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THE

ISSUE 113 I NOVEMBER 2013

BRISTOL MAGAZINE

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE CITY OF BRISTOL www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

£3.00 where sold

Swashbuckling Adventures

BRAVADO BALLET sets sail for the Hippodrome

WIN A CHRISTMAS SHOPPING EXPERIENCE A BALLOON FLIGHT FOR TWO

C IT Y S P EC IA L

THE CHESTERFIELD

FIVE STAR service at the city’s newest hospital CHRISTMAS WRAPPING

GIFT GUIDES For perfect presentation RESTAURANT REVIEW

FESTIVAL MAN

PIAZZA DI ROMA The Italian on Whiteladies Road

STEVE SYMONS selects his favourite tunes AND

ALSO

B R I S T O L’ S F I N E S T P R O P E R T Y F O R S A L E

S H O P L O C A L : C O L D H A R B O U R R O A D O N D I S P L AY


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THE | CONTENTS

NOVEMBER 2013 58

36 14

ZEITGEIST

36 39

THE CITYIST BARTLEBY

47

PEOPLE & PARTIES

48

BRISTOL AT WORK

50

FACE THE MUSIC

54

Bristol music man Steve Symons picks his top tunes

26

CULTURE BOOK

74 AUTHOR TALK

COMPETITION

Children’s Laureate comes to Bristol

WIN

Nuffield Health’s new hospital

ARTS & EXHIBITIONS ART TRAIL ARCHIVE How Leigh Woods was saved for the city

58

BE INSPIRED COMPETITION

WIN

64

SHOP LOCAL The delights of Coldharbour Road

6 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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NOVEMBER 2013

FOOD AND TRAVEL

Enjoy a Downton Abbey style of life

100 PROPERTY The best homes in and around Bristol

66

BRISTOL twitter@thebristolmag

A festive feast at Padstow

ON THE COVER

RESTAURANT REVIEW

Esteban Berlanga, Max Westwell and Junor Souza in the English National Ballet’s Le Corsaire © 2013 Guy Farrow

Traditional Italian on Whiteladies Road

A shopping experience in Bath

34

92 HOMES ON SHOW

THE

56

BRISTOL FASHION

86 THE CHESTERFIELD

Swashbuckling at the Hippodrome

North Bristol creatives on show

The art of imaginative gift wrapping

32

Events and activities for the whole family

BRAVADO BALLET

Showing off glamorous party wear

30

76 FAMILY FUN

What’s on show at the city’s galleries

Pictured: jewellery designer Diana Porter

24

Walking the old roads of the Mendips

A balloon flight for two

Snapshots from the city’s social scene

22

72 OUT AND ABOUT

What’s on in the city this month

Chasing a green hill far away

20

BAD FILM CLUB An entertaining experience

The buzz, My Bristol and a top read

18

54

66

Five things things to do this month

16

74

FESTIVE FROLICS The Christmas Spiegeltent is back

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

MAGAZINE


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.co.

Clion

An immaculate family house (5,142sq ). 3 recep#on rooms, family kitchen. Master bedroom suite with ensuite bathroom & dressing room. 4 further bedrooms. 2 further bathroom. Bedroom 6/study. Extensive lower ground floor with 2 rooms, stores and u#lity room/laundry. Superb enclosed gardens and terrace. Off street parking & garage. EPC ra#ng E. Guide price: £1,650,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knigh"rank.com 0117 3171999


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Leigh Woods

Chew Magna

A substantial 1,897 sq ft lateral period apartment with superb views. Drawing room, kitchen / dining room, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (1 ensuite), ample storage. EPC rating F.

A delightful family home (4,626 sq ft) with the opportunity of dual occupation. 5 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. 6/7 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms (1 ensuite). Garaging, extensive parking, enclosed gardens and terraces backing onto fields. EPC rating D.

Guide price: £465,000

Guide price: £1,100,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

Chew Magna

River Front

A fantastic and beautifully presented home (4,542 sq ft) within the heart of Chew Magna village. 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. 5 ensuite bedrooms, integral garage, enclosed gardens. Views of the church. EPC rating C.

An immaculate river front apartment (1,244 sq ft) within an iconic period conversion. Open plan drawing room / kitchen / breakfast room with vaulted ceilings, sun terrace. Master bedroom with ensuite shower, guest bedroom, bathroom, utility cupboard. Allocated parking for 2 cars. EPC rating C.

Guide price: £1,100,000 KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

Guide price: £395,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999


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.co.

SOLD Clifton Guide £799,950

SOLD Clifton Guide £1,395,000

SOLD Clifton £1,295,000

· We have 448 potential buyers on our books looking to spend a collective total of £506,800,000

SOLD Clifton OIEO £500,000

· Every day KF Bristol properties are viewed 548 times through our award-winning website · In the past 6 months our site was visited by people from 223 countries

SOLD Wraxall Guide £1,500,000

· 54% of our sales in the last 6 months were priced under £750,000

Contact us to arrange a free market appraisal of your home. bristol@knightfrank.com

SOLD Chew Magna Guide £1,350,000

SOLD Coombe Dingle Guide £595,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

0117 317 1999

Knight Frank.co.uk

SOLD Chew Stoke Guide £2,000,000

SOLD Clifton Guide £575,000

SOLD Harbourside Guide £545,000


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E

very month we aim to produce a wellwritten magazine with intelligent, engaging content for the whole of Bristol, covering all aspects of city living and offering something for everyone. And I think this issue fulfils that perfectly. As well as our usual comprehensive events guides, property section, business news, columnists and general talk of the town; we have something for foodies in the way of a travel feature on the gastronomic delights of Padstow; for film lovers we discover the fun to be had in watching bad movies as part of a new film club; for history buffs, Andrew Swift discovers how Leigh Woods was saved for the city; and for creative types, Amanda White of Gift Frippery inspires us with her imaginative gift wrapping techniques. We also aim to keep you up-to-date with the latest city happenings and so we take a look behind the doors of Nuffield Health’s new Chesterfield Hospital on Clifton Hill which offers the very latest technology as well as five star service. Residents will be pleased to hear that the Georgian villa which fronts the site has been protected, restored and given a new lease of life too. Read more on page 86. It’s hard to ignore the fact that Christmas is just around the corner, and in this November issue we’ve put together a gift guide with suggestions of what to buy your loved ones this year. We’re also championing local independents and highlight Coldharbour Road as a unique and varied shopping destination – if you haven’t been there in a while you’ll be pleasantly surprised by the latest offerings. And to get you in the Christmas party mood, there’s a fashion page of super glamorous dresses – perfect for if you’re going to one of the glitzy events at the Christmas Spiegeltent, which comes to the Harbourside for another fun-filled festive season at the end of the month – see page 66 for what’s on the line-up. Enjoy.

SAMANTHA COLEMAN All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

CONTACT THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE: Editor Email:

Samantha Coleman sam@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Deputy Editor Email:

Georgette McCready georgette@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email: Commercial Production Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Lorna Harrington lorna@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Publisher Tel: Email:

Steve Miklos 0117 974 2800 stevem@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Contact the Advertising Sales team on tel: 0117 974 2800 Advertising Sales Email:

Kathy Williams kathy@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Email:

Sue Parker sue@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Address:

The Bristol Magazine, 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED

The Bristol Magazine and The Bath Magazine are published by MC Publishing Ltd and are completely independent of all other local publications.

WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

NOVEMBER 2013

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 13


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ZEITGEIST Westonbirt Arboretum’s Enchanted Christmas © Paul Groom

5

things to do in November

Watch It’s that time of year: when the Christmas lights go on and the city is transformed into one big festive party. On Thursday 7 November, pop band The Saturdays will be headlining The Mall at Cribbs Causeway’s Christmas Charity Concert in aid of Help for Heroes. The band will be switching on The Mall’s Christmas Lights and performing their latest hits on the outdoor arena next to the Winter Wonderland which features an ice rink and castle. The Mall The Saturdays is giving away 10,000 free tickets in exchange for a minimum £2 suggested donation to Help for Heroes. Tickets are available on a first come, first served basis from The Mall’s information desk during opening hours. In central Bristol, the shopping area will switch on its Christmas lights in theatrical style with a magical Cinderella themed event on Friday 8 November, starting at The Galleries at 5.30pm with special guest, actor Suzanne Shaw, who is performing in this year’s Christmas pantomime at the Hippodrome. Visitors will be treated to a procession to Cabot Circus where a dazzling performance combining acrobatics, dance, music and theatre will take place under the glass roof as the countdown takes place and the Christmas lights are switched on throughout the centre of Bristol.

The largest ice rink in the south west at The Mall, Cribbs Casueway

See Kick-start your festive cheer with an outing to Westonbirt Arboretum for a magical evening among the trees as it once again hosts its signature winter event, Enchanted Christmas. On every Friday, Saturday and Sunday evening from Friday 29 November – Sunday 22 December the striking structures of Westonbirt’s trees are lit up by thousands of lights against the winter night sky in an illuminated trail. You can also join in with carol singing and browse festive market stalls offering hot chestnuts, a hog roast, toffee apples and more. Enchanted Christmas will start with a switch-on event at 5pm on Friday 29 November. Tickets are £10 adults, £8 children, on sale at: www.forestry.gov.uk/westonbirt-christmas

Remember Let us remember all those who have given their lives in war on Remembrance Sunday, 10 November. The Bristol City Pipes and Drums will lead a commemorative parade from College Green at 10.30am to the Cenotaph where there will be a service attended by the Lord Mayor and the Royal British Legion. The service includes two minutes silence at 11am and a wreath laying ceremony. Also on this day, the City of Bristol Choir presents a remembrance concert at St Alban’s Church at 7.30pm. Offering a chance to reflect, the City of Bristol Choir, conducted by David Ogden, is joined by the Lochrian Ensemble to perform Fauré’s setting of the Requiem and Vaughan Williams’ Dona Nobis Pacem. Tickets available from tel: 01454 778477 or www.cityofbristolchoir.org.uk. 14 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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NOVEMBER 2013

Skate

There are two places you can enjoy ice skating in the city this winter. One is brand new to Bristol, in Millennium Square, which AtBristol is transforming into a huge ice rink where you can skate with family and friends next to the Planetarium. Opening on Saturday 9 November and running until Sunday 5 January, the ice rink will be open from 10am – 8pm each day with sessions running on the hour, every hour. Tickets cost £7.50 for adults, £6.50 for concessions and £5.50 for children. To book visit: www.at-bristol.org.uk/icerink. You can also skate at The Mall at Cribbs Causeway’s annual Winter Wonderland which boasts the largest outdoor ice rink in the south west next to Santa’s enchanted castle. Launching on Thursday 7 November, after the Christmas lights switchon, the ice rink will be open seven days a week, 12pm – 9pm until Sunday 5 January. Skating sessions last 45 minutes and start on the hour. Prices start from £5 per child and £6 per adult (including skate hire). Book at: www.mallcribbs.com.

Enjoy See displays of bright colourful lights and soak up an atmosphere of oohs and ahhs at various locations around the city this month to celebrate bonfire night. The Bristol Round Table and Clifton Rotary Club’s Canford Park Fireworks Fiesta takes place on Saturday 9 November, raising money for local charities. This year the show, in Westbury-on-Trym, is promising to be bigger and better than ever with a fantastic dazzling family-friendly pyrotechnic display. Gates open at 6pm and the display starts at 7pm. Tickets are £5 on the night or £4 in advance from St Peter’s Hospice shops. Over in Downend, the annual firework show is back with a bang for the 42nd year on Friday 1 November. The Downend Firework Show, organised by the Great Western Round Table (GWRT), is being held at the King George V playing fields in Sutherland Avenue with spectacular fireworks from Bristol company Skyburst. BBC Radio Bristol will be on board to provide presenters and entertainment acts and there will be a selection of attractions for children including a special children’s firework display. For further information visit: www.downendfireworks.co.uk


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THE CITY The buzz... KNUTTY KNITTERS ARE BACK Last year the city was taken by storm by a group of self-proclaimed Knutty Knitters who delighted us with a tour of their lifesized ‘Knitivity’ scene. This year the Knutty Knitters are back and have created a Christmas card using a picture of the ‘Knitivity’ scene in the snow in front of the Suspension Bridge, to raise money for local charity St Peter’s Hospice. The group of six women from Bristol launched the Christmas card, which is sold in all of the St Peter’s Hospice shops across the city as well as online, costing £4 for a pack of 10. And keep an eye out later in the year, when the Knutty Knitters will be taking their tour on the road once more with new additions of a camel, a donkey and an angel. For more information or to order your Christmas cards visit: www.stpetershospice.org.uk

My BRISTOL We ask CRAIG EDWARDS, actor and director, what he’s doing this month... What brought you to Bristol? I grew up in Wolverhampton and as a kid we would go on camping holidays to Cornwall. Bristol was this exciting city Dad would drive through on the way. Later as a drama student at The Welsh College Of Music & Drama in Cardiff I would come to Bristol to see bands. After leaving drama school I had a short spell in London but I kept getting work in Bristol where I met designer Katie Sykes at The Bristol Old Vic in 1994 and I’ve been here ever since. What are you reading? I an currently reading as many different versions of The Seven Voyages Of Sinbad The Sailor as I can in preparation for rehearsals of the Christmas show I’m directing at the Tobacco Factory Theatre, which starts in a few weeks time.

JOIN THE JINGLE BELL DROP Bristolians are being invited to join in CLIC Sargent’s sponsored Christmas abseil on Sunday 1 December to help raise money for the charity which supports children and young people with cancer. Participants will be abseiling 200 feet down the city centre’s Haymarket Premier Inn. For further information visit: www.clicsargent.org.uk/jinglebelldrop

What is on your MP3 player? Jonathan Richman & The Modern Lovers. If I could have one superpower it would be to play guitar like Jonathan. Which café or restaurant takes your fancy? The Old Bookshop, Bedminster. Probably one of the grooviest places on the planet. Film or play? What will you be going to see this month? Looking forward to seeing Rannel Theatre’s

show Super Sam & Mega Max Save Christmas at the Brewery Theatre. Rannel are two very funny and super cool Hip Hop guys. Which museum or gallery will you be visiting? I sometimes dip into The Arnolfini – the bookshop is good for wrapping paper. What are your hobbies or interests? I sing in a band called Small, we have played at The Thunderbolt a couple of times. Some people really like us – most people, including my daughter, find us embarrassing. What attraction will you be visiting? The Totterdown Arts Trail. It’s great meeting local artists and you get to have a peek inside their house. Any projects/work in progress? I am working with theatre company Living Spit on a number of projects for the Brewery Theatre next year including a sequel to our show The Six Wives Of Henry VIII called Elizabeth – Virgin On The Ridiculous. Craig is directing The Last Voyage of Sinbad the Sailor at the Tobacco Factory Theatre, which runs from 27 November to 12 January. For further information visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatre.com or to book tel: 0117 902 0344

CITY HISTORY ON SHOW

WE’RE READING...

A new free exhibition – The Romans and Bristol – has opened at Bristol Museum & Art Gallery, shining a light on Bristol’s Roman collections and the people who discovered them. The exhibition, which runs until 12 January, focuses on the activities of antiquarian collectors, excavators and local residents who have all contributed towards making Bristol’s Roman collection what it is today. Many of the objects in the exhibition have never been on public display before. The exhibition complements the museum’s current show, Roman Empire: Power and People, featuring 160 objects from the British Museum.

Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan, £7.99 (Vintage). Review from Kathryn Atkins of Durdham Down Bookshop Ian McEwan is a writer who never disappoints and his latest novel, Sweet Tooth, is enthralling, beguiling and totally addictive from the first page to the last. Set in the early 1970s, McEwan’s sense of time and place is authentic with his trademark attention to details of the social history of the period. His protagonist, Serena, a reluctant Cambridge maths student, embarks on a career with MI5 in a spirit of enthusiasm and naivety. In trying to both please her middle-aged lover and to escape from a claustrophobic middle-class upbringing, she embarks on the adventure of a lifetime. But this is no ordinary spy story. It is a tale told by the narrator looking back from a much later point in time and it is up to the reader to decide on the truth of the recollected story. Suspense, thrills, danger, and a powerful love story combine to make this one of McEwan’s most enjoyable novels to date.

Twitterati 16 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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We’re following @magpiesandi for the latest tweets on everything vintage in Bristol, including dates of its vintage and handmade markets at the Mauretania and pop-ups at other venues around the city.

NOVEMBER 2013


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A green hill far away

A

s I write I can see out of my window the delights of south Bristol: a mish-mash of housing built over the last 50 years, the empty shell of a defunct college and, running east to west across the scene, a strip of green hillside. Come to think of it, this really is a Green Belt, holding in the city’s southward-bulging tummy. For reasons I can’t remember, and which make the geography of this area rather confusing, this strip of green is called the Northern Slopes. They do face north, of course, but to most Bristol people they lie to the south. Anyway, until recently Ms B and I had spent years looking at them out of the window, wondering whether the distant quadrupeds visible against the green were dogs or horses, but had not actually visited them. This all changed when some intrepid neighbours suggested we set off, like Speke heading up the Nile, to explore this uncharted region – uncharted by us, at any rate. I was expecting a long trudge through some of the city’s less imaginative post-war development, but before long we were climbing municipal steps that led upward to open grassland. A little further and we were standing on the top of a round green hill, more or less exactly like the one in the old hymn: There is a green hill far away; Without a city wall. From this viewpoint we saw allotment sites tucked in among the houses – each one a fascinating collection of shapes like a Paul Klee painting – and, slightly further away, the trees of Victoria Park. Further still lay the crescents of Clifton, and the curved cables of the suspension bridge. Beginning to envy the people whose gardens and bedrooms overlooked this glorious view we turned east and made our way along unofficial paths through thickets and up steep grassy slopes.

... this really is a Green Belt, holding in the city’s southward-bulging tummy

A detour brought us into a clearing filled with asters in flower, overhung with old man’s beard. The blackberry bushes were still covered in fruit and amateur wine-makers would have been overjoyed at the profusion of elderberry. Few people were about, save a chap riding along on his bike with a scaffolding pole sticking out in front of him like a knight going a-jousting. We encountered one or two dogs, none particularly alarming, and an old boy on crutches; a friendly teenage girl gave us directions. So we made our way from the Bommie, across Glyn Vale and on to the Novers, where I discovered that the distant quadrupeds are indeed horses grazing on common land given to the people of Bristol by the Smythes (of Ashton Court fame). The views from this eastern side of the Slopes were if anything more stunning than those we had already enjoyed, which is no doubt one of the site’s attractions for housing developers. I suppose it was inevitable, really, that we should discover this wonderful corner of urban countryside just as it was coming under threat from several directions at once. The whole business of planning is far too complicated for a tiny brain such as your correspondent possesses, but the problem seems to be that there are sites around the Slopes that are derelict and/or empty and would be ideal for housing, but that proposed plans would encroach on the bosky grounds described above. Look up the Northern Slopes Initiative for more info. As negotiations proceed it is vital that people use – and are seen to be using – the Slopes in ways that promote health and happiness. These days it is not enough to say that undeveloped land complete with trees, grass, birds, insects and so on is a good thing. We may know in our heart of hearts that this is the case, but somehow we have to translate this feeling into facts and figures, so that a sensible balance can be achieved between new growth and preservation.■

18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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NOVEMBER 2013

bijoux gifts home interiors & dollshouse 127 Coldharbour Road, Bristol BS6 7SN T. 0117 329 1788 E: bijouxgifts@live.co.uk

‘Beautiful Christmas gifts you’ll love to give and indulgent treats just for you.’ ‘Home interiors, stunning designer jewellery and suppliers of WoodWick candles.’

‘Come in and discover the magical world of dollshouse miniatures.’


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Gold & Platinum Studio

Loved forever... Beautifully crafted engagement rings, wedding rings and fine jewellery designed and traditionally handmade on the premises. All types of jewellery remodelled. Efficient repair service.

1 9 N o r th u m b e r l a n d P l a c e , B a t h B A 1 5 A R Tel: +44 (0)1225 462 300 www.goldandplatinumstudio.co.uk email: mike@goldandplatinumstudio.co.uk

WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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BRISTOL | SOCIETY

PEOPLE & PARTIES Snapshots from events, parties and launches in the city

Michael Porter of Art Ventures Ltd and Trevor Osborne of the Osborne Group, owner of The Guildhall

Artist Les Matthews collecting his award for the Radisson Blu Hotel Prize from the Lord Mayor of Bristol

The Bristol Art Prize Awards The Guildhall Arts Centre, Small Street An exhibition of all the pieces of artwork submitted for the The Bristol Art Prize was opened by the Right Honourable Lord Mayor of Bristol, Cllr. Faruk Choudhury, who also presented awards to the winners. Photographs by www.andyshortphotography.co.uk Bristol Art Prize winner Adrian Sykes with Inigo Jax

Presentation of the latest Per Una collection at M&S M&S at The Mall Award-winning fashion expert Hilary Alexander visited M&S in Cribbs Causeway last month. As a Per Una fashion consultant, Hilary presented style shows throughout the day and gave top tips for this season's fashion straight from the catwalk to local customers. Pictured right, Hilary Alexander

Hilary Alexander presenting at the M&S Per Una event

Claire Hodson, with Georgina Burke, Rachel Kipling , and Suzanne Lamb from M&S

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BRISTOL AT WORK Award winning British contemporary jewellery designer, Diana Porter in her shop on Park Street. Photograph by Charlotte Stone Diana began designing and making jewellery in her front room, after graduating from a three year degree course in jewellery and silversmithing from the University of Central England in 1993. The business expanded into a workshop, and in 2006, moved to a large shop on Park Street which showcases Diana’s handcrafted pieces of jewellery that are characterised by simple, organic shapes, made using recycled and Fairtrade precious metals and stones wherever possible. Diana also works to commission, creating one off designs, hand etching words and re-working existing pieces. Throughout the year the shop holds regular exhibitions, including an annual show promoting the work of emerging graduates from British universities, alongside Diana’s full collections and more than 50 leading national and international jewellery designers. www.charlottestonephoto.com

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2013 24 THEBATHMAGAZINE THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE xx 2013 | NOVEMBER | OCTOBER

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FACE | THE MUSIC

FESTIVAL FANATIC After 25 years experience in the music business, booking big name acts for festivals, Bristol man Steve Symons says he still enjoys discovering new talent. He talks to James Russell about his exciting career and picks his top ten favourite tunes

I

f you’ve been to Glastonbury Festival in recent years then you’ll have been entertained by Steve Symons, since it’s his job to book acts for the main stage. Not that he’s only interested in the star turns; after 25 years in the music business Steve still loves nothing better than to find new talent and share his discoveries. Securing the services of global stars is great, he says, but putting on a little-known act and seeing people respond to them is special. Steve moved to Bristol 30 years ago, drawn by a thriving music scene that had produced maverick acts like the Pop Group, and immediately got involved. DJ’ing initially at small clubs and pirate radio stations, where he played reggae and early hip-hop, he soon moved onto bigger things; running the Jazz Tent at the Ashton Court Festival he met musicians who were going places, people like Will Gregory (later of Goldfrapp) and Adrian Utley (of Portishead). It was here that he discovered the pleasure of booking acts, and developed a passion for festivals that remains as powerful as ever. He loves the spectacle and fun of a festival, whether large or small, and in recent years has been involved in the creation of Grillstock, a barbecue and music festival. Another of his pet projects is the glorious, glamorous Christmas Spiegeltent, which first materialised in Bristol a couple of years ago. This year the splendid 1950s travelling ballroom will spring up on Harbourside on 28 November, with acts including Georgie Fame and Sons, the Tiger Lilies and the Puppini Sisters taking to the stage over the following month. Steve took time out from his organisational duties to share some of his favourite tunes, and one or two reminiscences of life in the music business. He is evidently a man who loves his work…

Steve’s top ten: ❶ Talking Heads – Once In a Lifetime Still sounding remarkably fresh over 30 years after its release, this is a perfect tune for mind and body. Writing credits were shared between those slightly gawky intellectuals David Byrne and Brian Eno and the band’s awesome rhythm section of Tina Weymouth and Chris Frantz who provided that sensuous post disco groove. The combination was both whippet-smart and beguilingly mysterious.

❷ MIA – Paper Planes The song that cemented Maya Arulpragasam’s claim to worldwide stardom was a glorious mash-up of her Sri Lankan and British roots. It was also a bold hymn to female empowerment. A bona fide hustler making her name, indeed.

❸ The Stranglers – Golden Brown A harpsichord-led ballad written in waltz time that drummer Jet Black once claimed was a song about Marmite. The Stranglers were always about contradictions. I thrilled to their overt menace but later came to realise that they fitted into that lineage of quintessentially English bands from the Kinks to Madness. Even though one of them was French.

The Stranglers

Troker

MIA

❻ LCD Soundsystem – New York I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down At an age where many of my contemporaries had moved on from dance music, LCD Soundsystem had a special resonance for me. Losing My Edge and Daft Punk is Playing at My House were magical and hilarious paeans to the aging hipster. However, it was with New York that James Murphy gave us his most bittersweet lyric – an eloquent 21st century sequel to Lou Reed’s finest moments. ❼ Troker – Principe Charro I still have a visceral need to feed my soul with new music and one of my most exciting discoveries in recent years is the Mexican band Troker. I first came across them in a hip hop club in downtown Medellin, Columbia; this summer I was able to get them to Glastonbury and at several gigs there and one in Bristol I watched them repeatedly delight every audience. I’m just back from Mexico where I was fortunate enough to spend a few days hanging out with them. This track is taken from their forthcoming album and is a great showcase for their explosive power and stunning musicianship. ❽ Sun Ra – Door of the Cosmos The free spirited Afro futurist’s influence seems to grow every year since his death in 1993. He appears as a fleeting cipher in the work of performers as diverse as Pulp and Janelle Monae and as an overwhelming influence on artists from George Clinton to ex-Specials leader, Jerry Dammers. Although his work often threatens to spiral into chaos there is always a rigid discipline underpinning it.

Although this record takes me back to those heady days of the Dug Out it was also a potent signpost to what was coming. Jonathan More and Matt Black’s remix took one of the stand-out tracks from hip hop’s golden era and wove in fresh beats and that otherworldly vocal from the Israeli singer Ofra Haza.

❾ The Polyphonic Spree – Popular By Design I once had a spirited chat with Michael Parkinson about music. We didn’t agree on much but Parky did speak eloquently about the visceral power of the big band. I’m reminded of what he said every time I stand in front of a crowded stage. A big gathering of musicians can deliver an experience rare in this digital age whether it’s a band, orchestra or choir. The Spree are the latter and this track from their latest album is pure unbridled joy.

❺ Roy Ayers – We Live In Brooklyn Baby

❿ Chic – Good Times

Back in the day I used to run a club night called the Cooker with John Stapleton and my (now) wife, Shona. Roy Ayers played live for us aboard the Thekla several times and on the first occasion I asked him whether he could play We Live In Brooklyn Baby as it was a massive Cooker tune. He hadn’t played that number for years, he said, but I suggested that if he did and if he changed the lyric to ‘we live in Bristol baby’ he’d have the crowd in his hand. As he came on later in a jam packed club he walked up to the mic and sang those very words. Cue total pandemonium…

Music is a very fast moving art form and as a festival booker you can have a six month gap between brokering a deal and the artist taking to the stage. Much can change in this time and a couple of months before Glastonbury, Nile Rodgers’ collaboration with Daft Punk was revealed. We really did Get Lucky on this one as Nile was suddenly propelled to superstardom. The finale of Chic’s Friday night headline slot with a massive stage invasion and 30,000 people having the time of their lives was a proper lump in the throat moment.■

❹ Eric B & Rakim – Paid In Full (7 Minutes of Madness Coldcut Remix)

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SPARKLE & SHINE: left, French Connection sequin dresss from McArthurGlen Designer Outlet, Swindon, RRP £260, outlet price £49; right, black dress, £185 from French Connection, The Mall Cribbs Causeway

Alexander McQueen leather box clutch, £1,145 from Harvey Nichols

Invitation Laurence Maxi Dress £349, Hobbs at The Mall Cribbs Causeway

Lace dress, £48 from Sweet Pea, Westbury on Trym

Black trousers and lace top from Amulet Boutique, Cotham Hill GOLDEN WONDERS: Left, feather gold cuff, £18; below, Rosie Fox owl ring, £18, both from from Fox & Feather, Gloucester Road

GLAMOUR PUSS As we head into the festive season, make your party wear glitzy and theatrical to stand out from the crowd. Take inspiration from these pieces available around the city

BUY: ▼ STAR Giuseppe Zanotti metallic pumps, £405 from Harvey Nichols

ALL THAT GLITTERS: Above, Sparkly drop leaf earrings, £12, from Next at The Mall, Cribbs Causeway

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Parker sequinned dress, £380 from Harvey Nichols

Jazzy dress, £160 from Coast

Signature Satin Pencil Dress, £175, from Karen Millen, The Mall Cribbs Causeway

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Ladies and Girls Clothing and Accessories

10% off full priced stock with this advertisement WE HAVE RELOCATED 14 High Street, Westbury-on-Trym BS9 3DU 0117 9502 757 www.sweetpeafashion.co.uk

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1. Jelly Cat Noodle Fox soft toy, £15.50, The Pod Company, 24 The Mall, Clifton, www.thepodcompany.co.uk 2. Kikkerland Moustache Grooming Kit, £9.99, John Lewis, The Mall at Cribbs Causeway, www.johnlewis.com 3. Assymetric faux fur scarf handmade in Devon, £34.99, Amulet, 39a Cotham Hill, www.amuletjewellery.co.uk 4. Redken Diamond Oil, comes with free shampoo and conditioner, £26.25, Carlo Hair and Beauty, 6 Rockleaze Road 5. Second hand, vintage and antique books overprinted with quotations, £20, Fizz Gallery, 65a Hill Road, Clevedon, www.fizzgallery.co.uk 6. 18ct white gold with black and white diamond earrings, £435, Julie Anne Palmer, 129 Stoke Lane, Westbury-on-Trym, www.julieannepalmer.com 7. Freego electric bike, Gardiner Haskins Homecentre, £949, www.gardinerhaskins.co.uk 8. Festive designer gift wrap, ribbons, cards and journals, Rachel Goodchild designs, buy online from: www.rachelgoodchild.com 28 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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9. Cartwright and Butler cheese board gift set, £22, John Lewis, The Mall at Cribbs Causeway, www.johnlewis.com 10. Art Deco style perfume bottle, £32, Bijoux Gifts, 127 Coldharbour Road 11. Vivian Necklace, available in a choice of semi-precious stones, £95, Catherine Amesbury, 214 Gloucester Road, www.catherineamesbury.co.uk 12. Mixed metals from tarnished golds to burnished blacks create a chic and elegant style necklace, Allium, £28, 46 The Mall, www.allium-clifton.co.uk 13. Mandu Peak waterproof coat, £280, Jack Wolfskin, 36-37 Westgate Street, Bath, www.jack-wolfskin.co.uk 14. Scarlett Scarf, £15 available in navy, brown or white, Sweet Pea, 14 High Street, Westbury-on-Trym, www.sweetpeafashion.co.uk 15. Screen printed shopping tote bags, £12.50, Clifton Workshop, 139 St George’s Road, www.cliftonworkshop.co.uk 16. Set of three commission rings, price on application, Diana Porter, 33 Park Street, www.dianaporter.co.uk 17. Handmade Turkish Kilim bag, £125, Oriental Rugs of Bath, Hallatrow Business Park, Wells Road, www.orientalrugsofbath.com WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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BUSINESS | PROFILE

IT’S A WRAP Samantha Coleman meets Amanda White of Gift Frippery to learn some top gift wrapping techniques ahead of the festive season

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here was a time when the gift wrap and presentation was nearly as important as the gift itself. But due to our busy lives, the convenience of internet shopping deliveries and not wanting to waste paper and thinking green, it seems that elaborate and showy gift wrapping is left to department store displays. But Amanda White of Bristol business Gift Frippery believes it is really easy to create a beautiful gift wrap, using materials from around the home that can be up-cycled and recycled. Through her Gift Frippery business, Amanda offers gift wrapping workshops at venues around the city, including Berwick Lodge and Stoke Lodge, covering the basic techniques and moving onto more imaginative decoration, encouraging you to unleash your creativity. Generally in her workshops Amanda will show you three different wraps – a bottle, a box and an unusual shaped gift – and demonstrate ways to use the bits and bobs around your home to produce immaculately wrapped and decorated gifts, that people will really appreciate. I went along to meet Amanda in her home in Westbury Park from where she sometimes hosts workshops in her light-filled conservatory. My eyes widened as I walked in and saw a table full of ribbons, paper, glitter, bells, twigs, pine cones, leaves and fabric. Amanda was truly inspirational and after showing me top tips for wrapping, like cutting just the right amount of paper so there’s no overlapping, making folds and using double sided tape for a neater finish, she really opened my eyes to the possibilities of up-cycling things that you might have lying around to use as embellishments. “I like to put my own unique twist on gift wrapping,” says Amanda. “I’m a big believer in making an effort with wrapping and thinking creatively, because, regardless of what the present is, the anticipation is delicious!” Practicing for Christmas, I used white paper to wrap my gift box – white, says Amanda, gives a wonderful winter wonderland look – and then I used a piece of thick red ribbon to tie around the box and onto that, I tied a smaller, thinner piece of red ribbon. Amanda had some red and white bells that she had cut from an old wreath, so I threaded three (always use an odd number, says Amanda) onto the smaller piece of ribbon, which gave it a real festive feel and a lovely jingling sound too. For the finishing touch, Amanda gave me some plastic ivy leaves to stick on and the whole wrap came together perfectly and looked very professional (pictured right). “Imagine how it feels to give someone a gift that looks too good to be true, too nice to open. They will appreciate the effort you’ve made for their enjoyment,” says Amanda. She showed me some examples of her gift wraps and my favourites were the ones where she had used bits of fabric, materials from the garden and earthy tones. She has a real eye for colour and effortlessly puts shades together that you wouldn’t usually think of, but match and complement each other perfectly. “I get inspiration everywhere I go, usually from nature,” says Amanda. “I was in a fruit and veg shop recently and the green and purple of an artichoke caught my eye. So I bought it, took it home and recreated the colour harmony with ribbons – it looked so pretty.” It just goes to show that you don’t need to spend a fortune to make something look beautiful. Old pieces of ribbon, buttons, jewels, plastic flowers, pasta, ink stamps, beads, brown paper, newspaper and more can be instantly transformed into a piece of art with a bit of imagination. “Even a strip of really beautiful paper on plain coloured paper can look so elegant,” says Amanda. “Play around with things and experiment with your creativity – it’s all about trial and error.” Amanda collects anything she can get her hands on and has a whole room dedicated to bits and pieces for embellishments, however big or small. “The word ‘minimalist’ doesn’t exist in my vocabulary,” says Amanda. “Even my children have inherited my collecting gene and my husband has joined in too! 30 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Amanda White of Gift Frippery and below, some of Amanda’s gift wrapping creations

I can’t walk along a beach without picking up driftwood, shells or seaweed. In the countryside, it would seem silly to leave a perfect pinecone behind when I know it will come in handy at some point. There’s so much beauty in these simple things.” After years spent as a primary school teacher and part time radio presenter, Amanda decided to launch Gift Frippery five years ago when she received many compliments about her flair for gift wrapping, and she hasn’t looked back since. As well as hosting gift wrapping workshops and doing demonstrations at events all over the city, Amanda also provides private workshops to a minimum of four people and special wedding workshops too, specifically for brides-to-be to learn ideas to make their wedding day special and personal. For Christmas Amanda can also do a special cracker workshop, or can show you how to make handmade gifts such as decorative hanging hearts as well as table centres and hostess gifts. “It’s a really nice way to spend an afternoon,” says Amanda. “I never feel like I’m working, it’s so much fun. I really love what I do.” And it’s this enthusiasm that makes Amanda’s workshops so inspirational and popular. I left feeling excited to try out my own creations at home. Amanda regularly guest blogs for Fab Women in Business online, Filofax, PVB online, Laura Ashley and on her own website, sharing tips, thoughts and ideas. In the lead up to Christmas, Amanda is launching a Frippery Friday competition on Twitter, where every Friday you can share pictures of your gift wrapping and Amanda’s favourite will win a prize. Just follow @GiftFrippery. ■ For further information and workshop prices, visit: www.giftfrippery.co.uk

Upcoming Gift Frippery events: • Handmade Christmas workshops – six sessions starting 5 November, every Tuesday, 1pm – 3.30pm at Stoke Lodge adult education centre. • Seasonal Gift Wrapping, University of Bristol Botanic Garden, Saturday 23 November, 2pm – 4pm. • Feel Good Friday: Christmas gift wrapping with Gift Frippery, Tyntesfield House, Friday 13 December, 10.30am – 1.30pm.


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Kemps Jewellers

Kemps Jewellers established 1881

Kemps are a family business, carrying an extensive range of new and second-hand jewellery, across a wide price range, and offering you: • Professional friendly advice • Beautiful gift ideas • Gift wrapping service

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emps Jewellers was established in 1881. Michael Kemp is the fourth generation and with his team has tried to modernise the shop, with a friendly and approachable attitude, while still offering an old fashioned service. Every effort is made to make their customers feel welcome and relaxed whether from buying a watch battery or choosing that all important piece of jewellery. Kemps hold a surprising amount of affordable treasures. There is a large core of secondhand jewellery and new that is that little bit different. Kemps offer a wedding package. Buy any two wedding rings and receive a 10% discount. A varied range of rings is always carried in stock with the added option of a bespoke service should you wish for that something a little different. off There is also a 10% discount on any gifts purchased a ny two for the wedding, for the bridesmaids etc.

10%

weddin g rings

• Registered pawnbrokers • Jewellery and watch repairs undertaken • Gold purchased • Old jewellery & coins

10%

off*

when you buy any two wedding rings or buy gifts for a wedding, bridesmaids etc *Items and conditions apply, call for full details

Tel: 0117 950 50 90 Email: info@kempsjewellers.com 9 Carlton Court, Westbury on Trym www.kempsjewellers.com

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WIN a day out in Bath, shopping, pampering and dining Thermae Bath Spa

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hristmas shopping in Bath is a delight, especially during the Christmas season when it becomes an enchanting place to indulge in a little nostalgia. The World Heritage city offers everything you need for a family day out and shops of every description, whether you are looking for unusual gifts or great fashion; traditional or contemporary. Queen of Cakes, Mary Berry Milsom Place is switching on the Bath Christmas lights at 5.30pm on Tuesday 12 November, marking the start of the Christmas shopping season and the Bath Christmas Market perfectly captures the festive spirit, running from 28 November – 15 December when the area around the Abbey is transformed with over 150 traditional wooden huts each one offering hand crafted and unusual gifts among the twinkling fairy lights, the aroma of mulled wine and the backdrop of the majestic Bath Abbey. One lucky reader will win a fantastic day out in Bath to share with a guest in the lead up to Christmas. After ticking off the must-buys on your Christmas gift list, visit one of the oldest houses in Bath and sample the famous Sally Lunn bun. No shopping trip to Bath is complete without visiting Milsom Place, which boasts independent, stylish boutiques and leading brands that bring a sparkle all of their own to the city and some really unique gifts. Pop in to True Grace, embrace their aroma of festive fragrances and collect a gorgeous Manor Christmas candle evoking smells of warming cinnamon and zesty orange. Then stop for lunch at everyone’s favourite contemporary Italian, Carluccio’s at Milsom Place right in the heart of the city with a delicious meal for two and a bottle of house wine. After a day exploring Bath, there is no better place to watch the sun set than in the rooftop pool at the Thermae Bath Spa. Win a special Twilight for Two package with three hours of relaxing spa time to watch the sun set along Bath’s skyline in the steaming waters of the UK’s only naturally heated thermal spa. To enter this fabulous competition, just answer the following question: Who is switching on the Christmas lights in Bath this year? Email your answer, with Visit Bath Competition in the subject line, along with your full name, address and telephone number to: Harriet.Woolfrey@bathbid.co.uk. Deadline for entries: Tuesday 26 November. PLEASE NOTE: by entering this competition you are agreeing that your details may be used for marketing purposes.

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Vintage Retro & Collectables 109 St George’s Rd, College Green, Bristol • www.Relicsfurniture.co.uk

Vinyl and Music memorabilia


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We have moved to Bookbarn Interna onal!

Our enormous selecon of the finest hand-made oriental rugs and rug-related goods is now where you can park for as long as you want and browse hundreds of thousands of pre-loved books. We’ve got all sizes of Persian, Afghan, Turkish and Pakistani rugs, superb Kilim furniture and handbags, hand embroidered boots and cushions, and kantha shawls. Our world-class rug cleaning and restoraon service is available as before.

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CITY | SHOPPING

We discover the delights of Coldharbour Road in Westbury Park, a perfect place to enjoy a spot of Christmas shopping

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here’s a lot happening on Coldharbour Road, with shops offering everything from gifts and jewellery to sofas and art, alongside a bakery, a great Indian restaurant and a Spanish guitar centre. There’s a lovely community spirit here and all the independent traders, artisans and craftspeople work together to help each other succeed in their businesses. If you haven’t visited in a while, you’ll be pleasantly surprised – there really is something for everyone here, which means it’s a perfect place to come Christmas shopping. On Thursday 5 December, many of the traders on the road will be open late for a special Christmas shopping evening, offering festive drinks, nibbles, music and a great opportunity to pick up some unique gifts. Among others, this is what you’ll find: BARRY TOOGOOD FLOWER SHOP: A family owned business run by Barry and Jayne Toogood, Flowers by Barry Toogood is an ethical florist creating bespoke, unique and beautiful flowers for any occasion, sourcing only the best quality, ethically grown flowers from Holland alongside seasonal British blooms. Their work is designed personally to your specification, taking into consideration flower choice, colour and budget. They also offer a range of greeting cards, chocolates, vases and Christmas trees from the Quantocks throughout December. The friendly, personal and tailored service means that over the past 20 years they have enjoyed fantastic support from loyal customers locally, nationally and internationally – pop in and have a chat to see what they can create for you. BERTOLDI: Bertoldi is a one-stop shop for tailoring, dressmaking, clothes alterations and bespoke fashion, offering the best personal service and professional advice. Owner, Barbara Bertoldi was born and raised in Northern Italy and is a qualified pattern cutter and fashion designer who has more than 20 years experience. After working for top labels, Barbara opened Bertoldi, a studio space where she and her team of four in-house designers offer basic alterations, complete restyling and reconstruction of garments, as well as made to measure, bespoke outfits, designed and created in-house. A new addition to Bertoldi is a collection of handmade belts, bags and accessories from the finest leather and skins, all the way from Italy. BEAUTOLOGY: Beautology has eight treatment rooms where men and women can enjoy the most advanced range of treatments, from laser hair removal, skin peels and dermal fillers to spray tanning, massage and facials. When you visit you will find professional service and expert advice in a comfortable and relaxed environment and the friendly staff will listen to your concerns and tailor the perfect treatment to suit your needs, whether it’s a problem like pigmentation that needs addressing or you just fancy sprucing up your nails with a French manicure. BIJOUX GIFTS: Recently opened on Coldharbour Road, Bijoux gifts is a beautiful little shop that sells jewellery, trinkets, toys, greeting cards as well as dolls’ houses and a huge range of miniatures. The shop has a shabby chic feel about it, demonstrated in the elegant and rustic looking furniture it sells, from dressing tables to chests of drawers, and all reasonably priced. Whatever the occasion, you’re sure to find a special something here – whether it’s an elegant picture frame for a wedding, an ornament for a christening or a 34 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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striking Art Deco style perfume bottle or clock for a birthday. For Christmas do check out the range of Woodwick candles that not only smell gorgeous, but let off a comforting crackling noise as they burn. THE BIRD TABLE BISTRO: The Bird Table is a welcoming, friendly place to relax and enjoy homemade food, good company and a range of refreshments, all with great service. The contemporary and intimate bistro has a relaxing atmosphere, perfect for catching up with friends over coffee and cake, as well as light lunches and dinner, when it is transformed with candlelight and an evening menu that offers two courses for £14 and three courses for £18. The food is made using locally sourced, high quality ingredients, be it traditional breakfast (served all day) or fluffy pancakes with fruit and maple syrup, gourmet sandwiches or homemade cakes. CARNIVAL COSTUMES: You’ll find everything you need for a great fancy dress party here, from wigs, masks and hats to coloured hair sprays, face paints and accessories as well as costumes available to hire and buy. Whether you’re attending a 1920s Great Gatsby party and need pearls, a feather boa and headband, or if you’re planning to sail the seas as a pirate and need a sword and eye patch, there’s something for every character and decade, including lederhosen, full animal costumes, superheroes and 60s gear. And if you’re stuck for ideas, the expert shop assistants are happy to help out with any suggestions or even create an original costume for you, made to order. For Christmas there will be Santa suits as well as nativity essentials for the kids and fairy outfits. CASA PELO: Casa Pelo is a modern and trendy hair salon with a relaxed atmosphere that specialises in creating unique hair cuts that turn heads. The award-winning hair stylists can help create your perfect hair style, whether it’s a new colour, cut or restyle; and with professional, top of the range hair products including Label.m and GHD, you can relax in the knowledge that you’re in safe hands. Abigail McDougall: COLDHARBOUR Winter, Primrose Cafe FRAMERY AND GALLERY: This friendly, independent framery offers a bespoke picture framing service for all types of artwork and in the gallery, most of the artwork on display is by local artists and craftspeople, with paintings, prints, sculpture, glass, ceramics and wood, all in a range of prices. The gallery will be open late on 5 December when the gallery artists will be available to talk about their work, including local artist Abigail McDougall, who has painted a piece especially for the gallery.

GREEN WOODS FURNITURE: Green Woods Furniture is an independent retailer, supplying quality furniture, beds, organic mattresses and accessories, all made-to-measure in


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CITY | SHOPPING Sterling silver feather bracelet by Harvey Chavez of Kewa Pueblo tribe, at Rainmaker

Bronze conker by Michael Simpson, at the Coldharbour Framery & Gallery

Flowers by Barry Toogood

Enjoy a treatment at Beautology

the UK, only using materials from responsible and sustainable sources. You’ll find some really unique pieces here that will enhance any home, from contemporary lighting to traditional style coffee tables, as well as organic bedding and natural paints and wood finishes from AURO. HEARTSPACE STUDIOS: As well as an exhibition space and shop selling handmade gifts, plus knitting yarns and fabric packs, it’s a hub for all things textile, with design-led workshops catering for absolute beginners to master classes. In an attempt to show people how to make personal, meaningful and useful things, to keep or give, the workshops, led by experienced tutors, will teach you to draw, design, stitch, embellish, embroider, patchwork, quilt, knit, felt, bead and more. There are clubs available to join too, including the Knitting and Stitching Club that welcomes textile enthusiasts who enjoy making and talking. INTERIOR HARMONY: Interior Harmony can provide types of flooring to suit all budgets and needs and with more than 30 years of experience, it takes pride in its customer care and workmanship. As well as offering a bespoke service for wooden floors, Interior Harmony can supply and fit a large range of products including carpets, wood, parquet, laminate, natural, vinyl, rugs, cork and rubber and boasts a comprehensive service covering design through to installation. At this welcoming and friendly showroom there are plenty of samples for you to view and you can take advantage of the free measuring, estimating and home selection service. KEITH JAMES PHYSIOTHERAPY: Keith James is a highly experienced physiotherapist and his clinic on Coldharbour Road offers a huge range of treatments and services for common physiotherapy needs and conditions including sports massage, Chinese acupuncture, triathlon coaching, podiatry and personal training in the specially-built, fully-equipped gym that overlooks the garden. There are three physiotherapists on site who specialise in sports related injuries, catering for all levels of sportsmen and women with full rehabilitation equipment and the very latest technology on hand to do so, all in a spacious, light building with a positive, friendly atmosphere. WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

RAINMAKER: Rainmaker is the only gallery in the UK specialising in contemporary Native American Indian arts and jewellery. Here you’ll find unique handcrafted silver South American jewellery made with precious stones as well as striking original artwork adorning the walls. Owner Joanne Prince has family and friends in North America, where she has access to artists working in the Native community of different tribes and generations. Joanna handpicks all the items and artists on show in the gallery and is always showcasing new pieces from undiscovered talent. Throughout the year Rainmaker hosts special exhibitions of original work by leading artists. SALVATORES BARBER SHOP: A traditional and friendly barber shop offering a great cut at a reasonable price, and you won’t have to wait in a queue either – you can book an appointment on the website. The team is experienced and competent in all aspects of men’s hairstyling, using quality equipment and offering pleasant conversation too. The shop has been on Coldharbour Road for many years and enjoys a loyal customer base and a constant stream of new customers. SK109 HAIR COMPANY: This passionate and professional hair salon that specialises in all aspects of hairdressing, especially wedding and prom/party hair, will be celebrating 12 years of business on Coldharbour Road in December, so on the evening of the 5th it will be offering celebratory drinks and discounts on Tigi products. Owners Sian and Abi will also be on hand to give free consultations and hair care advice. Sian says: “If you are looking for a new look for the winter the latest colour trends are poppy reds, terracottas and warm browns and soft wheat, pale sand and beiges for blondes.” SOFA MAGIC: For more than 15 years Bristol company Sofa Magic has tailormade sofas and offered a personal service to help customers choose the right sofa for them. The stylish sofas are made with quality frames with designs in a wide range of hardwearing, washable fabrics to suit contemporary or classic style homes. Sofa Magic can even tweak its designs so that you have a unique piece of furniture which is perfect for your home and lifestyle. Every job is different and the skilled craftsmen apply their expertise and care to each one. NOVEMBER 2013

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FILM | SCREENINGS

Bad films, good times Enjoy an evening’s entertainment with a twist at one of the Bristol Bad Film Club screenings, says Samantha Coleman

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ristol, being a cultural hub of diversity, is home to many specialised quirky and unusual gatherings and societies, but there’s a new one on the scene that’s proving very popular with adults of all ages and walks of life – screening bad films for laughs. The Bristol Bad Film Club was set up in June by friends Timon Singh and Tim Popple in order to create a place where movie fans could come and behold some of the most awful films ever made. Instead of ignoring these films and condemning them, the Bristol Bad Film Club is dedicated to showing them in all their terrible glory, and basking in their awfulness. At venues around the city, you are encouraged to come, laugh, jeer and stare slack-jawed as you try and figure out what the cast and crew were thinking when they decided to make these cinematic abominations. I was interested to find out how they came up with the idea. Timon says: “I like watching bad films – it’s great fun. I’d watched The Room and Samurai Cop already and been to see some bad film screenings at The Prince Charles Cinema in London. When you get some friends together and have some drinks, it’s hilarious. Bad films are best enjoyed as a group experience, and this is something we wanted to share with our beloved city.” Tim says: “There is something wonderful about a truly bad film – whether it’s the head-scratching dialogue, the shoddy special effects or acting that would not look out of place in a nursery school’s nativity play. We set up The Bristol Bad Film Club because we love bad films – it’s purely selfish. We wanted to see bad films in Bristol, so we did it ourselves!” And because Tim and Timon are doing this purely for fun, all profits from the screenings go towards a selected charity or fundraising effort. At each screening, before the film starts, there’s someone to introduce the film, give a bit of background about it and highlight things to look out for. The whole evening is designed to be fun and people’s enthusiasm is

encouraged. There’s no shh-ing when you point and laugh out loud here. So what qualifies a bad film? I asked. “Bad actions scenes, clumsy editing, rubbish effects and cringeworthy acting mistakes.” says Tim. “There are a lot of bad films made but you know it’s really bad when the editing, dialogue, effects and acting are so terrible and the film makers actually think they are making a good film. It has to make you scratch your head and say ‘Who thought this was a good idea?’” So why watch them? “There is something fundamentally fascinating about a bad film,” says Timon. “Whether it is the bargain basement special effects or the fact they clearly didn’t care about lighting, continuity or even a script. That is why they are so infinitely entertaining. Whether it is watching John Barrowman take on a 60ft prehistoric shark or Tommy Wiseau having his infamous meltdown in The Room, there is simply nothing better than having a few beers and sharing the horror with a group of people. “What’s even better is that normal film decorum goes straight out the window and it is perfectly acceptable to shout obscenities at the screen, laugh hysterically and point out that a wig has fallen off the lead actor.” The club’s first screening was Plan 9 From Out of Space – a 1959 film that sees aliens resurrecting dead people – upstairs at The Lansdown pub, Clifton, in August. UWE film lecturer, Mark Bould introduced the film which, to Tim and Timon’s surprise, was a sell-out, attended by 50 people. “The Lansdown is the perfect venue because upstairs it has a big screen, a bar and there’s space for a good number of people,” says Timon. The second film screening was in September with Samurai Cop – a 1989 film with martial arts and guns on a very small budget – which was shown at the Old Fire Station with drinks supplied by Zero Degrees. Again it was a sell out with 150 people. “People were laughing and cheering all the way through,” says Tim. “The feedback we received was really positive – everyone had a great time!”

...film decorum goes straight out the window and it is perfectly acceptable to shout obscenities

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WHAT WERE THEY THIINKING? left, film posters designed for the Bristol Bad Film Club by designer and bad film lover Tiffany Farrant; above from left, a still from bad film Troll 2 that was screened last month; and Bristol Bad FIlm Club founders Timon Singh and Tim Popple

Last month saw a double bill screening of Troll 2 and Best Worst Movie back at The Lansdown. Double bill screenings of both these films have already been massively popular all around the world, from London to Hong Kong to Canada. Timon says: “Since we launched the club, people had been emailing and tweeting us, asking when we’re going to show Troll 2, which is regarded as one of the most famous best worst films of all time. Halloween was the perfect time to show it and we thought we’d throw in a little something extra too – Best Worst Movie, a documentary film made by Troll 2 child star Michael Stephenson, which charts how the film went from cinematic disaster to cherished cult classic. It not only answers how this film ever got made, but celebrates the type of people who love cult films like this – us essentially.” For those of you unfamiliar with Troll 2, the 1989 film starred a group of unknown Utah actors who thought they were making the next ET or Gremlins, but they failed spectacularly. Timon says: “Not only does the film have nothing to do with 1986’s Troll (the ‘2’ was added to cynically cash in on its success), but there’s not a single troll in the movie. Instead, it focuses on the

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Waits family who visit the town of Nilbog (goblin spelt backwards!), only to discover that the creepy locals aren’t their only problem. They are being hunted by vegetarian goblins that seek to transform them into plants so that they can eat them!” I asked the pair why it is regarded as being so bad? Tim said: “Well, firstly the script was written by director Claudio Fragasso and his wife Rosella Drudi, neither of whom actually spoke English at the time. Most of the cast had no prior acting experience and Fragasso hired an exclusively Italian crew, none of whom spoke English. The script was read verbatim at Fragasso’s insistence, and that, coupled with the production’s dodgy FX and poor acting, meant that Troll 2 quickly became regarded as one of the worst films ever made. The trolls are just people with Halloween masks!” “Nothing can beat the pure joy to be part of over 100 people laughing along to a truly terrible film,” says Timon. “It’s a great thing to know there are fans out there wanting more of the same. You don’t have to be a film buff to enjoy the screening, you just have to have a sense of humour and be prepared to embrace the badness!” This month, on Thursday 21 November at 8pm, the Bristol Bad Film Club will be presenting a special film screening, in At-Bristol’s Planetarium, of Star Crash – a 1978 science fiction film starring David Hasselhoff and former Bond girl Caroline Munro, with an appearance by Christopher Plummer and a score by John Barry, who is well known for composing the music to the James Bond films between 1963 and 1987. UWE lecturer Mark Bould will once again introduce the screening, and tickets are £5 in advance from the website or £6 on the door, but you’d better be quick as they are sure to sell out quickly. All profits from the event, as always, will go to charity. Next year Tim and Timon have plans to show The Room, which they say will be a really big event as it’s such a popular, cult classic. Keep up to date with the information on the latest screenings on the Bristol Bad Film Club’s website: www.bristolbadfilmclub.co.uk or the club’s Twitter (@TheOtherBBFC) and Facebook page. Film suggestions are always welcome, say Tim and Timon. ■

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CULTURE BOOK Our guide to this month’s top events in Bristol and beyond

Heath Quartet at the Bath Mozartfest

Little Shop of Horrors at the Tobacco Factory Theatre

Jason Manford at the Bristol Hippodrome

The Little Shop of Horrors, Tobacco Factory Theatre, 4 – 9 November, 8pm

Bristol Old Vic Theatre School: Serious Money, Circomedia, St Paul’s Church, 7 – 16 November

This promises to be a dark and twisted show with a wicked sense of humour, set in Grimlake’s Emporium of Novelties: a dilapidated shop on the outskirts of Nowhere, where strange puppets collect dust and cobwebs. Using extraordinary puppets, masks and props, Pickled Image has created a show to rival its sell-out international successes, Houdini’s Suitcase, Hunger and Late Night Wolf Tales. Tickets £14 from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatre.com.

Enter a world of finance where packs of traders and brokers make decisions that shape our lives. As their appetite for risk and dodgy deals reduces nations of people to mere statistics and figures, a trader is found dead, and morals are stretched to the limit as everything gets called into question. Box office tel: 0117 973 3955 or visit: www.oldvic.ac.uk.

Toro! Toro! at the Brewery Theatre, 5 – 16 November, 7.30pm Michael Morpurgo’s Toro! Toro! tells the story of when Antonito’s idyllic life on his parents’ bull-rearing farm in Spain is shattered when he realises that his favourite bull-calf is destined to fight in the bullring. Taking both their destinies into his own hands, and risking the lives and love of his family, Antonito hatches a daring plan. But it will take enormous courage – because this is 1936, and the drums of civil war are echoing across the Spanish plains. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatre.com.

The 23rd Bath Mozartfest promises another exciting line up of celebrations of classical music with Mozart as the central focus. Enjoy lunchtime and evening concerts by international musicians in some of Bath’s most beautiful venues, including the Assembly Rooms and the Abbey. The festival opens with Mozart’s The Hunt String Quartet played by internationally acclaimed Takács Quartet, followed by a week-long programme of events culminating with Manchester’s Hallé orchestra and young violinist Alina Ibragimova presenting Mozart’s Prague Symphony. For a full programme of events and ticket information visit: www.bathmozartfest.org.uk.

Charity Fashion Show, Red Maids’ School, Wednesday 6 November, 7.30pm – 9pm

Bristol Bach Choir, St Mary Redcliffe, Saturday 9 November, 7.30pm

The year 12 students at The Red Maids’ School are holding an autumn/winter fashion show to raise money for the Uganda Society to support The Busoga Trust which builds wells in communities, the Bujagali Trust which builds schools for educational opportunities and also the Gulu High School, which Red Maids’ is linked to. Tickets are £4 and are on sale at the school but also available to buy on the night.

The Bristol Bach Choir will perform a repertoire of music with the talented Wells Cathedral School Brass and Percussion Ensemble. The concert features Bernstein’s Chichester Psalms with its appealing Broadway-inspired melodies, intricate rhythms and haunting beauty; Gabrieli’s celebrated Polychoral Motets comprise Psalm settings for multiple vocal and instrumental choirs; while Walton’s setting of the Te Deum, first performed 60 years ago for the Queen’s Coronation, provides a glorious conclusion to the evening. Tickets available online at: www.bristolbach.org.uk or tel: 0117 214 0721.

Schlomo: Human Geekbox, Bristol Old Vic Studio, 6 & 7 November, 8pm Shlomo is back with his brand new interactive experience. Come on a mad beatbox journey as he explores the art and science of gadgets and the music of the human voice. Shlomo is an award-winning looping artist and world record-holding beatboxer. He returns to Bristol Old Vic following previous shows Mouthtronica and Ministry of Mouth. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0117 987 7877 or visit: www.bristololdvic.org.uk.

A Kind of Brubeck, St George’s Bristol, Thursday 7 November, 8pm US pianist Darius Brubeck pays tribute to the music of his late father, Dave Brubeck, and other modern masters. Expect Take Five, Unsquare Dance and more, together with Darius’s own African-flavoured compositions. Tickets £16 from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk. WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Bath Mozartfest, various venues in Bath, 8 – 16 November

Bristol Millennium Orchestra, with pianist Steven Kings, Cresswell Theatre, Bristol Cathedral School, Saturday 9 November, 7.30pm The concert programme features Holst’s Mars, Ravel’s Pavane pour une enfante defunte, the first performance of Rob Howe’s Piano Concerto and Sibelius’ Symphony 2. Tickets £8, available from: www.bristolmillenniumorchestra.co.uk or tel: 07812 347151.

Show of Hands, Colston Hall, Sunday 10 November, 8pm Hear material from the group’s latest album which weaves folk, blues and country sounds, alongside work from their back catalogue. Tickets from: www.colstonhall.org or the box office on tel: 0844 887 1500. NOVEMBER 2013

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The Fitzrovia Radio Hour at the Tobacco Factory Theatre

Josh Widdicombe, Tobacco Factory Theatre, Sunday 10 November, 8pm Josh Widdicombe returns to the road touring his brand new show, Incidently. The last 12 months have seen Josh star in Channel 4 show The Last Leg and regular appearances on 8 Out Of 10 Cats and BBC1’s Live At The Apollo and Mock The Week. Tickets £14 from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatre.com.

Cara Dillon, St George’s Bristol, Wednesday 13 November, 8pm Cara Dillon is an emotive and captivating performer, whether she is singing her native traditional Irish songs of lost love and emigration or original compositions. She comes to St George’s as part of her autumn tour, showcasing the songs on her new album. Tickets £21 from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

Ladies Blingo Evening, Clifton College Dining Hall, Thursday 14 November, 7pm This is the third year of the ladies Blingo night, which raises money for local meningitis charity, a Life for a Cure, which was set up by John and Michelle Bresnahan following the tragic and sudden death of their 16-year-old son, Ryan, in March 2010. The event includes a three course meal, three games of bingo, a charity auction with luxurious prizes and music and dancing courtesy of the Clifton College Soul Band. Tables of 10 are available at £65 per person to include a three course meal, a glass of fizz and wine with your meal. For availability contact Michelle Bresnahan on tel: 07971 878737 or email:michellebres@btinternet.com.

What the Frock, Colston Hall Thursday 14 November, 8pm

Bryan Ferry at Colston Hall

An evening of comedy from award winning comediennes Lucy Porter and Tania Edwards, raising funds for Whiteladies Picture House. Tickets from: www.colstonhall.org or contact the box office on tel: 0844 887 1500.

The Fitzrovia Radio Hour, Tobacco Factory Theatre, 15 & 16 November, 8pm Recreating the unique spirit of 1940s radio plays, The Fitzrovia Radio Hour is performed with theatricality and sharp contemporary humour to produce a heady comic cocktail. There are live sound effects too: a hairdryer imitates a heating torch, a desk fan becomes an aeroplane, and types of cabbage help to stage a fight scene. Tickets £14 from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatre.com.

Jason Manford, The Bristol Hippodrome, 15 & 16 November, 8pm Popular northern comedian, Jason Manford, comes to the Bristol Hippodrome as part of his new tour, First World Problems Overview. The show promises to feature a wealth of comedy anecdotes, misunderstandings and audience banter delivered with Jason’s likeable charm and teasingly intelligent wit. Tickets from: www.atgtickets.com.

Bryan Ferry, Colston Hall, Saturday 16 November, 7pm Join the Roxy Music frontman as he celebrates 40 years in the industry by performing a selection of his favourite tracks with The Bryan Ferry Orchestra. Tickets from: www.colstonhall.org or contact the box office on tel: 0844 887 1500. >>

EDITOR’S PICK... Afrika Eye Film Festival, 8 – 10 November Afrika Eye is the south west’s biggest celebration of African films and culture and this month it returns to Watershed for its eighth successive year, offering regional premieres of features from Algeria, Burkino Faso, Kenya, Nigeria and Senegal as well as director talks, documentaries by film-makers, shorts, debates and cultural exchanges featuring music and dance. To mark the 50th anniversary of Kenya’s independence, Kenyan films and film-makers are being given centre stage this year. This includes launching the festival with the first south west screening of David ‘Tosh’ Gitonga’s highly-praised Nairobi Half Life, and a showing of Something Necessary followed by a Q&A session with its director Judy Kibinge. Another festival guest will be director Alain Gomis introducing, and later discussing, his internationally-applauded feature, Tey, which stars the actor, musician and poet Saul Williams (whose previous film credits include Slam). Afrika Eye’s full timetable is available online at: www.afrikaeye.org.uk and tickets are on sale from the box office at Watershed, tel: 0117 927 6444 or visit: www.watershed.co.uk.

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Stephen K Amos at Tobacco Factory Theatre

Bristol Metropolitan Orchestra, St George’s Bristol, Saturday 16 November, 7.30pm The Bristol Metropolitan Orchestra with talented one-handed pianist Nicholas McCarthy, led by Pamela Bell and conducted by William Goodchild, present Kachaturian’s Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia, Britten’s Diversions on a Theme, op.21 and Mahler’s Symphony No. 1. Box Office tel: 0845 402 4001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

Stephen K Amos, Tobacco Factory Theatre, 18 & 19 November, 8pm Stephen K Amos hits the road with his new show, The Spokesman, which has been a smash hit success across Australia and New Zealand. Expect an evening of fun, warmth, big laughs and audience interaction from the master of feel-good comedy. Tickets £16 from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatre.com.

Paul Merton’s Impro Chums, Colston Hall, Tuesday 19 November, 8pm Paul Merton, Richard Vranch, Lee Simpson, Suki Webster and Mike McShane cultivate witty, clever and unique routines based entirely on audience suggestions in this funny improv show that will make you laugh out loud. Tickets from: www.colstonhall.org or contact the box office on tel: 0844 887 1500.

White Christmas, The Bristol Hippodrome, 19 – 23 November Bristol’s own award-winning production company, BLOC Productions, welcomes you to a winter wonderland with Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, a stage musical of Bing Crosby’s 1954 movie which is brimming with classic hits like Blue Skies, How Deep is the Ocean? Happy Holiday, Sisters and of course White Christmas. With an ensemble of over 50 performers, a dynamic live orchestra, tap dancing and lots of laughter, this is a feel-good festive treat for all to enjoy. Tickets from: www.atgtickets.com.

Ray Davies, St George’s Bristol, Wednesday 20 November, 6.30pm The lead singer of The Kinks talks about his remarkable career and in particular his new book, Americana, which explores his complex relationship with the USA. Promoted by Bristol Festival of Ideas. Tickets £8 from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

Charity Raceday, Chepstow Racecourse, Thursday 21 November Bristol-based charity Paul’s Place is hosting a race day with a difference this month as it will be camels under starters orders for the inaugural William Hill Camel Derby. There will be a star-studded line up for the camel race including At the Races TV presenter Matt Chapman, leading event rider Laura Collett and actor Sean Gleeson, alongside jockeys Killian Moore, Tim Hart, Nathan Ellis and Andrew Smith. For more information and tickets visit: www.chepstow-racecourse.co.uk.

Vintage and Handmade Christmas Fair, The Bristol Pavillion at Bristol County Ground, Saturday 23 November, 10am – 4pm The Last Voyage of Sinbad the Sailor at the Tobacco Factory Theatre

Enjoy browsing stalls selling vintage fashion and homeware, retro items, antiques, collectables, handmade arts and crafts, jewellery and Christmas gifts. There will also be a café serving light refreshments. Entry is £1, under 16s free. Free car parking on site.

Bristol Choral Society: Britten War Requiem, Colston Hall, Saturday 23 November, 7.30pm More than 400 performers will gather for this performance of Britten’s War Requiem including the 100-piece Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, Gloucester and Bristol Choral Societies and Bristol Cathedral choristers, all conducted by Adrian Partington on this weekend marking 100 years since Britten’s birth. Tickets from Colston Hall on tel: 0844 887 1500 or visit: www.bristolchoral.co.uk.

Blackout, Alma Tavern Theatre, 26 November – 7 December, 8pm A dark twisted tale of people left behind by a war and each other. The final production in Theatre West’s second A-Z season of new writing, Blackout will be preceded each night by a 10 minute Short Trip. Tickets from: www.almataverntheatre.co.uk

The Last Voyage of Sinbad the Sailor, Tobacco Factory Theatre, 27 November – 12 January Set sail on the last voyage of Sinbad the Sailor – his most dangerous, heart-breaking and hysterical journey ever. For this special Christmas show, The Tobacco Factory Theatre and Travelling Light have reunited members of the teams behind Cinderella and Ali Baba, to bring you this new telling of Sinbad’s most fantastical adventures, plus a >> 42 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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brand new tale that’s never before been told. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatre.com.

West Country Quilt Show, Bath & West Showground, 28 – 30 November, 9.30am – 4.30pm This is the second year of the show, which will see dozens of makers and suppliers gathered under one roof, with demonstrations, talks and workshops. Tickets, £9, tel: 0117 907 1000 or visit: www.westcountryquiltshow.co.uk.

Sicilian Gardens talk by Nicholas Wray, University of Bristol, Thursday 28 November, 7.30pm – 9pm The Little Mermaid at Bristol Old Vic

This lecture, by University of Bristol Botanic Garden curator Nicholas Wray, will discuss the natural landscapes of the island of Sicily. Lecture venue: Room B75, School of Biological Sciences, Woodland Road. Admission: Free to Friends, visitors £5 donation.

The Little Mermaid, Bristol Old Vic, 28 November – 18 January

Christmas wreath workshop at Bristol Zoo

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Immerse yourself in the underwater world of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Little Mermaid and experience a tale of heroic adventure, true love, luminous music and a generous splash of festive magic. The Little Mermaid continues Bristol Old Vic’s run of special Christmas shows including smash hits Peter Pan, Coram Boy and Swallows and Amazons. This year Simon Godwin (Bristol Old Vic Associate Artist) directs with music by Shlomo and DJ Walde. Tickets from the box office

on tel: 0117 987 7877 or visit: www.bristololdvic.org.uk.

Christmas Wreath Workshop, Bristol Zoo, Saturday 30 November, 10am – 3.30pm Get into the Christmas spirit on this practical workshop which will show you how to make a fresh, fragrant wreath to take home. In the afternoon, go for a short walk on the Downs to discover the folklore of trees and shrubs used to make seasonal decorations. Cost: £25 (including materials), book on tel: 0117 9030609.

Christmas Craft and Gift Fair, St Peter’s Church Hall, Henleaze, Saturday 30 November, 12pm – 5pm There will be quality stalls selling clothing, scarves, bags, accessories, jewellery, arts, handmade crafts, Christmas cards, gifts and more, along with a tearoom selling homemade cakes and a raffle. Entry £1, under 16s free.

Christmas Harmony Workshop, Alma Church, Clifton, Saturday 30 November, all day Women who enjoy singing, whether experienced singers or complete novices, are invited to join Avon Harmony Ladies Chorus for an informal workshop with songs for the festive season. The workshop will be an enjoyable introduction to singing four-part close harmony and will be followed by a concert at 7.30pm. Cost: £10 for the day. Visit: www.avonharmony.co.uk or tel: 01249 447146. >>


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David Attenborough is joined by wildlife film making colleagues at St George’s Bristol

Bristol Phoenix Choir, St Mary Redcliffe, Saturday 30 November, 7.30 pm To kick off the Bristol Phoenix Choir’s 50th anniversary celebrations, this concert programme features Duruflé’s Requiem, Vierne’s Messe Solennelle and Widor’s Surrexit a Mortuis. Paul Walton conducts with organist Andrew Kirk, mezzo soprano Katie Brake and bass Edmund Danon. Tickets £12.50, under 16s free. Tel: 01454 880458 or email: tickets@bristolphoenixchoir.org.uk.

BOOK NOW FOR... Bristol Concert Orchestra: Rachmaninov’s 2nd Symphony, St George’s Bristol, Saturday 7 December, 7.30pm The programme features Rachmaninov’s romantic 2nd Symphony, extracts from Rimsky-Korsakov’s Christmas Eve and a rare performance of Britten’s Movements for a Clarinet Concerto, with soloist Nicholas Shipman and conducted by Stefan Hofkes. Tickets from tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.bristolconcertorchestra.org.uk.

Life Behind the Lens: In the Company of David Attenborough and Friends, St George’s Bristol, Monday 16 December, 7.30pm Bristol Choral Society

David Attenborough is joined by wildlife film making colleagues and friends to share their stories of wildlife film making. We’ll hear tales of adventure revelation and what happens when

A new producon of JB Priestley’s An Inspector Calls, takes place on November 20, 21, 22 and 23 SPP Theatre Company, Southville is staging the show at St Paul’s Church, Southville, Bristol. Doors open 7pm for 7.30pm start, except Nov 23 when doors open 5pm for 5.30pm start. Tickets £9.50, concs £7.50. For more informaon go to www.sppthe-

atrecompany.org.uk

For ckets call box office: 0117 977 2882.

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animals don’t follow the script. Presented by the Natural History Network. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0845 402 4001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

Bristol Cabot Choir: A Christmas Fanfare, Bristol Cathedral, Monday 16 December, 7.30pm An uplifting concert with festive music and carols from Bristol Cabot Choir performing with Bristol Brass Consort and Preludes Project Children’s Choir. Highlights include Rutter’s Candlelight Carol and Bruckner’s Ecce Sacerdos Magnus with a festive brass medley. The finale will be the Hallelujah chorus from Handel’s Messiah. Tickets from tel: 0117 968 6822 or online at: www.bristolcabotchoir.org.

Bristol Choral Society: Handel’s Messiah, Colston Hall, Saturday 21 December, 7.30pm Bristol Choral Society’s renowned performance of the Messiah (plus, at 4.30pm the Mini Messiah for families and children). Tickets from Colston Hall on tel: 0844 887 1500 or visit: www.bristolchoral.co.uk.

Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory, 13 February – 3 May 2014 Booking has now opened for the 2014 Shakespeare season, which this year presents the Bard’s funny and moving As You Like It and Tom Stoppard’s challenging, intriguing and witty Arcadia. Tickets from £12. Box office tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.sattf.org.uk


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WIN a Virgin balloon flight for two

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e’ve teamed up with Virgin Balloon Flights to offer you the chance to win an unforgettable Champagne balloon flight for two worth £238. A Virgin Balloon Flight is a unique way to explore beautiful Britain and the perfect Christmas gift for that special someone. The prize includes: • • • • •

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For your chance to win this fantastic prize, just answer the following question: How many locations in the UK do Virgin Balloon Flights launch from? Email your answer, with Balloon Competition in the subject line, along with your full name, address and telephone number to: competitions@thebristolmagazine.co.uk. Alternatively, send your entry on a postcard to: The Bristol Magazine, 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED. Closing date: Thursday 28 November. Terms & Conditions: Competition prize is for a pair of Virgin Balloon Flights National Weekday Morning vouchers which have no cash value, are non-refundable and nontransferable. Vouchers are valid for 12 months and flying season is March to October with regional variations. Ballooning is weather dependent. Prize does not include any additional related expenses such as travel or accommodation. Passengers must be aged 7 or over and at least 4’6” in height. Children aged under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. Passengers who are pregnant or who have recently undergone major surgery are unable to fly.

READER OFFER: SAVE UP TO 50% ON BALLOON FLIGHTS Virgin Balloon Flights are offering readers up to 50% off selected balloon flights from £99pp. This includes the Christmas Gift Package including Merry Christmas Balloon in a Box and Champagne truffles at £135 for one (RRP £159) or £245 for two (RRP £289) saving 15%. Tel: 0844 8448070 and quote ‘The Bristol Magazine’ before 25 December. Terms & Conditions: Reader offer valid until 25 December 2013 – subject to availability. Price is for one person including VAT at the applicable rate and standard postage and packing. Offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer and cannot be exchanged for cash. Virgin Balloon Flights reserves the right to withdraw these offers or amend these conditions at any time. Full terms & conditions at: www.virginballoonflights.co.uk/legalstuff

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Junor Souza in Le Corsaire © 2013 Guy Farrow

BRISTOL | CULTURE

A SHOW OF BRAVADO English National Ballet’s Le Corsaire is a swashbuckling adventure featuring heroic and passionate characters. It comes to the Bristol Hippodrome on Tuesday 26 – Saturday 30 November as part of a national tour

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nglish National Ballet is presenting a new production of Le Corsaire (The Pirate), one of the great 19th century classics, this month at the Bristol Hippodrome as part of a national tour. English National Ballet is the first UK company to perform the complete work which is based on Lord Byron’s poem Corsaire and tells the story of Conrad, a dashing pirate, and his love for Medora, the beautiful harem girl. It is a swashbuckling drama of captive maidens, rich sultans, kidnap and rescue, disguise and conspiracy, love and betrayal, culminating in a shipwreck which is one of the most breathtaking spectacles in ballet. English National Ballet’s Artistic Director Tamara Rojo said: “Le Corsaire is one of the great classics created by Marius Petipa for the Mariinsky Theatre. Like all great Russian classics it is a true epic story that offers drama, an exotic landscape and the best pyrotechnics of the classic technique. It’s a men’s ballet, with heroic and passionate characters and with the famous pas de deux that made a legend of Nureyev when he first performed in England with Dame Margot Fonteyn. This is a unique and unmissable opportunity as it has never before been performed by a British company. “We are working with Anna-Marie Holmes who created this version more than a decade ago and she is willing to change it to make it specific for us. In reinventing Le Corsaire we have the chance to go through the whole narrative and look at it with fresh eyes, making it even better and more personal to the company. I am excited that this is a ballet with four male principal roles. Unlike many of the classics it will give great opportunities to the men in the company to show off their skills and athleticism. “We are also re-orchestrating the work because there have been many additions over the years. I want the music to sound more romantic and cleaner as it would have originally. And I am thrilled that Bob Ringwood, 48 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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the amazing designer of Batman, has agreed to design the sets and the costumes.” Bob Ringwood, whose film credits include Batman, Alien 3, Star Trek Nemesis and Troy, explains his ambitions for the piece: “Designing Le Corsaire, I thought it would be interesting to bring out the romantic and historic elements of the original ballet. I hope to capture the flavour of the Romantic period in which it was first staged. The sets and costumes are based on original paintings, prints and engravings of the mid-19th century to capture and infuse the essence of the period. I felt it was important to bring out the romantic, sensual and erotic elements of the piece, which have been so neglected in recent productions. The sensuality of the women and bravado and swagger of the men, for us all to enjoy those heavily scented and perfumed Arabian Nights that so captivated Orientalist painters and writers of the second half of the 19th century.” ■ English National Ballet: Le Corsaire, at the Bristol Hippodrome, 26 – 30 November. Tickets from: www.atgtickets.com. And don’t miss the English National Ballet Live Drawing Event on Wednesday 27 November.

WIN! We have teamed up with the Bristol Hippodrome to offer you the chance to win a pair of tickets to Le Corsaire for the 7.30pm performance on Tuesday 26 November. To be in with a chance of winning, just answer the following question: Which poet’s work is Le Corsaire based on? Email your answer with Hippodrome Competition in the subject line, along with your full name, address and telephone number to: competitions@thebristolmagazine.co.uk. Deadline for entries: Tuesday 19 November.


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ON SHOW IN THE CITY Harvest gold, ©Etienne Francey (Switzerland)

Wildlife Photographer of the Year, M Shed, 30 November – 23 February Explore the rich array of life on our planet in this world-renowned exhibition from the Natural History Museum, touring at M Shed for the very first time. The images provide an insight into the beauty and variety of nature and shine a spotlight on the rarely seen wonders of the natural world around us. New for this year is the complementing Wildlife of Bristol display celebrating Bristol’s diverse and special wildlife, encouraging visitors of all ages to explore nature on their doorstep. Get up close to rarely seen natural history specimens and discover the secrets of the city’s wild residents. Tickets: adults £3, concessions £2, children (5 -16yrs) £2, under 5’s free, family tickets £8 There will be free days on Wednesday 4 December and Wednesday 5 February. M Shed, Princes Wharf, Wapping Road. www.mshed.org

Mick Jagger ©JillFurmanovsky

My Dog Sighs, Upfest gallery, 1 – 24 November

My Dog Sighs Spray Paint Can

Keep your eyes peeled on Friday 1 November as urban artist My Dog Sighs will be bringing Free Art Friday to Bristol ahead of his show at Upfest gallery. Free Art Friday is a growing phenomenon, coined by My Dog Sighs more than ten years ago, where artists leave their creations on the streets for the unsuspecting public to find and give a home. Painting on recycled materials is a signature of My Dog Sighs’ work and most recognisable are the staple food, drink and spray cans, which are twisted, crushed and hand painted. Each has its own character, be it a melancholic clown or angry punk. Working with recyclable materials picked up on the streets, My Dog Sighs’ Bristol Can exhibition will have a particular slant to celebrate the city, with works produced on cider and spray cans. Lastly he will leave his mark permanently on the city with his Bristol Hu’, creating a street mural of his happy everyman character, designed to bring joy to the people of each city he visits. Upfest gallery, North Street. Join the chase and get clues for the can and art locations by following @upfest on twitter.

Christmas Exhibition at Lime Tree Gallery, 21 November – 24 December Rockarchive Pop Up Gallery, LITTLEWHITESPACE Until 20 November Rockarchive, the rock photography collective and gallery network, has a new pop-up gallery in Bristol. Specifically curated for this new pop-up, the exhibition will feature exclusive framed photographs from Glastonbury Festival over the years including the likes of The Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, Radiohead, Coldplay and Portishead, alongside Rockarchive’s classic and celebrated collection of rock and roll favourites David Bowie, Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles, Debbie Harry, Elvis Presley and Iggy Pop. Established by award-winning photographer Jill Furmanovsky, Rockarchive now has a worldwide network of outlets and galleries which stock the most iconic rock photographs taken over the last 50 years. LITTLEWHITESPACE, 14 Clifton Down Road. www.littlewhitespace.com. 50 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Following Steven Lindsay’s solo exhibition showcasing his traditional and mostly figurative, contemporary painting style, which runs until 19 November, Lime Tree Gallery will be full of a broad selection of paintings and glass by many favourite artists for its Christmas exhibition. Ranging from the traditional to the modern, the figurative to the abstract, artists include Jackie Anderson, Michael G Clark PAI, Morag Muir, David Smith RSW, Rhonda Smith, Marion Thomson and Christopher Wood RSW. Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road. www.limetreegallery.com. Pictured, Turn of the Tide by Christopher Wood RSW


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‘Drama’

A one man show of new paintings by Steven Lindsay

“like revisiting Vermeer in the Dutch Golden Age of painterly skill against the Colour Field of Rothko, all intertwined with an aesthetic twist of contemporary, complex-simplicity. Lindsay using his paintbrush eloquently, capturing painterly conversations between the art history giants of a bygone age and a bygone art.” Estelle Lova, art critic for the New Radio 2 Arts Show october 19th > nov 19th 2013

84 Hotwell Road, Bristol BS8 4UB tel 0117 929 2527

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Jennifer Davidson at Coldharbour Gallery, throughout November

New talent at Fizz Gallery, throughout November This month Fizz Gallery in Clevedon is introducing a series of new artists/designers/makers. As well as exciting new jewellery designers, the gallery will be showcasing original paintings, artists prints, limited edition prints, glass, ceramics, and home accessories by some of the country’s best known names as well as a host of new talent. Fizz Gallery & Framing, 65a Hill Road, Clevedon. Tel: 01275 341 141 www.fizzgallery.co.uk Otis EP Nest Stem

Dandelion Clocks by Jennifer Davidson

The gallery welcomes Somerset-based artist Jennifer Davidson with her colourful, slightly surreal landscapes of the countryside around us. She joins regulars such as artist Abigail McDougall and ceramicist Tean Kirby, returning with new work for the autumn. Coldharbour Framery & Gallery, 111 Coldharbour Road, Westbury Park coldharbourgallery.co.uk

David Mackintosh, WORKS|PROJECTS 16 November – 20 December

Sue Brown: Collagraphs at Sky Blue Framing & Gallery, November - December Sue Brown is inspired by the natural world and her collagraph prints have texture and many levels of surfaces. The Ravens, pictured below, are from studies and observational drawings, which have been done over a period of time. She has gained a reputation for her experimentation within printmaking and her work is worth a closer look. Sky Blue Framing & Gallery, 27 North View, Westbury Park. Tel: 0117 973 3995 www.skybluefineart.com

For this exhibition entitled Log Suite David Mackintosh has engaged with a new material to create his first sculpture that shares the same spirit as his signature gouache drawings. The floor of the gallery will be scattered with log-shaped objects made from air drying clay, varied in size and painted in a bold, loose style that resemble quick sketches of logs. The gallery walls will be covered with an David Mackintosh, Log, 2013, expansive wall drawing wrapping the show air drying clay, liquitex acrylic paint like a theatrical backdrop. The drawing will and clear matt varnish echo the greens and browns of the logs and depict a fictional woodland. Log Suite marks a significant departure for Mackintosh from his more familiar drawing practice, the use of mise-en-scene, soundtrack and performance in the gallery combining to investigate the concept of staging where art becomes a set in which something happens as much as an end in itself. WORKS|PROJECTS, Sydney Row, Bristol. www.worksprojects.co.uk

Garden Stories, Hidden Labours, Tyntesfield, 16 November – 28 February

24 Hours in Bristol, The Guildhall Arts Centre, from 16 November More than 120 images, including all of the winning photographs, from the 24 Hours in Bristol photographic competition, will be on show at the Guildhall Arts Centre in Broad Street On entering the competition, photographers were randomly allocated a one-hour time slot on 19 October during which they took at least one photograph, resulting in a fascinating hour by hour timeline of Bristol at work, rest and play.

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Cedric Laquieze, I’ll Be A Kid Until The Day I Die

Altered States at View Gallery, 14 November – 5 January Altered States seeks to explore how the human race and the elements interact, live with and fight against each other. Destructive acts of nature, personal and sentimental connections and a spiritual awareness of nature reclaiming back its original state will all feature. This fraught relationship will be interpreted through seven diverse artists, each exploring their own take on the theme. View Gallery, 159-161 Hotwell Road.

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An exhibition in the Piggery, of photographs from the gardens at Tyntesfield by photographer and garden volunteer, Amanda Harman, who has spent the past year photographing at Tyntesfield. The photographs, made around the glasshouses, potting sheds and scullery, make visible the unseen and often unsung work of the gardeners and garden volunteers: the tending of plants; their protection from insects, disease and weather; the nurturing of seedlings in the glasshouses; the harvesting, drying and storing of crops, and the gathering of flowers from the garden, to be arranged and placed in the house.


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Creative Bristol on show The North Bristol Art Trail will once again be offering a varied array of artwork from over 100 artists in more than 50 venues on Saturday 23 & Sunday 24 November. Enjoy the opportunity to meet the artists and take a closer look at their work

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he doors of artists’ homes and studios, as well as cafés, bars and community venues all over north Bristol will be open over the weekend of the 23 and 24 November for the 12th North Bristol Art Trail, showcasing an enormous variety of artwork available to buy and see. The trail has become a popular and regular event and, as the last art trail of the year in Bristol, it’s a perfect opportunity for those looking for unique and special Christmas presents. You’ll find paintings, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, jewellery, textiles, mosaics and glasswork as well as a warm welcome. There will also be live music performances by local musicians at St Bartholomew’s Church, St Andrews, and other venues will be offering singing, reading and acoustic performances, as well as refreshments and cakes. Although the majority of artists exhibit in their own homes, there are many public venues that offer exhibition spaces, including Artemis, Planet Pizza, Heart Space Studios, Fig and Room 212. Many of these venues already display a selection of work by north Bristol artists year round, have special group shows in the build up to the trail and will supply maps and information about the trail. In Gloucester Road’s new gallery, Room 212, there will be work from more than 50 artists – and it is fast becoming a hub for both artists and art lovers who enjoy browsing the original and inspiring work on offer and those who created it too. And keep an eye out on Gloucester Road for Gordon the Gloucester Road Goblin. Created by Room 212 illustrator and North Bristol Artist, Laura Robertson for her childrens’ books The Quest in a Vest and Oh My is That a Pork Pie!, Gordon will be hidden in shop windows and anyone who spots him is invited to post a photo on the Gloucester Road Facebook page – there will be a prize for those who spot the most. A trail map is distributed door to door, in local shops and can be found on the event’s website: www.northbristolartists.org.uk. ■

Laura Robertson

Chez Williams

Ella Rice

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Saved for the city Andrew Swift looks at the history of Leigh Woods and discovers how it was saved from development

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eigh Woods is the largest area of ancient woodland in the Bristol area. Given its proximity to the city, however, it is not surprising that its survival has sometimes seemed in doubt. In the 1830s, the wood’s owners, the Smyths of Ashton Court, leased 170 acres to William Watkins as a rabbit warren. He cleared large swathes of it, fenced other areas off and charged visitors a penny for admission to those parts still open to them. Worse was to come, however. In the early 1860s it was announced that the Clifton Suspension Bridge, work on which had been abandoned in 1843, was to be completed. This meant that the undeveloped land on the west side of the gorge – hitherto accessible only by ferry from Hotwells or via a circuitous route through Bedminster – would be within walking distance of Clifton. At around the same time, work started on a railway to Portishead, running along the west bank of the Avon and raising the prospect of a station at Leigh Woods. Sir Greville Smyth of Ashton Court, realising that Leigh Woods was now the most desirable piece of real estate in the area, announced that he was going to build on it. The plans, unveiled in June 1863, were for ‘a little town, comprising in all 435 houses’, with an iron bridge spanning Nightingale Valley, a church and ‘a hotel upon a scale of great magnitude and grandeur’ near the suspension bridge. Following numerous objections and ‘bitter letters’ in the newspapers, Smyth offered the council a short-term lease of the woods, but at such a high price that they turned it down. In September 1864, the Bristol Times revealed that Smyth had sold Leigh Woods to a developer who planned to build ‘some 800 tenements, many of them of a poor character, several of them small shops ... on the romantic site, thereby of course making it an eyesore to Clifton’. Faced with this threat, a number of wealthy citizens got together to buy the developer out. His terms

were so exorbitant, however, that they decided to play for time – very wisely, for, after failing to come up with the first instalment of his payment to Smyth, he disappeared. The wealthy citizens could now deal with Smyth directly. They formed the Leigh Woods Land Company to undertake controlled development while preserving the view of the woods from Clifton and maintaining recreational access. Even this was too much for HA Palmer, a philanthropist, who argued that ‘no building scheme – however limited, however judiciously planned – can give to these woods ... the sublime and beautiful aspect they now present’. His attempt to raise enough money for a rival bid failed, however, and Smyth sold Leigh Woods to the Land Company for £40,000. Although development was limited to large villas in an area west of the suspension bridge, it impacted on other parts of the site. In 1869, it was revealed that the stone used to build North Road was being taken from Stokeleigh Camp, the Iron Age fort overlooking the gorge, significant parts of which had been destroyed. There were also large quarries further down the gorge, which were only too visible from Clifton. In 1886, the English Illustrated Magazine launched an attack on the destruction of the ‘waving forest that had been the nursery of art to WJ Muller, Danby, Pyne and Turner, and the scenery that has given character to Clifton’, transforming it into ‘a record of an utilitarian age, whose sordid spirit could convert so choice a piece of landscape into crumbling stones for the sake of their value in money’. In 1902, a group of leading citizens petitioned the council ‘to urge that some steps should be adopted for the preservation of Leigh Woods from what appears to be impending destruction’. Bemoaning ‘the gradual erosion of the quarrymen on the river’s bank’ and prophesying that, if no action was taken, ‘the whole picturesque scene – one of superb grandeur and beauty – will be

...no building scheme... can give to these woods... the sublime and beautiful aspect they now present

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UNDER THREAT: left, Some of the villas built by the Leigh Woods Land Company; above left, Clifton Suspension Bridge under construction, with Leigh Woods, as yet undeveloped, on the far side; above right, present day, looking north across Nightingale Valley, with Leigh Woods on the left; right, the Clifton Suspension Bridge under construction

involved in destruction’, they called on the council to buy the woods or, failing that, for a public appeal to save them. In the event, it was George Alfred Wills, who lived in Burwalls, one of the grandest houses built by the Land Company, who came to the rescue, presenting 80 acres of the woods to the National Trust in 1909. Unfortunately, the quarries did not form part of the gift and quarrying continued. Not until 1936, when Walter Alfred Wills, George’s brother, gave the National Trust a further 60 acres – including the last working quarry – did it finally cease. In addition to the land owned by the National Trust, a further 300 acres of ‘devastated woodland’, where most of the trees were felled during the Second World War, was acquired and replanted by the Forestry Commission in 1949. Today, no metal bridge spans Nightingale Valley, no rows of terraces disfigure Leigh Woods, and nature has largely reclaimed the quarries so abhorred by Victorian lovers of the picturesque. Against overwhelming odds, Leigh Woods has been saved for future generations, and rapacious greed has given way to the careful management of this priceless green space at the city’s edge. ■

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PISCATORIAL PADSTOW Lindsey Harrad discovers the foodie delights of Padstow and plans a festive visit to the harbourside Christmas Festival

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erfectly picturesque in any season, the Cornish fishing town of Padstow is especially magical at Christmas. When the children dipping crab lines into the harbour waters and the tourists tucking into pasties on the seafront have long since headed home, the town gears up for the arrival of the serious foodies who flock in their thousands to sample the culinary delights of the Christmas Festival in early December. Often jokingly referred to as ‘Padstein’, the town is rather dominated by renowned chef Rick Stein’s business empire, which encompasses the worldfamous Padstow Seafood School, a restaurant, a bistro and a café, plus Stein’s Patisserie, Deli, Fisheries and Gift Shop, several holiday accommodation offerings, and of course, a proper fish and chip shop. Stein’s celebrity has undoubtedly helped to put Padstow on the map, transforming it from merely a pretty fishing port to a national foodie destination. However, this event also sets out to showcase a wide range of Cornish produce and chefs, in addition to inviting chefs from around the country who relish the opportunity to cook with the superfresh fish all caught in local waters. After being invited to sample the attractions of the town in advance of this year’s festival, we decided to start with lunch at The Basement, a charming café, bar and restaurant located in The Drang, a historic cobbled alley with views of the harbour (if you’re enjoying coffee or a beer from the outdoor courtyard). Inside the restaurant, which many years ago used to be store rooms for rope, canvas and fishing nets, is a cosy place to enjoy a very good value Sunday lunch (one course, £10; two courses £13.50; three courses £17), all prepared with fresh, local ingredients.

We tucked into exquisite seafood, of course – Padstow mussels in thyme, garlic, cream and cider sauce – and a creamy homemade vegetable soup, followed by a traditional roast pork belly with all the trimmings and a fabulously flavoursome linguine dish with woodland mushrooms, sunblush tomatoes and a hint of black truffle, all washed down with a fine glass of white wine from Camel Valley, a local Cornish vineyard. We were hugely impressed with the friendly service, the seasonal ingredients and the great value, generous portions here. After wandering around the pretty streets of Padstow working off our lunch, we discovered an ideal mix of appropriate high street brands that seem to fit the ethos of the town along with quirky independent shops, offering everything from jewellery to children’s clothing, homewares and seaside ephemera. If you don’t want a sit-down lunch, there are a number of pasty shops selling the traditional hearty regional snack, and several places to find real Cornish ice cream, plus a range of delicious deli and bakery goods from the Stein Patisserie and Deli. We were delighted to discover binTwo, an independent wine shop, champagne and coffee bar boasting a lovely terrace with harbour views. Here you can enjoy wine by the glass, or sample one of owner David’s famous flat whites, made with smooth, creamy Monmouth coffee, which is roasted in Bermondsey. Whether you prefer a glass of Billecart-Salmon Brut or Brut Rosé Champagne, a choice of handpicked wines or a G&T made with extra special Tarquin’s dry gin (made in Cornwall), then this is the place to come for a decent tipple. David and his staff are also on hand to help you choose a good bottle to take away, and whether it’s just something to go with dinner at home or a birthday gift for

Stein’s celebrity has undoubtedly helped to put Padstow on the map, transforming it from merely a pretty fishing port to a national foodie destination

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FRUITS OF THE SEA: left, a seafood dish at The Seafood Restaurant © davidgriffen.co.uk; above, clockwise from top right, a room with a sea view in the hotel above Rick Stein’s restaurant; binTwo, an independent wine shop with owner David; food tasting at Padstow’s Christmas Festival; roast truncon of turbot with hollandaise at The Seafood Restaurant © davidgriffen.co.uk; the market tent at the Christmas Festival

a friend, they’ve got suggestions from around the world to suit every budget. After sampling a range of delicious varieties during a wonderfully sociable wine tasting at binTwo, concluding on the terrace while wrapped in the cosy blankets provided, we headed off for a late evening snack of proper chips from Stein’s Fish & Chips, a perfect end to a day at the seaside. We had chosen to stay in one of the 16 rooms above Rick Stein’s Seafood Restaurant, and it’s Rick’s former wife Jill Stein who takes care of the design side of the business, styling the accommodation and restaurants, and also sourcing and creating gorgeous products for the shops. We were booked into the St Kew room (£225 a night) which was elegantly and comfortably furnished, with a subtle hint of seaside style, and offered a spacious bathroom with funky lighting, and treats such as a huge power shower and standalone bath. The four-poster bed was enormous and incredibly comfortable – but you’ll sleep like a baby anyway after all the delicious food and fresh sea air on offer in Padstow. We rounded off our stay with an exceptional three-course lunch at the Seafood Restaurant, and were not surprised to find it fully booked even on a Monday lunchtime. Since Rick and Jill first opened the place in 1975, in a prime location opposite the quay where the lobster boats and trawlers tie up and unload the catch straight through into the kitchen, the restaurant has grown in reputation for preparing the freshest fish and seafood. Over the years Rick has travelled the world for inspiration, and you’ll find fish dishes from Goa, Thailand and Bali as well as India, France and Cornwall – and there’s a new seafood bar in the middle of the restaurant if you want to watch the chefs in action while you eat. Such a perfect lunch certainly whetted our appetite for the seafood treats on offer at the forthcoming Padstow Christmas Festival, especially as this year’s exciting line up of regional chefs includes Paul Ainsworth, Nathan Outlaw, Rick Stein and his son Jack Stein, Tom Hunter, Stephanie Delourme, David Sharland and many more, along with chefs from around the country such as

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Angela Hartnett from Murano in London, Michael Caines from Gidleigh Park in Devon, Tom Kerridge from The Hand & Flowers in Marlow and Sat Bains from Restaurant Sat Bains in Nottingham. Festival-goers will be able to enjoy a selection of lobster, crab and other edible natives of the Cornish oceans in the specialist shellfish tent where all produce is sourced in local waters, while lining the quayside will be pop-up restaurant style food sellers offering everything from gourmet burgers to pizzas and handmade doughnuts. Finally, if you’re looking for delicious treats for your Christmas dinner or to give as gifts, you’ll be able to take your pick from over 110 local producers and stall holders who make up the vibrant Christmas market. You don’t need any excuse to visit Padstow, but the Christmas Festival may just be the ideal introduction to this piscatorially perfect Cornish town. ■

Further information The Padstow Christmas Festival runs from 5 – 8 December. For further information visit: www.padstowchristmasfestival.co.uk binTwo, The Drang, South Quay, Padstow. Tel: 01841 532022. www.bintwo.com The Basement, 11 Broad Street, The Drang, Padstow. Tel: 01841 532846. www.thebasement.co.uk To make reservations at any Rick Stein accommodation or restaurants, tel: 01841 532700. www.rickstein.com

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WINING & DINING news and reviews A five star lunch for a fraction of the price

Quick bites ■ Under new management, Café Revival, Bristol’s oldest coffee house located in Corn Street, will now be open in the evenings, transforming into a cosy bar. Upstairs on the first floor in the three storey 18th century building you will discover a café with rustic charm and on the second floor, a snug – both of which will remain open Wednesday to Saturday evenings when candles are lit and the venue is transformed into an intimate bar with an excellent wine list and local beers & ales. ■ Two of Bristol’s best loved sports teams are showing their creative side as they go head-to-head in a charity cocktail challenge. Bristol Rugby Club and Bristol Rovers have each designed a cocktail to go on sale at Po Na Na on the Clifton Triangle, with £1 from each sale being donated to local charities. Bristol Rugby Club will be donating the money raised to the Bristol Rugby Community Foundation, while St Peter’s Hospice will be benefiting from Bristol Rovers’ efforts. The charity cocktails will be on sale at the North African themed venue throughout November. ■ A cookbook containing 50 recipes from cafés, restaurants, residents and traders along Gloucester Road has been created by the Gloucester Road WI (Women’s Institute). The book is bursting with local and international influences, from British classics to Indian, Turkish and Swedish cooking, reflecting the diverse Gloucester Road community. Income from sales of the book will go to local domestic abuse charity, Survive, and to future Gloucester Road WI projects that benefit the local community. The Gloucester Road Cookbook is available to buy for £15 from shops on Gloucester Road.

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ospitality students at the City of Bristol College delightfully dispel the myth about disaffected teenagers as they offer a professional and enthusiastic service to diners at the college’s training restaurants. For £7.95 Bristolians can enjoy a three course lunch at the College Green City Restaurant, almost directly opposite At-Bristol, where they are served restaurant standard cuisine with silver service waiting. No wonder the college restaurant was buzzing with eager customers on the mid-week day we visited. This is no canteen full of clatter and noise, but a quietly carpeted dining hall where the tables are properly laid. Under the watchful eye of senior tutor Miriam Garstang our young squad of front of house waitresses brought us freshly baked bread rolls and offered water. Wearing neat uniforms with blue shirts and ties and aprons embroidered with their names, they may have only been training a few weeks but they look the part already. In the kitchens more students, under the leadership of chef Leon Hughes, prepared dishes for the table. Homemade minestrone soup was served piping hot, while my companion’s frittura mista was nicely presented in a light, crispy batter. My main course, of fresh plaice with mackerel, parmentier potatoes and black butter sauce was as good as any you’d get in a restaurant or gastro pub and the boiled beef with horseradish sauce served opposite me was met with equal enthusiasm. We finished with freshly made cake as our pudding choice. The service throughout was attentive and the students certainly gave the impression of enjoying their hands-on experience. Where else in the city could you get this level of cooking and service for less than £8? The answer is, in any one of the four training restaurants run by the City of Bristol College. The college has a good track record in turning out culinary stars. Michelin star holders Josh Eggleton of the Pony and Trap, Chew Magna, and Peter Sanchez-Igesias of Casamia, both trained at the college. Lunches are served between noon and 1.30pm. To make a reservation tel: 0117 312 2712. ■ GMc

The spirit of Cuba comes to Bristol Diners looking for a totally new experience in the city will be delighted when The Cuban restaurant and cocktail bar opens on the Harbourside on Thursday 7 November, with tapas, empanadas and rums topping the menu. Founder, Roger Payne says: “The Cuban restaurant and bar will have the same look and feel as our well-established counterpart in London’s Camden Market. The main focus with The Cuban in Bristol will be its cuisine. Cuban cooking is one of the most diverse in the world, taking its exotic influences from its birthplace in Cuba, the Caribbean, Africa, Brazil, Spain, China and Portugal. There are two very distinct styles of cooking too: the classic method which has been around for centuries on the island of Cuba; and the Nueva Cubano which brings in influences from all over the world. Our head chef David Parra Galvis and his team are well up to speed on everything Cuban – and they aim to please.” The Cuban in Bristol has a selection of more than 150 rum varieties and a versatile and stylish cocktail menu, featuring The Cuban’s signature speciality cocktails such as Che’s Revolution and Cuba Libre made with the finest fresh ingredients conjured up by mixology expert Tony Safqui, London’s leading and awardwinning drinks expert. The Cuban in Bristol is a large venue with specially created lounge areas and booths. The venue will have a further unique offering as it plays host to the Jongleurs Comedy Club every Friday and Saturday, and guests can also enjoy special theme nights throughout the year as well as live in-house bands and resident DJs playing popular Latin style rhythms. For further information visit: www.thecubanbristol.co.uk.

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FOOD | AND DRINK

NEW AND EXCLUSIVE

FOODIE EVENTS... A Night with the Flavour Smith, Kings Weston House, Friday 8 & Saturday 9 November Join The Flavour Smith, chef Tom Smith, and step through the doors of this elegant historic Grade I-listed Georgian mansion, for an evening of great British cooking, fine wine and good company. Ticket price £55, to include canapés and bubbles on arrival followed by a five course dinner. Must be booked in advance at: www.thefavoursmith.co.uk.

Averys Annual Christmas Wine Tasting, Bristol Grammar School, Saturday 9 November, 1pm – 6pm Join Bristol’s fine wine merchants Averys at its hugely popular Christmas tasting event and enjoy the opportunity to try more than 120 wines and chat to winemakers, as well as the Averys team, including newly announced Master of Wine, Matthew Hemmingtaste. A perfect chance to to select your wines for the festive period in a relaxed and informal environment. Price: £25, tickets from: www.averys.com/events

BRISTOL MAGAZINE

is now specially available to customers of John Lewis at The Mall at Cribbs Causeway Our display stands are situated in the Espresso Bar on the lower ground floor, and in The Place to Eat café on the top floor. Pick us up for free when you visit.

Wine and cheese tasting evening, SS Great Britain, Friday 15 November, 7pm

Supplies are limited and the stands are re-stocked by the John Lewis partners on a daily basis.

Brunel’s SS Great Britain is hosting a evening of fun, food and drink appreciation with a selection of local wines and delicious cheeses, supplied by Heritage Wines and Archhouse Deli, with introductions and discussion from their friendly experts. The ship will be open for exclusive exploration during the evening and there will be up to 12 different white, red, sparkling and rose wines and five different cheese selections. Tickets: £20, to book tel: 0117 926 0680.

Bristol Game Festival, Source Food Hall & Café at St Nicholas Market, Monday 18 – Saturday 23 November Source Food Hall & Café celebrates the British game season with its annual festival in honour of wild and foraged food. In a special week long festival, Source will be featuring the best of UK game on both the menus in its café and food hall. There will be game butchery courses, visiting gamekeepers sharing their experiences and some first class wild produce on offer. For further information visit: www.source-food.co.uk

Wine and Dine, The River Cottage Canteen, Wednesday 20 November Guests will be able to enjoy an evening of wine tasting led by Patrick Pigny from Etontria wines. Patrick will talk through the carefully matched wine and food menu as visitors dine. Booking is essential on tel: 0117 973 2458.

Game & Classic Wines Dinner, Flinty Red, Wednesday 27 November, 7.30pm The Cotham Hill-based restaurant holds regular tasting evenings throughout the year, run in conjunction with wine merchants Corks of Cotham. Among the events at the restaurant this month is the game and classic winer dinner, when Flinty Red will be using game cooking and preserving methods for feathered game, as well as for deer and rabbit, with complementary wine from the classic regions of France. Cost: £55, reserve your place on tel: 0117 973 1620.

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Piazza di Roma 178 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2XU. Tel: 0117 973 4183

REVIEW

THE AUTHENTIC ITALIAN JOB W e have a theory in our family that whatever city you find yourself in, if you seek out an independent Italian trattoria you’ll be sure of good food and a warm welcome. It’s a theory that’s never let us down as we’ve stuck to it and managed to tuck into delicious pasta and pizza in Birmingham, Oxford and, on a couple of occasions, on the way to a Tottenham game in a little Italian eaterie in an unikely spot almost under a railway bridge in north London. Bristol has its fair share of good, independent family-run Italian restaurants, and I would reckon that the Piazza di Roma on Black Boy Hill is worth adding to your list of reliable, welcoming venues. It’s got all the right elements for a traditional Italian, from the Sicilian head chef/owner who has more than 30 years’ experience, to the Leonardos and views of Rome among the artwork on a terracotta painted wall, and, of course, big bowls of fresh, tasty pasta and crisp, hot pizzas. There are only 30 covers in the trattoria, so it feels cosy and welcoming, especially with candles on every table and two twinkling chandeliers overhead. We were lucky enough to secure a table in the window, from where we could enjoy the site of runners slogging up the hill to the Downs, and the autumn leaves blowing about in the wind, while we began our journey into sunny Italy with a Peroni beer and a Martini bianco, accompanied by warm ciabatta and a big bowl of olives. The prices are very reasonable at Piazza di Roma, with starters from £4.95 to £6.95 (and very generous they are too) and main courses priced between £7.50 to £21 for the specials of the day. You could, as the pair of middle aged chaps behind us were doing, enjoy a starter and a main course of pasta or pizza for £10 if you dine between 6pm and 10pm on Tuesdays through to Thursdays and on Sundays, or between 6pm and 7pm on Fridays and Saturdays. That, with a bottle of house wine for £13.95, would be a very good value night out in these recessionary times. Italian hospitality being what it is you can rest assured that you will not go hungry. If you fancy a starter served as a main course, that’s no problem. But we found our starter portions more than ample, John’s a big bowl of mussels in a garlicky, herby broth with a chilli kick came with more bread for mopping up, while my golden crisp calamari was served with a large helping 64 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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of salad and a seriously spicy tomato-chilli dip. The chef makes his own chilli oil and I can testify that, when taken in small doses, it’s sufficiently fiery to keep out the winter chills. Piazza di Roma, like many restaurants in Bristol, prides itself on using local ingredients wherever possible, but its rather clever tag-line is that it uses ‘the best ingredients Bristol and Italy have to offer.’ So, with a choice of 18 pizza toppings there’s also the chance to pimp up your pizza with authentic Italian delights, including pancetta, Neapolitan salami or marinated olives. The pizza dough is made daily fresh on the premises, and the tomato, basil and oregano sauce is also of the casa. I think I chose well with the eponymous Piazza di Roma special pizza, topped with anchovies, olives and capers. This was tasty enough not to get boring but sufficient to feed two, let alone one, medium sized diner (but ask for a takeaway box and you’ve got the rest for a filling, cold lunch the next day). A beautifully dressed tomato salad with thinly sliced onions was a good accompaniment, the tomatoes properly room temperature – I don’t keep my tomatoes in the fridge at home and am always disappointed in places which serve ice-cold flavourless tomatoes. These were a delight. John’s bubbling hot lasagne served direct from the oven in a dish, was like the best of home-made dishes – tasty, generous and clearly made with Sicilian passion. A nice bottle of Italian chianti was, unsurprisingly, a good match for both our main courses. We shared a pudding, a golden lemon tart with ice cream, perfectly sweettart. The puddings are a reasonable £3.95 each and include classic tiramisu, made in house. They’re also offered with whipped cream and ice cream – you see I told you the Italians don’t want you to go to bed hungry. Piazza di Roma is now taking bookings for its Italian Christmas party lunches and dinners, priced at two courses for £17.95, or three for £19.95. The pizzeria also does a takeway service, with a ten per cent discount, but if you do eat in you’ll enjoy gentle, professional service and a friendly atmosphere. It’s the sort of place you could equally take a small child, a group of students, non-meat eaters, or an old friend for a heart-to-heart and all would feel at home. Buon appetito! as they say in Clifton. ■ GMc


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PRIVATE DINNER PARTY AT COUNTRY HOUSE RETREAT Near Chepstow, Wales

How about your own private house party for the festive season? Ever dreamt of creating a special festive occasion without the hassle of cooking and clearing up? Well, this country house retreat set in 13 acres of pasture and woodland, with panoramic views over the Usk Valley and The Black Mountains offers just that. Dinner, bed and breakfast and a chance to relax and celebrate, with no worrying about transport or time limits. Only a 20 minute drive from Cribbs Causeway, the spacious house sleeps 14 and is beautifully decorated for the festive season. Your celebratory evening would comprise of; welcome drinks, a three course dinner of home cooked, locally sourced produce and a choice of menus, for ÂŁ99 per person. Accommodation included. So gather your family and friends, a minimum of eight people. BYO. For more information, menus and bookings contact Helen on tel: 07837871572 or for more information on the house and location please visit: www.ownersdirect.co.uk/wales/W1075.htm.

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PARTY | TIME

A good old-fashioned shindig Christmas at the Spiegeltent will return to Bristol’s Harbourside from 28 November – 22 December with a line-up of cabaret, live music, swing dancing and the popular Spiegeltent Masquerade Ball

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he spectacular 1950s travelling ballroom will once again bring festive glamour to the city, with The Correspondents, The Tiger Lillies, Georgie Fame and Puppini Sisters leading the bill. Swing Dance Bristol will be hosting a dancing extravaganza and the venue will come alive as a vintage diner when it is transformed into the Bump Roller Disco. The Crystal Palace Spiegeltent will also host a month of Christmas parties with delicious three-course dinners, cabaret shows, live music and DJs. Tickets are on sale now from: www.christmasspiegeltent.co.uk. Also this year are a series of festive markets, with the finest independent traders filling the magnificent vintage mirrored ballroom and Waterfront Square with handmade gifts, jewellery, clothes and more. Starting on 30 November, the markets will run over four consecutive weekends where you can enjoy the opportunity to source handmade gifts by local artisans, get your hair styled by vintage hairdressers and sip a glass of mulled wine from the Spiegeltent bar. The opening weekend sees a return of the much loved Magpies & I market on 30 November and 1 December, with the following three weekends featuring Christmas at the Spiegeltent’s very own market. Steve Meadows, Organiser of the Christmas Spiegeltent says; “The Christmas markets at the Spiegeltent went down a storm last year so we’re bringing them back bigger and better. The setting of these vintage ballrooms are the perfect backdrop for markets and we have some exciting street food planned for people to pick up breakfast and lunch while they browse.” Each weekend The Spiegeltent will feature a pop-up bistro complete with tea room. Throughout the market days the whole family will be entertained with live music and vintage fairground rides too. Progamme highlights include: • The Correspondents, Friday 29 November Bristol favourites The Correspondents, will kick off musical proceedings in the Spiegeltent with jazz to electro, 60s beat to hip hop, blues to drum ‘n’ bass, all depicting the trials and tribulations of love, lust and loss. After a busy summer of touring festivals worldwide, this one-off gig will be a chance to hear stomping tunes from their much anticipated debut album. 66 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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• The Tiger Lillies, Sunday 1 December Best described as an anarchic Brechtian street opera trio, The Tiger Lillies’ music is a mixture of pre-war Berlin cabaret, anarchic opera and gypsy music. Keen collaborators, they have performed with circus performers, Shakespearean actors, experimental dancers, burlesque puppeteers and classical music ensembles. The Tiger Lillies will shock, amuse and entertain in a postmodern vaudeville way, with their inimitable shows, where no limit should be taken for granted. • Swingin’ at the Spiegeltent, Sunday 8 December It’s time to party like it’s 1929! Think Gatsby, think glamour, think Wall Street Crash is just around the corner and it’s time for the Bright Young Things to come out to play. Swing Dance Bristol presents a night of retro indulgence, with music from the 1920s to the early 1940s. • Christmas with the Puppini Sisters, Monday 9 December The glamorous retro-inspired Puppini Sisters are an internationally acclaimed vocal harmony trio, whose sell out show at the Spiegeltent last year was a programme highlight. Audiences will be transported through a festive musical journey of some classic Christmas songs of the swing era. Christmas jumper optional. • Georgie Fame & Sons, Tuesday 10 December Georgie Fame’s career has spanned more than five decades and has seen him work with musicians including Eric Clapton, Count Basie, Stevie Wonder and Muddy Waters and, notably, forge a close association with Van Morrison. Piano blues, best enjoyed from the opulence of the vintage Spiegeltent booths. • The Masquerade Ball, Saturday 21 December One of the undoubted highlights of Christmas at the Spiegeltent this year. Besides the DJ’s, fire jugglers, assorted freaks and ne’er-do-wells there will be two live bands plus an assortment of wild and wonderful cabaret acts. ■ Visit: www.christmasspiegeltent.co.uk


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The

CLIFTON

®

Christmas Party Menu 2013 Two course lunch £19.95 Three course lunch £24.95 Three course dinner £29.95

 Starters

(v) Spicy roast parsnip and curry soup, curry scented bread

Duck liver parfait, apple and saffron chutney, sour dough bread crisps

(v) Capricorn goats' cheese and thyme soufflé, red onion and thyme focaccia

Smoked haddock and horseradish croque'es, celeriac remoulade

Main Course Roast Somerset turkey, red onion and sage stuffing, Old Spot pigs in blankets, roast potatoes, roast gravy Reindeer and cranberry sausages, parsley mash, port and cranberry gravy, parsnip crisps Roast fillet of Loch Duart salmon, leek and potato cake, lobster bisque

(v) Roast bu'ernut squash and Cornish brie filo parcel with spinach and chestnuts, celeriac and potatoes dauphinoise, garlic cream sauce All served with a selecon of fesve vegetables.

Puddings Homemade Christmas pudding, brandy sauce

Chocolate and hazelnut mousse, hazelnut shortbread biscuits Bramley apple and pear crumble, homemade custard Godminster cheddar and Cornish blue cheese, homemade grape chutney, biscuits



All Christmas par&es are inclusive of Christmas crackers & mince pies. We do not make a service charge. All gratui&es, however given go directly to staff. For par&es of ten or more an op&onal 10% gratuity will be added to your bill. A deposit of £5 per person will be required to secure your Christmas party booking.

For bookings, please call 0117 973 1192 or email info@cliftonsausages.co.uk WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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BRISTOL | UPDATES

News in brief ■ A vintage clothing store that started up in the Midlands just two years ago is expanding with its latest store opening in Bristol. LOOT Vintage Clothing will be opening its doors in the newly revamped Bear Pit on Thursday 7 November, showcasing vintage clothing and accessories for men and women hand-picked by owners Richard Emerson and Louise Dooley. ■ Featuring leading and emerging designers of millinery and accessories, a new shop called Milliners' Guild has opened in Broadmead. The five-storey building also allows plenty of room for owner Ani to teach workshops and provide bespoke millinery services. Milliners' Guild stocks occasion and casual millinery for both men and women, as well as bridal headpieces and accessories such as handwoven scarves and handmade bags. For further information visit: www.millinersguild.com ■ There’s a new website that makes it easier to give money to Bristol charities that make a real difference. Visit www.giveamonkeys.co.uk where you can choose one of the four Giveamonkeys funds and they’ll distribute your cash direct to the charities doing what matters to you most. The new website is the brainchild of Quartet, the Community Foundation for the West of England which serves more than one million people in Bristol, Bath & North East Somerset, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire. ■ Bristol has won the bid to host the International Fairtrade Towns Conference in 2015, it was announced in Oslo last month. Bristol gained overwhelming support from Fairtrade Co-ordinators from around the world for its bid, due to the international reputation of the city’s Fairtrade campaigning and enthusiasm for linking the conference to the European Green Capital events and celebrations in 2015. 2015 will mark 10 years since Bristol became a Fairtrade City, and hosting this conference is a perfect way to celebrate what has been achieved in this time.

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Sparking new life into Electricity House Crest Nicholson has exchanged conditional contracts to purchase the 90,000 sq. ft. West Gate office building on Colston Avenue for a residential led mixed use scheme, in a deal brokered by Bristol-based property company Cubex Land. Previously known as Electricity House; the iconic Grade II-listed building, which was designed by renowned architect Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, is currently owned by Aviva Investor’s APIA Regional Office Fund. Ben Miller, development director for Crest Nicholson south west, said: “The West Gate building provides an excellent opportunity for Crest Nicholson to deliver an exciting, high specification development within what is arguably one of Bristol’s most stunning 1930’s Art Deco buildings. Our commitment and investment to this project will seek to secure a new lease of life for this prominent building, and we look forward to working closely with Bristol City Council to ensure that the building gets the new lease of life it deserves.” A planning application for the change of use and refurbishment works will be made later this year. The proposals are likely to be one of the first major residential projects to be put forward within the city’s Nelson Street regeneration area, acting as a stimulus for further development in the area.

CITY BUSINESS New Homes in Historic Church There’s been a turnaround for a landmark Portishead church, which has lain vacant for several years. The doors of the Victorian United Reformed Church were closed as a place of worship in 2010 when the congregation faced mounting maintenance bills on the historic building. Saved from disrepair by a North Somerset company specialising in converting redundant properties, the doors will re-open again for the first time this month. Following completion of a bespoke development of six contemporary town houses and two apartments by awardwinning developers Brownfield Green, part of the church is open for public view on 23 November. Renamed The View, the ambitious project, which has retained the fabric and character of the original building, is creating a range of two to five bedroom properties inside the church. Phase 2 of the work will be completed in early 2014. The open house event on 23 November runs from 11am to 3pm. Further details are available from agents Goodman & Lilley on tel: 01275 430440.

Dragons’ Den style club for the city One of the region’s fastest growing investor clubs is expanding into Bristol, as it aims to provide a source of funding for local businesses. The Chelverton Investor Club, which focuses on UK small company investments for high net-worth individuals, is celebrating the move with an exclusive event at Hotel Du Vin on Wednesday 6 November. David Horner, managing director of Chelverton, explains: “From both a fundraiser and investor perspective the timing for these types of investments, with the economic recovery underway, is crucial in terms of sustaining growth and providing compelling, investment opportunities that represent good value for investors over the medium to long-term. We expect to make some £6m-£10m worth of investments in our first year. These investments will be focused exclusively in UK businesses with an enterprise value of between £0.5m-£5m, which is an area long overlooked by private company equity providers, as well as banks. Up to £3m could be invested per company through the club, with each member investing up to a £1m across a range of companies, with a minimum investment of £25,000 in any one company.” For more information on the Chelverton Investor Club or attending its launch event, visit: www.chelvertonic.com


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Trusts and jointly owned property Have you and your partner bought a property where you have contributed unequally to the purchase price? If so, and you intend that unequal contributed to be recognised when you come to sell or one of you moves out, it is well worth spending time now recording your and your co-owner’s intentions in a legally binding document, so that there is less scope for disagreement in the future. In the absence of such an agreement, the courts will have to decide what your intentions were at the outset and if they have changed in the interim. Samantha Piper of solicitors Meade King LLP can help advise: she will explain the issues that need to be considered when making a declaration of trust, which will usually take into account: • The amounts contributed by each party towards the deposit. • A mortgagee’s interest. • Any lump sum payments towards capital or mortgage repayments by any one party to be deemed as additional payments from that party. Declarations of trust can also include: • The amount contributed towards the conveyancing costs by each party. • Any additional sums that are to be deemed as one party’s liability only (e.g. where that party has borrowed more on the mortgage to pay off a loan etc) • A time period for one party to remain at the property if one of you dies or if the relationship breaks down. For advice on making a declaration of trust please call Samantha Piper on 0117 926 4121 or email her at sjp@meadeking.co.uk.

Seeing the wider picture …focusing on the detail Meade King LLP Solicitors 11-12 Queen Square, Bristol, BS1 4NT

WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Tel: 0117 926 4121

www.meadeking.co.uk

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News in Brief

Amy Taylor, director of Just-So Balloons with graphic designer Helen Davies, from For Effect

UWE historians appointed advisers for WWI project

■ Billie-Jean Clothes, the colourful retro shop well known for its eclectic mix of vintage and modern clothing, has announced that it is closing its doors at the end of the year. Owners Billie and John Weston are retiring after 22 happy years of trading on the Gloucester Road. Although Billie and John are retiring they have a few plans up their sleeves so join them on their Facebook page for news of up and coming events.

Puzzling customers Family business Just-So Balloons in Henleaze has created a collection of 1,000-piece Great British Jigsaws of different landscapes across Britain and is donating proceeds to 12 charities including Bristol Oscar (organisation for Sickle Cell Anaemia Research) and Children’s Hospice South West. The jigsaw pictures were taken by Bristol photographer Graham Coleman and include the settings of Avon Calling and Cabot Tower and Brandon Hill in Bristol. Fifty pence from the sale of each jigsaw will go to one of 12 charities. The other charities include Rainbow Trust, Refuge, Missing people, British Institute for Brain Injured Children, Cystic Fibrosis Trust, Dogs for the Disabled, Rapid Response, Dementia UK, Emmaus UK and St Dunstan’s. Purchase from: www.gbjigsaws.co.uk

MOVERS

& SHAKERS The Pod Company’s winning window display

Above, At-Bristol’s John Polatch and Western Power Distribution’s Lian White

■ Limbs & Things – the UK’s leading manufacturer of medical skills training products – has been presented with The Queen’s Award for Enterprise Innovation by Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant Mary Prior. Limbs & Things, known for its world class medical skills training simulators, which it designs and manufactures in its Bristol factory, has been recognised for its innovative contribution to skills training in medicine. Margot Cooper, President of Limbs & Things says: “We feel extremely honoured to have been awarded The Queen’s Award for Enterprise Innovation. It is their sheer dedication, creativity and continuous innovative work of our employees that has ensured our remaining at the forefront of the industry.”

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■ At-Bristol and Western Power Distribution have been working together on a hospital outreach programme for patients and families at the Bristol Royal Children’s Hospital (BRHC) and the project has now been extended until March 2014. The aim of the project is to deliver fun, hands-on science based activities into BRHC’s Play Service, enabling sick children and their families to spend time together in a play environment. Twice a month, two staff from the At-Bristol learning team visit the play centre at the hospital, for sessions lasting two hours, which cater for children of all ages. At-Bristol and Western Power Distribution have been working together on the project since 2010, but the continued funding has allowed the scheme to develop in a new direction, with increased visits to the adolescent ward, as well as some bedside visits where appropriate. For further information, visit: www.at-bristol.org.uk

F

ollowing their involvement in a successful pilot project in the west region, Kent Fedorowich and Charles Booth from UWE Bristol will have roles as national advisers to the researchers of the BBC’s World War One at Fishponds War Memorial Home project. The project will tell the story of the First World War through the people whose lives were transformed – in homes, schools, churches, theatres, streets and factories. These stories are planned to be broadcast regionally and nationally during 2014. The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) is funding researchers to work with broadcast journalists in the BBC regions in England between now and January to source, select and showcase stories related to the First World War. Researchers will advise on the war’s impact on the regions and highlight links with broader national and international events and themes. Kent said: “We are delighted to be in on the ground floor of the project. With the success of the pilot project Charles and I are now national advisers as well as academic consultants for BBC South West.” Charles added: “I would really encourage people who have an interest in public engagement and knowledge exchange to grasp this opportunity to make a difference as far as our understanding of the First World War is concerned.”

Well presented Local gift retailer The Pod Company, located in The Mall, Clifton, has won a national shop window competition organised by leading UK stationery design company Caroline Gardner Publishing. Competition was fierce, with entries from as far away as St Andrew’s in Scotland to Tiverton in Devon. Commenting on the competition, designer Caroline Gardner said: “We were overwhelmed by the response to the window competition and it shows what amazing, creative design skills our high street retailers have. It’s been a challenging time on the high street and our retailers work so hard to keep customers engaged. The results show just what incredible skills they have.” The Pod Company won the top prize of £850 worth of retail stock, along with merchandising units and marketing advice from Caroline Gardner’s PR team. Sian Barker, director of The Pod Company said: “We are huge Caroline Gardner fans and so needed no encouragement to enter the window competition. The colour palettes and designs always seem to sit perfectly in Pod and they have been favourites with our customers for years. We are also lucky to have a number of truly creative people working for us who had great fun working on this!”


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Free Jewellery, Silver & Watch Valuations at Clevedon Salerooms

£3,400

£19,600

£41,500

£7,600

Clevedon Salerooms Specialist Sales have an enviable reputation for selling jewellery, silver and fine watches for the highest prices to bidders located around the globe. On Tuesday 5th Novenber, in time for our pre-Christmas Quarterly Specialist Sale on the 25th November, our Specialist Jewellery and Silver Consultant John Kelly, Fellow of The Gemmological Association, will be providing free verbal no-obligation sale estimates on all jewellery and silver. Watches will be appraised by Marc Burridge. No appointment is necessary.

Free Jewellery Valuations Tues 5th November 9.30am – 5pm

WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

£4,600

Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers The Auction Centre Kenn Road, Kenn Clevedon, BS21 6TT AMPLE FREE PARKING

Tel: 01934 830111 www.clevedon-salerooms.com

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OUT | AND ABOUT

The old roads of Mendip This month’s walk takes in two notable old roads – the Fosse Way, a Roman super-highway running from Lincoln to Exeter, and the 18th-century turnpike road from Bristol to Exeter. Much of the walk follows quiet lanes with good surfaces, although there is a muddy stretch near the start, says Andrew Swift

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he walk starts in Oakhill, where there is an excellent inn. It was visited just over a century ago, in March 1913, by Edward Thomas, a writer who loved the old roads. It was, he wrote, ‘a good inn’, where he had lunch ‘of the best possible fat bacon and bread fried in the fat, for a shilling; and for nothing, the company of a citizen of Wells, a hearty, strong-voiced man who read the Standard over a beefsteak, a pint of cider, and a good deal of cheese ... and praised the stout of Oakhill’. You can still have an excellent lunch at the Oakhill Inn, washed down with cider or local ale (or indeed wine), and, although it will cost rather more than a shilling – 5p in today’s money – it is the perfect place to round off a morning’s exploration of the old roads of Mendip. To get to Oakhill, drive south from Bristol along the A37 for 18 miles, before turning left along the A367 (signposted to Bath). After half a mile you will see the Oakhill Inn, where the walk starts, on the right. Having parked the car, head up the lane beside the Oakhill Inn (ST635472). After 500 metres, opposite Fosse Toll Cottage, turn right along the course of the Fosse Way (ST640741). Soon you are heading up a deep holloway, which curves away from a straight course to circumvent a particularly steep section before levelling out across open country. A tunnel of trees leads to a busy road, which follows the course of a Roman

road from Old Sarum to the lead mines at Charterhouse near Cheddar. Cross it and head into Beacon Hill Wood, where the course of the Fosse Way disappears. One theory is that, after running straight on for a little way, it curved right to avoid a particularly steep declivity, and that is the option we will be taking. Carry on for a few metres before bearing diagonally to the right for about 125 metres, until you come to a broad path (ST636460). Head south along it, following it as curves downhill, passing a couple of boundary markers. The initials on the stones – WMFM – are those of William Melliar Foster-Melliar who owned the woods in the early nineteenth century. They are now owned by the Woodland Trust. From here, the course of the Fosse Way – now a green lane shaded by trees – is clear. Stones in the track indicate it was a well-used road until the development of turnpikes led to its abandonment. When you come to a lane (ST635451), turn right along it for 1,300 metres. At the main road, cross and bear left along the pavement for 75 metres before turning right along a lane (ST624454). This is the old road from Exeter to Bristol, turnpiked in 1753 and abandoned in 1842 when traffic was diverted along the road you have just turned off. After 300 metres, when the lane bears left, carry straight on up the Old Bristol Road. Although abandoned over 170 years ago, and worn down by weather and the passage of farm vehicles, it is a remarkable survival and gives

You can still have an excellent lunch at the Oakhill Inn, washed down with cider or local ale

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TRACKS AND TRAILS: left and above, Beacon Hill Wood; right, the Old Bristol Road

a good idea what roads were like in the latter days of the turnpike era. After 850 metres, by a communication mast, the Old Bristol Road crosses a busy road before carrying on along a lane. About 300 metres along, just past a gate on the right, the lane is crossed by the course of the Roman road from Old Sarum to Charterhouse, but, as you will see if you scan the fields for any trace of it, it has disappeared (ST621469). After passing the entrance to a golf club, turn right along a lane. When you come to the main road, cross with care and carry straight on along a lane. When you come to a crossroads, cross and carry on, and, at a T junction, turn right (ST625477). At the next crossroads, turn right down Galley Batch Lane. At the bottom, turn left along the road. The Oakhill Brewery, which you pass on the right, was where the stout praised by the citizen of Wells was brewed. It is now being converted to housing. Opposite the bottom of Sion Hill, turn right up Dye Lane to return to the Oakhill Inn.■

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FURTHER INFORMATION ■

Distance: 5 miles

Approx time: 2-3 hours

Difficulty: Straightforward, although with muddy stretches near the start and two busy road crossings.

Map: OS Explorer 142

Refreshment stops: The Oakhill Inn serves food daily from 12 to 3pm and from 6pm to 9pm (www.theoakhillinn.com; Tel: 01749 840442)

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AUTHOR | EVENT

INSPIRING A GENERATION Children’s Laureate Malorie Blackman will be appearing at Bristol Grammar School to talk about her new book, Noble Conflict, on 25 November. We grabbed five minutes with her to ask her a few questions about her laureateship and some of her favourite books...

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s Children’s Laureate, Malorie Blackman is a very busy woman these days, appearing at literary events and talking to children in schools all over the country, but it hasn’t stopped her writing, as she says: “Writing keeps me sane!” Malorie published her first book at the age of 28 and has since written more than 60 books for children and young adults, including Pig-Heart Boy (1997), Cloud Bursting (2004) and the award-winning Noughts & Crosses series (2001-2008) in which she overtly addresses racial issues, depicting a world in which black people, or Crosses, are the ruling elite and white people, Noughts, are confined to a minority status, denied legal rights and work in menial jobs. In 2007 she edited Unheard Voices, an anthology of stories and poems to commemorate the bicentenary anniversary of the abolition of the slave trade and in 2009 she contributed to Free, a book of stories celebrating Human Rights. Her latest novel is Noble Conflict, a gripping dystopian thriller.

• What does it mean to be the Children’s Laureate? It’s such an honour to have been asked to be the eighth Children’s Laureate. The wonderful thing about this role is that each appointed author or illustrator can make it their own. • What do you want to achieve in your two years in the role? I really want to be a voice for children’s books, stories and for reading. Reading is so vital. It’s a skill that enriches and enables. My aim for the next two years is simple – more children, reading more. And I believe that one of the fundamental ways of doing this is to encourage children to read for pleasure. • What inspired you to become a writer? A love of stories and reading. I spent most Saturdays during my early years at the library, drinking in fairy stories, myths and legends, classics, contemporary stories, fantasy, science-fiction and anything else I could lay my hands on. I also wrote stories and poems for my own amusement but it never, ever occurred to me as a child or teenager that I could become a published writer. But in my mid 20s, after a few years in computing, I decided that I would make strenuous efforts to become an author. I got about 82 letters from publishers turning down my work before I finally got asked in to speak with editors. And the rest, as they say, is history. • What type of books do you enjoy reading? I read more children’s books than adult books, because I love stories with a strong, imaginative plot and interesting characters. I read The Silver Chair by CS Lewis about 15 times when I was a kid – there’s a part in the story about believing in yourself even if no one else does and that really spoke to me. Some of my favourite books are Holes by Louis Sacher, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Paradise Lost by John Milton and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time by Mark Haddon along with countless others. • What’s your advice to aspiring writers? Try to read as many different types of stories by as many different authors as you can and broaden your reading horizons. Try to get into the habit of writing every day – keeping a diary is an excellent way of doing this. Develop your own style, don’t copy anyone else’s – your own voice is individual and unique so don’t be afraid to use it. Write from the heart as well as the head – write about what makes you angry, what moves you to tears, the things about which you feel passionately. If you feel it when you write, others will feel it when they read. 74 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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• How did you come up with the idea for Noughts & Crosses? I’d been mulling over the idea of writing a story about slavery for quite a while, I wanted to write a story about the legacy of slavery. About how attitudes from way back when, still influence all our lives and the way we think and live today. Race and racism are emotive issues that a number of people are loathe to discuss but I think they should be discussed, no matter how painful. I wanted the society in my book to be viewed from two different points of view (Callum’s and Sephy’s) to show how our perspectives colour our thinking. The adage, ‘you can’t really know someone until you have walked in their shoes’ is, like all clichés, mostly true. That I think was the idea I had in mind when I sat down to write Noughts & Crosses. • Do you think racism is an issue that needs to be addressed in children’s books more? Absolutely! And not just in children’s books. I think a lot of racism comes out of ignorance, and we can start to combat it by showing different cultures, races and religions in story contexts. Stories promote empathy, a sense of being able to see through the eyes of others. I generally make my major characters black because that’s who and what I am and I’m seeking in part to redress an imbalance regarding ethnic diversity in children’s literature that I felt acutely when I was a child, but the ethnic identity of my characters is never the whole story. I try to make my characters real people who are trying to live their lives. • Do you ever worry that teens might struggle with the complex or gritty issues in your books? No! We need to stop underestimating our teens. As a teen that kind of attitude used to drive me nuts. The erroneous belief that I couldn’t understand the nuances of certain grown-up issues because I was just a teen. If we defer the consideration of gritty issues until after the teen years, then we do our teens a huge disservice. If we want mature, responsible teenagers making good decisions about drugs and sex and other issues, then we have to expose them to the complexity of these subjects early enough to make a difference. •What’s it like meeting your fans? Meeting enthusiastic young readers is one of the best things about what I do. When young people tell me that they didn’t think they liked reading until they read one of my books, that always makes my day. ■ An Evening with Children’s Laureate Malorie Blackman, Bristol Grammar School, Monday 25 November, 5pm. Tickets £5, including refreshments. For further information or to book visit: www.bristolgrammarschool.co.uk/events.aspx


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FAMILY | FUN

Take a ride on the Polar Express this winter

Family friendly fireworks at Bristol Zoo

Thrills & spills Use our guide to help plan quality time with your little ones this autumn. From family friendly fireworks and bonfire activities to storytelling and music, there’s something for all ages to enjoy T h e P O l a r Ex p r e s s , d a r t m O O R ra i lwa y, d e vO n, N O ve m b e r – j a n u a r y Families can discover the magic of Christmas aboard The Polar Express this winter. Inspired by the hit Warner Bros. film The Polar Express and book by Chris Van Allsburg, the train rides are set to the film’s soundtrack, where pyjamaclad passengers can relive the magic of the story and see their favourite characters come to life as they are whisked away on a magical round trip. During the journey, the conductor will punch tickets and chefs will serve hot chocolate, while passengers enjoy a sing song and a reading of the book. At the end destination Santa will board the train to greet the children who will be given a special sleigh bell. Advanced booking is required and tickets start from £20 per adult and £15 per child. Tel: 08000 23 23 83 or visit: www.UKPolarExpressRide.com

fa m i l y f r i e n d l y f i r e w O r k s a t B r i s t O l z O O, f r i d a y 1 , Sa t u r d a y 2 & Su n d ay 3 N O ve m b e r Now in its sixth year, Bristol Zoo’s Family Friendly Fireworks will be back for three evenings of family entertainment. Spectacular, low-noise fireworks will light up the zoo, adding a sparkle to Guy Fawkes Night without the loud bangs that might frighten your little ones or the animals. Tickets from: www.bristolzoo.org.uk

B O n f i r e N i g h t F a m i ly f i r e c ra f t , W i l d P l a c e P r O j ec t , S a t u r d a y 2 N Ove m b e r, 1 0 a m – 4p m Spend the day in the woodland learning the art of fire craft; safe places to site a fire, fire construction and matchless fire lighting. Discover how to involve children safely in this 76 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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activity and cook tasty treats over your very own fire. £45 one adult and up to two children or £65 two adults and up to five children. Visit: www.wildplace.org.uk

Ensemble presents a lively concert arranged for this combination of five wind instruments. Box office tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

Se a - H e a r St O r yt e l li n g a t t h e s s G r e a t B R i t a i n, T u e s d ay 5 N O ve m b e r, 1 1 am

A n t a r t i c a a t t h e B r i st O l O l d V i c St u d i O, 2 7 N O ve m b e r – 4 J a n u a r y

There’s no need to book, just turn up with your pre-school little ones and settle down for some maritime tales. Sarah Mooney captivates the imaginations of young visitors with free sessions; mixing classic legends with new twists. Expect whales and angel fish, pirate treasure and stormy seas.

The studio is once again transformed into a wintry wonderland for younger audiences to enjoy, as the Little Bulb Theatre take you on a journey armed with songs, instruments, puppets and plenty of snowy surprises. Box office tel: 0117 987 7877 or visit: www.bristololdvic.org.uk.

W i n t e r W O n d e r la n d a t T h e Ma l l , C r i b bs C a u se wa y, 7 N O ve m b e r – 5 J a n u a r y

St i c k Ma n Tra i l , W e st O n b i r t A r b O r e t u m, 1 D ec e m b e r – 3 1 J a n u a r y

The Mall’s Winter Wonderland is back for another year, offering a great festive day out for all the family to enjoy. The central attraction is the large outdoor ice rink which provides hours of fun for all ages, with a nursery ice rink for younger children and novices where Seal skating aids are available to hire. Children can share their Christmas wishes with Father Christmas in his Enchanted Ice Castle which will perform a musical light display every hour, and afterwards take a ride on the Christmas Train. On Sunday 10 November don’t miss the opportunity to get a closer look at Santa’s reindeer when Santa arrives in his sleigh. Winter Wonderland tickets can be purchased at: www.mallcribbs.com.

d a n c i n g B e a s t s a t t h e P O lk a d O t Pa r t y, St G e O r g e ’ s B r i st O l , Su n d a y 1 7 N O ve m b e r, 6 p m Featuring a witty musical setting of one of Roald Dahl’s Revolting Rhymes, the Galliard

Forestry Commission England has teamed up with popular children’s character Stick Man to create a special adventure trail at Westonbirt Arboretum. The trail, inspired by the Julia © Axel Scheffler Donaldson and Axel Scheffler character, is designed to help children find out more the importance of wood and trees to their daily lives. Children will be able to hunt for clues, write poems, build dens, draw pictures and create their own Stick Man character. To find out more and download free online activity sheets visit: www.forestry.gov.uk/stickman.


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Mum, voiceover artist and BBC Radio Bristol presenter, Faye Dicker, meets the Bristol businesses that make family life easier...

I

t was my mum who introduced me to Farrington’s a couple of years ago. Being a bit of a foodie, she was keen to share the joys of the farm shop with me – so I can blame her for my food bill! Without sounding like I’m about to break into an M&S advert, it’s not just any farm shop – it’s a rather special farm shop and centre of the Farrington story. Farrington Farm Shop is 10 miles south of Bristol in Farrington Gurney, with views over the Mendips. The friendly atmosphere is evident as soon as you drive into the farm; there’s a mini village feel about things with several shops on site, such as Pig Tails hair salon, Fairfield Nurseries, The Pink Prawn Fishmongers, Berry Barn gift shop and Keepers Preloved restored furniture, alongside the substantial farm shop which sells everything you can possibly imagine, from homegrown fruit and veg, artisan bread and cheese to local meat, chutneys and chocolate as well as a café serving up tasty lunches and delicious cakes. You can easily spend an afternoon there effortlessly, just moseying around.

I’ve had that sinking feeling at the thought of wet, cold weather stopping play

But for me, what has the appeal is the fact I can entertain my little one, Jemima, in the on-site Cow-tastic Farm Park and then do my food shopping. If ever there was an excuse to indulge in a farm shop, I have found one. There’s duck racing, welly skittles, animals you can feed, toy tractors to play on and even grass sledges. A blast of fresh air and easily an hour of playing, that toddler energy has expended – leaving me to the important task of shopping. And if those weary legs need a rest, there’s always time for a baby-chino, while sitting at the fish-tank table. Yet like every mum, with winter approaching, I’ve had that sinking feeling at the thought of wet, cold weather stopping play. Not any more, as Farrington’s quite literally has it covered, with the opening of a new soft play barn for juniors, toddlers and babies. And it’s not just any soft play; there’s a guarantee of two hours minimum play and a range of homemade healthy food for adults and children. No chicken nuggets here – well, not unless they’re homemade. They’ve even managed to get Katy Ashworth, from Cbeebies, to do the grand opening this month (impending baby permitting). Farrington’s is a Duchy farm, run by Andy and Tish Jeffery, who took over the tenancy in 1992 – although they have lived there from 1989. It was Tish I spoke to one Saturday morning, she made me a cuppa on the Aga and told me their story. She and Andy moved in with his parents on the farm as newlyweds – an interesting time for any couple to live with their in-laws, but they soon knuckled down. When Tish was pregnant with their first child, she could no longer get on the tractor, so was given a new task of opening a farm shop. Four children later, the farm shop kept going – though she had to admit, with a baby on each hip – it wasn’t easy. No wonder she understands the needs from a parents’ perspective, and the new Playbarn is very much her project. You can’t help but wonder if the Duchy of Cornwall himself might pay a visit with his grandson. You can hear Tish tell the full story on: www.freelancebristolmum.co.uk. ■

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HEALTH | & BEAUTY

FIT & FAB

News in Brief ■ Hypnotherapy is fast becoming one of the most popular complementary therapies, and in Bristol, Solution-focused hypnotherapist and founder of Clifton’s Positive Pathways hypnotherapy practice, Amanda Gazidis can effectively treat a wide range of conditions, including anxiety and stress, depression, addictions and phobias, weight management, OCD, IBS, insomnia, nerves, fertility and childbirth with clinical hypnotherapy. Solution-focused hypnotherapy is a gentle method focussing on the present and emphasising the positive aspects and strengths of the client through trance.It is a highly relaxing therapy which is deeply transformative in a short time. Amanda can be contacted on tel: 07594440949. ■ Bloggs Hair Design on Gloucester Road, established in June 2010 by award-winning young hairdresser Joe Hemmings, has launched a blow dry bar – the first to be opened in the city. The salon offers customers the opportunity to walk in, view a selection of styles and have that look recreated, with their hair washed and styled in around 30 minutes. Perfect for an instant pick-me-up, a remedy for a bad hair day or in preparation for a glamorous night out. Styles range from super sleek to wonderfully wavy, with the blow dry bar service costing from £10. Alternatively customers can choose their favourite celebrity look which the Bloggs team will re-create. “With people working long hours and having tight schedules, a blow dry bar is the ideal place to transform how you look and feel in just 30 minutes,” explains Joe. “Our styling team work quickly and efficiently to create your chosen style leaving you feeling groomed and glamorous.” ■ Children’s Hospice South West (CHSW) is inviting families to don their Santa suits and get in the festive spirit all for a good cause, by running, walking or jogging 2k at the charity’s annual Santas on the Run event on Sunday 15 December at 1pm in the city centre. CHSW has added some extra festive fun to the event along with a new route that will take participants right into the heart of the city centre, with a loop around the St Augustine’s Parade fountains, taking in the Harbourside and Millennium Square. Entry is £10 per adult, £5 for under 16’s and under 3’s go free. Entry includes your Santa suit, medal and treats. Register at: www.chsw.org.uk/santas

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The latest health and beauty news in the city

A new approach to IVF arrives in Bristol

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rofessor Geeta Nargund, Medical Director of IVF Professor clinic Create Health which has pioneered the use of Geeta Nargund Natural and Mild IVF, is opening a clinic in Bristol. “Natural and Mild IVF is carried out using no drugs or minimum of drugs and less invasive treatment,” explains Professor Nargund. “It works with the woman’s natural cycle rather than shutting down her hormones and then trying to force ovaries with large amounts of stimulating hormones as in conventional IVF. “As a result, Natural and Mild IVF is safer and avoids menopausal side-effects and risks associated with conventional IVF, including Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS). It is also cheaper than conventional IVF. We are greatly looking forward to bringing that choice to Bristol.” One happy patient of Professor Nargund’s work is Mandy Bond, from Portishead, who thought she would never be a mother after she and her husband Tim spent over £50,000 on conventional high stimulation IVF that failed. Then a friend told them about Create Health and Mandy was soon pregnant with Taylor, who was born in May 2012. “Prof Nargund never gave up on us,” says Mandy. “I didn’t have to take high doses of hormones nor was I subjected to continuous examinations and tests. Being with Create Health was a world away from other clinics.” For further information visit: www.createhealth.org ■

HEART TO HEART DOCTOR

Cardiac problems are a major cause of concern for many, significantly increasing with advancing age. Anxiety is therefore understandable when people have new symptoms such a palpitation or chest pain or learn that a relative has a heart attack. They may be told they have potentially a similar risk and are advised or request a referral to a cardiologist. When you chose a specialist there are many factors to consider and patients rely on their GP or often a personal recommendation. In addition to proven expertise in their field of practice, patients value a good bedside manner, the time available with the doctor and continuity. In the hectic world we now live in, time and continuity are in short supply but Bristol-based Dr Forbat has been innovative in overcoming these by using telemedicine and the Doc@Home system, which involves collecting data as necessary that is entered on a device that communicates via mobile chip technology to the internet. Dr Forbat reviews all results twice daily and more often as required if there are urgent matters arising from results, or if the patient contacts him with a symptom that needs review. Pulse rate, blood pressure, weight, ECG and other physiological parameters are correlated with questions tailored to suit each individual’s condition to meet changes in circumstances and medications. Dr Forbat has experience managing patients in the UK since 2008, using telemedicine from wherever he is, and patients find his service easy to use. Dr Forbat is now working exclusively as a private consultant cardiologist and has clinics at The Spire Hospital, Nuffield hospital and Litfield House. He can see patients outside his scheduled clinic times and do home visits on request. For further information visit: www.privatecardiologyservices.com

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY: Zumba fundraiser

Get involved in a charity Zumba event at Hengrove Leisure Centre on Saturday 2 November from 3pm-6pm. It promises to be lots of fun with dancing, a section for children and a cake sale, face painting and a luxury raffle, all in aid of the Brams centre at Frenchay as well as research on medicine for people suffering from multiple sclerosis. The tickets are £6, children free, and can be purchased on the day. The event is being held by Lauren Humphries who says: “Even those who don’t want to dance are welcome to come along to show support or cheer along the

Zumba. Every little bit of support is appreciated. I have the condition myself and although it can be a struggle at times I am determined to raise awareness and prove that people can always join in even if just for a few minutes.”

Pampering day

The Beauty Event is hosting an afternoon of tea and beauty treatments at Berwick Lodge on Sunday 24 November, 2pm – 5.30pm. Tickets are £25 including a treatment, afternoon tea and a talk from personal stylist, Karen Lowe. Book on tel: 07794 070 812


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PERFECT SCENTS Dr Lance Forbat BSc (Hons) MBBS St. Thomas’ MD London, FRCP (London/Glasgow)

Floral or woody, spicy or fresh – whatever fragrance you choose, make sure it reflects your personality and individual style. We asked Lisa Piddington from Harvey Nichols Bristol what to look for when picking perfumes

W

hen Marilyn Monroe declared she wore nothing in bed except Chanel No5 the fragrance became a best-seller across the globe. Today, 60 years after the actress’s breathless confession, it remains the world’s topselling perfume, with a bottle sold every 30 seconds. While Monroe will be forever associated with the famous fragrance, many women struggle to find their signature scent. Either they are unsure which smells suit them best or stick with the same one year in year out, regardless of time of year or even time of day. With the vast array of bottles on the shelves, it can be hard picking the right one for you. After all, perfume is a very personal choice and just because one works for a friend, it doesn’t follow that it will work on you too. Because the notes mix with the natural oils on your skin they can smell very different from one person to the next. You need to find which category of fragrance suits you best – try a variety of floral, citrus, Oriental, woody or marine aromas to find your favourite. Remember though, our noses can only take in a maximum of three smells only so don’t be tempted to try a whole range of perfumes in one go. Leave it for ten minutes then have a good sniff to get the true fragrance. ■

®

Dr. Forbat practises exclusively as a private cardiologist. He can see you in clinics at the Spire, Nuffield and Litfield House. He has wide clinical experience offering a unique service for patients using telemedicine. Detailed, illustrative and candid explanations are provided with a friendly, approachable manner. He visits the home or workplace if required for clinical or personal preference. He has his own ECG and cardiac ultrasound (ECHO) equipment so he ensures the same standards and easy availability of test results.

A personalised service from “Heart2Heart” Doctor includes • Managing patients seen at clinics in different parts of the UK, to accommodate their travel plans and maintain continuity of care • Telemedicine to diagnose, treat and then titrate medication (e.g. for blood pressure, angina, heart failure, arrhythmia) including trips abroad • Telemedicine to keep patients out of hospital and enabling early discharge

www.privatecardiologyservices.com

POSITIVE PATHWAYS

Hypnotherapy

(Solution Focused Clinical Hypnotherapy) Clifton-based Practice.

Hypnotherapy can help with; Stress and anxiety, Depression,Addictions and Phobias, Smoking, OCD,Anger management,Weight management, Fertlity, Childbirth, Children's issues, Performance enhancement and Confidence issues.

Contact Amanda Gazidis (DHP) AfSFH Ba (Hons) on 07594440949 or at agazidis@yahoo.co.uk to book a FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION

From top: Acqua di Parma Magnolia Nobile, £68 (50ml); DSquared2 Potion EDP, £55 (50ml); Lanvin Me EDP, £33 (30ml); Roberto Cavalli EDP, £35 (30ml); Gucci by Gucci EDP, £62 (50ml); Tom Ford Sahara Noir EDP, £100 (50ml); Marc Jacobs Honey EDP, £50 (50ml). All fragrances featured are available from the Ground Floor Beauty Hall at Harvey Nichols

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www.prohealthcare.co.uk

Calling all trained nurses 0117 973 6161

We are looking for registered nurses who would like the opportunity to earn between ÂŁ28 and ÂŁ36 per hour. We are now recruing!

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Stockists

Main stockists of REDKEN

Tel: 0117 968 2663 • www.carlohairandbeauty.co.uk 6 Rockleaze Rd, Sneyd Park, Bristol BS9 1NF

Do you have recent acute hospital experience in surgery, medicine or specialies? We have clients who would appreciate your skills.

We are a friendly, supporve and professional agency run exclusively by nurses and have been helping nurses ďŹ nd work since 2002. We oer outstanding rates of pay and can provide training and advice.

ProHealth Care Call us now!

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The nursing agency run by nurses, for nurses. WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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CITY | HEALTH

Caring about the future Samantha Coleman went along to visit Nuffield Health’s new Chesterfield Hospital in Clifton and discovered an impressive building boasting the very latest cutting-edge technology as well as five star service for patients

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hen it was announced last year that work was to start on the former Chesterfield Hospital site on Clifton Hill, to build a new, state-of-the-art Nuffield Health hospital, questions were raised by many local residents about how the healthcare charity would protect the Grade II-listed Georgian villa, Clifton Court, which fronts the site. But with permission from English Heritage, Nuffield Health has sympathetically refurbished the grand old building and restored it back to its former glory, and behind this magnificent façade, it has built a brand new hospital which is barely visible from the road on Clifton Hill. Last month saw the official opening of the new Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital: The Chesterfield, after over a year of building work and a £20 million investment, safeguarding 100 local jobs and creating 50 new positions. On 14 October the ribbon was cut by the Lord Mayor of Bristol, Faruk Choudhury, and the doors of the hospital were opened, introducing the people of Bristol to a premier healthcare facility that provides treatment by some of the country’s top surgeons, delivering five star service and offering the very best in patient care.

The creation of the new Nuffield Health hospital has seen the construction of a four-storey hospital building in the footprint of the previous Chesterfield Hospital alongside the restoration of the Georgian villa in which the walls have been repainted, fireplaces maintained, historic ceiling plasterwork reconditioned, new sash windows installed and damp and mould damage treated. Local residents can rest assured that nothing has been taken out of the old building or destroyed, everything has just been touched up and re-established. The Georgian villa is now home to conference rooms and administration offices for the new hospital, while the newly built 30-bed private hospital consists of deluxe, single en-suite patient rooms, a three bed ITU, seven pod day-case unit and 12 consulting rooms, in addition to three digital operating theatres plus a top diagnostic centre including MRI, CT, Digital Mammography and High Definition Endoscopy. The hospital calls itself a ‘centre of excellence for minimally invasive keyhole surgery’ and is the first fully digital hospital in the south west. The innovative equipment used in the high-tech digital theatres will allow surgeons to have complete control over every aspect of their surgery with all necessary information at their fingertips including fast access to patient X-

Bristol has some of the world’s leading surgeons and this new hospital allows them to showcase their skills to the very best

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CITY | HEALTH

CUTTING EDGE: left, an artist’s drawing of the new Nuffield Health Hospital: The Chesterfield, featuring the Clifton Court Georgian villa at the front of the site on Clifton Hill; above, clockwise from left, there are three digital operating theatres in the new hospital featuring the very latest innovative technology, which means operation times are reduced; there is an abundance of light and space in all the rooms with contemporary, comfortable decor adding to the relaxed and friendly environment; the new hospital was officially opened last month by the Lord Mayor of Bristol, Faruk Choudhury and hospital director, Ashley Livesey

rays and files. They even have the ability to pre-set the theatre to their own needs, which means operation times are reduced, as well as the length of time a patient is under anaesthetic which will cut the length of time patients need to spend in hospital and help speed recovery. On top of this, the digital theatres include extra screens for increased visibility for the surgeon during operations, as well as image streaming and conference call settings to allow access to other specialists and the potential for remote learning and training. For instance, live surgery can be transmitted from the new operating rooms to the hospital’s consulting and meeting rooms in the Georgian villa – a facility that enables Nuffield Health to access additional medical experts from across the world to remotely view surgery and provide a unique training opportunity. It is obvious that this impressive hospital is at the very forefront of developing technology in healthcare, and is sure to increase Bristol’s status as a city of innovation. Ashley Livesey, the hospital’s director, says: “The Chesterfield Hospital provides a fantastic new medical facility for the city, and the integrated theatres ensure that it is seen as a centre of excellence in minimally invasive surgery and technology. The digital theatre will allow patients to undergo treatment with the most technologically advanced equipment available, providing the optimal solution for our surgeons and further enhancing our high standards of patient care. We have combined world-class surgeons with the best of patient care from matron-led teams and the latest medical technology to ensure we can provide a service that is second to none. “Bristol has some of the world’s leading surgeons and this new hospital allows them to showcase their skills to the very best.” The hospital’s dedicated team of expert consultants and physiotherapists are highly experienced and specialise in a wealth of different treatment areas, including: orthopaedics, neurospinal surgery, sports injury, weight loss surgery, endoscopy, cosmetic surgery, ENT, urology, pain management and dentistry. The Chesterfield is a private hospital that offers a consultant-led service – all patients will see the same consultant, usually an expert in their field, from their initial consultation right through to their follow-up appointments post surgery, making the patient feel relaxed and at ease before, during and after their surgery. Indeed, the patients’ experience is very much at the forefront of the design and offerings of this new hospital, from the latest technology used in surgery, to the general feel and ambience of the place – it’s enough to rival some of the city’s best hotels. Outside the hospital the trees and wildlife have been protected, including the much-loved sweet chestnut tree. Mirrored pools and pretty flower beds lead you to the entrance and as you walk into the hospital you’ll not find a generic waiting area and reception, but

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instead, a welcoming and relaxed meet and greet area with the healthcare charity’s signature lime green chairs and an abundance of space and light. With an emphasis on relaxation and comfort, the private ensuite bedrooms are contemporary and spacious, boasting WiFi, a flatscreen satellite TV and views over the garden and its large leafy trees. Food is provided by a top quality, on-site catering team with tasty, nutritious meals delivered to your room, and to your guests if they require it. Or, on a lovely sunny day, guests and outpatients can enjoy sitting on the top floor terrace which boasts far-reaching views across pastoral Dundry and beyond. All the rooms are bright and uplifting and there is a striking piece of photography on every wall, a project by local photography students. Patients can also benefit from concierge services and valet parking. There’s not much missing from this five-star service. Ashley says: “This project has seen us take our 50 year-strong experience of providing high quality healthcare in Bristol, build on it and create a hospital which offers truly inspiring and innovative patient care. What has made this project all the more exciting, is that by redeveloping our Chesterfield site – where we first set-up home in 1961 – we have retained an important piece of treasured Bristol heritage and given it a new, modern lease of life.” The Georgian villa that fronts the site is one of the oldest buildings in Clifton, and was designed by renowned architect William Halfpenny. It was built between 1742 and 1743 for Bristol brass magnate Nehemiah Champion and his wife Martha. Over the years the building has been used as a family home, a nursing home, a WW2 army base and a hospital. It became known as The Chesterfield in 1934 when it was purchased by Chesterfield Place Ltd and converted into a nursing home. The name stuck and continued to be used when it was taken over by Nuffield Health in 1961 and established as one of the healthcare charity’s first hospitals. In 2008 the old Chesterfield hospital closed and everything was transferred to St Mary’s Hospital in upper Byron Place in Clifton with the intention always to develop the Chesterfield site. All operations from the St Mary’s Hospital site have now been transferred to the new Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital: The Chesterfield and the St Mary’s hospital site is now closed and has been sold, with plans for it to become student accommodation. ■ For further information about the new hospital visit: www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol NOVEMBER 2013

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How does Acupuncture actually work? By Henry McGrath, Academic Director and Acupuncture Course Director at CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine).

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cupuncture is the insertion of tiny needles into certain points on the body, for the treatment of illness. It has been practised for over 2000 years in China, and it is becoming ever more popular in the West. It is estimated that over one million treatments are given per year in the UK. There is increasingly good evidence that acupuncture can treat a wide range of conditions successfully. The World Health Organisation website lists 28 conditions for which acupuncture has been “proved through controlled trials to be an effective treatment”, including rhinitis, headache, high blood pressure, lowered immunity, rheumatoid arthritis, sciatica, back pain, and knee pain. It lists another 60 conditions for which some “therapeutic effect has been shown”, including asthma, infertility, insomnia, and pre -menstrual syndrome. Thousands of western doctors and physiotherapists have undergone some training in acupuncture. Despite this, many people are still sceptical about acupuncture because it seems to make no sense that the insertion of tiny needles can treat disease. So how does acupuncture actually work? Part of the answer is that the insertion of acupuncture needles causes the release of chemicals called “endorphins”. (This word is short for “endogenous morphine”. Endogenous means it is produced inside the body, and the word morphine comes from the Greek God of sleep, Morpheus.) There are many kinds of endorphins in the human body, each with a different function. Some reduce pain, some promote the healing of damaged tissue, some promote good sleep, some calm anxiety, and some play a role in hormone production. So, we can see how acupuncture can be used to treat many conditions. Recent scientific investigations have given us more clues. Using an MRI scanner, it has been shown that the shallow insertion of needles at specific points causes increased activity in the pain control centres of the brain. However, what the neuroscientists found really interesting and surprising, was that if the needles are inserted deeper into the skin, and manipulated until the patient feels a tingling around the needle, the pain control areas become less active (you can see this remarkable experiment on You Tube). This would explain why experienced practitioners get better results than novices, as getting the tingling sensation is an acquired skill. One study showed that acupuncture caused changes in the brain which promoted stroke recovery. In this experiment, normal acupuncture was compared to “sham” acupuncture, where needles are deliberately inserted in the wrong points. Only the correct acupuncture had the desired effect. According to Chinese medicine, energy, or “qi”, gathers in certain points near the surface of the body, and flows along channels called 88 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Henry McGrath

“meridians”. It has been speculated that this “qi” is a very low level of electrical impulse, and indeed acupuncture points and channels have been found to be areas of low electrical resistance. When a person is ill, the electrical activity at the acupuncture points changes from what it normally is. The insertion of needles helps to return the electrical activity of the acupuncture point to its normal level. Experiments have been done where substances have been injected into acupuncture points, and have been observed to move along the acupuncture channels. So, there is mounting evidence that acupuncture has real health benefits, and that it has a scientific basis of action.

Attend one of these FREE CNM events in Bristol Thursday 7th November 6.30pm-8.30pm CNM Open Evening including a talk by Henry McGrath on ‘How Acupuncture really works’. Plus a chance to find out more about training with CNM Bristol for a career in Naturopathic Nutrition or Naturopathic Acupuncture.

Thursday 14th November 6pm-7pm Talk and Demonstration by Neil Kingham on 'Chinese Acupuncture’.

Thursday 28th November 5.30pm-6.30pm Talk by Henry McGrath on 'How Does Acupuncture Work?'

For info on venues and to reserve your place: 01342 410 505 info@naturopathy-uk.com

www.naturopathy-uk.com (CNM’s next short course in Nutrition starts in Bristol on 6th November. Enrol and get a free Riverford Organic veg box!)


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INTERIORS INSIDER Be inspired by this season’s must-haves for the home

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FURNITURE MEETS FASHION Surely this is the most opulent and theatrical sofa you’ve seen this season? French Fashion designer Christian Lacroix has brought a splash of colour to Sofa Workshop with his Butterfly Parade Lagoon fabric, pictured here on the Grande Dame large sofa, priced from £2,799. The exciting world of Christian Lacroix couture has been translated into fabric with the most wonderful effect and will add style and colour to your room in an instant. Pop into Sofa Workshop on Whiteladies Road or visit: www.sofaworkshop.com.

TOADVERTISETEL: 0117 9742800

■ Get into the spirit of Movember with these fun Sass & Belle moustache egg cups, £6 from Debenhams

■ Create a cosy Nordic-style setting in your home for the festive season using natural fabrics, knitted throws, candlelight and earthy, wooden furniture. Take inspiration from the homeware collection at Next, pictured left, with these red check lambswool cushions, £14; matching throw, £40; red stag lantern, £8, and the wooden easel floor lamp, £20. 90 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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LIGHTING SPECIALIST

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HOMES | ON SHOW

VISIONS OF GRANDEUR Enjoy a Downton Abbey style of life in this charming Grade II listed property set in the extensive and exotically planted grounds of Barrow Court, writes Marianne Swinkels

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llow yourself a decent chunk of time to stroll round the garden of this particularly prestigious plot. An hour should do it nicely, though you’d be wise to double that if you wanted to loiter and take in the far-reaching views. Or sit for a while in a sheltered nook, savouring a sublime ‘as far as the eye can see is mine’

moment. And it could be all yours. Rarely on the market, this rather divine property, once part of a former out-of-town convent, offers a real Downton Abbey style take on life, right here in our Bristol neck of the woods. Forget Lady Mary and all those other upstairs Crawleys and downstairs Bates et al lot. Here is the chance to live like a little lord in your very own Grade II-listed gem, without a lottery-winning price tag – and without all those show-worthy shenanigans to contend with. This rural and private pied a terre promises classy living of a different sort in the extensive and exotically planted grounds of Barrow Court, Barrow Gurney; a very grand and secluded haven just half a dozen miles from the city centre. It is in this splendid country setting that you’ll find Number 7, a charming one-off, and one of the smallest of 18 handsome residences within what was once an enormous ancestral pile. If you’re considering making a home here, it’s worth digging through the archives to unearth a little history. Records go way back to the 13th century Benedictine convent which was founded here and which, following Henry VIII’s Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1536, was converted into a private mansion. Its modest sales price of £31 would now barely buy a decent Bristol brunch for two. You can sense the centuries of changing circumstances, alterations and

additions as the main residence passed through the hands of several notable local families. It was the wealthy Gibbs, then also the owners of neighbouring Tyntesfield and huge swathes of land hereabouts, which last put their stamp on the overall fabric of the property, saving it from decay. The so-called ‘richest commoners’ of their times, they cannily built their fortune on the trade of guano fertiliser – South American sea bird droppingsand were aptly remembered in this amusing Victorian music hall ditty: ‘William Gibbs made his dibs; Selling the turds of foreign birds.’ What was less sung about is the family cash which helped his sons to largely regenerate and rebuild the then fading Jacobean house and adjoining church and turn the court’s own fortunes around. It was also one of the Gibbs boys who handed famous garden architect Inigo Thomas the task of re-designing the grounds. And a grand job they did of it all. It was not until the late 1970s that Barrow Court was sold to a developer and tastefully divided into separate dwellings, effectively giving non-gentry folk a look-in on this property for the first time in generations. And what a look I had, invited as I was to take tea and a turn in the grounds. If you go to view, drive past the walled estate, deer park and woods that encircle Barrow Court, through the wrought iron gates and up the tree lined drive which grants glimpses of the grandeur ahead. Park up by the splendidly old parish church which sits in the grounds, cross by the magnificent gabled main house entrance, swing past the tennis courts into a flagstone alley of terraced stone houses, covered walkways, front garden plots and voila! Surely, a suitable setting for another great period film? Charming, authentic, it is location, location, location which serves this property so well. Spread over three floors, Number 7 was once part of a

Charming, authentic, it is location, location, location which serves this property so well

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HOMES | ON SHOW

Jacobean wing of the main house in the Gibbs days. The ground floor level pantry of yesteryear now serves as kitchen and dining room; the large first level living room and top floor double bedrooms boast mullioned and leaded windows, beams, family crests and original stone fireplaces – enough internal features to keep both heritage and atmosphere alive. Buy into this and you are buying into far more than a cosy section of a grand country house. You are gaining entry to a National Trust style living environment, without the need to ever pay the admission price. This is everyday access to a home with a backdrop of gentility, without the worry and expense of running a vast estate. History without histrionics. What can be better than that? And this will strike you most if you sally out round the communal grounds to take it all in. The formal and compartmented gardens of turf, topiary, stone and water, much shaped by an 1890s design fashion which rubbished the informal and naturalistic, include plantings of box hedges, yews and lime avenues and scores of raised flower beds; open out to lawned terraces and give way to an arboretum and spinney which harbour some 60 rare and exotic species of trees. And a poem in stone with its array of gazebos, follies, mock temple, ornamental sundial, statues, urns and walled arches. Gardens one could happily pass the time of day in. Or the time of year come to that. For in this garden of all seasons, the passing of time and the ageing of mankind, is dramatically represented by twelve Daughters of the Year outdoor sculpted busts on raised pillars, each female face depicting childhood to old age through the January to December months. Should you fall for Number 7, worry not that this place seems best suited to a Sir Titchmarsh or a Monty Don. Dig in if you wish, but this personal and well maintained parkland can be all yours without having to pick up a spade or own a mower. You might welcome an armchair though. ■

PROPERTY PROFILE: Where: 7 Barrow Court, Barrow Gurney BS48 3RP What: Grade II-listed residence forming part of the original Barrow Court mansion, in extensive grounds including formal gardens and woodland, with country views to Tyntesfield and Long Ashton. Price: Offers invited between £450,000 – £500,000 The spec: Three storeys, kitchen/dining room, first floor living room, 2 double bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Agents: Hydes of Bristol, 1 West Mall, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4BH Contact: Tel: 01179 731516, email: post@hydes.co.uk www.hydes.co.uk

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203 Gloucester Road, Bishopston, Bristol BS7 8NN

For a preview of the showroom search "Natural Born Flooring" on Google, visit their website at www.naturalbornflooring.co.uk or call 0117 942 7829. 94 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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We go over the top to transform your kitchen!

TEL: 0117 937 3361 www.quartz-lite.com 96 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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MULCH ADO ABOUT PRUNING Get the garden straight for winter with a timely pruning session that will leave you with a virtuous rosy glow, says Jane Moore

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ose and clematis are the two pruning jobs that are guaranteed to get many gardeners scratching their heads in befuddlement. You can happily forget about clematis for a few more months as they’re not due for pruning until February. But get your rose pruning out of the way before winter sets in and not only will the garden look nice and tidy but you’ll feel that rosy glow of virtue for doing a serious bit of gardening in November.

and smaller, neater shrubs like Gertrude Jekyll or Charlotte by about a quarter. Not quite enough, you may think, but it’s enough to stop them flailing about in the wind. Come spring I can whizz around and take a bit more off, cutting back to a nice healthy sprouting bud in March or April next year.

A cut above Always make sure your secateurs, loppers and pruning saw are nice and sharp before you start. Start by removing any dead, damaged or diseased parts of the plant. There are nearly always some stems that have died back and these should be cut back to the base or to the healthy part of the stem. Make your cut clean and tidy and cut to just above an outward facing bud. Some say make the cut sloping away from the bud but I usually cut the stems flat without suffering any problems.

Shrub roses Look at the books and they will tell you that this is a job for the spring which it is and it isn’t. Confused? Me too, but all I can do is tell you what works for me. Years of windblown, rocked and almost uprooted roses has taught me that a thorough prune in autumn is so worthwhile. It has definitely saved several of my roses from premature death and others from looking decidedly dog eared. Here in the relatively balmy south I feel we can get away with it – if I move to the Ridings of Yorkshire I may have to reconsider my strategy. I follow all the usual criteria – removing dead, diseased and damaged wood first. Then any crossing stems are tackled until I end up with a nice open, goblet-shaped shrub. Finally I reduce the height of the stems, taking the larger, vigorous varieties such as Falstaff down by about a third 98 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Climbers This is the main November job and is the one that most people shy away from. Keep in mind that you’re aiming for a nice even fan-shaped plant once you’ve finished and you won’t go far wrong. Start in the usual way – removing any dead, diseased and dying branches. Next tie in any new shoots and renew ties on older branches so that they’re well spaced and fanned out from the base. If you have plenty of new shoots, you can cut out any really old branches that are past their best as this will encourage new shoots next year. Finally prune back side shoots and branches growing from the main framework to two or three buds, trimming off completely any that are weedy and growing against the wall or fence.

Ramblers These really shouldn’t need too much pruning except to keep them within bounds and keep them healthy. If the plant is getting out of hand, you can chop back a few of the old woody

branches to the base to stimulate new shoots which can be tied in as they grow. Roses in this group include Albertine (pictured inset), Félicité Perpétue (pictured above) and The Garland.

Planting November is a great time to plant roses – either bare root plants or containerised ones. It’s open to argument which is the best – I’ve had some marvellous bare root plants that are way bigger and with more root than their potted cousins but I’ve also had some seriously ropey plants from a supplier who should know better. My general rule of thumb is to plant bare root in autumn and opt for nicely grown containerised plants in spring. When planting make sure it’s a nice big, deep hole which is back-filled with compost and/or well rotted manure mixed with a generous scoop of bone meal. Roses are greedy blighters and will love you if you get them off to a good start. Prune back any wildly unkempt roots and spread the roots in the hole, covering them with a layer of soil/compost/manure mix and firming in with a boot. Repeat until the hole is filled, making sure you get the ‘graft union’ or knobbly crown just beneath soil level. Now wait for spring.

And finally… Once the pruning and planting is done, finish off with a nice top dressing mulch of something. I like to use our own garden compost, freshly dug out from the heap, as it looks great and will be drawn down into the soil gradually through the winter months. You can use bark chips, wellrotted manure or even potting compost but a nice mulch finishes the job properly. ■ Suppliers: David Austin Roses,Wolverhampton. Tel: 01902 376300. www.davidaustinroses.com. Peter Beales Roses, Attleborough, Norfolk. Tel: 01953 454707. www.classicroses.co.uk. Jane Moore is the award-winning head gardener at the Bath Priory Hotel. Follow her on Twitter @janethegardener.


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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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erfectly situated in one of Clifton’s most sought after locations, this classic Grade II listed townhouse is beautifully presented with tasteful décor, wonderful retained features and an abundance of natural light. There are five floors in total which offer a significant amount of living space. The lower ground floor could provide self contained accommodation for either a dependant relative or tenant. At present the house is in full use by the owners as a family home. In brief the accommodation comprises: Hall floor: Sitting room, family kitchen, cloakroom. First floor: Full width first floor drawing room, study/family room, cloakroom. Upper floors: Master bedroom with en suite shower room, four further bedrooms, family bathroom and separate shower room. Lower ground floor: Family/play room, study/bedroom, shower room, kitchen/utility room. Vaulted storage. There is an elegant formal garden approach at the front of the house and a good sized, enclosed walled garden at the rear. A double garage is available by separate negotiation. This stylish Clifton home is for sale with agents Bristol estate agents Knight Frank. Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

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45 APSLEY ROAD CLIFTON • Sought-after Clifton location • 6 bedrooms • Potential for self contained lower ground floor • Delightful enclosed rear gardens • Retained features

Guide Price: £1,250,000


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news and market comments at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk 2 BEAUFORT ROAD, CLIFTON Stunning office headquarters of 5,715 sq ft with 13 car spaces. Mix of contemporary open plan offices and fine period rooms.

(0117) 934 9977

SUPERB INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Do you need a better return on your money? Two business/industrial units fully let until January 2018 to established tenant. UNIT 1 – Rent £8,500 pax. Price £96,000. UNIT 2 – Rent £12,500 pax. Price £140,000.

FOR SALE – BROAD STREET, BS1

6 LITFIELD PLACE, CLIFTON

4,000 sq ft clinic/office building with residential consent for student flats.

A stunning Merchants House with consent for office use and as a single dwelling – c. 10,000 sq ft.

£450,000

Guide £1.775m.

SHOWROOM UNIT ALSO WITH OFFICE/ RESTAURANT USE – BS1

CLIFTON VILLAGE SHOP COMING SOON….

Busy trading site with 1,000’s of office workers above/close by.

Situated in a prime Clifton Village location, a self-contained lock up shop soon to become available.

NEW LEASE.

TO LET.

HENLEAZE ROAD – SHOP

RIVERSIDE, ST ANNES Modern industrial unit of 5,112 sq ft (incl 1,456 sq ft offices).

Large shop of c. 800 sq ft, formerly a beauty salon in popular Henleaze pitch.

Excellent Central location.

New lease - £15,000 per annum, exclusive.

• • • • Julian Cook

Jayne Rixon

Andrew Oliver

Finola Ingham

FRICS

MRICS

MRICS

MRICS

Burston Cook NOV.indd 1

Sales /Lettings Acquisitions advice Valuations Landlord & tenant

To rent.

• • • •

Rent reviews Development advice Investments Dilapidations

(0117) 934 9977 18/10/2013 11:43


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Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

REDLAND guide £975,000

A rare opportunity. Impressive large Victorian period semi-detached family house, big elegant rooms, 6 bedrooms, 3 receptions, 3 bathrooms’ plus extensive basement rooms, off street parking for 3 vehicles, south westerly facing rear garden. Ideal location near the Downs & the nearby Redland Green School AFP. EPC: E.

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk

124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP

SNEYD PARK guide £1,250,000

A handsome & impressive 5 bedroom, 5 reception room detached Victorian period family house with a south facing rear garden, off street parking and garage; generously proportioned throughout & retaining many period features; an excellent family house over 3 large floors - offers extensive and flexible accommodation which could alternatively be adapted to provide a selfcontained annexe. EPC: E

In a coveted position this attractive & elegant 5 bedroom, 3 reception Victorian period family town house has direct views over Durdham Down along with civilised & generously proportioned accommodation & delightful gardens to the front & rear (the latter is 78ft long). EPC: D

WESTBURY PARK guide £975,000

An elegant and imposing 5 bedroom, 3/4 reception grade II listed detached period residence with roomy & flexible accommodation arranged over 4 floors; private walled rear garden & storage garage (with potential). Discreet favoured location near the Downs & Whiteladies Road. EPC: E

REDLAND guide £875,000

A fine elegant 5/6 bedroom, 3 reception, 3 ‘bathroom’Victorian period semi-detached family house with lots of space & character, delightful front & rear gardens & garage. Enviable location within Redland Green School AFP. An elevated position in a friendly neighbourly community with easy access to the Downs, Whiteladies Road & much more. EPC: F

STOKE BISHOP guide £780,000

Within Redland Green School AFP - a fine 5/6 bedroom, 2/3 reception, 3 ‘bathroom’ 1920’s period family house with charming & undemanding west facing rear garden inc gated access to garage. Comfortable civilised atmosphere, a lovely home. Pleasant front views over the courts of Redland Tennis Club and beyond. EPC: D

REDLAND guide £775,000

An attractive & charming 4 bedroom, 2 reception 1920’s period semi-detached family house with good gardens & a large garage; a welcoming property with a homely atmosphere. Well located – only a short walk away from the local Henleaze Road shops with Waitrose & the wide open spaces of the Downs only a little further afield. EPC: E

An outstanding large traditionally styled 5 bedroom, 4 reception, 3 ‘bathroom’ (2 en suite) detached family residence in an exclusive location with double garage, off street parking and lovely 51ft x 37ft rear garden. Generous accommodation full of light and space with a civilised atmosphere, prestigious location in a neighbourly community. EPC: D

REDLAND guide £825,000-£850,000

Professional, Reliable, Successful

HENLEAZE guide £695,000


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36 High Street, Portishead call: 01275 430440 email:

St Marys Road, Portishead

Guide Price

£575,000

An exceptional four double bedroom detached family home extensively renovated to offer generous accommodation & open-plan living areas throughout. Affording stunning Gordano Valley views, the downstairs flows to a high quality fitted 20ft kitchen/dining room with direct garden access, which serve as the crowning feature to the property with additional tiered seating areas & direct woodland.

g in m n o C Soo

sales@goodmanlilley.co.uk www.goodmanlilley.co.uk

Redcliffe Bay, Portishead

Guide Price £475,000

Charlcombe Rise, Portishead

Guide Price £465,000

A modern four/five bedroom detached family home situated in a commanding position with stunning Channel views towards the Welsh coastline. In brief: first floor living room with balcony, sitting room/bedroom 5, spacious kitchen/ dining/family room & utility room. Outside: a good sized rear garden, large driveway & garage. Viewing recommended & No Onward Chain. EPC Band C.

HoNew m es

The View, Woodhill Road

Guide Prices from

£265,000

We are delighted to announce our sole agency for the marketing of The View development, created by Brownfield Green. A beautiful & sensitive conversion of the old United Reformed Church, this bespoke development of 6 town houses and 2 duplex apartments will benefit from allocated parking & contemporary style interiors whilst retaining unique historical features. Viewing is essential.

A stunning light & airy four bedroom detached family home benefitting from far reaching Bristol Channel views towards the Welsh Coastline. In brief, this property comprises of: a 25ft living room with additional private sun terrace, 28ft kitchen/family room, landscaped rear garden and double garage. EPC Band C.

To arrange a viewing at your earliest convenience, call us on 01275 430440 or visit us at www.goodmanlilley.co.uk


www.maggsandallen.co.uk

0117 949 9000 60 Northumbria Drive, Henleaze, Bristol, BS9 4HW

UNDER OFFER

HarbOursIDe

£649,000

Wonderful waterfront townhouse that enjoys sweeping views of the floating harbour from the SS Great Britain to the Industrial museum with a backdrop of Cabot tower and Brandon Hill. This innovatively designed property offers a great opportunity for those wanting a City living lifestyle in unique surroundings. The ground floor provides a modern kitchen, complete with granite work tops and a picture window overlooking the harbour. This leads into a wonderfully light dining room, with feature double height windows and overlooked by the first floor reception room. This room has access out onto a waterfront balcony and is flooded with light from the rear. Upstairs are three bedrooms, the master benefiting from an en-suite shower room, and the two guest bedrooms sharing a bathroom. On the top floor is access out onto private roof terrace, a real sun trap and enjoying spectacular views and perfect space for entertaining. In addition, there is a rear landscaped courtyard, garage and utility room. EPC rating: C

FOR SALE

UNDER OFFER

Henleaze

£460,000

A fine example of a 1930s semi detached family home in a popular and quiet road close to the various shops and amenities in Henleaze. The property has retained some period features with an open plan living/dining room with stripped floorboards and kitchen with dining area on the ground floor. On the first floor are three bedrooms, a family bathroom and separate cloakroom with a fourth bedroom on the top floor. There is a delightful private rear garden, a garage and driveway. The houses in this part of the road were build as individual pairs of semi detached houses, making them highly sought after. Viewing is a must! EPC rating: E.

Estate Agents

Lettings & Management

Maggs & Allen Nov Residential.indd 1

Auctioneers

Westbury Park

£610,000

Maggs & Allen are delighted to offer for sale this extremely fine and spacious Victorian family house that has been completely renovated by the current owners. The stylish accommodation is very well presented, arranged over 3 floors and offers generous sitting room, cloakroom, contemporary open plan and extended kitchen/ living space to the rear of the property incorporating bi fold doors that lead onto the pleasant rear garden. Originally a 6 bed house the current owners use the property as 4 double bedrooms along with dressing room off the master bed and a study/office to the top floor. In addition there is a modern Shower room that services the first floor and second bathroom/ shower room that services the upper floor. The owners have managed to blend modern style with Victorian charm which makes a wonderful living environment. EPC rating: E.

Commercial/ Investment

Chartered Surveyors

Land/New Homes

Energy Assessors

18/10/2013 11:48


Horfield

Horfield

Bishopston

A four bedroom Victorian family home with a wealth of original features and presented to the highest of decorative order. The accommodation is arranged over three levels and boasts two reception rooms, utility room, kitchen/diner, family bathroom and en-suite. Further benefits include a landscaped rear garden and an ideal location close to Gloucester Road, Horfield Common and local schools. EPC – E.

A spacious three bedroom Victorian property located on this popular road in Horfield; only a short stroll from the bustling Gloucester Road and Horfield Common. This well-proportioned family home boasts three reception rooms, kitchen, three double bedrooms and family bathroom. Externally the property offers a mature rear garden which enjoys a southerly sunny aspect. EPC – F.

Occupying a prominent position on the highly sought after Bishop Road, is this three bedroom Victorian home. The accommodation in brief comprises; two reception rooms, breakfast room, kitchen and family bathroom. Further benefits include a rear garden in excess of 70ft which enjoys a sunny southerly aspect, located within the catchment areas for local primary schools, and close to Gloucester Road. EPC - TBC.

£385,000

£300,000

£355,000

Multi Award Winners 2011 & 2012 Triple Award Winners 2013

Henleaze

Henleaze

Henleaze

Situated within close proximity to Henleaze high street and Durdham Down, CJ Hole are delighted to offer to the market this five bedroom Victorian semi-detached family home arranged over three levels. Ground floor offers open plan living space with access via French style doors onto a private 17m family garden and kitchen/diner. EPC – E.

Detached family home positioned on Hill View in close proximity to Henleaze Infant and Junior School comprising three receptions, conservatory, spacious kitchen/ breakfast room, utility and downstairs cloakroom/WC. First floor has five bedrooms, bathroom and staircase leading to loft room. No onward chain. EPC – D.

Beautifully restored and renovated throughout, this welcoming halls adjoining semi-detached family home has a modern built-in kitchen with composite stone worktops and island, contemporary tiled flooring and appliances, three family-sized bedrooms with en-suite to master bedroom and a modern family bathroom. No onward chain. EPC – D.

Price Guide £625,000

CJ Hole Nov.indd 1

£585,000

£430,000

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£585,000 Abbey Road

An exemplary example of a detached home built in 1929 and offering spacious and well proportioned family accommodation. This property has been presented to exacting standards and has been extended at ground floor level to provide a 17 foot kitchen/diner, utility room, and possible fourth bedroom with adjacent shower room.The plot occupies approximately 1/3 acre acre. Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

£499,950

Located on Abbey Road, this family home is walking distance to the shops in Westbury on Trym village. With excellent access to public transport and road networks.Arranged over three stories, the property has four well balanced bedrooms, substantial kitchen dining room with a separate bay fronted reception room to the front the garden is substantial and turn backs directly on to parkland at the rear. Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

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£435,000

A detached David Wilson five bedroom family home, located in a prime position. An executive build called 'The Highworth' which includes five well balanced bedrooms, two of which have en-suites, and the master bedroom measuring in excess of 16 ft. There is a double garage to the ground floor and three reception rooms and a kitchen. The lounge is a stand out focal point of the property measuring in excess of 17 ft.

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

Glen Drive

£339,950 Cote Lea Park

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

Sabrina Way

£339,950

Nestled in a prime Stoke bishop cul-de-sac is this beautifully renovated family home. Lovingly restored by its current owners incorporating original features; such as picturesque led inset stained glass windows and floor boards; and cleverly contrasting and complimenting the historic with the modern, such as granite work surfaces and marble flooring. Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

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Sim

Located in a prestigious cul-de-sac, and lovingly and tastefully decorated throughout to an exceptionally high standard. The contemporary decoration is enhanced and complimented by many of the retained original features, including beautiful stainless lead inset windows to, and surrounding, the front door. The main focal point is the kitchen/dining room, which measures in excess of 20 foot.

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Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

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This modern interpretation of a three storey Georgian townhouse offers excellent amounts of space both within the property and gardens too. Built within the last ten years the house benefits from a wealth of reception space and flexible accommodation. This executive family home benefits from a stunning kitchen/dining/family room with a w.c and a further reception or bedroom five on the ground floor.

ld uired Soilar Req

£439,950

A gardeners paradise offered with no onward chain.This well presented semi detached home includes a quite magnificent c230' west facing rear garden which is beautifully mature and offers a wonderful safe playing environment for children and superb summer entertaining space for the family. The house itself is well balanced and is offered with no onward chain.

Sim

Sim

£440,000 John Repton Gardens

Abbey Road

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Sim

Royal Victoria Park

Sim

Sim

Sim

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Abbey Road

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£340,000

Located approximately just 300 metres fromWestbury on Trym C of E Primary School, this beautiful family home has been lovingly and carefully renovated by its current owners. Located in a prime Westbury cul-de-sac with the addition of off street parking and a short walk into the heart of the village, this property is ideally suited to families. Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

9560,000

A rare opportunity to acquire a beautifully presented three bedroom semi detached property that has been sympathetically styled to show off the period detailing.This delightful home, built in 1939 offers spacious, light and airy accommodation and lovely gardens to the rear with a deal of seclusion. Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973


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Sneyd Park

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£165,000 City Centre

A well proportioned one bedroom ground floor apartment with private sun terrace and a garage set within the desirable Goodeve Park with lovely gardens and the use of the heated indoor swimming pool with sauna and changing rooms weekly. EPC - D Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Sneyd Park

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£199,950

£174,950

Clifton

£189,950

A well thought out two double bedroom, two bathroom apartment set on the fourth floor of this modern block just off Bristol's City Centre. The kitchen consists of cream gloss fronted units with integral appliances. There is electric heating and no onward chain. For an asking price offer the owner would include a 2 year pass for the the NCP car park which is situated 80 yds away on Queen Charlotte St. EPC - E

A conveniently situated apartment next to the BBC just off Whiteladies Road close to Bristol University and the Clifton Triangle. Accommodation comprises a living room with cast iron fireplace, separate kitchen, one double bedroom, an additional Study room, bathroom with four piece white suite including a bath and a separate shower cubicle. No onward chain. EPC - C

Cotham

Redland

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

£375,000

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

£414,995

An attractive two double bedroom top floor flat set within an impressive period building directly overlooking the Durdham Downs with views from all rooms. The interior presents: lounge/diner with vaulted ceiling, sizeable dining hall, separate kitchen with woodblock work surface, bathroom with white suite. The property has an allocated parking space, and is offered with no onward chain. EPC - G

A simply stunning three bedroom detached home tucked away on Sydenham Lane, set within the Residents Parking Zone and conveniently located for Gloucester Road and the City Centre. Presented over two floors the accommodation comprises a 27' x 21' open plan living area with kitchen with oak worktops, and bi fold doors opening on to a 22' x 14' low maintenance rear garden. EPC - B Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Bishopston

St Andrews

Clifton

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

£500,000

A stunning five double bedroom detached house with ample off street parking, a garage and 65' private lawned rear garden with a patio area and hot tub! The interior presents: 25' x 13'5" lounge/diner with dual aspect, garden room with sliding doors to the patio, master bedroom with dual aspect and ensuite shower, fitted kitchen with modern units, four double bedrooms all with dual aspect and a shower room. EPC - E Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

£550,000

A charming Victorian end of terrace house with two double bedrooms, two separate reception rooms, fitted kitchen and conservatory. There is a nicely finished garden to the rear and No onward chain. EPC - E

£749,950

Located one road back from the sought after St Andrews Park is this impressive family home. The accommodation offers four bedrooms and there is a lovely 50ft rear garden. There is also the bonus of off road parking. EPC - E

All reasonable offers considered on this Clifton townhouse offered with no onward chain. There is flexible accommodation offered over four floors with five bedrooms, three receptions rooms and a kitchen/ diner with granite worksurfaces. Externally there is an off-street parking space tot he front and a South facing rear garden. EPC - E

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007


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Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

NEW INSTRUCTION

Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol

Guide price ÂŁ1,500,000

Spectacular family home with a large level plot of just under 1/4 of an acre. The current owner has both fully renovated and substantially extended the original cottage into the large family house you see today. It retains some period charm and is a deceptively large house offering flexible and well planned accommodation over three floors offering 4 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms and a double garage with further parking. EPC Rating: TBC

Clifton, Bristol

Offers in Excess of ÂŁ550,000

Spacious 3 bedroom apartment near the Durdham Downs, occupying the entire hall floor of this stunning Victorian house. This large apartment is beautifully presented and has over 1690 sq ft of spacious accommodation. It has been finished to a high standard and offers a plethora of original features throughout including cornices, sash windows, fireplaces and deep Victorian skirting. EPC Rating: D

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 322 6362 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

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NEW INSTRUCTION

Henleaze, Bristol

Guide price ÂŁ775,000

Substantial beautifully presented large family house with wonderful period features including stained glass windows and woodblock flooring. The house offers 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, conservatory, 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, off street parking and a generous enclosed 60 ft rear garden. EPC Rating: E

NEW INSTRUCTION

Sneyd Park, Bristol

Offers in Excess of ÂŁ795,000

A beautifully renovated detached house with direct views over the Durdham Downs, offering 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, large open plan living space, parking and garaging with landscaped gardens. Finished to an exceptionally high standard with bespoke fittings throughout including double glazed wooden windows, oak flooring with under floor heating and a handmade kitchen. EPC Rating: D

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Sneyd Park - £750,000

Westbury-on-Trym - £425,000

A modern five bedroom detached house situated in a private cul-de-sac in one of Bristol’s premier residential roads. An opportunity to update to the incoming owners taste the house is offered with no onward chain.

A lovely spacious three double bedroom 1930’s semi ideally suited to growing families. Attractively presented throughout with spacious rooms and a west facing rear garden. Ideally placed for local schools and amenities.

Stoke Bishop - £435,000

Stoke Bishop - £370,000

A lovely four bedroom extended 1930’s semi with lovely rear garden set in a quiet cul-desac. Good size reception rooms, kitchen with space for a breakfast table. Three bedrooms, bathroom and loft conversion bedroom. Garage and off street parking.

A good size 1950’s three bedroom semi detached house with attractive gardens positioned in a popular road. Offers scope for some updating or even extending to the incoming buyers own tastes. Garage and off street parking. No onward chain.

Westbury-on-Trym - £575,000

Westbury-on-Trym - £295,000

A spacious five bedroom detached family house situated within a stone’s throw of Elmlea schools. Two receptions, kitchen utility and cloakroom. Upstairs are five bedrooms, bathroom and en suite. Level rear garden with southerly aspect. Garage and off street parking.

A beautifully presented three storey townhouse set in a quiet cul-de-sac.The accommodation is beautifully presented throughout with ground floor bedroom, bathroom and utility room opening onto the rear garden. First floor lounge/diner and kitchen, top floor three bedrooms and bathroom. Parking to the front and generally low maintenance throughout.

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le Sa eed r Ag

Redland - £795,000

A superb Victorian family house with residents use of desirable Clyde Park. Recently refurbished it provides comfortable and practical family accommodation. 3 reception rooms, kitchen with breakfast area. Cloakrooms and basement utility. 6 bedrooms inc master bedroom suite. 3 further bath/shower rooms. O/S parking. No onward chain.

Cotham - £845,000

A simply stunning four bedroom Victorian family home arranged over four floors in a convenient position close to university, hospitals and city. The house boasts three lovely reception rooms, superb kitchen with AGA, four double bedrooms, bath and shower rooms. Two parking spaces to the front. One of the best we have seen!

Westbury Park - £449,950

Redland - £650,000

A 3 bedroom detached family home. Beautifully presented it offers light and airy accommodation comprising, sitting room and kitchen with arched opening through to a dining area. A further reception room or bedroom. Utility area. Bedroom one with en-suite WC, family bathroom and 2 further bedrooms. Garden to front and rear.

A rather large detached 1930’s family home within walking distance of Redland Green and Westbury Park schools. Great family layout with 3 reception rooms, kitchen/diner and cloaks. Five bedrooms and family bathroom. South west facing gardens and large tandem garage.

Clifton - £244,950

Clifton - £210,000 & £250,000

A rather lovely and particularly spacious one bedroom garden flat situated within a couple of minutes walk of Clifton village. Sitting room at the rear opening onto a lovely west facing rear garden. This is one not to miss. Offered with no onward chain.

A rather lovely one bedroom balcony flat and a spacious two bedroom top floor flat in central Clifton. Newly redecorated and carpeted throughout the flats are ideally suited to investors and first time buyers. No onward chain.

Leese & Nagle November.indd 2

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REFITTING SALE

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DISPLAY PIECES 50-75% OFF

FINAL REDUCTIONS ON EX DISPLAY PIECES 50-75% OFF We will be closing shortly for 3 weeks for a complete refit Any sofa style may be ordered in any fabric at 25% off – as illustrated All cabinet displays at least 50% off New cabinet orders 25% off – in any colour

40-65% OFF DISPLAY WARDROBES

We are just past Clifton Down Shopping Centre 56/60, Whiteladies Rd, BS8 2PY Mon-Sat 9.30 - 5.30/Sun 12 - 5

TEL: 01173 292746

Profile for MC Publishing Limited

The Bristol Magazine November 2013  

The Bristol Magazine celebrates everything wonderful about life and living in the historic city of Bristol – the capital of the west. Launch...

The Bristol Magazine November 2013  

The Bristol Magazine celebrates everything wonderful about life and living in the historic city of Bristol – the capital of the west. Launch...