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thebathmag.co.uk

ISSUE 181 | OCTOBER 2017 £3.95 where sold

FOUR HUNDRED FEET ABOVE THE CITY A DRONE’S SPECTACULAR VIEWS OVER BATH

GOTHIC GIRLS: THE WOMEN WHO WROTE TO CHILL

SPOOKS STAR GEMMA JONES ON TROUBLE AT WHITE HOUSE

DISHING THE DIRT: WHAT WAITERS HATE ABOUT DINERS

BATH’S FINEST CREATE A 21st CENTURY LUXURY HOME

ART REVIEW: OUR GUIDE TO BATH’S ART GALLERIES

THE CITY’S BIGGEST MONTHLY GUIDE TO LIFE AND LIVING IN BATH


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Contents October.qxp_Layout 1 22/09/2017 13:03 Page 1

49

24

70

Contents October 2017 5 THINGS

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10

THE CITYIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 The Edge hosts the Festival of the Future City Bath

18

A drone’s view of Bath, 400 feet above the city

Award-winning actress Gemma Jones talks American politics .........................................................

76

GUEST COLUMNIST

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80

HEALTH & BEAUTY

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98

30

THE WALK

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102

Andrew Swift discovers one of the finest views around Batheaston

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32

The best entertainment in Bath this month

KITCHENS SPECIAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 The experts reveal the popular kitchen trends

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42

A look at this year’s Film Bath festival programme

THE HOUSE THE TEAM BUILT

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108

How a team of local tradespeople rebuilt a house on Bath’s skyline

GOTHIC BATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Jenny McAuley explores Bath’s links with female Gothic writers

Bath’s galleries present their autumn collection ..................................

CITY GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Jane Moore gets the garden ready for autumn

SPECIAL FEATURE THE ART LOVER’S GUIDE . . . . . . . . . 49

BATH’S FIRST FEMALE MAYOR

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Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Paralympic gold medalist Stephanie Millward

FILM BATH PREVIEW

BATH AT WORK

Community fundraiser Bath Soup Project

SKULLDUGGERY IN THE WHITE HOUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

WHAT’S ON

68

Neil Menneer’s portrait of the month

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FACE THE MUSIC

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Things that irk us when eating out, a review of Chez Dominique, we go behind the menu with Giggling Squid, and a celebration of rioja

Your essential events to look forward to this month

COVER STORY

FOOD AND DRINK

66

ON THE COVER

The Circus captured by drone pilot Martin Crawley from The SkyCam Visit: theskycam.co.uk/bath

Catherine Pitt celebrates the life of Kathleen Harper

Even more great content and updates online: thebathmag.co.uk

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Like us: Facebook.com/ thebathmagazine

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine


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EDITOR’S PICKS

A PICTORIAL JOURNEY: Bath photographer Neill Menneer has been taking pictures of his home city for many years. His latest homage to Bath’s culture, history and vibrant present day is an illustrated book, Bath: A Pictorial Journey, with photography by Neill and pictures by Regency artist Jean Nattes. The book is published by Robert Frederick, £9.95. It would make a good souvenir for anyone who’s fallen for Bath’s many charms but has to leave it.

from the

EDITOR

PHOTOGRAPH: Neill Menneer

B

y happy circumstance our October issue has a strong architectural theme – befitting a city with a worldwide reputation for beautiful buildings. We begin with the cover story, which explores drone pilot Martin Crawley of The SkyCam and his fascinating aerial shots of Bath. You can see his bird’s eye view of the city streets from Page 18. One of the recurring ongoing debates in Bath is how we approach building in the World Heritage City. This and other relevant and topical architectural issues will be under discussion at the Festival of the Future City Bath being held at the University of Bath. Turn to Page 14 for some of the highlights of this public event. There’s a long history of skilled craftsmanship in Bath. You’ve only got to stand in front of one of the city’s Georgian buildings to marvel at what those workmen achieved more than two centuries ago. Step inside one of these 18th century masterpieces in Queen Square, which is now available for weekend and short lets, to sample what life was like as Georgian gentry, but with all mod cons and comforts. Take a peek inside, Page 116. And for a virtual tour of a Bath house that’s designed for the 21st century, turn to Page 108, where we get the chance to see what modern builders, designers and craftsmen and women can achieve in terms of modern home building. Lastly, on the home front, read about the At Home in Bath event taking place this month and about a revolutionary range of furniture that takes discarded plastic from the world’s oceans and turns it into a durable material to be transformed into designer chairs and sofas (Page 106). Our foodie pages are rammed with tasty stuff. Melissa Blease has compiled a report on what restaurant staff think of us, the diners, and also our pet hates when we’re dining out. Read her findings on Page 68. The October celebrity interview, Page 24, is with British actress Gemma Jones, who spoke to Jessica Hope ahead of her appearance at the Theatre Royal Bath in the UK premiere of Gore Vidal’s The Best Man. And I spent time with the inspirational Paralympic swimmer Stephanie Millward, the local athlete who’s constantly battling her disability to bring home fistfuls of medals in national and international events. Read her story – with tissues to hand – on Page 30. There’s lots more besides, with a bumper What’s On offering (Page 32) and a comprehensive guide to Bath’s art galleries from Page 49. Before I’m dragged off, like comedian Ken Dodd, as the curtain closes before he’s finished his act, you’ll love the story about Bath’s first woman mayor . . .

Georgette McCready Editor All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

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POT APPEAL: the Victoria Art Gallery has put a pot by Grayson Perry on display in the publicly owned gallery and is inviting donations so it can buy the piece for the city. It’s also put in a bid for some Heritage Lottery Fund money. Grayson Perry had a hugely popular show at the gallery last year and is currently showing at the Arnolfini in Bristol.

Pulteney Bridge in Winter, Christmas card by Peter Bowtell BE PREPARED: barely have the leaves started to turn autumnal red and gold than the first signs of Christmas start appearing. More welcome than others is the annual pop-up shop in St Michael’s Without Church in Broad Street, Bath, selling Christmas cards for good causes. It opens from Friday 13 October selling cards for national and local charities.

how a good dinner and feasting ❝ Strange to seereconciles everybody ❞ SAMUEL PEPYS

English MP and diarist, 1633 – 1703


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ZEITGEIST

5

things to do in

October

Play

Eat One of the highlights of the Great Bath Feast (which runs until Sunday 8 October, see: greatbathfeast.co.uk for full list of events) is the annual Great Bath Bake Sale, run by charities and held in Bath Abbey. On Saturday 7 October, from 11am – 3pm the historic church will be filled with people enjoying delicious home-baked goods and coffee and tea from a range of stalls. Money raised will go to local causes and the Footprint Project. There will also be pizza making for kids, Julian House’s bicyclepowered smoothie maker and a card game about food waste hosted by FoodCycle.

Looking for fun things to do at half-term that won’t break the bank? It’s Bath Museums Week, 21 to 29 October, so there’ll be free activities at the Roman Baths, Victoria Art Gallery and other museums. Mums and dads can also join their children for creative workshops at The Edge arts centre at the University of Bath which take place on Saturdays. Join a two-hour long art workshop on Saturday 28 October, in which families get involved in being creative. Sesssions for five to 11-year-olds are £5 children, £3 adults. For the full programme and FAMILY FUN: Create themed workshops in making things, to book places visit: edgearts.org. story telling and art take place at The Edge arts centre

Harvest For centuries the orchards around Bath hung heavy in autumn with apples and pears. An annual Apple Day was established by Commonground in 1990 and is now celebrated on Saturday 21 October. Orchardshare, a volunteer group which runs two orchards on the outskirts of Bath, will be making and selling freshly squeezed apple juice at Dry Arch, Holcombe Lane, Bathampton, from 2 – 4.30pm on Sunday 22 October. Meanwhile, the National Trust property Dyrham Park, just north of Bath off the A46, will be inviting visitors to help harvest the pears in the pear orchard, on Saturday 7 October, from 11am – 4pm, Dyrham Park. There’ll be chance to have a go with an old cider press and to squeeze your own pear juice. There will be harvest craft and games, pear bobbing, an orchard trail and harvest goodies in the café. Learn all about perry making and old Gloucestershire folklore and buy bottles of golden perry cider or local pear juice to take home. Normal admission prices apply.

Book Tickets have gone on sale for the annual big Bath Firework display which takes place in the city centre, on Bath Recreation ground, on Saturday 4 November (gates open at 5.30pm). The spectacular show, which lights up the sky over Bath, is organised by volunteers from the Rotary Club of Bath for charity. Tickets: £5 (£6 on the gate) and £3 for children (£4 on the gate). They’re on sale at all branches of sponsors Bath Building Society, Bath Tourism Office and from: rotary-bath.co.uk.

Celebrate As the witching hour approaches head down to the Spookley Pumpkin Festival at Farringtons farm shop, Farrington Gurney, and pick your own pumpkin from the pumpkin patch to take home for Halloween. The festival runs over the weekend of 14/15 October and throughout half-term, 21 – 29 October, giving you plenty of time to carve yourself a spooky Halloween lantern. Over at Bitton, on the Avon Valley Railway, children who arrive at the steam railway in fancy dress, 24 to 26 and 28 to 29 October, will be offered free rides on the spooky half-term trains. Those of a robust constitution (ie not easily spooked and aged 14 and over) might enjoy a fright night of ghost story telling at the American Museum on Friday 27 October. There’s more family fun for Halloween and half-term, with a host of events, on Page 90.

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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

See more online www.thebathmag.co.uk

Contact us: Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Editor Tel: Email:

Georgette McCready 01225 424592 georgette@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Financial Director Email:

Jane Miklos jane@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Web Editor/Staff Writer Jessica Hope Email: jess@thebathmagazine.co.uk Contact the Advertising Sales team tel: 01225 424499 Advertising Sales Email:

Liz Grey liz@thebathmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Email:

Jake Horwood jake@thebathmagazine.co.uk

The Bath Magazine and The Bristol Magazine are published by MC Publishing Ltd. We are an independent of all other local publications

If looking glamorous and chic are your desire, Chanel are

The Bath Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout Bath and the surrounding area. We also have special distribution units in the following city centre stores and coffee shops

the ones for you. super stylish.

Ellis & Killpartrick Optometrists 18 New Bond Street, Bath, BA1 1BA Tel: 01225 466954

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2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Telephone: 01225 424499. Fax: 01225 426677 www.thebathmag.co.uk Š MC Publishing Ltd 2017 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bath Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.


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ist

THE CITY THE BUZZ

Our BATH A festival of events this month sets out to explore the architecture of Bath – past, present and future

W

Historic

One of Milsom Street’s finest Georgian buildings is to begin a new, elegant lease of life when it becomes The Ivy Bath Brasserie – part of the acclaimed Ivy collection of restaurants orginally established in London. The former NatWest bank will open its ground floor dining room this month. It will be open seven days a week, serving meals from breakfast through to dinner. Eventually the new-look brasserie will have 207 covers inside and 52 seats on the terrace.

And breathe

Anyone who regularly walks or cycles round Bath city centre will testify that levels of air pollution are tangible, causing health problems for many. Bath & North East Somerset Council is now taking action to improve air quality. The main source of pollution is traffic and national air quality objectives for nitrogen dioxide have been exceeded in some areas. The council has three air quality management areas in Bath, Keynsham and Saltford. Recommendations have been put forward and specific initiatives have been implemented to reduce the levels of nitrogen dioxide in these areas. There will be three drop-in sessions for people to learn more about the proposed air quality action plan: Tuesday 10 October 2 – 5pm, New Oriel Hall, Friday 13 October, 12.30pm – 7.30pm as part of the Bath City Conference at the Guildhall and Wednesday 18 October, 1 – 4pm at Twerton Village Hall. The consultation runs until 26 November, visit: bathnes.gov.uk/services/environment/poll ution/air-quality/action-plan where comments can left.

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here does our World Heritage City go from here? A question that many Bathonians ask on a regular basis. This and other topics surrounding the architecture and future of the city of Bath will be examined in the Festival of the Future City Bath, which runs from Thursday 19 to Saturday 21 October. The Edge arts centre at the University of Bath has teamed up with Bristol Festival of Ideas and Bath & North East Somerset Council for a series of events which will explore the themes of housing, the artist and the city and great architecture. Highlights include: ARCHITECTURE AND UTOPIA Thursday 19 October, 2.45pm From No. 1 Royal Crescent, £12 / £9 concs A walk with leading architecture critic Owen Hatherley – author of A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain. He’ll be joined by ‘utopian’ artist Owen Griffiths and Dr Amy Frost, curator of The Museum of Bath Architecture. KEN LOACH PUBLIC LECTURE Friday 20 October, 7.30 – 8.30pm The Assembly Rooms, £12, £9 concs Acclaimed film director Ken Loach presents his vision for his adopted home, Bath. How can complexities around housing and jobs be resolved in the heritage-driven landscape of a UNESCO city? Includes audience discussion. IMAGINING THE FUTURE Friday 20 October, 5 – 6.30pm The Assembly Rooms, £9, £6 concs Join director at Zaha Hadid Architects, Jim Heverin, whose projects include the Port House, Antwerp, a radical addition to the cityscape, and Andrew Vines, regional director at Historic England. What could Bath learn from other cities in shaping its future? PRESERVING UTOPIA Friday 20 October, 1 – 2.30pm The Assembly Rooms, £9, £6 concs Architect Alison Brooks in conversation with Henrietta Billings, director of SAVE Britain’s Heritage and Tanvir Hasan, chair of Donald Insall Associates. This panel discussion will consider what a masterplan for Bath could look like and how the city can preserve its World Heritage status and evolve through new buildings and infrastructure.

SHARING A VISION: film director Ken Loach will be speaking

HOUSING IN THE FUTURE CITY Saturday 21 October, 12.30 – 1.45pm The Edge, University of Bath, £9, £6 concs Housing is a critical political issue and the provision of good homes is vital to the success of the future city. Authors Justin McGuirk, Anna Minton and Alex Vasudevan’s discuss their publications and the future of our city. WHAT MAKES GREAT ARCHITECTURE Saturday 21 October, 4 – 5.30pm The Edge, booking required Beauty, sustainability, functionality, audacity; what are the essential ingredients of great architecture? A free panel discussion. THE ARTIST AND THE CITY Saturday 21 October, 2.30-3.45pm The Edge, University of Bath, £9, £6 concs A panel discussion that questions how architecture and urban space inspire and shape the work of leading contemporary artists Rut Blees Luxemburg, Melanie Manchot and Owen Griffiths.

A RADICAL APPROACH: the Port House in historic Antwerp

RIBA ANNUAL LECTURE: ERIC PARRY Tuesday 10 October, 5.30pm The Edge, University of Bath, £6 Eric Parry’s practice is renowned for cultural projects involving sensitive historic buildings such as the restoration of St Martin-in-theFields Church in Trafalgar Square and the new extension for the Holburne Museum in Bath, as well as commercial projects in London. l For tickets to all events tel: 01225 386777 or visit: edgearts.org

We’re following @Breastcancernow which is the UK’s biggest charity dedicated to funding research to find a cure for breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, so look out #wearitpink and look out for our useful guide on services which help (Page 98)

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CLAVA DINE IN MATT WHITE BY VITA  COPENHAGEN

LIGHTING SPECIALIST

8 BATH STREET, FROME. TEL: 01373473555 WWW.FIATLUX.CO.UK TUESDAY – FRIDAY 9.30AM – 5.30PM, SATURDAY 9.30AM – 5.00PM

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BATH

Visit our showroom on Park Road,

(off Chelsea Road

)

sales@schmidt-bath.com | 01225 337276 1 Park Road, (off Chelsea Road) Bath BA1 3EE


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AERIAL | BATH

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AERIAL | BATH

Drone pilot Martin Crawley of The SkyCam tells Georgette McCready how the new generation of aerial technology is making an impact in a number of roles in the skies over Bath

A

piece of kit, small enough to fit inside a rucksack, is revolutionising the way we view the world around us. The drone – a remote controlled camera system – allows photographers to get precision shots from up to 400 feet above the ground. Drones have been used for military purposes for some time, but in the last couple of years their versatility has been realised by a number of sectors. BBC wildlife camera crews used aerial drone shots to great effect in the award-winning Planet Earth II – for example, the nail-biting, edge-of-the-seat footage of newly hatched iguanas running for their lives from the predatory racer snakes. Because a drone is so much quieter than a helicopter and far easier to control in height and direction than a hot air balloon, they have been used to great effect in panning shots, over the canopy of trees in the jungle and tracking the flow of fast-moving herds of wild animals across the plains. One expert who is deploying the technical possibilities of drone photography is Martin Crawley owner of The SkyCam operating in Bath. Martin is a fully qualified drone pilot, who has passed the written exam and practical test to gain official permission from the Civil Aviation Authority to fly and operate as a commercial drone pilot in the Bath area. He says: “The drone is a very versatile tool with all kinds of applications. For example, for a structural survey of a building, we can get precision shots of all the details of a rooftop, chimneys and tiles. And because the camera produces such high definition images, there’s no pixellation when you hone in on individual roof tiles.” “Drone photography is useful for land surveys, for estate agents and for insurance claims on property. It’s also great for reaching those hard to access spots in the gutters of rooftops.” But what Martin really enjoys is being able to take aerial shots over the historic city of Bath and the surrounding countryside: “You can sweep very gently over the buildings and reveal those different vistas and views. I particularly enjoying filming at dawn and at sunset over Bath.” BIRD’S EYE VIEW: aerial shot over Great Pulteney Street, exclusive images by Martin Crawley of The SkyCam

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AERIAL | BATH

T

he use of drones in the UK is heavily regulated. Professional drone pilot Martin Crawley has to follow a stringent list of guidelines to protect other people’s safety and privacy. For example, a drone may not be flown over crowds, say at Bath Christmas Market or Bath Rec during rugby matches – it should be a clear 30 metres away from people during take-off and landing. Typically a drone flies at up to 400 feet off the ground and must always be in the operator’s sight, with a flying time of up to 27 minutes and speeds of up to 45 miles an hour, although it is unlikely to ever need that turn of speed. The DJI Phantom 4 Pro+ drone that The SkyCam uses has a built-in return to home safety feature, which means if the battery or GPS fails, the drone will always automatically return to the spot on the ground where the operator is holding the controls. Martin says: “Because the drone has five very sensitive sensors – like a bat – it won’t ever fly itself into an obstruction or object. This means it’s suitable for using inside historic buildings, where for instance, you might want to get up close to film some ceiling cornice or plasterwork.” The drone can deliver stills or video film. Says Martin: “It’s great for occasions such as weddings. You know, ten years ago, fireworks were fairly unusual at weddings, now lots of couples want them. It’s the same with professional film making of the day. Adding in sweeping drone shots of the cars arriving, or those panoramic views of the venue, can enhance a wedding day film.” It also means that for Bathonians, we can enjoy aerial views of the city that we don’t normally get to see. For more detail visit: theskycam.co.uk/bath. Contact Martin, tel: 07968 142710, email: martincrawley@theskycam.co.uk.

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AERIAL | BATH

A NEW PERSPECTIVE: above, The SkyCam Bath took the drone up from Hedgemead Park to capture Camden Crescent rising above the trees. The crescent’s asymmetry is apparent in this shot Right, turning the drone 180 degrees in Hedgemead Park it picks out this shot of the rooftop views down Walcot Street, with St Swithin’s Church, where Jane Austen’s parents married, in the foreground. You can glimpse the scaffolding covering the Empire building in the near distance

FAMILIAR LANDMARKS: opposite page, top, Malborough Buildings at sunset, and the muchphotographed Royal Crescent Opposite, left, the home of Bath Rugby, the Bath Rec sitting alongside the River Avon

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AERIAL | BATH

THE OVERVIEW: above, gazing over Bath from above Alexandra Park, with Southgate in the foreground Below, an unusual bird’s eye view of Pulteney Bridge and the weir on the River Avon, central Bath, and hovering above Orange Grove this view of Bath Abbey and looking west, the city shrouded by a low cloud base

THE TECH SPEC DJI Phantom 4 Pro+: Known as a multi rotor (ie each motor spins at a different rpm to keep the drone true and stable) l weight 1.38kg l propulsion is battery operated (electric), 4 motors l battery is LiPo, with a 15.2v 5870 mAh capacity l maximum operating wind speed 10 m/s, or 22mph l flight time is around 27 minutes, max speed 20 m/s or 45mph l 5 direction of obstacle sensing Camera: l mechanical shutter l 1 inch 20-megapixel l shoots video and still images l 4K / 60fps (frames per second) video l burst mode stills at 14fps l video bitrate 100 mbps l supported photo types JPEG, DNG (RAW), JPEG + RAW l supported video types MP4/MOV. 22 TheBATHMagazine

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GEMMA | JONES

SKULLDUGGERY IN THE WHITE HOUSE

Award-winning actress Gemma Jones talks presidential campaigns and political schemes to Jessica Hope ahead of treading the boards of the Theatre Royal Bath this month

M

any will remember Gemma Jones for her portrayal of the ambitious, forthright chef Louisa, who defied the constraints of early 20th century society to become the owner of the fashionable Bentinck Hotel, in the 1970s Saturday night BBC1 drama The Duchess of Duke Street. Whereas to millennials she is synonymous with playing Bridget’s meddling mother in Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones’s Diary, or Hogwarts’ hospital matron Poppy Pomfrey in the Harry Potter films. Recognised for being able to take on any role that is thrown at her – be it a Jane Austen matriarch, the iconic Blanche DuBois or an MI-5 analyst in Spooks – Gemma is now turning her hand to politics, or the 1960 presidential nomination elections to be more specific. She is currently starring in the first major UK production of Gore Vidal’s awardwinning play The Best Man, which comes to Theatre Royal Bath this month as part of its national tour. The Best Man follows the political antics of two opposing presidential party candidates, both of whom are vying for the popular outgoing President’s endorsement to boost their campaign. One of the candidates, William Russell, played by Martin Shaw (Judge John Deed, Inspector George Gently), is the well-respected, likeable ex-secretary of state, whereas Joseph Cantwell, played by Jeff Fahey (Lost, Under the Dome, The Lawnmower Man), is the calculating populist opponent, determined to do anything to get into high office. Gemma plays Mrs Gamadge, the chair of the party’s Women’s League who plays a crucial part in securing the female vote for the Democrats. “The play is all about skullduggery in the race to the White House. My character is very forthright and challenging to the nominee (Russell), so there is a battle of wits quite often between Martin (Shaw) and I,” says Gemma. Gemma’s character plays a key part in providing Russell with an insight into what female voters like and dislike about the President and First Lady, and doesn’t shy away from voicing her opinions at a time when politics was dominated by men – Gemma suggests there’s even an element of Margaret Thatcher to her character. What first interested Gemma to this part? “She is a very vibrant and strong. And I’ve always loved playing American characters and doing an American accent,” she says. 24 TheBATHMagazine

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Award-winning actress Gemma Jones stars in The Best Man, photo: Pip, CLD Communications

Vidal’s The Best Man premiered on Broadway in 1960 to great acclaim and was nominated for six Tony awards before being adapted into a film in 1964 starring Henry Fonda. It was widely recognised at the time that the play was heavily influenced by Vidal’s own involvement in politics – he was a Democratic candidate for New York for Congress in 1960, but lost to Republican

J Ernest Wharton by a small margin. Vidal openly despised the Kennedys and used his opinions of JFK’s persona and family life to base some of the characters on. With the controversy around the recent US presidential election, and the media attention that ensued across the world, Vidal’s drama on the ruthlessness of politics and the issues surrounding publicity couldn’t be more


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GEMMA | JONES

Gemma Jones with Honeysuckle Weeks in rehearsal, photo: Pamela Raith Photography

The cast of The Best Man, starring Martin Shaw

Gemma’s long list of stage credits includes A Winter’s Tale, which came to Bath in 1993, The Masterbuilder, The Turn of the Screw, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and the world tour of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Gemma also played a vengeful Queen Margaret opposite Kevin Spacey in Sam Mendes’ 2011 production of Richard III at the Old Vic in London. With such an impressive CV of stage and screen roles over the years, has Gemma found it difficult to find a range of interesting roles as she has got older? “I’ve been incredibly lucky with the parts I have played. I have never shied away from playing my age. Although I do sometimes look in the mirror and wonder if its really me looking back (laughs).

I did become slightly frustrated recently after I was only being asked to play very elderly women with dementia

relevant. “Although American politics is very different to our politics, we (the British public) have got quite involved in American politics recently. So I think people will get a lot of the references (in the play), and they might just realise ‘God things really haven’t changed that much,’” says Gemma. And while the 1960 presidential campaign didn’t have the sheer scale of media interest as present day elections, by the midtwentieth century the media began to consider politicians as having celebrity status and so protecting your public image was necessary. “The play focuses on how there were issues at the time around what to conceal and what to reveal,” says Gemma. Born in Marylebone, London in 1942, Gemma was surrounded by the theatrical world from a young age with both her father, Griffith, and brother, Nicholas, working as actors. Gemma went on to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art where she was awarded with the Bancroft Gold Medal in her final year, a prize which recognises exceptional talent – other alumni who have received this award include Sir Kenneth Branagh, Juliet Stevenson and Sir Mark Rylance, just to name a few. After graduating in 1962, Gemma made her London stage debut in Bertolt Brecht’s Baal opposite Peter O’Toole. “When the production began, Peter had just come back from filming Lawrence of Arabia so there was a lot of interest around him. “I bumped into him a number of times over the years, as we used to live in the same area, and he was always very kind to me,” she says. “I had a smaller role in the play, but a very effective one. And I received some very nice reviews and it more or less kick started my career.” And what a career she has had. After working in the acting world for more than five decades, Gemma has become one of the UK’s most prominent actresses, and won the BAFTA for best supporting actress in 2015 for her role in the BBC television film Marvellous, starring alongside Toby Jones. Being a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company and the National Theatre,

“I did become slightly frustrated recently after I was only being asked to play very elderly women with dementia. So that’s why I was interested in being part of The Best Man – I’m always looking for challenging work.” With such an extensive list to choose from, are there any parts she has played over the years that Gemma looks back on with fond memories? “When I look at my next job, I always think it’s good to choose to do something I haven’t done for a while. I loved playing Sally Bowles in Cabaret when I was younger, I really had to work hard on my dancing and singing for that role. I also really enjoyed doing Bridget Jones’s Diary. But a lot of the parts that I have really fond memories of haven’t always had the most publicity.” Gemma is currently starring in Francis Lee’s God’s Own Country, which is in

cinemas at the time of writing. It follows the story of a young man who is forced to take over the running of his family’s farm. After a migrant worker arrives to help with the lambing season, the young men form a complex and confusing relationship, set against the bleak backdrop of the Yorkshire landscape. Gemma plays a “downtrodden grandmother”, as she describes her character. “It was a really tough shoot. We filmed in the middle of winter on the Yorkshire Moors and one of the actors got incredibly ill.” The film has received good reviews and was well received at the Sundance Film Festival and the Edinburgh International Film Festival in June. “I’m glad that it has had such positive reviews and has received awards, I’m so pleased for the young actors,” she says. Before heading back to rehearsals, Gemma enthuses about the tour of The Best Man coming to Bath. “I realised the other day how long it has been since I’ve been to the Roman Baths, so it will be good to go visit them and be a tourist for the day.” “Usually I will commute back and forth between my home and where the play is on tour, but when we come to Bath I am treating myself to a little holiday and staying in the city for a few days.” And Bath shall welcome such a distinguished actress into the city with open arms, that’s for sure. n The Best Man is at Theatre Royal Bath from Monday 9 – Saturday 14 October. The tour then moves onto Cambridge Arts Theatre, Cambridge and Lyceum Theatre, Sheffield. Visit: theatreroyal.org.uk or tel: 01225 448844 for tickets.

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SHOPPING | CITY

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Diamond Cluster Earrings set in 18ct White Gold - £5,670 For any of the above and much more, visit Mallory Jewellers, 1 – 5 Bridge Street, Bath BA2 4AP Tel: 01225 788 800 mallory-jewellers.com

Diamond Dress Ring set in 18ct White and Yellow Gold - £1,980

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FACE | THE | MUSIC

WINNING AGAINST THE ODDS Paralympic gold medallist swimmer Stephanie Millward MBE talks to Georgette McCready about her remarkable battle with multiple sclerosis and why she’s determined to carry on going for gold

A

s a 15-year-old schoolgirl at Corsham School Stephanie Millward broke the British record for the fastest 100 metre backstroke. But within the space of a few short years this promising young athlete found herself virtually bedbound as she lost the use of her legs and suffered the nightmare of being intermittently and suddenly completely blind, symptoms of the delibilating incurable condition multiple sclerosis. The poised, fit looking 35-year-old sportswoman who meets me at the University of Bath training village looks nothing like the teenage girl who used to sob in pain as she limped the few hundred yards from her home to her part-time job in Box Co-op. Yes, she still suffers from MS, which is a progressive condition, but it’s her strength of character and determination that mean she’s always ready with a smile and a quick joke and that grit has also earned her more than 100 medals for swimming at national and international level. After her diagnosis as a teenager Stephanie’s promising swimming career looked doomed to failure. She was so ill she couldn’t train and didn’t even get in a swimming pool for five years – which is what makes her current status in the world’s rankings even more admirable. As we speak Stephanie is about to leave the Wiltshire home she shares with husband Adrian to fly to Mexico for the World Para Swimming Championships, which run from 30 September to 6 October. She has already won two gold medals in the 2016 Rio paralympics and four silver medals in the 2012 London Paralympics. I am shocked when she tells me she had her funding from British Swimming withdrawn. She smiles ruefully: “Basically because I am too old and carrying too much skinfold – that means ‘you’re too fat love.’” Stephanie took her former funders to the high court but

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lost her case, so is now working parttime as a swimming teacher to fund her trip to Mexico. Her husband Adrian is not able to accompany her because it would be too expensive. It is ironic that Stephanie’s fundraising swimming job takes place at the Springfield Centre pool which has been re-named the Stephanie Millward MBE pool. Fortunately she has won sponsorship from Hitachi Capital UK and is able to use the gym at the University of Bath for free in exchange for motivational speeches. Stephanie swims nine times a week and trains in the gym twice a week. On land she struggles with walking any distance. The day before we meet she had to cancel our initial meeting as her legs collapsed. Smiling she says: “It’s a nuisance, but it happens.” She

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has trouble with her balance and coordination, but feels complete free and at home once she’s in the water. “I feel happy in the water, concentrating on my stroke and speed. Mind you, I’m a wreck when I’ve finished a race. I have to be hauled – literally – out of the pool by two people and strapped into a wheelchair. I’m a mess. If the telly cameras stayed on the pool for the next event you’d be wondering why I was still in the water – that would be because no one had pulled me out.” She qualified for the British squad by bagging two confident golds at this summer’s British Summer Championships, along with a silver and two fourth places. She refuses to be downhearted about the setbacks she’s had in life. She proudly shows

GOLDEN GIRL: main picture, Stephanie Millward with just some of her Paralympic medals Opposite page pictures courtesy of Dave Stone, DGS Photography, Chippenham Web: gsphotography. zenfolio.com Tel: 01249 656699


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me her custom-made swimming cap, across which the word Smile is emblazoned alongside her name. “I really believe in that. You have to believe in yourself and keep smiling. I also believe that if you let yourself get angry or upset – which I have been many times in the past – you’re giving the MS extra powers.” She says she has many things to be happy about. Whenever she’s about in Box and Corsham – she was awarded the Freedom of Corsham – people are very kind to her. She went to Buckingham Palace to pick up her MBE and says: “Yes, I’ve met the Queen a couple of times, she’s a very nice lady.” With so many medals – including gold – in her impressive collection, does she now want to stop putting herself through that gruelling training regime and maybe perhaps take things a little easier? She shakes her head vehemently at that: “Absolutely not. I am going to keep on being determined. I want to inspire other people to never give up.” We asked her to pick her favourite music from different times in her life.

Adrian to remind me of the name of this track – my memory is also affected by the MS – but luckily he’s brilliant, he’s my rock. I met Adrian when a friend asked me if I’d help a guy who was training for a triathlon and needed to learn to swim. I helped him with his swimming and he helped me in the gym, and it went from there. I had been trapped by the MS and Adrian has made me realise that anything is still achievable and that I am in charge, as opposed to the illness being in charge.

STEPHANIE’S TOP TEN SONGS

Take That – Rule the World This reminds me of my London Games. I think we athletes were in a bubble and didn’t realise at the time that the whole world was watching. We had Channel 4 in our shared apartment in the athletes’ village but we were cut off from all other media, including radio. There’s a whole chapter iny my book about this amazing experience at my home games. I also got to carry the Olympic torch through the streets of Liverpool, which was an amazing experience. The crowds were cheering me on. I was very nervous, but what a day!

REM – Everybody Hurts I am one of four children. I was born in Saudi Arabia and we moved to Box when I was ten. This REM track reminds me of my childhood. It was probably being played by my brother Paul. We were a very sporty family, my sister Kirsty and brothers Paul and Nicholas. My dad was into football and my mum spent a lot of time driving me to swimming sessions. She’s been amazing, my mum, so supportive. Madonna – Like A Prayer This reminds me of being at Box CofE Primary when I had a friend who was into Madonna, so we spent a lot of time messing about learning the dance moves. I went on to Corsham School where I really liked maths, but sadly the MS got me and my A Levels were pretty messed up. I always say I didn’t go to university because I went blind instead. Macklemore – 10,000 Hours He’s an American rapper who has overcome issues with drugs and drink. I’ve had to call

Peter Gabriel with Kate Bush – Don’t Give Up This reminds me of my dark times. I needed Betaferon injections but Wiltshire NHS Trust wouldn’t fund them, although just down the road in Bath you could get funding. I had a lot of support from people campaigning for me. Clive Mantle, the Casualty actor who lived in Box, was helpful and James Gray the MP took me up to the House of Commons, where he put my case. I made the local and national newspapers.

Green Day – American Idiot I love this, it’s a cheerful song. I try to focus on positive things rather than the setbacks. In my darkest times I wrote a poem, Paying the Price, which is basically about ‘why is this horrible thing happening to me?’ It was turned into a song and I used that for the title of my book. What helped me get through those difficult times were my mum and my dog Spring, who never used to mind when I sat and cried on her.

Snow Patrol – Chasing Cars This was our wedding song when Adrian and I got married in St Thomas a Becket Church in Box in 2013, after the London Games. We had an amazing day for our wedding with our families and friends around us. Among the guests was my friend and fellow para swimmer Ellie Simmonds. We got to be friends as we were room mates when we were away competing. Tim McGraw – My Little Girl This was the second dance at our wedding, which I did with my dad Mike. I love this song and it seemed perfect for the occasion. The Goo Goo Girls – Iris This song means a lot to me too. At the moment I am focussing on Mexico. Some people are saying that we should use Mexico as a rehearsal for Tokyo in 2020. I say this is no rehearsal, let’s do it. Let’s win! Ed Sheeran – Castle on the Hill Because it’s a song about home and friends and keeping it real. R Kelly – The World’s Greatest I have to have this one. I always wanted to be the world’s greatest and when I won my first gold I was so happy: “Now I really am the world’s greatest,” I thought. I just wanted to prove I could do it, that I could be the best in the world. But now what really motivates me is to inspire and motivate others, to encourage them to believe in themselves and go for it. Stephanie’s book is Paying the Price, published by paperback, £11.99 by Brown Dog Books. Stephanie is available as a motivational speaker. Find her via Twitter @Steph_Millward or on Facebook. She is a supporter of several charities including the MS Society and Just 4 Children which helps families get medical care and support. n

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WHAT’S ON in October EVENTS ARE LISTED IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER BONHAMS VALUATION Monday 2 October, 10am – 2pm n The Roman Baths, Bath Bonhams auctioneers, specialists in antiques, jewellery and art will be valuing small items with all valuation fees going towards the new education centre for the museum, the Archway Project. For larger items, provide an image of the item. Valuation charges, £3 for the first item and £1 for subsequent items. A maximum number of five items will be allowed. No appointment is necessary. HOW THE OTHER HALF LOVES Monday 2 – Saturday 7 October, times vary n Theatre Royal, Saw Close, Bath A star-studded cast, including Robert Daws, Sara Crowe, Matthew Cottle and Charlie Brooks transfers this Alan Ayckbourn hit comedy from the West End. Tickets, tel: 01225 448844 or visit: theatreroyal.org.uk. Also at the Theatre Royal this month ELAINE PAIGE Sunday 15 October, 7.30pm Singer Elaine Paige, the first lady of musical theatre comes to Bath for a one-off concert, in which she’ll perform many of her hits, interspersed with anecdotes. Tickets from £35.

Stacey Kent at the Wiltshire Music Centre

EDITOR’S PICK Himal: fashion and accessories from the Himalayas, a charity sale

STACEY KENT Friday 27 October, 7.30pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Ashley Road, Bradford on Avon As the music centre begins its 20th anniversary season, it proves itself time and time again as the provider of world class music of all genres. Grammy nominated jazz star Stacey Kent returns from her native America with a collection of songs, including bossa nova classics, French chansons and American standards. Band members include her husband and fellow song-writer Jim Tomlinson on sax and flute. Tickets: £23 / £11.50 u18s and students. Tel: 01225 860100 or visit: wiltshiremusic.org.uk.

GHOSTS Wednesday 4 – Saturday 7 October, 7.30pm n The Rondo Theatre, St Saviour’s Road, Larkhall Ibsen’s masterpiece, presented by Bath Drama. Oswald returns to his family home, where an orphanage is due to open in honour of his late father. But as the secrets about his true character are revealed, so we learn that Oswald is having to live with the consequences. Tickets from £10: rondotheatre.com.

Prohibition Ball at the American Museum

HIMAL: FASHION AND ACCESSORIES FROM THE HIMALAYAS Friday 6 and Saturday 7 October, 10.30am – 4.30pm n 5 Old King Street (next to Hall and Woodhouse), Bath This is a popular annual sale of beautiful, handmade cashmere shawls and scarves, silk and cotton pyjamas, handbags, children’s slippers and Christmas decorations – all from the Himalayas and sold to raise money for the locally run charity The Charitable Foundation for the Education of Nepalese Children.

Charlie Brooks and Robert Daws at the Theatre Royal Bath

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BOTTOM’s DREAM Friday 6 October, 7.30pm n The Mission Theatre, Corn Street, Bath Amateur actor Nick fails yet again to get a good part but when he


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falls asleep he finds himself starring in a most ambitious part in a world of fantasy and dreams. Shakespeare Live is on tour with this show, adapted from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Tickets from the Bath Box Office, visit: shakespearelive.com. KAKATSITSI Friday 6 October, 7.30pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Ashley Road, Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire This group of Ghanian drummers played the main stage at WOMAD last Kakatsitsi at the Wiltshire Music Centre year. They’ve teamed up with the Gubi family from Namibia to produce a stirring mix of drumming, chanting, singing and dancing. The show will be preceeded by a free workshop at 6pm, which is open to all. Tickets: £16 / £8 under 18s and students, tel: 01225 860100 or visit: wiltshiremusic.org.uk. Also at the Wiltshire Music Centre this month DORIC STRING QUARTET Friday 13 October, 7.30pm The quartet is one of Britain’s leading chamber groups. The programme comprises Haydn’s String Quartet Op64, Britten’s Quartet No 1 and Mendelssohn’s String Quartet Op 44 No 3. Tickets: £20, under 25s free. HOPE AND SOCIAL Sunday 15 October, 7.30pm A folk-rock six-piece based in Yorkshire who throw themselves wholeheartedly into every performance. As seen at Leeds Arena and Glastonbury. Tickets: £15 / £7.50 under 18s and students. CHAPLIN SILENT SOUNDTRACKS Friday 20 October, 7.30pm Screenings from Charlie Chaplin’s classic films The Immigrant, The Adventure and Modern Times will be accompanied by live music from violinist Matthew Trusler and pianist Ashley Wass, to mark the 100th anniversary of the silent screen star’s The Mutual Comedies. Tickets: £18 / £9 under 18s and students.

Bath Royal Literary & Scientific Institution Forthcoming Events: Women’s Lives and Liberation 9th October ● 7.30pm

How Emotions Drive Economic Decisions 10th October ● 7.30pm

Visual Arts in the 1960s 11th October ● 7.30pm

Is the World Becoming More Peaceful? 17th October ● 7.30pm

Exploring the Ocean Floor 26th October ● 7.30pm

The Remarkable Miss Breton:

Just one of the many publications available to buy at The Bath Royal Literary & Scientific Institution. 16 - 18 Queen Square, Bath, BA1 2HN 01225 312 084 www.brlsi.org reception@brlsi.org

HUSH NO MORE Saturday 7 October, 7.30pm n St Luke’s Church, Wellsway, Bath The Paragon Singers, conducted by Sarah Latto, offers a programme centred on Britten’s thrilling a cappella masterpiece, Hymn to St Cecilia, and also includes pieces by Monteverdi, Purcell and Rose. A captivating evening with one of Bath’s foremost chamber choirs. Tickets: £12, Bath Box Office: 01225 463362. PROHIBITION BALL Saturday 7 October, 7.30pm n The American Museum, Claverton, Bath To co-incide with the Jazz Age exhibition, the museum is transporting guests back to the 1920s with a costume ball. Dress in your best 1920s inspired outfits, dance to Victoria Klewin’s Speakeasy Band and sip prohibition-era cocktails handcrafted by the Abbey Hotel’s pop-up bar. Tickets £15. Pre-booking is essential. To book, visit: americanmuseum.org or call: 01225 460503. Also at the American Museum this month 1920S JAZZ AGE: FASHION AND PHOTOGRAPHS Until Sunday 29 October, 10.30am – 5pm, Tuesday to Sunday (also open Bank Holiday Monday) Evoking the days of prohibition in America, the bright young things, the decadence and the music. More than 100 objects from 1919 to 1929. Tickets include entrance to the main house, the grounds and the exhibition: £12 / £10.50 over 60s and students, children, £6.50. Continued page 36

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We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family then we are able to offer a mailing service for only £15.00 (6 issues) or £40.00 Euro zone; £30.00 (12 issues) or £70.00 Euro zone World Zone 1 £95.00 World Zone 2 £120.00 To subscribe to receiving the magazine go to our website; www.thebathmag.co.uk and scroll to the bottom of the page where you can click to an instant link Alternatively send a cheque payable to MC Publishing Ltd 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED or Telephone 01225 424 499 for card payment

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Craft show and quilt exhibition at the Bath and West Showground

EDANA MINGHELLA QUARTET Saturday 7 October, 8pm n Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls, Bath Edana Minghella is a highly successful jazz vocalist, regularly playing to full houses at home and abroad. She’ll be singing songs from Billie Holiday’s extensive repertoire. Tickets: £15 (£17 on the door). Visit: chapelarts.org, tel 01225 461700. Also at Chapel Arts this month PIERRE BENSUSAN Thursday 12 October, 8pm Multi-award winning and much acclaimed acoustic guitar virtuoso and vocalist Pierre Bensusan has played internationally for more than four decades. Catch one of the greatest guitar players of the 21st century when he plays Bath. Tickets: £13 (£15 on the door). ELVIS 56: FROM MEMPHIS TO HOLLYWOOD Saturday 21 October, 8pm Elvis 56 and his If I Can Dream Band take us from Memphis to Hollywood with renditions of the King’s greatest hits, especially those linked to his movies. Tickets: £17 (£19 on the door). BATH BRUNCH MARKET Sunday 8 October, 9.30am – 3.30pm n Green Park Station, Green Park, Bath Enjoy a late leisurely breakfast at Green Park Station, followed by a pootle around the artisan, vintage and independent stalls in the afternoon. Visit: bathartisanmarket.com.

Charlie Chaplin celebrated in film and music at the Wiltshire Music Centre

Elvis 56, an award-winning tribute act at Chapel Arts Music Centre

PUBLIC TALK: ART AND THE THAMES Monday 9 October, 1.30pm n The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath Art of the River through Artists’ Eyes is a talk by Alexandra Epps, who will be examining the way the Thames has inspired artists. Visitors welcome £10. No booking needed. Visit: theartssocietybath.com. CHRISTMAS EVE Thursday 12 October – Saturday 11 November, times vary n The Ustinov Studio, Bath Following national acclaim for The Mentor, starring F Murray Abraham, director Laurence Boswell has been reunited with writer Daniel Kehlmann and translator Christopher Hampton for this UK premiere. It all begins when a philosophy professor is unexpectedly bundled into police custody . . . Tickets: from £15. Visit: theatreroyal.org.uk or tel: 01225 448844.

Hope and Social at the Wiltshire Music Centre

Water Splash by Michael Hodgson, one of the photographs in an exhibition in Bradford on Avon

CRICKETER MIKE BREARLEY Thursday 12 October, 8pm n Topping & Co bookshop, the Paragon, Bath (some events are at other venues, check ticket for details) Former England cricket captain Mike Brearley will be discussing the idea of being in the zone as a state of mind, from the conscious determination involved in training and practice through to the almost spiritual state of being inspired. Tickets: £6 / £7, tel: 01225 428111. Also at Topping & Co this month SIMON JENKINS ON BRITISH RAILWAY STATIONS Thursday 19 October, 8pm Historian Simon Jenkins explores Britain’s railways to uncover the history, geography, design and significance of these marvellous, and often undersung places that link our nation. Tickets: £8 / £25. RIVERFORD MASTER VEG COOKERY WORKSHOPS Friday 13 October, 7pm – 9pm n Marshfield Community Hall, Marshfield, Gloucestershire These two-hour, hands-on classes offer seasonal veg inspiration. Turn a box of veg, fresh from the Riverford farm, into an inspirational organic feast. Learn essential skills – such as the best way to slice greens and segment citrus. All abilities welcome. Tickets: £25. After the class enjoy a meal over a glass of organic wine or beer. Bookings: riverford.co.uk/bat/masterveg – there are classes in Midsomer Norton and Longwell Green in November, email: alanandvicki@riverfordhomedelivery.co.uk. Continued page 38

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WHAT’S | ON THE BRUTON DECORATIVE ANTIQUES FAIR Friday 13, 2pm – 5pm) – Sunday 15 October, 11am – 5pm Saturday and Sunday n Haynes International Motor Museum, Sparkford, BA22 7LH Some of the most exciting decorative dealers from the UK and Europe. There’ll be 18th – 20th century decorative items for the home and garden, English folk art, French and Swedish painted furniture, mid-century furniture, textiles, lighting, mirrors, jewels and vintage designer handbags. Parking and restaurant on site. Complimentary tickets, visit: brutondecorativeantiquesfair.co.uk. ACHIEVE EXPO Saturday 14 and Sunday 15 October, see website for times of speakers n The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath Homes Under the Hammer presenter Martin Roberts has invited celebrities to give talks to inspire and uplift. These include Ruby Wax, Frank Bruno, Ella Mills of Deliciously Ella and Sharron Davies. There’s also an exhibition featuring wealth creation, fitness and motivation. Tickets visit: achieve.co.uk or tel: 01225 463362. THE INDEPENDENT BATH MARKET Sunday 15 October, 10am – 4pm n Abbey Green, Bath An independent monthly market featuring artisan and craft items, from handmade stationery to Somerset cider or freshly picked local flowers – you’ll discover different stallholders each month. The shops around the square are also worth a browse. CRAFT SHOW AND QUILT EXHIBITION Thursday 19 – Saturday 21 October, 10am – 5pm n The Bath and West Showground, near Shepton Mallet Three exhibition areas include a new quilt and textiles hall, where visitors will be able to enjoy the famous Magna Carta Quilts along with more than 100 quilt exhibits from different groups, including the Bath Quilters. There’ll also be craft suppliers, embroidery displays, workshops, demonstrations and make and takes. Restaurants, cafés, free car parking. Tickets: £8 adults, £7 concessions, u16s free, tel: 0345 3040222. Save £1 on tickets bought in advance. PASSCHENDALE: AN ACT OF REMEMBRANCE Thursday 19 October, 6.30pm n St Michael’s Without Church, Broad Street, Bath There will be a series of readings and music from the Bath Spa Band and Priordonnas choir to mark the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Passchendaele in 1917. It is in memory of all those who fought in this long-running First World War battle and has been sponsored by the families of TR Hayes and David Britton, who both had relatives who were killed in that conflict. A retiring collection will be held in aid of Help for Heroes charity. WESTONBIRT CHARITIES GYPSY BALL Saturday 21 October, 7pm n Westonbirt School, near Tetbury, Gloucestershire GL8 8QG Tuck in to Moroccan mezzes and tagines, enjoy magicians, entertainers and dancing to gypsy punk band Ushti Baba. Tickets: £65, includes entry to the Westonbirt Charities Fair, from: westonbirtfair.org. Supporting Home-Start SD and the Great Western Air Ambulance. Also at Westonbirt this month WESTONBIRT CHARITIES FAIR Tuesday 24 and Wednesday 25 October, 10am – 5pm Gifts and treats, talks by local authors, hunt the reindeer for children, displays of wearable art, free visits to the gardens and refreshments in the restaurant. A not-for-profit event supporting Home-Start SD, the Great Western Air Ambulance and Toucan for Children. Tickets £7.50 at: westonbirtfair.org, or £8 at the door. Under 16s free. Continued page 40 38 TheBATHMagazine

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WHAT’S | ON BRADFORD ON AVON U3A PHOTOGRAPHIC GROUP Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 October, 10am – 4pm n The West Barn, opposite the Tithe Barn, Bradford on Avon The University of the Third Age group of 30 members will be exhibiting about 70 pictures. Meeting once a month members show their pictures and get feedback about their work. Visit: boau3a.com. ELSIE AND NORM’S MACBETH Wednesday 25 – Saturday 28 October n The Rondo Theatre, St Saviour’s Road, Larkhall The Old Bag Theatre Company is putting on a 40th anniversary production of this domestic comedy. Norman and Elsie Grimethorpe have decided to stage Macbeth in their living room. Tickets: £12 / £10 from: ticketsource.co.uk/event or tel: 0333 666 3366. THE MAYOR OF BATH’S ART SHOW Friday 27 – Saturday 28 October, 10am – 4pm n The Guildhall, High Street, Bath Held during Bath’s open houses week and organised by the Bathavon Rotary Club. Around 200 paintings will be on show and for sale, with profits going to the Mayor of Bath’s Relief Fund and to the Bath Stroke Support Group and Dorothy House. BATH ARTISAN MARKET Sunday 29 October, 10am – 4pm n Queen Square, Bath More than 50 local artisans, vintage dealers and designer-makers pop-up alongside delicious street food stalls, stirring up delicacies including Indian, Thai, Caribbean and German food with vegan, gluten-free and vegetarian options too. Visit: bathartisanmarket.com. NATIONAL SPA WEEK Monday 30 October – Sunday 5 November n Thermae Bath Spa, Bath Monday 30 October, 2.30pm – 4pm free spa-themed walking tour, Tuesday 31 October, 10am – 5pm Cross Bath open day, Wednesday 1 November, 11.30am – 4.30pm, free consultations in the Thermae Bath Spa shop, Thursday 2 November, 6pm – 7.30pm, music in the Minerva Bath. For more details visit: thermaebathspa.com. RETURN TO WELLNESS DAY Saturday 4 November, 10am – 4.30pm n Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel, Bath A day dedicated to wellness, including a yoga session, mindfulness, nutrition and life coaching, lunch and a chance to use the five-star spa facilities. Places are limited, £35. To book tel: 01225 358888.

PLANNING AHEAD . . . PHILIP PULLMAN Saturday 4 November, noon n Komedia, Westgate Street, Bath Fans of the creator of the trilogy His Dark Materials will be delighted that the British author has two books published this autumn. Daemon Voices is a collection of essays, which will be the main focus of this talk, while The Book of Dust: Volume I revisits Lyra and her world. Tickets: from £20, redeemable against book purchase, from Topping & Co bookshop, the Paragon, tel: 01225 428111. BATH MOZARTFEST 2017 Friday 10 – Saturday 18 November n Various venues around Bath Long-standing artistic director Amelia Freedman has put together a stellar programme, including the Takacs Quartet, the New York based Escher Quartet and the BBC Symphony Orchestra. The programme is out in paper and online: bathmozartfest.org.uk. Tickets from £12, tel: 01225 463362. n

For more what’s on and things to do in Bath this month, visit us online at thebathmag.co.uk or follow us on twitter for updates @thebathmagazine

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FILM | BATH

LIGHTS, CAMERA – ACTION FilmBath’s creative director Philip Raby picks some highlights of November’s annual festival of film

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ath’s widely-envied annual celebration of cinema will bear a new name – FilmBath Festival – when it returns to the city from Saturday 2 to Sunday 12 November but, happily, with no change to its track record at clinching previews of the new films destined to become the most talked movies of 2018. Among the hot titles in the mix is The Battle of the Sexes, inspired by the true story of the 1973 tennis match between the world’s then top seeded woman Billie Jean King (Emma Stone) and ex champ and hustler Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell). It won’t reach UK cinemas until the end of the year but FilmBath is showing it as part of its launch party – happening at the Roman Baths amid eye-popping light projections by Bath School of Art & Design and co-hosted by Pukka (sponsors of the festival’s F-Rated strand of films by or starring women). In another coup, the festival will close with a preview of Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, a pitch black comedy, by In Bruges director Martin McDonagh, which has already won the prize for best screenplay at the Venice Film Festival and the Grolsch People’s Choice award, the top prize at the Toronto International Film Festival – so don’t be surprised if it carries off Best Picture in the Oscars. Between these two, there will be around 40 new-to-view screenings as well as nostalgia, including a 25th anniversary screening of the Oscar-winning The Crying Game. This tense thriller, written and directed by Neil Jordan, was set against the 42 TheBATHMagazine

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high again with this pitch-black comedy about a grieving woman (Frances McDormand) determined to shake local police into track down her daughter’s killer. The film also stars Emmy award-winning and Academy Award nominee Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell and Game of Thrones’ favourite Peter Dinklage.

background of the Troubles in Northern Ireland and starred Adrian Dunbar, Forest Whitacker and Miranda Richardson. Its Bath-based producer Stephen Woolley will be on hand at the screening for a question and answer session with the audience. There will also be a tribute to Los Vagueness, which many Glastonbury Festival veterans will remember from their time at the festival, with the regional premiere of a documentary, accompanied by live music, a DJ set and burlesque acts, celebrating this much-missed surreal zone of the Glastonbury scene, Lost in Vagueness. FilmBath Festival’s head of programming is lifelong film fan and former owner of On The Video Front, Philip Raby. Here, Philip picks out his personal favourites from the festival’s programme which, uniquely, offers as many films directed by women as by men. THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOUR Writer/director Martin McDonagh scores

PROFESSOR MARSTON AND THE WONDER WOMEN This is wonderfully timely given how Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman film has electrified the box office. It’s about the man who created the Wonder Woman character because he saw empowering potential in a female superhero. THE FLORIDA PROJECT Director Sean Baker takes the unpromising subject of a single mother struggling in a grubby motel with her six-year-old daughter and turns it into a heartwarming, lifeaffirming elegy to the creativity and imagination of children. Starring Willem Dafoe. WE CAN BE HEROES Good to see a film with a Bath connection, this is based on a book by Bath-based author Catherine Bruton and was filmed locally. It tells the story of a fatherless 11-year-old boy Ben, who gets into adventures after he befriends the Muslim girl next door while holidaying with his grandparents. Cast and crew members will attend the screening for a question and answer session with the audience.


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COMING TO SCREENS NEAR YOU: clockwise from top left, Becoming Cary Grant, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Lost in Paris, Aurore, Hotel Salvation, Even When I Fall and The Florida Project Opposite page, A Fantastic Woman and, inset, Miranda Richardson in The Crying Game

THE BREADWINNER A gorgeous animation about an Afghan girl who disguises herself as a boy to help her family to survive after the household’s one male – her father – is arrested by the Taliban. EVEN WHEN I FALL A beautiful and touching documentary about two young women, trafficked to India as performers, who start their own circus after getting no welcome when they return to their homes in Nepal. MY JOURNEY THROUGH FRENCH CINEMA For those (like me) who regard great French films as cinema’s crème de la crème, this guided tour from the great director Bertrand Tavernier of his personal choices is a gourmet banquet of delights. AURORE This stars the remarkable Agnès Jaoui as a 50-something single woman with an annoying ex and two daughters on the cusp of independence. Life is not easy but, fortunately, her resilience and sense of humour are intact and she can find her place in the world.

LOST IN PARIS The physical comedy traditions of Chaplin and Tati are continued triumphantly by the elastic duo of Fiona Gordon and Dominique Abel as an archetypal odd couple. She’s a tourist; he’s homeless. This looks like a match made in heaven – if they can stay on their feet. SAMI BLOOD One of three prize-winning European films FilmBath is able to show this year thanks to the European Parliament’s Lux Film Prize initiative. This one focuses on a teenage girl conflicted by Sweden’s efforts in the 1930s to suppress the indigenous culture of its Sami people. Free tickets are on offer for all three of the Lux films. See website for details. BECOMING CARY GRANT Many people know that Cary Grant was once just plain Archie Leach, a poor boy from Bristol, who became the biggest movie star in the world. Few know the way in which he achieved that remarkable transformation, or his experiments with LSD – before the drug became illegal – to help sort himself out.

Mark Kidel’s documentary shows clips from his Hollywood films as well as the actor’s private home films. IN BETWEEN A brilliantly made and well-acted film about three Palestinian women in Israel and how they use the bonds of friendship to handle the religious and sexual oppression of their culture and the challenges of living in the State that occupies their homeland. A FANTASTIC WOMAN Sebastián Lelio’s new film is a wonderful and moving account of a transgender woman, her relationship with an older man and how her life is destroyed by his sudden death, followed by the mistrust and hostility of everyone around her. HOTEL SALVATION A gem of a discovery, about an old Indian man who takes his unwilling son to a hotel by the Ganges as he prepares to leave this life. For full details visit: filmbath.org.uk, look out for the free FilmBath Festival brochure on Friday 13 October or find FilmBath on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. n

RE-BRANDING FOR SOUTH WEST’S LONGEST RUNNING FILM FESTIVAL South west England’s longest-running film festival, the Bath Film Festival has rebranded itself as simply FilmBath. After 27 years as the Bath Film Festival, the organising charity has changed its name to FilmBath to recognise that its activities now also include the year-round promotion of The F-Rating, championing films directed and/or written by or starring women; the IMDb New Filmmaker and Script to Screen

Awards, for emerging talent, and FilmScore, a competition for young screen composers. The new branding – created by Koop Design of Bath - will make its debut for the FilmBath Festival 2017 – an 11-day programme of UK and regional feature and documentary premieres; classics from around the world, awards-nominated shorts, director Q&As and special interest strands, with a full 50% of the films F-Rated.

FilmBath’s director Holly Tarquini says: “The name may be different but we guarantee we will be offering the same eyeopening, entertaining and inspiring selection of films and film-related events which have always made this festival unmissable.” To encourage more young people to enjoy its diverse programme half price ticket discounts have been introduced for festivalgoers under 25s.

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BATH | HERITAGE

BATH’S DARK GOTHIC PAST As Halloween approaches Jenny McAuley explores the city’s links with the Gothic writers of the last 200 years

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t was 200 years ago this December that Jane Austen’s famous parody of the Gothic novel, Northanger Abbey, was published. Appearing six months after the author’s death in July 1817, it affectionately mocked the melodramatic conventions of the Gothic romances of her youth. Like Austen’s last-completed novel Persuasion (with which it was simultaneously published), Northanger Abbey also evoked the streets and social life of Bath as experienced by Austen while visiting in 1799, and living there between 1801 and 1806. It’s only when Austen’s teenaged heroine Catherine Morland leaves the polite Assembly Rooms and bustling shops of 1790s Bath for mysterious Northanger Abbey that she begins to think her Gothic fantasies, fuelled by the sensational fictions of Ann Radcliffe, might be coming true. But Bath is steeped in Gothic histories of its own. Although its harmonious neo-classical architecture, and its fame as a health spa, may not immediately suggest the uncanny, Bath has been home to some of the most iconic and influential English women writers of Gothic fiction. For the fictional heroine Catherine Morland, Milsom Street is a significant location because it is where the object of her affections, witty Henry Tilney, is lodging. As a fan of Ann Radcliffe’s phenomenally successful novel The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794), however, Catherine might have been still more interested in Milsom Street had she known of its associations with Radcliffe – whose parents, William and Ann Ward, ran a showroom there for the porcelain-makers Josiah Wedgwood and Thomas Bentley. Having begun work at the first Wedgwood showroom in Bath (at Westgate Buildings) in 1772, William Ward relocated it to 22 Milsom Street in 1779. Although the young Ann Ward appears to have spent much of her childhood in the household of Wedgwood’s business partner Thomas Bentley (her mother’s brother-in-law) near London, she was certainly residing at Bath at the time of her marriage to the London journalist William Radcliffe, whose radical political views she shared. Their wedding took place at St Michael’s Without Church, Broad Street on 15 January 1787, when Ann was aged 23. Ann Radcliffe perfected a formula that characterised a specifically female strand of the literary Gothic for decades to come. The ‘female Gothic’ focused upon distressed heroines trapped in sinister castles or abbeys, which represented the constraints placed upon women’s lives under the patriarchal laws of 18th and 19th century Britain. Radcliffe herself learned from earlier authors 44 TheBATHMagazine

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such as Sophia Lee, another Bath resident. The daughter of actors, Lee established a prestigious (and profitable) girls’ school on Lansdown Road along with her sisters Harriet, Charlotte, and Anna in 1781 – initially funding the enterprise with proceeds from her dramatic writing. By 1786, the sisters had resettled their school at the larger Lansdown Road premises of Belvedere House. Sophia Lee’s 1784 romance The Recess, about the fictional adventures of two equally fictional daughters of Mary, Queen of Scots, is wildly far-fetched and over-sentimental to modern tastes. It nevertheless significantly influenced the development of historical fiction in England – while featuring such defining Gothic hallmarks as dark, imposing

architecture (the action of The Recess opens with the heroines secretly confined in a system of underground chambers, beneath a ruined monastery). When Sophia Lee died in 1824, her obituary in the Gentleman’s Magazine mentioned that she had been acquainted in Bath with the young Ann Radcliffe (‘Miss Ward’), adding that Radcliffe was an admirer of The Recess. Radcliffe biographers have doubted later claims that she attended Lee’s school, as she was already aged 17 when it opened; though it did admit young women up to about age 19 as ‘parlour boarders’, for training in etiquette and fashionable accomplishments. 20 years on from Radcliffe’s 1790s heyday, another young woman writer made Bath her


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BATH | HERITAGE

DARK IMAGINATION: main picture, an early book cover of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein by Theodore Von Holst (1810 – 1844), Tate Britain. Private collection, Bath Above, Gothic writers, Mary Shelley (image, Richard Rothwell), and right, Sophia Lee, (image by engraver William Ridley, after Thomas Lawrence), images via Wikimedia Commons Inset, detail from the gilding on Beckford’s Tower, Lansdown, photo by Neill Menneer of Spirit Photographic

base as she drafted perhaps the most famous of all female-authored Gothic novels: Frankenstein (1818). As her journal precisely records, 19-year-old Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley lived in Bath between 10 September 1816 and 26 January 1817, settling first at 5 Abbey Churchyard (which no longer exists). She travelled there with her unmarried stepsister Claire Clairmont, who was then pregnant by English Romantic poet and politician Lord Byron. When Mary Shelley arrived in Bath, she was still Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, daughter of radical authors William Godwin and his first wife Mary Wollstonecraft (who had died within days of Mary Shelley’s birth in 1797). Her marriage to poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, her lover of two years, took place on 30 December 1816, following the suicide earlier that month of Shelley’s first wife, Harriet Westbrook. This event had followed the suicide two months previously of Mary’s 21-year-old half-sister Frances, Mary Wollstonecraft’s daughter by American speculator Gilbert Imlay. Wollstonecraft herself was first employed as a lady’s companion on Milsom Street, near the Wedgwood showroom run by Radcliffe’s parents, during 1779 – 80. After Wollstonecraft’s death, Godwin also visited Bath in 1798, during his unsuccessful courtship of Sophia Lee’s sister and fellow author Harriet Lee. Mary Shelley’s work on Frankenstein in Bath formed part of a routine of writing, reading, drawing, and caring for her year-old son

William, steadily maintained despite the traumatic events of that autumn. She recorded her progress in letters to Shelley, frequently absent from her on business in London. On 5 December 1816, she reported having just completed the fourth chapter of Frankenstein – in which the monstrous creature comes to life on ‘a dreary night of November’. With Halloween approaching there’s still a dark thrill to be had from reading Mary Shelley’s tale of the creature: ‘By the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull, yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs . . . I rushed out of the room.’ Bath’s gothic echo continues down through the years. In the 20 century, it was while living on Hay Hill just off the Paragon, between 1973 and 1976 that Angela Carter began the dark fairytales collected in The Bloody Chamber (1979), which updated the ‘female gothic’ tradition of exposing patriarchal abuses. Carter was particularly alert to Bath’s eerie aspects. In her 1975 essay Bath, Heritage City, she noted the AngloSaxons’ superstitious fear of the site, with its crumbling Roman ruins and mysteriously heated waters. Carter herself loved the ‘haunting silences’ of 1970s Bath, and its then still-lingering atmosphere of faded Regency glamour – and perhaps even in today’s larger, livelier city, a hint of the gothic spirit that has inspired so many great authors might still occasionally be felt, as the nights draw in. n THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

IN GOTHIC MOOD Seekers of darkly romantic spots in Bath will find the city’s many historic graveyards a happy hunting ground. The 120 foot folly, Beckford’s Tower at Lansdown, built in the 1820s by William Beckford is a particularly evocative spot to visit, its air of mystery enhanced by the fact it stands in a cemetery. The museum is open regularly, giving visitors the chance to climb the dark stone spiral staircase to the viewpoint belvedere at the top. On Thursday 30 November The Beckford Book Group will meet at 7pm at the tower to discuss the great Gothic novel Dracula by Bram Stoker. To join them visit: beckfordstower.org.uk.

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AUTUMN | READING

CALL OF THE WILD

We pick six of the best books about nature from the shelves of Bath independent bookshop Topping & Co Windblown by Tamsin Treverton-Jones Hardback, £20, published by Hodder & Stoughton

Waterlog by Roger Deakin Paperback, £9.99, published by Vintage Publishing Deakin was a pioneer in modern wild swimming and a persuasive advocate of plunging into any stretch of open water, from waterfalls and cairns to rivers, lakes and the sea for the sheer, sometimes rebellious joy, of being immersed in water. In this classic 1999 volume he set out from his home in Suffolk (where he had the luxury of a moat to swim in at his pleasure) to swim his way across Britain. It includes a chapter on swimming at Farleigh Hungerford, on a quiet morning. He wrote of: ‘an enchanting south–facing grassy hillside, swooping down to the riverside through a sheltered little water meadow.’ Waterlog is one of those books whose popularity has been spread by word of mouth.

The Great Storm of 1987 claimed the lives of 18 people in Britain and uprooted more than 15 million trees. On the 30th anniversary of that October night comes this meticulously researched and absorbing account of some of the dramatic scenes that played themselves out over land and sea. Tamsin Treverton-Jones uncovers stories we may have not heard before, such as the eventful last journey of the former Herald of Free Enterprise, the ferry which had months before capsized with the loss of 193 lives, while being towed off to a shipping graveyard twice broke her chains and had to be recaptured. Meanwhile on Hastings beach the fishing community was working together to bring its fleet as far up the shingle as possible when tragedy struck. Beautifully written – you can almost feel the wind blowing through the pages – this is a personal tale too of landscape, legacy and loss. Tamsin will be at Topping & Co bookshop, Tuesday 7 November. The Man Who Climbs Trees by James Aldred Hardback, £16.99, published by WH Allen A newly published memoir by a professional tree climber and cameraman who has worked all over the world with the BBC Natural History Unit. Aldred’s tree top adventures range from scrambling up an oak as a youngster in the New Forest to escape exuberant ponies, to scaling the mighty canopy of the rainforest in Borneo and filming people building a tree house in Papua. He recounts the heart-stopping experience of hoisting David Attenborough 150 feet into the air among the treetops for a to-camera piece of filming, facing a camera which was also dangling, acutely aware that the fate of a national treasure lay in his hands. Above all else, quite literally, Aldred conveys the different character of trees and the wonder of this almost other-worldly experience as you leave the ground behind and disappear up into the arms of the world’s giants.

Landmarks by Robert Macfarlane, with artwork by Stanley Donwood Paperback, £9.99, published by Penguin Books This is another perennial, a classic example of fine prose about landscape. Macfarlane is like a Pied Piper, leading us not only into pastures new as he explores the physical landscape, from lonely mountainside to brownfield sites, but also pointing out other writers and their work along the way. This is a good starting point to head off and explore the work of other nature writers, including Nan Shepherd, whose book The Living Mountain is a vintage treasure.

Climbing Days by Dan Richards Paperback, £9.99, Faber and Faber Bath based writer Dan Richards took inspiration from the memoir of his great, great aunt Dorothy Pilley, who with her husband Ivor Richards was a mountaineer in the early 20th century. He set out in her footsteps, literally, heading for the peaks she had conquered. But first he had to learn how to climb . . . This book is almost like a scrapbook of his adventures and those of his relative and her fellow tribe of mountaineers. There is the romance of human endeavour as tiny specks of climbers make their ant-like labourious way up vast snowy slopes, but there is also the very real reminder that mountaineering is a precarious activity, as rocks, crevasses or a simple mis-placed footstep can end the life of even the most prepared climber.

Rain: Four Walks In English Weather by Melissa Harrison Paperback, £8.99, published by Faber and Faber It’s fair to say that the English have an obsession with rain, which is perhaps why nature writer Melissa Harrison managed to compile a glossary for 100 different words and phrases we use to describe the wet stuff falling from the sky. Some of these are delightful regional terms, such as the Cornish skew, meaning thick, driving but short-lived drizzle, or the Lincolnshire word for raining steadily – juggin. Harrison takes four walks through different parts of the country; Dartmoor, the Darent Valley in Kent, Shropshire and Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire. She takes each walk

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during rainy weather, observing at one point on Dartmoor that it is largely rain that has formed this landscape and that we only see half the picture of a place if we only visit on sunny days. It’s a slim volume but packed with beautifully descriptive writing to be enjoyed and savoured, whether you’re reading it on a cold night tucked up on a sofa, swathed in a velvet throw and with the woodburner fired up, or shortly after a bracing walk in which coat, hair and eyelashes are beaded in waterdrops. Either way, Rain has been an award-winner and a popular read. It’s also a great addition to the growing canon of British books which lyrically celebrate our diverse and beautiful wild landscape, from flat fens to snowy mountain tops.


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Original Furniture . Art . Homewares . Events

‘TEXTURES’ Weds 4 Oct 6-9pm see website for details

ver veliving.uk/events 15 Walcot Buildings. London Rd. BA1 6AD 07785 332536 | 07712 467347

Iconic chairs by Hans J. Wegner

The CH25 in oak-soap, CH22 in oak-walnut oil, CH26 in walnut-oak, CH23 in oak-walnut oil, and the CH24 in oak-white oil.

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Contemporary Nordic furniture from Carl Hansen and Son, Fritz Hansen and Swedese. Lighting by Louis Poulsen. Our homewares include Marimekko, Iittala, Rorstrand, with lots of Moomin mugs, fabric and throws from Denmark, Sweden and Finland.

68 Walcot Street Bath BA1 5BD 01225 424222 www.shannon-uk.com


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The Shells by Abigail Bowen, oil on canvas, at Lane House Arts

THE ART LOVER’S GUIDE A creative hub for artists, sculptors and curators, Bath’s galleries present their autumn collection

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ARTIST | PROFILE

A COLOURFUL TRIBUTE

Georgette McCready looks at a major exhibition in Bath staged by the publicly owned Victoria Art Gallery, which turns out to be an unexpected tribute to artist Howard Hodgkin, who died during its planning stages

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s the shorter days of autumn leach the colour and light from the streets of Bath, there’s a place to visit that seeped in the rich, sun-baked shades of India. The paintings of the late artist Howard Hodgkin, evoke a hot climate far from the pastels and greys of the British climate. A new exhibition at the Victoria Art Gallery, celebrates Hogkin’s long association with India and opens in the same month that Southeby’s is holding an auction of some of his work and hundreds of eclectic works of art and sculptures, his collection of pieces by other artists. It was reported in The Times recently that Hogkin’s partner Antony Peattie, who lived with him for more than 30 years at their Bloomsbury home in London and became his civil partner, had decided to put more than 300 items up for auction following his death aged 84 in March. The Bath exhibition, like those staged at the National Portrait gallery and the Hepworth in Wakefield, Yorkshire, was arranged before Hogkin’s death. 50 TheBATHMagazine

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As its title, India on Paper, suggests, this is a collection of work done over more than 40 years of regular visits to India. He said of his experiences: “Everything is very visible somehow there. Life isn’t covered up with masses of objects, masses of possessions.” Some of his masterpieces were almost lost for ever, after he accidentally left them on the roof of a taxi in India. He had given them up as lost when, a few months later, the Indian police contacted him to say they’d found some paintings and asked were they his. Although Hodgkin was a Londoner by birth he attended the Bath Academy of Art in Corsham, following a time studying at Camberwell art school. He later became a tutor at the academy (from 1955 – 1966) which was where he met his wife and mother of his children, Julia Lane. He was 30 when he had his first solo exhibition. His style was to work slowly, only finishing nine or ten works a year. The painted frames around a piece were a distinguishing issue 181

feature, although he later went on to paint directly onto wooden surfaces, including old table tops and on breadboards. In 1978 his marriage ended and from 1983 he settled down with music critic Antony Peattie. At this time his work went from strength to strength. In 1984 he filled the British Pavilion at the Venice Biennale and the following year won the Turner Prize. He had many friends, including writer Bruce Chatwin and painters David Hockney and Peter Blake and enjoyed painting portraits of them. Hodgkin was honoured to be asked to have a show at the Metropolitan Museum in New York – a rare accolade for a living British artist. He was knighted in 1992, although it was reported that he regretted this decision and used to shudder when people addressed him as ‘sir.’ He was much happier to be awarded a CBE. Throughout his career he proved his unique talent and style by never being part of any art movement or group, but being his own man. Jon Benington, manager of the Victoria Art Gallery said: “Sir

IN THE HEAT: main image, Mango 1990 – 91 Opposite page, Windows (Indian Leaves) 1978 and Monsoon 1987 – 88


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ARTIST | PROFILE

Howard was an alumni of Bath Academy of Art, where he both studied and taught as a young man, before going on to become one of Britain’s greatest painters. India on Paper explores Hodgkin’s love affair with India, which he visited every year from 1964 onwards. “The exhibition, which is exclusive to Bath, features a range of the artist’s Indianthemed works including gouache paintings, editioned prints and hand-coloured impressions made between 1967 and 2012. The show was conceived several years before

Hodgkin’s death. Never intended as a memorial display, I nonetheless hope it will be a fitting tribute to such a distinguished friend of the gallery and bring pleasure to tens of thousands of visitors from all over the world. “As well as including half a dozen works from the Victoria Art Gallery’s permanent collection, we have trawled far and wide to put this exhibition together, including loans from museums and private collections across the UK. Several of the paintings have never been seen in public before. I am hugely

grateful to the artist’s partner Antony Peattie and his studio assistant Andy Barker for giving us the benefit of their expertise and ensuring this is a show the artist would have been proud of.” n Howard Hodgkin: India on Paper, runs from Saturday 14 October to Sunday 7 January at the Victoria Art Gallery, the pubicly owned gallery. The gallery is open 10.30am – 5pm daily with admission to the permanent collections free. Admission to this show, on the ground floor, £4 (u16s and Discovery Card holders free).

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ART LOVER’S | GUIDE

Arrival by Akash Bhatt, at Beaux Arts

BEAUX ARTS

THE ARTS SOCIETY BATH

12 – 13 York Street, Bath BA1 1NG Tel: 01225 464850 Web: beauxartsbath.co.uk

Meetings held at the Assembly Rooms, Bath Tel: 01225 420517 Web: theartssocietybath.com

First opened in 1979, Beaux Arts is the longest established commercial gallery in Bath and is the sister gallery to Beaux Arts in Maddox Street, London. It specialises in the very best contemporary painting, sculpture and studio ceramics. Works by 20th century artists, such as Elisabeth Frink, Lynn Chadwick and Paul Mount, rub shoulders with new luminaries such as Nathan Ford, Anna Gillespie, Helen Simmonds and Simon Allen. The gallery has a programme of eight annual exhibitions, half of which are dedicated to promoting new talent. Noteworthy artists of the current vintage include the 2015 Sunday Times watercolour artist of the year Akash Bhatt, who is also a winner of the Villiers-David Prize and the BP Travel Award. Nathan Ford is another artist of singular talent, frequently lauded by the late Brian Sewell in his Evening Standard column. There is also a wealth of local talent to be seen at Beaux Arts, among them painter Helen Simmonds and sculptor Patrick Haines. Bristol Sculptor Beth Carter's minotaurs and other fantastical beasts also prowl the exhibition spaces within. Beaux Arts is spacious and open and you can depend on work being curated beautifully. With high ceilings and old fireplaces, there is a relaxed and unhurried atmosphere. Forthcoming shows: 16 October – 11 November: new paintings by Akash Bhatt, new sculpture by Beth Carter, new ceramics by Akiko Hirai. 18 November – 24 December: new paintings by Jo Barrett, new ceramics by Jane Muir, small paintings for Christmas.

The Arts Society Bath was established as the Bath Decorative and Fine Arts Society (Afternoon Group) 36 years ago. Over 200 members belong to a vibrant society where they enjoy an exciting and wide ranging programme of lectures, visits, and study days, learning about all aspects of the arts. Lectures are usually on the first Monday of the month beginning at 1.30pm in The Assembly Rooms. The 2017/18 season runs from October to June. The first lecture, The River Through Artists Eyes with Alexandra Epps, is on Monday 9 October – it will be a visual journey down the River Thames, from the historical to the contemporary. Arts Society lectures go through a rigorous selection process and speakers are experts in their fields whether in painting, sculpture, architecture, furniture or the wider arts including music. Members benefit from hearing nine outstanding lectures, plus can join study days and trips and will receive the Arts Society Magazine. The Arts Society Bath welcomes new members and visitors who might like to try a lecture before joining. If readers would like to learn more about the arts in a friendly and informal way, The Arts Society Bath is an enjoyable way of doing so. Information is available from the membership secretary or online.

THE BATH SOCIETY OF BOTANICAL ARTISTS Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, 16 – 18 Queen Square, Bath BA1 2HN Open: Thursday 5 – Monday 23 October 2017, Mon – Sat 10am – 4pm Free admission Visit: bsba.co.uk The Amazing World of Trees exhibition: The Bath Society of Botanical Artists has sought to capture the strong forms and delicate beauty of trees in this exhibition. Trees play an essential role in helping the balance of the world’s ecosystems. They are also a vital component of the British landscape and provide habitats for animals, birds, insects, and plants. Trees give us shade and protection, fuel, fruit and nuts for food and timber for construction. The artists have observed the amazing diversity of trees in great detail to portray compositions that are both scientifically accurate and visually pleasing. A talk, My Life with Trees and Theirs with Me by Alan Power, the garden and estate manager for Stourhead, forms part of the exhibition. The talk, also at BRLSI, is on Friday 13 October at 7.30pm. Tickets available through Bath Box Office, visit: bathboxoffice.org.uk.

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LANE HOUSE ARTS

CATHERINE BEALE PORTRAIT STUDIO Tel: 07891 409490 Web: catherinebeale.com / watercolourportraits.co.uk

5 Nelson Place East, Bath BA1 5DA Tel: 07767 498403 Web: lanehousearts.co.uk

Freefall by Abigail Bowen

Lane House Arts’ first permanent gallery opened in May 2013. This small, beautifully curated exhibition space specialises in contemporary art, ceramics, sculpture and prints carefully selected by director Jenny Pollitt for their quality and originality. In a series of gallery takeovers, guest artists are given the space to curate shows. This close collaboration results in original, exciting and challenging exhibitions. The gallery currently represents a growing number of contemporary artists and makers based in the UK, and displays a unique and strong design aesthetic. It welcomes new collaborations and partnerships, handing the space over to Fringe Arts Bath (FaB) for the last two years and working closely to promote the work of the Bath Spa University School of Art and Design. A new gallery artist arrives in October – Chelsea School of Art trained, Brighton-based painter Abigail Bowen. Abigail used to paint figuratively, then following a spate of mental illness in her family including dementia, Alzheimers and depression, she started to explore a more metaphysical approach and attempted to capture less rigid, more fluid states of mind. “This more abstract approach allowed me to create emotionally informed paintings and to express my feelings about love and loss. A year on, my work is less about memory but continues to try and visualise those emotional states that touch our heart and soul.” The gallery will also be introducing new contemporary ceramic artists as well as showing new work from gallery regular, Bath School of Art and Design graduate Kathryn Stevens. The Christmas show features the work of fine artist Yuki Aruga. Drawing on her mixed Japanese-British heritage, Yuki’s works are an investigation into how we understand, perceive and preserve time. Featuring exquisite, meticulously observed and executed flowers and other natural subjects, they are inspired by European still-life paintings of the 16th and 17th centuries – works associated with the concept of the Sublime – as well as traditional Japanese aesthetic norms.

Catherine Beale is a ‘memory-catcher’, creating bespoke paintings that help crystalise clients’ family memories into artworks to value for years to come. Her contemporary portraits help celebrate important milestones and have been presented with love at the birthdays of parents and grandparents, to mark children growing up and as graduation presents as children fly the nest. Catherine’s light-filled watercolours are especially suited to youthful portraits and their fluid pigments beautifully complement modern interiors. Catherine also paints spectacular Bath landscapes for her clients – whether they are leaving a much loved view, or celebrating their arrival at a beautiful new home. These paintings are formed by the wet-in-wet technique, dropping paint into water to form her own unique gravity paintings. In 2017 Catherine completed 21 years of experience painting to commission. No detail is overlooked as she guides clients step-bystep through the process, right up to advising on conservation framing and assistance unveiling at special events. Catherine’s paintings have been gifted to state collections, commissioned and reproduced by blue chip international companies and recently purchased by music royalty. Her portraits sell from the Mall Galleries in London with the Society of Women Artists. Forthcoming shows: Catherine will be at Imagianation Gallery on Saturday 28 October, 12 – 5pm. Meet the artist and view her very newest landscapes of Bath plus recent portraits. The exhibition continues until Sunday 19 November. Email for details: catherine@catherinebeale.com.

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ONE TWO FIVE GALLERY 4 Abbey Green, Bath BA1 1NW Tel: 07803 033629 Web: onetwofivegallery.co.uk One Two Five Gallery is a unique proposition – it combines the talent of two Bath artists; Carole Waller, whose wearable art has been stocked by Liberty’s and Harvey Nichols, and Gary Wood, whose ceramics are collectable, covetable pieces. Carole is often inspired by the city she calls home with the history of Bath interwoven into her beautiful and original painted scarves, shawls and clothing. Her latest collection reflects elements of the famous map by Gilmore that recorded the scale of the medieval city before the Georgian building boom. Also find paintings as glass panels by Carole, which can be seen as sculptural freestanding pieces, or integrated into the fabric of a building. Collaborating with local craftsmen, Wood and Waller have conjured up some rather wonderful gifts in time for the festive season including bespoke, hand bound note books, leather and canvas bags and a series of aromatic candles in Gary’s ceramic ware. You will also find contemporary jewellery in unusual materials at One Two Five – as well as artist made greetings cards, and a warm welcome from Carole and Gary who are often there in person. You can also make an appointment to commission work on: 07803 033629.

THE EDGE The Edge, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY Web: edgearts.org Parallel (of Life and) Architecture exhibition Until Saturday 4 November, open Tuesday – Thursday 11am – 8pm, Friday and Saturday 11am – 5pm, closed Mondays, free admission Parallel (of Life and) Architecture will see three duos of architects, artists and designers offer new insight into the legacy of Alison and Peter Smithson. It explores their relationship with the avant-garde and ‘architecture as a direct result of a way of life’ (A+PS). Known for their progressive approach, the Smithsons were key figures in the Brutalism movement and had a great fondness for Bath and the surrounding area. Parallel (of Life and) Architecture will be the first exhibition in the autumn season – the finale of events at The Edge celebrating the University’s 50th Anniversary year. This exhibition brings together the work of Turner Prize winning collective Assemble & Simon Terrill, Warren & Mosley, and The Decorators & GOIG who will each take key developments in the Smithsons’ oeuvre as creative departure points to highlight their impact and lasting relevance as radical thinkers. Forthcoming events: Festival of the Future City Bath: Life in the modern metropolis, Thursday 19 – Saturday 21 October The very first Festival of the Future City is coming to Bath this month, presented by The Edge, Architecture Is and Modern Culture. Set in one of the most cherished architectural landscapes, three days of walks, talks, exhibitions and workshops will focus on urban development in the 21st century. Join a variety of leading thinkers, writers, architects and artists, including local film director Ken Loach who gives his own vision for the city, as they help signpost the way and consider the question of how cities should look to the future. Robin Hood Gardens Remembered, Friday 3 November, 6.30pm An evening considering the much debated subject of Alison and Peter Smithson’s Robin Hood Gardens in London; a social housing offering scheduled for demolition. How will Robin Hood Gardens be remembered once it’s gone? Alison and Peter Smithson: Ideas & Impact, Saturday 4 November, 11am – 4pm A very special symposium that draws together a variety of leading international architects, artists and thinkers to consider the ideas and impact of the Smithsons across urbanism, habitation and education. Speakers include Simon Smithson, Peter Salter (2017 RIBA award winner and project architect for Alison and Peter Smithson), Assemble, Christine Boyer, David Turnbull, Keith Bradley, Juliet Bidgood, Dr Amy Frost (Bath Preservation Trust) and more. Admission: £45, includes lunch and refreshments.

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GALLERY & BARROW 118A Walcot Street, Bath BA1 5BG Tel: 01225 311379 Web: galleryandbarrow.com Gallery & Barrow is a contemporary art gallery on Walcot Street, opposite The Bell pub, that sells art by both local and international artists, including a number of screenprinters from Spike Island Studio in Bristol. The gallery shows mixed-media and progressive art featuring experimental techniques and unusual substrates like art on wood. For example, the gallery currently has paintings on wood by Suman Kaur, winner of the BBC’s Big Painting Challenge and Bristol artist Sally Whelan. This October, the Pysche, Dreams & Spaces exhibition includes oil paintings by Bristol based artist Toni Cogdell, which are ethereal, dreamlike portraits and also landscape paintings by local artist Antonella Scarpa-Isles. On Saturday 28 October Gallery & Barrow will be heading north to Manchester for the weekend to participate in The Buy Art Fair. November and December will feature winter scenes including mountains, cabins, snow and skiing mixed-media and screen prints. Artists include Rennie Pilgrem, Heather Power, Anna Harley, Clare Cutts and Michelle Loa Kum Cheung. In addition the gallery be adding some lovely artisan gift products, such as candles, wooden lanterns, vases and ceramics for the Christmas season. Gallery & Barrow gift vouchers are also available.

Ribbons by Toni Cogdell

THE HOLBURNE MUSEUM Great Pulteney Street, Bath BA2 4DB Tel: 01225 388569 Web: holburne.org Seurat to Riley: The Art of Perception Friday 20 October 2017 – Sunday 21 January 2018 Seurat to Riley: The Art of Perception explores how artists have exploited the ways in which the human eye and mind perceive what we see. The exhibition, one of the first of its kind in the UK, will be presented as a carefully curated, in-focus survey at the Holburne Museum, showcasing highlights of painting, sculpture, light works, prints and drawings from a 150-year period. Many artists from the Impressionists onwards were inspired by scientific colour theories, such as the pointillist work of Georges Seurat, where colours other than those painted on the canvas are generated in the eye of the viewer. During the 20th century this interest in perception extended to creating a sense of movement and a variety of artists from the Vorticists to Josef Albers looked at using form, and often colour, to convey the sensation of movement. This interest intensified in the 1950s and 1960s in what came to be known as Op Art and Kinetic Art, exemplified by the work of artists such as Victor Vasarely, Bridget Riley, Jeffrey Steele and Peter Sedgley. The exhibition will trace the history of Op Art from its beginnings in Pointillism and Vorticism, through the 1960s, with a focus on Riley’s iconic monochrome works and the similarly deceptive work in black and white of Steele, Vasarely and Michael Kidner, before looking at how Riley, along with Vasarely, Albers and Sedgley, introduced vivid colour effects. The exhibition will also demonstrate that this art has had a legacy right up to the present, not only in the further development of some of these artists, and highlight how Op Art patterns have crossed-over into popular culture, from Vasarely’s album cover designs for David Bowie, to Riley’s poster design for the 2012 London Olympics. A wide range of talks and events will accompany the exhibition. Highlights include a conversation with ceramicist Sara Moorhouse and Holburne director, Chris Stephens; evening lectures with Bridget Riley expert Frances Follin and Michael Proulx, reader in psychology and director of the Crossmodal Cognition Lab at the University of Bath, as well as adult workshops in poetry, silkscreen printing and paper cutting.

The Morning Walk by Georges Seurat © The National Gallery, London

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JESSICA PALMER Tel: 01225 284598 Web: jessicapalmerart.com Whether it’s a ten-foot high tiger gateway to a forest of imagination, a paper palace to celebrate a world-famous landmark, a life-size paper Tudor gown; a beguiling illustration for a bestselling book or an intricate papercut, Jessica Palmer is the go-to artist for both personal and commercial commissions. She also creates collages and is just about to begin a new book about collage art. Her aim in all her work is to conjure storytelling images with humour and movement. Jessica’s fifth book has just been published by New York publishers Rizzoli. She’s the in-house illustrator for English Heritage and a visiting artist at the V&A, National Portrait Gallery, and many other national institutions. Jessica loves to collaborate. “It’s great when someone is looking for an artist to make something really different, but they’re not sure what it is. It gives me the chance to work through different possibilities with them until we hit on the thing that will be perfect for their particular needs.” For a no-commitment conversation with Jessica about a possible commission, call 01225 284598 or email: palmerk@outlook.com. More examples of Jessica’s beautiful work can be found on her website: jessicapalmerart.com Jessica is running a paper cutting and collage workshop at the Holburne Museum in Bath on Saturday 13 January 2018.

DAVID SIMON CONTEMPORARY David Simon Contemporary 4 Bartlett Street, Bath BA1 2QZ Tel: 01225 460189 Web: davidsimoncontemporary.com David Simon Contemporary represents a stable of established, semi-figurative artists across a programme of monthly exhibitions. October and November sees two major solo exhibitions by Cornish-based painters. Neil Pinkett: Water’s Edge Saturday 30 September – Saturday 28 October With a preference for painting en plein air, Neil Pinkett’s paintings have an exciting energy and directness to them. This latest series of work features paintings of his homeland of the south coast of Cornwall, capturing the raw energy of the sea. In striking contrast he has returned to the still and tranquil waters of the River Avon, which winds through Bath. Ceramics by Emily-Kriste Wilcox accompany the exhibition. Wilcox trained at Bath Spa University and this recent collection of distinctive ceramic vessels is inspired by the Cornish coast.

Morning Sun by Neil Pinkett

Gareth Edwards RWA: After the Rain Friday 3 – Monday 27 November Edwards’ work has slowly evolved from abstraction towards a more specifically landscape based approach. The paintings remain open and free with abstracted elements but are now more spatial, more elemental and evoke emotional weathers and poetic atmospheres. This exhibition debuts Edwards’ work at the gallery, following the artist winning the David Simon Contemporary Prize at the Royal West of England Academy in 2016. Stoneware ceramics by Gabriele Koch accompany the exhibition. Gabriele Koch trained at Goldsmiths College, London and is internationally recognised and exhibited.

Incoming Tide by Neil Pinkett

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nick cudworth gallery Emma Rose

Award Winning Artist Original Art Limited Edition Prints Commissions Cards 78 Walcot Street . Bath 10am - 5pm Monday - Saturday www.emmaroseartworks.com

Painting Myself into a Corner ART WORKS

ACROSS THE BOARD 3 – 31 October An exhibition of paintings and prints representing the wide range of Nick’s interest’s including portraits, music and landscapes

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

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DARREN GORDON Tel: 07803 724474 Web: thelandandthesea.com Email: artgordon@btinternet.com Instagram: @artgordon2017 Using a rural location Darren is establishing drawing, painting and mixed media courses for differing abilities of artists, from teenagers to adults – be it for pleasure, development of examination coursework or getting back in touch with a passion for art. As a teacher of 25 years working in secondary schools and prep schools, Darren has a wealth of experience to offer. As an examiner at GCSE and A Level, he is also directly involved in assessments of pupils and students artwork and examination projects. Because of his experience he sees his courses as opportunities to share the fundamental principles of drawing, while using different materials and media to explore new ways of creating art. It could be as simple as discussing how to create the bones of a drawing using the rule of thirds, or how a household candle can have a profound effect on the creation of highlights in a study. Darren wants to help people get into the landscape and try out and play with possible ideas and materials. “I feel whether it is a landscape day, still life drawing or a day equine sketching that a number of new approaches and how to create great compositions may seem like a good day out in the country.” Darren will be running courses in October and a course for teenagers interested in developing their art work during October half term. The Bath Magazine’s Jessica Hope tried her hand at one of Darren’s workshops this month, find out more on page 64. Darren recently ran a successful exhibition at 44AD Gallery in Bath in September, showcasing his latest landscape and seascape paintings. A modern impressionist, he paints on location using both oil and acrylic. He lays down colour with fast broken marks and a light touch in order to gain an impression of the light falling on his subject matter. See more of his work online.

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MODERN ARTBUYER Tel: 01225 839834 Web: modernartbuyer.com Bath-based Modern ArtBuyer is a contemporary online art gallery and consultancy representing exceptional painters, skilled printmakers and digital artists. The artists featured are largely emerging or mid-career with a number of them based in the Bath and Bristol area. Customers can buy directly through the website or can visit the gallery at pop-up exhibitions and art fairs in London, Bristol and Bath. The team also offer a complimentary art consultancy to anyone looking for artworks for their home, business or commercial space. Through this service, the team helps buyers source great artworks, perfectly suited to their taste, budget and environment. In October, Modern ArtBuyer is taking its usual exhibition stand at the Affordable Art Fair in Battersea. It’s a huge fair, bustling with activity so the team always looks forward to it. The gallery will be showing both regular art fair artists as well as a few new ones. In November the gallery be hosting an informal open house pop-up gallery in Limpley Stoke, just outside Bath. The walls will be adorned with great artworks and refreshments will be served. More details will be available online soon.

RIOT. ACRYLIC BY CLIFTON POWELL

FINE CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS

8 Old Swan Yard, Devizes, Wiltshire, SN10 1AT

01380 729589

Buy Online from:

www.bluestonegallery.com

KING EDWARD’S SCHOOL The Language of Art art and photography exhibition The Wessex Building, King Edward’s School, North Road, Bath BA2 6JA Thursday 12 October, 6 – 8pm The art department at King Edward’s School explores drawing extensively through debate and experimentation, looking at issues such as; why, how, what do we draw and what can we learn through drawing? All pupils are challenged to explore and stretch their understanding of what drawing is and what they can learn by doing it. This exhibition showcases drawings from pupils, from reception to Year 13s, as well as staff, demonstrating the vibrancy, variety, potential and the power of drawing. The exhibition begins with a talk by Professor Anita Taylor, Dean of Bath School of Art and Design at Bath Spa University, followed by the KES Art department’s annual art and photography exhibit. Refreshments provided. Tickets: £7 adults, £4 concessions, email: boxoffice@kesbath.com or tel: 01225 464313. Darren Gordon is offering the following drawing and painting courses in October 2017 Adult drawing and painting days in Wellow on Monday 16th, Wednesday 18th and Friday 20th October 2017 - 10am-4pm.

Young Leonardos Art Development Days in the Country. Based in Wellow Village Hall and for a Maximum of 10 young artists. Monday 23rd, Wednesday 25th and Friday 27th October 2017 from 9am-4pm. £80 per day for the adult courses and £60 per day for the Young Leonardos courses

Toby Farmer

For more information contact Darren Gordon @ artgordon@btinternet.com www.thelandandthesea.com - 07803 724474

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VICTORIA ART GALLERY

Sculpture by Ian Turnock

Victoria Art Gallery Bridge Street, Bath BA2 4AT Tel: 01225 477233 Web: victoriagal.org.uk Victoria Art Gallery is Bath and North East Somerset’s most popular art gallery with more than 160,000 visitors a year. Spread over two floors, the council owned collection covers three centuries of British paintings and sculptures, from Gainsborough to Sickert and Peter Blake to Turner. Marvel at the display of 1,500 decorative art treasures, including sparkling Bohemian glass and ceramics. Browse the collection of Bath images, look at paintings restored under the Adopt a Picture Scheme or relax with a cup of coffee or tea in the beautiful upstairs rotunda. In the smaller, first floor gallery, you can enjoy hundreds of glittering Georgian glasses and many other beautiful items. There is also lovely book, card and gift shop and there are often exhibition works of art for sale. There is an exciting temporary exhibition programme, including national touring exhibitions and major retrospectives plus school holiday activities and workshops. Upcoming exhibitions include work by William Rose, Howard Hodgkin, Mo Lancaster, Kaffe Fassett and a new major exhibition of Entertainment in Bath. The upper gallery is free of charge and the gallery is open daily from 10.30am – 5pm.

EMMA ROSE Upstairs at 78 Walcot Street, Bath BA1 5BD Web: emmaroseartworks.com Tucked away on Walcot Street is an artistic gem. Bursting with colour and life it specialises in Emma Rose’s award-winning land/seascapes and abstract work – original contemporary paintings, signed limited edition giclée prints, canvas prints and cards. She also works to commission and creates paintings exactly the right colour, size and style for clients – from small to huge. Emma specialises in contemporary, semi-abstract painting with an emphasis on colour and texture. Her style is distinctive and original – she uses Indian Inks and acrylics, with land, sky, sea, nature and memory as the inspirational core. Her work is sold at artist price, saving the purchaser gallery rates. Each month she brings in new paintings to the gallery, mounting a different exhibition. This autumn and winter will see a new body of work which promises to be vibrant and arresting (after a near death experience in the summer). A busy year has seen Emma exhibiting in the west country and London. A finalist in the Creative Bath awards, she was also asked to be Wild Card on Sky Arts Landscape Artist of the Year 2017. There have been art donations to the RUH/Royal Crescent Cancer fundraiser, the Princes Trust in Bath and Save The Children.

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FIONA CAMPBELL AND IAN TURNOCK SCULPTURE EXHIBITION The Courts Garden, Holt, near Bradford on Avon BA14 6RR Web: nationaltrust.org.uk/the-courts-garden Form and Fascination: Sculpture exhibition Two sculptors will be showing their work among the bright flower borders of the Courts Garden throughout October. Fiona Campbell and Ian Turnock have created an exhibition called Form and Fascination which will be on display in the National Trust garden near Holt. Selected sculptural works by Fiona and Ian inspired by structures in nature will sit side by side with peaceful water gardens and herbaceous borders, with organically shaped topiary. The gardens are open from 11am – 5.30pm. The Courts Garden in Holt is well known for its imaginative use of colour and planting, creating unexpected vistas that are the perfect backdrop to this autumn sculpture exhibition. Contrasting with the garden design, Fiona uses instinctive building processes such as wrapping, weaving and layering to form large scale sculptural work – the effects of rust, corrosion and patination are often an integral part. Find out more by visiting her website: fionacampbellart.co.uk. Ian creates large scale contemporary sculptures inspired by nature, digitally cutting patterns into stainless steel, aluminium, copper, reclaimed steel, and plywood to produce free standing pieces for interior and exterior spaces. To find out more about Ian’s work, visit: ianturnock.com.

Emma Rose’s gallery


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KIT GLAISYER AT THE GARDEN GALLERY A view near Burton Bradstock Dorset by Kit Glaisyer

48 Great Pulteney Street, Bath BA2 4DP Tel: 07983 465678 Web: kitglaisyer.com A leading light of Bridport’s flourishing art scene, landscape painter Kit Glaisyer has almost completed a year-long residency at the Garden Gallery, 48 Great Pulteney Street, where he also hosts salonstyle events with a lively mix of art, live music and engaging talks. Kit is widely admired for his Cinematic Landscape series of panoramic oil paintings of the west country, each of which takes six to eight months to complete. He currently divides his time between Bath and Bridport, where he is also director of Bridport and West

Dorset Open Studios, a popular event that takes place in September. Kit exhibited as a finalist in Dorset Magazine Landscape Painter of the Year at the Lighthouse Gallery, Poole, in 2017, and was highly commended in the Marshwood Arts Awards in 2015. He exhibited at the Octogan Gallery, Bath, in 2013 and also in the Holburne Portrait Prize at the Holburne Museum in 2012. Kit’s residency in Bath concludes in November with an exhibition A Year in Bath at the Garden Gallery, 48 Great Pulteney Street which takes place over several open weekends from Saturday 30 September to Sunday 12 November, open from 11am – 5pm.

ART Salon, 21 Broad Street, BATH BA1 5LN 01225 422 220 | team@artsalon.co.uk | www.artsalon.co.uk

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THE ART SALON 21 Broad Street, Bath BA1 5LN Tel: 01225 422220 Web: artsalon.co.uk The ART Salon is celebrating it’s first year in Bath this October. Last autumn gave the gallery owners a great opportunity to meet so many supportive locals followed by a hugely successful spring season, both internationally and at home, closing with a sell-out show in Hong Kong. In August the gallery was transformed into a botanical paradise, with a pop-up print exhibition giving emerging artists and young collectors the opportunity to buy and sell. The gallery runs these pop-ups twice a year in August and at Christmas. The next one starts on Saturday 11 November, which will be great for tricky Christmas present shopping. In October, The ART Salon starts its ‘meet the artist’ events, giving artists and clients, both long-standing and prospective, the opportunity to meet in an informal setting. These events will be launched with the charismatic still-life artist Robert Walker on Saturday 14 October, followed by the extraordinary Roo Abrook on Saturday 11 November. Pop in for a cuppa and a chat to them between 12 – 4pm. Beyond Bath, The ART Salon has a year round calendar of international art fairs, consultancy and a framing service. In 2018 the gallery will bring its summer art courses to Bath. Get Mucky, a highly energetic water-gunwielding-paint-throwing extravaganza, will offer children the opportunity to create outdoor masterpieces under the guidance of selected artists and arts professionals. Previous holiday camps have been a wild success and places fill up fast, visit: theartcourse.co.uk. However the gallery also provides a cup of tea and a chat, so drop in the next time you are passing.

THE MUSEUM OF EAST ASIAN ART 12 Bennett Street, Bath BA1 2QJ Tel: 01225 464640 Web: meaa.org.uk Just a stone’s throw from two of Bath’s iconic attractions, The Circus and The Royal Crescent, is a hidden gem of a museum. The Museum of East Asian Art is the only museum in the UK solely dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of East and Southeast Asian arts and cultures. Its collections representing over 7,000 years of artistry and craftsmanship: ceremonial jade objects as luminous today as they were over thousands of years ago sit alongside imperial household items, Ming vases, bronze Buddhas, Chinese Blue and White porcelain and many more other artefacts. The upcoming exhibition, Dressed to Impress: Netsuke and Japanese Men’s Fashion, runs from Saturday 4 November 2017 to Sunday 22 April 2018, and is a British Museum Partnership Exhibition, featuring a range of netsuke and other traditional Japanese male dress accessories from the Edo period, from 1615 – 1868. Netsuke are a form of Japanese miniature sculpture that were used by men as toggles to fasten tobacco and medicine pouches to the belts of their kimonos. This exhibition features a selection of netsuke, chosen from over 2,300 in the British Museum’s collection, with more pieces added from museum’s collection to show the range and beauty of these objects and their excellent craftsmanship. Free entry for Discovery Card and Seasonal ticket holders.

NICK CUDWORTH GALLERY 5 London Street, Bath BA1 5BU Tel: 01225 445221 Web: nickcudworth.co.uk In the same year that the artist celebrates his 70th birthday, Nick Cudworth Gallery has had a face-lift. To recognise 20 years as a successful Walcot art gallery, Nick and Jenny Cudworth have had the exterior of their beautiful Edwardian shop front totally refurbished and restored. Now firmly established as one of Bath’s leading artists, with his own gallery and studio off the street, Nick has never been busier. With continuous monthly shows bringing regular sales of prints, cards and original oil paintings the gallery goes from strength to strength. Nick is currently working on two major 62 TheBATHMagazine

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commissions – a large oil painting of Bath Priory at Night for the Andrew Brownsword Collection and a private commission for a large canvas of an elaborate interior with windows and mirrors and five reflected figures. His own projects include paintings incorporating giclee print on prepared canvas which push the boundaries of new and old techniques. These currently feature Lansdown, Bathwick and Widcombe as their subjects. To mark his 70th year he is producing a life size self-portrait to continue the series of studies he has made throughout his career. Other new works in progress include an evening cricket match on the green behind The George in Norton St Philip and a vast work depicting the canalside gardens behind Sydney Buildings along the towpath.


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V sony by Clifton Powell

BLUESTONE GALLERY 8 Old Swan Yard, Devizes, Wiltshire SN10 1AT Tel: 01380 729589 Web: bluestonegallery.com The Bluestone Gallery sits in the middle of Devizes, and since 2000 has championed British art and craft with a wide and constantly changing display of paintings, jewellery, ceramics, textiles and glass. Currently the gallery is excited to be exhibiting originals by Clifton Powell. Clifton studied at The Jamaica School of Art, Kingston, Jamaica, before moving to the UK at the end of the 1980s. In London he took part in numerous exhibitions including the International Black Art Fair. He has exhibited alongside distinguished black artists from all over the world such as Paul Goodnight. He also exhibited at The International Art Exhibition at St Martin’s School of Art in London, as well as in Bath, Stroud, and the house of Emperor Haile Selassie. Clifton is a highly accomplished and versatile painter. He can paint with lyrical fluid draughtsmanship, and can capture extraordinary portraits. And he can paint with a strong and free realism that combines dynamic use of colour with confident brushwork. His work explores a wide variety of subject matter, influenced by the places he’s travelled and the people he has met. Recently he has concentrated on the local Wiltshire countryside. But his latest project is unrest in the world. A selection of his work is showing in the gallery until mid November. Following this, there will be an exhibition of Jonathan Mansfield’s highly stylised Wiltshire landscapes, full of colour and movement, and an influx of gorgeous jewellery.

ART AT THE HEART OF THE RUH Royal United Hospital, Combe Park, Bath BA1 3NG Tel: 01225 824987 Web: artatruh.org RUH Staff & Volunteer Exhibition 2017 Friday 20 October – Thursday 18 January 2018, open everyday, 8am – 8pm A fantastic showcase of the RUH staff’s artistic talents, exhibiting a range of mediums such as photography, painting and mixed media. A third of the sale price on all artwork sold is donated to the RUH Arts Fund charity. With more than 4,800 staff and volunteers at the RUH there is sure to be a great pool of artistic talent waiting to be revealed. Art at the Heart would like to support these abilities by encouraging staff and volunteers to share their work with other staff and members of the public.

(The new name of Bath Decorative and Fine Arts Society)

2017-18 Lecture Series begins on Monday 9th October 2017 1.30pm at the Assembly Rooms Bennett Street, Bath, BA1 2QH with ‘Art of the River through Artists Eyes’ Lecturer: Alexandra Epps Hare by Amanda Gell, matron in maternity

Visitors welcome £10 at the door (no booking required) www.theartssocietybath.com THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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PAINTING | WORKSHOP

AT ONE WITH NATURE Jessica Hope picks up a paintbrush and attends a new art workshop led by local landscape artist Darren Gordon

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fter working as an art teacher in local schools for 25 years, artist Darren Gordon has now turned his hand to taking small groups of artists of all abilities on artistic workshops in idyllic locations in the Bath countryside. Using pencils, charcoal, paint and mixed media, groups are able to explore the natural landscape using a variety of new techniques under Darren’s expert tutorship. I went along to one of Darren’s workshops in the beautiful village of Wellow, where I joined of group of locals who were keen to develop their artistic skills. We began by walking down to the river – wellies or walking boots and a coat are recommended – where we got a sense of the peaceful landscape we would be spending the day in. Once we were seated, Darren showed us an example of a sketch he had completed of the riverside. He gave us some tips on how to approach beginning a painting with a simple sketch, advising us on using certain parts of the riverside as focal points to stand out on our paper, before handing each of us our own board, paper, and a bag full of all the different art materials we would need. That moment before you make the first mark on a piece of art paper is always the hardest I find with painting, especially as I haven’t picked up a paintbrush in a very long time. But Darren put us all at ease, encouraging us to use the selection of materials to create different colours and textures. We all began by painting the flow of the murky river with watercolours and acrylic using a sponge to build up the different colours of the water, and Darren guided us on how to create the sunlight shimmering on the river by rubbing a standard household waxy candle and applying watercolour. Using a palette knife, which I had never used in this way before, we discovered how to create the texture and

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details of the trees framing the river. With one painting under our belts, we moved location to a little further along the path so we were overlooking a sloping field. Darren explained that he chose this location so we could experiment with creating perspective in our paintings. After a quick sketch, and now feeling a little more confident in using the materials, we soon got stuck into developing the layers of different coloured soils in front of us and Darren showed us a brilliant method of using a toothbrush and moving the bristles to sprinkle paint and make the texture of the soil. He also demonstrated how sometimes simply using the tip of your finger can be an even better painting tool than a brush itself – something I will definitely be trying out again with my work at home. All of the group interpreted the location differently in their paintings – while some focused on the unusual perspective and slope of the soil, others spent time on their depictions of the farmhouse at the top of the hills, whereas I focused on the hedgerows and the sweeping landscape. As we sat painting among the tranquil landscape, with the river trickling along behind us, it is easy to see why Darren has lived in Wellow for more than 20 years and found inspiration from the beautiful countryside on his doorstep for his own landscape paintings and exhibitions. After a spot of lunch at The Fox & Badger pub, we headed outside again for our final project of the day. Darren took us down to the ford, which often floods during winter but on this day the sun shone beautifully. Feeling much more independent with our work, we all focused on drawing and painting the bridge and the river flowing underneath. Using a range of colours, and with a palette knife and my fingers as tools, I discovered how to recreate the old brickwork of the bridge.

While we didn’t have enough time to finish our paintings (we all agreed we would have gladly spent hours at each setting), the time we spent at each location allowed us to develop and learn new skills, see different perspectives and use new art materials. Darren also took photos of each location from where each of us were sitting and emailed them to us, so we could finish our paintings at home if we wished. I came away from the workshop feeling much more confident about my painting technique, having learned some top tips from Darren on how to interpret the landscape around me, and I certainly have a renewed enthusiasm for painting. I don’t think my paintbrushes will be feeling quite so ignored in the future . . . Darren will be holding outdoor drawing days for adults on Monday 16, Wednesday 18 and Friday 20 October from 10am – 4pm in Wellow, weather depending. The workshop will include drawing and using mixed media. Maximum six per group. All materials are included, plus a light lunch at The Fox & Badger with a glass of wine and coffee. £80 per day, per person. Young Leonardo’s Art Development Days in the Country will take place on Monday 23, Wednesday 25 and Friday 27 October from 9am – 4pm in Wellow. Suitable for GCSE and A Level students. The workshops are intended to develop sketching, allow students to experiment with materials and create a final painting study. This will be great for art students needing time to further their own ability and experience. £60 a day. All courses can be taken as a single day or all three together for £160. n To find out more about Darren’s art workshops, visit: thelandandthesea.com, email: artgordon@btinternet.com, or tel: 07803 724474. Follow him on Instagram: @artgordon2017.


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BATH | HERITAGE

‘MR MAYOR, IF YOU PLEASE’ Historian Catherine Pitt celebrates the extraordinary life of Bath’s first female mayor, Kathleen Harper

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n the year of 1950 the annals of Bath’s history record that Miss Kathleen Harper became the city’s first female Mayor to take up the chain of office since the position of Mayor of Bath began in 1230. There is little recognition of this extraordinary achievement except this record in the roll of Bath Mayors; yet Kathleen Harper JP, OBE, was indeed a truly extraordinary woman. Born in the city on 19 November 1899 into an upper middle class family Kathleen Agnes Mabel Harper was the elder daughter of Agnes Bruce of Ashley, Box, and Dr John Maurice Harper of Batheaston – Chief Police Surgeon for Bath and Medical Officer of Health to Bathavon Rural District. Her younger sister, Dorothy, was born in 1902. The family had a long history of philanthropy and the Harpers encouraged their daughters to enrich their lives with civic responsibilities from a young age. Their mother’s great interest in infant welfare inspired her daughters, and all the family were heavily involved in the Bath District of the Waifs and Strays Society (later to become The Children’s Society charity). Kathleen was to eventually become one of only three vice-presidents for the society in the country. Whether local, county, or national organisations, the Harper sisters entered into everything they did with enthusiasm and gusto. In particular, Kathleen’s natural aptitude for altruism was highlighted in local newspapers. Aged 17 she became Honorary Secretary of the Bath Waifs and Strays Society and it was reported that half of the 600 tickets sold for a fundraising garden party in the city were sold by Kathleen alone. Her “zealous administration” for the society was even commented on in the national report of 1920. In 1923 the group started an annual historic dance and fair to fundraise over three days starting with an Elizabethan-themed event, selling from stalls in the Assembly Hall, decorated for the occasion as an Elizabethan village. Many visitors dressed in period costume and more 66 TheBATHMagazine

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than £1,000 was raised for the charity. To list all of the organisations that Kathleen alone was involved with in her lifetime would take up at least half this article. She and her sister were not just passionate about child welfare but had a love of gardening instilled in them by their mother who had been involved with the Larkhall Horticultural Society. They were keen dog lovers and supporters of the PDSA (People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals) which was formed in 1917. Kathleen was also secretary for 18 years of the Bath Branch of the English Folk Dance Society, 30 years president of the Mid Somerset Festival, 20 years chair of Bath and District Horticultural Club, and chairman and president of Bath Conservative Club. With a father who, as Bath’s police surgeon, was heavily involved in criminal cases, it perhaps is no surprise to find that Kathleen’s interest was to turn to the criminal iSSUe 181

courts. In 1942 she became the youngest city magistrate to sit on the Bench, specifically the city’s juvenile courts. She felt, according to one local paper, that it was “essential for a woman and one with youthful outlooks to be amongst the magistrates”. Kathleen was a firm but fair JP, believing that children should take responsibility for their actions and pay their own fines. She equally recognised the importance of parental role models in a child’s upbringing. In one case in 1947 a 15-year-old boy accidentally shot and severely injured a woman. Harper is recorded turning to the father chastising him by saying: “You as a responsible citizen are even more to blame than your boy to allow (him) to use a gun in this thickly populated area.” She remained on the Bench for nearly 30 years and was considered Bath’s “best juvenile court JP.” During the Second World War Kathleen and her sister were heavily

CIVIC PRIDE: above, the first lady Mayor of Bath, Miss Kathleen Harper. Opposite, the statesman Winston Churchill, accompanied by the Mayor of Bath, Kathleen Harper, as he was officially granted the Freedom of the city of Bath. Below, St Christopher’s Church at Ditteridge near Box where the Harper sisters are buried


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it was reported that during their visit they toured the nightclubs until 1.30am. Harper’s time as Mayor saw a number of achievements. She pushed forward a vote on 22 February 1951 to rename The City of Bath Honorary Guides as The City of Bath Mayor’s Honorary Guides, a title these volunteer city tour guides still hold today. But her finest hour must be the day she bestowed the Freedom of the city of Bath on Sir Winston Churchill, on 20 July 1950.

Her finest hour must be the day she bestowed the Freedom of the city of Bath on Sir Winston Churchill

involved in housing and clothing more than 3,000 children evacuated to the city. She also assisted in the war nurseries in the west of England. After the war Kathleen turned to politics and stood as a Progressive in the elections for Walcot North Ward. She won this seat, and again in 1946, and was soon excelling in her work as a councillor as much as in her charitable work. Esteemed for her public work and personal qualities, it was a unanimous decision in May 1950 for Bath city councillors to elect Harper as mayor. “Her unbounded energy, ability to marshal facts . . . and her reservoir of good humour has won her the affections of the council.” On 24 May 1950 Cllr Miss Kathleen Agnes Mabel Harper JP was invested as Bath’s 722nd Mayor. She insisted on tradition and being addressed as ‘Mr Mayor’. Her sister, Dorothy, joined her as the Mayoress, and when possible their three jack russells, Belinda, Jennifer and Penelope, also had supporting roles. The role of a woman mayor was not a new one; England’s first woman mayor was Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, in 1908 in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, but it was a rare enough occurrence for Harper’s investiture to be reported as far afield as in a Kentucky Journal. It would be a mistake to think of the two sisters as wealthy, old-fashioned spinsters, although most certainly eccentric, they had a youthful vigour even in middle age. During her tenure as Mayor Kathleen and her sister undertook an exhausting and relentless round of daily civic duties, but all imparted with professionalism, enthusiasm and good humour. The Mayor’s sherry parties were oft featured in the local press and over Christmas 1950 the Harper sisters visited every local hospital and care home, personally imparting good wishes to all. In October 1950 the Mayor headed to Bath’s twin city, Alkmaar in the Netherlands, for a four day official tour. The sisters were witnessed “waving vigorously” to those who had come to say farewell at Bath station, and

Harper’s competence as mayor was often praised. She was a shrewd diplomat, recognising that “A mayor should be impartial as far as politics are concerned” and at a Newspaper Editors’ Conference in the city declaring “it is impossible to be a good mayor without the goodwill of the press.” Her speech-making skills were second to none – clear, concise and delivered without notes. Many described her bubbling humour, shrewd judgement and an indefatigable character. Cllr Pearson who became mayor after Harper described her as “Bath’s friendly mayor.” In 1951 Harper was awarded an OBE in the King’s Birthday Honours in recognition of her child welfare work and public service. In 1978 she became an Honorary Alderman of the City of Bath. From birth until 1949 the Harper sisters lived at Number 3 Grosvenor Place in Bath. In 1949 the sisters chose to move to Middlehill House in Box, close to Sunnyside House, one of the many children’s homes they were responsible for.

The sisters are remembered locally as pretty reclusive in their private life but active in the local community. Kathleen is described by one local as being quite a personality. She had a love of cars and would buy a new one every three years. Her competency at driving these cars however was questionable, and there are tales of her feet not reaching the pedals of her Bentley, and on one occasion running into Dorothy with the car when her sister was opening the gate. She used to drive her Rover to the Guildhall and park it outside in the High Street. In their youth the sisters were considered beauties of Bath. But rather than marry, the pair devoting their lives to politics, the church, law, animals, music, gardening and children’s welfare. The sisters were very involved in the running of their local church, St Christopher’s at Ditteridge, where Kathleen insisted that those taking part in the flower rota arranged their blooms in vases, not jam jars. Sadly Dorothy died in 1970 leaving Kathleen to continue to live at Middle Hill until her own death in April 1983. Both sisters lie buried in the churchyard of St Christopher’s Church, a simple bank of conifers planted in their memory. Yet in Bath there is no plaque, no recognition of Bath’s first female mayor, and her contribution to the welfare of the children of Bath and beyond. “Few of us attempt to make so much of our lives in the service of others.”(Kathleen Harper’s obituary, The Bath Chronicle, 1983). n

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Restaurant Rants October 1.qxp_Layout 1 21/09/2017 15:42 Page 1

SPECIAL | REPORT

RESTAURANT RANTS

Melissa Blease lifts the lid on what really riles Bath’s restaurant owners and chefs and what diners dislike most about eating out

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ating out should be a pleasure for all, whether you’re a customer, a business owner or a hard-working chef. We go backstage on Bath’s restaurant scene and find out what customers’ gripes are and what the restaurant staff really think of us . . .

WHAT DRIVES DINERS DOTTY? Fellow diners in short. Those people who shove past your table then push past again ten minutes later reeking of smoke. Young people taking photos of their food or talking on their phones throughout the meal. And what about those people who constantly complain about or question the restaurant’s WiFi connection? And spare us from overly intimate public displays of affection or loud, boorish drunks behaving really badly. Yes, when we’re eating out, it seems, hell really is other people. Children Or, more specifically other people’s children (as our own are always angels, naturally). Oliver has an allergy, Olivia is getting over chickenpox, Toby is feeling grumpy, the baby needs changing and the whole brood want to run around the restaurant playing at being ninja warriors. Families and their noise and mess come pretty near the top of the complaints charts for diners. If you’ve got a brood in tow, be aware that not everybody thinks your little people are big fun. Poor service Most of the people working in the hospitality industry in Bath frequently go above and beyond the call of duty to make our eating out experiences pleasurable. Some, however, let the side down with inconsiderate behaviour. Top staff sins include those who lounge around texting or gossiping with other staff when you’re trying to order drinks and waiters who check back to see if everything’s OK with your meal before you’ve even tasted the first mouthful – or worse, while your mouth is full. We also don’t like it when we politely point out to our server that our steak isn’t cooked the way we asked for it to be cooked, only to be told “that’s the way chef likes to serve it.” As for getting a snooty response if we ask for salt/pepper/ketchup – that kind of behaviour is as old school as Gordon Ramsay’s tantrums. Annoying service isn’t always the fault of your server, though – many restaurant

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owners train their staff to do all sorts of annoying things, from constantly filling up your wine glass from the bottle every time you take a sip through to trying to upsell you by suggesting a side order with your meal as if its included in the price, when you end up paying an extra £3.50 for green beans you didn’t actually need. We’re not keen either on waiting staff kneeling chummily down by your table to take orders and addressing your whole party as“guys”. However you choose to cope with poor service, though, please don’t be the cause of it. We were shocked to hear that there are still people who snap their fingers at staff when demanding attention (vile behaviour indeed). Bad timing You get to your table in the restaurant at 9pm. You place your order. Your order arrives. And then your waiter says: “if you think you’re likely to want anything else could you let me know now please, as we close at 9.30.” Okay, there’s probably some small print about opening/closing times on the restaurant’s website. But couldn’t staff let us know that the kitchen closes in half an hour when we arrive?

WHAT DO RESTAURANTS RESENT ABOUT US? Booking no-shows The problem of booking no-shows causes so much stress amongst the Bath restaurant community that we dedicated two whole pages to this irksome problem alone in the August issue. If you can’t fulfil your reservation, let the restaurant know. Being accused of being lazy An angry Bath resident recently took to Twitter to complain of three Bath restaurants that, despite apparently having tables for two available, turned her and her partner away. However: “empty tables don’t always mean we can accommodate you,” came one response from one of the restaurants in question. “If kitchen orders are full to capacity, we can’t offer to seat more diners.” Worth adding: the complainant in question had approached all three restaurants at 9.30 – 9.45 on a Saturday night. ’nuff said. Blow-by-blow bill breakdowns Six people dine together. One has a starter, a main, no dessert but loads of wine. Another has no wine, two starters and a side of chips. A third has three courses and a cocktail, a


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SPECIAL | REPORT fourth has the set menu plus coffee. And then, at bill time, the ‘fun’ really starts – especially when some guests are paying by card, others by cash. “Please work out how you’re all going to pay before we have to stand at your table with a calculator,” begs one waiter. Fashionable food allergies (as opposed to serious health risks with foods such as nut allergies or coeliac disease) ‘Existential’ claims to food intolerances are driving kitchens nuts. “Just because you’ve decided you can only eat boiled fruit, I’m simply not going to start simmering oranges just for you during a busy service,” said one chef. But on a more practical note: “We offer a gluten-free menu, but we can’t guarantee that we have a separate kitchen in which we prepare that menu – we’re a tiny restaurant. And we aren’t going to take satay sauce, shellfish bisque or crème brûlée off our menu just because there are diners out there who can’t eat those dishes.” While on the subject of what people can or can’t eat, here’s a chef quote that we have to include for its brazen in-yourfaceness: “People following a raw vegan diet don’t deserve to take to a table in my restaurant.” Crikey! Faultfinders in search of freebies When do you alert your server to the problem regarding, say, a soggy risotto? By around no later than your second mouthful, that’s when – not when you’ve pretty much licked the platter clean, and left only a tiny morsel as evidence. “When it comes to refunding a customer who seems to have eaten the entire dish before making a complaint, we’re damned if we do, double-damned if we don’t,” said one restaurant manager. “If we refund the entire cost of the dish in question, we lose. If we don’t, we

still lose, because you can bet the cost of the dinner that the moaner will take to social media to scream about what a terrible time they had in our restaurant.” TripAdvisor/social media User-generated websites and social media platforms cause a lot of aggro. “I hate it when somebody who clearly doesn’t know the difference between decent food and a supermarket ready meal slags us off on TripAdvisor or Twitter,” says one owner. Another chef asks pointedly: “Does anybody really, honestly rely on recommendations (or otherwise) from people who can’t even string a decent sentence together when they’re choosing where to eat?” n

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PET HATES: main picture, it’s not an art installation, it’s a meal . . . people who take constant photos of their food annoy other diners WHAT’S YOUR BEEF: above, fussy eaters and inflexible chefs make for uncomfortable dining

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Food review Oct.e$S_Layout 1 20/09/2017 13:07 Page 1

RESTAURANT | REVIEW

CHEZ DOMINIQUE 15 Argyle Street, Bath BA2 4BQ. Tel: 01225 463482, Twitter: @ChezDomBath, visit: chezdominique.co.uk

R E V I EW

VIVE THE FRENCH INDEPENDENTS

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icture the scene. A couple is scurrying along the rain-swept darkened streets of Bath, heads down against the wind. Their attention is caught by a row of candles in a restaurant window, a welcoming beacon on a chilly night. Cut to the next scene, to find our couple toasting each other with a glass of delicious Merlot, seated at the window table inside a cosy French bistro. A jovial French waiter, Julien, is waiting to take their order and pretty much everything on the menu looks like something you’d want to eat. You might say, a promising start to a date night. And you’d be right. Since our favourite French restaurants, Beaujolais and Bistro La Barrique closed we have been looking for another independent venue to indulge our taste in French cuisine. And family-run Chez Dominique, opened by husband and wife team chef Chris and frontof-house manager Sarah, on Argyle Street a year ago, ticks all the boxes. The lighting is dimmed to a satisfyingly romantic glow, there’s music in the background (at one point we caught the strains of a classic French accordian) and looking out onto Pulteney Bridge, with the grey clouds scudding overhead and umbrella-wielding pedestrians blowing past us, the mood was Parisian. And the food is really very good. Traditional French with a light modern touch, and joy of joys, everything is served on plates and bowls, rather than boards. But when you look at chef Chris’s impressive CV you know you’re in safe hands. He cut his 70 TheBATHMagazine

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culinary teeth at the legendary Bibendum in London and was most recently executive chef at Bowood House and Country Club in Wiltshire. Chez Dominique is named after the couple’s oldest child and the family is happily settled in the west country, which is good news for Bath foodies. My companion made classic choices for his dinner, opening with a creamy, silky leek and potato soup that’s clearly been made using a proper stock. And it’s served so hot the steam is still rising as he dips his spoon into it. His main course, another tried and tested favourite is a sirloin steak served with a Bordelaise sauce and proper pommes frites. This is so ‘seriously good’ (his words), he is reluctant to let me try it. My starter of chicken terrine with pickled girolle mushrooms and crispy slices of Bayonne ham was a good balance of savoury meatiness, cut through by apricot purée. After that I ordered one of the dishes of the day, a huge bowl of Cornish mussels cooked in an Alsace bacon, leek and cider broth – this took me straight back to family holidays in Brittany, a wonderfully evocative dish. This too came with frites and Julien proffered a spoon and more bread for me to greedily mop up the broth. Starters range in price from £6.50 to £10.50, while mains range from £12, for the moules, to £22 for a steak. Unlike many French establishments there are vegetarian options. It’s also worth noting another great French tradition, the prix fixe menu, is served at Chez Dom. Between noon and 3pm

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(3.30pm on Sundays) and from 5.30 – 7pm every day, diners can choose from a two course menu for £14, or three courses for £17. A typical starter might be, for example, dill and gin cured salmon with pickled cucumber, followed by onglet steak and pommes frites. During the Great Bath Feast, which runs until Sunday 8 October, diners can enjoy a treat for a tenner at Chez Dominique at lunchtimes, Monday to Friday and before 7pm Monday to Thursday. Slurp your way through a generous portion of those Cornish mussels, cooked with cider, leek and bacon with a glass of sauvignon blanc, and pay for it with one of the new Jane Austen £10 notes. May I suggest, if you go at lunchtime, you ask to sit at the window in the private dining room at the back, which commands unrivalled views of Pulteney Weir. The private dining room would be a great place to book for a group of up to ten people. If you’ve got one of those friends who laughs too loudly, or whose politically dodgy views, or bad jokes you don’t necessarily want to share with the entire restaurant, this is an ideal secret corner. We finish our own French adventure with a simple vanilla ice cream for my trad companion and a crème brûlée for me. As you’d expect from a perfect pud, the surface cracked with a satisfying tap, releasing the moreish creamy custard beneath. Our couple venture back onto the windy streets vowing, like Francophile Arnie Schwarzeneggers ‘nous reviendrons!’ n

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Break the routine! Indulge in our famous afternoon tea in the elegance of the drawing room, just quote ‘Bath Mag’ to receive 20% off your bill.

Offer subject to availability. Available Monday – Thursday. Afternoon Tea offering subject to change. To book please call 0344 879 9106 and quote ‘Bath Mag’

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Behind the Menu Oct.qxp_Layout 1 20/09/2017 17:03 Page 1

BEHIND | THE | MENU

A NEW FAMILY FAVOURITE

Melissa Blease goes behind the menu to talk to Pranee Laurillard co-founder of the burgeoning Giggling Squid brand of Thai restaurants, on the eve of the opening of its new Bath restaurant

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re fish and chips, pie and mash and even the most celebrated British favourite the chicken tikka masala set to be relegated to the file marked ‘retro classics’? Very possibly. According to recent polls conducted by the BBC Good Food Nation Survey, The Telegraph and national diner discount app tastecard, Thai cuisine is taking over our tastebuds and dominating our foodie daydreams – and it isn’t difficult to work out why. Not as carb-rich or red meat reliant as traditional British dishes and less heavy on the rich sauces than Indian or Italian cuisine, Thai food tends to be packed with vitaminand mineral-rich vegetables and liberally infused with all manner of herbs and spices that are widely acknowledged to offer health-boosting benefits, such as lemongrass, galangal, chillies, turmeric and garlic. And above all, it tastes darn good. If you haven’t succumbed to the lifeaffirming (let alone apparently fashionable) delights of a really good green curry, or a comforting pad Thai, or a bracing Som Tum lately, you really have to get with the programme – which really isn't difficult to do in Bath, where we’re spoiled for choice when it comes to our options for getting all Thai’d up. From grand, glamorous Thai institutions to speedy takeaways by way of 72 TheBATHMagazine

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all manner of cheery Thai canteen-diners, we could eat Thai every day for a fortnight without visiting the same place twice (or blowing the bank – Thai food is reliably wallet-friendly). But there's a bright, bold new kid on the Thai block bringing a new dimension to our Thai food scene this autumn. Having stylishly, sensitively refurbished the auspicious surroundings of the Grade IIlisted Bluecoat House (a cornerstone of the soon-to-be-unveiled Saw Close redevelopment), Giggling Squid is proud of its USP that promises ‘staggeringly good Thai food.’ And while the new Bath branch is part of a chain of 20 plus branches around the UK, it’s most definitely not one of those big, bland assembly line operations that are all-too-increasingly beginning to dominate city centres – this is a success story with a very personal backstory, headed up by a down-to-earth couple. Back in 2002, Giggling Squid founder Pranee Laurillard sat down with her husband Andy in the basement of a tiny fisherman’s cottage in Brighton (now the Giggling Squid Brighton branch) and started putting together an authentic Thai menu based on the kind of simple, rustic, fresh Thai food that Pranee grew up with as a child in Thailand. She says: “I’m no good at the 9 to 5 routine, and I longed to have my own

restaurant that showcases a little taste of my home. In Thailand, meal times are all about lots of dishes that everyone shares, so that’s what I based our menus on. The name of the restaurant, meanwhile, was inspired by one of my three children: he was a wriggler and a giggler, and there we have it!” Pranee’s choice of location for the new Bath site was inspired by emotional rather than entirely corporate motivations, too. “Bath is such a beautiful city, how can anyone not fall in love with it?” she says. “When the Saw Close site came on to our radar, there was no chance of us passing on it, and we’re very lucky to have had the opportunity to take it.” There’s no chance of the building with a fascinating history (Bluecoat House was originally a school founded in 1711 to offer free education to Anglican children, before being rebuilt in a Northern Renaissance style in 1860 and eventually turned into offices in the 1920s) having all traces of its structural biography erased either. A quick imageshuffle around existing Giggling Squid restaurants proves that Pranee prides herself on turning remarkable and/or curious buildings into unique eateries by pushing their architectural quirks to the fore. “We believe that how the restaurant looks is as just important as the food and drink we serve, with the décor adding to the


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BEHIND | THE | MENU

SMALL PLATES: main image, dishes at Giggling Squid, fun for friends and family to share Above, Pranee Laurillard who founded Giggling Squid Thai restaurants with her husband Andy

atmosphere to create a warm and welcoming environment,” says Pranee. “We are a Thai restaurant but we keep the traditional Thai influences subtle, from the stunning ornate lights and simple bamboo weaving to decorative floral elements. We leave the Buddhas in the temples where they belong.” Little wonder, then, that Giggling Squid is set to offer broad appeal to a variety of customers from first dates, to friends getting together, to families too: “Children love the Little Tapas for Little People section of the menu, and parents love the adventurous nature of how we cater to young palates”. Ah yes, we’ve said the T-word – and in

this instance, we’re not using lazy shorthand for Thai, nor are we referring to anything with Spanish influences . . . apart from when it comes to matters of size. As we are indeed still riding the tide of the small plate revolution that’s dominated modern menus for the last decade or so, the Thai tapas selection at Giggling Squid, waltzes around classic and imaginative options, all of which come in at under a fiver each for what a friend in Brighton reassures me are generous portions, to say the least. Of this selection, Pranee says that the restaurant’s signature dish of salt and pepper squid is perennially popular, with the flavours of the spring onion, a hint of chilli and ground pepper working well together, coated in a light, fluffy batter. But there are sturdier options too, with One Big Dish priced at around £7 – £8, and the Two Dish Meal Combi offering exceptional value for money for a feast that includes a tapas dish and a chicken, prawn- or vegetable-based main. “Slow-cooked lamb shank massaman is big a hit due to the balance of the creaminess of coconut and tangy flavour of tamarind partnering perfectly with the spices of cinnamon and star anise,” says Pranee. I can see why Giggling Squid is going to bring a smile to our faces. But what does Pranee hope the experience is going to present to Bathonians? “We’re offering bold Thai flavours and authentic cooking techniques created by talented Thai chefs and freshly prepared on site,” she says. “From lunchtime tapas to delicious curries, salads, rice and noodles, I’m looking forward to showing it off.” And we’re eagerly anticipating saying sawadee to the merry mollusc too. n Giggling Squid, Bluecoat House, Saw Close, Bath BA1 1EY; web: gigglingsquid.com

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TRISTAN DARBY Recommends a trio of riojas which demonstrate the Spanish wine’s diversity

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bout an hour’s drive south of the northern port city of Bilbao is Spain’s most famous wine region, Rioja. With around a third of production being exported it’s also an important flagship for Spanish wine – especially here in the UK, rioja’s largest export market. Rioja’s wine law permits the production of white, rose and red wine, however, the vast majority of rioja produced is red, made from a blend of at least three grapes and dominated by Spain’s famous tempranillo. Rioja is often aged for longer before release than other commercial wines, with the helpful idea that wines are sold to the consumer at the point of drinking without the need for further cellaring, (though some rioja can continue to evolve for many years). Every bottle is then labelled according to its minimum ageing time and style. Wines labelled simply Rioja are released in the first or second year after the harvest, with little or no oak ageing. The inclusion of Crianza, Reserva or Gran Reserva on the label indicates an incrementally longer time maturing in both barrel and cellar before release – a minimum of two years for Crianza, three for Reserva, and five years for Gran Reserva. There’s growing interest in rioja’s diversity at the moment, including white rioja, which can be oaked or unoaked and uses the same labelling terms as red, but with shorter minimum ageing requirements. White rioja is traditionally a blend of local grapes, but following a law change in 2007 wines can now include chardonnay, sauvignon and verdejo. Sierra Cantabria, Otomán 2015 (£13.50, Great Western Wine) is a blend of sauvignon blanc with the traditional viura and malvasia grapes and well worth checking out. Fruity and fresh with lemony citrus and stonefruit flavours and a long fine mineral finish. The wine is fermented in French oak which adds a subtle creamy vanilla flavour and a soft silky texture. Try it with pork, chicken or grilled fish. Have you ever tasted rosé rioja? If not, then a graceful introduction is Ramón Bilbao, Rosado 2016 (£8.95, GWW), a delicious dry rosé made from garnacha (aka grenache) and a small dash of viura for extra freshness and fragrance. A delicate pale pink colour, it’s pretty and gentle on the nose with red fruit, citrus and flowers. Light and elegant in the mouth with a gentle fruit intensity of melon and orange zest followed by a fresh and fruity finish. Splendidly sippable rosé that’s worth every penny. For an unusual take on the crianza style of rioja I recommend Ramón Bilbao, Viñedos de Altura 2014 (£12.50, GWW). An equal blend of tempranillo and grenache (tempranillo usually dominates red rioja), the wine takes its name from the high-altitude vineyards where the grapes are grown. This is a vibrant and complex rioja. Intensely fruity on the nose – bursting with ripe strawberries and blackcurrants, underscored by sweet tobacco, chocolate, smoky herbs and peppery spice before finishing with a spiced blackcurrant note. With bags of character, it’ll be great with anything from lamb and beef to mature cheese and spicy Spanish stews. Learn more in a Rioja masterclass at Great Western Wine on Saturday 21 October, visit: greatwesternwine.co.uk/events for tickets. n

THE US DELICIO GUIDE LOOKING FOR RESTAURANT INSPIRATION? The Delicious Guide to Bath featuring all our fave eateries and foodie treateries is available online at our website www.thebathmag.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

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BATH @ WORK

Our series of photographic portraits by Neill Menneer shows Bath people at work. View a gallery of Bath@Work subjects at: thebathmag.co.uk

Cecil Weir

Fundraising director at Julian House charity

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t is interesting how a little coincidence or an innocuous happening can have a significant impact on one’s life. My father never talked about the war. The only snippets I ever picked up were some of the places he’d served. For a young boy growing up in the excessively green surroundings of rural midUlster his description of oranges growing in Palestine absolutely pricked my imagination. It was as a direct result of this that I later decided to go and work on a kibbutz in Israel, where I met the woman who was to become my wife. After graduating I went to work for a cookware company. Unsure of where my career was going I covered my options by going through the selection process for the regular army. Crunch time to take up a place at Sandhurst and I resigned from my job. Shortly afterwards an amazing coincidence happened. The firm knew that I wanted to move into marketing and when a colleague also resigned they offered me his job as a brand manager. That was the start of ten years promoting various brands, mainly in the drinks sector. All the while I was able to keep up my interest in things military by joining the Territorial Army – a parallel career which was to last 22 years. Following the introduction of an important piece of legislation, called the Beer Orders, there was massive structural change in the drinks industry, which ultimately led to my job being made redundant. As I looked for my next career move I decided to give a bit of time to a charity. A few months later one of the fundraising staff left and the organisation asked if I wanted to join them. That was the start of a great four year period – raising funds to alleviate the threat/impact of meningitis and ultimately its eradication. Then I joined Julian House. The contrast between a very scary disease and homelessness was quite dramatic. One generates very widespread sympathy and fear. The other is much misunderstood and beset by urban myths, for instance many folk think that it’s a lifestyle of choice. That a homeless person could only possibly want a pet dog so that they can claim extra benefits. Both of which are nonsense. During a long spell at the charity, raising funds and working on PR it has been gratifying to see that attitudes are changing. Likewise seeing new projects and services introduced which not only address the symptoms of homelessness but also the causes. The expansion by the charity into closely associated areas such as domestic violence and criminal justice has been very valuable – building on its expertise and experience, as well as providing better joined up working. Further evidence of the charity’s willingness to be bold is demonstrated by its move into social enterprises, like its busy bike workshop in Corn Street, Bath. Here we offer clients and other marginalised individuals the opportunity to access work experience and training – boosting self-esteem and hopefully, a way back into the job market. It’s a great feeling, enjoying what you do and knowing that you are making a difference for some of the most marginalised members of society. n

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151. THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

ALONG CAME A SPIDER

Fifty years after the iconic original was introduced, the all new Fiat 124 Spider makes a more than welcome return. Words by Chris Lilly

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iat has a proud history of building fun-to-drive, two-seater sportscars, with the 124 Spider the latest in a long line that includes the likes of its predecessor the Barchetta, and its namesake from the 1960s. With this new 124 Spider, Fiat is trying to recapture some of that heritage – and why wouldn’t it, when you consider the runaway success of the 500? The styling harks back to the original 124 Spider, and the two-seater, convertible, rear-wheel drive set-up is classic roadster; all looks good then for the Fiat. That positivity continues when you consider what makes up the 124 Spider under the skin. For those that don’t know, the Fiat is largely based on Mazda’s MX-5. If you’re going to base your new sportscar on any model, it might as well be the class-leading and widely-praised MX-5. This is something of a double-edged sword though, since Fiat has solid foundations on which to build – it has tweaked the suspension, brakes, and steering – but the 124 Spider also has a very strong rival which it will instantly be compared to. So how does the Fiat stack up? Starting with the styling, personally I like it. The 124 Spider is one of those cars that looks better in the metal than it does in photos. Pictures seem to convey it as a bit of a bruiser, a bit too muscular for a lightweight roadster. When you walk up to one though, it is more delicate looking than photographs convey, and the 124 Spider looks every inch a modern roadster. To be honest, I prefer the sharper looks of the Mazda, but certainly am not put off the Fiat because of its design – and it is, at least, markedly different to the MX-5. The same cannot be said of the interior, which is basically a carbon copy of the MX5’s. This is no bad thing, since the cabin is relatively stylish, but clean, simple, and driver focused – as it should be. It’s not spartan though, with a good satnav/infotainment system available, which is straight from the Mazda parts bin. The rest of the cabin is true roadster in fashion – that is to say, a bit of a squeeze. It’s not too small by any means – and I’m a chap

of average height and fairly substantial build. The transmission tunnel is wide and tall, and the car’s waist-line high. There are few cubby holes, and those there are, are of limited size. But you shouldn’t expect anything less from a two-seater convertible. The steering wheel is a lovely size and not too cluttered with buttons, and the gearstick offers a crisp and weighty shift, making it feel as though you are driving the 124 Spider, not just going through the motions. Everything is designed to offer a real roadster driving experience, and it works. Each time you climb into the Fiat, a smile spreads across your face, even if you’re just popping to the supermarket. The boot is small but not impossibly so. You need to accept limited practicality if looking at roadsters, but the 124 Spider offers (just) enough space and practicality to use as a daily driver. The roof is fabric and manual to keep things simple, costs down, and the car’s centre of gravity low. It’s easy to put up or down in less than five seconds too, with a safety catch above the rear-view mirror, before you just push the whole roof back until it clicks into place behind you. Simple yes, but effective. With the roof in either position, visibility is fairly good. It’s better out back with the roof down obviously, but even with it closed, the view rearwards isn’t bad at all. It’s easy to place the car too as the boot is truncated from the point you can see in the rear-view mirror, making it simple to park. The front view offers similar precision as the haunches over each wheel let you know where the front axle is, and there isn’t much of an overhang out front either. This helps with how the car drives, no matter if you’re in a multi-storey car park or on a flowing Broad. The 124 Spider has a good weight to its steering when on the open road, and it’s precise, meaning you don't have to guess where the wheels are, or take a couple of bites at turn in. The Fiat’s suspension will deal with many a scenario without fuss, too. The set-up is a little more supple than Mazda’s which means the car offers less out-right handling ability,

but is a better cruiser and more practical every day for those who aren’t passionate about ‘drivers’ cars’. It still offers a good driving experience, but the Fiat is better suited to speed bumps or poor-quality roads, and is a little more comfortable on the motorway than its cousin from Mazda. The biggest difference between Fiat’s and Mazda’s offerings, though, comes under that long bonnet. The engine on offer from Fiat is a turbo-charged unit, rather than Mazda’s naturally-aspirated powerplants. What this means in terms of driving dynamics, is that the MX-5 revs more freely, but the 124 Spider has more low-down grunt, again making it easier to drive every day. With 140 bhp and 240 Nm of torque on tap from the 1.4 litre turbo petrol, the 124 Spider will complete the 0-62mph sprint in 7.5 seconds. It’s not startlingly fast then, but plenty quick enough for most. Drop a cog and put your foot down, and the 124 Spider proves an effective overtaking weapon, and when you’re pushing hard, the Fiat provides a great driving experience without having to travel at ridiculous (and illegal) speeds to begin to feel what it is capable off. You do have to change down that gear though to make sure the turbo is on song, otherwise the pick-up can seem a little sluggish initially. The engine – like the styling and handling – is more muscular and less finely balanced than the MX-5’s. The Mazda offers a sharper driving experience, and is still the class leader in that regard. However, Fiat sensibly hasn’t tried to beat Mazda at its own game with a similar car. Instead, the 124 Spider has a character of its own and is a more attractive proposition for those that placer a higher priority on comfort than MX-5 buyers. It will still put a big grin on your face when the weather’s good and an empty road opens out in front of you. Importantly though, the 124 Spider isn’t the sort of car you have to keep in the garage the rest of the time, and is a genuinely usable proposition every day. ■

• fiat.co.uk

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GUEST | COLUMNIST

CROWDFUNDING BEGINS WITH SOUP Simon Brand volunteer and partner in the Bath Soup Project explains how a successful community fundraiser which began in America is now benefiting grassroots projects in Bath – and how we can help by simply taking part

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SHARING IDEAS AND RESOURCES: left to right, Mike Plows, Lucy Beettie, Julie Poll and Simon Brand Bath College. Over the next few months, we began planning for the first event which was held in November 2016 at The Shrubbery at Bath College. A packed first event saw pitchers from Southside Young Advocates, Three Ways School, Vegmead, B&NES Dementia Action Alliance and Bath Stroke Support Group. On the night, the winning vote went to Southside Young Advocates who took away £510. The Southside Young Advocates are working in local schools to set up a peer mentoring scheme and talk to teachers about bullying.

Members of the audience are encouraged to offer the pitchers their support, expertise and resources alongside their vote

n the summer of 2016 I met Julie Poll, business connector for Bath and North East Somerset Council and the concept of a Bath Soup was born. I had read about Swindon Soup in the Business Exchange magazine and started to look for a similar event in Bath. There wasn’t a local event so I arranged to meet the organisers of Swindon Soup and was put in touch with Julie, and here the foundations of Bath Soup Project were laid. Julie set about visiting the Bristol Soup, while I took the best from Swindon Soup to combine our ideas for Bath Soup Project. The Soup Movement began in Detroit in 2010, as an innovative crowd-funding project designed to help the city get back on its feet. It was founded by Amy Kaherl. In the last five years the project has raised more than $100,000 (£75,000) and has supported the success of many not-for-profits, local businesses and community organisations. Currently there are around 60 Soups across the UK. The concept of Bath Soup Project is simple; everyone donates £5 to attend and this is the prize fund. Five people are selected to pitch an idea – Dragons’ Den style, to improve their local community. The pitch lasts for five minutes and the audience are invited to ask up to five questions per pitch. Once the ideas have been pitched, everyone gets a bowl of soup, and a chance to network and vote. Members of the audience are encouraged to offer the pitchers their support, expertise and resources alongside their vote. When the votes have been counted, the project with the most votes receives all the cash raised on the night. The events aim to bring together people who share a desire for a better community. The added advantage is they also get to meet people and share ideas and resources. New connections are made and it brings the community together. As Amy Kaherl says of the growing community, it’s not just about the money: “It’s a little bit of funding, it’s a lot more empowering and it’s even more about connectivity.” To get Bath Soup Project up and running, Julie networked to find a project team and Simon and Julie were joined by Mike Plows, manager of Bath & Beyond Volunteer Centre and Lucy Beattie, employability advisor at

Kai Fletcher, 17, from the Southside Young Advocates, said: “Bath is a city with a large number of vulnerable young people needing support with complex issues. Southside Young Advocates feel passionately about spreading their message and providing a service in our local communities.” Another huge success on the night was an offer from a local building company to support Three Ways School with the completion of the landscaping for its 3 Café Kitchen. The first event was sponsored and supported by Bath College, Mail Boxes Etc,

Morgan Brinkhurst Consultancy, Thoughtful Bread Company, Mitie and The Bath & Somerset Business Exchange, meaning all of the money raised on the night went to the winning project. Following the success of the first event, the second event was hosted again at Bath College organised by college HND students. Bath Foodcycle won the funds to purchase new baking trays for their meals made from surplus food. Communal meals take place every Wednesday at 7.30pm at St Mary’s Church room in Julian Road, Bath, and everyone is welcome. Carole Rust, who led the pitch for FoodCycle Bath, said: “The evening has been a great opportunity for sharing contacts and knowledge. It’s a bit like our FoodCycle meals – you don’t know what those ingredients are going to do when they’re put together but often the result is awesome. I had no idea we would win the pitch.” Once again invaluable support and sponsorship was provided by Thoughtful Bread Company, The Free Range Chef, Mail Boxes Etc, Mitie, Bath College, Handelsbanken and FWD Thinking Recruitment. The next Bath Soup event hosted by Bath Foodcycle is planned for Thursday 12 October from 6 to 8pm at St Mary’s Catholic Church (Meeting Room), Julian Road, Bath, BA1 2SF. Tickets can be pre-booked through Eventbrite at: http://bit.ly/2h5kc2e. All are welcome. For further information, visit YouTube: http://bit.ly/2eXEn1c. Twitter: @bathsoupproject. Facebook: bathsoupproject. n


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Peace of mind when you need it most When Freddie Mercury sang ‘Who wants to live forever?’ it’s probably unlikely he would have been contemplating the practicalities of planning for later life.

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lanning for the future is generally something we would all rather put off, but as we grow older there may come a time when prior planning might help to prepare for those unthinkable situations. Taking the time to sit down and really consider the possibility of - ‘What happens if I lose the ability to make decisions? ’, ‘How would I fund a good care home?’, ‘What happens to my assets when I die?’, ‘I have no immediate family. Who do I turn to for help?’, ‘Can I stay in my own home?’ These are all questions that sadly, for many people, are asked too late by the time the answers to them are needed. Working with a Later Life Support team can provide guidance and practical, hands-on support. The team here at Mogers Drewett get more involved with our clients than many people might expect for a firm of lawyers. We work with clients who have very different and personal circumstances. We help them and their families by offering advice, and often more practical support, on a wide ranging number of issues from putting formal documents such as a Lasting Power of Attorney in place, to helping with the restoration of a home for a client needing respite care, to helping with entitlement to the right benefits or care arrangements. It really does vary from client to client depending on their needs and bespoke requirements. Having registered Lasting Powers of Attorney can be essential in a situation where it becomes impossible to take care of yourself financially or physically. This provides peace of mind and allows your chosen attorney to step into your shoes and to make those decisions about property and finance and even health and welfare when you are no longer able to. The cost of not having this in place can be substantial if it is done retrospectively and can often take much longer to arrange. We also have the power to act as an attorney. This is particularly helpful with every day requirements such as operating a bank account, making investment decisions, signing tax returns, paying bills and taking care of your affairs. We are able to work alongside existing advisers, such as banks, accountants or IFA’s. At a time when the stress of dealing with the loss of capacity is difficult enough, these arrangements can really be reassuring and provide peace of mind. The Later Life Support service isn’t a “one size fits all” approach because we know that life just isn’t like that. Each of our clients is unique. By getting to know them, and often their families well, we can protect them, liaise with everyone closely and ensure that the correct arrangements are in place to manage their situation appropriately. We have been helping clients to have a better quality of life in their later years for decades. To find out more, visit us at mogersdrewett.com

ocl A C C O U N TA N C Y

141 Englishcombe Lane, Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

Director dividends, salaries and perks With the recent changes to taxation of dividends and benefits in kind, it is important to check that you are still drawing funds from your company in the most tax efficient way. A "basic" salary remains a standard approach and this will usually be around (and may in certain circumstances be somewhat above) the NI threshold (currently £8,164). Dividends have been the obvious route for the next block of drawings, and although they are not as tax advantageous as they were, they remain a fundamental element of tax planning. However, consideration should also be given to benefits in kind, with the understanding that these aren't "cash" but can effectively save money by covering a cost for you and giving your company a tax deductible expense. Good examples of tax efficient benefits in kind are pensions contributions and pensions advice, childcare schemes, mobile phones, bikes via the 'cycle to work scheme' and what HMRC term 'trivial benefits' (costing up to £50). Such benefits are not profit dependent and so can provide early tax efficient rewards before a company is making the profits that it would need to pay dividends e.g. in start up situations.

For help & advice contact us – call Marie Maggs, Hannah Pettifer or Mike Wilcox on 01225 445507 for a no-obligation meeting.

We look forward to meeting you - and see our website for more, including FREE download guides. What our clients say:

“Believe it or not, in the 25+ years that we have been trading, the meeting with you was the first one ever where we went through accounts - very refreshing” “For us, in our 30 years experience OCL Accountancy is the best fit we have found”

Boost your profits - Reduce your tax Maximise your wealth

Sarah Dodd Head of the Later Life Support Team at Mogers Drewett Solicitors. 24 Queen Square, Bath BA1 3HY. Tel 01225 750 000.

Call Marie Maggs, Mike Wilcox or Hannah Pettifer on 01225 445507 to arrange a no-obligation meeting THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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CITY | PEOPLE

CITYNEWS FESTIVAL SHINES SPOTLIGHT ON DIGITAL

News

n Bath based Royds Withy King, which which is one of the UK’s top law firms, has been named as a senior corporate partner by the RUH’s charity The Forever Friends Appeal, thanks to partners and staff at the firm raising more than £25,000. Pictured are In Memory and Legacy Officer Jan Witt, Royds Withy King’s strategic lead partner for Bath, Stuart Brazington, and The Forever Friends Appeal corporate officer Jo Common, who met at Royds Withy King’s Midland Bridge House office to celebrate the firm’s achievement. Funds raised will go towards the cost of building a new cancer centre at the RUH. n Bath is to get its first Country Living festival

next spring, as the UK’s biggest selling home interest magazine announces its intent to create a village fete style event in the streets and green spaces of the city. The festival will run over the weekend of 11 to 13 May and will include stalls run by west country artisan makers, pop-up demonstrations, talks and food and drink stands. The festival will take over Parade Gardens and Queen Square, along with city centre streets. It’s been backed by Bath and North East Somerset Council, Bath BID and Visit Bath.

How ideas spread online, how businesses tackle ad blocking by using digital games to gain their customers’ attention, and how social media is affecting our personal lives, are all under discussion and debate at the fifth annual Bath Digital Festival this month. The festival runs from Tuesday 17 to Sunday 22 October at venues across the city, tackling a range of issues. There’ll be sessions looking at the digital key challenges faced by businesses in the south west, practical workshops and fun events where the audience becomes part of a hands-on game. There is a digital intelligence day, how to harness digital technology to do good in the community and a day dedicated to how the digitial world impacts on our personal lives. There will be an art show, comedy and an exploration of eco-digital activism. Dave Kelly, founder of the festival, said: “We’d like to think that at a local level, it provides inspiration to those working in, or hoping to work in the digital and tech

SHARING IDEAS: Bath Digital Festival is open to all

space.” Anyone of any ages can attend events at the festival, which is not-for-profit, relying on volunteers to run it. Buy a £15 wristband to attend as many events as you wish, but events will be booked on a firstcome, first-served basis. Look out for the #BDFestival stickers, Twitter @bathdigital. Visit: bathdigitalfestival.co.uk.

FUNDRAISING LAUNCH FOR ELDERLY CARE The trustees of Bridgemead Care Home in St John’s Road, Bath, have launched a £4.4m fund-raising campaign to upgrade the centre, which cares for vulnerable elderly people and those with dementia. Improvements will include a new wing with 12 en-suite rooms, complete with new equipment, and a courtyard, plus a lounge overlooking the river and an upgrade to five existing residents’ rooms. Money will also be spent on protecting the building from flooding from the River Avon, which has come perilously close to encroaching on the home in the past.

BATH BUSINESS BAROMETER provided for

UPDATE: AUGUST 2017

High Street Footfall

(Month on month % change)

n August 2017 in Bath saw 15 days of rainfall compared with just 5 in 2016, however sales held up well against a marginally lower footfall than July. Performance in the South West’s coastal towns demonstrates the critical impact of the school holiday period while Bath, as other historic destinations continues to offer year round appeal.

Geoffrey Weekes, chair of the trustees, said: “We have a lovely home with caring staff and have maintained our values which are driven by the same Christian principles on which Bridgemead was founded. Yet we have to be realistic and adapt to today’s challenges. We are delighted that planning permission for our imaginative but sympathetic extension, designed by SRA Architects, has been granted and are excited to start fundraising.” The plans also incorporate a community suite where services can be offered to older vulnerable people who are not residents.

BATH SALES* + 1.8 %

BDO UK SALES + 2.0 %

*Average of the 4 weeks in August 2017

Saturday continues to be the busiest trading day, with footfall Tuesday- Friday during August revealing relatively consistent footfall figures . As measured by Springboard’s sales index which tracks sales in brick and mortar stores

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PROPERTY TAX ISSUES Calvin Healy from Richardson Swift outlines the main taxes which apply to the purchase, ownership, and ultimate sale of residential property. Stamp Duty Land Tax Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) is paid by the buyer on the purchase of the property. You pay SDLT on increasing portions of the property price above £125,000. A 2% charge is levied on the portion between £125,000 and £250,000, 5% on the portion between £250,001 and £925,000, 10% on the portion between £925,001 and £1.5 million, and 12% on the portion above £1.5 million. There is also a 3% SDLT surcharge for purchases of additional residential properties, such as buy-to-let properties and second homes. The surcharge will apply whether the purchaser is an individual or not, and regardless of where the purchaser is tax resident. However, the surcharge will not apply where the property is the replacement of the purchaser’s main home or the purchaser’s sole residential property worldwide. Capital Gains Tax From 6th April 2016, individuals disposing of residential property at a profit are charged Capital Gains Tax (CGT) at the higher 28% rate. However, there is the potential for relief from CGT on the sale if it is your only/main residence. Where an individual has lived in the property from the date of purchase to the date of sale, any gain arising on the sale is normally covered by principal private residence relief and fully exempt from CGT. It used to be the case that only UK tax

residents were liable to CGT on the disposal of residential property, but rules have gradually extended the scope to include nonUK resident taxpayers. Income tax and Buy-to-let investors From 6th April 2016, the 10% wear and tear allowance was abolished for fully furnished buy-to-lets. Since that date landlords have only been able to claim an element of deduction against rental profits for actual amounts spent on replacement furnishings during the year. Changes are also being introduced to restrict tax relief on loan interest. Currently, full tax relief is available for interest on a loan used in a buy-to-let rental venture. The funds may have been used to purchase the property, to make repairs or improvements, or just fund working capital. From 6th April 2017, tax relief on interest will be restricted so that by 2020 interest will no longer be an allowable expense, but will instead attract relief at 20% as a reduction to your tax bill. This change will have a major impact on the owners of buy-to-let property. Therefore, advice will be required to assess the tax impact in order for tax planning opportunities to be explored.

1st April 2017, then be aware that the Annual Tax on Enveloped Dwellings (ATED) charge could apply, and a return may need to be filed if the property is worth more than £500,000. The annual charge starts at £3,500 and increases, depending on the property’s value. For further information and guidance, please contact either Calvin Healy or Jon Miles on 01225 325580, or email ch@richardsonswift.co.uk.

Calvin Healy

Annual Tax on Enveloped Dwellings Finally, if you have a company which owns a residential property classed as a “dwelling” on

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CITY | PEOPLE

CITYNEWS CHANCE TO INVEST IN ARTS VENUE

News

n Dorothy House Hospice Care charity expects to raise in excess of £60,000 from the Bath Moonlight Walk, which took place on the streets of Bath. More than 650 women took part in the sponsored walk, many of them in fancy dress as the theme was Saturday Night Divas. Overall the charity’s 11 Bath Moonlight Walks have raised more than £1m in sponsorship alone, not including entry fees. n A day of dragon boat racing on the River Avon in Bath raised more than £20,000 for Wizzybugs, which provides disabled children under five with powered wheelchairs, which are not funded by the NHS. The fundraiser, which involved 14 teams racing against each other, was organised by Designability. A team from Health Bath was the eventual winner. n Congratulations to Sue and Amy Adams, the Bath mother and daughter who set up their beauty business, The Brow Place, in Abbey Gate Street four years ago. The pair have expanded the business, taken on more staff and are moving round the corner to Abbey Street. Join the opening night party from 5pm on Monday 9 October and enjoy 20 per cent discounts.

Anyone who’s ever enjoyed a night of comedy, music or film at Komedia in Westgate Street, Bath, is invited to buy shares in the venue as it this month launches its bid to become a Community Benefit Society. Shares in the popular venue go on sale from £250, through crowdfunder.co.uk, offering a three per cent annual return on investment. Donations from £25 are also welcomed. Komedia Bath co-founder Richard Daws, who was part of the team that rescued and transformed the former cinema in 2008, says: “Community is at the forefront of this new chapter of Komedia’s story in Bath, and we’re giving everyone the chance to get involved. We’ve investigated many options with a view to securing the permanence of the Komedia venue in the city and this is by far the best way forward for us. It’s not about ‘saving’ the venue, which is the case with many community ownership schemes, more about taking a bold step to transform the way we do business, building a genuine

HAMPERS A TASTY WAY TO SAY THANK YOU Bath’s new Apex Hotel played host to a gathering of local food and drink producers for the launch of Taste of Bath’s business gifting service. Guests from the city’s business community were invited to sample the wares of the producers whose goods are featured in Taste of Bath’s range of hampers. Taste of Bath founder Helen Rich, said: “We think corporate gifting is a fantastic opportunity – not just to say thank you, but to show a little of the personality behind your brand and to make a lasting impression. For businesses based in Bath, sending a gift that celebrates fabulous local food and drink is the perfect way to do

RESIDENT INCOMING ON WALCOT STREET The latest arrival in Bath’s most characterful neighbourhood, Walcot Street, is Resident, a new pop-up shop set up by Bath-born James Borley, which opens on Wednesday 27 September and is due to be in situ until the end of the year. James already runs Frome-based lifestyle shop, Resident in Paul Street which sells homewares, clothing, accessories and beauty products. He started trading online in 2015, then opened the Frome shop in spring 2016. The new store will sell contemporary, Scandinavian-inspired fashion for men and women, alongside a mix of stylish and good looking homewares and accessories such as backpacks. Brands include Ferm Living, Earl of East London, Monokel eyewear and Rains. The Frome shop won the accolade of 86 TheBATHMagazine

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and committed relationship with the community we serve. Ultimately, we hope this exciting development launches a blueprint that works nationally for other mid-scale venues facing similar challenges.’ For details about the community ownership scheme email: eleanorhousehold@komedia.co.uk or tel: 01225 489070.

being named boutique of the week in The Times earlier this summer. James said of the new venture: “It’s such a great feeling to be opening in Bath. I lived in the city for many years and went to university here many years ago, so it definitely feels like coming full circle. We have big plans for the shop with lots of events and workshops and our signature curated selection of wares will all be coming with us from Frome.” The new store will be bigger, bolder and in some ways quite different to Frome. Expect to find an expanded calendar of events and workshops, exciting collaborations with local designers and makers and an expanded selection of clothing, homeware and accessories.

that.” The hampers are smart black boxes, carefully packed and be-ribboned and bearing Taste of Bath’s logo. Taste of Bath’s producers serving their produce included the Organic Cake Company, Somerset Charcuterie Company, Colonna and Smalls and the Bath Gin Company. Ben Franks from Novel Wines, offered guests Bacchus Dry White from Wraxalls Vineyard, Stoney Bonk, Honey’s Midford Cider, and Electric Bear Brewing’s Persuasion Pale Ale, and water from Bath Water. Visit: taste-of.co.uk, or email Helen: helen@taste-of.co.uk to create a bespoke hamper.


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A DV E RTO R I A L F E AT U R E

“WHAT’S MINE IS YOURS...” By Madison Fowler, Sharp Family Law. www.sharpfamilylaw.com …what’s yours is mine? Two recent cases have shown that the assumption of 50:50 split upon divorce may not always be correct. The Short Marriage Just last month, the court held that a husband married to a city trader earning £10.5 million in bonuses was not entitled to an equal share of their marital assets. It had been a 4 year childless marriage, and he was provided with £2million of the £5.5million pot. In coming to its decision the court took into account the length of the marriage, the absence of children to be taken care of, and the actual needs of the husband and wife involved. The result was not just a straight 50:50 division. The Long Marriage In another case recent case, it was again the actual needs of the wife that were used to calculate her settlement figures, rather than a 50:50 division. It involved a long 23 year relationship with adult children. Here, the issue was that the husband had amassed a fortune of £1.9m before the marriage, and the wife had come into it ‘with no assets except a Porsche’.

By the time the couple came to divorce, the assets involved were £9.4million – how much of this was matrimonial wealth? After 6 years of litigation, the result was that the Judge awarded the wife £3.5million – not the £5.1million she had requested. The Judge felt a 50:50 division was ‘unfair’ in the circumstances.

Madison Fowler

So what does this mean? Every case is different, and a court judgement turns on the facts of each case. Is this the end of the 50 / 50 divisions? Not yet – however, these cases have shown that a 50:50 split is not so cut and dry after all, and it is the needs of individuals and families that matter. The uncoupling of most relationships has a significant financial impact on those involved. What was once shared by two may need to be divided to support separate households, and how that is done can have consequences for families for years to come. The skilled lawyers at Sharp Family Law are experienced in handling complex financial settlements both in the court arena and through alternative dispute resolution. If you would like to talk in more detail about your situation, please call and speak with one of our specialist family lawyers.

5 Gay Street Bath, BA1 2PH t: 01225 448 955 info@sharpfamilylaw.com www.sharpfamilylaw.com

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CHARITY | NEWS

AN EXERCISE IN SELF SUFFICIENCY Film maker and Bath resident Ric Rawlins visited Kenya to meet the families benefitting from the services of charity Send a Cow

A

s a film maker and former journalist, I’ve interviewed a lot of interesting people but nothing could have prepared me for meeting the women of western Kenya. Earlier this year, I left my home and family in Bath and took the 10,000 km journey to rural Kenya where I met some of the women working with charity Send a Cow. Armed with as much camera and video equipment as I could carry, I was ready to start capturing the stories and lives of people I’d heard so much about back in the Send a Cow office in Newton St Loe. Over the next week I was scheduled to meet women who were thriving with support from the charity and also individuals who we were yet to start working with. The contrast was stark and immediately apparent. I met Alice, her four-year-old daughter, Starlett, and her mother-in-law, Agnes, who all live together on their farm. What struck me first was the farm’s cinematic qualities: it was physically isolated beneath a canopy of trees and seemed to have a graceful, poetic atmosphere. The closer I looked, something else impressed me though – the fact that every acre of their land had been put to good use. Working as a team, Alice and Agnes were really using their farm training with Send a Cow, growing a huge range of crops from bananas and sweet potatoes, to mangoes and peas. It was everything they needed to sustainably feed themselves – and make decent money from selling the surplus at their local market. I was amazed by their ingenuity, passion and independence. Agnes told me that life had not always been this way. Before working with Send a Cow they hadn’t known how to make the most of their land and Agnes had struggled to feed her children. Today, their crops are flourishing and Alice is able to send her daughter to a private school using money made from her farm. She even has plans to return to school herself so that she can become a nurse. When lunch time came we gathered inside their home; a simple but comfortable concrete-walled house with a corrugated iron roof. Laid out in front of us was an impressive spread of chapattis, vegetables, stew and ugali, a staple maize dish in Kenya. Never in my life had I eaten such fresh food. Earlier that day, I’d seen Alice go to the field and pick the green, leafy vegetables I was eating. I’d watched Agnes knead the

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SUSTAINABLE FUTURE: Ric with Kenyan farmers Alice and Agnes and Azita Shamsolahi from Newton St Loe based charity Send a Cow. Below, Mercy with her baby Angel, whose welfare is about to change, thanks to a Mother and Child project

dough for the chapattis. Almost everything on my plate had come from the farm or just down the road from someone else’s farm. The care and effort that had gone into the food was incredible – my weekly shopping trip to the local Lidl and a quick stir-fry dinner at home paled in comparison. However, a few days later, I met a young mother called Mercy and straight away I could tell things were different. She was a similar age to Alice and lived about an hour away but her situation couldn’t be more different. In her arms she carried her baby daughter, Angel, and I immediately thought of my own son Danny. She told me, with tears in her eyes, about her mother who had lost both her hands in a terrible house fire a few years ago. With noone to turn to Mercy struggles every day to care and provide for her mother, her two young children and her siblings. All six of them live in a tiny mud hut. School is a

luxury that they can’t afford and perhaps more worryingly, so is food. Like Alice and Agnes, she relies almost entirely on her plot of land to feed her family but she hasn’t got the knowledge and experience to farm. We all know that a healthy diet is important but it’s even more critical in the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. I looked at her baby and wondered what her life might be like if their situation doesn’t change soon. Just as I started to feel overwhelmed by her story, a Kenyan Send a Cow worker gave me a reason to hope. She told me that Mercy was one of the women Send a Cow plans to work with in a new Mother and Child project. That she, along with thousands of others, would be given the training, support and resources they needed to start growing their own food. I started to imagine a parallel future for Mercy. One where she was feeding her children well, sending them to school and looking forward to her life ahead. I returned to the UK not saddened by what Mercy had told me but filled with hope that things can – and will be – different for her.’’ You can help struggling mothers like Mercy by donating to Send a Cow’s Mother & Child appeal. Donate before 31 December and your donation will be doubled by the UK Government. With Christmas just around the corner you could also purchase a life-changing gift from the charity’s gift catalogue. Just £30 could provide a mother with tools and seeds to start growing food for her family. Find out more, visit: sendacow.org. n


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FAMILY | EVENTS

FAMILY DIARY IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO WITH THE CHILDREN THIS MONTH BATH CHILDREN’S LITERATURE FESTIVAL 2017 Friday 29 September – Sunday 8 October n Various venues across Bath Some of the biggest names in children’s books and television are coming to Bath for Europe’s largest dedicated children’s literature festival. The line-up includes The Gruffalo author Julia Donaldson and Goth Girl’s author and illustrator Chris Riddell. To mark the 20th anniversary of the first Harry Potter book, illustator Jim Kay will be talking about bringing the characters to life, plus test your knowledge at the Harry Potter quiz. There will also be workshops and writing and illustration masterclasses for all ages throughout the festival. Visit: bathfestivals.org.uk or call: 01225 463362. HERE BE DRAGONS Until Sunday 8 October n Victoria Art Gallery Last chance to see the dragons of all shapes and sizes that have taken over Victoria Art Gallery! Explore the colourful exhibition of work by some of the world’s best children’s illustrators and writers. Children can find their favourite fire-breathing characters before reading all about them in the story corner. Tickets: £4 for adults, free for under 16s. Visit: victoriagal.org.uk. Also at Victoria Art Gallery this month EXPLORER ART TRAIL Saturday 21 – Sunday 29 October, 10.30am – 5pm n Victoria Art Gallery Explore the art gallery and its special paintings. Find the clues in the family trail and meet some new faces and old friends in the displays. Free, no need to book. Visit: victoriagal.org.uk or call: 01225 477233. POTTY ABOUT POTS Saturday 28 October, 10.30 – 11.30am and 12 – 1pm Be inspired by the museum’s special display and create a pot using clay. Free but places limited. Book by calling: 01225 477233. Children must be accompanied by an adult. SO YOU THINK YOU WANT TO BE AN ARCHITECT? Saturday 7 October, 9.30 – 10.30am for ages eight – 12 and Saturday 14 October, 9.30 – 10.30am for ages 13 – 16 n Museum of Bath Architecture, The Paragon, Bath, BA1 5NA Are you interested in architecture? Would you like to know more about what an architect does? This informal session will

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trio of acrobatic penguins, alongside magical puppetry and live music, Metta Theatre’s Blown Away is a joyous stage adaptation of Rob Biddulph’s award winning children’s book. Suitable for age three and above.

Penguin Blue comes to The egg this month give young people an idea of the skills involved, what knowledge architects learn and use, and why it’s such an interesting job. Architect Simon Cartlidge will talk about his work and answer questions, plus there’s a chance to try out fun, architecture related activities. All children must be accompanied by an adult. Refreshments available. Visit: museumofbatharchitecture.org.uk or call: 01225 333895. FROGMAN Saturday 7 – Wednesday 11 October, times vary n The egg Meera’s first sleepover turns into torch-lit storytelling from sleeping bags. While her aquarium begins to glow, outside the Frogman is on a search for a missing child in The Great Barrier Reef. As police search lights refract through the ocean, the annual coral bloom is due, creating an underwater snowstorm. Time is running out. A groundbreaking, world first theatre experience, see it with VR headsets from double Fringe First-winners, Curious Directive. Suitable for ages 12 and above. Visit: theatreroyal.org.uk or call: 01225 823409. Also at The egg this month LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD Saturday 14 – Tuesday 17 October, times vary My, my, what a big imagination you have! Enter the belly of the wolf and experience the tale of Little Red Riding Hood like never before. Suitable for three – seven year olds. BLOWN AWAY Saturday 28 – Sunday 29 October, times vary A windy day, a brand new kite, for Penguin Blue a maiden flight . . . Meet Penguin Blue and friends as they go on an acrobatic Antarctic adventure full of good ideas, homesickness and the perils of kites. With a

CRAZY CHARACTERS Saturday 21 – Sunday 29 October, 10am – 1pm and 2 – 4pm n Roman Baths As part of Bath Museums Week, children can make a Roman actor's mask to take home. Included in admission. Free to Discovery Card holders. No need to book, children must be accompanied by an adult. Visit: romanbaths.co.uk or call: 01225 477785. Also at the Roman Baths this month QUEST FOR FUN AND FACTS Thursday 26 October, 6 – 8pm Explore, investigate and discover facts and fun around the baths with activities hosted by Children’s University. Included in admission price. Free to Discovery Card holders. ALIEN ART Saturday 21 – Sunday 29 October, 1 – 5pm on weekdays, 11am – 5pm on weekends n Herschel Museum of Astronomy, New King Street, Bath, BA1 2BL Be creative and make the craziest alien out of lots of art supplies. Will it have googly eyes, bendy arms or fluffy hair? Free workshop. Visit: herschelmuseum.org.uk or call: 01225 446865. MUSEUM TRAILS Saturday 21 – Sunday 29 October n The Museum of East Asian Art, Bennett Street, Bath, BA1 2QJ Learn about festival customs from east and south east Asia and explore the museum’s vast collection through a variety of family trails. Children can discover the mythical animals around the museum, while toddlers can pick out different shapes and colours. Visit: meaa.org.uk or call: 01225 464640. ROARING '20S! Monday 23 – Tuesday 24 and Thursday 26 – Friday 27 October, 2 – 4pm n Fashion Museum, Assembly Rooms Take inspiration from the Fashion Museum’s gorgeous 1920s collection and learn how to make your own colourful headdress. Included in admission price, free to Discovery Card holders. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Visit: fashionmuseum.co.uk or call: 01225 477789.


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FAMILY | EVENTS HAIRY MACLARY AND FRIENDS Wednesday 25 October, 1.30pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon, BA15 1DZ “Out of the gate and off for a walk went Hairy Maclary from Donaldson's Dairy…” The whole family will enjoy seeing the loveable characters from Lynley Dodd’s much-loved book come to life through music, song and stories. Tickets: £10 adults, £8 under 12s, family ticket £32. Suitable for ages three – seven. Visit: wiltshiremusic.org.uk or call: 01225 860100. ART MASTERCLASS: THINK INK Thursday 26 October, 11am – 4pm n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street Enjoy a day of explorative drawing, learning about different inks and a range of experimental techniques to produce expressive portraits. For 11 – 18 year olds. £30 per person, all materials included. To book, call: 01225 388568 or visit: holburne.org. THE TIGER WHO CAME TO TEA Thursday 26 – Sunday 29 October, times vary n Theatre Royal Bath The doorbell rings just as Sophie and her mummy are sitting down to tea. Who could it possibly be? What they certainly don’t expect to see at the door is a big, stripy tiger!

Judith Kerr’s much-loved children’s book The Tiger Who Came To Tea appears on stage at Theatre Royal Bath Following a smash-hit West End season, the tea-guzzling tiger visits Bath in this delightful musical play based on the popular book by Judith Kerr. Visit: theatreroyal.org.uk or call: 01225 44884. WALLACE AND GROMIT Friday 27 October, 11am – 12pm n The Museum of Bath at Work, Julian Road, Bath, BA1 2RH To mark the 120th birthday of the creation of Plasticine, the Museum of Bath at Work will be showing two early Aardman animation films featuring Wallace and Gromit. Visit: bath-at-work.org.uk or call: 01225 318348.

FRIGHT AT THE MUSEUM Friday 27 October, 6 – 9pm n The American Museum in Britain Behind the doors of Claverton Manor a host of ghostly storytellers await, ready to tell the most ghastly tales from American folklore. Guides will lead timed tours through the museum, stopping to find a few spooky surprises along the way. Hear about the manor’s sinister past and the peculiar goings on witnessed by staff over the years. Timed tours take place every half an hour from 6pm. Pre-booking essential. Adults £12, children £6.50, concessions £10.50, family ticket £28.50. The tour is designed for ages 14+ but parental discretion is advised. Visit: americanmuseum.org or call: 01225 460503 to book tickets. Also at the American Museum this month DAY OF THE DEAD FIESTA Sunday 29 October, 12 – 3pm At the beginning of November families across Mexico and the American Southwest remember deceased loved ones during Day of the Dead celebrations. There will be music from Latino musicians Mariachi Tequila, who will be closing the museum’s season by performing a variety of traditional songs in the stables from 2pm. Plus visitors can make their own skull mask or model to take home. Drop-in session, no need to book. Suitable for ages three and above. Included with gardens admission.

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EDUCATION NEWS GET YOUR KIDS TO GIVE A QUID

GETTING INVOLVED: reception and Year 1 pupils at King Edward’s pre-prep and nursery

Nurseries, schools and colleges across Bath, Somerset and Wiltshire are being invited to take part in a fundraising event called Pounds for Patients, which begins on Friday 13 October. Pounds for Patients is organised by The Forever Friends Appeal, charity which raises money for the Royal United Hospitals Bath. The affordable event is for everyone; pupils, teachers and parents. Schools simply decide how they want to fundraise on the day and everyone who participates donates £1. All proceeds raised go towards helping the RUH continue to deliver the best possible care to its patients and their families and to help raise funds for a new cancer centre at the hospital. It’s up to the schools to decide how they fundraise, whether they have a fancy dress day, organise a teddy bears picnic, or run a baking competition. For more information about Pounds for Patients visit: foreverfriendsappeal.co.uk.

ALL-YEAR ROUND REVISION SUPPORT Bath Tutorial College is offering an expanding programme of Easter revision courses in Bath for 2018 at the beginning of another demanding year for students working towards GCSEs, A levels and the International Baccalaureate. With full implementation of new and tougher qualifications next summer, the college’s courses aim to increase students’ chances of exam success. The revision programmes, at Easter and during half-term

holidays, are structured to offer students who attend all the crucial support needed – and much more. Staff at the college work to ensure students leave with an enhanced understanding of their subjects and improved exam technique, in a happy environment, gaining new friends and fond memories. Visit: bathtutorialcollege. co.uk. The website also features feedback following this summer’s results. Email for more information: info@bathtutorialcollege.co.uk.

ARTS FESTIVAL HOSTS AWARDS Six young performers will compete for the title of Mid-Somerset Festival annual Junior and Senior Bath Young Actor of the Year on Friday 13 October, from 6.30pm at The Edge arts centre on the University of Bath campus at Claverton, Bath. Each performer will be invited to show a repertoire of contrasting pieces to compete for the final accolade in the two age categories. Tickets: £5 (under 18s free), tel: 01225 463362. On Tuesday 7 November, from 7.30pm at the Pump Room, Bath, another talented group of young people will compete in the Bath Young Musician of the Year award, also run by the longrunning Mid-Somerset Festival. Tickets: £10 / £5 for under 18s, tel: 01225 463352.

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SIXTH FORM OPEN EVENING Thursday 30th November 2017

For more information, please contact the Sixth Form Office on 01249 766036 or email sixthform@sheldonschool.co.uk

THE

6.30-9.00pm

ROUTE to your

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Sarah Wringer KIE Bath, 5 Trim Street, Bath, BA1 1HB Direct Line (01225) 473502 Email: sarah.wringer@kaplan.com

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Independent Tutorial College offering: A Levels, GCSEs, Re-sits and Supplementary Tuition “Tutors are very supportive in helping students to prepare for examinations... and attain the higher grades.” OFSTED

27 Queen Square, Bath, BA1 2HX 01225 334577 | admissions@bathacademy.co.uk www.bathacademy.co.uk

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HEALTH | & | BEAUTY

BEING breast AWARE

To mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, we pick some local providers of health and beauty services for people who have cancer

B

reast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with more than 50,000 women being diagnosed annually. With scientific advancement, greater research and changes to treatment, more and more people are surviving cancer every year. For those going through treatment and post-surgery, the changes to your physical appearance can make it difficult to feel like yourself again. Here are a range of local businesses and NHS services that provide health and beauty treatments and facilities to help people who have had cancer or are currently going through treatment . . . WIGS AND HAIR TREATMENTS AT FRONTLINESTYLE 4 – 5 Monmouth Street, Bath, BA1 2AJ Web: wigsboutique.co.uk or tel: 01225 302105. Web: frontlinestyle.co.uk or tel: 01225 478478 Hair and beauty salon Frontlinestyle offers private consultations and wig fittings through its sister company Wigs Boutique. Using her years of experience, salon manager and master stylist Amie begins by organising a phone consultation with new clients to understand what kind of colour, style and fit they are looking for. She then orders a range of wigs for clients to try on in the privacy of one of the salon’s treatment rooms. Amie can then cut, shape and style the wig according to what the client prefers and she advises on how to wash the wig at home. The salon also sells wig stands that you can dry them on. The wigs are ordered from all across the world and can be made of synthetic and real hair. Monofilament wigs are particularly popular as they create the illusion of a scalp and are seamless going along the top of the forehead, making it look really natural. Clients typically have two consultations before their final wig is chosen, and they can be sent to the client usually within a week.

During October Breast Cancer Now has teamed up with leading retail partners to create a range of products where a percentage of the retail price is donated to the charity. See the full range at: lookbook.breastcancernow.org.

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BRAS AT PERFECT FIT 50 Temple Street, Keynsham, Bristol, BS31 1EH Web: perfectfit.uk.com or tel: 0117 9860950 The dedicated team at Perfect Fit have been fitting lingerie for 26 years, and finding the correct fitting underwear is their speciality. Perfect Fit specialises in mastectomy bras as well as everyday underwear. On a daily basis the team see women of all ages, from quite young to more mature, who have been affected by breast surgery. The store stocks post surgery and mastectomy bras, and you can have pockets put into any bra. HAIR LOSS TREATMENT AT LUCINDA ELLERY CONSULTANCY 58 Pembroke Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 3DT Visit: lucindaellery-hairloss.co.uk or tel: 0117 203 3222 Hair loss consultancy Lucinda Ellery can help people manage the effects of hair loss using its revolutionary Intralace System, which is an integrated hair loss prosthetic that creates a full head of hair that clients can wash, sleep and swim with. Many of the consultancy’s clients undergo chemotherapy and can use Intralace during or after treatment – clients can even use the system if they experience total hair loss. Clients usually use the Intralace System for eight to 12 months, depending on the length of hair they prefer. The consultancy

The Georgia post-surgery bra by Royce Lingerie, available at Perfect Fit, RRP £28 can also use ultra fine medi connection hair extensions which lengthens regrown hair to shoulder length. SERVICES AT THE RUH Combe Park, Bath, BA1 3NG Visit: ruh.nhs.uk The Breast Unit at the Royal United Hospital in Bath offers a range of services to patients, including a breast prothesis fitting clinic with a nurse specialist who is able to give advice about what bras to wear, and a free bra pocketing service. The RUH also holds regular free skincare and make-up workshops for cancer patients through the charity Look Good Feel Better, where representatives from the likes of Boots and Debenhams give their top tips on how to use different products and boost confidence. Plus, each person is given a gift bag full of goodies from cosmetic companies to take home. The RUH also offers an NHS wig and scarf fitting service. n n To find out more about breast cancer, the symptoms and how to check youself, visit the Breast Cancer Now charity website: breastcancernow.org. n Breast Cancer Now’s flagship fundraiser wear it pink takes place on Friday 20 October. Throw on some pink clothes, ditch your everyday rags, and help raise some funds for life-saving breast cancer research. Visit: wearitpink.org.

Award-winning ghd platinum styler in limited edition pink blush finish. RRP: £165, donation to Breast Cancer Now: £10. Available at Frontlinestyle Salon and ghdhair.com.

Charitable shopping with Breast Cancer Now’s lookbook

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“I love seeing the confidence people have when they find the right wig,” says Amie. For those who have grown their hair after chemotherapy or who have experienced thinning during treatment, therapists at Frontlinestyle suggest using Nioxin shampoo, conditioner and treatment. Nioxin refreshes the scalp, clears follicle-clogging sebum, and encourages the hair to grow faster and thicker than before. You can browse the range and purchase Nioxin products in the salon.

Floral embroidered bra from Marks & Spencer. RRP: £18. Donation to Breast Cancer Now: £3.60. Available in select stores and online throughout October.

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The Orangery fp October.qxp_Layout 1 21/09/2017 11:35 Page 1

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No.2 Kingsmead St. Bath • Tel: 01225 466851 www.theorangerylaserandbeautybath.co.uk


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Don’t be short sighted about your child’s vision Kathryn Anthony

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yopia (short sight) is an important cause of reduced vision throughout the world and its incidence is increasing. About one in three of the US population is myopic (short sighted) and in some Asian countries, up to 80 per cent of children are affected. For most short-sighted people, the main problem is inconvenience; being dependent on spectacles or contact lenses can limit activities and be frustrating. However, highly myopic eyes are at a greater risk of developing some serious eye conditions such as retinal detachment or

glaucoma. The Centre for Disease Control now views progressive myopia as an epidemic.

examinations to start at a young age, approximately 5 years old for yearly exams.

WHAT CAN WE DO TO STOP THIS MYOPIA EPIDEMIC?

OrthoK or Orthokeratology is currently one of the most effective methods of myopia control. OrthoK works through overnight vision correction. A specially designed contact lens worn overnight reduces the power of the cornea to improve your vision when you are short sighted. It is a particularly convenient method of myopia control because the lens wear and handling takes place in the family home, under parental supervision. The child is then free from spectacles and contact lenses through the day which is ideal for active lifestyles and participation in sport. This gives two clear benefits: 1) convenient visual correction; 2) prevention of myopia progression.

Myopia typically develops at about six to eight years of age and progresses at about half a dioptre (the measure of optical power) per year. The age of onset, progression and stabilisation varies but myopia typically progresses faster at younger ages. Boys and girls are equally affected and children can wear glasses or contact lenses to correct their short sight. However, various methods of 'slowing' the progression of myopia in children, rather than simply correcting it, have been investigated and are showing promising results. Myopia Prevention. There is an accepted genetic element but research has shown that more time spent outdoors as a child helps prevent myopia. There are methods to slow or prevent progression of myopia, but the action works best when the child is younger. Myopic changes are generally permanent and don’t get better with treatment. Treatment should therefore be designed to prevent the development and progression and to do that requires eye

OrthoK is also an option for myopic people who are finding their contact lenses less comfortable or who simply want freedom from glasses or contact lenses through the day. “If you are concerned about your child's vision and interested in how OrthoK could help you or your child, or would like further information on myopia control please contact Kathryn Anthony Optometry. Call us on 01225 464433 or just pop in: we are here to help.” Geoff Don

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‘ONE OF THE FINEST VIEWS’ Andrew Swift explores the riverside meadows and the hillsides around Batheaston

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the path is a memorial to David Waterstone, who was instrumental in the campaign. Just beyond it, the impressive façade of Batheaston House is suddenly revealed, with its gardens running down to the river. It was built in 1712 by Henry Walters, on the foundations of an earlier house which he inherited and demolished. His family’s wealth came from the clothing trade, and he was not only the most powerful man in Batheaston, but also became high sheriff for Somerset. Now the path narrows, and, through the willows fringing the river, come glimpses of the meadows on the far bank, with Bathampton and Farleigh Downs in the distance. Carry on past a turning on the right, to emerge by the Old Mill Hotel, built on the site of a mill destroyed by fire in 1909. To your right, through the gates of Avondale House, lies the tower of the old Avondale Brewery, now converted to offices. Ahead is the tollhouse for a bridge opened in 1870 to replace a ferry. Go through a tunnel under the road, on the other side of which is a good view of the bridge and weir. Carry on through a wooded area for 50m before emerging in an overgrown meadow. Before carrying on, bear left to see where the ferry once ran across the river. Bathampton Mill, on the far bank, was also destroyed by fire, in 1895. Tea gardens later opened there, and in the 1960s the mill became the Keel Club, before becoming a

lthough this walk, which begins in Batheaston, is relatively short, and traverses an area many readers will be familiar with, it heads well off the beaten track and may hold a few surprises. As well as a dramatic view of an early 18th century mansion – and a visit to a corner of its garden – it visits the site of a long-lost ferry, two old mills, a tin church, an archery ground, and a succession of memorable trees. It also climbs to take in a view described in the 18th century as ‘a most pleasing prospect of a rich vale, washed by the river Avon, and bounded by romantic towering hills.’ The walk starts in the car park at the far end of Batheaston, opposite the White Lion and George & Dragon pubs (ST780674). You can also get to the starting point by bus, catching the 3 or X31 from Bath and getting off just past the White Lion. Before starting the walk, take a look through the archway at the west end of the car park, which leads into what was once part of the garden of Batheaston House. It is now a public park, but an 18th century shell niche and seat survive on the other side of the wall. Heading back through the archway, walk down to the river and turn right along the riverside path. This path was closed in 2006 after part of it collapsed into the river, but, after a long campaign, was reinstated and reopened in 2011. A little way along 102 TheBATHMagazine

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restaurant in the 1970s. Head across the meadow and carry on along a tree-shaded path to emerge by the ground of Bath Archers. Carry on, and, after passing a venerable willow, you come to Avon Rugby Club’s ground. Bear left alongside the hedge and then right to carry on alongside the river. At the end, carry on along a narrow track for 50m, before turning right up a tarmac path. At the road, cross the two sets of pedestrian lights ahead, turn right along the pavement and take the second left up Eveleigh Avenue, through the grounds of Bailbrook House. After 200m, turn left along Eveleigh Avenue and follow the road as it curves up to the right. At the end, go through a gap beside a gate and head up a field towards Bailbrook’s old tin church, built in 1892. To your right, a row of lofty aspens, rustling in the breeze, masks the sound of the nearby dual carriageway. When you reach the church, turn right along the lane, and after 175m turn left up a drive with a public footpath sign (ST769671). Follow it as it curves past the back of buildings, carry on through a wooden KG and follow a track across a field. From here you have a view over one of the finest stretches of the Avon valley. On a sunny day, there is an Italianate quality to the view. This was something that struck 18th century visitors to Bath, who, according to John Collinson, compared it to the valley of the Arno near Florence.

ON OUR DOORSTEP: main image, the view over Arno’s Vale and along the Avon valley Opposite, Bathampton Mill in 1890, Batheaston House in all its glory and Bailbrook Lane’s tin church


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‘Batheaston,’ he wrote, ‘is bounded and divided from Bath Hampton by the river Avon, which, fringed with willows, forms an easy bend through a range of fine rich meads, called Arno’s Vale.’ Despite houses having been built on the slopes of Bathampton Down, despite the pylons marching across the valley, this remains one of the finest views in this part of the world – not the most spectacular or dramatic, perhaps, but, with the tree-cloaked hills running gently down to the green meadows, and the long line of Warleigh Woods closing the distant prospect along the Avon valley, one of the most satisfying. Carry on through another KG which leads across a ha-ha. After going through two more KGs – but ignoring a third branching off to the left – carry on through a meadow

overgrown with nettles, mint and comfrey. At the end, follow steep and tricky steps down to a lane and turn right (ST776676). After 35m, turn left through a KG into a field with a trio of stately trees – a lime, a sweet chestnut, and, in the distance, a variegated sycamore. Head straight downhill, cross a gated footbridge and head towards Batheaston church. After going through another KG, carry on a little way before following steps down to the road and turning right. Take the first left down School Lane and, after crossing St Catherine’s Brook at the end, turn right along a footpath. When it forks, bear right to carry on alongside the brook and continue in the same direction to emerge by the side of the White Lion, before crossing the road to the car park or bus stop. Level of challenge: Straightforward,

although with one short flight of steep and tricky steps; sheep in the fields above Batheaston; cows in the field leading to the church. n Andrew Swift is the author of On Foot in Bath: Fifteen Walks Around a World Heritage City and co-author, with Kirsten Elliot, of Ghost Signs of Bath.

FACT FILE ■ Length of walk: 3 miles ■ Approximate time: 1½ – 2 hours ■ Map: OS Explorer 155

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WHAT’S COOKING IN KITCHENS? Tactile surfaces and clever use of colour are among the popular trends in contemporary design. We asked the kitchen experts to share their latest innovations

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a complete makeoever. He said: “In this sprawling Georgian home, the kitchen is the one area that brings the whole family together. Our challenge was to create an open, social space, while ensuring the cook has pride of place and is always involved in the fun. “The central island plays many roles. One side is a dedicated cook’s zone with everything at their fingertips – from the Wolf range cooker and Sub-Zero fridge-freezer, to prep sinks, a spice shelf floating above the island and an integrated dishwasher. Elsewhere, the family can do homework at the island, watch television or just mingle about, chatting. “Tucking the range cooker into the existing Bath Stone fireplace creates a lovely classic-modern touch. The bespoke half-moon shaped dining table – seating up to ten people – is easy to serve and always involves the cook in conversation. Design-wise, straight lines are tempered by softened corners and chunky handles. And the dresser-style cabinet connects the kitchen to the home. “The island and table tops are made from single slabs of white quartz. This is neatly contrasted with the maple cabinetry, painted in a dark

t’s at the heart of the home. The room we come to when we’ve taken off our coats and shoes, to start opening the fridge and consider our next meal, or what we’re going to feed the family. The kitchen is a place where couples do their bonding and chatting, over the stirring of pans and the chopping of vegetables. It’s where children gather to ask thorny homework questions, where friends come to confide over a glass of wine and where birthday cake candles are blown out. In these times, fewer and fewer people choose to eat in their dining rooms, so the kitchen needs to be all things to all men – and women. A place where you can grab a quick coffee, or a mid-week bowl of pasta, or on special occasions, lay the table with all your best china, light the candles and invite your favourite people to join you. And all of this is why it makes sense to ask an expert when it comes to getting this most valued room just how you want it. THE BATH KITCHEN COMPANY James Horsfall of the family run Bath Kitchen Company was called to a family home in Bathwick, undergoing 104 TheBATHMagazine

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Farrow & Ball Hague blue – an unconventional yet very English colour. Antique copper-finish handles and red cooker handles add a pop of colour, while the natural wood floor provides a warm, rustic welcome.” Visit: bathkitchencompany.co.uk. HOBSONS CHOICE Richard Keyes, head of design and sales said: “One of our favourite recent projects is this bulthaup b3 kitchen in horizontally book-matched cherry veneer, stainless steel and kaolin white. Working collaboratively with the clients, who own a period townhouse and property development company Berkeley Place, we were able to create a kitchen / dining space that was stylish, highly functional and complementary to the period architecture. “The kitchen boasts cooking, cooling and extraction technology from Miele, alongside what is quickly becoming a ‘must-have’ feature – a boiling hot water tap by Quooker. Hobsons Choice also supplied the dining area, consisting of a bulthaup c2 table in kaolin (to complement the kaolin tall units) and Carl Hansen & Son CH20 chairs in oak and black leather. Created using a laser-welded laminating process, the table appears

GEORGIAN SPLENDOUR: main picture, a family kitchen in Bathwick designed by The Bath Kitchen Company, where an open, social space has been created with a central island Opposite page top, an in-toto kitchen in new marsala red, matt finish carcases can be added at the end of islands and units or as exterior shelves Opposite page, below, this bulthaup b3 kitchen is in sleek cherry veneer, while the dining table has been created using a laser-welded laminating process to give it a seamless look


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seamless, as if honed from a solid block of material while being incredibly hardwearing and easy to clean. As with every Hobsons Choice kitchen, the client’s lifestyle, cooking preferences, storage needs and style of property are all carefully considered to create a space that fulfils every need. The result is an intelligently designed, perfectly installed kitchen that makes life better for the client while adding value to their home.” Visit: hobsonschoice.uk.com.

lime green, elegant telegrey and vivid platinum blue – perfect for pairing with contrasting accessories to express your style. In-toto offers a variety of design possibilities, including a choice of worktops in the latest high-quality materials and finishes, inspired storage solutions, and harmonising lighting options helping you to create a kitchen that is individually tailored to your lifestyle and tastes. Visit: intoto.co.uk/showrooms/view/bath.

IN-TOTO BATH While timeless white kitchens will never go out of fashion, there is a growing trend for injecting bold colours and mixing textures and patterns as customers express their personalities in their homes and seek an individual kitchen. Pair with stone-effects or two-tone woods and accessorise with golds, coppers and, the latest trend – a return to brass. Playful colour choices doesn’t have to mean brash or overwhelming designs though, as the phrase ‘less is more’ is becoming more dominant, especially as open-plan living continues to grow in popularity. Vicky Elmore of in-toto Bath said: “We are seeing a demand for fewer wall cabinets, with clients instead choosing open shelving to accompany streamlined base units and islands.” In-toto has nine new colourful options for its matt lacquer carcase collection, allowing blasts of colour to be injected into the kitchen. Create a point of interest in your kitchen with bespoke open-shelving in vibrant and evocative accent colours. Eye-catching, sophisticated and contemporary, matt lacquer carcases are available in 16 shades, ideal for displaying decorative items and blending open-plan spaces. New hues for 2017 include, on-trend

SCHMIDT KITCHENS Schmidt Kitchens is a relatively new arrival on the Bath scene and is one of Europe’s

leading Kitchen Brands, headed up locally by Leroy McKenzie. Schmidt offers a wide range of colours and finishes with units that look good in both kitchens and living spaces, which suits the current trend for blending the two into one functional environment. Customisation is key to the Schmidt design philosophy, focussing on dimensions, aesthetics and function. Schmidt reports that the company is also seeing a demand for stylish, elegant designs which converge with technology that is revolutionising the way our kitchens integrate with our busy lives. Visit: Schmidt-kitchens.com.

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CITY | INTERIORS

MAKING WAVES

Bath based international interior designer Claire Rendall highlights the slowly changing tide in how to use plastic as she prepares to set up a pop-up with Chanii B shoes in Bath showcasing eco-friendly furniture

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he statistics are mind boggling. Each year 300 million tons of plastic is produced worldwide, of which eight million tons ends up in the ocean adding to the current 5.25 trillion pieces of debris. Of that mass, 269,000 tons float on the surface with some four billion plastic micro fibres per square kilometre littering the deep-sea floor. It should come as no surprise that plastic pollution is so acute that it has entered our food chain with two thirds of the world’s fish stock suffering plastic ingestion and 200 “dead zones” in the sea where no life exists. By 2050 the plastic in the world’s oceans will weigh more than the fish. This is even more alarming when you realise it takes 400 to 1,000 years for an average plastic bottle to decompose. Of the plastics that do decompose within a year, they leach toxic chemicals such as Bisphenol A, PCBs and derivatives of polystyrene into the water. Americans use 500 million singleuse plastic straws per day. Globally 500 million plastic bags are used annually. What many don’t realise is that the massive floods in Bangladesh in 1988 and 1998 were made more acute by plastic bags clogging the drains. So, what’s to be done? Clearly, we need to act fast. As with most things 106 TheBATHMagazine

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it needs both consumer and governmental pressure. There are some amazing initiatives already out there. Sky News has launched an Ocean Rescue campaign using its important platform to engage and educate. Recently Sky Rainforest Rescue claimed to have saved one billion trees in Brazil, which makes this an important initiative. David Rothschild has sailed across the oceans in Plastiki, a 60 foot catamaran made from 12,500 plastic bottles to highlight the issue and United by Blue removes a pound of plastic from the environment for every purchase of its products made. Restaurants, particularly in London have started Straw Wars. Plastic straws are not handed out unless asked for. Bath please take

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note. Starbucks offer a 25p discount if you take your own cup. Perhaps even more impressive is the government of Kenya which has introduced the world’s toughest plastic bag law with a £31,000 fine or four years in jail for selling or even using a non-degradable plastic bag. In the UK most councils will recycle plastic bottles, but many won’t touch any of the other recyclable plastics, leaving for example, plastic food trays and bags to go into landfill and beyond. Clearly this is not good enough. Project Ocean Cleanup has been launched to create an Oceanscraper with the aim of cleaning up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Sometimes referred to as gyres these massive areas of ocean are where currents converge bringing with them huge amounts of rubbish. A 100m prototype boom has been tested off the coast of the Netherlands. Sweetly named Boomy McBoomface, if successful it will be scaled up to a 100km version and set to work in the Pacific. On the creative side are companies using ocean plastic waste to produce something new. Adidas have joined with Parley for the Oceans and created a running shoe made from ocean plastic waste. An international architectural firm called Spark is collecting ocean plastic to make solar powered beach huts in Singapore.

THE DESIGNER’S RESPONSE: main image, Dutch design brand Van der Sant has created a new, durable material from compressed, recovered plastic found in the ocean to make this range of eco-friendly furniture, which can be seen in Chanii B in Milsom Place Inset, designer Claire Rendall Opposite page, top right, some of Claire Rendall’s new cushion collection and below, Madesimo, by Van der Sant


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CITY | INTERIORS

Christmas cookie wreath

AT HOME IN BATH

Bureo uses 30 square feet of recovered fishing nets (particularly harmful to sea life) to create each of its skateboards and Karun uses Ocean Plastic to make its Kayu range of sunglasses. Last year I was approached by Robert Milder, owner and founder of Van de Sant, to design a range of luxury, contemporary furniture from Ocean Plastic waste, principally for eco super yachts. Based in Curacao and the Netherlands, Robert’s vision is impressive. The plastic is collected, chipped and compressed to make an extremely hard and versatile board. This forms the structure of the furniture which means it’s suitable for both indoor and outdoor use. Using recyclable foam and aluminium, each piece of furniture is made to order and numbered so that at the end of its life, it’s fully recyclable, neatly creating a circular and sustainable economy. Van de Sant is working with Schipol airport near Amsterdam, the United Nations and is about to deliver furniture to the National Geographic Encounter Ocean Odyssey in New York. For the next six months we’re showcasing Van de Sant furniture at

Chanii B’s in Milsom Place. These pieces will be covered in fabric by Bionic Yarn which is also made from Ocean Plastic, making the perfect partnership. These creative initiatives are important on two fronts. They make use of the plastic that is already littering our oceans and so take it out of the environmental equation. Perhaps more importantly however is that these products highlight the issue and help bring it to a wider audience. Clearly the main issue is that we should stop making single-use plastic. It needs to become as socially unacceptable as smoking in a car with a baby present while texting and driving. It’s sad that it takes the problem to get to such epic proportions for mankind to take action, but we are where we are. So come along to Chanii B’s and see for yourself how an ugly mash of plastic waste can be transformed into something rather lovely. You’ll be sitting pretty. n Interior designer Claire Rendall will be at Chanii B shoe design shop, Milsom Place, Bath from 4pm to 8pm on Thursday 26 October to share ideas for the home as part of the At Home in Bath campaign.

It’s time to gather soft throws, plump cushions and a collection of scented candles as we prepare to hunker down for winter. And, as befits a city filled with beautiful houses, Bath’s business community, represented by the Bath BID, is hosting an At Home In Bath campaign in celebration of our love of home. Bath’s national brands and independent shops have been invited to take part, laying on a series of events, discounts and offers between Monday 23 and Friday 27 October. For a complete programme visit: athomeinbath.com. Throughout the week Lakeland in New Bond Street is hosting demonstrations of how to make a Christmas cookie wreath and how to use a spiraliser. These are from 11.30am to 2.30pm daily. On Monday 23 and Friday 27 October staff at Molton Brown in Union Street will be holding one-to-one consultations on how to make a delightfully scented home. Book a consultation for £15 and recieve a £10 gift card and £10 goodie bag with every purchase. To book tel: 01225 789984. On Tuesday 24 and Thursday 26, at 2pm, Yves Delorme in Milsom Place will be offering style advice on dressing your bed. And on Thursday 26, from 4pm, Anthropologie in New Bond Street is hosting a talk on colour in the home by Farrow & Ball, followed by a lampshade decorating workshop. Places must be booked, tel: 01225 335578. Take your dog to Pug and Puffin in Northumberland Place, 9am – 6pm, on Friday 27 October and peruse the coats and collars, pausing to have your pooch’s picture taken in the P&P photobooth. Visit the website: athomeinbath.com to find out what Waitrose, Rossiters, TSB Bank, Laura Ashley and other shops are offering.

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BATH | ARCHITECTURE

THE HOUSE THAT TEAM BUILT Georgette McCready visits a newly built home on Bath’s skyline that’s been created by the owners working with a crew of local skilled tradespeople. Photography by Anna Barclay

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ne way to get the home you want for your family is to buy an existing house – preferably one of no historic or architectural merit – demolish it and realise your own vision on the site. There’s an increasing trend in Bath of people doing just that, sweeping aside the less than pretty buildings of the 1960s and 70s, which happen to occupy prime sites, and building in their place homes better suited to 21st century living and values. The magnificent five bedroom house we went to visit, set on one of Bath’s wooded seven hills, has just been completed. It was commissioned for a graduate of the University of Bath who has long loved the city and wanted a family home here. The owner bought the less than lovely house before applying for planning permission for the new build. Simon Harris, chartered building surveyor, was involved from the offset. He said: “In March 2013 we were instructed by our clients to prepare initial sketch proposals. We worked closely with the clients on the concept and prepared an initial scheme, we submitted this to Bath and North East Somerset Council prior to making a full planning application.” Working in conjunction with the clients and BBA Architects and Planners, who used advanced CAD programmes with 3D images – the original plans for a Y shaped building with a central circular atrium/entrance evolved into a T shaped house with a hexagonal atrium/entrance. Simon said: “We acted as lead designers on the construction team and project managed the scheme co-ordinating specialist consultants for M&E, tanking and damp proofing, structural glazing, kitchen and bathroom design and fit out and suspended stair structures. The structural engineer was an important member of the design and construction team, we appointed lead engineer Chris Cozens of DJP Consulting Engineers who I have worked with for over 25 years, with his vast knowledge and experience we prepared the construction package for Practical Solutions to construct.” Experienced project manager Jim Norton, of Practical Solutions (Bath) was on site for three years, overseeing the project as it evolved from a muddy site, knee-deep in clay to the polished, finished home we see now. 108 TheBATHMagazine

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He said: “This was an extremely challenging site and we had to dig in and tackle each issue as it arose.” As we flicked through photographs of work in progress Jim talked about some of the challenges along the way. To begin with geologists found a deep seam of clay ran through the site – not ideal for stable foundations, especially on a hillside. Jim said: “We had to literally manhandle 200 lorry loads of rubble and earth off the site and then sink a series of massive piles deep into the ground to give the house the firmest of foundations.” Visitors enter the house into a large hall, with a glass atrium the full height of the

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property with a dramatic elegantly curved cantilered staircase rising up in spectacular style as its centrepiece. As Jim explained, an eye for every detail was needed as this intricate installation took place, ensuring that every measurement was correct. His was the overview that ensured millimetre-precise placement of stairs, landings and the symmetrical and pleasing sight lines as the visitor gazes through the house. Bath kitchen designer Stephen said of this brief: “Having previously worked for the clients, we were approached and asked to get involved with the project as design consultants for all aspects of the interior. “Although not involved with the


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BATH | ARCHITECTURE

A ENGINEERING CHALLENGE: main picture, the dramatic staircase that curves up through the atrium hall DESIGN BRIEF: above picture, the statement piece at the centre of the kitchen has marble work surfaces. Right, the walnut panelling in the dressing room. Both designed by Stephen Graver Ltd Far right, one of the guest bathrooms Pics by Anna Barclay

construction of the building, the team and I came up with concept ideas for the kitchen, utility room, boot room, study/library, guest bedroom furniture and the master dressing room and en-suite. The concept for the kitchen design was driven in part by the huge hexagonal entrance atrium that leads directly into the kitchen area. The initial designs were developed into working drawings. The statement piece for the kitchen is the large ceiling bulkhead and in order to make sure it worked aesthetically, we made a full size section that would enable the clients to fully visualise how the finished piece would look. The American black walnut panelling was chosen to compliment some of the client’s existing furniture, this material is used throughout the construction of the kitchen cabinets, with the paint colour of the door fronts complimenting the colour of all the building’s exterior doors and windows. The brief for the master bedroom dressing room and ensuite was to exude the qualities of some of the world’s most prestigious hotel suites, therefore we used solid oak frames with full bur oak panels for the beautiful, handmade furniture. Finally, we were instructed to bring a unique design to all of the guest bedrooms and the library furniture, the former being encapsulated by each room’s bespoke wardrobe design. We are incredibly proud that the clients should choose to work with our team again, putting their trust in us to create an incredible finish with exacting standards of design and quality within a property that deserves it!” Maya Wilson, who runs an interior design company in Bath, said: “The clients love the Art Deco style and this inspired the design of the architectural features and the clean monochrome palate. Little Greene paint shades Slaked Lime Mid and Lamp Black were used on walls and doors, complimented by 1,000mm square Jura Blue stone slabs with a walnut staircase and boards to upper levels. The clean space is enhanced by strong, stand out furniture and lighting pieces. In the hallway stands a striking console table and oversized mirror by Fiona ➲ THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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McDonald and lighting by Tigermoth. Wanting to avoid a hotel feel, a different look was achieved in each room by combining the clients existing furniture pieces alongside new. In the double height living space, the maker, Neil Wilkin, combined two existing chandeliers to create one very large piece. A Zoffany Wyatt sofa, upholstered in Zoffany’s Gondolier fabric adds fun and interest to the clients two purple velvet sofas. A different feel was achieved in each guest room using existing antique bed frames alongside distinctly contrasting styles of furniture, wall lights and fabric for curtains.” Because the property is a new-build it was easier to fit underfloor heating, which is fuelled by an eco-friendly air source heat pump. The owners have

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thoughtfully installed a lift for their less nimble visitors and, because they are dog lovers, there’s a handy dog shower and cloakroom just inside the back door. The house is designed for 21st century living. A sumptuous velvet Ushaped sofa was built for the cinema room, where eight people could comfortably sprawl. A dumb waiter in the first floor drawing room allows people in the kitchen to send food and drink to the first floor and a laundry shoot from a lobby near the four bedroom suites on the first floor leads down to the utility room. All thoughtful little touches. As Jim Norton points out, as you stand at one of the big picture windows and gaze out through the trees or over Bath, you really get a feel of why this home was created here, in this spot. n

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THOUGHTFUL TOUCHES: clockwise from top, the double height drawing room, whose chandelier can be automatically lowered for cleaning; the large communal sofa in the cinema room; sculptures in the landscaped gardens and, finally, picture windows and balconies allow fine, far reaching views over the hills and above the city of Bath

SOME OF THE THE TEAM Practical Solutions (Bath), project management, Higham Landscaping, Artistic Plaster Craft (cornicing), Axess 2 Ltd (lift), Bristol Marble, Durrant Securities (fire and intruder alarms), Foundation Piling, German Stair Co Ltd, Haines Construction (ground works), M J Patch Ltd (steel work), Mark Winter Joinery (cinema room), Mendip Electrical, NU Heat Underfloor Heating Ltd, P O’Neill Plumbing & Heating, Perfect Green Ltd (air source heat pumps), PH Gates, Pietra Ltd (tiling), Poole Single Ply Ltd (flat roofing and zinc), Prodeck Ltd (comfloor), Secure Door Services (garage doors), Service Lift Co (dumb waiter), Stephen Graver Ltd (kitchen, dressing room and office desk), Techniglaze Ltd (windows and doors), Tokyo TV (audio visual), Windsor Joinery.


Pietra wood and stone fp Oct.qxp_Layout 22 19/09/2017 15:52 Page 1

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Tel 0207 610 6111


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AUTUMNAL MOMENTUM Jane Moore is busy getting her garden in order for autumn and winter

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and containers, usually because they’re the ones screaming to be sorted out and also because the bulbs have often been burning a hole in boxes for a few weeks, so to speak. It’s essential to lift your pots up off the ground for the winter months to improve their drainage. Use proper pot feet or simply pieces of wood tucked underneath to lift them an inch or two and do it while the pots are empty – you don’t need a back strain at this point in the season. The reason the pots are completely empty because this is when I tend to replace the compost as well. Bulbs, particularly tulips, are prone to disease so nice clean compost gets them off to a good start. For pots and window boxes there are some lovely pansies and violas to choose from in all sorts of colours, some with blotches and others with cheeky little faces, as well as all sorts of cyclamen and seasonal whatnots that may or may not last the whole winter. At home, I tend towards a jolly Christmas window box of red cyclamen and a berried gaultheria or skimmia for a blast of seasonal cheer, followed by a more measured viola and Tete a Tete daffodil offering to get me through January to March.

or the past month I have been somewhat bipolar in my gardening. On the one hand, it’s the time of year when I positively savour the last blasts of summertime: the roses’ final moments, the glorious annuals and the late summer perennials which are huge favourites of mine. But on the other, I also get a bit impatient to get on with tidying it all up, getting everything cut back and the beds mulched and ready for the winter. Frankly I get downright irritated by the annuals that have had their day, annoyed with the echinops flopping and fed up with the spotty, spoiled roses after the rain. But now October is here I feel I can kiss goodbye to whatever summer we’ve had and get on with it. Yes it’s time, as they say, to pull on those Bridget Jones big pants – especially important now that the weather is getting colder – and set the garden to rights. CHEERY POTS Hurrah – it’s out with the old and in with the new. Finally it’s curtains for the tired old cosmos, the past tense for the petunias and the compost heap for the whole bally lot of ’em. There is something wonderfully cathartic about ripping out the old bedding, making way for the bulbs and violas and the promise of spring that they contain. I start with the pots 112 TheBATHMagazine

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BEDDING FOR BORDERS My favourite winter bedding plants for the border are the good old sturdy

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wallflower – I know it takes ages to flower but in the meantime all that lush foliage at least provides a good dollop of greenery. I’ve become disillusioned with pansies for bedding out as the flowering is so half hearted. Anna, my assistant at The Priory, is partial to the showy bedding daisies or bellis but I’m always a bit suspicious they look too much like the wild parent for comfort. This year I’m aiming for classy with rich purple tulip Negrita, a stalwart favourite of mine, combined with purple violas and cream wallflowers. RAINY DAY SOWING A little autumn sowing can go a very long way as long as you have some good windowsills, a porch or a little greenhouse to look after it all over the winter. It’s wonderful to get a head start on next spring and psychologically it’s very cheering to see those little plants holding their own through the dreary months. Anna is bordering on the obsessional about campanula patula, a delicate harebell-like bellflower, and erysimum marshallii, a rich yolk yellow wallflower, ever since she read a Christopher Lloyd book where he waxed lyrical about their usefulness. She’s right to be enthusiastic plus they are also pretty easy to grow. This year we’re also getting some exotic dark papaver going early as

TACKLING THE CHORES: main picture, Jane Moore gets busy preparing for winter, collecting seeds and tidying up the last stragglers of summer Opposite page, a little autumn sowing can go a long way Far right, the trusty trug is handy for carrying cuttings and secateurs


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CITY | GARDENING

well as some rich blue cornflowers. There are always a few casualties over the winter, some die off and get mouldy inevitably. But those plants that survive are all the stronger and more substantial for the long, hard growing that they have endured and, once they are finally planted out in the spring, they get off to a roaring start and become really big bumptious plants in no time at all. PLANTING FRENZY This wet and mild autumn is just perfect for planting. I’ve already been busy in September trying to get on with bits and bobs of planting that got left behind in the dry weather of April. All this autumnal weather is great for plants with lots of heaven sent

watering and lovely warm soil to settle those plants into. It’s a great time to plant herbaceous plants, shrubs and containerised trees, allowing them an entire winter to settle themselves in before the growing season starts. Avoid anything slightly tender and delicate, though, as these are best planted in spring and nurtured gently through a season before they need to brave a Bath winter on their own. I’ve also been doing a spot of lifting and dividing of perennials – the books will say it’s not the right time and that spring is better. But I’m prepared to take my chances with the sturdier heleniums, rudbeckia and sedums, especially as I know from experience that spring just ends up being a headlong

dash and splitting perennials is not top of the priority list. Think about getting on with the more robust plants such as hostas, bergenias and hemerocallis – it’s a bit of a risk with our Bath clay as they will sit wet all winter so make your chunks big. Our soggy soil makes dividing asters at this time a bit chancy as they really don’t like to be wet over winter. But I’m taking a deep breath and diving in anyway. You should see the size of some of our clumps of asters – they’re taking over entire borders – so it’s a case of now or never. n Jane Moore is the award-winning gardening columnist and head gardener at The Bath Priory Hotel. Twitter: @janethegardener.

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SUNNINGHILL INTERIORS BEAUTIFUL & EXCEPTIONAL INTERIOR 7 EXTERIOR DESIGN Call or email for a free initial consultation Tel: 01784 435175 Mobile: 07534 447676 info@sunninghillinteriors.co.uk www.sunninghillinteriors.co.uk

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CITY | HOMES

BATH MEETS PROVINCIAL FRANCE

Jessica Hope explores a property gem in Bath’s historic Queen Square which is available for short lets

Images courtesy of Maria Stengard-Green and The Bath Holiday Company

Charming portraits from France

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FEAST LIKE A KING: This bespoke dining table seats up to 20

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n its Georgian heyday Bath became the heart of fashionable society in England, with its Palladian inspired houses, thermal spa waters, and bustling Assembly Rooms. Now you can get a taste of what it was like to live like an 18th century socialite as local holiday lettings business The Bath Holiday Company has acquired an elegant, five floor property on Queen Square, full of period features and Georgian character, as well as modern appliances and luxury bathrooms. Queen Square, built in the early 18th century, was the first of a set of iconic developments in the city centre that John Wood the elder and younger set their minds to in Bath, and the west side of the square was designed by John Pinch the younger. With financial backing from Master of Ceremonies and socialite Beau Nash, the square soon became one of the most desirable addresses in the country. Fast forward three centuries and the majority of the buildings on Queen Square have been converted into businesses, education centres and a hotel. Few are still residential, and if they are then the buildings have most likely been turned into flats. However, The Bath Holiday Company’s new property could make an ideal location for visiting family members or friends planning a long weekend in the city. Or, if you’re looking for an impressive setting to host an event or celebration from, you could be the host with the most and hire it for you and your guests to enjoy . . . Behind the large white door, equipped with apt brass lion door knocker and smart camera doorbell, you walk into a house where the possibilities for socialising and relaxing over five floors are endless. We begin our tour in the basement, where we find the beautifully designed kitchen and diner, full with all the modern amenities large groups would need. Furnished with a large breakfast bar, guests can gather around and get stuck into cooking, plus you can

plug in your tablet to one of the multiple charging stations and scroll through recipes at your leisure. There’s a substantial wine fridge just to the side, perfect for someone to be on topping up duty. And the room is equipped with all the cooking necessities to whip up a small banquet – blenders, mixers, cast iron casserole dishes, and plenty of crockery, glasses and cutlery. Following on into the dining room – this is the heart of where elegant dining and socialising can take place. With a dining table that can seat 20, guests can wine and dine all evening in the comfort of this home. With so many mouths to feed around such a grand table, The Bath Holiday Company can organise private chefs to cater for large parties, so you can sit back and relax. There’s a separate utility room in the basement, where you can wash off muddy boots and dry coats after a long walk. Plus there’s a small private, walled garden, perfect for enjoying a cup of coffee in the cool morning air before breakfast. Heading back up to the entrance floor, there’s a large sitting room with plenty of comfortable sofas for guests to lounge and impressive high ceilings, with lots of natural light flooding the room. Many of the ornate furnishings have been brought over from the owners’ home in provincial France, bringing some country style to this Georgian property. The owners have purposely not installed a television in this room, making it an area where groups can gather and catch up after lost time without the noise of the TV in the background. The cabinets are full of books and board games to keep guests of all ages occupied when taking a break from exploring the city centre. And if you fancy staying in during the cold winter evenings, the family can gather in the cinema room and enjoy their favourite film – just don’t forget the popcorn. There’s also a snug which can be used as an office space or, if involved in the theatre, a quiet place to learn your lines.

On the first floor are two impressive master bedrooms with king sized beds, plenty of storage space, and extra seating – ideal for groups getting ready together, especially for bridal parties looking for the perfect backdrop for pre-wedding photos. The rooms are linked with a beautifully crafted modern bathroom. And despite being in the city centre and so close to a main road, even in the middle of the day there is very little noise from traffic outside. On the following two floors are four more substantial bedrooms, with two Jack and Jill bathrooms. The rooms include multiple double and single beds – overall the property can sleep 20. The bedrooms at the front of the building have beautiful views over Queen Square, the green and the obelisk, whereas the rooms at the back have incredible views over the rolling green hills surrounding Bath, making you remember just how close the city is to the countryside. With a property this size, children will love playing hide and seek in the rooms’ cubbyholes and behind the furniture, while groups of adults will enjoy the opportunity for spaces to socialise as well as having the privacy and comfort of the large bedrooms. And with Christmas not too far away, this could make a great spot to celebrate the festivities or to bring in the new year. The Bath Holiday Company can arrange a variety of services to make your stay even easier. As well as hiring private chefs, the team can provide locally sourced meals to pop in the oven, as well as organising cocktail classes, yoga sessions and beauty treatments in the comfort of the property. n There is a minimum two night stay required for this property, starting from £995 per night. To find out more, contact The Bath Holiday Company by calling: 01225 571234, email: hello@holidaylets.com or visit: holiday-lets.com. Follow on Twitter: @19QueenSquare and Instagram: thehouseonqueensquare.

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THE BATH DIRECTORY - OCTOBER 2017.qxp_Layout 31 21/09/2017 12:41 Page 1

the directory

to advertise in this section call 01225 424 499

Electricians

Holiday Rental

60+ luxury properties for lets 2 nights to 5 months Holidays – For business – Friends & family – Temporary accommodation during renovation/relocation Contact: 01225 482 225 alexa@bathholidayrentals.com www.bathholidayrentals.com Providing 4 & 5 star self-catering properties since 2006

Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

KEIKO KISHIMOTO Holistic Treatments for Wellbeing

Aromatherapy • Reflexology/Facial reflexology Japanese Cosmo Facelift • Deep Tissue Massage For more information, please visit:

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Trowbridge & Neal’s Yard Bath

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House & Home


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PROPERTY | HOMEPAGE

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ating from 1710-1720, Mellowstones was originally a series of three tied cottages attached to the Hinton Priory in Hinton Charterhouse. The current owners purchased the property in 1998 and have undertaken an extensive refurbishment and remodelling programme which has included extending the original footprint. The detached home now has a charming mix of features including feature fireplaces from the original Georgian period the art deco and 1930’s. There are also a series of intricate decorative leaded light windows with coloured insets of mainly floral motifs which were taken from the original cottages and have now been spread though both floor of the house. Arranged over two floors the accommodation has been thoughtfully arranged so that the master suite and three bedrooms are at entry level and maximise the glorious views over the Iford Valley. Stairs lead to three interconnecting reception rooms below and a fabulous kitchen/breakfast room with access to a sheltered sun terrace with veranda and pergola. The house sits in large and established gardens and is surrounded by woodland. There is an integral garage and large gravelled driveway with parking to the front. Mellowstones is a deceptively large family home in a beautiful and highly sought after location. Pritchards, 11 Quiet Street, Bath. Tel: 01225 466225

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MELLOWSTONES STAPLES HILL, FRESHFORD • 4 bedrooms, master with en suite dressing room and shower room • Family bathroom • Kitchen with breakfast room • Two Dining hall/study rooms, sitting room, utility, wc • Around 1 acre of gardens with breathtaking views

Guide price: £1,150,000


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pritchards-bath.co.uk

Warleigh, Bathford A truly outstanding, exceptional country residence occupying the major wing of this magnificent G II* Listed building with exquisite, light and impressive accommodation. Master bedroom and guest bedroom suites and 2 further double bedrooms and family bathroom. Magnificent entrance hall with library and drawing room off. Impressive kitchen dining room, larder and utility. 2 garages and ample driveway parking. Cellar storage. Enchanting private and landscaped grounds approx 2.4 acres extending to the River Avon with riparian rights. Int area 4487 sq ft/416 sq m. Garages: 335 sq ft/31 sq m.

Guide Price: ÂŁ2,750,000

Cleevedale Road Combe Down A particularly spacious 5/6 bedroom detached house standing in good sized, attractive south facing gardens. Enjoying wonderful views in a peaceful and desirable private road the prperty backs onto Horsecombe Vale on the popular southern fringes of the city. Garage, carport, undercroft and summerhouse. EPC C. Internal area house (excluding carport 3413 sq ft/317 sq m.) Outbuildings 229 sq ft/21 sq m.

Offers In Excess of ÂŁ1,000,000 11 Quiet Street, Bath BA1 2LB

Tel: 01225 466 225

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It pays to treat your tenants well Peter Greatorex, managing director of The apartment Company

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s mentioned recently, a quarter of UK households are expected to be renting privately by the end of 2021. Good quality tenants expect appreciation from their landlords. You therefore need to be the best possible landlord if you’re to attract those who will pay on time, look after your property and stay for a while. Here are a few things to think about to ensure you are seen as thoughtful, respectful and most importantly, trustworthy…

Be reachable… Trust is one of the biggest things in this business. Tenants have promised to pay on time, look after the home and to be respectable neighbours, so they want to know that in return for their commitment, they will be looked after throughout their agreement with you. Therefore, reassure them they can contact you about anything, at any time and you will do your very best to fix the problem. Maintain… Legally, you have to ensure a property meets safety standards, so things such as electricity, gas and drainage must all be checked regularly. Address reported issues as quickly as possible… Tenants love to have issues they raise handled quickly and efficiently – especially when it comes to repairs. They hate waiting so don’t delay until there is something else to fix before you deal with the problem. Good quality tenants don't forget if you ignore something or are slow about addressing it. No cheap fixes… Botch jobs not only annoys tenants, but you’ll find you’ll be paying for it further down the line with constant repairs.

Crafting beautiful homes in stunning locations Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswold | Dorset

Provide a safe home… Tenants like to feel safe. When buying an investment property, make sure the apartment building has good security systems in place, and the property itself has efficient doors and windows. Set a longer termination notice period… It can be hard to find another rental property so let them know from the beginning that you will try and give them plenty of notice should you need them to leave. Warn about rising rents… Sometimes, you will need to raise your rent, but give plenty of notice.

Respect their privacy… Tenants hate it when landlords do things to disturb them. They want to feel comfortable in their home and not constantly on edge that their landlord is going to pop by or call up to check all is ok. Of course, you are entitled to inspect the property (with appropriate notice), but otherwise try not to step on their toes. Respect their privacy! Finally, always be friendly and professional. If you have great tenants, you really don’t want to lose them.

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk

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These simple factors should help you entice respectful tenants, reduce void periods and achieve long-term financial success. However, for those who would prefer a professional to act on their behalf, we can carefully manage your property to achieve a successful tenancy and return. The Apartment Company Pg@theapartmentcompany.co.uk or call 01225 471144.


Southbourne Gardens, Larkhall Forming part of a brand new development, this four bedroom house has been beautifully finished throughout to create a contemporary and spacious family home, located in a highly sought-after residential area on the eastern outskirts of Bath, within walking distance of a wide range of highly reputed schools.

Rent: ÂŁ2,950 pcm* high specification finish | contemporary kitchen | granite work surfaces | integrated appliances | open plan dining room | conservatory | living room | study | cloakroom | enclosed front and rear gardens | 4 double bedrooms (2 en-suites) | fitted wardrobes | family bathroom | garage Reside Bath | 24 Barton Street Bath BA1 1HG | T 01225 445 777 | E info@residebath.co.uk | W www.residebath.co.uk

*An administration fee of ÂŁ420.00 inc. VAT applies.

RESIDE OCT.indd 1

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Camden Andrewsonline.co.uk

Berkeley Place, Bath, BA1 £850,000

This beautiful family home offers a delightful balance of impressive period features and spacious, flexible accommodation. Located in Camden, a popular area on the North East side of the UNESCO city of Bath, it has a charming south facing garden and balcony enjoying stunning city views. Energy Efficiency Rating: N/A

01225 809 868 camden@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bear Flat Andrewsonline.co.uk

Ivy Bank Park, Bath, BA2 £700,000

An expansive detached family home set within this pleasant residential cul-de-sac. Three reception rooms, four bedrooms, bathroom, en-suite, beautiful gardens, driveway and garages. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

Bear Flat sales 01225 805680 01225 805 680 bearflat@andrewsonline.co.uk Newbridge sales 01225 809685

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


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Central Andrewsonline.co.uk

Hantone Hill, Bath, BA1 £630,000

01225 809 571

Situated in Bathampton Village just 1.5 miles from Bath city centre. A link-detached home with four bedrooms and two bathrooms. Views to the rear over the valley. Extremely pretty gardens. Parking. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

central@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Newbridge Andrewsonline.co.uk

Greenacres, Bath, BA1 £350,000

Rarely available and beautifully located, semi-detached bungalow offering magnificent views over Kelston Roundhill. Set in a plot surrounded by mature gardens with garage and parking for two cars. This home may appeal to those who wish to escape to a slower pace of life surrounded by countryside or families who wish to be within walking distance (0.39 miles) to Weston all Saints Primary school. Accommodation comprises of light and airy sitting room with duel aspect windows. Modern fitted kitchen, two double bedrooms and modern bathroom. Energy Efficiency Rating: N/A

Bear Flat sales 01225 805680 01225 809 685 newbridge@andrewsonline.co.uk Newbridge sales 01225 809685

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


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NORTH LAWN, Ston Easton

ÂŁ1,100,000

A six/seven bedroom period stone built house in the heart of the Mendips, 11 miles from Bath and 13 miles from Bristol. Dating from seventeenth century, with beautiful gardens, heated swimming pool, tennis court and gym, in grounds of approx 1.25 acres. EPC Rating: E


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THE MANOR HOUSE, Petty France

ÂŁ649,950

The Manor House, on the edge of the beautiful Badminton Estate in the heart of the Gloucestershire countryside,is an elegant five bedroom period home forming part of an imposing Grade II listed country house. Gardens with views and annex. EPC Exempt Grade II listed


®

Belmont

£900 pcm

Furnished or Unfurnished · Double Bedroom · White High Gloss Kitchen · First Floor Apartment · Prime Location · Agency Fees £420 inc vat · Council Tax Band: C

LE

T

Victoria Bridge Court

£1100 pcm

Unfurnished · Two Bedrooms · Allocated Parking For One Car · Communal Gardens · No Pets · Council Tax Band: D · Agency Fees £420 inc vat

LE

T

Russell Street

£1200 pcm

Unfurnished · Two double bedrooms · Newly

refurbished · Brand new kitchen and bathroom · Prime location · Agency fees £420 inc VAT · Council Tax Band: C · Central zone parking permit

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Kensington Place

Philip House, Philip Street £1300 pcm

Vale Lodge

Furnished · 1 Double Bedroom · Stunning Views · Bright and Airy · On Street Parking · Communal Vault · No Pets/No Students · Council Tax Band: B · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT

£875 pcm

Part furnished · Popular Southgate area · Central close to shops · No pets · Lift · Suit professional couple or sharers · Bike store · Council Tax Band: C · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT

Two Bedrooms · Recently Refurbished · Period Features · Close to Local Amenities and City Centre · Victorian · Lawned Gardens · Council Tax Band: E · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT

Alexander Buildings

Marlborough Buildings

Beckford Road

£1450 pcm

Garden maisonette · Two double bedrooms · Third bedroom/Study · South facing garden · Own private entrance · Agency fees £420 inc VAT · Council Tax Band: A · Parking space

SALES

01225 471 14 4 The Apartment Company Octobrt.indd 1

LETTINGS

£1800 pcm

Unfurnished · Well presented · Three large double bedrooms · Two luxury bathrooms · Prime location · Parking - On street permit · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT

01225 303 870

£1500 pcm

£2250 pcm

Unfurnished · Two Double Bedrooms · Two En-Suites · Private Parking · Cloakroom · WC · Landscaped Gardens · Superb Finish · Council Tax Band: TBC · Agency Fees £420 inc VAT

sales@theapartmentcompany.co.uk

21/09/2017 11:43


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Green park

O.I.E.O

£600,000

Georgian Apartment · Grade II · Central location · Garden Apartment Two/Three Bedroom · Three/Four reception rooms · Approx 1852 Sq Ft

SO

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Philip Street

Widcombe Crescent

£575,000

Georgian Crescent · Grade I Listed · Development opportunity · Planning applications granted · Sought after location Private Garden · Approx 1642 Sq Ft

SO

LD

Paragon

O.I.E.O

£425,000

Georgian upper maisonette · Grade II Listed · Prime central location · Three bedrooms · Stunning views · Communal garden · Approx 1142 Sq Ft

SO

LD

Great Pulteney Street O.I.E.O £500,000

Lansdown Crescent

New built property · Two bedrooms · Contemporary living · Central location · Private roof terrace · Close to transport links · Lift · Approx 600 Sq Ft

Georgian · Grade I · Central location · Ground floor · Newly Refurbished · Two Bedrooms · Courtyard · Vaulted storage area · Approx 884 Sq Ft

Grade I Listed · Georgian Apartment · Upper Maisonette · Prime crescent location · Stunning views · Parapet balcony · Approx 1,756 Sq Ft

Grosvenor Place

Fountain House

Abbey Court

O.I.E.O

O.I.E.O

£340,000

O.I.E.O

£285,000

Georgian Apartment · Grade II listed · Two double bedrooms · Top Floor · South facing views · Close to city centre · Approx 785 Sq Ft

O.I.E.O

£295,000

Georgian apartment · Grade II listed · Mezzanine bedroom · Lift access · First Floor · Approx 660 Sq Ft

O.I.E.O

O.I.E.O

£660,000

£450,000

Modern property · Top floor · Lift access · Three double bedrooms · Stunning views · Large Garage · Approx 871 Sq Ft

www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk

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The Bath Magazine October 2017  
The Bath Magazine October 2017  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath