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thebathmag.co.uk

ISSUE 177 | JUNE 2017 £3.95 where sold

IT’S ALWAYS TEA TIME

INDIES UNITE

CELEBRATING THE CITY’S BEST SHOPS

THE HISTORY OF THE BREW IN BATH

MICHELIN MAN PROFILE OF CHEF HYWEL JONES

HOT PROPERTY

ROCK OF AGES

THE QUARRY WHERE BATH STONE IS HEWN

BATH’S NEWEST CRESCENT

IT’S A MOTHER DAUGHTER THING

DRESSING FOR THE OCCASION THE CITY’S BIGGEST MONTHLY GUIDE TO LIFE AND LIVING IN BATH


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Contents June.qxp_Layout 1 26/05/2017 12:24 Page 1

90

18

22

Contents June 2017 5 THINGS

12

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14

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FAMILY DIARY

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Caroline Kay, chief executive of Bath Preservation Trust

Fun things to do with your children

GUEST COLUMN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

LOCAL HERO: HARBUTT

The proposal that Bath needs a 21st century tram network

Celebrating the 120th anniversary of Plasticine

FACE THE MUSIC

74

Chris Lilly takes the Audi Q5 for a spin

Your go-to list for June

MY BATH

TEST DRIVE

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18

HEALTH & BEAUTY

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76

78

80

Star of The Addams Family and vlogger Carrie Hope Fletcher

The new-look Bath Thermae Spa and Bobby Mak hair salon

SUMMER FASHION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

THE WALK

Our mother-daughter inspired photoshoot

Explore the countryside on the edge of the Cotswolds

SUMMER FESTIVALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

DEEP UNDERGROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Nine up-coming events to enjoy

The quarry where Bath stone is hewn

INDIES SPECIAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SYLVAN SETTING

Our special supplement dedicated to Bath’s coolest shops

WHAT’S ON

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44

52

Neill Menneer’s photographic portrait of the month ........................................................

54

The best afternoon teas, chef profiles and six of the finest pubs

Even more great content online: thebathmag.co.uk

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GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

PEOPLE IN PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Robin Phillips of law firm Mowbray Woodwards

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FOOD AND DRINK

90

Jane Moore’s paeon of praise for the pelargonium

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Sculpture, paintings and ceramic shows

BATH AT WORK

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84

Explore Bath’s newest crescent

36

Theatre, comedy, music, talks and exhibitions

ART FOR JUNE

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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

ON THE COVER

Model Sophie Johnson photographed by Toby Merritt, wearing top by Mint Velvet and hat by Hallhuber, both from Jolly’s of Bath

Like us: Facebook.com/ thebathmagazine

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine


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Editors Letter June.qxp_Layout 1 26/05/2017 09:44 Page 1

EDITOR’S PICKS ANCIENT LANDSCAPE: I’m slightly ashamed to admit I had never been aware of Bushey Norwood, this beautiful woodland and meadow just behind the University of Bath at Claverton. The National Trust site, part of the Bath Skyline trail, is home to some alien-like grassy mounds, built by rare yellow meadow ants. I’ve made a note to myself to take the bus up the hill to the site over the weekend of Friday 30 June to Sunday 2 July when the pop-up festival of the playful and creative, the Forest of Imagination, springs to life. It promises all kinds of inter-active and unusual goings-on and they’re all free. If it’s even half as enchanting as last year’s Forest which was set up beside Bath Abbey, it will be well worth a visit.

from the

EDITOR

T

he calendar says it’s midsummer, and that’s the mood we’re going for, whatever the weather decides to do, bringing you a June issue that’s full of bright summer colour and packed with ideas for things to do. For many people the summer social season kicks off with weddings to attend, a trip to the races, graduation ceremonies for family members and any number of gatherings and parties where dressing up is required. We invited professional stylist Natasha Musson to meet our brief, to come up with suitable outfits for a mother and daughter attending formal events, using Jolly’s of Bath as inspiration. You can see the results of our two generation summer fashion shoot from Page 22. The Addams Family musical is about to hit Bath as part of its acclaimed national tour and assistant editor Jessica Hope caught up with one of its stars, actress and vlogger Carrie Hope Fletcher, to talk about her career and her responsibilities as a role model for other young women, see Page 18. Writer Eirlys Penn explores the fascinating life and times of William Harbutt, inventor of Plasticine, which has prompted Bathampton to hold a day’s celebrations this month to mark the 120th anniversary of its creation. Reading about this pater familias and generous employer, Mr Harbutt seemed like a thoroughly decent chap, but see for yourself, Page 78. Our award-winning gardening writer Jane Moore, before dashing off to Press Day at Chelsea Flower Show, shared some of her favourite beautiful and unusual pelargoniums to brighten our borders (Page 96) while our walking guide, Andrew Swift, offers a country route that takes in a romantic sunken green lane (Page 84). Your intrepid editor donned a hard hat and steel capped boots for an underground tour of a stone quarry – yes it’s a quarry not a mine – to find out where some of our famous Bath stone comes from (Page 86), while Melissa Blease enjoyed chatting to Michelin star chef Hywel Jones in his eponymously named restaurant at Lucknam Park about how he sustains his levels of culinary excellence (Page 60). There’s much more besides, what with a round-up of the best cultural festivals, a review of the excellent Acorn Vegetarian Kitchen, a full to bursting What’s On section and a round-up of Bath’s best independent shops. There are good reasons to visit the new-look Bath Thermae Spa, recommendations for six of the best pubs to visit on light summer evenings and a very persuasive argument as to why Bath should re-introduce trams as a 21st century form of transport. All in all, I tell you, I swear this June issue is tighter packed than a Kardashian’s frock and just as attention seeking. Georgette McCready Editor

All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

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FRINGE BENEFITS: alpacas Darwin, Bentley and Byron are popular members of the team at White Row farm shop and fish and chip café at Beckington near Frome. This delightful, friendly trio is going down a storm with visitors of all ages. HOME GROWN BEAUTIES: celebrate British Flower Week (Monday 19 – Sunday 25 June) with a simple arrangement of buttercups and cow parsley in a jam jar, or learn how to arrange like a professional with Bath florist Jo Wood of Passion at a day’s workshop at the five star Gainsborough Hotel on Wednesday 21 June. Places are £75, to include materials, lunch, tuition and floral notes to keep. Tel: 01225 355329  to book.

love the man that can smile in trouble, that can ❝ Igather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death THOMAS PAINE

Philosopher and political activist (1737 – 1809)


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l ful tion e c h w t colle July e i V im t of J 1s ui Ma n the o

Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

See more online thebathmag.co.uk

Contact us: Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Editor Tel: Email:

Georgette McCready 01225 424592 georgette@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Financial Director Email:

Jane Miklos jane@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Web Editor Email:

Jessica Hope jessica@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Contact the Advertising Sales team tel: 01225 424499 Advertising Sales Email:

Liz Grey liz@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Email:

Jake Horwood jake@thebathmagazine.co.uk

The Bath Magazine and The Bristol Magazine are published by MC Publishing Ltd. We are an independent of all other local publications

The Bath Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout Bath and the surrounding area. We also have special distribution units in the following city centre stores and coffee shops

2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Telephone: 01225 424499. Fax: 01225 426677 thebathmag.co.uk Š MC Publishing Ltd 2017 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bath Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.

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ZEITGEIST

5

things to do in

June

Enjoy Treat Finding it hard to think of a suitable present for your dad this Father’s Day (Sunday 18 June)? Instead of boring socks or a mug, how about offering him a day out instead? There’s lots going on over the weekend of 17 and 18 June, kicking off with the Bath Festival of Motoring, organised by Bath Rotary Club to raise money for the Freewheelers and the Time Share charities. There’ll be hundreds of classic cars and bikes at the Walcot Rugby Ground in Lansdown over the weekend, for £10 entry (adults) and £5 (children) you could make your dad go misty-eyed at the sight of a car he used to drive. Or if your dad doesn’t get excited about the idea of getting behind the BBQ himself, how about taking him along to the National Trust’s Prior Park Landscape Garden, pictured, on Sunday 18 June, where someone else is cooking the burgers? Admission is £7.70 (adults), £3.80 (children) – food from £2.50. Take a rug and let Dad lie back and enjoy the beautiful views over Bath.

If you live in Bath and North East Somerset you can enjoy the historic Roman Baths by flickering torchlight on a summer’s evening absolutely free. Following last year’s record number of 40,000 people to the Torchlit Summer evenings, the council-owned attraction will stay open until 10pm from Saturday 17 June until the end of August, with last entry from 9pm. Residents who carry a free Discovery Card are admitted without paying, while people from outside the B&NES area pay £15.50 for an evening visit (that’s £1.50 cheaper than a daytime ticket). If you haven’t visited this local attraction for a while, it’s really worth reminding yourself of why this is an internationally renowned and much visited site.

See

Search Bath jewellery designer Nicholas Wylde has launched a city wide treasure hunt with a package of prizes worth £10,000 to celebrate his three decades in business. To be in with a chance of winning the grand prize you’ll need to register online at: wyldetreasure.nicholaswylde.com, then you will recieve email clues which will have you scurrying off to find the seven treasures around the city centre streets. Good luck!

TIME TRAVEL: picture yourself beside the Great Bath as it was enjoyed by the Romans 2,000 years ago

DRAMA ON THE MOVE: Hurycan, a Spanish theatre group

International entertainers and emerging talent will be out on the streets of Bath for the aptly named Bedlam Fair, part of the Bath Fringe Festival, which this year has Arts Council funding to support newcomers to the entertainment scene. On Saturday 3 and Sunday 4 June from lunchtime, expect to see and hear all sorts of acts in the streets around Abbey Courtyard, Bath Street, Kingsmead Square and Saw Close. But don’t worry if you miss that as there’s plenty more mischief and music in the Bath Fringe, which runs until Sunday 11 June. Look out for cosy drinks and music in a tipi at The Edge on Saturday 10 June from 7pm, or join the Kilter Theatre Company’s unique pub tour cum quiz, which meets outside the Crystal Palace pub in Abbey Green at 7pm on Thursday 8 and Saturday 10 June, £9 a head. Visit: kiltertheatre.org.

Visit The historic market town of Corsham has recovered from Poldark fever, following filming in the town, to create its own lively vibe and this month there are no less than three festivals taking place. First up is the annual Corsham Walking Festival, which takes place over the weekend of Friday 9 to Sunday 11 June, with 18 different walks, some of them with themes. On Saturday 17 June there’ll be a celebration of local food and drink producers, with the Taste of Corsham market, speakers and live music. Local cafés and pubs will also take part in the town-wide event. Between Tuesday 13 and Sunday 18 June the Blue Sky arts festival takes place, with entertainment for all ages. For more information about the buzz being created in Corsham this month, turn to Page 32.

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WONDERFUL WILTSHIRE: out and about for Corsham Walking Festival


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Introducing Hans J. Wegner’s CH23 Chair from 1950

Iconic chairs by Hans J. Wegner - The CH25 in oak-soap, CH22 in oak-walnut oil, CH26 in walnut-oak, CH23 in oak-walnut oil, and the CH24 in oak-white oil.

S annon F U R N I T U R E LT D

Contemporary Nordic furniture from Carl Hansen and Son, Fritz Hansen and Swedese. Lighting by Louis Poulsen. Our homewares include Marimekko, Iittala, Rorstrand, with lots of Moomin mugs, fabric and throws from Denmark, Sweden and Finland.

68 Walcot Street Bath BA1 5BD 01225 424222 www.shannon-uk.com

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ist

THE CITY THE BUZZ

Race

Businesses in Bath have been busy signing up for the first Soapbox Derby, to be held in Royal Victoria Park on Sunday 9 July in aid of Dorothy House Hospice Care. The challenge is to build a human powered cart, or soapbox, for a three-person team with one person driving and two pushing. The run will be timed by marshals and the organisers will keep safety paramount. Family and friends will be encouraged to support. To sign up, visit: dorothyhouse.org.uk.

Rewind Julian House, the Bath based charity which works with homeless and vulnerable people, is inviting the city to help it mark 30 years of caring with ReWind, back to the 80s day on Friday 30 June. Cathy Adcock from the charity said: “It’s your choice how you help to celebrate our 30th birthday. You might have an 80s inspired mufti day, hold an 80s quiz, or dig out those old Rubik’s cubes and hold an 80s game challenge? Let us know your plans so that we can help with anything you need (collecting tins, sponsor forms etc). Share your plans on social media so more people get to hear about the day and raise even more awareness, use the hashtags #backto80s #JulianHouse and follow @JulianHouseUK.” Get in touch, tel: 01225 354656 or email: cathya@julianhouse.org.uk.

Twinning

A bench to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the formation of twinning between Bath and French town Aix en Provence is being unveiled in Parade Gardens by the Mayor of Bath Paul Crossley and Aix representative Alain Chabert at 2pm on Friday 2 June, where it will remain for all to enjoy.

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My BATH

We ask Caroline Kay, chief executive of Bath Preservation Trust for ten years, what she’ll be doing in June What brought you to Bath? I moved down to the area from London 20 years ago, to be with my (now) husband Jim who is a GP in Bradford on Avon. We live just outside Bradford, though I joke that since I took the job at Bath Preservation Trust I spend nearly all my waking hours in Bath. Leaving London was a wrench but this is the right place to be for family and a better quality of life. What are you reading? I attend two book clubs. One is a fun one with (mainly) school mums, where we are currently reading Sebastian Faulks’ latest Where My Heart used to Beat. The other one is the Beckford Tower Book Club, which I see as pleasure although of course Beckford Tower is one of the Bath Preservation Trust museums. We are reading Sheridan’s The Rivals as a nod to the Royal Crescent’s 250th anniversary this year. I also have a weakness for Golden Age crime fiction, which is my comfort reading. What music are you listening to? I now have Radio 3 on in the car and at home rather than Radio 4 as it is a more serene backdrop than the relentless news agenda. I love traditional choral music and have recently been listening to Ablaze with Light, The Rose Singers’ CD of the music of William Petter, a gifted composer who died tragically young last year. Which café or restaurant takes your fancy? I’m a regular at Society Café, where I don’t even have to ask for my skinny decaff flat white as they know what I like. I sometimes treat myself to lunch at Yen Sushi in Bartlett Street or the Green Bird Café in Margaret’s Buildings. And I will always take guests to the Circus Restaurant. Your passions? What hobbies or interests will you be pursuing? I’m lucky that my job relates to my interests, and so I get a lot of fun every day thinking about architecture in Bath. I will also keep half an eye on the England cricket scores. I’ve always loved cricket as a spectator, a parent and an avid Test Match Special listener. In addition I will be preparing to go on an archaeological dig for a week’s working

holiday. It’s on Lindisfarne and my husband and I are going with Dig Ventures, a crowdfunded archaeology company. What local outdoor activity or event will you be doing or visiting? I’m trying to cycle into work at least twice a week along the canal. It’s a brilliant way to clear the brain before and after work and great to be out in the fresh air – even when it’s raining. I’m also looking forward to Bath Preservation Trust’s members’ walks which take place in the summer months – there’s always more to learn in this lovely city. Film or play? What will you be going to see this month? I love theatre and don’t see enough of it. I hope to catch Racing Demon at the Theatre Royal, which I saw when it first came out in 1990 at the National – I’ll be interested to know if it, or I, have changed in the meantime. I’m also a recent convert to the live streaming of opera and theatre in the cinema – although it’s not the same as the real thing it massively widens access and it is a fantastic way to see much more than I would otherwise. What else are you up to? We have an exciting family year ahead with my eldest stepson and his wife expecting their first child, and my stepdaughter getting married. I think there are many bonuses to ‘blended’ or step-families and the good bits don’t get enough press. In addition, my son Benjy is in his last year at King Edward’s and so I am trying to do all the ‘last time’ events – concerts, cricket matches and so on – while trying mentally to adjust to what it will mean not to have a child at home next year. My main job in the A level term of an 18-year-old is to make sure there is masses of food in the house and at least a bit of decent home cooking. Celebrations for the 250th anniversary of the foundation of the Royal Crescent continue throughout the year. We are currently looking forward to A Day in the Life of the Royal Crescent: Picnic in the Park, which will be a free event for families, on Saturday 29 July, from 11am to 3pm. n

We’re following @PositiveNewsUK, a British independent co-operatively run project dedicated to constructive journalism and news about good things happening in the world. With 28,400 followers it poses the question: ‘What if we refuse to let hate and fear dictate what happens next?’ The answer, they argue, is to bring people what they desire, not what they fear.


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GUEST | COLUMNIST

BACK TO THE FUTURE: WITH TRAMS

PHOTOGRAPHS: courtesy of Paul Abell

Dave Andrews, of the Bath Tram Re-Introduction Group proposes a revolution for Bath public transport

B

ath is a beautiful city, a lovely place to live and deservedly a UNESCO World Heritage Site. But there is a problem – the traffic and the exhaust pollution. How on earth have we reached a situation where visitors to our lovely city take home as many memories of having to dodge cars as of the the Roman Baths, the spa and Bath Abbey? It doesn’t have to be like this. There is a way of using clean, sustainable energy, while at the same time getting rid of the dangerous tiny particles produced by the wear of rubber tyres on tarmac roads. Exhaust fumes are an obvious problem – just ask any cyclist who has followed a smoky diesel lorry up one of Bath’s hills – but in recent years another danger has come to be recognised, and given the name of the Oslo Effect from the city in Norway where it was first studied in detail. What do you think happens to the rubber which is worn off your car tyres between the time they are new and the time the tread is so worn down that the tyres need replacing? As the tyre wears it loses rubber particles, technically known as particulate matter. Much smaller than the diameter of a human hair, these particles can pass through the lungs into the human blood stream, bringing with them the risk of heart attacks in particular. And naturally the particles which come off the tyres have their counterpart in particles gradually coming off the road surface as it wears. All engines also produce iron particles from the engines and these are implicated in Alzheimer’s and dementia as they can become lodged in the brain. In these circumstances it is not surprising that the tram is making a long-overdue comeback, fume-free, no rubber tyres

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MODERN PUBLIC TRANSPORT: with trams traffic can be controlled so that cars follow the tram in at speed, beating the traffic and giving passengers shorter journey times – above, the Nottingham tram system Below, a modern tram takes a tight corner among historic city centre buildings in Nottingham shedding harmful particles, and powered by electricity that can be generated in an entirely sustainable manner. If you have visited Nottingham recently you may well have seen the fine modern trams that are spreading over the city. They serve the shopping centres and amenities in the city centre, the railway station, the two universities and – particular boon for anyone who has tried to find a space in a hospital car park – the massive QMC hospital . A key attraction is the service frequency – six minutes and the fact that with modern controls the trams can benefit from having the traffic lights automatically set to give the tram an unimpeded run into the city, a technique which cannot be applied to buses. However you may not have seen the Nottingham trams when they are their most useful, especially if you were only visiting the city for the day. In the morning peak the trams really come into their own for commuters, helped by the massive car parks at each terminus. Taking so many cars off the road makes things much better for cyclists, while the spacious trams are a welcome sight for parents with pushchairs. Bath used to have trams. Until 1939 tram routes brought people into the city centre from Bathford, Combe Down, Twerton, Newton St Loe, Upper Weston and Oldfield Park. Unfortunately the trams themselves were still the originals from 1904, so it is not really surprising they were replaced by buses. What a pity they were not modernised to give the fast, convenient transport found in Amsterdam or Prague, to name just two cities which kept their tramways and developed them. Naturally a new tram network would reflect modern needs. A tram route up the hill to the university would be a no-brainer, while a set of park and ride sites would have

the same success in keeping cars out of the city centre as do Nottingham’s 5,000 car park spaces. The park and rides at Lansdown, Odd Down and Newbridge would be much better used with a tram connection – they are presently little used during the key rush hour. One third of the traffic during the rush hour is the school run, because parents do not trust the unreliable and less frequent buses, but with trams on a six minute schedule they will be happy to trust their children to a fast and reliable system. Anyone who has commuted by train and by bus into Bath, will notice that trains are egalitarian, used by all, whereas buses tend to be used by lower income people and students – those without cars. It seems that trams however are perceived as a smart, urban way of getting about and research shows that when a tram is installed 35% of the new users are previous car drivers, whereas buses do not attract car drivers. Another interesting point is that whenever an expensive fixed link such as a tram is installed business property values rise significantly and investors will come into the area because they know the expensive link cannot be removed, whereas bus links can and are taken away at short notice much to the chagrin of the previous users. Just as a school is more than bricks and mortar, a tram system is much more than a collection of vehicles running on some tracks, however smooth the ride would be. A modern tramway (and the changes in traffic flows it brings with it) does so much to improve the environment of a city that its citizens wonder how they ever managed previously – and the answer to that is that they did not manage nearly so well. n Visit: bathtrams.uk for more details.


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CARRIE HOPE | FLETCHER

THE KOOKIEST KID IN TOWN

Jessica Hope speaks to musical star and internet sensation Carrie Hope Fletcher about playing a grown up Wednesday in The Addams Family musical

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escribed as an “honorary big sister” by many, at the age of just 24 Carrie Hope Fletcher has enchanted audiences onstage with her incredible voice, given advice to hundreds of thousands of people through her YouTube channel, and made numerous readers laugh and cry with her best-selling books. In her latest venture, Carrie has taken on her most demanding part to date, playing a grown up Wednesday in the musical version of everyone’s favourite kooky clan, The Addams Family. This production, which comes to Theatre Royal Bath this month, follows 18 year-old Wednesday as she comes to terms with falling in love with – shock horror – an American teenage boy from a respectable family. How will the Addamses be able to handle normal people coming into their lives as the families meet over a fateful dinner? In the midst of a busy tour schedule I spoke to Carrie, who is from Harrow in London, about what first drew her to this unusual part. “I grew up watching The Addams Family films (released in 1991 and 1993) and my mum loved the 1960s television version, so The Addams Family was always on in our household. I love the dark humour, which is similar to Tim Burton films like The Nightmare Before Christmas and Beetlejuice – I have always enjoyed that kind of genre.” This part is a world away from other characters Carrie has played in recent years – she performed as Eponine in Les Miserables in the West End and in Dubai, picking up the award for Best Takeover in a Role at the 2014 WhatsOnStage Awards, as well as playing Truly Scrumptious in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Jane Banks in Mary Poppins. “This is certainly the most challenging role I’ve ever played. The physicality of the production has been a test, especially with the corset I have to wear because of all the running around I have to do – trying to control my breathing while wearing it took a few shows to get used to.” Despite these challenges, Carrie 18 TheBATHMagazine

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says that the whole cast has thrown themselves into these quirky parts. “I’ve never seen a cast so in love with a show before,” she says. Playing alongside Carrie is ex-EastEnders star Samantha Womack as the iconic family matriarch Morticia, and Coronation Street actor Les Dennis plays the utterly bizarre Uncle Fester. Musical sensation Cameron Blakely (Les Miserables, Peter Pan, Oliver!) plays Gomez, who struggles with trying to keep his knowledge of his daughter’s relationship a secret from his beloved wife. “Cameron Blakely is hilarious. We played father and daughter in Les Mis when he was Thenardier, and now he’s playing my dad in this production, so I think we’re meant to play father and daughter forever,” Carrie laughs. The cast also includes a large ensemble but with a difference. “Each member of the ensemble has their own individual part playing an ancestor of the Addams family,” Carrie tells me. “There is a ballerina and a matador, for example. This is really rare in musicals as the ensemble are usually all dressed the same as villagers or something similar.”

Audiences will fondly remember a young Christina Ricci’s portrayal of the melancholic Wednesday in The Addams Family films from the 1990s. With her familiar pale complexion and long black plaits, Wednesday is a young adult in the musical version, battling her emotions and her affinity to her family and the man she loves. “It is really strange for Wednesday because she’s usually so dark and torturous, and finds nothing better than tormenting her brother. But now she’s confused about being in love as this goes completely against everything dark that she loves and is used to,” says Carrie. Despite being performed in countries around the world, this is the first time that UK audiences will be treated to the musical as it tours across the country until November. “The good thing about being on tour means you get to perform in a new venue, so the show gets refreshed each time,” she says. “There will be new routes to organise how to get on and off the stage and props put in different areas, so the show never gets tired.” Away from the stage Carrie

DARK HUMOUR: Carrie Hope Fletcher as Wednesday in The Addams Family © Matt Martin Oliver Ormson and Carrie Hope Fletcher in rehearsals © Craig Sugden The cast of The Addams Family musical © Matt Martin


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regularly vlogs (for the uninitiated that’s blogging, but with videos rather than writing) and her YouTube channel, ItsWayPastMyBedTime, has an incredible 640,000 subscribers and her videos have been viewed 97,000,000 times across the world since 2011. Her vlogs cover a variety of topics including music covers, backstage footage of her work in the theatre, and giving advice to her dedicated followers (who call themselves Hopefuls). “It was a happy mistake that I got into vlogging. I was unemployed and bored, so started doing a cover each month and posting it online and it just snowballed from there. I never knew that there was such a big vlogging community.” With the surge of video channels like YouTube in recent years, this has allowed younger people more access to celebrities and the chance to get to know their idols on a greater level. And for the stars of the videos, they can engage with their fans and give out advice to their viewers. But, as we are all too aware, there are the negatives that go hand in hand with these modern developments. Carrie tries to address the anxieties around body image for her young fans in her vlogs and fights back against keyboard warriors who make sly comments or attack others online about the way they look. “The people who make these cruel comments don’t get to see the affect that it has on someone. I’ve grown a tougher skin than most over the years, but I want to highlight in my videos that if someone said something nasty to someone who wasn’t as tough skinned as I am, then it can have lasting damage.” Similarly with her first book, All I Know Now, which was a number one Sunday Times bestseller, Carrie wanted to reassure her readers about those confusing and embarrassing moments that happen in your teenage years. “When I was a teenager, there weren’t any YouTube vloggers who could share those stories with you. So in my book I wanted to share stories about my teenage

years that would help me get through those problems if I were that age now.” Carrie has also brought out two bestselling fictional books and her third one, All That She Can See, will be released in July, all of which address subjects such as heartbreak, mental illness, death and romance – issues that Carrie believes are important to discuss with her readers, young or old. Performing, writing, making videos and fighting keyboard warriors – that’s just a day in the life of Carrie Hope Fletcher . . . CARRIE’S TOP FIVE BOOKS The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton Usually I can guess where a book is going to go by halfway through, but with this one I couldn’t figure out where it was going. I was completely surprised with how it ended and I absolutely loved it. I became slightly obsessed with the book afterwards. Every Day by David Levithan This is such a clever book for young adults which tells the story of a soul which has to move to a different body each day in order to survive. But then the soul falls in love and has to spend its life trying to find its way back to the woman it loves. All My Friends Are Superheroes by Andrew Kaufman This is my all time favourite book. My favourite superhero in it is The Spooner, whose power is that he knows when someone is in need of a hug. When that person is asleep, he goes into their house, spoons them for the night, and then leaves before they wake up, leaving the person feeling like they’ve had a little bit of comfort and love. This book was given to me by a fan after a performance of Les Mis and I began reading it on the train home and I couldn’t stop reading it. I finished it at around 3am and I held it to my chest and sobbed. Billy and Me by Giovanna Fletcher I love this story, and coincidentally it was written by my sister-in-law. It will leave you

feeling all warm and fuzzy, and because I know the author, it meant I read it while imagining it in her voice. Wilde Like Me by Louise Pentland This is by one of my friends (and fellow YouTube vlogger) and I’m reading the preview of it now. It is out in June and I’m absolutely loving it. CARRIE’S TOP FIVE SONGS Shape Of You by Ed Sheeran I know it seems really conventional to choose something by Ed Sheeran, but I’m obsessed with this song because it’s such an ear worm and so catchy. It just makes you want to dance whenever you hear it. High Hopes by The Vamps Again, coincidentally, this song was written by my brother (Mcfly’s Tom Fletcher), and I love it because it has such a summery feel. How Far I’ll Go from the film Moana I watched Moana while flying to Florida and I cried on the plane watching it. This is a Disney film about a young, strong girl finding her way, and it’s such a refreshing take on a female Disney character. You Matter To Me from the musical Waitress I can’t stop listening to the soundtrack to this musical and this duet is beautiful. It’s quite a new musical to Broadway, but I hope it comes to the West End soon. Hawaiian Roller Coaster Ride from the film Lilo and Stitch This is by far my most played song on my laptop – I think the last time I checked it had been played around 428 times. It just makes you feel good whenever you listen to it, and I sometimes play it on a loop when I’m cleaning my house. The Addams Family is on at Theatre Royal Bath from Tuesday 13 – Saturday 17 June. Visit: theatreroyal.org.uk or call the Box Office on 01225 448844 for tickets. n

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Gold & Platinum Studio Handmade and Bespoke Jewellery 19 Northumberland Place, Bath BA1 5AR | Tel: +44 (0)1225 462 300 www.goldandplatinumstudio.co.uk | e: mike@goldandplatinumstudio.co.uk

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HOLIDAY MOOD: Sophie wears pink shirt, £110, white shorts, £79, both Lauren Ralph Lauren at Jolly’s, embroidered bag, £49, Hallhuber Ann wears floral blouse, £115, Lauren Ralph Lauren and pink trousers, £69, Mint Velvet Shoes, models’ own 22 TheBATHMagazine

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SUMMER | FASHION

IT’S A MOTHER DAUGHTER THING

For our summer fashion shoot we raided Jolly’s department store in Bath to find clothes for every occasion. Photography by Toby Merritt A BREAK FROM SHOPPING: above, Sophie wears pink lace skirt, £79, and blouse, £59, both by Hallhuber, pumps, £65, Nine West Ann wears blue lace dress, £129, Hallhuber, pink jacket, £59, Label Lab, shoes, £99, Kurt Keiger OFF TO THE RACES: Sophie wears blue dress, £199, Jigsaw, Ann wears tomato dress, £89, Hallhuber, shoes stylist’s own Hats, made to order by Emelle at Get Dressy: getdressy.co.uk

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very mother and daughter will experience that moment when they’re going to a big family wedding or a formal party and they’re faced with the ‘what shall I wear?’ question. We thought it would be fun to take the mother and daughter scenario and ask professional stylist Natasha Musson to find them oufits for a series of events, from a day at the races (hats required) to daughter’s graduation day (nothing too fussy under the academic gown). Everything, bar the bespoke hats and some of the shoes, came from concessions in Jolly’s of Bath. What could our pair wear for a summer party, a christening or a family lunch that wouldn’t make them feel too matchy-matchy, would be age appropriate for both and would ensure that both women would own their share of the spotlight? We hope our summer shoot, photographed in Bath city centre, will inspire your own mother-daughter dressing up.

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WEDDING GUESTS: Sophie wears dusky pink floral dress, £89, Biba Fascinator stylist’s own Ann wears blue dress with floral and bird motif, £99, Biba, hat, £49, Phase Eight

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SUMMER | FASHION

FOR A FAMILY CHRISTENING: Ann wears a dress, £189, Jigsaw, pink jacket, £99, Phase Eight, necklace, £29, Phase Eight Sophie wears dress, £110, Phase Eight Shoes, stylist’s own

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GRADUATION DAY: this page, posing proudly outside Bath Abbey, Sophie wears a white dress, £150, Oui Ann wears a black and white jumpsuit, £155, Lauren Ralph Lauren Shoes, stylist’s own

COCKTAIL TIME: opposite page, Ann wears black and white dress, £189, pink shoes with bow, £99, both by Phase Eight Sophie wears a black jumpsuit, £99, Phase Eight Hat designed and made by Emelle of Get Dressy of Castle Carey, Somerset, silver shoes, £98, Linea THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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WITH THANKS TO: Photography: Toby Merritt Tobymerritt.co.uk Styling: Natasha Musson Natashamusson.co.uk Models: Ann Jackson and Sophie Johnson from Mustard Models Bigmustard.co.uk Clothes: all from Jolly’s, House of Fraser, Milsom Street, Bath Hair by Judy Simmons, senior stylist at Regis Salon, Jolly’s, tel: 01225 335308 Make up by Emma Crook and Lewis Clarke of M.A.C which has a concession in Jolly’s and a new stand-alone store in Southgate. Book a make up session at either store Editorial team: Georgette McCready and Jessica Hope Anemone florist, Milsom Place, Jamie’s Deli, the tea room at Jolly’s, The Guildhall, All Bar One and Southgate for providing the backdrops

FAMILY LUNCH: Sophie, black and white strap top, £59, stripe trousers, £89, both Mint Velvet, hat, £29, Hallhuber Ann, trousers, £69, vest, £49, jacket, £109, all Mint Velvet

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We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family then we are able to offer a mailing service for only £15.00 (6 issues) or £40.00 Euro zone; £30.00 (12 issues) or £70.00 Euro zone World Zone 1 £95.00 World Zone 2 £120.00 To subscribe to receiving the magazine go to our website; www.thebathmag.co.uk and scroll to the bottom of the page where you can click to an instant link Alternatively send a cheque payable to MC Publishing Ltd 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED or Telephone 01225 424 499 for card payment

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SUMMER | OF | FESTIVALS

READY FOR A LITTLE BLUE SKY THINKING?

Playful, entertaining, energetic and thought-provoking – here are the highlights from this summer’s crop of festivals

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o wild in Wiltshire, roam the streets of Bath, or head for the hills beyond the city. But whatever you do, keep your eyes open for art, music, comedy and dance as a series of summer festivals entices us to join them BATH FRINGE The Fringe started on Friday 26 May, but there’s still plenty to look forward to in this annual smorgasboard of cultural treats. A weekend of free street entertainment will take passersby unawares in the city centre as the always surprising Bedlam Fair kicks off from lunchtime on Saturday 3 and Sunday 4 June. Then Fringe events continue at a pace, in venues all over the city until Sunday 11 June. There are bands at The Bell, original drama at Burdall’s Yard, a comedy sketch show at the Old Theatre Royal and the evergreen master of the double entendre, Mr Bill Smarme with his backing band The Bizness at Widcombe Social Club. The Kilter Theatre Company launches its unique pub crawl cum quiz and there’ll be a tribute to Pink Floyd at The Barley Mow. Pick up a fringe programme to find out about these and many, many more events, including celebrations, on Sunday 11 June, of the 20th anniversary since the first Walcot Nation Day. Sadly they can’t close the street this year but The Bell has promised to squeeze a whole festival into its environs. 32 TheBATHMagazine

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FRINGE ARTS BATH It pays to be curious about the goingson in empty shops in Bath city centre at this time of year. Look carefully at Walcot Street, New Bond Street and Westgate Street this month as artists set up pop-up galleries inside. These exhibitions include traditional forms of media, such as lino prints and photographs alongside performances. Unusual venues include the Cleveland Pools and themes tackled include obsessive compulsive collecting, the emotional power of home the island of Orkney. The FaB programme details can be found on the flipside of the Bath Fringe programme or visit: fringeartsbath.co.uk. CORSHAM WALKING FESTIVAL Now in its fourth year, this year’s festival programme includes 18 walks – many of them themed – taking place over three days, from Friday 9 to Sunday 11 June. Walks will include tours and talks of the history of the town, local quarrying and medieval life. For the energetic there are also a 19-mile and a 20-mile guided walk through the Wiltshire countryside. Check out the festival website: corshamwalking festival.org.uk. BATH COMEDY FESTIVAL Not content with making us laugh for just a few weeks each year, the comedy festival is now spreading the love with gigs throughout the calendar. Next up is waspish/slash/outrageous US

comedian Scott Capurro, who is bringing his Gay Turnaround show to Widcombe Social Club on Thursday 8 June, from 7.30pm. Tickets are £12 / £10 concessions from: bathcomedy.com or tel: 0800 411 8881 BLUE SKY FESTIVAL The Pound Arts centre in Corsham continues to offer entertainment by some big names, alongside the quirky and the curious. Its annual Blue Sky arts festival runs from Monday 13 to Sunday 18 June, offering events and activities for all ages. As part of this year’s festival there’s an intimate theatre show in a caravan. Mobile is brought to us by Paper Birds company and based on real people’s aspirations and dreams. The 40-seat theatre will be parked in the arts centre car park and has won rave reviews from The Guardian. Shows are on Friday 16 June, at 5pm, 5.45pm, 6.45pm and 7.30pm. Tickets: £10, from: blueskyfestival.org.uk. On Sunday 18 June at 2pm there’s a rare appearance by Gas Giants featuring Goldfrapp’s Will Gregory, also at The Pound, and known for their experimental music which blurs the boundaries of jazz, electronica and pop.Tickets: £10. Austentatious: The Improvised Jane Austen Novel is on Saturday 17 June, 7.30pm at The Pound, tickets: £18. This is an entirely improvised, Regency comedy show, in which the cast improvises a new ‘lost’ Jane

A FRESH APPROACH: international artist Tomas Saraceno from Argentina will be bringing installations to the wide open space of the Bath Skyline as Forest of Imagination sets up camp in a new venue Opposite page, the inflatable boabab trees at last year’s Forest of Imagination Centre, singer songwriter Bella Hardy will be singing at the Blue Sky Festival in Corsham Right, The Fairy Queen, one of last year’s magical productions at Iford Arts, where opera is sung in English


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Austen work, based on nothing more than a title suggestion from the audience. Previous masterpieces include The Sixth Sense and Sensibility, Mansfield Shark and Double O Darcy. This show was a sell-out runaway success at the Bath Literature Festival a couple of years ago. The Blue Sky Festival rounds off with music from folk singer songwriter Bella Hardy with support from Mary Spender, on Sunday 18 June, 8pm at The Pound. Tickets: £18. Find out more at: blueskyfestival.org.uk. TASTE OF CORSHAM This is a new food festival, taking place in the town centre on Saturday 17 June, whose aim is to show off the best local produce from the area. There will be tasting tents, bars selling local cider and beer, stalls offering food and the restaurants, cafés and pubs in the town will also be joining in. There will also be an opportunity to take part in the national Great Get Together campaign being held as a positive tribute to the late MP Jo Cox. Leave a message of hope on the Pound Arts centre’s wishing tree, or take the children along to the workshops on the High Street to make a head garland or have their faces painted. There’ll also be a stage in the town centre with live music. FESTIVAL OF NATURE Families are invited to join in a celebration of wildlife in the heart of the city as the Festival of Nature returns to Bath. There will be lots of fun things to do at the Parade Gardens on Sunday 25 June between 11am and 6pm at this free festival. As well as a photography safari – seek out the creatures in the park – young visitors are invited to dress as pirates and take part in a wildlife treasure hunt, or to help make beefriendly installations for the city centre. There’s plenty of interest for adults too as organisations include the Bath Natural History Society, Bath City Farm, the Avon Bat Group and the Canal and River Trust will all be holding stalls and talking to visitors on the day. Find out more at the Festival of Nature’s Facebook page.

IFORD ARTS One of the cultural highlights of the British summer is an evening of opera – always sung in English – in the romantic setting of the Peto Garden at Iford, six miles from Bath in the Wiltshire countryside. Iford Arts Festival features fabulous productions set in the cloisters in the grounds, for a 90-strong audience. The three operas this year are: La Bohème by Puccini, which runs until 13 June, followed by Barber of Seville by Rossini, which runs until 1 July, and finally Jephtha by Handel, which closes on 2 August. There are also the Picnic Proms in the gardens on 7 and 8 July and on 5 August featuring musicians including Clare Teal, Pee Wee Ellis and Hailey Tuck. For tickets, tel: 01225 448844 or visit: ifordarts.org.uk. FOREST OF IMAGINATION In June 2016, the Forest of Imagination appeared like a magnificent dream in the heart of Bath. The area around Bath Abbey was transformed as a forest of trees sprang up; giant, silver, inflatable, baobab forest guardians appeared and thousands of butterflies fluttered among the soft dust motes of the abbey’s vaulted ceiling. It won the hearts of all ages and the organisers of this year’s Forest of Imagination, which runs from Thursday 29 June until Sunday 2 July, are determined that this year’s event will be equally captivating. Forest of Imagination was co-founded by Bath architect Andrew Grant, (celebrated for his work on the Gardens by the Bay in Singapore – recently highlighted on the BBC’s Planet Earth series) and Penny Hay, senior lecturer at Bath Spa University, champion of children being able to enjoy their childhood and founder of charity 5x5x5x=creativity. The creative project, which is free to visit and enjoy, is a unique pop-up event encouraging us all to set our minds free and engage in creative play. This year the National Trust is partnering the event, which take place next to the University of Bath campus at Claverton, in Bushey Norwood, a huge meadow and Iron

Age site which is part of the historic Bath Skyline. A major highlight for Forest 2017, is the arrival of Argentinian artist, Tomas Saraceno, whose work explores the relationship between the atmosphere and earth. He harnesses the energy of solar power to create free-flying objects. His Areocene Project collects atmospheric data, using self-inflating balloon structures. Last year’s giant inflatable baobab trees were designed to encourage a people to think about the forests of the world and how we can help to protect them. Bristol Zoo is again partnering with Forest and the House of Fairy Tales – an educational arts charity and travelling art circus founded by artists Deborah Curtis and Gavin Turk. In addition Anthony Head, digital artist and creative director of Illuminate Bath, will offer an insect workshop inviting visitors to discover more about the yellow meadow ants, a species unique to the Bath Skyline. The meadows will come alive with installations, workshops and other interactive experiences designed through partnerships with architects, Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, Carpenter Oak, Bath Spa University, the RSA, Illustrious, Buro Happold and Bath Abbey. Anna Newell, who creates immersive theatrical events, will create a sensory forest, and musician, Martyn Ware, founding member of The Human League and Heaven 17, and sound muralist will create an audio soundscape hidden within a forest dell. There will also be musical workshops led by WOMAD artists, Chartwell Dutiro and Denise Rowe, 5x5x5x artists and architect students from the University of Bath, the Edge Arts, and students from Bath Spa. Running in conjunction with Forest, the first International Festival of Childhood (IFC) will be held at The Edge, a symposium of interested parties and experts sharing ideas and concerns about modern childhood. Forest of Imagination is a free event is funded by the Arts Council and Herman Miller Cares among others. Find out more at: forestofimagination.org.uk. n

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OUR GUIDE TO

THE BEST INDIE SHOPS OF BATH 2017

Great cities need great shops Great shops are a primary reason why people love to shop in Bath, work in Bath and choose to live in Bath.

Interesting, designer, luxurious, cool, or just downright eccentric... Our independent shops sell beautiful things with a customer service that is rarely found elsewhere.

There’s a compelling argument that indirectly, indie emporiums and little shops contribute more to the city’s economy than the high street chains. While broader market pressures continue to challenge retailers (and sadly a few absent friends will be missed), Bath remains one of the finest shopping destinations in Europe.

In this special supplement The Bath Magazine celebrates the significance of our cherished local economy.

Lend some support... Think local.

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THE STATE OF INDEPENDENTS We take the temperature of Bath’s independent business scene and report on what’s being done to support this key sector of the Bath economy

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he closure of a number of independently run shops in the city centre has thrown the spotlight on Bath’s independent sector. We have asked some key figures to share their thoughts on the current state of the independents and find out what’s being done to support them. Sue Shannon, owner of Shannon, Walcot Street, in her 18th year of trading “Bath’s independents are a core attraction to locals and visitors and an important part of the city. It’s very sad that we have lost some very good independents recently. There is no doubt that if you are to succeed you have to be completely dedicated six days a week to the business. It’s not enough to open and hope that people will come in. You have to make sure your window display is appealing, that you advertise in the right places and that you pay attention to details, such as keeping your windows and signs clean. It goes without saying that you need to be open when people expect you to be open – especially if they’ve come into Bath intending to visit. There is quite a lot being done collectively in Bath and in Walcot Street to support traders. The council has been pretty good, rates are down on smaller shops and we’re doing a lot to help ourselves in Walcot collectively. I think it’s important to be positive, not to blame governments or Brexit or whatever, but having said that retail is particularly difficult at the moment. II TheBATHMagazine

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Renewing your lease is always a time when you ask yourself if you are prepared to carry on. If your lease is for four years you may decide that you really can’t commit the time, money and sheer hard work for another four years – and it’s not always feasible to sell the business on to someone else.” Mike Killpartrick, optometrist and director of Ellis and Killpartrick Opticians, trading in Bath since 1979 Mike is a director of Bath BID and former chairman of Bath’s Chamber of Commerce Transport and Highways subcommittee. “As the high street continues to adjust to the internet it is vital that city centre stores evolve and adapt to this fundamental change in our shopping habits. Retail experts believe that around 20% of all purchases are being made online, which means that high street retailers will experience a comparable drop in their sales. Unfortunately the government’s current model used for the recent rate revaluation was developed before internet shopping existed and the failure to recognise the fundamental effect this is having partly explains why so many city centre stores are closing. Similarly the failure of commercial surveyors to adjust to the internet effect has further compounded the problem. There is a significant knock on effect with around 20 empty retail units in Bath city centre equating to 60 – 70 fewer jobs, probably worth at least £1.2m loss to the local economy. The large multiple chains have the

resources to exploit tax efficient ways of reducing their tax burden, so in this climate can the small independent retailer compete and indeed survive? I believe the answer is yes. Firstly the shopping and eating experience offered by multiples tends to lead to uniformity and blandness in products, menus and indeed the whole shopping and eating experience, often referred to as the clone city effect. Independents will prosper if they exploit this uniformity by providing different, interesting environments, creative menus and products not available online. We all seek new and different experiences and it seems many shoppers and diners are increasingly seeking outlets that are better placed to meet this demand. This can be to the independents’ strength as small successful businesses are often run by creative individuals who look to develop innovation and new initiatives. This shift toward smaller independents is further helped by the increasing public distaste for and disapproval of the widely reported tax efficient structures developed by the multiple chains which results in unfairly reduced and disproportionate contributions to the country’s tax revenues. Fortunately Bath is an architecturally unique city and can therefore offer a very different shopping and dining experience. The contribution to Bath’s economy made by the independents is now widely recognised by the council which, unusually, owns an exceptionally large commercial property portfolio. The council is therefore uniquely placed to influence retail mix and recent proposals to provide a more flexible and innovative legal framework are greatly welcomed by the indies.”


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LOCAL | ECONOMY

Emma Savage has run Grace and Ted dress agency in Kingsmead Square with her mother, Sharon Savage, for five years “We have a private landlord, HPH Ltd who is very supportive and available for help and advice. Because our shop is so tiny we are able to claim Small Business Rate Relief, which has been a lifesaver. We have little interaction with the council but have received lots of support from the licensing and events teams when organising charity events in Kingsmead Square. We are always thinking of new ways to market our business. I have organised lots of events in Kingsmead Square which brought new faces to the square and to our shop. We are very active on social media and apps such as Instagram are great for reaching a wider audience. I invest a lot of time in our website to try and boost sales – online shopping is more popular than ever and it’s vital that independents compete. I think navigation is a real problem in Bath. There are businesses down every street, yet huge numbers of tourists are unaware that there is more to the city than the Milsom Street, Stall Street to Southgate stretch. The rent and rates are increasing and footfall is dropping in many areas. There are few businesses that can survive this, even chains; Lululemon opened on Upper Borough Walls – its first store in the south west – which lasted less than a year. A councillor once said to me: “It’s the council’s job to bring tourists to the city but the businesses’ responsibility to get them to their door” – to some extent I agree, but when there is no investment in comprehensive street signage (those bronze monoliths are like a Sudoku) and A boards have been banned – it’s hard for a business to target new customers without investing in advertising. Brighton is an example of a city with excellent street signs that enable visitors to explore. With some innovative thinking and investment from the council, Bath could be just as easy to navigate.

I think those in charge of the empty units could be doing a lot more to encourage new businesses to take a short lease. We are a city full of imaginative and creative people and it’s these businesses that create a buzz of excitement and inspiration on the high street. No one wants a clone town and Bath has the potential to be a real shopping destination full of independent retailers but the businesses, council, Bath BID and Bath Tourism Plus need to co-ordinate to make it happen. Louise Prynne, chief executive of Bath Business Improvement District “People are understandably concerned about shop closures and vacant premises in Bath. As a World Heritage City we attract visitors from around the globe, so it is perhaps even more important that we look like a vibrant city with a healthy local economy. However, at the same time we need to recognise that we are in a better state of health than the average UK city where the typical vacancy rates are noticeably higher. The national average vacancy rate is 11.5%, yet Bath’s is just over 4%. Anything under 5% is considered healthy, so while we must always monitor the situation carefully, we still have plenty of reasons to be optimistic. While we will always have periodic shop closures and vacant premises, the ongoing challenge for Bath is to ensure that we make sure we are appealing as a business destination and can attract new businesses to fill those premises, also to support the local trading environment to ensure our shop closure rate stays as low as possible. The retail landscape around the world is changing and facing new challenges. Online retail and out-of-town shopping have all impacted on traditional high streets. But that’s not to say our city centre cannot continue to thrive. Town and city centre retail is changing and the experience is becoming as much about a social experience as a retail experience, and this is where Bath

can excel, as our community of independent retailers, bars and eateries ensure we offer a highly social and varied experience. We should never underestimate the importance of this, as it is proven that areas with a higher proportion of independents will be economically healthier than clone towns which are dominated by generic retailers and outlets. There will be things the Bath BID cannot influence, such as business rates. Recent revaluations in business rates have been a challenge for small businesses and the seven year gap in the reevaluation has resulted in a large sudden increase that has hit some of them hard. While many of the independents in the city will be below the BID levy threshold of £25,000, we appreciate the extra burden business rate increases place on all businesses. However, the BID continually works to drive footfall and support the all businesses in the city centre. The BID is working with commercial agents and landlords developing a framework to dress empty shop fronts to ensure that the welcome to the city is maintained and the streetscape retains its vibrancy while refurbishments are underway. The BID’s new Bath Business Barometer and retail sales index is a new management information service available free to all Bath BID businesses to enable them to benchmark their own performance, keep abreast of changes on the high street and get insights into how other other towns and cities are faring.” Independents: a rallying call A group of independent traders in Bath are setting up a new organisation to be the voice for the sector. They are inviting all independent traders to attend the next meeting, which is from 6pm on Tuesday 13 June at the Hilton Hotel in Walcot Street. There will be invited speakers, including Louise Prynne from Bath BID and Bath and North East Somerset councillors and officers Topics under discussion will include the Christmas Market, empty shops, ideas for improving footfall and a name for the new organisation. n

TRADERS ARE DOING IT FOR THEMSELVES: The businesses around historic Abbey Green have launched the Independent Bath Market, which had its inaugural market in May and will be held on the third Sunday of each month The next market is on Sunday 18 June. Traders who would like to have a stall should contact Silvana at The Foodie Bugle, email: info@thefoodiebugle.com Photographs of the market in Abbey Green by Guy Joynson, visit: guyjoynson.com

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THE INDIE SHOPS OF BATH

THE DRESSING ROOM 7 Quiet Street, Bath BA1 2JU Tel: 01225 330563 Web: dressingroombath.co.uk Since opening in Bath in 1985, The Dressing Room has maintained its reputation as the ‘go to’ place for the finest in lingerie, beach and nightwear. While offering the most exquisite lingerie collections from the likes of Marie Jo, Aubade and Prima Donna, the shop also has a wide range of very basic t-shirt bras and invisible briefs. The beachwear collection features many brands, including Melissa Odabash, Maryan Mehlhorn, Gottex, Seafolly, Miraclesuit and Roidal amongst many others. The nightwear collection boasts Olivia Von Halle, Hanro Cottons, Laurence Tavernier robes, and silk gowns from Luna Di Seta and Marjolaine. With experienced and professional staff ready to help you, why not go along and have some fun?

AUDIENCE 14 Broad Street, Bath, BA1 5LJ Tel: 01225 333310 Web: audience.org.uk The well-thumbed copies of Mojo magazine in the listening room at Audience and the love of old-school vinyl, are a clear sign these guys will share your passion for music. Their indepth knowledge will help you select a hi-fi, home cinema or custom installation system that will transform your listening experience. The team are true experts, and in a cool way they border on the obsessive, but are equally happy designing and supplying complex home entertainment installations, as they are recommending albums for your listening pleasure. Top-end products such as Linn, Naim and Bowers & Wilkins are available – all with outstanding performance and capable of astounding Studio Master music. There’s also a selection of demonstration stock and quality pre-owned items; a visit to Audience is a must – pause, play... and enjoy.

SOFA.COM Unit 5/6 The Corridor, Bath BA1 5AP Tel: 0333 006 3262 Web: sofa.com Sofa.com knows the importance of furnishing your home with beautiful designs that will stand the test of time. Every item is hand made by expert craftsmen and whether you’re looking for a contemporary corner sofa or a mid-century accent chair, sofa.com allows you to upholster its collection with any of its 140 fabrics, from luxurious velvet to durable leather. Renowned for making stylish and comfortable sofas, armchairs, beds and footstools, sofa.com has recently extended its product range to offer dining furniture, children’s furniture, rugs, mirrors, and side tables – catering to every part of customers’ homes. Super-friendly experts are on hand in Bath to offer advice, ideas and design inspiration, and ultimately make sofa shopping easy and fun. Sofa.com creates a wonderfully relaxed environment where you can bring along the whole family, and even the dog, to find your ideal sofa in a no pressure, shopping experience in Bath. Enjoy a complimentary coffee or a glass of prosecco whilst browsing the collections. There is even a children’s entertainment area to keep the little ones occupied.

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JOHN MOORE SPORTS 2 Argyle Street, Bath BA2 4BA Tel: 01225 466341 Web: johnmooresports.co.uk Known for its exceptional customer service. An exciting combination of heritage and cutting edge sports kit, John Moore Sports stocks equipment and clothing for a whole host of sports from cricket, football and hockey to running, tennis, swimming and many more. John Moore Sports is also delighted to be offering its own yoga and fitness classes as well as a free running club, JMS Run Crew – ideal for those who have already signed up for next year’s Bath Half Marathon, or simply for Parkrunners wanting to get a new PB. The store’s printing and embroidery service is ideal for school and teamwear, while also catering for corporate workwear and one-off personalised pieces. And for all of those rugby fans, why not head up the road to sister shop, JMS Rugby opposite the Guildhall? JMS Rugby is the one-stop shop for players and fans, offering numerous club and international replica rugby shirts as well rugby boots, balls, protection and more.


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THE INDIE SHOPS OF BATH

MOSS OF BATH

HOMEFRONT INTERIORS

45 St James Parade, Bath BA1 1UQ Tel: 01225 331441 Web: mossofbath.co.uk

10 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath BA1 2LP Tel: 01225 571711 Web: homefrontinteriors.co.uk

Moss of Bath is an independent television and hi-fi retailer currently celebrating 55 years in business – a milestone that represents the type of strength and stability few independent electrical retailers ever achieve. From its modest beginnings the business now specialises in the sale, installation and servicing of consumer electronic products, including television, home cinema, hi-fi and portable audio products. The business boasts its own inhouse award-winning service department as well as dedicated installation teams who undertake a wide range of installations including the wall mounting of televisions, home cinema systems, audio and public address installations and satellite and aerial works. Owner Tim Moss is rightfully proud of the longevity of the business and its core values of integrity, hard work and outstanding customer service, and also gives testament to the loyalty of his customers, referral sources and friends. Tim and his staff pride themselves in being able to blend old fashioned customer care within a hightech industry. The team are planning some exciting celebrations, promotions and competitions throughout the year and have also taken the opportunity to create a new logo to ensure that the brand reflects their history.

Now in its second year the eclectic Homefront Interiors has continued to grow with an ever changing selection of homewares, gifts and cards. This little independent store may be small but it has a wide range and regularly updated stock of new and vintage homewares and tries to follow a simple ethos of sustainability. Whether that means recycled materials, fair trade origin, small scale production or simply showing a little love and care to vintage finds. It is the clever mix of vintage and contemporary alongside an ever growing selection of handmade pieces from local artists including textiles, ceramics, jewellery, art prints and cards that makes Homefront such a great destination shop. Perfect for gifts and unique finds for your own home. Homefront is also the Bath stockist for Grand Illusions chalk paints. These paints are perfect for upcycling furniture and if you are unsure where to start why not sign up to one of the store’s workshops.

THE SILVER SHOP 25 Union Passage, Bath BA1 1RD Tel: 01225 464781 Web: thesilvershopofbath.co.uk Celebrating its 65th birthday this year this little gem of a shop continues to be one of Bath’s favourite gift and jewellery stores and is still a family-run and independent business. You’ll find it tucked away, yet close to Bath Abbey and the Roman Baths. The shop is a firm favourite with visitors and residents alike and has a reputation for great customer service. With Bath’s largest selection of silver jewellery with prices ranging from £5 to £500, the staff work hard to source a wide selection of pieces with some ranges being handmade by local jewellers. With a small workshop on site The Silver Shop also offers a charm soldering service for customers. Make this your first stop if you’re looking for a gift for someone special or just to treat yourself, such as a clock or a candle, a christening gift or even a Charlie bear, it is certain to have something for you.

TOTAL FITNESS BATH 3 Saracen Street, Bath BA1 5BR Tel: 01225 444164 Web: totalfitnessbath.co.uk Total Fitness has a passion for cycling and with varied experiences within road biking, mountain biking and triathlon, can offer you the best advice possible on any aspect of cycling, running or swimming. Stocking Specialized bikes and lots of clothing, accessories, shoes and helmets, including dedicated children’s and women’s areas. The store has a large workshop offering repairs and servicing on any type of bike, if it operates on two wheels and under pedal power, Total Fitness will work on it for you. If you want to ride longer, faster and in more comfort then have a body geometry bike fit with the store’s qualified bike fitter.

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THE INDIE SHOPS OF BATH

PAUL GREEN HI-FI

HOUSE OF RADIATORS

Unit 8, Brassmill Enterprise Centre, Brassmill Lane, Bath BA1 3LN Tel: 01225 316197 / 337955 Web: paulgreenhifi.co.uk The Green family has served the Bath area with quality audio and visual goods since Ken and Gordon Green opened Green Brothers in Walcot Street in 1946. In 1977, Paul branched out and for over 40 years has offered service rarely found today. In these days of cheap internet sales, service is becoming a thing of the past. Not at Paul Green Hi-Fi. Now based at the Brassmill Enterprise Centre and still a family business, the team offers unbiased advice on the system to suit you. The expert staff can undertake complete installation of audio and visual equipment and there is a full after sales service including repairs. Products range from LED TV screens to docking stations, wireless hi-fi and headphones through to high end stereo and surround sound separates and speakers. Paul Green Hi-Fi stocks most major brands from Audiolab to Yamaha and everything in between. There is plenty of free parking, disabled access and ground floor viewing and listening facilities and staff will always try to be competitive on pricing. You are invited to relax in the friendly atmosphere in the knowledge that you will receive quality advice and service.

22 Wellsway, Bear Flat, Bath BA2 2AA Tel: 01225 424199 Web: houseofradiators.co.uk House of Radiators is a family run business that opened in 2011 and while they sell throughout the UK and overseas, the team has found that customers in Bath and in the local Bear Flat area have been very supportive. Selling traditional and designer radiators that can be off the shelf sizes/finishes or in bespoke sizes and colours the showroom has over 70 radiators on display and, due to specific local demand, the store is expanding the range of traditional cast iron and column radiators. With over 45 years experience in the heating and radiator industry, the small team in the showroom offers a friendly and high level of customer service and believes this is key in helping customers choose the right radiator for their home that will not only look amazing but will heat their room and do its job. Working with 20 of the leading manufacturers and distributors in the radiator industry House of Radiators can offer something to suit all budgets and styles. The store offers local customers a personal free of charge home service where they can measure up and work out the correct heat requirements and size up radiators accordingly.

SILVER BEAR 34B Wellsway, Bath BA2 2AA Tel: 01225 422225 Web: silverbearjewelleryandgifts.com Owner Sheralie Robinson has been a sales agent for many years and also runs a successful silver jewellery wholesale company (Smile Jewellery Ltd), but since opening her shop on Bear Flat has relished the opportunity to connect with customers face to face and become part of the very real community in the area. The shop stocks a great range of candles, scarves, children’s gifts and men’s gifts etc but currently the main range is Smile Jewellery’s sterling silver pieces. With the recent arrival of some lovely new designs there is a great selection of silver jewellery including rings, studs, earrings, necklaces meaning that customers feel spoilt for choice and regularly feel compelled to treat themselves.

AVONVALE CARPETS 37 Kingsmead Street, Bath BA1 2AA Tel: 01225 427057 Web: avonvalecarpets.co.uk The choice of flooring is vital in transforming any room and the range of options can sometimes overwhelm. Luckily Avonvale Carpets is on hand to assist. It has served homeowners and businesses throughout the city of Bath and Wiltshire for 45 years now, providing an excellent choice of flooring, in-depth expertise and perfect fitting. An independent, family-run business, Avonvale Carpets employs its own professionally trained fitters and offers customers a great selection of quality flooring that’s truly second to none – woollens, naturals, stain resistant, vinyls and tailor made too. You will be amazed at the variety on offer in the shop which is just off Kingsmead Square.

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THE BATH HAT COMPANY 9 – 11 Walcot Street, Bath BA1 5BN Tel: 01225 339009 Web: thebathhatcompany.com

VERVE LIVING 15 Walcot Buildings, London Road, Bath BA1 6AD Tel: 07785 332536 Web: verveliving.uk Located on the London Road in Bath’s artisan quarter, Verve is an interiors store with a difference. This creative hub is all about mixing it up: an ever-changing collection of one-off, character pieces sits alongside carefully chosen contemporary (and very covetable) accessories – ceramics, lighting, textiles, glassware and more. Verve also showcases artwork by local artists, from beautiful framed prints to original oils. Its affordable style at its best and the ranges on offer here are not available anywhere else in Bath. Styling advice, regular free events and workshops complete a ‘pass it on’ approach to creativity. Pop in, a warm welcome awaits and coffee is on the house! Open Weds to Sat, 11am – 5pm or by appointment.

This lovely shop has ladies hats for all occasions. One of the specialist independent retailers which make shopping in the city such a unique and enjoyable experience. A–listed by Harper and Queen magazine, the shop is brimming with colour and stocks a huge selection of contemporary designs, along with a hint of vintage and a touch of the outrageous, all beautifully hand crafted. For the man about town, they have a fabulous collection of gentlemen's hats, colourful trilby’s, fedora’s, Donegal and Harris Tweed caps, Panama’s and many more. All sizes are available.

TINA ENGELL 29 Belvedere, Bath BA1 5HR Tel: 01225 443334 Web: tinaengell.com A short walk up from the city centre is well worth the effort to visit Danish goldsmith Tina Engell’s Scandinavian-style space. Is it a workshop or a shop? You will find glass cabinets full of beautiful handmade jewellery, as you would expect. Perhaps more unusually, this is also Tina’s workshop, with a huge workbench illuminated by industrial lamps and covered in precious metals, stones, hammers, chisels and clamps. Tina designs and makes every piece by hand, using traditional methods. Although you can buy off the shelf, Tina often works to commission, creating unique pieces of jewellery to order. She can design and make a bespoke piece, or take inherited jewellery and refashion it. In this open-plan space the entire creative process is visible, and the results are bold and individual.

FLOCK BATH 12 – 13 The Corridor, Bath BA1 5AP Tel: 01225 442227 Web: flockbath.co.uk If you’re looking for something different for your wardrobe, Flock Bath sells beautiful clothes and accessories in a lovely independent environment that is rarely found on the high street. Located in The Corridor (the world’s second oldest shopping arcade) the store stocks a range of Italian imported fashion wear and accessories. Pop in today and you’re almost sure to find something individual and affordable to treasure. Flock Bath is a stockist of Ruby Shoo shoes and Disaster Designs accessories.

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GOLD & PLATINUM STUDIO 19 Northumberland Place, Bath BA1 5AR Tel: 01225 462300 Web: goldandplatinumstudio.co.uk Goldsmith and gemmologist Michael Parsons and his team run a delightful independent studio. He specialises in hand making one off engagement rings and wedding rings, as well as offering a wide range of individual pieces. Michael and his team undertake all types of commissions on site as well as carrying out remodelling and repairs. In addition Gold & Platinum Studio showcases a selection of independent designer jewellers. A superb choice to suit all budgets. Trading in Bath for over 40 years and with an enviable reputation for quality service. A visit is a must for jewellery lovers, anyone looking for a special gift or thinking of having a piece of jewellery made.

JOHN ANTHONY 26 – 28 High Street, Bath BA1 1RG Tel: 01225 424066 Web: john-anthony.com Located on the busy high street, just a stone’s throw from the beautiful Bath Abbey and Guildhall, John Anthony has called Bath home for over 25 years. Spread out over two floors, it boasts an impressive range of designer menswear from great British brands like Belstaff, Barbour and Vivienne Westwood, to contemporary global names like Comme des Garçons, Stone Island and Versace. The knowledgable team create a stress-free and enjoyable shopping experience for all. If you can’t find something in store, the team will always strive to order items in for customers. Or if you prefer to shop from the comfort of your own home, it offers an express service and free UK delivery on all orders over £40. John Anthony is the best shopping destination in Bath for top of the line designer menswear. Pop along and check it out for yourself.

LONDON CAMERA EXCHANGE 13 Cheap Street, Bath BA1 1NA Tel: 01225 462234 Web: lcegroup.co.uk If photography is your passion then head to an institution where you are guaranteed a personal and helpful service from staff who really know their business. London Camera Exchange, which has 28 branches nationwide, can trace its origins back to the original photographic studio in Guildford in the 1950’s. Each branch retains its individuality and the Bath store carries most popular camera models as well as a range of stock chosen by the manager and staff specifically to suit their clientele. Specialities include sensor cleaning and image recovery as well as prints from phones, instant prints and passport photos. There is an excellent part-exchange service so that customers can either trade up with the latest photographic equipment or choose from the selection of used items. Space is also devoted to other types of optical equipment such as astronomical telescopes and sport optics – visit or contact the team for the best deals in Bath.

AVENIDA HOME 27 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BN Tel: 01225 571718 Web: avenidahome.com Avenida Home is part gallery and part showroom, and provides a relaxed atmosphere in which to shop. It is located in the artisan quarter of Bath that is filled with independent craft and curio shops. The store has original Georgian windows set in Bath stone. Step through the wrought iron gate and the journey of discovery begins. The wall-to-wall display of exclusive home accessories includes wooden serving trays, unique placemats, designer dinnerware and luxury table linens. The designs are eclectic, contemporary, and quirky – the antithesis of mass-produced homeware. It is a riot of colour, texture and pattern. It is certain to inspire your own home décor design. The team selects bright and beautiful items of unique homeware that will work every day or create an exquisitely set table for special occasions. The home décor pieces make amazing gifts, particularly if you are looking for unique and stylish wedding presents. This is a local family business which offers a very personal service. VIII THEBATHMAGAZINE

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JODY CORY GOLDSMITHS 9 Abbey Church Yard, Bath BA1 1LY Tel: 01225 470072 Web: jodycory.co.uk Jody Cory is an independent jeweller and member of the National Association of Goldsmiths with over 25 years of experience. From her shop and workshop in Abbey Church Yard, Jody and her team create beautiful unique pieces which are the perfect way to mark any special occasion. Friendly advice is available seven days a week from a team of highly skilled goldsmiths working in extremely covetable silver, gold and platinum and using personally selected rare gemstones. Old or broken treasures can be repaired or remodelled, to become exciting new pieces to be enjoyed all over again – a free design service is available. Jody also offers restringing, rhodium plating and valuations. On display too is work from other designers, providing a variety of interesting, superbly crafted jewellery from inexpensive silver pieces to diamond set engagement rings and both traditional and contemporary wedding rings to suit all tastes.

MY SMALL WORLD

UP TO SEVEN

19-21 St Lawrence Street, Southgate, Bath BA1 1AN Tel: 01225 312943 Web: mysmallworld.co.uk

6 Pulteney Bridge, Bath BA2 4AX Tel: 01225 422333 Web: uptoseven.co.uk

My Small World Toy Store is famous way beyond Bath’s city walls – and justifiably so! After well over a decade of leading the way when it comes to awesome shopping experiences, My Small World is the epitome of what it takes to create a vibrant indie business. Every visit is unique and exciting, and the team members in the store are passionate about what they know and love best – children, playing and families! Stepping through the doors is an experience in itself as you discover toys from your childhood rubbing shoulders with brand new discoveries – you’ll be hard pressed to find as many amazing things for children all nestled under one roof anywhere in the UK.

Have you found this beautiful shop on Pulteney Bridge? Here the team makes and sells lots of dresses, reversible dungarees, hand knitted woollies and of course the store’s famous and incredibly cute hats; strawberry, Christmas pudding and now new dinosaur. Up to Seven is a major stockist of Frugi, Kite and Toby Tiger, organic cotton, fairly traded clothes for babies and children and always has lots of appliqued tee shirts, dresses, hats and baby gifts and dinosaurs. If you haven’t been in, or if you are looking for a baby gift, a frock for a special occasion or comfy clothes for everyday then pop in to Up To Seven to find the perfect solution.

SOFA WORKSHOP 21 Milsom Street, Bath BA1 1DE Tel: 01225 442586 Web: sofaworkshop.com Sofa Workshop has been at the top of Milsom Street in Bath for 20 years and is Bath’s first port of call for anyone in search of a very comfortable sofa. All the sofas are handmade in Britain and are available in the greatest choice of fabrics on the high street, including all the best known design houses. Visitors can find a wide choice in the spacious showroom with sofa styles ranging from contemporary to traditional. The experienced team at Sofa Workshop are there to help customers through the process ensuring that they choose the sofa that’s right for them.

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CUTLER AND GROSS 9 Bridge St, Bath BA2 4AS Tel: 01225 428427 Web: cutlerandgross.com The bold, individual style of Cutler and Gross has attracted some of the most prestigious names in the industry for collaborations — from design houses such as Erdem, Comme Des Garçons and Maison Martin Margiela, to creative icons including Victoria Beckham, Roksanda Ilincic and Bella Freud, as well as limited edition launches such as Jay-Z for Barney’s New York. Considered bastions of iconic eyewear, opticals and sunglasses designed by the brand have been worn by some of the most recognisable faces of the last four decades. Brand fans include the legendary David Hockney, Grace Jones, Sir Elton John and Madonna, as well as influential artists and style leaders from Rihanna, Alicia Keys and Erykah Badu to Kate Moss and Manolo Blahnik. Not a bad list to become part of... The Bath store opened in 2014 and is the only UK Cutler and Gross outside London.

SHANNON 68 Walcot Street, Bath BA1 5BD Tel: 01225 424222 Web: shannon-uk.com

GALLERY NINE

The trend for all things Scandi continues and Shannon, which occupies an old town house on Walcot Street has possibly the best collection of real, iconic, Scandinavian designer furniture and lighting to be found outside London. There’s nothing quite like the real thing so go and explore the impressive line up of products from acclaimed designers such as Hans Wegner, Arne Jacobsen, and Fritz Hansen. The shop is jam-packed with furniture, fabrics, lighting and ‘finds’ from the likes of Marimekko, Klippan, Moomin and Iittala. Owner Sue Shannon opened the shop in 2000 and has built up a superb reputation with architects and interior designers from all over the UK who rely on her knowledge to source and deliver classic pieces of timeless design and of the highest, authentic quality. The shop is also a Scantastic source of interesting and unusual gifts at affordable prices.

9B Margaret’s Buildings, Bath BA1 2LP Tel: 01225 319197 Web: gallerynine.co.uk Gallery Nine is located in Margaret’s Buildings, a delightful pedestrian street in between The Circus and The Royal Crescent. The gallery specialises in limited edition prints, studio ceramics, jewellery and textiles. The work on display is predominately British and is selected for its originality as well as its excellent craftsmanship. There are three exhibitions a year; spring, summer and winter. The current spring show features two lino cut print makers; Melvyn Evan’s seascapes and Gail Brodholt’s urban scenes of London. There is also jewellery by Katherine Campbell-Legg and Stephen Jamieson. Ceramics are represented by a fabulous collection of porcelain pieces by Justine Allison.

THE FRAMING WORKSHOP 80 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BD Tel: 01225 482748 Web: theframingworkshop.com TIME to try something FAN…cy? In 28 years of trading on Walcot Street, The Framing Workshop has framed many weird, wonderful, beautiful and fascinating objects and collections, all of which have their own story to tell. What do you have tucked away that you could have framed and displayed to tell its own story? Paper, canvas, fabric, objects, memorabilia? Go along and be inspired.

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SPOTTY HERBERTS 5 Queen Street, Bath BA1 1HE Tel: 01225 331834 Web: spottyherberts.com Discover a shopping experience showcasing an adventure in childhood, where children are welcome, where innocence and magic are alive and playfulness goes hand-in-hand with rainbow badges and fizzy sherbet sticks. This is Spotty Herberts, Bath’s double awardwinning, independent shop for children. The shop is brimming with colourful, practical, British brands of unisex clothes for children 0 – 10 years. Collections are chosen for their thoughtful design, singularity and ethical production, often sourced locally or Britishmade. Owners Kate and Emily explain the thinking behind Spotty Herberts: “We want to offer traditional, simple clever toys you can pick up and play with again and again – a warm, nostalgic experience for children, and adults, with clothing that children can grow up in, grow out of and hand on and on.” Image: © Chloe Moore Photography

TAKE CHARGE BIKES

A YARN STORY 128 Walcot Street, Bath BA1 5BG Tel: 01225 429239 Web: ayarnstory.co.uk

1 Victoria Buildings, Lower Bristol Road, Bath BA2 3EH Tel: 01225 789568 Web: takechargebikes.co.uk No one would argue with the fact that switching from using a car to riding a bike creates a host of benefits for both you and your surrounding environment. Exercise, even at moderate levels, helps to reduce stress and depression, as well as improving your mood and self-esteem. But could it be that the idea of pedalling up all those steep hills around Bath is putting people off? This is where the electric bike comes in. It provides all of the benefits of a regular bicycle, but with the added bonus of not arriving at your destination needing a shower. Take Charge Bikes is an award-winning company based in Bath with additional stores in Exeter, Woking and Cheltenham. They offer a wide selection of quality electric bikes from commuting bikes, tourers, leisure, folding, cargo bikes, tandems, and mountain bikes. Take Charge offers service and maintenance on all types of bikes too. Anybody who is considering an electric bike is encouraged to pop along and try a demo bike. An electric bike works like a regular bicycle but with power assistance when you want it. Take charge of your life – you too can really benefit from an electric bike.

Not your average yarn shop. At A Yarn Story the shelves are full of hand-dyed yarns, luxury fibres and the hard-to-find. Located on Walcot Street in the heart of Bath’s artisan quarter you’ll find a beautifully curated selection of yarns from around the world as well as several proudly British brands including the store’s own range; Walcot Yarns. Try on one of the many hand knit samples in the shop, browse the array of books and magazines or simply let the vibrant yarn colours inspire you. A Yarn Story also offers a variety of classes for knitters, crocheters and spinners of all abilities. A must visit for yarn and fibre lovers.

MAGALLERIA 22a Broad Street, Bath BA1 5LN Tel: 01225 471586 Web: magalleria.co.uk Magalleria is a unique store selling one of the largest collections of international, independent and niche magazines in Europe. It imports magazines, journals and zines from all over the world, with many exclusive to its range. Magalleria also provides magazine news, reviews and interviews from its online store and blog. Interest in creative print is currently sky-high. In addition to compelling content, production innovations now mean that the modern magazine is designed and geared to make reading a much more tactile, visually seductive and pleasurable experience than ever before. With knowledgeable staff, and offering strong depth in art, design and interior design, fashion, lifestyle, food, travel and literature, Magalleria is a store packed with ideas, information and inspiration.

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THE INDIE SHOPS OF BATH

NIGEL DANDO

KATHRYN ANTHONY OPTOMETRY

11 Pulteney Bridge, Bath BA2 4AY Tel: 01225 464013 Web: nigeldando.co.uk Nigel Dando began his career after he gained a national goldsmiths diploma before going on to study gemmology at the Sir John Cass College of Art, Whitechapel. Today he sells an eclectic mix of new pre-owned and vintage jewellery, and has a particular interest in pieces from the 1920 – 1960 era. Together with ranges of contemporary silver jewellery at affordable prices, many of which are one-off pieces, the emphasis is on quality and style. Another facet of the business is the buying of gold and silver items in any form or condition. Nigel also sells investment precious metals at what he believes to be the most competitive prices in the city. Being one of the few provincial members of the London Diamond Bourse, Nigel is in daily contact with the market, which enables him to offer undeniable expertise and value. He also offers a repair and valuation service.

16 Pierrepont Street, Bath BA1 1LA Tel: 01225 464433 Web: kathrynanthony.co.uk This forward thinking practice is able to offer expert advice and professional eyecare with its advanced testing facility alongside beautifully made, stylish designer frames to complete your look. Excitingly, Kathryn Anthony Optometry has been given the exclusive Lindburg Horn range – becoming the only stockist in the south west. Lindburg Horn is a collection made of multiple layers of natural horn, hand-crafted to bring out the individual nuances in this exquisite material’s colouration and markings; meaning no two frames are ever alike. Lindburg offers style and stability which we have grown to expect and admire in everything it creates. This exclusive range is now available at Kathryn Anthony Optometry.

GREEN STREET HOUSE 14 Green Street, Bath BA1 2JZ Tel: 01225 426000 Web: greenstreethouse.co.uk Since opening in 2003 Green Street House has grown from an exclusive day spa into the best “One Stop Holiday Shop’ in town. Experience all of your preholiday beauty treatments, and browse the retail shop for what you need to complete your summer chic look with a stunning range of on-trend designer kaftans, pareos, and sarongs for the beach and around the pool. Complete your look with a Pranella handmade beach basket or a tapestry mirrored clutch bag and a gorgeous tassel necklace. Everything you need to look and feel beautiful.

QUADRI 16 Milsom Place, Bath BA1 1BZ Tel: 01225 329212 Web: quadri.co.uk Quadri is a well-established luxury gift shop specialising in strong design and high quality products. Quadri centres its attention on offering unusual fine and fashion jewellery, watches and homeware. The team take great pride in the selections of precious jewellery and clean, contemporary styled watch brands, while also endeavouring to offer a choice of unique fashion jewellery at an affordable price. Find beautiful pieces for your home with eye catching, abundant Alessi collections or a gift for that notoriously difficult person to buy for. With a varied, ever changing range of stock and dedicated customer service, Quadri is the ideal shop to look for that extra special something for any occasion. This lovely shop is situated in the heart of Bath’s Milsom Place, just next door to Jamie’s Italian.

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NICHOLAS WYLDE 12 Northumberland Place, Bath BA1 5AR Tel: 01225 462826 Web: nicholaswylde.com

DAVIES OF BATH 19a Monmouth Place, Bath BA1 2AY Tel: 01225 423749 Web: rabart.co.uk Davies of Bath is a long-established decorating institution, having supplied high quality painting and decorating materials to the city for over 80 years to both trade and retail customers. Still a family run business, Davies of Bath offers probably the biggest range of Farrow & Ball paints in the south west, sitting alongside Little Greene, Paint Library, Colourtrend, Zoffany, Mylands, Earthborn and other leading trade paint brands such as Dulux Trade and Crown Paints, Armstead and Macphersons. You’ll not only find standard decorating materials here, there are also specialist problem solving products with advice from experienced, dedicated staff. With the widest selection of wood finishes from flooring to French polishing; interior and exterior; Davies of Bath can offer customers a huge choice in products, finishes and advice on colour. In store, there is also a designer area housing a vast range of wallpaper and fabric books, with a specific focus on colour consultancy where staff are on hand to help you. Whether you have just one wall to paint or a whole house to design, they can help you get the look you want.

The south west’s leading designer jeweller, award-winning Nicholas Wylde has been designing original, high quality jewellery since first opening his Bath store in 1987. Over 30 years, he has built up a superb reputation for designing outstanding pieces; from one-off commissions to larger corporate orders – all handmade, with great passion, in the workshop on the premises. Added cool factor: Nicholas Wylde offers his own patented diamond cut, the stunning Wylde Flower Diamond®, with more cut facets than a brilliant cut diamond for that extra-special sparkle. You won’t find this gemstone anywhere else in the world. For vibrantly unique designs, excellent service from knowledgeable and helpful staff, Nicholas Wylde is a perfect destination for anyone looking for that truly unique piece of jewellery.

CLANDAR 15 Cheap Street, Bath BA1 1NA Tel: 01225 335486 Web: clandar.co.uk Showcasing British textiles, Clandar excels at designing and making its own ranges of British tweed clothing – all manufactured by the team exclusively for its Cheap Street shop (close to Bath Abbey) and for its website. All the tweed is sourced directly from historic British tweed mills, including house tweeds that have been designed and woven exclusively for Clandar… and unavailable anywhere else in the world. Reassuringly it also looks to the British Isles first for its tailoring and manufacturing. British heritage, British expertise and modern wearable designs combine to allow Clandar to offer pieces of the highest quality that make customers look and feel very special. Also on offer is the finest Scottish cashmere and British woollens, woven in historic British mills.

GRAHAM & GREEN 92 Walcot Street, Bath BA1 5BG Tel: 01225 418 300 Web: grahamandgreen.co.uk Inspired by a love of travel and design, family business Graham & Green opened its first home interiors store in the heart of Notting Hill in 1974 and its style and influence has being growing ever since. Graham & Green’s expertise in furniture design coupled with strong family values translates into the unique, quality furniture and accessories you see online and in-store at Graham & Green today. Having recently renovated a 19th century former bake house on Bath’s Walcot Street into the company’s headquarters and its first store outside London, Graham and Green often hosts workshops and events in-store for the local community of Bath and beyond.

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THE INDIE SHOPS OF BATH

GREAT WESTERN WINE Wells Road, Bath BA2 3AP Tel: 01225 322810 Web: greatwesternwine.co.uk Expertise and good old-fashioned service is what sets Great Western Wine apart. The shop is an Aladdin’s cave of over 1,000 of the world’s best wines and an eclectic range of rare, small batch spirits. Great Western Wine is constantly up to date with modern, award-winning wines, as recognised by the International Wine Challenge, who voted GWW the Best Wine Merchant in south west England. A selection of wines is always open for tasting, and enthusiastic, experienced staff encourage visitors to linger and browse while helping to find the perfect wine. Prices at every level are competitive. A mail order service is also available and the same attention to detail and personal advice is available by phone, email or through their website. Regular wine tasting events and dinners sell out quickly, at GWW and at some of Bath’s best restaurants which are supplied with its wines.

THE BATH FRAMER

STAG

7 Walcot Buildings, London Road, Bath BA1 6AD Tel : 01225 920210 Web: www.thebathframer.co.uk

4 North Parade, Bath BA1 1LF Tel: 01225 310107 Web: bathstagshop.com

The Bath Framer, owned by Kelly, opened its doors just shy of two years ago. This friendly boutique picture framers has a beautifully quirky front of house and an amazing naturally lit workshop. Both are a joy to work in and for customers to see how frames are created. Since opening, the business has gone from strength to strength, building a client list of local residents, and businesses based in Bath, Bristol and beyond. A bespoke framing service, tailored to suit all individuals’ needs, runs alongside a gorgeous selection of cards, gift wrap and wonderful stationery.

The first thing you'll notice about Bath Stag Shop is Stanley, the iconic and extremely well dressed stag who guards the entrance to this stand alone store on North Parade. Stanley is never underdressed with his smart outfits often mirroring seasonal events such as Wimbledon fortnight or a local rugby home game in his famous Valentines Tuxedo or his finest festive regalia. Step inside the Georgian facade and you'll find three beautifully decorated rooms, each packed with a selection of unique gifts for men, women and children. Within these grand grade II listed rooms first to stand out are the majestic fireplaces and a gentle aroma from scented candles, providing a calming yet rather exciting atmosphere in which to shop. Delve deeper and you will discover further delights including scented candles, leather goods, jewellery, homewares and all manner of useful and beautiful things that owner Debbie has sourced from local suppliers in Bath as well as independent brands in Paris, Denmark and London. This is a shop with its customers in mind. If you’re after anything in particular, just ask and Debbie will be more than happy to source things specially for you or help with any creative projects.

ELLIE ROSE BRIDAL 7 Margaret's Buildings, Bath BA1 2LP Tel: 01225 443988 Web: Ellierosebridal.co.uk Ellie Rose Bridal brings exclusive bridal designs paired with personal bridal experience to everyone. Owned and run by chief bridal consultant Ellie and business partner Ollie, they bring their combined industry and business management experience together. They understand that finding your wedding gown should be an exciting part of your whole wedding experience, and are there to make it as memorable as it should be. Hayley Paige designs have taken the world by storm, firmly establishing her as one of the world’s top wedding dress designers and Ellie Rose Bridal has one of Europe’s largest collections of these designs. Other designs from Ti Adora Bridal offer an alternative, yet complimentary, choice to the Hayley Paige collections. Ellie Rose Bridal proudly represents these designs in the south west and with one of the largest hand selected collections on this side of the Atlantic, covers a range of fabrics and styles to suit everyone’s individual taste.

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THE INDIE SHOPS OF BATH

COOPERS ELECTRICAL SUPERSTORE 13 – 15 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BN Tel: 01225 311811 Web: coopers-stores.com

ELLIS & KILLPARTRICK 18 New Bond Street Bath BA1 1BA Tel: 01225 466954 Web: ellisandkillpartrick.com

Coopers is a family owned business that has been trading since 1948. Back then founder Harry Cooper ran a small shop in South London. His son Paul joined the business in 1973 and now operates from a large showroom right in the centre of Bath. Back then Coopers sold (and repaired) lots of small appliances as well as TVs, radiograms (remember them?) washing machines and cookers. In the early days no one even dreamt of owning a dishwasher or tumble drier. Today Coopers specialises in all kitchen appliances, built in and free-standing, top-end luxury as well as basic, catering for every taste... even white goods are now multi-colour. Over the years Coopers has built a strong reputation – great products, fantastic friendly knowledgeable staff and highly competitive, fair prices. This is independent retailing at its best – values driven and customer focused – a real antidote to the soulless online shopping experience and for many years running, a regular entry in our best shops of Bath list.

Ellis and Killpartrick was founded by Brian Ellis and Mike Killpartrick in 1979. They met while studying optometry at Bradford University. Both shared a keen interest in the new soft contact lenses that were just being developed at that time but due to a change in family circumstances Mike bought Brian’s share of the business in 1985 and relocated the practice from George Street to its current central location in New Bond Street in 1991. Mike has continued his speciality interest in contact lenses but also lists other special interests: glaucoma management and macular degeneration interventions. Ellis and Killpartrick has expanded the spectacle side of the business to showcase distinctive high quality brands and is exclusive distributor of Cartier, Lindberg, Chopard and Dunhill. Other high end brands carried include Prada, Chanel, Oliver Peoples, Maui Jim, and Mont Blanc. The practice motto is “Professional Eyecare, Distinctive Eyewear” and Ellis and Killpartrick is committed to providing patients with up-to-date information about the latest developments in eye care to help maintain eye health and to offer the most distinctive high quality eyewear for those who benefit from spectacles.

MALLORY

TOPPING & COMPANY

1 – 5 Bridge Street, Bath, BA2 4AP Tel: 01225 788800 Web: mallory-jewellers.com

The Paragon, Bath BA1 5LS Tel: 01225 428111 Web: toppingbooks.co.uk

Mallory is renowned as Bath’s destination jeweller. Now in its fifth generation, Mallory is one of the country’s oldest family owned and run jewellers, established over 117 years ago in its original Bridge Street premises. Today it boasts one of the largest in-house workshops in the UK, employing three master goldsmiths trained to the highest calibre, who create the most exquisite bespoke-made jewellery, as well as two fully accredited watchmakers and a technician, who are qualified to maintain the finest of timepieces. Inside the showroom you will find a majestic emporium of fine and contemporary jewellery, watches, and luxury gifts and accessories from the world’s most exclusive brands. The imposing frontage may look daunting, however Mallory’s offerings encompass something to suit all pockets, with international names such as Patek Philippe, Rolex, Cartier, Fabergé, Bulgari, Chopard, Montblanc, Tag Heuer, Longchamp, Longines, Breitling, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Georg Jensen, Fope and Mikimoto, as well as an extensive collection of jewellery designed by Mallory.

Now celebrating its tenth year at the heart of Bath’s literary scene, Topping & Company Booksellers is one of the best indie bookshops in the country and one of Bath’s most cherished independents. Pay it a visit and you’re likely to be offered complimentary tea or cafetiere coffee while you browse through more than 50,000 titles on the shelves. The shop recently installed bespoke lighting and floor-toceiling bookcases, complete with rolling library ladders to make the experience that bit more magical. In addition to running the bookshop itself, Topping & Company’s team of passionate booksellers host an all-year-round literary festival which brings a wide variety of celebrated authors and famous names to Bath, culminating each year in the Bath Autumn Literary Festival.

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Burst with excitement for Bath’s bubbliest day out!

T

he countdown to our Dorothy House Bubble Rush has started with over 1,200 people already signed up to take part in the Hospice’s frothiest fundraiser. The Bubble Rush 5k takes place on Sunday 25th June at Castle Combe Circuit near Chippenham and is a great day out for the whole family. The circular route is child-friendly and suitable for wheelchairs, pushchairs and prams so everyone can join in at their own pace.

If you fancy joining in the fun, you can choose whether to run, walk, skip or dance along the route which will be filled with huge clouds of rainbow-coloured foam. It’s not a race; the aim is for everyone to pass the finish line frothy and smiling! The Bubble Village will be party-central with a pre-event warm up routine, live entertainment, zorbing and children’s activities including bouncy castles. There will be face painting and the chance to buy funky merchandise plus ice creams, sweets food and drinks, so there’s fun to be had by those taking part and spectators alike. Everyone who completes the Bubble Rush will receive their very own T-shirt and a medal. The Bubble Rush has three start times with some availability still left in the 1pm and 2pm waves - but they’re selling fast! Entry for children aged 16 and under costs £10 and adults (aged 17+) cost £25. There is

no minimum sponsorship amount but participants are encouraged to raise as much as they can for Dorothy House Hospice Care to help fund vital patient care. The Hospice provides free palliative and end of life care from early diagnosis onwards to patients, their families and carers across Bath and North East Somerset (BaNES), Wiltshire and Somerset. Liam Tucker from Melksham has his 8th birthday on 25th June and his Mum, Dad and brother chose to hold his birthday party at the Bubble Rush on the same day, and what better way to celebrate a birthday! The family have invited six of Liam’s friends, their parents and Liam’s family to come and have fun at the event and enjoy a picnic and birthday cake. Liam’s Mum, Amanda said: “We can’t wait to celebrate Liam’s 8th Birthday party at the Bubble Rush Liam, his family and event. As he has autism, global events fundraiser development delay and speech Emily Knight delay, Liam really enjoys all things sensory so we know he’ll love playing around in the bubbles with his friends and family. We also chose this event for his party as we wanted the money to go to Dorothy House because it is such a great local charity and both my husband, John, and I have lost loved ones and friends to cancer in recent years.”

To book your place today and join the bubbly fun visit: dottybubblerush.org

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WHAT’S ON in June EVENTS ARE LISTED IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER Lansdown open gardens afternoon is on Sunday 4 June

THE BATH FIELD KITCHEN Until Saturday 10 June, open Tuesday to Sundays, 11am – 5pm n The Edge, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath Looking at the ways knowledge is distributed in society and featuring interactive exhibits, with installations including The Bath Field Kitchen – specially constructed tents for community activities. With performances from Owen Griffiths, Steven Pippin, Emma Smith and Vulpes Vulpes. LANSDOWN OPEN GARDENS Sunday 4 June, 2pm – 5.30pm n Various venues, including the Millennium Green, Richmond Road, Lansdown A fundraising event for the upkeep of St Stephen’s Millennium Green in Richmond Road. As well as open gardens, there is a plant and bric-a-brac sale, and teas and cakes in the St Stephen’s Centre. Tickets £5 (children free), available on the day from the Millennium Green, St Stephen’s Centre and the gardens. Visit: millenniumgreen.org.uk.

EDITOR’S PICK CHAPEL PLAISTER OPEN DAYS Wednesdays until 27 September, 2pm – 4pm n Chapel Plaister, on the B3109 between Corsham and Fiveways, Box, Wiltshire There are any number of historic churches to explore. You may have driven past Chapel Plaister, but it’s worth stopping to look inside this tiny chapel, which dates back to the 14th century when it was used by pilgrims on their way to visit the shrine of Joseph of Arimathea at Glastonbury. The chapel is used for regular Sunday services. Also worth a visit is the Saxon church of St Laurence in Bradford on Avon, which dates back to the 11th century.

David Haig stars in Racing Demon at the Theatre Royal

Emma by Jane Austen at the Theatre Royal

Enjoy a free cookery demonstration at Knees in Trowbridge by Miele Appliances Professor Robert Winston will be talking about genetics at the Wiltshire Music Centre

Comedian Hal Cruttenden at Wiltshire Music Centre

HAL CRUTTENDEN Sunday 4 June, 8pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon The host of Live at the Apollo and often heard on Radio 4, comedian Hal Cruttenden makes a welcome appearance at this Wiltshire venue. Tickets: £12, over 16s only. Tel: 01225 860200 or visit: wiltshiremusic.org.uk. Also at Wiltshire Music Centre this month BATH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Sunday 11 June, 3pm A concert suitable for all the family. The lively programme includes Grieg’s Norwegian Dances, Borodin’s Polovtsian Dances and Capriccio Espagnol by Rimsky Korsakov. Tickets: £15 / £8 under 18s and students. PROFESSOR LORD ROBERT WINSTON Wednesday 21 June, 7.30pm One of the country’s most influential doctors and medical scientists, Professor Winston poses some fascinating questions about genetics. Tickets: £17, £8.50 under 18s. HUSBAND OF THE BRIDE Sunday 4 June, 7pm n The Mission Theatre, Corn Street, Bath Luke Graves presents his stand-up comedy show about life, love and marriage as part of Bath Fringe. Tickets £7 / £5 concs, tel: Brown Paper Tickets 0800 411 8881, visit: brownpapertickets.com. Also at the Mission this month TARTUFFE Friday 9 June, 2pm and Saturday 10 June, 7.30pm

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Bath University Student Theatre presents a translation of Molière’s Tartuffe by Roger McGough. Tickets £8 (£5 concs) tel: 01225 386777 or visit: edgearts.org. BIRDSONG Tuesday 27 June – Saturday 1 July, 7.30pm and Saturday, 2pm Next Stage Theatre Company presents a powerful dramatisation of Sebastian Faulks’s First World War novel. Birdsong opens at the Rachel Newton is playing at the Chapel Arts Centre Mission before a tour to the Minack Theatre, Cornwall. Tickets £12 (£10 concs), tel: 01225 428600 or visit: missiontheatre.co.uk. TALK: THE IMPERIAL EGGS OF CARL FABERGE Monday 5 June, 1.30pm n The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath Bath Decorative and Fine Arts Society’ welcome visitors to a lecture by Toby Faber on the Imperial Eggs of Carl Fabergé before the Russian Revolution. Carl Fabergé made 50 jewelled eggs – presents from Russian emperors to their wives. Note: this is a change to the original venue. No booking required, £8 on the door. ARTISTS AND ESPIONAGE Monday 5 June, 7.15pm n Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, Queen Square, Bath Bath Evening Decorative and Fine Arts Society evening talk by Deborah Lambert about the 1930s Lawn Road flats in Belsize Park and the complex lives of its residents, which included artists and writers, and a nest of Soviet spies. Pre-booked visitors £8, students free. Tel: 01225 742989 or visit: bedfas.co.uk. EMMA Monday 5 – Saturday 10 June, times vary n Theatre Royal, Saw Close, Bath As part of the 200th commemorations for the death of Jane Austen here’s a witty, wonderful reminder of her talent for creating believable characters facing very real dilemmas. Take your own dashing Mr Knightley or hypochondriac Mr Woodhouse along for a charming adaptation. Tickets, tel: 01225 448844 or online: theatreroyal.org.uk. Also at the Theatre Royal this month RACING DEMON Wednesday 21 June – Saturday 8 July, times vary Jonathan Church, formerly of the Chichester Festival Theatre, takes the reins at the Theatre Royal Bath for its annual summer season. It opens with a David Hare play, starring Olivier awardwinning actor David Haig. JUBILATE: THE MUSICAL SCENE IN 18TH CENTURY BATH Until 10 December, open daily 1 – 5pm and 11am – 5pm at weekends and bank holidays n The Herschel Museum of Astronomy, New King Street, Bath William Herschel later went on to make major astronomical discoveries, but he was also a composer, musician and teacher, while his sister Caroline, also an astronomer, was a fine singer. The exhibition focuses on the development of music in Bath during the 18th century Age of Enlightenment. RACHEL NEWTON TRIO Tuesday 6 June, 7.30pm n Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls, Bath Singer and harpist Rachel Newton won the Instrumentalist Of The Year category at MG Alba Scots Trad Music Awards at Caird Hall in Dundee and was nominated for Musician of the Year at this year’s BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards. Rachel performs beautiful interpretations of traditional folk songs, in English and Gaelic and writes her own material too. Tickets: £10 / £12 on the door. Visit: chapelarts.org or tel: 01225 461700. Continued page 38 THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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WHAT’S | ON ONE NIGHT OF SKA n Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls, Bath Friday 9 June, 7.30pm A homage to the music, bands and artistes that influenced two generations of teenagers, from the original 1960s Jamaican scene to the Two Tone era of the 70s. Yesterday’s Men are one of the country’s finest exponents of ska. Time to dust off those skanking moves. Tickets: £15 / £17 on the door. MALCOLM BRUCE BAND Saturday 17 June, 7.30pm Malcolm sings and plays guitar, bass and piano. As the son of musician Jack Bruce (Cream), Malcolm has a long history playing with some of the greats. He’s supported by singer and guitarist Claire Boswell. Tickets: 10 / £12 on the door. MISS HOPE SPRINGS Friday 23 and Saturday 24 June, 7.30pm Miss Hope Springs, a tall imposing blonde bedecked in sequins, is the alter ego of Ty Jeffries. Ty, the son of the late actor Lionel Jeffries, spent some of his formative years in Hollywood and he has been a model and a cocktail pianist at The Ritz. He’s also done two sell-out runs at The Crazy Coqs in Picadilly. Tickets: £20 / £22 on the door.

Sunday brunch market, Queen Square

Miss Hope Springs is at Chapel Arts Centre for two nights

David Bowie tribute at the Bath Forum

A Handful of Singers perform at Prior Park College Chapel

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE Friday 9 June, 8pm nThe Rondo Theatre, St Saviour’s Road, Larkhall, Bath The Actor’s Wheel company brings to life Anthony Burgess’ darkly disturbing story which challenges our belief in social conformity. Tickets: £12 / £10 concessions. Tel: 0333 666 3366, or visit: ticketsource.co.uk. Also at the Rondo this month TERRY PRATCHETT’S WYRD SISTERS Wednesday 21 – Saturday 24 June, 7.30pm The Rondo Theatre Company takes master storyteller Terry Pratchett’s version of Macbeth and gives it a new tweak in what promises to be an entertaining romp through witches, kings and a kingdom at risk. In aid of the Peggy Dodd Centre which looks after people with dementia. Tickets: £12 / £10 concessions. A DOLL’S HOUSE Wednesday 28 – Thursday 29 June, 8pm Schoolhouse Productions presents this new version of Henrik Ibsen’s tale of a crumbling marriage which makes us think about equality, as it was in 1879 and how it is today. Tickets: £14 / £12 concessions. FRESHFORD VILLAGE FETE Saturday 10 June, 1 – 5pm n The playing field behind Freshford Memorial Hall, Freshford Lane, Freshford, near Bath Traditional fun for all ages. Admission: adult £2, child £1. Off road and on street parking available. SUMMER OPERA Saturday 10 June, 6pm n New Oriel Hall, Larkhall, Bath Bath Cantata Group presents a concert performance of Purcell’s The Fairy Queen, with musical director Neil Moore. Tickets: £15, students £5/U12s free, tel: 01225 463362 or visit: bathboxoffice.org. BATH BRUNCH MARKET Sunday 11 June, 9.30am – 3.30pm n Green Park Station, Green Park, Bath Wake up with a delicious brunch from street food traders, cooking everything from Caribbean to clean eating, Indian to a full English breakfast. There are a range of artisan, vintage, art and craft stalls, brought to us by the team behind the Bath Artisan Market.

Fun and laughter at Komedia, Westgate Street, Bath

ORGANIC SKINCARE PRODUCTS WORKSHOP Sunday 11 June, 9.45am – 4.30pm n BRLSI, Queen Square, Bath Make organic skincare products in a workshop led by senior international trainer Anna Christensen. Create personalised skin-care products which suit you. Be natural, feel good, and look radiant and Continued Page 40

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Bath royal literary & scientific institution Forthcoming events:

exhiBition lecture

riches of the earth 7 June, 7.30pm

1960s interior design

Futuro house: the spirit of the space Age 12 June, 7.30pm

geogrAphy / science

extreme Weather 22 June, 7.30pm 1960s drAmA

english drama in the 1960s 28 June, 7.30pm

new publication on sale £5.00

AdelA Breton

16 - 18 Queen Square, Bath, BA1 2HN 01225 312 084 www.brlsi.org reception@brlsi.org

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healthy. Places, to include recipes, ingredients, products to take home and lunch, are £145. To book, visit: annachristensen.eu/workshops or tel: 07811956685. THE BOWIE COLLECTIVE FRIDAY 16 June, 7pm n The Forum, Southgate, Bath Immerse yourself in the sound and vision of the late, great David Bowie with this musical tribute. Tickets: £22 (plus booking fee), tel: 0844 888 9991 or visit: thebowiecollective.com. VOCAL WORKS GOSPEL CHOIR: GOSPEL ROCKS Friday 16 June, 7pm n Komedia, Westgate Street, Bath One of the UK’s leading gospel and soul choirs cover rock classics by Queen, Aerosmith, U2 and more. Tickets: £15 tel: 0845 293 8480 or visit: komedia.co.uk/bath. Also at Komedia this month THE MINISTRY OF BURLESQUE: TWISTED CABARET Friday 30 June, doors open 6.30pm Sure there’ll be scantily clad girls and double entendres galore, but Twisted Cabaret is more than that, with music, song, dance and comedy. It also provides the audience the opportunity to go over the top with their own take on burlesque/vintage/glamorous attire. Feather boas at the ready . . . Tickets: from £17.50. A WALK TO REMEMBER Saturday 17 June n The Kennet and Avon Canal, Wiltshire A gentle charity challenge in support of Wiltshire charity Alzheimer’s Support. The main sponsored walk follows the Kennet and Avon canal for 12 miles from Bradford on Avon to Devizes and there are shorter options of seven and four miles. £10 entrance for over 14s (free for children). Book at: alzheimerswiltshire.org.uk or call: 01225 776481 for more information. THE ROAMIN’ JASMINE Saturday 17 June, 7pm n The American Museum, Claverton, Bath Forged in New Orleans’s French Quarter, this six-piece jazz ensemble’s repertoire draws on 1920s-era speakeasy blues, vintage calypso, 1950s rhythm, and original compositions. There will be a bar. Tickets: £12, pre-booking essential, tel: 01225 820866. Also at The American Museum this month SID GRIFFIN Sunday 25 June, 2 – 3pm Sid Griffin is one of the architects of Americana and alt-country. A raconteur and up-tempo Kentucky native, Griffin is equally at home on 12-string guitar, mandolin, or banjo. Concert in the Stables included with gardens admission. JAPAN FESTIVAL Sunday 18 June, 12pm – 4pm n Museum of East Asian Art and outside the Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath Bath and Beppu Friendship Association is hosting a free afternoon for children and adults to find out more about Japanese culture. Activities include arts and crafts, Taiko drumming, games for kids, try on a kimono, tea ceremony demonstrations, martial arts kendo/karate) and Japanese snacks. COOKERY DEMONSTRATION OF MIELE APPLIANCES Saturday 24 June, 11am – 2pm n Knees Home and Electrical store, Spitfire Retail Park, Trowbridge, Wiltshire BA14 0AZ Knees Home and Electrical will be holding a cookery demonstration to inspire home cooks and show off its new range of award-winning Miele kitchen appliances. A Miele expert home economist will be cooking delicious recipes using some of its most popular appliances, including built in ovens and induction hobs. For more information tel: 01225 754161. Continued Page 42

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WHAT’S | ON A HANDFUL OF SINGERS Saturday 24 June, 7.30pm n Prior Park College Chapel, Bath A Handful of Singers presents Mendelssohn’s Te Deum in D, Rheinberger’s Mass in E flat and Reger’s Sacred Songs Op.138. Tickets £12.50 (£5 under 25s), Bath Box Office, tel: 01225 463362, or visit: ahandfulofsingers.org BRIAN ROPER MEMORIAL CONCERT Friday 30 June, 7.30pm n The Forum, Southgate, Bath Bath Philharmonia presents a concert dedicated to the memory of local philanthropist Brian Roper. Internationally renowned pianist Peter Donohoe performs Rachmaninov’s Third Piano Concerto in a programme that includes Stravinsky’s Firebird and Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Tickets: £25 – £35 (plus booking fees), under 16s £5, tel: 0844 888 9991.

PLANNING AHEAD . . . AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE DAY FAIR Saturday 1 July, 10.30am – 5pm n The American Museum, Claverton, Bath Outdoor fun for all the family, with classic fairground games, bouncy castle, craft activities, food from Spitfire BBQ, and live music. Included with gardens admission. BATH BACH CHOIR’S 70TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION CONCERT Saturday 1 July, 7.30pm n Bath Abbey Exactly 70 years on from its first public performance, Bath Bach Choir will perform two of the greatest works of the choral repertoire. Bach’s Magnificat was composed for Vespers on Christmas Day 1723 in St Thomas’s Leipzig. A piece both exuberant and gentle by turns, its three trumpets lending pomp and celebratory brilliance, and are juxtaposed with some eloquent solo arias. Mozart’s Great Mass in C minor was composed for a special occasion in Salzburg in 1783, although never finished. Full of Bachinfluenced grandeur and colourful Italianate excesses, it calls for a double choir and two virtuosic solo sopranos. Conductor Nigel Perrin, orchestra Southern Sinfonia, sopranos: Verity Wingate and Anna Sideris, counter-tenor: Stephen Harvey, tenor: Kieran White, bass: Julien van Mellaerts. Tickets £12 – £30 (discounts for students and under 18s), Bath Box Office tel: 01225 463362 or visit: bathboxoffice.org.uk. A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Monday 3 – Saturday 8 July, 8pm (2pm Saturday matinee) n The grounds of Cleeve House, Seend, Wiltshire Shakespeare Live presents its annual al fresco treat, with picnics welcome beforehand and a covered stand for the audience to watch in comfort. This production promises dance, music and, the company’s well established acting skills in a beautiful setting. Tickets: shakespearelive.com or call: 07780 938107. BATH CAMERATA SUMMER CONCERT Sunday 9 July, 4pm n The Guildhall, High Street, Bath Enjoy fizz, strawberries, cream and songs for summer in the resplendent surroundings of Bath’s Guildhall with Bath Camerata. Tickets £20 and £16 (under 25s half price) from: bathcamerata.org.uk or Bath Box Office, tel: 01225 463362. DIDO AND AENEAS: A GALA CONCERT PERFORMANCE Saturday 15 July, gates open for picnics, 5.30pm n Prior Park Chapel and Grounds, Bath This will be Bath choir Lucis’ flagship event for 2017, set in the magnificent Grade I listed chapel at Prior Park. Enjoy a stroll round the romantic grounds beforehand. Tickets: £35 / £25 to include prosecco and canapés served during the interval, from Bath Box Office, tel: 01225 463362. n

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CITY | ART

HIS IMPLACABLE GAZE

A new solo exhibition by Rick Kirby, one of Britain’s leading sculptors, is to open at Bath Contemporary gallery

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any of us will be familiar with the sight of one of Rick Kirby’s distinctive giant faces gazing out at us from inside the Bath Contemporary gallery in Gay Street. This month the gallery is pleased to present a second solo exhibition for this prominent contemporary British artist. The steel sculptor is best known for his vast array of monumental public commissions across the UK. With prominent positions including the south bank of the River Thames opposite the Houses of Parliament, and the new Marlow Theatre in Canterbury, Kirby’s distinct style is instantly recognisable. Closer to home, a commission in Calne, Wiltshire, was unveiled by the Queen and we can see another of his pieces at Portishead Quays. Kirby’s figurative sculptures are made from hundreds of welded steel plates and discs, transforming industrial materials to convey movement, elegance and grace. A strong theme of guardianship runs throughout Kirby’s work; his figures leave one with a sense of safety and comfort as they sit patiently, quietly witnessing the world around them.

They do not dominate their settings, but instead calmly watch over their environment with an air of gentle theatricality

Kirby’s success as a sculptor comes largely through his ability to express a sense of universal experience and the strength of human unity. Multiple figures often hold hands, or support each other as a balanced structure; single figures often seem to soar upwards with ease and optimism. Other examples of Kirby’s work include large segmented faces, often relic-like in appearance. Although monumental in size, they do not dominate their settings, but instead calmly watch over their environment with an air of gentle theatricality. The precision and detail, 44 TheBATHMagazine

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particularly of these large pieces, echoes the symmetrical accuracy of classical sculpture; Ancient Greek, Roman, Renaissance – Kirby’s sculpture extends through the centuries of cultural history and the vastness of time, connecting us in a direct yet tranquil manner, with an air of myth, legend and story-telling. Kirby doesn’t often create large volumes of smaller gallery pieces. This is a rare opportunity to view and acquire Kirby’s work suitable for a domestic or corporate setting from an

internationally recognised sculptor. Kirby was born in 1952 in Gillingham, Kent and began his art education at the College of Art in Somerset, followed by a degree at Newport School of Art. After graduating he taught art for 16 years and it was during this time that his leaning towards sculpture evolved. Initially working in stone, Kirby’s practice moved towards steel while sharing a studio with a fellow artist, a medium that continues to resonate with him today.

STEELY STARE: above, Face to Face I by Rick Kirby GRAND SCALE: opposite top left, The Witness and left, Balcony by Rick Kirby


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Rick Kirby: Face to Face runs from Friday 2 – Saturday 24 June at Bath Contemporary. Kirby’s sculpture will be complimented with an exhibition of landscape paintings, including work by Kristan Baggaley, Alina Maksimenko, Ellen Watson and Claire Wiltsher. n Bath Contemporary, 35 Gay Street, Bath. Web: bathcontemporary.com, Tel: 01225 461230. Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am – 5pm.

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

MIDSUMMER IMAGINATION For June: contemporary tapestries, bewitching landscapes and pictures that draw the viewer in

ADAM GALLERY 13 John Street, Bath Tel: 01225 480406 Open: Monday to Saturday, 9.30am – 5.30pm Email: info@adamgallery.com Twitter: @Adam Gallery

Winter, Yellow Shed, Warmston by Barbara Rae

POSTCARDS FROM THE ARTIST Saturday 10 – Friday 30 June A major show of recent work by the acclaimed Royal Academician Dr Barbara Rae. The exhibition will focus on a group of small original works and will include larger mixed media works on paper. Barbara Rae is an artist of consummate ability: a renowned painter and a celebrated printmaker. Inspired by the landscape of her native Scotland and travels to Spain, France, Ireland and California, she explores the culture of a place, always looking for manmade marks and stories left behind in a landscape. Barbara has returned again and again to her favourite locations to depict the changing patterns of weather and changes in the landscape in her highly charged colourful paintings. She says: “landscape is only the beginning, the formal structure – the drawings are the starting point for something I play around with in the studio.” These works have a powerful dramatic impact and a distinct style which the artist has developed over many years. Barbara has been a member of the Royal Scottish Academy and the Royal Academy in London for more than 20 years. She has received numerous awards including three honorary doctorates and a CBE. She has works in many public galleries as well as works in many corporate and private collections.

WALCOT MORTUARY CHAPEL Walcot Street, Bath Open every day, 11am – 7pm RUST, BLOOD AND BONE Tuesday 20 – Sunday 25 June Artists Charlotte Rodgers, Victoria Musson and Katie Pollard explore the contemporary alchemical ingredients of rust, blood and bone. Working with taxidermy, natural fibres, fabric and the ubiquitous rust, blood and bone, these artists create a gateway through the wastelands of this reality. As the hackers take down our computers, the signals on our mobile phones stall and strange shaped clouds gather on the horizon, memories filter though of old traditions and folk magic. Coming from New Zealand, England and America respectively, these women pull together strands of art and magic to weave a powerful creative glamour. HOWARD JEFFS Wednesday 28 June – Saturday 8 July Howard Jeffs will be showing recent large etched lino prints and monotype prints based on a circular format, created in his studio in France and at Bath Artist Printmakers Workshop in Bath. Howard is an elected member of the Royal Society of Painter-Etchers based at the Bankside Gallery in London and of Bath Artists’ Society and is currently showing in the society’s summer show at The Victoria Art Gallery. He lectured in the Department of Fine Art at Goldsmiths College for more than 30 years and has had prints selected for the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition.

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Rust, Blood and Bone – an exhibition by three artists and left, Blue Circle by Howard Jeffs – two exhibitions at Walcot Mortuary Chapel in June


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nick cudworth gallery

From Morar To Skye. Oil on canvas

TAKING THE HIGH ROADS An exhibition of paintings and prints 1 – 30 June Whilst travelling round the Highlands last Autumn Nick was inspired by the magnificent drama of the landscapes and seascapes.

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639

Climbing Wisteria by Mariusz Kaldowski, 32” x 36”, £1450

The Art Gallery home of ArtGallery.co.uk

Spencer House, 34 Long Street, Tetbury, Gloucestershire GL8 8AQ Tues-Sat. 9.15-4.45pm. Tel: 01666 505152 help@artgallery.co.uk artgallery.co.uk

gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

art_gallery_uk

Bath Decorative and Fine Arts Society Bath Afternoon DFAS

Image courtesy of the Forbes Collection. Photographed by Joseph Cosica Jr. Copyright © All rights reserved

The Imperial Easter Eggs of Carl Fabergé: Before the Revolution Illustrated lecture by Toby Faber

Monday 5th June 2017 1.30pm at The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath Visitors welcome, £8 on the door. BathDFAS is a member of NADFAS, an Art Education charity www.bathdfas.com

e th e te enu e o n v ur se of ct ea ge is le l P an h ch or t f

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

NICK CUDWORTH GALLERY London Street, top of Walcot Street, Bath. Closed on Mondays. Tel: 01225 445221 Visit: nickcudworth.com

Sirens Call by Emma Rose

EMMA ROSE Upstairs at 78 Walcot Street, Bath (above the Bath Sofa and Curtain Company) Visitors welcome Open: Mon – Sat, 10am – 5pm Tel: 07885235915 or 01225 424 424 Visit: emmaroseartworks.com SIRENS CALL Throughout June Emma’s innovative and creative use of colour makes her work instantly recognisable, whether in one of her landscapes or in her more abstract work. She uses landscapes as a starting point for an exploration of hue and form, but going beyond the subject matter and into a world of shape, pattern and colour relationships. Her award winning originals, limited edition giclée prints and cards are for sale. ART SALON AND STUDIO SALE Friday 30 June and Saturday 1 July, 11am – 5pm at Emma Rose’s studio, Knight’s Barn, Wellow, BA2 8QE Artist Emma Rose, sculptor Rachel Stormonth-Darling and ceramicist Rebecca Wordsworth are hosting a joint studio salon. Bronze and resin sculptures of animals, delicate porcelain with gold vases and objects along with paintings and prints of landscapes real and imagined. Emma was recently invited to be the the wild card on Sky Arts Ceramics by Rebecca Landscape Artist of the Wordsworth Year.

TAKING THE HIGH ROADS Throughout June Nick travelled round the Scottish Highlands last autumn and the June exhibition of paintings and prints reflects the dramatic scenes of mountainous peaks, lakes and seascapes.

Glenfinnan by Nick Cudworth

THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM Great Pulteney Street, Bath Tel: 01225 388569 Open: Daily, 10am – 5pm (11am Sundays)

Detail from tapestry by Joan Baxter

TAPESTRY: HERE AND NOW Saturday 24 June – 1 October Some of the world’s leading contemporary tapestry designers will be showing at this exhibition. Alongside these pieces the Holburne’s own collection will be on public display for the first time.

VICTORIA ART GALLERY By Pulteney Bridge Open daily, 10.30am – 5pm Tel: 01225 477233 Visit: victoriagal.org.uk

Artists queuing outside the publicly owned Victoria Art Gallery on hanging day to audition their pieces

BATH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS ANNUAL OPEN EXHIBITION Until Saturday 15 July This annual exhibition is a treat for art lovers, as we enjoy sculptures, drawings and paintings shown alongside each other. The Bath Society of Artists was founded in 1904 with 26 members and now has around 120. Its exhibition attracts around 1,000 entries, some of them well known artists, others emerging talents. All the pieces are for sale and, with around 13,000 visitors, this is a great opportunity to reach a wider audience. Visitors can pick their favourite piece in the show and vote for it to win the people’s choice award.

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

GALLERY NINE 9b Margarets Buildings, Bath Tel: 01225 319197 Visit: gallerynine.co.uk Open: Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 5.30pm SPRING SHOW Until end of June Ceramics by Ceramics, prints Justine Allison and jewellery. Justine Allison works with hand built porcelain, Jane Seymour makes coil-built vessels. Gail Brodholt is a painter and linocut print maker, depicting journeys made on tubes and trains. Melvyn Evans is a professional artist, printmaker and illustrator. Key features of Katherine Campbell-Legg’s jewellery are the use of pattern, fine texture, finish and surface quality. Jeweller Steven Jamieson exhibits regularly in Cornwall.

BRADFORD ON AVON SCULPTURE GARDEN Lynchetts, 15 Woolley Street, Bradford in Avon, Wiltshire Open: Saturday 24 June, opening party, 6pm – 9.30pm, entrance £6 to include a glass of fizz and live jazz, after that entrance is £3 and the gardens will be open 11am – 6.30pm, closed Mondays, open late Friday 30 June until 9pm THE SCULPTURE GARDEN Saturday 24 June – Sunday 2 July The Sculpture Garden, now in its fifth year, is the first event of the Bradford on Avon Arts Festival which follows later in the summer. Exhibits, submitted by local sculptors, are both abstract and figurative, thought provoking and occasionally playful. The gardens of Lynchetts enjoy views over Bradford on Avon. Tickets on the gate or online: boaartsfestival.com.

DAVID SIMON CONTEMPORARY 3 – 4 Bartlett Street, Bath Tel: 01225 460189 Visit: davidsimoncontemporary.com Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm, and Wednesday, 2 – 6pm

Transfer2 Kinetic Study 19 Edward Willis

ONE TWO FIVE GALLERY 4 Abbey Green, Bath Open: Wednesday to Saturday, 11am – 5pm, Sunday, 11am – 4pm Tel: 07803 033 629 Visit: onetwofivegallery.co.uk TRANSFER 2 Until Saturday 11 June Transfer 2 is an immersive installation for Fringe Arts Bath, created by Gary Wood, Carole Waller, Fran Landsman and Will Renel, exploring ideas resulting in images on non-traditional supports and surfaces, interfaced with innovative soundscapes, generating unfamiliar, rich textures and surprising combinations and contrasts of light, colour, moving image and sound.

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ABSTRACTION AND COLOUR Friday 2 June – Saturday 1 July The gallery will be showing abstract work by two artists, John Croft and Howard Jeffs, with some abstract kinetic sculptures by Edward Willis. Croft and Jeffs’ work is all about colour field abstraction. Croft is inspired by landscapes or seascapes while Jeffs’ linocuts are based on his fascination with the circle as a fixed and powerful shape.

KIT GLAISYER Garden Flat Gallery, 48 Great Pulteney Street, Bath. Email: kitglaisyer@gmail.com or tel: 07983 465789 to arrange an appointment at another time, visit: kitglaisyer.com OPEN STUDIOS: JAMES URSELL AND KIT GLAISYER Saturday 24 – 25 June and Saturday 1 – Sunday 2 July, 11am to 5pm Welcome to a slow somnambulating journey through James Ursell’s beautiful yet sombre landscapes, inspired by his views of the Herefordshire borders where he has built a studio overlooking the Black Mountains.


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ART SALON AND

STUDIO SALE Emma Rose . Rebecca Wordsworth Rachel Stormonth - Darling Paintings . Prints . Sculpture Ceramics . Cards

Friday 30th June . Saturday 1st July 11am – 5pm Emma Rose Art Works Knight’s Barn . Wellow Bath BA2 8QE

www.emmaroseartworks.com 07885 235 915

Wellow is in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty 6 miles south of Bath Free Parking . Fox & Badger Pub Trekking Centre . Medieval Church Beautiful walks . Cycle Track

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BATH @ WORK Our series of photographic portraits by Neill Menneer shows Bath people at work. View a gallery of Bath@Work subjects at: thebathmag.co.uk

Simona Hernandez

Yoga teacher

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was born in the Canary Islands but when I was very young the family had to be evacuated to Morocco to escape Franco’s regime. My parents returned to the UK and from when I was eight we lived in Godstone near Guildford. My mum told me I had bumble bees in my bum because I was so hyperactive. I especially loved to dance and went to the Clarice Chater School of Dance in Carshalton Beeches. I wanted to take it further and was offered a dance place at university in Guildford. However, my parents wouldn’t fund a non-academic subject so I ended up doing the next best thing I could think of. This turned out to be psychology at London Guildhall University. It was an amazing place as the college was near Brick Lane and this was before it became trendy. I went out with the drummer from Skin so they were crazy, happy days. I worked in St Thomas’ Hospital for a while, but after a serious car crash my life changed – in a good way. As part of the recovery a friend, Mora kept nagging me to do some yoga. I duly went along to Tooting Leisure Centre and rediscovered my love of movement. I absolutely took to it and in a very short while found myself in Rishkikesh, India learning more about the Yoga Sutras. When I came home I easily found work teaching yoga and one class lead to another. Soon I was teaching all over the place. TriYoga, The Light Centre, Belgrave Dance Works and Dolphin Square are all places I’ve taught. This still didn’t impress my parents. My mum used to say: “You’ve done all this training to stand on your head.” But yoga is more than this and similar to my original passion for dance as the positions and poses are reflective or expressive of feelings. The yoga pose comes from an intention of the heart. That’s what brings it to life. We can all live too much in our head and yoga allows feelings outward expression. I met my husband, Simon through a yoga class. When our daughter, Poppy was born we decided to leave London as it was too expensive. Cambridge, Brighton or Bath, where should we go? Fortunately we chose the latter and we have been very happy here. I did miss a few things at first though, like Wagamama and TriYoga. There was no holistic yoga centre in Bath so I very quickly realised there was an important gap in the market and intended to remedy it. Finding the space in Bartlett Street (upstairs in the old Antique Centre) was fortunate as it is perfect and we are now expanding to create more studio space. We have about 350 clients and teach a range of different yoga specialisms, including Amusara, Ashtanga Vimyasa, Bhavana, restorative, Mum and baby, post-natal and core fusion. We have also initiated a teacher training programme. Bath is the perfect place to live and work. I’m always bumping into people I know and the walks around are really special. I particularly love mooching around in the countryside around Ford, finishing off with a meal in the White Hart. n

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151. THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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TEA | TIME

MORE TEA, VICAR?

Jessica Hope explores the vast history of Britain’s love affair with tea

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t has instigated wars, it has boosted morale in times of conflict, become a national symbol and empires have been built on it. Yes, that simple drink that you probably gulp down multiple times a day – tea – has much more to its history than you first might think. After water, tea is the most popular beverage consumed across the world, with us Brits drinking an impressive 165 million cups of it every day. That amounts to 62 billion cups being made per year, and 25% of all milk consumed in the UK goes into our brews. But where did our nation’s unfathomable love for this warming drink first originate, and how have our attitudes towards it changed over the centuries? Sling a teabag into your mug (or get your diffuser out if you prefer loose-leaf), put the kettle on, and discover where our love for this drink first came from . . .

A DRINK FOR ONE AND ALL Legend has it that tea was first created more than 4,000 years ago when the Chinese emperor Shen Nung was sitting beneath a tree when some leaves dropped into a bowl of water being boiled by his servant. Known for his interest in herbs and their remedies, the emperor decided to try the drink. The leaves were in fact from the camellia sinensis plant, which is where we get our tea leaves from. While the likelihood of there being any truth in this tale may be small, it makes you wonder how such a simple drink became so popular around the world. For centuries the Chinese drank tea, believing greatly in its medicinal qualities. When China began to expand its trade routes across the world in the 16th and 17th centuries, Europeans got to experience tea for the first time. The East India Company, established under Elizabeth I, held a monopoly on trade with Asia and merchants travelled to Canton, looking for goods that might make them profit back in Britain. While they recognised the medicinal properties of tea, British merchants had no idea that this commodity was going to become one of the most heavily traded items in centuries to come. To begin with, it was coffee that was the hot drink that really took off in the later half of the 17th century in Britain. In the 1660s coffee houses sprang up across the country, becoming places where people (mostly men) would drink, converse with their companions and read the pamphlets and gazettes distributed there. These houses

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became known as penny universities, where people of different classes and professions could mix and have sober and stimulating conversations about their ideas and beliefs – making this a world away from the drunken antics associated with taverns. Charles II’s wife, Catherine of Braganza is associated with the introduction of tea to the royal court at this time. Originally from Portugal, when Catherine moved to England for her marriage in 1662, she brought tea leaves with her from Portuguese merchants and supposedly began a trend around court for drinking tea. Tea soon became fashionable among the elite and by the early 18th century the East India Company was importing 100,000 pounds of green and black tea into Britain from China. The popularity for tea soon caught on across all areas of society and by 1750 five million pounds of tea was being imported every year. The sudden rise in popularity continues to confound historians to this day. How did a commodity become so in demand and accessible to all classes in such a small space of time? It cannot be a coincidence that the growth in tea imports correlates with the increase of sugar consumption in this country. By 1720 black tea overtook green tea as the preferred leaf, and sugar and milk began to be added to make it more palatable. As Amanda Vickery states in Radio 4’s In Our Time podcast on tea, tea was a simple, hot drink that people could now prepare in their homes – it wasn’t a costly or complicated method like hot chocolate or coffee at the time. Plus, it was non-alcoholic, making it a

sobering and respectable drink, and unlikely to make you unwell because the water was boiled. This meant that by the middle of the 18th century, tea was now considered the British national drink. And if even the poorest people were unable to access tea, there are reports that people would even pour hot water over stale bread as a substitute. There were reports that some servants in large Georgian houses in cities such as Bath would try and steal the leaves from their employer’s tea caddies, resulting in many housekeepers having to lock the caddies and sugar loaves away from wandering hands. Servants began to demand that alongside their allowance for meals by their


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TEA | TIME

Above, The Public Breakfast by Thomas Rowlandson, 1798, © Victoria Art Gallery / BANES Council, and overglaze enamel tea caddy, c1683 – 1700, © Museum of East Asian Art Below, Tea bowl and saucer, Chelsea Porcelain Factory, 1752 – 1756; chocolate cup, cover and saucer, ChelseaDerby Porcelain Factory, about 1770; coffee cup and saucer, Chelsea Porcelain Factory, 1752 – 1756, © Holburne Museum

employers, they should also have an allowance for tea written in to their contracts. By the mid-18th century, Bath had become a popular resort for the wealthy to visit and tea played an essential part in the social scene. Tea rooms opened allowing the social elite somewhere respectable to go in the day time to socialise, and prominent visitors to the city would also host public breakfasts at the Assembly Rooms or one of the open gardens where visitors and residents were invited to take tea. To meet the sheer demand, 672 tea dealers were registered in Bath and Bristol in 1784, out of a possible 1,769 shopkeepers in the area.

MEDICINAL QUALITIES When it was first introduced to the British market in the 17th century tea was advertised as a tonic. It was thought to benefit a person’s health, as seen in a broadsheet commissioned by coffee house owner Thomas Garraway in the mid-17th century. It stated that tea was good at “persevering perfect health until extreme old age” and “good for clearing the sight.” Tea could also be used to treat “gripping of the guts, cold, dropsies, scurvys and it could make the body active and lusty.” Medical writers promoted the

benefits of drinking tea, including Cornelius Bontago who recommended people drink between 15 and a staggering 250 cups of tea a day in 1685. However, there is evidence that the East India Company may have been paying certain writers of the day to overexaggerate the health benefits of tea in order to increase sales.

Tea could “make the body active and lusty . . .”

TIME FOR TEA: Opposite, A Lady taking Tea, Charles Christian Rosenberg (1745 – 1844), painted on glass, after 1795, and tea kettle, lamp and stand, silver, fruitwood handle, William Shaw and William Preist, London, 1755/56, both © Holburne Museum

Despite the supposed medicinal qualities, there were others who were sceptical about the increase in tea consumption. 17th century physician Simon Paulli stated that tea “hastens the death of those that drink it, especially if they have passed the age of 40 years,” while philanthropist Jonas Hanway wrote in 1758 that working class women who drank tea were “neglecting their spinning, knitting etc, spending what their husbands are labouring hard for, their children are in rage, gnawing a brown crust, while these gossips are canvassing over the affairs of the whole town . . .” These fears surrounding the consumption of tea by the working classes continued into the late 18th and 19th centuries. With the rise of the Methodist movement and what some considered to be the “battle for temperance” over the supposed unruly working classes, Methodist John Wesley believed that tea and coffee could have the same effects as alcohol on the body and mind. In his book Primitive Physick (1747), he wrote that tea and coffee “are extremely hurtful to persons who

have weak nerves”, and suggested that people drink “small weak beer” instead.

MORALE BOOSTER Tea had become an integral part of British people’s lives, so when the First World War broke out in 1914 the government believed that tea was an incredibly important commodity that could boost morale, and therefore oversaw the importing of tea to make sure that everyone in society had access to it. Similarly in the Second World War, the government moved the tea warehouses from along the River Thames to somewhere considered safe from foreign attacks, as ministers realised how important this drink was to the state of the nation. There were even jokes made that if Hitler had been able to prevent the imports of tea to Britain during the war, then the British may have surrendered early on in the conflict. While teabags were created in the USA in the early 20th century and quickly became popular, it wasn’t until after the Second World War that they started to catch on in Britain. As technology developed, Brits turned their backs on cleaning out their teapots and began using the simplified teabag for their brews. Tetley became the first big brand to advertise teabags in the 1950s and other brands soon caught onto the craze. Nowadays teabags have their own dedicated spaces in our kitchens at home and work, and they make up around 96 per cent of the British tea market. Time to put the kettle on again methinks . . . n To find out about the best places for afternoon tea in and around Bath, turn to page 56.

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AFTERNOON | TEA

AN AFTERNOON TREAT

The Bath Magazine picks six of the best spots where you can enjoy a quintessentially English afternoon tea

BAILBROOK HOUSE Eveleigh Avenue, London Road West, Bath BA1 7JD Tel: 01225 855100 Web: handpickedhotels.co.uk/bailbrookhouse Afternoon tea is a great British tradition and what better place to enjoy it than the historic surroundings of Bailbrook House? Relax in one of the royal lounges or take in the panoramic views of the Avon Valley from the Cloisters patio. Tea is served the traditional way using the finest loose leaf teas, strained to your personal taste which together with a selection of delicious sandwiches, handmade cakes, pastries and scones make up the perfect tea experience. Why not take advantage of the hotel’s prosecco afternoon tea offer? On week days during June, July and August Bailbrook House is adding a glass of prosecco for the price of £30 for two.

ROYAL CRESCENT HOTEL 16 Royal Crescent, Bath BA1 2LS Tel: 01225 823333 Web: royalcrescent.co.uk What can be better than relaxing in the beautiful location of the iconic Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa and catching up with friends over a chilled glass of Champagne and a delectable selection of scones and sandwiches? The hotel’s unique selection of five afternoon teas include beautiful finger sandwiches, delicate cakes and savouries, the finest world teas and some of Bath’s best scones and buns. Sit down and relax in the hotel’s

THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM Great Pulteney Street, Bath BA2 4DB Tel: 01225 388572 Web: holburne.org This summer enjoy the beautiful terrace of the Garden Café at the Holburne Museum, serving loose leaf Newby Teas and an indulgent selection of cakes, biscuits, pastries and scones freshly baked every day, as well as range of light meals, quiches and soups. Newby offers the world’s finest luxury loose leaf blends selecting only prime-season leaves from quality Ethical Tea Partnership estates. The freshness of the tea is preserved at a state-of-the-art facility in the world’s best tea-growing regions in Kolkata, India. The team at Benugo prepare bags of the loose leaf tea in small batches to ensure that the craft of fine tea in every cup can be savoured. The Garden Café has something to treat yourself to whatever the time of day. It is open from 10am and last orders are at 4.30pm.

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breathtaking acre of secluded gardens or enjoy the elegant surroundings of the award-winning Dower House Restaurant. We highly recommend adding a flight of Taittinger Champagne or a Grey Goose martini cocktail flight to complement your Royal Crescent experience. Afternoon tea is served daily between 1.30pm and 6pm. Afternoon tea is £35 per person, or with a glass of Champagne it is £45 per person. Afternoon tea with a Taittinger Champagne or martini flight is £55 per person, and children’s afternoon tea is £16.50 per child.


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THE GAINSBOROUGH BATH SPA Beau Street, Bath BA1 1QY Tel: 01225 358888 Web: thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk What could epitomise ‘the Bath experience’ more perfectly than taking an afternoon tea in the classic yet irrefutably modern Gainsborough Bath Spa? This is an experience for both locals and visitors alike. Your traditional afternoon tea will be served in the cool society atmosphere of the fashionable Canvas Room, where you can sit, chat and enjoy the stylish surroundings. The delectable selection of sandwiches, scones, cakes and refreshments come with the additional option of Champagne if you wish to make your experience that little bit more indulgent. Afternoon tea at The Gainsborough costs £30 per person, or £46 with a glass of Champagne, and is served every day from 2.30pm – 5.30pm. Booking is essential.

LUCKNAM PARK HOTEL Colerne, SN14 8AZ Tel: 01225 742777 Web: lucknampark.co.uk Where better to indulge in a traditional English afternoon tea than at Lucknam Park Hotel, an 18th century Palladian mansion set among 500 glorious acres of beautiful gardens and unspoilt parkland. Afternoon tea at Lucknam Park has always been a firm favourite with visitors, whether it’s for a special occasion or just a treat after a long day shopping in Bath which is six miles away. From £29 per person you will be able to enjoy a full English afternoon tea served in the library or drawing room overlooking the gardens, or if it’s fine weather, on the terrace. Reservations are recommended. Afternoon tea is available Monday – Saturday, 2.30pm – 5pm and from 3pm – 5pm on Sundays.

THE PUMP ROOM RESTAURANT Stall Street, Bath BA1 1LZ Tel: 01225 444477 Web: romanbathssearcys.co.uk A trip to Bath wouldn’t be complete without a trip to the Georgian splendour of The Pump Room, with its Corinthian columns and crystal chandelier. Live music is played daily by resident pianist and trio to create an enchanting atmosphere. The Pump Room is world famous for its signature traditional afternoon tea packages which are served daily from noon. This summer there are two new packages to the menu. The beautifully elegant Jane Austen Tea which is served with a pot of Pump Room blend loose leaf tea, a glass of Fentimans ginger beer, Bath chap and ham hock terrine, mini Bath bun, egg custard and nutmeg tart and a

rhubarb syllabub dessert with almond crumble, for £26 per person. The Pump Room has also launched a Somerset High Tea which is perfect for a Father’s Day gift; this includes an Orchard Pig cider or apple juice, two mouthwatering savouries; the chicken and fennel sausage roll and a free range scotch egg and a deliciously sweet apple cider cake. All afternoon teas are served with a looseleaf house tea or a pot of hand roasted coffee, for £18.95 per person. At lunchtime the restaurant serves a seasonal à la carte menu and a set menu for £17.50 for two courses, or £22.50 for three. On 15 June a sumptuous summer menu goes live and from 17 June The Pump Room will be open in the evenings for dining. Dinner is served from 5 – 8.30pm and is the perfect way to end a perfect day.

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RESTAURANT | REVIEW

ACORN VEGETARIAN KITCHEN 2 North Parade Passage, Bath BA1 1NX. Tel: 01225 446059, Twitter: @AcornVegetarian, visit: acornvegetariankitchen.co.uk

R E V I EW

ENOUGH OF THE STEREOTYPING

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n the same way that people don’t always want to be defined by gender or sexual orientation, how about we stop defining ourselves as vegetarian, vegan or carnivore and simply call ourselves food lovers? “Yes, I really enjoy good food,” should be sufficient, without having to go into your exact preferences. That aside, one of the many pleasures of dining at Acorn Vegetarian Kitchen is that the vegetarian, vegan, nut allergic or glutenfree diner can eat in the safe and sure knowledge that everything has been carefully prepared with a plant-centric menu as well as meat-free dishes that are fine for those last three food types, being all clearly labelled. Which allows us to settle in this relaxed Georgian dining room, admire a glimpse of the flamboyant facade of Ralph Allen’s Townhouse (if you bag the table in the window you’ll see one of Bath’s secret architectural gems) and choose from a sensibly small set menu. Two courses are £26.95, three for £33.95. Add a three course wine match for £18. Our overture was an amuse bouche of a refreshingly vibrant green pickled cucumber served with fine slithers of fresh ginger, fennel and dill. A delightful wake-up call to the appetite and this dish, as with everything we ate, was a treat to the eyes as well as the palate. The menu changes dish by dish every few weeks as produce comes into season. My pal Susie – who doesn’t eat meat and tries to avoid processed food for health reasons – is wild about garlic, so picks parsnip and 58 TheBATHMagazine

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hazelnut soup, which is poured hot at the table over a bundle of wild garlic pesto, and which she pronounces deliciously velvety, rich and smooth. My starter is altogether a more hearty affair. Even if you’re a keen home cook, I’d put money on you not taking the time and effort that the Acorn kitchen puts into its dishes – let alone the skills. A couple of nobbly Jerusalem artichokes are unlikely to inspire most of us to roast them to caramelised perfection and then add some lightly chargrilled pink grapefruit segments – each vein beautifully delineated in black by this process – with some creamy rich butter, made from sunflower seeds. It is a combination of flavours that works perfectly. Bertinet bread is served, with a deep rich olive oil and dukkah to dip into. I’m familiar with this Eygptian mix of spices, nuts and sesame seeds, but there are other items on the menu that we have to look up. The vegetables in each dish are the main stars of the show, not merely backing singers. And a dazzling display they put on too. It’s almost as though the concept of eating meat or fish had never been dreamt up. The secret of the creation lies in taking an almost painterly eye to building up layers of texture, colour and ultimately different flavours. We, like other diners around us, spent a lot of our meal tasting and then exclaiming: “Wow! What’s that?” Who could believe, for instance that humble parsley could be transformed into a pure emerald green puree that tastes gently divine. The staff are very

knowledgable and happy to explain what various ingredients and methods are. Susie’s main course was a generous bowl of agnoletti pasta, topped with a smoked king oyster mushroom and sitting in an extremely umami mushroom emulsion. I tasted it and shared her enthusiasm for its complexity and smoky savouriness. Pretty as a painting came for me a plate full of roast onion shells, like boats, filled with pale orange cashew and carrot pate, each topped with a thin ribbon of raw carrot. Setting off the orange was the emerald parsley puree and a risotto made from seven seeds and grains in pumpkin seed milk, paired with a glass of fresh Chenin Blanc from California. Although deeply satisfied we were still curious to finish our culinary adventure. Who could resist the novelty of beetroot ice cream? A quenelle of rich pink earthy yet sweet loveliness was accompanied by shards of honeycomb, like the inside of a Crunchie bar, and a pale white chocolate panna cotta. And the dish of compressed fresh pineapple was perfectly matched with amaretto cream, crisp ginger biscuit pieces, fresh basil and an olive oil sorbet. The latter was weird and delicious at the same time. The cool, sweet sorbet undercut by the Mediterranean grassy warmth of olive oil. So, don’t be defined by boring culinary stereotyping and instead venture on a fascinating exploration of flavour at Acorn. I’ll wager you’ll find exciting tastes you’ve never tried before and will want to try again.

GMc


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Behind the menu June.qxp_Layout 1 24/05/2017 09:19 Page 1

STAR SPANGLED DISHES Melissa Blease goes behind the menu to talk to Hywel Jones executive chef at the eponymous Michelin starred restaurant at Lucknam Park

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here’s something about Lucknam Park that brings out the Downton Abbey yearning in all of us. This beautiful country mansion lies six miles east of Bath – seven if you include the dramatic treelined drive that leads visitors off the main road and up to the house itself. The house has a fascinating history and is today a five-star, award-winning independent country hotel, part of the exclusive Relais and Châteaux portfolio. The grounds contain acres of picturesque parkland, manicured lawns, a riding centre, a spa, two restaurants and a cookery school. Inside the hotel there are wood-panelled drawing rooms and bars and elegant bedroom suites, which all combine to create a supremely luxurious experience. But in the kitchens of the hotel’s glamorous main restaurant and the informal Brasserie, executive chef Hywel Jones’s talent is what really captures the imagination of foodies, earning multiple awards and accolades including a bright, shiny Michelin Star. While Benjamin Taylor oversees the cookery school and restaurant manager Chris Kidd choreographs the overall dining experience, the kitchens behind Lucknam’s two restaurants are Hywel’s exclusive playground – and a recent name change of the main restaurant pays respectful homage to the man himself: welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to a trip behind the menu at Hywel Jones by Lucknam Park.

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Hywel began his career with David Nichols at The Royal Garden before moving on to work as chef de partie in two triplestarred Michelin establishments, Chez Nico at 90 and Marco Pierre White. Prior to his residency at Lucknam Park (which began in 2004), he was executive chef at Pharmacy Restaurant in Notting Hill. Quite a CV. He says: “After being at Lucknam Park for 13 years, it’s a great honour to have the restaurant in my name. I’ve become very attached to Lucknam and for the owners to recognise me in this way is something I’m very proud of.” Understandably so. And it’s not only the restaurant’s name that’s changed during the recent reshuffle; the main dining room has recently unveiled a complete refurbishment, from menus (choose from three separate tasting menus alongside the a la carte offering) to new crockery and glassware. But what is Hywel’s overall personal vision for his new territory? “Along with Chris Kidd, our aim is to offer our guests the very best food, wine and service in a professional but relaxed environment. We have a captive audience of hotel residents as well as a fantastic following of guests who live both locally and further afield, and we aspire to appeal to all of them.” And what’s the best part of his job? “Working in such beautiful surroundings is obviously a massive bonus, but for me, the most enjoyable part of what I do is to work alongside the fantastic teams that I’ve built,

and seeing them develop. Elly Wentworth, who recently did so well in MasterChef The Professionals, is a little superstar – an extremely talented yet humble chef. We’re also fortunate to have head chef Dean Westcar with us – he was a semi-finalist in the series prior to the one Elly was in. We’re all very proud of their achievements. “But I’ve been fortunate to have had some amazing chefs come through our kitchens – Hrishikesh Desai is now at Gilpin Lodge, Richard Edwards was formerly at the Lords of the Manor, and Mark Stinchcombe at Eckington Manor and Robert Potter at The Manor House have all gone on to gain recognition and Michelin stars of their own”. Ah, the subject of stars has arisen. Is it stressful to maintain star-spangled status and how important are stars and accolades to Hywel? “As a young chef, my ambition was always to achieve a Michelin star,” he says. “Having won a star once in London and then another at Lucknam Park is something I’m extremely proud of. It’s a very personal thing to a chef, but it’s also extremely valuable to the hotel from a guest perspective. There’s always pressure related to maintaining standards, but not necessarily stress – I tend to reserve feeling stressed these days for when I watch my kids play rugby. That’s not to say that my role is without its challenges, though; we constantly work hard to ensure we remain consistent with the experience we offer, and the standards and targets we set ourselves are demanding,


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A WIZARD IN THE KITCHEN: main picture, executive chef Hywel Jones at work in his kitchen at Lucknam Park Above, examples of starters, main dishes and puddings that have helped earn Hywel Jones his reputation – and his coveted Michelin star

which is why having such a talented team is so important.” As the summer season dawns, I was keen to discover if there might be a dish that Hywel cite as representing his particular style of cooking. “We have a beautiful turbot dish on the menu. We braise the fish, and serve it with hand-rolled macaroni, buttered lettuce, flaked white crab and a butter sauce infused with Wiltshire truffle – this dish is attracting rave reviews and even I think it’s the best dish I’ve ever produced,” he says. But in every dish, every day, Hywel uses locally sourced ingredients including micro-salads, vegetables and herbs from Lucknam’s kitchen garden and produce from local suppliers. “Right now, late spring vegetables are a joy to work with,” he says. “Local asparagus, peas and morel mushrooms can turn creating dishes into an absolute joy. Other than what’s in season, I pay no attention to the overall notion of fashionable food, though. The quality and combination of ingredients, plus the execution when

cooking them is what matters the most.” When Hywel takes a break from the kitchen, he uses his time to mingle with his contemporaries, citing recently appointed Bath Priory head chef Michael Nizzero as one to watch: “Michael has a great pedigree – I ate a fabulous lunch at the Priory recently,” he says. It’s true that there are other super-talented chefs doing wonderful things in the kitchens of some rather splendid hotels in and around Bath. But there’s something very special about Lucknam Park. On the hotel’s website it says this is the place to sample the ultimate “do nothing, try something, indulge in everything” experience – and Hywel Jones by Lucknam Park is at the very heart of that tantalising objective. If you don’t set the SavNav for Colerne this season, you’re just not giving your downtime the Downton pzazz it deserves. n Lucknam Park Hotel and Spa, Colerne, Wiltshire SN14 8AZ. Tel: 01225 742777; web: lucknampark.co.uk.

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FOOD | HEROES

CREAM OF THE CROP

Melissa Blease meets Gary Fisher, director of Strawberry Field Catering

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hat have Mercedes Benz, Nicholas Wylde jewellers, Buro Happold architects, Savills estate agents, the Law Society and newlyweds Mr and Mrs Loved-Up of Combe Hay all got in common? Impeccable taste, that’s what. For they’re all on the long, illustrious list of companies, organisations and individuals who have put their request for special event sustenance in the safe hands of Strawberry Field Catering, a Bath-based company established back in 1985. In the following three decades the company has continued to build its reputation for providing high quality, memorable food, offering outside catering or hosting at one of several characterful venues in and around Bath. But according to the company’s director Gary Fisher, the secret behind the success of one of Bath’s longestestablished food businesses comes down to one thing: “If a customer is good enough to entrust Strawberry Field Catering with their event, we can be totally relied upon to give them our very best service,” he says, in a refreshingly modest manner for a chap at the helm of a foodie empire. But then again, it has to be said that Gary was hardly handed the business on a plate – he’s all too au fait with the hard work needed to build such a solid business, as he’s been with the company from grass roots level pretty much since the beds were first planted. So how did this fruity feast of a garden grow? “A lovely lady called Belinda Winchurch started the business towards the end of the 1980s, from what was then her home on Lyncombe Hill,” says Gary. “Belinda took me on as head chef in May 1988. I became a partner in the company in the summer of the following year, then Belinda moved on to pastures new in early 1990. My parents had great faith in what I was doing with the business, and helped me move the company forward with a loan. “Our big break came in 1996 when we were given the catering contract at Priston Mill. It was a initially a 12month contract that we maintained for the following ten years. During that time, the wedding industry 62 TheBATHMagazine

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changed dramatically; we went from catering for 23 weddings in the first year to hosting and catering for 200 weddings by 2006. “In 2007, my wife and fellow director Deborah and I bought the Pride of Bath river boat, moored at North Parade Bridge. After an 18month, £250,000 refurbishment we relaunched her as the Penny Lane. She’s a fabulous boat, and a credit to Deborah (and Kev and Andrea Bassett) who look after her so well.” Today, Strawberry Field continues to cater for trips and get-togethers on the Penny Lane, sailing between Pulteney Weir and Saltford Marina. It also maintain a long-standing contract with Sophie and Julian Janes at Wick Farm in Farleigh Hungerford and other contract venue collaborations including Kingscote Tythe Barn near Tetbury, Bath Pavilion, Brunel Old Station at Temple Meads and Almonry Barn, near Langport. How does Gary select which venues to work with? “The collaboration only works if the venue and the caterer – us – can create a realistic business plan, respect each other’s point of view and deliver the right product. There are multiple challenges to consider, the Penny Lane, for example, has a big problem when the river flows fast – getting rid of big trees that have jammed under the pontoon is an extremely arduous task. Aside from venue maintenance, there’s the happiness of our all-important team to consider, and we need to keep

a keen eye on suppliers’ prices and consistence in the produce we require. All caterers will come across some pretty stressful challenges from time to time, but with our level of experience, we expect to resolve whatever the problem may be.” These days, its probably more important than ever before for food businesses to keep ahead of the curve, offering novel twists and turns to their existing array of services. To this end, Strawberry Field has recently launched its Food Drawer concept, a mini food box with the option to have either two or three drawers full of goodies. It’s ideal as either a sharing gift or as a treat for a friend or a corporate client (logos can be incorporated on the recyclable packaging). The drawers can be filled with either one, two or three courses, and tipples are optional. “What the general public expect nowadays compared to 30 years ago

CHANGING TASTES: main picture, sharing boards are increasingly popular at weddings Inset, Gary Fisher, managing director of Strawberry Field Catering Opposite, some of the intricate seasonal dishes cooked up by Strawberry Field’s chefs and, far right, tables ready to welcome guests at a wedding


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is of an extremely higher, more labourintensive standard than ever – we all have access to far better restaurants than we had back when Strawberry Field started, and now we all wish to replicate the same qualities and flair that we see on the food pages of magazines or on cookery TV shows. We have to move with the times. “The biggest trend in wedding catering over the past three years has been the massive rise in the popularity of sharing courses. We now offer circular maple boards that can be used for all kinds of antipasti and tapas dishes – sharing is now much more popular than, say, hog roasts once were. They’ve had their day now, so instead of hog roasts, we offer fabulous marinated/rubbed pork joints which deliver a vastly better, consistently tasty celebratory feast. And

people are genuinely more interested in the provenance of food than they used to be too, so we use locally-sourced produce as much as we can – we’ve relied on Terry and Son Butchers in Bath and Cirencester-based M&J Seafoods for 30 years, our eggs are from Paxcroft Farm in Hilperton, and our fruit and vegetables from Eurofresh, based in Shepton Mallet.” So when he’s not busy catering for others, where does Gary prefer to be catered to? Unsurprisingly, his foodie credentials go back as far as the start of his business does. “I’ve enjoyed Rick Stein’s philosophy on cooking since he very first started out, but going back even further than that, I always believed Anton Edelmann during his stint at The Dorchester was a total craftsman. Back in Bath, I’ve eaten wherever Dan Moon has

cheffed in the last ten years. He’s a great local food hero who will surely be a long term success in the Gainsborough Hotel. And I really enjoy Clayton’s Kitchen in George Street, because it offers a great range of dishes that won’t break the bank, at lunchtime in particular.” When making decisions as to where to eat in Bath, we are spoiled for choice. But when it comes to having a company cater specifically for our needs, Strawberry Fields Catering is pretty much the cream of the crop. “We hope to continue doing what we do in Bath for a long time into the future,” says Gary. Altogether now, let’s sing: “Strawberry Field forever.” n Strawberry Field Catering, The Old Bakery, Jews Lane, Bath BA2 3DG. Tel: 01225 339394; web: strawberryfieldcatering.co.uk.

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FOOD | NEWS

n An all day and evening eaterie, Framptons

Bar and Kitchen, is soon to open in the historic Empire on Grand Parade, overlooking Pulteney Weir in Bath. This will be the third venue for founders, three ex-army comrades, Tom Walker, Ed McAdam and Sam Westlake, who already run Framptons in Tunbridge Wells, Kent and Ringwood in Hampshire. n Explore the world of delicious artisan

chocolate as Bath-based Tracy Chapman – one of the world’s first appointed professional chocolate tasters – leads visitors on a Chocolate Voyage at Verve home and art shop on London Road. This is a chance to try chocolate as never experienced before, promise the organisers. To book a free place on the Chocolate Journey, which takes place from 6pm on Wednesday 14 June at Verve, Walcot Buildings, London Road, visit: verveliving.co.uk. n Newton Farm Café at Newton St Loe, Bath

is hosting a global tapas evening on Friday 16 June from 7pm. Diners will travel from the original tortilla and olives of Spanish cuisine, to appetising bites from other European countries and then to dishes from Asia and spicy flavours of South America. Price: £37.50 per person. To book (pre-payment is required) tel: 01225 873707 or email: kirsty@newtonfarmfoods.co.uk.

SAY HOLA TO OMAR’S SMALL PLATES

SouthGate is adding a new international flavour to its food scene with the opening of Tapas Revolution. The new small plates bar and eaterie is the seventh tapas bar for Spanish chef and TV presenter Omar Allibhoy. Madrid born Omar has cooked for celebrity and royal diners, including Penelope Cruz, Johnny Depp, Antonio Banderas, Tom Hanks, Bill Nighy and Prince Willian. He has written two cookbooks Tapas Revolution and Spanish Made Simple and appeared on Saturday Kitchen, Masterchef, The One Show, Sunday Brunch and This Morning. The Tapas Revolution menu is divided into fish, meat and vegetable sections and includes delicacies such as the famous Jamon Iberico, hand carved to order by a maestro jamonero. Expect all the classics, such as tortilla, croquetas de jamon, calamares, chorizo cooked in Asturian cider and freshly-made churros as well as a wide range of cocktails and craft beers.

PICTURE: Martin Poole

TITBITS

MADE FOR SHARING: Omar Allibhoy’s small plates

CHALLENGE TO FOLLOW YOUR NOSE

People are being invited to take part in the Big Bath Cheese Trail, between Tuesday 10 and Sunday 16 July, which is being organised by Bath Comedy in association with Bath Alkmaar Twinning Association and VisitBath, as part of the 70th anniversary of the world’s first town twinning. The aim is to tell the story of how the twinning came about through the generosity of the people of Bath towards the children of Alkmaar in the aftermath of the Second World War. Cheese traders from Alkmaar, which boasts a spectacular cheese market, have given up to 100 cheeses, which will be placed in shop windows and other prominent places throughout Bath, forming a trail for people to follow. There will be prizes to be won.

TWIN TALENT: the Dutch city of Alkmaar’s cheese market

LOCAL FOOD AND DRINK PRODUCERS UP FOR AWARDS

A record number of people have nominated their favourite food and drink producers for this year’s independent Bath Good Food awards, with more than 150 businesses nominated. Those with the most votes in each category have made it on to the final shortlist and the winners will be announced at the awards ceremony on Saturday 24 September at the start of the Great Bath Feast food festival. Here is the shortlist of producers: Confectionery: Megs Cottage Fudge, Ooh Chocolate, Bath Fudge Factory. Charcuterie: Native Breeds, Castellanos, Somerset Charcuterie Company. Bakery: Thoughtful Bread, Bertinet Bakery, Parsons Bakery. Butcher: Larkhall butchers, Bartlett Butchers, Newton Farm shop, Hartley Farm shop. Oils and sauces: Bath Harvest, 64 TheBATHMagazine

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Somerset Hot Sauce Company, Wiltshire Chilli Farm. Cheese: Cheddar Gorge Cheese Company, Sleight Farm,Westcombe Cheese Company, Homewood Cheese Company. Condiments and pickles: In a Pickle, Fox Gourmet Foods, Langford Pickles. Preserves: In a Jam, Fox Gourmet Foods, Heavenly Hedgerows, Langford Preserves. Cakes: Bath Cake Company, Organic Cake Company, The Pudding Kitchen. Non alcoholic drinks: Henny & Joes, Bradleys Juices, The Juice Collective. Cider: Iford Cider, Burrow Hill Cider Company, Honeys of Midford, Homemade Cider Company. Beer: Electric Bear Company, Hubris ID, Abbey Ales. Wine: Dunleavy, Wraxhall, Quoins. Spirit: Bath Botanics, Bath Gin Company, Heavenly Hedgerow. Meat: Brown Cow Organics, Hartley

Farm, Newton Farm. Pies: Lovett Pies, Made by Ben, Pies and Puds. Farm shop: White Row Farm, Hartley Farm, Newton Farm. Grower: Grown Green at Hartley Farm, Newton Farm, White Row Farm. Judges – who include Michelin star chef Josh Eggleton, food and wine critic Angela Mount and former BBC Masterchef winner Ping Coombes – will blind taste everything to decide the ultimate winners in each category. Heading the awards team is Chris Hull, who said: “The increased level of votes proves the passion that the people of Bath and the surrounding areas have for supporting local produce and small local businesses.” To find out which restaurants and cafes will also have been shortlisted, visit: bathgoodfood.co.uk. n


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PUB | GRUB

THE GOOD PUB GUIDE The Bath Magazine rounds up six of the best pubs for a summer’s evening

THE BUNCH OF GRAPES 14 Silver Street, Bradford on Avon BA15 1JY Tel: 01225 938088 Visit: thebunchofgrapes.com Chef proprietor Steve Carss spent several years cooking in south west France before he returned to the UK and brought back all the best bits of his French experience with him. The menu at The Grapes features the very best moules frites, entrecôte steaks grilled over wood in the Bertha oven and pissaladière flat breads, alongside exceptional value wines that are directly imported from small scale family producers. Opened in November 2015, The Grapes has been hugely successful in attracting a number of awards including listings in both the Good Food Guide 2017 and Michelin Guide. The Grapes was also a winner of an Observer Food Award (Best Sunday lunch) and the BOA Business Awards Best Pub and Best Food Outlet.

KING WILLIAM PUB & DINING ROOMS 36 Thomas Street, Bath BA1 5NN Tel: 01225 428096 Visit: kingwilliampub.com King William pub and dining rooms is just 15 minutes walk from Bath Abbey and is a destination for lovers of great food. Independently owned for over 13 years, it’s a good idea to book as this cosy little Georgian eatery is a favourite for locals and visitors. The huge picture windows are the perfect spot for people watching along the bustling street. The bar is well stocked with locally brewed cask ales, 30 craft beers, Somerset ciders and an extensive and excellent wine list. The King William’s eponymous house ale is exclusively brewed by Danish master brewer Stig Anker Andersen. Coffee is freshly ground and tea is served in warmed pots. Cooking at the King William is about

THE GEORGE 67 Woolley Street, Bradford on Avon BA15 1AQ Tel: 01225 865650 Web: thegeorgebradfordonavon.co.uk A country pub in a bustling town, The George at Woolley proudly holds one AA rosette. The pub’s chefs focus on classical cooking with a creative twist, with an emphasis on fish and game. The menu changes daily, and there is an open plan kitchen so if you dine in the pantry you can chat with the chefs while they cook. The George is open for breakfast, lunch or dinner, plus there is afternoon tea served on Friday, Saturday and Sundays (booking is essential). Enjoy the sunshine on the south facing garden terrace and lawns, which are open all day on Friday and Saturdays. There are also private dining rooms available for meetings and functions.

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respect for the ingredients that are sourced from the wealth of artisan producers found in and around Bath and the south west. Modern British in style, menus are fresh, seasonal and local. Sunday roasts are the stuff of legend and child friendly with complimentary gifts to keep young minds occupied while the adults get to grips with a serious wine list and four real ales from local micro breweries. Two first floor dining rooms offer a more intimate setting for private dining, special occasions or as one of Bath’s most romantic dining venues. The King William is also known for serving the Georgian delicacy Bath chaps (cured pig’s cheek served bread crumbed and deep fried with apple sauce) as a bar snack.


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PUB | GRUB

SIGN OF THE ANGEL Church Street, Lacock SN15 2LB Tel: 01249 730230 Web: signoftheangel.co.uk Sign of the Angel is a 15th century coaching inn that encompasses the key elements of a traditional inn – providing great tasting food and drink in front of large open fires with warm, homely rooms for those staying overnight. Located in the National Trust village of Lacock in Wiltshire, on the edge of the Cotswolds, this pub is a short distance from Bath. The kitchen uses fresh, seasonal ingredients in order to serve great tasting dishes from honest foods. Sign of the Angel sources produce from local suppliers in the west country to ensure that the food process is traceable and from sustainable farmers, growers and butchers. In the summer, there is a beautiful garden to enjoy a cream tea next to the stream, along with a paddock, which will in time subsidise the produce for the kitchen. Sign of the Angel has been awarded with two AA rosettes and is a 4* AA accommodation.

GARRICK’S HEAD PUB & DINING ROOM 7 – 8 St John’s Place, Bath BA1 1ET Tel: 01225 318368 Visit: garricksheadpub.com Garrick’s Head pub and dining room was the former home to Beau Nash and is a grand building with stately proportions. Its location next to the Theatre Royal always makes for an interesting and colourful crowd. Open everyday from noon onwards, lunch and dinner are served in the bar, on the terrace or in the dining room. Menus are full of fresh seasonal ingredients and the style is modern British. The bar menu features pub classics prepared with respect and using the best regional ingredients, while the pre-theatre and à la carte menus are more fine dining in style. Sunday roasts are served in the traditional style with all the trimmings and children are occupied with complimentary gifts to keep them busy at the table. Booking is always

advisable, especially at the weekend. Renowned for having the best fish and chips in Bath, Garrick’s Head is also known for serving Bath chaps. The Garrick’s Head’s house ale is brewed by Stig Anker Andersen and is available to take home as well as enjoy from the hand pumps. Its reputation for well kept ales and ciders doesn’t preclude that the Garrick also has a comprehensive wine and spirits list, with over 20 wines by the glass and 50 whiskies. Outside the spectacular floral displays from the hanging baskets and window boxes of the terrace catch the early afternoon and late evening sun and this is the perfect location to sit back and watch the hustle and bustle of Bath go by while enjoying a bite to eat or a glass of something delicious from the bar.

THE NEW INN The New Inn, 80 Lower Westwood, Bradford on Avon BA15 2AE Tel: 01225 863123 Visit: thenewinnwestwood.co.uk Set in a beautiful village of Westwood, The New Inn is a great place for family dining or romantic evening meals. You can dine al fresco in the sun trap beer garden or sit inside and enjoy the relaxing atmosphere and wooden beams of the pub’s cosy interior. Pub classics such as ploughman’s, a classic prawn cocktail, half pounder beef burger with cheese, bacon, onion rings and chips, fish and chips and many more are served throughout the week and traditional roasts on Sundays. Dogs are welcome and Westwood Manor and Iford Manor are nearby, perfect for sightseeing.

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TRISTAN DARBY Says there’s more to New Zealand wines than Marlborough Sauvignon

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ince the first commercial wines were released in the 1980s, New Zealand’s pungent, herbaceous, tangy, tropical-fruited style of sauvignon blanc has been a smash hit, now accounting for three quarters of NZ wine production and around 85% of wine exports – with the most famous and productive region, Marlborough, leading the charge. However, New Zealand is 1,000 miles long with a latitude equivalent of Bordeaux to southern Spain, a diverse geography and geology (mountains, coast and volcanic plateaus) and a wide selection of grape varieties, so there’s plenty more to be discovered. Central Otago is the world’s most southerly wine region, plus the highest altitude and most continental in New Zealand (no vineyard here is more than 80 miles from the sea). Spectacularly beautiful, adorned with dramatic snow-capped mountains and lakes, this is also one of the world’s top spots for Pinot Noir, which thrives here. Relatively warm daytimes with high UV levels bestow the grapes with plenty of ripeness and flavour, locked in place by cool night temperatures – producing characterful wines full of vibrant ripe fruit flavours, depth and balancing acidity. I like the Mohua Pinot Noir 2014 (£17.50, offer price £15.50 at Great Western Wine) from Peregrine wines, with its floral and fruity aromas and a juicy, quite rich, yet smooth palate where cherry and black fruit flavours combine with a savoury edge and a touch of spice. Central also produces world-class chardonnay, and Carrick Chardonnay 2015 (£16.95, offer price £14.95 GWW) is a splendid example. Complex, elegant and fine. Deliciously ripe tropical fruit flavours and a lemon-like acidity are complemented by creamy, nutty notes and a lick of spice from fermentation and ageing in French oak. Classy and it’ll keep and develop in the bottle over a couple of years, too. Around the Art Deco Mecca of Napier in northisland is NZ’s oldest and second largest wine region, Hawke’s Bay, perhaps best known for its age-worthy red blends made with classic Bordeaux grapes. The Crossroads Winemaker’s Selection Cabernet/Merlot 2011 (£19.95, offer price £17.95 GWW) uses top fruit from the acclaimed Gimblett Gravels sub-region. Yes, it’s big and pretty concentrated, but not heavy. Juicy blackcurrants and plums are supported by a toasty complexity from French oak barrels. Perfect with roast lamb, beef or a juicy steak. The superb Man ‘O’ War Dreadnought Syrah 2013 (£31.50, offer price £27.50 GWW) is produced a short boat ride away from the mainland on the winemaking island of Waiheke, where the climate is drier and the warmth is tempered by the cooling effects of the sea. This stellar Rhone-style syrah had me at first sip. Concentrated and rich, yet elegant, fine and balanced with a mineral touch. The seductive smoky and savoury characters mingle with blueberries, blackberries and black pepper spice. Tristan is hosting a NZ tasting on Wednesday 14 June at Great Western Wine. Tickets are £15 from: greatwesternwine.co.uk/events. n

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RECEIVE THE BATH MAGAZINE BY POST NEVER MISS OUT We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month, and there’s plenty of pick up points around town. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family, we offer a magazine mailing service.

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FROM JUST £30 SUBSCRIBE ONLINE AT www.thebathmag.co.uk/subscribe or call: 01225 424 499


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CITY | PEOPLE

CITYNEWS News in brief n Award-winning Bath jewellery designer and

diamond expert Nicholas Wylde, pictured, is celebrating his 30 years in business in the city by launching an audition to find a new model to be the face and hands of his jewellery. The competition is called The Queen of the Wylde and the winner will receive £500 worth of Nicholas Wylde jewellery plus a portfolio of photographs. Visit: queenofthewylde.nicholaswylde.com. n Tickets have gone on sale for a masquerade

ball to be held at the Assembly Rooms, Bath on Saturday 23 September to celebrate 100 years since the birth of Leonard Cheshire, who founded the disability care charity, the Leonard Cheshire Foundation. This ball will be held to raise funds for Greenhill House, a care home in Timsbury. The theme of the ball will be sport, with guest speakers from Help for Heroes Invictus Games atheletes. VIP guest is Wing Commander Ross Priday, an ex RAF Red Arrow. Auction lots include a Battle of Britain Memorial Flight VIP day for four, a 30 minute Spitfire flight over Biggin Hill, a bobsleigh run experience at the University of Bath plus a hot air balloon flight and many more. For tickets call Ann Birtwistle on: 01761 479902. n Bath business Hawker Joinery has given

tonnes of timber to city charity The Woodworks Project, which runs furniture and upholstery workshops for people re-building their lives following mental illness or addiction. Their completed work is on sale at the shop in Southgate Street, Bath.

ART AUCTION TO RAISE FUNDS Some of Bath’s most popular and collectable artists have donated their work to an art auction to raise money for the campaign to try and save Bathampton Meadows from a park and ride being built on the site. Peter Brown, Bob Rudd, Catherine Beale, Steve Hall, Jane Riley, Barry Hulme, Sarah Targett, cartoonist Perry Harris and ceramicists Gary Wood of One Two Five Gallery and Clare Day are among those whose work will be auctioned at the Green Park Function Rooms, Green Park Station on Friday 16 June from

7.30pm. The art will be on show at the Function Rooms, 10am – 5pm on Thursday 15 June and

11am – 7pm on Friday 16 June. Bidding is open online: bathamptonmeadows alliance.org.uk.

LENDING AT A RECORD HIGH Bath Building Society’s mortgage lending book rose to a record high of £231.2m for 2016, with gross mortgage lending at £43.6m, up from £40.9m in 2015. The group’s assets rose by 2.2% to £298.9m, from £292.6m on the previous year and it showed an 11.6% increase in its reserves from £26.8m to £29.9m year on year. Dick Jenkins, chief executive, said: “The society has had another strong year in which it has built its reserves to become one of the best capitalised in the building society world, and increased its long term resilience as a result. While the immediate impacts of Brexit are fairly minor for a business trading solely in the UK, we remain concerned about the secondary impacts on the economy and care will need to be taken with the Great Repeal

BATH BUSINESS BAROMETER

Bill to ensure that the potential benefits of leaving the EU can be realised. “The ultra-low interest rate cycle looks likely to last for even longer than most of us anticipated some years ago, and we have consequently remained focussed on helping our existing savers in preference to chasing new customers. “We are pleased to have grown our mortgage book in the face of huge competition through the development of our Rent-a-Room mortgage. We are looking forward to launching a new mortgage targeting retired customers in the coming weeks through our innovative approach to lending to this group. We continue to be committed to helping people in Bath and further afield to buy homes.”

APRIL 2017

High Street Footfall

provided for

n Bath’s month on month % change figure shows positive growth for the city. From a UK perspective, the significant increase in the South West is due to the good weather and the positive impact it had on coastal towns. The shift of Easter to April this year from March last year delivered a demonstrable boost to high street footfall throughout the UK. The year on year rise in the UK was fuelled further by the weakened Pound, driving both an increase in overseas tourists and Easter staycations amongst domestic visitors. The froth on the top of the positive impact of Easter is the underlying structural shift UK wide towards leisure focussed trips, which meant that whilst high street footfall rose by +1.4% during retail trading hours, trips to UK high streets post 5 pm increased by +2.6%.

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GREEN VISTA: Bathampton Meadows from Little Solsbury by Jane Riley

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(Month on month change)

Springboard Research Ltd.


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

COUNTDOWN BEGINS FOR MAKING TAX DIGITAL With huge change to the UK tax system less than a year away, Calvin Healy of Richardson Swift explains how businesses, landlords and individuals can start to prepare.

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f you haven’t heard much about Making Tax Digital (“MTD”), you might want to read on. This Government project aims to move to a fully digital tax system and is set to revolutionise the way in which businesses, landlords, and individuals report and interact with HMRC. MTD is a key part of the Government’s plans to make it easier for individuals and businesses to keep their tax affairs up to date. This means the end of the Self Assessment tax return, with MTD being the replacement. HMRC indicates it will bring significant benefits for individuals as they won’t have to give HMRC some information that it already holds. For instance, from employers, pension providers, banks and building societies, and down the line (and this is quite ambitious), investment providers. Digital tax accounts for all will mean people can check the information HMRC has, plus add anything further, before agreeing the tax position for each year. As outlined, HMRC will obtain some data from third parties, but it will also be the responsibility of the individual to provide information, such as their business and rental income.

To do this, individuals will need to interface digitally with HMRC and report their accounts quarterly before following up with a final end of year position.

For more information on MTD, please contact Calvin on 01225 325580 or email ch@richardsonswift.co.uk.

Calvin Healy

As things stand, only individuals with income below £10,000 will escape an obligation to provide business and/or rental information. Any non-compliance will attract penalties. These proposals are being brought in soon and it will be a huge learning curve for all stakeholders to get to grips with the new rules. Are you ready for the changes ahead? MTD is already in pilot phase, but will become mandatory from 6 April 2018 for individuals with business and/or rental income exceeding £85,000. From 6 April 2019, all other individuals with business and/or rental income will be required to file information (subject to the £10,000 deminimis limit, as indicated above). Following this, companies and large partnerships will be subject to the changes from April 2020. All in all, the time to start planning for change is now.

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CITY | HERITAGE

PROTECTING OUR CITY’S ASSETS Anyone buying a listed building in Bath will be offered a guide book filled with practical advice on how to look after their property, thanks to the Bath Preservation Trust

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nyone buying a listed building in Bath will be given a specially written guide book to help them look after their investment and protect it for future generations. The new 50-page guide, Making Changes has been produced by the Bath Preservation Trust, a charity dedicated to being a custodian of the World Heritage City. The book was written by Joanna Robinson, conservation officer with the trust with input from members of the BPT’s experienced architecture and planning committee and from Bath and North East Somerset Council and Historic England. Thomas Sheppard, Chairman of BPT, said at the book launch, held at No15 Great Pulteney Hotel, that the preservation trust had no intention of insisting that people live and work in a Jane Austen theme park. “We want to thank people for buying a listed building and reward them with a copy of the book,” he said. Making Changes has been distributed to conveyancing solicitors, estate agents and mortgage lenders to give away to clients. There are many words of wisdom in Making Changes which perhaps home buyers may not have known before – particularly if they have come from overseas. If you own a Grade I or Grade II listed building you’ll need a Certificate of Lawfulness for works that do not need official approval. If you’re not sure Bath and North East Somerset Council offers a listed building inquiry service (see: bathnes.gov.uk/services/planning-andbuilding-control/listed-buildings). There is a £51.80 charge for this service. If installing solar panels, satellite dishes or television aerials you will almost certainly require consent and are urged to try and put them in a discreet place where they are not easily visible. And, as a general rule,

FOR POSTERITY: Bath’s historic buildings are one of its greatest assets and need looking after PICTURE: courtesy of Rich Stapleton

repairing historic fixtures including iron railings, doors and plasterwork is preferable to replacing them. When it comes to vaults owners are advised not to use chemical injections or acrylic paint as neither of these allow the materials to breathe. And when repairing stonework lime mortar should always be used in preference to modern concrete. We are but custodians of our World Heritage City and organisations such as Bath Preservation Trust help us make the right decisions for future generations. The book quietly answers questions that people may have had but felt reluctant to ask. Hard copies of the book can be picked up from the Museum of Bath Architecture on the Vineyards, or by calling: 01225 338727 or email: conservation@bptrust.org.uk. If posted out the trust requires a stamped addressed envelope for £1.50. As the trust is

a charity, a donation of £5 per book is requested to help cover costs. n

DESIGN CLASSIC RETURNS TO CITY A suite of furniture designed by renowned Glasgwegian architect and designer Charles Rennie Mackintosh is coming home to Bath 100 years after it first arrived in the city. The bedroom suite, designed for the home of Bathbusinessman and engineer Sidney Horstmann in 1917, will be recreated in the Museum of Bath at Work in Julian Road. It will be part of A Bedroom In Bath exhibit, which opens on Thursday 15 June and runs until October. The items have been loaned from the Victoria and Albert Museum. Bath is one of only a few known locations for Mackintoshcommissioned work outside Scotland. He designed the interior for the bedroom

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and furniture in a house that Horstmann lived in until 1935. His daughter Alison Dunmore was born in one of the beds designed by Mackintosh and had fond memories of being a child growing up in the bedroom. Horstmann had been introduced to Mackintosh’s work via his friend businessman Wenman BassettLowke who had commissioned Mackintosh to design the interior and furniture for his home. Pamela Robertson, professor emerita of Mackintosh studies at the University of Glasgow, said: “It will be marvellous to see the Horstmann furniture set against a recreation of the original Mackintosh decorative scheme.”


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ocl A C C O U N TA N C Y

141 Englishcombe Lane, Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

Are you paying high overdraft interest & fees in your limited company whilst receiving minimal interest on your personal savings?

WOULD YOU LOVE2LEARN A NEW SKILL FOR WORK OR LEISURE? Fancy trying something new? Bath College has revealed its new selection of part-time courses, available for all ages

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ath College is offering an exciting new range of part-time leisure courses at its campuses in Bath and Radstock, starting in September. You can study anything from studio painting, wood engraving and massage therapy, to business, foreign languages and web development at the college’s city centre campus right in the heart of Bath. The popular floristry programme begins with a four-week floristry for beginners course, where you’ll use a variety of flowers, foliage and sundries to create simple and effective designs to take home. The college also has the space and the resources to support you if you’d like to learn stone carving, jewellery, photography or glass techniques. In the Bath College kitchen, you can study pastry skills, how to cook fish, speciality artisan breads and Italian cookery. To get advice on cake decoration, children’s cakes and sugar craft, enrol on a course with specialist pastry chef Steve Benison. If you’re interested in digital media or graphic design, the college runs video editing classes, as well as sessions to help you use Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe InDesign. For small businesses, the college is running a series of workshops. You can sign up to business start-up made simple, digital marketing strategies, promote your business with PR and managing finance. It is also introducing new courses through its health and social care department, including baby massage classes, an introduction to Makaton, and understanding dementia. In September, Bath College is opening a state-of-the-art Construction Skills Centre, catering for students who want to learn a trade at the Somer Valley Campus in Radstock. As a result, the college is able to offer leisure learners a wider range of courses, from property maintenance to landscaping and animal care. Classes at the Somer Valley Campus include an introduction to garden construction, a beginner’s guide to growing flowers, grow your own food and build your own planter. There is also a wealth of courses for people interested in home decoration and DIY. Enrol on one of the property maintenance courses to learn the basics of plumbing, plastering, electrics and wallpaper hanging. For more information visit: bathcollege.ac.uk or call the Student Advice Centre on 01225 312191. n

It may be time to reconsider the way you are investing your personal money if you are paying high overdraft / loan interest / fees in your limited company whilst receiving little personal savings interest. Your limited company may be able to pay you interest on the money you loan it at a rate similar to that paid on an overdraft or loan facility. The rate of return on those savings can be significantly better than the rate you are receiving from high street banks. The interest paid by your company is deducted from trade profits and therefore reduces corporation tax and so if your company is making profits, this can be an excellent way to boost your investment income. You will have a personal tax liability for any interest received from the company, but there is now the tax free savings allowance of £1,000 for basic rate and £500 for higher rate tax payers which will make this less painful (if you aren’t receiving interest from other sources).

For help & advice contact us – call Marie Maggs, Hannah Bratten or Lesley Allen on 01225 445507 for a no-obligation meeting.

What our clients say:

“Believe it or not, in the 25+ years that we have been trading, the meeting with you was the first one ever where we went through accounts - very refreshing” “For us, in our 30 years experience OCL Accountancy is the best fit we have found”

Boost your profits - Reduce your tax Maximise your wealth

Call Marie Maggs, Mike Wilcox or Hannah Bratten on 01225 445507 to arrange a no-obligation meeting THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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Motoring Bath Audi Q5 June.qxp_Layout 1 25/05/2017 11:58 Page 1

MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

THE ALL-NEW AUDI Q5

If you thought the previous version was a pretty tough act to follow then take a look at Audi’s all-new Q5, says motoring critic Chris Lilly – it’s a superior upgrade, and some . . .

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udi’s new Q5 has some big boots to fill, with the previous version being one of the bestselling models in its class. The subtly stylish family-sized SUV offered an excellent blend of practicality, performance and comfort, making it one of the best all-rounders money could buy. Now there’s a fresh and completely revised model looking to carry on the success story of that first generation. So, this new Q5 might look rather like the older model, but Audi has long favoured evolutionary design over radical changes in styling. It’s a sensible approach, and one that immediately links new models to old favourites; but look closer and the new Q5 is actually quite different. Sharper in every detail, the Q5 looks sportier than ever and exudes subtle style. The simple Bauhausesque lines of previous Audi’s are now part of the company’s proud history, but the Q5 remains unfussy in its design in a way many of its rivals simply can’t match. That styling extends to the interior, where Audi can reasonably be argued to have taken the lead from its competitors. Each of Audi, BMW, Mercedes, Jaguar Land Rover and Lexus have their merits and faults, and personal taste is a big variable, but Audi interiors are beautifully designed, ergonomic, classy, and well built. The new Q5 benefits from the latest developments brought in on the A4 models, which includes Audi’s Virtual Cockpit. It’s not standard across the board and the model I test drove featured more standard dials with a central information display – which is still a good set-up, make no mistake. However the Virtual Cockpit is an excellent feature, allowing drivers to easily personalise the digital instrument screen to their tastes. Digital dials can be enlarged or reduced, with the central section able to display driving information, or even a large map for navigation purposes. The rest of the Q5’s kit is equally impressive. A large colour display screen comes as standard, and Audi’s infotainment control system is one of the most intuitive in the business. A central dial, shortcut buttons, and a trackpad work really well together, and front seat occupants can also draw out characters on a touch-sensitive section. With

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practice this can speed up the act of putting a postcode into the sat-nav for example. Those up front will have plenty of top quality dials, buttons, rocker-switches, and surfaces to play about with. The cabin is beautifully made and every element feels reassuringly solid. Space is plentiful in the front too, and the driver will be able to get into a comfortable seating position easily thanks to multiple degrees of adjustment. A high roof-line provides all passengers with ample head room, while leg and shoulder space are good almost everywhere. The Q5 can reasonably seat five adults and swallow up a load of luggage in the boot. Those in the middle rear seat rear will either need to be on the small side or will have drawn the short straw though, because a large transmission tunnel limits legroom somewhat. That said, a family will have no problem fitting everything they need – including family members – into the Q5, and the SUV will prove a handy tipworkhorse/Swedish flatpack superstore delivery wagon when the need arises. Having mentioned the transmission tunnel, every Q5 comes with Audi’s legendary quattro four-wheel drive as standard. It offers excellent grip in all conditions and superb traction in the dry. This has a serious benefit in terms of safety – a key consideration for many buyers – and also means that when the British winter hits, slippery roads can be tackled with little apprehension. Apart from the sporty S-Series models, or ridiculously fast RS line-up, Audis aren’t well known as being the best handling cars around. If you want a really engaging SUV to drive BMW’s X3, the Jaguar F-Pace, or Porsche’s Macan offer sharper handling. However, the good thing about Audi models in general is that its cars have more than enough grip for most owners’ needs, and the handling is precise even if not the most communicative around. This is true for the Q5 too, and while some buyers might want the agility of a hothatch in their tall family SUV, most owners want a safe and comfortable machine, with accurate steering to easily negotiate car parks and tight junctions in built up areas. The Q5 fills these needs perfectly, and will smooth out rough road surfaces, tackle speed bumps,

and settle down nicely at motorway speeds with equal aplomb. Along twisty roads, the Q5’s weight is felt when cornering, but the Audi remains surprisingly level throughout. Powering the driver through these various environments is a solid engine line-up, currently made up of a 190hp 2.0 litre TDI diesel, and a 252hp 2.0 litre TFSI petrol. Both are good units, and there are more powerful offerings in the pipeline too. Tested was the diesel which returned a little under 50mpg during my time with it, having covered a variety of conditions and driving styles. Officially, it will achieve 56.9mpg, with CO2 emissions of 132 g/km giving it reasonable tax and company car tax costs. Performance is more than enough for most needs, with the 0 – 62mph time despatched in 7.9 seconds. The petrol will do the same sprint in 6.3 seconds for those wanting more performance, but at the sacrifice of fuel economy with an official figure of 40.9mpg. Power is put through a seven-speed dual clutch automatic gearbox in all models, which is operated via a nice rocker-style gearstick. The transmission is smooth at just about any speed, and is almost never caught in the wrong gear. Prices for the various Q5s range from £37,150. All in all then, the Q5 doesn’t really lead the class in any particular attribute – apart


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from maybe cabin design/quality, but that’s a more subjective issue than most others. That’s not to say that the Q5 fundamentally lacks in any aspect though, and in fact it scores highly in just about every area. All things put together, the Q5 shows itself to be a seriously good car. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts, and Audi’s mid-sized SUV is a great all-rounder like its predecessor. Although quite pricy, the Q5 is in the premium SUV category and is of equal or better value than its rivals. It might not be the most exciting choice in the sector, but the Q5 is certainly one of the best. ■ For further information visit: audi.co.uk.

A GREAT ALL-ROUNDER: the Audi Q5 will smooth out rough road surfaces, tackle speed bumps and settle down nicely at motorway speeds with equal aplomb

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FAMILY | EVENTS

FAMILY DIARY IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO WITH THE CHILDREN THIS MONTH night to life. Children can make their own sound suits before listening to some fantastical tales by the Somerset Storytellers, to be enjoyed by everyone, young and old. For under 12s and parents. In association with Bath Fringe. £10 adults, £8 concessions and children. Group tickets available. Visit: edgearts.org.

FANTASTIC MR FOX Tuesday 30 May – Saturday 3 June, times vary n Theatre Royal Boggis, Bunce and Bean, three greedy, smelly, horrid farmers hate the cunning Mr Fox. Mr Fox is smart, clever and rather fantastic, but he doesn’t realise how determined the farmers are to get revenge. Can he hatch a plan to save his family and friends? Adapted for the stage by Sam Holcroft. Suitable for ages five and above. Visit: theatreroyal.org.uk or call: 01225 448844. MAKING MERRY WITH MERELS Tuesday 30 May – Sunday 4 June, 10am – 1pm and 2 – 4pm n Roman Baths Explore one of Britain’s finest historic sites and learn how to make a Roman board game at this half-term activity. All included in admission price, no need to book. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Visit: romanbaths.co.uk. A FINE BUNCH Friday 2 June, 10.30am – 12.30pm and 1.30 – 3.30pm n Victoria Art Gallery Explore the flowers and bugs in the gallery’s special exhibition, and children can create some 3D artwork to take home. Suitable for ages six – 11. Free activity, children must be accompanied by an adult. Visit: victoriagal.org.uk. AHOY THERE…PIRATES AND PRINCESSES AT BOWOOD Friday 2 – Sunday 4 June, 11am – 5pm n Bowood House & Gardens, Calne, Wiltshire, SN11 0LZ Well, me hearties, you’re in luck – Bowood is hosting pirates and princesses this summer. Dress up as a pirate or your favorite princess and join in all the fun and games, including treasure trails, fencing, archery, and even a cannon ball alley. Visit the Gardeners’ Bothy for magical princess activities with storytelling and face painting. Normal house and garden admissions apply. Visit: bowood.org or call: 01249 812102. THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS Thursday 8 – Saturday 10 June, times vary n The egg The tales of Ratty, Mole, Badger and boisterous Mr Toad have been entertaining families for generations. Alan Bennett’s version of the enchanting tale is true to the original, yet written with distinctive Bennett

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Tales of Birbal at The egg flair and humour. Suitable for ages six and above. Visit: theatreroyal.org.uk or call: 01225 823409. Also at The egg this month TALES OF BIRBAL Saturday 17 – Monday 19 June, times vary How many crows are there in this land? Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Whatever the question, Birbal – cunning advisor to Mughal Emperor Akbar – has the answer! Mashi Theatre’s travelling storytellers stop by to share the enchanting Tales of Birbal, ancient stories of adventure and problem-solving. Suitable for ages six and above. THE BOY WHO GREW WINGS Friday 9 – Sunday 11 June, times vary n Prior Park Gardens, Ralph Allen Drive, BA2 5AH Journey with Whispering Woods for an immersive woodland experience which combines aerial acrobatics, live music and spoken word. Suitable for ages five and above. In association with The egg. Visit: theatreroyal.org.uk or call: 01225 823409. NOWADAYS FAMILY TIPI

n Fine Art Studio, The Edge,

University of Bath Saturday 10 June, 6 – 8pm Sit around the campfire, enjoy a picnic and prepare for an evening of music and storytelling. Kilter Theatre will be bringing the weird and wonderful characters of the

Also at the Fine Art Studio this month CREATE: ART Saturday 17 June, 10.30am – 12.30pm Hands on creative workshop led by artist educator Dorcas Casey. Children can try their hands at sticking, drawing and making collages, as well as printmaking and using textiles. Plus pick up some useful tips about making art at home. £5 per child, £3 per adult. Suitable for five – 11 year olds. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-booking advised. Call: 01225 386777 or visit: edgearts.org. MR BROWN’S PIG Sunday 11 June n Parade Gardens, Grand Parade, Bath As part of B&NES council’s children’s entertainment programme, head to Parade Gardens for a day of fun with Mr Brown’s pig and enjoy the Captain Barnacle Pirate Show. Free entry for Discovery Card holders, or £1.50 for adults, 80p for children and under fives go free. Follow @BathnesParks for more details. WALCOT VILLAGE FAIR Sunday 11 June, doors open at 2pm n St Swithin's Church, The Paragon, Bath The whole family can enjoy an afternoon of children’s outdoor theatre with performances of the hilarious stories of The Adorable Snowman by Gulliver Keunzler and The Lorax by Dr Seuss, followed by children’s cabaret in the garden of St Swithin's Church. Does your child have a special skill or joke to tell that the audience will love? Come along to the fair and try it out. Free entrance for all. Part of the Bath Fringe Festival. Visit: bathfringe.co.uk. GBH BIG BAND: WHO’S AFRAID OF THE BIG BAND WOLF? Sunday 18 June, 3pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon, BA15 1DZ In a special family concert for Father’s Day, GBH brings the big band to life with Peter and the Wolf, arranged by master of the big band genre Oliver Nelson. With special guests Lifted Voices Choir. £15 adults, and


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FAMILY | EVENTS bring up to two under 18s for just £1 with a full price ticket. Visit: wiltshiremusic.org.uk or call: 01225 860100. MONDAY AND TUESDAY YEARLINGS Mondays and Tuesdays, 10.30am – noon n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street In these weekly workshops, led by Chrissie Weltike, parents and pre-school children can play and learn together through songs, stories and creative activities inspired by the museum’s collection. Suitable for 12 – 24 months. £50 for five weeks. Block Bookings only. Visit: holburne.org or call: 01225 388568. Also at The Holburne Museum this month TODDLEALONGS Fridays, 10.30am – noon and 1 – 2.30pm Parents and children can take part in creative activities together in the cosy environment of the Gardener’s Lodge. There is a new museum-related theme every week. £60 for six weeks. Block bookings only. ROOTS AND SHOOTS TODDLER GROUP Tuesdays in term time, 10 – 11.30am n Bath City Farm, Kelston View, Bath, BA2 1NW Toddlers can explore the farm, learn how to feed the animals and discover how to garden.

The Boy Who Grew Wings at Prior Park Gardens

No booking needed. Small admission charge, includes a glass of squash for kids and a hot drink for parents. Suitable for children under five. Visit: bathcityfarm.org.uk or call: 01225 481269. Also at Bath City Farm this month SATURDAY CLUB Saturdays all year around, 10 – 11.45am Children can get covered in mud, make a bonfire and learn how to cook on it at this weekend workshop. Plus, they can go on treasure hunts, make candles, look after the farm’s wildlife, feed the animals and get crafty. Blocks of six sessions must be booked in advance. ART AND CRAFT AT MIDSOMER NORTON ARTS FESTIVAL Saturday 24 June, 10am – 4pm

n The Hollies, High Street, Midsomer

Norton, BA3 2DP Enjoy a variety of art and craft activities during this community festival, such as clay modelling, printing, weaving and drawing. There will also be a range of artistic items on sale including ceramics, mosaic, graffiti work, weaving and jewellery. Visit: midsomerartsfestival.weebly.com. INDEPENDENCE DAY FAIR AND BBQ Saturday 1 July, 10.30am – 5pm n The American Museum in Britain, Claverton Manor, Bath, BA2 7BD Expect outdoor fun for all the family, including classic fairground games, bouncy castle, crafts, lip-smacking food from Spitfire BBQ, and live music. Included with gardens admission. Visit: americanmuseum.org or call: 01225 460503.

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Archive June.qxp_Layout 1 24/05/2017 13:18 Page 1

INDUSTRIAL | HERITAGE

PLASTICINE KNEADS YOU On the 120th anniversary of the invention of Plasticine, Eirlys Penn explores its history and looks forward to this month’s community celebrations in Bathampton

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Alfred Street family home. And in 1897 he came up with the winning formula – which included, among other things, calcium carbonate, petroleum jelly and stearic acid. He patented his recipe in 1899 and, after a period of laborious domestic production involving grooved wooden butter pats to shape the slabs, Harbutt soon geared up to industrial processing in an old flour mill at the Grange, High Street, Bathampton.

during harsh winters he’d extend lunch breaks to allow skating on the frozen Kennet and Avon Canal

O

n the first floor of the Victoria Art Gallery in Bath you’ll find the bust of William Harbutt, local hero and inventor of Plasticine. Shaped by one of his students, the luxuriously bearded lateVictorian likeness was fittingly modelled first in Plasticine, then bronze. There can’t be anyone reading this who didn’t have a formative experience as a child with that slightly acrid-smelling modelling material – which comes in many colours but invariably morphs to brown. Harbutt’s secret recipe has fuelled a century of kindergarten creativity capped by Aardman’s Oscarwinning Wallace and Gromit. Born in North Shields, Tyneside on 13 February 1844, William Harbutt studied art in London and, aged 30, moved to Bath to teach. He ran Bath School of Art and married fellow artist Bessie, a fine miniature portraitist, with whom he had six surviving children – who would all go on to work in the family business. Though Plasticine would become best known as a children’s play material, Harbutt first concocted it as a serious tool for his adult sculpture students: clay could be hard to work and dried too quickly. So Harbutt began experimenting in a makeshift laboratory set up in the basement of the

Harbutt was a popular, generous and genial boss who managed to create a happy, convivial atmosphere at the Plasticine factory. He arranged annual outings, bussing managers, workers and families out to Henley or Maidenhead for a steamer cruise along the Thames. By tradition, everyone wrote their seat number on the tyre of the bus (possibly with a Harbutt’s roadmarking

crayon – which you can see on display in the Museum of Bath at Work). The fortunate person whose number was nearest the ground when the bus stopped won the contents of the kitty. Though he walked with a limp, Harbutt vicariously encouraged the high-spirited playing of ball games outside the factory during lunch breaks – tolerating broken windows, and extending the break if the winner hadn’t been decided yet. He occasionally sent staff home early during fine weather to make the most of the sunshine. He also made the Harbutt family boat available on the canal at lunchtimes. And during harsh winters he’d extend lunch breaks to allow skating on the frozen Kennet and Avon Canal beside the factory. A family man, he was teetotal, a regular churchgoer, and benevolent to local charities, giving over part of the factory premises as a clubroom for Bathamptonians. A man of conviction and principle, with a genuine sense of civic service, he was a local parish councillor and stood for election to Somerset County Council in 1907 with the manifesto: ‘I ask you to send me to the council not to rule but to serve, having no belief in the birthright privileges of a governing class.’ Harbutt was also a tireless promoter and astute marketer. Plasticine was originally


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INDUSTRIAL | HERITAGE

PATER FAMILIAS: opposite page, a 360 degree photographic portrait of William Harbutt, courtesy of the Museum of Bath at Work, Julian Road This page, William Harbutt at a summer fete surrounded by Edwardian girls and right, the Harbutts factory next to the canal, frozen over in December 1925 Below, a bright advertisement for Plasticine Inset, the lovable children’s character Morph, created in Plasticine

produced only in grey, but a rainbow of colours soon emerged, once its potential as a children’s toy became obvious. Harbutt wrote pamphlets and books to explain the benefits of his product. And, from the very beginning, he travelled widely for promotion, demonstrating in up to four schools a week. As Plasticine went global, the travelling ramped up too; in 1908, Harbutt and his daughter Olive undertook an extended tour of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the US, giving more than 140 demonstrations in under 12 months. And it was on a selling trip to New York that Harbutt unfortunately caught a chill and died of pneumonia on 1 June 1921, aged 77. His body was returned to Bathampton, and he is buried within sight of the old factory in the churchyard at St Nicholas’ Church. After William, further generations of Harbutts continued in the family business, updating production, diversifying and expanding. They

ventured into early character merchandising in the 1930s with Disney and Enid Blyton. Business boomed after the Second World War when, after years of grey austerity, children responded eagerly to its pop of colour. But the 1960s brought disaster when the factory burned down in the bitter winter of 1962/3. Ironically, it wasn’t neglect but an electrical fault in new equipment that caused the problem. The fire brigade arrived to find hydrants and the canal frozen solid. And, by the time they’d accessed water, the original 200-yearold mill was totally destroyed – as was production machinery, countless artefacts and records, including the original formula. Astonishingly, Plasticine-making resumed after just three weeks, though it took a year to rebuild the factory and return it to full production. Production finally moved away from Bathampton in 1983 when the doors of the Plasticine factory closed for good. n

ANNIVERSARY PARTY The Museum of Bath at Work has arranged a day of celebratory events at Bathampton Village Hall on Saturday 17 June, starting at 10am with a day-long programme of entertainment for the people of Bathampton to mark the 120th anniversary of its origins in the village, the original Plasticine village, including: • Plaque unveiling: a newly installed plaster cast of a plaque featuring William Harbutt’s head will be revealed • Plasticine workshops and competitions for all ages, plus Plasticine-sculpting competitions for primary and secondary-age kids, plus mums and dads • Cake-baking competition on the theme of Bathampton, Plasticine Village • Aardman screening: the day will be capped off with a free screening of an Aardman film William Harbutt impersonator, Doc Watson, will act as master of ceremonies and Jess McKillop – executive producer and head of CGI production at Aardman Animations, Bristol’s Oscarwinning claymation studio – is to judge the competition entries. Further details available on the Museum of Bath at Work website: bath-at-work.org.uk.

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Review spa June.qxp_Layout 1 23/05/2017 16:30 Page 1

CITY | SPA

IT’S PLAYTIME FOR GROWN-UPS A new suite of themed hot and cold rooms and a fresh menu of treatments provides the perfect excuse to revisit the Thermae Bath Spa, reckons Georgette McCready

H

ow many of us have forgotten the art of play? To be a like a child and lose ourselves in the glorious physical present, forgetting everything but the fun we’re having? Ladies and gentlemen, I can direct you to a place where grown-ups can discard their worries, albeit temporarily, with their clothes and their phones, and rediscover the simple pleasures of playtime. A visit to the Thermae Bath Spa should really be on every Bathonian’s wishlist. For all its busyness – and it can get very busy at popular times – like the Eiffel Tower or St Mark’s Square in Venice this is one of those memorable to-dos in the city. And if you have been once, the spa has now provided you with two fresh excuses to return: namely a new Wellbeing suite and a whole set of newly developed treatments. The middle floor of the building has been completely revamped. Out go the old dome steam rooms surrouding a central shower, and in their place is the Wellbeing suite, with five separate chambers and a much more pleasant shower area. You’ve got three floors to choose from in the spa building and the biggest decision you’ll face is which order to try everything. I admit that my favourite place is up on the rooftop pool, where you wallow in delightfully warm water even on the chilliest of English summer days. It’s fun to point out familiar Bath landmarks, as close as Bath Abbey and then as far away as the trees on Kelston mound. It’s also a good reminder of how the city is surrounded by verdant green hills and woodland. It’s easy to lose yourself in day dreaming in the rooftop pool, but even easier as you drift along the lazy river section of the pool on the lowest level of the spa building. A gentle current carries you round and, if you grab yourself a float, your emotional age will go back in time to maybe eight or nine. You’ll spot middle aged people with childish grins on their faces as they float past. The middle floor, where the new Wellbeing suite is, invites you to try the Roman style steam room, presided over by a giant mosaic head of Minerva on the wall, which looms at you out of the steam, or sample a faux Georgian steam room with images of a country garden. An infra red room provides a more gentle heat and there’s an ice chamber, where you can dare each other to cool down your limbs by rubbing ice cubes into your skin. I found the celestial relaxation room pretty trippy. You lie on mosaic tiled loungers while a big screen takes you on a psychadelic journey through space and the planets, all accompanied by music. The Bath link is that

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TIME OUT: free from phones, spa visitors chat in the Minerva steam room, or lie back in the celestial relaxation lounge

William Herschel, astronomer, discovered the planet Uranus while living in Bath. A tad tenuous perhaps. Still, it made us smile. Along with the new Wellbeing suite there’s a range of new treatments which have been devised by the therapists who work here, and who know how people respond to different treatments and what they like to benefit from them. There is a menu of five themed treatments to choose from, according to whether you want to be comforted, restored, uplifted or calmed. I figured a restorative Perfect Pick-Me-Up (priced at £98 for 85 minutes) sounded exactly what I needed. I quickly discovered, without giving the game away, that my therapist didn’t know I was a journalist. She was very attentive, utterly calm and set about gently ensuring that I was able to relax and enjoy the whole experience. If you’ve never experienced this sort of treatment before it may take you a while to surrender mind and body to the process of relaxation, of ceasing to worry and fidget. A thorough exfoliating scrub, followed by an energising wrap (don’t worry it’s not claustrophic, just soothing) and a head massage all help aid the relaxation process. The spa uses the Aromatherapy Associates British range of products and the rich essential oils of pink grapefruit, rosemary and juniper berry smelled divine and felt nourishing on the skin. The last inner circle of relaxation nirvana was achieved with a traditional tension releasing pressure massage before I was very gently led to the relaxation lounge. You could go back in the water after this, I was

told, as the oils are deep in your skin, but I had planned my session at the spa to end with dinner in the restaurant. You’re free to wear your street clothes or your robe and slippers in the restaurant, where although the atmosphere is of a healthy, light-filled space, they don’t skimp on portion size or deny you a nice glass of wine. I enjoyed a Thai green chicken curry with rice while John had an enormous bowl of fresh pasta. We drifted off into the evening, replete and happily, healthily tired. A Twilight Package for two people is £88, Monday to Friday (you’ll need to book as Friday evenings are particularly popular). You’ll get three hours to spend in the spa complex, a robe, towel and flip-flops are included in the price, and the latter you can take home. A main course and a drink each is also included in the package. To book at the spa visit: thermaebathspa.com, tel: 01225 331234. n


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Jane Bobby Mak.qxp_Layout 1 26/05/2017 11:20 Page 1

HEALTH | & | BEAUTY

R E V I EW

LIGHTEN UP Jane Miklos gets the perfect summer look, with a little help from Bobby Mak Hair

If you have been thinking about getting rid of an annoying or unsightly skin lesion then we can help you • Removal of single or multiple skin lesions • • Simple, surgical procedure using local anaesthetic • • Delivered by highly experienced local doctors • • Convenient ‘one-stop’ appointment including consultation and procedure •

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fter several years of sterling effort tending my totally unremarkable locks, my hair stylist recently hung up her hairdryer for pastures new, leaving me on the lookout for someone else. I had heard several enthusiastic reports about Bobby Mak from friends and colleagues of various ages, both high and not so high maintenance, so when my roots became too much to bear I booked in for a ‘refresh’. In common with other independent salons in Bath, Bobby Mak is found on the first floor of a Georgian building and so without a shop window to peer into the first visit can seem like a step into unknown territory. Rest assured, the mood here is calm, relaxed and without the stark lighting that seem so unkind when you’re feeling exposed during long periods in front of the mirror. Most of the team have been working together for some time having formed when working at what was The Bath Hairdressing Company and there is a sense of close knit family here. I had dropped by a couple of days before my appointment for a quick consultation and colour patch test (vital before any colour treatment to test for allergy). My mid-length hair has been coloured a medium brown for many years and had been looking flat and oversaturated. Salon director Trevor suggested some highlights and a root touch up to brighten the look and avoid adding yet more colour to the ends, followed by a cut and finish to add some movement. On the day itself, Trevor briefly explained his plans to colourist Tori who suggested a light golden brown for the bleach highlights using Matrix colour. She then expertly applied the foils while I enjoyed a spot of people-watching from the salon’s bird’s-eye view overlooking Milsom Street and New Bond Street. She then dealt with the root re-growth to match my existing colour. A quick shampoo and condition and I was back in the stylist’s chair where I explained my flat-hair issues to Trevor once again and he got to work chopping in some layers and cutting off just enough to lift the style, adding some bounce and enhancing the colour. I’m not a fan of too much product but Trevor used some Muk brand volumiser and finished with Moroccan Oil Shine Spray, neither of which felt sticky or heavy but left my hair smooth, shiny and bouncy. It’s been so long since I had anything but monotone brown hair (with occasionally visible grey roots) and I’m loving both my new colour and cut. I’ve also received the seal of approval from some stern in-house teenage critics. The highlights are subtle but not invisible, giving a slight sun-kissed look and it’s not a myth that a slightly lighter shade can do wonders to warm up your skin tone, especially when the sun comes out. Something to consider if you’re off to the Riviera (French or Cornish) or simply hoping for a few summery days picnicking in the park. Half head highlights £65. Cut and finish (director) £50. Bobby Mak Hair Ltd, 15 Old Bond Street, Bath, BA1 1PB. Tel: 01225 337245. n

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TheBATHMagazine 83


Walk June.qxp_Layout 1 22/05/2017 13:35 Page 1

THE GREEN WOODS LAUGH Andrew Swift heads to the edge of the Cotswolds, taking in views of a giant caterpillar, a visit to Pennsylvania and a walk along an ancient green lane

F

or our June walk we explore old tracks, lanes and holloways at the Cotswolds’ southern edge. Although the countryside it passes through is largely unspoilt, however, it does encounter six busy roads, which need to be crossed with patience and care. The walk starts seven miles north of Bath in Doynton, best reached by heading over Lansdown and through Wick. Once there, you should find on-road parking near the Cross House Inn (BS30 5TF) – now happily reopened after long closure – or the church. Having parked, head south east along Toghill Lane opposite the church (ST720740). After passing the old brewery on the corner of Watery Lane, Tarmac turns to gravel and high hedges rise up on either side. Beyond Babwell Farm, gravel turns to mud and the climbing starts in earnest. The climb is eventually rewarded by a view to the left – the first of many – as the hedge falls away to reveal fields sweeping away to the far horizon, with a thin line of blue hills in the distance. A few yards further on, you reach the A420 (ST 726727), the old coach road from Bristol to London, and the building down to your right is the Royal Oak Inn, closed in 1894. Cross, go through a gate and, as you head up a track, the views open up westward. At the top, cross a stile by a gate, carry on through a seven-bar gate and carry on alongside a fence. After crossing a stile at the end, cross another busy road and turn right along a rough and narrow verge for 100m. Turn left along the drive to Hamswell House for a few metres before crossing a stile on the right (ST727720) and following a waymark diagonally across a field. Cross a double stile 84 TheBATHMagazine

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and carry on in the same direction. As you continue to climb, you cannot see the other side of the field. Little by little, though, as you approach the crest of the hill, the views southward towards Bathampton Down and the Westbury White Horse unfold, while, on your right, the caterpillar of trees on Freezing Hill comes into view. Cross a stile and, as you follow a hedgerow downhill, a view of the Swainswick Valley opens up below. After 300m, go through a kissing gate (KG) in the hedge and head down to the left of a cottage at the bottom. Go through a gate, cross a gravel drive, go through another gate and turn left along a lane. After 150m, just before Brook Cottage, turn left through a KG to follow a Cotswold Way (CW) waymark (ST734710). Carry on in the same direction through three fields, and, after crossing a brook, follow a CW waymark uphill past Hill Farm. Continue along the lane for 1,200m, before crossing a busy road and heading up the lane opposite. After 100m, carry on along another lane through the village of Cold Ashton (ST746725), passing a succession of ancient buildings, the highlight of which – Cold Ashton Manor – can be glimpsed behind a high wall on the left. Its ornate early 17th century gateway commands a view over the wooded valleys southwards, with Beckford’s Tower just visible. Beyond the manor is the old rectory, to which Sir Bevil Grenville was brought after being fatally wounded at the Battle of Lansdown in 1643, although the building was substantially altered in the 19th century. Turn left up a path to the church, whose squat 14th century tower is all that survives

of the original building, which was rebuilt in the 16th century. Go through a KG beyond the church and carry on to another busy road. Cross and turn left past the 17th century White Hart Inn, closed around 2010 and now home to an interior design company. After 100m, turn right to follow a CW sign diagonally across a field. Cross a step stile (ST746729) and head along a track to the buildings on the far side of a field. This is Pennsylvania, and, when you reach the road, you can see another lost inn, the Swan – now a B&B – beyond the petrol station. Cross the road with care and head up Bull Patch Lane opposite. After 75m, follow a footpath sign through a handgate on the left (ST743733). Keep close to the fence on the left, but, when it veers away, carry straight on, heading to the left of a row of conifers. When you reach them, bear right, keeping the fence on your left, and after 350m you will come to yet another busy road (ST738734). Cross over, go through a handgate and head straight across a large field. After about 250m, the land starts falling away and the views open up to the north and west. You will also see a large hedge – or rather a long line of woodland – in the direction you are walking. As you head to the right of it and carry on downhill, the reason for it becomes apparent in the form of a steep drop on the other side. At the bottom of the field, turn right along the fence for a few metres before crossing a stile and following a waymark downhill. Carry on across a stile and head for the bottom right-hand corner of the field, where there are two KGs (ST731738). Go through the one on the right and turn left along a green lane, which, as you can see, is


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THE | WALK

FACT FILE ■ Length of walk: 7 miles ■ Approximate time: 3 – 3½ hours ■ Map: OS Explorer 155 ■ Refreshment stops: Cross House at Doynton. Open all day Tuesday to Sunday, closed Monday. Tel: 0117 329 5830, visit: thecrosshousedoyton.com

THE ROAD TO NOWHERE: main image, a green lane that ends abruptly in the Wiltshire countryside Opposite, views of undulating fields and woods enjoyed from Cold Ashton Manor

impassable in the other direction. If you were to hack a way through the undergrowth and force your way uphill, you would find, after about 300m, further progress impossible, for the lane ends in the middle of nowhere and has done for a very long time. That it once continued on seems indisputable, and, given the width of the lane, it was probably well used. But at some stage, probably when the land was enclosed, someone decided to close it off, and those who had walked or ridden it had to find an alternative route. Since then, what is left has become a lane without a purpose, a lane to nowhere – and a suitably evocative way to head back to Doynton. As you carry on down, you will see that the old lane is still well walked, and two gates have been installed where it crosses a farm track. Just beyond them a spring has

colonised the old track, and further down, where there are KGs on either side, rough stepping stones indicate where to cross. Head towards the KG on your right and work your way along a spring before crossing more stones across a brook to continue along the green lane. When you come to a gate, follow the lane as it bears left and turn right along a lane at the end. After 300m, when you come to a T-junction, turn right and retrace your steps into Doynton. Level of challenge: some climbing, several stiles and muddy sections. There are also six busy road crossings and fields where livestock may be encountered. n Andrew Swift is the author of On Foot in Bath: Fifteen Walks Around a World Heritage City and co-author, with Kirsten Elliot, of Ghost Signs of Bath.

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BATH | STONE

OUR CITY’S PRECIOUS RESOURCE Georgette McCready goes underground to Hartham Park near Corsham to find out how Bath stone is quarried

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ocally sourced is one of the buzz phrases of our time. We want to know that the cheese, ale and bread on our plate have been produced by artisans, keeping our food miles down, our local economy afloat and our conscience at peace. How many of us spare a thought then for the ultimate locally sourced, natural product – the Bath stone that has been used for centuries for the city’s distinctive honey coloured buildings? With the celebrations for the 250th year of the laying of the Bath stone foundations for the Royal Crescent ringing in our ears, now seems as good a time as any to take a look at where Bath stone comes from. In true Blue Peter presenter style I discovered that there’s a hive of activity at Corsham, where the Hartham Park underground quarry is currently cutting and excavating the ancient limestone in readiness for the homes being built at Holburne Park, the former Ministry of Defence site off Warminster Road, Bath. Stone from this quarry is currently being used in the restoration of Windsor Castle and stone from the site was also used in the Pump Room in Bath, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery and, in 2000, for the Queen’s Gallery extension at Buckingham Palace. I went to meet Simon Hart, managing director of quarry owners the Lovell Stone Group, where we left the bright early summer sunshine by the site offices off the Bradford Road in Corsham and climbed down a flight of 158 stone steps – the equivalent of a 12 storey building – underground to see the quarrymen in action. Simon’s family business owns four other quarries across the south west of England, taking over the rights to quarry at Corsham last year. I queried whether – given that we’re underground – this was a stone mine or a quarry and Simon explained that since Victorian times there is a legal and official difference between quarrying and mining. He said: “I am fascinated by the history of quarrying and of this site which is the oldest Bath stone quarry, being worked since 1810. In those days every piece of stone was hand cut and sawn. They used pickaxes and hand-held saws. Conditions for those quarrymen were incredibly tough. “It’s still a very harsh environment,” he added. “The men go down those steps in the morning for their shift and don’t see daylight for eight or ten hours.” While this is no tourist attraction, Simon does welcome visits from architects – “it 86 TheBATHMagazine

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helps them to see another part of the story,” he says. Before you descend into the earth visitors watch a safety film to remind them of the very real hazards faced in stone quarrying. The giant tunnels are precision cut with massive electric saws, the roof pinned at regular intervals and carefully monitored for any movement in the earth. Water levels are also watched and everyone who enters the mine is subject to a rigorous checking in and checking out process. Ventilation, naturally, is of prime concern to ensure the teams working in the dimly lit caverns get enough fresh air to breathe and fire is, naturally, the biggest concern after rock fall. As a result, in addition to ear defenders against the noise of machinery and masks to protect from the stone dust, each worker carries an emergency respirator as a precaution. Watching these skilled men in action handling the powerful machinery and vehicles like giant Tonka toys, you’re aware of the physically challenging environment they’re working in. Simon is proud that of the ten men working here, some have worked together for 20 years, forming a close-knit team and training the young apprentices in their multi-skilled tasks. “All the men are local. We have fathers and sons working for us and we’re proud to see the progression as youngsters join us.” There is a cosy mess room built underground, with electricity and running water and where the crews can take a break, use wi-fi and get a phone signal to the outside world. Fortunately, as the quarry tunnels all look similar to me, Simon knows his way around the maze and leads me through a small opening into an older set of tunnels, dating back to the early 19th century. The marks cut by hand are still clearly visible, there’s an old massive hand winch abandoned here, its top still embedded in the roof of the cave. And there, caught in the beams of our head torches, are graffiti and drawings dating back to the Second World War when the navy stored its munitions down here. Enormous blocks of stone, weighing nine tonnes or more, are winched up to the surface, from where they are bar-coded and taken off site by lorries to masons’ yards where the stone will be cut down to the appropriate size for use in construction. Some of that stone will end up at Holburne Park, where architect Robert Adam, said of his designs for the new site: “We believe that we are adding something new to the classical legacy of Bath, in the

same tradition as the Georgian era but interpreted for modern needs.” While it’s exciting to realise that this locally hewn stone is soon going to form part of someone’s house, I also wanted to raise the question of sustainability and to talk about the Combe Down case. In answer to the first question, Simon showed me the map of the existing tunnels that lie under Pickwick and the east of Corsham. The area is honeycombed with myriad workings, but he says, there is much much more scope to contine responsibly quarrying Bath stone. As for the historic Combe Down mines scandal, in which residents found their gardens, roads and homes literally undermined by unsafe caverns and huge sums of money had to be spent on filling in and shoring up, Simon assured me that careful attention is paid to distances between digging to retain full support. Waste rubble and loose stones have been packed in as filler and ballast once quarrying has been carried out. Each site is mapped and accounted for. “I’m happy to say that ours is a closely regulated industry and that we have enough capacity to go on producing Bath stone for future generations to enjoy.” The marketing pavilion at Holburne Park is open daily, its Bath stone facade and pillars made from Hartham Park stone. There will eventually be more than 200 homes. The first phase of 35 two, three and four bedroom homes is under construction, with prices starting at £480,000. The agent handling the property sales is Savills. n


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UNDERGROUND: Above, stone is hewn by skilled quarrymen at Hartham Park underground stone quarry Below, Managing Director of the Lovell Stone Group, Simon Hart with a branded block of Hartham Park stone, and far right, every piece of equipment has to be painstakingly taken down a shaft the equivalent of a 12-storey building

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CITY | INTERIORS

DESIGN INSPIRATION Bath interior designer Clair Strong has some suggestions for exhibitions and shows to inspire your own interior design journey

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he UK has always been something of a design Mecca. Our museums, galleries, festivals and conferences have been drawing huge crowds from all over the world for decades. And every year, there’s another new exhibition or trade show making waves in the design community. The wonderful thing about most of these events is that they’re not just for design professionals. Anyone with an interest in design is welcome; in fact, their attendance is encouraged. Design is for everyone and that’s the message I’m hoping to share with you. With that in mind I’ve put together a list of some of the best events for summer 2017. I’ve picked them based on their proximity to Bath so most are within driving distance and can be done in a day. ROYAL CRESCENT 250 Bath’s Royal Crescent turned 250 this year; the first stone of this iconic landmark was laid on 19 May 767. A series of events will be taking place throughout the year to celebrate the remarkable impact the Royal Crescent has had on the world of architectural innovation. The programme will include exhibitions, film screenings, concerts, talks and trails. This is an exciting and immersive way to learn more about the Royal Crescent. Find out more at: bathpreservation-trust.org.uk. HOUSE & GARDEN FESTIVAL, OLYMPIA LONDON, TUESDAY 21 – SATURDAY 24 JUNE This four-day festival is for interior design enthusiasts. Bringing together three lifestyle events; Grow London, Spirit of Summer Fair and The HOUSE Fair, House & Garden festival is a celebration of summer living. It’s a vibrant shopping experience with more than 550 brands (all handpicked by the House & Garden team) to discover. There will also be a fascinating series of workshops, talks and advice clinics during the course of the festival. Visit: houseandgardenfestival.co.uk. THE BRUTALIST PLAYGROUND, BATH, TUESDAY 27 JUNE – SATURDAY 9 SEPTEMBER “Part sculpture, part installation, all play!” are the words used to describe the exciting RIBA-commissioned exhibition coming to The University of Bath’s arts and creativity centre, The Edge, in June. The Brutalist 110 88 TheBATHMagazine TheBATHMagazine | |JUne DeCeMber 2017 2016

POPS OF COLOUR: room sets at the House and Garden Festival in London Below, from the 2016 Brixton Design Trail, We Stand As Living Monuments

Playground is the work of Turner Prize winners Assemble and artist Simon Terrill. It seeks to shine a light on the abstract, almostsculptural concrete playgrounds built in post-war Britain. This family-friendly exhibition runs from Tuesday 27 June to Saturday 9 September and admission is free. Go to: edgearts.org for more information. LONDON DESIGN FESTIVAL, SATURDAY 16 – SUNDAY 24 SEPTEMBER You could say I’m a bit of a London Design Festival evangelist; I’ve written about it for The Bath Magazine a number of times now. But for good reason: now in its 15th year, the festival has successfully positioned London as the design capital of the world. It’s a huge, all-encompassing event taking place over eight days across the whole of the city. There are hundreds of events to take in, from talks and workshops to huge trade shows and breathtaking installations; many of which are free. For the full programme and ticketing information, check out the London Design Festival website: londondesignfestival.com. SOMETHING GOOD, BRISTOL, FRIDAY 6 – SATURDAY 7 OCTOBER

Something Good is a new addition to the design festival scene. Based in Bristol, this two day event, which takes place over different venues, is “a celebration of creativity and the magic of the creative process.” Day one features a full programme of talks by creatives from a range of different disciplines, including designer Morag Myerscough, and is followed by an after party. On day two, you’re encouraged to get your hands dirty with workshops in papercutting, woodworking, letterpress and more. Talks and workshops are open to all; for more information head to: somethinggoodbristol.com. n


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CITY | INTERIORS

TACTILE TASSELS: above, one of the installations at Focus 16 at the Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour, where art meets design

SHARING A VISION: left, British designer Morag Myerscough will be speaking at the Bristol creative festival Something Good, which takes place in various venues around the city in October

FRESH IDEAS: The Smile was a rocking pavilion designed by architect Alison Brooks in association with Arup and set up last year near Tate Britain as part of London Deisgn Festival – this year’s festival takes place in September

Clair Strong Interior Design is a small, friendly, creative business based in Bath and London, providing services for residential and commercial clients. Visit: clairstrong.co.uk or contact: clair@clairstrong.co.uk.

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CITY | PROPERTY

IN AMONG THE TREETOPS

Greenway Crescent is Bath’s newest hidden gem, tucked away behind a wall above Bear Flat. Georgette McCready enjoys a tour of the show home

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hose clever Georgians used to pop a row of terraced houses on to a hillside with consummate skill. Look at all those delightful rows perched at odd points around Bath, such as Macaulay Buildings, Bloomfield Crescent or Widcombe Crescent. And in 2017, that tradition continues, with the creation of a new crescent of four townhouses built into the hillside off Wellsway, on the edge of Greenway Lane and overlooking the woods of Lyncombe Vale. It is the first crescent to be built in the city for more than 15 years. Work is just finishing on what has been a painstaking two year project for local family developers and builders Simon and Lisa Hatch of Hatch Builders of Bath (hatchbuilders.co.uk). The show home at Greenway Crescent is now open for viewings. I had first visited the site a few months ago to discover that the Hatches had launched themselves into an ambitious project which had involved demolishing a bungalow on the site and building five new homes into the slope, using an enormous gabion wall to allow the gently curved crescent of four homes to nestle into the hill. From the front they look like contemporary homes with integral garages and a first floor over them, but step inside and the light and spacious interior opens up over five floors. The show home, No 1, has been beautifully styled and furnished by Susanna and Chloe Temple of Blue Home at The Loft, of Bartlett Street. Theoretically the new owners could buy the whole house and contents as seen. Lisa and Simon, who have three children and understand the practicalities of busy working parents, have designed the houses to be as low maintenance as possible. Drive the car into the integral garage, open the door inside and you’re in the hallway. From here there are doors to a wet room – with a hand held shower as well as the overhead showerhead, which makes it useful for hosing down muddy dogs or children. Next door is the utility room, into which said dogs or children’s muddy kit or towels can be deposited for laundry, and down a short flight of stairs, all the shopping can be put away in the enormous kitchen-dining room. This room is a delight. It’s been practically designed with loads of cupboard and wall space, an island with a hob and a breakfast bar plus plenty of room for a full size family dining table. There’s even more space for a child to wheel about on a trike or for guests to mingle while the 90 TheBATHMagazine

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WHATEVER THE WEATHER: main picture, big doors unfold from the kitchen-dining room on to the terrace, with the treetop views beyond Left, a fuel efficient log burning stove adds a cosy glow to the main drawing room, pictured right Top, the view from the back garden and a dining table, invitingly laid out so people can envisage how the space could be used in the kitchen-dining room


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COMANDING POSITION: top, the view of the rear of Greenway Crescent Above, left, the kitchen has glass splashbacks and handle-free cupboard doors for easy maintenance Right, the master suite at the top of the house has a mezzanine space at one end for use as a dressing room, while the open plan bathroom occupies the other mezzanine floor The lavatory is discreetly hidden away behind a door in the master suite

hosts cook. And, best of all, on fine days a huge set of glass doors opens fully on to the terrace outside, the Pietra stone floor the same inside and out for continuity. It’s within conversation distance to sit on the terrace with a glass of wine while your partner prepares dinner and you sit back, soak up some sun and listen to the birdsong from the wood below. How many other contemporary homes in Bath can boast an English wood at the foot of their gardens? Views over this wonderful natural plot can be enjoyed by all the houses, although actual ownership and access (along with foraging rights for wild garlic, blackberries and firewood) will belong to Numbers 1 and 5 Greenway Crescent. The terrace, the first floor drawing room and master suite on the top floor all look out over the trees and the views from differing heights. There are balconies with glass panels to allow space for bistro tables and chairs to be set up to make the most

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of the peaceful surroundings. Those who love generous sized rooms will be delighted to find that the kitchen/dining room is not the only big space. The first floor drawing room is big enough for any family gathering or party and the main bedroom suite makes a king size bed look modest in this setting. This room has two mezzanine levels under the rooftop, reached by a few steps up from the bedroom, both of them open plan. One contains a glass fronted shower and a giant free-standing bath right under a skylight window, which can be opened so you would really feel you’re bathing by moonlight. The other mezzanine on the opposite side is a dressing room plenty big enough for even the most avaricious clothes collector. There are three more bedrooms, all doubles, with one them a large suite with its own en suite shower room. There’s an additional family bathroom, as well as the ground floor wet room, and on the ground floor an

additional bedroom, study or studio for those quiet hours of concentration. Ever thoughtful the Hatches have built walk-in cupboards all the way up through the properties which could be converted to carry a lift. They also decided on high grade astro turf for the lawn beyond the terrace, low maintenance hedging for privacy and easy-on-the-eye underfloor heating. Although you’re just a mile from Bath city centre, you really feel as though you’re in the heart of the countryside. And yet Bear Flat, with its eateries, shops and community buzz, is just down the road. No 1 Greenway Crescent is being marketed at £1.5m, to include an acre of wood, while No 2 has a guide price of £1.35m. Numbers 3 and 4 will go on the market shortly, followed by the detached woodland house which the Hatches are completing at the far end of the plot. Savills is the agent. To arrange viewings tel: 01225 474500, visit: savills.co.uk. n


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HOMES | GARDENS

Garden

NOTEBOOK

NEW ROOMS FOR THE CITY GARDEN To complement their extensive display of top-notch garden offices, posh sheds, summerhouses and gazebos; outdoor living space specialists, Garden Affairs have just launched an exclusive new range of garden rooms. With a contemporary concept that solves the problem of space constraints, especially in city gardens, the Linea range of modern Scandi style cabins are perfect for all uses, and comply with most planning guidelines and they look great too. For more details contact Garden Affairs on 01225 774566, or view their display centre at the Trowbridge Garden Centre, 288 Frome Road, Trowbridge, BA14 ODT. gardenaffairs.co.uk

LLOYD LOOM The new Neptune Chatto range is an outdoor collection that brings together the great British craft of Lloyd Loom with a canapé-style sofa shape. The continuous roll from the arms to the back make it a pleasure to lean back in, as well as a pleasure to behold. Practical and durable for alfresco living, it’s handpainted and will age over time to give rise to a more antique air. Available as a sofa, £1,260, and an armchair as shown, £725. Visit: Closa, Bristol Road, Chippenham Wiltshire, SN14 6NA. Tel: 01249 448731. closa.co.uk

TEALIGHTS AT TWILIGHT Romantic summer evenings in the garden can linger a little longer with the help of these green Kastehelmi votives from designer iittala. There’s a full range of this bright and very desirable glassware to be seen at Shannon, 68 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BD. Tel: 01225 424222. shannon-uk.com

SMART FENCING THAT LOOKS GREAT AND LASTS Colourfence garden fencing is available in a variety of colours and heights to suit your outdoor space. Your fence panels can be further enhanced with an attractive trellis in a matching or contrasting colour for an added touch of style. Colourfence is also built to last – capable of withstanding extreme winds and is virtually maintenance free. Tel: 01225 650 284 for details or visit: colourfencebath.co.uk

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THE BROADWAY BANANA BENCH

Teak garden furniture is synonymous with longevity. It is a dense, close grained hardwood that naturally contains high levels of oil – qualities which allow the wood to withstand exposure to extreme weather conditions and apart from the occasional clean requires very little maintenance. With a gentle curve and a scrolled back, and mellow wooden warmth, the Broadway Banana bench is just a small part of the great range of teak, woven and Aluminium garden furniture to be seen at the Boniti showrooms. Visit Boniti, Dunsdon Barn, West Littleton, ( nr J18 M4) SN14 8JA. Tel: 01225 892200. boniti.com


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HOMEFRONT - INTERIORS -

Homewares Interiors Handmade Gifts Vintage Finds Chalk Paint T: 01225 571711 E: info@homefrontinteriors.co.uk 10 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath, BA1 2LP homefrontinteriors.co.uk

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OLD-FASHIONED CHARMERS Jane Moore delights in the lesser know pelargonium varieties

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all me old fashioned but I love a nice display of geraniums. I don’t mean the proper hardy geraniums so beloved of cottage gardeners, although I do love them to distraction. No, I mean the big, bold pelargoniums that you see just about everywhere during the summer, bursting effusively from hanging baskets and council displays. I know what you’re thinking – they’re so passé, so very parks department. I can sense delicate shudders of disapproval resonating throughout Bath, but hear me out. For, as with all plants, its how you use them that counts, and to my mind pelargoniums have their place. Just use a little imagination and they can be things of great majesty and beauty. A LITTLE HISTORY The rise of the pelargonium is all down to the Victorians. They championed these reliable and cheerful plants for their sturdiness and sheer flower power, developing new varieties and creating new ways to use them. As the public park and the seaside became essentials of Victorian life so did the displays that went with them and so the modern pelargonium – and the council parks bedding display – was born. NOT SIMPLY A PELARGONIUM What we think of as bedding geraniums are actually zonal pelargoniums and these are brilliant for flowers all summer long. Some of 96 TheBATHMagazine

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the colours are a bit much, although I’m a great fan of a good shocking pink and the bright, blood reds look fantastic in terracotta pots or old olive oil tins, channelling a little of the Mediterranean holiday on the British patio. And who doesn’t love a trailing ivy leaf pelargonium in a window box or basket? But it’s the scented leaf ones especially that attract me, along with some of the regal and decorative varieties too. These are finer, more elegant and to be savoured in more delicate ways. Rather than relying on them for a splash of colour like the zonals, these daintier plants should be allowed to go solo, or mix gently with others of their kind and the more delicate end of the bedding spectrum such as soft cosmos, cottagey nemesia and tiny flowers such as bacopa. DEFINING MOMENT My whole pelargonium argument can be encapsulated in just one name, one variety which tipped the balance for me in my student days so very long ago – Lord Bute. Even now Lord Bute fills me with wonder, flowering fabulously in the greenhouse as I write, its large, almost black flowers rimmed with the brightest shocking pink. Just one potful is enough to make you stop and stare. “Everyone always comments on how lovely Lord Bute is,” says Julie Dolphin of The Nursery at Miserden, a fan of all things pelargonium. “But there are so many other good ones to choose from.”

BIG AND BEAUTIFUL Julie grows a good selection of pelargoniums in her charming walled garden nursery in the Cotswolds triangle between Stroud, Cirencester and Cheltenham. But for sheer flower power she tends towards the regal pelargonium varieties with their larger flowers and lush foliage. “The regals are so big and blousy and they look great in pots and containers. I love to see them lined up in terracotta pots indoors on a windowsill or in a conservatory or out on the patio,” she says. These love warmth and shelter and need regular feeding as they can be a bit shy of flowering. Julie advises feeding every time you water with a high potash feed such as tomato feed to keep them happy. My pick of the regal and decorative types, besides Lord Bute, is Mystery a lovely deep velvet red with darker centres which looks great in pots. One of Julie’s favourite is the exuberant Margaret Soley which has large lavender pink flowers highlighted with a deeper rosy red blotch on the upper petals. And we both agree that Pompeii, a new variety to me, has great potential with its dramatic frilly petals in deep purple edged with white. “I like the rich colours and their bushy habit just lends itself to containers,” says Julie. I don’t tend to plant them with other things but I like to cluster them together in groups of similar colours. You can chop and change them around that way.”

BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL: main picture, the eyecatching Ardens pelargonium Opposite page, pink Clorinda, Pompeii, edged with white and an array of candy bright pelargoniums in the greenhouse


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SWEETLY SCENTED My gardening is as much influenced by my nose as it is by my eyes and I will take any chance I can get to add scent to the garden so scented pelargoniums tick several boxes. As a consequence I have what my deputy Anna would probably describe as a motley collection of scented pelargoniums in the greenhouse, all somewhat neglected and misshapen but all flowering their little socks off anyway. These are probably my favourite group of all pelargoniums and I am by no means alone. That doyen of gardening taste Sarah Raven offers numerous cultivars and collections while Julie’s enthusiasm knows no bounds. “The scented varieties are simply stunning,” she says. “Although the flowers may be small and insignificant they are

beautifully dainty and delicate compared to the big, blousy regals.” Julie happily sings the praises of even the daintiest bloomers such as Royal Oak with its aromatic oak shaped leaves and pale mauve flowers and the delicately scented Deerwood Lavender Lass which has arching sprays of mauve flowers above compact mounds of foliage. I’m a fan of the beautifully named Attar of Roses which has a wonderful rose scent and lovely clusters of pale pink flowers According to Sarah Raven it also lasts brilliantly in a vase which is something I will definitely try. My last word is for Clorinda, a real beauty with scented leaves and surprisingly large – for a scented variety – glowing rose pink flowers and vigorous bushy growth. This lovely variety was bred in 1907 which just goes to show

our gardening forebears knew a thing or two about long-lasting pelargonium appeal. Suppliers: The Nursery at Miserden, Miserden, Stroud, Gloucestershire GL6 7JA. Tel: 01285 821638, email: info@miserdennursery.co.uk, web: miserdennursery.co.uk. Fibrex Nursery, Honeybourne Road, Pebworth, Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire CV37 8XP. Tel: 01789 720788, email: sales@fibrex.co.uk, web: fibrex.co.uk. Sarah Raven, tel: 0345 092 0283, email: info@sarahraven.com, web: sarahraven.com. n Jane Moore is the award-winning gardening columnist and head gardener at The Bath Priory Hotel. Follow her on Twitter: @janethegardener.

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the directory

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SELLING YOUR PROPERTY? Choose an estate agency that will promote your best interests If you are currently thinking of selling your property, then consider using one of The Bath Magazine’s featured estate agencies to give you the best possible promotional coverage. Our estate agents advertise with us as part of a bigger selection of print and online marketing which means your property is presented to the highest standard and will reach the greatest audience.

Bath’s Biggest Magazine

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PROPERTY | HOMEPAGE

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unkerton is approximately 6 miles south of Bath and a half hour drive from Bristol Airport. Situated in the heart of the village, Millham House is a gorgeous period home approached via a timber five bar gate and down a long private driveway. It stands in around two acres of south facing gardens with the Cam Brook running alongside. The internal area of the house is 3106 sq ft/288 sq m with an outbuilding of 674 sq ft/62 sq m so there is plenty of room to spread out. The linear layout of the ground floor includes a large, elegant sitting room, double reception hall, cloakroom, spacious handmade kitchen/breakfast room with Aga and a utility room. Leading off the kitchen is a beautiful dining/garden room which has under floor heating and is perfect for entertaining and family occasions. On the first floor there are 4 generous bedrooms including the master which has an en suite bathroom and dressing room. There is also a large family bathroom at this level. The second floor houses bedrooms 5 and 6 complete with another complete bathroom. The waterside gardens come with riparian rights and there is a two storey double garage for parking and storage. This idyllic and picturesque home is marketed by agents Pritchards. Pritchards, 11 Quiet Street, Bath. Tel: 01225 466225

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MILLHAM HOUSE DUNKERTON • Waterside property set in two acres with riparian rights • South facing • Spacious and beautifully maintained • 6 bedrooms • 3 bathrooms

Guide price: £1,650,000


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pritchards-bath.co.uk

Great Pulteney Street An elegant and particularly impressive 3 bedroom maisonette, with garden, parking and garage, in one of the most prestigious streets in the city. The exceptionally light and well balanced accommodation offers a seamless flow throughout, and enjoys direct access to a delightful south-facing private walled garden with views to the Bath skyline, yet is only a few minutes from the centre of the city. Internal area approximately 2612 sq ft 243 sq m.

Guide Price: £1,400,000

Monkton Farleigh A beautifully presented 4 bedroom property dating back to the 1600s (not Listed) having retained many period features set within this sought after village. Secure ample off street parking Pretty gardens to side and rear. Kitchen with Aga. EPC F Approx house area: 2000 sq ft/185.8 sq m.

Offers In Excess of £699,950 11 Quiet Street, Bath BA1 2LB

Tel: 01225 466 225

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THE POWER OF PR Peter Greatorex, managing director of The apartment Company

Most independent estate agents in our area rely on local and online advertising only to promote their homes for sale

Y

es, these are essential elements of the marketing mix, but buyers come from afar, not just locally, so properties need to be marketed nationally too, to ensure they are seen by as many people as possible.

In today’s market, Public Relations (PR) plays a vital role in helping us to achieve national exposure, yet its often left on the wayside by small estate agents. Understanding its value, we maximise every opportunity we can to secure multiple viewings and the best price for our sellers with our unique PR service, so that we can target the national press and their individual websites. Often mentioned in property articles within the likes of the Daily Telegraph, Evening Standard, Country Life and The Times, this widespread exposure ensures we are not just marketing homes on a local level, but targeting the lucrative London and International markets on a national level too.

Crafting beautiful homes in stunning locations Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswold | Dorset

Articles could be about the Bath property market, listed homes or an individual apartment steeped in history. Our PR consultant, who has worked for some of the world’s best property companies, chats with us regularly to find the good PR hooks of our apartments and our area. She also talks to key property journalists daily to find out what they are writing about as well as suggest ideas on behalf of The Apartment Company. The results have been phenomenal. One of our homes on Walcot Parade for example has already been in The Guardian and the Daily Telegraph. In addition, a recent mention in The Times for a home on Henrietta Street led to several enquiries from London and overseas buyers. We then sold the apartment well in excess of the guide. PR is such a powerful marketing tool, promoting apartments in a much more subtle way than advertising does. Unlike advertising it’s free, and it’s far more valuable to prospective buyers who value reading something which has been written by a journalist over a property advertisement composed by an estate agent.

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk

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As an independent estate agent, this additional service is very unique for our area and further enhances our marketing offering for our clients. For more information about how we can help promote your home to the widest possible audience via PR, please do get in touch. The Apartment Company: Email Pg@theapartmentcompany.co.uk or call 01225 471144.


Marchant House, Southgate A contemporary two bedroom apartment situated in a recently completed development right in the heart of Bath, just a stone’s throw from a wide array of restaurants, shops and Bath Spa railway station. Finished to a high standard throughout, the apartment has two good sized bedrooms and a stunning open plan living space.

Rent: £1,295 pcm* entrance hall | light and spacious open plan living room | fully fitted contemporary kitchen | bathroom | two good sized double bedrooms | en-suite shower room | communal courtyard gardens | city centre location Reside Bath | 24 Barton Street Bath BA1 1HG | T 01225 445 777 | E info@residebath.co.uk | W www.residebath.co.uk

*An administration fee of £420.00 inc. VAT applies.

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PEOPLE | IN PROPERTY

A VOICE OF REASON: Robin Phillips, partner in residential property at Mowbray Woodwards

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PEOPLE | IN PROPERTY

ADVOCATE ON TWO WHEELS Robin Phillips, partner in residential property at Mowbray Woodwards, talks to The Bath Magazine about his legal career and his love of music and motorbikes

What significant changes, for better or worse, have you seen in the house buying and selling process over your career? I guess the introduction of what I call conveyancing factories and online conveyancing firms has been one of the big changes. There’s a world of difference between dealing with local solicitors and these conveyancing factories in some B&Q type warehouse. With most of the Bath solicitors I know and trust, I can pick up the phone and we can sort things out between us. Whereas in these big conveyancing outfits you’re often dealing with inexperienced people using computer programs, who don’t always use common sense and nous and can make the whole process much more complicated than it needs to be. I find they can ask a lot of pointless questions which could be easily sorted out by the buyer going to the property

to see for themselves. If people ever ask me who they should use to do their conveyancing, I always suggest they use a local solicitor, as they have local knowledge and you can go in and see them, or drop papers off for them. The other big change, which I deeply regret, is the cuts in Legal Aid. There are very few firms offering Legal Aid now as it’s uneconomic to do.

When the Prime Minister stopped wearing a tie I took my cue from him and stopped wearing them too. I am grateful to Tony Blair for that

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ou started out in criminal law, but what made you move into property law? I came to Bath in 1989 from London after completing my legal training there. I started in Bath with Thrings and Long and then went to Macfarlane Guy, working in criminal law. We were based over what was then Pizza Hut in Kingsmead Square. I came to Mowbray Woodwards getting on for 20 years ago. I started out as a defence solicitor then became a higher court advocate, then I started to do more prosecuting, covering all kinds of cases like prosecuting postmen stealing money out of birthday cards. This was always a family firm, run by Douglas, Max and Guy Woodward and they were beginning to let non-Woodwards become partners. As a criminal lawyer you’re never in the office, you’re always dashing off to the police station or in court, and as I was becoming a partner in the firm I wanted to get more involved. I had been doing criminal law for more than ten years and I think I was in danger of becoming burnt out. There are only so many nights when you want to be called out to the police station at 3am, then have to go into work the next morning. So I moved into property law. It’s rewarding, although you don’t get quite the same dinner party stories to tell as you do with criminal law. I find property law more stressful as people have very high expectations and you’re trying to manage people’s expectations, which can be unrealistic. Generally in criminal law your clients’ expectations are much lower and more easily managed.

What makes your team special and why do you enjoy working at Mowbray Woodwards? Well I have been here 20 years . . . I know law firms have a reputation for being stuffy but we pride ourselves at Mowbray Woodwards on being approachable. I like to think people come to me and the team at Mowbray Woodwards because we’re experts in our field, we’re efficient and easy to work with. We have a good team here and we have a laugh. Things have changed in the last 20 years. I have told my younger colleagues about we used to smoke in the office – just imagine how unpleasant that must have been for people who didn’t smoke. I gave up many many years ago. I’ve pretty much given up wearing ties as well. I always keep one in the office to put on if I’m meeting new clients and they might expect a tie. Say what you like about Tony Blair, but when the Prime Minister stopped wearing a tie I took our cue from him and stopped wearing them too. I am grateful to Tony Blair for that. If you had the power what changes could be made to improve Bath? I have lived in Bradford on Avon with my family since 1996 and we’re happy there, with our house and we have some good friends. So I commute daily into Bath from home, which is very near St Laurence School on the Bath side of town. I also sit as a judge on tribunals and although I usually arrive by bike I sometimes need to take the car.

Mostly I commute into Bath by motorbike, but when I bring the car in it can take me 45 minutes to get from the slip road on the A46 by-pass to my desk in Queen Square. The other evening it took me over an hour in the car to get home. It was gridlocked along the Paragon. So, if I could, I’d do something about Bath’s traffic problems. Would I use a park and ride on the eastern side of Bath? Yes, probably. Although this topic is something of a hot potato, so I am not sure where it should be sited. And if there were a park and ride I’d want the proviso that there would be a fast moving dedicated bus lane all the way in. I would sooner sit in my car in a traffic jam than on a bus in a traffic jam. What do you enjoy doing in your spare time? I’ve always had motorbikes, since I was 16. My pride and joy is a 1941 BMW R12, which I’ve recently acquired. It’s been fully restored and is really very nice. I’ve also got a modern BMW for commuting and a Harley Softail deluxe. I don’t tend to go for long journeys on the bike these days. An hour is about as long as I want to sit on a motorbike. My other passion is music. I collect records and CDs – I currently have around 6,000 CDs and records, covering all genres of music including classical, jazz, rock and pop. I think it’s a pity that there’s now only one record shop in Bath. When I first came to the city there were lots of good places. I use Spotify, but mostly to audition music to see if I like it. And if I do I will then buy it on vinyl or CD. My family are also music lovers. My wife Selina sings in a choir and my son Isaac and daughter Phoebe are in an indie band, Wasuremono (which means ‘something left behind’ in Japanese). Isaac plays the drums in the band and Phoebe the bass. They recently did a gig at Komedia and have had airplay on Radio 6. Isaac is studying music in Bristol and Phoebe is a graphic artist and works in a record shop in Bristol. I enjoy live concerts and had tickets for Georgie Fame and for pianist Brad Mehldau as part of The Bath Festival and recently saw Martin Simpson at Chapel Arts. We’re very lucky that we live within walking distance of the Wiltshire Music Centre in Bradford on Avon, so we regularly go to concerts there. We saw Clare Teal recently. My wife also sings there with the choir and I played a classical guitar duet there at the Bradford Roots Festival, which is a lovely family event. Further afield, I’m excited about going to see Steely Dan when they tour the UK in October. n

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Leighton Road, Bath • • • • • •

£475,000 Ivy Cottage, Southstoke OIEO £425,000

3 Bedroom detached family house Upper Weston No onward chain Dining room with doors to the garden Lovely views over the Cotswold Way Off-street parking

Crowe Hill, Limpley Stoke • • • • • •

• • • • • •

£498,000

1930s semi-detached property Wonderful views across the Avon valley 4 double bedrooms, bathroom with shower Sitting room with doors to rear patio and garden Open plan kitchen/diner Loft suitable for conversion

2 Bedroom period cottage over three floors Newly renovated Stunning countryside views and walks Lovely kitchen/dining room with views Sun terrace in the rear garden Period charm and character

Upper East Hayes, Bath • • • • • •

£315,000

An excellent, 1 bedroom, top floor apartment Grade II Listed Georgian building Close to the city centre Period features Dual aspect lounge/dining room Permit free on-street parking

enquiries@nashandcobath.co.uk www.nashandcobath.co.uk Tel: 01225 444 800

NASH & CO


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Bear Flat Shakespeare Avenue, Bath, BA2 ÂŁ825,000

A stunning family home within 50 meters of the gates to Alexandra Park. Three reception rooms, four bedrooms, bath and shower rooms, ground floor WC, balcony, front and rear gardens and stunning views. Energy Efficiency Rating: F

SSTC

Newbridge Rosslyn Road, Bath, BA1 ÂŁ535,000

This house is an extremely well presented 1930's semi detached home with three bedrooms. Accommodation includes two reception rooms, kitchen/ breakfast room, mature rear garden and off street parking. EPC: D

Bear Flat sales 01225 805680 Newbridge sales 01225 809685


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Camden Beaufort Place, Bath, BA1 ÂŁ625,000

Central Belvedere Bath, BA1 OIEO ÂŁ650,000

A three bedroom, grade II listed Georgian house, with two reception rooms, Kitchen/diner and a lovely walled garden. This charming property has real character and a cosy, yet spacious feel. Beaufort Place is a terrace of painted cottages in the heart of Larkhall, an extremely popular area on North East side of the World Heritage City of Bath. EPC: N/A

A beautifully presented grade II listed Georgian townhouse in Bath city centre. The home is spread over four floors and features a kitchen dining room, living room and three bedrooms. The vaults are converted to add a study and utility plus there is a small courtyard to the rear. EPC: N/A

Camden Road sales 01225 809868 Bath Central sales 01225 809571


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Entry Hill Park Bath • Large detached 1970s house in popular location • Four bedrooms • Additional two bedroom flat • Fabulous views • Good sized gardens • Garage and off-street parking • Sitting room has a balcony • Price guide: £750,000

ere’s a Bath home that would suit either a family of three generations, or perhaps the parents of boomerang kids – those adults who left home to go to university but end up returning to the family nest while they save to buy an elusive home of their own. This 1970s detached house in Entry Hill Park with some of the best views in Bath, has four bedrooms in the main part of the property but also benefits from a separate two bedroom apartment downstairs. This would be ideal for elderly parents, or an elder and their live-in carer, or for younger generations to enjoy their own space, allowing the middle, squeezed generation breathing room to enjoy their new-found freedom too. It’s an interesting house, as you enter at street level but take a short flight of steps up to the main living area, the spacious pine kitchen/diner and sitting room, which enjoys a west facing balcony, from which to drink in the views. The three main bedrooms, shower room and bathroom are below the living space, while on the first/second floor is a fourth bedroom, or study, and a dining area. The flat is at the back of the house, with its own entrance. Because it is self-contained it is subject to separate council tax from the main house. It has an open plan living room, some 20 feet long, a double bedroom, bathroom, kitchen and a single bedroom. The gardens at Entry Hill Park have been designed for ease of maintenance, with a walled bed at the front and to the side and back mainly gravelled areas with shrubs. There’s off-street parking for several cars and an integral garage. It’s in a quiet cul-de-sac and Sainsbury’s is near by.

H

Mark Naylor, 1 Hayes Place, Bear Flat, Bath. Tel: 01225 422224


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k Mar r o l y a N

local • trusted • independent

Wellsway, Bear Flat, Bath • Beautifully finished Victorian property • Planning Permission to create 2 parking spaces to rear. Reference - 16/05775/FUL

☎ 01225 422 224

Price £625,000 • Generous rear gardens • 4 bedrooms including large, en-suite attic bedroom

• Highly recommended • Heart of Bear Flat location


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CUTTERIDGE BARN, North Bradley

£1,250,000

A spacious and attractive Grade II listed barn conversion with three holiday cottages set in approximately three acres with extensive outbuildings in a popular rural area. EPC Rating: Exempt Grade II listed


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ELM LODGE, Colerne

ÂŁ650,000

Period four bedroom home located in the sought after village of Colerne. Comprises the following accommodation: drawing room, sitting room, dining room, kitchen/breakfast room, bathroom, garage, parking and gardens. EPC Rating: E


®

Green Park

offers in excess of

£625,000

A beautifully presented three bedroom apartment. Situated in central Bath, and forming part of a grade II listed Georgian townhouse. Recently refurbished, providing spacious accommodation with contemporary features including stylish kitchen and bathroom fittings. Grade II listed · Georgian townhouse · Three bedrooms · Second floor · Beautifully refurbished · Far reaching views · Private parking · Large communal garden · 930 Sq ft

Great Pulteney Street

offers in excess of

£550,000

Featuring the grand Georgian architecture for which Bath is renowned, this immaculately presented two bedroom courtyard apartment, primly situated opposite the Holburne Museum and historic Sydney Gardens. The stunning interior has been recently redecorated and is situated just a short walk from Bath City Centre. Georgian · Central location · Lower maisonette · Newly refurbished · Two bedrooms · Courtyard · Vault · 884 Sq ft

SALES

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LETTINGS

01225 303 870

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®

Equus House

Offers in access of

£700,000

An exceptionally beautiful two bedroom ground floor apartment, occupying one of Lansdowns premium positions on Baths popular Northern slopes. This stunning contemporary accommodation has been finished to the highest standards. Bespoke architectural design · Contemporary finish · Stunning views · Two double bedrooms · Large garden · Secure gated driveway · Private parking · 1367 Sq ft

Holburne Place

Offers in access of

£700,000

An immaculately presented three bedroom maisonette with the benefit of gated entrance and private parking. The apartment boasts high specification and quality of finish throughout. This is central living in Bath as its very best. Newly refurbished · Three double bedrooms · Immaculately presented · Central location · Private gated entrance · Covered parking space for two cars

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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®

Lyncombe Hall

offers in excess of

£475,000

This impressive maisonette is situated on the southerly side of the city and is ideally situated being just a 5-10 minute walk to the City Centre and Bath Spa Train Station. Beautifully presented and boasting far reaching views, with stunning communal gardens and own garage. Viewing recommended. Grade II listed · Two double bedrooms · Beautifully presented · Excellent views · Communal gardens · Garage · 1280 Sq ft

Percy Place

offers in excess of

£475,000

A super two bedroom garden apartment offered with its very own private south facing garden and summer house. You’ll be able to soak up the last of the evening rays surrounded by the sophisticated Georgian architecture. A large vaulted wetroom and original inglenook fireplace add to this period gem. Grade II listed · Georgian · Two bedrooms · Large wet room · Large private garden · Original features · 882 Sq ft SALES

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LETTINGS

01225 303 870

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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®

Brook Street

offers in excess of

£400,000

We are delighted to bring to the market this beautifully presented second floor apartment. Set in one of Bath’s most prestigious locations, Brock Street links the Circus with the Royal Crescent. If you are looking for centre living in a premium location, look no further. Grade II · Georgian · Prestigious address · Period features · Large bright living space · Second floor · 603 Sq ft

Ladymead House

offers in excess of

£210,000

Pretty, bright studio apartment, Ladymead House is a mainly Georgian property and set around one of Bath’s largest private gardens that slopes down to the banks of the river Avon. Newly decorated, the apartment offers cleverly balanced living space with contemporary charm. Georgian · Newly refurbished building · Studio apartment · Communal gardens · Far reaching views · Central location · 282.7 Sq ft

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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®

Camden Crescent - Penthouse

per calendar month

£1,600

A superb two double bedroom Penthouse Apartment in a newly refurbished Grade II listed Georgian substantial townhouse. Situated on the northern slopes of Bath with breathtaking views over the City. The Penthouse is offered with the WOW factor and comes Highly Recommended. Unfurnished · Grade II listed townhouse · Panoramic south facing views over the city · Two double bedrooms · Central location · Tenant fees £420 inc VAT

Alexander House

per calendar month

£1,395

Brand new luxury third floor, two bedroom apartment set on the banks of the River Avon. Beautifully maintained communal gardens and allocated secure underground parking space. Unfurnished · Private balcony with river and city views · Two double bedrooms · Secure allocated parking space · Beautifully maintained communal gardens · Tenant fees £420 inc VAT SALES

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LETTINGS

01225 303 870

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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®

Bennett Street

per calendar month

£1,150

A beautifully presented and spacious two double bedroom top floor apartment just moments away from the City Centre where Bath’s finest restaurants, historic attractions and shops are located. Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · Central location · Tenant fees £420 inc VAT

Spencers Belle Vue

per calendar month

£950

Newly refurbished and conveniently located two bedroom apartment with spectacular views. The apartment comprises a sitting room that leads through to the luxury fitted kitchen, a double bedroom with a second bedroom on the internal third floor and bathroom. Unfurnished · Two bedrooms · Fabulous views · Communal front garden · Tenant fees 420 inc VAT

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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The Bath Magazine June 2017  

The Bath Magazine is Bath's biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath. No body does Bath better.

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