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THE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

Issue 164

I

february 2018

MAGAZINE

SUFFRAGETTE CITY A vote of thanks to the forward-thinking females who pushed for change and equality 100 years ago in Bristol

T H E C I T Y ’ S B I G G E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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Knight Frank February.qxp_full page 22/01/2018 14:49 Page 1

Move. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £875,000

New Instruction

Abbots Leigh Beautiful detached family home (approx. 1,761 sq ft) with attractive gardens and stunning views. 4 bedrooms (one en suite), family bathroom, guest shower room, 2 reception rooms, kitchen/dining room, gardens, parking, garage, garden store, outstanding views. EPC: F.

Guide price £450,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £335,000

Clifton

Clifton

Deceptively spacious courtyard apartment (approx. 1,247 sq ft). Master suite, guest bedroom, family bathroom, stting room, sun room, kitchen, ample storage. Patio gardens and allocated off street parking.

Immaculate apartment (approx. 587 sq ft) found within a recent chapel conversion with private parking. 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom, open plan kitchen, drawing room. EPC: E.

Prices from £375,000

Prices from £290,000

Harbourside

Harbourside

A new development in Bristol City Centre with a stunning specification. Fourteen, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments. Completion expected February 2018.

The last puzzle piece on the northern side of the harbour. 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments available to reserve now. Completion due Spring 2019.


Knight Frank February.qxp_full page 22/01/2018 14:50 Page 2

Move. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,100,000

Redland An exceptional Victorian family home (approx. 3,265 sq ft) with gardens, parking and superb views. 6 bedrooms, 1 family bathroom and 1 en-suite, guest WC, 3 reception rooms, kitchen and cellar. EPC: F.

Guide price £750,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £725,000

Wedmore

Chew Valley

Impressive south facing conversion on the edge of Wedmore with fabulous views. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, immaculate self-contained annexe, 3 reception rooms. Pretty gardens and parking. EPC: C.

A unique house (approx. 2,325 sq ft) with views to the Mendip Hills. 4 bedrooms, bathroom, shower room, drawing/dining room, kitchen, breakfast/ sitting room, study, garden room. Garage, parking and gardens. EPC: F.

Guide price £700,000

Guide price £575,000

New Instruction

Horton

Compton Martin

Newly renovated L-shaped barn conversion (approx. 2,518 sq ft) in rural setting. 3 bedrooms (1 ensuite), bathroom, kitchen/dining/living room, sitting room. Gardens and grounds, garage, workshop, parking, stream.

A well-presented cottage (approx. 1,461 sq ft) with spectacular views over Chew Valley Lake. 3/4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 reception rooms, kitchen, study/bed 4, conservatory. Landscaped gardens and parking. EPC - Pending.


Knight Frank February.qxp_full page 22/01/2018 14:50 Page 3

Move. Faster. Sell with Knight Frank.

Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call 0117 295 0425 to arrange your free market appraisal. knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,650,000

Winscombe Beautiful period home (10,084 sq ft). 9 bedrooms, 8 bath/shower rooms, 8 reception rooms, kitchen, utility. Garage, tennis court, swimming pool, stores, gardens and grounds. 2 bed cottage available by seperate negotiation. About 2 acres. EPC: E.

Guide price £1,650,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £750,000

Wickwar

Old Sodbury

Beautfiul Grade II Listed 17th Century house (approx. 6,298 sq ft). 6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 7 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. Range of outbuildings, landscaped gardens. About 1.7 acres.

An immaculate house (approx. 2,688 sq ft) situated on the outskirts of Old Sodbury. 4 bedrooms (all en suite), vaulted sitting room, dining room, kitchen/breakfast. double garage, parking and garden. EPC: D.

Guide price £1,000,000

Guide price £895,000

Near Regil and Winford

Hunstrete

Former farmhouse approx. (3,553 sq ft) in an elevated setting with views. 5/6 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 4 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. Gated entrance, drive, garage, gardens, paddock. About 2.4 acres. EPC: D.

A well-presented cottage (approx. 2,712 sq ft) situated at the centre of an idyllic village in Chew Valley. 4 bedrooms, bathroom, 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. Delightful gardens, outbuildings, carport. EPC: D.


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28

Strictly’s Brendan Cole (image by Shane Finn)

34

Winter fashion at Ladye Bay (image by Abi Galatia)

Contents

GENERATION GAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 The stars of Old People’s Home for Four Year Olds discuss its impact

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12

Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

14

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 ...talks 21st-century romance .............................................................................

24

BEAUTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Jessica Hope heads to EF Medispa for some face time

FOOD & DRINK NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Tasty tidings from our local eateries and producers

Fab feminist tomes to mark the centenary of the Representation of the People Act 1918

HOT TOPIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

THE CULTURE

Melissa Blease talks tipping – are you a big spender?

DANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Melissa Blease talks to Marmite man and Strictly dancer Brendan Cole

WHAT’S ON & HAPPENINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Get the diary out!

COMEDY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Brian Donaldson gets the lowdown on Ed Byrne’s latest live tour

EXHIBITIONS

HEALTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 TedX speaker Alan Bec on his latest idea: wellbeing by numbers

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Get to know Bristol jeweller Diana Porter and catch up on local news

BOOKS

See Ed Byrne at Colston Hall (image by Roslyn Gaunt)

February 2018

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

42

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RESTAURANT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Be transported to the sunny side streets of Spain at Mesa Tapas

YES, CHEF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Verity Hesketh meets the brains behind the Five O’Clock Apron

HABITAT WILD BRISTOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

46

What’s on at our local galleries this month?

Pete Dommett goes deer-watching on his doorstep

THE GREAT OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

FEATURES

Andrew Swift visits a largely overlooked, ancient stone formation

HISTORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 How much do you know about Bristol’s past as a suffragette city?

SAY IT WITH FLOWERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Where best to pick up a bouquet for your beloved

FASHION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 We’re craving cosy, chunky knits and muted, wintry palettes

INTERIORS

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Purchase and position thoughtfully; pare down and put away; tidy-home tips from our style crush across the pond

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Discover the intriguing symbolic history to the world of flora

PROPERTY

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News from the industry, plus hot homes on the market

ENVIRONMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 A report on our ocean plastic problem – and some solutions

MOTORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Chris Lilly’s monthly report from the world of automobiles

RETIREMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Looking for fulfilling ways to occupy yourself? Volunteering adventures aren’t just for the gap yah gang you know...

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ON THE COVER

Author Jane Duffus – also founder of Bristol’s What The Frock event series promoting female comedians – has created a compendium of more than 250 wonderful women who have helped to shape our city’s past. Read on for our feature remembering our local suffragettes. Illustration by Tiitu Takalo

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THIS MONTH WE’VE BEEN... Excited for...

from the

EDITOR

Find out about the symbolic history to the world of flowers on p92 – pictured here is gladiolus, representing strength, named after the Latin word for sword, and well suited to the Bristol suffragettes in our cover feature

The Florist, which will be opening this month in the Park Street spot where Goldbrick House once stood. It promises a ‘sensory world’ full of culinary delights, fragrant lychee sours and ‘sharing vases’ (like the sound of those), plus live music. We can’t wait to see what they’ve done with the fourstorey townhouse.

“Any great change must expect opposition, because it shakes the very foundation of privilege” – Lucretia Mott

Penning in...

S

ince finding out that this month marks the 100th anniversary of the Representation of the People Act 1918, which allowed some women over the age of 30 – those who met certain property criteria – to vote for the first time, we’ve been learning about those who pushed for change in Bristol in the 1900s. We really fell in love with a few of them – not least Theresa Garnett, who gave Winston Churchill what-for (with a whip!) when he arrived at Bristol Temple Meads, and Elsie Howey who hid in Colston Hall’s pipe organ to interrupt the speech of a cabinet minister. See p22 for more from local author Jane Duffus on these warriors of women’s rights, and p24 for other titles raising awareness of this important part of British history. Meanwhile, Melissa Blease talks to Strictly star and Marmite man Brendan Cole ahead of his solo show at Bristol Hippodrome on p34, and we’re thinking about the plight of our marine wildlife as Claire Rendall reports on the ocean plastic problem – and some solutions on p50. Then we’ve wintry fashion scenes from Ashton Court and Clevedon’s Ladye Bay, courtesy of a brilliant team of Bristol creatives led by local photographer Abi Galatia from p28; and a chat with comedian Ed Byrne before he stops off at Colston Hall with his latest live show on p42. Elsewhere, in our food pages, find Jessica Hope’s review of Mesa Tapas in Westbury Park (p56) – ideal for a romantic tête-à-tête we hear – and the brains behind Bristol’s Five O’Clock Apron, as well as industry news and a look at the practice of tipping. If you saw the heart-warming, tear-jerking social experiment (and TV gold) that was Old People’s Home for Four Year Olds on Channel 4, you might want to turn to p70 – we’ve been chatting to a few of the pensioners graced with the joyful presence of a group of pre-school children as part of a study in their Bristol retirement home. And we’ve gathered ideas for those looking for a fulfilling challenge in their later years, too, on p68. Finally, for those keen to say it with flowers this 14 Feb, there’s inspo on p26, with some favourite floristry experts profiled, and the ancient meanings behind some of the beaut blooms soon to be bestowed on p92, thanks to the wonderful Elly West. See you in March, muckers.

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR Editor’s image by Paolo Ferla; ferlapaolo.com

@thebristolmag

10 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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@thebristolmag

...All of the Bristol Jazz and Blues Festival fun. Particularly keen on attending the Cuban dance party, the Electric Ladyland 50th anniversary sesh with Bristol musicians recreating the classic Hendrix album, and the Big Swing – step inside Colston Hall’s bigband ballroom and party like it’s 1949...

Inspired by...

...Two very different Claires. One – pictured here – on a mission to prove that food doesn’t have to be time consuming to be individual and delicious, and the other encouraging mindfulness over the problematic plastic filling our oceans. See p58 and p50, respectively, for more.


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ZEITGEIST

Top

5

things to do in FEBRUARY

PROTEST Derby 1918. Due to fabricated evidence, Alice Wheeldon is sent to prison for attempting to assassinate the prime minister. Her real crime: sheltering young men avoiding being conscripted to the armed forces. The Gloucester Theatre Company will explore the lost story of resistance to the First World War in Pacifists & Protestors, featuring a performance of A Dangerous Woman by Alexander J Gifford, recently shortlisted for the Adrian Pagan New Writing Award, at Redgrave Theatre on Tuesday 13 – Wednesday 14 February, 7.30pm. Tickets: £13/£12 concs.

TRY AN ALTERNATIVE VALENTINE’S DAY If the ‘V’ word is enough to send shivers down your spine, or if you’re looking to do something a bit different with your loved one, then Arnos Vale Cemetery is holding a Valentine’s date like no other this year. Go on a Love Beyond the Grave tour, hear stories of lost loves, forbidden relationships and spot secret love signs on gravestones around the cemetery, before heading to the spectacular candlelit Anglican Chapel for a screening of the Tim Burton classic, The Corpse Bride. Takes place Wednesday 14 February, 6.30 – 9pm. £15 per person. Continuing with the deathly theme, Arnos Vale will also be holding Morbid Curiosity Night Tours on Thursday 22 and Friday 23 February. Here visitors can discover some of the gruesome ways people died – such as through stabbings, cholera and smallpox. £10 per person. Not for the faint-hearted, not suitable for children.

• thegloucestertheatrecompany.co.uk • redgravetheatre.com

GET SWINGING Wind back the clock, pin your victory rolls in place, and dance like it’s 1945 at an evening of glamour and entertainment at Bristol Old Vic on Saturday 17 February. The backstage bar bunker will be transformed into a dance hall as satin-voiced bandleader Jack Calloway and his Dance Orchestra broadcast live to the nation on the wartime wireless. On The Air will be a tribute to the works of the BBC and its uplifting broadcasting through 1940s war-torn Britain. Dressing for the occasion is highly recommended, so rummage through your vintage clothes, shine those shoes and don’t forget the red lipstick. Doors open 8pm, show begins 8.30pm, tickets: £20 per person, age 18+.

• arnosvale.org.uk

• bristololdvic.org.uk

BOOK You Fill Me With Colour bouquet from Wilderness Flowers

The Bristol Jazz and Blues Festival is back, ready to get audiences’ toes tapping and fingers snapping. Taking place in various city centre venues, mostly at Colston Hall, the festival takes place from Thursday 15 – Sunday 18 March – so there’s plenty of time to book tickets to events. Music lovers of all ages will enjoy the programme of events – there’s a Cuban dance party, a celebration of 50 years of Jimi Hendrix’s album Electric Ladyland, and an evening dedicated to British rock trio Clapton, Bruce and Baker who made up the band Cream. And one of the big ones to look out for – musical director and composer for musical giants such as James Brown and Van Morrison, Pee Wee Ellis will be performing on Sunday 18 March, 6.30pm at The Lantern, Colston Hall. Book now and don’t miss out.

SAY IT WITH FLOWERS There’s always something extra special about receiving a beautiful bouquet from your beloved. With Valentine’s Day fast approaching, we’ve picked some of our favourite places around Bristol to find flowers that will definitely put a smile on your loved-one’s face this month. See page 26 to find out more. Keeping with the floral theme, our resident gardener Elly West explores the fascinating history of flora and discovers the true meanings and traditions behind flowers on page 92.

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• bristoljazzandbluesfest.com

No 164

Pee Wee Ellis is coming to Colston Hall


Classic Carpets January.qxp_Layout 1 24/01/2018 12:15 Page 2

Visit us in Gardiner Haskins to see our fantastic new range of rugs by Mastercraft Rugs

THE MASTERCRAFT RANGE COMES IN A GREAT VARIETY OF SIZES

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Unit 8B, Emersons Green Retail Park,

Straight Street, Bristol, BS2 0JP

Bristol, BS16 7AE (next to Costa Coffee)

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• Carpets and Rugs (500 rugs in stock)

• Carpets, Vinyl, Moduleo, Wood, Rugs

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Always Here


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ist

THE CITY THE BUZZ

My

BRISTOL

Wix

Meet local jeweller Diana Porter What brought you to Bristol? A car, I presume – since I was only three years old! I was born in Weston.

By George! Former Bristol music student George Ezra has announced that he will play at Westonbirt Arboretum this summer as part of Forest Live, the summer concert series organised by the Forestry Commission. George, who studied at BIMM (The British and Irish Modern Music Institute) is one of the biggest selling male artists of the decade, who’s got a big year ahead, surrounding the release of his highly anticipated second album this March. His debut album Wanted On Voyage is certified 4x platinum in the UK, and was among the top 10 biggest selling artist albums in this country in both 2014 and 2015, reaching number one in the Official UK Chart and spending 122 weeks in the chart overall. In little more than 18 months, George went from virtual unknown to one of the international breakthrough artists of recent times: taking in a top 10 album in 10 countries; three sold out UK tours; and nominations for four BRITs, one BBC Music Award and an Ivor Novello. George returned last summer with his single Don’t Matter Now, another sold out tour and a summer of festival performances at the likes of Glastonbury, V Festival, TRNSMT and the Isle of Wight. Held annually in seven beautiful forest locations across the country, Forest Live is a major live music series managed by the Forestry Commission. Over 1.5 million people have attended over the programme’s 17-year history. Income generated from ticket sales helps look after the nation’s forests sustainably. George, who will be joined by a support act yet to be confirmed, will play Westonbirt on Sunday 17 June, as well as Cannock Chase Forest near Rugeley on 1 July. Tickets £34.50 (plus £3.95 booking fee).

How did the jewelling come about? My interest in making jewellery started later on in life. In the late ’80s, having previously been involved in organising numerous community arts projects, I decided to pursue my own creativity and threw myself into various art classes held in the adult art school commonly known as ‘Queens Road’ in Bristol. One was jewellery making and I got hooked. I applied to do a full-time course in Birmingham, emerging with a degree in jewellery and silversmithing and some designs I was dying to try out. I set up a studio in my front room and my collection was soon taken up by a variety of galleries and shops throughout the country. There are now 16 of us in our lovely shop and workshop on Park Street. What’s your USP? Nowadays we specialise in unusual contemporary engagement and wedding rings which are often organic in nature, with hand-etched textures. Our jewellery is made in certified Fairtrade or recycled gold and silver. We are passionate about promoting change in the way that precious metals are mined and ensure that our Fairtrade gold pieces are traceable back to the artisanal miners. We also have a range of Fairtrade and certified stones for customers to choose from and customise

• forestry.gov.uk/music

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their jewellery further. The original appeal of my work centred on the etched lettering. For instance, I would write ‘on and on and on’ round a ring instead of the more traditional row of diamonds to symbolise eternity. Share a few facts about yourself... I have a beautiful brown cockerpoo called Nutmeg who comes to work with me each day. And when I’m not at work, I am an avid knitter! I’m always making something, taking traditional knitting patterns and adapting them for friends, family or my lovely team. What’s planned for the rest of 2018? I’ll start 2018 by witnessing the Davies Cup being played in Spain this month and I have booked a trip to Naples in April. When I get back from Spain, we will be preparing for our wedding themed exhibition in April. We are inviting a selection of designers to send us their favourite wedding and engagement ring pairings; plenty of inspiration if you’re planning to make commitments this year. We are also working on something special for our 25th anniversary in September so watch this space. Which hobbies will you be pursuing? Pilates, Tai Chi, knitting, badminton…Theatre and film are my great loves so hopefully more of these! • dianaporter.co.uk

Image by Jon Craig


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THE CITY

Whole lotta history Almost 50 years after Led Zeppelin performed at Bath Blues Festival on Bath Recreation Ground in 1969, former lead singer, lyricist and one of the greatest voices in rock and roll, Robert Plant CBE will return to our neighbour city for the 70th anniversary finale weekend of The Bath Festival with his band The Sensational Space Shifters. In the crowd watching Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and others that day in 1969 was Michael Eavis, who was then inspired to start the Glastonbury Festival a year later. “We’re thrilled to announce that Robert Plant will headline on the second day finale weekend, completing a great circle in rock history 50 years on,” said Ian Stockley, chief executive of Bath Festivals. “This important weekend will have something for all the family, with three outdoor stages and a number of hugely exciting acts across the two days, and it’s terrific that Robert will be there to perform for us.” Robert will return to Bath for its multi-arts festival (which runs from 11 to 27 May) with his new album Carry Fire, heading up the Sunday programme on the Rec on 27 May, following Tears For Fears and Alison Moyet who perform on the Saturday evening.

BRISTAGRAM Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your Bristol pics using #thebristolmag

We love this snow shot of A y shto by @crai n Court gderrick4 0

called akmedia re @greystre the human of rt pa g bein shape that concorde Arrows at ed R e th greeted Bristol Aerospace

• thebathfestival.org.uk

Heart and soul Trinity Bristol has launched its newest heritage project – a year-long programme of activies, events and talks to run alongside the current conservation works. ‘Heart & Soul’ will celebrate the history of the centre as a pillar of community celebration – collecting images, archive footage and stories from people who have celebrated big life events there. “Trinity has long been a place of celebration and commemoration, since its opening in 1832,” says writer and historian Dr Edson Burton, leading the project. “It was the preferred church for christenings, marriages and concerts and is now a choice venue for ‘DIY’ weddings and famed for the birth of the ‘Bristol Sound’.” Local artisans specialising in clay, woodcarving, stained glass and textiles will deliver a series of courses in these traditional crafts used in Trinity’s 1800s building, and throughout 2018, the centre will welcome national speakers to a series of accessible evening talks in partnership with Bristol’s Architecture Centre and the University of the West of England. Trinity Community Arts recently secured funding to undertake essential works to the Grade II* listed building. “Our recent phase of repairs is part of a 10-year project to restore the ‘Cathedral of the East’ to its former glory,” said Emma Harvey, centre director. “During these works we have discovered that the stone work is damaged much more than we could have known. In order to finish this critical project, and ensure that Trinity stays open for the 60,000 people who find community, skills and confidence here every year, we still need the public’s help.” As part of the works, Trinity has created two intern opportunities for young people to gain practical skills in heritage and conservation. Trinity has welcomed 16-year-old Davontay Benjamin, whose mum Natasha runs the award-winning weekly Hype Dance Group at the centre. “The conservation and maintenance assistant internship is my first job,” he said. “It’s perfect for me, as not only will it tie into what I would like to do as a career, it will help me to gain more skills in my passion and will definitely give me a better start in life. I am used to being around a diverse range of people and working in a community setting, as I have watched my mum do it for the past 13 years and I would like to be able to do that also, so that I can be a great role model to young boys in the future.”

One of our favourite local vessels captured by @michew atkins

for So very excited to open on @thefloristuk is month Park Street th

• To find out more or donate to the restoration project, visit 3ca.org.uk

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Beautiful harbour scene from @bitsofbristo l


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THE

B R I S TOL MAGAZINE

Young love

H

aving teenage children may not be particularly relaxing but you do at least feel connected to the wider world. Right now I feel I belong in 2018, but when they leave home I will probably retreat into some 1950s version of myself. Cricket, jazz, tank tops. I can see it now… I suppose all young people think their world is new and exciting, whereas their parents inhabit the kind of ghastly primeval age outlined above. When I grew up in the 1980s my parents’ generation seemed hopelessly old-fashioned, but were their young lives really so different? OK, so we had colour TV and an extra channel, Mrs Thatcher (love her or hate her) and package holidays, but we communicated by letter or phone as they had, and knew what it was to spend Sunday afternoons staring at the wall. In many ways, life is much the same today. Kids still have to go to school and eat vegetables. The flavour of cabbage has not changed. But as we all know, the young are growing up in a world we would have considered utterly impossible. Mobile phones were strictly Star Trek. Beam me up, Scottie! If we wanted information about something we looked it up in a book. Today’s youth have the smartphone and its relentless connectivity. Day and night the messages, pictures and clips flood in. If we did something embarrassing we might ask our friends not to tell. Now the plea is not to share the video with the world. And what about the business of dating, as they used to call it way back when? It being Valentine’s Day this month, it’s worth pausing to imagine how tricky it must be when the whole awkward business of teenage romance is played out in public. If you don’t announce your new relationship on Facebook, someone else probably will. Likewise its demise. But then people have always gossiped, haven’t they? Around the village well, in the pub, on the phone. In other ways, though, the world has surely changed. A couple of years ago Ms B patiently explained the different terminology for different states of dating. I’ve forgotten most of it, but I remember that ‘chatting’ meant something other than ‘talking inconsequentially’ and there was a special word that described two people meeting in person, rather than virtually. After a long period (a week, say) of constant messaging, etc, such a meeting could be fraught with danger, because everyone now has a virtual persona different from their real physical self. How dreadful, I remember thinking. What a world! Recently I came across some old letters in a box, which reminded me how ridiculously over-excited I sometimes got, waiting for the postman. There are individual letters from particular people that I can picture in my mind – the colour of the paper and ink, the handwriting – including one from a girl I met briefly on holiday. In fact we wrote back and forth many times over the space of a few months, before we were finally able to meet again, at a railway station café somewhere in the Midlands. I arrived in a fever of anticipation, but now I think about it the rendezvous was a disappointment. I guess our virtual personae were simply different from our real physical selves… Social media and letter-writing have a lot in common, after all. In both instances we can compose and edit what we say, presenting a version of ourselves that we feel happy with; and perhaps feeling less inhibited than we do when talking to someone in person. But can you imagine a 17-year-old today waiting for a letter? Every morning the butterflies in the stomach. The pacing up and down. The endless imaginings of what She might say. Then the postman’s step! Letters falling through the box! Is it…? No… Tomorrow, then… That world has gone, but for better or for worse? Ask a teenager. ■ 18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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BRIST OL MAGAZINE Bristol and Exeter House, Lower Approach, Temple Meads, Bristol BS1 6QS Telephone: 0117 974 2800 www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk © MC Publishing Ltd 2018 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bristol Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


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VALENTINE’S | GIFTS

MAKE A STATEMENT Platinum 1.78ct solitaire diamond engagement ring, £13,995. Pravins, Cabot Circus, 19 Brigstowe Street, Bristol BS1 3BH Tel: 0117 933 8589 Web: pravins.co.uk

SWOONING HEART

DROP NECKLACE

18ct white gold swirling heart diamond pendant, £195. Pravins, Cabot Circus, 19 Brigstowe Street, Bristol BS1 3BH Tel: 0117 933 8589 Web: pravins.co.uk

Silver drop necklace, £85. Kemps, 33 Union Street, Broadmead, Bristol BS1 2DJ Tel: 0117 926 4888 Web: kempsltd.co.uk

BLUSHING PINK Morganite and 9ct yellow gold pendant, £930. Diana Porter, 33 Park Street, Bristol BS1 5NH Tel: 0117 909 0225 Web: dianaporter.co.uk

ORGANIC DUO Organic 9ct white gold engagement ring set with a grey rose cut diamond and mini white diamonds with matching organic wedding band, £1245 & £665. Clifton Rocks, 31 The Mall, Bristol BS8 4JG Tel: 0117 973 1342 Web: cliftonrocks.co.uk

THE LOOK OF LOVE Treat someone you love to a beautiful gift this Valentine’s Day

WHITE DIAMOND

PAIR OF HEARTS

Diamond heart ring in 18ct white gold, £995. Julie Anne Palmer, 129 Stoke Lane, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS9 3RW Tel: 0117 962 1111 Web: julieannepalmer.com

Heart brooches set with hand-cut and polished natural green turquoise and spiny oyster shell mounted in a sterling silver setting all handmade by Harvey Chavez of the Kewa Pueblo tribe, £150 & £195. Rainmaker Gallery, 123 Coldharbour Road, Bristol BS6 7SN Tel: 0117 944 3101 Web: rainmakerart.co.uk

DID YOU KNOW...

PINK LADY Rolex stainless steel Lady Datejust 28mm, £4650. Mallory, Bridge Street, Bath BA2 4AP Tel: 01225 788800 Web: mallory-jewellers.com

SILVER SWEETHEARTS

Silver sweetie necklace and bracelet both with triple charms of silver, crystal and freshwater pearl hearts. Necklace £135, bracelet £65. Catherine Amesbury at Artemis, 214 Gloucester Road, Bishopston, Bristol BS7 8NU Tel: 0117 924 1003 Web: catherineamesbury.com

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Nº 164

The origins of Valentine’s Day and its romantic traditions are a little mysterious. At least three Catholic martyrs have a claim to be the St Valentine associated with the day, all of whom the Catholic church recognises as different saints that were martyred on 14 February. The most popular candidate is a third-century Roman priest who performed secret marriages against orders from Emperor Claudius II, who believed single soldiers were more likely to join his army. According to the legend, Valentine sent a note to a jailer’s daughter signed ‘From Your Valentine’ before he was executed on 14 February 270 AD. This date was thenceforth named in honour of St Valentine by Pope Gelasius as the saint of lovers.


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HISTORY

Suffragette City Local author Jane Duffus has a new book out this month, cataloguing more than 250 fabulous females from our city’s past. Here, we’re introduced to a few of ‘the women who built Bristol’...

Jessie Stephen, illustrated by Jenny Howe. The suffragette and labour activist became the first female president of Bristol Trades Council

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T

his year is a big one for women in Britain. Because 100 years ago, after decades of campaigning, women were finally granted the vote (so long as they were over 30 and met certain property requirements – full voting rights would come in 1928). To mark this victory, Bristol will be celebrating its ‘herstoric’ achievements with a programme of events led by the charity Bristol Women’s Voice (bristolwomensvoice.org.uk). As well as a one-off special return of the award-winning, all-female comedy event What The Frock! at the Bierkeller on 2 March, there will also be a full day of free workshops, talks and events at City Hall on 3 March – including a guided walk around the city led by acclaimed suffrage performer Naomi Paxton – and much more throughout the year. There’s also a book, The Women Who Built Bristol, being published this month; a compendium of more than 250 women who shaped Bristol into the city we know and love today. So below, linking to the suffrage theme, are potted histories of some of our city’s finest suffragettes – snippets that just scratch the surface of what these women achieved...

Elsie Howey, 1884-1963 In May 1909, Elsie and Vera Holme hid in the pipe organ at Colston Hall and interrupted the speech of a cabinet minister with shouts of “votes for women!”. Elsie was attacked at a public suffrage meeting in Bristol in June, arrested in July for demonstrating and sentenced to seven days before going on hunger strike. Elsie took the symbolic role of Joan of Arc at the funeral of Emily Wilding Davison in 1913.

Aeta Lamb, 1886-1928 Having already proved her worth at the WSPU headquarters in London, Aeta was dispatched to Bristol in 1907 to help Annie Kenney set up the Bristol branch. When medical students threatened to break up a meeting in the Victoria Rooms on 3 April 1908, Aeta hired six professional boxers to protect the speakers. She had misgivings about the rapidly escalating WSPU militancy but continued to support the Pankhursts and was still working for them when the First World War broke out.

Adela Pankhurst, 1885-1961 Annie Kenney, 1879-1953 Annie was a rare member of the Women’s Social and Political Union elite who had come from the working classes, having been a cotton-mill worker in Lancashire. Such was her charismatic personality that by the time she moved to Bristol in 1907 to lead the WSPU, the nearby Blathwayt family were so enamoured by her that they nicknamed their suffrage garden ‘Annie’s Arboretum’. Annie’s time in Bristol coincided with a general election and it was not unusual for her to be speaking at three or more different meetings in just one day.

Mary Sophia Allen, 1878-1964 Hearing Annie Kenney talk in 1909 spurred Mary into action. Just weeks later, she was in prison for militancy, enduring hunger strike and three rounds of forced feeding. While set to work in jail, mending men’s shirts, Mary took the opportunity to embroider the words ‘Votes For Women’ into the shirt tails. Her third sentence of 1909 saw Mary sent to Horfield Gaol for breaking windows at the Board of Trade Office.

Although her stay in Bristol only lasted a few months, we can claim Adela as a brief Bristolian. Emmeline Pankhurst’s youngest daughter came to Bristol in the summer of 1908 to help Annie Kenney before moving on to become WSPU organiser in Yorkshire that autumn. Like the rest of her family, Adela was a frequent visitor to the Blathwayts’ home in Batheaston and planted a tree in their wood.

Vera Wentworth, 1890-1957 Jessie Spinks was an ordinary shop girl who turned herself into the super-suffragette ‘Vera Wentworth’ after joining the WSPU. In November 1909 she was released from Horfield Gaol where she had been force fed. Speaking to the Western Daily Press, she said: “At four o’clock on Tuesday afternoon they brought a nasal tube. They forced me onto my bed and six wardresses held me down. I resisted all I could but it was impossible to hold out against them. That was done twice a day until I came out.”

Emmeline Pethick Lawrence, 1867-1854 Lilian Mary Dove-Wilcox, 1877-1963 Lilian was born in Clifton, and by October 1908 was a member of the WSPU, hosting fundraising tea parties. Lilian succeeded Annie Kenney as honorary secretary of the Bristol branch in autumn 1911. By 1913, she was a member of Mrs Pankhurst’s bodyguard and on 9 March attempted to protect her from the police at a meeting in Glasgow, which descended into violence. A couple of days later, plucky Lilian was arrested.

Born at 20 Charlotte Street, in 1890 Emmeline went to London, where in 1901 she married Frederick Lawrence. During the week they lived at Clement’s Inn, providing an office for the WSPU. Emmeline became treasurer and in 1907 the couple launched the newspaper Votes for Women. It was Emmeline who chose purple, white and green as the colours by which the WSPU should be recognised. ■

Theresa Garnett, 1888-1966 On 15 November 1909, Winston Churchill was due in Bristol to speak at Colston Hall so Theresa went to Temple Meads to welcome him. Armed with a horse whip, she set about striking Churchill while shouting: “Take that in the name of the insulted women in England!” When arrested, Theresa gave her name as ‘Votes For Women’ and received one month in Horfield Gaol. In protest, she set fire to her prison cell and went on hunger strike.

Vera Holme, 1881-1969 Vera became interested in the suffrage movement in 1908. She was the chauffeur to Emmeline Pankhurst and was Britain’s only female chauffeur at that time. Dressed in a smart uniform and wearing her RAC badge of efficiency, Vera drove Mrs Pankhurst around in an Austin Landaulette owned by the WSPU. In addition, with Elsie Howey she famously hid in the organ at Colston Hall – more on this escapade later...

• The Women Who Built Bristol is published on 26 February by Tangent Books. For the full story on these women and others (doctors, architects, teachers, factory workers, even a secret agent), snap up a copy from bristolwomensvoice.bigcartel.com. All profits from sales via this link go direct to the charity Bristol Women’s Voice.

Annie Kenney and Theresa Garnett © Bath in Time (bathintime.co.uk)

Jessie Stephen, 1893-1979 Jessie was working as a maid in 1912 when she received her first taste of activism through organising maidservants in Glasgow into the Scottish Federation of Domestic Workers. By the age of 16, she was vice chair of the Independent Labour Party in Glasgow, as well as a militant member of the Women’s Social and Political Party. Following decades in London at the frontline of the campaign, in the 1950s Jessie moved to Chessel Street, Bedminster and became the first female president of the Trades Union Council. Jessie was elected as a city councillor of Bristol in 1952 and used this as an opportunity to speak out about birth control. In 1978, Jessie received the MBE for her trades union work. THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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BOOKS

VOTE OF THANKS Charlotte Pope picks out some fabulous feminist reads to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Representation of the People Act 1918

BAD GIRLS THROUGHOUT HISTORY, BY ANN SHEN

From queens to warriors, activists to astronauts, Bad Girls Throughout History has them all. Featuring 100 incredible women who changed the world in various ways, this is Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls for grown-ups. There’s Lilith, the lesser known first wife of Adam, rejected from the Bible for refusing to be subservient to her husband; the revolutionary Anita Garibaldi who rode into battle on horseback while pregnant; the daring Annie Edson Taylor who became the first person to survive a trip over Niagara Falls, at the age of 63; and Helen Keller, the first deaf-blind person to receive a bachelor’s degree. These amazing women and more – beautifully and colourfully illustrated by Anna Shen – are in this book for daring to be bad and fighting back against the status quo.

WOMEN AND POWER, BY MARY BEARD

Adapted from two lectures given by the author, this book may be only 115 pages long but it packs one hell of a punch. Beard traces the roots of misogyny right back to Ancient Rome and Greece, to Homer’s Odyssey with young Telemachus effectively telling his mother to “shut up”. Beard highlights how the silencing of women is a common theme in ancient literature, therefore arguing that the practice of revoking power from women by keeping them mute has been dictating human lives for thousands of years. She theorises that if the entire concept of power has been so ingrained and tailor-made for male voices, that it may be the concept of power itself that needs to change in order for women to take their place there. Women & Power is an insightful, thought-provoking and eye-opening read, for men and women alike. 24 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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THE BRISTOL SUFFRAGETTES, BY LUCIENNE BOYCE

Local author Lucienne Boyce was one day rummaging in the Corn Exchange market when she came across a photograph of a group of local women standing under a women’s suffrage banner. She has been researching and writing about the Bristol suffragettes ever since, and has produced an excellent book documenting the fight for women’s right to vote in this city – a side of social history that is relatively unknown to many in Bristol. Did you know about the colourful demonstrations on the Downs, and the stonethrowing in the city centre? Included in the book is a short guided walk around Bristol detailing several interesting locations around the city, steeped in history; from the homes of many prominent suffragettes to the Victoria Rooms, where the Bristol and West of England Society for Women’s Suffrage held its meetings.

LITTLE PEOPLE, BIG DREAMS: EMMELINE PANKHURST, BY LISBETH KAISER AND ANA SANFELIPPO

When she was a girl, Emmeline Pankhurst read all about heroes who fought for others and was utterly entranced. One night she heard her father saying it was a shame that she wasn’t a boy: as a girl, she’d never be able to go to university or even vote. Emmeline began researching women’s rights and went on to become one of its leading activists in the UK, inspiring women to fight back in a way that had never been seen before – braver and stronger than anyone had ever believed they could be. This gorgeously illustrated book is just the thing to teach little ones about the 100th anniversary of such an important part of British history. Simply written and carefully curated for younger readers – the perfect addition to any young egalitarian’s library.

OPAL PLUMSTEAD, BY JACQUELINE WILSON

When her father is imprisoned for embezzlement, 14year-old Opal must give up her highly prized scholarship and instead go to work at Fairy Glen sweet factory. Alienated for her upper class education, Opal finds a saviour in factory owner Mrs Roberts – a suffragette. Opal becomes inspired to fight for women’s rights and begins attending suffragette meetings, much to the disapproval of her mother. Many of the people around her reject the suffragettes, calling such ideas foolish and silly but Opal remains convinced of the importance of the mission. Before long, she is consorting with Mrs Pankhurst and learns the suffragette motto of deeds, not words. But will getting newspaper headlines be enough to win the fight? This excellently written novel – Wilson’s 100th book – is a great introduction to the women’s suffrage movement for readers aged nine to 12.


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Creative & individual flowers for your special day From her chic boutique florist in the heart of Clifton Village, Lisa and her creative team will design gorgeous wedding flowers to enhance your perfect day – from beautiful bridal bouquets to fabulous floral decorations.

1 waterloo street, clifton village Bristol BS8 4BT 0117 9732440 • email: lisa@lisa-elliott.co.uk • www.lisa-elliott.co.uk

Venetia Norrington Photography

Bespoke Flowers

for Weddings Bristol, Bath and beyond www.tillytomlinsonflowers.co.uk 0117 904 1141

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FLORISTRY

BLOOMIN’ MARVELLOUS We’re feeling the love this month at The Bristol Magazine. With Valentine’s Day upon us, we a round up some of the best spots around the city to find a special bouquet for the one you love

You Fill Me With Colour bouquet from Wilderness Flowers

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FLORISTRY

FlowerBe delivers loose flowers straight to your door

W

hether it’s to say ‘happy birthday’ to mum, ‘congratulations’ when your friend bags that dream job, or ‘get well soon’ when a loved one is ill, flowers are synonymous with putting a smile on someone’s face whatever the occasion. So with Valentine’s Day just around the corner, you might be thinking about where to get a unique bunch of flowers to show your beloved just how much you care. Here are some of our favourite places around Bristol and online where you can find a bouquet like no other to say those three special words...

Lisa Elliott Floral Design If you know Clifton, chances are you’ve already come across Lisa Elliott’s gorgeous flower shop in the heart of the village. Lisa and her team pride themselves on their artistry and expertise, and on providing a very special experience for each and every customer. From a luxury hand-tied bouquet to celebrate a birthday or anniversary, a classic bunch of a dozen red roses for Valentine’s Day, to small jam jars of flowers that will enhance any dinner party table, the team delights in creating something specific, and very special, for any requirement. Founder Lisa established her shop nearly 20 years ago, and has gained a reputation as one of Bristol’s leading florists. She has extensive knowledge when it comes to bridal flowers and loves chatting to couples to discuss their ideas and themes before bringing them to life for that all-important day. For fabulous flowers, combined with friendly and helpful service, a visit to Lisa Elliott Floral Design is highly recommended. • 1 Waterloo Street, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4BT, visit: lisa-elliott.co.uk

FlowerBe FlowerBe is a new, creative flower company that delivers beautifully curated selections of flowers to your door for you to arrange. Loose, unarranged selections of flowers in inspiring combinations of colours, forms and scents arrive in a box with a booklet bursting with ideas on how to present them. Each month a new creative theme is introduced with three inspiring flower combinations, offering a selection of styling possibilities for you to experiment with. Founded by brother and sister team Lisa Roberts and Sean Millard, FlowerBe is a friendly, family-run company. The team’s creative approach invites collaborators to experiment and pass on any of their top tips and ideas for artful arranging. There is not one type of rose or dahlia, or one shade of blue, and equally there is no single way of arranging your flowers to suit your interior space. This is why FlowerBe doesn’t deliver arrangements – the company gives you the tools in a box to create your own beautiful arrangements. Each delivery includes loose and unarranged flowers, and includes some great ideas and inspiration on how to style them. FlowerBe offers a fully flexible service and you can choose to sign up for regular deliveries or order on demand. If you change your mind, that’s no problem – you can adjust your options each month to suit you. Each monthly theme offers three flower selections to choose from: tall (£30), short (£26) or a market selection (£22). • Visit: flowerbe.co.uk

A beautiful bridal bouquet from Lisa Elliott Floral Design

Wilderness Flowers Hayley, founder of Bristol-based floristry company Wilderness Flowers, specialises in bespoke, natural designs. “I like to begin with the unique forms of each flower, keeping arrangements loose and wild, as if they had just grown that way,” she says. Hayley enjoys working with what is in season, and uses local organic growers whenever she can. These flowers are ecological, but also can produce unique kinks and twists, giving even more personality to an arrangement. Hayley also looks to 17th century Dutch flower paintings for inspiration for her bouquets and arrangements. Wilderness Flowers mainly caters for weddings and events, but Hayley also has a growing bouquet business, including key dates like Valentine’s and Mother’s Day. Each of her signature designs and bespoke bouquets are delivered from her online shop by bicycle. “I began Wilderness Flowers because I believe that flowers add colour to people’s lives, on an emotional and physical level. It’s such a treat to be able to create a little bit of happiness for somebody everyday,” she says. • Visit: wildernessflowers.com, Instagram: @wilderness_flowers

Tilly Tomlinson Flowers This floral design studio in Bristol’s old stock exchange specialises in weddings and events. Tilly Tomlinson has 20 years’ experience of creating flowers, initially through a retail shop, but now offers more of a one-to-one design service. Tilly says: “We specialise in all styles of weddings but the current trend for wild and whimsical designs really excites me – bringing the outside in with cascading garlands, floral arches and foliage-based designs using seedheads and ferns, cones and berries. “Roses are always going to be Britain’s favourite flower but now they share centre stage with what is in season – whether it is ranunculas, anemones, dahlias or peonies.” Contact Tilly to discuss any special events or ideas. • The Stock Exchange, 34 St Nicholas Street, Bristol BS1 1TG, tel: 0117 9041141 / 07809832731, visit: tillytomlinsonflowers.co.uk ■

An arrangement by Tilly Tomlinson Flowers

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FASHION | SPECIAL

DOING IT UP BROWN: With its Templemoyle waxed cotton exterior, brushed tweed lining, A-line silhouette and cinching buckle belt, independent Bristol brand Peregrine’s Crosby jacket in cumin, £250, is both stylish and insulating

COSY CLUB

From chunky knits and brushed wools to cool greyscale, minimal monochrome and low-key, muted palettes; whether we’re snug beside the fire or strolling the bracing beach, we’re loving winter’s neutral ground


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FASHION | SPECIAL

CABLE GIRL: How well are you weathering the elements? With its high neckline, this merino wool funnel neck jumper in ecru, £79, is great layered beneath a favourite winter jacket and teamed with a cute mini

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FASHION | SPECIAL

GREY POWER: In the market for an investment piece? We’re considering a classic-cut Cromwell wool jacket in ‘birdseye’, £250 – warm and easy on the eye with its subtle Aline shape

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FASHION | SPECIAL

NATURAL WOMAN: We love the lowkey, slouchy look in the chillier months and the long-line hem and loose fit of this oversized polo neck jumper in ivory, £85, would see it sail into our winter wardrobe

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FASHION | SPECIAL

HIT MUTE: Somewhere between a cardigan and a coat, finished with some big ol’ pockets and cute blue suede elbow patches, the supersoft Croft knitted piece, £99, is another good one for a multi-layered look and will see you through to spring

Director & photographer: Abi Galatia; abigalatia.com Locations: Ladye Bay, Clevedon; Ashton Court, Bristol Model: Lianne Howley; gingersnap.co.uk Garments: Peregrine; peregrineclothing.co.uk Stylist: Lucy Eastment; styledbylucy.com Hair: Naomi Ayodele; toniandguy.com Make-up: Kate Austin; @kateaustin_makeup Nails: Marie-Louise Coster; marie-louisecoster.com

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Looking for a perfect Gift?

Stunning Engagement rings, Wedding bands and tailor-made rings

CARLO &beauty M

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Tel: 0117 968 2663 6 Rockleaze Rd, Sneyd Park, Bristol BS9 1NF

Beautiful Gift Ideas for the bridesmaids, mother of the bride and for the groom A 10% discount on any pair of rings purchased & off any further gifts for your wedding when you mention The Bristol Magazine We also offer Bespoke Jewellery • Silver Jewellery • Watches Jewellery & Watch Repairs • Gold purchased (old jewellery & coins)

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ONE TO ONE

DANCING TO HIS OWN TUNE Love him or hate him, Brendan Cole’s outspoken nature has got him far. Melissa Blease meets the Marmite man ahead of his Bristol show in March

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ONE TO ONE

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f we were to compare the most popular Strictly Come Dancing professionals to our favourite traditional British food (bear with me here, please) then Anton Du Beke is Angel Delight, Kevin Clifton is fish and chips and Brendan Cole is Marmite: tantalisingly controversial; adored and denounced in equal measure. Brendan is as unafraid of fighting back when the judges get snarky as he is of “illegal” lifts, putting the tease into the tango, the wonder into the waltz and the sensuality into the salsa as he dances his away up and down the leaderboard with grace, attitude and style. And very soon, the ‘bad boy of Strictly’ will cha-cha-cha his way to Bristol with his very own, brand new show All Night Long. Born in Christchurch, New Zealand in 1976, Brendan has been a Strictly stalwart since the very first series back in 2004, when he and his first dance partner, Natasha Kaplinsky, waltzed off with the original glitterball trophy. In pre-Strictly days, his career was based in the professional ballroom and Latin American dance scene (he was ranked within the top 12 professional dancers in the world) and his dream of becoming world champion was always his goal. But when the BBC approached him to participate in the dance-based series we know and love so much today, he took a very different route altogether; today, he and Anton Du Beke are the only two professional Strictly dancers to have competed in every series since it first began. And yet Brendan isn’t the kind of guy to put his dancing shoes away in a box in between series – far from it; his new live show follows on from his previous three, hugely successful, stage shows Live & Unjudged, Licence to Thrill and A Night to Remember, and marks his ninth nationwide tour of the UK. Does he ever take a break? Apparently not. “I love what I do, and in work terms, I’m a bit of a lunatic,” he says. “I don’t like sitting still for a second. I love being busy, I love pressure and I have a very strong desire to succeed in everything I do. Having said that, although I don’t need that much time off for myself, family is my main priority; my daughter turned five on Christmas Day, and every moment I spend with her and my wife Zoe is very special to me, so I work very hard to make that time happen too.” Meanwhile, he’s certainly been working hard on putting this year’s tour together as well. “You can expect a full-on night of entertainment from All Night Long,” he says, with so much confidence that I can almost feel the rhythm of the night warming my winter-chilled bones as he speaks. “There will, of course, be everything people know and love from Strictly in the mix, because Strictly has a unique magic about it, and I’ve aimed to recreate that magic on stage. But there’s a little bit more of something for everybody in it, and there’s an emotional side to it, too. “For me, dancing is very emotional. While I’ve put together a big show that goes at 100 miles an hour for two hours, I like to take people’s feelings on a rollercoaster as well: one minute you’ll be up partying and dancing in the aisles, the next you’ll be stunned by something really beautiful. You most definitely will not be seeing the same type of dances over and over again!” But if Brendan could choose just one dance to do over and over again,

he has a clear favourite. “The waltz has an emotional edge that really connects with a live audience, and the waltz we do in the show is a really powerful piece of theatre. We’ve chosen a Michael Bublé track called At This Moment to accompany it, and it tells the story of an affair. The waltz is usually a love story: romantic, and poetic. But because of the story behind ours, there’s an edge in the mix too. “I can feel the audience coming on the journey of the story with me as I dance, and by the time it’s finished, we’ve all been carried off somewhere else, watching a tale unfold before our eyes,” he says. “The high energy moments are really special as well, though – we do an extremely passionate Argentinian tango, and a dramatic, forceful paso doble that literally brings flames to the stage. Every dance takes the audience in a different direction – but yes, I love the waltz.” While it might be easy to think that busy Brendan hasn’t got much time to reflect on his own personal journey to becoming the hugely successful dancer that he is today, his dancing feet remain very firmly on the ground when it comes to considering how the next generation might follow in his path. Dancing from the age of six, he says he wasn’t so much bullied during his school years but certainly teased on occasion, which fuelled his feisty nature and pushed him to be the best he could be at everything he did. “Every situation is very different for every child, and the fulfilment of early ambitions depends so much on opportunities, inspiration, support and ambition,” he says. “If a young boy gets a bit of stick from his mates for wanting to dance, then take that stick and use it to drive yourself to be even better at what you’re doing – that’s exactly what I did. “I’m not saying it was easy, but as you’ll know from Strictly, if somebody tells me I can’t do something, I do it. I’m aware that not everyone’s as bloody-minded as I am, and whatever age you are, negative people will always try and get to you. But with the right energy around you, those people disappear eventually. It’s hard at the time, but what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. Do what you want to do because you want to do it.” If such a philosophy makes Brendan sound like a very determined man with a plan, he begs to differ. “Haha, I wish I had a bloody plan!” he laughs. “I just work with what life gives me, but I work incredibly hard too – and I certainly don't plan to stop any time soon.” And what about all those rumours at the end of the most recent Strictly series – was that last speech really a farewell to all that? “They were comments I made about ending that particular series,” he firmly proclaims. “Every year I’m contracted by Strictly Come Dancing. If they want me back – which I hope they do – and if I want to be back, which I hope I do, then I’ll be back, being a pain in the arse to everybody, next year. I love being part of one one of the biggest shows in TV history. I have my own touring theatre production. I have a wonderful family, and a wonderfully interesting life. Nothing lasts forever, but I’ll just keep going the way I do for as long as I can.” And all around the UK this spring, Brendan will be doing it the way he does, all night long. • See Brendan at Bristol Hippodrome on 11 March; atgtickets.com

Photos (this page) © Shane Finn

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WHAT’S ON The Planetarium at We The Curious

Image: OAE

Image: Lee Pullen

Kati Debretzeni will lead the orchestra at Bath Camerata’s performance at St Mary Redcliffe

TUESDAY 30 JANUARY – SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY, 7.30PM (PLUS 2.30PM SATURDAY MATINEE)

A Passage to India, Bristol Old Vic The advice was harsh but clear, and Aziz ignored it. Now he lies in jail on a charge of sexual assault. Forster’s masterpiece poses a question more urgent today than ever: how can we love one another in a world divided by culture and belief? Multi award-winning ensemble, simple8, transports us to Imperial India, conjuring up the elephants and caves, courthouses and temples with the simplest and boldest means. Tickets: £10 – £29. Visit: bristololdvic.org.uk

FROM SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY, 11AM – 4PM

Spectacular Snowdrops, Newark Park, Gloucestershire See the spectacular snowy white carpets of snowdrops at Newark Park. Blow away the winter cobwebs and enjoy the fresh air and stunning views of the Gloucestershire countryside on this estate walk. Free, normal admission charges apply for the venue. Dogs on leads are welcome. Sturdy footwear and warm, waterproof clothing suggested. Visit: nationaltrust.org.uk/newark-park

Archive in Five, The Brunel Institute, SS Great Britain

Alongside Bath Camerata, James Gilchrist leads a line-up of some of Europe’s great soloists and players in Bach’s dramatic masterpiece, retelling the story of the last days of Jesus. Tickets: £10 – £28, VIP tickets: £45. To book, visit: bathcamerata.co.uk

Get closer to history in the Brunel Institute as maritime curators and volunteers take you on a journey of discovery with precious items from the Archive Vault. Free drop-in session. Visit: ssgreatbritain.org

SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY, 7.30PM DATES THROUGHOUT FEBRUARY, TIMES VARY

House site pass, Tyntesfield Things are changing at Tyntesfield this year. Get the chance to look behind the scenes at the major conservation projects happening around the historic house. Tickets: £14.80 adults, £7.50 children, free for National Trust members. Tel: 0344 249 1895 or visit: nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield THURSDAY 1 FEBRUARY, 1.05PM

Sean Shibe: YCAT Lunchtime Concert, The Lantern, Colston Hall

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All Night Vigil: Bristol Bach Choir, St James Priory, Bristol Rachmaninov’s All Night Vigil, also known as his Vespers, has been lauded as his ‘greatest achievement’ and as ‘the greatest musical achievement of the Russian Orthodox Church’. This extraordinarily inspirational work can be considered as the finest a cappella choral work of any era. Tickets: £15 – £20, £5 for students and under 25s. Tel: 0117 214 0721 or visit: bristolbach.org.uk TUESDAY 6 AND 20 FEBRUARY, TIMES VARY

In 2012 musician Sean Shibe became the only solo guitarist to be selected for the BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artists scheme and to receive a Borletti-Buitoni Trust Fellowship. At this lunchtime concert he will be playing JS Bach: Lute Suite No.4 or 2 and VillaLobos: Selection of Preludes and Etudes. Tickets: £5.50, tel: 0117 203 4040 or visit: colstonhall.org

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Blood and Butchery in Bedminster, Begins at The Rope Walk, Nelson Parade, Bedminster, Bristol Theatre company Show of Strength delves deep into Bedminster’s gruesome history and discovers how its pubs play a key role in these stories – featuring tales of body snatchers, concrete coffins, hangings judges and the most notorious heist in living memory. £10 per person, advance booking only. Visit: bit.ly/BloodandButchery to book.

SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY, 7.30PM

St John Passion: Bath Camerata, St Mary Redcliffe Church

EVERY TUESDAY – THURSDAY, 12.30 – 1.30PM

TUESDAY 6, 13, 20 FEBRUARY AND TUESDAY 6 MARCH, 7PM

Dark Side of the Moon: The Fulldome Experience, We The Curious An audio-visual extravaganza inspired by the music of Pink Floyd, featuring the entire Dark Side of the Moon album in glorious 5.1 surround sound with spellbinding abstract projections, creating a truly astounding experience. £15 per person, recommended for 16+. Book online, visit: wethecurious.org

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WEDNESDAY 7 FEBRUARY, 7.15PM

Tosca, Curzon Cinema & Arts, Clevedon Jonathan Kent’s production of Tosca will be streamed live from the Royal Opera House. Tosca captures the dangerous political turbulence of Rome in 1800. The Chief of Police, Scarpia – one of the most malevolent villains in opera – ruthlessly pursues and tortures enemies of the state. Visit: curzon.org.uk to book. THURSDAY 8 FEBRUARY, 6.30 – 10PM

After Hours: LOVE, We The Curious In anticipation of Valentine’s Day, this adultsonly event takes on a romantic theme and promises to be a different kind of night out. The science centre will come alive after dark with music, stargazing, cocktails, and some intriguing games and activities exploring the science connected with this most wonderful of emotions. Get yourselves a drink and enjoy our two floors of exhibits without the kids around, and see the beauty of the winter’s night sky in the Planetarium. Tickets: £8.95, £7.95 concs. Visit: wethecurious.org THURSDAY 8 FEBRUARY, 7 – 9PM

Mindful Eating Taster Workshop, Park Grove, Henleaze, Bristol Had enough of dieting and thinking that your life will be better if only you can lose a few pounds? Discover how to manage your diet


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by eating what you want at this workshop led by My Body Positive founder Lisa Beasley. £12 per person. Visit: mybodypositive.co.uk

Singer-songwriter Jake Bugg is coming to Colston Hall

THURSDAY 8 FEBRUARY, 8PM

Leonard Cohen Celebration, The Lantern, Colston Hall The Fantasy Orchestra including choir and a dedicated backing band of troubadours will be collaborating with local legends including Nuala Honan, Jimmy Goodrich, Emily Breeze and many more to bring you this exquisite event for Leonard devotees and newbies alike. Tickets: £10.75. Tel: 0117 203 4040 or visit: colstonhall.org FRIDAY 9 FEBRUARY, 8PM

Miranda Sykes, 1532 Performing Arts Centre, Elton Road, Bristol Miranda Sykes, the acclaimed singer and bassist is returning to her roots. After a career spanning over 20 years, she will be touring as she started out: one woman, one bass, and one guitar. Borrowed Places is a project that draws its inspiration primarily from the songs and landscapes of her native Lincolnshire but seen through the eyes of someone who has lived away for many years. Tickets: £12. Visit: 1532bristol.co.uk SATURDAY 10 FEBRUARY, 10AM – 4PM

Come & Sing: Will Todd’s Mass in Blue, Tyndale Baptist Church Join Bristol Choral Society to sing Will Todd’s Mass in Blue with the society’s new musical director Hilary Campbell. Tickets: £15, under 18s £7.50, includes score hire. To book, email: comeandsing@bristolchoral.co.uk or call Sarah on 0117 962 3223. Visit: bristolchoral.co.uk SATURDAY 10 FEBRUARY, 12 – 4.30PM

LGBT History Month: Outing the past, M Shed A variety of speakers and stalls will showcase the achievements of local LGBT people, while performer Tom Marshman will be unveiling his new LGBT audio guide to M Shed. Drop in, pay what you think. Visit: bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed

SATURDAY 10 FEBRUARY, 2 – 3PM

Wedding Open Day, The Radnor Rooms, 30 St Nicholas Street, Bristol Be inspired to plan your big day with this different take on a wedding open day at Bristol’s newest wedding venue. Experience creative workshops such as flower-crowning, hair fascinating and favour making, and enjoy a vintage tea party in association with Heartfelt Vintage. There’ll also be vintage wedding dresses to peruse and a chance to meet the venue’s wedding coordinator to answer any questions. Visit: theradnorrooms.co.uk SUNDAY 11 FEBRUARY, 12 – 3.30PM

Valentine’s Day afternoon tea, Avebury Manor Treat your loved one to a romantic afternoon tea in the beautiful, historic location of Avebury Manor. £40 for a table of two. To book, tel: 0344 2491895 or visit: nationaltrust.org.uk/avebury SUNDAY 11 FEBRUARY, 7.30PM

Postcards Home: Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Colston Hall A double helping of Dvořák – including his

homesick postcard home From the New World – frames Shostakovich’s pithy concerto as the mighty Czech Philharmonic returns to Bristol. Tel: 0117 203 4040 or visit: colstonhall.org SUNDAY 11 AT 6PM, THURSDAY 15 AT 7.30PM, SUNDAY 18 FEBRUARY AT 6PM

Opera in a Box presents La Traviata, Bristol BierKeller, All Saints Street Award-winning opera company Opera in a Box brings its latest production of Verdi’s La Traviata. Violetta Valéry is the shining star of Parisian nightlife. Surrounded by clutching patrons and lusting fans, her life is a neverending party. When disease touches her, and a naïve young admirer makes her question her own happiness, Violetta must stare deep into the shadows cast by all those bright lights. Tickets: £15/£10 concs. Visit: operainabox.com or tel: 0333 666 3366. MONDAY 12 – FRIDAY 16 FEBRUARY, 11AM – 7PM

Biba Inspiration exhibition, City Hall, The Vestibules, Bristol An exhibition of oil pastels by Bristol-based Italian artist Emanuela Di Filippo, inspired by the iconic Biba style of London in the 1960s and 70s. Free admission. Continued on page 38

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EDITOR’S PICK... THURSDAY 15 FEBRUARY, 6PM

Women, citizenship and the 1918 Representation of the People Act: Bristol women in politics, M Shed Professor June Hannam and local suffrage historian Lucienne Boyce will look at women’s participation in local and national politics following the Representation of the People Act 1918. They will consider why women wanted the vote, how the 1918 Act affected both the municipal and parliamentary franchise, and how women prepared for their new status as citizens, with a focus on Bristol using local case studies. Free admission, donations welcome. Damaged suffragette headquarters in Queen’s Road, Bristol, 1913, Bristol Archives: 43207/22/19/20

• Visit: bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed

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Ivan Harbour talks about the housing crisis at The Architecture Centre

Tosca will be live streamed at Curzon Cinema & Arts, Clevedon

TUESDAY 13 – WEDNESDAY 14 FEBRUARY, 2.30PM AND 7.30PM

Pacifists and Protesters: The lost story of resistance to World War One, The Redgrave Theatre, Percival Road, Bristol The Gloucester Theatre Company’s new piece of theatre to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War. Features a new play called A Dangerous Woman (shortlisted for the Adrian Pagan New Writing Award) and a devised presentation, inspired by the words of poets, pacifists and other protesters. A Dangerous Woman tells the incredible story of Alice Wheeldon, a suffragette and single-mother, who sheltered conscription-evaders from arrest. Tickets: £13/£12 concs, visit: thegloucestertheatrecompany.co.uk THURSDAY 15 FEBRUARY, 6 – 9PM

Bristol Film Festival: Rush, The Paddock, Cribbs Causeway Enjoy this high-adrenaline biopic about one of the most famous rivalries in sporting history, between Formula One legends James Hunt and Niki Lauda. £10 – £15. Visit: bristolfilmfestival.com FRIDAY 16 FEBRUARY 2018, 7PM

Cinema in the Cathedral: Holiday with the Cary Grant Film Festival, The Chapter House, Bristol Cathedral Bristol Cathedral has teamed up with the Cary Grant Film Festival to show classic screwball comedy Holiday, which tells the story of a self-made man who falls in love while on holiday, starring Grant alongside Katharine Hepburn. Tickets: £10, £8 concs, includes a drink on arrival. Visit: bristol-cathedral.co.uk

SUNDAY 18 FEBRUARY, 10AM – 4PM

SATURDAY 24 FEBRUARY, 7PM

Introduction to Stumpwork embroidery, 38 Old School House, Britannia Road, Kingswood, Bristol

Jake Bugg – Solo Acoustic, Colston Hall

This day class will introduce students to a small selection of stumpwork stitches and techniques which will be used to create a charming watering can pin cushion project. This includes creating fabric painted petals, an embroidered flower with silk shading wired petals and fabric leaves with fly stitch and wired edges. Suitable for all ability levels including students who are new to the technique of stumpwork. Admission: £104 per person. Visit: royalneedlework.org.uk/courses to book. SUNDAY 18 FEBRUARY, 7.30 – 9.15PM

Cupid’s Arrow: Nova Early Music Vocal Ensemble, All Saints Church, Pembroke Road, Clifton An evening of love with NOVA, Bristol’s specialist early music vocal ensemble. Cupid’s Arrow features love songs from medieval and Renaissance Europe: ecstatic young love from The Song of Songs by Victoria, Senfl and de Goes, as well as work from the 13th-century Carmina Burana, heartbroken longing from Monteverdi, and David’s lament for his beloved Jonathan by Josquin. Tickets on the door, £8 adults, £5 for students. THURSDAY 22 FEBRUARY, 6 – 8PM

Wedding Showcase, SS Great Britain Explore Brunel’s historic ship and catch a glimpse of how the SS Great Britain could be the perfect romantic setting for your wedding day. Free admission. Visit: ssgreatbritain.org to reserve your space. THURSDAY 22 FEBRUARY – SATURDAY 7 APRIL, 7.30PM AND 2PM MATINEES ON THURSDAYS AND SUNDAYS

FRIDAY 16 FEBRUARY, 7 – 9.15PM

Bristol Film Festival: Groundhog Day, Averys, Culver Street, Bristol

Macbeth, Tobacco Factory Theatres

Take your seats in Averys’ atmospheric cellars, enjoy a mouth-watering selection of wines, plus bread and cheese courtesy of Arch House Deli, before the screening of acclaimed comedy Groundhog Day. £25 per person. Visit: bristolfilmfestival.com

Battling elemental forces and their own blind ambition, Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are at odds with the natural world, haunted by three unearthly witches and inspired to commit terrible, unnatural acts. Tickets from £12. Age 12+. Tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: tobaccofactorytheatres.com

Raised on a steady diet of the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, and the Gallagher brothers, singer/songwriter Bugg blends the melodious swagger of the La’s and the bluesy simplicity of the White Stripes with the wry, weathered romanticism of Jens Lekman. Tickets: £24.19. Age 14+. Tel: 0117 203 4040 or visit: colstonhall.org SATURDAY 24 FEBRUARY, 7.30PM

The Story of the Solar System, Redgrave Theatre, Percival Road, Clifton In this exciting new live show, astronomer Will Gater brings remarkable stories about the planets, moons, asteroids and comets that orbit the sun to the stage. Audiences will hear about those who pioneered the study of our solar system and learn about modern space missions. Tickets: £12, £10 concs. Visit: redgravetheatre.com SUNDAY 25 FEBRUARY, 6PM

Exultate Singers and Craig Ogden: An Evening Romance, St James Priory, Whitson Street, Bristol Internationally renowned guitarist Craig Ogden and virtuoso cellist Richard May join Exultate Singers for a concert of romantic music from around the world, conducted by David Ogden. Tickets £10 – £18. Tel: 0117 923 0164 or visit: exultatesingers.org TUESDAY 27 FEBRUARY, 6.30PM

Home Building: Ivan Harbour, The Architecture Centre, Narrow Quay, Bristol Expanding on themes in The Architecture Centre’s current Saving The City exhibition, Ivan Harbour (RSHP) discusses the practice’s approach to tackling the housing crisis. Tickets: £9/£7. Visit: architecturecentre.org.uk TUESDAY 27 FEBRUARY, 7PM AND 8.15PM

DJ Food: The Search Engine, We The Curious Be immersed in this fulldome interpretation of DJ Food’s 2012 album accompanied by captivating visuals with artwork from Henry Continued on page 40

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Czech Philharmonic Orchestra will be performing at Colston Hall

The Cherry Orchard at Bristol Old Vic

Flint, best known for his ground-breaking work on the comic 2000AD. Suitable for 16+. £15 per person. Visit: wethecurious.org WEDNESDAY 28 FEBRUARY – FRIDAY 16 MARCH

Richard Cartwright exhibition, Adam Gallery, John Street, Bath Richard Cartwright, who lives and works in Bristol, paints what we hold inwardly in our mind’s eye: a landscape, an image offering solace, reflection and stillness amidst a fastpaced contemporary life-style. Visit: adamgallery.com for opening times.

City of Bristol Choir conducted by David Ogden, All Saints Church, Pembroke Road, Clifton

The Hall On The Hill, St George’s Bristol St George’s has commissioned a brand new community opera to celebrate the launch of its brand new creative space. Based on the life and times of the building and its fascinating location, The Hall on the Hill is written by Mark Lawrence and Claire Williamson, and features a cast of hundreds. Tickets: £10, £5 concs. Tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

Six Nations rugby on the We The Curious Big Screen, Millennium Square Get your friends together, don your nation’s colours and watch the rugby championship unfold on the big screen with free live screenings of the matches throughout the competition. UNTIL THE END OF MARCH

New Designers exhibition at Diana Porter, Park Street, Bristol This exciting annual exhibition combines contemporary art with traditional jewellery making techniques. Features the work of a new wave of talent including Miki Asai, Cara Budd, Hayley Grafflin, Dominika Kupcova and Adrienn Pesti. Visit: dianaporter.co.uk

Metropolitan merrymaking and mystery meets a no-holds-barred slice of medieval life as Bob Chilcott and Carl Orff go head to head in a programme bursting with life, liberties and sassy savoir-faire from Bristol Choral Society and Bristol Youth Choir. Tickets: £10.75 to £31.18, under 25s £5.38. Visit: bristolchoral.co.uk / colstonhall.org

The Cherry Orchard, Bristol Old Vic The tide of change is coming. Madam Ranyevskaya’s liberal world of privilege and pleasure is beginning to show cracks, but she

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SATURDAY 10 MARCH, 7.30PM

Strings Showcase: Henleaze Concert Society, Trinity-Henleaze URC Showcasing the string section of Bristol Ensemble, features the repertoire’s best-loved pieces including Grieg’s zesty Holberg Suite and Vaughan Williams’ variations on the folk song Dives and Lazarus. Tickets: £16, £13.50 members. Visit: bristolensemble.com

THURSDAY 8 MARCH, 7PM

A jam-packed weekend of free and ticketed concerts, dancing, jam sessions and masterclasses celebrating all things jazz and blues. This year the festival marks 50 years of Electric Ladyland and will be hosting both legendary and rising jazz and blues stars. Visit: bristoljazzandbluesfest.com for the full programme and to book tickets.

THURSDAY 15 – SUNDAY 18 MARCH, TIMES VARY

Bristol Jazz and Blues Festival, various city centre locations

The world premiere of a major new choral work The River of Life, performed by more than 150 voices from All Saints Church Choir, singers from Clifton College, the Bristol Cathedral Consort and the St John’s Junior School choral speaking group, and other local choirs. The concert will be the first in a yearlong programme of events to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the consecration of the original Victorian church. Admission is free, tickets must be booked in advance. Tel: 0117 974 1355 or visit the Parish Office.

Bristol Cathedral Lay Clerks will perform Tallis’ Lamentations. Free entrance, there will be a collection. All welcome.

THURSDAY 8 MARCH, 8PM

SATURDAY 24 MARCH, 7.30PM

Ed Byrne: Spoiler Alert, Colston Hall

From Earth to Heaven: Bristol Bach Choir, St Mary Redcliffe, Bristol

Top stand-up Ed Byrne returns to Bristol with another rib-tickling show. Byrne is a regular face on Mock The Week, Have I Got News For You and Live at The Apollo among many others. His latest live show asks the question, is life really all that bad or are we just a bunch of spoiled brats? Age 16+. Tickets: £25.80. Tel: 0117 203 4040 or visit: colstonhall.org

THURSDAY 1 MARCH – SATURDAY 7 APRIL, 7.30PM AND 2.30PM ON SELECTED THURSDAYS AND SATURDAYS

FEBRUARY 2018

Carmina Burana, Colston Hall

A celebratory concert marking the 100th birthday of one of America’s greatest conductors and composers, Leonard Bernstein, with a performance of his Chichester Psalms for choir, organ, harp and percussion. Tickets: £15, £5 for students and under 18s, available from Opus 13 music shop, 14 St Michael’s Hill. Tel: 0117 923 0164 or visit: cityofbristolchoir.org.uk

Community Choral Concert, All Saints Church, Pembroke Road, Clifton

MATCH DAYS THROUGHOUT FEBRUARY AND MARCH

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and her family live on in denial. Chekhov’s final masterpiece is full of wild humour and piercing sadness in this fresh, funny and honest new translation by award-winning playwright Rory Mullarkey. It maps the tensions between the desperate longing to hold on to what is familiar and the restless lure of the new. Tickets: £35.50 – £7.50. Tel: 0117 987 7877 or visit: bristololdvic.org.uk

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SUNDAY 18 MARCH, 6PM

Passion Sunday Tallis, All Saints Church, Pembroke Road, Clifton

Spanish Renaissance composer Tomás Luis de Victoria’s Tenebrae Responsories will feature on the programme with Dan Forrest’s beautiful Requiem for the Living, conducted by Christopher Finch, featuring Bristol Ensemble. Tickets: £10 – £20. Visit: bristolbach.org.uk or tel: 0117 214 0721. n


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In his latest show, Ed talks everything from the ever-increasing size of garden trampolines to his own kids’ demand for elderflower cordial

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SPOILER ALERT! Comedian Ed Byrne’s nationwide tour stops off in Bristol next month – Brian Donaldson has been finding out more...

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d Byrne has been an acclaimed stand-up, with audiences and critics alike, for 20 years now. His success with shows such as Roaring Forties, Different Class and the 1998 Perrier-nominated A Night At The Opera, led to him appearing on the box in the diverse likes of Mock The Week, Father Ted and All Star Mr & Mrs, while his love of natural history has also crossed into television, seeing him abseil in Snowdonia for The One Show; on Countryfile, climbing Sgùrr Dearg on Skye; on BBC Two as part of a travelogue show with Dara Ó Briain; and presenting items on the BBC’s Volcano Live – his fondness for hillwalking also resulting in a regular column for The Great Outdoors magazine. But in his latest touring show, the Irish comic focuses on family life, on home soil, and his firm belief that the current breed of parents spoil their kids rotten, whether it’s to do with the ever-increasing size of garden trampolines, or his own kids’ demand for elderflower cordial. “My dad wasn’t a bad dad, he was just a 1970s dad,” he says. “I could never see my children ever again from this moment on, and I’ve already done more parenting then he did in my entire life. But, of course, I made a conscious decision that I was going to be an awesome dad. My wife will come back with tales from her friends of how awful their husbands are and she’ll see me smiling and say ‘Alright, stop congratulating yourself just because such-and-such can’t be left alone with their children for two minutes’.” The aptly-titled live show Spoiler Alert sees Ed compare and contrast the old-school child-rearing days with 21st-century methods and suggests that there are different ways to learn how to be a mum or dad. “I grew up in what I would call an aspirational household in that my parents bettered themselves over the course of my childhood,” he says. “My mother was a radiographer and ended up a lecturer in radiography, while my dad was a sheet metal worker and went up to a supervisory role. I’d still say that you are expected to do a lot more parenting than our parents did and that’s a weird thing because you tend to think that your parents are where you learned parenting from. But you don’t, really – it’s more that you look around you to see what’s going on with other parents.” Ed extends his analysis on the culture of entitlement to look at areas where we could perhaps do with being spoiled a little bit more. “Where I think we’re not acting spoiled enough is in the political arena,” he says. “We have a tendency to accept what’s happening and that’s where we should be acting more entitled: we are literally entitled to the government we want. We’re spoiled in all these little ways, but not spoiled enough.” As well as stories about his two young sons, Ed weaves in routines about running out of petrol in the most awkward place imaginable, helping rescue an injured man in the

Cairngorms, and the nation-dividing campaign and result of the EU referendum. His way of tackling Brexit is to draw an analogy with the time his son was determined to touch an electric fence with his dad trying to warn him of the dangers. “I was telling the story of the electric fence for a while, and then suddenly it struck me that it was Brexit in microcosm,” he recalls. “I don’t want to alienate half of the population or maybe a third of my audience, but it works as an analogy whichever side you’re on. The government told you not to do this and that it would be a terrible idea, but you said ‘no, we want to do it anyway’. So now we’re doing it and it’s proving a terrible idea. I do think it’s a fair analogy but, no doubt, for some it will come across as me being a typical liberal elite Remoaner.” Loyal fans may well recognise a SIGNS OF SUCCESS: continuing theme that Ed has tackled Ed is now the in previous shows – that of his proud owner of two gradual shift from being a workingchainsaws and a class Dubliner to a fully paid-up, bow tie rurally-residing member of the middle classes. Where once he would do routines slating 4x4 owners, he is now the proud(ish) owner of such a vehicle. And in the poster for his tour, he brandishes other signifiers of social mobility: a bow-tie and chainsaw. “It’s one of two I own: that one is the smaller of the two,” Ed remarks, of his chainsaw rather than his neckwear. “I use it for firewood, both for my wood-burning stove and also for the barbecue. The first time I used one I was fine, though I think it worried my parents that I had bought a chainsaw.” Having premiered at the Edinburgh Fringe and toured around the country since September last year, as part of an extensive series of dates, Spoiler Alert is pretty well-honed. “Being on stage is enjoyable and this part of the writing process is enjoyable,” Ed says. “The empty page, though, is a scary thing. On the first leg of a tour I’ll do about an hour and 15 minutes, plus I’ll have a support act. I keep a tour diary now of places where the curries are disappointing and where they are good and where audiences have been good before.” Well, of course, we Bristol folk are great, and we’ve the best curry in the country according to the Asian Curry Awards, so Ed’s Colston Hall date should be a top gig all-round. The show arrives on 8 March – go and spoil yourself. ■

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V Day proposals.qxp_Layout 1 25/01/2018 09:58 Page 1

LOVE BRISTOL

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT Fancy proposing in one of Bristol’s lovely open spaces? Bernard Bale considers a few places to pop the question

BLAISING LOVE

SOUTH-WEST SIDE STORY

For a chocolate-box setting, venture to Blaise Hamlet in the north-west suburbs. As a hamlet under the ownership of the National Trust, it consists of nine amazing 19th century homes which have to be seen to be believed. These thatched gems sit around the village green, with its unique sundial and water pump – an ideal spot to get down on bended knee… Not far away is another historic setting with the less romantic name of Pill – simply an old Welsh word for inlet, and it is exactly that. Not only is it wonderfully picturesque; it has the second highest tidal range in the world with a difference of more than 12 metres between the highest and lowest of tides.

There are few better places to go than Leigh Woods on the south-west side of the city if you want to feel as if you’ve quietly stepped off the planet for a while. Nowadays it’s quite the idyll – a real haven of peace and contains the most beautiful of flora and fauna – yet a century ago it was still the scene of mining, quarrying and even had a dock. The Leigh Woods of today takes us closer to nature and offers sanctuary from the bustle of Bristol – seek out the 200-yearold wall to steady yourself if the nerves set in and the knees go weak. The National Trust also runs woodland skills sessions if you want to be all Bear Grylls about it, as well as tree climbs – which we reckon would be a great way to request the hand of a beloved, and a guaranteed high.

COURTLY QUESTION

How about the always-immaculate College Green alongside Bristol Cathedral – the city centre oasis with its manicured lawns has stood for some nine centuries. There are plenty of good places nearby to celebrate a successful pledge too – having swooned over one another, you could swoon over a jubilatory gelato at, you guessed it, Swoon! We’d choose a spring-time proposition, in sight of the optimistic shoots of the early daffodils. Alternatively, perhaps you’ve been harbouring plans of marriage and fancy broaching the subject in view of all Bristol’s wonderful sailing craft? You’ll find them beautifully illuminated at night, afloat on the historic dock waters that once provided a gateway to the world for equally brave explorers, pioneers and pirates that journeyed forth into the unknown. n

STUCK IN THE MIDDLE WITH YOU If you (and more importantly, your beau) like your history, a stroll along the pretty, tree-lined path of Temple Gardens could be just the spot. The original Temple Church was built by the Knights Templar, who were both warriors and monks. Their original mission was to protect pilgrims to the Holy Land during the 12th century, although their brief did change through the centuries. The church is only one of a dozen such buildings in the land and has a real romantic ambience – pretend you’re a courageous knight and pop the question in a courtly manner. Otherwise, how about Redcliffe Caves, where time has virtually stood still since man discovered fire? The caves are steeped in stories, some almost romantic, but definitely gruesome enough to require a reassuring embrace. Warm up with some impressive facts before casually throwing in your proposition.

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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Native Color, Rainmaker Gallery, until 25 February This exhibition celebrates the range and depth of colour investigation flourishing within 21st-century Native American art; and masterful colourists including Nocona Burgess, Billy Hensley, Dan Lomahaftewa, Debra Yepa-Pappan and Cara Romero. The focus is the work of artist and curator Tony Tiger, who is inspired by the expressive use of colour in the traditional ribbon-work appliqué designs of Sac and Fox tribal regalia and in Seminole patchwork. Other highlights include the paintings of Yatika Starr Fields, who describes his canvases as “sensation through color and movement”; Comanche painter Nocona Burgess who has perfected a method of applying vibrant pigments onto dark backgrounds that he describes as “painting outward”; and the late Hopi and Choctaw artist Dan Viets Lomahaftewa.

• rainmakerart.co.uk Contemplation of Souls and Culture by Tony Tiger

Brave Poor Things: Reclaiming Bristol’s Disability History, M Shed, until 15 April A landmark exhibition exploring the previously hidden histories of deaf and disabled people in Bristol. It’s estimated today that there are one billion disabled people in the world, yet their history continues to be overlooked, even while their stories are intrinsic to the environments we live in and around every day. This show tells the unique story of The Guild of the Brave Poor Things; a pioneering social and educational space for disabled people, founded in Bristol in 1896 by local philanthropist Ada Vachell. The Guild set new benchmarks for disabled people, affecting the ways they were treated and viewed by society, and more importantly, how they viewed themselves. The Guild’s 1913 building was exemplary in its design, often described as the first purpose-built building for disabled people; it played a unique role in bringing together people with physical impairments in order to socialise and enjoy themselves in a place free from judgement or stigma. It also offered routes back into work by enabling apprenticeships and teaching members to make items that were then sold. The exhibition displays artefacts made by these members, archive material and photographs depicting life at the Guild. There are also interactive elements including a digital game, and a film created by young people in Bristol. • bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed

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A Different Perspective: Feb 17 - March 3

A solo exhibition by John Evans

Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol BS8 4UB

Tel 0117 929 2527 • www.limetreegallery.com

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EXHIBITIONS

Flowered Up, Clifton Contemporary Art, 2 – 24 February This month, charming city gallery Clifton Contemporary Art is adding a little life to late winter with works that breathe light and colour. From 2 to 24 February, visitors to 25 Portland Street will be able to view paintings as part of a gorgeous collection including still life oils by Lynne Cartlidge, the wild flower meadow canvases of Sally Stafford and Lynn Golden’s pastel and metallic leaf pieces. Also on display will be the miniature floral worlds of Stephanie Axtell, Parastoo Ganjei’s majestic roses and the life forms and landscapes that fill Maggie Matthews’ Penwith visions – one of which is pictured here.

• cliftoncontemporaryart.co.uk

Spring Daffodil by Maggie Matthews

Rooftops and Archways, Christmas Steps Gallery, until 11 February Local artist Susie Ramsay’s new collection of paintings continues her focus on Bristol’s architectural landscapes, capturing the city’s viewpoints and hidden corners, and providing fresh perspectives. “The aim is to present a bold and contemporary vision of Bristol,” she says. “This collection offers a freer series of paintings than previous exhibitions, capturing the spirit and vibrancy of the city. My work is inspired by how the natural world impacts on our built environment; how a change in light, weather or season can transform our daily city landscape.” The show includes paintings of Bird Cage Walk (pictured left), Colston Street, Cliftonwood, the Granary Building and more.

• susie-ramsayartist.com

● Tipping Point, The Box at We The Curious, until 18 March The Box celebrates the synergy between art and science, and features exhibitions and artists that occupy the exciting space where art and science meet. Kathy Hinde invites us all to consider our relationship with water, and the necessity of balancing how we Image by Kathy Hinde use the world’s water resources. The installation is created using a delicate combination of glass, water, audio feedback and lighting. Free with standard admission.

Chinese boy holding a mask for a lion dance. Mikawachi kilns (Saga prefecture), Japan, 1800s ( © The Trustees of the British Museum)

• wethecurious.org

● Dressed to Impress: Netsuke and Japanese Men’s Fashion, Museum of East Asian Art, until 22 April This charming museum in beautiful Bath has teamed up with the British Museum for this unusual exhibition of small but intricate netsuke from Japan. These tiny sculptural creations were made to fasten men’s clothing and tobacco pouches, before becoming highly collectable items. This fascinating museum has some exquisite and delicate pieces and, just inside the main door, there’s free access to the museum shop which is packed with unusual gifts and mementos. • meaa.org.uk

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Free Jewellery Valuation Day at Clevedon Salerooms

Diamond Ring

Cartier Brooch

Rolex Ref: 8171

Sapphire Ring

£30,000

£23,500

£69,000

£6,600

Clevedon Salerooms will be holding a FREE no-obligation Specialist Jewellery, Watch, Silver & Gold Valuation Day at the Salerooms on Friday 16th February between 10am – 4pm. Clevedon Salerooms Specialist Valuers, Gemmologist John Kelly FGA, watch specialist Marc Burridge ASFAV and Toby Pinn MRICS will be providing free no-obligation verbal estimates with the 15th March Specialist Sale in mind. This pre-Christmas Specialist sale attracts international interest. For more information contact the salerooms on 01934 830111 or visit www.clevedon-salerooms.com

Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers The Auction Centre Kenn Road, Kenn Clevedon, BS21 6TT

Friday 16th February 10am-4pm --------------------------------------------------

Tel: 01934 830111

Held at Clevedon Salerooms, Kenn Road, Kenn, Clevedon, BS21 6TT Every lot, in every auction, illustrated and sold with live internet bidding

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Claire is pleased to see creative companies producing something new from ocean plastic and helping to raise awareness

MAKING WAVES Furniture and interior designer Claire Rendall is among the local environmentalists helping to highlight the plight of our ocean wildlife and encouraging conscientious use of problematic plastic Last year Claire was approached by sustainable furniture brand Van de Sant to design a contemporary range made from ocean plastic


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ENVIRONMENT

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ew who recently watched the amazing Blue Planet series on BBC One can have failed to be deeply moved by the plight of our ocean wildlife due to the extensive dumping of plastic into our seas. The statistics are mind boggling. Each year 300 million tons of plastic is produced world-wide, of which eight million tons ends up in the ocean, adding to the current 5.25 trillion pieces of debris. Of that mass, 269,000 tons float on the surface with some four billion plastic micro fibres per square kilometre littering the deep-sea floor. It should come as no surprise that plastic pollution is so acute that it has entered our food chain with two thirds of the world’s fish stock suffering plastic ingestion and 200 ‘dead zones’ in the sea where no life exists. By 2050 the plastic in the world’s oceans will weigh more than the fish. This is even more alarming when you realise it takes 400 to 1,000 years for an average plastic bottle to decompose. The plastics that do decompose within a year, leach toxic chemicals such as Bisphenol A, PCBs and derivatives of polystyrene into the water. Americans use 500 million single-use plastic straws per day and, globally, 500 million plastic bags are used each year; the massive floods in Bangladesh in 1988 and 1998 were made more acute by plastic bags clogging the drains. So, what’s to be done? Clearly, we need to act fast and with China now refusing to accept our 500,000 tons of plastic waste sent annually, the problem is worse than ever as our recycling plants bulge under the back up. As with most things, it needs both consumer and governmental pressure. A 25p levy on disposable (not the same as recyclable) coffee cups should help with the 2.5 billion cups thrown away each year. Certainly, the ban on free carrier bags (except for meat and fish) has drastically helped reduce usage. Sky News has launched an Ocean Rescue campaign using its important platform to engage and educate. Recently its Sky Rainforest Rescue claimed to have saved one billion trees in Brazil, which makes this an important initiative. British adventurer, ecologist and environmentalist David de Rothschild has sailed across the oceans in ‘The Plastiki’ – a 60-foot catamaran made from 12,500 plastic bottles – to highlight the issue and United by Blue removes a pound of plastic from the environment for every purchase made of its products. Many bars and restaurants have started “straw wars” – replacing plastic straws with biodegradable ones or reusable metal ones, or not handing out single-use plastic straws unless they are specifically asked for.

...By 2050 the plastic in the world’s oceans will weigh more than the fish... Perhaps even more impressive is the government of Kenya who has introduced the world’s toughest plastic bag law with a £31,000 fine or four years in jail for selling or even using a non-degradable plastic bag. In the UK, most councils will recycle plastic bottles, but many won’t touch any of the other recyclable plastics, leaving, for example, plastic food trays and bags to go into landfill and beyond. Clearly this is not good enough. Project ‘Ocean Cleanup’ has been launched to create an oceanscraper with the aim of cleaning up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch – the cluster of marine debris particles in the central North Pacific Ocean. Sometimes referred to as ‘gyres’, these massive areas of ocean see currents converge, bringing with them huge amounts of rubbish. A 100m prototype boom has been tested off the coast of the Netherlands, sweetly named Boomy McBoomface, and if successful it will be scaled up to a 100km version and set to work in the Pacific. On the creative side are companies using ocean plastic waste to produce something new. Adidas have joined with Parley for the Oceans, an organisation raising awareness of the fragility of this major global ecosystem, to make a running shoe from ocean plastic waste. Closer to home, the amazing Dr Linda Thomas, a Bristol

designer horrified by the 14,000 cheap bodyboards dumped in Devon and Cornwall each year, worked with Beach Care and created a 22metre-long dress from the covers. This has recently been followed up by her ‘99 Dead Balloons Float By’ – a dress made the from discarded balloons found on the beach, to promote the horrors of releasing helium balloons into the environment. Every one of us needs to think about where these balloons end up.

...We have to stop making single-use plastic. It needs to become as socially unacceptable as smoking in a car with a baby present, while texting and driving...

Last year I was approached by Robert Milder, owner and founder of leading sustainable furniture brand Van de Sant, to design a range of luxury, contemporary furniture from ocean plastic waste, principally for eco super-yachts. Robert is based in the Netherlands, and his vision is impressive. The plastic is collected, chipped and compressed to make an extremely hard and versatile board. This forms the structure of the furniture, which means it’s suitable for both indoor and outdoor use. Using recyclable foam and aluminium, each piece of furniture is made to order and numbered so that at the end of its life, it’s fully recyclable, neatly creating a circular and sustainable economy. Van de Sant is working with Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, the United Nations and the National Geographic Encounter: Ocean Odyssey in New York – a first-of-its-kind immersive entertainment experience using groundbreaking technology to journey into the ocean. For the next six months, we’re showcasing Van de Sant furniture at Chanii B’s in Milsom Place in Bath. These pieces are covered in fabric by Bionic Yarn which is also made from ocean plastic – making for the perfect partnership. These creative initiatives are important on two fronts. They make use of the plastic that is already littering our oceans and so take it out of the environmental equation. Perhaps more importantly however, is that these products highlight the issue and help bring it to a wider audience. Clearly the main issue is that we have to stop making single-use plastic. It needs to become as socially unacceptable as smoking in a car with a baby present while texting and driving. It’s sad that it takes the problem to get to such epic proportions for mankind to take action, but we are where we are. So go to Chanii B’s and see for yourself how an ugly mash of plastic waste can be transformed into something rather lovely. You’ll be sitting pretty. ■ • clairerendall.com

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FOOD & Drink

TASTY TITBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

GET THEE TO THE GREEK Lovers of Greek cuisine – have you spotted The Real Greek in Cabot Circus yet? Another DFL (that’s down-from-London, of course...) to arrive in Bristol in recent months, this newcomer to the local food scene offers a laid-back, Greek island-inspired space for locals to escape the bustle of the shops and sit themselves down with traditional cold and hot mezes, grilled skewers, marinated meats and souvlaki wraps. Seating up to 80, the restaurant – led by Bristolian and Greek Cypriot Johnny Koumourou – has a mix of hand-sourced wines and beers from Greece, and is using premium, wholesome ingredients from Greece and Cyprus whenever possible in its menu – developed with Greek Cypriot TV presenter and author Tonia Buxton. “We’re really excited to be in Bristol,” said operations director Christos Karatzenis. “We hope the new restaurant offers a relaxed space to enjoy time spent with friends and family over great food and drinks!” • therealgreek.com

PRINCELY SUM Bristol-based cancer charity Penny Brohn UK received £41,000 in the form of a grant from The Prince of Wales’ Charitable Foundation recently, to develop its nutritional programme. The princely sum covers 450 nutritional therapy appointments, 36 healthy cooking demos, six healthy cooking day workshops, three short retreats and a seven-day recipe plan book. The book – based on Penny Brohn’s healthy eating guidelines and helping people facing cancer learn how good nutrition and small lifestyle changes can improve health and wellbeing, and reduce the impact of treatment – is packed with inspirational breakfasts, lunches, dinners, snacks, desserts and dressings, and is available free on the charity’s one-day nutrition course and retreats, or to buy for £5.95. “The Prince has seen, first-hand, some of the excellent work done by Penny Brohn,” said a Foundation spokesperson. “Through his Foundation, we hope more will benefit from the charity's efforts to promote the importance of diet and nutrition, and to help make life with cancer that little bit easier for people.” • pennybrohn.org.uk; princeofwalescharitablefoundation.org.uk

AVOCADON’T: A BOLD MOVE Bristol’s Tincan Coffee Co. has launched a new menu and, in a bid to be truly ethical, has removed avocado from the breakfast menu. Since it opened in April 2016, Tincan’s café in North Street has prided itself on its original takes on breakfast and brunch classics – their twist on the classic eggs and avocado becoming somewhat legendary among their customer base. However, ethics have always been important to owners Adam and Jessie, who were alarmed to learn of the huge environmental impact of farming avocados – from the vast amounts of water needed to farm the now ubiquitous breakfast staple, to the illegal deforestation happening to make way for it. Keeping avocado on the menu didn’t fit with Tincan’s ethos – which includes the use of recyclable straws and compostable packaging made using plant-based bioplastic – so it has gone. However the new menu includes such delights as American sourdough pancakes, seasonal ‘shrooms, and breakfast bubble and squeak – sounds good to us! “We love an avocado, particularly when it is on sourdough with an egg but the ethics behind running a café have always been important to us,” said founder Adam White, who hopes, later this year, to launch his own re-usable cups. “Serving avocados, knowing the huge socio-economic impact that avocado farming is having in Mexico and California, just didn’t feel right. The new menu is full of Tincan twists on brunch classics like huevos rancheros and some awesome breakfast muffins as well as some new dishes.”

• tincancoffee.co.uk

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MO LE A SW LS OR O N TH OW S, FR AT AM PT ON

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VALENTINES NIGHT IN

Have a romantic night in

TOP QUALITY LOVINGLY PREPARED BY YOU FOR YOUR SPECIAL PERSON y MATURE STEAKS y BEEF WELLINGTONS FOR TWO y PORK OR VENISON VALENTINE STEAKS y PHEASANT EN CROUTE www.henleazebutchers.co.uk

101 Henleaze Road, Bristol BS9 4JP 0117 962 1095 147 Church Road, Frampton Cotterell, Bristol BS36 2JX 01454 777337 EXPERIENCE THE REAL GREEK IN BRISTOL

Now open in Cabot Circus, The Real Greek is offering 25% off main menu food to anyone showing a valid cinema ticket for the same day as dining (T&C’s apply).

BRISTOL

25% off

The Perfect Gift! A voucher for our Bristol wine tastings makes a unique gift for all special occasions. Fun, informal and informative courses to suit all experience levels. We now offer Craft Beer, Gin and Whisky tastings too. Cheers!

www.cliftonwineschool.com 0117 370 6576

main menu food if you show valid showcase cinema ticket for day of booking

84A Glass House, Cabot Circus, Bristol, BS1 3BX www.therealgreek.com/bristol • Tel: 0117 990 2170

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HEY, BIG SPENDER? Melissa Blease examines the practice of tipping serving staff and talks to some of the people at the sharp end of our gratuitous gestures

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any folk do it without giving the issue a second thought, rounding the bill up to a few quid above the bottom line. Some people apply a more studious method, ‘rewarding’ staff for ‘good behaviour’ and applying penalties when service hasn’t been as efficient as they’d like it to be. Others take a clinical approach, whipping out calculators in order to strictly adhere to the “required amount” of 10-15% added to the total sum (according to Debrett’s, “the UK’s number one authority on social etiquette”). So, what kind of tipper are you: scrooge or spendthrift? Be careful how you respond to that question because according to many psychologists, from armchair to professional, your attitude to tipping restaurant staff says more about your personality than your job, your handwriting or your body language. 54 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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“I can always tell when I’m serving a newly-dating couple because the man – and it is still usually the man – is always particularly generous when it comes to leaving a tip... As long as his date can see how much he leaves!” says Erica, who works at a popular local gastropub. “He’s letting his date know that firstly, he’s not short of cash, and secondly, he’s not mean – nobody wants to date a meanie, do they?” Very true.

...Psychologists say your attitude to tipping restaurant staff says more about your personality than your job, your handwriting or your body language... But there are, indeed, plenty of meanies around. “It’s not unusual for a table of diners to rifle around for spare change to leave on the table after they’ve all paid their sections of the bill,” says Stan, who works in a diner in Cabot Circus. “This is more likely to happen if it’s a table of tourists; I think they’re thinking, we’ll probably never come here again, so we don’t care what the staff think of us. But I’d rather have a table


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TIPPING

leave nothing at all than 84p between four of them – it’s just condescending.” Whether we agree with the practice or not, tipping is a timehonoured way of recognising good service while offering a quantifiable ‘thank you’ to a person who works in an industry that’s hardly renowned for paying generous wages. While staff wages shouldn’t be our responsibility, some restaurant owners believe it’s okay to take extra cash from customers to contribute towards their staff’s take-home pay.

...Tipping is a time-honoured way of recognising good service; a quantifiable ‘thank you’ to a person working in an industry that’s hardly renowned for generous wages...

cartoonstock.com

A recent survey conducted by the Institute for Public Service discovered that fewer than half of all restaurant workers get to keep tips given by customers, as their bosses put gratuities towards staff wages: a practice that was officially outlawed by the government back in 2009 but apparently still goes on today, albeit in many clever disguises. “I worked for a restaurant who only let floor staff take home tips to a maximum of £10 a week as the rest had to go towards kitchen staff wages,” says one Bristol-based waiter. “I’ve been told that the cost of processing a tip left on a credit or debit card comes to more than the tip itself, so the restaurant I work for can’t afford to do it,” says another. But there’s no law that requires that tips left by customers go to the restaurant staff anyway; little wonder, then, that 83% of the people polled for the IPC survey – many of them former or current waiting staff themselves – believe that the government should amend consumer protection laws so that both employees and customers are clear about tipping policies and cover charges. Ah, cover charges: a tip – or a tax?

Cover and ‘discretionary’ service charges are increasingly appearing as an extra cost added at the end of our total restaurant bill. “The restaurant I work in adds a 15% service charge to all bills during evening service,” says a waiter at a recentlyopened, big name chain. “I can tally up what tips the team should be sharing at the end of any given shift just from the number of tables we’ve served, but we never get anything close to that amount at the end of the evening. The bosses say that the cover charge goes towards the general cost of servicing the whole restaurant, from cleaning the loos to changing the lightbulbs. But when people see a service charge, they think it’s going directly to the people who served them their meal.” There are customers, however, who may not even notice the additional charge; at the end of a convivial evening out, it’s easy to ignore the small print (and it tends to be very small indeed) ‘flagging up’ an additional cost generally fluctuating between 12.5-15%. And what if the service has been less than efficient anyway? Asking for the charge to be removed – which you’re totally free to do – isn’t an easy task, especially if there’s been more than one server involved. Bear in mind, too, that many restaurants genuinely do share service charges between all the staff involved in making your evening go swimmingly, from the meet ’n’ greet team to the kitchen porters who do the dishes and take out the bins – surely those hard-working people shouldn’t be penalised if your main server has been sulky, or inept, or just plain lazy? But we’re getting perilously close to some kind of ancient masterservant power trip relationship here, far removed from a friendly ‘thank you’ custom between equals. Has the very concept of leaving a gratuity become outmoded altogether? “To be honest, I’d prefer to be paid a decent wage for the work I do, and not have to constantly hope that customers leave me a decent tip in order to help me make ends meet,” said one waiter – and he wasn’t alone in his opinion. But as the convention of tipping is unlikely to be phased out anytime soon, restaurant customers can play a big part in putting a stop to bad practice – top tips include paying all gratuities in cash so there aren’t any transaction costs to be claimed back at the processing point, and asking your server (or even the restaurant manager, or owner) if staff do indeed get their fair share of tips, especially service and cover charge supplements. It’s time to stop tiptoeing around the subject of what happens to tips, and demand change. ■ THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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RESTAURANT | REVIEW

MESA TAPAS & BAR Stepping into the charming surrounds of this Westbury Park eatery, Jessica Hope is transported to the side streets of Spain

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magine a couple, scurrying out of a taxi into the winter air, attempting to dodge the bitterly cold wind produced from the back end of a storm. They cross the road, and a warm, inviting glow from a nearby restaurant draws them in. As they open the doors to the quaint eatery, they are swept from blustery, dark, British days to the sunny salvation of the sort of place you might find on the side streets of Madrid. This is Mesa Tapas and Bar, just around the corner from The Downs. Opened in March 2017 by chef Olly Gallery and Julian Faiello, who also run the Italian restaurant, Prego, opposite, Mesa offers a take on Spanish small plates, and prides itself on its Iberian ingredients, wine and spirits. My partner, Russell, and I had the pleasure of dining here on a Monday evening, when most restaurants usually see a dip in the number of diners compared to the rest of the week. However, this wasn’t the case for Mesa – it was bustling and nearly full by 7.30pm, maybe owing to the fact that the restaurant has a 20% off deal on Mondays, and most certainly because of the high quality of the dishes being produced in its relaxed, friendly environment. We were greeted by front-of-house chap Danny, whose knowledge and enthusiasm for Spanish cuisine and drinks shines through. He recommended we start by trying the Corpse Reviver cocktail, £8 – a prohibition-style short drink of gin, Cocchi Americano, triple-sec and lemon juice. This was a refreshing and delicate drink – surprising for the strength of the alcohol in it – that cleansed the palate. As we perused the menu, we nibbled on big, beautiful Gordal olives marinated in-house with orange, bay and fennel, and a mix of dried almonds, giant corn and broad beans with salt and paprika (which my partner has talked enthusiastically about on numerous occasions since), £3.50 each. We ordered six dishes to share and these came out promptly; at the table almost as soon as they hit the plate. We began by digging into a plate of aubergine fries with cumin salt and miel de caña, £4.95. Now this is a crowd-pleaser – even people put off by the texture of aubergine are likely to be fans. Having been lightly fried, the aubergine – prone to absorbing oil quickly – wasn’t too greasy and instead was incredibly moreish, the drizzle of miel de caña adding a sweet stickiness that had us wanting more. The next dish we delved into was slow-cooked cauliflower with coriander and spices, £4. The delicious aroma surrounded us as it came to the table, and the cauliflower was soft, delicately spiced and the perfect accompaniment to both the meat and fish dishes that next arrived from the kitchen. Adobo chicken thighs with padrón peppers and chilli yoghurt, £5.95, were succulent and smokey with golden crispy bits adding to the deep flavour of the marinated meat. There was a subtle heat from the peppers, and the yoghurt added a creamy, cool element to the dish. From the specials board we ordered the scallops with morcilla (a Spanish-style black pudding), spiced broad beans and membrillo, £9.50. These were by far the sweetest, juiciest scallops I have ever tasted. The morcilla just fell apart, complementing the scallops with an earthy, savoury touch, and the broad bean purée cut through with its light spices. Served next was the overnight brisket with patatas a lo pobre and

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romesco sauce, £7.50. The brisket melted away in the mouth, while the patatas (potatoes, green peppers and onion) soaked up the salty, savoury meat flavours and the romesco added a pop of colour, its red peppers creating a sweet contrast. A hearty, comforting dish to be enjoyed in the dark of winter and to put a smile on your face. Our final dish was octopus with Valencian-style arrocina beans and mojo verde, £7.95, a dish, according to chef Olly, that the team take great care with – indeed, overcooked octopus is a very unfortunate occurrence. The extra attention paid off: it was delicate and perfectly cooked. The beans had deep flavour, having soaked up the sauce, and added a different texture. Fully satisfied, we mopped up with some warm, fresh sourdough bread, with a side of olive oil infused with smoky paprika.

...We ended with El Castaño Monastress dessert wine – which was simply like drinking a good jam... Before jumping into the dessert menu, we tried a refreshing Montenegro Spritz, £7.50, with Amaro Montenegro, spiced pink grapefruit and peppercorn syrup made in-house, prosecco, soda, ice and dehydrated pink grapefruit, served with a paper straw (no unnecessary plastic in sight, hurrah). With its spice and citrus notes, it’d be equally as great in the height of summer as it would in front of the fire on a chilly winter evening. The drinks menu also features an extensive wine list that Danny has been crafting for some time, with a variety of mostly Spanish white, rosé, red and sparkling varieties plus, as you might expect, a range of fortifieds, from white port to dry sherries, and a selection of cold lager and cider. Somehow we squeezed in dessert: the frozen crema Catalana, similar to creme brûlée and beautifully presented with orange torta and caramel shards; and the thick, decadent dark chocolate and salted caramel pot with crème fraîche and chocolate crumble, £4.95 each. We were left fighting for the last spoonful, with Russell scraping the bowl. We ended our feast with deep Pedro Ximenez sherry, and El Castaño Monastrell dessert wine, which was simply like drinking a good jam – if you’re too full for a dessert, then just a glass of this is a sweet way to conclude. The food is fresh and authentic, the decor cosy and casual, the service friendly and attentive. Testament to the inclusive feel were the people eating on their own, the mothers and daughters, the groups of friends catching up, the couples enjoying date night; and that, despite being outside the city-centre scene, it’s usually packed on weekends – booking at least two weeks in advance is advised. And a taxi is definitely recommended as you won’t be able to resist the range of cocktails, wines and beers – trust us... • mesabar.co.uk


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FOOD

YES, CHEF Verity Hesketh meets the brains behind the 5 O’Clock Apron

The food books Claire rates aren’t necessarily cook books per se; more like food encyclopaedias that she can refer to for complementary flavous rather than a specific recipe

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FOOD

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ood is part of life, food is story telling. In today’s liberalised society, it is also perhaps the most international means of communication that we have. In an old, all-at-angles cottage off the Gloucester Road, chef and author Claire Thomson is inspired daily to find ways of communicating that food doesn’t have to be tedious and time consuming to be delicious. The very opposite, in fact. At her kitchen table, catering for her busy family, there’s room for autonomy, room for individuality. When dinner is served there are always other extra plates; a dish of chilli flakes, a bowl of lemon wedges to squeeze. In a world full of machine-made meals, Claire’s are a breath of fresh air. Better known as Five O’Clock Apron, she’s a blogger who – you guessed it – posts at 5pm more or less on the dot every day, with a particular slant towards cooking for a family. She is now a cookery writer with three tomes under her apron strings, and a fourth on the way. The Art of the Larder, her third book, was one of the most successful food books of 2017, keeping Jamie, Hugh and Nigella company in the top 10 best seller lists. Its attraction is plain to see, even from the title – frankly, who wouldn’t want a larder? The very word speaks of comfortable organisation – the knowledge that you’re covered, should a sudden snowstorm ground you. Claire’s kitchen table is, no doubt, her hub – but the kitchen itself is far from a mysterious, off-limits place where delicious meals are simply magicked up; Claire’s girls are encouraged to get stuck in and to have opinions about flavours, spices and ingredients. It’s a room as down to earth as its owner; jars labelled by the girls (Dorothy, aged four, Ivy, seven, and Grace, 10) line the kitchen dresser and include many names of spices I’ve never heard of, let alone know how to pronounce. Stacks of plates are arranged neatly, ready for the extra guest or five, and aprons hang behind the door. “My aprons are my battledress,” says Claire. “I’m ready for anything once the strings are tied. My favourite is one made for me in a lovely denim blue with big pockets and adjustable straps. The girls have an apron each with their names on and they love getting them on and helping out.

...There shouldn’t be any need for food trends in today’s society; we’ve been through so many fashions, now is the time for good, simple meals... “We don’t own a TV so after dinner we make time to read lots of books, take stock of the day and indulge in a glass of wine – us that is, not the kids.” The children are clearly never far from Claire’s thoughts, popping up at every corner of the conversation. She deftly fishes out a volume from her bookshelf. “If you have any cookbook to refer to, make it Jane Grigson’s veg book and fruit books,” she says. “They are proper tomes. The food books that I rate aren’t necessarily cook books per se; more like food encyclopaedias where I can find out what flavours complement each other, rather than slavishly following someone else’s idea of what goes with what and how it should be done.” And what is on the menu for five o’clock tonight? She shrugs; “I’m thinking of a saucy, slow-cook casserole – wintery flavours for hunkering down. Nice and easy, no faffing about – the broccoli will be left to steam on top of the rest of the casserole, there might be a few dates in there, a nice bit of beef. Practically a one-pot dish.” Not much washing-up? She nods emphatically; “Absolutely.” It certainly sounds attractively down to earth and no-nonsense; whipped up fairly sharpish. What’s not to love? Claire briefly explains her diverse background for me; as a child she lived first in Botswana, then London, and finally ended up in a rural idyll in Shropshire during her teens. Her earliest food memory is teething on a piece of biltong – the dried cured meat common in southern parts of Africa. Shropshire, despite the idyll (a large vegetable garden and a bee hive), could not hold Claire, and after studying media and journalism at

university, she upped sticks to go back-packing around Australia and Thailand, absorbing as many flavours and tastes as possible along the way. “It was then I felt in my bones that I needed to write about food,” she discloses. These adventures were swiftly followed by chef training in Bristol and work in London. As well as kick-starting her career, through this Claire also met her husband Matt (a fellow chef) in London. The pair travelled for nine months, first to New Zealand and then back to China, via India, all by public transport and with Dot – Claire’s youngest, then just a year old – carried throughout in a sling. Although at first glance, Claire’s recipes seem homely, their homeliness belies their diverse layers. Expect to see recipes from all corners of the earth, with a focus on the easy and inexpensive, and no compromise on flavour. “Meals for the family could cost as little as a few quid, but they’re always yummy,” she says. For Claire, consuming food needs to start with understanding, and the only way of understanding it is through education. “I most often get asked about lunches; how to put together something filling, wholesome and, above all, quick. School dinners are still fairly bad, despite all the good work that’s been put towards them – they are essentially a clumsily designed conveyer belt. Recently I was able to visit one of the factories where school dinners are produced, and there I came face to face with the food charts aimed at optimal nutrition for children… I was taken aback. Butter was listed as one of the baddies. How have we arrived in a world where butter is dangerous? It’s not necessarily good or bad, it just is.” Claire’s current project Table of Delights, cooked up with her husband, is a way to educate the younger generation about food – through a fabulously nutty, splendidly batty interactive theatre show. It is truly a Spike Milliganish, Pythonesque achievement of education through a hands-on approach. Claire has harnessed the talents of several artists and creatives to bring the show to life over the last three years, including Bristol graffiti artist Alex Lucas. Claire has just launched a website to extend the project – a celebration of ingredients where you can find recipes, fun facts and tunes that turn into serious ear-worm very quickly (my personal favourite being a ditty about spuds – essential listening for any little one with a keenness for carbs). Today, Claire gathers her daily inspiration from her shopping commute; five minutes out of her front door and into the Gloucester Road. You don’t need to travel to the ends of the earth here to pick up exotic flavours, and Claire is no stranger to Asian supermarkets, Polish delis and a good, old-fashioned greengrocer; her eyes glisten while recounting her bargains. “Yesterday I picked up a massive bag of overripe bananas for £1! I made banana bread that day, perfect for the girls after school.” When I ask her about food trend predictions, she briskly rejoins, “There shouldn’t be any real need for food trends in today’s society; we’ve been through so many fashions, now is the time for good, simple meals.” Claire’s favourite ingredients are simple, but easily made stylish: “I love food from that hot, dusty southern belt of countries – Spain, Turkey, Italy. I wouldn’t be without pasta, olive oil or tinned tomatoes. When in doubt, these are my go-tos.” It is impossible not to be swept along by Claire’s enthusiasm, but rather than being overtaken by the urge to cook anything complicated, I’m refreshed by her philosophies of simplicity and of edible egalitarianism. ■ • 5oclockapron.com


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BRISTOL UPDATES

BITE-SIZED BUSINESS AND COMMUNITY NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY

BLOOMING PARTNERSHIP

Eleanor Tomlinson at The Bottle Yard (image © Mammoth Screen & BBC)

EXPANSION BREWING

A THRIVING SECTOR

St Austell Brewery has announced the opening of a Bristol-based, storage and distribution depot in Avonmouth, creating at least seven new jobs in the area. As work continued on the construction of the company’s multi-million pound Hare Brewery investment at the Bath Ales site in Warmley – due for completion in May – the decision was taken to combine St Austell Brewery’s existing distribution facility in the area and the Bath Ales logistics teams into a larger and more accessible site. “Once work started on the new brewhouse to double the capacity of the Bath Ales output, it was obvious that there would not be adequate space for storage and distribution at Hare House, which gave us the perfect opportunity to find a bigger and better site to merge the Bath Ales distribution with the existing St Austell Avonmouth distribution team,” said head of supply chain Kevin Andrews. With increased stockholding and improved service operations, the new depot forms part of a wider strategic move to improve the brewery’s logistics network and increase its South West coverage, enabling it to be more responsive to customer needs.

An estimated 380 jobs were created onsite at Bristol’s Bottle Yard Studios last year, according to annual figures. The largest dedicated studio facility in the west of England, it has attracted a regular supply of UK and overseas productions to the city since 2010. A breakdown of the figures indicates that an estimated 83% of the positions generated were filled by crew working on productions made at the studios while 16% were created by business tenants providing specialist production services on site. 64% of posts created benefited the local workforce, with 243 positions filled by Bristol crew. Skills development was also boosted on-site, with 14% of the total positions filled by trainees. “A major part of our successful bid to become the UK’s second UNESCO City of Film was a demonstrable track record of creating employment and training opportunities in the film sector,” said Mayor Marvin Rees. “These figures show the growth we’re experiencing in the industry, fuelled in no small part by having a dedicated studio facility that draws production activity into the city.”

• staustellbrewery.co.uk

• thebottleyard.com

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Volunteers at the Metford Road Community Orchard in Redland have welcomed a vital sponsorship by Bristol law firm Barcan+Kirby. It has allowed the group to implement a crucial hedge laying project to maintain the orchard, encourage new growth and protect local wildlife. Hedge laying, a traditional skill used on farmlands and countryside across the UK, is vital for creating wildlife corridors and safe havens for small animals and nesting birds. The funding is part of Barcan+Kirby's 'Growing Together' campaign, which supports community orchards, gardens, meadows and a city farm located in proximity to the firm's six offices in Bristol and Thornbury. “We are delighted to be able to help,” said managing partner Bill Willcocks. “Grassroots projects such as this make such a positive contribution to the environment and give local people an opportunity to benefit through volunteering as they develop skills.” • barcankirby.co.uk

CONGRATULATIONS! Sharp Family Law has announced the promotion of Clare Webb to partner. Since joining the firm in 2011, Clare has been committed to finding constructive ways to address the challenges resulting from divorce and separation and developed her practice to help clients resolve current issues and shape their futures to ensure long-term security. “We are pleased to acknowledge Clare’s dedication to clients and commitment to this firm. A well-deserved promotion for a truly valued member of the Sharp Family Law team,” said the firm. • sharpfamilylaw.com


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SELLING YOUR SMALL BUSINESS: FOUR THINGS TO THINK ABOUT GEORGINA BRYANT

Want to become a better leader? Come along to our Open Evening on Wednesday 21 March between 6-8pm to find out more.

Making the decision to sell your business isn’t always easy, but preparing for the inevitable business exit is crucial for a stress-free process. Georgina Bryant, Commercial Solicitor at Barcan+Kirby, shares her tips on selling your small business.

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s a small business owner, selling your business may be something that crosses your mind on a regular basis. It could be that your interests have changed, or you just want to retire. Whatever the reason, a plan for the exit involves preparing for the sales process, and there are a few things to consider. Selling your business won’t happen overnight and you’ll need to put a strategy in place that will make your business desirable to potential buyers. There are certain questions you’ll have to ask yourself such as do you want a full or partial exit? What kind of buyer do you want? Taking time to firm up your objectives will be key in the selling process.

Plan in advance If you wake up one morning and decide you want to sell your business, you’ll have to be realistic about timescales. Selling a business can take up to two years, as there are multiple factors to consider. You’ll have to involve your accountant and solicitor early on in the process in order to obtain advice around tax, staff and contracts. Putting a good plan in place as early as possible will help alleviate further stress as the process goes on.

Consider your options There are different ways to structure the sale of your business, such as selling the shares in the company or just certain assets of the business. As a seller you might prefer to sell the whole company, but a buyer may not want to take on all the liabilities. If you’re a family-run business, selling to a larger corporate player may not be the best move if you want the culture of your business to stay the same. You might consider selling your business to your management staff (depending on employee size) which has the advantages of keeping the process smooth, given they know your business in depth already, and boosting morale within the team.

Know your buyer Building a relationship with your potential buyer is advisable from the start, so you’ll know if they’re the right fit to take over your business. Through this process, you’ll also be able to pre-empt issues that they might be concerned about. A smoother sale usually happens between two parties who’ve built up trust between them.

Prepare your business for sale You’ll save time if you get your business in order before a buyer starts asking lots of questions. Make sure your paperwork is in good shape and to hand. A buyer will have confidence that your operations have been run well if you present an organised and well-documented business from the outset. Not only will this help with the process, but it may have a real impact on the commercial deal you are able to strike. n Georgina is a Senior Associate within Barcan+Kirby’s commercial department and advises businesses on all aspects of commercial law. Contact her at g.bryant@barcankirby.co.uk or on 0117 325 2929

www.barcankirby.co.uk

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Designed for busy managers to fit around a demanding management role, this part-time programme will help you to: • enhance your impact as a leader • understand organisational complexity and issues affecting success • improve your ability to manage change and uncertainty • make better choices about growth and strategic direction

Email Cheralyn Dark at efim-scl@bristol.ac.uk or Tel: 0117 954 6694 for details www.bristol.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/2018/ssl/msc-strategy-change-leadership/ Come along to our Open Evening on Wednesday 21 March 2018 between 6-8pm. To register, please email Cheralyn at efim-scl@bristol.ac.uk


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Motoring Bristol - Audi RS5.qxp_Layout 1 23/01/2018 09:55 Page 1

MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

A MARVEL OF PERFORMANCE Audi’s new RS5 has all the muscle of its predecessors and is a real challenger in the super-coupé stakes – it also has refinement and a beautifully balanced ride. Motoring correspondent Chris Lilly discovers that the RS5 is the new Quattro for all seasons

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udi has a proud heritage when it comes to fast coupés, based on its association with the legendary Quattro. Very much in the same mould as its 80s predecessor is the new RS5 – a rapid two-door coupé with four-wheel drive and a styling that catches the eye. Things have moved on somewhat since Audi was winning World Rally Championships in the Quattro, though. Under the bonnet of the RS5 is a twin-turbo V6 producing 450hp and 600 Nm of torque. It’s a powerhouse of a unit, and gives the Audi some impressive performance figures. 0–62mph is dispatched in just 3.9 seconds before heading on to an electronically limited top speed of 155mph. Should buyers so wish, there is an option to de-restrict the RS5 and, given the chance, it would then reach a top speed of 174mph. Installed behind the wheel, the Audi quickly reminds me of a Nissan GT-R, with the same prodigious levels of power – and more importantly torque – that can be deployed at any time and in any conditions thanks to a sophisticated four-wheel drive system. What’s impressive is the way that the Audi has a highly accessible performance, such that with, seemingly, just a flick of your right toe, the pace picks up at levels that are likely to lose you your licence without careful attention to the speedometer. The huge levels of torque are available low down the rev range, which means acceleration is effortless at just about any speed. That trait also means that the RS5 is a versatile machine, just as capable of being driven flat-out as covering long distances or pottering

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about town. The eight-speed automatic gearbox deals with the engine well, putting power to all four wheels all the time. The Audi offers no complaint at being driven around town, with none of the jerkiness that can be displayed with some high-performance machines. Equally, it settles down to a motorway cruise without fuss, providing a refined environment in which to travel at speed. The RS5’s engine – or rather the exhausts – can produce a pleasing racket, with a sporty rumble rising to a roar when testing the Audi’s performance potential. It burbles nicely on the over-run too, which is of no importance apart from the fact it makes the driving experience all the more fun for the enthusiastic driver. When driven more sedately, the Audi’s cabin is well cossetted from external sounds – be this engine, wind or tyre noise. It’s the sportiest of the A5 range, so the RS5 isn’t as refined as the conventional coupé, but it’s surprisingly civilised for the majority of the time when used as a means of travel, rather than as a toy. The handling matches the engine’s character too. It’s sharp, but without unsettling the car or being ‘too’ sharp. The variable power assistance takes a short amount of time to get dialled into, with the driver needing to learn its nuances. However, the brain quickly ‘gets it’ and the Audi can be driven easily and with precision. The one criticism is that there is little feedback, noticeably less than its super-coupé rivals in the shape of the BMW M4 and Mercedes C63 AMG. Most of the time, this is a benefit, providing a more relaxing


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driving experience, but it means the RS5 can’t compete with its competitors in terms of pure driving enjoyment. The suspension is well set-up, combating body roll while also dealing with road imperfections. It is more comfortable than one might suspect when climbing aboard an Audi RS model, but this reflects the way Audi has targeted the RS5 in the market. The M4, for example, is a better drive when making the most of the performance available. It would beat the Audi around a track I would suggest – particularly in the hands of someone who knows what they are doing. However, it is the RS5 that I would prefer to drive on a circuit, particularly if it were a long way away. The cabin plays a part in this too. It lives up to Audi’s typically excellent standards, with a clean design and enough technology available to satisfy even the most demanding of customers. Audi’s Virtual Cockpit is a superb digital instrument display – customisable to show different elements depending on the driver’s preference. The info-tainment system is logical and easy to use, too, with a dial surrounded by some shortcut buttons to get you around the menus quickly. Audi offers a drive mode select system which allows for Comfort, Auto, Dynamic and Individual settings. Options fitted to the model on test included a head-up display, parking assistance pack, Bang & Olufsen sound system, panoramic glass sunroof, RS Sport suspension with Dynamic Ride Control, and 20-inch alloys amongst other items. It was also de-restricted according to the specification sheet. Suffice to say I trusted the press team, rather than put that particular feature to the test. A shocking dereliction of duty I know, but I value my driver’s licence. In all, the RS5 tested came in at £78,345. Somewhat surprisingly, the RS5 can seat four adults. Those in the rear would be better off being short of stature, but it is possible for four to be transported without complaints about head and shoulder space. Leg space comments will depend on the height of both those in the rear seats, and how far back those up front position their seats. No matter who’s sitting in the back, the RS5 makes a decent effort at being a practical car, with a good-sized boot – more than large enough for a pushchair and other bits and pieces. The styling helps with the RS5’s practicality. Its chiselled shape doesn’t just emphasise its sportiness and heritage – the squared-off wheel arches, for example, are pure Quattro. It also frees up cabin and boot space. The roofline doesn’t swoop down at the rear, which makes the RS5 a more comfortable proposition for those sitting in the back. It also means that the Audi has Grand Tourer levels of space. Audi has set up the RS5 to mimic GT levels of comfort, too, foregoing large bolsters on the front seats for more comfortable pews. In short, the RS5 sits in a curious middle-ground between GT car and uber-coupé. It has the speed to compete with its rivals, but without the pure driving involvement that is almost a prerequisite of this class. Audi, though, shows that other ways of doing things are available, and the RS5 makes a compelling case in a small market, but one crammed with quality. The RS5 is stunningly fast – and in just about all conditions thanks to its Quattro four-wheel drive system. It also tackles long-distance drives with ability, put to the test with a cross-country drive in the middle of winter that was not only comfortable, but also fast and entertaining. It’s a bruiser of a car, but one that is easy to live with – a bruiser that’s on your side. ■

• For further information visit contact Bristol Audi, Lysander Road, Cribbs Causeway, Bristol BS10 7FF Bristol BS10 7TU; 0117 9581450; bristolaudi.co.uk

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Wild Bristol.qxp_Layout 7 24/01/2018 16:51 Page 1

A red deer stag at Ashton Court. As well as red and fallow deer, wild roe deer can also be seen on the estate (image © Bristol City Council)

LORD OF THE MANOR This month, Pete Dommett goes deer-watching on his doorstep

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nder a flawless, ice-blue sky, a large herd of deer bathes in a welcome wash of winter sun. My youngest boy and I try to count the stags lying among the many conkercoloured hinds. We spot at least nine, their spiky antlers poking up above the still-green grass and giving them away. These are red deer – Britain’s largest land animals – but we haven’t travelled to the Scottish Highlands or the wilds of Exmoor to see them. In fact, we’re just 10 minutes from Bristol’s city centre. Ashton Court became a deer park over 600 years ago, making it one of the first in the country. Deer were kept, and hunted, here for centuries, but the estate fell into disrepair after the Second World War and the animals escaped through the broken boundary walls. Then, in 1959, the city council bought up the land and deer were reintroduced a decade later. Rangers Mark Cox and Julian Smart have been looking after them for much of the time since then. “Mark’s been the ranger for 32 years,” says Julian. “But I’m the newbie – I’ve only been here for 27!” Their experience is matched by their obvious enthusiasm, as they tell us, with palpable pride, about their charges. “We’ve got a herd of about a hundred reds in one area, near the mansion house,” Mark clarifies. “And about the same number of fallow deer on the other side of the estate.” So Tom and I set off to find the fallow herd. Their enclosure is more wooded than the reds’ and consequently looks more natural, but fallow deer are not native to the UK – they were introduced by the Normans in the 11th century. They’re pretty animals – some have spotted coats, Bambi-style, while others are plain and paler.

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We watch a big buck, almost white in colour with wide, palmate antlers, browsing the bushes beneath a magnificent old oak. Deer grazing is used to control scrub encroachment on the estate, enabling wildflower meadows – and the rare species, like green-winged orchids, that are found there – to flourish. The deer lead a privileged life at Ashton Court. They’re no longer hunted, of course, and, in the winter, their diet is supplemented with hay and sugar-beet. As a result, they tend to be larger than their country cousins and males have bigger antlers. In red deer, antler size determines a stag’s ‘rank’. “A red with 12 points on his antlers is called a royal stag, one with 14 is an imperial stag and one with 16 points is a monarch,” explains Mark. “The biggest stag we have at the moment has got 21 points, so I’m not sure what that makes him!” We return to the red deer field to search for this mythical-sounding beast. Sticking to the signposted paths is the safest way to observe the deer on the estate. They may not be wild, but they’re not tame either. A fully grown stag can weigh up to 190kg or nearly 30 stone – an intimidating sight at close quarters. Eventually we find him, feeding peacefully amidst a harem of hinds. He stops for a moment and stares directly at us, chewing nonchalantly like a gunslinger in a Western saloon bar. This city stag might not be the monarch of the glen, but, round here, he’s certainly the lord of the manor. ■ • For more tips on watching deer at Ashton Court, go to: ashtoncourt.bower-ashton.co.uk


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NEW TRICKS Retired and looking for new, fulfilling ways to occupy yourself? Volunteering adventures aren’t just for the gap yah gang, as Felicity Gardiner has been finding out

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ou might feel like embarking on a year abroad and getting stuck into a positive humanitarian project is the preserve of the spring chicken, but there you’d be wrong. It’s never too late to make a difference in the world, and many organisations offer opportunities specifically tailored to the over-50s, so if you’ve stopping working entirely, or found yourself with a whole lot of extra time on your hands, we daresay you’re probably perfect volunteering material. While, yes, many operations are aimed specifically at those aged from 18 to 35, there are also lots with vacancies for mature folk – whether they’ve had plenty of practice putting their philanthropic feelings to good use, or are planning their first volunteer venture. Most overseas trips provide a good blend of cultural immersion and exploration so you can combine a responsible holiday with crossing off some bucket list items, learning new skills and helping others; and whether your passion lies in marine and wildlife conservation, child care, animal care, health care or teaching, there’s sure to be a project somewhere that suits you down to the ground. “As with all our prospective volunteers, we consult with each individual to understand their experience and skills and, importantly, their expectations and preferences,” says Steve Summer, director at Outreach International (outreachinternational.co.uk; 01903 746 900). “This consultation is important, as we often find that they only discover what they are really looking for once they talk about it with an experienced individual. Some are actually looking for travel, with a cause, while others are looking to do something different from their profession, or to augment it, and then others are looking to relocate! “Many retirees will have great professional experience we can use, whether in healthcare or commerce, and often have more time to share. Being a little older, however, may mean we take account of 68 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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different lifestyle requirements – not living in a shared, basic bedroom for example.” Semi-retired occupational therapist Laura was looking both to challenge herself and give back. Volunteering as a therapist in rural Cambodia, and operating largely as an independent volunteer, was always going to be a challenge but also proved to be an immensely rewarding experience that the team were proud to support.

...Organisations value older people for their calm, problem-solving skills, empathy and experience...

“I absolutely loved my experience in Prey Veng, volunteering as an occupational therapist,” she recalls. “I was able to live as part of the local community, living and working with local people and I was able to develop an understanding of this beautiful country. It was challenging at times but such a rewarding experience and I would love to return to Cambodia again in the future. I felt like I was able deliver a much needed service to the community during my time in Prey Veng.” Even if you’ve already got plenty of ideas for how to fill your newfound free time – writing a novel, spending more time with the family or sailing off on a cruise perhaps – the long-term sense of structure and purpose that volunteering can give can be a very


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welcome addition to day-to-day life, post-retirement. Your lifetime’s worth of knowledge, and your various different skills and experience accrued are such valuable things to share with those who could really benefit from them, and, of course, you could learn some new skills into the bargain. “From aid projects in Africa to teaching English in India, there are thousands of opportunities when you retire,” says Simon Hemelryk at Saga. “Don’t be put off getting involved because you’re not the classic gap-year student volunteer. According to Voluntary Service Overseas, for instance, around two fifths of its volunteers are in their fifties or sixties, with two percent in their seventies. Organisations value older people for their calm, problem-solving skills, empathy and experience.

