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ISSUE 187 | APRIL 2018 £3.95 where sold

THE DELICIOUS GUIDE WE SERVE UP A FEAST OF SPRING/SUMMER DINING PLUS

FASHION IDEAS • AIM HIGH WITH TEAM BATH • WALK IN THE WOODS • BATH’S ECCENTRICS

AND SO MUCH MORE IN THE CITY’S BIGGEST MONTHLY GUIDE TO LIFE AND LIVING IN BATH


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Contents April 2018 5 THINGS

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ONE BURGER AND A CROSSWORD PLEASE?

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Your essential events to look forward to this month

Emma Clegg visits the casual delights of Firehouse Rotisserie

PRETTY PASTELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

SPECIAL FEATURE

Update your wardrobe for the new season

WHAT’S ON

THE DELICIOUS GUIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

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Our guide to the top events happening around the city

A STANDING OVATION

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Emma Clegg discovers the incredible facilities at the University of Bath that are helping Britain bag more gold medals

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A LITTLE ‘ME’ TIME

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Jessica Hope gets away from the stresses of everyday life with a trip to Frontlinestyle Spa and Salon

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Neill Menneer’s portrait of Wera Hobhouse, MP for Bath

BATH’S EXTRAORDINARY RESIDENTS

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A colourful look at what’s on offer at the local galleries

BATH AT WORK

The go-to directory for the best places to eat around the city

TEAM PLAYERS

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We chat to musician-extraordinare Ben Folds

FOR ART’S SAKE

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THE WALK

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Andrew Swift explores a 700-acre wood

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Catherine Pitt explores the lives of some of Bath’s eccentrics

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Jane Moore finds some uplifting gardens for visiting this spring

PLANTS TASTE BETTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

HOT PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

A review of Acorn chef Richard Buckley’s newest vegetarian cookbook

The finest homes to buy or rent

A FINE PALATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Georgette McCready meets Jaq Brewer, the local cook preparing the recipes of celeb chefs who come to Bath

TABLE MANNERS

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Have restaurant dining standards declined? asks Melissa Blease

BACK TO TRADITION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

ON THE COVER

A sumptuous plate of shellfish from one of our favourite eateries, The Scallop Shell. Read more about the best places to dine around the city in our Delicious Guide from page 66 Photo by Paolo Ferla

Have gastro-eateries and gin bars taken over our traditional pubs?

Even more great content and updates online: thebathmag.co.uk

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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

Like us: Facebook.com/ thebathmagazine

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine


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Editors Letter April.qxp_Layout 1 23/03/2018 17:04 Page 1

EDITOR’S PICKS POOL YOUR RESOURCES: The state-of-the-art Olympic sized swimming pool at the University of Bath has made a world of difference to swimmer Emma Hopkin, who was British freestyle 50m champion in 2017. The 50m pool is also open to the public, so anyone can use the pool alongside Olympic, Paralympic and world medallists. See more on Team Bath’s sports training village at the university on page 78.

from the

EDITOR “

STRONG WOMEN:

P

roud-pied April, dressed in all his trim hath put a spirit of youth in everything”, penned William Shakespeare in one of his sonnets. The climate has changed somewhat since then (I’m fairly certain they didn’t have March snow in the 16th century), but the sentiment still holds true. We have some diverse treats for you in this issue. I went up to Team Bath’s sports training village and had a tour around their extensive facilities, which are accessible to all (their youngest regular visitor is four months old and the oldest is 85). I even saw some Olympic and Paralympic medallists in training. Read all about it on page 78. We’ve got a serious food theme running through this issue, including our Delicious Guide to the best food venues in the region – just turn to page 66. On page 62 Melissa Blease discovers that our traditional British pubs are in no danger of being sidelined by their gastro competitors and celebrates how local establishments are keeping ale-house traditions strong. Melissa also shares her forthright opinions on page 60 on how public table manners seem to have relaxed considerably in recent years. You can also read about a very satisfying meal Jessica Hope and I had at the Firehouse Rotisserie on page 64 (there were no cross words, but there was a crossword). Catherine Pitt has profiled four eccentric figures from the history of Bath on page 50, including Carroty Kate, who was a force to be reckoned with in the 18th century. Jane Moore has suggestions for some April gardens to visit on page 94 and Andrew Swift finds an ancient woodland walk where, towards the end of the month, carpets of bluebells should be appearing. There are lots of forthcoming cultural treats in store at The Bath Festival from 11 to 27 May and we profile many of them here. I spoke to American singer-songwriter Ben Folds (and loved his North Carolina accent) about his performance with a piano at the festival (see page 38). Writer and journalist Lucy Mangan also talks about her new book on her childhood reading passions on page 35. Our fashion feature on page 18 brings many shades of pale to your attention with the latest clothing in ice-cream pastels. So you can discover ways of shimmering (in the balmy April weather, obviously), in hues ranging from pale peach to bleached citrus. All this will, we hope, set you up to find the youth in everything this month.

Emma Clegg Editor All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

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Carroty Kate, an 18th-century redheaded resident of Bath, wasn’t a woman to be messed with – find out why on page 50. We also showcase more strong women on p22 in our profile of events with a feminist agenda at the forthcoming Bath Festival: bathfestivals.org.uk WILDLIFE SPOTTING: Nature lovers in Bath are being asked to join a race to discover and record wildlife as part of a new international competition. The four-day City Nature Challenge runs from 27–30 April. Families can spot and take photos of wildlife in the garden, local park or walking trail and record their findings on the iNaturalist app. From bugs and birds to amphibians and fungi, the free app will identify the species and add the wildlife to the international tally: bnhc.org.uk/festival-of-nature/survey-team/

The fight is won or lost far away from witnesses − ❝ behind the lines, in the gym, and out there on the road, long before I dance under those lights. ❞ MOHAMMED ALI (1942–2016)


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ZEITGEIST

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things to do in

Get your groove on Being Brunel The brains behind the SS Great Britain in Bristol have brought together the world’s most significant collection of Brunel’s personal possessions, diaries and designs to open Being Brunel – a new £7.2m visitor attraction located next door to his revolutionary ship. Explore the museum’s six galleries featuring 150 never-before-seen artefacts, and find out about the engineering genius who changed the way we travel; ssgreatbritain.org

April

Saxophonist Jess Gillam

After her success in BBC Young Musician of the Year in 2016, saxophonist Jess Gillam’s career to date can only be described as stratospheric, especially after her 2017 BBC Proms debut. Jess has teamed up with Bath Philharmonia for an evocative concert of Vaughan Williams’ Tallis Fantasia, Fantasia on Greensleeves and the enchanting Linden Lea. This special performance, conducted by Jason Thornton, will also feature the music of Bryars and Nyman. Taking place on Thursday 19 April, 7.30pm, at the Assembly Rooms. Tickets: £25 – £5; bathphil.co.uk Image: Kaupo Kikkas

Listen to a green champ

Untamed by Henrik Simonsen, Artizan Editions

Be inspired Fresh: Art Fair is taking over Cheltenham Racecourse on Friday 27 – Sunday 29 April with 46 galleries, 400 artists and 5,000 works of art on display. There will be a broad spectrum of art on offer to suit all tastes and budgets, with work from emerging artists to Royal Academicans. Tel: 01242 224734; freshartfair.net

Emma Bridgewater, well-known for her iconic kitchen pottery ranges, is President of the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE). Now employing more than 300 people, Emma has refused to outsource manufacturing to low-wage economies abroad and her company makes all of its pottery in Stoke on Trent. Bath Preservation Trust and CPRE Avonside will be hosting an informal interview with Emma on Wednesday 18 April, 7pm, at St. Michael’s Without, Broad Street, Bath about the green landscape setting of Bath’s World Heritage Site and its threats from development. Emma will also talk about women who share some of her own relevant experiences of countryside campaigning. Tickets: £5 via Eventbrite; bit.ly/2ptMmZx

FilmBath has teamed up with The Bath Festival to launch a one-day event celebrating women’s voices in film, literature, politics, comedy and music, all coinciding with the centenary of some women being granted the vote in Britain. There will be MPs discussing how women are treated in Westminster, names from the world of film exploring how the fallout from the Weinstein accusations and the #MeToo campaign will impact on the movie industry, and a panel of experts will be revealing the lengths the suffragettes went to to get the vote in 1918. Don your purple, green and white rosette and march on Komedia on Sunday 20 May. See the full programme on page 22.

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Author Diane Atkinson will be discussing the lives of the suffragettes

Image: Lawrence Lawry

F-Rated


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ist

THE CITY THE BUZZ THE BUZZ POETRY PLEASE Doctoral students at the University of Bath have been using their rhyming skills to describe their PhD research on social media in the form of a limerick. The challenge, which used the hashtag #PhDlimerick, was started by the University’s Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT). Students were invited to take part via a limerick by the CSCT’s Director Professor Matthew Davidson: I reckon that now is the time To render your research in rhyme Haiku’s too pretentious And might work against us But something like this would be fine Isabel Thomlinson, whose research is to develop sustainable plastics from biological alternatives to crude oil, won first prize with her limerick: Sustainable plastics are trendy, But when hot, polylactide gets bendy Helping molecules lie Tucked in side by side Can make bio-based cups coffee-friendly

FANCY spending an evening with Mary Berry? She’s the utterly dependable guide in your kitchen, much-adored original Bake Off judge, with four decades of culinary experience and author of more than 70 books. Her limitless energy and good sense have made her one of our nation’s sweethearts. Who would you trust to teach you to master the classics other than Mary Berry? In her new book, Classic, she does just this. An Evening with Mary Berry, Thursday 26 April, at The Forum, £12; toppingbooks.co.uk/events/bath

My BATH

Comedian and writer Arthur Smith has long connections with Bath as his parents lived here for many years. He is appearing at the forthcoming Bath Comedy Festival. A police costume may be involved...

What are your associations with Bath? My parents retired to Bath and I visited once a month for the next 25 years – I have also premiered lots of shows in Bath. It is my favourite city in England (not counting London). What is your favourite building in the city? Does Pulteney Bridge count as a building? If not, then the Roman Baths – they are like nowhere else. Where do you like to eat in Bath and what is your meal of choice? Loch Fyne Seafood and Grill Restaurant in Milsom Street. I do like an oyster – or (why not?) 12 oysters. Some sole too, maybe. Name a street in the city that means something to you Pera Place where my parents lived, or else Camden Crescent because it is Royal Crescent for the thinking person. Of Bath’s famous historic names who would you like to meet for a cup of tea, and why? Jane Austen, to see if she was as witty and eloquent as her writing. I could maybe get her a stand-up gig in the Assembly Rooms. What makes you laugh? Human beings and our ludicrous behaviour, and always when a proud man falls over. Best evening’s entertainment in Bath? Bath Comedy has some great shows all year round and so, of course, does the Theatre Royal. Or maybe Bizarre Bath, especially as it was (sort of) my idea. What is your most memorable moment? The moment I learnt I was to answer these questions.

Photograph by Noel Murphy

What drew you to stand-up? I was always a bit of a show off – I started in reviews but I love the purity of stand-up. No props, no costume, no editing, all your own words and an immediate response. Are you really a Grumpy Old Man? When I am paid to be, but not otherwise.

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I am a grumpy grammarian, mind, and cannot abide the constant abuse of the word ‘literally’. Also, now I think about it, people who start every sentence with ‘so’. Where would you go for a weekend trip in Bath? I would see a play, walk up to Sally in the Woods, and sit under a tree in Hedgemead Park where I like to remember my Dad. What is your favourite quote? “Limited in his nature, infinite in his desire, man is a fallen god who remembers heaven.” You have over 44,000 followers on Twitter. What is it like running a Twitter account? I tweet most days – gags I have thought up, funny pictures, retweeting friends. I always stop and think before I post one – I can’t face a lot of trolling. I try not to put ‘Trump’ into a search as the result is now more depressing than funny. What animal would you like to be? A snail – I have one that lives under a rock in my tiny garden and he seems to live an agreeably gentle life… What contribution are you making to the Bath Comedy Festival? I am doing my first attempt at a show about my father, with singing and, possibly, a police uniform. After the success of my Leonard Cohen show, I love the chance of premiering this new show in Bath, with the wonderful Smithereens, my backing band – Carrie Marx, Ali Day and Kirsty Newton. I’m actually performing three times at this festival, and am a patron – I was told to be by Nick [Steel] a few years ago. I am happy to be so, and won’t stop coming here as I truly believe this is the best comedy festival in England. n Arthur Smith & The Smithereens – PC Syd, Thursday 12 April, 9pm for 9.30pm, Widcombe Social Club, £12/£10 con. Also at the Bath Brew House on Friday 13 April and the Festival Closing Gala Show on Saturday 14 April at the Apex Hotel. Bath Comedy Festival, 27 March – 15 April. Booking: 0800 411 8881; bathcomedy.com


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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

See more online www.thebathmag.co.uk

Contact us:

Bringing a little bit of Colombia to the UK Find us at 6 Abbey Gate Street, Bath BA1 1NP tel: 07534 391992 thecolombiancompany.com

Mon-Sat 8am till 6pm Sunday 10am – 5pm

Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Editor Tel: Email:

Emma Clegg 01225 424592 emma@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Financial Director Email:

Jane Miklos jane@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Production/Web Assistant Crystal Rose Email: crystal@thebathmagazine.co.uk Assistant Editor Email:

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Contact the Advertising Sales team tel: 01225 424499 Advertising Sales Email:

Liz Grey liz@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Email:

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The Bath Magazine and The Bristol Magazine are published by MC Publishing Ltd. We are an independent of all other local publications

The Bath Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout Bath and the surrounding area. We also have special distribution units in the following city centre stores and coffee shops

2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Telephone: 01225 424499. Fax: 01225 426677 www.thebathmag.co.uk Š MC Publishing Ltd 2018 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bath Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.

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DARCY’S NEWS CAFÉ Brunch @ Darcy’s

KNOW WHEN TO UNFRIEND

Our roving reporter looks at social media etiquette and the pitfalls of public pronouncements

S Bath’s finest

independent

news café

Breakfast from 8am available all day Lunch from 12pm

01225 435 308 | 34 Gay Street, Bath BA1 2NT |

darcybath

vintage furniture contemporar y styling

15 WALCOT BUILDINGS. LONDON RD. BA1 6AD Free parking on London Rd, in Weymouth St & at Morrisons ver veliving.uk

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ocial media is a handy, if admittedly lazy, way of keeping in touch with people, of cultivating friendships without the hassle of having to comb your hair, or needing to offer your undivided attention over coffee, and look sympathetic over the airing of first world problems. No, thanks to Facebook, Twitter and, to a lesser extent, Instagram, you can slob out in front of a box set of The Walking Dead, wearing your pyjamas and digging into a family size pack of Doritos while giving the world the impression that you’ve just slipped on a slinky little designer number, some vertiginous high heels and are off to quaff cocktails and canapés at one of Bath’s smartest establishments while laughing your red lipsticked face off for all those society photos. Judging by my feeds online lots of you actually do that and, yes, I do suffer sometimes from what the millennials refer to as FOMO (fear of missing out). That’s when you are at home but feeling miffed that you haven’t been invited to the party that everyone else is clearly enjoying. In fact what we really crave is to be invited to everything, whether it’s a glittering (they’re always glittering) black tie awards ceremony or a drinks reception for the opening of a new opticians on the high street, then we can RSVP that we’re too busy, or double booked that night, and get back to the box set, sure in the knowledge that we could have been a contender in the sparkliest guest contest, but that we chose not to, thank you very much. On the whole I am fine with people creating these better, brighter versions of themselves online. If it makes them happy, then who am I to stop them presenting a carefully edited impression of their lives? But there does come a point when we have to unfollow or unfriend someone in our social media address book. What online faux pas brings you to hover over the delete button? Pet hates. I can cope with the whole ‘oh, look here’s another photo of an adorable kitten’ trend, but when your mate insists on referring to herself as ‘Mummy’ when addressing her dog, or calling her pet her ‘fur baby’ it may be time to unfriend. Redneck values. That cousin or old colleague, who might have been hilarious in person after a few drinks down the pub, telling a few offcolour jokes that made you snigger at the time, suddenly looks a bit suspect when his views are expressed in black and white. All those posts of bikini-clad models and those damning remarks about women drivers, or ‘the good lady wife’... Time to delete this dodgy geezer from your timeline. The sounding board. Is social media really an appropriate place to air your grievances against a fellow committee member on the school parents’ WhatsApp group? Or to launch a rant about flatmates who steal other people’s cheese from the communal fridge? Or, indeed, to conduct a highly charged – and accusatory – argument with your father? (I have actually seen this on social media, avidly reading every detail while at the same time condemning this as shocking behaviour). It can all go a bit Jeremy Kyle before the participants have realised that airing your dirty laundry in public might not be the solution to the problem. Maybe not delete as they’re probably vulnerable, but give them a wide swerve by not ‘liking’ or commenting on their behaviour. The exes and ohs. When you split up you agreed you’d stay friends, but then you start seeing them having fun on social media with their new squeeze. Ouch! Time to let them go. One of the other big problems of social media is the jolly Facebook prompt that reminds you of what you were doing together when you were all loved up this time last year, or even seven years ago. But unfriending someone won’t solve this painful reminder of the way things used to be. While we’re on the subject of pain, how many of us know how our Facebook accounts will fare after we’re dead... will we unwittingly haunt those left behind with memories of good times past? n


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NEW SEASON | FASHION

ice-cream

pastels

“Delicacy can be strong,” advised Victoria Beckham, describing the new spring/summer trends. Pastels are a key part of the delicate vocabulary this season, so here we celebrate a shifting mixture of sherbet shades, dusty tinges and pale-as-pale hues

1 2

4

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aspberry ripple, vanilla, mango, strawberry, coffee, mint choc chip, pistachio and lemon sherbet. All flavours of ice cream, but they also form a palate of delicious fashion flavours for the new season. The trends are firmly raising their hats to the 1980s, and ice-cream pastels are part of this nostalgic direction. Here are ideas for a laid-back selection of soft, light-filled hues for you to dazzle in during this spring and summer. Build up your pastels – choose from dusky pink, pale peach, fresh apricot, ethereal mint, light-as-air blue, bleached citrus, washes of nude and faded lavender. Give these airy shades and gossimer weights your own fresh take – combine and layer them neopolitan style, block choice pieces up against crisp white trousers or shorts or wear your soft sherbet items more robustly, combining them with a denim jacket or jeans. Here is all you need for a quality pastel performance. n

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THIS PAGE: 1 Ashling dress, £139, from Hobbs, 43 Milsom Street, Bath; hobbs.co.uk 2 R+R earrings, £26, from Quadri, 16 Milsom Place, Bath; quadri.co.uk 3 Coeur de Lion bracelet with amazonite and haematite, £75, from Quadri, 16 Milsom Place, Bath; quadri.co.uk 4 Pale pink pleated wrap, £400, from Liz Clay: enquiries@lizclay.co.uk; lizclay.co.uk 5 Stephania knit jumper, £55, from Anthropologie, 1–4 New Bond Street, Bath; anthropologie.com 6 Bitte Kai Rand yellow padded jacket, £249, from Blue Woman I Home, The Loft, 1–2 Bartlett Street, Bath; bluewomensclothing.co.uk 7 Stefania knit culottes, £65, from Anthropologie, 1–4 New Bond Street, Bath; anthropologie.com 8 Broomfield pink tote, £55, from Cath Kidston at Milsom Place, 3 Broad Street, Bath; cathkidston.com 9 Aluminium cuff by Annie Beardsley, £45, from Waller and Wood, 4 Abbey Green, Bath; wallerandwood.co.uk OPPOSITE: 10 Floreat Effie robe, £78, from Anthropologie, 1–4 New Bond Street, Bath; anthropologie.com 11 Rose pink linen oversize shirt, £155, from Blue Woman I Home, The Loft, 1–2 Bartlett Street, Bath; bluewomensclothing.co.uk 12 Bindu voile dress, £269, from Oska, 30 Upper Borough Walls, Bath; uk.oska.com 13 Geraldine painted silk herringbone lined coat by Carole Waller, £1250, from Waller and Wood, 4 Abbey Green, Bath; wallerandwood.co.uk

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NEW SEASON | FASHION

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There’s bound to be something for your home in our enormous collection of handsome, hand-selected, hand-made rugs, kilims, furniture and accessories, reasonably priced from £50 to £5000. Cleaning • Restoration Valuation

Tel: 01761451764 Email: katya@orientalrugsofbath.com www.orientalrugsofbath.com at Bookbarn International, 1 Hallatrow Business Park, Wells Road, Hallatrow, Bristol BS39 6EX

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Idyllic Holiday Let Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty 2 Bedrooms . Sleeps 5 Wellow . Bath . BA2 8QE

www.theartcottagebath.com Next to the studio of Emma Rose Art Works www.emmaroseartworks.com

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CITY | CULTURE

WOMEN FIRST EVENTS

The Bath Festival and FilmBath have joined forces to programme an entire day of F-Rated events on Sunday 20 May that celebrate women’s extraordinary achievements FEMINISM 101 A whistle-stop tour of feminist thought and history courtesy of the incomparable double act Shirley & Shirley, creators of characters who, in the words of Mackenzie Crook, “make you think I wish I’d thought of that.” 10–10.30am, £9 (£8)

POST WEINSTEIN: BEYOND THE F-RATING The accusations against Harvey Weinstein, followed by the #MeToo movement, exposed the systemic sexism and abuse in the film industry. Chaired by writer, director and actor Kate Hardie, the panel will explore how this moment can be harnessed. 4.45–5.45pm, £10 (£9)

HERSTORY AND ALICE WROE This participatory project straddles art, activism and education and uses feminist art to engage people with the women’s history that has been systematically left out. Join founder Alice Wroe to learn about the project. 11–11.45am, £9 (£8)

READING WOMEN Author Kamila Shamsie, writer Lara Feigel and novelist Heidi Sopinka discuss how female artists find a space to create, and the obstacles they have to face. 6.30–7.30pm, £10 (£9)

WHO RUNS THE WORLD? For centuries, the answer has been men. An eminent panel asks how women can make their voices heard and bring about change. Guests include MPs Rachel Reeves, Jess Phillips, Thangam Debonnaire and Jo Swinson; chaired by Melissa Benn. 12.15–1.15pm, £10 (£9) CN LESTER AND URSULA’S ARROW Music group Ursula’s Arrow will be performing the work of Baroque Italian composer Barbara Strozzi as part of their commitment to highlight some of history’s female musicians. 2–2.45pm, £12 (£11)

BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: Kate Hardie, chair of Post Weinstein; MP Rachel Reeves (Who Runs the World?); Alice Wroe, founder of Herstory; an audience at Komedia; Diana Atkinson (Meet the Suffragettes)

GALA COMEDY EVENING This rip-roaring evening of irreverent acts features the award-winning FUNNY WOMEN. The night will be interspersed by the F-Rated Awards – allowing you to catch your breath between laughs! 8–10pm, £20 (£19) KEEP THE FLAME ALIVE: WORKSHOP Join potter Zoe Cameron and create your own lamp to honour the memory of strong women. You will be able to take your unfired project home with you. 12–1pm and 3-4pm, £14 (£13) FILM SCREENING: FRIDA A very special screening of this wonderful film with Salma Hayek at the Little Theatre Cinema. 8pm, stalls £8 (£6) and sofas £10 (£8). n

All events apart from the film screening will take place at the café at Komedia. Day tickets available. For full details visit: bathfestivals.org.uk or call: 01225 463362. Image by Lawrence Lawry

MEET THE SUFFRAGETTES Who were the women who put everything on the line to lead the charge for female suffrage? Join bestselling authors Diane Atkinson, Tessa Dunlop, Helen Pankhurst, greatgranddaughter of Emmeline Pankhurst, and writer and performer Naomi Paxton to find out more. 3.15–4.15pm, £10 (£9)

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BOOKS | AND | CULTURE

FIVE MINUTES WITH... Bestselling author Tarquin Hall moved to Bath last year after a decade living and writing in India – the setting for his popular Vish Puri detective novels. He lives in Lansdown with his family and is halfway through his tenth book. Here he tells us about his favourite novels, his dream house and where to buy the best noodles in town... If money was no object, I’d live on Lansdown Crescent – William Beckford's old house would do. My favourite shops in Bath? Mr. B’s is a brilliant bookseller – I’m amazed by the depth of the staff’s knowledge and often extremely grateful for their recommendations. Bayntun is surely one of Bath’s great treasures, one of the last bookbinders in the country, its bookcases packed with first editions replete with embossed gold lettering; the whole place has a wonderfully alluring musty smell that somehow inspires a desire to read more! And finally The Woodworks charity furniture shop often has the most beautiful pieces at very reasonable prices. We’ve picked up a few great pieces there, incuding a lovely old oak coat rack. The best food in town is served at Chilli Family Noodles next to the bus station. Not the most charming of venues, but fresh, delicious, authentic. If I were to sum up my new book in five words: Essential, insightful, original, funny, moustache. My advice to budding authors: Don’t talk about it, just get on with it. Don't be afraid of writing. Find other writers who inspire you. It’s mostly about imagination (but discipline is essential, too). I have to write in the morning, preferably starting at 6.30am. Being at home gives me cabin fever after 9am and I like to write in libraries (though not around students who often get up and down from their desks, eat crisps and go on Snapchat). I have to work out the plots for my fiction in blue lawyers’ notebooks. No other notebook will do. I have to write in pencil. I get very frustrated if people take my pencil sharpener! I don’t watch much TV. I’ve loved Blue Planet, though.

ABOVE: Tarquin Hall pictured in Delhi; BELOW, FROM RIGHT: The Great Game by Peter Hopkirk; Arabian Sands by Wilfred Thesiger; and Hall’s most recent book, The Delhi Detective’s Handbook, which he self-published via Crowdfunder No one would ever guess that I was once a cowboy in Texas, working on a cutting horse ranch when I was 18. I spent ten years living in Delhi and I love it on many levels – it became a second home. But we had to leave because the pollution got so bad. We have two young kids and it would have been irresponsible to keep them there any longer. And it wasn’t doing us much good either. The decision to move to Bath and not back to London came after we came down here to meet up with a cousin. It was a beautiful summer’s day and we fell for the place. Advice to my 18-year-old self? There are only so many doors open. Take them. My guilty pleasures: Honeycomb chocolate, strawberry cheesecakeflavoured frozen yogurt, Christmas pudding with brandy butter. My three most-cherished books: Arabian Sands by Wilfred Thesigers, which he signed for me when I stayed with him in northern Kenya in a mud shack; Timbuctu by Tahir Shahs, again signed, one of the best novels of the past few years, an extraordinary tale; and The Great Game by Peter Hopkirks, which was a huge inspiration to me, and is also signed – Peter was kind enough to invite me for tea after he read my first book. My best new discovery has to be Bath. We moved here 18 months ago and I have been exploring endlessly. I try to go for a walk every afternoon up Sion Hill. I love the view from the top of the golf course onto the back of the Royal Crescent with the Abbey and the centre of town beyond. I often take my kids up to the very top on a summer’s evening. n

The Delhi Detective’s Handbook by Tarquin Hall, RRP £12; tarquinhall.com

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WHAT’S ON in April BATH COMEDY FESTIVAL Tuesday 27 March – Sunday 15 April, times vary n Various venues around Bath Heading into its tenth year, Bath Comedy Festival has got a line-up that will be rib-tickling audiences around the city. The programme includes Radio 4’s It’s Just a Joke, Comrade Viv Groskop, Simon Evans, and Janey Godley. Absolutely Fabulous’ Helen Lederer will be adding her comedic touch to The Wine Arts Trail – jump on the big red bus and discover the secret corners of our super city, hosted by Ralph Oswick. Bizarre Bath will be taking guests on a stroll around Bath, and you’ll be laughing your socks off at Mother’s Ruin – a hysterical cabaret about gin. Feeling peckish? Don’t miss the Faulty Towers Dining Experience at the Abbey Hotel – Basil, Sybil and Manuel will serve a three-course meal along with plenty of laughs. For the full programme, visit: bathcomedy.com

Rebecca Louise is Adele at Komedia

NEON DANCE: MAHAJANAKA Monday 2 April, 7.30pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Neon Dance artistic director Adrienne Hart and composer Sebastian Reynolds collaborate with musicians and dance artists to retell the story of Mahajanaka Jataka, a shipwrecked prince who survives alone at sea until the goddess of the ocean comes to his rescue. £14/£7 cons. Tel: 01225 860100; wiltshiremusic.org.uk Neon Dance: Mahajanaka at Wiltshire Music Centre

DIANA HENRY TALK & TASTINGS Tuesday 3 April, 7.30pm for 8pm n Topping & Co Bookshop, The Paragon Acclaimed flavour queen Diana Henry chats about her book How to Eat a Peach. From £15; toppingbooks.co.uk/events/bath SAMANTHA HARVEY Wednesday 4 April, 7.45pm for 8pm n Topping & Co Bookshop, The Paragon Gifted novelist Samantha Harvey talks about her suspenseful new novel, The Western Wind. From £8; toppingbooks.co.uk/events/bath MARY STUART Wednesday 4 – Saturday 14 April, times vary n Theatre Royal Bath Friedrich Schiller’s political tragedy takes us behind the scenes of some of British history’s most crucial days. Two of the UK’s leading actors will reprise their acclaimed performances, playing both Elizabeth I and Mary Stuart. Juliet Stevenson (Truly, Madly, Deeply) and Lia Williams (The Crown, Kiri) trade the play’s central roles, decided at each performance by the toss of a coin. Tel: 01225 448844; theatreroyal.org.uk

Lia Williams and Juliet Stevenson in Mary Stuart at Theatre Royal Bath

CAROLINE HERSCHEL AND THE NEARLY ALL MALE WORLD OF C18TH SCIENCE Thursday 5 April, 7.30pm n BRLSI, 16 Queen Square, Bath An evening talk by Dr Emily Winterburn, an academic and former Curator of Astronomy at Royal Observatory Greenwich, exploring the life of Caroline Herschel, who became the first woman to be published in the journal of the Royal Society. £4/£2 cons; herschelmuseum.org.uk / brlsi.org

Image: Manuel Harlan

WEST OF ENGLAND YOUTH ORCHESTRA WITH JOANNA MACGREGOR Friday 6 April, 7.30pm and Saturday 7 April, 3pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon An exciting collaboration with a performance of Gershwin’s Piano Concerto taking centre stage as outstanding youth talent from across the region perform with artist in residence Joanna MacGregor. £15/£9 cons. Tel: 01225 860100; wiltshiremusic.org.uk 26 TheBATHMagazine

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EDITOR’S PICK THE ARTS SOCIETY BATH EVENING TALK: THE ORIGINS OF THE TUDOR ROSE Monday 9 April, 7.15pm n BRLSI, Queen Square, Bath The Tudor rose has been one of Britain’s foremost emblems for half a millennium. So where did it come from? And what did it mean? This lecture by Jonathan Foyle traces its longhidden origin and uncovers a conspiracy to hide it. Non-members welcome, £8 per person; batheveningarts.co.uk CARPENTERS GOLD – LIVE IN CONCERT Friday 6 April, 8pm n Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls, Bath Produced by London West End director of 80s Mania, The Abba Reunion Tribute Show and Abba Mania, Carpenters Gold perform their greatest hits, such as Goodbye to Love, Solitaire, We’ve Only Just Begun, and Top of the World. £20. Tel: 01225 461700; chapelarts.org JESSIE GREENGRASS AND MAX PORTER Monday 9 April, 8pm n Topping & Co Bookshop, The Paragon Elegant prose stylists, Jessie Greengrass and Max Porter discuss their award-winning fictions. From £4; toppingbooks.co.uk/events/bath LUNCHTIME TALK: ROGUES AND VAGABONDS Wednesday 11 April, 1pm n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street Join Carmen Holdsworth-Delgado as she examines the history of the Garrick Club and some of the treasures within, paying particular attention to images of David Garrick and his contemporaries, such as Susannah Cibber, Samuel Foote, Peg Woffington and many others. Carmen will look at the role of art in the making of David Garrick’s career and his extraordinary skill for self-promotion. £7. Tel: 01225 388569; holburne.org THE HOBBY AND NEEDLECRAFT SHOW Thursday 12 – Saturday 14 April, 10am – 5pm n Bath and West Showground, Shepton Mallet More than 150 leading craft supply businesses, groups and guilds will be on display, with over 50 workshops, demonstrations, make and takes, plus children’s workshops. Restaurants, cafes, free car parking, free shuttle bus service. £9, £8 concs, under 16s free. For advance tickets, tel: 0345 3040222. Save £2 on all door tickets when purchased in advance; craft4crafters DORIC STRING QUARTET Friday 13 April, 7.30pm, free pre-concert talk 6.30pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon This internationally-acclaimed quartet is renowned for their willingness to explore the most complex of scores. They present an inventive programme including Haydn’s uplifting Op 33 No 5 and Thomas Ades’ Four Quartets. Also includes pieces by Purcell and Brahms. £20, free under 25s. Tel: 01225 860100; wiltshiremusic.org.uk POP-UP BOWIE Saturday 14 April, 8pm n Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls, Bath Paul Anthony was voted the UK’s No.1 David Bowie Tribute Act at the National Tribute Awards 2016. With a full band Paul will perform two hours of Bowie’s biggest hits taking the audience on a musical journey, experiencing the masterpieces that made the late, great David Bowie the legend he is today. £21. Tel: 01225 461700; chapelarts.org / popupbowie.co.uk Continued page 28

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WHAT’S | ON TALK: KAREN PARRY – NEEDLE KNOW-HOW BY JOHN JAMES NEEDLES Thursday 15 April, 7.30 – 9.30pm n St Luke’s Church Hall, Hatfield Road, Wellsway Join Bath Quilters for a talk on the John James Needle company and the different types of sewing needles it makes. Afterwards there will be the opportunity to buy a large range of needles for various types of work. There will be a charity raffle in aid of RUH. Refreshments available, visitors £5; bathquilters.weebly.com THE REAL WAR OF THE ROSES Tuesday 17 April, 2pm n BRLSI, Queen Square Shakespeare’s earliest plays deal with the most turbulent period in English history, from the loss of France through to the Battle of Bosworth. This talk hosted by Bath Shakespeare Society shows how Shakespeare used history – what he retained, what he ignored and how he melded real events into drama. £4/£2 cons; brlsi.org JOHN ROBINS: THE DARKNESS OF ROBINS Wednesday 18 April, 7.30pm n Komedia Edinburgh Comedy Award winner John Robins is one of the most exciting and distinctive voices in comedy. He returns to Bath reflecting on love, loss and lamenting the fact he can’t break up with himself. From £14.50. Tel: 01225 489070; komedia.co.uk BATH PHILHARMONIA WITH SAXOPHONIST JESS GILLAM Thursday 19 April, 7.30pm n The Assembly Rooms, Bath Bath Philharmonia is joined by BBC Young Musician of the Year in 2016 and saxophonist Jess Gillam, who made her Proms debut last year. The concert programme features Vaughan Williams’ Tallis Fantasia, Gavin Bryars’ The Green Ray and Michael Nyman’s Where the Bee Dances. Conducted by Jason Thornton. £25 – £5. Tel: 01225 463362; bathboxoffice.org.uk THE RHEINGANS SISTERS Thursday 19 April, doors 7.30pm n Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls Winners of the 2016 BBC Radio 2 Folk Award for Best Original Track, The Rheingans Sisters make playful, powerful and richly connecting music that is wholly contemporary while deeply anchored in folk traditions. £12/£14 on the door. Tel: 01225 461700; chapelarts.org. Last orders in the café at 6.30pm. THE LANDSCAPE COLLECTIVE EXHIBITION Until Thursday 19 April n Art at the Heart of the RUH, Royal United Hospital, Bath This prestigious exhibition shows a large variety of landscape collective works by a group of UK based photographers. The group includes a recent winner of Landscape Photographer of the Year, and many are Fellows of the Royal Photographic Society. A third of the sale price on artwork sold is donated to the RUH Arts Fund. Donations go directly into maintaining the award-winning arts projects on offer at the hospital; artatruh.org TIM MARSHALL Wednesday 18 April, 8pm n Topping & Co Bookshop, The Paragon In his new book, Divided: Why We’re Living in an Age of Walls, Tim Marshall offers an unflinching analysis of the fault lines that will shape our world. From £4; toppingbooks.co.uk/events/bath REBECCA LOUISE IS ADELE Friday 20 April, 7.30pm n Komedia As seen on the BBC One’s Even Better Than The Real Thing, Rebecca Louise is the BBC’s number-one choice Adele tribute in the world. Her talents and musical mind help recreate the soulful,

powerful and emotional sounds of one of the world’s most favourite artists – Adele. £14. Tel: 01225 489070; komedia.co.uk TCHA LIMBERGER TRIO / MOZES ROSENBERG Friday 20 April, 7.30pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Tcha blends swinging jazz with European folk music in a gypsy-jazz extravaganza. Mixing traditional music from central Europe with the swinging, hip-twitching jazz of Django, Tcha and his band will be joined on stage by jazz-guitar virtuoso Mozes Rosenberg of the famed Rosenberg dynasty. £18/£9 cons. Tel: 01225 860100; wiltshiremusic.org.uk WESTMINSTER CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Saturday 21 April, 7.30pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon One of the UK’s newest chamber orchestra makes its debut at the Wiltshire Music Centre with an exciting programme of string orchestra music. With a flair for programming lesser-known works alongside the more standard repertoire, the orchestra present La oración del torero by the early 20th century Spanish composer Joaquin Turina, as well as works by Holst, Respighi and Tchaikovsky. Renowned pianist Cordelia Williams, whose recordings of late classical and early romantic repertoire have received critical acclaim, will perform Mozart’s Concerto No 12 in A, K 414. Tickets: £22 / £15 cons. Tel: 01225 860100; wiltshiremusic.org.uk BATHAMPTON ART GROUP EXHIBITION Saturday 21 April, 10am – 5pm n Bathampton Village Hall, Holcombe Lane, Bathampton Bathampton Art Group celebrates its 50th year with a special exhibition featuring around 120 artworks on display which will be opened by MP Wera Hobhouse. Catherine BealE, professional watercolourist, will be judging the exhibits. Enjoy browsing the work and vote for your own particular favourite; bathamptonart.co.uk

PHENOMENAL WOMEN TALKS: CAROLE MUNDELL Thursday 26 April, 6pm n The Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel, Beau Street, Bath Carole is Professor of Extragalactic Astronomy and Head of Physics at the University of Bath. An observational astrophysicist, her research has involved using ground- and space-based facilities across the electromagnetic spectrum to understand cosmic black holes and their environments. After two years at the University of Maryland, Carole brought a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to Liverpool John Moores University where she led an international team specialising in catching the fast-fading light from gamma ray bursts – the most powerful explosions in the Universe. She was appointed to a Professorship in 2007 and has held fellowships including a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award for the study of black hole-driven explosions and the dynamic Universe. Carole’s experience in strategic science policy advisory work has included technology, basic research and horizon scanning beyond astrophysics. She is a committed communicator of science to the public and advocate for diversity in science. Tickets: £15, including prosecco and canapes. Tel: 01225 355 329; thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk Continued page 30

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WHAT’S | ON SHAKESPEARE’S BIRTHDAY Sunday 22 April, 7.30pm n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street Celebrate William Shakespeare’s birthday at this evening concert. Be entertained by the vocal talents of Operaletta, who will present a tuneful, interesting and sometimes surprising mixture of solos, duets, trios and ensembles inspired by the Bard. Likely to be very popular, so get your tickets quick. Tickets: £15. Tel: 01225 388569; holburne.org AI: ECONOMIC SALVATION OR SOCIETAL PERIL? Monday 23 April, 7.30pm n BRLSI, Queen Square, Bath For a long time artificial intelligence was the stuff of science fiction. But now advances in robotics, and machine learning make it a very real and urgent one. Mark Purdy, managing director of Accenture Research, will explore whether AI can bring economic gains for countries, and discuss whether we can build in the right frameworks and safeguards ahead of time. Tickets: £4/£2 cons; brlsi.org AL FRESCO DINING EVENING Wednesday 25 April n Cross Guns in Avoncliff, Bradford on Avon An evening hosted by Barabiku Outdoor featuring a bespoke vegan, seasonal menu. Cooked using a variety of open fire cooking methods. Advance bookings only. Limited spaces. To book email: info@crossgunsavoncliff.com or call: 01225 862335. SHERLOCK HOLMES: THE FINAL CURTAIN Wednesday 25 April – Saturday 5 May, times vary n Theatre Royal Bath Robert Powell stars as the world famous detective in this brand new adventure, with Liza Goddard. Could this be the final curtain for the world’s greatest detective? Chilling, gripping and filled with

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unforeseen twists and revelations, this new thriller has been commissioned by Theatre Royal Bath from award-winning dramatist Simon Reade. Tel: 01225 448844; theatreroyal.org.uk MARY BERRY Thursday 26 April, 7.15pm n The Forum Queen of Cakes, Mary Berry, comes to Bath to talk about her inspiring life and career, and celebrate her new collection of recipes in her new TV-tie in cookbook, Classic. From £12; toppingbooks.co.uk/events/bath RAYMOND E. FEIST Friday 27 April, 8pm n Topping & Co Bookshop, The Paragon Meet Raymond E Feist, legendary master of the fantasy genre, and discover the first book of his new epic Firemane Saga series. From £8. FRESH: ART FAIR Friday 27 – Sunday 29 April, opening times vary n Cheltenham Racecourse With 46 galleries, 400 artists and 5,000 works of art on display, art lovers won’t want to miss this contemporary art fair. There will be a broad spectrum of art on offer to suit all tastes and budgets, with work from emerging artists to Royal Academicians. There will be original paintings, prints and sculptures from £100 to £50,000. Tickets: £6 per person on-the-door and £8 for two when you buy online. Tickets are valid for the whole weekend, so return as often as you like. Tel: 01242 224734; freshartfair.net HOLBURNE UP LATE Friday 27 April, 5 – 9pm n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street Enjoy after-hours access to the galleries and exhibitions. Relax with friends and a drink, and enjoy music in the Garden Café. Continued page 32


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Robert Webb and Sophie Ellis-Bextor will be at The Bath Festival

QUIZ NIGHT AND SUPPER Saturday 28 April, 7pm n Bathampton Village Hall, Holcombe Lane Test your general knowledge at this quiz night, which includes a two course dinner. Tickets: £12.50, tel: 01225 465781. First prize is £50, plus there will be other prizes, a raffle and a bar. Maximum of six people per team. Proceeds go to Bathampton Village Show. BATH MINERVA CHOIR: SPRING CONCERT Saturday 28 April, 7.30pm n Bath Abbey Join Bath Minerva Choir, an international team of soloists and Bath Philharmonia for the beautifully atmospheric Stabat Mater by Dvorak performed in the magnificent setting of Bath Abbey. Tickets from Bath Box Office, tel: 01225 463362; bathboxoffice.org.uk THE JAYWALKERS: LIVE IN THE BAR Sunday 29 April, 7pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon These former BBC Young Folk Award finalists fuse elements of American bluegrass and folk in their exhilarating live performances. With good humour, virtuosic instrumentals, three-part harmonies and impressive slap bass, The Jaywalkers are guaranteed to put a smile on your face. £10/£5 concs. Tel: 01225 860100; wiltshiremusic.org.uk SALLEY VICKERS Thursday 3 May, doors 7.45pm n Topping & Company, The Paragon, Bath Author Salley Vickers will discuss her charmingly subversive novel about a library in 1950s England. Sylvia Blackwell, a young woman in her twenties, moves to East Mole, a quaint market town in middle England, to start a new job as a children’s librarian. But the apparently pleasant town is not all it seems. Early bird tickets £8, £20 redeemable against a copy of the book; toppingbooks.co.uk THE LIFE AND RHYMES OF BENJAMIN ZEPHANIAH Sunday 6 May, 7.30pm n Theatre Royal Bath He befriended Nelson Mandela, fought in the 1980s race riots and recorded radical and relevant reggae music with Bob Marley’s former band. Benjamin Zephaniah was unable to read and write at school but became one of Britain’s most remarkable poets. And now he’s back with his first tour in eight years, to coincide with his remarkable autobiography, The Life And Rhymes Of Benjamin Zephaniah. Tel: 01225 448844; theatreroyal.org.uk PLANNING AHEAD... THE BATH FESTIVAL Friday 11 – Sunday 27 May n Venues around the city The Bath Festival returns for its 70th anniversary year as a 17-day multi-arts festival, celebrating all things music and literature. The programme features Robert Webb, Diana Henry and Judy Murray, as well as Mary Chapin Carpenter, Roderick Williams, Simon Continued page 34 32 TheBATHMagazine

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WHAT’S | ON Mayo, David Olusoga and Henry Blofeld. The finale weekend will culminate with a big concert at the Bath Recreation Ground featuring Tears For Fears, Robert Plant and the Sensational Space Shifters, Sophie Ellis-Bextor, Midge Ure and many more. Be quick to book to see your favourites as tickets are already selling out. Tel: 01225 463362; bathfestivals.org.uk

RACE FOR LIFE Sunday 8 July n Royal Victoria Park Challenge yourself to a 5k or 10k Race for Life to raise money for Cancer Research UK and help beat cancer. Entry fees: £10 for children and £14.99 for women. To sign up go to: raceforlife.org

ETERNAL LIGHT: A WWI CENTENARY CONCERT Saturday 12 May, 7.30pm n Bath Abbey Musical director Francis Faux will direct Lucis and the Southern Sinfonia in a special concert of remembrance featuring the music of Elgar, Parry, Gjeilo, Will Todd and Sir Karl Jenkins, concluding with Howard Goodall’s Eternal Light: A Requiem. £25 – £10. Tel: 01225 463362; bathboxoffice.org.uk

BATH PRETTY MUDDY AND PRETTY MUDDY KIDS Sunday 23 September n Bath Racecourse Pretty Muddy is a muddy obstacle course that women of any ability can climb over, crawl under, and charge through for charity. For the first time in Bath there will be Pretty Muddy Kids, which is a new exciting obstacle course designed just for children – with added mud, thrills and spills. Pretty Muddy Kids is £10 for children, and Pretty Muddy is £19.99 for adults. To sign up go to: raceforlife.org n

IFORD ARTS 2018 Saturday 26 May – Saturday 4 August, times vary n Iford Manor, Bradford on Avon The internationally renowned Iford Arts Festival celebrates its 25th anniversary season with a programme of captivating and intimate opera performances including Candide, Partenope and Madame Butterfly. Get your friends together, cross your fingers for good weather, grab a picnic and enjoy an eclectic evening of music and cocktails at the Midsummer Prom, and witness young operatic talent in the making at the Iford Arts Young Artists In Concert. Tickets available from Theatre Royal Bath Box Office, tel: 01225 448844. For the full programme, visit: ifordarts.org.uk Tickets are selling fast for Tom Kerridge’s Pub In The Park

TWERTON PARK DAY OF EVENTS Saturday 12 May n Twerton Park, Bath For the first time, The Bath Festival, in association with Bath City Football Club and radio station talkSPORT, will run a day of events at Bath City’s ground, Twerton Park. talkSPORT’s Danny Kelly will host a three-hour live broadcast from Twerton Park to more than one million listeners. Includes food, drinks and live music. Events confirmed include: FAMILY FOOTBALL QUIZ 12–1pm, £6, age 7+ Test your knowledge against footballing super-brain David Brayley in this quiz for children and adults. Buy a ticket and come with your team (maximum eight per side) or have a bunch of experts provided. Under 12s must be accompanied by an adult.

TOM KERRIDGE PRESENTS PUB IN THE PARK Friday 8 – Sunday 10 June n Royal Victoria Park Join Tom Kerridge for a festival of top tunes and amazing food. Razorlight, Tom Odell and Melanie C top the music line-up, and you can enjoy great food from pop-up pubs including Tom Kerridge’s The Hand & Flowers and The Coach. See Tom and other top UK chefs including Paul Ainsworth live on stage, plus there’s loads of foodie shopping to enjoy; pubintheparkuk.com FOREST LIVE Thursday 14 – Sunday 17 June n Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire The popular outdoor concert season is back with a programme that will get your toes tapping. Selling more than 29 million records worldwide, Irish three-piece The Script will be kicking off the event on Thursday. Paul Heaton, one of the UK’s most successful songwriters, and Jacqui Abbott will take to the stage on Friday as a duo. BRIT-nominated and No 1 album selling soloist Paloma Faith will be performing on Saturday, and George Ezra is scheduled for the Sunday. For tickets, tel: 03000 680400; forestry.gov.uk BATHIRON 2018 Thursday 14 – Sunday 17 June n Venues in Bath tbc The National Heritage Ironwork Group is proud to announce its first major event, BathIRON, aimed at heritage professionals, practitioners and the public. An opportunity to see ironwork being made in Parade Gardens and follow an ironwork trail; nhig.org.uk 34 TheBATHMagazine

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talkSport – LIVE BROADCAST 2–5pm, £8 (£7) talkSPORT’s live broadcast includes a preview of the last day of the Premier League and the FA Cup, a look ahead to the World Cup, interviews and games. Get your question lined up and they’ll put you straight to air. CREATE A FOOTBALL ADVENTURE 2–3pm, £7, age 7+ Join sports writer David Brayley for this workshop learning how to create spellbinding stories and characters, all based around the beautiful game. THE MEN WHO LOVE FOOTBALL 6–7pm, £7 (£6) Retired pro Vince Hilaire (Crystal Palace, Portsmouth) and writers Michael Calvin, Tony Evans and James Brown will discuss what makes people devote their lives to the game, along with all the highs and lows. The panelists will be signing books afterwards. CELEBRITY QUIZ 8–9pm, £8 (£7) Watch the panel slug it out in a homage to A Question of Sport – and refer to Bath City’s website for a chance to win a place on the teams. Tel: 01225 463362; bathfestivals.org.uk


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BOOKS | AND | PEOPLE

LOVING TO READ

When Lucy Mangan was little, stories were everything. They opened up new worlds and cast light on all the complexities she encountered in this one. Lucy, who is appearing at The Bath Festival on 19 May, here shares her thoughts on her new book, Bookworm, and the reading experiences it celebrates

A “

few years ago”, says Lucy Mangan, “I wrote a weekly column reminiscing about individual books that were my childhood favourites.” “The column was inspired by a good friend of mine – a wonderful parent, confident, highly educated and so on – who said she was terrified of choosing books for her children. She hadn’t been much of a reader and didn’t know where to begin. That was quite a revelation, and made me think that I might have some useful information to impart to people.” Lucy Mangan’s new book, Bookworm, shows her revisiting her childhood reading, reliving her best-loved books, their creators, and the endless subtle ways they shape our lives. The book is aimed at reminiscing adults rather than younger readers, but – knowing that she would have loved to have read about the books she was reading from quite early on – Lucy thinks it could also appeal to teenagers, although they might, she admits, need to be “hardcore bookworms”… There is a quote included in the book from philosopher and psychologist Riccardo Manzotti: “The more you read, the more locks and keys you have”. Lucy Mangan explains: “This describes the process of reading and re-reading as creating both the locks and the keys with which to open them; it shows you an area of life you didn’t know was there and starts to give you the tools with which to decipher it. I think it works at a linguistic and emotional level.” “So, for example, when I first read in one of my Beverly Cleary books that ‘Ramona chewed a hangnail as painful as her thoughts’ I was introduced to a new language construction and shown how to use it. And when I read End of Term by Antonia Forest

and Lawrie begins an internal monologue delving down into the various layers of motivation she has for agreeing to swap with her twin sister for an upcoming netball match, that opened up a whole new hinterland and showed me how to pursue it too.” The emotional impact of Lucy’s reading journey is clear throughout: “Any kind of book has the potential to change you in some way. That’s one of the most wonderful things about reading – you never know what someone is going to get out of a book. The bit that blew my mind when reading Mrs Frisby and the Rats of NIMH wasn’t the idea of

superintelligent rats being bred in a secret laboratory – it was Nicodemus talking to Mrs Frisby about how they live compared to humans. Nicodemus says: ‘A rat civilisation would probably never have built skyscrapers, since rats prefer to live underground. But think of the endless subways-below-subways-belowsubways they would have had.’” “And a veil was lifted. The world I lived in wasn’t preordained, or immutable or, indeed, even anything special. Just human. Built and organised for us, by us, developed to serve our needs. I was just about catatonic with shock.”

Asked to choose a stand-out book from her childhood selection, Lucy is categorical: “I just can’t choose. I have nightmares about being forced to flee my burning house with only one book. Don’t make me do this. I could probably get it down to a top thirty but I would hate to try.” “Bookworms and readers are born, not made,” Lucy maintains. “I do say in my book that to be a bookworm is an extreme state, and as with almost all extreme states, there are downsides. I feel very much that I’ve done my duty by my son, who shows no bookworm tendencies, because he has every opportunity to become as much of one as he can and wants to be, and that’s the very best I can do for him in any field of endeavour. And he does read. It just doesn’t utterly consume him as it did me. My heart feels this is deeply wrong, but my head knows it’s not.” “I would like to write for children, but it is a great and specific talent to write well for young readers and I am too frightened to try. They find you out very quickly, do young readers, as they should.” Finally, what advice would Lucy Mangan give to her five-year old self on reading? The answer is simple: “Carry on. It’s all you’re going to be good at.” n

Lucy Mangan talks about Bookworm, and her bookworm tendencies, on 19 May at 5pm at the Assembly Rooms, Bath. £10/£9 concessions. To book tel: 01225 463362; bathfestivals.org.uk

BELOW, left to right: Three of the books that featured large in Lucy Mangan’s childhood, and her recently published book Bookworm: A Memoir of Childhood Reading. Square Peg, rrp £14.99

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CITY | CULTURE

Photograph by Lars Borges

Photograph by Benjamin Ealovega

Photograph by Sim Canetty-Clarke

BEST CUTS OF CLASSICAL

There is a rich array of classical music running through The Bath Festival. You can hear the work of the master composers, much-loved pieces, and the new rhythms of young, upcoming stars – here are some highlights

F

irst up, a real treat will be a series of performances called Coffee and Cakes with Haydn. Roman Rabinovich, one of today’s most exciting pianists, will introduce and perform all of the composer’s sparkling and utterly charming piano sonatas over 10 concerts. This is a chance to dip your toes into classical music – to relax, unwind and enjoy an informal atmosphere, with coffee and cake provided by Didi Cakes of Bath. (Performances on 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 21, 23, 24 and 26 May – see the full programme online.) For those with a penchant for Schubert and the lieder tradition, come and enjoy BathSongs. Britain’s leading baritone Roderick Williams will perform Schubert’s trio of great song cycles, masterpieces of extraordinary beauty and emotional depth. (Performances on 18 May at 1pm, 20 May at 3pm, 22 May at 3pm.) More sublime voices, this time from the Marian Consort, can be heard in a performance of Allegri’s Miserere, one of the most popular pieces of choral music ever written. Set in the breathtaking Bath Abbey, this is likely to be an unforgettable experience. (Performance on 15 May at 7.30pm.) Stand-out musical stars at the festival include pianist and conductor Lars Vogt, one of the leading musicians of his generation. He performs the complete Beethoven piano concerto cycles – some of Beethoven’s finest music – with the Royal Northern Sinfonia. (Performances on 18 May at 7.30pm and 19 May at 3.30pm.) For stellar piano playing of wonderful music, go and see Stephen Hough, who has won global acclaim for his outstanding piano performances, play pieces including Debussy’s Clair de la Lune, Schumann’s C major Fantasy Op 17 and Beethoven’s Appassionata Sonata. (Performance on 25 May at 3pm.)

If chamber music appeals, you’ll want to see Vision String Quartet, a young ensemble from Berlin who are performing for the first time in the UK. This exciting and inspirational chamber group has exploded on to the classical music scene in recent years, turning convention on its head and combining the highest musical demands with their high-energy performances and irresistible style. (Performances on 19 May at 9pm and 20 May at 7.30pm.) Another rising star is cellist and BBC Young Musician of the Year, Sheku Kanneh-Mason, who has become an inspiration to all young musicians. He performs with the 2017 BBC Cardiff Singer of the World, Catriona Morison, at the Concert for the People of Bath. The Kanneh-Masons are an extraordinary musical family who reached the semi-final of Britain’s Got Talent in 2015. They perform as The Kanneh Mason Family on the last Saturday of the festival. (Performances on 25 May at 7.30pm and 26 May at 2.30pm.) If you are a musical theatre fan, don’t turn down the opportunity to experience the rich score and vibrant lyrics of West Side Story. The lead roles in Leonard Bernstein’s great musical are taken by two young stars, soprano Gemma Summerfield, winner of the distinguished Kathleen Ferrier Prize, and John Porter, a young tenor with a bright opera career ahead of him. Set in 1950s New York, the musical includes some of the most recognisable, iconic and much-loved songs – among them Somewhere, Maria, America and I Feel Pretty. (Performance 19 May at 7.30pm.) n

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: baritone Roderick Williams, cellist Sheku Kanneh Mason, soprano Gemma Summerfield, pianist Stephen Hough, pianist Lars Vogt, the Vision String Quartet and pianist Roman Rabinovich.

For full details and prices refer to The Bath Festival website: bathfestivals.org.uk or call: 01225 463362. Photograph © Giorgia Bertazzi

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CITY | CULTURE

ROCKING THE PIANO

Musician Ben Folds is appearing at The Bath Festival on 24 May. He will have a piano by his side. Emma Clegg discovers that there may be a few musical surprises in store…

A

merican singer, songwriter, and producer Ben Folds has gained a reputation for meshing the classical and pop music worlds. His musical range incorporates pop albums with his power pop trio Ben Folds Five, multiple solo albums, and collaborative records with artists from Sara Bareilles to William Shatner. He also performs regularly with some of the world’s greatest symphony orchestras. Last year he was named as the first-ever artistic advisor to the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center. He has written songs for movie sound tracks (including DreamWorks’ Over the Hedge) and has even appeared as a cameo piano performance on Sky Atlantic’s Billions. Ben, who is from North Carolina, is unfazed by the range of music he creates and performs: “My perspective of a certain type of music is that it has an ethnographic kind of quality to it. It’s like an anthropologist would say that I’m from New England and I’ve gone to the Amazon.” He continues, “If I had to be legitimate in anything, I suppose it lies strictly in rock and roll. Being a rock and roll musician is not the most relevant thing in the world right now, but that’s where my feel is.” His Concerto for Piano and Orchestra reached number one on the Billboard Classical and Classical Crossover charts. Ben wrote the concerto with the idea of paying homage to the classical masterpieces while appealing to a new generation of music lovers. Why did it do so well? “It was because a pop artist did it, but did it in earnest,” he says. “I think it was because I composed something in a legitimate form. It took years. It was not a stunt.”

In the States I ask people to throw paper aeroplanes with requests on. It’s kinda cool and it keeps them from shouting.

“I began playing in orchestras before I was 10 years old, playing percussion in youth symphonies,” says Ben, “so it’s been part of my childhood and through my life.” As a rock musician in the early part of his career he was asked to work with orchestras. It took him some time to agree. “I turned them down for a while until I could figure out a way to work with no rock band. I don’t like meddling with the structure of the symphony orchestra – it upsets the balance. So I worked out a way to make it work. That happened in 2003 and since then I’ve been playing a lot of symphony shows. And I keep tweaking the musical charts to make things better and better. It’s a lifelong project.” His appearance at The Bath Festival on 24 May is part of a solo tour, delivering a high-energy rock performance using the intimacy of just a piano. This is a return to the solo emphasis of the early years of his career. Touring to venues in the UK and Europe as well as the US, it’s a hectic schedule – think North Carolina to Belfast, Glasgow to Hamburg and Canterbury to Paris. Ben loves performing in the UK and feels at home here: “I have been playing the UK for my whole career. We had our first breakthrough radio single, Underground, in the UK in 1995 before we did America. I always felt like coming over to the UK was the place where I was more understood.” How strictly does Folds plan his performance? His approach depends on how much he has toured to a place. If it’s familiar, he can

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take more liberties, even use in-jokes. On the other hand, “If I am playing in a country that doesn’t speak English, that’s when I shut the hell up.” In America, where the audiences can be heckling and rowdy, he has an idiosyncratic technique. “In the States I ask people to throw paper aeroplanes with requests on. It’s kinda cool and it keeps them from shouting. It also keeps me on my toes because I have to remember all my songs.” “I’ve had tours where it’s very repetitive and I’ve found that to be a good thing. Where it’s only piano, dynamics become a bigger element. So I find a flow and a cadence that really works with the songs, putting each of them in a good light. But that only happens for about five shows. Then I will walk out and do something completely different.” Most of Ben’s material is upbeat – the musical vibe, if it can be pinned down, is power, piano-driven punk, with high energy and buzz. His performances can be unpredictable – he has been known to throw a stool at the piano and use a technique called palm-smashing. “The palm stuff is to excite the bottom of the piano, it sounds like an explosion. If you can get a force into a piano, it’s quite a rumble and it sounds dynamic.” You may not see flying furniture in Bath, but do be prepared for a musical explosion when Ben Folds visits with his piano. n Ben Folds & A Piano, Thursday 24 May, The Forum, 7.30pm, £18–38. Bath Festivals booking: 01225 463362; bathfestivals.org.uk


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

ALL THINGS BRIGHT April brings a splash of colour to the city’s galleries just in time for spring

BATH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS’ ANNUAL OPEN EXHIBITION Victoria Art Gallery, by Pulteney Bridge Open: daily, 10.30am – 5pm Web: bsartists.co.uk On until Saturday 12 May This highly popular exhibition showcases the best of the region’s artistic talent. The society has grown from 26 members in 1904 to a membership of around 120 diverse, talented artists. The annual exhibition, which is open to non-members, attracts up to 1,000 entries, with sales doubling in the last few years. Application forms are also available from the gallery. The prizes on offer total more than £3,000. During the exhibition members of the public can vote for their favourite artwork, the winner receiving the Public Choice Prize.

Blossom by Susanna Lisle

AXLE ARTS Leighton Road, Weston, Bath Open: Monday to Saturday, 10am – 5pm by appointment Tel: 01225 461230, web: axlearts.com IAN EDWARDS WILDLIFE SCULPTURE Throughout April Ian Edwards’ sculptures incorporate classical ideas about the sculpting process, reminiscent of Michelangelo’s idea of seeing a form within a piece of marble and ‘setting him free’. Well known for his figurative work, Edwards is also recognised for his keenly observed, wildlife pieces. As a lover of countryside walking, Edwards often uses the peace of the outdoors as a break from his busy practice. Time to stop and observe a kingfisher sitting on a reed by the riverbank, or an otter swimming in the canal are vital to Edwards’ peace of mind and his sense of balance within a crazy, manic world. Edwards’ sculpture will be shown as part of Axle Arts’ Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition at Tasburgh House Hotel, Bath over the first two weekends of May.

Togetherness by Alexei Bazanov, Paragon Gallery

FRESH: ART FAIR Cheltenham Racecourse Friday 27 – Sunday 29 April, opening times vary Tel: 01242 224734, web: freshartfair.net This new contemporary art fair instantly established itself as a key player in the provincial art fair calendar after its first show opened last year when 4,500 art lovers headed to Cheltenham, and this spring’s show is set to push the bar higher. With 46 galleries, 400 artists and 5,000 works of art on display, art lovers won’t want to miss this. There will be a broad spectrum of art on offer to suit all tastes and budgets, with work from emerging artists to Royal Academicians. There will be original paintings, prints and sculptures from £100 to £50,000 with interestfree credit from Arts Council supported Own Art. Tickets: £6 per person on-the-door and only £8 for two when you buy online. Tickets are valid for the whole weekend, so return as often as you like. Entry will be free on Friday from 11am – 5.30pm (no ticket required) and Friday Happy Hour from 5.30 – 8.30pm (ticket required) means free drinks all evening. Under 16s go free throughout.

On The River by Ian Edwards

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2017/18 Lecture Series

The Silver Thread : Silver Filigree and the Traditional Arts of Kosovo Mentioned in Danté -The story of the silver thread that still winds its way through Kosovan history.

Lecturer: Elizabeth Gowing at

1.30pm on Monday 9th April 2018 at

The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street Bath Visitors welcome £10 at the door (No Booking required)

www.theartssocietybath.com

Celebrating 50 years of the National Association of Decorative and Fine Arts Societies

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

Krishna by the Lake by Anthony Fry

THE ARTS SOCIETY BATH LECTURE SERIES 2017/18 THE SILVER THREAD: SILVER FILIGREE AND TRADITIONAL ARTS IN KOSOVO Monday 9 April, 1.30pm at The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath Early Kosovan silver mines are mentioned in Dante and this silver thread still winds through Kosovan history. Generations of Filigree artisans magic lacy creations from silver wire, creating beautiful jewellery, boxes, buttons, religious ornamentation and the talismans of superstition. Lecturer Elizabeth Gowing moved to Kosovo in 2006 and worked with the Ethnological Museum in Prishtina. She is the author of four books about Kosovo, and is a regular contributor to Radio 4 (Saturday Live, Excess Baggage, From Our Own Correspondent) and the BBC World Service. All welcome, £10 on the door, no booking required. Visit: bathdfas.com

THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM Great Pulteney Street, Bath Tel: 01225 388569 Open: daily, 10am – 5pm (11am Sundays) Web: holburne.org ANTHONY FRY: A RETROSPECTIVE On until Sunday 7 May The first museum retrospective of the painter Anthony Fry (1927–2016), who lived and worked near Bath for 60 years, and who made pictures that expressed his principal inspiration of travel. His early work, dominated by dancing figures, reflects the landscape of Tuscany. From the late 1980s his painting is characterised by strong, intense colour, influenced by the landscapes and culture of India, Morocco and the Sahara Desert, and Andalucía. LIGHTING UP THE STAGE: STARS OF THE GEORGIAN THEATRE On until Sunday 3 June Somerset Maugham’s collection of theatrical portraits was acquired by the Holburne in 2010 and contains key works by Johan Zoffany, including portraits of David Garrick and the 18th-century small scale portraitist Samuel de Wilde. The theatrical portraits immortalise stars of the 18th and 19th century stage, often in moments of high drama.

THE BATH ROYAL LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTION 16 Queen Square, Bath Web: brlsi.org BRLSI MEMBERS ART EXHIBITION On until Friday 13 April, 10am – 4pm There will be an exquisite variety of works from professional and award-winning artists, including west country based Victoria Gamberoni who will be raffling one of her paintings from the exhibition. Tickets for the raffle are available from the BRLSI reception. Works in the exhibition include oils, watercolours, sculptures, ceramics and other media. Free entry.

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Farewell to a Norfolk Summer by Vanessa Lubach

GALLERY NINE 9b Margarets Buildings, Bath, open: Monday to Saturday, 10am – 5pm Tel: 01225 319197, web: gallerynine.co.uk SPRING EXHIBITION Saturday 14 April – Thursday 31 May

Gallery Nine will showcase six artists this spring. Ceramicist James Campbell has been making pots since 1957, and is best known for his hand-built decorative sculptural pots. His pieces are characterised with the depiction of a moody, brooding atmosphere, especially those influenced by the Pembrokeshire coast. Distinguished potter David Leach was taught by Shoji Hamada, and his pots are collected worldwide. He was awarded an OBE in 1987. Jewellers Mizuki Takahashi and Helen Noakes will also be featuring their work. Mizuki Takahashi works with paper thin porcelain and enamel copper that are set on an oxidised silver wire structure. Helen Noakes creates work in resin and silver, and developed an obsession with combining sets of miniatures and resin, incorporating everything from penguins to circus performers. The exhibition features linocuts by Paul Catherall and Vanessa Lubach. Paul Catherall has become renowned for his clean, sharp linocuts of architectural London landmarks including the Elephant and Castle Shopping Centre, The National Theatre and Telecom Tower. Vanessa Lubach creates multilayered, intricately carved linocuts, and her portrait Rosie and Pumpkin was selected for the 2012 BP Award at the National Portrait Gallery.


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nick cudworth gallery

Self Portrait at 70

APRIL EXHIBITION 3 – 28 April An exhibition of paintings and prints by Nick that reflect his interest in a variety of subjects including portraits, still life and landscapes.

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

BATHAMPTON ART GROUP Bathampton Village Hall, Holcombe Lane, Bathampton BA2 6UL Web: bathamptonart.co.uk Email: info@bathamptonart.co.uk 50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Saturday 21 April, 10am – 5pm Bathampton Art Group celebrates its 50th year at Bathampton Village Hall where around 120 artworks will be on display. Wera Hobhouse, MP for Bath, will be opening the exhibition. Catherine Beale, professional watercolourist, will be judging the exhibits. Enjoy browsing the work and vote for your particular favourite. Refreshments available all day. Students from King Edward’s School are designing posters reflecting the art group’s 50 years of art, which will also be on display at the exhibition.

Pulteney Bridge by Jane Riley

EMMA ROSE Upstairs at 78 Walcot Street, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am – 5pm Tel: 07885 235915 or 01225 424424, web: emmaroseartworks.com Throughout April Original contemporary paintings, limited edition giclée prints and cards of Emma Rose’s award-winning landscapes and abstracts are on view in this gem of a gallery tucked away on Walcot Street. With an emphasis on spring, the paintings zing with green life – the highlight painting is Chagall’s Valley. Emma’s unique work is a mix of Indian inks, acrylics with gold, copper and silver leaf. She is happy to talk through any commission ideas, now a mainstay of her work. Chagall’s Valley by Emma Rose

April Stile by Nick Cudworth

NICK CUDWORTH GALLERY London Street, top of Walcot Street, Bath, closed on Mondays Tel: 01225 445221, web: nickcudworth.com Throughout April April Stile is one of a series of stiles painted by Nick that represent the flora and fauna of each month. All of the stiles can be found in the Cotswolds.

THE EDGE The Edge, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath Open: Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 5pm Tel: 01225 386777, web: edgearts.org COLLECTED SHADOWS: THE ARCHIVE OF MODERN CONFLICT Friday 20 April – Saturday 16 June This exhibition of 200 photographs is drawn from the extensive collection of The Archives of Modern Conflict. The AMC was first established 25 years ago as a repository for vernacular photography and ephemera relating to the First and Second World Wars. It has since grown to a total of eight-million images. Spanning the history of the photographic medium from the mid-1850s to the present day, the exhibition represents a great variety of techniques, from early albumen and hand-tinted silver gelatin prints to the distinctive blue of the cyanotype. Free admission. 44 TheBATHMagazine

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Ensembles rythmiques et gymnastiques a Pékin, 1965


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The Cafe, Jane Riley

Bathampton Art Group CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF ART

EXHIBITION Saturday 21st April 10am–5pm

Bathampton Village Hall, Holcombe Lane, Bathampton BA2 6UL info@bathamptonart.co.uk www.bathamptonart.co.uk

The Framing Workshop has been trading as an independent family run business on Walcot Street for over 28 years. We treasure you, our client, and spend time helping you to find the best way to display and protect your cherished objects, artworks and memorabilia. Creativity and respect for each artwork are core to what we do. Every picture tells a story. Come and share yours.

80 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BD Tel: 01225 482748 www.theframingworkshop.com framing@theframingworkshop.com

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ART | EXHIBITIONS

BATH OPEN STUDIOS Web: bathopenstudios.co.uk Larkhall Open Studios: 5 – 7 May Newbridge Arts Trail: 12 – 13 May Widcombe Art Trail: 19 – 20 May Bear Flat Artists Open Studios: 26 – 28 May

MUSEUM OF EAST ASIAN ART Bennett Street, Bath Open: Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 5pm, Sunday, 12 – 5pm Web: meaa.org.uk DRESSED TO IMPRESS: NETSUKE AND JAPANESE MEN’S FASHION On until Saturday 22 April The museum has teamed up with the British Museum for this unusual exhibition of small but intricate netsuke from Japan. These tiny sculptural creations were made to fasten men’s clothing and tobacco pouches, before becoming highly collectable items. This fascinating museum has some exquisite and delicate pieces and, just inside the main door, there’s free access to the museum shop which is packed with unusual items for unique presents.

Bath’s popular arts trails and open studios run throughout the month of May, with an event in a different part of the city each weekend. In total, more than 180 artists and makers will open their doors to the public to showcase original artwork, give demonstrations or offer workshops. It’s an opportunity to discover the wide range of art and craft being created here, meet artists and makers, talk about their ideas or just enjoy browsing. You might even buy a piece of original art at an affordable price, or feel inspired to take up a new creative activity. With painting, printmaking, photography and sculpture on show as well as glass, jewellery, ceramics and textile art, there’s something for all tastes. Whether you’re walking or driving, the routes are manageable and refreshments are provided at pubs, cafés and some artist venues. Coast by Paul Brokensha

ART AT THE HEART Royal United Hospital, Combe Park Open: daily 8am – 8pm Web: artatruh.org THE LANDSCAPE COLLECTIVE EXHIBITION Until Thursday 19 April This prestigious exhibition shows a large variety of landscape collective works by a group of UK based photographers. The group includes a recent winner of Landscape Photographer of the Year, and many are Fellows of the Royal Photographic Society. A third of the sale price on all artwork sold is donated to the RUH Arts Fund charity. Donations received by the art charity go directly into maintaining and continuing the broad range of award-winning arts projects on offer at the hospital.

BEAUX ARTS York Street, Bath Open: Monday – Saturday, 10am – 5pm Tel: 01225 464850 Web: beauxartsbath.co.uk

Winter Reflection by Paul Mitchell

SPRING SEASON Throughout April Three artists are featured in Beaux Arts’ spring show. Bath sculptor Anna Gillespie is exhibiting intriguing new figures in plaster and resin, together with her more familiar bronzes and found object work. Japanese artist Atsuko Fujii’s captivating paintings radiate a sense of calm, while Sara Moorhouse’s delightful coloured ceramics will also be on show. Split by Anna Gillespie, plaster, resin, mixed media 46 TheBATHMagazine

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Saltburn Pier by Eva Worobiec


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ART | IN DETAIL

THE WITCOMBE CABINET

Investigate close-up some of the rich artistic pieces in the collections of our Bath museums and galleries. This month we feature the Witcombe Cabinet, which was made in around 1697 for Sir Michael Hickes (1645–1710) for the new house in his estate in Gloucestershire. It was donated to the Holburne Museum in 2005.

A CABINET OF STATUS Laquer cabinets were a great status symbol in the late 17th century. The secret of genuine Japanese lacquer was unknown, but Engliush craftsmen imitated it using varnish and shellac, known as japanning. This magnificent cabinet, the finest of its type known, shows the superb quality that some English japanners were able to achieve.

The cabinet is in remarkable condition and is unusual in retaining its original silvered stand and cresting. Instead of being made to imitate the black and gold of lacquer, this cabinet was intended to resemble porcelain. The shellac varnish has since darkened giving the cabinet a yellowish hue.

A cabinet of status

A CABINET OF STATUS Laquer cabinets were a great status symbol in the late 17th century. The secret of genuine Japanese lacquer was Laquer cabinets were a great status symbol in the late 17th unknown, but Engliush craftsmen imitated it using varnish century. The secret of genuine Japanese lacquer was unknown, but and shellac, known as japanning. This magnificent cabinet, Engliush craftsmen imitated it using the finest of its type known, shows varnish and shellac, known as the superb quality that some English japanning. This magnificent cabinet, the japanners were able to achieve. finest of its type known, shows the The cabinet is in remarkable superb quality that some English condition and is unusual in retaining japanners were able to achieve. its original silvered stand and cresting. Instead of being made to imitate the black and gold of lacquer, this cabinet was intended to resemble porcelain. The shellac varnish has since darkened giving the cabinet a yellowish hue. The cabinet is in remarkable condition Interior Display and is unusual in retaining its original Thestand cabinet have been displayed silvered andwould cresting. Instead of being against a fine set of tapestries, with Chinese Japanese made to imitate theimported black and gold ofand lacquer, this porcelain cabinet was arranged on the brackets on the The cabinet intended to resemble porcelain. Thecreasting. shellac varnish has since remained at Witcombe Park for over 300 darkened giving the cabinet a yellowish hue. years. See the Witcombe Cabinet at The Holburne Museum, tel: 01225 388569; web holburne.org

Thinking of advertising your business Our media pack can be viewed online

FOR A COPY OF OUR 2018 MEDIA PACK EITHER VISIT THE BATH MAGAZINE WEBSITE THEBATHMAG.CO.UK OR CONTACT US ON 01225 424499 or EMAIL: SALES @ THEBATHMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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BATH @ WORK

Our series of photographic portraits by Neill Menneer shows Bath people at work. View a gallery of Bath@Work subjects at: thebathmag.co.uk

Wera Hobhouse

MP for Bath

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s Member of Parliament for Bath, I want to bring people together and make things happen. Life in this city is not easy for everybody and my aim is that this is a good place not just for those who can easily afford it, but also for those who struggle financially, physically, mentally or in any other form. Bath has a great community spirit. People care about each other – that is what I like most about our city. I am German by birth and grew up in Hanover. I first got involved in politics while at school. I campaigned with the anti-nuclear movement when a disused salt mine near Hanover was earmarked as a permanent nuclear waste storage facility. ‘Nuclear Power – no thanks’ is important to me to this day. After studying art in Münster and Paris, I moved to Berlin. It was there I met William, who is British, and we married in 1989. Two months after we got married the Berlin Wall fell. Europe changed from being a continent overshadowed by the Cold War to being a place embracing peace and freedom. In 1990, we moved to Liverpool, where all our four children were born. While being a mum I continued to paint and exhibit, opening an art gallery in the centre of Liverpool as part of the regeneration ‘between the two cathedrals’. Nine years later our family moved to Rochdale to be closer to William’s industrial textile business, and I became involved in politics again. I was elected as a councillor in 2004, and quickly learnt that if you bring together many allies and persist for a long time, you achieve things for your community. In 2014, William and I moved to Bath. I stood against Jacob Rees-Mogg in the 2015 General Election and from the beginning of 2016 was a lead member of the Bath ‘Stronger In’ campaign to keep Britain in the EU. Our defeat in the referendum was a profound blow, but within two weeks like-minded proEuropeans and I set up Bath for Europe to organise demonstrations and events which highlight the benefits of the EU and the vital part it has played for Britain’s peace and prosperity. Becoming Bath’s first female MP came out of the blue. Not only was the election a surprise, but I was only selected as the Lib Dem candidate 38 days before polling day. My life is now divided between Bath and London. A lot of MPs find the House of Commons and the way parliament works quite tedious or intimidating. But I love to debate and enjoy the competition of ideas. The biggest challenge for an MP is the enormous number of issues you can get involved in, and you need to focus your energy on very specific issues and actually deliver results, rather than dabbling in everything. There are always obstacles to change – not just vested interests but inbuilt structures and ways of working which people get stuck in. However, Bath is brimming with ideas. It is a place full of people who are getting involved in their communities and wanting to move things on. Debate and community activism are part of the fabric of Bath and that is why I immediately loved living here. I am here for, and with, the people of Bath; together we can achieve things.

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151 THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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CITY | HISTORY

BATH ECCENTRICS

Behind the big-banner names that we associate with our city, there are a host of characters from Bath’s past who made their marks in a variety of colourful ways. Historian Catherine Pitt takes a look at four of them... DOMINICO CONIO aka Guinea Pig Jack (1832–1907) Whether alighting or departing from Bath Spa station in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, you couldn’t avoid seeing Dominico Conio, otherwise known as Guinea Pig Jack. A short man in a red coat and French cap, he would patrol Manvers Street with newspapers to sell, and a wire basket slung on his back. He lived at 84 Avon Street with fellow Italian, Antionio Peirano and his family, until the property was demolished. It is believed he arrived in Bath when he was 16, around 1848, from the Italian town of Chiavari near Genoa. Italy at this time was suffering food shortages and violent unrest and it was rumoured in Bath that Jack had fought under Garibaldi against Austrian troops. Conio was renowned for wearing a scarlet military jacket which may attest to this, or indeed have led to the rumour. Jack worked as a newspaper vendor for the various publications of the time. He was a hardworking man and at 6am every Saturday he was at Bath Journal’s offices in Kingsmead Square to pick up the papers to sell, returning later in the day to take another large pile. His sideline is what earned him his nickname. He trained animals to perform, most specifically guinea pigs, as well as white mice. Many Bathonians recalled for decades after his death his cry of “Die for a penny! Die for a penny!”. On offering the said fee they would watch as the guinea pigs would roll on their backs with their legs in the air

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and play dead. To rouse them Jack would shriek, “Bobby’s coming” (as in police officer) and the pigs would leap up alive again. This trick didn’t always go smoothly – one journalist witnessed Jack holding down the animals as they refused to “play dead” and then, “failing to alarm the guinea pigs it became a necessity to give the box a violent shake to jerk them to their trotters”. Jack was so famous in Bath during his lifetime that more than 20,000 postcards of him were sold and he was mentioned each year in the pantomime in a song entitled, The World Turned Upside Down, which had the line, “And Guinea Pig Jack, he played Macbeth, in the world turned upside down”. He was even part of the 1886 Fairland Bazaar at the Assembly Rooms showing off his trained pets in order to raise money for the Royal United Hospital. A devout Roman Catholic, Jack worshipped at St John’s on Manver’s Street and he ended his days at 6 St John’s Place being cared for by local Catholic priests and a Mrs Wall, who had been a relative of his friend Peirano with whom he had lived. Guinea Pig Jack died of acute bronchitis at the age of 74 on 31 January 1907. He was buried with his friend Peirano at Perrymead Cemetery. In the words of a local newspaper, Jack was a character like no other: “One thing’s certain, as fog in November, When his time comes there’ll be many regrets. Each one who knew him will kindly remember Guinea Pig Jack with his paper and pets.”

CARROTY KATE 19th-century firebrand, unknown dates It is telling that Kate’s true identity, date of birth or death, have never been recorded. A true reflection, perhaps, of the poor in Bath in previous centuries – those who were seen but not heard, ignored and wiped out of history. Kate, however, takes pride of place in a story that went national and was even included in the autobiography of circus entrepreneur, “Lord” George Sanger. There were areas of Bath in the Victorian era where no self-respecting member of society would tread; areas where even policemen would fear to go. Places such as Walcot Street, Broad Quay and Avon Street, as well as inside the city walls such as the old Guildhall Market and the site of the current Empire Hotel. Here were common lodging houses and dilapidated crowded residences, brothels, slaughterhouses and the detritus of the city. Accounts indicate that Kate came from Avon Street or Milk Street. She was the leader of a local gang that was viewed as “the most brutish and criminal mob in England”. She was nicknamed “Carroty” because of her flaming red hair, still a sign in Victorian England of a ne’er-do-well woman. The papers portray Kate as a virago, who feared neither magistrates nor gaol. She wore tattered clothing and was described as being “as strong as a navvy, a big brutal animal,” reflecting the hard life and environment she came from. She was considered the “Mistress of Bull Paunch Alley, Queen of the Slum.” Annually, in August, Bath would enjoy Lansdown Fair. On the evening of St Lawrence’s Day it was a tradition for the poor of Bath to enjoy a night out at the fair when the entertainment would go on all evening. On 10 August in 1840, the lower classes of Bath – including Carroty Kate and her men – had been enjoying the fair. As dawn approached Kate is said to have been heard crying out the order of “Wreck the Fair!” “Almost naked and screaming dreadful oaths, she (Carroty Kate) led the attack on the booths, goading her drunken followers to wreck the shows.” This from the account of George Helton, an eyewitness. Leaving destruction in their wake, Kate and her gang headed back to Bath. Meanwhile the showmen whom they had attacked regrouped. Mounting some of the show horses, the fairground folk set off in hot pursuit capturing Kate and 12 of her followers. The men were tied up together and taken to a large pond nearby where they were dragged through the water repeatedly until they were cold, wet, and gasping. They were then horsewhipped before being released.


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Kate had something different in store. She was tied up separately and taken before the showmen to pay for her crimes. Stripped to her waist she was tied facedown to a trestle table and two of the showmen’s wives “administered a thrashing of a lifetime” with penny canes from the fair. A local paper records an incident in 1832, a few years earlier, describing “a gang of the most desperate and inhuman monsters committed outrages that would have disgraced a nation!” Being similar in character, perhaps this was also Carroty Kate and her gang. Either way, she goes down in Bath’s history as a reminder of a hidden side of Bath and the ordinary folk who made up the Victorian city at that time.

Illustrations by Robert Highton

CITY | HISTORY

Kate wore tattered clothing and was described as being ‘as strong as a navvy, a big, brutal animal’

AMABEL EDMUNDA WELLESLEYCOLLEY (1907–1987) Amabel Wellesley-Colley was a strong woman at the other end of the social spectrum. Her actions sent shockwaves through Bath – in what was considered a vandalisation of the nationally important Royal Crescent, Amabel had simply painted her front door. It’s clear that painting your door shouldn’t illicit as strong a reaction as that induced by Miss Wellesley-Colley’s actions in 1971. However, she had chosen a jolly shade of primrose yellow rather than the regulation white, as other doors in the crescent. Her window shutters were also painted to complement the door in a shade of daffodil. Amabel defended her choice, claiming that it was her property and she could do as she wished. She also maintained that as a relation of the Duke of Wellington, she was upholding the tradition of choosing a colour that was her great-grandfather’s favourite. She also maintained that the window shutters, also yellow, had to be kept closed to protect her antiques and furnishings. Bath Planning Department and Bath Preservation Trust thought differently and ordered her to re-paint or remove the offending colour. They were relying on a 1968 law for listed buildings that stated that property owners could not alter the appearance of the Royal Crescent without permission. Amabel took a different view and retorted that if you don’t have individual doors “you might as well be living in a row of council houses.” National newspapers soon took notice of this extraordinary case while Amabel took the issue to the highest authorities in the land. She appealed firstly to MP Sir Edward Brown to raise the issue in the House of Commons. She also contacted the Secretary of State for the Environment, Peter Walker.

Amabel did, however, stop short of bringing her case to the House of Lords. After thousands of pounds spent by Miss Wellesley-Colley, and a six-hour long public enquiry (which she attended in a bright yellow suit), the Department of the Environment found in her favour, stating that, a year on, the door had now faded to an innocuous colour. A few years later in January 1976, Amabel found herself in court again, this time at Bow Street, London. She had been booked under a 1872 ‘walking only’ regulation while cycling on a footpath beside Hyde Park’s Rotten Row. Using her legal knowledge and tenacity she won her case. And as for the door of Number 22? Miss Wellesley-Colley may be long gone, but the primrose door remains, a tradition now in itself and a tribute to the determination of this one lady of Bath. CHARLES FABIAN WARE aka ‘Champagne Charlie’ and ‘Mr Moggy’ (1935–2015) Charles Ware was one of the more largerthan-life Bath characters in recent living memory. Schooled in quite a liberal environment, Ware studied at the Slade School of Art in London. He soon settled with friends in Islington. Surrounding him were vast numbers of dilapidated Georgian properties, abandoned and ruined after World War II. Ware and his friends began buying the houses for next to nothing, doing them up and selling them on. In the 1960s Ware moved from London to teach at the Bath Academy of Art in Corsham. With his self-taught skill for restoring Georgian houses and the money he had made, Ware set about the ruins of Bath’s Georgian buildings. The city in the 1960s was experiencing what was termed the ‘Sack of Bath’ where bomb-damaged properties were demolished rather than being carefully restored. Ware was in the right place at the right time to take advantage of the situation, and bought buildings, including the Theatre Royal and the former Cleveland Hotel on Great Pulteney Street.

With long hair and hippy clothes, Ware didn’t quite look like your usual property developer, but he enjoyed his wealth and led a bohemian lifestyle. People today still recall his all-night, all-weekend and even all-week parties. He even set up art and music festivals within the derelict Cleveland Hotel. Ware owned Number 10 Royal Crescent and at one all-night party in 1971 involving 500 people, the vibrations from the people dancing on the first floor caused chunks of the plasterwork ceiling below to collapse. He was suitably nicknamed Champagne Charlie in 1970 by the News of the World. Although he had some business success restoring buildings and financing bands such as Roxy Music, the property crash of the mid 1970s made Ware bankrupt. He remained unfazed, and was reported to be “cheerfully adjusting his lifestyle.” With a family to support and debts to pay, Ware attended night school and learnt car maintenance while a friend ran his property business on his behalf. In just two years Ware paid off his debts, and opened his own car business, a Morris Minor Centre in a disused railway arch in Bath. Now nicknamed ‘Mr Moggy’ (Morris Minors were known as Moggies), Ware worked hard to build up his car business. Leyland had stopped production of the vehicle in 1972 and it was difficult to get hold of spares. Ware chose to source them and make them. He would also renovate the cars so that people could continue to run them. In 1991 Ware set up partnership with a Sri Lankan businessman Dhanapala Samarasekara, the ‘Durable Car Company’, which made spares for Morris Minors. In 1984 Viscount Linley bought a split screen 1954 Morris convertible and Ware delivered it to Kensington Palace in London. The story goes that Princess Diana was also a fan of these cars and just as Ware pulled up, she appeared and leapt barefoot in to the passenger seat uttering the words “what a beautiful car.” Ware continued to run his business in the city until he retired in 2009. The Morris Minor Centre has now relocated to Bristol. n

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GIGGLING SQUID IS NOW OPEN IN BATH!

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ocated within the beautiful Grade II listed Blue Coat House, Saw Close – locals will be treated to a very competitively priced lunchtime Thai tapas menu and an extensive evening menu. Both feature a varied selection of seafood, meat, curry, noodles and stir fry options. Street food style snacks and carefully curated cocktails are also available in the exclusive separate lounge and bar. Founder, Pranee Laurillard is delighted to open in Bath saying, ‘Bath is such a beautiful city and we are so happy to now be part of it. When we first saw the building we instantly fell in love and knew we had to do it justice. It’s been lovely to see guests bring it to life whilst enjoying our fresh take on Thai food. Lots of happy faces and laughter!’ Giggling Squid, Bluecoat House, Saw Close, Bath, BA1 1EY. Tel: 01225 331 486 web: gigglingsquid.com Social: @GigglingSquid


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BOOKS | IN FOCUS

FINE DINING WITH PLANTS If you’re not yet a convert to plant-based food, it’s time to rethink. Do it with Richard Buckley’s new book as your guide, says Emma Clegg, and you’ll do it in style

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limination is the best drive for creativity,” says Richard Buckley, chef-proprietor of the Acorn Restaurant, as I savour the nuanced flavours in a forkful of mushroom parfait with red cabbage and red chicory. Richard’s new book, Plants Taste Better, which is, yes, all about cooking with plants, is the uplifting, practical guide to this philosophy. A plant-based diet is a vegan diet, but the ‘V’ word isn’t mentioned in the book (at least not prominently), as the term ‘plant-based’ has purer connotations. It’s all about the plants, you see. Vegan we know is a diet that doesn’t include animal products, so it’s about the lack of meat and animal products. Plant-based food, on the other hand, celebrates any ingredients that are planted and grown. The no-meat bit doesn’t define or limit the diet. Richard is critical of other vegan books that are written by people who have “photographic lifestyles”, but not the plant knowledge. You certainly can’t accuse him of this. His philosophy is always to start with a vegetable or fruit, as opposed to finding a way of replicating a meat recipe. “Plants have certain characteristics,” says Richard, “and the cooking technique is a way of enhancing and manipulating the characteristics to suit our appetites.” The techniques and many of the recipes are drawn from the menu of the Acorn Vegetarian Kitchen restaurant, with new ones developed by Richard to give the selection a holistic balance. Stand-out, artful photography by Kim Lightbody shows each dish presented with restaurant finesse and elegance, but also with grain and honesty. And the recipes are not just for those with sweeping marble work surfaces, self-cleaning ovens and pull-out kitchen taps – Richard made them all in his tiny kitchen at home with a battered oven. “Read the introduction,” Richard tells me, “and then you can cook better for the rest of your life.” There are some revelations therein. Here are three examples. One: throwing the core from a broccoli or cauliflower in the bin loses the best part of the vegetable. Two: flavour is the combined experience of the aroma of the food experienced through the back of the mouth and taste is those

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experiences that happen within the mouth. Three: The instruction “season to taste” doesn’t mean “add salt to your liking”, it means “taste the food and add salt until you have achieved the correct flavour balance.” Be prepared for an educational food journey. There are more than 70 recipes, each one with individual key ingredients at their core. To give you a descriptive snapshot, they include sunchoke velouté with a mushroom duxelle garnish, roasted donkey carrots with cashew cheese and seeded buckwheat, parsnip barley risotto with poached pears and smoked hazelnuts, and chocolate olive oil pot with rosemary soil and raspberry sorbet. You can see the restaurant roots in the sublime names. If you have ever eaten at the Acorn you’ll also have experienced the mixture of flavours and tastes, from robust to subtle. There are a range of shorter recipes for snacks and starters, so you can experiment at your own pace. There is a purity to Richard’s approach that feels refreshing, in tune with the times. There are also layers of know-how about the balancing of flavours. For this reason, Richard is firm about following the recipe weights – varying them can make a world of difference, he maintains. Back to Richard’s introduction: “I always think of taste like the rhythm section of a blues band, you need the drive and groove before you scatter the aromas, the melody, over the top.” This book is layered and beautiful, a little like a musical composition. It is not one for the casual cook to dive into for a quick vegan fix – these are refined plates and immaculate eating experiences inspired by the dishes in Richard’s restaurant. But, bearing in mind the driving food philosophy of our time – natural, fresh and local, unprocessed and sustainable for better health and an improved eco-balance – perhaps it’s the moment to give it a try. n Plants Taste Better by Richard Buckley, Jacqui Small, photography by Kim Lightbody, rrp £25 Acorn Vegetarian Kitchen tel: 01225 446059; acornvegetariankitchen.co.uk

BELOW, LEFT TO RIGHT: Plants Taste Better, Richard Buckley’s new book; pistachio pâté with orange and marjoram salad, and roasted cylindra beetroot


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FOOD | & | DRINK

CHEF TO THE STARS

When our favourite celebrity chefs and food writers visit Bath, chances are you’ll find local cook Jaq Brewer preparing their recipes. Georgette McCready meets the chameleon in the kitchen

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and he’d light up. Yes he used to drink and he could be demanding, but he could be great company.” By chance Jaq has met many chefs and food writers through her career. She worked on the 1985 Live Aid charity project and its spin-off, a Food Aid recipe book fronted by Delia Smith and Terry Wogan, but it was while working for design agency Bartle, Bogle, Hegarty that she became friends with Italian chef and food writer Antonio Carluccio. “I used to go in to his Neal Street restaurant for lunch most days. He was a lovely man and a great friend. He didn’t have children of his own so when my first son, Alexander, was born I asked him to be his godfather.” Antonio repaid this honour by becoming an affectionate friend of the family, enjoying laughter-filled lunches together and taking the time to teach Jaq how to make the perfect Italian risotto and the ‘best ever’ poached egg with shaved truffle. “We had happy times at Antonio’s home where he taught Alex and I to make various dishes, including a sublime hollandaise sauce. I last had dinner with Antonio about six months ago, when he really seemed to have found his peace. We were devastated to learn of his death in November. Such a loss.”

Yotam Ottolenghi reported back it was the best hummous he’d ever had

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aymond Blanc, Yotam Ottolenghi, Rachel Roddy and Rick Stein – each of these chefs has their own distinctive style of cooking. But there’s a Bath woman who can execute any of these foodie stars’ signature dishes and serve them to their adoring fans to applause and approval. Jaq Brewer is a real chameleon in the kitchen. For the past few years she has been feeding the crowds who flock to launch events run by independent bookshop Toppings, creating dishes from recipes out of the pages of the celebrities’ very own books. She’s cooked up a Hairy Bikers’ Mediterranean lunch for more than 70 among the pews of Christchurch in Julian Road, she’s fed bite-sized snacks to 500 plus of Ottolenghi’s acolytes at Komedia, and proffered up the trickiest of delicate mushroom pithiviers to the audience in Bath to see Raymond Blanc – the great man himself even sampling her offerings and, as a result, inviting Jaq to spend a day as his guest in his pastry kitchen at his acclaimed Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons in Oxfordshire. That was a day to remember, says Jaq: “That was very exciting, one of the highlights.” Doesn’t she get nervous cooking for these nationally and international renowned chefs and food writers, I ask? “No I don’t get nervous. All I want is to please people with my food. I am happy in the kitchen and comfortable when I’m cooking.” So how does a former BBC publicist and mother-of-three find herself choosing recipes and cooking lunch for former Prime Minister Gordon Brown (in Bath to talk about his memoir)? Jaq’s earliest happy memories of cooking are as a girl working alongside her maternal grandmother in her Bath home. The two of them would prepare pastry and cakes for the household. Does she still use her grandmother’s traditional recipes today? “Oh yes. I still use her fruit cake recipe and there’s a delicious brandy sauce I make at Christmas time that’s from a recipe passed down through the generations.” After a year in Paris working in a design agency – “no time for cooking then” – Jaq moved to London to work for the BBC as a design manager, moving on to work as a publicist with BBC Enterprises, which is when she got to know Bristol chef turned celebrity Keith Floyd. “We used to watch him as he cooked outside, on tour for his television shows. He was an inspired cook, but a haunted man. You’d see him arrive at a BBC party

Jaq left London to return to her home city of Bath with her three sons, opening an independent eponymous boutique in Margaret’s Buildings. “I was very proud of the boutique and the JAQ brand,” she says. “We had some fantastic names in there, some of which had never been available in Bath before then. These included Amanda Wakeley, Jimmy Choo, Armani, Sass and Bide and the L’Artisan Parfumieres range.” With a growing family Jaq devoted her time to her sons, Alex, Sammy and Charlie, volunteering at local schools and also taking on a role as school governor. At this time she also worked as a food stylist for the Daily Telegraph, working alongside Bristol based food writer Xanthe Clay. “My involvement with Toppings began when Charlie went to work for them as a teenager. He was asked to help set up the green room at The Forum for Graham

Norton’s visit and, being a teenage boy, he didn’t really know what might be required, so we went shopping together and bought flowers, candles and wine and I made something simple. I think I did salad and sandwiches and some of my favourite frangipane. And so it took off from there.” “I suppose among my highlights were those 570 mushroom pithiviers for Raymond Blanc’s gathering. I made them from scratch, they were really tricky and time-consuming. It meant a lot to me that he tasted them and pronounced them delicious. “I rarely get tongue-tied when I meet the chefs but when Yotam Ottolenghi came to Komedia I was at a loss. I think I just said “I’m such a fan” or something ridiculous. I’d made 550 little walnut snowballs for the event, but then I got a call from Ottolenghi’s publicist to say would I be able to make him something for his supper. What an honour! I made some falafel and aranchini and some hummous for him. He took the whole lot back to his hotel to enjoy and reported back that it was the best hummous he’d ever had. He’s since followed me on Instagram, which is really special.” She has enjoyed working with and meeting many chefs and food writers, from Ruth Rogers to Tom Kerridge and Jean Christophe Novelli to Michel Roux. “Talking to Nigel Slater at Toppings when he came to do a signing was a bit special. We bonded, talking about our love of fountain pens and the beauty of Bath Abbey.” One of the things that’s remarkable about the range and quality of the dishes Jaq cooks, is that she prepares them in her small home kitchen in Combe Down. This is where she enjoys cooking for her boys when they’re home and where she is busy honing her favourite recipes for a Middle East and North African themed cookery book that she’s writing. Look out for Cook with Jaq’s occasional pop-up supper club in various Bath venues and if you’d like to try Ottolenghi inspired salads or Jaq’s sweet signature frangipane, you’ll find her at Bath Farmers’ Market at Green Park Station on Saturday mornings. She also regularly caters for private clients and parties. Aside from cooking for the celebrity visitors to Toppings and publishing her first cookery book, what are Jaq’s plans? “I’d really like to run my own deli one day, serving food cooked from the heart.” n Jaq is cooking on 3 April for an event with Diana Henry at Toppings. Follow Cook with Jaq on Instagram, and Jaq Brewer #deliciousdishesoftheworld on Facebook


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LEFT: Jaq with Yotam Ottolenghi BELOW: Frangipani tartlets, made with a sweet lemon shortcrust pastry SECOND ROW, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Bath farmers’ market stall celebrating the flavours and spices of the Middle East and North Africa; Jaq with Michel Roux; Bouquet of freshly made falafels with a chilli and sesame twist; Jaq with Nigel Slater; Jaq’s version of Mary Berry’s lemon, fig and ginger cheesecake with fresh figs and blackberries


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TRISTAN DARBY Our trusted wine columnist seeks out classic wines perfect for spring

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e British wine consumers are blessed with a far broader selection of wine than most other countries – Turkish Öküzgözü, anyone? But among all the noise it’s easy to lose touch with the classics. So here are some that fly the flag for their respective regions, offering character and value-for-money. Let’s kick off with a classic Italian white that’s perfect for springtime sipping. Gavi di Gavi takes its name from the vineyard town of Gavi in south-west Piedmont. Gavi wines are classically dry, crisp, fresh, fruity and mineral in style and the Nicola Bergaglio, Gavi di Gavi, ‘La Minaia’ 2016 (£13.50, Great Western Wine) is a cracker, bristling with mouthwatering green apple flavours, a lightly peachy richness and a good hit of citrussy vim. Gavi’s close proximity to Liguria on Italy’s Mediterranean coast aligns it gastronomically with herby pasta, seafood and grilled fish. This would be a knockout with crab linguine. Burgundy is home to some of the world’s most exclusive and highly prized wines. Chardonnay is the only grape allowed for fine whites, and the prestigious wines of Chablis, Meursault and Montrachet all hail from Burgundy’s northern vineyards, but come with a prestigious price tag. Look to the Mâconnais in the sunnier south, however, and you find stylish white Burgundy at a more approachable price. Domaine Paquet, Mâcon Fuissé 2016 (£15.50, GWW) is classy, classic and refreshing – it tastes like baked apples drizzled with cream, with a lemon squeeze and a dusting of spice. Roast a chicken, bake a fish or sip and smile. France’s Rhône region takes its name from the river it follows for 140 miles. Neatly split into two distinct areas, the northern Rhône focuses its reds around the Syrah grape – while reds from the much larger southern Rhône can choose from a much longer list of permitted grapes including Syrah, Grenache and Mourvèdre. One wine that unites both areas is Côtes du Rhône, a region-wide appellation for good quality red, white or rosé wines. The reds are typically fruity, midweight and perfect for this time of year. Domaine de la Janasse, Côtes du Rhône 2016 (£12.50, GWW) is made by one of southern Rhône’s best producers in a tip-top vintage, and at the price, it’s a steal. Mouth-filling and warming, yet refreshing and balanced, with red berry aromas and flavours of ripe strawberries and blackberries sprinkled with black pepper and herbs. There’s a spot of sweet liquorice tucked in there, and an almost chocolatey richness that pulls back to a seductively smokey and meaty finish. Drinking well now, it has the potential for cellaring over a few years, so decant or ‘breathe’ it for an hour before serving and you’ll see the benefit. Carnivores will enjoy this with a rack of lamb, and veggies could go for hearty pulse-based dishes to help soften the youthful tannins. A seriously good wine for a ludicrous price tag, this gives many Châteauneufs a run for the money. Join Tristan for a ‘Classically Cool’ tasting at Great Western Wine on Tuesday 24 April, 7pm. Visit greatwesternwine.co.uk/events for tickets

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FOOD | AND | DRINK

MODERN MANNERS

Formal clothes, restrained politeness and the correct use of knives and forks seem to have been replaced with some less admirable habits such as dressing down, licking your fingers and prioritising checking your mobile phone over conversing with those around you. Melissa Blease takes a tongue-in-cheek look at how things have changed...

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Unless you’re delicately picking your way through a seafood platter or stuffing your face at a fast food outlet, cutlery is the way forward when transporting food from mouth to plate

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recent survey conducted by VoucherCodes.co.uk estimated that UK citizens over the age of 18 eat out at least twice a week, spending an average of £44 per head for the pleasure. But a quarter of respondents over the age of 50 recalled that, even as recently as the 1980s, going to a restaurant was an experience reserved to mark special occasions only... and dressing and behaving “properly” for that occasion was assumed to be a fundamental code of practice acknowledged by all. Indeed, for past generations, eating out bought a veritable minefield of Rules That Must Be Obeyed to the table, often unspoken, often too complicated to decipher unless you’d spent ‘a season’ taking etiquette classes and often – yuk! – laden with mysterious signals and symbolisms denoting class, education or income. Such social mores were restrictive enough to turn anything more than a solo dinner at home into an excruciatingly agonising experience that could, at best, give you a 24-bout of indigestion... and at worst, have the

potential to pour cold water on the prospect of a potential paramour, or demote your status at work. But while leaving certain boorish, outdated pretensions ranging from not being ‘allowed’ to drink beer with food to the necessity to know how and when to use grape scissors back in the dark ages where they belong, too many habits that were once viewed as general ‘table manners’ (but can just as easily be referred to as being sensitive to those around us) seem to have

been lost in the mists of time. It seems a little odd that now dining out is a casual pastime accessible to all (and the trend for dinner parties and takeaways at home continues to rise too), we seem to have forgotten how to eat. When discussing the topic of modern manners (or in this case, the lack of manners entirely), all too many people begin a whispered observation on the subject with “perhaps I’m getting old...” or “call me oldfashioned...” But why should anybody feel it necessary to make excuses for noticing that impolite, inconsiderate or immature behaviour has apparently become socially acceptable? But before we put the spotlight on the worst public displays of disaffection, it’s only polite to issue the following warning: reading this feature over dinner is most definitely not recommended (and anyway, reading at the table is a very rude thing to do). CLOTHES WOES Many people – usually young men, and often at a Saturday or Sunday lunch sitting – think it’s quite okay to sit at a restaurant


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FOOD | AND | DRINK

The worst habits include loudly slurping, gurgling and/or chomping. There’s also talking with mouths full and picking teeth with fingernails

FINGER-LICKIN’ FELONIES Unless you’re delicately picking your way through a seafood platter (usually presented with a lemon-infused finger bowl) or perhaps eating hungrily at a fast food outlet that expects us all to eat like babies, many people believe that cutlery is the way forward when transporting food from mouth to plate – a plate that, by the way, should remain in place on the table throughout your meal, not lifted up and held aloft in mid-air while eating. There are, of course, exemptions to this diktat including bar snacks, canapés, party buffets, pizza, picnics, sandwiches and certain types of sushi. But eating a steak with your hands? No, most definitely not.

pools of glowing lights and flashes from people sending texts, or Skype-ing, or booking train tickets, or posting social media updates, or sharing YouTube videos, or taking endless pictures of soup that they’re probably never going to look at again, or talking loudly into their phones when everybody else around them is talking to each other. Aaaaargh! It’s easy to think, these days, that this kind of carry-on is normal behaviour. But think again – it isn’t! In the eyes of some more traditional folk, it’s weird, and wrong, and massively distracting for fellow diners who are happy to be doing just that: dining, in the company of real, actual people, in the here and now. HORRIBLE HABITS: THE WORST OFFENDERS The worst habits include loudly slurping, gurgling and/or chomping. There’s also talking with mouths full and picking teeth with fingernails. Then there’s belching, blowing noses into napkins and leaving the napkins on the table, running fingers through the gravy and then licking those fingers salaciously. More examples are frantically blowing on hot food (calm down, and wait for it to cool down), casually helping yourself to food from somebody else’s plate, reaching across other people’s plates of food to grab the salt, constantly refilling wine glasses from a shared bottle just because you’re drinking faster than the folk you’re supposedly sharing it with. If you think any of these heinous eating out habits aren’t obnoxious, disgusting or downright abhorrent, please, I beg you: Don’t. Eat. Out. Ever. Again. n

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table wearing a football or rugby kit fresh (although those clothes aren’t going to be that fresh, are they?) from the pitch, or gaping shorts and grubby flip flops, or vests that expose acres of thick underarm/back pelt. In the literal sense of the expression, such sartorial inelegance is enough to put anybody off their food. And do they really need to keep their caps on throughout their dinner? Only if they’re suffering an acute case of dandruff, in which case... don’t, don’t, don’t keep scratching your scalp at the table.

VILE VOCABULARY “Bring me a burger!”, “I’ll have a side order of chips”, “Get me the fish and chips.” Why have we rewritten the rather pleasant customer/waiting staff making-your-order exchange that begins with “Please may I have....” followed by your choice from the menu? Talking of the menu... yes, we often encounter lengthy descriptions that let us know exactly what to expect on the plate. But you are not obliged to read the whole list back to your waiter (especially not in a sneery, ‘ironic’ tone) when ordering; a simple “the chicken/fish/beef, please” will suffice. Also in this category: please don’t call your waiter “love,” “darling,” or “mate” when trying to catch their eye – using overfamiliar terms is derogatory, not friendly, and only serves to replace the former (horrible) habit of snapping fingers for attention. And please... keep your voice down. You may have lots of lively opinions on lots of fascinating subjects, but we’re in a restaurant, not the House of Commons. TECHNOLOGICAL TURMOILS Imagine beautifully laid tables scattered with phones, iPads, chargers and E-cigarettes. Softly lit dining rooms turned into miniTHEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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NEW REAL PUBS

Have gastro-eateries and gin bars taken over from our traditional pubs? Melissa Blease finds that traditional public houses are still valued by the community, and are keeping their fires burning brightly and local ales on tap

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doors in March this year (on the 400th anniversary of its inauguration as an ale house), marking the completion of a long, hard fight, backed by over 400 visionary community shareholders involved in the largest ever “pub buy-back” in the UK. Elsewhere, several of the ancient, historic inns and hostelries that offer so much rich texture, character and energy to our villages, towns and cities are being offered the TLC they so richly deserve, courtesy of innovative new owners who have taken inspiration from time-honoured traditions in order to reaffirm a bright new lease of life.

The British pub tradition is still very much alive, but it’s up to the owners to maintain that vibe for the customers.

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he Great British Pub is as much of a British Tradition as eating fish and chips, complaining about the weather and... well, “going down the pub”. In recent years, however, it started to look as though time had been called on one of our favourite pastimes; in 2014, UK pubs were closing down at a rate of 29 per week. But despite multiple challenges, ranging from the rising cost of living in a harsh economic climate to cut-price supermarket alcohol deals, the popularity of niche pub alternatives including dedicated gin bars and the promotion of public health such as Dry January lines, the pub refused to die. At the time of writing, only 616 pubs have closed in the past year. While the closure of two pubs a day is still a sorry state of affairs, a number of initiatives launched by the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) with government policy support are going a long way towards ensuring the stability of our much-loved public houses. Meanwhile, increasing numbers of forward-thinking entrepreneurs have taken matters into their own hands. In July 2013, 518 locals, customers, employees and fans of the legendary Bell Inn on Walcot Street bought the pub under IPS Co-operative rules. Five years later, another historic Bath pub institution is celebrating an independent, co-operatively owned success story of its own. After many years of campaigning and months of project toil, the Packhorse Inn in Southstoke reopened its

In 2016/17, the small but perfectly formed Ideal Trade Company took over three of the most beautiful pubs in the Bath locale: the 16th-century Inn at Freshford, the Cross Guns in Avoncliff (also boasting 16thcentury origins, nestled on the canal towpath and featuring panoramic views from the riverside pub gardens) and the Old Crown Inn on the Bath-Bristol road that passes through the picturesque little village of Kelston.

“We’re really proud of all three of our pubs,” says says Rozi Hempstead, Ideal Trade Company director. “We chose them because of their uniqueness, their historic charm and their gorgeous locations: each one is set in an idyllic position with stunning surroundings that encourage people to get out and about in the glorious countryside, too – visitors have been known to get to the Cross Guns, for example, by many forms of transport including bike, boat, kayak, paddle board and even horse, and both the Cross Guns and the Inn at Freshford are on the Two Valleys Walk route. “We’ve kept the traditional ambience and beautiful original features such as wooden beams, flagstones and log fires throughout all three pubs, which we’ve complemented with antique curiosities and furniture while still adding a contemporary flavour.” The pubs are far removed, however, from being tourist destinations. “Although each pub attracts visitors from far and wide, they all enjoy long-standing support from our many locals and regulars, who we actively support in return,” says Rozi. “We change our menus regularly and host monthly events such as Burger and Malbec evenings or curry nights alongside weekly drinks offers such as half price wine or prosecco – and, of course we serve full-on roasts every Sunday. We manage a packed calendar of events throughout the year including beer festivals and our Al Fresco Dining Clubs in the pub gardens, and feasts hosted by our sister company Barabiku Outdoors Catering that put seasonal menus cooked outdoors using a variety of open fire cooking methods in the spotlight.” There is a strong emphasis on local ingredients. Rozi continues, “We’re


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FOOD | AND | DRINK passionate about food and drink and have traditional values. We source the best ingredients from local suppliers wherever possible – we're big fans, for example, of Bath Soft Cheese, we have our own smokehouse and our menu reflects the increased recent demand for vegan and vegetarian food.” It seems that the new-look pub does need to be about far, far more than just a decent bar, a sturdy bar stool and a packet of pork scratchings in order to keep up with modern tastes. “The British pub tradition is still very much alive and going strong, but it’s up to the owners to maintain that vibe for the customers,” says Emily Brew (yes, really!) who, alongside her husband Dan, took over the Curfew on Cleveland Place, Bath in the summer of 2016. “Pubs are the original social networking site and it’s important to keep this value in place.” Following a major refurbishment, Dan and Emily’s popular, 200-year old hostelry is now a vibrant, buzzing merrymaking zone that blends heritage with present-day sensibilities to remarkable effect. “We all know how easy it is to speak to someone through a screen, but there’s nothing better than seeing your friends face to face and catching up over a pint (or three). “Our Wadworth Brewery selection is brewed just 20 miles away in Devizes and all our food is freshly cooked on site for menus that change with the seasons. As a small independent business, we know how important it is to support others in the same position so we’re big advocates of local sourcing with all our meat and vegetables coming from local butchers and greengrocers, and our loyal regulars are rewarded with events to thank them for supporting us.” A short (pub) crawl along London Road takes us to another vibrant, independent pub hotspot that pulls a perfect pint to a similar beat. Chapter One – formerly known as the Hanover Hotel, the Britannia Inn, the Piccadilly Ale House and The Hive – was built in the early 1800s and, from the outside, looks like a run-of-the-mill local neighbourhood pub. Inside, Australian-born Emma Heap and her Canadian-born husband Michael have mixed things up a bit in order to offer broad appeal to the demands of the contemporary pub-goer. “Victorian pubs were often modelled on the parlours of grand homes – a kind of nod to the aspirations of their customers. We set out to take that tradition into the 21st century, creating a space that people feel is an extension of their own front room. We’re passionate about the concept of a ‘Third Space’ – a public space that is neither home nor work, where you can meet up with friends, feel safe to hang out by yourself, bring family, play games, read books, try something new or just come in to have a chat; a space where you feel comfortable to just ‘be’,” says Emma. Upholding the same ethos outlined by Rozi, Emily and Dan in their pubs, Emma and Michael eschew patronising multinational drinks companies in favour of supporting

LEFT: The Old Crown Inn on the Bath-Bristol Road in the village of Kelston has always been enthusiastically supported by locals and regulars BELOW LEFT: The Inn at Freshford combines traditional charm with a contemporary vibe OPPOSITE (ABOVE): Chapter One on the London Road is modelled on the idea of a ‘Third Space’, somewhere to relax that isn’t home and isn’t work

local producers on their carefully-curated drinks menu. “Why drink a factory-produced lager from a company that spends more on their marketing budget than they do on the ingredients when you could be drinking a beer made by a small team of really passionate people who have scoured the earth for the best ingredients and spend huge amounts of time and energy getting that recipe perfect?” says Emma. As for food... “We have a lovely selection of crisps, nuts and scratchings available if you get the munchies, but we encourage our customers to order their favourite local takeaway and eat that in the pub if they get properly hungry – that way, people can eat what they feel like instead of having us tell them what we think they should eat!” “Exceeding expectations and delivering the best guest experience is crucial to the success of the modern pub and we ensure this ethos is delivered across all three of our sites,” says Rozi. “Quite simply, we want people to come to us to relax and enjoy what we offer. The challenge, however, is to be consistently consistent, maintain customer service and to adapt and deliver what the customer wants.” And if what the customer wants is an escape route from the challenging times we're living in, the new-look Great British Pub doors are open for business. n

OPPOSITE (BELOW): The Cross Guns in Avoncliff, situated on the Two Valleys Walk route, has an idyllic position and is not short of historic charm FAR LEFT: The Curfew on Cleveland Place likes to connect with the people who visit and makes a point of supporting local businesses LEFT: The Packhorse in Southstoke reopened recently after being remodelled with the support of over 400 shareholders

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RESTAURANT | REVIEW

FIREHOUSE ROTISSERIE 2 John Street, Bath BA1 2JL. Tel: 01225 482070, visit: firehouserotisserie.co.uk

R E V I EW

THE CLUE’S IN THE FOOD

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picy Indian dish (five letters), boat race meeting (seven letters), small island (five letters), universe (six letters), estimates (seven letters). I love a good crossword, but I was probably never going to find the answers to these particular clues because the paper puzzle had taken on a second life as a food display mat. And there was a glistening chuck steak burger bursting with ingredients settled in the middle obscuring the majority of the down clues, and, indeed, the crossword grid. My steak burger (with aged cheddar, tomato, lettuce, onion, pickles and French fries), you see, was placed on a neatly cut-out crossword on a wooden platter. It sounds eccentric, but it was quirky and original, the burger and its accompaniments basking in the warm orange light of the interior, looking glorious, and waiting to be eaten. I was sitting in the Firehouse Rotisserie in John Street and the main meal had just arrived. I was reluctant to destroy the crossword artistry, to be honest, so I didn’t rush to dismantle the platter. Fortunately my blood sugar was stable as I’d already had a ‘small plate’ of Chinese chicken salad with ginger wasabi dressing, toasted cashews with a wonton on top. I’d been nervous about having a small dish because I knew the main would be a substantial one, and I like to think of myself as a light eater. Anyway, the chicken salad had been an absolute dream – as things often are when you hesitate over them – with the 64 TheBATHMagazine

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combination of soft chicken slices, the pliant grain of the toasted cashews and the oh-sodivine deep red wasabi dressing. The wonton hovered on the surface, drizzed with wasabi, to give an extra crunch. So, I was admiring the crossword platter with chuck burger. I eventually broke the puzzle charm by lifting a single French fry from the said crossword and daubing it in a red sauce beginning with ‘k’. That was it. More duly followed. Along with some pickles, and onion, and tomato, and rocket. The burger was naturally too big to eat gracefully (as is the way with burgers), and the serving wasn’t small, but the crossword and the platter beneath were there to pick up the escaping ingredients. It was very tasty and extremely satisfying – onion, pickles and all – and I ate so much of it that if I’d had a fine-liner Sharpie I could probably have filled out a few of the crossword clues. My companion Jessica hadn’t got a puzzle and she didn’t appear to be upset or jealous. This was possibly because, to start, she had enjoyed crisp halloumi fries with a salsa picante dip. The deliciously salty strips of halloumi had a delicate smokiness, and the dip subtle underflavours of coriander. This was scattered with (miniature) pickled chilli pearl peppers, adding a little kick of spice. Her main course was the classic herb and lemon rotisserie chicken with applewood smoked bacon and Dijon tarragon aioli, the robust flavours balanced with a tomato and red onion salad.

The general menu offers a selection of small plates – including creamy mozzarella, vine tomatoes, fresh basil and mammoth olives and warm ciabatta. Three styles of rotisserie chicken include Texas spiced and Cuban spiced as well as the classic herb and lemon. The burger and grills section, which has the serious meat content, also features a vegetarian option, a grilled halloumi salad with asparagus, green beans, blushed tomatoes, fresh herbs and crunchy chickpeas. There are five choices of pizza and side dishes ranging from sweet potato fries to fine green beans with toasted almonds. You’ll also discover an extensive wine list and a compact choice of desserts. I didn’t have to think too hard before ordering an affogato, vanilla ice cream drowned in espresso. This is currently my dessert of choice – nothing to do with being a caffeine fiend, it’s just that the espresso takes away the frost chill of the ice cream divinely. We were also treated to a warm and attentive waiter service, with advice on wine and the prompt identification of ingredients. How would I describe my meal at Firehouse Rotisserie? Here’s a clue: delicious, tasty, mouthwatering, agreeable. Seven letters; first letter ‘s’, last letter ‘y’. n Crisp halloumi fries with salsa picante dip £6.50; Chinese chicken salad £7.50; rotisserie chicken £13; chuck steak burger £13; affogato vanilla ice cream with a shot of espresso £4.50. EC


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the delicious guide the best places in the city to eat, drink and enjoy

‘Spoilt for choice’ is a bit of a cliché, but it couldn’t be more appropriate when looking for places to eat in Bath, whether we’re grabbing some street food on the go, taking a friend out for coffee and cake, maybe satisfying an impromptu supper urge, or wining and dining our beloved by candlelight. Our famous Delicious Guide has just the right foodie destinations for your mood and pocket. We begin with some great Bath classics, the venues we return to time and again with affection as they reliably deliver great dishes every time. For a quick, tasty bite, make your selection from our menu of cafés, delis and foodie emporia, or relax in one of the local pubs that manage to combine an informal setting with some top quality dining. You might opt for a hotel with an elegant restaurant, or perhaps join colleagues after work in a bar or brasserie, where you can quaff a craft ale or have a glass of fizz and enjoy a plate of seasonal, local produce. All served and prepped for your delectation, we hope you’ll enjoy our celebration of the city’s finest.

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THE CIRCUS RESTAURANT 34 Brock Street, Bath BA1 2LN Tel: 01225 466020 Web: thecircusrestaurant.co.uk This is one of Bath’s very best and a well-loved entry in our Delicious Guide each year. A small, very busy, much-admired, family-run business, The Circus Restaurant is one of Bath’s sparkling culinary gems, serving seasonal, locally sourced, freshly cooked English food. It has a carefully chosen wine list, and the exceptionally welcoming and charming staff all radiate enthusiasm for working there. Set in a fine Georgian house in a prime position – between The Circus and The Royal Crescent – you will find sensible and honest prices, and you’ll leave feeling that you will want to return very soon. Voted number four in the UK in The Times 20 Secret Restaurants That Foodies Love. Open Monday to Saturday, 10am to midnight (closed Sunday). Booking is advised.

GREEN PARK BRASSERIE Green Park Station, Bath BA1 1JB Tel: 01225 338565 Web: greenparkbrasserie.com Live music, locally sourced produce and a lively atmosphere make this is one of Bath’s most popular restaurants. Independently owned and run for 26 years, Green Park Brasserie is set in the impressive former booking hall of Green Park Station. Hosting live music four nights a week (Wednesday to Saturday) the brasserie is metres from the Bath Farmers’ Market, enabling a fresh, seasonal menu from head chef Steve Derry. Green Park Brasserie has been awarded the title of UK’s most Romantic Restaurant and has had honourable mentions in The Guardian, AOL Travel and Culture Trip. Booking advised. Directly above the restaurant is the sister business Bath Function Rooms, which hosts private events for up to 140 guests.

BATH PIZZA CO Green Park Station, Bath BA1 1JB Tel: 01225 588886 Web: bathpizzaco.com Bath’s favourite wood-fired pizza joint was recently awarded the highly coveted Taste of the West Gold Award and has also been featured on the BBC, Huffington Post and Stylist Magazine. The alfresco, casual dining pizzeria is set under the glass roof canopy at Green Park Station where you can watch your pizza being made in front of you. With outstanding freshly made dough (gluten-free available) the chefs partner with local farmers, beer and cider producers to offer a very popular £10 pizza and a pint or prosecco deal. Family run and owned, Bath Pizza Co also offers discounts to Bath Rugby Supporters’ Club Members and BANES Discovery Card holders. This year it will host alfresco live music evenings (6pm Thursdays, April – September). Private hire available.

THE SCALLOP SHELL 22 Monmouth Place, Bath BA1 2AY Tel: 01225 420928 Web: thescallopshell.co.uk The Scallop Shell on Monmouth Place is a much-loved AA Rosette fish and chip restaurant, serving lightly battered and grilled fish and chips and seasonal seafood. Flying the flag for a fresh, sustainable catch from UK waters, the menu changes daily depending on the coastal landings, with at least 15 species of fish and shellfish displayed for customers to see in an ice-filled roll-top bath. Opt for the daily Fisherman’s Lunch special, with a choice of mains all served with mushy peas, tartare sauce, bread and butter and a mug of proper Yorkshire tea for just £10, or make it more of a foodie experience with shared shellfish plates or the likes of oysters followed by whole lemon sole or skate wing, with a great selection of wines sold by the glass. There’s a covered heated terrace for al fresco dining and a bar area where you can enjoy a drink if you’re waiting for a table.

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WOODS 9 – 13 Alfred Street, Bath BA1 2QX Tel: 01225 314812 Web: woodsrestaurant.com With Georgian elegance and a warm informal atmosphere, Woods has created an enviable reputation as one of Bath’s best independent restaurants. David and his French wife Claude have owned and run Woods since 1979. Stuart Ash, head chef for the past 24 years, leads the team with the owners’ son Gaston, daughter Gabby and son-in-law Joe. This is a family-run business offering personal service, dazzling food, modern British cooking with a classic French influence, and sourcing local and international ingredients to give you a mouthwatering sensation that will leave you coming back for more. Friday is fish day at Woods with fresh produce coming straight from Cornwall and Devon. The wines to accompany the delicious dishes are specially selected and tasted by David. Woods caters for all; the small terrace and bar are great to meet friends for a glass of wine, a dish of olives and a catch-up, the main dining room is ideal for intimate or informal dining and the private room is perfect for corporate entertainment, family celebrations or weddings.

ALLIUM AT THE ABBEY HOTEL

CHEZ DOMINIQUE

1 North Parade, Bath BA1 1LF Tel: 01225 461603 Web: abbeyhotelbath.co.uk

15 Argyle Street, Bath BA2 4BQ Tel: 01225 463482 Web: chezdominique.co.uk

Treat yourself to some culinary indulgence at Allium, with its relaxed ambience, rustic gold drapes and vibrant art collection. Head chef, Rupert Taylor, has 20 years’ experience, an impressive culinary career rooted in Bath, and a Michelin background. Rupert has developed a distinctive style focusing on simple food with brilliant flavours and quality seasonal ingredients. The wine list has been crafted to offer wines to suit the menu and to enable the discovery little-known gems rarely seen on restaurant lists outside London.

Chez Dominique is a family-run restaurant serving local and seasonal French and European food. Included in The Good Food Guide 2018, they received Best French and Best Steak awards at the Bath Good Food Awards 2017. Located on the beautiful Argyle Street just over Pulteney Bridge, the private dining room, comfortably seating eight, overlooks Pulteney Weir. They offer an á la carte menu, specials, Sunday roast, a carefully chosen wine list and a prix fixe menu at lunchtimes and in the early evenings. Enjoy great food and drink in a relaxing and friendly atmosphere.

ROMAN BATHS KITCHEN Abbey Churchyard, Bath BA1 1LY Tel: 01225 477877 Web: romanbathkitchen.co.uk Nestled in Bath’s iconic Abbey Churchyard, The Roman Baths Kitchen is perfectly positioned for a stop-off between sightseeing and shopping. Enjoy alfresco dining all day with unrivalled views of some of Bath’s iconic landmarks including Bath Abbey, The Roman Baths and the Pump Room. The 2018 menus, created by head chef Ross Shaw, feature a fantastic selection of feel-good dishes, using the very best in locally sourced, seasonal ingredients. The restaurant’s central location and proximity to Bath’s main attractions makes it the perfect spot for dining, whether it’s a morning coffee stop, a light lunch or dinner following a busy day’s shopping and sightseeing. Enjoy breakfast, coffee, lunch, dinner, drinks or maybe some after-work cocktails.

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DAN MOON AT THE GAINSBOROUGH The Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel, Beau Street, Bath BA1 1QY Tel: 01225 358888 Web: thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk Dan Moon at The Gainsborough restaurant is destined for great things, and is already delivering with its inspiring fine-dining menus and sophisticated yet relaxed décor and atmosphere. The moment you step through the doors, you will be personally looked after by the friendly restaurant manager, expert sommelier and the lovely waiting staff. Award-winning head chef Dan Moon sources the ingredients for his dishes locally, then creatively fashions them into classically flavoured works of art. Little touches like freshly baked breads, hand-churned butter and optional wine pairing will put the final garnish on your dining experience. Check out the excellent lunches including a wonderful Sunday roast, or, for a special treat, the ultimate of tasting menus.

DOWER HOUSE RESTAURANT & AFTERNOON TEA GARDEN AT THE ROYAL CRESCENT HOTEL 16 Royal Crescent, Bath BA1 2LS Tel: 01225 823 333 Web: royalcrescent.co.uk What can be better than relaxing in the beautiful location of the iconic Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa and catching up with friends over a chilled glass of Champagne and a delectable selection of scones and sandwiches? The hotel’s unique selection of five afternoon teas include beautiful finger sandwiches, delicate cakes and savouries, the finest world teas and some of Bath’s best scones and buns. Sit down and relax in the hotel’s breath-taking one acre of secluded gardens or enjoy the elegant surroundings of the awardwinning Dower House Restaurant. Afternoon tea is served daily between 1.30pm and 6pm. Afternoon tea is £37.50 per person, or with a glass of Champagne it is £50 per person. Afternoon tea with a drinks flight is £55 per person, and children’s afternoon tea is £19.50 per child.

THE OLIVE TREE Queensberry Hotel, Russel Street, Bath BA1 2QF Tel: 01225 447928 Web: olivetreebath.co.uk Beneath The Queensberry Hotel is the 3 AA rosette Olive Tree, one of Bath’s longest established independent restaurants, offering relaxed fine dining in a contemporary British style. Head chef Chris Cleghorn honed his skills under world-renowned Michelin Star chefs, and is tipped for one himself by The Times. His unique style – which showcases the finest seasonal ingredients from high-quality local producers – has won many awards, most recently the Crumbs Award for Fine Dining 2017: “Faultless service, serious cooking of prime ingredients and consistently high quality. This is as good as it gets.” The wine list, also awardwinning, eclectically balances traditional and new, and the restaurant’s warm opulence perfectly complements the quality and style of food.

THE BRASSERIE AT LUCKNAM PARK Lucknam Park Hotel & Spa, Colerne, SN14 8AZ Tel: 01225 742777 Web: lucknampark.co.uk Set among the 500-acre Lucknam Park estate, The Brasserie at Lucknam Park is a contemporary and stylish restaurant perfect for morning coffee and pastries, light lunches, alfresco dining and informal dinners. With a light and airy interior, this restaurant makes an ideal place to while away the hours in relaxed surroundings. Take a stroll through the elegant walled gardens, soak in the scenic views and choose from a full seasonal a la carte menu. Head Chef, Thomas Westerland, recently awarded National Chef of Wales 2018, creates a varied menu using fine, local produce wherever possible. Open daily from 7am to 10pm, and, located adjoining the fabulous ESPA spa, you can stop off as you enjoy a day of relaxation and rejuvenation.

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AMARONE RESTAURANT

THE PUMP ROOM

Beau Nash House, Saw Close, Bath BA1 1EU Tel: 01225 330030 Email: reservations@ameroneristorante.co.uk

Stall Street, Bath BA1 1LZ Tel: 01225 444477 Web: pumproombath.co.uk

Amarone is a unique independent Italian restaurant situated in the elegant Georgian building that was once home to Richard ‘Beau’ Nash, the renowned socialite. The atmosphere is relaxed and inviting. This, combined with the thoughtfully created menus and impressive décor, ensures a memorable experience. Enjoy delicious, freshly prepared pasta dishes, locally sourced steaks and fish fresh from the Dorset coast, as well as stonebaked pizzas and delectable desserts. The wine list has been carefully compiled from primarily quality Italian family estates to perfectly complement the traditional yet innovative Italian cuisine. Amarone is the only restaurant in the south west to offer the delicious wine of its namesake by the glass as well as the bottle. The upper level at Amarone can be exclusively hired and offers a beautiful space in which to hold celebratory lunches and dinners with family and friends as well as business meetings, with menus created to suit personal requirements. Booking is advised as Amarone has an excellent reputation and is popular with both tourists and regular clientele.

A trip to Bath wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the Georgian splendour of the Pump Room, with its Corinthian columns and crystal chandelier. Live music is played daily by the Pump Room Trio and resident pianist to create an enchanting atmosphere. Enjoy a selection of delicious seasonal dishes for breakfast or lunch, or why not try one of the afternoon tea options and really indulge? In the summer, the Pump Room is open for evening dining when you can enjoy the dinner menu and summer cocktails. Visitors and residents can enjoy long balmy summer evenings with mouth-watering seasonal dishes – the perfect excuse to get together with friends and family.

HUDSON STEAKHOUSE 14 London Street, Bath BA1 5BU Tel: 01225 332323 Web: hudsonsteakhouse.co.uk Hudson Steakhouse has been serving the people of Bath the best steaks for a decade now, offering its diners prime dryaged steaks, starters with a fusion influence and classic dishes, all served in a sympathetic conversion of a once notorious Victorian pub. Owner Richard Fenton took on this run-down building and has created a destination that has consistently won best-restaurant awards locally and nationally. The bar serves cocktails, premium beers and world wines under sparkling chandeliers and the upstairs grill room has an open kitchen and looks out over Hedgemead Park. Top local hotels like to send their customers to Hudson, so it’s advisable to book. We recommend the Monday to Friday early evening special from 5pm to 7pm, which features an eight ounce Flat Iron steak with frites and a glass of wine for £16.95.

LANSDOWNE STRAND The Strand, Calne, Wiltshire SN11 0EH Te: 01249 812488 Web: lansdownestrand.co.uk Refurbished and refreshed, the Lansdowne Strand boasts 2 AA rosettes and a selection of fabulously comfy and cosy bedrooms. Within reach of the best of the South West and the Cotswolds, this historic coaching inn is perfect for a stay away or perhaps a pit stop for a change of scenery. The menu consists of the finest of local produce to enjoy with local ales or local gins. Interesting flavours are celebrated with carefully considered presentation and textures. A handful of the rooms accept polite dogs by request and excellent walks are not far from the inn’s doorstep, including landmarks such as the Cherhill Monument and Wiltshire’s white horses. The UNESCO listed Avebury stone circle and the towering neolithic Silbury Hill are a short drive away. For fantastic high street (but high-end!) shopping pop to Marlborough, the charming old market town known for being the second broadest high street in the UK.

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THE HOLBURNE GARDEN CAFÉ The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street, Bath BA2 4DB Tel: 01225 388572 Web: holburne.org The Holburne Garden Café is only a 10-minute walk from the city centre and is one of the most beautiful contemporary spaces in Bath. Set within the grounds of the museum there is a seasonal menu offering light lunches and delicious cakes. The garden café is open from 5 – 9pm on the last Friday in the month and is a great place to relax with friends and enjoy the museum’s galleries out of hours. Currently there is a special offer running with the exhibition Anthony Fry: a retrospective – you can enjoy admission to the exhibition and coffee and cake for £12.50.

THE COLOMBIAN COMPANY 6 Abbeygate Street, Bath BA1 1NP Tel: 07534 391992 Web: thecolombiancompany.com Owner Jhampoll Gutierrez opened the lively and welcoming coffee shop The Colombian Company in November but his passion for coffee started during his childhood. Today he imports the best speciality green coffee from Colombia, buying only from small farmers giving him direct contact with producers who struggle to compete with big farms selling to large companies. The company is based on quality, traceability and a direct relationship with the farmer. As well as ethically sourced and expertly made coffees, including the specially created Bombon (espresso and condensed milk), the range available also includes Colombian chocolate and Panela (sugar cane) as well as delicious cakes and savouries. Ground coffees are also available to buy from the coffee shop and online.

DARCY’S NEWS CAFE OLD STABLES COFFEE SHOP The Estate Yard, Castle Combe SN14 7HU Tel: 01249 783872 Web: oldstablesdeli.co.uk Yasmin and Philippa started their coffee shop venture in 2013, moving to the Cotswold village of Castle Combe in 2017. Their team of friendly staff and the cosy atmosphere they have created has made it a popular spot for both visitors and locals. Inside awaits a delicious choice of homemade cakes, locally roasted coffee, light bites and their renowned heartshaped scones, all of which can be enjoyed either snuggled up in front of the wood burner or outside soaking up the sun and the tranquil atmosphere. Walkers and dogs are welcome as are cyclists and groups. For dog lovers without dogs Twiglet and Bumble are sometimes in residence and are more than happy for you to make a fuss of them. Open Tuesday – Sunday from 10am.

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34 Gay Street, Bath BA1 2LT Tel: 01225 425308 Web: darcysofbath.com At Bath’s only news café you can pick up your daily newspaper and enjoy it over a freshly prepared cooked breakfast or lunch. Darcy’s News Cafe is a family-run, independent business and its focus is on providing great quality food and excellent customer service. Breakfast starts at 7.30am and is served all day; lunch begins at noon. All meals are available to eat in or take away. Darcy’s caters to a wide range of dietary preferences including gluten-free, dairy-free and vegan. It has a large hot drinks menu which includes Lavazza coffee, a wide selection of Novus Loose Leaf Teas and a luxurious hot chocolate menu that includes a choice of milk, dark, white and sugar-free chocolate. Based on Gay Street, it is just a few doors up from the Jane Austen Centre and is en route to popular tourist destinations The Circus and The Royal Crescent. The newsagents side of the business still delivers newspapers and magazines to more than 600 customers throughout Bath daily and it specialises in sourcing foreign titles on request. Darcy’s News Cafe is also the only Pass My Parcel (Amazon) drop-off and collection point in Bath. It also offers free WiFi and is fully licensed.


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CAFÉ LUCCA 1 – 2 Bartlett Street, Bath BA1 2QZ Tel: 01225 938282 Web: cafelucca.co.uk Café Lucca revives and relaxes in equal measure. It serves wonderful food in a welcoming environment, offering freshly ground coffee and a light breakfast in the mornings, lunch from a selection of brightly coloured salads and bruschetta and panini, or for afternoon tea, an array of tempting cakes. This is the perfect place for catching up with friends, or as a respite from shopping and is one of Bath’s favourite places to see people and be seen. Deliciously fresh, modern Italian style/mediterranean food is served in the elegant and spacious surroundings of The Loft. All the fresh produce and Italian products are from small local family suppliers. Situated in a traffic-free street in Bath’s boutique quarter, the restaurant is just two minutes’ walk from Milsom Street and the Fashion Museum. And when the sun shines there are tables outside from where one can watch the world stroll by.

THE ITALIAN FOOD HALL

CASTLE FARM CAFE

8 Edgar Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2EE Tel: 01225 334127 Web: theitalianfoodhall.com

Midford Road, Midford, Bath BA2 7BU Tel: 07564 783307 Web: castlefarmcafe.co.uk

The Italian Food Hall is a speciality food store and deli that brings the very best foods from small producers in Italy straight to the centre of Bath. From Italian delicacies to traditional family favourites it has delicious fresh cheeses, cured meats, wonderful wines and liqueurs, the very best pasta sauces and pasta plus gluten-free and vegan options too. Go and grab a bite to eat or take away a fresh panini and coffee – discover a little piece of Italy here in Bath.

Castle Farm Café nestles in the glorious Midford countryside on a charming organic farm amongst fresh herbs and sweet-smelling flowers. The café and open kitchen serves only vegetarian dishes with plenty of vegan and gluten-free options to boot. There’s nothing quite like their delicious fresh-from-the-oven pizza and a sparkling cider enjoyed outside on a warm day while admiring the breathtaking surrounding views. The suppliers list reads like a roll call of the best local producers for miles around – so there are lovely fresh salads, hot dishes and daily specials to choose from. As well as opening daily for lunch and tea, the café serves supper on Friday and Saturday evenings. Keep an eye on the website for a programme of events and supper clubs as they tend to fill up quickly.

CAFE 15 AT NO. 15 GREAT PULTENEY 15 Great Pulteney Street Bath BA2 4BR Tel: 01225 807015 Email: no15greatpulteney.co.uk Downstairs in Cafe 15, the food is simple yet refined. This is the relaxed restaurant of the No. 15 Great Pulteney hotel and it’s open every day for breakfast, from Tuesday to Saturday for dinner, along with weekend offerings of Saturday lunch and Sunday brunch. Each dish is carefully created to let the quality of the ingredients shine and to complement the unique setting. Expect to see the likes of rump of lamb, lamb ragu, Lyonnaise potato, morels, asparagus and wild garlic; and duck egg custard tart with textures of forced Yorkshire rhubarb on the menu.

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PEKING RESTAURANT 1–2 New Street, Kingsmead Square, Bath BA1 2AF Tel: 01225 466377 Web: pekingrestaurantbath.co.uk Peking Restaurant opened in Bath in 1985. A family-run, independent restaurant it is the number-one choice for local, authentic Chinese food. The team at Peking put their customers at the forefront of everything they do. The master chef has created an extensive menu of fresh, healthy and innovative dishes selected from Cantonese, Szechuan and Peking cuisines, using local ingredients wherever possible. As well as the traditional flavours of sweet and sour, ginger and spring onion, Peking also offers much-loved lobster and crab dishes. The chef relishes a challenge and will also prepare special dishes on request. The friendly, experienced staff at Peking strive to provide a genuine Chinese experience with a promise to put their hearts and souls into everything they do and with the belief that their customers deserve the best.

LA PERLA

FIREHOUSE ROTISSERIE

12A North Parade, Bath BA2 4AL Tel: 01225 463626 Web: la-perla.co.uk

2 St John Street, Bath BA1 2JL Tel: 01225 482070 Web: firehouserotisserie.co.uk

La Perla Restaurante Y Tapas offers a small Spanish enclave in the heart of Bath. The tapas or tapeo experience is an Andalucian mentality, an Iberian way of life. At its essence is the art of living simply and without pretence. The key to it all is pure ingredients and simplicity, with amazing flavours created from minimal processes. “Vamos de tapeo” and “vamos a tapear”, it’s time to hang out and share some time with friends as you help yourself to delicious bites of food. The tapas lifestyle is joyful, casual, and about living in the moment. Tapas and sangria might be holiday staples but when looking for somewhere for dinner, Spanish food hasn’t always been the first thing that springs to mind. La Perla has changed all that, and in doing so has leaped right to the top of the list of must-visit places in Bath. All through your visit you’re sure to enjoy unparalleled tapas, paella and sangria. La Perla celebrates the romance of real Iberian dining, and the whole team love what they do and openly invite everyone to come along and discover this unique taste of Spain.

Firehouse Rotisserie has been one of the most popular independent restaurants in Bath for 20 years. Voted by Channel 4 as one of the top five American restaurants in the UK, it has been recommended by GQ, Tatler, and The Daily Mail. It is the only genuine rotisserie restaurant in this part of the country, boasting a blend of authentic Californian and south western American flavours using ancho, guajillo, chipotle and pasilla chiles as well as more familiar herbs and spices. In addition to its delicious free-range rotisserie chicken, the Firehouse is known for its range of exciting and luxurious gourmet brick fired pizzas, and classic American Deli burgers. Located on a quiet street just off the main shopping area, the buzzy, cosy and relaxed atmosphere has a bustling open kitchen where diners can watch the food being cooked to order.

OLÉ TAPAS First Floor, 1 John Street, Bath BA1 2JL & 1 Saw Close, Bath BA1 1EY Tel: 01225 424274 Web: oletapas.co.uk Olé Tapas is an informal, bijou place in the centre of the city. It is inspired by the many small tapas bars in Spain, where people often eat standing up or at small tables. Tapas is a very personal style of dining and its simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication. If you like an eating style to share with friends and family that encourages conversation and laughter, then head to Olé Tapas. Olé is convivial and noisy so if you like for a relaxed, buzzing atmosphere with genuine Spanish food and drink and great service, it’s an experience that you will enjoy. Come and create your own individual lunch or dinner while enjoying the authentic vibe of Spain.

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YAK YETI YAK 12 Pierrepont Street, Bath BA1 1LA Tel: 01225 442299 Web: yakyetiyak.co.uk Yak Yeti Yak is a one-of-a-kind restaurant, family run with an eclectic mix of artefacts and old memorabilia from the owners’ home village. In addition to conventional tables and chairs there’s also a cushioned area where you can sit on the floor to eat your meal – very traditional and very popular. The food is as unique as the décor, and with one of the longest running listings in the Good Food guide you know it’s something special. Light fragrant curries cooked to order and Tibetan-style momos – steamed stuffed dumplings – are among the specialities. There are plenty of vegetarian and vegan options including wines.

RAPHAEL RESTAURANT

GIGGLING SQUID

Gascoyne House, Upper Borough Walls, Bath BA1 1RN Tel: 01225 480042 Email: reservations@raphaelrestaurant.co.uk

Bluecoat House, Saw Close, Bath BA1 1EY Tel: 01225 331486 Web: gigglingsquid.com

Raphael is a well-established independent restaurant renowned for serving exquisite food and excellent wines in a warm, welcoming atmosphere. The head chef and his team create imaginative menus inspired by fresh, seasonal, locally sourced ingredients. Enjoy beautifully presented dishes such as roast rump of lamb with a hazelnut and rosemary crust, celeriac and potato dauphinoise with seasonal greens, and mouth-watering desserts such as spiced fruit steamed sponge pudding, with toffee sauce and homemade vanilla ice-cream or iced white chocolate and Baileys parfait with dark chocolate sauce and fresh strawberries. The wine list regularly changes and a good selection of bottles at reasonable prices are thoughtfully chosen to complement the food. Catering for visitors to the city and the restaurant’s loyal customers, Raphael offers leisurely lunches, pre-theatre dining or romantic meals for two – this is the perfect place for any occasion.

New to Bath and proving very popular, Giggling Squid lends itself to the distinct sharing culture of Thailand. The menu lunchtime tapas and delicious curries, salads, rice and noodles – there is even a dedicated ‘little tapas for little people’ to ensure there are smiles all round. Street-foodstyle snacks and artfully balanced cocktails are also available in the separate lounge and bar.

NOYA’S KITCHEN 7 St James’s Parade, Bath BA1 1UL Tel: 01225 684439 Web: noyaskitchen.co.uk Noya’s Vietnamese Supper Clubs have long been one of the hottest dining tickets in Bath, and we just love its new home on St James’s Parade. The stylishly beautiful décor and relaxed, welcoming atmosphere from Noya’s friendly team complement her delicious Vietnamese home cooking. Her ethos on menus is refreshingly different, posting the weekly lunchtime menu on social media, and keeping her wonderful five-course Supper Club menu a secret until she personally introduces the dishes on the night. For serious foodies, Noya’s fortnightly Vietnamese cooking classes are a must. Classes are hands-on, informal and fun, creating three delicious dishes from a choice of street-food-inspired menus, eating them communally in Vietnamese style around Noya’s Kitchen’s tables.

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SIGN OF THE ANGEL Church Street, Lacock SN15 2LB Tel: 01249 730230 Web: signoftheangel.co.uk Sign of the Angel is a 15th-century coaching inn that encompasses the key elements of a traditional inn. It provides great tasting food and drink in front of large open fires with warm, homely rooms for those staying overnight. Located in the National Trust village of Lacock, on the edge of the Cotswolds, this pub is only a short distance from Bath. The kitchen uses fresh, seasonal ingredients in order to serve stand-out dishes from honest foods. Sign of the Angel sources produce from local suppliers in the west country to ensure that the food process is traceable, and from sustainable farmers, growers and butchers. In the summer months, there is a beautiful garden where you can enjoy a cream tea next to the stream, along with a paddock, which will in time subsidise the produce for the kitchen. Sign of the Angel has received two AA rosettes and is considered a 4* AA accommodation.

PACKHORSE INN

THE PEAR TREE INN

Old School Hill, South Stoke, Bath BA2 7DU Tel: 01225 830300 Web: packhorsebath.co.uk

Top Lane, Whitley, Melksham SN12 8QX Tel: 01225 704966 Web: peartreewhitley.co.uk

The recently refurbished Packhorse is now open for bookings. Located in the picturesque village of South Stoke a few miles outside the city centre, this 17th-century pub boasts spectacular views across the Cam Valley and is a favourite with walkers and cyclists. The garden provides a relaxing space away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Head chef Dan Vosper aims to deliver high-quality pub classics, as well as daily specials – keeping to his philosophy of simple cooking done really well, using the finest locally sourced ingredients. Rob Clayton (of Clayton’s Kitchen fame) is the Operations Director, so expect some synergy between venues. Food is served daily. Please check the website for details. Sign up to receive a free walking guide for the local area.

The Pear Tree Inn’s unique concept centres around a rustic Farmhouse Kitchen with a bar and rooms tucked away in rural Whitley, 25 minutes from Bath. Enjoy modern, imaginative cooking, showcasing the best in locally sourced produce. With a menu guided by the seasons and vegetable beds bursting with fresh produce, the chefs make the most of the fresh crops and local specialities. The Pear Tree Inn has sensitively restored the former 17th century farmhouse, returning it to its original character and charm. There are eight rooms split between the inn and a beautifully converted barn leading onto the garden. All of the rooms are named after varieties of pears and the garden are dog friendly. Beyond the flagstoned bar are two dining areas, the garden room, adjacent to a secluded courtyard, and a large open sunroom with exposed beams and a sun terrace.

THE INN AT FRESHFORD The Hill, Freshford, Bath BA2 7WG Tel: 01225 722250 Web: theinnatfreshford.com Spend time at The Inn at Freshford and enjoy a rural escape. This traditional 16th-century village pub is tucked away in the pretty village of Freshford, near Bath, and has a welcoming and friendly atmosphere. Set in an idyllic location by the river, it has stunning countryside surroundings and easy access to river walks. With old beams, open fires and antique curiosities, the inn is full of historic charm but has been updated with a modern flavour. At the rear is a flower-decked garden with outside bar and elevated views across the valley – a perfect place to spend a sunny afternoon. The owners are passionate about food, serving home-cooked dishes using quality ingredients and local and seasonal produce where possible. Open seven days a week, food is served every day and there’s a superb roast on Sundays. Separate children’s menu. Real ales, craft beers and an excellent wine list. Private dining available. Dogs welcome.

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THE OLD CROWN KELSTON

CROSS GUNS

Kelston, Bath BA1 9AQ Tel: 01225 423032 Web: oldcrownkelston.com

Avoncliff, Near Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire BA15 2HB Tel: 01225 862335 Web: crossgunsavoncliff.com

The Old Crown Inn in Kelston is a traditional 15th-century country inn nestled in the Cotswolds countryside a few miles from the centre of Bath. This cosy, friendly, welcoming pub is full of historic charm and character, with old beams, polished flagstones and open fires and has been updated with a contemporary craft flavour. Open seven days a week, great food is served every day and seasonal menus use quality ingredients and support local suppliers where possible. Separate children’s menu. Roast served on Sundays. Real ales and fine wines. The large pub garden with covered deck and outside bar is a popular destination on warm, sunny days and is available for exclusive hire throughout the year. Surrounded by stunning countryside, this is the perfect location for walks with easy access to Kelston Roundhill, the Cotswold Way and the river. Dogs welcome.

The Cross Guns is a stunning 16th-century inn full of historic character with original beams and low ceilings. Located in the idyllic and tranquil village of Avoncliff, it nestles on the canal towpath between Bath and Bradford on Avon. The Cross Guns has a breathtaking setting with panoramic views of the river, the aqueduct and weir. The large decked and terraced garden set on the river bank is a perfect location on sunny days and is a popular destination for walkers, cyclists, boaters, canoeists, photographers and wildlife enthusiasts. Dogs welcome. Open seven days a week, serving home-cooked food every day using seasonal and local produce where possible. Open for breakfast daily. Vegetarian and vegan dishes feature on the menu and a delicious roast is served on Sundays. Sumptuous feasts are cooked over an open fire from the outdoor kitchen on the first Sunday of every month.

GARRICK’S HEAD 7 – 8 St John’s Place, Bath BA1 1ET Tel: 01225 318368 Web: garricksheadpub.com The Garrick’s Head pub and dining room was the former home to Beau Nash and is a grand building with stately proportions. Its location next to the Theatre Royal always makes for an interesting and colourful crowd. Open every day from noon onwards, lunch and dinner are served in the bar, on the terrace or in the dining room. Menus are full of fresh seasonal ingredients and the style is modern British. The bar menu features pub classics prepared with respect and using the best regional ingredients, while the pre-theatre and à la carte menus are more fine dining in style. Sunday roasts are served in the traditional style with all the trimmings and children are occupied with complimentary gifts to keep them busy at the table. Booking is always advisable, especially at the weekend. Renowned for having the best fish and chips in Bath, the Garrick’s Head is also known for serving Bath chaps. Outside the spectacular floral displays from the hanging baskets and window boxes catch the sun – this is the perfect location to sit back and watch the hustle and bustle of Bath go by.

KING WILLIAM

PUB AND DINING ROOMS 36 Thomas Street, Bath BA1 5NN Tel: 01225 428096 Web: kingwilliampub.com King William Pub and Dining Rooms is just 15 minutes walk from Bath Abbey and is a destination for lovers of great food. Independently owned for over 13 years, it’s a good idea to book as this cosy little Georgian eatery is a favourite for locals and visitors. The huge picture windows are the perfect spot for people watching along the bustling street. The bar is well stocked with locally brewed cask ales, 30 craft beers, Somerset ciders and an extensive and excellent wine list. The King William’s eponymous house ale is exclusively brewed by Danish master brewer Stig Anker Andersen. Cooking at the King William is about respect for the ingredients, which are sourced from the wealth of artisan producers found in and around Bath and the south west. Modern British in style, menus are fresh, seasonal and local. Two first-floor dining rooms offer a more intimate setting for private dining, special occasions or as one of Bath’s most romantic dining venues.

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THE HARE & HOUNDS Lansdown Road, Bath BA1 5TJ Tel: 01225 482682 Web: hareandhoundsbath.com The Hare & Hounds enjoys a stunning location high on Lansdown Hill with glorious views over the Bath countryside. Open from 8.30am every day for breakfast, The Hare & Hounds serves home-cooked seasonal food all day and every day. The smart interior features wooden floors, panels, tables and chairs – and food is very much the focus. You might start with chargrilled asparagus, prosciutto ham, mozzarella and rocket, followed by slow-cooked pork belly with ham hock croquette, celeriac, apple and pickled fennel. A dark chocolate brownie, salted caramel sauce and chocolate ice cream makes a tempting finale. On summer days, customers can enjoy lunch on the large terrace and on winter evenings the open fire creates a cosy atmosphere and the attentive but relaxed service really shines. There’s a separate menu for children and a large garden that’s a big draw in the summertime. The Hare & Hounds sits only a mile from town but feels like a world away in beautiful countryside. Its location is perfect for visitors heading to or from the M4 motorway to the north of Bath. It’s well worth a visit for the views, but certainly stay for the friendly service and fabulous food.

THE MARLBOROUGH TAVERN

THE CHEQUERS

35 Marlborough Buildings, Bath BA1 2LY Tel: 01225 423731 Web: marlborough-tavern.com

50 Rivers Street, Bath BA1 2QA Tel: 01225 360017 Web: thechequersbath.com

Located a stone’s throw from The Royal Crescent, The Marlborough Tavern combines the atmosphere of a local pub with the food quality of a top restaurant, making it a firm favourite for locals and visitors to Bath. The menu is essentially English in character, and uses local produce to create great tasting, simple dishes where the quality of the produce speaks for itself. The Marlborough has held 2 AA rosettes for food quality since 2009, and the pub features in both The Good Food Guide and the Michelin Guide. Sundays are especially busy, with groups of friends and families enjoying the friendly pub atmosphere and the legendary roasts. The Marlborough Tavern’s reputation for good food is matched by the service: friendly and attentive without ever being intrusive. The wine list is extensive, as is the selection of local ales – and the bar staff mix a mean cocktail, too. Outside, The Marlborough boasts what is arguably Bath’s finest pub garden – a walled courtyard space that’s just perfect for summertime lunching and drinking with good friends.

Situated a short walk from The Circus and The Royal Crescent, The Chequers is a beautiful little gastropub that serves seriously good food. It delivers top-quality restaurant standard dishes in the convivial atmosphere of a friendly pub. The quality of the cooking has put The Chequers firmly on the map for serious foodies, attracted by the imaginative menu and friendly service. Traditionalists will also be glad to hear that the pub caters for them with a selection of beautifully crafted down-to-earth pub classics. Diners can choose to eat either downstairs in the traditional bar area or in the upstairs restaurant – this features a window into the kitchen where they can see the chefs hard at work. The Chequers offers a tasting menu experience and has private dining and meeting room facilities available. There’s an impressive and accessible list of well-kept wines and local ales and ciders.

THE LOCKSBROOK INN 103 Locksbrook Road, Bath BA1 3EN Tel: 01225 427119 Web: thelocksbrookinn.com The Locksbrook Inn is a beautiful, contemporary gastropub located beside the canal with extensive outside garden space. With plenty of decking and an outdoor bar, it’s the perfect spot to enjoy a glass of prosecco or a pint on a warm summer’s evening. The menu comprises high-quality modern gastropub cooking, including homemade burgers, sharing platters and classic pub dishes. Enjoy salt and pepper squid and pan-fried scallops to start, or share a charcuterie board before tucking into a crisp, hand-stretched pizza with spicy salami and cherry tomatoes. You won’t be able to say no to a dessert with the likes of hot chocolate fondant and sticky toffee pudding gracing the menu. Weekends are busy with brunch and Sunday lunch a speciality. Open seven days a week for breakfast, lunch and dinner, the Locksbrook Inn is family friendly with a separate children’s menu. Dogs are welcome.

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VINO VINO WINE AND COCKTAIL BAR 5-6 Saw Close, Bath BA1 1EN Tel: 01225 312341 Email: enquiries@vinovinowinebar.co.uk Located a short distance from the Theatre Royal, Vino Vino is a sophisticated wine and cocktail bar with an informal, convivial atmosphere. There is an extraordinary array of choice from the carefully chosen wine list, with wines to suit all palates, many available by the glass. The unique cocktail list retains the balance between classic and signature concoctions, with the emphasis on creativity. Vino Vino offers a seasonally changing selection of cheeses, charcuterie and bar plates, all of which lend themselves perfectly to sharing with friends, continental style. Many of the cheeses are sourced locally in Somerset, with the Thoughtful Bread Company in Bath supplying the fantastic bread and scrumptious desserts. Outside there is a large alfresco terrace, part of which catches the sun beautifully, furnished with cosy blankets and heated parasols, making Vino Vino the perfect place to relax with a glass of wine and some good food while watching the world go by.

GREAT WESTERN WINE Wells Road, Bath BA2 3AP Tel: 01225 322810 Web: greatwesternwine.co.uk Great Western Wine is an Aladdin’s Cave of over 1,000 of the world’s best wines, and 450 small batch spirits – including 150 gins at the last count. Beer lovers are well catered for with bottles from the best of the west country local brewers, and in the last year there is the welcome addition of artisan cheeses on sale with a Pong Cheese concession. We love its modern, friendly approach backed up by old-fashioned service and advice. GWW is an award-winner, having scooped the Best Wine Merchant in south west England for the last four years in the wine industry Oscars, the International Wine Challenge Awards. Wines and spirits are always open to taste and experienced staff are great at finding the perfect wine for you at any budget. Prices at every level are competitive and there’s always a good selection of special offers. Watch out for the bin-ends for the best bargains. The website and mail-order service is just as good for those further afield. Wine-tasting events, dinners and The Great Wine School are worth checking out – but get in quickly as they’re very popular and sell fast. You’ll find many of Great Western Wine’s wares in Bath’s best restaurants, hotels and pubs, as well as at Bath Rugby.

INDEPENDENT SPIRIT OF BATH 7 Terrace Walk, Bath BA1 1LN Tel: 01225 340636 Web: independentspiritofbath.co.uk Established in 2013, Independent spirit of Bath is an independent specialist off-sales venue in the heart of Bath. Specialising in single malt whisky, artisan gins, the best UK and world craft beers. A dedicated whisky room houses a large range single malt whiskies from Scotland and others from around the world. Private and scheduled events such as whisky tastings, gin masterclasses and cocktail masterclasses are hosted downstairs in the custombuilt tasting room which can be hired out for exclusive events for up to 20 people.

TASTING ROOM 6 Green Street, Bath BA1 2JY Tel: 01225 483070 Web: tastingroom.co.uk Located in the heart of Bath, Tasting Room offers up a selection of fine wines and spirits. Specialising in wines from around Europe including the historic regions of Bordeaux, Burgundy, Rhone Valley and with a passion for the wines of Italy and California. There are a large selection of boutique gins and whiskies as well as an array of older Armagnac and Cognac. If you’re looking for a present, choose from the range of vintage ports and Madeira or an unusual white port. If you are a group of eight people or above treat yourself to a private tasting or alternatively book a tasting event for gin, whisky or wine. If you like quality wines and spirits visit Tasting Room Wine and Spirits and have a look around.

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THE DELICIOUS GUIDE | SS18

DOUGH PIZZA 14 – 16 The Corridor, Bath BA1 5AP Tel: 01225 443686 Web: doughpizzarestaurant.co.uk A proudly independent, family-run business, Dough brings together years of expertise and the best ingredients to bring you first-rate pizza and Italian food, every time. With a focus on ‘pizza for everyone’, Dough offers eight alternative health-giving bases, from turmeric to hemp, grano arso, multigrain and more, alongside traditional sourdough. Gluten-free and vegan pizzas are a particular speciality. You’ll find all the classics from margheritas to marinaras alongside pizza parcels, star-shaped pizzas and gourmet specials such as The King with mozzarella, sautéed porcini mushrooms in white wine, Argentinian king prawns slow-cooked in smoked paprika, rocket pesto, truffle oil, pink pepper, parsley and lime zest, based on seaweed dough. Warm, family-friendly service, dough-spinning entertainment and plenty of Italian charm ensures that any visit to Dough is memorable.

THE OVEN PIZZERIA

PHAT YAKS

3 and 4 Seven Dials, Saw Close, Bath BA1 1EN Tel: 01225 311181 Email: enquiries@theovenpizzeria.co.uk

3 New Street, Bath BA1 2AF Tel: 01225 571 057 Web: phatyaks.com

As one of the original artisan pizzerias in Bath, The Oven has established an outstanding reputation, specialising in authentic Neapolitan pizza. At the heart of its stripped-back interior, the team at The Oven, led by head chef Fabrizio Mancinetti – winner of Pizza chef of the year 2016 – create their delicious pizzas in the open kitchen, which are then baked in the traditional wood-fired oven. The dough is made using Fabrizios’ secret recipe, and then proved for between 36-40 hours. The pizzas are baked for no more than 90 seconds giving a beautifully puffy, slightly singed crust and a unique flavour. Good-quality ingredients are essential for the toppings and are sourced from simple fresh seasonal and imported Italian foods, such as the renowned San Marzano tomatoes and Fior di latte mozzarella. The Oven also offers a selection of starters, freshly prepared salads and mouthwatering desserts. All of these can be complemented by an Italian wine from the reasonably priced wine list, or by craft beers or cider. Set in a prime position in Bath, with a heated, covered terrace, The Oven offers authentic artisan pizza in a vibrant, friendly atmosphere.

With freshly cooked food and the use of subtle spices, Phat Yaks has brought all the passion that makes its older sibling Yak Yeti Yak so popular to a café in Kingsmead Square. Here it’s all about street food, with curries, pakoras, crispy spiced vegetable fritters and sumptuous salads washed down with speciality coffees or house lassis – yoghurt milkshakes that are every bit as decadent as their ice-cream counterparts, but a whole lot healthier. Pakoras and little meat kebabs are cooked to order in the open kitchen where there is countertop seating, or head to the first floor for a table overlooking Kingsmead Square. You can even relax on cushioned seating with low-level tables. Ever popular is the takeaway option where your food is wrapped carefully for you to take to your favourite sun spot to eat picnic style.

SMASHBURGER 8 – 9 Southgate Street, Bath BA1 1AQ Web: smashburger.co.uk Launched in May 2017, Smashburger has been making waves in the heart of Bath and is guaranteed to show you a smashing time. What makes it different? The secret is in the ‘smash’, a unique method of cooking a burger, where 100% British Red Tractor Assured beef is hand-formed into a meatball and then smashed onto a hot buttered grill, searing in all the juices and flavour for a must-try, explosive taste sensation. Other tasty options include grilled and crispy chicken breast sandwiches, garlic-grilled Portobello cap mushroom burger, freshly prepared salads and irresistible sides like the garlic and rosemary Smash fries. Smashburger’s list of libations does not disappoint. Try the local beer offering – Werrrd!, a 4.2% APA by Electric Bear Brewing Co., alongside a choice of red, white and rosé wines and prosecco. Or indulge in a creamy handspun shake made with Häagen–Dazs® ice cream in chocolate, vanilla, strawberry and Oreo flavours. Enjoy your feast in the casual environment while kicking back in curved banquettes, perfect for large groups and gatherings.

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LE CHEF PRIVE

MA CUISINE

Email: info@lechefprive.co.uk Web: lechefprive.co.uk

3 – 4 St Saviour's Road, Larkhall, Bath BA1 6RT Tel: 01225 312959 Web: macuisine.co.uk

Since retiring from Casanis, Chef Laurent Couvreur offers personal chef services for special occasions. From cheffing on board “Northabout” in the Arctic for Adventurer David Hempleman-Adams to recreating favourite restaurant dishes in local homes, Laurent uses wonderful local produce to recreate his Southern French style of cooking with a twist. Le Chef Privé takes all the stress out of your dinner parties presenting award-winning restaurant quality food in the comfort of your own home. "Thankyou for a truly wonderful evening, I cannot imagine a better way to have celebrated my birthday. The food was, (unsurprisingly), marvellous and the entire evening flowed beautifully, from canapés to dessert. All our guests have expressed their delight at the dinner" We look forward to bringing incredible flavours and a ray of French sunshine to your home.

Brigitte and Christophe Lacroix, who have run this family business since 2012, will welcome you into their store in the heart of Larkhall, a friendly neighbourhood in Bath where locals pop into the shop for a coffee and chat about food, ingredients and French cooking. From Ma Cuisine's kitchen, respected chef Christophe creates healthy, gourmet ready meals using local British ingredients wherever possible, with no additives, no preservatives, no colourings. All meals, including all stocks and sauces, are handmade in small batches in Ma Cuisine's beloved kitchen and then fast-frozen to retain all of their freshness, goodness and flavour. As they are frozen, they are ready to pop in the oven or microwave so you can enjoy all the classic flavours of France without all the effort. Ma Cuisine’s Gourmet French Meals are also available to buy online for free local delivery and national shipping.

RIVERFORD HOME DELIVERY

PASTA STATION

Tel: 01225 437438 Web: riverford.co.uk

Pasta Station may well be the single answer to every express lunch dilemma you've ever had. An exceptional range of its own artisan pasta is offered to 'grab and go' or eat in for a shockingly good £4.50 or less. These guys have also nailed 'healthy options' with vegan, wholegrain and the best gluten free pasta we've ever tried! The impressive Italian Delicatessen range of artisan Italian charcuterie and cheeses wins our hearts over. Wiltshire’s De Luca Organics Mozzarella and Ricotta products are stunning. Pasta Station go to great lengths to make everything amazing the prices literally blow our minds. Oh they also sell cannoli and sfoglietelle italian sweet pastries so if you’ve never tried these pop along and taste for yourself.

Alan and Vicki, Riverford’s local vegteam, deliver organic vegboxes and recipe boxes to households in the Bath area. Veg has been grown organically on the farm in Devon for over 30 years, and is delivered to a loyal band of customers in and around Bath who share the Riverford commitment to fresh, seasonal food, produced with respect to customers, staff, farmers and the environment. From the start, the business has minimised its environmental impact, from the way food is grown through to how it is packed and delivered. You won’t find crazy supermarket-style cosmetic specifications, just beautiful, often wonky veg, that’s grown for flavour. Vegboxes start at £11.45, you can change or stop your orders whenever you like, delivery’s free and you don’t have to be at home when the box is delivered.

Bladuds Building, 7 The Paragon, Bath BA1 5LS

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THE BATH MAGAZINE - To advertise tel: 01225 424499


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ocl A C C O U N TA N C Y

141 Englishcombe Lane,

Avoiding a dispute with your builders

Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

Restrictions for tax relief on finance costs began in 2017/18 and get worse from 6 April 2018. Is there anything you can do to lessen the impact? The tax relief restriction came into effect on 6th April 2017 and affects residential landlords if they are individuals, trusts or partnerships - but doesn’t affect companies. It doesn’t affect you if you’re the landlord of a furnished holiday let, a property developer or dealing in land and property. The rules affect mortgage interest on buy to let property and from 6th April this year, the proportion of interest you will be allowed to deduct from your property income falls to 50% (from 75% last year). The other 50% will only give you basic rate tax relief. The changes will significantly affect landlords with high borrowings. Unfortunately there is no easy way around the rules unless you transfer the properties into a company. This will avoid the finance cost restriction and can ring fence your profits at the corporation tax rate (due to fall) so avoiding income tax rates (which can be as high as 45%). However, the transfer can bring other tax charges and might not be tax efficient overall. A more direct way to mitigate the negative impact is to reduce the interest you pay, by using your own savings to reduce the borrowing.With current rates, the interest you save on borrowing is almost certainly going to be higher than you are receiving on savings; and if you want access to your savings you could switch to an offset mortgage.

For tax saving tips contact us – call Marie Maggs, Hannah Pettifer or Mike Wilcox on 01225 445507 for a no-obligation meeting.

We look forward to meeting you - and see our website for more, including FREE download guides. What our clients say: “We are a small, but very busy, independent restaurant in Bath…We couldn't have reached this stage without the help of OCL. I would thoroughly recommend OCL accountants to any small to medium sized business.” “The biggest recommendation would be that my daughter has just started up in business and I told her to go to OCL, I don’t think you can get a better recommendation than that.”

B

uilding an extension or loft conversion, or even embarking on a self-build project to build a new home, is an exciting prospect. But to avoid your dream project turning into a nightmare, it is vital to minimise the potential for disputes to arise. Here are seven tips to keep things running smoothly with your builder. Get more than one quote Make sure you spend time selecting the best builder for the job. Get more than one quote so you can compare and contrast and ensure you are getting a good price. The quote should be as detailed as possible and very clear about exactly what work is included. Ask for references/accreditations A good builder will be able to give you references or put you in touch with previous customers. Are they qualified or accredited – members of the Federation of Master Builders for example? Agree payment terms and pricing upfront Agree the payment schedule – and avoid paying too much upfront. Make sure it is clear who is paying for which materials, and when. Wherever possible it is worth having everything written down in a signed contract that clearly sets out who is responsible for what, and what happens if something goes wrong – for example, can you withhold payment until defects are rectified? Have clarity about sub-contractors If the builder brings in other contractors, eg an electrician or plumber, you want to ensure that the builder remains responsible for the quality of their work and for making good if needs be. This should be in the contract between you. Be careful if plans change One area where disputes often arise is when plans change midway through the project – perhaps excavations reveal an issue meaning that the scope of work shifts. When this happens, it is essential to agree straightaway with the builder whether this affects the price and timings. Keep one comprehensive snagging list Many disputes also arise from the ‘snags’ at the end of the project – little items that remain unfinished or are not quite right. Keep a list of these as things progress and go through them with the builder towards the end of the project to agree a plan of action. Don’t overlook insurance What insurance does your builder have? Make sure you find out. Don’t forget to look into the terms of your own insurance policy too. You are likely to need to inform your home insurer of the work. Reputable builders will have their own liability insurance against third party risks, but you may need to ensure that there is contract works cover in place. It’s also important to understand what is covered to avoid nasty shocks if something goes wrong. At Mogers Drewett, we have an experienced team of dispute resolution experts who have worked on many construction cases. We’d be delighted to hear from you for a free, no-obligation discussion. www.mogersdrewett.com Jake Stacey, associate solicitor at Mogers Drewett

Call Marie Maggs, Mike Wilcox or Hannah Pettifer on 01225 445507 to arrange a no-obligation meeting

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CITY | PEOPLE

CITYNEWS THE PACKHORSE PUB REOPENS FOR BUSINESS Following its closure in 2012, the 400-yearold pub The Packhorse in Southstoke on the outskirts of Bath has re-opened its doors to the public. Following the news of its closure, locals banded together to stop plans to convert the pub into a private residence. They raised £1.25m to buy and refurbish the pub, which may be the largest sum in the UK raised for a community buy-back. Interior designer Claire Rendall

ARTISTIC AIRBNB RETREAT OPENS Award-winning artist Emma Rose and leadership coach John Rose have launched a holiday let with a difference. The new holiday let, The Art Cottage, set in the idyllic village of Wellow just outside Bath, is filled with Emma’s expressive artwork which are all for sale. Next door is Emma’s art studio, where visitors are welcome to view her collection of work during their stay. To find out more, visit: theartcottagebath.com or book via Airbnb: airbnb.co.uk/rooms/23035526

volunteered to restore this local iconic pub to its former glory. “The Tap Bar was particularly revered, so I knew it was important to recreate that pared-back 17thcentury look. True to the village spirit of this project, hundreds of picture frames were donated and we selected 20 frames and images to decorate and celebrate the history of this pub in the downstairs bars,” says Rendall. Visit: packhorsebath.co.uk

MARTIN ROBERTS LAUNCHES NEW CHARITY Most known for presenting Homes Under the Hammer, TV and radio personality Martin Roberts has unveiled a new charity, The Martin Roberts Foundation. The charity’s mission is to support educational, safe-guarding and wellbeing initiatives for children and young people. The main project for the charity in 2018 is to raise £500,000 to print and deliver a free copy of Roberts’ book Sadsville to every child aged eight to nine in the UK. Roberts wrote Sadsville to encourage children to seek to change upsetting circumstances and to use Childline; martinrobertsfoundation.org

THE NATURAL THEATRE COMPANY INTRODUCES NEW THEATRE SCHOOL The Natural Theatre Company has launched the Natural Theatre School, which includes new evening classes for adults, as well as continuing with its ever popular sessions for 11–18 year-olds. The adult classes will run as a 10-week programme led by acclaimed theatre director Andy Burden. For anyone who enjoys

Did you Know? there are over 250 independent businesses in the BID area

performing, has an interest in theatre, or would like to try something new and engaging, the classes will give attendees the chance to set aside the paperwork and have fun. The Young People’s Company enables 11–18 year-olds to learn from professional actors, play with costumes, and try new types of performance.

Adult classes begin from 19 April and the 11–18 year old classes start on 18 April. Both take place at The Natural Theatre Company Studio, Widcombe Hill, Bath; naturaltheatre.co.uk/nts

BATH BUSINESS BAROMETER UPDATE: FEBRUARY 2018

provided by

High Street Footfall

n Across the UK there was a -1.4% drop in high street footfall during February. This is less than half January’s downward pattern but significantly worse than the -0.02% UK figures from February 2017. In Bath the raft of UK closures is reflected in the loss of Jamie’s Italian. However, demand for premises in the city remains positive, with new operators Giggling Squid and Zizzi appearing over the same period as part of the new casino complex. Bath saw a welcome rise in footfall from January, providing good news for the city in the face of trading challenges for the UK. Over February half term, week on week figures rose by an encouraging 21.6%. The Bath BID is supporting footfall growth with its sponsorship of the Shopalong joke trail as part of this year’s Bath Comedy Festival.

(Month on month % change)

Bath

+14.4%

South West UK

+11.5%

+ 9% Springboard Research Ltd.

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Will MacFarlane: City experience for Bath families Partner, Will MacFarlane, joins Royds Withy King’s top ranked Family Law team in Bath from international firm Withers LLP. We talk to him about his first impressions of Bath and a shift in trends in Family Law. Will, tell us why you’ve made the move to Bath? I trained in Bristol and I’m excited to return home to the West Country after eight years in London. When we got the opportunity to live and work in the beautiful city of Bath, it was a case of “where do I sign?” Walking across Queen Square in the mornings, I don’t miss my old commute! Tell us about your background I specialise in financial settlements on family breakdown, helping those with businesses, trusts, investments and property both here and abroad. Previous clients have included senior executives, city professionals, entrepreneurs and creatives. I’m used to tough litigation but where possible, I’m pragmatic and seek a settlement to avoid expensive court proceedings. So how can couples avoid stressful and costly separations? Family lawyers are known for advising clients on relationship breakdown but increasingly we’re advising them prior to marriage or moving in together, helping them avoid a costly dispute down the line. Once seen as the preserve of the super-rich, prenuptial agreements (‘pre-nups’) are now seen as essential life planning in the same way as a Will. Parties can expect to be held to them if each received independent legal advice, the procedure was correct and if the weaker party's basic needs are met.

Many couples are now shunning marriage in favour of buying together and cohabiting. However, they don’t have the same rights as married couples and a Cohabitation Agreement and Declaration of Trust are essential to avoid a messy dispute at an already difficult time. What feedback do your clients give you? That I’m knowledgeable, empathetic and really care about their outcome. How are you planning on getting involved in the Bath community? I want to continue volunteering at the Citizens Advice Bureau. I enjoy theatre and live music and I’m keen to check out the Theatre Royal, Komedia and The Bell. I also need to find a tennis club! Royds Withy King supports Bath Mind as our chosen charity in 2017 - 2019. I’m very much looking forward to getting involved in our fundraising and practical support.

For further details please contact Will MacFarlane on: T. 01225 459 917 E. will.macfarlane@roydswithyking.com www.roydswithyking.com


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FAMILY | EVENTS

FAMILY DIARY IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO WITH THE CHILDREN THIS MONTH EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA Friday 30 March – Monday 2 April, 11am – 5pm n Bowood House & Gardens, Calne, Wiltshire From naming the newly born chicks to finding the hidden golden eggs, Bowood House & Gardens will have plenty to keep the kids occupied this Easter. Explore the beautiful grounds with the Spring Trail and head to Tractor Ted’s Little Farm where there will be newly born lambs and piglets – petting times on throughout the day. Normal admission prices apply; bowood.org

SUPERPIRATES TAKEOVER Friday 13, Friday 20, and Friday 27 April, 10am n Komedia SuperPirates will be transforming Komedia’s huge dancefloor into a fun-packed pop-up play area for under fours. There will be dens, giant inflatable bouncy snakes, crazy games, dancing, and the opportunity to generally have a wild time – plus there’s free face painting. There will also be entertainment for babies with playmats and toys, and plenty of space for buggies and feeding. £3 for children; adults and newborns go free. No advance tickets needed, pay on the door; komedia.co.uk

MAKE A ROSETTE Until Sunday 8 April n No 1 Royal Crescent Suffragettes made badges to convey their political message. In this arts and crafts session, kids can make their own version to show what’s important to them. Free with normal admission to the museum. EASTER ART CAMP Tuesday 3 – Friday 6 April, 9am – 4pm n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street Children aged five – 11 can take part in a range of art workshops inspired by the museum’s collection and try a variety of materials and techniques. Young artists can create landscapes using inks, handmade books, clay cakes, costume designs, wire figures and much more. Booking essential, £38 per day; £15 discount for booking four consecutive days. Tel: 01225 388568; holburne.org SEA HEAR STORYTELLING Tuesday 3 April, 11am n Brunel Institute, SS Great Britain, Bristol Enjoy some maritime tales as storyteller Sarah Mooney captivates the imaginations of the young and the not so young visitors with this free session. Children can join in the action with stories of whales and angel fish, pirate treasure and stormy seas. PICTURE ME Wednesday 4 April, 10.30am – 12.30pm and 1.30 – 3.30pm n Victoria Art Gallery Use a simple collage to create a historical portrait. For ages three – 11. Included in admission, no need to book. NATURE NINJAS Friday 6 April, 11am – 3pm n The Bishop’s Palace, Wells Kids can be inspired to get involved in

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gardening and nature as the team holds special sessions in the community garden. There will be lots of horticulturally based fun activities for all ages. Included in standard admission; bishopspalace.org.uk FAMILY FORAGE AND PESTO MAKING Sunday 8 and Sunday 22 April, timed slots from 10.30am – 2.30pm n Prior Park Landscape Garden The garden will be full of wild garlic in the spring. The whole family can learn how to forage and make a tasty pesto to take home. Wear clothes you don’t mind getting a bit dirty. £5 per group. Tel: 0344 249 1895; nationaltrust.org.uk/prior-park-landscapegarden ARTY BABIES Monday 9 April – Monday 11 May, 1 – 2.30pm n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street This weekly group provides a cosy, relaxed, creative space for parents to meet other parents over a cup of tea and make something different each week while their babies enjoy safe and sensory play. No experience necessary. Must be booked in advance, block bookings only. £50 per person for five weeks. Tel: 01225 388568; holburne.org

AUTISM FRIENDLY SESSION Sunday 15 April, open from 9am n We The Curious, Bristol Harbourside Science centre We The Curious is a big and noisy venue at times, which can be challenging for visitors on the autism spectrum. The venue will be open early on this day, so visitors can explore the exhibits at their own pace and try out the fun activities in the kitchen, greenhouse and Live Lab. There will be an autism-friendly show in the Planetarium at 10.15am for ages five and over. Tel: 0117 915 1000; wethecurious.org EASTER BUNNY HOP FAMILY SHOW Sunday 15 April, 3pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon The ABC Bunny Band will get you into the Easter spirit with a show full of exciting folk music and lots of dancing, singing and jiggling. Clap along to some of the best tunes from the British Isles and join in with the massed Morris Dance. Put on your bunny ears and get ready for an egg-traordinary concert. Suitable for three years and above. Tickets: £8 / £4 under 18s and students. Tel: 01225 860100; wiltshiremusic.org.uk MACBETH Thursday 19 and Sunday 22 April, times vary n The egg An exciting adaptation of Shakespeare’s exploration of evil as an active force. Vibrant language and physical theatre chart the devastating effect that one act of evil can have on an otherwise honourable and loyal man – we see how the ripples of that act spread to destroy both Macbeth, his wife Lady Macbeth, and all those for whom he cared. Suitable for 10 years+. £8.50/£7.50 children. Tel: 01225 823409; theatreroyal.org.uk


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FAMILY | EVENTS

The Easter Bunny Hop Family Show at Wiltshire Music Centre

PENGUINS Friday 27 – Sunday 29 April, times vary n The egg Roy and Silo are just like the other penguin pairs at Central Park Zoo – they walk, play, swim and dance together. When the zookeeper finds them trying to hatch a rock, he has a clever idea that could mean Roy and Silo raising a chick for real. Penguins is a unique and engaging show for children about friendship, fun, identity and the everchanging meaning of family. Suitable for ages three+. £8.50/£7.50 children. Based on a true story that touched hearts worldwide. Tel: 01225 823409; theatreroyal.org.uk

The Family Arts Day at The Bath Festival

PLANNING AHEAD... THE THREE LITTLE PIGS WITH THE MAGNARD ENSEMBLE Sunday 13 May, 3pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon Discover the magic of musical instruments as the Magnard Ensemble and narrator Rebecca Kenny bring to life the characters of Roald Dahl’s The Three Little Pigs in this interactive family concert with storytelling and live music. Venture into the dark forest to take on the Big Bad Wolf and visit an enchanted garden. Suitable for three years+. Tickets: £8 / £4 under 18s and students. Tel: 01225 860100; wiltshiremusic.org.uk

FAMILY ARTS DAY Sunday 20 May, 11am – 3pm n Parade Gardens The Bath Festival is hosting a day of arty fun for all the family. Try a new instrument and make some noise, listen to some tall tales in the story tent, or make your own jumble masterpiece with artist Claire Loder. Have a go at the popular musical treasure hunt and listen to up-and-coming performers on the bandstand. All ages welcome. Entrance to Parade Gardens: £1.50/80p, free for Discovery Card holders. Visit bathfestivals.org.uk to find out more about the festival’s other family-friendly events. n

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION NEWS EAT, DRINK AND LEARN ITALIAN

PUPILS’ ARTWORK TO BE SHOWN IN THE NATIONAL GALLERY Artwork by pupils from The Paragon School will be displayed in The National Gallery in London this summer. Year 4 students working with Miss Alexandra Hucks, Head of Art, took part in the Take One Picture Exhibition initiative where they were inspired to make their own artwork after studying the themes of Pintoricchio’s painting Penelope with the Suitors. The pupils had lots of ideas about Penelope weaving or stitching a story about the voyage of Odysseus’ boat, where it had come from, why it was returning home and what the sailors had seen on their travels. While many primary schools around the UK take part in the Take One initiative, only a few are selected to have their work displayed at The National Gallery. The Paragon is the only school in Bath to be chosen. The display takes place in the Sunely Room at The National Gallery from Wednesday 9 May until Sunday 12 August. Admission is free; paragonschool.co.uk

LEARN SPANISH OVER PLATES OF TAPAS Ever fancied learning Spanish? Native speaker Verónica Ramírez is holding a six week Spanish course titled ¿Hablamos? for beginners over a selection of delicious tapas in the relaxed atmosphere of Pintxo Tapas and Sherry Bar on Barton Street. Taking place on Tuesdays from 3 April, 7–8pm. Places are limited, email: learn@spanishwithvero.com

The Italian Food Hall on George Street recently launched a Language Supper Club, where guests can learn how to speak Italian while tasting the delicious food of Italy. On Tuesday and Wednesday evenings, the food hall will host a language lesson over a light supper of cheese, meats and bread. Students can learn Italian in a fun and sociable way while ordering at the food hall’s deli counter, putting their new-found language skills to the test. There are two session levels – beginners and intermediate – where students can learn basic grammar, numbers, everyday phrases, and names of food, drink and places. Laura Doria is a fully qualified Italian teacher with more than 20 years’ experience. It costs £20 per session, including food and drink. Groups and individuals welcome, the first session is half-price. Pay as you go. To book, tel: 01225 334127 or email: info@theitalianfoodhall.com. Visit: theitalianfoodhall.com

BATH STUDIO SCHOOL TO HOST THE VOICE AUDITIONS The Bath Studio School is holding auditions for ITV’s singing contest show The Voice on Thursday 19 April. If you think you’ve got what it takes to show the judges Sir Tom Jones, Jennifer Hudson, Will.i.am and Olly Murs that you could be a star, then email: info@thebathstudioschool.org.uk or tel: 01225 831933. If you wish to perform with a backing track you will need to bring one with you or be able to access to it online. Those wanting to audition must be at least 16 years-old in October 2019. The Bath Studio School on Frome Road is a digital media and film academy specialising in industry and design skills. The school is holding an open evening on Wednesday 25 April, 6–8pm; thebathstudioschool.org.uk

MILLFIELD CAPTAIN BECOMES FIRST EVER TO LEAD ISFA AND ESFA SQUADS Millfield Upper Sixth pupil Cormac Pike from Yeovil has become the first ever Millfield player to captain the Independent Schools Football Association (ISFA) and the English Schools’ Football Association (ESFA) squads in the same season. He is one of only a handful of players in the country to hold the captaincies in both leagues. The centre back has also played for Shepton Mallet FC, part of the Western League Premier Division, for two years since beginning his studies at Millfield. Cormac plans to follow former Millfield 1st team captain Matthew McGlinchey to Fairfield University in Connecticut, USA, to study and play football; millfieldschool.com

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Sarah Wringer KIE Bath, 5 Trim Street, Bath, BA1 1HB Direct Line (01225) 473502 Email: sarah.wringer@kaplan.com

A.L.F.A. LANGUAGE SCHOOL FRANCE

HOST FAMILIES REQUIRED Would you like to host French students? Ages 11-17 Saturday 14th July – Friday 3rd August One Student – £525 Two Students in Room Share – £995 Two Students in 2 Rooms – £1050

For further information please contact Mrs Susie Houston on 0777 379 2866 or email: susie.houston.alfa@gmail.com

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SPORT | AND | LEISURE

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SPORT | AND | LEISURE

TEAM PLAYERS

How do we encourage and enable people of all ages and abilities to enjoy healthier and active lifestyles? And how do we get more gold medals at the Olympics? Emma Clegg discovers how the University of Bath has the answers...

T

Image - Jo Muir © Pentathlon GB

eam GB came back with five medals from the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. It’s our best Winter Olympics medal crop yet. Three of them were from skeleton athletes who train at the University of Bath: bronze for Dom Parsons, bronze for Laura Deas and gold for Lizzy Yarnold. So three-fifths of those with Team GB medals have been trai ned and supported by one of our universities. Impressive, huh? What’s more, if you look below the medal radar, there are other big achievements from Team GB athletes with a University of Bath connection. Mica McNeill and Mica Moore finished eighth in their bobsleigh event, while Brad Halland and Joel Fearon were 12th in the two-man bobsleigh. Jerry Rice finished 10th overall in skeleton, and sports performance graduate Lloyd Wallace, who is supported by a Team Bath service support grant, was 20th in his Olympic debut in aerial skiing, a remarkable achievement after suffering a severe head injury in training just six months before. In the Pyeongchang Winter Paralympic Games, University of Bath graduate Kelly Gallagher came eighth in the visually-impaired alpine skiing Super G. September saw the University of Bath named as the Sports University of the Year in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide. So what exactly is the magic that the university is weaving? And how does it achieve clear excellence in ice-track events when Bath (which can, it’s true, get darn cold), doesn’t normally boast sub-zero temperatures? Well, it all comes down to teamwork. Team Bath, in fact, and their £30-million spo rts training village (STV). The village accommodates more than 50 sports – among them athletics, bobsleigh, modern pentathlon, skeleton and swimming – and regularly hosts major international competitions, as well as being a world-class multi-sport

training environment. There’s an Olympic-sized swimming pool, indoor and outdoor athletics tracks, 16 tennis courts, a state-of-theart gym and a leading phy sio and sport science centre, which as a whole receives around 1.6 million visits every year. The facilities at the STV have helped Bath become an internationally renowned centre of sporting excellence. Championship achievements over the past two decades include those of former international rugby player Steve Borthwick; the winner of the first-ever gold medal for Britain on snow, Kelly Gallagher MBE; a nd Olympic gold medallist for coxless pair rowing Heather Stanning MBE. International bodies to have staged camps at the training village in recent years include the likes of Australia Rugby, FA Premier League, the Chinese swimming squad and the British Paralympic Association. The training village is also a major competition venue, with such diverse events as the Invictus Games GB Trials, the Bath International Indoor Wheelchair Tennis Tournament and the Strength In Depth (club fitness competition) European Finals. It has also been selected to host the 2019 Modern Pentathlon European Championships, a qualifying event for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Piers Gilliver, wheelchair fencer and silver medallist at the 2016 Rio Paralympic Games, has experienced it as a competition venue: ”In the two weeks before the games we held our wheelchair fencing holding camp here as it was felt that this was the best location where I could be sure of accessing all of the training and support facilities that I needed in the final run-up to the games. It worked very well!” There’s no sitting back on heels glorying in success, either. Investment in the facilities continues – a new £3.5million extension to the Team Bath gym and fitness centre is being built as you read ➲

JO MUIR

EMMA HURST

LLOYD WALLACE

ANNA HOPKIN

Pentathlete and Sports Performance graduate

Tennis, helped GB win the Master’U BNP Paribas 2017

Aerial skiier, 20th position at Pyeongchang Winter Olympics

Swimmer, British 50m freestyle champion in 2017

“Having access to an Olympic sized swimming pool, an indoor and outdoor running track with a shooting range and a fencing salle all in one location is a massive help. The hydro pool enables me to complete some of my recovery on site, so I can relax when I’ve finished training rather than worrying about travelling.”

“The support I have received has played a massive role in helping me to perform better at tournaments and has enabled me to travel to more competitions. When I was injured, I received individual physio support and I also had life support sessions and the opportunity to see a psychologist.”

“Training with Team Bath has been huge for me. I had three or four weeks after coming back from my injury where I had to put on all the weight I had lost (7kg of muscle mass). If it wasn’t for the hours in the high-performance gym with Harri Cizmic, I wouldn't be where I am now.”

“At the University of Bath I train in a state-of-the-art 50m pool with unlimited access to gym facilities which has hugely improved the standard of my training. The close proximity of the pool to my lectures means juggling training and studying has always been straightforward.”

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SPORT | AND | LEISURE the priorities: “The area of clear need is to increase our outdoor, all-weather provision through adding floodlit, 3G pitches to our two existing hockey pitches.” Team Bath’s achievements in skeleton and bobsleigh come from the elite training facilities, and specifically from the presence of the only push-start track in the UK. The 140-metre track, including a sophisticated braking mechanism to maximise training safety and comfort, enables bobsleigh and skeleton athletes to hone their starts away from the ice. In these events where finishing positions are decided within fractions of a second, the starting speed is critical. In these two ice-track events athletes need to push the sled/bobsleigh from a standing start as fast as possible over 20–30 metres for skeleton and 65 metres for bobsleigh before leaping on board. While this is not the complete picture – travelling to the nearest ice track in Königssee, Germany for full-track training is essential – it gives elite ice-track athletes the facilities they need to keep pushing (ahem) their potential. Laura Deas, skeleton bronze medallist at Pyeongchang, explains, “The push-start track at the STV is the only one of its kind in the UK and is vital for keeping our training as close to on-ice practice as we can get. The GB team are renowned on the international circuit for fast pushes and this facility enables us to maintain that standard.”

You can see four to five year olds taking their first tennis lessons while senior players practise for tournaments like Wimbledon on an adjoining court.

The University of Bath offers help to student-athletes to excel in both their sporting and academic careers. “We are most active in supporting athletes as they strive to make the demanding transition from top junior performers to senior internationals,” says Stephen Baddeley. “In the case of high-performing student athletes, we are also able to offer financial scholarships thanks to the generosity of our alumni.” More than 50 students benefit from financial assistance towards training and competition, as well as lifestyle support to ensure they successfully manage the demands of their dual careers. Tennis athlete Emma Hurst received the Trendell Sports Scholarship and TASS support, which allows her to train full-time and receive individual support on and off the tennis court. “The main struggle I faced was combining the degree with the demands of my training schedule. With the support I was given from TASS and my subject tutor, I was able to learn to balance these effectively for the majority of my course.” Rugby player Will Britton, captain of the University of Bath men’s 1st XV in the national BUCS Super Rugby league, was also awarded

PIERS GILLIVER

WILL BRITTON

LAURA DEAS

MICA MOORE

Wheelchair fencing, silver medal at Rio Paralympic Games

Rugby, captain University of Bath men’s 1st XV in the BUCS Super Rugby league

Skeleton, bronze medal at Pyeongchang Winter Olympics

Bobsleigh, finished 8th with Mica McNeill, in women’s bobsleigh at Pyeongchang

“Training at the university has allowed me to progress with my rugby massively and pursue professional level opportunities with Bath RFC. My most memorable moments at the STV will be the BUCS super rugby games that we have played there over the past couple of seasons. Wins, losses and draws, but all memorable.”

“The push-start track is invaluable, as well as the indoor sprint track and the gym. Having everything in one place enables us to run an efficient training programme and maintain a true team environment as the whole squad can train together almost every day. It’s also great to have a café on site that sells food tailored to athletes.”

“The Bobsleigh team training gives us use of the indoor track for warming up and use of the highperformance gym. Both these facilities aid our training massively and allow us to warm up properly so we can push well at the pushtrack and get in quality lifting sessions before going on season.”

“The facilities here combine sparring opportunities with the university fencing club, the Pentathlon GB elite training squad and Bath Sword Club, as well as the sports science services. All of this and the fact that you mix with elite athletes from a broad spectrum of sports, all pushing to be the best.” 80 TheBATHMagazine

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Will Britton image © Clare Green for Matchtight

this. Scheduled to open in September this year, the two-floor extension will offer a significant increase in cardio and strength equipment together with a group exercise studio with sprung floor, functional training areas and an indoor cycling studio. Stephen Baddeley, director of sport at Team Bath and a former Commonwealth Games badminton champion, comment s, “Our gym is heavily utilised and we have had to limit community memberships for some three years now, so we will be significantly adding to our gym and fitness capacity from the autumn when the new gym and fitness centre will open.” Swimmer Anna Hopkin, the 2017 British 50m freestyle champion, explains how much difference the existing training and gym facilities have made to her: “The coaching and tr aining at the university was very specific to my strengths. At Bath there is a sprint squad meaning all of my training is tailored to my events. The excellent gym facilities and guidance in the gym was also a huge benefit to my training.” What about plans for future investment? Stephen Baddeley explains


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ABOVE: Mica Moore and Mica McNeill doing the starting run before mounting their bobsleigh. ABOVE RIGHT: The weights section of the Team Bath gym. OPPOSITE PAGE, from the top: The pushstart track, used for skeleton and bobsleigh is the only one in the UK; the martial arts dojo is based on a traditional Japanese style and children’s badminton session with Team Bath Tribe

a scholarship: “I was given a rugby service scholarship during my time at the university, providing me with funding for services from the STV. This has helped me develop as a rugby player and athlete in general. It has been adapted throughout the years as I have gone along the university pathway. For example, last year it focussed on nutrition and physio services, and this year it has been predominantly sports psychology focussed.” The STV also offers training to provide people with the skills to pursue careers in sport, with Team Bath offering regular courses in such areas as fitness instructing, sports massage and lifeguard training, as well as first aid at work. Part of the onsite facilities, supporting both Olympians and keen amateurs, is a physio and sport science centre with an applied sport science laboratory. There is some impressive technology here. The VO2 Ma and Lactate Transition exercise test is used for athletes participating in endurance and team sports. The test – which can be be completed running, biking, rowing or swimming – is carried out on laboratory grade treadmills or cycle ergometers and measures the athlete’s maximum oxygen uptake and their blood lactate and heart rate profile. This is then used to give the athlete specific training guidelines to prescribe their ideal paces, exercise intensities and heart rates so they get maximum benefit from their sessions. Jo Muir, pentathlete and sports performance graduate, explains the impact the sports science centre has had on her training: “The overall package of training with the sport science services have been a huge help to me. I don’t think I could have managed to stay in such good shape or get back from niggles and injuries if I didn’t have this support. Having access to a lifestyle adviser and a psychologist during my time studying helped me deal with stress and allowed me to get the best from my training and studying. Physiotherapy, strength and conditioning, nutrition and video analysis support help me on a daily basis to enhance my training and performance.” The training facilities here are elite, yes, encouraging a new generation of athletes in a variety of sports, but they

are shared with the community, so the public get to train alongside Olympic, paralympic and world medallists. Nobody is excluded. You can see four to five year olds taking their first tennis lessons while senior players practise for tournaments like Wim bledon on an adjoining court. There are pensioners taking advantage of the daily SwimFit sessions in the London 2012 Legacy Pool while the British swimming squad train alongside them, and people working out in the gym while the GB Rowing Team Start squad do their gruelling ergo exercises. Stephen Baddeley explains the level of community engagement: “We have 10,155 community members and more use the facil ities on a pay-and-play basis. From 4pm until early evening we are overrun with excited primary school children and in the evening and at weekends our community clubs provide sessions for teenagers and adults.” The Team Bath Tribe programme helps more than 5,000 children get active in a variety of different sports. Coaching is offered in more than 40 schools in the area. Secondary school pupils also visit for practical lab-based and

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SPORT | AND | LEISURE

educational sessions with the sport science team, aimed at groups studying physical education, sport studies or GCSEs. How is this all funded? The bulk of the revenue, just under £5 million per year, is raised through commercial activities – facility hire, memberships, physio and sport science services, sponsorships and commercial partnerships. The university itself provides considerable funding, focused on enhancing the student experience and maintaining and refurbishing the building. They have also received significant capital funding from UK Sport and Sport England. On top of this, university alumni and businesses fund the sporting scholarships. Businesses who support the Team Bath brand include Carter Jonas, the new Tribe sponsor; Investigo which backs the rugby and netball teams; and the Iesis Group which sponsored a student rugby match at Bath Rugby's recreation ground, attracting a crowd of nearly 5,000. The family of commercial partners also includes MJ Church, Sitec, Mogers Drewett and IKON Construction.

Netball at the university offers many competitive and recreational opportunities

After Pyeongchang, I walked into the STV and there was a big ‘congratulations’ banner with my face on it which greeted me!

It’s clear that Team Bath pitch their weight at all levels, from supporting young children as they learn to swim to honing the training of high-achieving Olympic hopefuls. Ultimately, their approach uses a bottom-up approach. Take part in sport and exercise, see others doing the same, be inspired by the best and develop sporting ambitions for the future. And Team Bath are not just a team in name. As Laura Deas recalls, “After Pyeongchang, I walked into the STV and there was a big ‘congratulations’ banner with my face on it which greeted me! I couldn’t wait to see everyone in the building who played a part in getting me to the Olympics healthy and happy.” n Sports Training Village, University of Bath, Claverton Down Road, Combe Down, Bath BA2 7AY, tel: 01225 386339; teambath.com

FACTS & FIGURES • The university is one of only six UK Sport accredited elite training centres • The sports training village (STV) can accommodate more than 50 sports and regularly hosts major international competitions • There are more than 250 elite athletes on site • The university provides more than 50 sporting scholarships to student-athletes • Team Bath Tribe, the youth participation programme, has more than 250,000 interactions each year with children in sport • There are 43 community sports clubs based out of the STV, with an average of 4,262 club members active every week • The youngest regular customer at the sports training village is four months old and the eldest is 85

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Children’s classes on the indoor tennis courts

The Olympic sized pool


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Bath Canoe Club The Old Organ Factory, situated on the banks of the Avon in Bath, was used by Bath-based organ maker William Sweetland in the 19th century. The striking building has been given a new lease of life by its current tenants, Bath Canoe Club (BCC). After receiving a total of £100,000 in grant money from British Canoeing and Sport England last year, BCC has redeveloped the inside of the building into a classroom, a social room and a mixed use area. The river access has also been widened and upgraded to make carrying boats down to the bank easier and safer. The project has been guided by current chairman Ashley Matthews and his committee of volunteer kayakers. Quartermaster Sue Spurling recently attained £9,573 in grant money from Sport England’s ‘This Girl Can’ campaign for smaller-sized canoes and sea kayaks which are lighter and more suitable for female paddlers. BCC hopes the improved clubhouse and new boats will encourage people in the local area to get paddling. The club offers kayaking and canoeing courses at Saturday-afternoon taster sessions and four-week training courses which run throughout the summer. Kids, adults, families, beginners and improvers are all welcome so BCC has something for everyone. As well as being lots of fun, kayaking provides a full-body workout and is a great way of meeting people, with many trips ending in tea and cake or a visit to the local pub. So pop along, give kayaking a go and meet the volunteers that make BCC such a fun place to be. For more details: Visit: bathcanoeclub.co.uk, @bathcanoeclub on twitter, Bath Canoe Club on facebook.

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HEALTH & BEAUTY NEWS

A much-awaited fashion and beauty collaboration, a beauty debut from Jo Malone and the latest wellbeing campaign that we just can’t get enough of, Crystal Rose shares the latest health and beauty news

NARS X ERDEM STRANGE FLOWERS

THE LITTLE POT OF WONDER Jo Malone has just launched its first ever lip balm and boy do we love it. The English Mint & Ginger Lip Care is enriched with moringa butter, rose flower wax and kukui seed oil to help condition and protect those lips. This is the first beauty product that Jo Malone has ever released and it fits in harmoniously with the Jo Malone vibe. Now the beauty barrier has been broken, there’s no guessing what’s going to come next... £20, 6–7 Old Bond Street, Bath BA1 1BW jomalone.co.uk

You heard it here first, the Erdem x NARS 13-piece make-up collaboration has finally arrived. Creator of some of the most beautiful floral designs in fashion, Erdem Moralioglu has finally turned to beauty and it’s more incredible than we could have ever imagined. The Erdem x NARS Strange Flowers Collection is available from 15 April at Selfridges and 1 May nationwide. Jolly’s, 13 Milsom Street, Bath BA1 1DD narscosmetics.co.uk

APEX HOTELS #WARMERWELCOME Apex Hotels has introduced a new brand ambassador to help spearhead its new guest wellbeing campaign. Wellbeing expert Celynn Morin is working with Apex to roll out its #WarmerWelcome campaign, which launched at Apex City in Bath recently. The campaign, headed by Celynn, focusses on guidance for guests on how to get the best out of their stay at Apex, whether they want to relax, rejuvenate or focus. Set to be released across the group’s remaining nine properties across the UK in the coming weeks, this campaign also sees the new introduction of in-room guide books detailing how to keep a healthy routine. In addition to this, the team at Apex City of Bath is offering an exclusive range of three #WarmerWelcome hot drinks. Healthy in-room SMART snacks will also be introduced to help guests make healthier choices, and to ensure they stay energised and focused during their stay. Each hotel will also create its own unique range of drinks and snacks as the campaign rolls out across the UK – all in line with Celynn’s expert guidance. Apex City of Bath Hotel, James Street West, Bath BA1 2DA apexhotels.co.uk

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the orangery l a s e r

&

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Specialists in Ellipse IPL Permanent Hair Reduction Treatments

Dermapen Cryo is an advanced cryotherapy innovation that is fast, effective and safe and a new solution for removal of skin imperfections. The Dermapen Cryo emits a fine jet of nitrous oxide under high pressure which destroys the tissue without damaging the healthy surrounding skin. Dermapen Cryo offers the ideal treatment for skin tags • sun damage • pigmentation • age spots milia • warts • cherry angiomas

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Solution Focused Hypnotherapy in Central Bath

I can help and support you with Stress and Anxiety • Depression • Fears and Phobias Confidence • Childbirth • Stop Smoking • OCD Weight Management • Sleep Problems IBS • Performance Enhancement

Free Initial Consultation 07949 240190 www.andreakellyhypnotherapy.co.uk andrea@andreakellyhypnotherapy.co.uk THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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HEALTH | & | BEAUTY

CALMING YOUR ISSUES

Feeling anxious? Hyped up? Wanting to slow down, but not sure how? We talk to four local businesses which have techniques to help you calm anxiety and discover a more meditative, relaxed perspective

W

e all experience anxiety or other negative emotions from time to time. There is no need to fear this – it can help us to get things done, it can be a useful prompt to slow down or adapt your behaviour and it can even alert us to danger. Jessica Till explains how yoga can help deal with negative anxieties: “Yoga can be massively beneficial in lowering stress levels through controlled breathing techniques (or Pranayama) that will lower heart rate and slow breathing. Practising Pranayama can bring us into a more mediative state by focusing and clearing our minds of racing thoughts. “Your breathing muscles consist of the diaphragm and muscles in the abdomen, chest, neck and shoulders. Around 70–80 per cent of inhalations should be done by the diaphragm so that your breathing is steady and deep. When we are stressed or anxious, we tend to take smaller and more shallow breaths. “The actual asana – the moving, physical part of yoga – will work in time with your breathing, and also enable stress to be physically released. For most of us, we hold tension in our shoulders and hips, and yoga is a great way to ‘open’ these areas and relieve that tension.” Another effective way to address stress-related issues is through hyponotherapy. Practitioner Christian Dunham sees more and more young people every year suffering with anxiety. “Exam stress is probably top of the list of anxiety issues. The pressure to succeed in an environment that is constantly being assessed can be very intense. “Social media is also a big factor in raising the anxiety levels across our society. This is amplified in our youth. Everybody wants to fit in, and the pressures to do so can be intense.” So how can hypnotherapy help? “Hypnosis is simply a state of deep relaxation that brings the mind back to a calm and balanced state,” Christian explains. “Solution-focused hypnotherapists like myself are trained in a unique method that combines psychotherapy and clinical hypnotherapy. It is based on the latest neuroscience and how the brain works. Each session follows a clear structure where we focus very much on an individual’s unique strengths. “CDs and MP3s are also used – these are a very powerful tool that gets things moving immediately. Using them maintains the work in sessions, and carries it forward once people have reached a more balanced state.” Another solution-focused hypnotherapist and psychotherapist Andrea Kelly has noticed the same increase in those with stress disorders where there is a negative link with social media. “A big problem with Facebook and other social media is discontent. People are comparing their lives with other people’s, which is just a tiny glimpse of their best bits. “People are also losing sleep by spending time on social media,” Andrea continues, “and this is detrimental to their whole wellbeing.” “The brain we now know is made up of plasticity and we can work

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towards changing our unhelpful patterns and behaviours and make positive changes, using the client’s strengths and abilities and helping them work out what it is they really want. “My sessions are made up of two parts, the first the talking therapy, the second is time spent on the couch. While each person is different, I usually see clients for between eight to 12 sessions, although change can be seen almost immediately.” Another issue that can be disruptive to wellbeing is anger. Viv Kenchington, who also uses a solution-focused approach explains: “When someone gets stressed there are only three main directions that they head in – anger, depression or anxiety. Anger is a natural response – but one that is not very helpful or acceptable in most situations.” “When angry, a chain reaction happens in our brain that finally results in stress hormones being released such as cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline. The effects are negative on one’s wellbeing. “Each session is tailored to the individual, but there is no need to separate out road rage from work frustrations, it’s all coming from the same place, just manifesting in a different way. “This hypnotherapy technique does not involve analysis of the past,” Viv says, “The only time I chat to a client about the reasons they have come to seek help is in the initial consultation. From there (most are pleased to hear) it’s about moving towards their preferred future.” n Jessica Till: 07887 548336; tri3eyoga@yahoo.com Christian Dunham: 07910 332393; christiandunham.net Andrea Kelly: 07949 240190; andreakellyhypnotherapy.co.uk Viv Kenchinton: 07974 153487; hypnotherapyandhealth.co.uk

Viv Kenchington


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TRI3E YOGA Yoga • Massage • Meditation • Mind • Body • Spirit

Yoga for Every Body

Jaime Brain Dip CDT RCS (Eng)

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07887548336 • tri3eyoga@yahoo.com • tri3eyoga.com

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HEALTH | & | BEAUTY

The new Advanced Face Serum from Origins is made with mushrooms, yes mushrooms... Known as the skin superfood, mushrooms are nutrient-rich powerhouses that help to calm the skin and build visible resilience. The Mega-Mushroom Relief and Resilience face serum is from the Mega-Mushroom collection that has just been released by Origins. £65, Jolly’s, 13 Milsom Street, Bath BA1 1DD origins.co.uk

The Vegetal Exfoliant uses papain, an enzyme present in papaya, as the exfoliant. This Phytomer product eliminates impurities and refines the skin’s texture. It’s extremely hydrating and leaves you with a radiant complexion. What’s not to love? Rated as the No.1 spa brand in the USA, the only Phytomer Spa in Bath is Frontlinestyle. £24, Frontlinestyle, 4-5 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2AJ frontlinestyle.co.uk

It wouldn’t be right if we didn’t have a chocolate beauty product in our food inspired issue. This newly released Chocolate Soleil Matte Bronzer from Too Faced is infused with 100% real cocoa powder. Not only will you look good, you’ll smell great too. £25, Debenhams, Southgate, Bath BA1 1AP

beautyThis Wild Fig soap from Priddy Essentials has complementary notes of ambery balsam, shady violet leaves, bitter angelica and citrus that blend smoothly with the sweeter aspects of the earthy and powdery notes of fig. Made from goats milk, this soap is perfect for this issue. Available at Homefront Interiors for £4.95, 10 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath BA1 2LP homefrontinteriors.co.uk

LICIOUS

To coincide with our spring Delicious Guide, Crystal Rose searches for a few health and beauty products that are almost good enough to eat

This deliciously invigorating blend of firming, exfoliating and antioxidizing ingredients has a combination of fairtrade Peruvian and Indonesian coffee beans with enticing aromas of vanilla bean, black pepper, chocolate and cardamom. £36, Littlelab, 20 Broad Street, Bath BA1 5LN littlelab.co.uk

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Containing milk, pear, ginger, lime and tangerine these Naturally European Luxury soaps from The Somerset Toiletry Co. are each hand-wrapped in new vibrant packaging. With seven scents to choose from, each soap contains 3% shea butter and is priced at £4.95. thesomersettoiletryco.co.uk

This refreshing Elemis Superfood Facial Wash gel cleanser offers your skin a balanced diet of active ingredients to help give you that radiant glow. Made with avocado, broccoli, pumpkin seed oils, wheatgrass, kale and nettle, this nourishing face wash is stacked full of foody goodness. Elemis products are available from Homewood Park Hotel & Spa. Abbey Lane, Freshford, Bath BA2 7TB homewoodpark.co.uk


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BEAUTY | REVIEW

A LITTLE MORE ME TIME Jessica Hope says goodbye to the stresses and strains of everyday life with a bundle of top-to-toe relaxation treatments at Frontlinestyle Salon and Spa

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ur working lives can get on top of all of us at times. Whether you work the nineto-five, take on late shifts or are up with the lark, it’s very easy to slip into a monotonous routine of: get up, work, food, sleep, repeat. We all need a bit of TLC in our lives, but we’re all guilty of not taking the time to really relax and indulge in a bit of welldeserved ‘me’ time. When we think of ways to de-stress, most people think that heading to a spa for a treatment or two is a real luxury. But, in my opinion, it’s necessary for our wellbeing. We all need get away from the stress of everyday life more often, and that is exactly what I did at a recent visit to Frontlinestyle Salon and Spa. I booked in to have the Phytomer Marine Breeze Luxury Facial (75mins, £64) with therapist Lauren. As soon as I was taken upstairs to the quiet lounge prior to my treatment, I instantly relaxed and felt a world away from the hustle and bustle of the city centre outside. Lauren started by guiding me through the different aspects of the treatment and gave me a skin consultation. Being prone to oily skin, she recommended a facial that would be good for decongestion and encourage my skin to glow. My treatment began with a back massage. While determined to get all my knots out that I have been struggling with thanks to being hunched over a computer for most of my working day, Lauren was gentle; working on all my muscles and aching areas, and the scent of warm lavender and sea salt relaxed my joints. Turning to the other side, Lauren added a warming mud pack to my lower back which instantly soothed my muscles and warmed

me underneath the fluffy towels. My facial kicked off with a Phytomer Rosée Visage cleansing toner. This removed any traces of oil and make up, leaving the skin feel silky smooth and replenished. Lauren then used a Phytomer Vegetal Exfoliant, which is a grainless exfoliant that includes natural enzymes to remove the top layer of dead skin cells. While this product worked its magic, I received a deep shoulder, neck and scalp massage which worked all of my knots out and sent me into a state of absolute relaxation. Phytomer is the biggest spa brand in the USA and prides itself on using ingredients directly from the sea to create its 100% natural, nourishing products. Phytomer is exclusive to elite spas in the UK and Frontlinestyle is the only spa to use these organic products in Bath. After the exfoliant was removed with hot towels, Lauren applied a Phytomer Pure Pore Heating Mask to my face to draw out the impurities, give my pores a deep cleanse and brighten my skin. While the mask was left for a few minutes, Lauren gave me an arm and hand massage using a Phytomer Ultra-Nourishing Hand Cream which nourished my dry skin with natural marine oils. My treatment finished with an incredibly relaxing face massage, which eased my muscles and temples, followed by a foot massage to relieve tension. Feeling utterly serene, I was left alone to wake up from my dozy state. I took a peek in the mirror before I left the room – my skin was glowing and I looked and felt totally stress-free. For the full top-to-toe treatment, I headed downstairs to Frontlinestyle’s salon where master stylist Alex greeted me to give me a deep conditioning hair treatment to smooth my long locks and give them a great shine. Just as many people experience at some point in their lives, I am prone to having an itchy scalp. Alex recommended starting with a Philip Kingsley Exfoliating Scalp Mask which is rubbed into the scalp and combats the build-up of flakes, removes dead skin and soothes the skin.

As this treatment settled, Alex applied a Philip Kingsley Elasticizer to the rest of my hair. This pre-shampoo treatment (£20) adds bounce to the hair through its intensive conditioning elements. My head is then placed under a steam pod for around 15 minutes where the heat activates the treatment, opening the follicle and allowing the elasticizer to penetrate deeper into the hair. My hair is then shampooed and conditioned with the Moisture Balancing range by Philip Kingsley which helps balance wavy and textured hair, smoothing out the kinks and making it feel super sleek and more manageable. Frontlinestyle prides itself on using Philip Kingsley products that contain high-quality ingredients and don’t use any ‘nasties’. The trichologists behind the brand have a holistic method to hair care – all hair types are catered for and the products can be used to hydrate, moisturise and smooth the hair. After a blowdry and styling (£33), my scalp is left feeling deeply cleansed, and my hair is looking healthier and wonderfully shiny, with just the right amount of bounce. Leaving the salon I feel carefree and completely relaxed after my treatments. And the results are noticed straight away when I meet up with my friends later that evening as they compliment me on my glowing skin and silky, styled hair. My afternoon of ‘me’ time was certainly worth it – I would encourage anyone to take more time out for a bit of spa-related mindfulness, especially under the guidance of the talented team at Frontlinestyle. n Frontlinestyle, 4 – 5 Monmouth Street, Bath, BA1 2AJ. To book, tel: 01225 478478; frontlinestyle.co.uk

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LOWER WOODS WALK

Edge towards the end of April and the bluebells will arrive, carpeting the woodlands with their dusky blue shades. Andrew Swift finds a walk in a 700-acre wood that gives bluebells and an experience of an ancient, tree-filled landscape

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ach spring, from around St George’s Day (23 April) to late May, England’s woodlands are transformed as carpets of bluebells come into bloom beneath the canopies of trees. There are many favoured spots for witnessing this annual spectacle, but for me few compare with Lower Woods in South Gloucestershire, where the azure haze of bluebells is offset by the dazzling whiteness of wild garlic. This 700-acre wood is not only one of the largest areas of ancient woodland in the South West, its terrain is so varied, and so unmanicured, it evokes a sense of remoteness and timelessness. Walking these woods, there is an abiding sense that you are glimpsing what much of medieval England might have looked like. Having said that, there are what some may regard as several downsides to Lower Woods. The Saxons knew them as horwudu or ‘muddy wood’ and, although the name has changed, the mud remains – fortuitously so, for the heavy clay that turns its tracks to quagmires has made the land useless for cultivation. It also means that, even if the Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust, which manages the woods, wanted to create a network of easy-access, all-weather paths, their efforts would almost certainly be 90 TheBATHMagazine

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frustrated. Mud, springs and swampy ground are part of Lower Woods appeal, but you need to be well shod to appreciate it. This is no untrodden wilderness, though. The woods have been coppiced for centuries, and are criss-crossed by a network of once-busy tracks, known as trenches, along with a labyrinth of narrow, winding paths. The word ‘trench’ fell into general disuse around 500 years ago, giving an idea of their antiquity. Another feature of Lower Woods is the ease with which you can get lost. I am still astonished by how quickly you can lose your way – yet, far from being an inconvenience, this reveals hitherto unknown corners and reinforces that sense of brooding mystery. Lower Woods are not only easy to get lost in; unless you know how to get there, they are almost impossible to find, as there is a total absence of signposts. Fortunately, getting there from Bath is straightforward. Head north from Bath along the A46 and after 15 miles, just past Petty France, turn left to Hawkesbury Upton. Drive through the village and after 1½ miles you will see a large tower ahead. This is the Somerset Monument, erected in 1846 by the Duke of Beaufort. As you pass it, turn left down a lane signposted to Wickwar. At the bottom of the hill, carry on across a cattle grid. Follow the lane across Inglestone

Common before curving through a coppice. Emerging into the open, you will see a building on your left called the Old Shop. Carry on for another 100m before turning left, opposite a wall letter box, along a rough, deeply-rutted track (GL9 1BX; ST749885). After 600m, you come to a clearing with room for about 20 cars (ST746880). Before exploring the woods, look out for a box by a handgate which should contain leaflets with maps and suggested walks. To aid navigation, numbered waymarks on wooden posts are provided, although, as the numbers are only on one side of the posts, you may have to look hard to find them. Here you have a choice – to follow one of the waymarked walks or to wander at will. Alternatively, you could, if you’re eager to see the bluebells, try the following route: Instead of going through the handgate, head to the left and follow a drive to Bucklesbury Farm. After 250m, bear right across a grassy area known as Shepherd’s Knap before dropping down to a bridge over the Little Avon (ST745876). This has no connection with the Avon that flows through Bath, but runs west to enter the Severn at Berkeley. Don’t cross the bridge, but turn left to ford a tributary stream, go through a gate and head up a track known as Littley New Trench.


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THE | WALK

After a few metres, fork left uphill, and after 100m bear right at a waymark (W59) along a narrow track. After 450m (W55), bear right to double back along a track beside a fence. Carry on as it heads downhill and after 350m follow stepping stones across the Little Avon (W52; ST745872). Head up a muddy track on the other side, bearing left at a fork and left again along a broad track.

After 80m, when you come to a T-junction, bear right uphill and carry on along Long Trench. After 500m, you come to a clearing where four tracks meet (ST743866). Take the one ahead, Musgrave’s Trench, which dips down to a stream before climbing to emerge in an open space (ST740867). This is Horton Great Trench, probably pre-Roman in origin and once the main route between Bristol and Wotton under Edge. A 13th-century statute decreed that such highways should be 120 feet (37m) wide, to prevent brigands ambushing travellers. As you bear right along it today, however, all that’s likely to impede your progress are some distinctly swampy patches. After 1,000m – when it divides to go either side of a copse – take the left-hand fork, carry on as it curves downhill and go through a gate. Ahead is the bridge you saw earlier (ST745876). You can, if you wish, cross it to retrace your steps to the car park, but a more attractive option is to bear left before the bridge, go through a gate into Wetwood Nature Reserve and follow a track winding alongside the Little Avon. This rocky track is steep and muddy at the best of times, but several trees have fallen across it during the winter, and, until cleared away, pose an additional challenge. After 400m, you come to a wooden bridge (W31; ST741877). You can carry on, but follow the river downstream along ever more vertiginous tracks through the steepening

valley, you eventually come to the end of the woods where you need to retrace your steps. After crossing the bridge, head up a steep track and carry on for 300m, before turning right along Plumbers Trench (W15; ST741881) to return to the car park. n Andrew Swift is the author of On Foot in Bath: Fifteen Walks Around a World Heritage City and is co-author, with Kirsten Elliot, of Ghost Signs of Bath.

FACT FILE ■ Length of walk: 4 miles pm

■ Approximate time: 2 hours ■ Level of challenge: Muddy, rough and swampy in places, with some steep stretches.

■ Map: OS Explorer 167 ■ Refreshment stops: The Beaufort Arms in Hawkesbury Upton (GL9 1AU; ST777870) is open all day from noon. Food served noon to 2.30pm; 6.30 to 9.30pm. Booking advisable. Dogs allowed in public bar. Tel: 01454 238217; beaufortarms.com

■ Further info: gloucestershirewildlifetrust.co.uk/reserves/lower-woods

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CLAVA DINE IN MATT WHITE BY VITA  COPENHAGEN

LIGHTING SPECIALIST 8 BATH STREET, FROME. TEL: 01373473555 WWW.FIATLUX.CO.UK TUESDAY – FRIDAY 9.30AM – 5.30PM, SATURDAY 9.30AM – 5.00PM

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HOMES | GARDENING

APRIL GARDENS

Spring has returned. The jobs in your own garden multiply, but it’s also time to look for inspiration. Jane Moore finds some uplifting gardens for visiting this spring – many of them also offer a tempting selection of tea and cake-based treats

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is the season for the sap to rise, the garden to flourish and the gardener to skip forth among the primroses and lushly growing new grass. April is the month when it all happens – it’s a job but also a joy to keep up with everything. It’s also the season to get out there and visit other people’s gardens and to savour their take on spring, gleaning hints and tips as you sip tea and sample cake. Luckily there are plenty of good ones to choose from within a stone’s throw of home. While my selection includes some quite sizeable grand gardens, others are of a more intimate scale and nature and many number great cakes among their attributes. I’m happy to say that The Bath Priory and John the Pastry’s carrot cake make a very worthwhile contribution to this. 94 TheBATHMagazine

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Truffles

Saturday 7 April and Sunday 8 April 1 – 5pm, Church Lane, Bishop Sutton, Bristol BS39 5UP, admission £4.50, children free Delicious homemade refreshments I can’t speak from experience but this sounds like a treasure of a garden. Unexpected, impressive and with views over Chew Valley Lake – what’s not to like? The garden extends over two acres with a wooded valley, a stream and wildlife pond, lots of spring bulbs and wildflower meadows after a stroll around, after which you will have earned the delicious homemade refreshments on offer. For the selfsufficiency enthusiast there’s an interesting large kitchen garden with high raised beds and plenty of hens

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clucking contentedly, which adds to the ambience. There is also an original restored privy which doubtless deserves a look.

The Yeo Valley Organic Garden

Sunday 15 April, 2 – 5pm Holt Farm, Bath Road, Blagdon, Somerset BS40 7SQ, admission £5, children free Light refreshments This is one of only a handful of ornamental gardens that is Soil Association accredited due to its organic practices. With six and a half acres of contemporary planting, quirky sculptures, bulbs in their thousands and a glorious meadow, there is much to see. The garden is made up of lots of smaller spaces with formal planting, hedges and

ABOVE, clockwise from top left: the Yeo Valley Organic Garden; the laburnum tunnel at Hazelbury Manor Gardens; the wildflower meadow at Truffles; the Italianate garden at Iford Manor; and Charlton Down House.


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HOMES | GARDENING

The Bath Priory Hotel

Thursday 19 April, 2 – 5pm Weston Road, Bath BA1 2XT, admission £3, children free, homemade teas in aid of Dorothy House I know I’m biased, but we do put on a good spring show. Dotted about our three acres there are lots of bulbs and spring flowers and the meandering borders and paths make for a pleasant stroll around our, ahem, award-winning gardens. For those of you that know The Priory, thanks for your support year after year. New visitors are hopefully in for a treat. I can’t guarantee the weather but I can promise tea and plenty of cake courtesy of John, our pastry chef.

Charlton Down House

Sunday 22 April, 12 – 6pm, Charlton Down, Tetbury, Gloucestershire GL8 8TZ, admission £5, children free, homemade teas If the April weather is amenable then a little drive out into the charming Cotswold countryside to visit a garden is just what spring is all about. Charlton Down House

has quintessentially country house gardens complete with formal terraces, perennial borders and a walled topiary garden, all set within an equestrian estate complete with rescue animals too.

My favourite highlights of Hazelbury Manor include the megalithic circle and the wonderful topiary and hedges as well as the laburnum tunnel

pleached crab apple trees as well as informal areas such as the birch grove, the streamside garden and the woodland with its carpet of spring bulbs. There’s a posh vegetable patch and a greenhouse to boot.

Hazelbury Manor Gardens

Wednesday 25 April, 11am – 3pm Wadswick, Box, Wiltshire, SN13 8HX, admission £5, children free, sadly no teas. This is one of my favourite local gardens. It’s a real treat of a place, even if there is no tea on offer. If you simply must have tea, then you can wait until Sunday 3 June to visit. But for the early birds of the season there are eight acres of loveliness originally created by the famous ‘Naked Gardeners’ Barbara and Ian Pollard who went on to put the Abbey Gardens at Malmesbury on the map.

The owners have developed native and herbal plantings throughout the garden which must complement the broad range of existing planting. Favourite highlights for me include the megalithic circle and the wonderful topiary and hedges, as well as, of course, the laburnum tunnel.

Iford Manor

Sunday 29 April, 11am – 4pm Bradford-on-Avon BA15 2BA, admission £6, child £5.20, homemade teas Romantic, historic, Italianate, awardwinning, Iford is a gem of a garden created by architect Harold Peto. Lovingly restored over decades by the Hignett family, it has deservedly won many accolades including the Historic Houses Association Garden of the Year. Despite its fame Iford continues to be a charmingly intimate garden which holds strong appeal to even non-gardeners. It also rejoices in glorious planting and has recently undergone a huge renovation and re-planting programme. There are plenty of homemade cakes and cream teas available for visitors on NGS days, complete with a wide range of loose leaf teas from Iford Manor Teas. Thank goodness for that. n

Jane Moore is an award-winning gardening columnist and head gardener at The Bath Priory Hotel. Twitter: @janethegardener

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THE BATH DIRECTORY - APRIL 2018.qxp_Layout 31 22/03/2018 13:01 Page 1

the directory

to advertise in this section call 01225 424 499

Electricians

Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

Chauffeur/Private Hire

Holiday Rental

We provide Bath Airport transfers to and from all major airports in the uk. We use only Hi spec vehicles and give a near on chauffeur experience at less than regular taxi prices.

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Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

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Contact: 01225 482 225 alexa@bathholidayrentals.com www.bathholidayrentals.com Providing 4 & 5 star self-catering properties since 2006

House & Home

Advertise your Business in this space for as little as £80 per month and get 2 FREE.

Aromatherapy • Reflexology/Facial reflexology Japanese Cosmo Facelift • Deep Tissue Massage For more information, please visit:

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TEL: 01225 424499 Trowbridge & Neal’s Yard Bath 96 TheBATHMagazine

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Advertising that keeps working


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Pritchard PIF April 18.qxp_PIF Full Page 20/03/2018 15:13 Page 85

PROPERTY | HOMEPAGE

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hestnut Lodge is a detached modern house situated in popular Weston Lane approximately 25 minutes walk from the city centre and very conveniently located for the Royal United Hospital. The modern, spacious, split level accommodation is light and well maintained with plenty of room for the family to spread out. On the ground floor there is a large living room with a cosy wood burner, study, dining room and well-fitted kitchen/breakfast room, utility and cloakroom. Upstairs there are four bright bedrooms, a modern family bathroom and two en suite shower rooms. The gardens have been beautifully planted and well kept and there is a south facing sun terrace for dining and entertaining. There’s a good sized garage and plenty of parking for the family vehicles. Chestnut Lodge combines good looks, with contemporary practicality and would be ideal for a busy, growing family. Full details are available from agents Pritchards. Pritchards, 11 Quiet Street, Bath. Tel: 01225 466225

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CHESTNUT LODGE WESTON LANE, BATH • 4 Bedrooms • Family bathroom and 2 en suites • Modern, versatile accommodation • Sought after location • South facing sun terrace

Guide price: £875,000


pritchards-bath.co.uk

Bathford An elegant end of terrace 4 bed Georgian style property occupying a spacious corner plot perfectly positioned within an exclusive gated development in this sought after village. Finished to an exceptionally high standard the property benefits from materials such as engineered oak wood flooring and natural stone finishes. Level secure gardens to the rear and side, further communal gardens. Under cover parking for 1 vehicle, 1 allocated parking space and visitors parking. Secure gated development. EPC B. House internal area 1637sq ft/152sq m.

Price: £639,000

Sydney Place An impressive and particularly spacious 4 bedroom top floor apartment enjoying wonderful views over Sydney Gardens to the front and across the city to the rear in a sought after residential area just a short level walk from the centre of Bath. Fine communal reception hall and staircase. Residents’ parking permit. No onward chain.

Guide Price: £545,000 11 Quiet Street, Bath BA1 2LB Pritchards April.indd 1

Tel: 01225 466 225

Follow us on 20/03/2018 10:31


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Best Places for Capital Growth

Duncan Nash reveals why Newbridge is attracting national press interest as one of the country’s most desirable neighbourhoods

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iving in Newbridge, I have a vested interest in flaunting this particular area of Bath. My desire to write this piece emerged after reading a Sunday Times article last week, in which Newbridge was named under the title “best places… for capital growth” in the UK. Suburban life is based around the popular Chelsea Road, with its unique collection of shops, hairdressers, cafés and restaurants. Included in this is a Thai restaurant, pizzeria, bakery, grocer, deli and café amongst others. One only has to pass by this road on a typical Saturday morning to get a feel for the thriving community that exists within its parameters. Cyclists gather together for a well-earned brunch at Chelsea Café after having met outside the first class bike shop Cadence earlier that morning. I, for one, am familiar with this! Newbridge offers an optimum location for all kinds of people and paces of life. The city centre is within a 20-25 minute brisk walk away, as are rolling green fields. For those who prefer to travel by bike, the cycle path offers a

Duncan Nash, Director nash & Co

convenient access to the two tunnels cycle path, and to Bristol and beyond. Closer by are the conveniently accessible Royal Victoria Park and Royal United Hospital. A 5-10 minute walk and one can enjoy a pint by the river at the Locksbrook Inn, or reach a larger supermarket. Commuters can also walk to Oldfield Park train station. This area has an attractive collection of mainly Victorian bay-fronted family houses, marking an area with a rich eloquence. Newbridge offers a warm and welcoming neighbourhood, with more affordable house prices than the centre of Bath, yet does so without detracting from the character and charm that makes Bath so special. For those who know and love Bath, there are many other fantastic areas to live in this fine city, too many to mention here, but none the less, it is great to be able to celebrate the benefits and virtues of Newbridge this time round. n Nash & Co web: nashandcobath.co.uk or call: 01225 444800

We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family then we are able to offer a mailing service for only £15.00 (6 issues) or £40.00 Euro zone; £30.00 (12 issues) or £70.00 Euro zone World Zone 1 £95.00 World Zone 2 £120.00 To subscribe to receiving the magazine go to our website; www.thebathmag.co.uk and scroll to the bottom of the page where you can click to an instant link Alternatively send a cheque payable to MC Publishing Ltd 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED or Telephone 01225 424 499 for card payment

Subscription FORM Mr/Mrs/Ms ................Forename .............................................. Surname .............................................................................. Address ............................................................................ ..........................................Postcode ............................ Daytime telephone No ..............................................................

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Sydney Place A beautiful one bedroom apartment occupying the second floor of this Grade II listed former Georgian Town House, recently refurbished to a very high standard to combine modern comforts with a wealth of period features and charm. Located at the end of Great Pulteney and overlooking the attractive Sydney Gardens, the apartment is a short level walk from Bath City centre and the Kennett & Avon Canal.

Rent: ÂŁ1,050 pcm* former home of Jane Austen | open plan living room | high ceilings & tall sash windows | oak flooring | fully fitted kitchen | bedroom with fitted wardrobes | modern shower room | separate cloakroom | separate office space | fitted laundry cupboard

Reside Bath | 24 Barton Street Bath BA1 1HG | T 01225 445 777 | E info@residebath.co.uk | W www.residebath.co.uk

*An administration fee of ÂŁ420.00 inc. VAT applies.

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St. Johns Road, Bathwick

Guide Price £550,000

A beautiful example of a semi-detached house in the heart of Bath city centre. The property benefits from well planned accommodation over two floors, front and rear gardens and a single garage. Internal inspection comes highly recommended to fully appreciate this property.

Beech View, Bath

Guide Price

Guide Price £550,000

A characterful two bedroom Georgian cottage found in a quiet cul de sac in the sought after location of Larkhall to the east of Bath city centre. The property boasts well appointed accommodation set over three floors, with a wealth of period features, front and rear gardens as well as private parking. Internal inspection comes highly recommended.

£775,000 Beechwood Road, Bath

An exquisite four storey townhouse found at the top of Widcombe Hill in the desirable area of Claverton Down in Bath. The property has been finished to the highest standard throughout and offers light and airy accommodation along with an enclosed south facing rear garden and private parking to the front for two cars.

25 Monmouth St, Bath BA1 2AP

Worcester Villas, Bath

OIEO

£1,000,000

A stunning detached family home, set in a magnificent plot in the heart of the desirable village of Combe Down. Internally the property offers light and airy, flexible accommodation, whilst externally you have a beautifully maintained south facing garden to the rear and driveway parking to the front.

T: 01225 904 904 for a free valuation www.wentworthea.com


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Embracing modern technology [SOUTH WESTERN] LIMITED

Peter Greatorex, managing director of The apartment Company

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s you will have seen me mention over recent months, we, like many estate agents, have had to embrace modern technologies alongside traditional methods, in order to create the best results for our sellers and landlords.

Our main goal is always to attract lots of interest from buyers from the offset, and sell or let our clients’ apartments quickly, and for the highest price we can. However, with people now changing the way in which they search for a property, ie mainly online, an estate agent’s website has become even more of a crucial marketing tool – needing to go far beyond just being a shop window.

Crafting beautiful homes

Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswolds | Dorset

Norwood Dene, Bathwick Hill

Seven luxury apartments with unrivalled specification and exceptional quality From £895,000

For example, at The Apartment Company, we provide a 24/7 Live web chat, which automatically pops up on your screen when you are looking at our website. This tool has been a huge success, especially for our sellers because we receive a lot of overseas interest. With so many different time zones, it’s vital we can capture a potential lead the moment they come onto our website, should we be fast asleep in our beds. Without the Live web chat, we risk losing their interest if they have to go away and come back when we’re open again in the morning. 52% of the visits to our website happen outside of office hours, so our clients have peace of mind that those potential opportunities are covered 365 days a year. The same principle applies to our 360-degree virtual tours too. For anybody who is not able to travel to Bath, they can see what an apartment looks like inside and out from our website. For example, we have sold to a buyer based in Canada using this service. Our ‘book a viewing’ option has also been a big hit with buyers and tenants. We have seen a sharp increase in our viewing stats as a result – up 31% when comparing January to March 2018 with the same period last year. Overall, we’ve had a busy start to the year for both buyers and sellers. Registrations are up 12%, whilst sales have more than doubled. We’re seeing the highest level of first-time-buyer enquiries we’ve seen in a while, which I think is partly down to The Chancellor’s changes to stamp duty. Meanwhile the number of new instructions has increased 33%.

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk

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For those contemplating a sale or just curious, why not try out our free instant online valuation tool which can be found on our home page. The Apartment Company Pg@theapartmentcompany.co.uk or call 01225 471144.


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Rockliffe Road, Bath • • • •

£635,000

Terraced Edwardian property Highly desirable Bathwick location 3 bedrooms Circa 1150 sq. feet

• • • •

Open plan sitting and dining rooms Mature rear garden Breakfast room/additional reception room Potential to convert the loft and extend to the rear (STPP)

Ivy Cottages, South Stoke • • • •

A stunning 2 double bedroom period cottage Modern fitted kitchen with AGA South-facing, dual aspect living room with wood burner and countryside views Beautifully appointed bathroom with claw footed bath and separate shower

£515,000 • • • •

Wonderful period features Sun terrace in large south-facing detached rear garden Home office with separate access Underfloor heating in kitchen and bathroom

enquiries@nashandcobath.co.uk www.nashandcobath.co.uk Tel: 01225 444 800

NASH & CO


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PROPERTY | BRIEFING

New property round-up

While the Government’s current target is to build 200,000 homes each year in England, there should be no compromise in good quality housing at every rung of the property ladder. Here’s a round-up of the superb choice of modern builds alongside classic refits currently on the market in Bath. Beckford Gate, on the upper slopes of Lansdown, has a bespoke collection of four residences, including a penthouse. The Grade II listed Beckford Gate is a local heritage asset and sits within the development. The residences boast generous Georgian ceiling heights, classic mouldings and architectural joinery, alongside high-quality modern finishes, such as zoned under floor heating. Now available for reservation from Savills with a starting guide price of £1,350,000 and due for completion later this year. Lansdown Fields is a development of four- and five-bedroom Bath stone townhouses and villas, offering a modern interpretation of classic Bath living. There are plenty of green spaces, and generously sized private gardens and terraces. Developed by the world-renowned partnership of Conran + Partners with the developers Kersfield, the properties provide contemporary, flexible living spaces. Phase one is fully sold out and phase two will be released by Savills in May with prices from £950,000. Walcot Yard is a collection of eight 3-bedroom homes, over two or three floors, overlooking a landscaped courtyard in Bath’s central artisan district of Walcot Street. With an architectural design in sympathy with the area’s industrial heritage, each property boasts flexible, generously proportioned living space, contemporary oak timber flooring and 100 per cent wool carpets. Marketed by Savills, two of the eight homes, which have a starting price of £695,000, have been released to market early. Sovereign Point is the much-anticipated sister building of Royal View at the Riverside development, a collection of 52 elegant 1- and 2bedroom apartments. Each one has a sleek balcony offering far-reaching views across the city. Inside, residences offer luxurious open-plan living. The building, marketed by Savills, combines original Bath stone with contemporary elements and a pioneering curved design by the award-winning architects Studio Egret West. Due for completion later this year. Fitzroy House spans five Grade I listed townhouses, and its lateral residences are positioned in Bath’s widest and arguably most grand address, Great Pulteney Street. The one-, two- and three-bedroom luxury apartments are filled with character, having been remodelled to make the most of the apartments’ individual features. More than 50 per cent of the apartments are reserved after they launched at the end of last year. Prices start from £475,000 and, managed by Savills, the show home is open between 10am-4pm from Thursday to Saturday. Somerset Place (Savills)

Beckford Gate (Savills)

CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT: Evelyn Close (Ashford Homes), Somerset Place (Savills), Walcot Yard (Savills), West Farm (Ashford Homes), Norwood Dean (Ashford Homes), Lansdown Fields (Savills), and Evelyn Close (Ashford Homes) Somerset Place has 20 high-end apartments on the historic crescent spread across eight Grade I listed buildings. Rich with original features and with majestic views, each one has been revived, rejuvenated and individually designed. Managed by Savills, they include parking and a concierge service. Only 3-bedroom residences remain, which each have a garden and an upper maisonette. Evelyn Close is situated three miles to the east of Bath in the village of Bathford. This is a small development of four individual detached homes – managed by Ashford Homes, only one 3-bedroom property remains at a price of £595,000. Norwood Dene is a development of seven luxurious apartments set in mature, secluded and extensive grounds towards the top of Bathwick Hill. The apartments have either 2 or 3 bedrooms, all with en-suite facilities, an additional bathroom and some with study areas. All have outside private space and parking. Managed by Ashford Homes, prices start from £895,000. West Farm is a development of 13 individual detached homes located in the heart of Faulkland village, near Norton St Philip. The village setting combines the tranquility of the countryside with wonderful views. It will include a terrace of three 3-bedroom houses. Managed by Ashford Homes, prices start from £315,000. n Savills: 01225 474500; savills.co.uk Ashford Homes: 01225 792550; ashford-homes.co.uk

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Bear Flat

Andrewsonline.co.uk

St. Marks Road, Bath, BA2 ÂŁ795,000

A beautifully refurbished Grade II Listed Georgian townhouse situated in a no through road in Widcombe within 0.1 miles of Bath Spa train station. Three storeys with open plan reception rooms, three double bedrooms, bathroom, en suite shower room and terraced garden with views. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

01225 805 680 bearflat@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Central

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Longmead Terrace, BA2 Offers in excess of ÂŁ650,000

01225 809 571

Andrews April.indd 1

A three bedroom beautifully presented townhouse boasting 1,550 sq. ft. of spacious stunning accommodation over 4 floors. The property lies within level walking distance of the city centre on the acclaimed Riverside Development in World Heritage City of Bath. Bath is renowned for its architecture as well as its cultural and leisure amenities including world famous Theatre Royal, Bath Abbey, the Thermae Bath Spa and the Roman Baths. Energy Efficiency Rating: B

central@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

21/03/2018 10:05


Camden

Andrewsonline.co.uk

Brunswick Street, BA1 £525,000

A beautifully presented, interior designed home with a self-contained apartment, 0.7 miles from Bath city centre. This unique and well-maintained period property combines a contemporary and bespoke finish with period features to create an exceptionally attractive home. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

01225 809 868 camden@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Newbridge Andrewsonline.co.uk

Wellington Buildings, BA1 £360,000

A delightful period property in a no through road off Weston village. This refurbished cottage offers two bedrooms, sitting room with wood burner and a charming cottage garden with gated parking. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

01225 809 685 newbridge@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews April.indd 2

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

21/03/2018 10:06


BLOOMFIELD ROAD, Bath

Guide Price £849,950

Open House on Saturday 24th of March, 13.00-15.00pm. Viewings by appointment. A lovely Victorian house, built in 1868 with four bedrooms and three reception rooms in a superb location in the ever-popular Bear Flat. EPC: D

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®

Portland Place

£950 pcm

Unfurnished · One bedroom with mezzanine level · Central Location · Georgian · Available 23rd April 2018 · No Pets · Permit Parking · Council Tax Band: C · Agency fees £420inc VAT

T D LE EE R AG

Henrietta Court

£1200 pcm

Unfurnished · Luxury high gloss kitchen · Two double bedrooms · Study Area · Private allocated parking · No Pets · Council Tax Band: C · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT · Available 30th March 2018

T D LE EE R AG

Cavendish Crescent

£1250 pcm

Unfurnished · Georgian apartment · Top Floor · Premium Location · Two double bedrooms · Available 2nd April 2018 · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT · Resident parking permit · Council Tax Band: D

T D LE EE R AG

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Berkeley Court

£1050 pcm

Catharine Place

£1250 pcm

Lime Grove

Unfurnished · Communal Gardens · Garage · No Pets · Council Tax Band: D · Agency Fees £420 including VAT · New carpets/new decor · Available by mid April or earlier by negotiation

Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · Three storage vaults · Open plan sitting room/ kitchen · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT · No Pets · Council Tax Band: C · Available 10th March 2018 · Resident parking permit

Lansdown Crescent

Royal York Crescent, Bristol £1300 pcm Cavendish Crescent

£1000 pcm

Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · Generous storage space · Beautiful Views · Second floor apartment · Council Tax Band: D · Available Now · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT · Residence Parking Permit

SALES

01225 471 14 4 The Apartment Company April.indd 1

LETTINGS

Two Bedrooms · Kitchen/Breakfast Room · Sitting Room · Dressing Room/Study · Bathroom Clifton Village Location · Available 9th February 2018 · Gas Central Heating · Communal Gardens · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT

01225 303 870

£1800 pcm

Unfurnished · Victorian · Three bedrooms · Beautifully presented · Private Garden · Resident permit parking · Council Tax Band: E · Available 29th January 2018 · Agency fees £420inc VAT

£1350 pcm

Unfurnished · Private Terraced Garden · Two double bedroom · Premium Location · Ground Floor · Period Features · Available 30th of April 2018 · Council Tax Band: D · Agency fees £420 inc VAT

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk

22/03/2018 17:20


®

Lansdown Crescent

O.I.E.O

£750,000

Georgian Property · Grade I listed · Stunning views · Sought after location · Two double bedrooms · Second Floor · Immaculately presented

The Paragon

O.I.E.O

£575,000

Georgian Maisonette · Grade I listed · Private Garden · Two Double Bedrooms · Period Features · Stunning Views · Approx 1580 Sq ft

Edward Street

O.I.E.O

£525,000

Georgian Apartment · Two bedrooms · Two Reception Rooms · Beautifully Presented · Central Location · Great Views · Approx 916 Sq ft

SO

Norfolk Crescent

O.I.E.O

£275,000

Forester Court

O.I.E.O

£375,000

Belgrave Terrace

O.I.E.O

£285,000

Georgian Property · Grade I Listed · Ground Floor · One bedroom · Well-presented · City centre location · Private Garden

Three Bedrooms · Riverside Location · Ground Floor · Covered Terrace · Garage · Newly Refurbished · Approx 758 Sq ft

Georgian Apartment · Grade II Listed · Lower Ground Floor · One Bedroom · Rear Garden · Beautiful views · Approx 586 Sq ft

Connaught Mansions

Morford Street

The Academy

O.I.E.O

£310,000

Georgian Property · Grade II listed · One Bedroom · Lower Ground Floor · Private Parking · Lift Access · Premier Location

O.I.E.O

£300,000

Georgian Mansionette · Grade II Listed · Three double bedrooms · Central Location · Investment Opportunity · Approx 968 Sq ft

O.I.E.O £320,000

Modern build · Two bedrooms · Open plan sitting room · Central Location · Secure Private Parking · Communal Gardens · Approx 724 Sq ft

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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The Bath Magazine April 2018  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath

The Bath Magazine April 2018  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath