and Rachel find summer produce inspirational in itself too, with Vicki favouring asparagus: “It’s so British, and it feels like a luxurious treat. Eat it for breakfast dipped in a soft-boiled egg, griddle it on the barbecue, steam and serve with butter or hollandaise, or bake it into a quiche for a picnic… endless possibilities. But the season is short, so savour it while you can.” Rachel, meanwhile, opts for summer peas and beans (“mainly because they grow so well in my garden – I like to pick them young and tender and eat them straight away either lightly steamed or even raw”) and strawberries, which she calls “the quintessential summer treat.” At the cookery school, she makes an ‘over the top’ Eton mess with Cheddar strawberries and a vegan version with aquafaba meringues and rose-infused coconut cream... oh, and she heartily recommends adding strawberries to salads too; go on, try it! Summer’s here and the time is right for vegging out in style. Seriously, you have no excuse not to. n • Riverford Organic Farmers; riverford.co.uk • Demuths Cookery School, 6 Terrace Walk, Bath BA1 1LN, Tel: 01225 427938; demuths.co.uk THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE How Crest Nicholson Regeneration created a new community in Bath on a stretch of wasteland

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE

THE VISION

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he idea of living by the river is an enchanting, idyllic prospect. Being able to look at the river frees you, so you can see beyond your immediate frame of reference. It allows you to drift, to dream, to be recharged by the movement of the water, the shifting reflections, the ever-changing light, and the constant activity on and around the water. The vision of living by the river in Bath was created with the identification of a derelict site on the banks of the River Avon. This had once been the site of Stothert & Pitt Founders and Engineers, then a thriving ironmongers and crane-making business, but the company closed in Bath in the late 1980s and the site had not been used since. The concept for the residential development was to take this underutilised location and come up with an inventive plan to revitalise it. A collection of property types was conceived – ranging from studios and penthouses to townhouses and villas – that would give Bath over 2,000 new homes. Those properties would offer spectacular views across the city, taking in the Royal Crescent and Royal Victoria Park, as well as the surrounding countryside and along the River Avon. Those living there would have direct access to the riverside and a short, flat walk to the city centre.

Bath Riverside is regarded by the industry as one of the most ambitious regeneration projects in the UK – Scott Black, Managing Director, Crest Nicholson –

There would be pocket parks, wild meadows and riverside pubs within easy distance to enjoy for a day out, an afternoon stroll or a summer picnic. Just across the river would be the Royal Victoria Park, with a landscape of greenery including botanical gardens, a children’s play area and tennis courts. How to make this vision a reality? Moving from an abandoned site with potential to a bustling residential development is a lengthy journey. Such an ambitious inner-city regeneration involves courage, determination, energy, investment and passion. It also involves endless research, discussion and collaboration, written assessments and a mountain of planning. Work on the Bath Riverside project started in 2011, but planning started in 2004. This is the story of the creation of a vibrant and sustainable community space designed to bring people together and meet the needs of modern living. Here you can read about the latest part of the journey, focusing on the development of Royal View and Sovereign Point, two striking residential buildings that have already transformed Bath’s city skyline. You will be introduced to the key players in this riverside story – the stone suppliers, the architects, the landscape architects and the building site manager. Then you will follow the evolution of the design and build and, finally, get an idea of what the future holds for Bath Riverside. 

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | PLANNING & COMMUNITY

PLANNING & COMMUNITY Transforming land that has been left derelict for over 25 years poses certain challenges. Scott Black of Crest Nicholson talks about some of the strategies that were planned as part of the big vision

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this way. Working with Bath College, courses are delivered through industry training groups. Another community measure is the Art Strategy. Led by art consultant Peter Dickinson, the idea was to create visual points of interest across the whole development. Local community artists, craftsmen and organisations were encouraged to submit a selection of quirky and eccentric ideas. The results have now been incorporated into the stone carving, bins, lampposts and artwork, original pieces that add to the experience of the space.

n example of inner city regeneration, the Riverside project has shown what can be achieved with planning, commitment and passion. The longterm aim was to create more than 2,000 new homes in the city. The project would also provide public spaces to enhance the experience of Bath for residents and visitors. The scheme included the refurbishment of the Grade II listed Victoria Bridge, providing pedestrians and cyclists access to the Upper Bristol Road. A new Destructor Bridge has also been installed, providing a vital link for motor vehicles across the river. Revitalising the river towpath was crucial – this now provides a car-free, level walk into the city centre. The future plan encompasses a new school, an energy centre, acres of public space including a large riverside park and commercial spaces consisting of restaurants, cafés, shops and community areas.

SUSTAINABILITY

Sustainability has always been a high priority in the planning and construction of Bath Riverside and has been led by the Bath Riverside Sustainable Development Strategy. The construction stage included the use of a ‘soil hospital’, which has moved, cleaned and reused 45,000 tons of soil. The Bath stone was from the local Limpley Stoke quarry, reducing the environmental impact of transporting materials and investing in a local business. Green roofs have been incorporated within many buildings, including more than 20 plant species native to the area. The seeds were collected back in 2001 and stored in preparation. To date, more than 18,500 trees and shrubs have been planted, a mixture of mature and semi-mature plants and seedlings. Inside the new homes, each property has a new smart meter and the site has partnered with Eon to deliver a combined heat and power energy centre using woodchip fuel, reducing carbon emissions by 66 percent and producing 14 percent renewable energy. Homes are also fitted with appliances that use less water, and have energy-saving lighting. n

COMMUNITY

It was always important to involve the local community in the design and implementation of Bath Riverside, because the project had to fit with its needs. The overriding design concept was about making connections. The idea was to connect people to a community, and then connect the community back to open space, back to the water and back to the city. This vision has been the anchor that brings the Riverside story to life. Apprenticeships have always been seen as the future of the business, and local apprentices have been employed on site – indeed many of Crest’s current managers started their career in

GOING TO PLAN: THE BUILDING STAGES

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1. Stothert Avenue - 2011 2. Palladian, Imperial and Highgate at Victoria Bridge Road - 2012 3. Albert Crescent - 2014 4. Longmead Terrace - 2015 5. Leopold House - 2015 6. Beatrice House - 2015 7. Elizabeth Parade - Late 2015 8. Alexandra House - Late 2015 9. Percy Terrace - 2016 10. Frederick House – 2016 11. Royal View – 2017 12. Sovereign Point – 2018

Left: The overview architectural plan, detailing the building stages of each of the property developments

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | THE PEOPLE

THE PEOPLE THE HOUSING DEVELOPER Scott Black, Managing Director, Crest Nicholson Regeneration “There is no arrogance about the success of this development. The achievements have been the result of real hard work and continuous collaboration. Proving this continues to be the modus operandi now as it will be in the future. Bath Riverside is set to be an iconic piece of architecture, and a positive legacy in this beautiful city for many generations to come.”

THE STONE SUPPLIER Matthew Hawker, Director, The Bath Stone Group “Having quality material for Bath Riverside is of paramount importance. Our rich reserves of stone and our stateof-the art equipment enable 6,000 cubic metres of mineral to be mined annually. We are conscious to ensure the high grade stone constantly meets the exacting standards of builder and discerning house buyer.”

THE ARCHITECT Christopher Egret, Partner, Studio Egret West “Conservation bodies can be formidable opponents to new development, and yet our experience in Bath proved otherwise; the city wanted to embrace a truly contemporary approach. Designed using a figure of eight to create depth and maximise views, the Royal View building has no beginning or end. This creates a sense of fluidity across all eight floors.”

THE PROJECT MANAGER Jamie Hurren, Crest Nicholson Regeneration

THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT Claire Hobart, Senior Associate, Grant Associates “Our approach and inspiration towards the design was how could we better connect with nature. Place-making is all about making connections. Connecting to nature, connecting the site back to the city, connecting people back to the river, connecting the river back to the land.”

“When the scaffolding gets dropped, landscaping gets finished, roads are tarmacked and finished and paved and cars are starting to park on drives or in spaces, then it starts to become a community. To see that happen is brilliant and that’s why we all enjoy working in this industry.”

THE SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR Marcus Evans, Crest Nicholson Regeneration

THE MATERIALS CONTOLLER Sheldon Payne, Crest Nicholson Regeneration “I started at Bath Riverside three years ago as an apprentice materials controller. Crest put faith in my hard work and ambition to do well and have given me the tools I need to move forward in my career. I am now working on the final stages of Royal View as a trainee site manager.”

“The early days of Bath Riverside saw many challenges, Some local residents felt our scheme was not appropriate for the city’s heritage status, but many of those who originally opposed the development now live there. It’s clear the mood has changed, demonstrated by the sales success.”

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | THE STONE

THE STONE

The location is secured. Now it’s time to start building. Bath stone might be an obvious choice for a new development in the city, but any building project needs to assess the innate qualities of the stone and evaluate its qualities as a contemporary building material 

WHY BATH STONE? Bath stone has been used within Bath’s architecture since Roman times. It has a surface uniformity that lends itself to grand architectural statements and can also be worked finely to create impressive architectural detailing. It has been extensively used in new-build and restoration projects nationally and internationally and is regularly specified by English Heritage, The National Trust and The Royal Household. Bath stone was an obvious choice for the Bath Riverside development, being strong, easy to carve, local to the site and fitting sensitively with the city’s existing architectural landscape. On a practical level, Bath stone is a freestone and so can be sawn or squared up in any direction. While the stone gives the impression of softness, it is in fact highly durable, as the examples of Roman and Georgian architecture in the city demonstrate.

SUSTAINABILITY Sustainability – in particular the use of local materials – was a decisive factor in the choice of stone supplier. Matthew Hawker, Director of The Bath Stone Group in Limpley Stoke who have supplied all the stone for the Riverside project, says, “There was a conscious desire to use local materials. As our stone is mined just down the road from the Riverside site, the project has fully embraced all sustainability issues.” With The Bath Stone Group having an annual stone tonnage level of over 12,000 tonnes, Matthew and his team have been able to satisfy the needs of the 40-acre development and to provide stone of the highest quality. As Matthew explains, “Bath Riverside is in a premier location so having quality material is of paramount importance, and we are conscious to ensure the high-grade stone constantly meets the exacting standards of builder and discerning house buyer alike.”

MINING THE STONE The Stoke Hill Mine owned by The Bath Stone Group lies on the outskirts of Bath. The rich reserves of stone and the state-of-theart equipment used by the company enables 6,000 cubic meters of consistent and uniform mineral to be mined annually. Stoke Hill Mine is the only producer of Stoke Ground Top Bed and

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Base Bed Bath stone and is the only mine able to call on the use of four electrically remote-controlled saws to extract the seam. The saw blades are tipped with tungsten and these are cut into the Bath Stone faces some 35 metres under the ground. Highly trained mining operatives carefully manoeuvre the saws and cut the face to specific dimensions and separate the two types of Stoke Ground Bath Stone within the seam. The resulting blocks are removed by inserting hydraulic water bags into the cuts and with the application of gentle pressure the stone blocks detach from the back of the cut.

The Top Bed stone is finely grained with a pale cream colour that mellows to the quintessential honey colour that is the hallmark of quality Bath stone

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ur story starts in the earth, 30 metres under the Bath countryside, with the mining of the Bath Stone used to build the development at Riverside. In fact it goes back further than this because the Stoke Ground Bath Stone is a light, honey-coloured oolitic limestone that was formed in the middle Jurassic period some 195 to 135million years ago. In the Jurassic period, the region around Bath (as we now know it) was under shallow seawater. Fragments of calcium carbonate rolled about on the sea bed and picked up coatings of lime, gradually growing in size and compacting together. With sustained pressure from ever-growing layers of sediment above them, these grains became the limestone that now defines the city of Bath.

TYPES OF STONE The two types or beds of stone are unique to Stoke Hill, the result of a very stable deposition during the middle Jurassic period. The Top Bed is finely grained with a pale cream or buff colour that mellows to the quintessential honey colour that is the hallmark of quality Bath Stone. It is used for ashlar, cladding, fireplaces and sculpture as its natural bed height can reach 1.6 metres high. The Base Bed is the ideal stone for exposed areas such as cornices, coping and string courses (the horizontal bands on a building). The stone is a light buff/grey colour with a slightly open grain and small intermittent shell inclusions and is therefore a popular choice for flooring, cladding and fireplaces.

BATH STONE AT RIVERSIDE Top Bed and Base Bed Bath stone have been used at Riverside. Architects and designers worked with the mine and the masonry contractors to ensure the best use of the two stone types. Forklift trucks remove each block and each one is checked for quality. The stone is then marked with the face number or area it was mined from, its bed type and most importantly the natural bed direction or grain. This information is used by the masonry team when cutting the stone – it also confirms the provenance and quality of each individual section. Once the miners are satisfied, the blocks are loaded onto a trailer and are hauled approximately two kilometres by a specially adapted tractor that can fit through the narrow historic tunnels of the old mine. As the load reaches the surface, or ‘daylights’, it is unloaded, checked again and then weighed. The allocation for the Riverside project is then placed, awaiting collection for cutting and the final formation of the high-grade ashlar and masonry that the project demands. 


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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | THE STONE

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THE BUILDING BLOCKS 1. The remote-controlled saw at work – the saw blades cut into the Bath stone face 35 metres underground 2. The freshly hewn blocks of stone leave the quarry and are assigned to the project 3. The Bath stone interior of Bath Abbey 4. Many of the buildings of the Royal Household use Bath Stone, including the west face of Buckingham Palace 5. A metal sculpture adds detail to a Bath stone wall at Riverside 6. A stone inscription in a new building in the Victoria Bridge Road development

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | THE ARCHITECTURE

THE ARCHITECTURE The design of Royal View is based on a language of curves. Other key themes are the central atrium and a strong connection with the landscape from all aspects, explains architect Christophe Egret of Studio Egret West

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ath is the most complete and best-preserved Georgian city in Britain and is on UNESCO’s world heritage list of 30 sites in the UK, considered to be of outstanding international importance. Conservation bodies can be formidable opponents to new developments, and yet our experience in Bath proved otherwise; the city wanted to embrace a truly contemporary approach for this riverside site. Our response was to introduce a language of curves to soften the form and help reduce the visual impact. A dash of orange tiles in the recesses of the balconies helps to break the solemnity of the stone cladding and is a reference to the rusty stains of ferruginous water found in the city’s Roman Baths. The building development acts as a marker from afar and as a ‘gatehouse’ to the masterplan at the crossing point over the River Avon. The historical significance of water in Bath – as a natural spa location – was also considered. The garden plant space on the roof of the building forms a ‘green crown’ that can be seen from afar, while vertical walls at ground-floor level soften the experience of passing between interior and exterior. We wanted the building to be deliberately distinct from the more rectilinear and formal elements of the surrounding masterplan, creating a sense of contrast between the street pattern of the masterplan to the south and the landscape of the riverside park in which the buildings will sit. The building’s formal language developed from our research of natural Bath stone, landscape formations and ideas of water and erosion. The curved form of the building as it steps backwards creates terrace spaces from which to view the landscape (the riverside park and the Royal Crescent, the Circus, and hills beyond). The curves are reminiscent of examples of Georgian buildings which use curved forms – often semi-circular in plan – to view specific pieces of landscape such as pleasure gardens.

INTERNAL DESIGN On entering at ground floor level, the atrium gives the building an immediate feeling of both light and space, drawing residents into the lobby and providing a direct link with the sky above. From here the lifts and stairwell serve as access to the residential floors, where apartments at the upper levels are arranged around the central atrium space. The logic of the central atrium was to draw natural light in from above at the same time as using this space to create internal balconies and walkways that provide the access into apartments. Each apartment has a recessed entrance, giving the sense of an individual private entrance. The central atrium is seen as the communal heart of the building, allowing views from level to level and sounds to travel VIII TheBATHMagazine

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between levels internally, which increases the potential for chance encounters with neighbours and natural surveillance over the residential entrances. Each apartment has been arranged to maximise views out and achieve solar orientation, allowing sunlight in but avoiding overheating and glare. The majority benefit from a corner or curved aspect.

ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE The building has been conceived as a pavilion within the landscape, inspired by and nestling within the landscape rather than sitting above it. Landscape is used as an architectural material, growing up the façade of the building as well as framing the top. The distinction between landscape and building is blurred so that the building is truly rooted in the riverside park setting. The building utilises and enhances the topography of the site by sitting on raised plateaux above the riverside park. This sitting also responds to the flood plain of the River Avon and helps to reduce the risk of flooding to a minimal amount. There has been careful consideration given to local wildlife, particularly through the use of green wall landscape features to aid to the riverside biodiversity. Lighting on the riverside façade has also been designed to minimise the impact on the river bat corridor. This building has no ‘back’ so it has been sited so that it connects equally well to each of the four elevations. Each elevation is shaped and formed to respond to the the various surroundings – the park, the river, the square and the other buildings on the site. The metalwork balconies in the façade design perform the same role as those you find on the classical architecture of Bath. While these primarily serve as protection from falling, they also give the building a contrasting detail and elegance against the solidity of the stone. The design of the balustrades is inspired by the adjacent Victoria Bridge. This bridge has an unusual construction where the suspension cables are diagonal rather than straight; once these diagonals are viewed in perspective they create the woven language upon which Royal View draws.

CONSULTATION A significant amount of consultation has been undertaken throughout the design process, including local individuals, residents’ groups and statutory and non-statutory consultees. We have done this through community and stakeholder events, workshops, a public exhibition and via social media and the local press.


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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | THE ARCHITECTURE

We wanted the building to be deliberately distinct from the more rectilinear and formal elements of the surrounding masterplan, creating a sense of contrast between the street pattern and the landscape of the riverside – Christophe Egret, Architect, Studio Egret West –

SUSTAINABILITY The residential brief set high sustainability and energy targets and requirements, including the provision of a central energy centre to supply both heat and electrical power through the use of a central heat and power plant (CHP). A proportion of the CHP plant – sized to supply the yearly average hot water and heating demand – is intended to be fuelled by biomass (timber and other plant material), which will generate around 10 percent of the residential energy requirements from renewable energy sources. 

Images courtesy of Hundven Clements

❝ These consultations have been critical in helping us to develop our design. The input from these various groups and meetings has been far-ranging – some of the suggestions have included a desire for sculptural forms, the use of Georgian detailing, and the idea of thinking about the roofs as the ‘fifth elevations’.

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | THE LANDSCAPE

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THE MAKING OF A LANDSCAPE 1. The waterside landscape from Royal View to Sovereign Point 2. Many new trees have been planted to knit the site into its broader landscape 3. Green vertical installations in the central atrium bring drama to the open space 4. Planted borders provide softness and colour and delineate the public walkways 5. Planted beds and avian topiary in one of the communal garden areas

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | THE LANDSCAPE

THE LANDSCAPE Making connections with nature has been a key inspiration for the landscape design team, Grant Associates, who started work on the project at Bath Riverside in 2006. Claire Hobart explains the design rationale behind their plans

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rant Associates worked closely with masterplanners Feilden Clegg Bradley Architects and Crest Nicholson Regeneration to develop the principles that influenced the relationship between new built form and open spaces. The approach was collaborative, design-led and inspired by the context of the world heritage city of Bath. The conceptual basis for the landscape design masterplan hinged around creating a clear hierarchy of spaces. Each space and the major linking corridors were given clear identities and boundaries, establishing a sequence of views and other sensory experiences. The design sought to set out highly functional plans for spaces that best suited their purpose and setting.

CONTEXT The urban fabric of Bath is fundamentally shaped by the interrelationship between landscape and buildings. Each era of Bath’s development has created a legacy of important public streets, spaces, parks and playgrounds, each representative of the needs and concerns of the age they were built. At Bath Western Riverside the intention has been to create a landscape and public realm for the 21st century. A feature of Bath’s public space through the ages has been the emphasis on creating grand walkways, circuits and other opportunities to promenade and meet people. These have always responded to the topography, aspect and the spirit of the setting. The spaces have been associated with fun and leisure activities and typically incorporate feature buildings or structures. Bath Western Riverside follows this model, but enriches it with contemporary ideas for the environment and its features. The holistic vision addressed the multiple aspects of a sustainable development, such as lifestyle, mixed use, flooding, ecology, energy, water, recreation, education, value and context. The River Avon provides a natural focus, with a new riverside experience lined by a sequence of new public spaces and routes including the new and refurbished river crossings of Victoria Bridge and the Destructor Bridge. Public open spaces are overlooked by distinctive new riverside residential buildings.

PLANTING New planting includes a significant number and variety of trees to enhance the overall character and knit the site into its broader landscape. Most importantly the scheme provides space for trees along the riverside to form informal belts and clumps to enhance riverside potential for nature conservation. A hierarchy of street trees ranges from large trees along the strategic routes to smaller trees in residential streets and gardens. Landmark trees and clumps are proposed at key locations in the site to break up the visual mass of buildings and to act as local features of the site. This green character is reinforced by a framework of planting to streets, front gardens, communal gardens, living walls, roof gardens, green roofs and garden balconies. This multi-layered approach reflects the nature of the Georgian city, with planting from basement to roof level.

OPEN SPACES The proposals represent significant additions to the public realm and riverside of Bath. The area of the new riverside parks and associated links and landscapes are comparable to many of the major public parks and spaces in the city, such as Parade Gardens and Green Park, providing a refuge and peaceful space for both people and wildlife. With a clear emphasis on ecology, art and general recreation, these new spaces offer contemporary and distinctive new additions to the fabric of the city. Incidental play and landscape features are incorporated into the public areas and residents’ gardens along with improved links to the formal play and recreation facilities in Victoria Park. Bath Western Riverside occupies an important piece of Bath’s river corridor. Grant Associates recognised the need for the landscape framework to ensure the project was fully integrated into the world heritage setting, at the same time possessing its own sense of neighbourhood. The riverside areas of central Bath, such as Parade Gardens, demonstrate how the urban form has responded to the specific geometry and levels of the river to create a variety of conditions and character. The key landscape components included the treatment of the river corridor; the extensive use of large trees in streets, parks and squares; the clear delineation of open spaces with terraces and object buildings. The landscape design reinterpreted the use and detailing of the traditional Bath landscape and public realm to create an area of the city with a clearly contemporary, but complementary character through expressive ramps, steps, walls, railings and embankments.

VIEWS AND LANDMARKS From Bath Western Riverside, attractive and distinctive views are afforded to a number of Bath’s landmarks and surrounding countryside. These views offer the most distinctive sense of being in Bath and are typical of the pattern of views experienced throughout the city centre out to the surrounding hillsides. The site layout and landscape masterplan have been designed to allow multiple opportunities for views out from the development to local landmarks such as St Stephens’s Church Tower, Beckford’s Tower, the steeple of Locksbrook Cemetery Chapel, Beechen Cliff, Twerton Round Hill and Kelston Hill. Enhancement of the river corridor includes the planting of strategic trees to frame views, line the river and to contribute to general habitat enhancements. New local views have been created within the development using built form to frame views to the river corridor and promote a continual sense of connection to green and open spaces.

PUBLIC ART A trail of public art is laid out for discovery and delight, woven into the fabric of the buildings and landscape. Sculptural pieces in prominent positions in the public areas are complemented by smaller incidental interventions in public and communal spaces. These enrich the experience of the place. The public art is linked to a strategy for information and education in the landscape, telling the history of the site and the ecology of the River Avon.  THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | THE BUILD

THE BUILD Coordinating a building development on a large site and not inconveniencing people already living there can be a challenge. Jamie Hurren, the overall project manager at Bath Riverside, explains how the overall plan is masterminded

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n a project of this size and scale, there are a huge number of elements which need to be considered and co-ordinated. This is no mean feat when you are covering a 40-acre site where dangerous construction work is taking place, and striving to provide a serene living space for those already residing at Bath Riverside. There needs to be a continuous fine balance. This is achieved by having a project manager who oversees the entire site, supported by a full team from all disciplines: surveyors, technical managers, architects, accountants to name but a few, all working in project offices on site with weekly meetings to enable efficient communication between all parties.

PHASES OF WORK To accommodate the large scale of the site at Bath Riverside, the work is divided up into individual phases with separate management teams for each phase. This allows each team to take ownership of their piece of this iconic development. Rather than working independently, however, it is essential that all the teams for all the phases co-ordinate their work, especially when phases are being built simultaneously.

COMMUNICATION There are site logistics to consider – such as traffic management, moving-in strategies, and the separation of construction and residential areas – so awareness and communication are key. In a bid to ensure residents are kept abreast of the changes and progress of the development, there is a monthly newsletter circulated to all residents detailing the work that is taking place

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at that time on the development. Residents are always encouraged to feed back any queries, questions or concerns to the site team who always try their best to help.

ASPIRING HIGH One of the greatest challenges of Bath Riverside for the construction team has been the installation of Victoria Bridge, which took more than 30 people in excess of 15 months. The bridge is remarkable in that it was built without ever spanning the river. Constructed and imported from Italy on articulated lorries, there was an extremely detailed and carefully managed delivery schedule which involved the bridge being escorted through the finished areas of the development. Using hydraulic jacks, the bridge was effectively pushed across the river into its final position. The construction team are exceptionally proud of their achievements at Bath Riverside. Of great note is the Royal View apartment building, the first of two iconic, curved buildings on the banks of the river. The building was of such a complex and unusual nature that it was recognised for the National House Building Council’s (NHBC) Pride in the Job Awards, winning the best in the region and was entered into the national final. The build of Bath Riverside is a complex, challenging, but ultimately rewarding juggling act. Knowing all the incredibly hard work that has gone on behind the scenes makes the construction team responsible incredibly proud, and brings a remarkable sense of satisfaction. There aren’t many jobs where you get to see a disused waste ground evolve to transform into a collection of award-winning buildings and, ultimately, a place to call home. 


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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | THE STYLING

INTERIORS GALLERY The Riverside project has consulted with a number of interior designers who were responsible for different phases – the most recent three to be finished were designed by Rasalo. Each one had an individual brief: Alexandra House – ‘Fashionable and different’; Royal View –‘Fresh and contemporary’; and the Penthouse in Royal View –‘A classical look’. So how do you style a one-million-pound penthouse showhome? Here’s a peek inside Royal View

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A MODERN CLASSIC 1. The spiral staircase in Royal View leads up to the roof terrace 2. A contemporary look in the lounge of the penthouse suite 3. Clean lines in the open-plan kitchen with breakfast bar 4. Intimate, elegant dining and a dramatic view of the spiral staircase 5. A Buddah figure brings a sense of spirituality to a balcony seat 6. Statement wallpaper on a bedroom wall in the Royal View penthouse gives texture and focus to the sleeping area

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TALES FROM THE RIVERSIDE | LOOKING AHEAD

LOOKING AHEAD By Scott Black, Managing Director of Crest Nicholson Regeneration

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he future of Bath Riverside is bright. As the development continues to evolve and mature, it is certain to become home to many more Bath residents and form a special place in the heart of this beautiful city. It’s true that the project has not been without its challenges, not least in the form of strong local opposition from many resistant to the contemporary look and feel of the development in such a resolutely Georgian setting. This sentiment has however subsided as Bath Riverside has grown. Indeed many of those originally opposing the development are now residents of this new city landmark. The way ahead will include commercial buildings such as a café and restaurant, together with a four-and-a-half acre park. Growing a real community and capitalising on the almost forgotten riverside element of the city, the area will go from strength to strength. The development has even challenged the notion that there is no crossover between Bristol and Bath property markets. This was highlighted recently on Channel 4’s Location Location Location where a Bristol couple was featured purchasing at Bath Riverside, drawn by the dramatic riverside site and the proximity between the cities. The future won’t be without its challenges. Overcoming local opposition is an ongoing process, along with the fact that the market has become tougher. Marcus Evans, Sales and Marketing Director at Crest Nicholson, believes that there is a need to work with local partners to educate the marketplace about Bath Riverside. It is also important to stimulate a slower market – processes need to be made as easy as possible for potential purchasers, using tools such as part exchange. Maintaining the sales momentum at the development is essential to ensuring the riverside area evolves and establishes itself as the hugely desirable destination that it has always promised to be. There is no arrogance about the success of this development. The achievements have been the result of real hard work and continuous collaboration. Providing this continues to be the modus operandi now as it will be in the future. Bath Riverside is set to be an iconic piece of architecture, and a positive legacy in this beautiful city for many generations to come. 

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Any city with a river running though it is a special place. Bath’s River Avon has defined the city from Roman times when baths and a temple were built in the valley of the River Avon. The river – running in Bath from Locksbrook to Pulteney Weir – has followed the city’s fortunes ever since. The city has many other assets. Its size means that everything is walkable; it is blessed with beautifully proportioned architecture crafted from a stone that flatters in any light; and at every turn there are leafy parks and green spaces to find quiet moments of recreation and peace. There are also two high-profile universities, high-achieving schools, a good business infrastructure, as well as a desire to promote the arts, culture and diversity. Yes, Bath is a city that attracts worldwide interest, but – like so many smaller cities – its ability to accommodate has fallen short of demand. In this special edition we follow the story of the Crest Nicholson Riverside urban regeneration project in Bath, from its status as an unloved wasteland 10 years ago to the creation of a purposeful, contemporary community offering an array of state-of-the-art homes. We speak to people who have worked across this major landmark project, identifying their commitment to build, the sense of community they have created and their investment in the long-term success and wellbeing of the city.

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TRISTAN DARBY Our resident sommelier finds some cooler wines for warmer weather

IS IT A REALLY GOOD INVESTMENT? Duncan Campbell HAS BEEN DEALING IN ANTIQUE SILVER SINCE 1986.

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urely one of the most interesting things about wine is the seemingly endless combination of grape type, vineyard location and winemaking tricks that combine to make so many wonderful varieties. Most wines on the shelves are made from just a handful of key grape varieties, but the difference between them can sometimes be vast. This month’s recommendations are based on where nature has helped to contribute character and freshness, making them perfect for sipping in these warmer months. The grapes for Yealand’s Single Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2017 (£12.75 at Great Western Wine) are grown at Yealands Seaview vineyard, one of New Zealand’s most coastal, located in Marlborough’s Awatere sub-region. The high level of sunshine and wind, cool nights and low rainfall here produces smaller, thicker-skinned berries with more intense aromatics and flavours. It’s consistently great Marlborough sauvignon blanc, concentrated and complex with aromas of blackcurrant leaf, cut grass, guava fruit, herbs and a touch of citrus. It’s got the perfect balance between fruitiness and freshness in the mouth, with a long, dry refreshing citrus and mineral finish. This is fantastic on its own, but also works well with goat’s cheese salads, and green veg-based pasta and risotto. The excellent Leyda Pinot Noir Single Vineyard ‘Las Brisas’ 2015 (£14.95 at GWW) hails from Chile’s cool Leyda Valley. It’s another wine with a coastal influence in the vineyard, which has a south-west aspect, the westerly exposure receiving a cooling Pacific breeze (Las Brisas), and the southerly one with less direct sunlight. Both of these factors help to slow down the maturation of the grapes and encourage deeper aromas and flavours. Red summer fruit waft out of the glass, with some floral and spice notes. It’s round, fruity and juicy in the mouth with cherry and blackberry flavours, underpinned with a savoury herbal and spice character. It’s a must-buy for pinot lovers looking for an interesting well-made wine with bags of character at a very reasonable price. Great with a host of mushroom pork, duck, tuna or salmon dishes. Vines planted at altitude can make wines with extra freshness and intensity. Generally, the higher you go, the more the average temperature drops, meaning higher acidity levels in the wine. The difference between day and night time temperature is greater, too, which helps to preserve the acidity. Ramón Bilbao Viñedos de Altura 2014 (£14.50 at GWW) is a vibrant and fresh Rioja Crianza from vineyards located at around 700 metres, made with an unusually equal blend of Tempranillo and Garnacha. A gorgeous floral nose with blackberry and red fruits is followed by a flavoursome mouthful of intense dark cherries and berries, some toasty oak, and chocolaty spice. However, there’s loads of freshness and life here and a satisfying, long, mouthwatering finish. An ideal wine for barbecued meats, or spiced pork and lamb dishes. n You can learn more about the effects of location on wine with Tristan at Great Western Wine on Wednesday 27 June at a Location, Location, Location wine tasting. Tickets are available at: greatwesternwine.co.uk/events

There's a historically justified expectation in the UK that the value of our houses will go up in value over time.

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here's a historically justified expectation in the UK that the value of our houses will go up in value over time. The same assumption is often made for antiques. This is not such a leap of faith as the value of antiques has, for the last generation or two, at least kept up with inflation. From time to time certain antiques have roared up in price especially when two or more deep pocketed collectors appear in the market. However, a basic principle of economics is that any price rise is dependant on the future demand and not past performance.

There are plenty of antiques which, while the height of fashion in the 1980’s are just not fashionable with people creating their interior scheme now. Over the same period, a range of furniture and decorative items made after the war have gone from being uninteresting “second hand” to highly desirable “vintage”. The scarcity of well made and designed items from the post war period has made values rise considerably in recent years and while tastes remain for ‘20th century modern’ it is a fair bet that the prices of good pieces will continue to be strong. Anyone who has the temerity to claim that they have prior knowledge of what might be a “good investment” is deluding themselves. We can all guess at what might go up in value and even make an educated guess based on what we think is undervalued now but this is at best, a ‘roll of the dice’. A good antique investment that can be guaranteed is to buy something that is enjoyed for its beauty and hopefully can be used daily. For example; as the flat pack explosion subsides we may see an increase in enthusiasm for durable, handmade wooden furniture. I was amused recently by a friend who commented that as his family and dogs had walked and even slept on his old persian rugs for over 30 years and that he was taking them away to his new house, why on earth would anyone expect them to have gone up in value? A good investment is a useful thing, if it goes up in price too that’s fantastic! n www.beaunashbath.com, 01225 334234

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AFTERNOON | TEA

A SPOT OF TEA

A few of the best spots where you can enjoy a quintessentially English afternoon tea

THE GAINSBOROUGH BATH SPA HOTEL Beau Street, Bath BA1 1QY Tel: 01225 358888 Web: thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk What could epitomise ‘the Bath experience’ more perfectly than taking an afternoon tea in the classic yet irrefutably modern Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel? This is an experience for both locals and visitors. Your traditional afternoon tea will be served in the glamorous atmosphere of the fashionable Canvas Room, where you can sit, chat and enjoy the stylish surroundings. The delectable selection of sandwiches, scones, cakes and refreshments come with the additional option of Champagne if you wish to make your experience that little bit more indulgent. Afternoon tea at The Gainsborough is £30 per person, or £46 with a glass of Champagne, and is served every day from 3 – 5.30pm. Booking is essential.

BAILBROOK HOUSE HOTEL Eveleigh Avenue, London Road West, Bath BA1 7JD Tel: 01225 855100 Web: handpickedhotels.co.uk/bailbrookhouse Afternoon tea is a great British tradition and what better place to enjoy it than the historic surroundings of Bailbrook House? Relax in one of the royal lounges or take in the panoramic views of the Avon Valley from the Cloisters Restaurant patio. Tea is served the traditional way using the finest loose-leaf teas, strained to your personal taste which together with a selection of delicious sandwiches, handmade cakes, pastries and scones make up the perfect tea experience. Why not take advantage of the hotel’s Prosecco afternoon tea offer during June, July and August and have two Prosecco teas for £29?

LUCKNAM PARK Lucknam Park Hotel, Colerne SN14 8AZ Tel: 01225 742777 Web: lucknampark.co.uk Indulge in a traditional English afternoon tea at Lucknam Park Hotel, an 18th-century Palladian mansion set among 500 glorious acres of beautiful gardens and unspoilt parkland. Tea at Lucknam Park has always been a firm favourite with visitors, whether it’s for a special occasion or just a treat after a long day shopping in Bath, which is only six miles away. From £29 per person you will be able to enjoy a full English afternoon tea served in the library or drawing room overlooking the gardens, or if it’s fine weather, on the terrace. Reservations are recommended. Afternoon tea is available Monday – Saturday, 2.30 – 5pm and from 3 – 5pm on Sundays.

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AFTERNOON | TEA

THE IVY BATH BRASSERIE 39 Milsom Street, Bath BA1 1DS Tel: 01225 307100 Web: theivybathbrasserie.com The relaxed yet sophisticated setting at The Ivy Bath Brasserie is perfect for an afternoon spot of tea for local businesses, residents and visitors. The menu features an array of sweet and savoury favourites such as truffled chicken brioche rolls, marinated cucumber and dill sandwiches and smoked salmon on rye with cream cheese and chives, as well as raspberry cheesecake and chocolate and salted caramel mousse. Afternoon tea at The Ivy Bath Brasserie is served daily from 3 – 5pm and is £17.95 per person, or £25.95 with a glass of Champagne.

THE BATH PRIORY HOTEL Weston Road, Bath BA1 2XT Tel: 01225 331922 Web: thebathpriory.co.uk Served in The Pantry, in the lounges or on the terrace overlooking four acres of award-winning gardens in the summer sunshine, afternoon tea at The Bath Priory is something of a hidden gem. Treat yourself to a full afternoon tea including a selection of freshly cut sandwiches, delicious homemade cakes and warm scones served with clotted cream and a local preserve. Choose from a vast selection of teas and coffees or, enjoy a fine glass of Ruinart Champagne with your tea. Afternoon tea at The Bath Priory is available daily from 3 – 5pm and is £30 per person; Champagne Afternoon Tea is £42 per person.

THE PUMP ROOM Stall Street, Bath BA1 1LZ Tel: 01225 444477 Web: romanbathssearcys.co.uk A visit to Bath wouldn’t be complete without a trip to the Georgian splendour of The Pump Room, with its Corinthian columns and crystal chandelier. Live music is played daily by the resident pianist and trio to create an enchanting atmosphere. The Pump Room is world-famous for its signature traditional afternoon tea packages which are served daily from noon. There are a number of options including the beautifully elegant Beau Nash Tea which is served with a pot of Pump Room blend loose-leaf tea, a glass of Fentimans ginger beer, Bath chap and ham hock terrine, mini Bath bun, egg

custard and nutmeg tart and a rhubarb syllabub dessert with almond crumble, for £26 per person. The Pump Room has also launched a Somerset High Tea which is perfect as a Father’s Day gift; this includes an Orchard Pig cider or apple juice, a chicken and fennel sausage roll and a free-range scotch egg, as well as a deliciously sweet apple cider cake. All afternoon teas are served with a loose-leaf house tea or a pot of hand roasted coffee, for £18.95 per person. For something a little more opulent, the Searcys Champagne Pump Room Tea (£35) adds a chilled glass of sparkling cuvée to the standard Pump Room Tea package, which includes a traditional selection of sandwiches, cakes and delicacies.

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AFTERNOON | TEA

THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM Great Pulteney Street, Bath BA2 4DB Tel: 01225 388572 Web: holburne.org One of the most beautiful outdoor spaces in Bath, only a 10-minute walk from the centre of town, the Garden Café at the Holburne Museum provides the perfect escape within the city for a relaxing cream tea. This summer you can visit the beautiful exhibition Prized Possessions: Dutch Masterpieces from National Trust Houses and enjoy a cream tea for only £12.50. The seasonal menu also offers light lunches, cakes, a selection of tea and coffee, and includes in the summer months a barbecue on Saturday and Sunday. The Garden Café has something to treat yourself to whatever the time of day, and is open from 10am. Last orders are taken at 4.30pm.

THE REGENCY TEA ROOM The Jane Austen Centre, 40 Gay Street, Bath BN1 2NT Tel: 01225 443000 Web: janeausten.co.uk Combine the rich history of Jane Austen novels and high-tea treats at The Regency Tea Room. Tea and literature lovers can enjoy two of their favourite things. Step back in time as you enjoy a delightful range of loose- leaf teas, coffees, sandwiches and sweet treats. The staff will also be dressed in full Regency regalia. Have tea with Mr Darcy or dine on delicious scones with Lady Catherine and immerse yourself in some of the finest literature in history. The full menu is served daily between 10am and 4.30pm and is available in both vegan or gluten-free options.

WOOLLEY GRANGE HOTEL Woolley Green, Bradford-on-Avon BA15 1TX Tel: 01225 864705 Web: woolleygrangehotel.co.uk Afternoon tea is a relaxed affair at Woolley Grange. Ideal for young and old, this luxury family hotel offers a range of afternoon tea options from a simple but delicious cream tea at £9.50 to full afternoon tea at £21.50, or a champagne afternoon tea for £32. Scones are served with indulgent clotted cream and strawberry jam; sandwiches are freshly made and cakes are hand baked by the talented pastry chef. All is served on white porcelain with the finest loose-leaf tea selection. There’s even a special child’s afternoon tea (£6.75) with finger sandwiches, crunchy carrot and cucumber sticks served with flatbread fingers and hummus, scrummy chocolate brownie and fruit jelly and ice-cream, plus a babyccino, milkshake or hot chocolate. Afterwards explore the 14-acre gardens; meet Rosie the Pig, Simon the Rabbit and the Indian runner ducks; admire the produce in the Victorian walled kitchen garden; enjoy a game of croquet, boules or football; or simply chill in this fabulous country setting. *Booking is subject to availability and the offer is not valid on bank holiday weekend.

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EXCLUSIVE OFFER Enjoy a free child’s afternoon tea when purchased with an adult tea. Simply show this at the hotel to redeem. Valid until 30 June*


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ROYAL CRESCENT HOTEL & SPA 16 Royal Crescent, Bath BA1 2LS Tel: 01225 823333 Web: royalcrescent.co.uk What can be better than relaxing in the beautiful location of the iconic Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa and catching up with friends over a chilled glass of Champagne and a delectable selection of scones and sandwiches? The hotel’s unique selection of five afternoon teas include beautiful finger sandwiches, delicate cakes and savouries, the finest world teas and some of Bath’s best scones and buns. Sit down and relax in the hotel’s breathtaking acre of secluded gardens or enjoy the elegant surroundings of the award-winning Dower House Restaurant. You can even add a flight of Taittinger Champagne or a Grey Goose martini cocktail flight to complement your Royal Crescent experience. Afternoon tea is served daily between 1.30 – 6pm and the price is £37.50 per person, or with a glass of Champagne £50 per person. Afternoon tea with a Taittinger Champagne or Martini flight is £62.50 per person, and children’s afternoon tea is £19.50 per child.

the delicious guide the best places in the city to eat, drink and enjoy

available online at our website

www.thebathmag.co.uk

Bringing a little bit of Colombia to the UK Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

Find us at 6 Abbey Gate Street, Bath BA1 1NP tel: 07534 391992 thecolombiancompany.com

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FOOD AND DRINK | BUSINESS FOCUS

CLEAR WATERS

Even if you were to only visit Bath for a couple of hours, you couldn’t help but come away knowing that Bath’s very foundations were built on the mineral-rich springs that flow beneath the city’s historical Roman remains; heck, there’s water, water everywhere. But two years ago there was not a drop of locally sourced H2 0 in a bottle to drink. “Given the city’s history, surely we can do a bit better than that,” said Rachel Allen – and the idea of Bath Water was born. Melissa Blease gets the low down

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FOOD AND DRINK | BUSINESS FOCUS

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he Bath Water story goes something like this: in October 2016, Rachel Allen, her husband Mark and their friend Jonathan Willis were having lunch in a city centre restaurant. They ordered water for the table... and a bottle sourced from Scotland appeared. “We asked ourselves, why hasn’t Bath got its very own brand of water?” Rachel recalls. “And so, we went to work. We started laying the foundations of the business in November 2016, founded the company in March 2017 and started trading in May last year.” In a very short space of time, Bath Water has made quite a splash. Local businesses lent their full support to the initiative, and a solid customer base was swiftly established. Meanwhile, the company’s high profile at events such as the Gourmet Picture Company’s screenings in Royal Victoria Park, the Bath Boules event and their role as Official Hydration Partner of Bath Rugby (established last August) has changed thirst-quenching habits across the city. But it hasn’t all been easydrinking at Bath Water HQ... “As you’d imagine, there’s far more involved to launching a new brand of bottled water than just sticking a label on a bottle,” says Rachel. “There’s been an awful lot of work to do from start to finish, from complying with various legislations, branding and packaging to finding the right partners to support and help promote us. But Mark has been launching products and services for Blue Chip and SME clients for the last 20 years, and I’ve worked extensively in PR and media as well as supporting new businesses and marketing initiatives in the Fast-Moving Consumer Goods food and drink sector. As a team, we have all the right skills at our fingertips.” And, it turns out, a great deal of inspiration to drive the company’s ambitions forward. Bath Water continues the tradition started by Victorian entrepreneur Jonathan Burdett Bowler of providing a natural spring water, drawn from the original source of Bath’s spring water from organic Mendip Hills land. With an almost perfect PH of 7.3, it has a fantastically clear, fresh taste – and the bottle is equally refreshing too; plonk it on a supper table alongside the prerequisite bottles of wine and it naturally creates an interesting talking point. “We wanted the very look of Bath Water to capture our passion for our city and locally sourced produce,” Rachel explains. “Essentially, we aimed to put Bath in a bottle. Using an obvious play on words in creating the brand, we aimed to capture the essence of leisure and fun for which Bath is renowned, while honouring our local culture and history. The label takes you through a journey of Bath’s heritage, incorporating Bath’s founder King Bladud and his pigs in 863BC, and the most famous of Bath landmarks, the Royal Crescent.” But while Rachel acknowledges that sharing a vision with people who are equally passionate about working towards the same goal and gaining the support and backing of local businesses has gone a long way to helping the Bath Water team turn their dreams into reality, their mission has not been without its challenges. “We’re a tiny company, so we’re pretty much on the case 24/7,” she says. “Even when we managed to take a short break abroad last summer, there was a hiccup with our delivery driver; we flew back to Bristol airport, drove straight to our warehouse to collect the van and delivered to all our customers on time – but that kind of immediate response is the nature of the business’s beast at this stage. “Working days can be very long, too, and we often find ourselves working late into the night, which can make it hard to switch off. As full-time working parents, it’s not always easy to maintain the work/life balance either, but family and friends are a great support in emergencies. Oh, and we try our best not to talk about the business during family mealtimes, but sometimes that’s impossible.” Such stresses don’t detract, however, from the company’s pipeline plans for further development. Rachel, Mark and Jonathan want to expand Bath Water into other regions in the UK as well as international markets including Europe, Japan, China, South Africa and Canada, following interest from distributors at the Speciality and Fine Food Fair in London’s Olympia last September. The Bath Rugby sponsorship, too, has created yet another wave of buoyancy that further establishes Bath Water’s tide of success. “Mark is a very keen Bath Rugby fan, so he was especially delighted when we negotiated our Official Hydration Partner

Mark and Rachel Allen

sponsorship. Bath Rugby are avid supporters of local businesses so, combined with Mark’s passion and loyalty to the club, we make a great team. We were able to supply a sports cap, easy-drink bottle for the squad that got us off to a great start, and they love it. We also supply Farleigh House HQ (on the club’s training ground) and the Recreation Ground bars and hospitality areas with our large 750ml bottles.” Phew! But even with so much going on, the Bath Water team still make time to kick back and relax when their schedule permits – and when downtime arrives, they make the very most of the lively food and drink scene on our doorsteps. “The cafés, bars, hotels and restaurants in Bath are the life-blood of the city, and our fellow local independent business need all the support we can offer them,” says Rachel. “We visit our indies at every opportunity; our favourites include the Green Bird Café, No 15 Great Pulteney, the Porter, Corkage, the Hare and Hounds, Society Café, the Circus Restaurant and The Bath Priory for special occasions.” Whatever the occasion, make it memorable by raising a glass to Bath Water: one of the city’s most refreshing local businesses. n Visit: bathwater.co.uk

SUMMER SERVING SUGGESTIONS with still or sparkling Bath Water to taste; and add ice to serve.

Strawberry Spritz Muddle a handful of quartered fresh strawberries, a generous squeeze of fresh lime juice and a few sprigs of fresh basil together in a jug. Top up with a 750ml bottle of sparkling Bath Water and add ice to serve.

Luscious Lemonade Combine the juice from 6 freshly-squeezed lemons with 3 level tablespoons of sugar in a small pan; heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar has dissolved (around 2–3 minutes.) Transfer to a jug and allow to cool before topping up with still or sparkling Bath Water and ice.

Orange Oasis Mingle the juice from 3 freshly-squeezed oranges with 2 tablespoons of runny honey or maple syrup. Serve diluted

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Food review June Giggling Squid.qxp_Layout 1 23/05/2018 14:42 Page 1

RESTAURANT | REVIEW

GIGGLING SQUID Bluecoat House, Saw Close, Bath BA1 1EY. Tel: 01225 331486, visit: gigglingsquid.com

R E V I EW

THE OLD SCHOOL THAI

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he Grade II listed Bluecoat House is the home of the new Thai offering in Saw Close, Giggling Squid. It’s on the site of an 18th-century charity school, but the building itself dates from 1850, constructed in a brimful-offeatures Northern Renaissance style, with turrets, columns, arched openings and a leaded spire. Yes, it’s as far as you can get from a traditional Thai stilt house with overhanging eaves and a gabled roof with a smoke hole to the sky. But let’s mix it up – Thai Renaissance rocks, you see. Once inside, we settled ourselves in a large, high-ceilinged room, formerly an enormous classroom. This is light, high, uplifting, spectacular. The walls are decorated with free-flowing florals in dusty shades of mauve, lilac and pale green. One wall is pinned with artificial flower stems in blushing magenta and soft pinks. The centre of the room features two metal pergola ‘birdcages’, each surrounding a table. The space is at such a scale that tables and diners stretch into the distance. When it comes to Thai we’re not undercatered for in Bath, but our liking for the food has gathered such pace – filled as it is with fresh herbs and spices, lots of vegetables, low carbohydrate and a natural absence of gluten – that there’s welcome space for another. Giggling Squid launched in the owners’ fisherman’s cottage in Brighton in 2002 – it had a leaky roof and dodgy lighting, but its menu was a massive hit, so the brand has 74 TheBATHMagazine

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become a roll-out chain with attitude, stretching its vision to quirky sites in more than 25 towns from Billericay to Bury St Edmunds and Salisbury to Sevenoaks. Our waitress Saifon, meaning ‘rain’, unpeeled the constraints of her name with her bright-as-sunshine hospitality, and eased us into the menu. Prawn crackers, brown from the spices, and a sweet satay sauce accompanied our decision-making. Thai cuisine encourages shared (tapas) dishes, so we ordered three for starters – salt and pepper squid, watermelon salad with pork floss and chicken satay, the latter with pickled vegetables and peanut sauce. The first is a Giggling Squid staple, the tender squid lightly coated in flour, deep fried and served with spring onion and sliced chilli. The second created outstanding contrasts, the cool juiciness of the watermelon counterpointed by the nutty pork floss (made from dried, shredded pork) with undercurrents of lime juice, fried shallot and leafy herbs. For our main we continued to share, creating combined piles on our plates – Thai green curry, hake with dry green curry, jasmine rice, stir-fry pak choi and tender stems, and the classic vegetable pad Thai covered with a protective net of omelette. The green curry with chicken had a fragrant sauce that majored on a sweet coconut heat with a chilli kick. The hake was flaky and luminous, with levels of lingering flavour from grachai, lemongrass, galangal and lime

leaves. The jasmine rice absorbed the flavours and textures of the different dishes, a taste experience called khluk. For dessert we sampled jasmine and toasted rice ice cream (a mild floral flavour with swollen grains of rice captured in each mouthful); black sesame ice cream (a green/grey shade with a smoky, nutty character); pineapple, coconut and Mekhong (aka the spirit of Thailand) sorbet; and lychee yogurt ice cream, carrying a light, mellow fruity taste. Compare these with off-the-shelf iced desserts, quite frankly, and you’ll never approach a frozen dessert aisle again. We finished with cocktails, enjoying the sweet liquid explosion of a strawberry mojito with Mekhong, mint and lime and a Thai coconut, gin and coconut flavoured rum with fever tree ginger and lime, the glass decorated, margarita style, with a rim of salt. Cocktails aside, this is not just for grownups – there’s a children’s menu with mix-and-match small plates (two for £5.95) including chicken satay and peanut sauce and pad Thai noodles. So there’s no escaping the Thai experience for the young ones, but what temping options for training up their palate. Don’t visit Giggling Squid for a pre-theatre meal because there’s no brisk let’s-eat-andtake-to-the-stalls vibe – we were there for more than three hours. Instead arrive for a leisurely evening, and revel in subtle, layered flavours characterised by garlic, galangal, lemon grass and lime, and an immersive EC south east asian experience. n


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CITY | PEOPLE

ROMAN BATHS AND PUMP ROOM WIN TOP NATIONAL TOURISM AWARDS

Bagan

The Roman Baths has been recognised for the outstanding welcome it offers to visitors with disabilities at the national VisitEngland Awards for Excellence. The attraction won gold in the ‘Inclusive Tourism’ category as well as silver for ‘Inbound Tourism’. Councillor Paul Myers said: “Many efforts have been made to ensure that the Roman Baths can be enjoyed by all of its visitors, including those with disabilities, for example through staff training, information provision and adjustments to the building. “It’s great that the Roman Baths has been named as the best in the whole of England for inclusivity, as well as receiving a second award for Inbound Tourism. The Roman Baths and Pump Room receive more than 1.3 million visitors every year, which in turn benefits the economy of the whole area.” Owing to recent major redevelopments, 90% of the Roman Baths can now be accessed by wheelchair users. Visitors with hearing or visual impairments can explore the site using British sign-language guides and tactile displays, and visitors on the autism spectrum can find detailed guidance about what to expect on the Roman Baths website; romanbaths.co.uk

TRAVEL EXPERTS TRAILFINDERS OPENS Trailfinders has opened its latest store on Union Street in Bath, making it the 34th travel centre to open in the UK and Ireland. The travel experts were voted ‘Best Tour Operator’ by readers of The Times in 2017 for the fifth consecutive year. Bath residents will now have the award-winning service and knowledge on their doorsteps. From chic city breaks to luxury beach resorts, wildlife safaris or a classic cruise, Trailfinders can tailormake any holiday you wish; trailfinders.com

ASHFORD HOMES ON THE MOVE Local award-winning developer Ashford Homes now has purposebuilt, state-of-the-art new headquarters in Bradford on Avon. The company has steadily outgrown its humble beginnings with a team of just four and currently has developments in Bath, Bourton, Cirencester, Chilcompton, Devizes, Faulkland, Rode, Sparkford and Trowbridge and a workforce of 30. Ashford Homes builds highly specified quality homes and the new premises reflect these standards. The contemporary designed building conceived with SRA Architects will be built using natural, locally sourced materials and will embrace new technology with photovoltaic solar panels on the roof combined

LOOK OUT FOR:

Pub in the Park 8 – 10 June

Credit © platongkoh01 – DepositPhotos

CITYNEWS

NEW HEARING CENTRE ARRIVES IN BATH

with air source heat pump technology, making the building exceptionally economic to run. The building will also house a specialist sales suite. Contact Carter Jonas for enquiries tel: 01225 747268; ashford-homes.co.uk

A new hearing centre has recently opened in Bath with the aim of making hearing issues easier to tackle. Hearing aid audiologists Anthony and Alison Stone are passionate about helping people to hear better and making a difference to patients and people they care for. They create a formidable partnership, delivering expertise in patient care, hearing loss and hearing aid technology. Hearing aid technology has made some incredible breakthroughs in the last two years. From direct streaming of sound from a smart phone to internet apps, and seamless reduction of background noise, there are a variety of ways in which patients can take back control of their hearing and improve quality of life. Holistic Hearing Excellence offers free consultations. Tel: 07421 368051; hearingexcellence.co.uk

BATH BUSINESS BAROMETER UPDATE: APRIL 2018

provided by

High Street Footfall

n April UK footfall was recorded overall as a 3.3% fall but what a difference the sunshine makes as mid-month saw shoppers return in force for their spring and summer wear. In Bath average day (full week) footfall rose by 2.7% from the previous year. n The consensus view is that growth in consumer spending will pick up modestly soon and some retailers may have an eye on the World Cup tournament (starting 14 June) to boost some retail sales.

(Month on month % change)

Bath

+14.2%

South West UK

+9.5%

+10.4%

n As the holiday season beckons we welcome a number of new businesses, including Trailfinders on Union Street. Springboard Research Ltd.

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Do I need a contract with my builder?

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his is often a question that forms in the mind of a homeowner when considering an extension. In many cases the builder is a friend or someone already known to them. There is a reasonable level of trust between them, yet still the questions forms. The answer is far simpler than you might imagine. If there is an agreement that both parties understand and are committed to, a contract has already been formed. It is immaterial that there is nothing in writing. If anything goes wrong the homeowner is entitled to similar consumer protection to that which they would receive were they to purchase a toaster. Really the question is not if you need a contract, because at some point one will be formed, but do I want a written contract. This is where it gets more complex. A written contract provides reassurance about the cost, the duration, daily activities, materials used and a host of other things. Any builder unwilling to accept a written contract probably isn’t worth contracting with and no, it’s not rude to insist on one. The contract can expressly set out when payments are to be made; the total cost of carrying out the specific works; how the builder has to address ‘extras’ so as to ensure you always know what your build has and is going to, cost; how long it is all going to take and what happens in the event that the timescale is not stuck to. It can also reference other documents like the architects plans or material specification sheets so that everybody knows what they’re actually agreeing will be built. Whilst a written contract can seem daunting and may involve some expense in drafting and agreeing, it will likely save time, energy and cost as a build progresses. There are always changes and compromises in building works, material selections alter, even the extent of the works can change. But if you start from a position that is understood by all to be X and decide you want to change your destination from Y to Z its helpful to be able to agree at the beginning how those changes in direction will be dealt with, rather than trying to agree these things as you go along. Most homeowners will spend months or even years planning their build and choosing how they want it to look. It can’t hurt to spend a bit of time thinking about how you want to control what it costs or how long it will take to erect. If you have any questions about this article or want to know more about construction disputes please contact Iain Cole on 01935 846456 or email iain.cole@battens.co.uk

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THEBESTOFBATH PERFECTLYCOVERED TOADVERTISETEL: 01225 424499


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Yvonne Bignall June.qxp_Layout 1 23/05/2018 14:46 Page 1

BOOKS | AND | PEOPLE

FIVE MINUTES WITH... Entrepreneur Yvonne Bignall is an award-winning personal development trainer, mentor and coach. She specialises in inspiring confidence and unlocking potential, helping women gain the belief to do the things they have been telling themselves they can’t

I’ve lived in Radstock for 14 years after spending 38 years in London. I feel closer to nature here. At any given moment I can escape into the countryside and feel totally at peace with the world. I left school at 16 and wanted to work, but didn’t have any clear direction. Further education didn’t float my boat. Then, at 19, I started working in the fitness industry and my first passion was born. I was made redundant in my thirties and this was a challenging and painful time. There was so much going on in the lead up to my redundancy – the end of a long-term relationship, the start of a new one, locking horns with my then teenage son and wanting to leave my job but lacking the drive to do so. When the redundancy was announced I felt elated and scared. I spent the first few days feeling worthless but then, bored with my own sense of drama, I went looking for temping work. It became a life-changing moment as I toyed with the idea of working for myself. One year on from the redundancy that’s exactly what I did. I’ve never looked back. I’m a believer in keeping things real. George S. Patton Jr once said “Say what you mean and mean what you say,” and to me that means ensuring thoughts, words and actions are in alignment. It’s also about not falling into the trap of living a life of people pleasing or of pretending things are okay when they are not. I love taking my laptop to Hall & Woodhouse – it’s such a relaxed atmosphere with just enough buzz not to distract me from what I need to get done. I’ve had some lovely meals in Castello’s in Radstock – the staff are excellent and, as a customer service freak, that’s a good thing. I’ve also had some great meals in Opa in Bath – the food and the setting make it a pleasure. There was a period in my life where everything appeared to be going wrong, and my book Suck It Up or Change is all about this. I touch on the principles that helped me shift from a place of low confidence to feeling empowered: being fit and healthy, being fearless, creating freedom, building a network of family and friends, paying it forward, having fun and having faith. It’s about shifting away from the victim mentality and making the most of the control you do have in life. I volunteer with a charity to help women gain an education in Africa – W4, also known as Women’s Worldwide Web, works with projects across the globe to support women in education and entrepreneurship. I registered as an e-mentor so that I could assist projects using my coaching skills, soft skills training and business knowledge. W4 is an amazing charity doing life-changing work, helping women and girls rise out of poverty and abuse to create better lives for themselves and their families. We have moved forward on gender equality, and I do believe the tide is turning. However, it’s important that we actively drive the agenda and don’t become complacent. Men and women all have a role to play. Women must stand up and be recognised for their contribution in all areas of life alongside their male counterparts.

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Inspiring and motivating others is the most rewarding thing I’ve ever done. When a person believes in themselves enough to make a change, to do something different, and their life changes because of it, it fills me with joy. It never ceases to amaze me how sometimes one small adjustment can alter your mindset and set you on a completely different path. It energises me and drives me to do more. Michelle Obama, ex-First Lady extraordinaire, epitomises all that is great in being a strong woman – she is educated, self-sufficient, able, humorous, and a dedicated mother and wife. She is someone who cares about her world and actively seeks to make a difference in it. Looking back, I wouldn’t do anything differently. Not because there haven’t been more mistakes and mess-ups on the way than I can count, but because I’ve won through in spite of them. Everything that has been in my life, good, and bad, is what has brought me to where I am today – for that I am truly grateful. I am busy building the Women Unmasked Community, a self-discovery group for women over 50. It’s about exploring the things that affect our confidence, such as progression at work or in business, or in our family lives. We meet in Bath at the luscious No.15 Great Pulteney hotel on the last Wednesday or Thursday of the month. It’s women supporting women, building each other up through sharing experiences, getting expert advice and offering practical help to each other. n Yvonne presents Women’s Power Hour, Somer Valley 97.5FM on Wednesdays, 1–2pm; yvonnebltd.com

Suck It Up or Change by Yvonne Bignall is published by CreateSpace Independent Publishing, rrp £7.80


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ocl A C C O U N TA N C Y

141 Englishcombe Lane, Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

Lifetime gifts and Inheritance Tax (“IHT”) Lifetime gifts, if made tax efficiently, can significantly reduce the amount of Inheritance Tax payable on death. Individuals have an annual exemption of £3,000 – the value of gifts each tax year that can be made without them being added to the estate. Unused annual exemption can be carried forward to the next year - but only for one year. Spouses each have an annual exemption so there is the potential to give away £12,000 in any tax year free of Inheritance Tax issues. Each tax year, an individual can usually also give away: • A gift of any amount to a spouse or civil partner provided you are both permanently UK resident • Wedding or civil ceremony gifts of up to £1,000 per person (£2,500 for a grandchild or great-grandchild, £5,000 for a child) • Normal gifts out of your income, for example Christmas or birthday presents you must be able to maintain your standard of living after making the gift • Payments to help with another person’s living costs, such as an elderly relative or a child under 18 • Gifts to charities and political parties • As many gifts of up to £250 per person as you want during the tax year as long as you haven’t used another exemption on the same person. Gifts exceeding these exemptions & made to non-exempt beneficiaries are normally considered Potentially Exempt Transfers falling outside of your estate provided you live for 7 years following the gift. If there is IHT to pay, it is charged at 40% on gifts made in the 3 years before your death. Gifts made 3 to 7 years before your death are taxed on a sliding scale (‘taper relief’). Where the transferor of a Potentially Exempt Transfer continues to receive a benefit from the gifted property - for example where the transferor gives their residence to their children but continues to live in it, then special rules apply designed to prevent taxpayers reducing the value of their IHT estates through making gifts while effectively leaving their basic situation unchanged. Such a gift will normally not be considered exempt and may therefore be treated as part of the death estate and still charged to IHT if the estate value including the gift exceeds £325,000.

For tax saving tips contact us – call Marie Maggs, Hannah Pettifer or Mike Wilcox on 01225 445507 for a no-obligation meeting.

We look forward to meeting you - and see our website for more, including FREE download guides. What our clients say:

“We are a small, but very busy, independent restaurant in Bath…We couldn’t have reached this stage without the help of OCL. I would thoroughly recommend OCL accountants to any small to medium sized business.” “We couldn't have reached this stage without the help of OCL. I would thoroughly recommend OCL accountants to any small to medium sized business.”

Congratulations Prince Harry and Meghan!

F

ollowing the excitement of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s big day, royal onlookers are still ploughing through the details – her beautiful dress, the hats, the smiles, the flowers and of course, the cost of it all! In particular, many have commented on the rumour that the happy bride and groom didn’t sign a pre-nuptial agreement before making their vows. This isn’t particularly unusual in royal circles – neither Prince William or Princess Diana signed anything before getting married – but it bucks the trend that we are seeing across the UK. Nowadays more and more people are protecting themselves, and their assets, through prenuptial agreements, cohabitation agreements (for those not actually marrying) or sometimes postnuptial agreements (if already married). In the best-case scenario, the agreement may never be needed, and in the worst-case scenario it may save you the emotional and financial drain of contested Court proceedings. A pre-nuptial agreement can be seen as another form of marriage preparation, although much like an insurance policy, hopefully you will never need to use it. They can also provide individuals with the opportunity to freely follow their heart whilst protecting owned or yet to be acquired assets. Both parties need to enter into a pre-nuptial agreement freely and without pressure. Pre-nuptial agreements are not legally binding, but if a couple divorce, the court will give weight to any agreement that has been reached. An agreement can offer clarity to the court as to the ownership of the assets and provide certainty as to how they ought to be divided. These agreements can save money in limiting arguments following separation and protect assets. They may not be legally binding but they can be persuasive. If you or a member of your family have recently become engaged or decided to live together, we would recommend thinking about what would happen should the relationship end. This is easily discussed at the outset but not so easy if a relationship finds itself in difficulties. www.mogersdrewett.com Victoria Strode is Associate Solicitor & Head of Family at Mogers Drewett

Call Marie Maggs, Mike Wilcox or Hannah Pettifer on 01225 445507 to arrange a no-obligation meeting THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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FAMILY | EVENTS

FAMILY DIARY IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO WITH THE CHILDREN THIS MONTH MAKE Thursday 1 June, 9am – 4pm n Art Studio, The Edge, University of Bath Children aged seven to 11 can spend their half term having imaginative fun using the themes of the current exhibition The Know Show in the Edge Arts galleries. Spend the morning working on activities in the special tent installation The Bath Field Kitchen and have a play with clay with local ceramicist Claire Loder during the afternoon. Booking advisable, £35 per child; edgearts.org BABY LOVES DISCO Sunday 3 June, 2pm n Komedia Enjoy some nostalgic floor-fillers at this orginal family dance party as it makes its Bath Fringe debut. This day-time clubbing dance party will include face painting, crafts and balloons as well as a toddler chill-out zone, dress-up area and selfie booth for parents and babies, toddlers and young children to enjoy together. There will be free ice lollies for little groovers and two hours of festival dancefloor fun with games and giveaways galore. Suitable for children up to six years. Advanced ticket: £9, family of four: £32. Babies in arms go free; komedia.co.uk ROOTS AND SHOOTS Every Tuesday, 10 – 11.30am n Bath City Farm Under fives can play, discover and investigate nature at this weekly toddler group. With a focus on exploring the farm and feeding the animals, Roots and Shoots is full of toddler friendly activities. From bug hunts, digging in the mud and story-telling, your little ones can see nature in the best way possible. Term time only. No booking required. £1 for a child, £4.50 for two and £6 for three children. Under twos go free if coming as an extra sibling. Parents/guardians free. Includes a drink and snack. Tel: 01225 481 269; bathcityfarm.org.uk SUPERPIRATES TAKEOVER Friday 8, Friday 15, Friday 22 and Friday 29 June, 10.30am n Komedia SuperPirates will be transforming Komedia’s huge dance floor into a fun-packed pop-up play area for under fours. There will be dens, giant inflatable bouncy snakes, crazy games, dancing, and the opportunity to generally have a wild time – plus there’s free face painting. There will also be entertainment for babies with playmats and toys, and plenty of space for buggies and feeding. £3 for

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Sourpuss at The egg

children, adults and newborns go free. No advance tickets needed, pay on the door; komedia.co.uk SATURDAY ART CLUB: FLORAL FABRIC Saturday 9 June, 10.30am – 12.30pm n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street Create a small textile work inspired by the beautiful images of flowers in the Holburne collection. This is a drop-off session for children. Suitable for five to 11 years. Booking essential, £10 per child. Tel: 01225 388568; holburne.org SOURPUSS Saturday 16 June, 11.30am and 3pm n The egg Meet Sourpuss, the very grumpy ginger cat. When shut out of the house he feels lost and confused but the beautiful garden soon intrigues him. Watch his journey of discovery and enjoy learning the secrets of the great outdoors. From buzzing bees, chirpy robins and vibrant flowers to stinky rubbish, the visual show features beautiful string and shadow puppets. Recommended for ages three plus. Tickets: £8.50, children: £7.50; lap seats 0 – 18 months: £1.50. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult; theatreroyal.org.uk THE SELFISH GIANT BY WRONGSEMBLE Saturday 16 June, 12.30pm and 2.30pm n The Pound Arts Centre, Corsham Behind a crumbling wall and a thousand Keep Out signs lives the selfish giant. So selfish he shut away a garden where children

used to play and cursed the town with a never-ending winter... or so they say. But one curious child wants to discover what really lies within. Oscar Wilde’s classic tale is re-imagined for the stage in this magical adventure for the whole family. Suitable for ages three to seven. Standard tickets: £8, cons: £7; poundarts.org.uk BOWOOD’S TREASURE ISLAND Sunday 17 June n Bowood House and Gardens Ahoy there! Be a pirate for the day and visit Bowood House & Gardens. All o’ you are welcome, shiver me timbers they have something for everyone. House and garden admissions apply, complimentary for season ticket holders. Tel: 01249 812102; bowood.org NICK COPE Sunday 17 June, 10am and 2pm n The Pound Arts Centre, Corsham Making the charts as The Candyskins’ lead singer in the 1990s, Nick Cope now performs music for children and no-so-little people all over the world. Monkeys, bears, socks and mud, this man sings about everything that children are interested in. Sit back and relax or get up and dance. Suitable for ages up to eight. Tickets: £5; poundarts.org.uk WHATEVER THE WEATHER Friday 22 June, 10am and 1pm and Saturday 23 June, 11.30am and 3pm n The egg Sponsored by King Edward’s School and winner of the Best Production for Children


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FAMILY | EVENTS

MAKE at The Edge

and Young People this is a story about a weather house that sits on a quiet wall. A little lady comes out when it’s going to be sunny and the little man comes out when it’s going to rain. Never together and always alone. But what would happen if one magical day… they came alive? Recommended for ages three plus. Tickets: £8.50, children: £7.50; lap seats 0 – 18 months: £1.50. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult; theatreroyal.org.uk

Whatever The Weather at The egg

BIG FAMILY MUSIC DAY Saturday 23 June, 11am n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Enter a world of drumming, tooting and strumming and discover all the brilliant ways that children can enjoy music making with a day of family fun. Packed with activities, creative games and crafts for kids. Try out real instruments, watch live musicians and get stuck into lots of different activities. Suitable for all ages. Tickets: £4. Tel: 01225 860100; wiltshiremusic.org.uk

MEN BEHAVING DADLY Saturday 23 June, 9am – 10.30am n St Swithin’s Church, The Paragon This monthly toddler group for dads and their pre-school children is a community that builds friendship, support and encouragement between fathers. Meet other dads, have fun and spend some quality time with your little ones. There are toys, games and toast for the kids, as well as coffee and bacon butties for the dads. £3 per dad; stswithinswalcot.org.uk

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Sarah Wringer KIE Bath, 5 Trim Street, Bath, BA1 1HB Direct Line (01225) 473502 Email: sarah.wringer@kaplan.com

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION NEWS BATH NAMED THE TOP UNIVERSITY IN THE SOUTH WEST The University of Bath has been named the region’s top university for a third consecutive year by the Complete University Guide 2019. The university is ranked eleventh nationally out of 131 UK universities. On a subject level, Bath has performed well with 18 of its 27 subjects ranked in the top ten in the UK, while coming first nationally in both architecture and marketing. Other top-five subjects include accounting and finance, business and management, civil engineering, psychology and sociology. President and vice-chancellor of the university, Professor Dame Glynis Breakwell, said: “I am delighted that the university has been ranked as the region’s top university for a third consecutive year and maintained its overall position in the national rankings.” The ten criteria used by the guide to assess a university’s overall performance are: student satisfaction, research quality, research intensity, entry standards, student to staff ratio, spending on academic services, spending on student facilities, good honours degrees, graduate prospects, and degree completion. View the rankings at: thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk

SALE OF WORK BY LOCAL ARTIST BREAKS FUNDRAISING RECORD Artist Peter Brown has Frost and Tree Shadows, been instrumental in the Prior Park by Peter Brown most successful single fundraising event ever at Prior Park College. This was a one-night only sale of the 28 paintings completed by Peter during his time as Artist in Residence at the college. A total of 17 paintings were sold, with the remainder available to view at the artist’s home or on the school’s website. Total sales have raised in excess of £40,000 so far. Prior Park’s development office is looking to raise a total of £1.5m for its Chapel Appeal. Our Lady of the Snows Chapel is at the heart of the school community, and will soon celebrate 140 years since its consecration – it needs urgent investment to preserve it structurally and to ensure it meets the needs of a modern school. The college also plans to invest in facilities to make the beautiful chapel more accessible, not just to its own pupils, parents and alumni, but also to the wider community, encouraging use by local Christian community groups, schools and congregations. For details see: thepriorfoundtation.com and priorpark.gallery

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STUDENT’S COMPOSITION TO BE MADE INTO METAL Final year Bath Spa University music student Jake Garratt has won a National Heritage Ironwork Group (NHIG) competition to have his original piece of classical music immortalised in the city as an iron bandstand. NHIG approached students on the course to work on this exclusive collaboration. Jake’s composition The Hammer and Anvil will be brought to life as part of the charity’s £20,000 crowdfunded bandstand appeal. Each note, key and stave from his score will be hand-forged into a new iron balustrade for Bath’s Parade Gardens. Local blacksmiths from Iron Art of Bath have started working on the installation, and treble clefs – which can be sponsored for £50 – were recently on display at a ‘forge-in’ at the Upper Lambridge Street workshop during the 10th annual Larkhall Festival. The finished article will be unveiled at the first-ever BathIRON festival on 14–17 June. Jake said: “I entered the competition because I thought it would be a fun project to work on. Composition is one of the areas I major in, and hope to have a career in, so it was great experience for me.” To find out more about BathIRON festival, visit: nhig.org.uk/bathiron

RISING CLASSICAL MUSIC STAR SHARES EXPERTISE WITH YOUNG MUSICIANS The BBC Young Musician of the Year finalist in 2016, saxophonist Jess Gillam, visited King Edward’s School recently for workshops and masterclasses with musicians and orchestras from local schools. Jess worked with Bath Philharmonia to co-host workshops with two local school orchestras from St Keyna and Roundhill Primary Schools, before undertaking a masterclass with KES musicians. The KES Senior Orchestra played alongside Jess and Bath Philharmonia to create their own musical composition inspired by a piece by Gavin Bryars, entitled The Green Ray. Jess also led four solo performance masterclasses with KES saxophonists, where she provided technical and performance advice. Jess has recently been nominated for a Classic Brit Award and continues to study at the Royal Northern College of Music.


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CITY | HISTORY

THE RIVER OF TIME

Forming a natural boundary for the city, the River Avon has always mirrored Bath’s fortunes. Its water mills once powered industry, it was used to transport stone for building and its crossing points have defined the city, says Catherine Pitt

T

he Celtic word for “river” is “Afon”, and there are seven River Avons in the UK. The river in Bath is known as the Bristol Avon – it begins its 75-mile (120-km) journey from Tetbury in Gloucestershire, and finishes at the Severn Estuary at Avonmouth. Bath’s section is 18 miles (30 km) long. THE GROWTH OF A SETTLEMENT

The River Avon acts as a natural boundary and defensive border to the south and east of Bath. With such a freshwater source readily available, it was an obvious point for a settlement to grow in Celtic and Roman Britain. A number of trade routes converged around Bath, such as the Fosse Way where a crossing point over the river was naturally established. Beginning as a ford and then a wooden bridge, the site would have had defences to guard this important crossing point. Archaeologists believe this was where Cleveland Bridge, which connects Bathwick Street to Cleveland Place, stands today. Nowadays there are a number of ways to cross the Avon, but until the end of the 18th century there were only two – via Pulteney Bridge, which was built in 1774, or at Southgate via the Old Bridge, known as St Lawrence’s after the chapel that once stood on it. Before St Lawrence’s was built in the 13th century people would cross fords or use ferries, either horse drawn, or chain ferries like the one at East Gate by the Horseshoe Weir next to Pulteney Bridge. FLOODING AND POLLUTION

Photograph © Bath in Time, bathintime.co.uk

The river remained outside the town walls as the medieval city developed. Early maps depict the floodplains and meadows outside the gates, these often used as grazing fields or orchards. The Romans had attempted to alleviate

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the swampy marshland by creating weirs, which the monks of Bath Abbey continued to maintain. The weirs didn’t mean flooding ceased completely, however. Excavations of the Roman Baths have revealed that floor levels have been raised a total of four times over the years to counteract the rising river. Flooding continued to cause havoc in the city up until the 1960s when the Bath Flood Prevention Scheme finally resolved the issue. Today we look at the river and see a peaceful and clean expanse of water. This wasn’t how it’s always been however. Centuries of industrial and human waste turned the Avon into a foul and stinking mess. In medieval Bath the streets were slopped with river water, open sewers ran through the city directly into the Avon, and local industries not only used the water in manufacturing but dumped their waste into it afterwards. When John Wood the Elder created his raised South and North Parades, it was to enable the fashionable visitor to view the river above the floodplains. However the public privy that he built at the end of the parades created an open drop into the river. On a hot summer’s day the stench emanating from the Avon was often commented on. In 1774 the Dean of Durham described a “foul and yellow” Avon, while Horace Walpole spoke of a “dirty ditch” of a river on his stay in 1766. By the 18th century the expansion of Bath outside the city walls had led to housing being built along the riverside, such as Avon and Milk Street, and the Dolemeads in Widcombe. These gained fearsome reputations as slums and dens of iniquity, although Avon Street began quite promisingly in the 1730s with the building of fashionable lodging houses. The regular flooding gradually saw the wealthy move away and the poor move in. In a 1860s sanitation report, one inspecting

OPPOSITE TOP: The popular riverside view of Pulteney Weir, where Robert Adam’s 18th-century bridge looks out on to the tumbling water of Horseshoe Weir OPPOSITE BELOW LEFT: A horse-drawn cart in Victorian times goes through the flooded river under Victoria Bridge in Twerton OPPOSITE BELOW RIGHT: A stretch of the Kennet and Avon Canal at Widcombe

BELOW LEFT: A 1758 engraving of Bath, showing Ralph Allen’s wharf in the foreground. The line of the Fosse Way Roman road coming into Bath can be seen in the top right corner BELOW RIGHT: The Kennet and Avon Canal from Bristol to Bath was made navigable by a series of locks and weirs


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CITY | HISTORY

SPRING WATERS

Before the 19th-century sanitation reforms in Britain, the polluted river water was often used for drinking water. Bath, however, had alternate water sources at its disposal. A number of cold springs surround the city, and by the 16th century these were being used to supply wealthier households with fresh water. The spring water was brought into Bath from two wells via wooden and lead pipes and stone conduits. The northern part of Bath was supplied by St Swithun’s Well on Beacon Hill while southern Bath tapped into the spring at Beechen Cliff. Where houses didn’t have direct access to water, public fountains were built. However, the poorest members of society, usually located in tenements on the lower areas of Bath, still used what water was at hand – the river. officer wrote of the slum children playing on and around the open sewer pipes that ran directly into the river. RIVER POWER AND INDUSTRY

Photograph © Bath in Time, bathintime.co.uk

Early industries that harnessed river power were mills, often used for grinding corn or cleaning (fulling) cloth. They were also used in gunpowder production at Bathampton and brass-making at Saltford Mill. The remains of Monk’s Mill, used for both corn and cloth – mentioned in the Domesday Book in 1087 – still stand in the Parade Gardens. Bath’s wealth was built on the cloth trade and fuller’s earth, used to clean cloth, was abundant in the Avon Valley. The weirs and mills made the river unnavigable for vessels as they created erratic water levels. This changed between 1724 and 1727 with the building of the Avon Navigation, part of what we now know as the Kennet and Avon Canal. Entrepreneur Ralph Allen built six locks and deepened parts to enable the transportation of stone from his quarry at Combe Down. Illustrations showing Allen’s wharf at Widcombe depict the early wooden railway that brought the stone down to the cranes at the Quay for loading onto barges. With the Avon in Bath at this time open to more vessels and markets, warehouses and wharfs sprung up along the riverside. The current riverside development around Broad

Quay and New Quay has uncovered parts of the city’s industrial past. Excavations have located where tenements and warehouses once stood, the site of the public baths, and the location of the laundry that heated the river water in coal fired steam boilers. From tanneries and steam dying, ironworks and glassmaking, soap makers and milling, most of these industries harnessed the power of the river in one way or another. In the 1860s 53 slaughterhouses were recorded, most found around the riverside from Walcot to Broad Quay. None were regulated or inspected and all disposed of their waste into the Avon. The Northgate Brewery in Walcot Street (where the Podium now stands), which was once the largest brewery in the South West, was reported to the corporation in 1798 for causing a nuisance by dumping grains and waste into the river. The rising flood waters, sometimes reaching more than 20 feet above the normal river level, not only caused loss of life and ruined homes, but swept disease into the city. Eyewitnesses describe the giant rats that would feed on the detritus, and the diseases such as dysentery, diphtheria and scarlet fever that ensued. RIVER RECREATION

Despite the unsanitary nature of the river, it was used for recreational activities over the

centuries. River swimming was especially popular in the 18th-century, with popular points at Walcot and Kingsmead, but only men took part. Increasingly the site of naked bathers offended society and the Bathwick Act of 1801 made it illegal to bathe or strip naked for swimming in any watercourse in the parish. River swimming did make a comeback in 1936 with the creation of the Bath Lido at the Bath Boating Station but this closed in 1966. Commercial fishing took place in Bath and angling shops are recorded as offering a selection of bespoke flies in 18th-century Bath. The city authorities still grant fishing licences today. The cleaner waters have meant that the fishing has improved, and has supported the local wildlife and fauna, including the return of an otter colony. Pleasure boat cruising was popular after the creation of Ralph Allen’s Avon Navigation, and there were regular ferry services between Bath and Bristol that would take around four hours and cost one shilling. Local collegiate, university and amateur boating and canoe clubs have their origins in 19th-century Bath and still use the river. The river has been used for entertainment in the mid-20th century – it was the setting for the 1962 Bath Festival Venetian evening at Pulteney Weir – but its heyday was in the 19th century when Regattas organised by The Bath Boating Station were popular. The star of the regattas during the 1860s was Captain Evans, an expert in escapology. He would allow himself to be cast “helplessly” into the river bound by chains, disappear under the water, and resurface after an interval, casually dressed in a change of clothes and reading a newspaper. Although the river around Bath has had a chequered history, it’s in a much cleaner state than it ever was. It forms part of so many of Bath’s classic views, and there is nothing more delightful on a summer’s evening to walk along its banks, hire a boat, or enjoy the view from the Parade Gardens – let’s celebrate and enjoy Bath’s own Avon. n

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TRAVEL

BREAKING NEW GROUND

Which big sights deserve to step out of the shadows? We’ve discovered seven destinations that are now firmly on our dream destination list – there’s also some specialist advice on how to get the best from them…

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ave you watched the sun set behind the Sydney Opera House? Have you touched the pearlescent surface of the Taj Mahal? Have you sidled up to the Statue of Liberty for a selfie? Established sights such as these feature large on many people’s wishlists – but what about discovering something that takes you by surprise, something in the raw? Here we round up a few falling-under-the-radar sights to set your pulse racing. THE GOLDEN TEMPLE, AMRITSAR, INDIA

This monument quite literally outshines the Taj Mahal. Its 750 kilograms of gold gilding make this revered Sikh temple a blinding spectacle. Floating serenely in the centre of a pool surrounded by marble walls, the complex offers a welcome respite from the bustle of the city beyond. TOP TIP: Enjoy the unique experience of dining in the world’s largest kitchen or ‘langar’ at the Golden Temple, which serves up free (and delicious) food for up to 100,000 people a day, regardless of their nationality or faith. SALAR DE UYUNI, BOLIVIA

Looking for an experience that’s out of this world? Here it is. Covering some 4,000 square miles, the world’s largest salt flat is

eerie to behold. Aside from the salt, though, there’s plenty more ethereal experiences in this area of the Andean Plateau, including multi-coloured desert lakes teeming with flamingos, bubbling hot springs and even an ancient island of giant cacti. TOP TIP: Take inspiration from photos of Salar de Uyuni’s famous optical illusions to get some memorable images of your own.

water, Iguazu Falls offers hundreds of waterfalls spread across the border of Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay with everything from idyllic jungle clad-cataracts to the raging white-water and mist of the gargantuan Devil’s Throat. TOP TIP: Be sure to devote enough time to see the falls from both the Argentinian and Brazilian side to get the most from the experience.

BAGAN, MYANMAR (BURMA)

Having only recently emerged from decades of military rule, Myanmar’s treasures have yet to draw huge throngs of visitors, despite playing host to archaeological wonders every bit as impressive as Angkor Wat or Machu Picchu. The jewel in the country’s crown, however, is the 26 square miles of verdant canopy dotted with thousands of temples and pagodas that make up the former ancient kingdom of Bagan. TOP TIP: Rise in tandem with the sun, ensconce yourself in a hot air balloon and drift serenely over this breathtaking temple complex.

LI RIVER, GUANGXI, CHINA

While it tends to be the manmade wonders of the Great Wall, Xian’s Terracotta Warriors or Hong Kong Harbour that receive the plaudits, China’s natural wonders are equally Herons are and the canal’s impressive capture the pre-developed watchful companions past of this ever-changing nation. For a relaxing introduction to the scenery, take a boat ride along the winding Li River, passing epic karst mountains and village life that has changed little for centuries. TOP TIP: Keen walkers can make the four to five hour trek along the most scenic section of the river between Yangdi and Xingping.

IGUAZU FALLS, SOUTH AMERICA

MEKNES, MOROCCO

It might not be as well-known as its North American neighbour, Niagara, but it wasn’t out of diplomacy that First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt exclaimed “Poor Niagara!” during her visit. More than just a single curtain of

Often overlooked in favour of Marrakech and Fes, the imperial city of Meknes offers the same architectural marvels and Moroccan culture minus the crowds. What’s more, the city is within a short drive of the remarkable Roman ruins of Volubilis and the pretty whitewashed town of Moulay Idriss – it’s the perfect daytrip. TOP TIP: If you’re offered a whisky berbère, don’t expect any alcohol but do accept the offer and enjoy a delicious mint tea – it’s the national beverage and the ideal way to ingratiate yourself with the locals.

Li River, Guangxi, China

NINGALOO REEF, WESTERN AUSTRALIA

While it may be eclipsed by the sheer size of its east-coast neighbour, the Great Barrier Reef, Ningaloo Reef has plenty of strings to its bow, not least migratory humpback whales and whale sharks that gather in huge numbers each year. Best of all, its isolated location means vast stretches of white sand all to yourself. TOP TIP: Time your visit to coincide with whale shark season from April to August for a once-in-a- lifetime opportunity to swim alongside these gentle giants. These top spots and tips were compiled with the help of the team of travel experts at Trailfinders. Their new travel centre at 5 Union Street, Bath, is open from 30 May. Tel: 01225 724 000; trailfinders.com 90 TheBATHMagazine

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Peter Cuff and dog Pies aboard their boat Mettela

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Bagan, Myanmar, Burma; Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia; The Golden Temple, Amritsar, India; Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia; Iguazu Falls, South America

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THE | GETAWAY

The converted barns house guests at Lee Byre

The view looking towards Wistman’s Wood, Dartmoor

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THE | GETAWAY

UPON ENGLAND’S MOUNTAINS GREEN

Jessica Hope dons her hiking boots and discovers the perfect countryside retreat for walkers, just a stone’s throw away from Dartmoor National Park

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s I opened the gate to the car park and chickens scurried around my feet, I could immediately see why people are drawn to this idyllic countryside retreat. With the sun-drenched green hills rolling into the distance, new-born lambs bleating nearby, and birdsong surrounding us, the strains of William Blake’s Jerusalem rang through my head. We had arrived in England’s green and pleasant land. In need of some R&R and invigorating fresh air, Russell and I travelled to Dartmoor for a long weekend at Lee Byre. This award-winning bed and breakfast is based on what was once a working farm, and is perfectly located for exploring Devon, Dartmoor National Park and Cornwall. Run by Guy and Kathrin, Lee Byre is a series of barns dating from the 18th century that were lovingly restored to their present glory by Guy’s father, John. Converted into three charming bedrooms, the barns feature exposed beams and original stonework, as well as modern bathrooms and king-sized beds. We stayed in Dart, the superior double, which has incredible views over the luscious landscape, plus fluffy dressing gowns, comfy slippers and tea and coffee facilities, as well as homemade chocolate and peanut cookies. There’s also fresh water provided – all the water at Lee Byre comes from the nearby spring, so whether you are making a cuppa or having a shower, it comes from the well. When you need to quench your thirst there is an honesty fridge in the dining area where you will find sparkling soft drinks, cider and wine selected by a local expert. Pick your tipple, mark it off on a tally and it gets totted up at the end of your stay – it’s all very relaxed. We enjoyed a fruity bottle of Sharpham Dart Valley Reserve from Totnes while sitting on the patio, watching the sky turn to hues of pinks and blues as the sun began to move below the hills. Food is taken seriously here. Everything is homegrown on site, sourced locally or homemade by chef Nina. On our first night, we demolished warm bread rolls with salted butter and the most incredible pesto made from wild garlic picked from the lane – you can even purchase a jar to take home. This was followed by shortcrust pie filled with slow-cooked lamb and mint, served with buttery new potatoes, fresh garden peas, and a salsa verde made from foraged herbs and a sharp tang of vinegar. We then tried Nina’s homemade caramel and sea salt ice cream with a warm chocolate

Guy, far left, takes guests on guided tours around Dartmoor National Park

brownie for dessert – dark, smooth and sweet, it hit just the right spot. Feeling energised, we ventured outside for a guided night walk with Guy around Dartmoor. As the sun set and the light began to change, we were able to explore the hills of the national park in a whole new way. While our eyes adjusted to the dark, our other senses became heightened – the sound of the river racing beneath us and the wings of bats swooping overhead suddenly became more evident. Throughout the tour, Guy stopped to tell us about how Dartmoor’s landscape has changed over the centuries due to granite mining and deforestation. Then we enjoyed a spot of star gazing and walked in the moonlight. There were no head torches needed – a novelty when we’re so used to the light pollution of city life. As well as night tours, Guy provides guided day walks through the national park. These trips are designed to give guests the opportunity to explore more remote areas, with homemade packed lunches and car transfers included. After falling asleep looking at the stars through our room’s skylight, we awoke feeling well rested. Before setting off to explore Dartmoor on our own, we enjoyed an almighty breakfast to prepare ourselves for the day. With homemade granola, fruit salad, yoghurt, fresh bread and muffins made by Guy’s mother Judy, there’s plenty to please everyone. There’s also a cooked breakfast made from local ingredients and eggs from the site’s chickens, and the fruity banana and cinnamon porridge will go down a real treat. Guy kindly plotted a day out for us to see some of the highlights of the national park.

We began with a walk to the atmospheric Wistman’s Wood at Two Bridges. With the twisted tree branches, moss-covered rocks and thick vegetation, it looked like a landscape from The Lord of the Rings. Then we headed to Postbridge to see the medieval clapper bridge before arriving at the Hound Tor, thought to be the inspiration behind Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles. With its unusual rock formations and incredible views over Dartmoor, you can see why it’s so popular with abseilers and rock climbers. Arriving back at Lee Byre, our room’s ensuite was a welcome sanctuary after a busy day of hiking with its roll-top bath, power shower and Bramley toiletries. Having worked up an appetite, dinner featured a delicate mackerel fishcake with a hint of warming horseradish on a bed of spinach with a mussel and cream sauce, topped with a plump poached egg, and served with broccoli and carrots tossed in toasted almonds. Dessert included a cleansing raspberry sorbet with crunchy pistachios and fresh, sharp raspberries. After another hearty breakfast the following morning, we were crestfallen at the idea of leaving the tranquil setting of Lee Byre. This is an ideal getaway for walkers wanting to traverse Dartmoor’s incredible landscape, with the addition of outstanding food, friendly owners, and comfortable rooms. In the words of Blake, we left with a need to explore more of England’s pleasant pastures. n Superior double room at Lee Byre starts at £85, standard doubles or twins are from £75, includes breakfast. Visit: leebyre.com

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MALE | GROOMING

DEAR BARBER Give the bearded man in your life the care he deserves. All facial hair is brought under control with this beard oil from Dear Barber. Containing argan, coconut and almond oils, you can pick this up from local barbershop Fine and Dandy. Fine and Dandy, 4 Prior Park Road, Widcombe, Bath BA2 4NG; fineanddandybarbers.com

ACQUA DI PARMA CREED AVENTUS This fragrance by Creed celebrates strength, power, vision and success – does this remind you of anyone? With top notes of blackcurrant and Italian bergamot, it’s packed with a contemporary scent. £230, Jolly’s, 13 Milsom Street, Bath BA1 1DD; creedfragrances.co.uk

Give your dad the chance to have a satisfying close shave. The badger-bristle shaving brush is made in Italy and with its burnished brass stand has a clean-cut functional design. Plus it features the understated masculine essential razor. The Collezione Barbiere range from Acqua di Parma is full of top-quality shaving products. £472, Jolly’s, 13 Milsom Street, Bath BA1 1DD; acquadiparma.com

dad’s

GROOMING

With Father’s Day on its way, Crystal Rose rounds up grooming products that will make the perfect gift for the man in your life

MOUSTACHE MAINTENANCE Make Father’s Day fan-tache-tic with this little tin. It has everything needed for maintaining that facial hair. A beard comb, moustache wax and a little pair of scissors are all you need to keep your moustache in place. The Moustache Kit Guide by Men’s Society is available from Caro Somerset. Caro Somerset, 18–20 High Street, Bruton BA10 0AA; carosomerset.com

FACIAL FUEL A firm Kiehl’s favourite, this non-oily vitaminenriched moisturiser helps to waken dull, fatigued skin, leaving it feeling refuelled and revitalised. Perfect for everyday grooming and keeping dad’s skin at its best. £33, Kiehls, 1 Milsom Street, Bath BA1 1DA; kiehls.co.uk

PENHALIGON’S A total favourite at TBM right now, not only does this bottle look the part, it smells it too. With warming scents of cumin and nutmeg mixed with headnotes of refreshing grapefruit and bergamot, nothing says Happy Father’s Day quite like this. £168, Halfeti; penhaligons.com

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HEALTH | & | BEAUTY

Not holding anything back but your hair, these hair toggles are perfect for long locks. Available from Sweaty Betty, this five-pack of snag-free bands are slip-free and don’t harm your hair. The unique plastic spiral design is perfect for the active lifestyle and for £5 we think this is a total steal. £5, Sweaty Betty, 13 Northgate Street, Bath BA1 5AS; sweatybetty.com As the sun makes a regular appearance, you need to make sure you’re covered. This suncream offers water-resistant UV protection for the lips, face and eye area. It’s simple to apply quickly when you need it, plus it’s super easy to carry around. £22.50, Sugar Sport Treatment Sunscreen SPF 30, Fresh; fresh.com

With a name like this, it has to be good. The Caudalie Moisturizing Sorbet is a hydration essential giving your skin a refresh. This gel-cream has instant soothing properties to calm irritated and stressed skin. Made with organic grape water and soothing camomile it’s a calming combination that will sort your skin out in no time. £23, Frontlinestyle, 4-5 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2AJ; frontlinestyle.co.uk

Available from Thermae Bath Spa, this 100% lavender pure essential oil is the perfect way to end your day or to use after a workout. Designed to improve the appearance of spots, scarring, bites and burns, lavender oil is also effective for calming your skin down after an energetic workout. Applying this after exercising will comfort and uplift your face and leave you feeling better than ever. £22, Thermae Bath Spa Shop, The Hetling Pump Room, Hot Bath Street, Bath BA1 1SJ; thermaebathspa.com

active

BEAUTY

This month we’re getting out and about. Crystal Rose rounds up a few beauty products that are perfect for an on-the-go lifestyle This innovative, non-foaming cleansing lotion freshens, cleanses and hydrates skin without leaving it dry or tight. Its powerful, natural active ingredients treats your skin to a bit of intense nourishment without clogging pores. Pomegranate extracts act as effective power antioxidants, refreshing and hydrating the skin, and encouraging the regeneration of healthy new skin cells to create a youthful glow. White willow bark works to clear pores and apricot seed powder extracts gently exfoliate the top layer of dead skin cells to rejuvenate the face. £71, SpaceNK, 10 New Bond Street, Bath BA1 1BE; spacenk.com

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Do you have a day full of fun activities planned? This Dry Wash by Paul Mitchell will have your hair feeling on form and ready for a day outside. Find Paul Mitchell products at Zara Perry Hairdressing, Lombard House, 30 St James’ Place, Bath BA1 1UJ; zphairdressing.co.uk

With the launch of Jo Malone’s first-ever body mist last month, this product is perfect for that quick spritz. The Cattleya Flower Body Mist is full of fresh and exotic floral notes, sparkling citrus fruits and a splash of bitter gentian. Lightweight yet luxurious, enjoy a spray of pure sunshine. Refresh the skin while enveloping yourself in the velvety scent of the Cattleya flower. £45, Jo Malone, 6-7 Old Bond Street, Bath BA1 1BW; jomalone.co.uk


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Hydra Peel Infusion is a treatment that combines exfoliation, hydration, chemical peeling and non-needle mesotherapy to infuse different vitamins into the skin. Treatments have no down time and are suitable for all skin types. It can be used to target fine lines, wrinkles, dry skin, scarring, rosacea, sun damage and pigmentation as well as problematic skins.

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Zara Perry Hairdressing, Lombard House, 30 St James’ Parade, Bath, BA1 1UJ 07867 510160 / 01225 444178

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Not happy with your dentures? Are your dentures loose or painful? We can help regain your confidence and your smile

WE OFFER • FREE Consultation • New Dentures direct • Flexible dentures • • Denture repairs • Saturday appointments •

With 12 years experience in the industry Lulu London brings the very best in beauty to Bath at the boutique salon Zara Perry.

Enabling clients to have all their hair & beauty needs met under one roof and even in one appointment! Specialising in Nail Enhancements, Shellac Manicures, LVL Lashes*, HD Brows* & Crystal Clear Microdermabrasion. *Test Patch required 48 hours before

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style Boutique Salons & Spa Winner of Best Hair Salon & Best Day Spa in Somerset 2016

Frontlinestyle welcomes both Men & Women and caters for all your Hair and Beauty needs. Popular treatments for men include…

• Male Waxing (including intimate) • Clarins or Caudalie Facials • CACI Synergy Non Surgical Facelift • Spray Tanning • Permanent Hair Removal • Massages • Footlogics orthotics medical pedicure 4/5 Monmouth Street Bath, BA1 2AJ 01225 478478

11 Broad Street Wells, BA5 2DJ 01749 672225

Book online www.frontlinestyle.co.uk

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Gift Vouchers available www.frontlinestyle.co.uk


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Open Day Event

Thursday 14 June Friday 15 June 9am-5pm

It’s never too early to take control of your hearing health. Join us at this special event to find out how. We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family then we are able to offer a mailing service for only

• FREE trial of Bernafon Zerena • FREE consultation and hearing test • FREE TV-A Adaptor or SoundClip accessory

£15.00 (6 issues) or £40.00 Euro zone; £30.00 (12 issues) or £70.00 Euro zone World Zone 1 £95.00 World Zone 2 £120.00 To subscribe to receiving the magazine go to our website; www.thebathmag.co.uk and scroll to the bottom of the page where you can click to an instant link Alternatively send a cheque payable to MC Publishing Ltd 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED or Telephone 01225 424 499 for card payment

Subscription FORM Mr/Mrs/Ms ................Forename .............................................. Surname .............................................................................. Address ............................................................................ ..........................................Postcode ............................ Daytime telephone No ..............................................................

Book your place now! Call 07421 368 051

Spaces Northgate House 336 2nd & 3rd Floor, Barton Court, Upper Borough Walls, BATH BA1 1RG info@hearingexcellence.co.uk www.hearingexcellence.co.uk

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BATH @ WORK

Our series of photographic portraits by Neill Menneer shows Bath people at work. View a gallery of Bath@Work subjects at: thebathmag.co.uk

Zita Alves

Fitness coach

I

f you had told me 25 years ago, when I first came to Bath, that I’d be running a successful fitness business, I’d have laughed. I was an overweight, non-exercising asthmatic who didn’t really do any sport at school, which is not your usual background for a personal trainer. Born in the UK to an English mother and Portuguese father, I have always loved to travel, spending six months in Australia when I left school, as well as time in Holland as part of an exchange programme during further study. I came to the West Country from Berkshire to study business and finance in Bristol and then I started a career working at a direct marketing agency in Bear Flat, not knowing that years later I would be at the top of the hill in Alexandra Park getting Bath residents fit and healthy. At the age of 28 I was made redundant from my role as project manager – I then spent four months travelling around South America, an experience I will never forget. When I returned to the UK I had no idea what I was going to do and heard a radio advert about studying to become a personal trainer – the rest is history. I have no idea why I decided to change my career direction, except that I love to help people, and when I had some personality tests done in my old job I came out as having ‘teacher’ type skills rather than being a technician, salesperson or any of the other categories, so it was obviously meant to be. What motivates me each day is that I still remember what it was like to feel unfit, unhealthy, out of shape and with no energy, and I want to help more people to experience the benefits of living a healthy lifestyle. It appears that health and fitness found me rather than the other way around. I have spent the last 19 years working with a huge array of clients, 10 years of which was in the gym at the Bath Spa Hotel. I spent a brief time at The Royal Crescent and Combe Grove Manor before I decided to focus on Zest Bootcamp and training clients in their own homes or outdoors. This year I am also running my first retreat in the French Alps which I am excited about. I have some high-profile clients and I was lucky enough to train the French actress Juliette Binoche when she came to Somerset to film Chocolat many years ago. Oh and my husband was once a personal training client of mine … when he said he needed a lifestyle change, I never expected it would end up with me marrying him. I feel blessed to have spent 25 years working in such a beautiful city, and I am forever grateful to be able to help people feel better and to be able to look at the amazing view of the city most days from bootcamp – I don’t think it will ever get boring. After all, fresh-air fitness rocks. email: fitnesszita@gmail.com

TRI3E YOGA Yoga • Massage • Meditation • Mind • Body • Spirit

Yoga for Every Body Classes designed to strengthen the body, lengthen the muscles, and relax the mind. Created for ALL abilities, whether this is your first introduction into yoga, or you’re a more experienced yogi. Come and join a friendly group. Every Body is welcome. Monday 6:15pm

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HeidiReiki

Energetic space clearing and reiki treatments in Bath

Creating calm, joy and balance for you and where you live heidi rearden heidi@heidireiki.com

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151

heidireiki.com

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CAM VALLEY WALK

Andrew Swift’s June walk takes in a canal towpath, disused railways, a tunnel of trees, a railway bridge and plenty of locks

O

ur walk for June follows the course of an abandoned canal through the glorious scenery of the Cam valley. We start, though, in Bath, climbing up from Widcombe on an old packhorse trail before heading along a drungway once used by the quarrymen of Combe Down. After joining the towpath of the old canal, the walk passes the viaducts and earthworks of longdisused railways, before climbing past a ruinous flight of locks and heading up to the village of Southstoke and the reopened, community-owned Packhorse Inn. From there, the walk back into the city follows the hidden valley of the Lyn Brook, passing a forgotten spa built 280 years ago. Heading across the river to Widcombe, turn up Prior Park Road beside the White Hart Inn (ST755642). After 500m, turn right up Perrymead, and, when the road forks, turn left past the entrance to the Cloisters. As you continue past a cemetery, the lane – once the main way from Bath to Combe Down – turns into a rough track, climbing ever more steeply through a tunnel of trees. After passing under a grotto-like archway, it levels out to become a tarmac path, with a former MOD site, now being redeveloped, on the right. Carry straight on and, at the main road, cross to the Hadley Arms. Cross left to a 102 TheBATHMagazine

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telephone box and turn right along a narrow drungway. When you come to a road, cross to carry on along the drungway to the right of the gates to Ashlands. At the next road, turn left for a few metres before turning right down steps. Continue down a rough path, ignoring footpaths leading through gates to left and right, and carry straight on through a kissing gate (KG) to follow a track through a field. After going through another KG, a track leads down through woodland to emerge by a house where William Smith, the father of English geology and surveyor to the Somersetshire Coal Canal, once lived. Cross the road and turn right along a footpath. After passing a Gothic cottage with a plaque which records – erroneously – William Smith’s residence there, the path curves away from the road to follow the course of the coal canal (ST765615). Here it has been filled in, but, 300m further on, just past a KG, you come to a section which, though overgrown, is still recognisable as a canal. After the path diverts past a fence, turn right along a road for 50m. Cross by the Hope & Anchor pub to follow a footpath sign down steps and under a viaduct that once carried the Somerset and Dorset Railway – the first of two railways that ran along this valley. Go through a KG and carry on along the towpath, looking to your left to

see an aqueduct which carried an arm of the canal across the Cam Brook (ST757605). After passing a bridge that once spanned the canal, the path goes through a KG and curves left under a viaduct which carried the Camerton and Limpley Stoke Railway. This was built after the canal was abandoned, and followed its course for much of the way along the valley. It closed in the 1950s after being used to film The Titfield Thunderbolt. Following the path under the viaduct, bear left through a KG to rejoin the towpath. After passing the remains of three locks, head up steps and go through a KG (ST748602). Turn right and then left through a gate to continue along the canal, which has once again been filled in here. At a lane, cross and go under a railway bridge. Continue over a stile and carry on up past a flight of abandoned locks. After 400m, when the canal doubles back on itself to continue through more locks, carry straight on through a KG. Head up a field and go through another KG to the left of a pair of cottages (ST743609). Carry on uphill, go through a squeeze field and follow a track curving up a field. After going through another squeeze stile, head up a lane and, when it forks, bear right. Carry on through a gate, bearing to the right of a telephone box to head down to the Packhorse Inn (ST747612).


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THE | WALK

ABOVE: Along the towpath of the coal canal OPPOSITE: Following the Cam Valley From the Packhorse, head back up to the telephone box, bearing right and then left uphill past Brewery House. After 100m, follow a footpath sign up steps on the left, continue along a path, crossing two drives and carrying on along the edge of a field. At the end of the field, go through a KG and turn right along the Wansdyke to emerge opposite the Cross Keys pub.

You can, if you wish, catch a bus back to Bath from here, but to continue the walk cross the road and head along Southstoke Road. At the end, cross Bradford Road and continue down Entry Hill. After passing the entrance to the golf course, when the view opens up ahead, you can see the valley of the Lyn Brook over the wall on your left. After the road crosses the valley on a high embankment, look for Lynbrook Lane on the right and turn down it. At the bottom, follow public footpath signs down a rough alleyway on the left, where, part way along, you pass the brook flowing out of a culvert. Carry straight on to emerge in a meadow, and at the end of it follow the path as it curves left under another Somerset and Dorset viaduct, now used by walkers and cyclists on the Two Tunnels Path (ST750634). Carry on along a lane past the gates of the Paragon School, opened in 1738 as Lyncombe Spa to capitalise on the merits of a chalybeate spring whose waters can still be seen issuing from a spout in the wall. When the road forks, bear right down Lyncombe Vale. After passing a rustic lodge, carry on alongside the Lyn Brook, here channelled to form a millstream, and before long you will find yourself following what Jane Austen described in 1801 as ‘a raised narrow footpath’. At the end, bear left down Prior Park Road, passing the mill – now a car dealership – once fed by the millstream. The brook re-emerges

on your left in the grounds of the garden centre and if, after crossing the bottom of Forefield Rise, you turn left up to Prior Park Buildings, you can follow it before it finally disappears into a culvert. Further along is the White Hart and the end of the walk. n Andrew Swift is the author of On Foot in Bath: Fifteen Walks Around a World Heritage City and is co-author, with Kirsten Elliot, of Ghost Signs of Bath.

FACT FILE ■ Length of walk: 7 miles pm:

■ Approximate time: 3–4 hours ■ Level of challenge: Some steep sections and steps, otherwise straightforward

■ Map: OS Explorer 155 ■ Refreshment stops: The Packhorse is open every day. Lunch served 12–2.30pm Mon to Fri; 12–3pm Sat; 12–5pm Sun (packhorsebath.co.uk; 01225 830300)

■ Find more walks along the Cam Valley and the story of the canal and railways along it in Country Walks from Bath by Andrew Swift, Akeman Press

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Interview by Vishaka.qxp_Layout 1 24/05/2018 09:39 Page 1

INSIDE | STORIES

THE INTERIORS MAVEN

Patrick Williams Photography by Derryn Vranch

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CITY CONVERSATIONS Vishaka Robinson meets Bath interior designer Patrick Williams

I

f you’ve ever strolled down Margaret’s Buildings – a pretty lane east of the Royal Crescent – you’ve probably gawped through the dust-covered windows of number eight. With its 1760s’ façade and impressive galleried interior, it looks like someone shut up shop a century ago leaving the space untouched. For interior designer Patrick Williams the unique, but semi-derelict space was his dream project. “Our shop was one of five in Bath, and there were several more in Bristol and across the region. They were known as the ‘Fortnums of the West’ and sold foie gras and Bollinger to well-heeled locals. They amalgamated the three buildings on the site into one huge store, removing walls and floors to create a double-height galleried space filled with mahogany mirror-backed glazed cabinets and marble-topped counters. It’s a museum piece, and a miracle that it’s survived. Patrick and his wife, photographer Neri, bought it last year, scraping together every penny to meet the nearing million pound price tag. They sold up their award-winning B&B, Berdoulat and Breakfast on Pierrepont Place, which had taken three years to restore and was also their family home – the couple have two daughters, Wren, five and Bonnie, two. Patrick’s design education started earlier than most. His parents, both teachers, spent the bulk of holidays in Berdoulat, an 18th-century farmhouse in south west France. “I spent about 40 percent of my childhood there,” he says, “They bought the house when I was in the womb, and it was in ruins. We restored the place as a family, my siblings and I learning joinery, how to render walls, lay tiles, glaze windows – everything from septic tanks upwards. Our alarm clock was often the cement mixer outside our bedroom windows at 5am. My parents really understood the importance of using the correct materials, carefully sourced and installed (even using handmade 18thcentury nails to hang paintings). The name of my practice is Berdoulat, as it was there I caught the bug for restoring old buildings.” Having cut his teeth working at the coalface of a decades-long family renovation project, Patrick did a fine-art degree at Oxford University. He then set up Berdoulat, designing and project managing for clients – he has just been added to the coveted House and Garden ‘Top 100 Interior Designers’, a list of the very best talent working in the UK. The plan for their new project is a cellar-to-ceiling restoration, turning the 4,215-square-foot space into both a family home, a kitchen shop, holiday accommodation and a small museum charting the history of the building. “We are going to meticulously restore the place and take it back to its 1890s’ glory. We will introduce the untouched 1770s’ servants’ quarters in the basement into the retail space, too, resulting in a three-story shop. The basement will house our showroom for 18th-century kitchens available to commission. The ground floor will tip its hat to the original offering, with teas and coffees, spices from the Grand Bazaar (Neri is originally from Istanbul), wines, as well as kitchen and tablewares we’ve designed ourselves. The first floor will be full of cookbooks, and you’ll be able to enjoy a cuppa, lie on a chaise longue, and read (there will be a grand piano too). Beyond being a shop, we will host talks, book launches, music recitals, as well as workshops relating to period building restoration. We want it to be a cultural hub in Bath.”

CLAVA DINE IN MATT WHITE BY VITA  COPENHAGEN

LIGHTING SPECIALIST 8 BATH STREET, FROME. TEL: 01373473555 WWW.FIATLUX.CO.UK TUESDAY – FRIDAY 9.30AM – 5.30PM, SATURDAY 9.30AM – 5.00PM

Seasoned Grandeur Decorative artist Interior & exterior decorating & design Specialist distressed & vintage decorating Residential & commercial projects Children’s rooms & murals Painted furniture

www.seasonedgrandeur.com susanwild@seasonedgrandeur.com

berdoulat.co.uk

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Gardiners Bath and Bristol June.qxp_Layout 1 22/05/2018 13:55 Page 1


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PHOTOGRAPHY: LIZ HARRISON

Reclaimed pennant stone can be used inside and out. Subtle light fixtures and tiers of planting create a private dining space

OUTSIDE ROOMS LINKING INDOORS AND OUT One of the most effective ways to bring a ‘garden room’ to life is to connect it with the interior, providing an smooth transition from inside to out. Landscape architect Liz Harrison explains how this connection can start from inside: “In our climate, we spend a vast proportion of the year looking at the garden from the house. So ensure the views from your most-used spaces – the kitchen and living room – are visually stimulating. Provide a focal point such as a specimen shrub or tree with seasonal colour to provide interest throughout the year, or install an archway or sculpture to lead your eye into the space.” USING COLOUR Another useful device to link indoor rooms to the garden beyond is to use colours from the interior scheme. Liz has a number of tips for using colour in the garden: “Carry colour from your soft furnishings or accessories into the planting scheme, and repeat the colour palette throughout the garden. This will make the space feel more ‘as one’”. 108 TheBATHMagazine

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Seasonal bedding will create an instant colour lift in the garden, and this becomes even more effective when it features colours that are used in the interior. “Changing planting in window boxes and containers will complement an interior scheme,” explains Liz. “Colour can also be used to create a visual trick – blues recede and make the area feel bigger, for example, whereas hot hues such as reds and oranges come forward, demanding attention.” FLEXIBLE BOUNDARIES Bi-fold doors are a dramatic way to connect the house and garden, so that you can open them up, fold them back unobtrustively and benefit from a joined-up space that stretches from inside to out whenever the occasion demands. “While terraces were traditionally accessed via French windows,” Liz explains, “the use of bi-fold or retracting glass panels allow rear walls to disappear and gardens become part of the house. As a result, external terraces become larger and more flexible; used for dining, lounging and, more recently, as outdoor kitchens.”

FLOORING AND PAVING Flooring plays a significant role in creating harmony between your inside and outside spaces, so it is advisable – whenever possible – to use flooring that creates a seamless flow from one area to the other. It is sometimes an option to use interior materials and products externally, but you’ll need advice from the manufacturer or retailer of products you are considering. “The use of a thin paving profile internally, often combined with underfloor heating, positioned next to outside flooring that needs to be slip and frost-resistant, make for a challenging specification,” says Liz. She recommends natural stone over reconstituted paving or ceramic tiles as this has greater longevity and can be jet-washed every couple of years to remove the build-up of algae. If you plan to use two different flooring products, aim to source materials that look similar. This will create the illusion of a continuous flow from one space to the other – then, when the outside doors are open, the whole area will be transformed into a spacious, open-plan room.

Photography: Liz Harrison

The garden can be used as a refuge and a social space, an outdoor room where you can play, cook, eat and lounge. Interior designer Clair Strong talks to landscape architect and garden designer Liz Harrison about how to create practical and stylish garden rooms


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GARDEN DESIGN

FURNITURE Your outdoor room has so much potential beyond the standard table and chair set. You can ‘decorate’ your garden as you would your living room, with sofas, cushions, lamps, rugs and more. Liz likes to echo the style of contemporary interiors with furniture from Indian Ocean or adds a touch of elegance to a classical scheme with a sustainable oak bench from Gaze Burvill. Strong brands for outdoor furnishings include Coco Wolf, Dash and Albert, Serralunga and Fatboy. You can also buy fade-resistant outdoor fabrics from companies such as Designer’s Guild and Thibaut to create your own bespoke furnishings. LIGHTING Lighting can be an effective way of complementing your garden design and making the most of your garden. A string of fairy lights and a few solar lanterns may look pretty, but don’t provide flexible options. Installing proper lighting will allow you to use to the space after dark, and will further enhance the feeling of your garden as a room. Liz suggests using quality lighting fixtures that reflect the interior style: “Although there are a large range of fixtures on the market, I would advise investing in lights designed for longevity and sustainability. When combined with low energy LEDs, these cost very little to run and are virtually maintenance free.” Instead of dotting lights here and there, a lighting plan for the whole garden is recommended, one that draws attention to key features such as steps and footpaths and introducing subtle lighting in seating areas. A wireless system will even allow you to control your garden lighting from your phone. Relaxing in your garden room has never been easier. n

COLOUR MATCH: The colours of Iris pallida (right) and Echinacea purpurea (above) complement features such as the outdoor sofa below

Clair Strong Interior Design is a small, friendly, creative business based in Bath and London, providing services for residential and commercial clients. Visit: clairstrong.co.uk or contact: clair@clairstrong.co.uk. View Liz Harrison’s garden projects: lizharrisondesign.co.uk

Sliding doors open to create an insideoutside space – soft textured planting breaks down the lines and is reflected in the glazing

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HOMES | GARDENING

SMALL WONDERS

Make every element work hard in a small garden, advises Jane Moore, and choose plants with several seasons of interest

A

fter a week of gardening in the generous grounds at The Bath Priory, I love to return to my pint-sized garden at home. It’s not that you can take it easy, because even with a small garden there’s always a vital job to do. The difference, however, is that a couple of hours work in my little garden creates a noticeable transformation. The true joy of a small garden is that it takes little effort and – if you have planned it well – not too much time or money to keep it looking animated and fresh. My garden has changed style and substance several times over the decade I’ve lived there and it’s currently in metamorphosis again. There lies the challenge and the reward of a small garden. It’s great to be able to ring the changes, but that involves experimenting and playing around with different ideas. My partner has taken to calling my garden Jane’s junkyard – rather unkindly I feel – and likens it to the way a builder’s house becomes a never-ending project. There is 110 TheBATHMagazine

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some truth in his observation, so in the spirit of “do as I say not as I do” here are a few useful tips about planning and running a small garden.

Make it manageable

Be realistic about just how much time you are prepared to devote to your garden. If you work full-time and have a slew of timeconsuming hobbies, then low-maintenance is the name of the small garden game. This doesn’t have to mean an unexciting space – it’s just a case of making each plant work hard for its allotted garden space and ensuring that it proves its worth without intensive care. To achieve this, don’t bite off more than you can chew, planting time-consuming exotica or enormous topiaries that require constant clipping. By all means have a couple of box balls, if that’s your inclination, or an olive or lemon tree, but avoid overdoing any elements that need regular maintenance. In general, it’s wise to

opt for plants, bushes and trees that are planted in the ground where they tend to look after themselves, rather than having too many that require frequent watering and replanting.

Grass or not?

Ask yourself very sternly if you need grass in your garden. Lawns are wonderful to stretch out on and sink your bare toes into, and they encourage wildlife, but they do require work. You have to mow them every week without fail or you’ll end up with a sparse imitation of a lawn that will compromise the impact of your little patch. After treating my lawn abysmally for several years, I took the plunge and dispensed with it and I’ve not regretted it a jot. Now I have some lovely gappy paving laid directly on the soil with thymes, dainty Erigeron daisies and golden marjoram planted in the gaps. These do need regular maintenance, it’s true, but this is way less bother than a lawn.


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HOMES | GARDENING

Every plant has to earn its keep in a small garden and for me that means plants need at least two seasons of interest, if not three. I’m demanding of ‘my chosen few’, as I like to think of the plants that have made the grade and entered the inner court of my own private garden. I have two small trees – the first is a Japanese cherry – this flowers beautifully in the spring and sports a fabulous autumn colour later in the year. The second is Cercis ‘Forest Pansy’ which has a great architectural shape and fantastic heartshaped purple leaves. A handful of evergreens, such as fragrant myrtle, ferns and hellebores, keep the garden looking shapely in winter while plenty of bulbs make for a good show in spring. For summer, when I’m most likely to spend quality time in my garden, I’ve chosen some classic herbaceous perennials such as penstemon, hardy geraniums, irises and grasses. I’ve even planted a giant silvery cardoon to give the garden a spectacular ‘wow’ in high summer.

Take a seat

It’s so important to get your priorities right with a small garden. So ask yourself where exactly you want to sit and sip your Pimms, G&T or beer on a balmy summer’s evening.

Once you have chosen a seating area then everything else can flow around it. Decide on paving, decking or gravel and ensure your choice fits your budget. For me, having a nice spot to sit in is perhaps the most important thing. My small garden has two seating areas, which may seem a tad excessive, but I do like a change of view.

I’ve planted a giant silvery cardoon to give the garden a spectacular ‘wow’ in high summer

Plant choices

Garden inspiration

Other people’s gardens are always a great source of ideas and inspiration. There are plenty of gardens open in June but here are a few that might inspire you: BLOOMING BEDMINSTER in Bristol on 2 and 3 June opens up more than 30 city gardens in BS3, including two tiny treasures I filmed for BBC Gardener’s World a few years ago. In Stackpool Road, Matthew’s

courtyard garden squeezes in a sunken paved area, raised beds, a pond and pleached hornbeam trees, while Tony’s features bamboo, melianthus major, banana trees, a self-seeded echium and a tiger sculpture. 12 – 2pm, £2. Visit: bloomingbedminster.org.uk WESTON VILLAGE GARDENS in Bath on 16–17 June are taking part in the National Garden Scheme (NGS). Four interesting gardens are tucked away in a village community. Broadmoor Lane is a sloping garden with herbaceous borders, roses, clematis and wisteria. Savile House has a Mediterranean terrace with an arbour and a wild flower garden. Ingleside has a vegetable plot and greenhouse and Glenfield has a series of rooms with scented and colourthemed plants – Glenfield also offers a delicious tea. 2 – 5pm, £5 admission. Visit: ngs.org.uk PEAR COTTAGE in Devizes is open for the NGS on 15 June. Full of interest all year round, this little garden seems to pack it all in. You’ll find alpines, hellebores, perennials and peonies, alongside quirky topiary, grasses, clematis, a willow arbour and a wild garden with a pond. 2 – 5pm, £6 admission. Visit: ngs.org.uk n Jane Moore is an award-winning gardening columnist and head gardener at The Bath Priory Hotel. Twitter: @janethegardener

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the directory

to advertise in this section call 01225 424 499

Electricians

Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

Chauffeur/Private Hire

KEIKO KISHIMOTO Holistic Treatments for Wellbeing

Aromatherapy • Reflexology/Facial reflexology Japanese Cosmo Facelift • Deep Tissue Massage For more information, please visit: We provide Bath Airport transfers to and from all major airports in the uk. We use only Hi spec vehicles and give a near on chauffeur experience at less than regular taxi prices.

www.keikokishimoto.co.uk 07739 827186 contact@keikokishimoto.co.uk

Airport transfers • City to city travel • Hi spec vehicles 1-8 seat vehicles available • Account work considered • Free Wifi in selected vehicles Card payments taken with Izettle • Prices start from as little as £39 Call or email us for a quote now!

@Romanbathprivatehire

Web: romanbathprivatehire.co.uk Email: Info@romanbathprivatehire.co.uk Tel: 01225 484346

Trowbridge & Neal’s Yard Bath

Holiday Rental

Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

60+ luxury properties for lets 2 nights to 5 months Holidays – For business – Friends & family – Temporary accommodation during renovation/relocation Contact: 01225 482 225 alexa@bathholidayrentals.com www.bathholidayrentals.com Providing 4 & 5 star self-catering properties since 2006

House & Home

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PROPERTY | HOMEPAGE

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his is a rare opportunity to acquire of the principal part of this impressive Grade II listed country house. Fogleigh stands in approximately 12 acres of magnificent landscaped gardens and dates from the 1800’s. Character and original features are in abundance from the moment you enter via the Gothic arched porch into a grand reception hall. There are stone mullion windows, decorative plasterwork, stained glass windows, original fireplaces and something to catch the eye in almost every room. The ground floor comprises four substantial rooms: The drawing room has a double height bay window overlooking the garden to the fields beyond and the billiard room overlooks the swimming pool. A large dining room links to the fabulous kitchen / dining room with a four oven gas Aga and space for a large dining table and sofas. Upstairs there are five bedrooms on the first floor including the master suite and guest suite and a further bedroom and study on the second floor. Two additional bathrooms serve the family bedrooms. As well as the main building there is a stable block and detached coach house with garaging for four vehicles and a home office and gym. Additional storage comes in the form of a basement floor to the house. The grounds of Fogleigh House are a delight, with breathtaking views over the Box Valley. This spectacular property can only be appreciated in person and viewings are arranged by contacting Bath agents; Pritchards. Pritchards, 11 Quiet Street, Bath. Tel: 01225 466225

FOGLEIGH HOUSE BOX HILL, NEAR BATH • Principal part of Grade II listed country house • 6 bedrooms • Detached coach house with garaging, office and gym • Swimming pool • Breathtaking views

Guide price: £2,250,000

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pritchards-bath.co.uk

Worcester Terrace, Larkhall

Queens Parade off Queen Square

An exceptional 3 bed Grade II Listed town house within a level walk of the city centre. This elegant beautifully presented property has retained many of its period features and benefits from a pretty landscaped garden. Numerous period features. Level walk to city centre and Larkhall amenities. Good sized, mature rear garden. Vaults. Int area house approx 1749 sq ft/162.4 sq m, vaults 107sq ft /9.9 sq m

An elegant ground floor apartment situated in the heart of the city, forming part of a Grade II terrace. Quietly positioned and benefiting from two double bedrooms. Useful communal storeroom. Popular and most convenient position with residents parking. Floor area approximately 586 sq ft (54.5 sq m)

Price: £695,000

Price: £550,000

Beach, Bitton

Avoncliff, Bradford on Avon

A charming semi-detached 2-3 bed period property standing in well proportioned attractive gardens and enjoying fine open country views in a particularly sought after rural hamlet just over 5 miles north west of Bath. Wonderful newly extended garden room with woodburner and underfloor heating. Delightful mature gardens with paved sun terrace and large timber garden store. Single garage and driveway parking for 2-3 cars.

A divine 2 bedroom period cottage exquisitely positioned canal side with beautiful views over the canal, river and open countryside. Attractive courtyard garden with an array of mature shrubs, plants and flowers complimented by a decked terrace area. Parking for one vehicle, excellent access to railway station. Int. area approximately 616 sq ft/57.2 sq m

Price: £675,000

Guide Price: £350,000

11 Quiet Street, Bath BA1 2LB Pritchards June.indd 1

Tel: 01225 466 225

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Are you thinking of extending your home with a loft conversion or extension? Do you also need help and support through the planning and building control processes along with the production of plans? Whether you’re looking for inspiration or already know what you want, the first step to transforming your home is a consultation with Dimension 22. Tap into our experience to develop a bespoke solution that you’ll love.

Our services are targeted at home owners, property managers and local builder contractor in the domestic housing market and include; • Property Surveys • • Design & Construction Plans • • Agents for Planning Applications • • Plans For Planning & Building Control Applications • • Schedule of Works & Specifications • • Contract Tendering & Contract Administration • • Maintenance & Compliance Management •

71 Rush Hill, Bath BA2 2QT • 07872 016350 jeremy.lear@dimension22.co.uk • www.dimension22.co.uk

“After 11 years living in Southampton my partner and I made the big decision to move to Bath. It was a decision two years in the making but we finally did it in August 2017. We wanted to know that our processions were in safe hands and therefore used Mardan to put our house contents into store, whilst we renovate our new home. With clear and helpful instructions on how to pack belongings safely for storage, using the boxes provided, our day of removal was amazingly smooth. The Mardan lorry arrived with our storage containers already on the truck, so that our possessions could be packed straight into them, ready for smooth unloading into storage. Our three bedroom town house was packed up within just a couple of hours. The speed of removal and skill in loading was impressive. We had specific requests and these were taken on board and met with ease. Having had a very competitive quote, we couldn't have asked for more from the high quality, professional and courteous service that we received. We will be recommending them unreservedly!” Mr Carr September 2017

DOMESTIC & COMMERCIAL MOVERS • PACKERS • STORERS • SHIPPERS

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PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

Laverton £900,000

S

ituated on a hill and away from the road, this unlisted dates back to 1644 and is surrounded by beautiful countryside. The character of the original house is complemented by a stunning cedar clad extension which was completed in 2017. The accommodation consists of a spacious hallway, study, W/C and a kitchen with wonderful views and space for a table. In addition there is a laundry/boot room. Also from this floor steps lead up to a truly magnificent sitting room, which features two fireplaces, one of which is a fabulous inglenook with woodburning stove. Upstairs there are four bedrooms, one a splendid master bedroom with ensuite shower room and a Juliette balcony with stunning panoramic views towards Westbury White Horse. Externally there are grounds of approximately 0.5 acre, with sweeping lawns and a variety of shrubs and trees, including several apples, damson, plum, greengage and cherry. There is a lovely peaceful terrace, a well and two treehouses, a garage and driveway parking for several cars. The village has a wonderful community, a pretty church and lies just 10 miles from Bath and 6 miles from Frome. Hunter French 01373 464040 Frome Office Frome, 19 Paul Street, Frome BA11 1DT

Exclusive new collection of homes brought to market in Batheaston

A

boutique development of new homes is set to attract considerable interest when it launches in June. Heather Rise is a collection of eight 2 and 3 bedroom houses and two 2 bedroom apartments, set within a classical Bath stone building and enclosed landscaped gardens. Meticulously converted by renowned local developer, Juniper Homes, Heather Rise blends historic architecture with a bespoke, high-quality specification. Each home has been thoughtfully and individually designed for comfortable modern living. Attention has been paid to every detail, evident throughout, from the engineered oak floors across the living areas, and underfloor heating to the downstairs rooms and apartments, through to the ceramic Porcelanosa wall and floor tiling in the shower and bathrooms, and quartz worktops in the kitchens. An exclusive gated community, Heather Rise boasts beautifully landscaped communal gardens that wrap around the building, plus an attractive terrace area. A popular village just two miles east of Bath, Batheaston sits between Bannerdown and Little Solsbury Hill, the latter famously providing the

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inspiration to Peter Gabriel’s first ever solo track. The landscape that stretches across the Avon Valley is indeed nothing short of inspirational, but more than this, Batheaston is a village that is thriving. From the excellent local primary and secondary schools, to the renowned George and Dragon pub and award-winning Mumford’s Vineyard, Batheaston is a vibrant community. Anna Fairman from Savills, who is marketing Heather Rise, comments: “When it comes to location, Heather Rise offers the best of both worlds. There is so much to love about living in the country, especially here, in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, however it is possible to make the move without closing the door on city life and the abundant world-class culture, sport and culinary scene it has to offer.” Homes at Heather Rise are offered to the market at a starting price of £395,000 with Help to Buy available on selected properties. A show home launches on Saturday 2nd June (open between 10am and 4pm) and will continue to be open to view, strictly by appointment only, following the launch. For further information, contact Savills on +44 (0)122 547 4591.


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Longmead Terrace, Riverside Arranged over four floors, this light and contemporary recently built property in the popular Riverside development is presented in the most immaculate condition, creating a wonderful home. Located a short level walk from Bath city centre, the property enjoys convenient access to Bath Spa railway station and Bristol, and benefits from an off street parking space.

Rent: ÂŁ2,000 pcm* light & spacious open plan kitchen / dining room | dual aspect living room | contemporary kitchen | Siemens double oven | 3 good sized double bedrooms (1 en-suite) | beautiful family bathroom | private lawned garden | off-street parking space

Reside Bath | 24 Barton Street Bath BA1 1HG | T 01225 445 777 | E info@residebath.co.uk | W www.residebath.co.uk

*An administration fee of ÂŁ420.00 inc. VAT applies.

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Estate Agents Wells Road

Wisden Homes Powlett Road

SOLD STC – MAY 2018

Personally caring for every aspect of your sale

£1500 – No Sale No Fee For a Free market appraisal please call 01225 429987 www.wisdenhomes.com

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What do I do if my apartment isn’t selling? [SOUTH WESTERN] LIMITED

Peter Greatorex, managing director of The apartment Company

T

he papers might be full of stories about demand for property outstripping supply, but that doesn't mean it’s always easy to sell your apartment.

From estate agent problems to overambitious asking prices, read on to understand what you can do to sell your apartment quicker and more easily.

1. The photos on your property’s online listing aren’t up to scratch With more and more people searching for property online, photographs play a significant role in attracting would-be buyers. You may only have seconds to capture someone’s attention. Before the photographer comes round, make sure that rooms are brightly lit and clutter free – remove bins, open curtains and make the beds at the very least – as small touches make a big difference.

2. Your property isn’t being properly promoted Ensure your home is listed on Rightmove, the UK’s biggest portal, as well as being on the estate agent’s own website.

3. Your asking price is unrealistic

Crafting beautiful homes

Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswolds | Dorset

Norwood Dene, Bathwick Hill

Seven luxury apartments with unrivalled specification and exceptional quality From £895,000

If a potential buyer sees your property but it’s substantially above their budget, they’re unlikely to view it. The best way to gauge your home’s value is to combine web research and conversations with a range of local agents. If you decide the asking price is too high, there’s no shame in reducing it.

4. Buyers aren’t being given the best first impression. If your property has had a decent amount of viewings but no offers, there might be a problem with the way it’s being presented. Could the bedroom do with a fresh lick of paint? Is the balcony tidy? Is there too much clutter? Are the lightbulbs all working? Walking around the apartment as if you’re on a viewing might help, as could asking your estate agent, friends and family for their honest opinions. And never underestimate the importance of smell, particularly if you’re a smoker or a pet owner.

5. You haven’t gone with a specialist agent

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk

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If you’re selling an apartment, why not go with the experts? Finding an apartment specialist estate agent means they will know exactly how to market your home to people looking for apartments. They’ll also understand the leases, be expert at showing off the best parts of your home, and will have a database of people specifically looking for apartments already at their disposal, so a wider range of people who will be instantly genuinely interested. For more information on the best, and fastest way to sell your apartment, get in touch with us today! The Apartment Company Pg@theapartmentcompany.co.uk or call 01225 471144.


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Camden

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Lower Camden Place, BA1 £750,000

The Corner House is a charming grade II listed home in the prestigious Camden area of Bath. Built in the late 1800s in the Georgian style, it is the ideal blend of period elegance and country cottage charm, within half a mile of the centre of the UNESCO world heritage city of Bath. Of particular note is the beautiful garden and its stunning south facing aspect, with views that are unmistakably Bath. Energy Efficiency Rating: N/A

01225 809 868 camden@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Beat Flat

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Daisy Bank Bath, BA2 £625,000

Set within the attractive, semi rural location of Lyncombe Vale is this beautiful and charming period home. Extending over three storeys and offering three reception rooms, three bedrooms, bathroom and en-suite, under croft and gardens. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

01225 805 680 bearflat@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews June.indd 1

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

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Newbridge Andrewsonline.co.uk

Audley Park Road, BA1 £499,950

An elegant and spacious 2 double bedroom flat with high ceilings and large windows. Featuring a large sitting room with a bay window looking out over the gardens, a spacious kitchen, the main bedroom has en-suite bathroom – but also great potential to make a statement suite and the family bathroom has scope to create a sumptuous space with some thoughtful design. Beautiful, well manicured communal gardens. Energy Efficiency Rating: C

01225 809 685 newbridge@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Central

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Brunel Crescent, Box, SN13 £400,000

01225 809 571

Andrews June.indd 2

A crescent of luxury retirement apartments with valley views in the desirable village of Box. Stunning accommodation presented to a high standard with open living spaces and two double bedrooms. Comes with balcony and master en-suite. Lift to all floors. Excellent storage and gated parking. Energy Efficiency Rating: TBC

central@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

22/05/2018 14:02


LOWER SHOCKERWICK, Bath

Guide Price ÂŁ1,100,000

A charming Grade II listed four bedroom country house built in the 1740s with later additions, offering 2,400 sq. ft. of accommodation over three levels. Many period features including exposed oak beams, original stone fireplaces and stone mullion windows. Desirable location close to Bath and formerly part of the historic Shockerwick House estate. . EPC: Exempt

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KINGSDOWN, Bath

Guide Price £1,250,000

A four/five bedroom period house with a modern extension and flexible layout in Kingsdown, near Bath. Stunning country views across the Box valley, in a plot of just over 3 acres. EPC: TBC

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®

N

EW

Rochfort Place

N

£700 pcm

This delightful second floor studio apartment is situated with a short walk to the city. The accommodation comprises; sitting room/bedroom, kitchen and bathroom. Close to both Henrietta Park and Sydney Gardens. Viewing comes highly recommended.

N

EW

Park Street

Located north of the city centre, this beautiful two bedroom apartment is sure to excite. The property comprises; spacious sitting room with built in shelving, fitted kitchen, master bedroom, second bedroom and stylish bathroom. Parking.

N

EW

Park Lane

£1350 pcm

01225 471 14 4 The Apartment Company June.indd 1

LETTINGS

N

£825 pcm

The Apartment Company is delighted to market this beautiful, ground floor studio property. Being a stone’s throw away from Henrietta Park and Sydney Gardens, the accommodation comprises; living area, kitchen and shower room.

EW

New Marchants Passage

£1200 pcm

EW

New King Street

£1400 pcm

01225 303 870

£850 pcm

An absolutely delightful one bedroom apartment situated in a most desirable location. Offering a light and airy sitting room, modern kitchen, spacious bedroom and luxury bathroom. This really is a truly special property.

EW

Bridgwater House

£1250 pcm

This beautifully furnished, two bedroom apartment has been perfectly designed for stylish living. The apartment comprises; sitting room, modern kitchen, master bedroom, second bedroom with storage and stunning bathroom.

N

This beautifully presented two bedroom apartment is accessed at ground floor level where you will find the entrance hall, kitchen, spacious sitting room and cloakroom along with access to the private garden. The lower ground floor comprising; three double bedrooms and bathroom.

EW

Brock Street

N

This modern, two bedroom apartment is located in the heart of Bath. The apartment offers generous living space comprising; open plan sitting room/kitchen, master bedroom with ensuite, second bedroom and bathroom.

N

Situated on Park lane is this beautiful converted Georgian building, set back from the road and enjoying its own well-tended communal gardens and views across the Royal Victoria park. This first floor apartment boasts a large living space, modern kitchen, two double bedrooms and fabulous wet room. With parking and a garage. SALES

Daniel Street

N

£1100 pcm

EW

EW

Marlborough Buildings

£2200 pcm

We are delighted to bring to the market this exceptional apartment that is sure to impress. The apartment offers superb accommodation that has been beautifully designed. Comprises; drawing room, fitted kitchen, master bedroom with ensuite, contemporary mezzanine second bedroom and shower/utility.

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk

22/05/2018 15:55


m

m

m

®

N

EW

Cavendish Place

N

O.I.E.O

£575,000

A superb opportunity to purchase this charming first floor apartment in a highly desirable location offering great space and excellent natural light. Comprising: Sitting room, two double bedrooms, a modern kitchen, bathroom and utility space.

N

EW

Russell Street

£425,000

A beautifully presented, two bedroom maisonette situated in a prime location. The property has a delightful bright sitting room, dine in kitchen, two good sized double bedrooms and family bathroom with separate cloakroom.

N

EW

Walcot Parade

Cavendish Place

O.I.E.O

£275,000

O.I.E.O

£475,000

EW

Great Stanhope Street

O.I.E.O

£325,000

EW

Charlton Buildings

O.I.E.O

£265,000

O.I.E.O

£450,000

This spacious two bedroom apartment with its own private entrance and private courtyard, comprises; sitting room with double doors leading out to the courtyard, fully fitted kitchen, two large double bedrooms and spacious bathroom.

EW

Brock Street

O.I.E.O

£300,000

A delightful one bedroom courtyard apartment in a desirable location nestled between the Royal Crescent and Circus. The property offers open-plan living space, bedroom, modern bathroom and charming courtyard.

N

This second floor apartment is located on the western fringes of Bath and comprises: large sitting room, dine in kitchen, two double bedrooms and bathroom. The property also boasts its own parking space and communal courtyard.

EW

Green Park

N

Spacious first floor apartment with beautiful high ceilings comprising: Large sitting room, modern kitchen, two double bedrooms and bathroom. With its convenient location and smart layout, this property is sure to impress.

N

This bright first floor apartment is located a stones throw from Bath city centre. Newly decorated, comprising; sitting room with delightful views, double bedroom, second bedroom, kitchen and family bathroom.

N

Situated in an impressive Georgian terrace, this fabulous second floor apartment offers spacious accommodation, comprising: large sitting room with period features, fitted kitchen, large double bedroom and bathroom.

N

O.I.E.O

EW

EW

Comfortable Place

O.I.E.O

£240,000

This fantastic garden maisonette boasts a south facing private garden, good sized living room, kitchen, double bedroom, luxury bathroom and storage. With a flat level walk into the city this apartment comes highly recommended.

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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The Bath Magazine June 2018  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath

The Bath Magazine June 2018  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath