Page 1

Bath_Mag_Cover V2_December.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 15:25 Page 1

ISSUE 207 | DECEMBER 2019 | thebathmag.co.uk | £3.95 where sold

SPIRIT OF THE SEASON Vintage made modern in our festive fashion shoot CHRISTMAS ROUND-UP

SNOW-TIME MUSIC

STREET SCENES

Sparkly what-to-dos BathPhil perform Peter Brown and and where-to-gos Rupert & the Frog Song his new show at all around the city and The Snowman Victoria Art Gallery

HIDDEN TREASURES

Try your hand at our treasure hunt with an arts theme

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O NTHLY GUIDE TO LIFE AND LIVING IN BATH


Nicholas Wylde dps.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:01 Page 1


Nicholas Wylde dps.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:02 Page 2


Boniti DPS.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 16:03 Page 1


Boniti DPS.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:03 Page 2


Sofa Smith FP.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 17:00 Page 1


Ben Argent FP.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:05 Page 1


Contents dec.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:20 Page 1

60

Contents 5 THINGS

44

40

December 2019

.......................................................................

10

Essential events to look forward to this month

VINTAGE VARIATIONS

..................................................

....................................................................

BATH AT WORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Neill Menneer’s portrait of decorator David Babb

40

............................................................

44

.................................................................

46

TAKE TWO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52

54

......................................................................

Peter Brown – a.k.a. Pete the Street – talks to Emma Clegg about his show at Victoria Art Gallery .....................................................

deceMber 2019

|

72

Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

iSSUe 207

............................................................

90

Jude Higgins explains the writing technique of flash fiction and treats us to two examples

HOW WILL YOUR GARDEN GROW? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110

THE PROPERTY PAGES

113

...............................................

Bath’s finest homes to buy or rent

Melissa Blease meets Freshford Food Co’s head baker Rachel Milsom and samples some of their home-cooked artisan goodies

|

Catherine Pitt investigates the history of St John’s Foundation, once St John’s Hospital

Jane Moore forecasts next year’s trends for gardens

STREET PERFORMER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

8 TheBATHMagazine

88

Andrew Swift follows the trail of Bath’s public houses

The latest art exhibitions from around the city

More content and updates online: thebathmag.co.uk

..........................................................

A MERRY WALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104

Georgina Southam finds films with a strong family narrative at The Little Theatre Cinema

FUNKY FRESHFORD

Simon Horsford tries out the shooting simulator at Wadswick Country Store in Corsham

INSIDE STORIES

Jessica Hope puts the glitz into everyone’s Christmas with a round-up of all the events and festivities

CITY ARTS

SHOOT TO THRILL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86

TAKING UP ALMS

Melissa Blease talks to Jason Thornton about the upcoming festive performance of The Snowman at The Forum

FESTIVE FUN

76

30

Our guide to the top events happening around the city

IT’S SNOW TIME

.....................................................

Catherine Pitt raids the museums and art galleries of the city and challenges you to take on this year’s treasure hunt

Past glamour with a modern refresh – one-of-a-kind fashions shot on location at Lucknam Park Hotel and Spa

WHAT’S ON

ARTS UNDERCOVER

ON THE COVER

Outfits from our vintage fashion shoot on page 30, with photography by Jay McLaughlin, taken in the library at Lucknam Park Hotel and Spa.

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine


Bo Concept fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 16:48 Page 1


Editors Letter dec.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 17:09 Page 1

EDITOR’S PICKS EQUESTRIAN STYLE

How would you like to dress up like a fairy tale prince or princess this Christmas and ride away to the end of the rainbow? Why, simply find an outfit at Vintage to Vogue on Milsom Street and then visit Lucknam Park and Spa’s equestrian centre. See our Weekend in the Country fashion shoot on page 30 to discover more.

from the

EDITOR Editor photograph by Matthew Sterling

I

’m holding very tight, I’m riding in the midnight blue...” The Walking in the Air song and the animated film of Raymond Briggs’ 1978 children’s book The Snowman capture like nothing else the feeling of Christmas. Magical, dreamlike, free-spirited, brimming with warmth, the film and the musical score burrow down through all the paraphenalia of the season to capture its pure atmosphere. It’s good news for those that agree, as the Bath Philharmonia will once again be playing the score live to the animation on 21 December at The Forum. Melissa Blease chats to Jason Thornton, music director and principal conductor of Bath Philharmonia, on page 44 about his role and the upcoming performance, which also includes Rupert and the Frog Song. The spirit of the season is also heralded in thrilling style by our fashion pages on page 30, produced in creative collaboration with specialist clothes store Vintage to Vogue. Here you will discover a host of dazzling vintage outfits, shot at Lucknam Park Hotel and Spa, with an unashamedly modern vibe. The message here is that upmarket vintage apparel – from Ossie Clark to Alexander McQueen – is ripe for reinvention. Visit Vintage to Vogue on Milsom Street to find your own vintage glow. Jessica Hope has rounded up the brilliance of the season with her Christmas events guide on page 46 – it’s all on offer from mulled wine and ice-skating to brass bands and illuminated trails. And thinking ahead to your Christmas storecupboard, Melissa Blease talks to Rachel Milsom, head baker at the Freshford Food Co, on page 72 and samples some of the company’s small-batch, home-cooked artisan goodies. On the gallery front, local artist Peter Brown has a new one-man show at Victoria Art Gallery, Bath Is It, and I took to the streets (also known as his studio) to talk to him about his plein air paintings, why Bath is amazing and why it’s always better to be outside, even when it’s snowing – see page 60. Our December pages are brimming with gift ideas. You’ll also find a selection of magazines on page 64 from specialist retailer Magelleria that will offer plentiful diversion during the holiday. And there are more ideas in a bottle from wine columnist Tristan Derby on page 66. Finally, try our arty Christmas treasure hunt on page 76 – if you can unravel the answers, you’re in with a chance of a visit to Le Vignoble to sample their liquid wares. Whether you’re escaping to the Highlands or hunkering down at home this holiday, don’t forget the mistletoe! Emma Clegg Editor

All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

10 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207

WE’RE SO LOOKING FORWARD TO...

...when the panto comes to town! Star of stage and television Wendi Peters is set to play Fairy BonBon alongside Jon Monie as Louis La Plonk (who has also authored the script) and Dame extraordinaire Nick Wilton in this year’s magical, award-winning pantomime, Beauty and The Beast, at the Theatre Royal Bath from 12 December to 12 January. theatreroyal.org.uk MISTLETOE

Mistletoe (Viscum album) is an evergreen plant with forked branches and pairs of symmetrical evergreen leaves that grows on trees including willow, apple and oak. In winter it produces clusters of pearlescent white berries which are favourites with hungry birds such as thrushes. The tradition of hanging it in the house goes back to the time of the ancient Druids.

ILLUSTRATION BY JAN HOPKINS The Bath Society of Botanical Artists; bsba.co.uk

nights lengthened, went darker, brightened ❝The in their clustered stars. The chilled air smelled of woodsmoke, of distances and passing time. ❞ JAMES CARLOS BLAKE (b.1947)


Project1_Elmore 297 x 210 +3mm 19/11/2019 14:28 Page 1


5 things, Bath Dec 19.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 17:07 Page 1

5

ZEITGEIST

things to do in

December

Soar

Walk It may be getting chilly outside, but a good walk is the best way to blow away the cobwebs this winter, so wrap up warm this month and head out on a guided tour of the deer park at Dyrham Park. Tours take place every day at 11am and 2pm in December, apart from Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Meeting at the visitor reception, the tour will finish at the house. Suitable shoes essential. Free event, but normal admission to the property applies; nationaltrust.org.uk/dyrham-park

DeceMber 2019

Be it as Nicky Hutchinson in Our Friends in the North, Maurice in The A Word or as the ninth Doctor, one man in life and death has accompanied actor Christopher Eccleston – his father, Ronnie. In his new book I Love The Bones Of You, Eccleston unveils a vivid portrait of a relationship that has shaped his entire career trajectory. Now he is coming to Christ Church in Bath on 5 December, 8pm, to talk about his career highs and lows and the impact his father has had on his life. £10 early bird/£20 includes book; toppingbooks.co.uk

|

iSSUe 207

Now it wouldn’t be Christmas if we didn’t see James Stewart running through the snow shouting “Merry Christmas, you wonderful old Building and Loan!”on the big screen, would it? If you’re like us, then you’ll be glad to know that the Little Theatre Cinema is holding special screenings of It’s A Wonderful Life on 16, 18 and 19 December with carols, mulled wine and mince pies. There will also be standard screenings on 22 and 24 December; picturehouses.com/cinema/littletheatre-cinema n

Snowman Enterprises Ltd. The Snowman by Raymond Briggs is published by Puffin, thesnowman.co.uk

Some of the top comedians on the circuit are heading to Bath this month for a seasonal show sure to get you giggling. US stand-up sensation, co-star and co-writer of Channel 4’s multi-award-winning hit comedy Catastrophe Rob Delaney will be headlining, before fast-rising Taskmaster and Have I Got News For You star Phil Wang provides his latest material. Also in the line-up is Edinburgh Comedy Award winner Rose Matafeo, and Mock The Week’s resident pluckyscamp and one half of the popular Off Menu podcast Ed Gamble will host. Takes place on 14 December, 7.30pm at The Forum. Tickets £20/£25; bathforum.co.uk

|

Listen

Watch

Laugh

12 TheBATHMagazine

Bath Philharmonia will once again be bringing a double bill of classic film scores to life this Christmas to get the whole family in the festive spirit. The 40-strong orchestra will perform Howard Blake’s beautiful music live to a screening of Raymond Briggs’ animated masterpiece The Snowman on 21 December, 3.30pm, at The Forum. As well as this, Bath Phil will be presenting its first ever live performance of Rupert and The Frog Song featuring Sir Paul McCartney’s massive hit We All Stand Together. Tickets £22/£14. If you need any more inspiration for what to get up to over the festive period, turn to page 46 for more ideas; bathphil.co.uk


Mandarin FP Bath.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:06 Page 1


My Bath Dec.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 17:10 Page 1

The city

ist

THE BUZZ THE BUZZ

My BATH

Choir leader Grenville Jones founded the Goldies charity which puts on fun singing sessions for the elderly. His passion is to get people of all ages singing and he leads seven choir rehearsals each week

SouthGate success

SouthGate has received national, regional and local recognition for being one of the leading retail and leisure destinations in the region, with four award wins in just one month. The centre received a Britain in Bloom Award for the recent investment in Brunel Square and its Bee Kind initiative during the summer which featured 12 metres of bee-friendly plants and an insect hotel. SouthGate also picked up gold trophies at the South West in Bloom and Bath in Bloom Awards for its floral displays throughout the summer, as well as a gold Bath BID Business Award for the investment in its public spaces. southgatebath.com

Historic dams revival

I have lived in Bath for almost 50 years. I was born and bred in Swindon – my parents moved there from Yorkshire. My great grandfather was Welsh, which I think contributes to my love of music. Bath is a special place and those of us who live here are very fortunate. I love the buzz in Moorland Road where there is always a friendly face to chat to. There are lots of coffee choices, a warm welcome from the boys in the Panahar, the new community library, and Kay at the pet shop, my daughterin-law’s mum! I was brought up in a Methodist family with music at its heart. Singing hymns around the piano on a Sunday night with my parents, sister and friends installed in me my love of harmony which I will be forever grateful for. I recently spent a brilliant week in Boston with Bath Male Choir where I saw the superb soprano Ailyn Pérez singing Mimi in La Bohème. Any aria sung by her would be top of my current list of favourites, followed by Billy Joel singing Piano Man. Every one of my choirs is special and I choose the music that I know they will enjoy singing and performing. With seven choir rehearsals each week, I’m always looking for new music.

Structural and engineering works to restore Prior Park Landscape Garden’s 18th-century dams has begun. The works will see the garden’s historic structures strengthened, an empty lake refilled, paths reinstated and the return of a small cascade. The project will fall into three phases, with the main engineering works expected to take most of 2020. The final landscaping phase will see the planting of 18th-century inspired trees and shrubberies, and the restoration of the iconic reflections of the Palladian Bridge. The contractor is Alun Griffiths Ltd, a leading civil engineering and construction company. The garden will remain open throughout the works. nationaltrust.org.uk/prior-parklandscape-garden

14 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMber 2019

|

As a choirmaster, it’s important to understand that the social aspect of singing in a group – the fun, the friendships – are as important as the singing, and to have a sense of humour. I founded the Goldies charity 12 years ago with just four daytime sing-along sessions for older isolated people in Bath. There are now almost 200 across England and Wales, led by 67 dedicated freelance session leaders. Thousands attend their Goldies session wherever it might be. The music is based on the memory-evoking hits of the 50s and onwards. Everyone loves a good sing-along! We also have a Goldies shop in Keynsham. In terms of music provision, there is something for everyone in and around Bath. There are probably more choirs in Bath than in any other city in the UK.

issue 207

Singing hymns was a very important part of my early life, and they are a great learning facility for choirs. My auditioned Bath Chorus choir can be seen on my site hymnsearch.co.uk – I hope that this will help people to enjoy the beautiful melodies that are an intrinsic part of our religious heritage. I embrace music of all types, but I am first and foremost a lover of harmonies, whether it be the Beach Boys, The King’s Singers or a brilliant chorus of a hundred voices. I took part in the BBC One series All Together Now last year – it was great to be asked to be one of the 100 judges and it reminded me of the days spent with my Bath Male Choir and the BBC’s Last Choir Standing series all those years ago. It was huge fun, and I booked a couple of the acts to come to Bath. Most importantly I met my new northern pal Ged Thompson, the man with the braces. The sudden appearance of Katherine Jenkins at a Cardiff school to announce that the Goldies charity had won the prestigious National Lottery Awards in the education category was a special moment. I am a big fan of hers and have had the privilege of working with her on stage. The award was for our First World War primary schools project and I was honoured to be invited to attend the National First World War Service in Westminster Abbey last November. I have no plans to slow down any time soon. There are six new Good Afternoon Choirs planned in 2020, an exciting new tourist project for Bath, and 80 new Goldies daytime sessions across England and Wales. Why slow down when life is so enjoyable? Christmas is a hectic time as our ten Good Afternoon Choirs have Christmas concerts and my Bath Chorus, Welcome Choir and Bath Male Choir have performance dates too. I have other choir commitments, but I do love Christmas music, so it’s a pleasure to be busy. I will be spending Christmas Day with my lovely partner Jacky in London and am hoping to see my three sons, their families and my six very special grandchildren. ■ grenvillejones.biz


Project1_Layout 1 22/11/2019 12:43 Page 1


Richard Wyatt - Notebook.qxp_Layout 1 19/11/2019 10:22 Page 1

CITY | NOTEBOOK

Richard Wyatt:

Notes on a small city

Columnist Richard Wyatt recollects treading the boards one Christmas past... Illustrations by Brian Duggan

W

hat do we mean by a traditional Christmas? There are some generalised customs that the majority of us follow and transmit down through the generations. Most of us, for example, will put up trees and festive lights and overindulge in gorging chocolates, mince-pies and mulled wine. But what about the more intimate traditions that are special to individual homes? My elder sister and I always had to wait in bed while our parents – who we’d woken around 4am – went down to prepare the way. Dad lit a fire, mum made tea and then we gathered in the hallway – to wait for our grandmothers who were always the last down for the grand reveal. The living room door was slowly opened and there before our enchanted eyes was a sea of colourfully wrapped presents, delivered by Santa, spreading out from beneath our decorated and aromatic pine. The tree would kiss the ceiling, glowing with all the colours of the rainbow and radiating the warm magic of that first memory of each Christmas Day. There’s another seasonal tradition that kicks in a couple of weeks before the big day that has helped build up the excitement for young and old since Victorian times. Pantomime! This year’s offering at Theatre Royal Bath will be the 18th annual event that actor and general funny man Jon Monie

Richard in Babes in the Wood as the Sheriff of Nottingham

16 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMber 2019

|

has appeared in. However, it’s the first he’s actually written, from prologue to walk down. The story of Beauty and the Beast will no doubt have youngsters enthralled, but I wasn’t so sure it qualified as a traditional panto. Jon told me the problem is that many of today’s youngsters are not up-to-speed with the stories behind productions such as Mother Goose or Babes in the Wood. If Disney has turned fairytale into film, however, kids will know it. That’s certainly true of the story of beautiful Belle and the handsome prince turned into a monster by a vengeful witch. I was a little miffed about the Babes panto reference, as my only claim to professional theatre fame was treading the boards in 1989 in that very pantomime at Theatre Royal Bath. Little star-struck me then rubbed shoulders with real pros like comedian, producer and writer Roy Hudd, the late, great Geoffrey Hughes, bin man Eddie Yates from Coronation Street and Onslow from Keeping Up Appearances. Also in the cast was Jack Tripp – then one of the best dames in the business, but he has sadly long ago exited stage right. Those old enough to remember me as ‘Young Richard’ on HTV West News will no doubt appreciate the irony of my being cast as the baddie, the dastardly Sheriff of

issue 207

Nottingham. This character gets put in his place by Robin Hood, the hero, played by New Seekers singer and actress Lyn Paul. Despite my lack of ‘evil’ experience, I rushed off-stage full of glee to tell everyone the first time l made a youngster in the front row cry. How’s that for acting? I was also supposed to sing my own version of Michael Jackson’s Bad while fronting the professional panto dancers. The boys and girls were there to ape my moves and join in on the chorus. Roy wasn’t that impressed with my singing efforts so I ended up speaking the lyrics – a bit like Peter Sellers’ performance of the Beatles’ Hard Day’s Night, delivered in the style of Laurence Olivier’s Richard III. Panto is often said to be a young person’s introduction to the theatre and I certainly hope my performance all those years ago won’t prevent anyone that was there from bringing their own grandchildren to enjoy this year’s offering. One lasting memory I took with me from my curtain call that Christmas was being told as I came off from my walk down in all my finery and black tights that l had the best legs in the cast. Merry Christmas! n Richard Wyatt runs the Bath Newseum: bathnewseum.com


Alexander May fp.qxp_Layout 23 21/11/2019 16:11 Page 1

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

I

n conjunction with Simon Harrison Jewellery and All We Are, this year’s windows at Alexandra May have a striking celestial theme. Stars feature prominently in storytelling, their appearance in the night sky often heralds an important event. All We Are have taken the folk tale of the “Star Coins” as the basis of the Taler Collection. Taler is German for coin, recognising the origin of the story. This is a story of a poor girl who is inspired by an act of kindness to give away all she has to others with greater need. Stars rain down and are turned to coins. The story’s message is that unconditional generosity will be rewarded. A perfect message for this season.

reflect light to dramatic fashion. The natural formation of ice crystals is chaotic yet precisely geometric. The structure of the Iceflow necklace and bracelet perfectly echoes nature’s fractal geometry. The segmented design allows each perfectly symmetrical crystal element to rotate freely, jutting out at randomly naturalistic angles.

Shine Bright

The morning frost has star like qualities, gently twinkling in the early light. Simon Harrison is known for their bold use of Swarovski® crystal, each stone positioned by hand to refract and

These striking pieces of jewellery are best seen in person, you can explore the full ranges at Alexandra May on Brock Street, near the Royal Crescent. From gifts to show your love or a statement piece for the party season. There is perfect selection for you to shine bright this Christmas.

Find the wonderful Alexandra May store at 23 Brock Street, Bath, BA1 21W or view the collections online atwww.alexandramay.com

‘Aya Chandelier Pendant’ £99 available at Alexandra May

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 17


Roving reporter December.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 16:49 Page 1

Do good if you can

Our roving reporter celebrates the community spirit behind so many Bath projects

I

Ellis & Killpartrick Styling Opticians

18 New Bond St. Bath BA1 1BA T. 01225 466954 www.ellisandkillpartrick.com

18 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

issue 207

’m not going to talk about the elephant in the room, which is about to make a lot of noise and no doubt leave a trail of unpleasant mess in its wake on the morning of Friday 13 December. No, I’d sooner we focus on what binds us together rather than what divides us. Two brilliant events were held in Bath recently which demonstrate that there is a strong sense of community in the city and its surrounding area. Both events shone the spotlight on projects which show that people are looking after each other and making other people’s lives better. A new documentary A Roof Over My Head was made by local filmmakers Meaningful Films. It’s worth a viewing as a reminder of what’s going on to help the homeless in the Bath area. I’m not saying it’s going to make us feel any better when we walk past someone sleeping in a shop doorway, but it does show that loads is being done behind the scenes. The film introduced us to men who had found a purpose in living after they’d been helped to find a home and to the young mums learning about cooking and childcare in a hostel that has been set up as a real home from home. There was also a timely reminder, as we stepped out after the screening into torrential rain, that nobody chooses to sleep on the streets. It is categorically not a choice, but a series of unhappy incidents that finds someone’s brother, someone’s son or daughter with no safe place to call home. The depressing statistics are that there are more than 5,000 people on the waiting list for homes in Bath & North East Somerset, of which around 1,000 are acute cases. It’s also a salutary thought that this Christmas there will be families with children who will be forced to take gifts of food from the foodbank as their incomes are insufficient to pay the bills. The film also showed us the hopeful side to stories. It showed us teams going out in the early morning to take coffee to rough sleepers, to chat to them and see what can be done to help. It showed volunteers filling bags with donated food for local families. And some of the people whose lives have been turned around spoke to camera, giving their names and so strengthening our connection to them. The film screening was held at Komedia, to a packed house and it was supported by the brilliant St John’s Foundation. The following evening I attended the big reveal for next summer’s Bath Carnival. The 2019 procession was a joyous occasion, with more than 1,000 people of all ages dressed up and taking part and the streets of Bath lined with people enjoying the music and the spectacle. The good news is that Stu Matson, the carnival organiser, plans to run another event next summer, on Saturday 11 July, involving more community groups and more children. The bad news is that despite a small army of volunteers Bath Carnival still needs to raise around £50,000 for it to happen. And before you say ‘that’s a blooming lot of sequins and feathers’ there are lots of hidden costs, not least the sums required to close the city streets to traffic on the day. Bath Carnival’s spirit is about reaching out to all kinds of people and getting them involved. If, as a child, you ever dressed up for your village fete or rode on the back of your uncle’s lorry which was decked out as a carnival float, I’ll bet that stands out in your childhood memories. And it’s the same for kids now. If someone volunteers to run drumming workshops or to help children create their own carnival costumes, then they’ve given these children memories to treasure. My grandma used to have a big yellow chunky jug with two handles. It had a message painted in wobbly brown writing which said: ‘Do something. Do good if you can. But do something.’ I didn’t understand what it meant when I was a child, but I do now. That’s going to be my resolution for 2020. I’m going to do something. Good, if I can. n


Dents fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:06 Page 1


P20.qxp_Layout 22 22/11/2019 16:11 Page 1

CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS with a special gift

Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

See more online thebathmag.co.uk

Contact us: Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Editor Tel: Email:

Emma Clegg 01225 424592 emma@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Financial Director Email:

Jane Miklos jane@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Production/Web Assistant Georgina Southam Email: georgina@thebathmagazine.co.uk Assistant Editor Email:

Jessica Hope jessica@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Contact the Advertising Sales team tel: 01225 424499

9 ct white gold multistone pendant and earrings. Necklace: £525, earrings £455 ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING RINGS HANDMADE BESPOKE JEWELLERY REPAIRS AND REMODELLING

Advertising Sales Email:

Liz Grey liz@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Email:

Jenna Moris jenna@thebathmagazine.co.uk

MC Publishing Ltd. is an independent publishing company and publishes The Bath Magazine and The Bristol Magazine.