...Choose a project that suits your interests but also your experience and past career – from nursing in a field hospital to optometry to setting up IT systems... “If you’re unsure whether you want to commit to a project, consider a short-term position or programme. These can last from one week to three months, and could include anything from helping to build a school to providing assistance after a natural disaster. Consider choosing a project that fits your interests, but also your experience and past career. That could take in everything from nursing in a field hospital, to optometry to setting up IT systems. Investigate the organisation you are thinking of working for. Do you agree with all its principles? How is it funded? Is it linked to any

governments or other bodies you might not approve of? “Also find out about the conditions you’ll be living and working in. Will there be running water, easily accessible health care, food you like? You need to know you can cope and won’t feel the need to come home early. And be sure to get a health check with your GP. The work and daily routine could be pretty strenuous – especially in very hot temperatures – so you need to make sure you’re in good condition. Check whether you need any vaccinations. “Finally, be prepared to pay costs such as airfares and limited living expenses. Few projects will cover everything. Cancel any monthly services you won’t need while you’re away, to keep your costs as low as possible, and remember to budget for other outgoings you can’t avoid, such as council tax payments and utility bills.” If you don’t fancy going abroad, of course there are plenty of ways to make a difference here in Bristol, too. Thriving local charity RSVP West (rsvp-west.org.uk; 0117 922 4392) encourages and provides support for people over 50 to volunteer for the benefit of their local communities. “It is well known that volunteering not only helps others but provides great satisfaction, and staying active improves your quality of life,” says Bob Maggs, regional coordinator for the organisation, which is part of the national charity Volunteering Matters. “RSVP’s volunteers can join any one of a number of projects which include reading to schoolchildren, transport and wellbeing support for frail surgery patients, lay assessing for care homes and home care services, as well as musical activity sessions or working on the Matthew Project at Bristol Harbourside, where we maintain and crew the ship, and greet and guide visitors round it. “With so many people living alone and confined to their homes, our surgery volunteers tell us how very rewarding it is to see the patients they befriend improve in confidence and stamina. They work as little or as often as they wish; we provide good insurance cover and reimburse all out-of-pocket expenses.” So, if one of your new year’s resolutions happened to be along the lines of giving back, you know what to do... ■

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SOCIAL

GENERATION GAME Following the Bristol-set television show Old People’s Home for Four Year Olds, we meet a few of those involved to get their take on the impact of Channel Four’s moving social experiment

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f you saw the heart-warming, tear-jerking TV gold that was Old People’s Home for Four Year Olds, which led to the Christmas special at the end of last year, you’ll know all about the valuable study undertaken with Bristol and North Somerset’s St Monica Trust and Bedminster nursery The Southville Centre, to socialise select pensioners with a group of pre-school children in a Bristol retirement home. Social isolation is one of the biggest problems for the elderly, with reports suggesting loneliness can be as damaging to our health as smoking. The Channel Four experiment was inspired by a revolutionary American scheme which brought together a group of older people and a group of four year olds for a six-week period to attempt to prove scientifically that the younger generation can transform the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of its elders for the better. We talked to a few of the latter lucky enough to take part in the Bristol study, to get their take on the show. TBM: What difference did being part of the experiment make to you? Pat Ison: Before it started I had been a bit down, ill and slightly depressed but being around the children made an amazing difference. It really lifted our spirits and gave us something to look forward to. It definitely helped us to become more mobile, and got us moving around. It was something I really felt privileged to be a part of. Michael Hardwick: Well I was used to being around children before the show so I knew before the experiment it would be beneficial. But it was a jolly good time and I thoroughly enjoyed myself. It is a great experience being around younger children who haven’t been limited by the world yet – it definitely enlivened some of the others in the group and helped to cheer them up. St Monica Trust is a vibrant community but it can still be lonely for some people – and it was invigorating, there is no doubt about that. Zina Wilson: It has been transforming. When it started, I was quite down in the dumps – tired and very gloomy. So I thought this might drag me out of my doom and gloom. It was also good to be interviewed throughout the process as it really made you think about the difference and impact that the experiment was having. The children were also so loving and delightful. They were always full of life and so spontaneous. It brought back memories of my own 70 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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children and old times. The parents were also very fond of us and have still kept in contact which is simply amazing. They are all wonderful and heart-warming people. Did you expect it to have such an impact? Pat: It all happened very quickly so we didn’t particularly have any expectations going into it at the beginning. We all sort of just wondered what it was all about! Zina: No – I thought it would just be something to cheer us up. I wasn’t expecting a long lasting effect. But it was like having a big family around me – I have a family in Holland but not here and it made a huge difference. It made me rediscover there is more to life and that I want to be here a bit longer. How important is it that different generations socialise together? Pat: I think it is very important for different generations to socialise. I used to work for many years in the NHS with geriatric patients and I was always surprised by how many older people had been neglected by their family. At St Monica Trust we also took computer lessons with UWE. We all toddled up to the university and it was amazing just to be integrated with younger people with no pressure to talk. I think we all know that isolating people in care homes is a disaster. But it has taken us a long time to learn that the hard way. Michael: I think it is beneficial. It is also important to get the ages right – some of the older and more frail residents here are visited by slightly older children who can help them and show them useful skills, for example on the computer, and the children take charge of looking after them. It was a great success and well worth doing, even the doubters at the start were very pleased by the end that they had the chance to take part. Zina: It is very, very important, and beneficial to both generations. The children easily accept your disabilities and learn to be so helpful. You can see them becoming more helpful, offering to push you around! I am hoping for them to build a nursery here – it is great to have children around and see them frolicking, it is so uplifting.

• stmonicatrust.org.uk; bs3community.org.uk


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Why Buy when you can Rent?

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he Hawthorns in Clevedon offers a really different approach to high quality retirement living, with an allinclusive rental model – so as opposed to a purchase there’s no need to tie up your money and assets and still incur the costs of maintaining your own property. Property purchase is also unlikely to give you the lifestyle features and community included at The Hawthorns, with all your dining and entertainment for example. Right now, a rental model has never looked so good. Property purchase does give you the valued position of home ownership, but as many of the retirement property options are leasehold rather than freehold anyway, there is very little difference to a rental model. The difference is in the costs, some of which can be less than obvious. Purchase prices for retirement properties can carry a premium over the general market as you are paying for communal space, and you may only be able to sell back to the original developer or freeholder, often at their valuation rather than an open market assessment. Exit fees from such developments can range from 5% to 20% of either the original purchase price or the sell back value; add in the stamp duty on purchase and legal costs for purchase and sale and there is a definite premium for tying your money into another purchase. Most leaseholds also carry other costs such as ground rent, service charges or maintenance costs – month in, month out. This is money you and your family will never get back. In contrast the all-inclusive Hawthorns rental model offers certainty, easy planning, and flexibility. To make life really simple and worry-free there are no property repairs, gardening upkeep, council tax or weekly housekeeping costs. They’ll even do your bedlinen laundry each week. With no utility bills as well you can use as much hot water or central heating as you like to stay warm throughout even the coldest spell. Staff are on hand around the clock in case of emergencies, and each apartment has a call system, so you can feel safe, secure and looked after. The team at The Hawthorns are so confident that you’ll love the community and lifestyle there that you can also try before you buy with the rental model, with a month’s trial stay; again, something else you can’t do with a property purchase. There is no long contract either, just 30 days’ notice if your circumstances change, giving you the flexibility and choice that you deserve. 72 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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They recognise that quality of dining is important to you, and there is a team of professional chefs on hand to prepare freshly made nutritionally balanced meals with choices in each of three courses, including wine at lunchtimes, again all inclusive. There are three waitress-served restaurant meals daily and free refreshments available throughout the day to include tea, coffee and juices, home baked cakes and biscuits, and a variety of fresh fruit. There is a comprehensive wellbeing programme that supports you in staying healthier and independent for longer and a daily entertainment and activities schedule within the community and including trips out in their own private minibus.

If you prefer a different outlook or you wish to downsize apartment there are no sales fees, purchase costs, legal charges or delays; with just a single charge to reflect that the apartments always come freshly decorated and with new carpets where required you just move and pay the new monthly rent. Property purchase won’t give you that flexibility, choice or service. Situated on the North Somerset coast in this unspoilt seaside town, with lovely sea views to the front, the Hawthorns offers the warmest welcome in Clevedon. It’s a short walk to the beautifully refurbished Victorian pier, as well as a range of local cafes, shops and restaurants. Enquiries are welcome at any time - just call in and experience the community, or for more information search ‘Hawthorns Clevedon’ online or on Facebook.


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LATER | LIVING

PLANNING FOR LATER LIFE: THREE THINGS TO THINK ABOUT ANNA MOLTER

Senior Associate Solicitor at Barcan+Kirby discusses three legal safeguards she thinks everyone should consider doing now, to give them certainty about their future.

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hinking about your later life should never be left to the last minute, especially when you’re considering leaving assets to your loved ones. If you’re worried about losing mental capacity or unsure if your Will needs updating, there are various legal options available to help plan your future. It may be difficult to have these discussions with your family, but getting these plans in place can help alleviate any stress that may arise, and give you and your family peace of mind.

Abbeyfield offers up the stress-free retirement option Leaving your family home to downsize is a huge decision, and knowing all the alternatives for your later years is crucial, says Abbeyfield Bristol & Keynsham.

Write a Will You may have already written a Will, but surprisingly around two thirds of people in the UK don’t have one. Creating a Will essentially ensures that your assets are distributed as per your wishes after you die. If you don’t create a Will, you’ll die intestate. The law will then decide who will receive your property and assets and in what shares. You should always seek legal advice when drafting a Will. It’s a legal document which deals with your entire estate in the event of your death – getting it wrong by doing it yourself can cause upset to your family and with a rise in inheritance disputes, could be subject to legal challenge from disgruntled beneficiaries.

Create a Lasting Power of Attorney It would be beneficial at the same time as writing your Will to consider a Lasting Power of Attorney. There are two types of Lasting Power of Attorney – Health and Welfare, which enables a family member or friend to make decisions of your behalf regarding your medical treatment and the type of care you’ll receive, if you lack mental capacity to make decisions yourself. The other type is for Financial Property and Affairs, where an appointed ‘deputy’ handles your bills, pension and can buy and sell properties on your behalf. A Lasting Power of Attorney isn’t just for the elderly, if you do lose capacity and don’t have a Lasting Power of Attorney in place, your family, friend or a professional will have to apply to the Court of Protection in order to be appointed a deputy on your behalf – and this may not be someone you would’ve chosen yourself.

Set up a trust Setting up a trust is a lot easier than it sounds. They aren’t reserved for the super wealthy as many might think, and can be a useful tool when you’re considering inheritance tax planning. A trust doesn’t have to be set up during your lifetime. Assets can be put in trust under the terms of your Will to help mitigate care fees (without giving up your property during your lifetime). Trusts can also be useful to provide for children and grandchildren. n Anna Molter and the Private Client team at Barcan+Kirby offer specialist advice on Will drafting, estate planning, Lasting Powers of Attorney and trust creation. Anna is available at a.molter@barcankirby.co.uk or on 0117 325 2929.

www.barcankirby.co.uk

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any people still aren’t aware of all the options for accommodation as they get older, and it can be confusing,” says Frances Stretton, Chief Executive of Bristol & Keynsham, “Some people still believe the choice is to either buy a retirement flat, or wait to go into a care home. Not everyone wants, or can afford, to buy, and sadly, many leave it too late to make a decision. We believe we provide a wonderful alternative: it’s the next best thing to living in your own home”. Part of the worldwide Abbeyfield Society organisation, Abbeyfield Bristol & Keynsham has 5 gorgeous houses in the Bristol area: offering flats for rent to older people. The affordable fees are inclusive of utility bills, including council tax, and delicious home-cooked meals: so, residents don’t have to worry about shopping, cooking or even, admin. There’s also a 24-hour team member on hand seven days a week, which residents, and families, find reassuring. A handyman pops over if you need a picture hanging on the wall, or an adaption to your apartment. There’s a calendar of social events, daily coffee mornings and regular trips to local places. When looking at retirement living, it’s worth remembering that there are both emotional, and practical factors to think about. After the death of a spouse, people can feel isolated and lonely. Plus, they might find it difficult to cope in a large house; with the cleaning, and garden maintenance to think about, as well as the usual admin that comes with running a property. “So many residents tell us how they really started to ‘live again’ after coming to one of our houses”, says Frances, “Not only do they enjoy themselves without the worries of running a house, but they make new friends and get to know a whole new community”. Abbeyfield offers studio and one-bedroom flats to rent and, with the all-inclusive fees starting at an affordable £330 per week, it does seem to tick many of the boxes, on both a practical and emotional level. The five houses are in Easter Compton, Redland, Henleaze, Hanham and Keynsham. Call the friendly team in the office today on 0117 973 6997 to visit any one, or all, of them and see the benefits of living in an Abbeyfield house for yourself. n www.abbeyfield-bristol.com

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Personalised care in and around Bristol

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hoosing a care home can be a difficult decision for everyone involved, but finding the right home can relieve worry, knowing that you have found the best possible care for you or a member of your family. At Barchester Healthcare we provide an individualised approach to care for all of our residents. We have a number of care homes situated in and around Bristol, such as Kingfisher Lodge and Beaufort Grange. Both homes offer person-centred care provided by our highly qualified professionals and carers working within the homes. Services include residential care, nursing care and respite care, as well as expert care for those with dementia within our dedicated Memory Lane community. The teams of dedicated staff ensure that all residents receive professional, respectful and personalised care. Both Kingfisher Lodge and Beaufort Grange offer stunning furnishings throughout to ensure that residents feel comfortable and at home, and both homes boast beautiful landscaped gardens that residents can enjoy all year around. The varied activities taking place across our Barchester care homes allow residents to have plenty of choice of things to do; from baking, to sing-a-longs, or attending outings to a number of places of interest near the homes. Both Kingfisher Lodge and Beaufort Grange provide seasonal menus of flavoursome, nutritional dining that are prepared fresh on the premises by the hospitality teams. Both homes also cater for dietary requirements needed for each individual. Beaufort Grange also features bespoke services including a beautician, physiotherapist, dietitian, life coach and occupational therapists. All of these services help to enrich the lives of residents. Looking for care can be a daunting process, and we’ll do all we can to provide you with the guidance and support you need, and answer any questions you may have. For more information about the services available at any of our homes please visit our website www.Barchester.com/Bristol

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The AMD Solicitors Private Client department presents a Spring workshop on

The Snakes and Ladders of Life

AMD Solicitors invite you to join us for a practical afternoon workshop on The Snakes and Ladders of Life. This workshop will cover:

• Who pays? - Care Fees and Inheritance Tax

• Bank of Mum and Dad – The Lenient Lender • Where there’s a will there’s a way • Incapacity – who’s in charge?

RECEIVE THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE BY POST

We will be holding the workshop in both Redland and Henleaze as follows:-

Redland

Wednesday 28th February 2018 - 3pm to 4pm Tyndale Baptist Church, Whiteladies Road, Bristol, BS8 2QG

Henleaze

Thursday 1st March 2018 - 3pm to 4pm Leonard Hall, Trinity-Henleaze United Reformed Church, Waterford Road, Henleaze, BS9 4BT The workshop will begin with talks by two of our Solicitors, Florence Pearce and Andrew Jack, and will be followed by a question and answer session. Florence and Andrew are experienced specialist private client solicitors. Florence is also a full member of STEP (the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners), the leading professional association in this field. Refreshments will be provided. There is no charge but a donation to our charity of the year, Guide Dogs For the Blind, would be appreciated. To book a place at one of our workshops please telephone: 0117 9621205, email probate@amdsolicitors.com or call in to one of our four Bristol offices:

www.thebristolmag.co.uk/subscribe or Tel: 0117 974 2800

100 Henleaze Road, Henleaze BS9 4JZ 15 The Mall, Clifton BS8 4DS 139 Whiteladies Road, Clifton BS8 2PL 2 Station Road, Shirehampton BS11 9TT

THE

BR I S T O L MAGAZINE © AMD Solicitors

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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

FAMILY DIARY Image: Jack Sain

Ideas for things to do with the little ones in Bristol this month

Horrible Histories: More Best of Barmy Britain Thursday 22 – Friday 23 February, 1.30pm and 7pm

Redgrave Theatre, Percival Road, Clifton Prepare for a special production of Horrible Histories featuring your favourite characters from our barmy past – and a brand new scene with wordy Will. Find out why the Romans were revolting. Could you survive the vicious Vikings? Can evil Elizabeth entertain England? Would you party with the Puritans? And clap along with crazy King Charles. Vomit with the vile Victorians and prepare to do battle in the frightful First World War. Tickets: £15. • redgravetheatre.com

Top pick... DON’T MISS... Flash, Bang, Wallop! Daily, Dockyard Museum, SS Great Britain Travel back in time, and around the world, and pose for a portrait in the Melbourne photographic studio. Dressed in stovepipe hats, bonnets and crinolines, these Victorianstyle pictures are a great souvenir of your visit. Included in the price of admission. Frost Lab Weekdays 10am – 4pm, weekends and holidays 10am – 5pm, We The Curious Wrap up warm visitors, the clever people at We The Curious are investigating chilly things, hot things and other snowy wonders in frost lab. Get stuck in to some icy investigations, chat to the Live Science Team, make up your own experiments, or have a go at one the science centre has tried out before. Drop in session, included in general admission. Visit: wethecurious.org Cardboard Arcade: Family Day Saturday 3 February, 11am – 4pm, The Loco Klub, Temple Meads A portable video game arcade that all the family can enjoy, partnered with Bristol Old Vic Ferment. Explore a pop up virtual kingdom, try out new analog games from small indie developers and designers, and check out the virtual reality station. Tickets: £10. Visit: locobristol.com Autism friendly early opening Sunday 4 February, 9 – 10.30am, We The Curious We The Curious will be open early so those on the autism spectrum can explore the exhibits at their own pace, chat with the staff, and take part in activities in the kitchen, greenhouse and live lab spaces. There will be an autism-friendly show in the 76 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Planetarium at 10.15am (suitable for five+). The fascinating show Exploring the Solar System will be in 2D, with softer music, the lights on and doors open, so you can leave at any time you wish. The show lasts around 30 minutes. Admission: £5.25 adults, £4.25 for children three+, carers free. Planetarium tickets are an additional £2.50 per person. Visit: wethecurious.org

barn. The lambing team will be giving talks throughout the day about the lambing process and lots of super sheep facts. Visit: avonvalley.co.uk

Launchpad Classes Monday 5 and 19 February, 10.10 – 11am, Arnos Vale, Bath Road, Bristol Fun and educational sessions for two – four year olds to share with their parent or carer. The classes give a gentle introduction to letters, numbers and science, as well as encouraging communication and social skills. Activities include stories, simple science experiments, active games, craft and parachute activities. Visit: arnosvale.org.uk

Fireside Tales with Granddad Saturday 10 – Saturday 17 February, 11am (and 2pm on 10 February), The Wardrobe Theatre, West Street, Bristol Cuddle up around the campfire as Granddad recalls a daring escape from a hungry shark. Tuck into a marshmallow or two as he attempts to make a new set of underpants for a giant. And watch as the shadows between the trees unravel a tale of greedy goblins, grumpy trolls, sneaky princes and a very unusual princess. Exquisite puppets and captivating storytelling combine to create an enchanting show. Suitable for ages three – eight. Tickets: £8, under threes go free. Visit: thewardrobetheatre.com

Senior Schools’ Art Exhibition Thursday 8 – Wednesday 21 February, Bristol Cathedral This annual exhibition showcases artwork from students across Bristol, with this year’s promising to be one of the biggest yet, with art on show in the Nave Aisles. Admission is free, all welcome. A special prize-giving ceremony will be held at on the final day of the exhibition at 6.15pm, where prizes will be awarded for the best artwork from each school and an overall winner will be crowned. Visit: bristol-cathedral.co.uk

Make your own hunky punk Saturday 10 – Sunday 18 February, times vary, The Sawmill, Tyntesfield Have you ever spotted the carved hunky punks on the outside of Tyntesfield’s Victorian chapel? At this family workshop, you can have a go at making your own hunky punk out of clay. Recommended for ages seven – 12. Advised children wear old clothes, aprons will be provided. All children must be accompanied by an adult. £3 per person. Tel: 0344 249 1895 or visit: nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield

Lambing Live Friday 9 – Sunday 18 February, 10am – 5.30pm, Avon Valley Adventure & Wildlife Park, Keynsham, Bristol Half term is going to be baaaa-rilliant at Avon Valley this month. There are 20 ewes ready to lamb twins and triplets every day over the week in the indoor animal handling

Family foam printing workshop Saturday 10 – Sunday 18 February, times vary, The Sawmill, Tyntesfield Tyntesfield is home to hundreds of different animals and plants. At this family workshop you can create a design inspired by the grounds and gardens of this historic house, carve it into foam, then print your own

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EVENTS | FOR KIDS

Cardboard Arcade at Loco Klub

Try a workshop at We The Curious

natural pattern to take home. Recommended for ages five – seven. All children must be accompanied by an adult. £3 per person. Tel: 0344 249 1895 or visit: nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield

fleece at this popular family workshop. All materials are provided and staff will be on hand to offer help and advice. Free event, all welcome. Visit: wellscathedral.org.uk or tel: 01749 674483.

Memories of Doris Monday 12 – Friday 16 February, 10am – 5pm, Bristol Museum & Art Gallery Say farewell to Doris in the final week of the museum’s Pliosaurus! exhibition. Will you dare to come face to face with her one last time? Share your memories and what you have enjoyed most about the exhibition by adding to the special memories display. Have fun dressing up as a doctor for Doris and play with dinosaur worlds, books and games. Drop in, pay what you think. Ideal for families with children aged three – 11. Visit: bristolmuseums.org.uk

Tiddler and Other Terrific Tales Thursday 15 – Sunday 18 February, times vary, Bristol Old Vic Four terrific tales - one superb show! Under the sea, out on the farm and into the jungle, these terrific tales are woven together with live music, puppetry and a whole host of colourful characters from Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler's best-loved titles: Tiddler, Monkey Puzzle, The Smartest Giant in Town and A Squash and a Squeeze. Suitable for ages 3+. Tickets: £45 – £12.50. Visit: bristololdvic.org.uk

Heroes and villains Wednesday 14, 10am – 3pm, and Thursday 15 February, 10am – 3.30pm, venue confirmed when booking Themed fun around Shakespeare’s heroes and villains. Children can get making and creating with designers and storytellers, before taking their work and new skills home with them. Wednesday session for ages five – seven, Thursday for ages eight – 11. £30 per person. Visit: tobaccofactorytheatres.com

Pandora's Box Friday 16 February, 2pm and 7.30pm, Redgrave Theatre, Percival Road, Clifton An eerie forest, an abandoned palace and a mystery woman who holds the keys to universe; if you go down to the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise... An epic story of friendship, courage and sacrifice exploring how the world came to be filled with good and evil. Suitable for ages seven+. Tickets: £12/£10 concs. Tel: 0117 3157 602 or visit: redgravetheatre.com

Family Felt Beads Workshop Wednesday 14 February, 10.30am – 12pm and 2 – 3.30pm, Wells Cathedral Have a go at making felt from carded sheep’s

Chinese New Year celebrations Saturday 17 – Sunday 18 February, 11am – 4pm, Bristol Museum & Art Gallery Mark the Year of the Dog with spectacular

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traditional and contemporary performances, stalls, workshops and activities around the museum. Stalls will feature elements of Chinese culture, there will be a delicious Chinese inspired menu in the café and beautiful Chinese goods for sale in the shop. Drop in session, donations welcome. The Nick Cope Show Sunday 18 February, 11am, The Wardrobe Theatre, West Street, Bristol With songs about dogs eating soap and dragons called Keith, the popular Nick Cope returns to The Wardrobe Theatre to perform his special live music gig for children. Nick Cope is a professional singer and songwriter and has over 20 years of experience in music, including international success as lead singer and songwriter with The Candyskins in the 1990s. He now writes and records music for children and has established a fanatical army of little people and their parents, from all over the world. Tickets: £7, under threes go free. Visit: thewardrobetheatre.com Toddler Takeover: Super Senses Friday 23 February, We The Curious Textures and tastes, sounds, sights, and smells (good ones we promise). Take a walk through the texture garden, head to the magical forest with Ursa and Leo in a storytelling session, prick up your ears to some intriguing noises in the Soundlab. And for the pioneering toddlernauts you can even jump into the giant silver ball for an unforgettable trip to the stars and beyond in the Space Explorers show. Visit: wethecurious.org n

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• Co-educational day school for pupils aged 5-13 with

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HEALTH

WELLBEING BY NUMBERS Alan Bec, a man of many hats, shares his idea for a co-created, energy-conscious ecosystem

Alan presented his thoughts on co-created wellbeing at Bristol’s most recent TED Talks event

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ccording to TEDx, I’m now one of Bristol’s most positive disrupters. In my recent talk for the organisation, I shared how, after living with chronic fatigue syndrome for four years – isolated and with no way to help myself – I had a lucid dream that inspired me to dare to disrupt the unconscious ways in which we relate to each other. My chronic ill health led me to invent The Wellbeing Indicator Badge, or the-wib® – a number system that facilitates and enhances wellbeing. By absolute chance, I contracted CFS due to a severe ear infection. This terrible disease is a complex array of debilitating and fluctuating conditions, with common symptoms such as extreme physical and mental fatigue, poor memory recall, restricted mobility, irritable bowel syndrome and flu-like signs. Many sufferers are housebound or confined to bed. Unlike many other conditions, medical science does not know the causes, or how to treat it, and it does not have a cure. My autoimmune system acts like it’s continually fighting an infection or virus, which means I rest or sleep five or six times a day to manage my energy to improve my quality of life. My Bristol-based consultancy Reality Check is in its 24th year. I’m a creative information designer, reality coach, board and team facilitator, and psychology educator. I am an elected fellowship councillor for the Royal Society of Art, Commerce, and Manufacturing for the South West; a member of the International Time Perspective Network and a family man. Without this previous professional experience, my optimism and passion for life would have ended. I knew that when we are ‘well’, few of us notice how we are using our energy. This absence of health monitoring, when left unchecked, leads us all to become busy, stressed and disconnected from others. So, to improve our wellbeing, we all need to get familiar with our unconscious energy use. Learning to live with my fluctuating illness gave me real-life opportunities and the motivation to work out how I could better help myself to live well during ill-being. With millions of people suffering from ill health, I ultimately wanted to support them to enable and enhance their wellbeing too. At the core of wellbeing is the need for human connection with others that acknowledges, understands and appreciates each other’s similarities and differences. So for me, the clues to a sustainable solution had to be hidden in how we unconsciously communicate and interact. Individual and collective wellbeing is dependent on our ability to be able to notice the impact of the external environment and the social influences around us. And heeding the four internal 80 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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dimensions of wellbeing: mental, emotional, physical and spiritual. My idea of wearing a badge to display numbers that reflect our current energy levels is a radically simple, yet profound game-changer in healthcare, education, and work – launched in Copenhagen at the International Conference on Time Perspective and endorsed by psychology academics, healthcare professionals, educators, workplace trainers and coaches alike. The-wib® displays numbers on a scale of one to 10, enabling the wearer to assess, select and declare their vitality level. Ten being high energy; one low. As I write this article, I’m a seven. For me, this helps me to utilise my energy productively while it lasts. It indicates to others that I can think clearly, emotionally unhindered by depression and in low intermittent pain physically. When I gave the TEDx talk, my four represented that I was struggling to think and talking was exhausting me – I knew I was drained emotionally, and standing and walking was becoming increasingly painful. If I had to keep telling everyone I met how I was feeling, it would be exhausting, irritating and waste valuable energy and time. Using numbers allows quick communication, and they empower the wearer to connect and reconnect with their fluctuating energy. At the same time, family, work colleagues and friends can take note of their energy and instinctively attune in meeting each other’s real-time needs [see Alan’s YouTube channel for more]. By explicitly communicating in numbers, we create a very helpful shortcut to openness, honesty, and integrity together. By sharing our numbers, we connect empathetically, caring without explanations or justifications. The-wib promotes wellbeing, as a co-created living eco-system, where we are all natural caretakers. My number idea was formed out of illness, but it’s not just about that – it’s for everyone who wants to learn how to co-create wellbeing. “It has useful applications for many fluctuating health conditions and should be helpful to patients, families, carers, and clinicians,” agrees Dr Peter Goyder, general practioner at Air Balloon Surgery in Bristol. I have recently created a new start-up business – the-wib ltd – and have been crowdfunding to re-design the badge concept and get them made and available for use as soon as possible. In the meantime, start talking in numbers and check out the website for up-to-date news and features, wib training and what the team are up to in 2018.

• the-wib.com


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Welcome to... the new you Conveniently located on the stylish Whiteladies Road, EF MEDISPA Bristol combines cutting edge aesthetic treatments alongside wellness services, fitness classes and a juice bar. The clinic offers a lifestyle centre for the vibrant city of Bristol & its surrounding areas. EF MEDISPA offers a selection of award-winning therapies including: bespoke peels & facials, anti-wrinkle injectables, advanced laser treatments as well as lifting, tightening and weight loss led body treatments.

Treatments at our Bristol Clinic • • • • • •

Bespoke Facials Acne Treatments Non-Invasive Fat Removal Laser Hair Removal Skin Tightening Dermal Fillers

• • • • • •

Professional Peels IV Vitamin Drip Anti-Wrinkle Injectables Laser Tattoo Removal Non-Surgical Facelift Mesotherapy

Like an eclipse reframes the sun and the moon, our new eclipting™ technique frames and illuminates your face with a personalized placement of shadow and light. Every strand of your hair instantly feels healthier, too, thanks to the conditioning plant oil blend in our full spectrum™ shades. Stop in and discover every luminous possibility. Book a colour, cut & blow dry with Jess or Claire and receive a complimentary 30 minute Aveda facial. Offer valid until 30 April 2018.

Lavish Salon & Spa The Marriott Royal Hotel Bristol BS1 5TA www.lavish-spa.co.uk 0117 927 3389

0117 405 8695

e: bristol@efmedispa.com

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BEAUTY REVIEW

FACE TIME Jessica Hope says goodbye to adolescent spots and shiny skin after a series of specialised treatments at EF Medi Spa

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cne. It’s a word that has followed me around for the past ten years. Despite now being in my mid 20s, I still feel like I’m living in a teenager’s nightmare when I wake up each morning with another painful, volcano-sized spot beating on my chin. Spots, blackheads, oily skin – these are all things that I thought you were meant to leave behind when you turned 20 and waved goodbye to the years of crazy hormones, cheap make up and questionable face washes. As I have recently discovered, this certainly isn’t the case. EF Medi Spa on Whiteladies Road in Clifton is seeing more and more people in their 20s, 30s and even 40s coming through the clinic’s doors, looking for a treatment for their spotty skin problems – and for the last few months I have been one of them. Back in the autumn I went for a skin consultation with Becca, one of the clinic’s therapists, where she analysed my skin and advised a series of treatments that directly target acne, large pores and shiny skin. She advised that I undergo a course of six ClearSkin™ laser treatments and LED light therapy sessions every two to three weeks for around three months to help reduce my spots, minimise redness and smooth my skin. ClearSkin™ combines a non-ablative laser treatment with direct cooling technology, making this a more comfortable and precise treatment for acne sufferers. It penetrates deep into the skin without damaging the top layer, and uses a dermal heating process to disrupt the sebaceous glands that can produce too much oil and increase the appearance of acne. I began each of my treatments with a cleanse and light exfoliation with Dermaquest DermaClear Cleanser which is specially formulated to calm blemishes and sooth the skin using ingredients such as willow bark and tea tree oil. After covering my eyes with protective goggles, Becca started the ClearSkin™ laser treatment where the laser is gently moved across my face, going over areas that are particularly spot prone, especially my chin – this process takes approximately 15 minutes. Don’t be put off by the word laser, this is a painless process and the cooling mechanism calms the skin where it might tingle a little – plus it is suitable for all skin types and there aren’t any side effects. Using a different laser setting, Becca targeted particular spots on my chin with a function that almost sucks the spot and the surrounding area, giving it a concentrated laser treatment, helping to reduce the size and redness. Following this treatment, I was put under a Dermalux® LED light therapy treatment for around 20 minutes. This treatment features infrared, ultra violet and blue light at different frequencies – the blue light is anti-bacterial and calms the skin, while the red light increases blood circulation and rejuvenates. Becca tells me that she recommends that all of her clients undergo LED light therapy, whether they have acne or any other skin conditions, as the healing properties can help to reduce scarring, tone the face, and improve the elasticity.

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Snuggled under a blanket and with calming music playing in the background, the light therapy is relaxing, warming and the perfect opportunity for that bit of mindfulness we all need to squeeze into our busy lives. With my face feeling rejuvenated and smooth, Becca finished my treatment by applying a hydrating serum and a SPF 30 moisturiser. Following my series of treatments, a skin consultation revealed that my pores are now tighter, I have less blackheads, and smoother, less oily skin. Although I do get the odd spot thanks to annoying hormones, I definitely have fewer than before, my redness has reduced and there is less pigmentation across my face. And the changes with my skin haven’t gone unnoticed: I have received lots of comments from family and friends who weren’t aware of me having these treatments saying my skin looks brighter and clearer. This has also helped with my skin’s hydration – this is the first year that I can remember where I haven’t experienced dry, flaky skin during the winter. I used to plaster my face in thick moisturiser to try and get through the cold months (this would only clog my pores further), but thanks to the ClearSkin™ laser and light therapy, as well as using hydrating skincare products at home, my skin has survived the winter without any signs of drying out. In order to help maintain my skin in between treatments I used the DermaClear Cleanser at home, as well as a hydrating serum and moisturiser with SPF. My attitude towards taking care of my skin has changed dramatically – using just soap and water is a big no no now. I spend more time on cleansing and exfoliating, and I take extra care in choosing products with ingredients that will help keep my acne at bay. EF Medi Spa sells several ranges of skincare products to suit all skin types over the counter, so you can pick up some items while visiting the clinic. Everyone’s skin is different, so the therapists at EF Medi Spa are specially trained to design a treatment plan to suit an individual’s needs using quality products and advanced technology. Thanks to my treatment plan, for the first time in a long while I’m not afraid to face the world free of make up and with my head held high. n • EF Medi Spa, 10A Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 1PD Tel: 0117 911 2740, visit: efmedispa.com


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Why I retrained in Nutrition Hannah Braye was a Solicitor who retrained as a Nutritional Therapist to help herself and others to better health. She is a graduate of CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine).

I

previously worked for ten years in the legal profession, and when I started to train in Nutrition at CNM I was a Solicitor in a large commercial law firm. I was working in a stress filled corporate environment and was looking for a career where I felt more fulfilled. I also wanted to improve the health of my family, some of who suffer with chronic autoimmune conditions. I’ve always understood that what we fuel ourselves with is important for our health. During a particularly stressful period, I decided to start looking after myself a little better by exercising regularly and eating well. It was amazing how much better I felt even in a very short space of time. I was intrigued to learn more, so I started looking into nutrition courses. Initially I did CNM’s Nutrition for Everyday Living Short Course. I enjoyed it so much that I decided to enrol on their full Diploma Course and retrain as a Naturopathic Nutritional Therapist. CNM has a college in Bristol where I was able to study at weekends, making it easier for me to continue working. I had some amazing and very inspiring tutors at CNM and I made some great friends. The course is a steep learning curve,

not only about anatomy, physiology and nutrition, but also about yourself. It was an intense and mind-opening experience. I enjoyed getting into the nitty gritty science (something I didn’t enjoy at school) in a really supportive environment, with a group of like-minded people. I gained an in-depth understanding of my body and how to listen to what it needs, allowing me to develop a great relationship with food. Now, not only is my job very different as a result of my studies, but so is my outlook on life. I value and prioritise my own health and wellbeing far more than I used to. Retraining has given me a career that I love, and a subject that I will never tire of learning more about. It has also allowed me to help family members and friends with their health, making me feel less helpless in the face of their conditions. I graduated in 2016 and now work three days a week as a Technical Advisor for supplements company Probiotics International Ltd (Protexin), who make the Bio-Kult and Lepicol ranges. The role involves staying up to date with the latest research, training staff on gut health, helping to formulate new products and writing articles for consumer, trade and practitioner publications on a variety of nutrition topics. On the other 2 days a week I run my own nutritional therapy business where I help clients with all manner of health concerns, either in my clinic in central Bristol or via skype. Sometimes the positive results clients see from implementing my recommendations surprise even me and it’s a great feeling to see someone re-motivated about food and their health. My favourite moments include working with infertility clients who have been able to conceive. I love working with clients who are determined to make meaningful, long-lasting changes.

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Hannah Braye

Attend a FREE Open Evening to find out about part time training with CNM Bristol for a career as a Naturopathic Nutritionist or Naturopathic Acupuncturist.

21st February at 7pm. Please book online at:

www.naturopathy-uk.com 01342 410 505 Not looking for a career change but interested to know how best to feed yourself and your family? Visit our website to see our Nutrition For Everyday Living Short Course, starting 2nd March. CNM is the UK’s leading training provider in a range of natural therapies. Colleges across the UK and Ireland.

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CINDERELLA CIRCLE The third, largely overlooked, ancient stone formation of the South West has a real sense of solitude, potency and magic about it, says Andrew Swift

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hree of Europe’s greatest stone circles lie within easy reach of Bristol. The first two – Stonehenge and Avebury – need no introduction. They have featured in countless documentaries, had scores of books devoted to them, and, as internationally famous tourist attractions, are surrounded by all the visitor centres, gift shops and facilities that go with such celebrity. The third circle is very different. Not only does it lack a visitor centre, it has no facilities of any kind. It doesn’t even have a proper car park, and instead of a ticket office there is an honesty box by the gate. Interpretation boards are conspicuous by their absence. All you will find are cows mooching between the stones. This is Stanton Drew, seven miles south of Bristol, which, unlike its more famous counterparts, still looks much as it did when antiquarians started taking an interest in such places in the mid-17th century. The earliest survey of Stanton Drew was published in 1749 by John Wood, the architect who designed Bristol’s Exchange, as well as buildings such as The Circus in Bath, which were informed by his study of prehistoric sites. Remarkably, in an age when the prevailing belief was that Stanton Drew’s circle was created when the guests at a wedding party were turned to stone by the devil for dancing on the Sabbath, Wood’s take on it was not that far adrift from what many people believe today. “The works of Stantondrue,” he wrote, “at the same time they represent the Pythagorean system of the planetary world, they also point out the computations of time to bring the motions of the chief bodies in that system within the same period.” Wood was convinced that Stanton Drew was at least as important as the other two sites but, despite others having echoed this view, this Cinderella among stone circles still languishes in relative obscurity. Recent suggestions that it predates Avebury and Stonehenge, and that the techniques used to build them were developed here, offer a glimmer of hope that the focus of attention may finally start to shift. Stanton Drew certainly has some catching up to do. My most recent visit was on a bright Saturday morning a couple of weeks before 84 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Christmas, and, for over an hour, I had the place to myself – apart, that is, from the cows, and rooks and seagulls wheeling about above the field. Not something you are likely to experience at Stonehenge – or at Avebury for that matter – and such solitude, in the presence of stones set in place between four and five millennia ago, for reasons long forgotten, has a peculiar potency and magic. If this whets your appetite, getting there could not be easier. Head south from Bristol along the A37 and after 5.5 miles, turn right along the B3130. After another 1.5 miles, turn left by a thatched tollhouse, follow the lane through the village and, just after The Druids Arms, pull into a parking space on the left. From here, steps lead up into a beer garden with a difference – the difference being some colossal stones, possibly a cromlech or the remains of a long barrow several centuries older than the circle which lies on the far side of the church. The church was built in the 13th century amidst a site as mysterious then as it is today, although then it would have been viewed as a relic of paganism. There has been speculation that the church was built on some of the standing stones, as a way of neutralising or rechanneling their power, but – so far – there’s nothing in the way of evidence. From here, walk or drive back past the pub, turn right towards the church and follow a sign for the circle. As you turn through the kissing gate, the chances are that your first impressions will not be that favourable. Compared with the drama of Stonehenge and Avebury, it looks more than a little boring. That goes a long way towards explaining why it has received far less attention – not only from tourists but also from archaeologists. Lack of attention means, however, that there has been little of the invasive investigation which accompanied the work of many early archaeologists. More importantly, it has not been ‘restored’. It therefore has the potential to yield up more of its secrets to future archaeologists. As you head across the field, what may, at first, seem a random assortment of stones, slowly assumes a pattern. There is not just one circle in this field, but three. The one you are heading across is the


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largest, which, with a diameter of 113m, is second only in scale to that at Avebury. Twenty-six of its stones survive – there were originally around 30 – and, as you wander around it, the scope of what was built here starts to become apparent. Beyond it is another circle, much smaller but with more impressive stones, including a curious assemblage of them – possibly the remains of a fallen portal – on the south. Finally, if you head towards the church, you come to the third circle, some distance from the other two, and something of an anticlimax. So much for what can be seen on the surface. Until 20 years ago, this was thought to be the extent of what had been created here. Then, in 1997, a geophysical survey revealed that it was a far larger, older and more important site than had hitherto been suspected. Around the large circle, traces were found of a henge ditch, seven metres wide; while within the circle were nine concentric rings of pits once lined with timber poles – around 400 in total – similar to those at Woodhenge and Durrington Walls. Whether these were an earlier version of what was later created in stone, or whether, as seems more likely, they were the supports for a large roofed structure, is unclear. What seems certain, though, is that this mysterious site, so long overshadowed by the compelling power of what survives above ground at Stonehenge and Avebury, has many more secrets to reveal. Maybe one day, when further investigation has uncovered more of what has lain hidden for millennia, it will take its rightful place alongside them. Until then, you can still enjoy the privilege of turning up and having this extraordinary place to yourself. ■ • The site is open daily during daylight hours, except on 25 December. Although the circles at Stanton Drew are cared for by English Heritage, they are on private land. A £1 entrance fee is charged by the landowner. Dogs are not allowed. Apart from The Druids Arms in Stanton Drew (BS39 4EJ), local pubs serving food include the Pony & Trap at Chew Magna (BS40 8TQ) and the Carpenters Arms at Stanton Wick (BS39 4BX).

“WE JUST WANTED TO SAY HOW PLEASED WE ARE WITH OUR NEW KITCHEN. THE PROCESS FROM START TO FINISH WAS SUPERBLY SMOOTH AND THE ATTENTION TO DETAIL HAS PROVIDED US WITH A BEAUTIFUL KITCHEN. THANK YOU VERY MUCH”. MR & MRS GODBEER

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INTERIORS

Get yourself a more ‘shoppable’ space by ‘merchandising’ as those in retail do

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INTERIORS

NEW ORDER Purchase and position thoughtfully; pare down and put away: tips to help us go forth into 2018 with both tidy house and tidy mind

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e spend an unhealthy amount of time poring over certain interiors-focused Instagram accounts – one of which being San Franciscan source of home inspiration, Remodelista. The group of design-minded mates behind it, who make it their mission to “decode all the details that go into well-put-together living quarters,” have now released a room-by-room guide encouraging us to pare down and purchase thoughtfully in order to create calm spaces to look forward to being in. Storage, of course, is key, as well as getting into the habit of organising belongings in a way that enhances routine. The Organized Home includes strategies for combatting ‘problem zones’ like the medicine cabinet and bedroom closet; and interviews experts in different industries – hotelier, stylist, teacher, boutique owner – to see what tips can be taken from the way each of them organises. It’s this element of the book that we’ve found perhaps most interesting...

• Choose furnishings that fold, stack, or disappear. On a ship, tables drop down from the wall on hinges, so they’re out of the way when not in use. Teak and canvas chairs fold up. So do canvas buckets.

Think like a shopkeeper In retail parlance, it’s called merchandising: the art of arranging goods so that they’re easy to access and visually appealing. Here are six principles from kitchen designer Sam Hamilton. Apply them to your kitchen and you’ll have much more ‘shoppable’ space.

• Use canvas storage. Canvas boat totes and buckets are handy all over the house. We hang them in the bathroom to hold toiletries, washcloths, and kids’ bath toys. Source from nautical suppliers. ■

• Use shallow pantry storage. The items that are visible are the ones you’ll use (just as with the retail mantra ‘What you can see is what sells’). So line your goods up front and make use of risers in the back. When installing storage, measure accordingly: “You don’t want shelves that hold more than two rows of cans,” advises Hamilton. “Anything deeper and things get lost in the void.”

Extracted from Remodelista: The Organized Home by Julie Carlson and Margot Guralnick (Artisan Books). Photography by Matthew Williams

• Create kitchen zones. Just as retailers group goods by theme, you should set up areas in your kitchen for coffee-making, food prep, and so on. Cluster culinary essentials on trays to anchor them.

• Install hardware that’s flush with the walls. Knobs that stick out are a hazard in tight quarters: as you move around, you’re liable to get bumped. Discover the nautical alternative: flush-mounted ring pulls that are just as easy to install as standard cabinet hardware. No more bruises, and your rooms will feel streamlined. • Embrace nautical hooks. Unlike landlubber counterparts of plated metal, marine hooks are solid brass, steel, or bronze. Dock cleats work well for securing Roman shade cords and as hooks for hanging towels and robes. And they look good.

Embrace nautical hooks: Dock cleats work well

• Consider proximity. Daily dishware belongs on the shelves closest to your sink and dishwasher, for ease of loading and unloading. • Leave yourself elbow room at the sink. Keep your work area as clear as a checkout counter. Ask yourself: “What do I use here all the time?” Relocate the rest. • Conquer drawer space by dividing it. Size up what you’re stowing and create compartments accordingly, so that nothing is free-floating or jumbled. You can always buy ready-made drawer inserts from places like Ikea. • Look up, look down. In shops, plenty of stock is kept on hand but out of sight. The same rule applies in kitchens: deep corner cabinets work well as appliance garages. And high cabinets are ideal for storing occasionally used tableware. For access to these spots, keep a step stool or a rolling ladder handy.

Think like a ship designer There’s no wasted room in marine design – since quarters are tight, storage has to be tucked in here and there. It also has to be built to last (otherwise salt air and humidity take over). These five gracefully nononsense solutions, provided by furniture designer and boatbuilder Asa Pingree, can be applied to compact quarters of all sorts, at land and at sea. • Use every square inch. Look for cavities in your home and ask yourself: “How can I gain access to that and put it to work?” Pingree says. The risers under stairs? Insert drawers. The space under a bench? Add a hinged seat and you have a bin. The hollow under the floorboards? Create a trapdoor. THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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HOMES & INTERIORS

NEW PURSUITS You may know Clinton and Fiona Patey from in-toto, but this expert interiors duo have now rebranded as The Kitchen Partners The Bristol Magazine: So let’s rewind; where did it all begin? Clinton: I’d been working for many years at a senior level in the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector, but I decided on a complete change of direction when I started with the in-toto franchise back in 2006. Fiona: I started working in television production and then set up my own interior design business, after a career break to have children. What inspired you to get involved with the franchise? Clinton: Having worked for many years for other people, I was keen to work for myself. At the time the franchise route seemed the best way to do that. Fiona: Having met Clinton, it was obvious that my future was going to be in kitchens! What inspired you to start your own venture, The Kitchen Partners? Clinton: Although we’ve always been independent, for many years the marketing support offered by the in- toto franchise was a definite plus. Our business grew rapidly in Bristol to the point where we were the number one franchise in the UK for four out of the last five years. However, following the demise of Alno (the owners of the old in-toto brand and its main kitchen supplier) it became apparent that the restrictions of the franchise prevented us from being able to react as quickly as we’d have liked to the problems we were facing. The Kitchen Partners now isn’t tied to any supplier so we can always offer the very best kitchens, appliances and worktops to our customers. What inspired the new name? Clinton: Fiona and I very much work as a partnership when we design our kitchens. We have also always felt like we develop a real partnership with our customers from initial consultation through to completion. The partnership theme continues with the way we work with suppliers and even our employees, so the name really evolved from that. How is your approach to the market unique? Fiona: We really feel that it’s important to understand the requirements of

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each customer and then select the right product for them in terms of design, style and budget. Having the freedom to source products from across the industry means that we’re not forcing people to choose from a specific supplier or range of products which can compromise the design. What trends are surfacing for 2018? Clinton: There has been an ever-increasing move towards open-plan living, with the kitchen forming the central focus of the room. The latest trend is to camouflage the kitchen by hiding away as much as possible behind doors, including the ovens, using a pocket door system. What do you find to be a source of inspiration when selecting products? Fiona: Our German suppliers are fantastic at showcasing their latest products and innovations in their vast showroom facilities. We visit them a couple of times a year to ensure that we incorporate the very best ideas in everything we do. What style is your kitchen at home? Clinton: We’ve just moved home so we are fortunately in the process of designing our new kitchen. Both Fiona and I love the handleless look which is a timeless design classic. We are looking to make a statement and so the carbon grey, matt lacquer door with a Trilium Dekton worktop is our preferred choice. A key component of the kitchen is easy access storage so it will be filled with drawers and the essential tall larder cupboards also with pull-out drawers. Surprise us with something about yourselves... Clinton: My auntie is the TV presenter Gloria Hunniford. Fiona: My 19-year-old son’s just been selected for the England Rugby Sevens team and has so far been to Cape Town, California and Dubai playing for them. That’s some gap year before university!

• thekitchenpartners.co.uk


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SALE ENDS SATURDAY

Cristin Pendant and Kempten Table Lamp

10/2/18

Lighting the way is should be

Tel: 0117 963 5943 Email: info@thelightingstudiobristol.co.uk www.thelightingstudiobristol.co.uk Visit us in store at: Unit 2, Bedminster Retail Park, Sheene Way, Bedminster, Bristol BS3 4TA

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11 Zetland Road, Redland, Bristol BS6 7AG Tel: +44 (0)117 942 4949 www.disney-flooring.com

THE Visit orientalrugsofbath.com or call 01761 451764 at Bookbarn International, Wells Rd, Hallatrow, Bristol, BS39 6EX

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NEED BROCHURES OR LEAFLETS DELIVERED? INSERT IT INTO OUR MAGAZINE AND YOU WILL REALLY REACH GREAT QUALITY READERS EVERY MONTH THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE IS PERFECTLY DELIVERED TO OVER 20,000 HOMES AND BUSINESSES

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Is your home your peaceful place? *Science proves our homes can make us feel happy or sad.

A professional organiser can help you: • regain control of your home or workspace • teach you how to organise your belongings & create systems that work • banish clutter forever • always know where to find those important documents and belongings • feel proud inviting loved ones to share your space

Contact Martha today on 07817041731 and claim your FREE 30 minute consultation for Jan/Feb ONLY www.creatingspacewithme.com contact@creatingspacewithme.com *"There is pretty strong evidence that the environment in which people live is closely linked to their well-being," says Graham Rowles, a gerontology professor at the University of Kentucky.

• Plain and Ornamental plastering • • Wide selection of new cornices, ceiling roses etc • • Cornice made to match existing and repair work • • Lime plastering and rendering • • 29 years experience •

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Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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SAY IT WITH FLOWERS There’s a fascinating symbolic history to the world of flora, including that of the traditionally romantic rose, says Elly West

L

ove is in the air, and flower sales go through the roof this month when Cupid strikes on 14 February. Red roses are still the number one choice when it comes to communicating love through flora, with red being the colour of passion and desire. But why? Delve into the symbolic language of flowers and there’s a rich history and whole language, dating back centuries, to be discovered. The ancient Greeks, Romans, Egyptians and Chinese all said it with flowers, which have been used to express nearly every sentiment imaginable. Red roses appear in poetry, literature, classical artwork, contemporary films and everywhere in between, but their earliest use as a symbol of romance was most likely in Greek and Roman times, when they were associated with Aphrodite and Venus, the goddesses of love. During Victorian times, a whole language known as floriography flourished, and sending flowers was a way to express secret messages, particularly romantic ones, which often could not be spoken aloud in those restrictive times. Victorians used flowers like we use emojis. Entire floral dictionaries were popular, including The Language of Flowers, illustrated by Kate Greenaway, first published in 1884 and still in print today. Although flowers were usually sent to relay positive messages of interest, affection and love, they could also send a negative message. The same flower could even have a different meaning depending on how it was arranged or what it was with. A marigold worn in the hair, for example, implied mental anguish, while at the breast it could mean indifference. Daffodils have been associated with uncertainty, respect, unrequited love, and even deceit. And to receive just one lone daffodil meant misfortune. A bouquet of flowers could, therefore, be the ultimate passive-aggressive gift, and send the 92 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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receiver straight to the dictionary to interpret what each bloom signified. A bunch of hydrangeas and basil would actually be saying ‘You’re heartless and I hate you’, while one of ranunculus implied; ‘I am dazzled by your charms’. When Jane Eyre looks at snowdrops, crocuses, purple auriculas and golden-eyed pansies, Charlotte Bronte is telling us her protagonist is feeling hopeful, cheerful, modest and preoccupied with the connection between money and happiness. Who would have thought it? Even today, many of these meanings and traditions still exist. Pink roses are a sign of warm affection, white are associated with purity, and yellow roses with friendship. And nothing quite says ‘I love you’ like the tightly packed velvet blooms of two dozen sumptuous red roses. Garden roses seem to divide the nation, as they regularly top the lists of both our most loved and most hated plants. I must admit, when I first got into gardening and garden design, I wasn’t sure about including roses. They seemed more trouble than they were worth, and I couldn’t shake off that mental image of formal rows of hybrid teas, perhaps being sprayed by some retired brigadier-type. But modern roses are tough and stylish, with plant breeders working hard to create new, disease-free and even thornless varieties. Roses have a glamour that’s hard to beat, and can mix well in modern and cottage planting schemes, alongside perennials and ornamental grasses, grown as a hedge, or as part of a long-lasting container scheme. As designers have shown at Chelsea and elsewhere, there really is a rose for every place. Always read the small print, and you can find roses that will do well in tricky spots such as shade, dry soil, or on a

Above: Victorians used flowers like we use emojis, including the rose which has been a symbol of love for centuries Opposite: Plant of the month Jacqueline du Pre’s ivory-white blooms almost glow, and its pretty pink-gold stamens become more prominent as the flower ages


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GARDENING

steep slope. Many of the modern varieties will also keep flowering for months on end, starting in June and continuing until October or even later, after which they offer attractive hips that encourage wildlife to your garden. Bare-root roses are available to buy until March or even early April, and now is a good time to plant them as long as the soil isn’t frozen. Bare-root plants are generally good quality with wider roots than their container-grown counterparts, and often offer better value for money as well. Roses are ‘hungry’ plants, which is why they thrive in clay soils that hold the nutrients for longer. Dig in some well-rotted manure or other organic matter when you’re planting a new rose to give it a good kick-start, chuck a handful of fertiliser over the surface of the soil and fork it in as it gets going in spring, and again in summer. There are specially formulated rose feeds available to buy. I also dump the wood ash from my log burner around the base of roses, as it gives them a boost of potassium.

Given that there are 150 known species of rose, and literally thousands of garden hybrids, the David Austin website (davidaustinroses.co.uk) is a great place to start if you’re not sure which one to buy. You can search by colour, type or situation, and it also lists those thornless varieties. Although I always think that rather than complaining that roses have thorns, we could instead be thankful that thorns have roses. Happy Valentine’s Day! • ellyswellies.co.uk

PLANT OF THE MONTH: ROSA ‘JACQUELINE DU PRE’ This modern shrub rose is one of my favourites, and its beautiful ivory-white blooms almost glow, working well with just about any colour scheme, and alongside a wide range of perennials in a mixed border. Its single flowers have traditional, natural charm, but as a modern variety it’s been bred for disease resistance and a long flowering period. The flowers are freely produced on strong stems, sometimes from May right through until November if you remember to dead-head, and the pretty pink-gold stamens become more prominent as the flowers age. They also pack a soft, light musk fragrance. Plants reach about 1.2m in height and spread. Pruning should be carried out in late winter (wearing gloves). Remove any dead, damaged or congested stems, and cut back vigorous new shoots by about a third to stop them becoming straggly and to maintain a neat shape.

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Colourfence fp.qxp_Layout 1 24/01/2018 11:20 Page 1

Now’s the perfect time to get your garden ready for the weather ahead. I’ve wasted countless days and a small fortune, trying to maintain tired wooden fences that looked dreadful and always required yet more work. Discovering Colourfence has changed things forever!

It’s scientifically tested and rated to ensure when professionally installed it can withstand wind gusts of up to 130mph. This year when my neighbours are wasting precious leisure time treating their fences with a variety of preservatives, I’ll be giving my Colourfence a quick hose down then sitting back to enjoy my garden. As the Colourfence system offers a lasting solution to fencing woes it’s easy to see why many regard it as the premier fencing solution on the market. Colourfence won’t rot and it resists weather that quickly damages wooden fences, it has none of the drawbacks of wood but plenty of added bene ts and it’s better value too! High quality AND

great value – it’s a customisable product with a variety of colours and styles offering a first rate finish. The materials and fitting are so good that Colourfence is guaranteed† for 25 years!

To find out how Colourfence might benefit you and arrange your free no obligation quote, I strongly suggest you call one of their helpful experts. THE COLOURFENCE PROMISE Virtually maintenance free Saves time and money – no annual treating required Guaranteed for up to 25 years† Unbeatable value compared to other fences Versatile range of colours & sizes No risk professional installation


KF PIF full Page Jan 17.qxp_PIF Full Page 22/01/2018 11:28 Page 1

BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

H

ernhill is situated on a quite lane in the sough after village of Abbots Leigh. The village church, hall and pub are all within walking distance. The property itself was built in the 1920s and is full of character. The house has undergone a significant refurbishment programme in recent years with wall insulation and the replacement of the heating system, roof and services. During the renovations many interesting period features were retained including fireplaces in the bedrooms and beautiful wooden floors. The reception rooms are open plan, making the most of the light and space and there are log burners and cast iron radiators to give a cosy and inviting feel. The bespoke hand painted kitchen has limestone flooring, marble worktops and an Aga-style biomass range oven. Both the kitchen and the sitting/family room have French doors leading our into the gardens. Upstairs there are four consistently proportioned bedrooms, one en suite, each having its own unique outlook over Abbots Leigh and the Welsh hills beyond. There is a generous onyx-tiled family bathroom. The gardens at Hernhill are lovely with lawns, shrubs, fruit trees, an evergreen and hazel woodland and vegetable/herb garden. In terms of parking, there is a detached garage and a substantial gravelled driveway. Hernhill is an absolute delight – the perfect mix of rural charm with excellent access to the city centre. Viewing and full details are from agents Knight Frank Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

HERNHILL, MANOR LANE ABBOTS LEIGH • Open plan kitchen & dining room • Sitting room with French doors to gardens • Four bedrooms • One en suite shower room, family bathroom & guest shower room • Gardens, parking, views

Guide Price £875,000

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PROPERTY NEWS

BITE-SIZED UPDATES FROM ACROSS THE CITY’S BOOMING SECTOR The Pick Everard team is expanding as part of its ambitious growth plans

CONGRATS!

CONTRACT COUP

Property consultancy Lambert Smith Hampton has boosted its South West building consultancy division; appointing David Bridges as associate director after his six years working in the Northampton office, across the full spectrum of building consultancy services. David joined LSH as a graduate in 2010 following the completion of his masters in building surveying, and achieved chartered status in 2013. During his time in the East Midlands, David worked with clients across both the public and private sectors, including Essex County Council, Henderson Property Fund, Heineken and Exova. “Having been with LSH for several years, I know I am already part of an ambitious and enterprising business focused on delivering outstanding client services,” he said. “My new role will see me supporting the team’s further growth, servicing existing clients while developing new opportunities in the wider region." Simon Redgers, head of building consultancy South West, added: “David has proven himself to be an excellent asset and I have no doubt that his significant experience will be invaluable.”

The project management team at property consultancy JLL in Bristol has been instructed on two major new office fit-outs at One Cathedral Square. The two contract wins cover the whole building with Dyson and University of Bristol taking two floors each, comprising a combined 56,059sqft of office space. Both organisations are due to move into the building in spring 2018. The instructions represent the continuation of JLL’s long-standing relationship with the University of Bristol and the team’s first instruction from Dyson – on their first long-term commitment in Bristol city centre. “We are delighted to have secured One Cathedral Square to continue to provide our staff with high quality office space and are pleased to have JLL on board,” said the University of Bristol’s head of capital projects, Andrew Casselden. Adam Staite, associate director in JLL’s project management team, added: “We look forward to bringing to both projects our extensive recent fit-out experience, working with major clients and our own experience from our recent office move to 31 Great George Street.”

• lsh.co.uk

• jll.co.uk

CHOICE PICKS Leading independent property, construction and infrastructure consultancy Pick Everard has expanded its Bristol team with three new appointments as part of its ambitious growth plans. The team – which recently unveiled its new-look office after undergoing a full re-fit – already offers a multitude of construction consultancy services to its clients. However, the addition of three new senior team members means that they will be able to broaden and develop their offering even further. Among Pick Everard’s new starters is Edward Carter, who joins as director of strategic asset services. With more than 30 years’ experience in the sector, Edward will lead the development and growth of Pick Everard’s facilities and asset management consultancy across the whole business. “Pick Everard has always been an innovative firm and I have been impressed by the organisation, and its employees, when I’ve encountered them in my previous role at property consultant and facilities management company Mace Macro,” he said. “I’m delighted to have joined the Bristol office; the construction industry in the region is doing incredibly well, with considerable investment being seen across the South West and a number of transformative projects on the horizon.” Richard Evely and Mark Gaylor have also joined the firm, heading up the quantity surveying and structural engineering teams. Since opening its doors in March, the Bristol team has gone from strength to strength, working with major clients in the South West area such as EDF Energy and both North and South Somerset Council. Rod Burton, partner at Pick Everard added: “The Bristol office is seeing more work coming in than ever from local authorities, private sector companies and major frameworks such as Scape. Edward, Richard and Mark will not only be instrumental in delivering projects for these clients, but they will also enable us to deliver more work to a wider selection of clients. Now is a really exciting time for the team; we’re looking forward to delivering significant new schemes across the region.” • pickeverard.co.uk

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Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

LARGE BS1 SHOP

CLIFTON SHOP TO LET

• Close to the BRI, the University and city centre

• Lock up shop

• Prominent corner site

• Fronting onto Queens Road

• Established retail pitch

• New lease

• Rent on application

• Rent on application 164 WHITELADIES ROAD

FREEHOLD FOR SALE (MAY LET)

• Prominent busy location

• Rare opportunity to purchase a shop in Clifton

• Shop with A2 consent • 733 sq ft

• With or without upper 4 bed maisonette

• £17,500

• Price on application

8 UNITY STREET, BS1

NEW BOND HOUSE, BS1

• Stunning contemporary refurbishment

• Prime modern offices • 5,468 sq ft + 6 cars

• Prime office location

• V competitive rent

• C 1,000 sq ft to 2,750 sq ft

• Terms on application

• Terms on application

PORTLAND VIEW, DEAN STREET, BRISTOL, BS2

BEDMINSTER OFFICES • Open plan offices • 5,493 sq ft

• 2 New contemporary office units

• Parking on site

• 368 sq ft & 560 sq ft

• To be refurbished

• New flexible leases

• Rent on application

• Great space…

INVESTMENT FOR SALE

FOR SALE INDUSTRIAL UNTI +YARD

Numerous new investment sales coming soon in Bristol including HMO’S, shops with flats in Clifton and BS1 –

• 21,442 sq ft • C 1 acre

TEL FOR DETAILS

• Freehold

Ref Julian Cook or Charlie Kershaw

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon

Burston Cook February.indd 1

MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

• Guide £1,100,000

Tom Coyte MRICS

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

22/01/2018 15:23


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

PORTLAND SQUARE – BS1

BERKELEY SQUARE BS8

• Located on the prestigious Portland Square • 3,360 sq ft – floors from 532 sq ft • Car parking to the rear for up to 7 / 8 cars • Flexible lease terms

• For sale

ECONOMICAL CENTRAL OFFICES

DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY FOR SALE

• Only £6.50 psf! • 3,039 sq ft

• Consent for 2 x two beds, 1 x 1 bed and 3 bed coach house

• Fitted as 2 storey offices

• + prime Park Street shop

• New flexi lease

• Freehold to purchase

FOR SALE HIGH STREET KINGSWOOD

ECONOMICAL OFFICES

• Penthouse office suite • 773 sq ft • Price on application

• 790 sq ft + 4 car spaces

• Lock up shop + 2 x one bed flats • Popular location

• Low service charge and rates

• Price on application

• Lodge Causeway BS16 • Rent on application 43 BROAD STREET

26 VICTORIA SQUARE – PORTISHEAD

• Suit office, retail and A3 uses

• Suit offices and retail uses • 1,032 sq ft + 4 car spaces

• From 428 sq ft (shop) to 2,312 sq ft (whole)

• Low business rates

• New flexible leases

• Rent only £11,700 pax ALL SAINTS HOUSE, BRISTOL CITY CENTRE

FOR SALE

• Impressive period offices to let

• Fully let investment • 2 x retail units + 2 bed maisonette

• Sizes up to 2,000 sq ft

• £21,160 pax rent

• New flexible leases Rent on application

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon

Burston Cook February.indd 2

MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

• £300,000 ONO

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

22/01/2018 15:23


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carpe n t r y

Land & Development

B R O K E R S

DOMESTIC & COMMERCIAL CARPENTERS Specialising in bespoke kitchens, cupboards, shelving and wardrobes For a quote call us on 01275 844899

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT SITES WANTED WITH OR WITHOUT PLANNING PERMISSION FROM SINGLE PLOTS TO MULTIPLE UNIT SCHEMES STRATEGIC LAND UNUSED PUBLIC HOUSES, HOTELS AND COMMERCIAL UNITS

contact: CAMERON GRAY mobile: 07876 197522

or info@hughescarpentry.co.uk

T H E

B R I S T OL M A G A Z I N E

During the festive break our offices at Bristol & Exeter house were heavily flooded by a water escape in the offices above us. The rooms are currently undergoing a complete overhaul and we hope to return very soon. All mail and telephone lines are temporarily redirected, but for people wishing to visit us, or for parcels and other deliveries, please contact us beforehand.

TEL : 0117 974 2800 sales@thebristolmagazine.co.uk editor@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

cameron@landdevelopmentbrokers.co.uk www.landdevelopmentbrokers.co.uk

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PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

C

rossover House is a charming well appointed detached family home, much loved and improved by the current owners, who have lived there for just over two decades. The property has excellent arrangements of its bedrooms and bathrooms (and Tardis like internal footprint). All the ensuite facilities have been modernised. Four of the bedrooms are comfortable double rooms, with the fifth slightly smaller and perfect for a nursery. The house flows beautifully with the heart of the house to the rear, overlooking the south facing garden and comprising a light filled open plan kitchen and family room. There is also an enjoyable garden room with central heating enabling it to be used all year round. To the front are two delightful reception rooms to retreat into in the evenings and entertain guests; with an open hearth in the drawing room complete with exposed beams; and a charming dining room opposite. A home study provides a place to work in peace, with a door leading into the garden. With a deep front garden and access to excellent offstreet parking, as well as an integrated garage.

Crossover House, Almondsbury, Bristol • • • • •

5 bedroom detached house 4 bathrooms (3 en-suite) Sought after village Generous garden Intergrated garage

Guide price: £895,000

Rupert Oliver Property Agents, Somerset House, 18 Canynge Road, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 428 6464

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Westbury-on-Trym Andrewsonline.co.uk

Brentry Lane, Brentry, Bristol, BS10 6RH £484,950

This beautiful three double bedroom detached house situated on Brentry Lane is now available to buy. With its 70’ rear garden and driveway parking, this house shouldn’t be overlooked. Two reception rooms plus office. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

0117 405 7685 westburyontrym@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Keynsham Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bath road, Saltford, Bristol, BS31 3JU £3,000,000

0117 405 7683

Andrews February.indd 1

This imposing turn of the century residence sits within the large village of Saltford, just 4 miles from the historic Georgian city of Bath and in brief comprises 7 bedrooms plus a further two bedroom, detached, annexe bungalow, floodlit tennis court and substantial grounds with additional paddock. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

keynsham@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

19/01/2018 17:17


Southville Andrewsonline.co.uk

South Liberty Lane, Ashton Vale, Bristol, BS3 2TH £425,000

A beautifully presented, 4 bedroom, semi-detached property with it’s own driveway and self-contained flat underneath. The house benefits from a kitchen/dining room with granite worktops and fitted appliances, as well as French doors to a raised decking area with views over the city. The self-contained flat has an open plan kitchen and living area and a one double bedroom along with a versatile study/office space. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

0117 963 3000 southville@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Longwell Green Andrewsonline.co.uk

California Cottage, O/Common, Bristol, BS30 9PR £800,000

California Cottage is just a wonderful home, with so much character and charm and with the existing property allowing for the division to create two marvellous four bedroom homes as per the planning, which can be viewed on south Gloucestershire’s website as well as the creation of a new three bedroom detached house also under the same scheme. Planning Permitted PK17/0530/F for sub-division of existing dwelling to form two separate dwellings & erection of one additional dwelling. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

0117 911 6902 longwellgreen@andrewsonline.co.uk

Andrews February.indd 2

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

19/01/2018 17:17


City Centre £380,000

Clifton Office 0117 946 6007

Two bedroom flat

A stunning 2 double bedroom, 4th floor apartment with secure parking in the heart of the city, the iconic Electricity House retains many original Art Deco features, partnered with modern finishes. A truly bespoke residency and ideal for those seeking all the benefits of city centre living. EPC - C.

oceanhome.co.uk

Ocean February.indd 1

Westbury-on-Trym Office 0117 962 1973

Chock Cottage £317,500 Two bedroom house

’Chock Cottage’ is perched at the top of Chock Lane. The cottage is arranged over 3 floors, providing a surprisingly spacious interior, including a cellar. Situated just 5 minutes walk from the Westbury-onTrym C of E Academy school, as well as being a short stroll to local shops and restaurants within the village. EPC - E.

19/01/2018 14:34


Cotham £280,000 Two bedroom flat

A fantastic opportunity to acquire a well proportioned, 2 double bedroom garden flat on Cotham Brow with scope for modernisation. This owner occupied property has a private entrance, 47ft x 20ft walled private rear garden, gas central heating, UPVC double glazing throughout and is in the Cotham residents’ parking zone. EPC - TBC.

Lawrence Grove £850,000 Four bedroom house

This substantial and beautifully presented four bedroom semidetached family home comes to market in the popular Lawrence Grove, situated within level approach of Henleaze high street and close to Henleaze infant and junior school, the property has been renovated by the current owners. EPC - D.

Ocean February.indd 2

19/01/2018 14:35


Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com Negotiation is not an easy business. I was at a conference recently in which a hostage negotiator outlined the finer points of his (much more perilous) negotiation strategy, and much of it resonated for me. He maintained that active listening and clear communication are key. You only have to look at the business of Brexit to know that skill and experience matter when reaching an agreement with serious implications. While selling or letting a home is a different beast, it’s not that different, and the financial consequences are huge for most

of us. There is an art to reaching an agreement between buyer and seller, landlord and tenant, and a deal that everyone can agree on. Property negotiation is not a game and not for the fainthearted. You could do it yourself? Or you could hire seasoned, respected experts whose job it is not to be influenced or undermined by the tactics of others. It pays to instruct a good agent. Howard Davis M.N.A.E.A Managing Director - CJ Hole Clifton

REDLAND Guide Price £1,200,000 A substantial refurbished four storey Victorian family house built in 1868 (2979 sq ft). This well presented house offers: Generous kitchen/dining room with direct access to the rear garden, four reception rooms, five double bedrooms, three bathrooms, front and rear gardens with side access to the property. EPC D

ernisation

REDLAND Guide Price £725,000 - SSTC

ear

MORE REQUIRED - A charming semi-detached house requiring some modernisation yet still retaining a wealth of character and period features. The property comprises: Three receptions, kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms, rear garden and a cellar area. EPC D

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HARBOUR AREA Guide Price £350,000

CLIFTON Guide Price £485,000

A beautifully presented and recently modernised apartment offering: Spacious lounge/diner with access to a private balcony which offers a lovely sun trap to relax and entertain, recently installed kitchen, two double bedrooms, modern bathroom plus a real bonus of a garage and car port parking space. EPC C

A grand and beautifully presented hall floor apartment with Whiteladies Road just a short walk away. The apartment consists: Stunning lounge with triple bay sash windows, kitchen/diner, two bedrooms, main bathroom plus there is a separate shower room. To the front of the property is a communal garden. EPC E

CLIFTON Guide Price £330,000

CLIFTON Guide Price £225,000

A well-presented garden level flat situated in a great location with its own private entrance. The property offers: Living room with three sash windows, fitted kitchen, utility/storage cupboard, two double bedrooms, bathroom and conservatory with direct access to the rear garden which is mainly communal. EPC D

An attractive two bedroom retirement apartment just a stroll away from nearby Whiteladies Road, Clifton Down Shopping Centre, restaurants and coffee bars. Situated on the first floor the property offers: Hallway with storage cupboards, living room, separate kitchen, double bedroom and bathroom. EPC B

CLIFTON Guide Price £945,000

REDLAND Guide Price £250,000 - SSTC

A Victorian house enjoying a central Clifton location, currently arranged as three separate flats but with the necessary planning permissions there is potential to convert back to a single dwelling. Should you consider buying for investment then we can advise on current rents achieved. EPC 2 x C & 1 x D

BUYERS WAITING – A beautifully presented fifth floor apartment with fantastic views across the Downs, Redland and surrounding areas. The property consists: Large living/dining room (with space for an office area), kitchen, two double bedrooms, shower room plus an under croft car port with space for one car. EPC D

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CAIRNS ROAD, WESTBURY PARK A three bedroom family home with many period features throughout offering two receptions, kitchen/breakfast room, utility and private rear and front gardens. The property is within the Redland Green Secondary School catchment area and marketed with a complete chain. 2

1

3

GUIDE PRICE ÂŁ575,000

ABBEY ROAD, WESTBURY-ON-TRYM A beautifully presented family home offering an open plan kitchen/living area which provides access to a delightful garden. To the first floor are three spacious bedrooms and master with ensuite to the second floor. This property is marketed with a potentially complete onward chain. 2

2

4

GUIDE PRICE ÂŁ699,950

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Hallen, Bristol

| Guide Price £825,000

A fabulous detached barn conversion set in circa 2.5 acres of gardens and paddock; complete with an extensive commercial barn offering versatility, privacy and enjoyment. Detached family house set within extensive grounds | Generous sitting room and open plan dining room | Study / Bedroom 4 | Family kitchen & breakfast room | Master bedroom with en-suite shower room | Two further double bedrooms | Family bathroom and separate cloak room | Detached commercial barn with a fully fitted home office suite | Detached “piggery” presenting further opportunity | Circa 2.5 acres of gardens, grounds and paddock | Extensive driveway and hard-standing for numerous cars | EPC: B Main home circa 1700 sq. ft with circa 2500 sq. ft detached barn.


Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

SS

TC

Redland

SS

Guide Price £315,000

Sale agreed in the first week of January. Split across two floors, this period cottage is quaint, yet surprisingly practical.

SS

TC

City Centre Guide Price £199,950

Sale agreed in early January. A perfect slice of city living in a cosmopolitan, central location.

TC

Wanted City Centre Guide Price £265,000

Due to our successful start to the year we are actively looking for 2, 3 and 4 bedroom properties in Clifton, Redland and Cotham for buyers looking in these areas. Call us now to include your property in our London to Country Roadshow which takes place in March.

Sale agreed in the second week of January. A stylish and contemporary two bedroom apartment with its own integral private staircase.

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 369 1004 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

CHURCH ROAD, SNEYD PARK

guide £875,000

A very charming and surprisingly spacious (circa 2013 sq. ft.) 3 double bedroom, 2 bathroom (originally 4 bedroom) detached lodge house over two floors and dating from circa 1850 with later additions, in a coveted location near St Mary’s Church and standing within its own lovely gardens with parking space and double garage. Very comfortable and civilised accommodation, interesting with character and a rather special atmosphere, well presented with generous fenestration providing lots of natural light. Prestige location enjoying privacy and seclusion in a sought after neighbourhood. EPC: E

GREAT GEORGE STREET, PARK STREET guide £1,695,000

WOODFIELD ROAD, REDLAND

Stunning central location near Brandon Hill Park, within the Royal Colonnade - an elegant 5 double bedroom Georgian period grade II* listed town house, circa 4,800 sq. ft. Separate self-contained flat, parking & 76ft rear garden.

An immaculately presented and large 6 bedroom (2 with en-suite), 3 reception room semi-detached Victorian home with a stylish interior designed for modern family living, further benefiting from off street parking, a fabulous 21ft x 12ft kitchen/dining space and a level rear garden. Coveted location off the beaten track and yet so convenient. EPC: C

AUBURN ROAD, REDLAND

REDLAND ROAD, REDLAND

guide £895,000 - £935,000

An elegant & well-proportioned, 4 double bedroom, 3 reception room, 3 bath/shower room semi-detached Victorian town house on a much sought after road. Off street parking and a sunny fully enclosed rear town garden. EPC: E

Professional, Reliable, Successful

guide £1,150,000

guide £730,000

A stunning, 3 double bedroom, 3 reception room, 2 bath/shower room Victorian period upper maisonette apartment, of circa 1885 sq. ft., with separate kitchen/breakfast room, off-street parking space, south-west facing rear garden, timber workshop & enclosed rooftop terrace. Impressive & stylish with high ceilings and an abundance of period features combined seamlessly with high quality contemporary additions. EPC: E

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP

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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

BETWEEN PORTISHEAD AND PORTBURY guide range £965,000 - £1,055,000 A most striking, contemporary and minimalist single storey residence - architect designed and built with an emphasis on seclusion, light and space The south facing accommodation is uncluttered with a combination of white walls and glass - bright on even the most grey of English days - three or four bedrooms, kitchen/dining room, 2 receptions and circulation areas surround a 12 metre swimming pool which acts as a shimmering focal point; outside there is a large double garage complete with wine store and ample driveway parking. The house sits in circa 3/4 of an acre of formal gardens.

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP

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Bristol’s Independent Estate Agents

Our local, friendly team of property experts are on-call to offer you up-to-the-minute property valuations and advice on selling your home. Developing and building professional relationships with our clients is really important to us, and we believe it’s the way we deal with people that makes us different.

Redland Guide Price £525,000

Westbury Park £725,000

A stunning three bedroom garden flat with private rear garden, two garages and off street parking in highly desirable Cambridge Park. Set in Grade II listed building the apartment is attractively presented throughout and offered with completed onward chain in place for a swift move.

Currently arranged as two flats we feel the property has potential to revert back to a substantial 5 bedroom family home in this desirable location within walking distance of Redland Green School. Available for occupation from May with no onward chain. EPC - F.

TEL: 0117 974 1741 61 Apsley Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2SW

Leese & Nagle February.indd 1

sales@leeseandnagle.co.uk

24/01/2018 15:23


www.leeseandnagle.co.uk

Westbury on Trym

NEW INSTRUCTION

£650,000

This attractive 1930’s 4-bedroom semi-detached family home is situated equidistant between Stoke Lane and Westbury Village. Offering an integral garage and lovely South-Westerly facing garden. It is within the current catchment area of Elmlea Infants’ School and the Bristol Free School. EPC - D.

Stoke Bishop £265,000

Westbury on Trym £550,000

Westbury on Trym £375,000

We are very pleased to offer this two double-bedroom first floor flat in the highly sought after Stoke Bishop. The property is located to the end of a lovely cul-de-sac with stunning views over the playing fields and benefits from double glazing and electric heating. EPC - C.

We are delighted to present to the market this extremely rare 2/3 bedroom detached bungalow with a southerly facing garden in a lovely cul-de-sac. The property is on the level and is offered chain free. EPC - F.

A lovely two double bedroom semi-detached home in the heart of Westbury Village within easy walking distance of shops etc. Ideal for those downsizing or first time buyers. EPC - E.

TEL: 0117 962 2299 125 Stoke Lane, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS9 3RW

Leese & Nagle February.indd 2

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24/01/2018 14:33


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The Bristol Magazine February 2018  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol

The Bristol Magazine February 2018  

The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bristol