The Bath Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout Bath and the surrounding area. We also have special distribution units in the following city centre stores and coffee shops

9 Abbey Churchyard, Bath BA1 1LY 01225 460072

The Designer Collections 15 Northumberland Place, Bath BA1 5AR 01225 448823

jody@jodycory.co.uk | www.jodycory.co.uk

20 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207

2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Telephone: 01225 424499. Fax: 01225 426677 thebathmag.co.uk © MC Publishing Ltd 2019 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bath Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


Silver Shop fp.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 13:12 Page 1


Bath General Gifts page.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 11:27 Page 1

SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

Gifting like a star Scratching your head to think of the perfect Christmas gift? Here’s a few ideas to point you in the right direction... think stellar

Orion

1. Family photography session gift voucher, prices from £100. Jess Cheetham Photography; jesscheetham.com 2. Handmade in Bath, this knitted red strawberry hat is available in five sizes, £15. Up to Seven; uptoseven.co.uk 3. Silver gilt claret jug made in 1865, holding approx 2 litres, £2,250. Beau Nash, beaunashbath.com 4. Jeremy the Crocodile by Mari Mari. Measuring 101cm and made in organic cotton, £80. Spotty Herberts; spottyherberts.com 5. Christmas baubles, £12.95 each. Bath Aqua Glass; bathaquaglass.com 6. Sony A6100 + 16-50mm lens, £899.99. London Camera Exchange, Bath; lcegroup.co.uk 7. Sonos Move, battery-powered smart speaker, £399. Paul Green HiFi; paulgreenhifi.co.uk 8. Gift a new pair of glasses or sunglasses with a voucher from Kathryn Anthony Optometry; kathrynanthony.co.uk 9. Candle bowl by ceramic artist Gary Wood, £95. Waller&Wood; wallerandwood.co.uk

22 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMBeR 2019

|

iSSUe 207


P23.qxp_Layout 23 22/11/2019 14:35 Page 1

DESIGNER COLLECTIONS HANDMADE BESPOKE JEWELLERY REPAIRS AND REMODELLING 18ct white gold diamond cluster ring £899

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 23


Bath Fashion Gifts page.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 11:31 Page 1

SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

All wrapped up Thoughtfully chosen, luxury fashions and smart accessories make the perfect presents for our loved ones. Here’s our pick of the most covetable, wearable gifts

1. Fairfax & Favor Regina heeled boot (Tan), £345, Wadswick Country Store; wadswick.co.uk 2. Soft leather Hamilton gloves with cuff, £155 and soft leather and wool red tartan gloves, £125. Dents; dents.co.uk 3. Olivia von Halle Lila Zoda silk pyjamas, £420. The Dressing Room; dressingroombath.com 4. Merino Scarf in cream check. 100% merino lambswool, made in England, £35. Clandar; clandar.co.uk 5. Exquisite silk scarf by Patrick Morrison of Furious Goose, £130 (medium) or £270 (large). Alexandra May; alexandramay.com 6. Silver and turquoise stone-encrusted seahorse brooch, can be worn as a pendant, £125. Icarus Jewellery; icarusjewellery.com 7. Chloe ‘Vera’ sunglasses with graduated lenses, £256. Ellis & Killpartrick; ellisandkillpartrick.com 8. Secrid leather miniwallet with RFID protection for bank cards (available in a range of colours), £49.95. Quadri; quadri.co.uk 9. Tissa Fontaneda bag in very soft hand-crafted leather (available in black or smoke grey), £595. Kimberly of Bath; kimberly.co.uk Ursa Major

24 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

iSSUe 207


P25.qxp_Layout 23 20/11/2019 12:15 Page 1

Want to get something a little different this year for the makeup fanatic in the family?

Check out our range of creative makeup classes taught by inspirational film & TV industry professionals. Your makeup world will be changed forever! office@bammakeup.com • bammakeup.com • 01225 331315

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 25


Bath Jewellers Gifts page.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 11:33 Page 1

SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

Set to sparkle ‘Tis the season to be sparkly and Bath’s jewellers are some of the best in the land, offering a variety of perfect pieces to dazzle and delight. Here’s our festive wishlist – an inspired celebration of what awaits in their showrooms

1. Multi-coloured sapphire and diamond ring set in 18ct rose gold, £7,245. Mallory Jewellers; mallory-jewellers.com 2. 18ct white gold with black and white diamonds, £5,500. Orton Jewellery; ortonjewellery.co.uk 3. 18ct white gold and diamond snowflake pendant, £795 (not inc. chain). Sterling silver cufflinks, £285. Nicholas Wylde; nicholaswylde.com 4. Textured pendants in silver and 9ct gold, £160–£390. Gold and Platinum Studio; goldandplatinumstudio.co.uk 5. 18ct white gold and diamond pendant, £1,480 and 9ct white gold, diamond and topaz stud earrings, £300. Jody Cory; jodycory.co.uk 6. Handmade sterling silver necklace, £315, matching drop earrings, £129, finished with gold vermeil. Quadri; quadri.co.uk 7. Aya Chandelier drop pendant necklace, £99. Alexandra May; alexandramay.com 8. Bumble Bee necklace with gold plating on sterling silver, £65 (matching items available). The Silver Shop of Bath; thesilvershop.eu.com 9. ‘Fat’ linked earrings in silver/gold-plate, £70. Tina Engell; tinaengell.com Cygnus

26 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

iSSUe 207


P27.qxp_Layout 23 21/11/2019 16:13 Page 1

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 27


P28.qxp_Layout 22 21/11/2019 11:01 Page 1

INTERIORS – ARTWORK – GIFTS

Most of our clothes are designed and made in our studio workshop here in Bath. We make and sell them exclusively in our shop on Pulteney Bridge. 01225 422333 info@uptoseven.co.uk 6 Pulteney Bridge, Bath BA2 4AX

OPENING HOURS Monday – Saturday 10am – 5.30pm Sunday 11am – 4.30pm

28 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207

POP UP SHOP Open until Dec 21st see website for details UPSTAIRS @ Maison Georges Larnicol Top of Union Street - BA1 1BN verveliving.uk

I

07785 332536


Clander fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:07 Page 1


lucknam park shoot V2.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 17:26 Page 1

THEATRE

A WEEKEND IN

THE COUNTRY “

Michael Boyd


lucknam park shoot V2.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 17:28 Page 2

VINTAGE | FASHION

Modern vintage

If you want to stand out this party season why not look back in time for one-off classics and bespoke tailoring? With vintage references all over the catwalk, let specialist clothing shop Vintage to Vogue inspire you to embrace a bygone era in a fresh and modern way Photography by Jay McLaughlin

Bright young things “Life is a privilege. Its youthful days Shine with the radiance of continuous Mays. To live, to breathe, to wonder and desire, To feed with dreams the heart’s perpetual fire.” Ella Wheeler Wilcox



OPPOSITE, left to right: Vintage sheepskin leather flying jacket worn with a 1960s Tootal scarf; 1970s cotton paisley print dress with faux fur boa worn with a 1950s wool felt trilby hat and Belmore Bordeaux leather boots by Duo Boots (£230); 1969 moss crepe and satin Ossie Clark long dress; vintage redskins leather jacket worn with 1960s Tootal scarf

➲ THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEmbEr 2019

|

ThEBATHmagazinE 31


lucknam park shoot V2.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 17:34 Page 3

VINTAGE | FASHION

At leisure “She was a phantom of delight When first she gleam’d upon my sight; A lovely apparition, sent To be a moment’s ornament.” William Wordsworth

 THIS PAGE: 1930s silk slip dress and 1930s silk kimono; and 1930s three-piece silk and embroidered lounge suit OPPOSITE: 1930s silk and lamé gown

32 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207


lucknam park shoot V2.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 08:52 Page 4

CITY | INTERIORS

WWW.THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

MARCH 2015

|

THeBATHMAgAzine xx

âž²


lucknam park shoot V2.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 08:57 Page 5

CITY | INTERIORS

xx TheBATHMagazine

|

MaRCh 2015


lucknam park shoot V2.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:00 Page 6

VINTAGE | FASHION

Evening ready “Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup, And I’ll not look for wine.” Ben Johnson

 OPPOSITE, left to right: Vintage military jacket worn with 1950s wool dinner trousers; Edwardian wool frock coat worn with 1930s wool dinner trousers and vintage Alexander McQueen cotton shirt THIS PAGE, RIGHT: 1930s silk crepe and lamé gown with fishtail BOTTOM LEFT, left to right: 1920s beaded flapper dress with red silk underdress; 1970s Bill Blass crepe and lamé long dress BOTTOM RIGHT: 1980s sequin and silk cocktail dress

➲ THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

december 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 35


lucknam park shoot V2.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:02 Page 7

CITY | INTERIORS

xx TheBATHMagazine

|

MaRCh 2015


lucknam park shoot V2.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:04 Page 8

VINTAGE | FASHION

Once upon a fairy tale “Let us write of olden, golden days and hunters of the Holy Grail and men called ‘knights’ riding horses in the rain.” Carl Sandberg

 LEFT, left to right: 1980s tweed fitted jacket worn with 1980s Celine houndstooth wool skirt, 1960s knotted tie and Thornbank boots in rustic brown leather by Duo Boots (£295); 1950s windowpane tweed thornproof suit worn with 1950s Paisley cravat

RIGHT, left to right: 1960s Donegal tweed jacket worn with 1950s pleated wool trousers, 1940s wool felt trilby and vintage Burberry knitted tie; suit as above OPPOSITE: 1930s panne velvet silk-lined opera cape worn with a 1930s silk slip dress and a 1920s beaded headpiece n



Credits

Clothes supplied and styled by Vintage to Vogue: Imren Lowin and Charlotte Melling vintagetovoguebath.co.uk Wardrobe assistant: Betsi Hughes Photographer: Jay McLaughlin jaymclaughlin.co.uk Hair and makeup: Frontlinestyle – Alex Morris for hair and Taya Redman for makeup frontlinestyle.co.uk Models: Freya Thomas, Rio Pennington, Laurie McCroddan and Will Moore, supplied by Gingersnap Models gingersnap.co.uk Boots supplied by Duo Boots duoboots.com Shot on location at Lucknam Park Hotel and Spa lucknampark.co.uk



THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEmbEr 2019

|

ThEBATHmagazinE 37


P38.qxp_Layout 22 22/11/2019 16:50 Page 1

HOMEFRONT - INTERIORS -

Homewares Interiors Gifts Cards & Prints Handmade / Local Artists Ethical / Sustainable Products T: 01225 571711 E: info@homefrontinteriors.co.uk 10 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath, BA1 2LP homefrontinteriors.co.uk | trouva.com

The Framing Workshop has been trading as an independent family run business on Walcot Street for over 28 years. We treasure you, our client, and spend time helping you to ďŹ nd the best way to display and protect your cherished objects, artworks and memorabilia. Creativity and respect for each artwork are core to what we do. Every picture tells a story. Come and share yours.

80 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BD Tel: 01225 482748 www.theframingworkshop.com framing@theframingworkshop.com

38 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207


P39.qxp_Layout 23 22/11/2019 12:24 Page 1

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 39


what's on - Dec 2019.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 16:19 Page 1

WHAT’S ON in December

BBC Young Musician of the Year Lauren Zhang joins Bath Philharmonia at The Forum

Ben Elton is bringing his tour to Bath

QUERCUS GALLERY WINTER POP-UP n Until 21 December, 11am–4pm, 7 Walcot Buildings, London Road Find Quercus Gallery at The Bath Framer’s former studio for a pop-up shop filled with a mixed display of artworks, jewellery, ceramics and textiles, and discover original pieces and gift ideas. THE MAGIC OF PANTOMIME n 2 December, 1.30pm, The Assembly Rooms In this talk hosted by The Arts Society Bath, lecturer Ian Gledhill will explore the history of the peculiarly British institution – the pantomime – from its origins in Italian Comedia dell’arte, through to the influence of 19th-century music hall, to the family shows that we see today. Visitors welcome, £10 on the door, no booking needed; theartssocietybath.com TEN TIMES TABLE n 2–7 December, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath Set in the once grand ballroom of The Swan Hotel, Alan Ayckbourn’s Ten Times Table follows the increasingly raucous attempts of a village committee to organise the first Pendon Folk Festival. The opening of the festival, as envisaged by chairman Ray, will be a supposedly uplifting pageant based on an incongruous piece of local history, The Massacre of the Pendon Twelve. But as the committee members break into two factions, their wrangling culminates in a scenario that mirrors the original event all too closely. £24–£38.50; theatreroyal.org.uk SETTLERS STORES POP UP n 3–10 December, 10am–6pm, Gray M.C.A, 5 Margaret’s Buildings Frome-based textile and clothing designers Settlers Stores are bringing their luxury 40 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeceMber 2019

|

tweed collection of men’s and women’s tailored country clothing and travel accessories to Bath for the first time. Marrying bespoke Scottish tweed with Dutch wax batik, they create an unexpected fusion of style and cultures, that takes inspiration from around the world, celebrates diversity and champions sustainability; settlersstores.co.uk WHAT IS IT THAT HUMANITY SHOULD NOT GIVE AWAY TO MACHINES? n 3 December, 7.30pm, BRLSI Dr Patrick Stacey will chart the darkside of technology, the compelling contextual forces at work which are reinforcing dark-side technology use, and he proposes that this is explained through a loss of human critique. £5/£2; brlsi.org RAT PACK OF OPERA n 3 December, 7.30pm, Homewood The number-one selling classical vocal trio Tenors Unlimited present their Rat Pack of Opera at the inaugural Christmas dinner concert at this country hotel, bringing their own blend of wit, humour, charm and vocal arrangements. £85 per person, includes three-course meal, half a bottle of wine and welcome drink; homewoodbath.co.uk COLLECTION HIGHLIGHT TOURS n 4 December, 1pm, Victoria Art Gallery Discover the stories behind the gallery’s principal treasures with Dr Chris Davies. Free, no need to book; victoriagal.org.uk THE REGENCY REVOLUTION n 4 December, 6.15pm, The Holburne Museum Professor Robert Morrison explores one of the most extraordinary decades in British history, delving into the lives of the Prince of

iSSUe 207

Maz O’Connor is heading to Chapel Arts Centre

Wales (the future George IV), Sir Humphry Davy, George Stephenson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and more who lived and made a name for themselves in the Regency period. Free, booking online; bathspalive.com BEN ELTON: LIVE n 4 December, 7.30pm, The Forum The godfather of modern stand-up returns with a new stand-up show which promises to try to make sense of a world which appears to have gone stark raving mad. £29.50; bathforum.co.uk NICK MACER: THINGS THAT TURN ME ON – CONFESSIONS OF A PLANT FREAK n 4 December, 7.30pm, University of Bath Gardening Club, East Building, University of Bath The founder of Pan-Global Plants, Nick Macer, has travelled the world to collect extensively for his nursery in Gloucestershire. He will be talking about why he is obsessed with plants, and which ones particularly excite him. £6 visitors, £20 membership; ubgc.org CANDLE MAKING WORKSHOP WITH HAZEL AND BLUE n 5 December, 10am–1pm, Homewood Join Becky Avery, founder of the Wiltshirebased company for a beginners soy candle-making workshop where you will be guided step-by-step through the candlemaking process before making your own. £69, includes two-course lunch with wine and coffee; homewoodbath.co.uk FETING THE FINNS – 100 YEARS OF INTREPID INDEPENDENCE n 5 December, 10.30am, Bath Pavilion This U3A in Bath talk will feature Christopher Massy-Beresford discussing


what's on - Dec 2019.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 12:54 Page 2

FILM SCREENINGS n Throughout December, The Little Theatre Cinema This month there’s encore screenings of The Winter’s Tale starring Judi Dench and Kenneth Branagh, showings of Noël Coward’s Present Laughter (with Andrew Scott), and there’s another chance to watch the National Theatre Live encore of Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s Fleabag. Also showing is a staged concert of Les Misérables featuring Michael Ball, Alfie Boe and Carrie Hope Fletcher, and a screening of the 2018 West End revival of 42nd Street. Plus there’s plenty of festive film screenings you won’t want to miss; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little

Finland’s geography, history, language and culture, and explore how in the 20th century it emerged on the world stage led by a handful of remarkable artistic and political personalities. Free for members, £2 non-members; u3ainbath.org.uk SCIENCE SHOWOFF n 5 December, 6pm, Arts Lecture Theatre, The Edge, University of Bath Science and comedy might seem like a strange mix, but Science Showoff is here to prove that science can be just as funny as any other topic. Hear from four of the funniest scientists around as they perform their brilliant stand-up sets. An opportunity to hear about the lighter side of research. Free; bath.ac.uk/events LAUREN ZHANG AND BATH PHILHARMONIA n 5 December, 7.30pm, The Forum Bath Philharmonia will be joined by BBC Young Musician of the Year 2018 pianist Lauren Zhang, who will perform Rachmaninov’s 3rd Concerto. Also on the programme is Mussorgsky’s Night On Bald Mountain and Anna Clyne’s epic Night Ferry. £5–£25; bathphil.co.uk DEAD MEN’S EYES: TWO GHOST STORIES BY M R JAMES n 5 and 6 December, 7.30pm, Rondo Theatre “Put it down, you fool! Do you want to look through a dead man’s eyes?” Hear two chilling and thrilling tales from M R James, the master of the English ghost story. £16/£14; rondotheatre.co.uk MAZ O’CONNOR n 5 December, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre Described as having “the perfect mix of youthfulness and gravitas” by The Guardian, critically acclaimed English singer and songwriter Maz O’Connor is bringing her solo tour to Bath following the release of her new album Chosen Daughter. £14; chapelarts.org LONDON AFRICAN GOSPEL CHOIR n 6 December, 7.30pm, The Forum The London African Gospel Choir perform the classic Paul Simon album Graceland in full live on stage as part of their UK tour. From £25; bathforum.co.uk NED PALMER ON A CHEESEMONGER’S HISTORY OF THE BRITISH ISLES n 6 December, 8pm, Topping and Co Booksellers Every cheese tells a story. Whether it’s a fresh young goat’s cheese or a big, beefy 18-month-old Cheddar, each variety holds the history of the people who first made it, from the builders of Stonehenge to the factory cheesemakers of the Second World War. Cheesemonger Ned Palmer will talk about his new book and handing out a few tasters and wine. £20 early bird/£30 includes voucher for the book; toppingbooks.co.uk

Continued page 42

➲ THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

December 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 41


what's on - Dec 2019.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 16:19 Page 3

WHAT’S | ON

Glenn Moore will be at the Rondo Theatre

SATURDAY SKETCHING n 7 December, 10.30am–12.30pm, Fashion Museum Get creative on the first Saturday of every month and draw the fabulous items on display in the museum’s galleries. Sketchbooks and pencils provided by Minerva Art Supplies. Free with museum entry; fashionmuseum.co.uk GLENN MOORE: LOVE DON’T LIVE HERE GLENNY MOORE n 7 December, 7.30pm, Rondo Theatre Glenn Moore (star of Mock The Week, The Stand Up Sketch Show and Absolute Radio), presents his first solo UK tour, full of the distinctive jokes and offbeat gags we’ve learned to accept from him. £12; rondotheatre.co.uk BINGO LINGO n 10 December, 7pm, Komedia The newest and most exciting breed of Bingo that’s sweeping across the UK. Expect miniraves, on-stage dancing, twerking, tacky prizes, pocket-money, and utter chaos. The evening consists of around eight games of three bingo boards with terrible prizes to be won, and one strange mother-of-all-prizes at the end. 18+. From £1; komedia.co.uk ELENA FERRANTE’S NEAPOLITAN QUARTET: THE POWER OF WOMEN’S WORDS n 11 December, 7.30pm, BRLSI Elena Ferrante’s quartet has enjoyed global success since its publication in 2012–15. The books tell a story of female friendship and creativity set against the last 60 years of Italian history. Dr Adalgisa Giorgio from the University of Bath will examine the novels with reference to the dilemma exposed by early feminists: how can women make space for themselves in institutions that are intrinsically masculine? £5/£2; brlsi.org LITERARY LUNCH: SALLEY VICKERS n 13 December, 12–3pm, Homewood Salley Vickers, Sunday Times bestselling author of The Librarian, will talk about her new book, Grandmothers, followed by a 42 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeceMber 2019

|

book signing and a two-course lunch with wine. £29.50; homewoodbath.co.uk IMPERSONATING THE POLICE n 13 December, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre Guilty as charged, Impersonating The Police are the UK’s finest tribute to The Police, consisting of friends Olly, Mike and Pabs who bring together their combined 75 years worth of touring, music production, and recording experience to produce a show that captures the music and energy of a live performance of The Police in their prime. £17/£15; chapelarts.org SUZI RUFFELL: DANCE LIKE EVERYONE’S WATCHING n 14 December, 8pm, Pound Arts Centre Suzi Ruffell has made a name for herself by turning tragedy and anxiety into big laughs. The last 12 months have been massive for Ruffell; a smash hit UK tour, heaps of television appearances including Live At The Apollo, Hypothetical, 8 Out Of 10 Cats and she has learnt how to make the perfect lemon cake. Go and see what all the fuss is about. 15+. £15; poundarts.org.uk UNTAMED BURLESQUE n 14 December, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre Watch what the brightest burlesque and cabaret stars from the south west and further afield have to offer as this special show returns for its third Christmas at Chapel Arts Centre. £18/£16; chapelarts.org TRIBUTE TO THE QUEEN OF SOUL n 15 December, 7.30pm, Bath Pavilion An uplifting concert bursting with all the greatest hits celebrating the music of Aretha Franklin, featuring the powerful and dynamic vocalists from Vocal Works Gospel Choir under the direction of Tim King and accompanied by musicians from the VW Soul Collective. £11–£16; bathboxoffice.org.uk INTRODUCTION TO WATERCOLOUR WOODBLOCK PRINTMAKING n 17–18 December, 9am–5pm, Locksbrook Campus, Bath Spa University

iSSUe 207

Salley Vickers will be talking about her new book at Homewood

Learn the basics of woodblock printmaking on this two-day course. Working from your own designs, which you’ll bring with you, you will learn to cut your woodblocks and make prints from them. All levels welcome; bathspalive.com WINTER WONDERBAND n 17 December, 8pm, Ring O Bells Maclaine Colston, Saul Rose, Jennifer Crook and Beth Porter team up once more to celebrate the music born out of our great British winter with their mastery of the dulcimer, melodeon, harp and cello. Expect great sing-a-longs, real foot stompers, beautiful ballads and lots of laughs. £12/£10; bathcomedy.com THE BOOTLEG BEATLES n 20 December, 7.30pm, The Forum The world’s premier Beatles show continues to draw critical acclaim for their immaculate note-perfect portrayal of the fab four’s journey through the swinging 60s. It’s all there – the costumes, the mannerisms, the witty banter and the period gear. With a little help from their Pepperland Sinfonia and featuring a special set to mark the 50th anniversary of Abbey Road, this multi-media concert has to be the year’s not-to-be-missed event for Beatlemaniacs. From £32.50; bathforum.co.uk CLYVE – FUNKY CHRISTMAS SPECIAL n 21 December, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre Clyve is back with his sixth Christmas special for an evening of soul, funk, seasonal favourites and a few surprises. His show is guaranteed to make you dance with tracks from the likes of Chic, Chaka Khan, Motown legends and even a bit of Beyonce. £15/£12.50; chapelarts.org MOTORCITY GOLD – NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH SOUL n 31 December, 10.30pm–3am, Komedia Say goodbye to one decade and hello to a new one at the ultimate New Year’s Eve party with a night of non-stop fun, dancing, and plenty of Motown music. 18+. Advance tickets £15; komedia.co.uk n

TTT: Pamela Raith

Robert Daws stars in Ten Times Table at Theatre Royal Bath


Longleat fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 16:49 Page 1


Bath phil dec.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 16:48 Page 1

Jason Thornton, music director and principal conductor of Bath Philharmonia

The Bath Philharmonia

44 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207


Bath phil dec.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 15:02 Page 2

CITY | MUSIC

Playing to the crowd

Watching The Snowman at Christmas is an essential part of the season’s magic for many. That’s especially true in our city as Bath Philharmonia has been playing it for 20 years – and this year, there’s an added bonus, discovers Melissa Blease learning team creates, shares and performs original music with local schools, helping young people develop their musical skills, opening up new opportunities for a whole new generation of concert-goers, and making live orchestral music accessible to all by distributing free tickets for the orchestra’s concerts to young people at schools across the city. These are the initiatives and collaborations that have led to Bath Philharmonia being nominated for a PRS award for their work in the field. “PRS awards are the equivalent of the BAFTAs in the classical music world, so for a small organisation like us to get nominated for one is fantastic,” says Jason. “We were shortlisted from 70 projects in the orchestra sector, and we’re down to the last three.”

Rupert Bear and the Frog Chorus has never been performed live before; we’re the first orchestra to do it

I

had imagined that being a symphony orchestra conductor might involve time reclining on a velvet sofa sipping sherry in between concerts. “Ha ha, I wish!” laughs Jason Thornton, music director and principal conductor of Bath Philharmonia. “There’s no time for any of that. I’ve spent most of today getting through office admin, and now I’m sorting our gear out ready to load our van up and drive it to a primary school tomorrow!” Indeed, since Jason – a former Ralph Allen schoolteacher who formed the Bath Philharmonia in 1996 – moved the orchestra from amateur to professional status in 2000, there’s been little time in which to indulge in downtime. “We decided to go professional without really knowing what was involved,” he recalls. “Looking back, we had terrible struggles to endure in our early days, but we had massive good fortune along the way too; now here we are, celebrating our 20th season as a pro-orchestra! We’re still very young; a lot of our fellow orchestras in the UK are 75, 80, 100 years old. But hey, they all had to start somewhere!” Today, Bath Philharmonia’s firm footing on the Bath institution charts can largely be credited to the popularity of their regular annual Christmas event at The Forum, when they bring Howard Blake’s magical score for Raymond Briggs’ animated masterpiece The Snowman to fully orchestrated life. This December, they’ll be bringing a special extraadded bonus to proceedings... But first, what about the orchestra’s year-round work? “I’ve always had a love for introducing as many young people as I can to music and the creation of music,” says Jason, chatting to me in the orchestra’s Widcombe HQ. “When the Bath Philharmonia turned professional I retrained as a music leader so I could carry on teaching music, but not necessarily in a classroom situation. As we became more established, we started introducing education projects and in 2009, I met two amazing people: Sonia Hutchison, CEO of BANES Carers’ Centre, and Victoria Clare, who established Wiltshire Young Carers’ Service in 2002. At the time, I didn’t know anything about young carers, but we sat and chatted and decided to do some projects together. Ten years on, and we’re doing more than ever before. We’ve done six projects this year, all around six or seven days long, and we’re going to be working a lot more with young carers across the south west next year.” The additonal work that Jason and his orchestra does isn’t all about young carers, either. At the epicentre of the Bath Philharmonia schedule, their creative

The Christmas performance has always been special, and their best-selling concert of the year. “We’ve been doing The Snowman at The Forum for 20 years – the audience adores it, and we love it too,” says Jason. “Like most of us, I watched it as a kid, and ever since then I wanted to perform it live, with film.” And this year, there’s a very special addition to the programme. “Rupert Bear and The Frog Chorus was another one that I absolutely adored when I was a kid – but it’s never been performed live before; we’re the first orchestra to do it,” says Jason. “Paul and Linda McCartney wrote it, George Martin orchestrated it, and it was recorded in Abbey Road Studios. But after it was released [We All Stand Together, from the animated film Rupert and the Frog Song, reached number three in the UK Singles Chart in 1984 and re-entered the UK Singles Chart again in 1985] it was never touched again. So, we started communicating with Paul McCartney and George Martin’s estate and I’ve ended up with access to all the original manuscripts that George Martin wrote for it, putting it into performable parts and scores. I’ve been working alongside George Martin’s original manuscripts for the last few weeks, which has been an amazing experience; it’s even got Paul’s original notes

and alterations on it, it’s fabulous!” So can we expect a very special guest to be in the audience alongside us on 21 December? “Well we’ve put the invitation out there, so you never know...!”, says Jason.” Celebrity special guests and festive fun aside, Jason has a key message that he wants to convey to people of all musical tastes. “Contrary to the old-fashioned image of orchestras and classical music, we’re not stuffy in any way, shape or form,” he says. “You don’t have to dress up to come to our concerts, you can clap when you like – you can just enjoy the experience. We have people introducing the pieces, we talk with the audience – it’s just like any other gig. We don’t just do old favourites and greatest hits either – we shake it up with modern pieces because if we don’t pass all this down to the next generation, what’s going to happen?” As that’s a question that we hope will never be answered. So, Jason: is a conductor the ultimate symphonious showman? “If you’re not doing it correctly, then yes, it probably is. But if you’re conducting to look good in front of an orchestra, you’re not doing your job properly. It’s the same with musicians: flashy is never usually very good. The composer and the music should be the star of every concert, every time.” What’s your favourite piece of music? “I love it all, whether it’s the stuff that we make up with young carers, a Beethoven symphony, or a modern piece. But if the piece of music that I’m working on at any given time isn’t my favourite at that time, then that’s a bad sign. Do you ever put Radio 1 on? “Yes I do! In fact, as I’ve got older – I’m 49 now – I’ve started to get into pop music, whereas as a kid I was always into classical music, so I’ve gone the opposite way around. I quite like dance music, and all that sort of stuff. Good music is good music!” And what’s the best thing about your job? “Everything: the variety, the creative learning projects, the people, the gigs – everything. I have to pinch myself every day, because I can’t believe how lucky I am.” The Bath Philharmonia: a gift that Bath should treasure for life, not just for Christmas. When you go forth and kiss their Frog (Chorus) this December, raise a glass of sherry to their prince, Jason Thornton – he’s definitely deserving of the cheers. n

Bath Philharmonia presents The Snowman/Rupert and the Frog Song at The Forum, Bath on 21 December; bathforum.co.uk; bathphil.co.uk

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

december 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 45


Christmas events - Bath 19.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:37 Page 1

WHAT’S | ON

There’s more than 150 stalls at this year’s Bath Christmas Market

MERRY AND BRIGHT

Glad tidings we bring, dear readers, in the form of a super festive round-up of events happening around Bath this month to get you in the Christmas spirit BATH CHRISTMAS MARKET n Until 15 December Get ready as the city begins to get in the festive spirit as the annual, award-winning Christmas market takes over the city centre with stalls brimming with beautifully crafted, locally made gifts and produce. This year there’s more than 150 stalls and plenty of food and drinks outlets to try; bathchristmasmarket.co.uk CHRISTMAS AT CHEDDAR n Selected dates until 24 December, times vary, Cheddar Gorge and Caves Father Christmas’ elves have set up a special workshop in Gough’s Cave to help manage the huge quantity of letters and make enough presents for everyone as the North Pole is very busy. Father Christmas is stopping off to ensure his operations are up to scratch and is waiting to meet you and your children – he may even have a gift for them 46 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeceMber 2019

|

if they’ve been good this year. Book online and save 15%, dogs also receive a treat; cheddargorge.co.uk

presents expertly wrapped by one of the volunteers. Donations will go to local charity Julian House.

FATHER CHRISTMAS’ WORKSHOP n Until 24 December, times vary, Milsom Place Help snow elves, Coco, Sprinkles and Dave collect the magical wonderberries – a wondrous fruit that helps the reindeers fly. If they aren’t collected, Christmas could be cancelled! Expect adventure, storytelling and live music at this immersive and interactive experience for all the family. Advanced booking only. £12; bathboxoffice.org.uk

CHRISTMAS AT STOURHEAD n Until 30 December, times vary, Stourhead For the very first time at Stourhead the tree-tops will glisten and the gardens will shimmer and sparkle as an illuminated trail takes over the National Trust site. Wander beneath unique tree canopies drenched in seasonal colour and dripping with shards of light, frosty snowflakes, stars and baubles. From £12; nationaltrust.org.uk/stourhead

LUXURY CHRISTMAS GIFT WRAPPING SERVICE n Until 24 December, 2–5pm, 4 Union Street Bath BID is hosting a free gift wrapping service this season, where you can get your

iSSUe 207

THE CHRISTMAS TAVERN n Until 31 December, 12–10pm, The Bird Head to The Bird’s pop-up Christmas Tavern, complete with tree-lined walkways and snow-capped mountain scenes, and snuggle down in front of the cosy woodburner in the cabin-styled venue. There will


Christmas events - Bath 19.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:37 Page 2

WHAT’S | ON

be mulled drinks, hot chocolate, creative cocktails and seasonal snacks on offer at the bar; thebirdbath.co.uk CHRISTMAS AFTERNOON TEA n Until 3 January, 1.30–4pm, Bath Spa Hotel After a busy day of Christmas shopping, warm up at Bath Spa Hotel with a special Christmas-themed afternoon tea. There will be classic sandwiches and cakes on offer with festive twists such as turkey and mulled cranberry sauce sandwiches and lightly spiced fruitcake. From £27; bathspahotel.co.uk THE FESTIVAL OF LIGHT n Selected dates until 5 January, times vary, Longleat Longleat will be illuminated this winter as the Festival of Light returns. This year, be taken on a thrilling odyssey as myths and legends from across the world are brought to life, filled with extraordinary creatures, ancient deities, magnificent scenery and stunning structures. From £23.55. Book online and save up to 10%; longleat.co.uk CHRISTMAS VILLAGE n Until 5 January, SouthGate The shops in SouthGate will be extending their opening hours this season, and there will be traditional market carts selling unique gifts. The Gingerbread Bar will be selling mulled wine, and there’s a chance to catch a golden snowflake in the life-sized magical snow globe. Enjoy a free hot chocolate and a family storytelling session as part of Christmas Jumper Day, in partnership with Save The Children on 7 December, 11am– 3pm. Father Christmas will also be visiting on 21 December, so little ones can meet him and share their wish lists; southgatebath.com

Kate Rusby: David Lindsay

CHRISTMAS TRAIL n Selected dates from 1–29 December, 10am–3pm, Prior Park Landscape Garden There’s a landscape-wide advent calendar to

BATH ON ICE n Until 5 January, times vary, Royal Victoria Park Now in its eighth year, the magical Bath On Ice returns with a whopping 1,000 square metres of ice, as well as festive food and drinks, and glow in the dark mini-golf. There will also be penguins and sleighs galore for young kids, with friends and families being able to watch all the action with a hot drink from the rink-side Moguls Alpine Bar; bathonice.com

discover at Prior Park, so wrap up warm and see if you can find everything on the list. Dogs on leads welcome. Trail sheet available from visitor reception. 50p per trail, booking not needed; nationaltrust.org.uk/priorpark

twinkling surrounds of the hotel’s secluded gardens under the starlight. There will be mulled wine and hot chocolate to keep you warm, as well as festive canapés. £25, booking essential; royalcrescent.co.uk

STEAMED: A DICKENSIAN IMPROVISED CHRISTMAS TALE n 4 December, 7.30pm, Rondo Theatre Steam ships, steam trains, steamed puddings, hilarious comedy, astonishing drama, endearing orphans and perhaps the odd catchy music hall number. Join Closer Each Day Company for something distinctly Dickensian, dynamic and entirely improvised. £16/£14; rondotheatre.co.uk

CORSHAM CHRISTMAS LIGHTS SWITCH ON n 6 December, 5pm, High Street, Corsham Father Christmas will be making a special stop off at Corsham with his reindeer just in time for the big Christmas lights switch on at 6pm. There will be a festive market, entertainment, live music, fairground rides and lots more; corsham.gov.uk

CHRISTMAS CAROLS IN THE GARDEN n 5 December, 6pm, The Royal Crescent Hotel and Spa Courage Choir will be singing some of your favourite Christmas carols amid the

CITY OF BATH BRASS BAND CHRISTMAS CONCERT n 6 December, 7.30pm, St Michael’s Without The City of Bath Brass Band presents its annual concert with an arrangement of Christians Awake, music from Tom and Jerry, Mussorgsky’s Great Gate of Kiev and Kalinka, among new and traditional arrangements of Christmas favourites with guest soloist soprano Krystl Ride. £10/£5; bathboxoffice.org.uk KATE RUSBY AT CHRISTMAS n 11 December, 7.30pm, The Forum Self-confessed Christmas obsessive Kate Rusby is bringing her festive concert to Bath, where you can expect traditional Yorkshire carols, storytelling, humour and plenty of Christmas cheer as she performs songs from her new festive album, Holly Head. Joining her on stage will be a top flight brass quintet and her band of merry musicians. From £20; bathforum.co.uk

Continued page 48

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

December 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 47


Christmas events - Bath 19.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:37 Page 3

WHAT’S | ON

FESTIVE BAKING n 6, 12 and 21 December, 10am–3pm, Lucknam Park Hotel and Spa Wondering what to bake this festive season? Head to Lucknam Park’s cookery school where you will be shown how to make your own pastry and mincemeat filling, seasonal desserts, centrepieces and festive breads, which can be recreated at home. £140, includes lunch, tea and coffee, use of apron, recipe folder and a cookery school bag to take home; lucknampark.co.uk

must be accompanied by an adult. All paying entrants will receive festive attire to wear during the run and refreshments after the event. If you don’t feel like running, you’re more than welcome to pop along and cheer the participants on; dorothyhouse.org.uk

WINTER FAIR n 7 December, 12–3pm, Bath City Farm Lots of festive activities to inspire and entertain the whole family at this local fair. Visit Santa in his grotto, make a Christmas wreath and see all the animals. The café will be open selling festive treats. Free entry, all welcome; bathcityfarm.org.uk

UPROAR! CHRISTMAS SPECIAL n 9 December, 7pm, Komedia Komedia Bath and Bath Mencap are teaming up to present a festive edition of their popular club night exclusively for adults with learning disabilities, their families and carers. The night offers a safe, relaxed and fun environment where everyone can cut loose and dance like nobody’s watching to all those cheesy Christmas bangers, festive favourites and party classics. Limited meal deal tickets available (doors open at 6pm for diners). 18+. £5–£17, carers go free; komedia.co.uk

SANTA AND ELF RUN 2019 n 8 December, 11am–1pm, Bath Spa University Dorothy House Hospice Care’s much-loved annual festive fun run is back, offering all ages the chance to take on the 2.5km or 5km courses to help raise funds for the hospice. Online entries will be open until the event starts. £15 for ages 12+, £7.50 for ages two– 11, free for under twos. Runners under 16

TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS WREATH MAKING n 11 December, 11am–1pm and 2–4pm, American Museum and Gardens Make your own colourful Christmas wreath to take home using foliage from the American Museum estate. £40, includes materials, coffee and a cookie. Also includes admission to the museum and gardens all day; americanmuseum.org

WREATH MAKING WORKSHOP WITH THE ROANTREE

n 9 December, 10am–1.30pm, Homewood Join florist Sky as she shows you how to make a festive wreath you’ll be proud to have hanging on your front door this Christmas. The workshop will be followed by a twocourse lunch with wine. £79, includes coffee, lunch, wine and materials; homewoodbath.co.uk

THE SPIRIT OF GIVING n 11 December, 6.30pm, The Holburne Museum Enjoy an evening of festive treats, carols and art as six local charitable organisations come together to host a special Christmas party all for a good cause. The evening will celebrate philanthropy in the city, bringing together Bath Abbey, The Roman Baths Foundation, University of Bath, Bath Spa University, Bath Percent Club and the Holburne Museum. All proceeds from the evening will help to deliver world-class research, education, art and heritage in Bath. £10; holburne.org PATHWAY TO CHRISTMAS IN WORDS AND MUSIC n 11 December, 7.30pm, St Michael’s Without The Silver Ring Choir of Bath will perform festive songs and readings, together with various solo acts, both vocal and instrumental. Expect a warm and jolly atmosphere to get you in the mood for Christmas. Supporting CLIC Sargent. £10; bathboxoffice.org.uk THE STORY OF CHRISTMAS n 12–23 December, times vary, Rondo Theatre A family Christmas show packed full of songs, jokes, silliness and festive frivolity as you are taken on a rip-roaring comedy ride through history to look at the weird and wonderful origins of some of our barmy Christmas traditions – and meet some of the whacky characters who invented them. Relaxed performances and shows specially for under 18 months available. £16/£14; rondotheatre.co.uk CAROL SINGING WITH THE BATH CHORUS n 13 December, 5pm and 14 December, 4pm, The Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel Join Grenville Jones and The Bath Chorus for an afternoon of carol singing, mulled wine and mince pies in the hotel’s chapel. All proceeds will be donated to Julian House. £10; thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk Continued page 50

KINGSMEAD SQUARE STREET FOOD MARKET

n Fridays–Sundays until 15 December, 11am–9pm (closes 6pm on Sundays), Kingsmead Square Kingsmead Square will be turned into a foodie wonderland offering delicious street food from 18 of the south west’s finest street food aficionados including wood-fired pizza, brilliant bangers from Sosij and award-winning macaroni cheese from Alp Mac. Plus there will be a bar with mulled drinks and live music.

48 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207


P49.qxp_Layout 23 20/11/2019 13:40 Page 1

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 49


Christmas events - Bath 19.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:37 Page 4

WHAT’S | ON

IT’S THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR n 20 December, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre Dress up and join Bath’s cult cabaret crooners, 20th Century Foxes, as they kick-start the festive season with their unusual and uplifting blend of stylish swing, with a heady Yuletide tonic flavoured with the spirit of Christmases past. £17.50/£19; chapelarts.org

ORIGAMI: CHRISTMAS MAGIC STARS AND CARD MAKING n 13 December, 6.15pm, Museum of East Asian Art Get creative with paper-folding techniques and make your own decorations to take home. Choose from one of the origami crafts, either making star decorations and learn how to turn them into magic wands, or make Christmas trees to use them in card making. £10/£8; meaa.org.uk A CELEBRATION OF CHRISTMAS CAROLS n 14 December, 7.30pm, St Swithin’s Church Bath Minerva Choir’s winter concert will feature the world premiere of Gavin Carr’s Angels’ Feet Cantata, written for the choir by their director, as well as marvellous medleys and other carols from Gustav Holst and many other favourites. Booking ahead recommended. £15/£7.50; bathboxoffice.org.uk

PETER GILL’S CHRISTMAS COMEDY SONGBOOK n 18 December, 8pm, Chapel Arts Centre Renowned entertainer Peter Gill presents his ever popular Comedy Songbook with a special Christmas theme. Along with favourites from Victoria Wood, Noël Coward, Allan Sherman, Flanders and Swann, Billy Connolly and Johnny Cash, expect festively themed classics like Tom Lehrer’s Christmas Carol, Weird Al’s The Night Santa Went Crazy, Spike Jones’ All I Want For Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth, and many more. £15/£13; chapelarts.org

AN EVENING OF FESTIVE MUSIC n 14 December, 7.30pm, St Mary the Virgin, Bathwick Join The Handful for a double helping of the Magnificat (Swayne and Cui), Exultate Deo (Poulenc and Palestrina) and Cantate Domino (Monteverdi and Rutter) for an evening exploring the variety of ways Christmas has been expressed in choral music, from the 16th century to the present day, via Russia, Italy and Cornwall. £15/£5 for under 25s, free for under 16s; bathboxoffice.org.uk

BATH BACH CHOIR’S CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT n 18 December, 7.30pm, St Michael’s Without, and 19 and 20 December, 7.30pm, The Pump Room Three nights of glorious Christmas music-making. This much-loved annual entertainment includes songs from the choir, seasonal tunes, a touch of jazz, young virtuoso musicians, children’s voices and audience fun. Conducted by Nigel Perrin. From £12, family tickets available; bathboxoffice.org.uk

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST n 12 December – 12 January, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath One of the most popular fairy tales of all, Beauty and The Beast follows the story of Belle, who finds herself imprisoned in an enchanted castle by a prince who has been transformed into a hideous beast by an evil sorceress. This year’s pantomime includes Coronation Street’s Wendi Peters as Fairy Bon-Bon, Bath comedian and panto legend Jon Monie (left) stars as Louis La Plonk, and EastEnders’ Nick Wilton returns as the dame. Ticket prices vary; theatreroyal.org.uk

50 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207

THE MINISTRY OF BURLESQUE: CHRISTMAS CABARET n 20 December, 8.30pm, Komedia Expect an uproarious revue of camp Christmas comedy and festive friskiness at this special burlesque night. Witness amazing aerial displays, breathtaking feats of human grace and daring antics. With a night of festive treats – both naughty and nice – all under one roof, guests are invited to eat, drink, laugh and dance the night away. From £20, meal tickets also available for £32/£43; komedia.co.uk THE SNOWMAN AND THE FROG CHORUS n 21 December, 3.30pm, The Forum Bath Philharmonia presents a double bill of film classics on the big screen with live music. Once again, the 40-strong orchestra will play Howard Blake’s score live to Raymond Briggs’ animated masterpiece, The Snowman, as well as the first ever live performance of The Frog Chorus. £22/£14; bathphil.co.uk A CAMERATA CHRISTMAS WITH JOHN RUTTER n 21 December, 5pm, St Mary’s the Virgin, Bathwick Following last year’s sell-out concert, Bath Camerata is delighted to welcome John Rutter back as the conductor for this year’s festive concert which promises to be an uplifting performance of music for the festive season, old and new, in beautiful settings and arrangements (including some by John Rutter himself), with lots of audience participation. £25/£10; bathboxoffice.org.uk THE WURZELS’ WEST COUNTRY CHRISTMAS PARTY! n 22 December, 7.30pm, Komedia OOO arrrrr! Them Wurzels are back on the road bringing some fun to the festive season, performing a set list consisting of all the hits, stories and jokes from a career spanning more than 50 years. Drink up thy Zider! £15–£17; komedia.co.uk n


Bath Philharmonica fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:26 Page 1


Take Two Films December 19.qxp_Layout 22 21/11/2019 09:47 Page 1

CINEMA | HIGHLIGHTS

Take two: films

The Little Theatre Cinema has two films on show this month, one about a connected, loving family and the other about a family riven with conflict, says Georgina Southam

Knives Out Rian Johnson, best known as the director of Star Wars: The Last Jedi has been let loose with Knives Out, a wickedly entertaining homage to Agatha Christie, featuring a starpacked cast. Johnson’s script creates a contemporary murder mystery that both respects and revises the genre. There are a number of disorientating reveals and it’s clear that Johnson is in his element when pulling the characters’ strings. The script plays with the regular tropes of the classic murder mystery but brings contemporary relevance with timely jokes about Game of Thrones and Hamilton. The setup is a Gothic house in the middle of the countryside, with a rich white family full of bitter grudges and a dead patriarch with a large fortune. Johnson has taken inspiration from films such as Murder by Death, which satirise the works of the best mystery writers, with his version constructing a fine line between homage and self-parody. The body that is discovered is that of Harlan

Little Women Following her directorial debut with comedy-drama Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig has re-told a well-known story that is both faithful to its source and yet highly original. The script takes a new approach to Louise May Alcott’s 1868 novel Little Women about the lives of a family of four teenage sisters and their mother at the time of the American Civil War as they grow from children to adults. The linear story has been broken up, so at the start of the film the main characters

Thrombey (Christopher Plummer), a successful mystery writer whose 85th birthday party proves to be his last. Found with a slashed throat, the authorities deem the incident a suicide, but private detective Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig) has been hired to investigate the possibility of foul play. He conducts interviews with the dysfunctional Thrombey clan to work out who might have motive, and soon discovers they all do. The film is stacked with stars. Jamie Lee Curtis is the vainglorious ‘self-made’ daughter who specialises in vicious one-liners, Don Johnson is her husband Morris Bristow, Chris Evans her spoilt son Ransom Drysdale, Michael Shannon her bookish brother Walt Thrombey, and Toni Collette her instafamous sister-in-law Joni. This framework of a rich, white family under suspicion demonstrates what can happen when the privileged are under threat, and the family’s vicious hypocrisies are exposed. This work also raises questions about the American politics of today, directed towards the issues of immigration and the invincibility of the wealthy. are already adults. Using constant flashbacks, the perspective is of mature characters looking back at their story. Alcott’s resonant tale of girlhood and family has been adapted for film seven times since 1917, and has therefore been interpreted over successive generations. Gerwig’s version is a smart, layered adaptation that weaves together the March family’s lives as girls and young women that is true to Alcott’s writing while also being vibrant and thought-provoking. Saorise Ronan, who also starred in Lady Bird, takes on the role of Jo March, Alcott’s alter ego in the novel who reflects on her life

There’s a standout performance from Ana de Armas as Harlan’s faithful maid Marta, who helps to unravel the mystery. Hiding under the guise of a murder mystery, this is a smart political piece on some of the fragile tensions within American society. with her sisters who are all determined to live their lives on their terms. Emma Watson plays Meg, the eldest sister, Florence Pugh is the vain and ambitious Amy, and Eliza Scanlen (from Sharp Objects) is the shy and sentimental Beth. Timothée Chalamet stars as Laurie, Jo’s love interest, despite her constant rebuffs, Meryl Streep is Aunt March and Laura Dern is Marmee. Gerwig’s adaptation is not just about growing up – it offers a social commentary on the position of girls growing into adulthood, faced with the need to make a living or marry into wealth. Because of its fresh perspective, it’s a story that will resonate well with young audiences. ■

SHOWING TIMES Knives Out From 6 December, see website for times Little Women From 27 December, see website for times Little Theatre Cinema, St Michael’s Place; picturehouses.com/cinema/The_Little

52 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207


P53.qxp_Layout 23 20/11/2019 13:32 Page 1

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 53


Arts Dec 19.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 16:10 Page 1

ART | EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART There’s plenty of colour and texture to see around Bath’s galleries and museums this month, as well as a number of items that could make memorable gifts ART BAR The Abbey Hotel, North Parade, Bath WINTER EXHIBITION Until 5 January Grab a cocktail, enjoy a bar snack and see the work of four local artists – Emma Taylor, Emma Rose, James Nunn and Lucy Saunders – adorn the walls of the bar in The Abbey Hotel. There will be affordable pieces of art, prints and cards for sale. Left, Hibiscus by Emma Rose

The Caterpillar In Winter by Nick Cudworth

VICTORIA ART GALLERY By Pulteney Bridge Open: Daily, 10.30am–5pm Tel: 01225 477233, web: victoriagal.org.uk SALLY MUIR: THE DOG SHOW Until 9 February Sally Muir has had dogs all her life and for nearly as long has drawn and painted them. Some years ago she began a Facebook project, posting her dog art daily. As people became interested she became more adventurous in her materials, combining wire drawings, lithography, paper cuts, pen and ink and potato prints. The project finished several years ago, but Muir continues to find people and their dogs endlessly fascinating. She has held successful one-woman shows with retailer Anthropologie in London and Bath, and in 2017 a book of her dog portraits was published, entitled A Dog a Day. This new exhibition is guaranteed to bring smiles and nods of recognition to visitors’ faces, even if they are not dog owners. Free entry.

Hound by Sally Muir 54 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207

NICK CUDWORTH GALLERY London Street, top of Walcot Street, Bath. Closed on Mondays. Tel: 01225 445221, web: nickcudworth.com Throughout December The December exhibition features original paintings and prints of images in and around Bath during the winter months. Nick paints in his studio connected to the gallery and is available to show and discuss his finished work and works in progress.


Gray MCA fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:27 Page 1


Arts Dec 19.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 16:10 Page 2

ART | EXHIBITIONS

GRAY M.C.A 5 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath Open: Wednesday – Saturday, 10am–4pm, Monday and Tuesday by appointment Tel: 01225 422117, web: graymca.com THE WINTER SHOW Throughout December Fresh from the catwalks of Paris Fashion Week S/S 2019, Gray MCA is excited to present The Bil Donovan 2019 Series: Original Signed Works For Luxure Magazine. See beautiful original fashion illustration in watercolour and wash by the artist in residence at Christian Dior in New York, Bil Donovan. Left, Maison Rabin Kayrouz S/S 19 for Luxure Magazine, watercolour and wash on paper, signed

BEAUX ARTS 12–13 York Street, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am–5pm Tel: 01225 464850; web: beauxartsbath.co.uk

WALLER & WOOD

Stoneware bowl by Gary Wood

4 Abbey Green, Bath Open: Wednesday to Saturday, 11am–5pm, and Sunday, 12–4pm Tel: 07803 033629 Web: wallerandwood.co.uk CHRISTMAS EXHIBITION Until 23 December Find special Christmas gifts at this festive exhibition. There are new ceramics by Gary Wood, clothing and scarves by Carole Waller and a fine collection of contemporary jewellery.

WINTER EXHIBITION Throughout December Beaux Arts welcomes back artists of renown such as John Maltby, Sarah Gillespie and Nick Makcman, as well as several new and talented artists such as Alex Callaway and Rachel Ross. Jane Muir’s quirky ceramics add to an impressive array of work that is well worth a look during the holiday season.

Right, Owl on a Wall by John Maltby

Kraak basin, late Ming dynasty China (c1600–1620)

MUSEUM OF EAST ASIAN ART 12 Bennett Street, Bath Open: Tuesday – Friday 11am–5pm, Saturday 10am–5pm Tel: 01225 464640; web: meaa.org.uk CHINA ON A PLATE Until 8 May Many beautiful artefacts that are classified as Chinese art were originally made for daily purposes and were not meant to be displayed in a museum or collected by enthusiasts as they are today. In fact, a large percentage of objects within the MEAA’s collections were originally used as food or drinking vessels. This exhibition explores the culture of food and drink in China through a wide range of vessels made of different materials and used by various social classes over centuries. The exhibition is the result of a joint research project between the museum and the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. 56 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207


P57.qxp_Layout 23 22/11/2019 13:58 Page 1

THE

PERFECT We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family then we are able to offer a mailing service for only

CH RI ST M A S G IF T

£15.00 (6 issues) or £40.00 Euro zone; £30.00 (12 issues) or £70.00 Euro zone World Zone 1 £95.00 World Zone 2 £120.00 To subscribe to receiving the magazine go to our website; www.thebathmag.co.uk and scroll to the bottom of the page where you can click to an instant link Alternatively send a cheque payable to MC Publishing Ltd 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED or Telephone 01225 424 499 for card payment

Subscription FORM Mr/Mrs/Ms ................Forename .............................................. Surname .............................................................................. Address ............................................................................ ..........................................Postcode ............................ Daytime telephone No ..............................................................

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 57


Arts Dec 19.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 16:10 Page 3

ART | EXHIBITIONS

THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM GALLERY NINE 9b Margaret’s Buildings, Bath Open: Monday to Saturday, 10am – 5pm Tel: 01225 319197, web: gallerynine.co.uk WINTER EXHIBITION Throughout December

Gallery Nine’s winter exhibition features the highly acclaimed Egyptian-born studio potter Ashraf Hanna and his wife Sue. His ceramic forms are hand-built vessels and his work is in the permanent collections of several museums around the world. Drawing inspiration from tribal art, Sue’s work is decorated with slips made from locally dug clays, and then raku or saggar fired. Featured jewellers are Rachel Butlin and Leoma Drew. Artist and printmaker Merlyn Chesterman specialises particularly in woodcuts and her work can be found in the Hong Kong Museum of Art and galleries in London and the South West.

Turquoise and orange formica brooch by Rachel Butlin

Great Pulteney Street, Bath Open: Daily, 10am–5pm (11am Sundays), tel: 01225 388569, web: holburne.org HENRI MATISSE: MASTER OF LINE Until 5 January One of the undisputed masters of 20th-century art, Henri Matisse (1869–1954) is renowned for the exquisite delicacy of his drawn line as much as for the intense brilliance of his colour. His etchings are remarkable for the fact that they preserve the vivacity and clarity of his drawing, giving them an immediacy that is especially striking in dialogue with the etchings of Rembrandt. This display, commemorating the 150th anniversary of Matisse’s birth, focuses on around 20 of his works. REMBRANDT IN PRINT Until 5 January As well as being an undisputed master of the Dutch Golden Age, Rembrandt was also one of the greatest printmakers of all time. He used a characteristic scratchy fine line to create images remarkable for their power of expression. He also reworked some of his plates, demonstrating his pursuit of atmosphere in his images and a canny recognition of the financial potential of the print. This selection from The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford – one of the world’s greatest collections of Rembrandt’s etchings – will include many of his most iconic images. It will juxtapose works of different scale and feeling, and a variety of subject matters, from selfportraits through religious scenes to female nudes.

Right, The Three Trees by Rembrandt, 1643 © Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford

THE FRAMING WORKSHOP 80 Walcot Street, Bath Tel: 01225 482748 Web: theframingworkshop.com Throughout December

George Weeks works with a variety of wood veneers using marquetry techniques to produce pictures, frames and small objects. n

Playing the Picturesque – an exhibition by You + Pea © Tristan Fewings, Getty Images for RIBA

THE EDGE Andrew Brownsword Gallery, The Edge, University of Bath Open: Tuesday – Saturday, 11am–5pm. Tel: 01225 386777, web: edgearts.org PLAYING THE PICTURESQUE Until 14 December Experience an interactive installation exploring the boundaries between virtual and physical space. Using video game technology, this exhibition explores architectural designs showcasing historical landmarks. All the artworks have been designed by You+Pea and were commissioned by RIBA. Free admission. 58 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207

Below, Bella by George Weeks


P59.qxp_Layout 23 20/11/2019 13:42 Page 1

nick cudworth gallery

Walcot in Winter Oil on linen – prints available 24 x 16 inches

DECEMBER EXHIBITION 1 – 30 December

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

2019/2020 Lecture Series

‘The Magic of Pantomime’ Lecturer : Ian Gledhill

~ Join us for our Pre-Christmas Lecture ~ Exploring the history of this peculiarly British Institution ! at 1.30pm on Monday 2nd December 2019 in The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street Bath

Visitors welcome £10 at the door (No Booking required) Visit our website for membership benefits and other information www.theartssocietybath.com

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 59


Pete Brown 3.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:48 Page 1

ARTS

Man on the street

W

hat I love about oil painting – apart from the lushness and the paint itself – is that you can fiddle with it and you can add stuff and take stuff away. And you can really look into things a lot more and start to pierce reality.” This painting process and the piercing of reality has become an obsessive endeavour for artist Pete Brown, a familiar face on the streets of Bath, with his protective padded all-in-one smeared with paint and his distinctive wooden easel and palette, as he records en plein air the animated scenes in front of him. In a time and culture where artists seem increasingly to depend on technology in the form of phones and iPads to create their compositions and grids and document their subjects before painting even starts, Pete’s decision to always work from life, and mostly outside, harks back to a different artistic canon. The idea of working directly from nature – rather than creating contrived landscapes in a studio – was first propounded by the Barbizon School in France, the I Macchiaioli painters in Tuscany in the 19th century and then most influentially the impressionists, including Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro. Standing at the top of Milsom Street (where else?) with Pete at his easel blocking out a composition on a letterbox-shaped art board, and in a nippy wind, wasn’t at all like

being in Monet’s Giverny garden, but it did allow me to embrace both the romance and the reality of Pete’s outdoor studio. Pete first started to work en plein air when he was 18 at sixth form college. “I’d brought in a painting I’d done of my sister, from a photograph, and the tutor questioned why I had done this. It was the first time that working from a photograph had been challenged for me. I obviously took it to heart, because that was the last time I painted from a photograph.” “I am quite anal about working outdoors. To a stupid extent. You might say that some photographic reference couldn’t harm. But actually for me working outdoors is just more interesting than sitting in a studio and transcribing something. For me it is all about noise, temperature, space and time.” Pete Brown did an arts foundation course in Bath for a year from 1986–7. Then he spent three years studying fine art in Manchester where he adopted a modernist style and spent his time painting coloured squares. This may be surprising to those of us who know him as ‘Pete the Street’ and associate him with impressionist oil paintings of familiar Bath street scenes. “There is only so far you can go with coloured squares,” says Pete, in his typically blunt style. When he first moved to Bath, he started to work in charcoals. “Bath is a very tonal sort of place so it suits charcoals,” says Pete. “Looking back on it now I can see that I was exaggerating the tones a lot. And that is still there in my work. I do love contrasts and am always looking for darks and lights.” Pete Brown’s current show at Victoria Art Gallery, which runs until 2 February, includes more than 100 new oil paintings and drawings, and while it is called Bath Is It (because the city defines his work), there are also paintings of London, New York, Havana and Vietnam. “I just want to go everywhere,” says Pete. “It’s all about trying to do decent paintings. My next trip is to Nepal. I do these painting trips and it’s a bit scary going back to that fear when you go somewhere new. You feel nervous and at odds with your environment. And sometimes I come back to Bath from travelling and I’m struck about how amazing it is. And so it’s trying to come back to that.” “India was the most exciting place I’ve painted,” says Pete. “Just because it’s mad. Not so much because of the colour – the colour is incredible, but the architecture has no rules, there are just blocks of structure, made with fertilizer bags and random objects. There are no rules so you have

to look very intensely and assess what you’re looking at. And it’s all moving and chaotic and there’s no personal space. It is quite intense.” We all know that Pete is no stranger to the weather. “The weather is my subject, really,” he explains. “I love the snow. It’s hard when it’s actually snowing because you are painting with a mixture of oil paint and ice. I painted one in St James Street when it was snowing and it was interesting because you can’t achieve those hard edges but it had a nice light finish to it.” The weather also plays a part in the style of Pete’s painting. “There are quite a few sketchy paintings in the show, oil paintings that didn’t get finished. There is a rainy one on Grand Parade that I’m quite fond of. The rain was really crazy and everyone’s umbrellas were turning inside out. Because of the weather I couldn’t get darks in there, so it’s very close tone.” Pete describes his painting technique as hit and miss: “I just mark out where things are. And I get into it and the scale changes and I find I’ve missed the top of a spire or something. I think this comes from working with charcoal, but I find it hard working in line, delineating things. So I work with blocks of colour and just slap it on. The dream is to paint and draw in one. So not draw and fill, make all the drawing be represented by the luscious painting.” Does Pete have plans to move on from Bath? Hasn’t he exploited every potential landscape here? “I really do love the place for what it is,” he says. “What’s so lovely about Bath is the stone and the patination and the light banging around. I’ve always ducked Pulteney Bridge because it’s quite a classic view, but this year in the summer, in the late afternoon, I did a big one of the front of Pulteney Bridge and the weir. So the sun is off the bridge, lighting the end of the buildings in Argyle Street, and the light is just bouncing around. And then the view. I revelled in this one. “You will never stop me doing plein air sketches,” says Pete. “I love it, and it has been almost 100% my body of work. I always feel if it’s a sunny day you should be outside. If it’s good weather, what the hell are you doing inside?” n

Peter Brown: Bath Is It is at Victoria Art Gallery until 2 February; victoriagal.org.uk; peterbrownneac.com Victoria Art Gallery is part of Bath & North East Somerset Council.

Photograph of Peter Brown by Neill Menneer

Peter Brown and his easel and paints is a familiar sight on the streets of Bath. Emma Clegg wraps up warm and joins him there to soak up the plein air vibe and ask why our city has been such a source of creative inspiration


Pete Brown 3.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:49 Page 2

George Street in the Rain, by Peter Brown, November 2018

“The dream is to paint and draw in one. So not draw and fill, make all the drawing be represented by the luscious painting�


P62.qxp_Layout 22 22/11/2019 11:35 Page 1

It really is the thought that counts DUNCAN CAMPBELL FROM BEAU NASH

HAS BEEN DEALING IN ANTIQUE SILVER SINCE 1986

Thoughts on finding successful gifts

I

For the impossible to buy for

was recently talking to a Chinese national about the British custom of buying Christmas presents. She explained to me that in China nearly all gift giving is in the form of envelopes containing cash. There is undoubtedly an honesty about giving money, so the recipient can buy something they actually want rather than something you have grabbed off the shelves as the shops were closing on Christmas Eve. However, while a case might be made for giving cash presents to some, surely for those nearest and dearest, it still has to be the thought that counts. Part of my role as a shopkeeper is to ease the pain of choosing, even if it is for someone I will never meet. I generally ask two questions of gift seekers. What is the budget, and what are the recipient’s interests? The answer to the first question saves a lot of time by eliminating ideas that are simply too generous. The second question sounds obvious, but experience indicates that it is often overlooked. Successful present buying takes a commitment to finding ‘something’ rather than giving up and getting ‘anything’, but the rewards are great and can be out of proportion to the money spent. I had a very sweet email last year from a gentleman whose relative had bought his Christmas present from us. I well remember the lady concerned being at a total loss: “What can I possibly give – he has everything he needs?” After a brief interrogation, I discovered that he particularly enjoyed a glass of port and was a native of Edinburgh. A way-underbudget silver decanter label marked for Edinburgh and engraved ‘Port’ was, as it turned out, the perfect gift. He was touched enough to write to me, and the giver, for a trivial sum, gave something wanted, thoughtful and long-lasting – not bad. And so a well-chosen trifle will – to coin a phrase – say more than cash ever can. n beaunashbath.com; 01225 334234

62 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207


P63.qxp_Layout 23 21/11/2019 14:04 Page 1

Ma San Auction In Bath

SPECIALISTS IN ORIENTAL WORKS OF ART A vintage 18k gold twist ring with two jade cabochon. Est £120-140

Chinese Blue and White porcelain Dragon Jar bearing Ming dynasty six character mark of Wanli. Est £3000-5000

g eptin Acc nments ig cons r future fo es! sal

Very large Chinese Han Dynasty (206BC – 220AD) Earthenware figure of a horse. Est £12,000–15,000

Wu Guanzhong (1919–2010) Ink and colour on Paper. Est £1000-2000

Pair of Chinese Late 19th / Early 20th century coral ground porcelain ‘Hu’ vases. Est £1500-2000

Chinese 19th century Hardwood and glazed display cabinet. Est £500-600

Free valuations and home visits • Over 30 years experience • Competitive commission rates • Direct contacts in Hong Kong and China • Sales every month 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Tel: 01225 318587

www.masanauction.com

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 63


6 magazines for Xmas.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:48 Page 1

CITY | READING

Magazines for Christmas

We visited independent magazine store Magalleria to find the best stylish, inspirational and thought-provoking magazines with which to furnish our festive coffee tables

THE SECOND SHELF

This is a literary magazine and rare book catalogue for books written by women. It highlights undervalued and rediscovered works to ‘balance the bookshelves’ and redress gender inequality in the wider literary canon. Contributors are commissioned to focus on writers they admire, so along with those discussed here (Angela Carter, Sylvia Townsend Warner and Posy Simmonds, among others) you’ll enjoy a showcase of related modern first editions, rare and antiquarian books with bibliographical data and market prices. (£15)

THE PRESERVE JOURNAL

This Danish magazine signposts the road to a sustainable, responsible and transparent food culture, believing that the connections between the soil, producers, produce and consumers are now blurred by industrialised processes and commercial interests. It’s less a polemic than a rolling guidebook to sustainable food production and consumption – exploring foraging and fermentation, for example – and how we might be able to shape, influence and impact change. Lookout out for Richard Buckley from Bath’s Acorn restaurant in the next issue. (£15)

CABANA

EMERGENCE

Until now Emergence was a quarterly online bulletin identifying and gathering together various threads in ecology, culture and spirituality for a quietly building audience. Now we have its first outing on paper and it’s predictably questing, literary and meditative – plus the team hasn’t stinted on the production quality. Hand-sewn with an exposed spine, it employs a variety of different papers and finishes to make an imposing 300-page volume that is superbly equipped to handle a multitude of layers and themes ranging from the Anthropocene to Thomas Merton to Earthrise and beyond through reportage, prose, poetry, interviews, illustration and photography. (£20)

IL LIBRO

Il Libro explores Italian art from the ancient to the present – painting, photography, architecture, supplemented with music, literature, film, fashion, design and craft, but what is unusual here is its fresh and distinct slant toward lesser-known and lost artifacts. It’s a charming and sumptuous little volume wrapped in an eye-catching gold dust jacket; indeed, the production standards are very high. Because this is the first issue the we think the publishers have underpriced it. The initial UK supply disappeared quickly, so Magellaria has had these copies specially shipped in. (£12)

THE SKIRT CHRONICLES

With story titles such as Flaubert, Duras and Stein walk into a bar, it’s clear that The Skirt Chronicles is not your average fashion magazine. A petite, sharp, pop-cultural journal created by a trio of 30-something Parisiennes, it celebrates women’s fashion for all, regardless of age, race and culture. Printed by one of France’s most esteemed fine art printing houses, it intersects ideas, histories and stories around art, literature, cinema and more to teach you a lot about fashion. The magazine’s name refers to the skirt as a onetime symbol of protest and the theme of this fifth issue is, perhaps cheekily, ‘Pants’. (£14)

The opulent interiors juggernaut Cabana makes its entrance twice a year with variegated cover sets swathed in sumptuous designer textiles from the likes of Gucci, Fornasetti, Burberry and Ralph Lauren. Often packaged with print production extras, it allows us to rubberneck some of the most quirky, wondrous, undiscovered stately houses and

buildings around the world (and often in these parts). This eleventh issue is a rich and dazzling ode to trendy Egypt, draped in four gorgeous fabrics from Fendi. Anyone looking for inspiration from period architecture, furniture, furnishings, surface and pattern design should start here. (£22)

Visit Magalleria at 22a Broad Street, Bath BA1 5LN; magalleria.co.uk; tel: 01225 471586

64 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207


P65.qxp_Layout 23 20/11/2019 13:29 Page 1

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 65


wine column dec 2.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 10:07 Page 1

DRINKS | COLUMN

TRISTAN DARBY Columnist Tristan Darby puts a spotlight on drinks to give as presents this Christmas. The opening of each of these bottles will bring a real sense of occasion

FESTIVE FIZZ Champagne is always a great gift, and a good safe option if you’re not entirely sure what your recipient drinks. Taittinger is a top house that needs no introduction and their wines have a trademark elegant style with broad appeal, making them a great choice for gifting. Taittinger, Prélude Grand Cru Champagne (£52.50, Great Western Wine) would be my choice. Made with an equal blend of chardonnay and pinot noir grapes sourced from grand cru Champagne vineyards, Prélude has subtle slightly floral aromas on the nose, but in the mouth, it’s a sublime, rich yet elegant wine with a dreamy creamy texture and delicious notes of citrus, brioche, stone fruit, and honey over a long and fine finish. A seriously smile-sending sparkler. WHITE WONDER If you’re buying for a white wine fan, I’d recommend a good barrel-aged wine from Bordeaux. Whites from here are often overlooked, but the best are beautifully balanced, complex and age-worthy should the lucky recipient want to hold on to the bottle to develop the flavours further. Château Lamothe Bouscaut Blanc, Pessac-Léognan (£28.50 to £22, on Christmas offer at GWW) fits the bill perfectly. It’s a blend of Sauvignon and Semillon fermented and aged in French oak barrels that’s creamy, toasty, fresh and balanced with hallmark notes of grapefruit and a little pineapple. It will drink beautifully now, especially alongside scallops or steamed fish, or age beautifully for up to five years.

potential, and buying an aged vintage can be pretty costly. Tawny port, however, doesn’t improve or need to improve in the bottle as it’s released at the point of drinking after spending all of its ageing time in wooden casks. The ageing changes the wine’s colour from intense purple/red to a paler wine with gradually increasing brown (tawny) hues, and its flavours to a wonderful medley of nuts, dried fruits, caramel and toffee. Quinta do Crasto, Colheita 2000 (£39.50 to £32.50, on Christmas offer at GWW) is a single-vintage tawny from a top port house that delivers amazing quality at its full price, but with an extra Christmas discount for December, it’s a must-buy gift (get one for yourself while you’re at it). Elegant yet full-bodied with classic notes of nuts, dried fruits, orange peel and spice, it’s excellent alongside fine cheese (especially aged Cheddar, Comté or gruyere).

REVEL IN RED For a red drinker, why not gift BIG this year with a magnum they can share (with you, if you’re lucky), or pop in the cellar for a few years if they wish. Ramon Bilbao, Rioja Reserva Magnum 2012 (£32.50, GWW) is a wine that’s big enough to please the palates of fuller-bodied red drinkers but balanced, smooth and understated enough to suit those who prefer something a little more restrained. A classic Rioja that’s fruity, fresh and smooth with flavours of cherry, blackberry, cocoa and with a smattering of sweet spice from the American oak casks the wine was aged in for 20 months. Twice the volume and double the pleasure, serve it with a big roast, lamb hot-pot or meaty tomato-based curry.

SEASONAL SPIRITS Audemus, Pink Pepper Gin (£45 to £38, on Christmas offer at GWW) from the Cognac region of France is a great choice for gin lovers. The recipe includes Spanish pink peppercorns, juniper, black cardamom, pink peppercorns, cinnamon, vanilla and tonka beans. Each botanical is macerated and distilled separately inside a vacuum to reduce the temperature and capture the fullest flavour profile of each ingredient. A drop of local honey is added in at the end, too. Wonderfully aromatic and smooth with a gentle peppery flavour and just a nip of vanilla/honey sweetness. Best served neat on the rocks or with premium tonic and orange peel. Finally, a recommendation for whisky drinkers. Compass Box, Spice Tree (£45, GWW) is made by a first maturation in a combination of new and old American oak casks, followed by a second maturation for up to two years in custom-made hybrid barrels of American oak bodies with toasted French oak heads. Each head is given one of three levels of toasting for more layers of complexity when the different casks are blended. Spice Tree is certainly big and rich but there’s a lovely balance between the intense fruit, oak, and spice notes. The palate is pretty round and sweet at first, but not heavy – building to layers of cinnamon and cloves with vanilla then a tiny spot of smoky peat. Long and complex on the finish, this is a great dram that’s perfect for an endof-dinner sip or fireside contemplation. n

PORT For many, it wouldn’t be Christmas without port. It certainly makes a classic gift, but buying a ‘young’ vintage port may mean many years of ageing by the recipient for the wine to mature and reach its

Join Tristan for a range of wine classes throughout the year at Great Western Wine. Visit greatwineschool.co.uk for information and booking.

66 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMBeR 2019

|

issue 207


Larkhall Butchers FP.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:24 Page 1


Homeslice! brilliant bristol baker Briony May shares what she’s been making this month

A

lright, I am just going to say it: I love Christmas! From the minute I first hear Mariah, mid-November, I get that familiar childish sense of excitement. I love the cheesy music, the tinsel, the extra family time and the food – oh how I love the food. Even turkey. I know, I am a rare breed; although this year will be completely meat-free for me as I have recently gone veggie. So this month I wanted to whip up something delicious and vegetarian for the festive season. This puff pastry tree will look great on a buffet table or as a starter on the big day. You can even buy readymade pastry if you are in a rush... I won’t tell anyone!

Cranberry Pesto Puff Pastry Christmas Tree Pastry ingredients: 350g plain flour 1 tsp salt 250g unsalted butter, frozen 100ml cold water Cranberry pesto: 125g cranberry sauce 125g walnuts 35g parmesan, grated 2 tbsp olive oil Salt and pepper to taste To finish: 1 egg, beaten Method: • Make the rough puff pastry. Put the flour and salt into a bowl. Mix to combine. • Grate the butter into the flour then fold the butter into the flour so butter is coated. • Add water a tablespoon at a time (you probably won’t need it all). Bring pastry together with your hands until it forms a ball. • Tip onto surface and bring together. Shape into a rectangle and flatten. Wrap in clingfilm. Chill for 30 minutes. • Make the pesto. Place all the ingredients into a food processor and then blitz until combined and the consistency of pesto. • Get the pastry out and on a floured surface, roll it out into a rectangle ¼ inch thick with short edge closest to you. Fold the bottom third onto middle third, then top third on top of that. Turn so that short edge is closest to you again. Repeat. 68 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207

Wrap in clingfilm then let it chill for 30 minutes. • Repeat the previous step then the pastry is ready to use. • Heat oven to 190°C fan. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Divide the pastry in half. Roll each half out into a rectangle ¼ inch thick. Place one rectangle of pastry on the prepared parchment. • Cut into the shape of a Christmas tree using a knife. Cover with the pesto. Place other rectangle of pastry on top and trim to the same tree shape. Cut slits on both sides 2cm apart leaving the middle as the trunk. Twist each strip twice (once as you get to the smaller ones). • Cut out a star and place at the top of the tree. • Use a pastry brush to eggwash the trunk of the tree then bake for 15 – 20 minutes until golden brown. ■

Illustration by Cat Faulkner

Recipe (2).qxp_Layout 7 21/11/2019 11:33 Page 1


Firehouse fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:26 Page 1


Ideal Trade Co. FP.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:25 Page 1


P71.qxp_Layout 23 22/11/2019 16:46 Page 1

Welcome to Sunday lunch e food we’re cooking at our wonderfully intriguing Dispensary restaurant is all about a social style of eating, which is why we’ve introduced a relaxed and indulgent Sunday lunch to the mix. We love elevating the best of British, seasonal ingredients to create the sort of quintessentially English comfort food you really want to eat, so bring family and friends and come and try it!

The Dispensary Sunday lunch 12.30-3.30pm Two courses £23.50 / three courses £28.50 Children up to age 12, two courses £11.50 / three courses £14 Selection of breads, oils

Very Best Wishes for the Festive Season

Stters French onion soup, sourdough croutons Wiltshire game terrine, pickled onions, stout and treacle bread Matt’s home cured salmon, pink peppercorns, lemon, horseradish Wyfe of Bath cheese soufflé, burnt leeks Roasted beetroot, toasted seeds, pickled mushrooms, malt crumb

Mains

From all the team at

All roasts served with carrot purée, Yorkshire pudding, seasonal greens, roast onion, roast potatoes, cauliflower cheese Rare roast beef, horseradish cream Braised shoulder of lamb, mint sauce Hampshire pork belly, apple sauce Roast nut tartlet, kale pesto Cod loin, lemon and chive crushed new potatoes, white wine cream sauce For a minimum of two people: Traditional beef Wellington served pink, red wine gravy Seasonal vegetables, roast potatoes (£7 supplement per person)

Puings

Advertisers Please Note:

Apple crumble, thyme ice-cream Classic lemon tart, pouring cream Chocolate mousse, hazelnuts, blood orange sorbet Bath So Cheese, homemade chutney, crackers Selection of homemade ice-creams and sorbets To reserve a table please visit www.no15greatpulteney.co.uk or call 01225 807015.

The Deadline for Receiving Copy for the January 2020 Issue is Wednesday December 11th

Telephone 01225 424 499 15 Great Pulteney St, Bath BA2 4BR

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 71


Freshford Food.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:41 Page 1

A selection of Darcy pies from The Freshford Food Co

Sing a song of Freshford

In the heart of the Bath countryside there is some serious baking activity afoot. Melissa Blease finds out more from Freshford Food Co’s head baker Rachel Milsom who is preparing for their stall at the Bath Christmas Market

T

he picture-perfect, super-pretty village of Freshford (around five miles south east of Bath) is wellknown around these parts for being the ultimate ‘escape to the country’ location. Whether you choose to meander alongside the Avon or Frome rivers, cycle along the Kennet and Avon Canal towpath, or leap in the car to get there, you’re very quickly at the heart of a village that looks like a backdrop for a scene in a Beatrix Potter story. And if you’re in search of refreshment at journey’s end, you’ve most certainly come to the right place. Situated at the bottom of a gentle hill offering views across acres of countryside from the front, adjacent to a bridge across a 72 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMber 2019

|

tinkling brook to the right of the entrance and featuring a quirky collection of magical, split-level gardens to either chill out or soak up the rays in (those long lost days of summer will find us again one day), The Inn at Freshford – an artfully funky, no-fuss contemporary inn – specialises in proper, down-to-earth modern pub grub and proper, upmarket liquid refreshment. And although the inn has origins dating back to the 16th century, there’s a thoroughly modern backstory to the recent developments in the kitchen. In September, the lovely folk responsible for The Inn at Freshford celebrated the launch of the Freshford Food Co (FFC): creators and purveyors of an ever-evolving

issue 207

range of small-batch, home-cooked artisan goodies all made on site at the inn, and available via an online order/delivery box service to domestic and wholesale customers. The selection includes the FFC’s delectable Darcy Pies (which, by the way, have nothing to do with Jane Austen’s dashing leading man and everything to do with being named in tribute to FFC founder Jack de Bruin’s daughter), superb sausage rolls, sublime Scotch eggs and mixed boxes themed according to the season alongside super-cool condiments and sweet treats, flaunting outstanding vegetarian/vegan variations across the whole product range. And just to add further cheerful spin to this tasty initiative, every single step from the sourcing


Freshford Food.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:41 Page 2

FOOD | & | DRINK

of ingredients and cooking procedures to the packaging and transport puts environmentally friendly policies and procedures at the forefront of all their activities. “The Freshford Food Co is a really lovely business to be a part of,” says the company’s head baker Rachel Milsom, taking a break from making a batch of mincemeat shortbread in the company’s kitchen, upstairs from the pub. “The team are united by a love of good food, and we’re all passionate about sharing that love with our customers.” Rachel’s role is integral to proceedings at the very heart of the FFC menu; she makes all the bread, desserts, cakes and pastry across the whole range. And like her colleagues – who bring more than 40 years’ worth of combined skills and experience to the FFC – she provides an impressive back catalogue of experience to the new initiative.

Rachel starts work in the kitchen at dawn most days and doesn’t turn the ovens off until way after sunset

“I moved to Bath around 30 years ago, when I was 18,” she tells me. “I started off in the hospitality industry working in hotels and restaurants in the fine dining sector; I was pastry chef at The Olive Tree in 1993, before I went to The White Hart in Widcombe where I worked for around eight years. I’ve made cakes for Mokoko, too, which is where I met Jessica Langford-Snape, the owner of the Wild Flour Cake Company in Timsbury – I trained her up, then she asked me to work with her. Of course I said yes – I’m a bit of a machine when it comes to work!” A machine? It’s a proclivity that’ll stand Rachel – who starts work in the kitchen at dawn most days and doesn’t turn the ovens off until way after sunset – in good stead at this time of year, when taking tasteful, convenient shortcuts to stocking up fridges and larders with the most indulgent, treatsome food we can get our hands on is at the top of our agenda. “As well as cooking for the FFC and our pub kitchens [you’ll find all manner of FFC products on the menu at the Inn at Freshford’s sister pubs including The Old Crown Inn in Kelston and The Griffin Inn in Bath city centre], I’m cooking for our two Bath Christmas Market stalls too, one for our bakery products and one for sausage rolls. So far I’ve made 500 Christmas cakes and 400 Christmas puddings, and I’m

keeping on going!” Ah, those sausage rolls. I recently took delivery of a box of FFC goodies as a research exercise prior to writing this feature (our investigative journalism standards need to be thorough) and the flaky pastry-wrapped porkers – one traditional and one vegetarian incarnation, both of which can only be described as sensational – are the stuff of frenzied foodie dreams made flesh after just 10 minutes in the oven. We tasted the Darcy Pies, too: chicken and leek featuring huge chunks of cheerful chicken in a thoroughly indulgent sauce, and a perfectly balanced spicy veggie version. At first glance, on serving (they only need a 25-ish minute heat-up before hitting pie perfection) I uttered a line that that swiftly topped my ‘Most Ridiculous Words I’ve Ever Uttered’ charts by suggesting that one pie would easily serve two people; on tucking in, I replaced my suggestion with ‘No Way Am I Sharing!’ We served the sausage rolls with dollops of FFC Piccalilli mustard on the side, the Scotch eggs (did I mention the Scotch eggs? Cricket ball-sized domes of lusciousness, again available in veggie format as well as a porky one; howzat?) with a pile of pineapple chilli chutney (sounds weird, but honestly, it’s a winning combo), and the pies with a heap of homemade mash. Unfortunately, the presentation, service, surroundings and accompanying wine were nowhere near as good as the high standards set by the pub that spawned the business that supplied our feast, but the actual food goes down in history as one of the best athome feasts we’ve indulged in for a while; next time I’m hosting a comfort foodthemed supper party, you can guess who I’ll be turning to for the catering. Talking of which...

The Darcy pie

The festive food box

Those aforementioned seasonal mixed boxes tick off all manner of, erm, boxes in one swift click. Whether you’re gifting or being greedy this December, FFC’s seasonal festive box has got your name all over it, bringing charcuterie, game terrine, mushroom parfait, two festive pork pies, pretzels, melba toast, spple and chipotle jelly and one of Rachel’s massive 1kg Christmas cakes direct to your doorstep for £65... and lightening Santa’s workload in fine style. “I really, really love every aspect of my job,” says Rachel, before returning to her ovens – and you can taste that love in every bite. n

The Freshford Food Co: freshfordfoodco.com

Traditional pork pie

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEmbEr 2019

|

ThEBATHmagazinE 73


Bath Food Gifts page.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 11:36 Page 1

SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

Wassail and drink hail Tantalise your taste buds with our festive feast of Christmas food, wine and merrymaking indulgences. It’s time to celebrate the season to the very last crumb

1 Pink Pepper Gin gift pack, Audemus, £45. Great Western Wine; greatwesternwine.co.uk 2. Jellies Gift Set (Damson, Mint and Bramble), £10. The Pockeredge Pantry; thepockeredgepantry.co.uk 3. Somerset Sparkling Wine in a Taste of Bath wooden gift box, £40. Taste of Bath; taste-of.co.uk 4. All Wrapped Up festive hamper, £185. Harvey Nichols; harveynichols.com 5. Naturally crafted Booch Bubbly 75cl, £8. Available from Wolf Wine; Green Park Market 6. Godminster Triple Cheddar Collection £20. Larkhall Butchers; larkhallbutchers.co.uk 7. Paco Garcia Experiencia N3 (2 bottles), £42.50, Le Vignoble; levignoble.co.uk 8. Orchard Blush Gin 35cl, £19.99, Thatchers Cider Shop; thatcherscider.co.uk 9. Praline milk chocolate truffles with sea salt, £8.99, The Roman Baths Shop; romanbaths.co.uk Lyra

74 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMBeR 2019

|

iSSUe 207


GWW FP.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 13:13 Page 1


Treasure hunt DECEMBER.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:52 Page 1

TREASURE | HUNT

Christmas treasure hunt

For our treasure hunt this year we have raided 10 galleries and museums in Bath to test your knowledge of their precious wares. Can you uncover the answers to all 20 questions? Compiled by Catherine Pitt

T

here’s an intoxicating prize to be be won for the clever winner of our galleries and museums treasure hunt – a £100 card to use in Le Vignoble’s self-serve Enomatic dispensers. The monthly wine selections cater for every taste, with wine varieties from all corners of the globe. You need to be prepared to visit the local museums and be thorough while you are taking part in the treasure hunt – you’ll need to look up and find hidden places in some instances. All the featured venues are open in December, but check for specific opening

times. Discovery Cards are accepted in many of the venues, enabling either free or reduced entry. Send your entries by post to The Bath Magazine, 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED or by email to: competitions@thebathmagazine.co.uk by midnight on 30 December 2019. Mark your entries Treasure Hunt 2019 and don’t forget to include your name, address, email and phone number so we can get in touch in the event of your winning. We will select the winner by putting all the correct entries in a hat and drawing one at random. n

2

1

1. I stand aloft and survey the city, scroll in hand, but who am I?

3

4

3. Before technology took over, one read a 2. You can weather most storms with this book. These three are all connected, but what bright jacket and tie by Michael Fish, but who gifted it to the museum you’ll find it in? are their titles?

4. A mystery object here, perhaps one for the ladies. Find it and it will reveal its secret – what was it made for?

6

6. Sniff me out, I’m almost 150 years old, but who made me?

7. This angel weeps over a memorial to its right, but who does it weep for? Tell us for whom the memorial is dedicated. 76 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

iSSUe 207

5

5. This one may drive your round the bend, but that’s only to frame you. What is the name of the painting depicted within?

7

7. It’s all Greek to me! Where can you see this pretty architectural feature?


Treasure hunt DECEMBER.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:53 Page 2

TREASURE | HUNT

8

8. Hop along to this museum to find this amphibian and tell us who made and signed it.

9

9. The purrfect employee, but what was Wally’s collar number – the clue will be evident on the wall nearby.

11

10

10. A famous Emma wrote this and illustrated her note with the depiction of an animal. Name the creature.

11. This object might spark your imagination, so tell us where you might find this sculpture.

13

12

12. You don’t want to be on the receiving end of what was held in one of these curious things. What is the name of the people who used this object?

13. Don’t let its size stump you, seek out this object and tell us its approximate date.

14

14. The pipes are calling, calling for you, for near this instrument hangs a plaque and pipes on which what words are inscribed?

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

➲ |

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 77


Treasure hunt DECEMBER.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:53 Page 3

TREASURE | HUNT

15

15. Wade through this museum’s objects and tell us the collection reference of this plate.

16

16. Set sail on your tour and name the captain of this particular ‘ship’ who was in charge in 1958?

17

19

18

17. Fashion forward Georgians kept cool with such a dress, but what is the motif printed upon it called? You’ll find out if you visit me.

20 18. A curse upon this house: I lie between a missing cape and cloak, but who wrote me?

19. It may have been too late for this object, but it’s never too late to answer this question – where was the town and county it should have ended up at?

WIN AN ENOMATIC CARD WORTH £100 AT LE VIGNOBLE The winner of our Christmas treasure hunt will win a £100 Enomatic card to use at Le Vignoble in Milsom Place. Le Vignoble is a hybrid wine business providing a relaxing place to discover and enjoy wine. The winner will be able to visit Le Vignoble’s wine lounge and help themselves and their guests to glasses of wine from the self-service Enomatic dispensers. The prize must be taken before the end of March 2020. If you are tempted to treat yourself or like the idea for a Christmas present for a loved one, call Le Vignoble on 01225 465907; levignoble.co.uk 20. By heavens you must look up to reach the stars, below an instrument passes the time, but who made it? 78 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

iSSUe 207


GWR FP.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:08 Page 1


city news dec.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 12:38 Page 1

CITY | NEWS

MORE FOREVER FUNDS

THE EYES HAVE IT

BROADBAND WOES

Employees from Andrews estate agents in Bath and Midsomer Norton have committed to support the RUH’s Forever Friends Appeal and turn £20 into £20,000, with all money raised going towards the breast unit at the RUH. There is a quiz night on 3 December at The Claremont in Camden, a fundraising day on 12 December across all the Bath Andrews branches and a raffle, to be drawn on 25 January between 5–7pm at The Bear Hotel in Bear Flat. The prize draw will take place on Burns Night in Poets Corner in recognition of one of the first RUH fundraising events that ever took place in the mid-1800s. Tickets for the raffle evening, which include a buffet and raffle ticket, cost £20. “We were excited to be involved in such a worthwhile cause for an invaluable resource in the community that we all rely upon”, said Nik Carson, general manager at The Bear Hotel. “The sense of community is very strong in Bath and we are looking forward to hosting this event and welcoming people in support of the RUH.” Visit your local Andrews branch in Bath to find out more and buy tickets or donate directly to: justgiving.com/fundraising/ andrews-forever-friends

Ellis and Killpartrick Opticians is celebrating its 40th year. The opticians was established by Brian Ellis and Mike Killpartrick in 1979, both sharing an interest in the new soft contact lenses being developed at the time. As well as contact lenses, Mike now also offers advice on glaucoma and macular degeneration. The spectacle side of the business has been expanded to showcase high-quality luxury brands and the company is now exclusive distributors for Cartier, Lindberg, Gucci, Chopard and Dunhill. Ellis and Killpartrick are committed to providing patients with information about the latest developments in eye health to help maintain the best possible vision throughout life. ellisandkillpartrick.com

A new survey of 135 Somerset-based firms shows a huge appetite for faster, more reliable broadband connectivity. The survey, undertaken by local full fibre broadband provider Truespeed in partnership with the Somerset Chamber of Commerce, reveals that 42% of businesses still don’t have access to fibre broadband. The survey also reports that half of Somerset businesses tolerate daily or weekly drop-outs in their broadband service, and almost half (48%) struggle to access online banking services. Jez Allman, sales director at Truespeed, said, “We must act now to avoid a twospeed nation in which largely rural counties such as Somerset are left languishing in the digital slow lane.” truespeed.com

Approximately 25% of the people who work in Bath are aged 18–24.

MAKING WISHES COME TRUE Age UK B&NES are making sure that the magic of Christmas is alive for some of the 12,000 older people they help. Assisted by many generous local business who are donating time, money or goods, Age UK B&NES staff elves are working to make their wishes come true. One example is how choir leader, Matt Finch, has donated his time to help the charities make their first ever Christmas single with their Bath Day Centre and children from Widcombe Infant School. Contact Age UK if you’d like to help make a wish come true for an older person in your community. ageuk.org.uk n

The Bear Hotel bar

Did You Know?

Jez Allman

BATH BUSINESS BAROMETER UPDATE: OCTOBER 2019

provided by

High Street Footfall (Month on month % change)

n Footfall across the country fell in October compared to September. Springboard speculates that this is due to low consumer confidence on top of less than ideal weather. Bath was no exception, but October’s strongest week was week 42 when there was a 4% increase in footfall (compared to the same week last year). It was also the only week this month when it was not raining on a Saturday. The St Lawrence Street North area was the strongest in October, averaging a 31% yearon-year increase, coinciding with JD Sports’ opening and the Day of the Dead celebrations and installations in SouthGate. Sales in October appear to have ended on a positive note, boosted by week-on-week increases in the retail sector. n EVENTS: The main event of this month is the annual Christmas Market, going on until 15 December. But don’t miss out on the other festivities throughout the month – there are traditional market carts in SouthGate until the 15th, Father Christmas’ workshop will be popping up at Milsom Place every weekend (until Christmas) and catch your favourite holiday films at Slug & Lettuce every Wednesday night (also until Christmas). Find more on our comprehensive events calendar at bathbid.co.uk/events

Bath

-5.5% South West UK

-10.9%

-4.0% Springboard Research Ltd.

80 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207

Photo by Paul Gillis

CITYNEWS


Truespeed fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:24 Page 1


P82.qxp_Layout 22 21/11/2019 16:07 Page 1

ocl

141 Englishcombe Lane, Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

Company Car Changes in 2020

A C C O U N TA N C Y

If you have use of a company car for private travel then you will pay tax on the value of the benefit calculated by reference to a Co2 emissions percentage that is applied to its list price.There will be further tax to pay if your employer also pays for your fuel for private journeys; this based on an annual fixed fuel benefit charge & the Co2 emissions. There are also NI contributions. With the environment very much in the headlines HMRC is introducing changes to the tax regime to favour greener cars. With effect from 6 April 2020 a zero tax charge will make a comeback applying to company cars: a) registered before or after 6 April 2020 powered wholly by electricity and therefore producing zero emissions and b) cars registered on or after 6 April 2020 which have emissions up to 50g/km and can be driven solely on electrical power for 130 miles or more. In the case of cars with up to 50g/km emissions not meeting the 130 miles threshold the rates used will depend on whether they were registered before or after 6 April 2020. A hybrid registered before 6 April 2020 with a range of 70 to 129 miles will result in a taxable charge of 5% of list price whereas a comparable car registered after 6 April 2020 will have a taxable charge of 3% list price. This disparity between pre and post 6 April 2020 registered cars is largely reflected throughout the new car tax regime. Generally speaking, cars registered after 6 April 2020 will be taxed 2% less on list price than comparable cars registered before that date. For example, a company car registered before 6 April 2020 with emissions between 100g/km and 104g/km will be taxed on 25% of list price whereas the rate for a later registered car with the same emissions will be 23% It is proposed that this differential will be reduced over the next two tax years as the lower rate rises to meet higher rates. Lower rates of benefit will be good news for employees using zero and very low emission cars by reducing their tax burden and for employers in reducing their NI charges.Whereas the separate tax charge for provision of car fuel for private journeys has become less tax efficient and therefore less popular, the introduction of 0% rates for some hybrid cars from April 2020 will allow for the provision of fuel in these cases to become a more attractive low tax perk.

For tax saving tips contact us – call Marie Sheldrake, Tom Hulett or Jacqui Bates on 01225 445507 We wish you all a peaceful Christmas and a healthy & happy 2020!

A Property Owner’s Guide to Commercial Tenancy

The process of drawing up a commercial lease can be a convoluted and time-consuming experience. Our Commercial Property team at Mogers Drewett has developed this quick and easy guide to help steer potential landlords through some initial considerations. Tenancy background checks It may seem obvious, but knowing who your tenant will be and their ability to keep tenant covenants is vital. Questions to consider should include, how viable is the tenant’s business? Would it be wise to secure a rent deposit? Should a limited company tenant provide a personal guarantor? Lender considerations A commercial property mortgage is typically a long-term loan of up to 25 years and provided at a rate of 70% of the property's value. The remaining amount will need to be funded by the tenant business and their associated rent. When selecting a lender, it is important to ensure that bank consent will be forthcoming on the grant of a lease. Ensuring your own house is in order All leases in excess of 7 years have to be registered at the land registry. Title documents need to be available to the tenant at the outset of the transaction. If there are missing documents, the sooner your legal advisor is aware, the sooner corrective action can be taken. For a lease of longer than 7 years land registry compliant plans are required and should be professionally drawn up. Repair and maintenance When investing in property it is vital that you are aware of the condition of the property and your associated responsibilities for repairs as landlord. Being certain about who is responsible for repair and maintenance can prove to be one of the most important aspects at the end of the lease when establishing end of term liabilities. The importance of break clauses Break clauses (the ability to end the lease early) are amongst the most heavily litigated terms in a lease and require careful drafting. It is always a good idea to obtain legal advice to ensure the clause meets your requirements and that you can comply with any conditions in the break clause to avoid the risk of you losing the right to end the lease early. For detailed support and advice on commercial property tenancy agreements, visit www.mogersdrewett.com. Richard Pike, Partner, Commercial Property team at Mogers Drewett

Call Marie Sheldrake, Tom Hulett or Jacqui Bates on 01225 445507 to arrange a no-obligation meeting 82 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207


Abbey pews.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 14:58 Page 1

CITY | HISTORY

Take a pew

A unique collection of hand-carved oak pews that used to reside in Bath Abbey and were designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott are up for sale carved four-metre oak pews, unsold due to their undesirable length. In the 1860s, Sir George Gilbert Scott – one of the era’s greatest Neo-Gothic architects – won the commission to restore Bath Abbey to its former glory. Scott was tasked with restoring the abbey’s roof and interior and designed and installed the hand-crafted oak pews to reside within his Gothic masterpiece. Each pew is unique, with the pew-end designs inspired by the stonework, memorials and Gothic designs within the abbey. The pews remained in situ until 2014, when the abbey announced its Footprint Project, a major renovation and redevelopment of the building. The Victorian Society, dedicated to the preservation of Britain’s Victorian heritage, tried to prevent the removal of the Gothic pews and took the abbey to court. The abbey won and decided to sell off the pews discreetly. Pews can be ordered in the original 4m length, at three reduced sizes or at a custom size. Each pew comes with a certificate of provenance, approved by the abbey’s experts. Bath Abbey’s pews are for sale at limited release at bathabbeypews.com n

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

Photos by Paul Gillis

J

ules Mittra, a former local history teacher, is selling pews from Bath Abbey via online auction to raise capital to fund the growth of his tour business, Around and About Bath. Jules heard about the pews and straight away understood their historical significance. Bath was home to one of the earliest Christian communities within the British Isles. Bath Abbey is located above the Roman temple to Minerva, an effort by early Christians to bury the dying Roman gods beneath the glorious edifices of the all-powerful Christian god. By the 900s, the abbey was considered one of the most magnificent buildings in England. In 975, Edgar was crowned King of England, the first to hold that title anad he chose Bath Abbey for its splendour, which would reflect his reign and confirm his favour from God. With these stories in mind, Jules decided to buy two pews. His plan was to have them reduced in size with the off-cut pieces being recycled into mementoes. Jules arrived at the entrance of a colossal, disused Cold War aircraft to collect them and was confronted with the sight of row after row of beautifully

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 83


Bath at work dec.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 12:17 Page 1

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151


Bath at work dec.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 10:31 Page 2

Bath @ work

Our series of photographic portraits by Neill Menneer shows Bath people at work. View a gallery of Bath@work subjects at: thebathmag.co.uk

David Babb

Commercial painter

I

was born in 1954 in the Chinese laundry on Walcot Street, Bath (on hot wash!). I lived at James Buildings near Hedgemead Park. Dad worked in the sooty, smoke-filled Bath foundry at the end of Walcot Street, while mum worked at the laundry until we moved to Odd Down in 1962. I moved from the small Walcot Infant School to Fosseway Junior School, with the much-respected Mr Jerome the head teacher. Life for kids back then seemed so much more adventurous, with self-run games of football going on until the winning team reached 30 goals or more. We also played knock knock ginger, forty forty, street rounders and hopscotch. Showing an artistic flair for drawing, painting and lettering, I was nominated for a place at The Bath Art School. I managed to impress and acquire a position at the school. I was delighted, so you can imagine my horror at being told that I also had to study maths, English, history and science. I can remember telling them: “No, you don’t understand, I’m here to draw and paint.” Five years later I was ready to join the working community and fulfil my dreams of becoming a sign writer, only to find that traditional sign writing had largely been replaced with neon and vinyl lettering. I decided to try my hand at painting and decorating instead, working for a local building company while trying to build my own customer base, as I always intended working for myself. It didn’t take long for me to become selfemployed. The 1970s and early 1980s were a busy time for me, carrying out decorative finishes such as wood graining, marbling, paper hanging, tiling, artexing and coving. I’ve always had lots of hobbies and interests but photography has been one of my favourites – I would spend hours in my darkroom developing and printing my pictures. Eventually I was asked if I could photograph the wedding of a daughter of a family friend and agreed. Things moved rapidly from there with many requests for wedding photography based on the photographs I had taken. I initially did this alongside my decorating work but this meant that the majority of my time was spent away from my wife Yve and my young son Jake (Charlie was then just a twinkle in my eye). A year or two later, I decided to take the plunge, work full-time in photography and opened a wedding and portrait studio. I also took the annual photographs at many of the city’s schools and some commercial work such as album covers for local music artists. Yve came to work with me when our two sons started school, so for the next 18 years we based our work around them, enjoying their young lives and achievements immensely. When digital photography came to the fore, I decided to return to decorating. I did not forget the skills of more than 20 years earlier and am currently enjoying decorating commercial and private properties in and around Bath. Neill has photographed me decorating the Graham & Green shop in Walcot Street, so my life has come full circle. n David Babb: 07701 087615 PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151 THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

december 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 85


Wadswick simulator.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:54 Page 1

Shooting simulator in action on clay pigeons

Shoot to thrill You need to keep both eyes open when using a shotgun, discovers Simon Horsford as he tries out the shooting simulator at Wadswick Country Store in Corsham and takes aim at imaginary pheasants, grouse and wild boar

I

tracked the wild boar with my rifle as it emerged from the bushes in the German countryside. It was around 60 metres away and I had to be accurate because the last thing I wanted was to get on the wrong side of an angry 200kg boar. I pulled the trigger and the boar went down – a perfect shot, despite no bullet being fired. ‘Shoot, train, play’ is the catchline for the shooting simulator at Wadswick Country Store, near Corsham, which, since it opened two and a half years ago, has been the place to go, not only to hone your skills with a shotgun or rifle, or to get in some practice before the shooting season, but also as a fun venue where groups as various as stag, hen or birthday parties and family groups and corporate bonding outings can tackle a variety of shooting disciplines from clays, tin cans and balloons to pheasant, grouse, mallard, moose, and, yes, wild boar.

“Think of it in terms of DRS (the technology-based system used to help umpires with their decision-making in cricket) or VAR (football’s equivalent) for shooting,” says Dan Scull, who runs the simulator. “You shoot and we see what’s going on via simple mathematics and a digital camera showing how you look over the gun and how you mount [the gun]. Every single move you make is recorded and transferred to the screen in front of you and shown in real time or re-played back.” So you immediately see how accurate you are. Made in Sweden, it’s certainly very clever with a high-tech camera sensor (no laser light is used), attached to the barrel of the shooter’s gun, which registers gun movements, firing direction and trigger-pull timing with high precision. The system also offers up a variety of locations and landscapes. Poppy Clifford, manager of Wadswick’s gunroom, says the

Shooting simulator analysis and feedback screen showing location of shot in relation to target 86 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMber 2019

|

issue 207

advantage of their simulator – there are only three in the country – is that, uniquely, it offers two screens, one six metres wide, so you can shoot from right to left or vice versa, and another set at 45 degrees to simulate incoming overhead birds. “It’s a very good entry point to learning to shoot,” adds Poppy. My only experience of firing a gun before my visit to the simulator was shooting clays while doing a story on sport shooter Peter Wilson after his victory in the double trap final at the 2012 Olympics. He gave me a lesson and praised my efforts in hitting virtually all the clays. The simulator was a different story. Dan took me through the basics and handed me a Caesar Guerini Temio Light shotgun, reminding me that what makes the weapon lethal is not the gun itself, but the person holding it. Of course, in this instance, we aren’t using cartridges, anyway. Dan is ex-army and knows his stuff. We begin as the screen brings up a snowy field of rape in Germany and I am after pheasant. “Aim and relax,” says Dan as he tells me to follow a line through the bird and shoot. I miss. I’ve instinctively closed one eye (“keep both open when using a shotgun”, he reminds me) and also flinched at the thought of the recoil, even though there is none. We try again and Dan shows me on the screen where I shot and traces the jagged movement of my gun. “You’ve drawn a bunny rabbit,” he laughs. In more basic terminology, he says, it’s about “bum, belly, beak, bang.” Eventually, I get it and register a couple of kills. “Shooting game on here is similar to shooting in the field,” says Poppy, “other than


Wadswick simulator.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 09:55 Page 2

CITY | ACTIVITIES

the fact that there is no recoil, but how the bird gets faster, deviates and moves [can be replicated here].” I wonder if it is better than shooting clays and Dan, unsurprisingly, agrees: “When you first go clay shooting, you may get 10 clays, you get hit in the shoulder and banged in the face (by the recoil) and have no idea what you’ve hit, or how, or why. If you then come here you can have 250 clays in an hour and not have that fear of being hit by the recoil.” Dan can also tell you immediately where you are going wrong – or right. For that reason also, the simulator is also becoming increasingly popular with women and families. Both Dan and Poppy point to the fact that more women have also taken up the sport – and are going pheasant shooting – since the 2012 Olympics watching Peter Wilson and, more recently, the exploits of skeet shooter Amber Hill. Dan says gun manufacturers have also been quick to adjust to the market with three leading gun-makers bringing out new guns for women (the shape of the stock is the main difference) from around £1,500. But back to the screen. Next up we are in the highlands of southern France and grouse shooting. These appear more elusive than the pheasant and I miss a few. “Stop overthinking,” says Dan as I eventually bag a couple. I then switch to a rifle, the Swedishmade, bolt-action Tikka T3 Lite with a hunting scope with a red-dot sight to improve accuracy. We start on some targets and I do well before shooting down five balloons in a given time. Then we move on to that wild boar in Germany. I miss a few before getting my range and accuracy and the satisfaction of seeing it roll over after the right shot. The one aspect missing from the simulator would seem to be the adrenaline buzz of being out in the wild, but as Poppy points outs “this is the closest we have got to being on the ‘peg’ and watching that first bird being flushed out.” And Dan adds: “It’s about adrenaline, yes, but not a blood-thirst. It’s the knowledge that you have done as much training as possible so that when that bird comes down, it is not pricked [wounded] and is an instant kill. It’s about giving the bird more respect.” This takes our conservation on to issues ranging from land management by the National Trust (and its effect on ground birds) to game conservancy – a subject close to Dan’s heart as he is also a bushcraft instructor and he keeps wild boar – and how game consumption has gone up in recent years. “We rear probably 18-million pheasants in the UK …and the majority stays here so what’s reared here, stays here. We are also now importing boar because demand is so high.” Dan also points out that game meat is leaner [than other meats] and organic, “the only hurdle [to people eating game] is Bambi,” he jokes, “the anthropomorphism, Disneyfication of animals.” For some added fun – should you need it – Dan can also set up a “rapid target acquisition” scenario where you shoot a range

of targets (tin cans) in a limited time span. In the store’s swish café, I meet Alex Barton, who runs the gun room, and whose family have been arable farming here for more than half a century and launched the initial store in 1990. He explains they initially sold animal foodstuffs, but it has grown over the years to include its country store with its wellestablished equestrian and shooting supplies, such as clothing and boots. The gun room (“a good complementary offering”) and the simulator followed, while the new-look café opened this year. Barton also believes that the shop benefits from the fact that because people are ‘time poor’ these days they want to make the day a bit more of an occasion so they can have breakfast or lunch as well as going shopping. Another advantage is that items such as riding boots or helmets should also be fitted properly, he says, and you can do that on site “which gives people more confidence than buying them online.” Barton has a beautiful range of guns for sale in the gun room by leading manufacturers such as Beretta and Browning and Blaser. “Probably more than half the time people are

trading a gun in, so that’s a challenge. Our guns go up to around £20,000, but most sell at around £1,500.” Unlike most gun shops, the one at Wadswick is open seven days a week and the simulator adds another dimension. “It works in three ways: first for coaching, then for the ‘play’ element and, thirdly, it’s also brilliant for trying out a gun before buying one,” adds Barton. Ultimately, via the clothing and the gun room and the simulator, the aim is to drive footfall and they certainly have a huge range of clientele, “from someone down the road buying chicken feed to those people buying shotguns.” Future plans include the possibility of a wellness centre at the site, although there won’t be a farm shop – there is an abundance of them in the area anyway. The restaurant does serve game, however, when in season – pheasant was recently on the menu. What’s happening at Wadswick is an indication of the diversification farmers are having to consider these days and with the gun shop, the simulator and the new café, they appear to be hitting the right targets. n wadswick.co.uk

The gunroom at Wadswick

Overhead screen in shooting simulator, pitched at 45 degrees overhead to replicate incoming targets

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEmbEr 2019

|

ThEBATHmagazinE 87


St Johns Hospital.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 17:21 Page 1

CITY | HISTORY

Taking up alms

Historian Catherine Pitt explores St John’s Foundation, one of the UK’s oldest almshouse charities, and discovers a medieval site that has always had charitable work at its heart

S

St Peter’s Priory (now Bath Abbey) oversaw the day-to-day running of St John’s. A master oversaw the administration and care, a reader took services, plus there was a washerwoman from the local community. Funding came from the church in the form of tithes, land and gifts and donations. From the 12th to the 16th centuries St John’s received two sheaves of corn per annum (later five shillings), a tithe of bread and salted meat, dead wood from the parks and woods owned by the monastery for firewood, pasture rights on Lansdown, and an annual payment of four silver marks (around £2,000 today). Local benefactors also provided donations and legacies. Bequests such as that from Richard of Combe and his wife Alice stipulated that in return for their land near Frome, the incumbents of St John’s would pray for their souls. Bath had its fair share of travellers, as well as the poor and sick. People visited the city to use the healing waters, while others stopped on their way to the pilgrimage sites at Glastonbury and Canterbury. Travellers’ needs were met in Bath through other almshouses that opened, such as St

Catherine’s (c.1444) and Bellott’s Hospital (c.1609). An even earlier hospital in Holloway, St Mary Magdalene (founded between 1088 and 1100) was specifically for the care of lepers. These were over time amalgamated into St John’s estate. St John’s originally provided shelter for no more than 15 poor local men and women. The St John’s of today however, has five almshouses (four at their city centre site and one at Combe Park) divided into apartments and housing 98 residents. The charity also manages 60 commercial and residential properties and it is the income generated from these properties which enables St John’s to carry out its extensive charitable work. The medieval site of St John’s has long since vanished after centuries of rebuilding. What stands today was begun in 1716 by William Killigrew and completed by John Wood the Elder around 1727. We know from extant medieval hospitals that St John’s probably began as an open hall with beds divided by screens (and by sex), with a chapel at the east end. Residents were expected to attend chapel twice a day. Today the chapel is known as Images © St John’s Foundation

t John’s Foundation is hidden, but in plain sight. You may never have noticed the small iron gateway behind the Cross Bath in Bath’s city centre that’s open during daylight hours, or perhaps you’ve never stepped through, but if you did you would find yourself stepping back in time and into the courtyard of a charity that has existed in our city for 845 years. Founded in 1174 by the 4th Bishop of Bath, Reginald Fitz Jocelyn (d.1191), St John’s (previously known as St John’s Hospital) was created for the benefit of the poor and sick of the city. With no government welfare available if people were incapacitated by sickness or old age, poverty was never far behind. The word ‘hospital’ comes from the Latin hospitalis, meaning relating to guests. Early hospitals offered shelter and sustenance to travellers and pilgrims, and a chapel was also built to meet spiritual needs. At first medical care wasn’t offered at St John’s, but as increasing numbers of the elderly residents needed care, infirmaries were created.

The main courtyard at St John’s Foundation

88 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207


St Johns Hospital.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 17:21 Page 2

CITY | HISTORY

St Michaels’ Within, after a church that once stood on St John’s land near to where the Little Theatre Cinema is today, and with whom it shared a cemetery. During the chapel’s re-building in the 18th century it was discovered that it remains in the footprint of the 12th-century hospital chapel. Medieval inhabitants of St John’s adhered to a strict set of rules on entry. Not only did they have to display piety, but impeccable behaviour, with no drinking or cursing allowed. Sarah Dill, who in the 17th century was removed from St Catherine’s Almshouse on Bilbury Lane for swearing, scolding and begging, would most certainly not have been admitted to St John’s. In return the residents were paid 4s 2d per week, given food, shelter, and provided with a blue smock. It is the colour of this ‘uniform’ that led to the moniker of ‘Blue Alms’ in relation to St John’s occupants. The hospital was located, as it still is, between two of the thermal baths, which residents could (and still can) access. This eased the aches and pains of the sick and elderly in a time when doctors were not provided and treatment was limited. When the renaissance of the spa took place in the 18th century, St John’s was perfectly placed, owning lots of land and property around the Cross Bath and Hot Baths. Revenue on its properties increased but it is not known if the residents’ conditions improved – although for the master and officials at that time it did. When the monasteries were dissolved in the 16th century around half of all church and monastic almshouses across England and Wales were closed. St John’s survived, thanks to the decision by the Crown in 1536 to appoint a layman, Simon Shepherd, to the mastership. Although this was to the chagrin of the snubbed Prior of Bath, in the long term it facilitated St John’s survival. By the 16th century the hospital had become a wealthy institution, owning property, land, and in Paulton and Timsbury The chapel of St Michael’s Within at St John’s Hospital, after being bombed in the Second World War

A view into the courtyard of St John’s Foundation

operating coal mines. By the 19th century St John’s held nearly 400 properties in and around the city, including in the slum district of Avon Street. Although over the centuries the charity attracted philanthropists and benefactors, it also attracted those who wished to gain personally. William Crouch was one such man. In the early 16th century Crouch was in service to Bath Priory. He not only persuaded the prior to appoint one of his kinsmen as master of St John’s, but in 1533 Crouch claimed he had also been given the right to choose the next incumbent. Tensions culminated with Bath Priory taking him to court. Aggrieved priory servants even attempted to burn down Crouch’s property in Englishcombe – he reportedly fired arrows back at his attackers. In 1616 John Bewshin was dismissed as master of St John’s when it was discovered that during his 20 years in charge he had not once visited the alms people in his care. The appointment of the next master remained contentious up until the 19th century. After the dissolution of Bath Priory, the Crown, trustees, and Bath Corporation all had a hand in securing the appointment. Many of St John’s residential tenants had been granted 99-year or 125-year leases at low fixed rents, which exonerated the master from inspecting conditions, ordering repairs, and instead pocketing any income made that should have gone into the care of the poor residents at St John’s. Between the 16th and 19th centuries nepotism reared its head when six members of the Chapman family succeeded to the role of master of St John’s. By the 19th century the role of master and that of mayor of Bath went hand in hand. In an attempt to resolve nepotism and potential corruption, St John’s was declared an ecclesiastical trust in 1837. On petition to the Chancery, the Bath Corporation were handed back control of St John’s in 1851 on proviso that it was run by Bath’s Municipal Charity Trust. In the late 19th century improvements began, heralded by petitioning from St John’s

residents and tenants. In 1890 prostitutes were cleared from dilapidated tenements like Chapel Court. In 1911 workshops were demolished to create Shickle Garden, the residents’ private garden between Chandos House and Chapel House. Lastly, in the 1970s grants from the local authorities and English Heritage aided in resolving the issue of the final few properties with no electricity, running water or fixed heating. Today St John’s Foundation continues to support local residents. Its offices and many of its almshouse apartments remain on the original site of the medieval hospital. In addition to its almshouse provision, the St John’s of today also distributes around £2m a year to local charities and organisations as well as running an active community outreach service to tackle loneliness and social isolation. n stjohnsbath.org.uk

The iron gate to the Shickle Garden, the residents’ private garden

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

december 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 89


flash fiction.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 12:09 Page 1

CITY | CULTURE

Inside stories

When does a short story become flash fiction? It’s a matter of music, pauses, and an understanding of what is left unsaid, says writer and tutor Jude Higgins. Here she introduces us to two published examples of the form

F

lash Fiction is a short-short story form that is growing in popularity worldwide and the Bath area is a hot-spot for the genre. So what are flash fictions? In brief, stories under 1,000 words, with many 500 words or fewer. The skill in writing flash fiction successfully is to convey much more than the words written on the page. Author, Bristol-based writer and writing tutor K.M. Elkes, whose story is shown below, says: “Flash leans heavily on the reader’s imagination and their ability to gather what is implied. As in music, it’s not just the sounds that are important, but the silences in between.” Another local flash fiction writer, Bath-based Diane Simmons has written a collection of flash fiction on the theme of grief. Her book Finding a Way shows the journey of one family over four years as they navigate loss. The fictions, told from several different points of view, are tightly written and accessible.

A feature of the flash fiction form is to go quickly to the heart of the matter. Dividing Time, the micro fiction by Diane reproduced opposite, is only 121 words long but says much from a grieving father’s perspective. Finding A Way was recently shortlisted in the short story category of the UK’s Saboteur Awards. One reviewer of the book has said it should be prescribed on the NHS for anyone who has suffered a bereavement and wants to read and be supported by an everyday account of what life is like afterwards. This is the power of short fiction. Stories of few words can have a lasting and meaningful impact. People of all ages and backgrounds write flash fictions. Some write historical stories, some science fiction or humorous pieces. Others write memoir-type fiction or focus on world issues. As in longer form writing, all themes and subject matter can be tackled successfully. Flash fiction can be poetic or written plainly in traditional narrative forms. The very short length allows a writer to try

something new. And like the tiles on a roof or the patchwork pieces in a quilt, you can put individual pieces together in flash fiction ‘chapters’ to create a larger piece. Flash fiction is versatile, addictive and has recently entered mainstream fiction channels with a flash fiction novella Bottled Goods by writer Sophie Van Llewyn being long-listed for the 2019 Women’s Fiction Prize. GETTING INVOLVED So how can you try out writing flash fiction? One way is to experiment with a weekly free micro fiction contest, which is run by Ad Hoc Fiction. To take part, you write a story of up to 150 words that is inspired by a prompt word. It’s possible to do this easily, writing directly on a userfriendly screen on your phone. Long-listed stories using the prompt word are published in an ebook where you then have the chance to read and vote for the winner, who then qualifies for a free entry to Bath Flash Fiction Award and a chance of the £1,000 first prize.

SISYPHUS AND THE BLACK HOLES Nobody explains how there are five stages of grief – having kids in the first place, the experimental pissing phase, the era of sticky door handles, pocket money as a form of quantitative easing, and finally acceptance. The midwife doesn’t tell you she slaps them so they stay angry. They don’t reveal the intricacies of compromise. You are left to discover, by accident, that a Sunday newspaper supplement can still be enjoyed, at length, in a cloakroom smelling of shit and feet. Or that on nights when you reveal the stars in all their glory, the firmament and all of that, it is always good to have a moon (two would be better) in your back pocket. They don’t use the words Sisyphean or Herculean. They don’t reference Greek mythology at all, not even mentioning Hydras in armbands, snapping at attempts to remove them from holiday pools.

90 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMber 2019

|

You will discover, alone, the unbearable tension of rainy school runs, the language of door slams, angry exchanges about sweat-pitted cousins, the whole tangle of birthdays, and how, with the addition of hormones, they are whole universes of black holes, swallowing light. And yet. Neither do they mention the prickthroated happiness when light lightly covers them, or the smell of their scalps, like a freshly cooked poem. Or how when they drift to you, and are unexpectedly still, it is as though a breeze has blown a snowflake to your face. They don’t tell you there has never been so much absence, as the absence when they are gone. And that then, only then, will you miss the rock and the hill. By K. M. Elkes, from his collection All That Is Between Us

issue 207

The unveiling of Nelson’s plaque in Pierrepont Street in 1904

“...when they drift to you, and are unexpectedly still, it is as though a breeze has blown a snowflake to your face”


flash fiction.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 12:13 Page 2

CITY | CULTURE

For those who like face-to-face teaching, writer and tutor Jude Higgins – also the organiser of Bath Flash Fiction Award and director of Flash Fiction Festivals UK – runs regular affordable creative writing sessions in Bath, with a focus on writing flash fiction. The Bath Flash Fiction Award runs a competition three times a year, which attracts national and international entries and the UK’s only literary festival dedicated to flash fiction, will take place in Bristol for the fourth year running in June 2020. Writers of flash fiction come to this unique festival from many different countries to give workshops, talks and readings on all aspects of the genre and participants come to learn, write and read their fictions. For inspiration, read the collections featured here by Diane Simmons and K.M. Elkes and any of the flash fiction anthologies and collections published by Ad Hoc Fiction, who offer many opportunities for people to write, read and be published. n To buy these books or to find out about other events in the area, visit: bookshop.adhocfiction.com adhocfiction.com bathflashfictionaward.com flashfictionfestival.com mrbsemporium.com

DIVIDING TIME

“There I tie the flowers to my daughter’s bench”

“Do you want to go to the dry ski slope, Dad?” I take in Sam’s expectant face, ignore my own exhaustion and drive him there. When we get home we watch some telly, then he nags me to play chess. Later, when I am alone, I think about how many outings Sam and I do together now, the hours he spends watching films with his mum. When our children were young, Liz and I used to make sure we treated them equally. I get up early the next day, buy roses from Becky’s favourite florist and walk slowly to the park. There, I tie the flowers to my daughter’s bench. I sit a while and chat. By Diane Simmons, from Finding A Way

Want to give the gift of hearing? Come see us about our festive offers. Better Hearing is Better Living ✜ Hearing aids

✜ Hearing assessments ✜ Hearing rehabilitation

✜ Microsuction ear wax removal We offer open and honest impartial advice on all hearing queries to help you achieve excellence in your hearing.

Call us to arrange a free hearing test on 07421 368 051 Spaces Northgate House, Upper Borough Walls, Bath, BA1 1RG. hearingexcellence.co.uk

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

december 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 91


Bath Family Fun December.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 10:33 Page 1

FAMILY | EVENTS

Family diary IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO WITH THE CHILDREN THIS MONTH SUPER PIRATES n Every Friday during term time, 10.30am, Komedia Super Pirates will be transforming Komedia’s dance floor into a fun-filled playroom. Build dens, play crazy games and let off confetti cannons for a wild time. There’s also playmats, toys and plenty of space for running around. Suitable for babies and toddlers. £4 per child, adults and newborn babies go free; komedia.co.uk CHRISTMAS AT CHEDDAR n Until 24 December, times vary, Cheddar Gorge and Caves Visit Cheddar Gorge and Caves with the whole family including the dog this winter. On selected dates you can see the elves preparing for the big day from within Gough’s Cave. Meet Father Christmas, receive a present, sing some songs and marvel at the magic. Book online and save 15%, dogs also receive a treat. Valid with a day ticket; cheddargorge.co.uk THE FESTIVAL OF LIGHT n Until 5 January, 10am–7pm, Longleat Head to Longleat on a thrilling odyssey on selected dates as The Festival of Light showcases Myths and Legends. Don’t miss the ever popular Enchanted Christmas Tree Show and Flight Before Christmas flying owl display, plus much more. New for 2019, gaze at the breathtaking choreographed light projection on Longleat House – the iconic frontage of the stately home will spring to life like never before. Book online and save up to 10%. Suitable for all ages, £26.20–£34.95; longleat.co.uk BATH ON ICE n Until 5 January, 10.30am–10pm, Royal Victoria Park Take to the ice and enjoy an hour of skating. Pre-booking is not required but it is advised, especially in the evenings and on weekends. A selection of pizzas, fries, hot dogs and hot chocolate is also available. Skate aids are available for £5 per session. Suitable for all ages, £10–£37; bathonice.com FORTNIGHTLY TAKEOVER n 1 and 23 December, 11am–2pm, The Edge, University of Bath Artist Victoria Willmott will be hosting a series of fun and informal creative activities that explore The Edge’s current exhibition with special themes. Drop-in for just 10 minutes or stay for the duration and get creative. Suitable for ages four – 12, free event; edgearts.org 92 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMber 2019

|

Christmas at Cheddar Gorge

’TWAS THE TRAIL BEFORE CHRISTMAS n 1–8 December, 11am–4pm, American Museum and Gardens Journey along the Winding Way and discover who has been making all the noise in the garden on this family fun trail. You might see a flash of red, a little bushy tail or even some antlers. Suitable for ages five and above, £2.50; americanmuseum.org AFTERMIRTH n 3 December, 12pm, The Rondo Theatre An adult comedy club that you can bring your baby to. Each show features three top circuit comedians delivering their usual club routines, so the material is mature and sweary with the odd birth story flashback… The only difference is it’s during the day. Adults and babies under 18 months only. £10; rondotheatre.co.uk KIDS OF BATH CHRISTMAS MARKET n 7 December, 10am–3pm, The Guildhall This Christmas market will host more than 40 of the cleverest makers in the south west, selling beautiful products for all the family. Children can make two of their own gifts, all wrapped in their personally designed wrapping paper. £10; kidsofbath.com FAMILY CHRISTMAS ORIGAMI WORKSHOP n 7 December, 2.30–4pm, Museum of East Asian Art Learn the ancient of art of origami by making fantastic Christmas decorations to take home. All materials will be provided in an array of colours and designs. Suitable for all ages, £3; meaa.org.uk

issue 207

SQUIRREL n 7–29 December, 9.30am, 11.30am and 1.30pm, The egg Squirrel loves a good acorn. But not all acorns are good. Some are downright second rate. And Squirrel is fussy like that. Under the light of the winter sun, between the houses and the offices, the rivers and the factories, Squirrel has buried his favourite acorn collection. A story of new growth, with a sprinkling of snowy magic and puppetry mayhem. Suitable for six months to four years. £8 children, £9 for adults and a lap seat; theatreroyal.org CHILDREN’S WEEKEND CRAFTS n 7–29 December, 11am–2pm, Dyrham Park Create some festive crafts focusing on nature and traditional 17th century decorations. Make scented pomander bags, orange decorations and bird feeders. Suitable for all ages, free event, normal admission applies; nationaltrust.org.uk/dyrhampark THE STORY OF CHRISTMAS n 12–23 December, times vary, The Rondo Theatre A family show packed with songs, jokes and festive frivolity, as we take a rip-roaring comedy ride through history to look at the weird and wonderful origins of some of our barmy Christmas traditions. Celebrate mince pies, turkey, presents, tinsel, crackers and more. Suitable for all ages, £10–£16; rondotheatre.co.uk BEAUTY AND THE BEAST n 12 December – 12 January, times vary, Theatre Royal Bath One of the most popular fairytales, Beauty and the Beast follows the story of Belle who finds herself imprisoned in an enchanted castle by a prince who has been transformed into a hideous beast. In this year’s pantomime, expect a cast of larger than life characters, sidesplitting comedy, sumptuous costumes, fabulous scenery and a thrilling transformation scene. Suitable for all ages, £26.50–£36.50; theatreroyal.org HO HO HOLBURNE n 8 December, 12–4pm, The Holburne Museum Enjoy an afternoon creating unique decorations and gifts inspired by Sir William Holburne’s Grand Tour around Europe. Make Italian inspired clay angel tea light holders, painted baubles, French gift boxes, Dutch silver and gold garlands and more. Suitable for all ages, free; holburne.org


Bath Family Fun December.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 10:33 Page 2

FAMILY | EVENTS

Christmas Decoupage at The Art Cohort

Christmas gift. Suitable for ages seven and above, £10; theartcohort.co.uk MEN BEHAVING DADLY n 16 December, 9–10.30am, St Swithin’s Church A monthly toddler group for dads and their pre-school children. Meet other dads, have fun and enjoy some quality time with your little one(s). There are toys, games and toast for the kids, and coffee and bacon butties for the dads. £3 per adult; stswithinswalcot.org.uk

FAIRY CHRISTMAS n 14 December, 10.30am–12.30pm, Victoria Art Gallery Create fairies and angels using inspirations from the characters in the amazing Lichfield Clock. Suitable for ages three and above. Free event, normal admission applies; victoriagal.org.uk CHRISTMAS DECOUPAGE BOX DECORATING n 14 December, 2–3.15pm, The Art Cohort Begin by making decoupage collages to build confidence and experiment with the materials and techniques. With lots of different paper products to experiment with, learn how to embellish and decorate a star, round or oval shaped box for a lovely

THE SNOWMAN AND RUPERT AND THE FROG SONG WITH BATH PHILHARMONIA n 21 December, 3.30pm, The Forum Bath Philharmonia brings Rupert the Bear’s magical adventures to life as the orchestra performs George Martin’s score live to the amazing animation for the first time ever. Plus it wouldn’t be Christmas without The Snowman, so the orchestra will also perform Howard Blake’s iconic music to Raymond Briggs’ animated masterpiece. Suitable for all ages, £14 children, £22 adults; bathphil.co.uk FAMILY CAROL SERVICE n 22 December, 2.30pm and 4pm, Bath Abbey Come dressed as a shepherd, angel or wise man and enjoy singing carols in the beautiful

Kids can get crafty at Dyrham Park

abbey, with a special appearance from Frosty the donkey. Suitable for all ages, free; bathabbey.org THE GRUFFALO’S CHILD n 24 December, 11am, The Little Theatre Cinema Some years have passed and the Gruffalo lives in a cave surrounded by woods. His child wants to explore beyond the family clearing but, concerned for her safety, her father warns her not to go into the deep, dark woods. If she does, the Big Bad Mouse will be after her. One wild and windy night, she ignores her father’s warnings and bravely tiptoes out into the snow in search of the fabled Mouse... Suitable for toddlers, £3; picturehouses.com n

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEmbEr 2019

|

ThEBATHmagazinE 93


education -DEC.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 11:16 Page 1

EDUCATION

EDUCATION NEWS NEW EDUCATIONAL SPACES This autumn has seen several major new facilities arrive at King Edward’s, beginning with the extended and refurbished sixth form centre. Working with architects Mitchell Eley Gould, KES sixth formers and staff were instrumental in developing plans for the new space. Pupils were keen that the new centre echoed the environments typically found at universities and was able to support different workstyles and study needs. As a result, the former large common room style space has been zoned into different areas. An ‘inhabited’ wall runs through the middle of the room defining the separation between social and study spaces and provides recessed alcoves for small groups, seating for individuals, built-in lockers and glazed doors to the adjacent quiet room. A new, two-storey modern foreign languages centre has also just opened its doors. The new £2m facility allows a more flexible approach to teaching, particularly when helping pupils to develop their listening and speaking skills, and incorporates seven new classrooms, including language labs and smaller teaching spaces. kesbath.com

HOCKEY SUCCESS Will Prentice and Jack Webb from Prior Park College have been selected for the England U18 and U16 hockey teams for this season. Both boys went through a very long selection process and have made the squads for the test matches and tournaments that will take place between Christmas and next summer. Director of sport at Prior Park, Mr Rhys Gwilliam, commented “We are extremely proud of the achievements of both boys and it is just reward for all of the hard work and dedication they have put into their hockey.” priorparkcollege.com

BATH COLLEGE RANKING Bath College has been ranked sixth in the country in the NICDEX annual league table. NICDEX rated 172 further education colleges across England in four categories: employer satisfaction, learner satisfaction, 16–18 positive progression and adult progression into work. The criteria is based on performance measures published by the Department for Education. Bath College’s sixth position betters the two previous years’ rankings of 17th and 16th place. An impressive 52% of Bath College’s adult learners on benefits progressed into work, while 80% of 16–18 year old learners went on to positive progression, whether employment or Higher Education. Employer satisfaction with the college is at 86.6% while learner satisfaction is at 82.7%.The annual college league table, now in its fourth year, was created by FE Week editor Nick Linford. Laurel Penrose, principal and CEO of Bath College, is delighted with the ranking: “We’re really proud to be listed as sixth in the country. This is a brilliant reflection of the passion, commitment and hard work of Bath College staff.” bathcollege.ac.uk n 94 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207


P95.qxp_Layout 23 22/11/2019 15:39 Page 1

30TH BIRTHDAY FOR COBB FARR

C Foreign Languages Centre UNIVERSITY OF

Daytime, lunchtime and evening foreign language classes for members of the public. Enrolling now!

obb Farr estate agents is celebrating an impressive 30 years in business, and to mark their milestone birthday the team at Cobb Farr held an exclusive, black tie Champagne party at Woods Restaurant attended by friends and clients of the business from as far back as

the 1980s. The evening was a roaring success and a chance for managing director Philip Cobb to thank his guests for their support and encouragement over the years. “A successful business is built on reputation and word-of-mouth, and we saw our thirtieth birthday as a chance to show our appreciation to those who have spread the word about us over the years. It was lovely to see so many familiar faces in the same room!” The housing market in Bath has changed hugely since 1989. Cobb Farr estimate that they have sold over 6,000 properties in that time and average property values have increased almost fourfold. Cobb Farr’s first ever sale was a one-bedroom apartment on the Royal Crescent which sold for £110,000. The very same property recently sold for £425,000! n cobbfarr.com

Arabic French German Italian Mandarin Chinese Portuguese

Japanese Spanish

We offer a wide range of foreign languages at beginner through to advanced level. To find out more about the courses available, or to enrol, visit our website www.bath.ac.uk/flc and apply online or call 01225 383991.

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 95


Bath Beauty Gifts page.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 11:47 Page 1

SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

Beauty and wellbeing Say Happy Christmas to a loved one with a beautiful pampering present. Wellbeing and sensory experiences are top of the list this year, and being the best spa city in the world – Bath has so many great options

❶ ❷

❹ ❼

1 Clarins Eau Dynamisante collection, £36. Clarins Men Cracker, £10. Frontline Style; frontlinestyle.co.uk 2. Spa and treatment experiences at Bath Spa Hotel, from £45. Bath Spa Hotel; macdonaldhotels.co.uk 3. Luxury experiences at Lucknam Park, a variety of voucher packages starting from £18 (cream tea). Lucknam Park; lucknampark.co.uk 4. Enhance Medispa pampering and aesthetic treatment vouchers, a wide selection and prices vary. enhancemedispa.co.uk 5. The Soothing Skincare collection, £20.99 (cleanser, toner, moisture lotion and refining eye gel). CJ Beauty; cjbeauty.co.uk 6. The Winter Wind-Down collection by Aromatherapy Associates, £36. Thermae Bath Spa Shop; thermaebathspa.com 7. Pampering treatments at The Orangery Laser and Beauty Clinic, all pricing options are available. theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk 8. Spa Days at The Gainsborough, voucher packages from £150. The Gainsborough; thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk 9. Bonsai botanical candle by Aery Living, £24.95. Homefront Interiors; homefrontinteriors.co.uk

Cassiopeia

96 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

iSSUe 207


frontlinestyle fp .qxp_Layout 23 21/11/2019 16:05 Page 1

style Boutique Salons & Spa

Gift Vouchers available online Frontlinestyle Hair and Beauty salons welcome both Men & Women. Our highly trained team cater for all your party & pampering needs. Popular treatments include: • Facials (Clarins, Caudalie & Phytomer) • Massage (inc. Wellness, Deep tissue, Hot stones & Lava Shells) • • Blow Dry Bar • Hair Up • Wella Master Colourist • Wigs • • CACI Synergy • Electrolysis • IPL • Waxing • Threading • Slimming Wraps • • Manicure • Footlogix pedicure • Eyelash Extensions • Lash Lift • Clarins Makeup • Spa Packages • 4/5 Monmouth Street, Bath, BA1 2AJ. T: 01225 478478

11 Broad Street, Wells, BA5 2DJ. T: 01749 672225

Book online www.frontlinestyle.co.uk


CJ Beauty Review VH.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 14:40 Page 1

BEAUTY | REVIEW

Skin spa

The Body Clinic...

by Victoria Rawlinson, Heath & Fitness Practitioner Bespoke Nutrition & Lifestyle Plans available

IPL Facial Rejuvenation and Thread Vein Removal

IPL Acne Treatment

IPL Nasal and Ear Hair Reduction

36 Gay Street, Bath • Tel: 01225 466851 www.theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk

98 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeceMber 2019

|

issue 207

Tempted by a natural treatment that hydrates and rejuvenates, Georgina Southam tries out the Eve Taylor Facial at CJ Beauty Taking the time to learn more about your skin and the products that you use is important for maintaining a healthy glow. Michelle at CJ Beauty takes this into consideration when choosing the products that she endorses for her beauty facials, focusing on what is healthy, natural, but also affordable for her clients. I learnt all this and more after my recent visit for an Eve Taylor Facial. Combining aromatherapy and botanical extracts, it is all about natural skincare and enriching hand-blended essential oils. Michelle takes the time to learn about your type of skin, allowing her to create a treatment designed specifically for you. With calming spa music and aromatic candles, I reclined on the massage table ready to be pampered. Starting with the balancing cleanser, a light textured cleansing lotion was massaged into my features softly, smelling of lavender and jasmine to balance and harmonise while ensuring a thorough antiseptic cleansing. Between each product, a hot towel was placed on my face with a mixture of aromas to ensure ultimate relaxation, while removing any excess product from the skin. After the light cleansing, an exfoliating scrub teamed with a facial cleansing brush gently buffed and polished the skin surface using spherical bamboo beads. Using toners to hydrate and tone the skin’s texture, as well as a moisturiser for hydration to keep the water and oil levels balanced, we moved on to the masque. The balancing masque was creamy, nourishing and hydrating with natural clay to lift any impurities without drying out the skin’s surface. As I waited for the masque to take full effect, a neck, shoulder and chest massage was given to deepen the experience and ensure optimum serenity. The final stage was a moisturising solar shield that works for all types of skin. With a nourishing base of sunflower and cocoa butter, the moisturiser provides 25 broad-spectrum sun protection from UVA/UVB rays to guard against premature ageing, as well as a protecting lip balm for supple and hydrated lips. After the treatment, my skin felt nourished and vibrant – and the benefit of the treatment was still apparent weeks later. The Eve Taylor Prescriptive Facial is £30 for a 30-minute session, or £50 for a 60-minute session.  • cjbeauty.uk


The Orangery fp December.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 10:29 Page 1

T H E O R A N G E RY l a s e r. a e s t h e t i c s . b e a u t y.

Established for over 25 years we are the experts in skin health, aesthetics and advanced beauty treatments in Bath.

WOW Facial

Let it glow, let it glow, let is glow.

Christmas Beauty Gift Vouchers available for all the girls on your list

The perfect pre-party prep and post party perk up.

Let it glow, let it glow, let is glow.

The perfect pre-party prep and post party perk up.

All our consultations are free of charge so please feel free to book an appointment to see which is the right treatment for you.

Natural Looking Results For many people the younger they look the better they feel. Age is an unstoppable process but we can help with our vast range of treatments performed by our highly qualified and experienced doctor. DERMAL FILLERS To revitalise your face and restore volume loss.

UltraCel AWARD WINNING NON-SURGICAL FACE, NECK AND BODY TREATMENT Non-surgical skin tightening treatment that lifts the face, neck, eyes and body areas. • SCIENTIFICALLY PROVEN - stimulates new collagen and elastin which can reverse the signs of ageing. • PAIN FREE non surgical treatment with NO DOWNTIME. • IMMEDIATE RESULTS Treatments are performed by an experienced aesthetic doctor from the prestigious Knightsbridge, London clinic of Dr Rita Rakus, which is regularly featured in the Tatler Cosmetic Surgery Guide.

“They gave me natural looking results which suits my whole philosophy on life.” MUSCLE INHIBITOR TREATMENT Used by millions around the world to improve the appearance of facial lines and wrinkles. “My treatment made a fantastic difference giving me back my youthful appearance and my confidence.”

“My skin felt and looked 10 years better than when I walked in.”

36 Gay Street, Bath • Tel: 01225 466851 • www.theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk


P100.qxp_Layout 22 21/11/2019 14:28 Page 1

CJ Beauty Offering a wide range of treatments massage manicure pedicure waxing tinting facials IBX nail treatment LVL lash lift callus peel hopi ear candles microdermabrasion 10 -11 Green Street , Bath, BA1 2JZ 07840 864829

100 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207

Owner Michelle previously Senior Therapist at Green Street House

cjbeauty.uk


P101.qxp_Layout 23 22/11/2019 11:44 Page 1

Perfect vision without glasses at any age ✜ ✜ ✜

Over 30,000 successful cataract and vision correction procedures. Eyelid surgery, removal of eyebags, excess skin and lumps. Virtually 100% patient satisfaction. Javad Moayedi,

MD, MRCOphth, MSC Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon Bath, Bristol, Somerset and Harley Street, London

Specialist in Cataract, Lens and Laser Vision Correction and Eyelid Surgery Contact No: 07885 655091 Email: javadvisionuk@gmail.com Facebook: Javad Moayedi www.javadmoayedi.co.uk

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 101


P102.qxp_Layout 22 22/11/2019 13:22 Page 1

Jaime Brain Dip CDT RCS (Eng) GDC 142490

Not happy with your dentures? Are your dentures loose or painful? We can help regain your confidence and your smile

WE OFFER • FREE Consultation • New Dentures direct • Flexible dentures • • Denture repairs • Saturday appointments •

BOOK YOUR FREE CONSULTATION ON

01225 311 681

27 Walcot Buildings (Weymouth Street), Bath, BA1 6AD

www.jbdentureclinic.co.uk

One Gift, Double the Love With 100% of Ubiety’s profits benefiting Dorothy House Hospice Care, this natural, essential oil hand wash and hand lotion duo is the gift that indulges your loved ones and gives back to the community. Purchase from the Ubiety chalet at Bath Christmas Market, 28 November - 15 December for £25, (RRP £36) or use BATHMAG25 online for your reader discount at

www.findubiety.com.

102 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207


The Whiteley Clinic Advertorial.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 13:01 Page 1

Bath woman becomes one of the first women in the world to receive a non-invasive cure for varicose veins

B

ristol based Prof Mark Whiteley is one of the world’s most respected vein experts. He is the first doctor in the world using new ultrasound technology to treat patients with varicose veins from outside the body. This technique avoids any invasive procedure or hospitalisation. It is called Sonovein echotherapy and it uses ultrasound to treat the damaged veins, www.echotherapie.com/varicoseveins. This first ever Sonovein system has been installed in Prof. Whiteley’s London Clinic. Patients from all over Prof. Mark Whiteley, revolutionising the the south west who attend his Bristol treatment of varicose veins clinic at Litfield Place, Clifton Down, and who are suitable for this new treatment, are invited to London to receive it. As it is totally non-invasive, patients travel up in the morning and are back by teatime. Patients from the south west are some of the very first to receive this treatment. Rachel Walker from Bath was one of those patients. “I work with ultrasound at The Whiteley Clinic and when I heard about Sonovein it sounded totally revolutionary!” Sonovein works by focusing a high-intensity ultrasound beam on the troublesome vein. An integrated low-intensity ultrasound lets the clinician see the vein being treated in real time, ensuring optimal treatment accuracy. As the treatment beam is delivered, the affected vein shrinks and is sealed closed. The system is so accurate it can treat veins which are notoriously hard to access, such as perforator veins, even if they’re close to an open ulcer.

“I've had varicose veins since the birth of my children and when I learnt I was suitable for Sonovein I decided to have the treatment.” For the majority of patients Sonovein is a completely painless procedure, unlike traditional varicose vein treatments, no catheters or incisions are used, meaning patients are left with no scars or risk of infection, and can return immediately to their normal daily activities. “It was strange for me to attend our clinic as a patient but during the treatment, I recovered quickly enough to take my colleagues out for a celebratory drink at the pub when we'd finished!” “I was back to normal activities the following day. I’m proud to have been one of the first patients to have undergone this amazing and pioneering new technique.” “I’m proud to have been one of the first Varicose veins can lead to patients to have undergone this amazing and serious health problems pioneering new technique.” including leg ulcers. Patients with leg ulcers are consigned to a life of discomfort, disability, and pain. They become a huge burden to their families, and leg ulcers cost the NHS approximately £2–3 billion a year in dressings alone. Almost all these conditions can now be cured with the new vein treatment techniques pioneered at The Whiteley Clinic. n

For further information call 0330 581580 or email psc@thewhiteleyclinic.co.uk

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

december 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 103


The Walk - Dec.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 10:36 Page 1

THE | PUB CRAWL

The Packhorse in the 1940s

The Pig and Fiddle

Walk, drink and be merry

Avoiding wild country paths, muddy fields and dark forests this month, Andrew Swift wanders around the city investigating the pubs and taverns where the lights shine especially bright in the lead up to Christmas

P

ubs come into their own during the festive season – busier than ever in the run-up to Christmas but somewhat quieter thereafter – and seeking out unfamiliar hostelries is an ideal way of discovering little-known corners of the city, or, by venturing slightly further afield, enjoying a brisk country walk. Top of many people’s list of traditional pubs is likely to be The Old Green Tree in Green Street. It dates from around 1716, and its wood-panelled rooms were last fitted out in 1928 when it was taken over by The Lamb Brewery from Frome. Prior to that it was a free house and brewed its own beer in a yard at the back. Today it is once more a free house and much frequented by real-ale aficionados – although there are no plans to reopen the brewery. The Old Green Tree’s unspoilt interior is very much a rarity in a world where pubs tend to get made over on a regular basis. Up on The Paragon, though, The Star, with its warren of tiny rooms and wooden partitions, still looks much as it did when it was refurbished in the mid-19th century. The Star, like The Old Green Tree, is no museum piece, however, but a pub that still works superbly well today, as its loyal band of regulars will confirm. 104 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

Down on Walcot Street is The Bell, first recorded in 1728, although, to judge by the blocked-up mullion windows at the back, somewhat older. Famed for its live music, range of real ales and ciders and bohemian vibe – with food courtesy of a pizza bike in the garden – it is owned by 536 of its customers, having become Bath’s first co-operatively owned pub in 2013. The Raven on Queen Street is another free house noted for real ale, along with regular beer festivals and pie and mash dinners. Like The Old Green Tree, it has its own unique brand of beer, brewed especially by Blindmans Brewery in Leighton near Frome. Over on Broad Street, Butcombe Brewery, which took over the Pig and Fiddle in 2015, has recently refurbished it, with beams, woodpanelling and rough stonework. In a nod to the 19th-century ghost signs that are so prominent a feature of Bath’s cityscape, a splendidly retro sign has also been painted on its previously featureless side wall. One pub which has revived the tradition of brewing its own beer – which just about all pubs did in the 18th and 19th centuries – is The Royal Oak at Twerton. Long regarded as one of the top real-ale pubs in the area – as well as one of the top music pubs – the

issue 207

landlord, Chris Powell, upped his game in 2017 by opening a brewery. He called it Ralph’s Ruin, after his dog, who ‘likes to ruin stuff’. Although only small – with a twobarrel capacity – its brews have already gained a large and appreciative following. Despite its current popularity, 20 years ago The Royal Oak stood shuttered and derelict, and in 2002 came within a whisker of being demolished. Fortunately, it was saved and since reopening in 2005 has become one of the most successful pubs in the city. It is one of the lucky ones. In the past 25 years, Bath has lost around a quarter of its pubs. Once popular venues such as Ye Old Farmhouse, The Beehive, The Rummer, The Hat and Feather, The Castle in Bathwick and The Rose and Laurel at Odd Down have called last orders for the last time. Another pub that, against all the odds, was brought back from the dead is The Grapes in Westgate Street. When it closed in 2017, it seemed inevitable that it would be converted to other uses. Fortunately, Ellie and John Leiper were not prepared to accept the inevitable and took on the monumental challenge of restoring one of Bath’s most historic buildings to its former glory. After reopening in August, brightened up beyond


The Walk - Dec.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 10:37 Page 2

THE | PUB CRAWL

recognition, it has taken its rightful place as one of Bath’s top freehouses. An added bonus is that, for the first time in decades, Bathonians can see the grandest plasterwork ceiling in the city, dating from the 17th century, on the first floor. Along the London Road are two more success stories. At the King William, Charlie and Amanda Digney’s revamp of a down-atheel street-corner boozer managed the seemingly impossible – transforming it into a top gastropub while keeping it as a friendly local. Further out of town was a pub that seemed to have closed for good. Originally a Regency tavern called The Britannia, it was later renamed The Piccadilly and then The Hive, before lying abandoned and unloved, ripe for conversion. At the eleventh hour, however, it was rescued by Michael and Emma Heap, whose herculean efforts to reverse years of dereliction have turned it into one of the most vibrant and successful community pubs in Bath. Now renamed Chapter One, it is proof that, with vision and determination, there is no such thing as an unviable pub. Some might bridle at Chapter One being described as traditional – but, if tradition is less about preserving the past in aspic than keeping the spirit of conviviality alive, than it justly deserves such an accolade. Other pubs have had to be rescued not only from dereliction but also from those bent on

Nick Cudworth’s painting of The Bell in Walcot Street

converting them to something else. One of the most high-profile campaigns was staged by the villagers of South Stoke to save the 17thcentury Packhorse after it was bought in 2012 by someone who wanted to convert it to a desirable country residence. Not only did they have to thwart the plans; they also had to raise enough money to persuade the owner to part with it. This took four long years, and it

was a further two years – during which an extensive refurbishment was needed – before this iconic country pub could open its doors once again in March 2018. The Packhorse lies on the edge of glorious countryside, so that a visit to this most traditional of pubs can be combined with a bracing winter’s walk. For shorter excursions, you could try The Pulteney Arms, handily sited between Henrietta Park and Sydney Gardens, or walk alongside the river to Widcombe, where there is a choice of three pubs – The Ram, The Ring o’Bells and The White Hart. Or for something more strenuous you could climb Beacon Hill to find the Richmond Arms, reopened a couple of months ago with community support after being closed for two years. Bath’s pubs are a vital part of the city’s heritage, albeit one that is too often undervalued and overlooked. They are also a link with a time when communities had a greater coherence than they do today, and their survival is one of the best ways of ensuring that communities thrive in the future. The traditions they embody are well worth raising a glass to over the festive season, and remembering that their survival is dependent, above all, on our support. n Andrew Swift’s Country Walks from Bath is available from bookshops or direct from akemanpress.com

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

december 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 105


Interiors Gifts page.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 12:12 Page 1

SHOPPING | CHRISTMAS

Dec the halls,walls et al Don’t just deck your halls with boughs of holly this Christmas when you could be dreaming about decorative gift ideas for every room in your home

❷ ❺

❼ ❽

1. Safa pineapple table lamp, £64. Knees of Trowbridge; knees.co.uk 2. A poster of Bath from the cover of the official 1964 guide book, various options from £15. Bath in Time; bathintime.co.uk 3. Handcrafted open-weave Vivian side lamp, £80. Nala Lighting; nalalighting.com 4. Stylish prints of Bath, from £19.99. LoveIncPrints available at Pickled Greens in Bath; etsy.com/uk/shop/LoveIncPrints 5. Ginko leaf wall votive candle holder by Grand Illusions, £9.95. Homefront Interiors; homefrontinteriors.co.uk 6. Hand crafted oak bowls, from £45. Verve; verveliving.uk 7. Handmade Indian fine silk and cotton Kantha cushion (45 x 45cm), £60. Oriental Rugs of Bath; orientalrugsofbath.com 8. Brass stationery, prices starting from £15. The Bath Framer; thebathpictureframer.co.uk 9. Rosemary, fougere and camphor premium essential oil candle by Rathborne’s, double wick £35. Article (Castle Cary); articlesomerset.com Ursa Minor

106 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

iSSUe 207


P107.qxp_Layout 22 21/11/2019 16:05 Page 1

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 107


interiors December v2.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 15:50 Page 1

INTERIORS

Green calm, blue quietness Here are products with organic shapes and an assortment of shades from the blue and green spectrum – think of this as an ode to living within the resonant colours of nature, says Emma Clegg

Dog-a-Day mug by Sally Muir, £10, Anthropologie; anthropologie.com

Eden Present cushion by Margo Selby, £65, Gallery Nine; galleryninebath.com

Nibbles bowl, set of three, by Rupert Blamire, £24; rupertblamire.com Rupert has a stall at the Bath Christmas Market in Bath Street

Stoneware wallpiece by Gary Wood, £600, Waller & Wood; wallerandwood.co.uk

Calligaris Lazy Chair, £1,615, T R Hayes; trhayes.co.uk

Number One Blue by Philip Lyons, £550, Gallery Nine; galleryninebath.com

108 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

issue 207


P109.qxp_Layout 23 22/11/2019 11:54 Page 1

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 109


Gardening dec.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 17:29 Page 1

Yellow squash in the vegetable garden

Nasturtiums

A living wall

Margaret Grant from Sheppards Gardens

Hydrangea ‘Macrophylla’

Wildlife pond

Nigella damascena

Gardens: the year ahead

Think up rather than down, adopt a Monstera, grow your own, think about wildlife and celebrate the woodland – Jane Moore makes her predictions for the trends that will be dominating gardens in 2020 urtling headlong into a particularly momentous December, gardening is perhaps the last thing on anyone’s mind. The combined weight of Christmas and heavyduty politics are enough to overload my poor little brain but, on the other hand, perhaps some gardening is just what we all need. Let me encourage you all to look forward, beyond whatever this loaded month holds, into a hopefully brighter new year. So let’s take a look at the big trends – horticulturally speaking – that will shape our gardening in the year ahead.

H

and bird boxes nestled among the foliage. There are several different styles you can go for, firstly the classic one using trellis or wires with climbers such as ivy, clematis and wisteria. You can also go for planting pockets such as the Easiwall range from Treebox, described as ‘green walls’ and ‘vertical allotments’. Alternatively, the WallyGro range of Pro Pockets or Eco Planters fixed to the wall can contain all sorts of plants from bedding plants to herbs and grasses. The great thing about the snazzy Eco Planter range is that it works just as well indoors as outdoors, coming into its own when filled with lush, leafy houseplants.

GO VERTICAL Think up rather than down, bringing the garden to life on fences and walls. Use climbers, planters, hanging baskets – anything you can think of – to create living walls. This is a key trend, particularly in urban spaces and there are more products than ever available to help you achieve it. Instead of going for classic flowering plants and bedding, the look is much more wildlife friendly, typically with grasses, seed heads

HOUSEPLANTS Houseplants are back in vogue in a big way. So dust off your macramé plant hanger and buy yourself a new spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) because houseplants are the thing to have. For younger people and flat dwellers who are short of time, space and money, they make a lot of sense and do much to brighten up your environment. Trends in the horticulture industry indicate that houseplants are the

110 TheBATHMagazine

|

deceMber 2019

|

iSSUe 207

biggest boom area, which means there should be plenty of interesting ones around. I’m still very inclined towards Swiss cheese plants (Monstera deliciosa), with those fantastic holey leaves, or prayer plants (Maranta leuconeura) which are great for darker rooms, as well as the old faithful spider plant. Other easy-going indoor plant species include Dracaena, almost like an indoor Cordyline with lovely coloured foliage, and Philodendron, the epitome of lush foliage. And don’t forget the ubiquitous seasonal poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima). This one really is just for Christmas – while you can keep them going, persuading them into flowering again is very tricky. EAT THE GARDEN Plant-based eating is here to stay and it’s only going to get more popular. Growing your own is enduringly satisfying and great fun too. You don’t need to grow everything you eat, but just try a few salad leaves, herbs or even some potatoes and you’ll be delighted with the results. If you haven’t much room, stick to a few pots of culinary herbs, such as chives, mint


Gardening dec.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 17:30 Page 2

GARDENING

and tarragon or a window box of edible flowers like violas and nasturtiums. Simple vegetables to start off with are cut-and-comeagain crops such as mixed salad leaves and rainbow chard or quick croppers like baby turnips, radishes and beets. But do grow things you actually want to eat – there’s no point in growing fantastic beetroot if you can’t stand the stuff. Just think, no food miles, no pesticides and as fresh as can be. I can’t tell you how handy it is to have a few fresh, ready-to-pick vegetables at hand when you haven’t had a chance to get to the shops for a while. BE GREEN Sustainability is the thing this year, as it was in 2019. In 2020 we’re all going to be planting and planning for pollinators, using less plastics in the garden and thinking way more about wildlife. Plants will suffer, I’m afraid, as those that can’t justify their existence in my garden on the grounds of being good for wildlife, are taking up valuable space that could provide seeds for birds, pollen for bees or nectar for butterflies. High on this list are many of the plants in my kitchen garden. Most of the herbs and edible flowers are good for pollinators, particularly free-flowering herbs like marjoram and thyme. Many of the ‘freeseeders’ do the same, the lovely bright

An insect hotel provides shelter for insects

Calendula, Viola and Nigella species, and Verbena bonariensis will seed themselves around the garden and pop up in all sorts of nooks and crannies. If you haven’t already got a pond, your thoughts may turn towards a manageable water feature to attract wildlife. It doesn’t need to be big, just a bit wild, with plants coming up to the edges and plenty of cover in the pond for tadpoles and newts. And if you haven’t built a compost heap yet, then what are you waiting for? Not only is it handy for getting shot of your green

waste and fertilising the garden, but it’s a mini ecosystem in its own right. PLANT TRENDS I’m supporting the increased use of hydrangeas and all things woodland. Think ferns, dainty cyclamen, primroses and Dicentra creating a naturalistic carpet beneath an upper layer of elegant hydrangeas such as the lace cap varieties Hydrangea serrata ‘Tiara’, Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Lanarth White’ and the lovely mophead Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Ayesha’ with its tightly furled flowers. When it comes to choosing plants, we’re all going to be thinking more about sustainability and less about flower power. These two things are not by any means mutually exclusive, although it is important to choose plants carefully. When you think about it, a lot of the woodland favourites tick all the ecological boxes in terms of sustainability and being wildlife friendly. And by creating layers of planting, you’re setting about making you garden a safe habitat for all sorts of little creatures as well as making it look good. n uk.wallygro.com; treebox.co.uk Jane Moore is an award-winning gardening columnist and head gardener at The Bath Priory Hotel. Twitter: @janethegardener

Create space with a garden room GARDEN OFFICES • LOG CABINS • STUDIOS • SUMMERHOUSES POSH SHEDS • TIMBER GARAGES • OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES

01225 774566 • www.gardenaffairs.co.uk Visit our Display Centre at Trowbridge Garden Centre 288 Frome Road, BA14 0DT THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

december 2019

|

TheBATHmagazine 111


Andrews Flyer FP Bath.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 15:19 Page 1


P113.qxp_Layout 23 21/11/2019 14:20 Page 1

“Founded in 2011 by Marcus Spanswick, who already had 20 years’ experience in the industry, Mardan Removals and Storage Ltd is a, family run, professional full service removals and storage company based in Bath. Marcus wanted to build a company that he and his team would be proud of. The key to the company’s success is providing a personalised service, treating each customer as an individual to ensure they get an excellent removal service. Mardan have a fleet of vehicles allowing them to offer; commercial moving, local to international moves and storage”.

DOMESTIC & COMMERCIAL MOVERS • PACKERS • STORERS • SHIPPERS

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 113


THE BATH DIRECTORY - DECEMBER 2019.qxp_Layout 31 20/11/2019 13:52 Page 1

the directory

to advertise in this section call 01225 424 499

KEIKO KISHIMOTO Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

Electricians

Holistic Treatments for Wellbeing

Aromatherapy • Reflexology/Facial reflexology Japanese Cosmo Facelift • Deep Tissue Massage For more information, please visit:

www.keikokishimoto.co.uk 07739 827186 contact@keikokishimoto.co.uk

Trowbridge & Neal’s Yard Bath

House & Home

Chauffeur/Private Hire

We provide Bath Airport transfers to and from all major airports in the uk. We use only Hi spec vehicles and give a near on chauffeur experience at less than regular taxi prices. Airport transfers • City to city travel • Hi spec vehicles 1-8 seat vehicles available • Account work considered • Free Wifi in selected vehicles Card payments taken with Izettle • Prices start from as little as £39 Call or email us for a quote now!

@Romanbathprivatehire

Web: romanbathprivatehire.co.uk Email: Info@romanbathprivatehire.co.uk Tel: 01225 484346

Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

ONEMAGAZINEONECITYONEMONTH

Independent family run business with family values • • • • • •

New and Reconditioned Warranty Contracts Straight and Curved Stairlifts Services and Repairs Rental Stairlifts Removals

Call 01666 822 060

Email: info@simplystairlifts.co.uk

• Interior and exterior • Wallpaper specialist • Ceiling repairs and lining

• Working with designer paints • Free quotations

• Over 20 years experience

114 THEBATHMAGAZINE

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

IssuE 207

Create your home for life

Web: simplystairlifts.co.uk


Cobb Farr PIF.qxp_PIF Full Page 20/11/2019 14:46 Page 1

PROPERTY | HOMEPAGE

C

hurch Farm is located at the south eastern edge of the village of Rode approximately 10 miles south of Bath, close to St Lawrence’s Church, with open views across the North Somerset countryside. The site offers a wide range of superb, individually designed properties to suit different preferences, priorities and budgets. The development offers 2, 3, 4 and 5 bedroom homes built by Autograph Homes using local material and naturally-quarried Cotswold stone, with spacious, contemporary interiors, Church Farm brings together the finest traditions of West Country craftsmanship with the highest standards of modern architectural design. Autograph Homes is an independently owned homebuilder with an established regional heritage, creating exciting new developments across the South West and Church Farm certainly combines heritage with imagination to create countryside homes of great character with a simple sense of village charm. The marketing suite is open on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday from 10.00am – 5.00pm. Cobb Farr are working jointly with Savills in the marketing of Church Farm, Rode.

Church Farm, Rode • Two, three, four and five bedrooms • Luxury kitchens and bathrooms • Help to buy available • Fabulous location Prices from £345,000-£850,000

Cobb Farr, 37 Market Street, Bradford on Avon, BA15 1LJ. 01225 866111

THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

|

DECEMBER 2019

|

ThEBATHMagazinE 115


Cobb Farr December.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 12:27 Page 1

SOLD PRIOR TO MARKETING

Whiteheads Lane Bradford-on-Avon Guide Price £995,000

• • • • • • •

3/4 double bedroom 3 reception rooms En suite facilities Double garage and ample parking Private south facing garden Quiet location only minutes from the town Wonderful views

01225 333332 | 01225 866111


Cobb Farr December.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 12:28 Page 2

SOLD

Flatwood Road, Claverton

COMING SOON

Bailbrook Lane, Nr Bath

01225 333332 | 01225 866111

£1,450,000


The Apartment Co - December 19.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 14:35 Page 1

Looking out towards the city you gain a new perspective; you see rooftops, spires, and architectural delights. It’s a great reminder that there is so much more to the city than what’s held within its walls, where we feel at ease and at home.

Peter Greatorex managing director of The apartment Company

Is it time you changed perspective to find your next home?

E

very day we walk the streets of Bath; every day, we see the same faces, as well as those that like to visit our incredible city. We have our favourite coffee shops, where we often grab a naughty treat; the restaurants where we eat with family and friends; and the green spaces where some of us like to take a run from time to time. But when you become too comfortable with the familiar it can be difficult to see the true benefits of something that’s a little different. Last weekend we ventured along the National Trust’s Bath Skyline Walk, miles of waymarked footpaths. It’s something we hadn’t done for a long time and we vowed we wouldn’t leave it that long again. It feels like you are entering another world, and yet you are only a short walk from the city centre. Instead of the hustle and bustle that surrounds you on the streets, you are met by a tranquil scene where nature is your guide. As you pass through ancient woodland, meadows and even a castle, you notice sounds that you would otherwise miss, such a bird chirping melodiously and the sound of the wind rushing through the many barren trees.

[SOUTH WESTERN] LIMITED

Crafting beautiful homes

Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswolds | Dorset

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk

118 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207

Stepping outside our comfort zone can feel alien to many of us, but often when we take a risk it can surprise us. You may be looking for a new home now, or thinking of doing so in the next few months. It doesn’t matter if you’re looking to buy or rent – we encourage you to approach your search with an open mind. It’s easy to get caught up in the blinkered zone rather than going to see a property that may not fulfil all your wants, but still meets your needs. Viewing properties online is a start, but it can only tell you half the story. Images won’t tell you how it feels to stand inside the property, how each room flows into another. Sticking only to those properties in your comfort zone could mean you miss out on a hidden gem. When you start your next property search, change your perspective; of course, go and see those that immediately catch your eye, but have the courage to view those that meet your needs too. Ask your estate agent for recommendations – they will know the property beyond the details and will have a better understanding of what matches what you’re looking for. If you’ve only been looking at houses, for example, why not see what the apartment market can bring? If you’ve only been looking at contemporary, why not throw a period property into the mix? At The Apartment Company we believe that it’s in the unexpected that you will find your dream home. The Apartment Company Pg@theapartmentcompany.co.uk or call 01225 471144


Hope House fp.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:09 Page 1


Central

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Circus Mews, BA1 £675,000

01225 809 571

A Bath city centre, mews property nestled between the Royal Crescent and Kings Circus. Spread over three floors with two parking spaces & courtyard garden. The modern home offers a spacious kitchen dining room, three bedrooms & study/ bedroom 4. There is also a bathroom and en-suite. Vacant possession. Energy Efficiency Rating: C

central@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Camden

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Leopold Buldings, BA1 £450,000

Stunning view across the park and to the hills beyond. A period property ideally suited for the centre of the city, but set in a quiet tree lined enclave. It has a large garage and pretty terraced garden to the rear. Energy Efficiency Rating: C

01225 809 868 camden@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews December.indd 1

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

18/11/2019 15:12


Newbridge Andrewsonline.co.uk

Newbridge Road, BA1 £500,000

A well-presented end-terrace family home set back off Newbridge Road. The house offers three bedrooms, sitting room, dining room, modern kitchen/ breakfast room, family bathroom, separate WC and a well maintain rear garden. Convenient transport links for both Bath city centre and Bristol. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

01225 809 685 newbridge@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bear Flat

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Devonshire Mews, A three double bedroom, two en-suite, 2004 built mews house located in Poet’s Corner. Over three storeys, this property has a garage, kitchen/dining room, southerly landscaped garden and courtyard. Bath, BA2 Energy Efficiency Rating: C £525,000

01225 805 680 bearflat@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews December.indd 2

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

18/11/2019 15:13


Savills Column FP.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2019 14:27 Page 1

CITY | BUSINESS

DOUBLE DIGIT GROWTH FORECAST OVER FIVE YEARS LUKE BRADY

Head of Savills Bath office and southern residential division

H

ouse prices in the south west are expected to rise by an average of 13.1% over the next five years, according to Savills latest residential property market forecast, published earlier this month. Anticipated growth is expected to be stronger still in the prime market, with the projected increase peaking at 16.5% across the south in the period 2019-2024, as the ripple of wealth out of London resumes. This will come as welcome news to Bath home owners, who have experienced a largely flat market in the last few years.

The state of play We published our forecasts following the announcement of a general election in December. This news provided an element of certainty in the face of a largely uncertain landscape. Any certainty relating to the direction of travel politically and economically is likely to have a big impact on the market, including providing a platform for house price growth.

The expectation As the market ceases being ruled by sentiment, we anticipate a continuation of trends seen historically, where the regional markets play catch up with London. This stage of the cycle appears to have begun in 2016, coinciding with the referendum, when buyers in the capital hit up against the limits of affordability.

122 TheBATHMagazine

|

DeCeMBeR 2019

|

issue 207

While Bath is unlikely to see the price increases expected in the northern cities of Leeds, Liverpool and Sheffield, where the value gap relative to incomes is significant, what we can expect is a return to a more typical level of mainstream market growth in the coming years. The prime market Prime property, typically those priced in the top 5-10% of a market, is expected to perform particularly well in the next five years. Central London is set to be one of the strongest performing prime markets, reversing the downward trend of recent years, where the compound effect of stamp duty reform and the Brexit vote resulted in falls of 20%. Recovery here will start in 2020, with price growth of 3% increasing to 20.5% by 2024. While other prime London locations will undershoot central London with more subdued growth of 11.5%, the value gap will allow for slightly higher growth of 14.2% in the outer commuter belt. In the south of the country, where Bath is located, we are anticipating a stronger performance again, with prices to increase incrementally to 16.5% from next year.

Between now and then In the short term, Brexit and election-related angst will continue to act as a drag on the market. Sensible pricing will continue to be fundamental to success. Having said this, we are anticipating a busy start to the year in Bath. We have reported a growing pool of buyer demand this year, and with a healthy pipeline of property ready to launch in the new year, alongside the greater level of political and economic certainty on the horizon, the market should have the catalyst it needs. n Luke Brady, Savills Bath. Edgar House, 17 George St, Bath BA1 2EN Web: savills.co.uk


Lansdown Court A stunning 2 bedroom apartment situated on the first floor of an exclusive gated development located on Lansdown. The apartment offers breath-taking views and convenient access to Bath, Bristol and the M4 motorway.

Rent: ÂŁ1,500 pcm* light and spacious open plan living room with wooden floors | private balcony with spectacular panoramic views | contemporary fitted kitchen with stone work surfaces | two good sized double bedrooms, the master having an en-suite shower room | modern family bathroom | off-street gated parking for two cars | plenty of storage space

Reside Bath | 24 Barton Street Bath BA1 1HG | T 01225 445 777 | E info@residebath.co.uk | W www.residebath.co.uk

*A Holding Deposit equivalent to one week’s rent will be payable.

RESIDE December.indd 1

20/11/2019 14:40


Savills December.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 10:05 Page 1


Savills December.qxp_Layout 1 22/11/2019 10:05 Page 2


Knight Frank.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:11 Page 1


Knight Frank.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:11 Page 2


Knight Frank.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:11 Page 3


Knight Frank.qxp_Layout 1 18/11/2019 15:11 Page 4

The market is moving. Now could be a good time to sell. If you’re thinking of selling your home, or would simply like some advice on the market, get in touch today. We’d love to help you.

Knight Frank 4 Wood Street Queen Square Bath, BA1 2JQ United Kingdom 01225 616690

knightfrank.co.uk

Connecting people & property, perfectly.


®

N

EW

Hayesland House

N

£1,800 pcm

Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · Two large reception rooms · Luxury kitchen · Council tax band D · Allocated parking and garage · Available now

N

EW

Royal Crescent

Furnished · Spacious Double Bedroom · Luxury Bathroom and Shower En-Suite · Luxury Bathroom and Shower En-Suite · No Students, Pets or Children

N

EW

Henrietta Street

£1,150 pcm

01225 471 14 4 The Apartment Company December.indd 1

N

£1,650 pcm

Unfurnished · Three double bedrooms · Communal gardens · Approx. 1119 Sq. ft. · Council tax band G · Allocated parking space · Available now

EW

Holburne Place

£1,295 pcm

EW

Fountain Buildings

£1,150 pcm

£1,600 pcm

Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · One single bedroom/study · No pets · Permit parking · Council tax band D · Available beginning of February

EW

Lansdown Place West

£1,295 pcm

Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · Highly sought after location · Light and airy · Council tax band C · No agency fees · Available 1st of November 2019

N

Fully furnished · Two bedrooms · Beautifully finished · Lift access · Council tax band D · Central zone parking permit · Available now

EW

Camden Crescent

N

Unfurnished · Two double bedroom · Fabulous finish · Light and spacious · Council tax band C · Gated allocated parking space · Available now

N

Furnished · First Floor Apartment · Central Location · Light and spacious · Residents Permit Parking · Council Tax Band D · Available 13th December 2019

SALES

Cavendish Lodge

N

£1,600 pcm

EW

EW

Walcot Parade

£900 pcm

Furnishing is optional · One double bedroom · Spacious and light · Newly decorated · Council tax band B · Central zone parking permit · Available now

LETTINGS

01225 303 870

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk

20/11/2019 11:39


®

N

EW

m

m

m

Chatham Row

£400,000 to £440,000

We are delighted to present to the market this beautiful 2 bedroom apartment, refurbished to an excellent standard. Being first floor it offers enormous amounts of light and coupled with high ceilings it has a fabulous spacious feel. Comprising; Sitting room, master bedroom, second bedroom, kitchen, bathroom and inner hall. The tasteful décor is stylish and contemporary and is consistent throughout the property. Located within a five minute level walk to the centre this certainly is an apartment that must be seen!

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk

The Apartment Company December.indd 2

20/11/2019 11:40


Mallory fp.qxp_Layout 1 20/11/2019 11:40 Page 1

Profile for MC Publishing Limited

The Bath Magazine December 2019  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath

The Bath Magazine December 2019  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath