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Belief Statement We at Middleton High School have fundamental convictions, values and beliefs. We believe that . . . • • • • • • • • • •

Our focus is students and the work they do. Students should be self-managing learners. Each student needs to develop the capacity to think and reason. All students should be challenged intellectually. Every student can and will learn if presented with the right opportunity to do so. Goals and expectations should apply to all students, but the means to these goals will vary. Program design should be shaped by the outcomes that students need. The tone of our school should explicitly stress the values of integrity, trust, and decency. Family and community participation and support is essential. Each individual must accept personal and community responsibility.

Mission Statement Middleton High School is a learning community that fosters intellectual growth and habits of commitment, reflection, wellness and wonderment, developing citizens who make a living, a life and a difference.

A MESSAGE FROM THE PRINCIPAL . . . Take pride! You are among the more than 2250 students who make Middleton High School what it is – an outstanding school! Our success is due to the high level of student performance in all areas of school life. We’re glad that you are part of our student body. In order for our school community to fulfill its mission, Middleton High School needs to be an environment that is both compassionate and challenging, a culture in which students are valued as individuals and stretched to achieve their full potential. It is my hope that this course offering book will assist families in their efforts to create such an environment — by selecting courses that help each student realize their dreams. Students - please keep in mind the following advice: • Challenge yourself! Take challenging courses — yet maintain a balance between school, home and co-curricular obligations. • Plan ahead. Use the 4-year planning guide to map out your course of study. This includes making course selections aligned with post-graduate plans. • Choose carefully. During your four years at MHS you will have many opportunities to explore your interests (4 years * 7 courses per year). The course selection choices you make in January/February determine which courses will and will not be offered next year. We are proud to be able to offer a broad curriculum, which ensures that our students are prepared for whatever they choose to pursue upon graduation. Additionally, our school is much more than our curriculum and we know that if all you do is “get through” the requirements for graduation, you will have missed many excellent learning opportunities. We view our mission as getting you ready for life and to this end we encourage you to find co-curricular activities with which to become involved. Life is more than plugging through your job—it will be much richer if you see the fun to be had by interacting with other people. Drama, music, athletics, yearbook, clubs… there are so many wonderful possibilities. Dare to become involved and to have fun. Know that we enjoy a community, which supports its schools and students, as well as students and faculty who make this a wonderful place to learn. Ms. Peg Shoemaker, Principal


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MHS COURSE OFFERING BOOK Table of Contents ACADEMIC INFORMATION BUSINESS, MARKETING, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION ENGLISH FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES FINE ARTS: ART FINE ARTS: MUSIC FINE ARTS: THEATRE MATH PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH SCIENCE SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD LANGUAGES ONLINE COURSES

4 10 14 16 18 21 25 29 30 32 35 39 42 47

MHS Student Services Red Maple House Administrative Assistant: Ms. Probasco 829-9662 mprobasco@mcpasd.k12.wi.us School Counselors: Ms. Brown 829-9788 tbrown@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Ms. Debilzen 829-9778 kdebilzen@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Mr. Kusch 829-9915 mkusch@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Ms. Smith 829-9909 msmith@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Social Worker/AODA: Ms. Wilson 829-9793 kwilson@mcpasd.k12.wi.us School Psychologist: Mr. Wasmund 829-9787nwasmund@mcpasd.k12.wi.us White Spruce House Administrative Assistant: School Counselors: Social Worker/AODA: School Psychologist: MHS Administration Principal: AP Teaching/Learning: AP Teaching/Learning: AP Teaching/Learning: AP Student Services: Athletic & Activities Director: Assistant Athletics Director: Special Education Coordinator: Special Education Coordinator Red Maple Dean: White Spruce Dean: Dean (Both Houses);

Ms. Vuong Mr. Athanas Ms. Helminick Ms. Pellegrino Ms. Garcia Ms. Pyka

829-9663 nvuong@mcpasd.k12.wi.us 829-9916 gathanas@mcpasd.k12.wi.us 829-9910 ahelminick@mcpasd.k12.wi.us 829-9914 jpellegrino@mcpasd.k12.wi.us 829-9789 aschirmacher@mcpasd.k12.wi.us 829-9859 cpyka@mcpasd.k12.wi.us

Ms. Shoemaker 829-9923 pshoemaker@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Ms. Klassy 829-9669 cklassy@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Mr. Reinhart 829-9921 rreinhart@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Ms. Merrick 829-9907 emerrick@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Ms. Rust 829-9664 lrust@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Mr. Sims 829-9913 jsims@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Mr. White 829-9818 bwhite@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Ms. Morehouse 829-9896 nmorehouse@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Ms. Poehls 829-9790 rpoehls@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Mr. Crandall 829-9777 bcrandell@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Mr. Eckford 829-9922 reckford@mcpasd.k12.wi.us Ms. Roupp 829-9972 jroupp@mcpasd.k12.wi.us

Other Support Services Administrative Assistant: Ms. Middleton Athletic Assistant Ms. Ripp Data and Systems Analyst: Mr. Astroth School Nurse: TBD School Resource Officer: Officer Chung CTE Coordinator: Mr. Benz

829-9917 829 9912 829-9918 829-9686 829-9665 829-9858

dmiddleton@mcpasd.k12.wi.us mripp@mcpasd.k12.wi.wi.us tastroth@mcpasd.k12.wi.us kchung@mcpasd.k12.wi.us gbenz@mcpasd.k12.wi.us


ACADEMIC INFORMATION

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION Middleton High School’s Student Services Department provides opportunities and information that enhances the academic, career, social and emotional skills needed for a student’s success. The Student Services Department also focuses on resources and interventions that can remove barriers to a student’s ability and availability for learning that may exist within the student or in their environments.

Information Found in the Student Handbook and the MHS Website Graduation Requirements Auditing a course Retaking a course 4-Year Planning Worksheet Apprenticeship Programs Service Learning Technical College Requirements

Minimum Credit Load

Every MHS student must be registered for at least 2.5 credits per semester unless otherwise defined via IEP, 504 Plan, or At-Risk Plan. We recommend that students earn a minimum of 6 credits per year (3 credits per semester) to stay on track to meet graduation requirements.

Dropping a Class

A student may drop a course without penalty through the sixth week (30 school days) of the semester as long as it does not put the student below a full-time program of 2.5 credits. Students are encouraged to carefully consider their course options prior to registration. It is important that students are exposed to new courses and related career possibilities as well as to understand the expectations of a class prior to dropping the course. Beyond the sixth week of class, withdrawal from a course will result in an “F” for the course on the student’s transcript. Withdrawal from a course without an “F” may occur if there are extenuating circumstances and approval is obtained by the house team.

Early Graduation

A student may graduate at the end of the semester in which all credit and graduation requirements have been fulfilled. Students graduating mid-year may participate in the spring commencement ceremony. Students must meet with their school counselor for early graduation approval.

Coursework Taken Outside of MHS

All outside classes must be approved in advance of starting the class; see your school counselor to complete the appropriate paperwork. This paperwork must be completed prior to starting the class. Classes taken outside of MHS or over the summer may be used for placement but will not receive high school credit. Likewise, courses taken at MHS prior to the first day of 9th grade will be used for placement but will not receive high school credit.

Schedule Change Requirements

Any student requesting a schedule change must do so by completing the form available in the Student Services Office or on the MHS webpage. The form must be completed and returned by the dates indicated each semester. Forms will be reviewed by the school counselors and administration and students will be contacted via school email with the outcome of the request.

Criteria for a schedule change are: • • • • • •

Graduation requirement College admission requirement Career pathways requirement Grade of D/failure/repeat a class Prerequisite – do not meet course requirements Course selection form error (Your original course selection form will be checked for verification.)


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MIDDLETON HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Subject English

Requirements 4.0 credits: 1.0 English 9, 0.5 English 10, 0.5 Communication Studies, 1.0 English 11 or AP Language and Composition, 1.0 English electives Class of 2024, Freshman of 2021

All other classes (2021, 2022, 2023)

3.0 credits: 1.0 Land, People, and Power 1.0 World History (TBD) 1.0 United States Government & Politics

Social Studies

3.0 credits: 1.0 Modern World History 0.5 Contemporary United States History 0.5 United States Government & Politics 1.0 Other social studies electives

Health

0.5 credit

Physical Education

1.5 credits: 0.5 Foundations of Movement, 1.0 other PE electives taken over two different years

Mathematics

3.0 credits: through Algebra II, Tech College Math or higher

Science

3.0 credits: 1.0 life science, 1.0 physical science, 1.0 other science electives

Financial Literacy

0.5 credit: Consumer Financial Literacy (FCS Dept) or Economics (SST Dept) or Personal Finance (BMIT Dept) Completed during sophomore, junior or senior year

Additional Required Courses

OPTION A 1.0 credit CTE 1.0 credit Fine Arts

OPTION B Level III World Language or higher 0.5 credit CTE 0.5 credit Fine Arts

Other Electives

OPTION A 6.0 credits

OPTION B 4.0 to 6.0 credits

Advisory

.25 creditsits per year

Service Hours

Various based on year of graduation, please check the service learning website

Civics Exam s Ex

Successful completion of Civics Exam

Total Credits

23.75 credits

Career and Technical Education (CTE): Business/Marketing/Information Technology, Family & Consumer Science/Health Science Occupations, Engineering & Technology Fine Arts: Art, Music or Theatre Financial Literacy: Consumer Financial Literacy (FCS Dept), Economics (SST Dept), Personal Finance (BMIT Dept)


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ACADEMIC INFORMATION

ACADEMIC COURSES ADVISORY

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 All students will automatically be enrolled in their grade level Advisory Credit: 0.25 Elective Year Course Students in Advisory will benefit from intellectual growth through the promotion of 21st Century Skills throughout their tenure as a student at Middleton High School. The MHS-Advisory program supports students as they establish and maintain positive interpersonal relationships with staff and peers, encouraging each student to make responsible personal and academic choices. Furthermore, the Advisory curriculum is structured to provide students with opportunities to establish workable goals that will positively impact their high school experience and post-secondary life. Staff Advisors, in conjunction with student leaders, will provide insight on how to navigate school experiences, develop student self-advocacy skills, facilitate communication (student-teacher-parent) and most importantly, personalize each student’s experience at Middleton High School. Note: The Ninth Grade Advisory is aligned with the National Link Crew Program which provides a structure to transition into high school and guide students toward both academic and social success.

LINK CREW LEADER

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of application, interview process Credit: 0.25 Elective and summer training Year Course Student Link Crew Leaders are an invaluable resource to the Advisory program. Link Crew Leaders are extensively trained through a structured curriculum that focuses on team and relationship building. Leaders are equipped with necessary skills to serve as positive role models, motivators and mentors to successfully guide students through the transition from middle school to high school. Link Crew Leaders are selected through a rigorous application process that includes a written application, interview, and mandatory training sessions. Leaders will be expected to attend several special events, such as Freshman Orientation and Future Freshman Night. Students will have the opportunity to apply for Link Crew Leader in the spring of each year.

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Grade(s): 11, 12 Prerequisite: Completion, with above average grades, of all course Credit: 0.5/1.0 Elective work in a given area, written application and application approval. Semester/Year Course Students enrolled in a semester or full year credit of an Independent Study will have an opportunity to jointly design and complete projects under the supervision of a cooperating teacher geared toward enrichment, interests, aptitudes, and individual needs that expand beyond the present course offerings. Credit will be awarded through the successful completion of the designed curriculum. Any independent study proposal must be agreed upon and contracted between a student in an advanced academic area and the cooperating teacher. Students may replace a regularly scheduled class with an independent study. A written application is available in the Student Services Office. A finalized, teacher-approved plan must be submitted to the Student Services Office within the first two weeks of the semester. Note: A student must complete the application for Independent Study (by May 15 for Semester 1 and December 13 for Semester 2). Applications are available in the Student Services Office along with specific guidelines detailing this program. An independent study course may be designed for any curricular area. A student should not register for Independent Study on the registration sheet. An adjustment to the registration and student schedule is made after committee approval is received for the Independent Study course.

ACADEMIC TUTOR

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5/1.0 Elective Semester/Year Course Students with Junior or Senior status can apply to serve as tutors for any academic area. Students can only tutor one class per semester, and they must have taken the course in order to tutor. Academic tutors will serve as role models, coaches, and academic resources for peers. Potential candidates must have excellent attendance and a strong academic background (B or better) in the subject area they will be tutoring. Tutors must be willing and committed to helping ALL students reach their academic goals. Applicants must submit an application that includes a writing prompt and teacher recommendation. Once selected, candidates must complete training workshops. Tutors will be assessed on the quality and quantity of support provided to all students. Students are expected to request a full schedule of courses (not including academic tutor). Once accepted, selected students will have their schedules adjusted to include the Academic Tutor class if possible. Academic Tutor applications are available in the Student Services Office. Students may earn a maximum of 1.0 credit of Academic Tutor.


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ADDITONAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Advanced Placement

AP courses are college level courses taught in high school by high school teachers and follow a College Board approved curriculum. Upon completion of an AP course, students may elect to complete the AP exam in May (approximate cost is $125.00). Many colleges grant college credit for specified scores on the test. If a student participates in an AP exam, the student is responsible for exam fees. Students who qualify for Federal Free/Reduced lunch are eligible for a fee waiver. Please see your school counselor for more information. For additional information on Advanced Placement courses please see the College Board website: www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/subjects.html Middleton High School offers AP courses in the following subjects: Biology Literature and Composition Calculus AB Environmental Science Calculus BC Human Geography Chemistry Music Theory I/II Computer Science Principles Physics II Comparative Government Psychology Computer Programming Statistics Language and Composition US History

Early College Credit Program (ECCP) 9th-12th/UW Systems

Start College Now (SCN)

ECCP - SCN - 11th, 12th/WisconsinTechnical Colleges

The ECCP/SCN was established to allow students to enroll at an institution of higher education in Wisconsin to take courses that lead to credit toward high school graduation. Grades earned at a postsecondary institution will likely count in the high school GPA because the district pays for the courses in most cases. School policy does not permit a student who has participated in the ECCP/SCN to decide after the fact, and based on the result of the class, to reimburse the school district and not have the class count toward the school GPA calculation. ECCP/SCN students are responsible for their own transportation. Financial assistance is available to support transportation costs, if needed. Participating in ECCP/SCN may limit the number of courses a student can take at MHS. Applications are available online and from your counselor. If you wish to participate in the ECCP/SCN, discuss your plans with your school counselor. Students must complete the application and return it to their School Counselor by the state-mandated deadlines: • October 1st for spring courses • February 1st for summer courses • March 1st for fall courses Prospective ECCP/SCN students are encouraged to register for a full schedule of MHS courses. Changes to your MHS schedule will be made upon enrollment in your ECCP/SCN course and as your schedule allows. Students must meet institutional entrance requirements and are only enrolled if there is space available in the requested course. Students may take a maximum of 18 credits. If a student receives a failing grade or fails to complete an ECCP/SCN course for which the Board of Education has made payment, the Board of Education will request reimbursement from the student/family. If the student/family fails to provide reimbursement for the dropped or failed course(s) the student will no longer be eligible for participation in ECCP/SCN. Popular courses include the Nursing Assistant program at Madison College and higher level math at University of Wisconsin and Madison College. Note: The ECCP/SCN grade could affect consideration for certain scholarships including the Academic Excellence Scholarship.


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ACADEMIC INFORMATION

DUAL CREDIT Cooperative Academic Partnership Program (CAPP)

The Cooperative Academic Partnership Program (CAPP) at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh (www. uwosh.edu/capp/) provides academically able high school juniors and seniors with a GPA of 3.25 or higher the opportunity to earn college credits while still in high school. Students who register and successfully complete courses offered through CAPP earn University of Oshkosh credit, verified by an official transcript. These credits are transferable to all UW system schools and 2 year colleges as well as, approximately 200 additional colleges and universities across the country. Information regarding transferring CAPP credits can be found at:https://www.uwosh.edu/capp/students/transferring-credits Note: CAPP offerings are dependent on teacher certification. While there have been several changes to the funding of this dual credit program over the past several years, CAPP courses are currently tuition based and parents are responsible for this tuition. Last year, tuition was $100 per college credit and courses range from 1 to 5 credits. This remains a substantial tuition reduction from on campus tuition. CAPP tuition is set by the UW-system and is subject to change. Students who qualify for Federal Free/ Reduced lunch are eligible for a fee waiver. Sophomores who wish to take a course for CAPP credit, will require a waiver presented on their behalf by their CAPP teacher per UWO policy. Final waiver approval is determined by the department chair at UWO, not the high school teacher and therefore, is not guaranteed. Any student can still take the course for MHS credit. Economics Intro to Sociology Entrepreneurship Lifeguard Training Fitness for Life Personal Finance French V Ropes French VI Spanish V German V Spanish VI German VI

Early College Achievement Program (ECAP)

The Early College Achievement Program (ECAP) at Madison College (madisoncollege.edu/college-credit-opportunities-cct) provides the opportunity to gain early college credit while still attending high school. Middleton High School ECAP courses are identical to the Madison College course catalog. ECAP classes focus on introductory-level courses or courses that could be considered developmental at the college level. To be eligible for a Madison College ECAP course you: • Must be a junior or a senior • Must be in good academic standing • Must have no record of significant disciplinary problems • Must complete the ECAP course with a “C” or better There is no cost associated with taking ECAP courses. Computer Application I Fashion Analysis Introduction to College Reading and Writing Principles of Marketing Social Media Marketing Tech College Mathematics

Project Lead the Way (PLTW)

Most Project Lead the Way courses can be taken for dual credit at a number of universities across the country. All qualified students (grades 9-12) can receive college credit for PLTW classes.  College credit usually requires a B or better in the class and a certain score on the PLTW End of Course exam.  These requirements are dependent on the university granting the credit.  Please visit PLTW.org for additional information on requirements and cost. Civil Engineering and Architecture Digital Electronics Engineering Design and Development Human Body Systems Introduction to Engineering Design Medical Interventions Principles of Biomedical Sciences Principles of Engineering


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OFFSITE OPPORTUNITIES Youth Apprenticeship

Wisconsin’s Youth Apprenticeship program is a Department of Workforce Development program targeting high demand industry sectors in the state. Students in 11th or 12th grade are able to use this unique opportunity to be employed at a local business where specific, job related skills are learned. Youth Apprenticeship is a one or two year opportunity requiring 450 hours of career experience per year. In addition to the hour requirement, students must enroll in concurrent classes related to their apprenticeship and participate in an online learning environment to earn credit for the program. This opportunity is an excellent resume builder for potential college, scholarship, or employ- ment applications. Applications can be found at https://sites.google.com/mcpasd.k12.wi.us/mhsyouthapprenticeship/home Students must meet with the CTE Coordinator prior to completion of the required application. Note: Apprenticeship placement in the community will be off site. Students will need to provide their own transportation. Employment placements are not guaranteed. Middleton High School offers Youth Apprenticeships in the following areas: Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Architecture & Construction Arts, A/V Technology, & Communication Finance Health Science Hospitality, Tourism & Lodging Information Technology Marketing Manufacturing STEM Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics

Offsite Courses

MHS offers additional off site and evening classes for all students. While these classes may be required as part of the Youth Apprenticeship program it is not necessary to be a Youth Apprentice to take these courses: Veterinary Technician (Grade 12) Commercial Construction (Grade 12) Pharmacy Technician (Grade 12) Biotechnology/World Medicine (Grade 11 or 12) Auto Technician (Grade 11 or 12)

CTE7911/7912 CAREER INTERNSHIP Grade(s): 11,12 Credit: 1.25 Career&Tech Ed Students Students Students required

Prerequisite: Grades 11-12 and Outside Employment Year Course

enrolled in Career Internship will gain experience and exploration while still in high school. enrolled will be working to complete specific skills as part of a state certificate program. interested in this opportunity should meet with Mr. Pertzborn in the business department for documentation. In order to participate in this program, students must be employed.

Please contact CTE Coordinator Mr. Benz (gbenz@mcpasd.k12.wi.us) to register for these courses.

ATHLETICS/ACTIVITIES Middleton High School offers a robust selection of clubs, activities, and education based athletic programs. For more information please visit:Â www.mcpasd.k12.wi.us/mhs/


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BUSINESS, MARKETING & INFO TECH

BUSINESS, MARKETING, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The Business, Marketing and Information Technology department gives students a taste of multiple career opportunities. Students considering careers and/or college majors in computers, finance, business law, accounting, marketing and advertising have several classes available to them.  In many of these courses students have the opportunity to earn college credit through UW-Oshkosh or Madison College.  Middleton HS is also proud to be a member of the national High School of Business™ program. By utilizing the High School of Business™ curriculum, students work in cooperation with businesses on real business projects and problem solving applications, in preparation for college and the workplace.

FINANCE/BUSINESS BUS0515: PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Principles of Business will use a project-based curriculum to develop their understanding and skills in areas such as economics, business organization, human resources and information management, marketing, operations, and accounting concepts. Students will use current technology to acquire information and complete projects. Throughout the course, students will be presented with problem-solving situations for which they must apply academic and critical thinking skills. Note: Students will have the opportunity to take the Industry Recognized Credential test.

BUS2515: BUSINESS ECONOMICS

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Business Economics will expand their understanding of how consumer spending, government policies, economic conditions, legal issues, and global competition affect the success of business practices through practical, current applications regarding everyday societal and business life. Students will develop their knowledge and skills in areas such as economics, entrepreneurship, operations, and professional development using decision-making matrices. Note: This class does not fulfill the Financial Literacy graduation requirement.

BUS8515: PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Principles of Finance will increase their understanding of two specific business practices - accounting and finance. Through team activities and a semester-long corporate investment project, students will make connections between accounting and finance and learn about financial statements, calculating financial ratios, and corporate decision-making based on financial data. In addition, students will apply the concepts of operating and overhead costs, internal accounting controls, and budgeting to their classroom business. Note: This class does not fulfill the Financial Literacy graduation requirement.

BUS7515: PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Principles of Management will learn about the legal and ethical issues associated with management. They will develop an understanding of how to initiate, plan, implement, control, and close a project as well as how to motivate team members, delegate work, develop a chain of command, coordinate work efforts, and interpret statistical findings.

BUS7715: BUSINESS STRATEGIES

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Business Strategies will work through a project-based curriculum to increase their understanding and skills in such areas as business law, entrepreneurship, financial analysis, human resources and strategic management. By planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling business activities, students will acquire a realistic understanding of what is required to open and successfully run a business. Throughout the course, students will make decisions, use problem-solving skills, and implement formal reflection practices. Through individual and team activities and a semester long project, students will make connections between management and business success.


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BUS3071/3072: ACCOUNTING

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Career & Tech Ed Year Course Students in Accounting will learn to record financial transactions, develop financial reports, process payroll and taxes, and enhance their general knowledge of business. The class combines traditional accounting techniques with computerized accounting using QuickBooks. Students will apply their accounting knowledge to complete a small business computer simulation.

BUS4585: ENTREPRENEURSHIP (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Entrepreneurship will understand the procedures and techniques of owning and running a business. Students will explore career opportunities and recognize the role of an entrepreneur. Through the use of simulations, students will investigate the rewards and pitfalls of operating their own business. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification. Note: Students will have the opportunity to take the Industry Recognized Credential test.

BUS5015: BUSINESS LAW

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Business Law will increase their legal knowledge and awareness through two major areas of study - criminal law and civil law. Both areas of study will be presented in relation to how crimes interfere with personal and property rights, how that directly affects people, and the ripple effect on society and business. The goal of Business Law is to make students aware of their legal rights, remedies, and obligations. Mock trials, case studies, guest speakers, and a courthouse field trip may be applied to help solidify an understanding of the legal process.

BUS1015: PERSONAL FINANCE

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Financial Literacy Semester Course or Career & Tech Ed Students in Personal Finance will develop an understanding of financial skills and strategies. Students will increase their knowledge in the areas of: economic influences, personal decisions, banking, financial services, saving, investing strategies, taxes, credit, budgeting, housing options, car purchases, loan choices, and economic influences. Throughout the course, students will be presented with problem solving situations and project-based learning activities.

BUS1085: PERSONAL FINANCE (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite:None Credit: 0.5 Financial Literacy Semester Course or Career & Tech Ed Students in Personal Finance for CAPP will develop an understanding of financial skills and strategies. Students will increase their knowledge in the areas of: economic influences, personal decisions, banking, financial services, saving, investing strategies, taxes, credit, budgeting, housing options, car purchases, loan choices, and economic influences. Throughout the course, students will be presented with problem solving situations and project-based learning activities. While covering the same content as Personal Finance the Personal Finance for CAPP course will be taught at the college level by a CAPP approved instructor. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BUS8015: INTRO TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

Grade(s): 10,11,12* Prerequisite: Algebra I Credit: 0.5 Career & Semester Course Tech Ed or Math Students in Computer Programming will develop strategies for breaking down problems into smaller parts. The history of computer science, graphic user interfaces, data types, use of variables, numerical data, selection statements, strings, loops, and an introduction to methods and objects are some of the topics that will be introduced. Python and/or Java programming languages will be used. *Grade 9 with instructor approval.


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BUSINESS, MARKETING & INFO TECH

BUS8085: AP COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Intro to Computer Programming Credit: 0.5 Career & Semester Course Tech Ed or Math Students in AP Computer Programming will focus on data structures and object orientation. Some of the topics of study include: methods, object orientation, arrays, inheritance, polymorphism, searching and sorting, and recursion. All performance tasks will be completed in the Java programming language. Students who successfully complete the AP exam may earn college credit.

BUS7861/7862: AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Algebra I is recommended Credit: 1.0 Career & Tech Ed Year Course Students in AP Computer Science Principles will work in teams to develop computational thinking and solve open-ended, practical problems that occur in every day society. This class contains elements of the PLTW Computer Science Essentials class. Students will explore a wide range of computer science topics including programming, the Internet, global impact, abstraction, data and information, algorithms and creativity in computing. Students who successfully complete the AP exam may earn college credit.

BUS7015: WEB PAGE DESIGN

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Web Page Design will learn the basics of website design and development. Students will learn a variety of design principles and apply those principles while learning HTML and CSS. Students will have the opportunity to receive industry certification in Adobe Dreamweaver software. This software is the industry standard for creating and editing compelling websites and mobile use apps. Beyond design, students will focus on the fundamentals behind websites from obtaining a URL to site hosting to utilizing online free design programs. Course concepts will be applied through a variety of projects and students will leave the course with a web portfolio demonstrating their work and skills.

BUS7145: ADVANCED WEB PAGE DESIGN

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Web Page Design Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Advanced Web Page Design will further increase understanding of the intricacies of web page design. Students will produce challenging, independent material based upon self-guided learning. Students will be offered the opportunity to earn industry certification in Adobe Dreamweaver. This certification is the industry standard for creating and editing compelling, rich media websites and mobile apps.

BUS2015: VISUAL PRES/TECH

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in VPT will learn the technical and creative demands of video editing and production. Students will learn basic camera operation and shooting techniques, as well as Adobe Premier Pro’s feature set and basic interface for editing video. In addition to the technical aspects of video editing students will be taught the fundamental concepts of editing, both practical and aesthetic. Students will have the opportunity to earn industry certification in Adobe Premier Pro.

BUS2145: ADVANCED VISUAL PRES/TECH

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Visual Presentation/Technology Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in AVPT will continue to create videos and analyze media in this individualized course with an emphasis on self-paced instruction. The Adobe software will allow students to create cinematic titles, transitions, and animate logos. Students will have the opportunity to earn industry certification in Adobe Premiere Pro and Adobe After Effects.

BUS1575: COMPUTER APPL I (ECAP)

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Computer Applications I will be challenged no matter their level of computer proficiency. The class will provide students with a working knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel. Students completing Computer Applications I and II will have the opportunity to earn Microsoft Office Suite certification. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through ECAP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.


BUSINESS, MARKETING & INFO TECH

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BUS1675: COMPUTER APPL II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Computer Appl I (ECAP) Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Computer Applications II will continue their study of Microsoft Office Suite (MOS) by developing a working knowledge of Advanced Excel, Access, Powerpoint, and Web Tools. Students may earn MOS certification.

BUS4015: DIGITAL MEDIA DSGN & PROD

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Digital Media Design and Production will develop a working knowledge of visual communication by using a combination of text and picture layout in advertisements, magazines, books and other printed media. Students will learn production techniques through the use of Microsoft Publisher, Adobe In-Design, Photoshop and Illustrator. Students will also create and produce design layouts and projects while learning the software. Note: Students will have the opportunity to take the Industry Recognized Credential test.

BUS4045: ADV DIGITAL MEDIA DSGN & PROD

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Digital Media Design & Production Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Advanced Digital Media Design and Production will increase their understanding of graphic design and layout. Students will be encouraged to create challenging, independent projects based upon their interests. Note: Students will have the opportunity to take the Industry Recognized Credential test.

MARKETING BUS5575: PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (ECAP)

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Principles of Marketing will learn basic marketing principles, consumer buying behavior, product planning and development, Packaging, branding, promotion, distribution, and pricing. Projects will challenge students to analyze the business world, work through key marketing decisions, and apply knowledge to develop a marketing strategy. Note: Students will have the opportunity to take the Industry Recognized Credential test.Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through ECAP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

BUS6315: SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING (ECAP)

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Social Media Marketing will build their knowledge and skills through hands-on projects. They will utilize activities to enhance their social media marketing skills and strategies. The goal of the course is for students to use social media technologies to create and improve marketing efforts for businesses.

BUS6515: SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT MKT

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: PrinclCredit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed ADVERTISING AND SALES Semester Course Students in Sports & Entertainment Marketing will utilize the application of marketing principles and concepts in the sports and entertainment industries. General units of study will include: marketing events, products and services through sports, recreational marketing, and legal issues surrounding sports and entertainment marketing. Students may hear from guest speakers and participate in a field trip to a college or professional sports venue to see the real life implementation of marketing to promote their teams.

OFFSITE OPPORTUNTIES Please see pages 8-9 for information on Youth Apprenticeship, Offsite Classes and Career Internship Opportunities.


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ENGINEERING & TECH ED

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION The Engineering and Technology Education department provides students with an understanding of the nature of technology, technological systems, design and ingenuity, and the impact engineering and construction have on society. Students taking courses in this department will not only design, develop, and utilize technological systems, but also apply their knowledge and abilities to real world problem-solving. Teamwork and collaboration on project implementation will be essential as students explore engineering graphics, metals processing and production, woods processing and production or pathways to engineering.

TED1105: DIGITAL DESIGN & MAKING

Grade(s): 9 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Digital Design and Making will be introduced to modern making through the use of 3D modeling programs and computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines. Students will gain an understanding of the elements of design and how to transform ideas to finished products. Digital Design and Manking will focus on developing students’ design potential through the use of modern, industry-standard programs and equipment. Students will have an opportunity to learn to operate the CNC router, CNC plasma, laser cutter/engraver and 3D printers. (replaces Engineering Graphics 1)

TED1305: WOOD DESIGN

Grade(s): 9 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Wood Design will begin to learn how to work with and manipulate wood products using hand tools and machinery. Various woodworking techniques will be introduced including methods of assembly, joinery, and finishing applications in this entry level course. Students will apply their skills to complete small projects that demonstrate a variety of skills and processes.

TED1205: DESIGN & FABRICATION

Grade(s): 9 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Design & Fabrication 1 will be introduced to metal working through the use of hand tools and machines. Students will gain an understanding of the elements of design and jow to transform ideas to finished products. Design and Fabrication will focus on developing students’ fabrication skills through the use of industry-standard equipment. Students will have an opportunity to learn sheet metal working, welding, and basic machining. (Replaces Metal 1)

TED9015 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I

Grade(s):10,11,12 Prerequisite: Woods I or Metals I Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semeste Course Students in Building Construction I will explore the phases of residential construction, creating the foundation, exterior carpentry, rough-ins, drywall, roofing, finish carpentry, electrical, and plumbing installation in this introductory course. Students will apply the skills learned to complete small construction projects. Professionals involved in the field of construction will speak to students to provide some insight into career opportunities.


ENGINEERING & TECH ED

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PROJECT LEAD THE WAY TED6091/6092: INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (PLTW)

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Career & Tech Ed Year Course Students in Introduction to Engineering Design will learn problem-solving skills through the design development process. This process will assist students with turning a concept into reality and utilizing a logical sequence of steps to develop the best solution to a specific problem. Students will use solid modeling computer design software to create products/solutions.

TED6591/6592: DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (PLTW)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: ALGEBRA I Credit: 1.0 Science Year Course Students in Digital Electronics will follow a course of study in applied digital logic. Students will be introduced to digital circuits found in a variety of electronic devices. Students will use computer simulations to learn about the logic of electronics as they design, test and construct circuits and devices. DE is similar to a first semester college course and is helpful for students exploring careers in engineering or engineering technology. Students will learn the fundamentals of programming for embedded systems (arduinos) and be provided the opportunity to engage in a personal project second semester.

TED7591/7592: PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (PLTW)

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Recommend GEOMETRY (or concurrent enrollment) Credit: 1.0 Career & Tech Ed Year Course Students in Principles of Engineering will explore technology systems and engineering processes to discover how math, science and technology are connected. Students will develop problem solving skills by immersing themselves in real-world engineering problems in a technology lab setting. Students will use project-based, hands-on experiences to learn the key elements and skills of engineering and technology-based careers.

TED6791/6792: CIVIL ENGINEERING & ARCHITECTURE (PLTW)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Career & Tech Ed Year Course Students in Civil Engineering & Architecture will focus on completing long-term projects that involve the development of property sites. Students will work in teams, exploring hands-on activities and projects to learn the process of designing and developing a property as well as the characteristics of civil engineering and architecture. In addition, students will use 3D design software to help them design solutions to solve major course projects. Students will learn about documenting their project, solving problems and communicating their solutions to peers and members of the professional community of civil engineering and architecture.

TED7091/7092: ENGINEERING DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT (PLTW)

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Science Year Course Students in Engineering Design & Development will engage in a full iterative design cycle over the course of the year to solve a technical problem of their choice. Students will work in teams to research, design, construct and test a solution to an open-ended problem. The team will present and defend their solution to the problem in front of a panel of experts at the end of the course.

OFFSITE OPPORTUNITIES Please see page 8-9 for information on Youth Apprenticehip, Offsite Classes and Career Internship Opportunities.


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ENGLISH

ENGLISH The MHS English department integrates communication skills in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing media in multiple ways. Applying critical, original, and creative thinking through a multi-cultural lens helps students to shape a diverse, responsible, and compassionate vision of the world and their role in it.  English electives are predominantly available to seniors, though juniors may double up with their English 11 or AP-Language coursework. Prior to selecting elective options, students should be aware of which courses align with their post-secondary plans. There are some intervention, ESL, and self-contained Special Education courses, but they are not listed here, as they require an IEP or school team decision for placement. For more information, please contact your child’s case manager or Coordinators Nicole Morehouse and Rebecca Poehls.

ENG0511/0512: ENGLISH 9

Grade(s): 9 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 English Year Course Students in English 9 will focus on reading, writing, thinking, and speaking while using a wide selection of materials. Poems, short stories, novels, plays, and various nonfiction pieces will be read and studied. English 9 will enable students to listen and think critically, develop skills in reading and interpreting literature, evaluate nonfiction, prepare for and deliver presentations and discussions, and employ full composition processes. Every section of English 9 will offer Earned Honors. Honors designation implies the students’ work is measurably broader, deeper, and more complex. Students choosing the honors designation should possess a passion for the subject and demonstrate integrity and leadership in the classroom. Through completion of parallel and additional coursework students will be challenged to think more independently and work toward more complex literary interpretation.

ENG1015: ENGLISH 10

Grade(s): 10 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 English Semester Course Students in English 10 will continue to build upon the skills practiced in English 9. As such, the focus will be inquiry and analysis through reading, writing, thinking, and speaking while using a wide selection of materials. Thematically, this course will focus on personal responsibility and the responsibility of community. Every section of English 10 will offer Earned Honors. Honors designation implies the students’ work is measurably broader, deeper, and more complex. Through completion of parallel and additional coursework students will be challenged to think more independently and work toward more complex literary interpretation.

ENG1020: COMMUNICATION STUDIES 10

Grade(s): 10 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 English Semester Course Students in Communication Studies will develop their communication and rhetorical skills in a supportive and focused environment. Students will deepen their understanding of both verbal and non-verbal communication and the art of persuasion (ethos, pathos, and logos). At the completion of the semester, students will have developed critical thinking, researching, writing, and listening skills to exercise their voices for a variety of purposes and audiences.

ENG1111/1112: ENGLISH 11

Grade(s): 11 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 English Year Course Students in English 11 will explore the idea of what it means to have a voice and how to make that voice heard in a world that is becoming increasingly loud and chaotic. Ideas will be explored through a wide variety of texts and written assignments, as well as discussions and presentations. The themes of fairness, justice, and equality will be studied and by the end of the course students will be able to not only convey their own experiences, but will also be able to amplify the voices of those who are often held silent in society.


ENGLISH

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ENG3115: CREATIVE WRITING

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 English Semester Course Students in Creative Writing will discover and develop their unique, personal writing voices. By studying professional and amateur authors, exploring various styles, genres, and techniques of writing, and interacting with the living world around them, students will learn to see the world through the eyes of a writer. Students will explore their thoughts, insights, and imaginations - sometimes through spontaneous composition and sometimes through a process approach - creating several pieces ranging from impromptu poems to revised works worthy of critique and publication. Writing will be shared daily in a variety of small and large group settings in order to seek feedback, to hear other writers’ voices, and to connect with each other’s thoughts, imaginations, and experiences.

ENG3315: SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 English Semester Course Students in Science Fiction and Fantasy will explore the genres of science fiction and fantasy by studying how our world issues are reflected in pieces of literature as well as genre-specific characteristics of the setting, plot, characters, writer’s crafts, and story structure. Through short stories, novels, films, and non-fiction articles, students will study how these works have mirrored concerns and troubling trends in the human experience. Students will also examine how these works have given society optimistic possibilities as well as alarming predictions about our world and human nature.

ENG3715: HEROES VILLAINS AND QUESTS

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 English Semester Course Students in Heroes, Villains and Quests will start by looking at how to define a hero, and then unlock the secrets of the hero’s journey in contemporary literature, mythology, Shakespearean literature, graphic novels, and modern film. Star Wars, The Lord of the Rings, The Avengers, Harry Potter, and The Hunger Games are so successful because they put a modern twist on the monomyth or “hero’s journey”, a recurring pattern in stories from around the globe spanning all of human history.

ENG4315: MODERN MIDWESTERN CULTURE

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 English Semester Course Students in Modern Midwestern Culture will explore the culture, environment, foods, music and sports of Wisconsin and the Midwest through the issues and/or writers unique to these regions. They will examine the culture of the Midwest through literature by contemporary authors, columnists, and musicians. Students will select an area of study (environment, urban life, agriculture, etc.) and create a semester project that includes research, writing, reading, and analysis. Readings will be high-interest, thought provoking, and almost entirely chosen by students. Text selections will include informational text, poetry, biographies, and current events.

ENG4715: VOICES OF COLOR

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 English Semester Course Students in Voices of Color will participate in an experience based on the belief that we are all better off when we have a chance to listen to and understand each others’ life stories. Books, stories, essays, and poems from a variety of voices will be read, analyzed, and discussed to enable students to view other perspectives and gain knowledge and empathy. Students will learn from both mentor and choice texts, fiction and non-fiction; the semester will culminate in a synthesis research project and presentation. Curiosity and an open mind are essential for success in this course.

ENG6561/6562: AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMP

Grade(s): 11 12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 English Year Course Students in AP Language will learn to write effectively and confidently in their personal and professional lives. The course will challenge students to read critically, think analytically, and communicate clearly in both writing and speech. Students in this college-level course will read and analyze a range of non-fiction prose selections, deepening their awareness of rhetoric and how language works. Students will also develop a comprehensive grasp of how grammar works and how important the writing process is. While AP Literature and Composition offers an intense study of fiction and poetry, this class, again, focuses on essays, argumentation, and rhetoric. Students who successfully complete the AP exam may earn college credit.


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ENGLISH/FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

ENG6071/6072: INTRO COLLEGE READNG & WRTNG (ECAP)

Grade(s): 12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 English Year Course Students in Intro to College Reading and Writing will learn about critical thinking, reading, writing, and study strategies for college-level readings (textbooks, essays, and articles). First semester topics include recognizing organizational patterns, highlighting and annotating texts, summarizing, and making inferences. During the second semester, students will focus on college-level writing strategies, such as grammatical competence, developing writing processes and styles, multiple revisions, self-advocacy skills, and researching skills. Note: Qualified seniors may receive elective technical college credit for this class through ECAP. These potential six credits are free. These college credits do not transfer to all colleges, particularly ones with more rigorous entrance requirements, and those wishing to be a Division I or Division II scholarship athlete should talk to their counselor.

ENG7061/7062: AP ENGLISH LIT & COMP

Grade(s): 12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 English Year Course Students in AP English Literature and Composition engage in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts and writing about these works, students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. Students will consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, connecting craft to meaning. The reading in this course is wide and deep and reinforces ideas from literature spanning different genres and time periods. The writing will focus on critical analysis of the literature and will include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. While taking and passing the AP English Literature and Composition exam is not a requirement for students in this course, students will dedicate some time preparing for it. Students who successfully complete the AP exam may earn college credit.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES The Family and Consumer Sciences program is committed to empowering students to fulfill individual, family, community and work roles within a diverse global society. Course offerings represent many disciplines including food preparation, child care, interior design, fashion analysis and medical career training, with many courses providing opportunities for service learning.

CULINARY ARTS FCS0515: CULINARY ARTS I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Culinary Arts I will gain knowledge and understanding of kitchen management, chef responsibilities, food service and technology, and other careers related to the food industry. Content covered will include: kitchen basics (measuring and lab equipment), safety and sanitation, knife skills, and cultural cooking. Lab opportunities will include a variety of cooking experiences related to unit content.

FCS0711/0712: CULINARY ARTS PROSTART 1

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: CULINARY ARTS I Credit: 1.0 Career & Tech Ed Year Course Students in the ProStart® Program will participate in an industry-based experience that will prepare them for careers in the restaurant and food service workforce. Students will participate in catering activities and simulated restaurant experiences, preparing meals for faculty and community members. Students may also participate in culinary food preparation competitions. Class challenges will help students prepare for competitions and give them the chance to test their ability to work under pressure. Students will be matched with a mentor to facilitate mastering the ProStart® Certification Competencies. Students who meet the ProStart® Program competencies and pass the Year 1 and Year 2 national exams will receive a National Restaurant Association Education Foundation Achievement Certificate and may be eligible for advance placement credits at vocational and culinary colleges. Students can repeat this class for ProStart 2 credit.


FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

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FCS1015: CARDINAL ENTERPRISE CAFE

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: CULINARY ARTS I, GLOBAL FOODS, or PROSTART Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Cardinal Enterprise Cafe will build upon previously learned skills from Culinary Arts I, Global Foods, Pro Start 1 or Pro Start 2 to operate their own business out of the MHS Family and Consumer Science Food labs. Students will be responsible for quoting jobs, ordering materials, manufacturing food products, quality control, shipping/receiving, invoicing, customer service, accounting, maintaining equipment and other tasks related to running a business. Cardinal Enterprise will generate funds to help further the Family and Consumer Science Department.

FCS7515: GLOBAL FOODS

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Global Foods will learn about the concept of a global society through the study of food preparation, nutrition, food consumerism and safety and sanitation. Twenty-first century skills will be addressed by promoting an understanding of diversity through food study. Students will utilize a project-based curriculum combining classroom and lab experiences.

FCS1115: HOSPITALITY & EVENT PLANNING

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Hospitality and Event Planning will explore careers in the hospitality, tourism and recreation industries with stress on hotels and event planning. We will discuss the role tourism plays in local, state, and national economies. Students will practice skills needed to provide quality service that can be applied to any career within the service industry. Students enrolled in the course will have the opportunity to work for the student run school cafe, and will explore nearby businesses and learn from industry professionals. Students will also have the opportunity to earn service learning hours through this fun, hands-on project based class.

CHILDCARE FCS3015: CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Child Development will study children 0 to 5 years and the responsibilities of the caregiver for the development of healthy children. Topics within the course will include: theories and theorists, children’s growth and development (physical, intellectual, emotional, and social), prenatal development, and guidance and caregiver responsibilities.

FCS4015: ASST CHILD CARE TEACHER

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Asst Child Care will learn about child development and the child care industry. Students considering careers in childcare, psychology, social work, primary or elementary education, nursing and other medical fields will benefit from participation in the Assistant Child Care Teacher course. Topics will include: development of children, positive discipline/guidance strategies, curriculum and teaching techniques for young children, health and safety and child abuse. The ACCT course offers students certification for employment as an assistant child care teacher in a child care center as well as SBS and SIDS certification. Note: Qualified students may receive Advanced Standing for this class through Madison College.

FCS4515: CHILD CARE SERVICES

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: ASSISTANT CHILD CARE TEACHER Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Child Care Services will have the opportunity to design coursework and volunteer or work in their areas of interest. Child Care Services is designed for the student who is seriously considering a career working in education or the child care industry. Certification as a child care teacher can be part of the course.


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FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

FCS5015: INFANT/TODDLER CERTIFICATION

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: ACCT certification Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Infant/Toddler Certification will focus on the development of children from birth to age three including meeting their developmental needs, effective communication and sanitation and safety in an infant/toddler setting. Throughout the semester, students will also focus on brain development during the first three years of life and how experiences that happen early on can continue to impact children and adults throughout their lifespan. After meeting all course requirements, students can earn their state infant/toddler certification at age 18, qualifying them to work with children under age 2 in a State Licensed Day Care Facility.

FCS8015: CONSUMER FINANCIAL LITERACY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course or Financial Literacy Students in Consumer Financial Literacy will develop personal financial skills and understand their consumer rights and responsibilities through discussion and real world applications. Students learn important financial skills such as: money management, decision making, budgeting, career exploration, buying a car, renting an apartment, insurance, taxes, credit, and the role of the consumer in society.

HEALTH SERVICES FCS1515: INTRO TO MEDICAL OCCUPATIONS

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Intro to Medical Occupations will explore the world of healthcare and what it means to work in a variety of medical fields - both from an informational and a practical standpoint. The focus will be on gaining knowledge about many opportunities in healthcare, obtaining some basic skills necessary to work in the field, an understanding of ethical concerns and how to navigate a professional healthcare environment.

FCS6015: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Medical Terminology will focus on communication using medical language through the analysis and classification of medical terms as they relate to each body system. Both written and spoken formats for using medical terminology will be practiced including word construction, definition, spelling and pronunciation as well as the interpretation of written materials.

OTHER FCS COURSES FCS2415: FASHION ANALYSIS (ECAP)

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Fashion Analysis will examine the fashion industry and how it promotes products, influences trends in clothing and helps one develop their own universal design. Units of study will include color, elements of design, principles of design, solving industry related challenges and applying learned concepts through practical application projects that incorporate the basic fashion analysis concepts. Throughout the course, career opportunities will be featured and explored. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through ECAP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

FCS2615: HOUSING & INTERIOR DESIGN

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Housing and Interior Design will study how to create aesthetically pleasing living spaces. Students will examine the needs of the individual, the family, and the community and learn how design affects thoughts and behaviors. Throughout this course, students will explore career opportunities through the study of elements and principles of design, color, floor plans, furniture styles, and selection of accessories. An introduction to computer floor plan drawing and design may be utilized in project work. A large collection of fabrics, wallpaper and flooring samples will be available for student use. The students may also have the opportunity to do a design project from implementation to collection, as well as earn service-learning hours in this hands on class.


FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES/FINE ARTS: ART

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FCS3515: SERVE/LEAD/LEARN

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course Students in Serve, Lead, Learn will explore the changing needs of society. They will be able to strengthen their leadership and communication skills and learn ways to help provide support to others through career exploration and personal growth. Students will help determine some of the units - including the development of a service learning project that will benefit individuals, school and the community. Topics that may be explored include: relationship skills, dating, sexual abuse, chemical dependency, stress management, homelessness and hunger, eating disorders, racial equity and gender equality. The overall objective of the class will be to learn the value of respectful and caring relationships as well as ways to help others. Note: The Service-learning Project may require up to five hours of time outside of the regularly scheduled class period.

OFFSITE OPPORTUNITIES Please see page 8-9 for information on Youth Apprenticehip, Offsite Classes and Career Internship Opportunities.

FINE ARTS: ART The MHS Art Department aims to provide each student with a strong foundation in the techniques and processes of producing visual art.  Through the production of visual art, students will understand the historical importance that visual art has in human society, appreciate the development of a personal approach in the making of visual art and incorporate new technologies into the process of creating visual art.  We believe that education in the arts can: • Strengthen a student’s ability to be creative and inventive problem solvers and decision makers.   • Enrich student’s understanding of diverse human cultures and histories through the study of art.   • Enhance student’s understanding of complex social, cultural and intellectual trends.

2D/3D MEDIA ART0515: ART FOUNDATIONS

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Semester Course Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Students in Art Foundations will work with a variety of media in this entry level class with an emphasis on drawing, painting, sculpture, and ceramics. Class activities will be designed to promote artistic growth through students’ interactions with traditional art materials, tools, and technical skills. Art Foundations offers students the opportunity to develop their understanding of art history, methods of art production and ideas concerning the significance of art.

ART1015: DRAWING & PAINTING

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Semester Course Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Students in Drawing & Painting will learn about materials, skills, and concepts used in creating two-dimensional artwork. There will be an emphasis on drawing, painting and a variety of mixed-media explorations.

ART1515: SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Semester Course Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Students in Sculpture and Ceramics I will learn about materials, skills, and concepts used in creating three dimensional artwork. A wide range of materials, tools, and techniques will be used in this class. There will also be an introduction to historically well-known sculptors. Areas of study will include: woodworking, ceramics, the potter’s wheel, and mixed media.

ART1615: SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: SCULPTURE & CERAMICS I Semester Course Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Students in Sculpture and Ceramics II will further develop their understanding of three dimensional art and sculpting techniques. Students will have the opportunity to work with new materials and design processes while also honing their skills with clay through hand building and the potter’s wheeL.


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FINE ARTS: ART

ART2015: ART EXPLORATION

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Art Exploration will explore the rich diversity of art forms created by cultures and ethnic groups from around the world. Students will have the opportunity to explore and create artworks that investigate concepts of identity, community, utility and individual expression from a multicultural perspective. Topics such as papermaking, fibers, carving, and art metals will be explored through the use of traditional and non-traditional art materials.

ART5515: ART & DESIGN

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Art and Design will study their environment and draw connections with the world of art. Through the process of design, students will bring their ideas to life through drawings, illustrations, graphic works, models, prototypes and installations. Students will also explore the creative processes used by designers, architects, and graphic artists.

ART2545: ADVANCED ART I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: DRAWING & PAINTING Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Advanced Art I will learn about various art styles in this studio course that begins with an in-depth study of twentieth century painting ranging from Impressionism to Post-Modern Art. Students will also explore the world of contemporary art through weekly readings and journal entries, with an emphasis on personal imagery and visual language. The areas of study include advanced painting, charcoal, colored pencil drawing, and mixed media explorations. Students will also begin creating an art portfolio and explore post-secondary options for art.

ART2645: ADVANCED ART II

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: ADVANCED ART I or SCULPTURE & CERAMICS II Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Advanced Art II will create their own projects stemming from what they learned in Advanced Art I. Students may choose to explore a range of 2-D and 3-D medias as well as work on portfolio development. Students will also explore the world of contemporary art through weekly readings and journal entries, with an emphasis on personal imagery and visual language. The class will be structured similar to that of an independent study, and every three weeks the students will evaluate their progress with their instructor.

ART2745: ADVANCED ART III

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: ADVANCED ART II Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Advanced Art III will create original artwork stemming from their own ideas. A key focus of this course will be creating and building upon their art portfolio. The class will be structured similar to that of an independent study, and every three weeks students will evaluate their progress with their instructor.

ART3515: ART STUDIO

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: ADVANCED ART III Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Art Studio will further develop their portfolio to possibly pursue art as a career. They will learn about the requirements for an art portfolio as it pertains to a variety of schools. The art portfolio may be used for college admission, scholarship opportunities or art competitions. The class will be structured similar to that of an independent study, and every three weeks students will evaluate their progress with their instructor.


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ART8015/ SCI8015 : INTEGRATED ART AND SCIENCE

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Integrated Art and Science will explore ways in which artists and scientists make use of imagination, creativity and innovation to gain insight into the world. Students will investigate connections between art forms, materials, principles of science and the roles art and science play in society. Students will create artwork with a variety of media such as soap, ceramics, textiles, and dyes. Note: The class will meet daily for one semester; students will earn one half credit in Fine Arts and one half credit in Science. Students registering for this class MUST also register for SCI8015: Integrated Art and Science located on page 36

DIGITAL ARTS ART4215: INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOSHOP

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Introduction to Photoshop will understand and use the fundamental workflow of Photoshop to create artistic imagery in this project-based course. Students will learn to digitally create striking designs, illustrations and artwork. Additionally, students will also edit and combine images into seamless compositions, use adjustments and effects, and paint digitally. Students with prior experience will be provided the opportunity to work at an accelerated pace.

ART4315: PHOTOSHOP & ILLUSTRATOR DESIGN

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOSHOP Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Photoshop & Illustrator Design will continue the exploration of digital media and build on their skills in digital art in this project-based course. Students will use Adobe Illustrator to create vector based art while also expanding upon their Photoshop knowledge. Students will create art from a design perspective through working from preliminary sketches to final digital compositions, exploring digital painting, illustration, and digital imagery.

ART4815: INTRODUCTION TO ANIMATION

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Intro to Animation will create hand-drawn, stop motion, and digital animation. Final projects will be created in Adobe Animate and include sound effects and synchronized music. The class will focus on drawing for animation and understanding the principles of animation, as students work to tell original stories and develop a personal style.

ART4945: ADVANCED ANIMATION

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: INTRODUCTION TO ANIMATION Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Advanced Animation will learn advanced 2D animation techniques in Adobe Flash and also create animations in Adobe After Effects. The focus will be on the use of motion studies, storyboard techniques, character and narrative development, and camera movement. Final projects will be presented in a digital portfolio.

ART5045: ADVANCED DIGITAL ART

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: ADVANCED ANIMATION or PHOTOSHOP & ILLUSTRATOR DESIGN Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course

Students in Advanced Digital Art will continue to individually develop their digital art skills. In this contract based, studio course, students will explore digital imagery and illustration, photography, animation and video. Students will work at their own pace, creating and building upon their digital art portfolio.

ART7015: GRAPHIC DESIGN

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Graphic Design will learn how the principles of design affect how we create images. Students will learn to create compelling design by exploring and organizing texts, images and drawings. This class will also provide students with a conceptual understanding of typography, logo and icon design, poster and magazine layouts, branding, and information design.


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PHOTOGRAPHY ART7515: PHOTOGRAPHY I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Photography I will learn to use a manual 35mm camera, develop their own film, and create high quality prints through traditional darkroom techniques. No prior knowledge of photography is required; students will be led from photography composition and design to dry mounting and presentation. This class has darkroom work, classroom assignments and digital computer work to successfully understand camera settings, photography methods and techniques. Note: Students are asked to provide their own 35mm camera, film and printing paper. (A limited number of cameras are available from MHS.) Students with financial need may be eligible for assistance; please see your teacher or house social worker.

ART7615: PHOTOGRAPHY II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: PHOTOGRAPHY I Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Photography II will learn the concepts, tools and technology of digital imaging for photographers. Photography assignments will focus on discovering creative approaches to making compositions, lighting, and controlling exposure for outdoor and studio photography. Adobe Photoshop will be introduced for file adjustments and creative file manipulations. Students will learn how to prepare and present images. DSLR cameras are available from MHS for use in this class.

ART7715: PHOTOGRAPHY III

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: PHOTOGRAPHY II Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Photography III will learn to advance and expand their photography skills. This is a course for students who have been successful in previous semesters of photography and are ready to learn through teacher led and self-guided study. Students will create images with Digital Cameras and the use of Photoshop. Creative exploration of photography techniques will be a focus of this class. Students must be highly motivated, as they will be responsible for designing and implementing images for their own photography website and gallery show. DSLR cameras are available from MHS for use in this class.

YEARBOOK ART6015: YEARBOOK DESIGN I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: PHOTOGRAPHY I, GRAPHIC DESIGN, or PHOTOSHOP Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Yearbook Design I will design, create and produce the school yearbook. Clubs, athletics and other school related activities will be covered as part of the production process. Students will have the opportunity to become involved as an editor, photographer, journalist and/or staffer.

ART6115: YEARBOOK DESIGN II

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: YEARBOOK DESIGN I Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Yearbook Design II will take on additional responsibilities in the overall production of the yearbook. Yearbook II students will also serve as mentors to the Yearbook I students as the process is a multi-level learning/production environment.

ART6215: YEARBOOK DESIGN III

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: YEARBOOK DESIGN II Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Yearbook Design III will take on additional responsibilities in the overall production of the yearbook. They will continue to serve as mentors to the Yearbook I & II students.

ART6315: YEARBOOK DESIGN IV

Grade(s): 12 Prerequisite: YEARBOOK DESIGN III Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Yearbook Design IV will work closely with the advisor as an editor or editor-in-chief throughout the entire yearbook production process. They will also continue to serve as mentors to the Yearbook I - III students in an independent study format.


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FINE ARTS: MUSIC Students at Middleton High School have a full array of performing ensembles. There are 6 bands, 3 choirs, and 3 orchestras, all described below. In addition, students who are committed to multiple performing areas are able to “double” by enrolling in two ensembles during the same block. Truly dedicated doublers can take multiple ensembles by enrolling in two ensembles during different blocks (which takes 2 selection slots). To register for Music ensemble courses: • • • • •

To enroll in any Band course, register for BAND: MUS8101/2. To enroll in any Choir course, register for CHOIR: MUS8201/2. To enroll in any Orchestra course, register for ORCHESTRA: MUS8301/2. To “double” in Band & Choir during the same block, register for BAND/CHOIR DOUBLER: MUS8401/2. To “double” in Choir & Orchestra during the same block, register for CHOIR/ORCHESTRA DOUBLER: MUS8501/2. • To “double” in Orchestra & Band during the same block, register for ORCHESTRA/BAND DOUBLER: MUS8601/2. • To take multiple ensembles during separate blocks, register for 2 different ensembles.

In all cases, the music instructors will place you in the appropriate ensemble courses.

BAND Students enrolling in BAND (or Band doubler course) will be placed in one of these ensembles:

CARDINAL BAND

Grade(s): 9 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts Year Course Students in Cardinal Band will experience individual musical growth and improved technical skills while preparing for small and large group performances. In addition to large group rehearsals, students will receive more personalized attention in small group instruction sessions each quarter. Cardinal Band members will be eligible for participation in festivals, concert field trips, pep band and jazz ensembles, and will participate in several culminating evening concerts. This is the entry-level band for incoming 9th graders.

CONCERT BAND

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Teacher placement Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts Year Course Students in Concert Band will study and learn a challenging repertoire of music. Advanced concepts of phrasing, musical precision, and interpretation will be stressed. Though concert repertoire remains at the core of the curriculum, Concert Band members will have the opportunity to explore jazz, chamber music, and marching band. Student learning will be personalized and assessed in small group instruction. Activities include performances at music festivals, eligibility for solo/ensemble performances, regular public performances and biennial extended tours. Beyond classroom instruction, attendance at evening events is expected as well. This class may be repeated. Note: Possession of a well maintained instrument is recommended, however some instruments will be available through the school. See instructor for additional information, including rental fees.

SYMPHONIC WINDS Grade(s): 12 Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts

Prerequisite: Teacher placement Year Course

Students in the Symphonic Winds will study the art of music while emphasizing performance of collegiate level repertoire for wind ensemble and classic chamber works for winds. Students will perform in many evening band concerts throughout the year, and will also have performances in small groups and as individuals. Students will also study how music works, including music theory, notation, composition, improvisation, and cultural relevance. Chamber Wind Ensemble members will be eligible to participate in all facets of the band program, including festivals, marching band, jazz band, field trips, pep band, and full orchestra. Symphonic Winds is designed for 10th-12th grade students who have attained a high level of proficiency on their band instrument.


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FINE ARTS: MUSIC

CHAMBER WIND ENSEMBLE

Grade(s): 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Teacher placement Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts Year Course Students in Chamber Wind Ensemble will see it is designed for the most advanced wind, brass and percussion students. The curriculum emphasizes music study through the medium of high quality, advanced Wind literature. Student leadership in the interpretation and preparation of all music is encouraged through the use of student led sectionals and chamber music groups. Student learning is personalized and assessed in small group instruction that employs both direct teacher contact and personal music learning projects. Ensemble activities include performances at music festivals, solo/ensemble performances, and public concerts. The Chamber Winds ensemble combines with the Concert Band for biennial extended tours. This class can be repeated. Expectations beyond the classroom: 6-7 evening events throughout the year including concerts and field shows. Community service performances occur during 2nd and 3rd quarter. Note: Possession of a well maintained instrument is recommended, however some large instruments are available through the school - see your instructor for additional information. Private lessons are encouraged.

CARDINAL PERCUSSION

Grade(s): 9 (10-12 Prerequisite: Middle school percussion experience by teacher recommendation Year Course Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts Students in Cardinal Percussion will develop the same musical knowledge and skills as in Cardinal Band but through the specific lens of percussion performance. Students will develop their skills as performers along with their understanding of music as an art form. Students will perform in several evening band concerts throughout the year, and will also perform in small groups and as individuals. Students will also study how music works, including music theory, notation, composition, improvisation, and cultural relevance. Cardinal Percussion members will be eligible to participate in all facets of the band program, including festivals, marching band, drum line, jazz band, field trips, and pep band. Cardinal Percussion is designed for percussion players who are in 9th grade or are new to their band instrument.

ADVANCED PERCUSSION

Grade(s):10, 11,12 Prerequisite: teacher placement Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts Year Course Students in Advanced Percussion will emphasize performance of collegiate percussion repertoire to develop their skills as performers along with their understanding of music as an art form. Students will perform in many evening band concerts throughout the year, and will also have performances in small groups and as individuals. Students will also study how music works, including music theory, notation, composition, improvisation, and cultural relevance. Advanced Percussion members will be eligible to participate in all facets of the band program, including festivals, marching band, drum line, jazz band, field trips, pep band, and full orchestra. Advanced Percussion is designed for 10th-12th grade students ready to study percussion repertoire at a near-collegiate level.

CHOIR Students enrolling in CHOIR (or Choir doubler course) will be placed in one of these ensembles:

CARDINAL CHORALE

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts Year Course Students in Cardinal Chorale will engage in activities such as development of vocal technique, music reading skills and exposure to a variety of choral masterworks, cultural traditions and languages to foster independent musicianship. In addition to weekly assignments, students will be expected to attend small group instruction and participate in evening concerts. Other optional concerts and activities will also be available. This course may be repeated.

CANTUS

Grade(s): 10 ,11,12 Prerequisite: Placement based on previous experience, Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts assessment from teachers, and/or auditions Year Course Students in Cantus will advance their independent music skills through the development of vocal technique, music reading skills and exposure to choral masterworks in a variety of styles, cultural traditions and languages. In addition to weekly assignments, students will be expected to attend small group instruction and participate in evening concerts. Other optional performances and activities will be available. This course may be repeated.


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CONCERT CHOIR

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: Placement based on previous experience, Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts assessment from teachers, and/or auditions Year Course Students in Concert Choir will advance their independent music skills to include development of vocal technique, music reading skills and exposure to choral masterworks in a variety of styles, cultural traditions and languages. In addition to weekly assignments, students will be expected to attend small group instruction and participate in evening concerts. Other optional performances and activities will be available.

ORCHESTRA Students enrolling in ORCHESTRA (or Orchestra doubler course) will be placed in one of these ensembles:

CARDINAL ORCHESTRA

Grade(s): 9 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts Year Course Students in Cardinal Orchestra will be in an entry-level string orchestra where students will perform standard orchestral literature, explore alternative musical styles (jazz, fiddling, etc.) and sharpen skills such as vibrato and shifting. Students will grow as musicians through both large-group rehearsal and small-group instruction. There will be expectations for participation and attendance at performances outside of the school day, including, but not limited to: chamber music, solo/ensemble festivals and evening concerts.

SINFONIA

Grade(s): 10,11 Prerequisite: Placement based on previous experience, Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts assessment from teachers, and/or auditions. Year Course Students in Sinfonia will develop their music performance skills and ability to perform in a large ensemble through large group rehearsal and small group instruction. Musicians in Sinfonia will learn advanced concepts of phrasing, interpretation, and musical precision. There will be expectations for participation and attendance at performances outside of the school day, including, but not limited to: chamber music, solo/ensemble festivals, a district tour and evening concerts. Violinists, violists, cellists, and bassists may enroll for this course. Harpists and pianists can also enroll, and these students will perform on these instruments and perhaps also learn a bowed string instrument.

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Grade(s): 12 Prerequisite: Placement based on previous experience, assessment Credit: 1.0 Fine Arts from teachers, and/or auditions. Year Course Students in Symphony Orchestra will continue to develop their musicianship in this advanced level course. The curriculum, through large-group rehearsal and small-group instruction, stresses high-quality standard orchestral literature, personal development, and leadership. There will be expectations for participation and attendance at performances outside of the school day, including, but not limited to: chamber music, solo/ensemble festivals, a district tour and evening concerts. Violinists, violists, cellists, and bassists may enroll for this course. Harpists and pianists can also enroll, and these students will perform on these instruments and perhaps also learn a bowed string instrument. Winds, brass, and percussion will be selected from the Wind Ensemble for the full orchestra experience.


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GENERAL MUSIC MUS0515: HIP HOP EVOLUTION

Grade(s): 9, 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts or Semester Course Social Studies Students in Hip Hop Evolution will be offered a chronological assessment of hip hop’s progression as an art form from its roots to its growth as an international cultural phenomen. Students will explore the art, aesthetics, and musical styles that superseded and made the genre possible while examining various issues regarding race, class, violence, gender, politics, and society. This cross-departmental course between fine arts and social studies will allow students to deeply analyze all aspects of hip hop as an art form and make meaningful connections to contemporary social issues in America. Students will study iconic originators, albums, and innovations within the art form and within social justice movements of each era. Students will perform pivotal moments in the history of hip hop through mixing and sampling to create and find their own voice in the art form.

MUS0711/12: THE HIP HOP COOPERATIVE

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Hip Hop Evolution Credit: TBD Year Course Students in the Hip Hop Cooperative will build a creative incubation zone that is theirs to shape. They will develop knowledge of self while building relationships with other students and faculty that spark creative collaboration through the medium and culture of Hip Hop. Students will participate in an immersive non-traditional educational experience that centers on the power of youth culture and voice. Members of the cooperative will learn about the history, evolution, and current cultural dynamics of Hip Hop through the interdisciplinary study of Fine Arts, English, Health, and Social studies. Students will demonstrate their growth through the weaponization of their academic skills and the creation of music, art, and social action while being trained using state of the art industry equipment and technology. * See addendum or course book insert for updated registration info for the 2021-2022 school year.

MUS1515: PERFORMING ARTS FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Performing Arts for Diverse Learners will be engaged in music, acting, and dancing in this semester long course. This blended class of special education students and traditional learners will work together to develop skills, self-expression, and self-confidence through the exploration of the different forms of performing arts. Students interested in education, social services, or just the opportunity to work with a diverse group of students are highly encouraged to take this course.

MUS2015: MUSIC WORKSHOP I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Music Workshop I will develop music making skills and explore music literacy using the medium of pop and rock music. This is an entry-level music course for students with no music training and is not recommended for students with formal music experience. Hands-on instruction will be provided on guitar, drums and vocals. Students will develop skills on each instrument, create ensembles, and explore music performance.

MUS7015: MUSIC WORKSHOP II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: MUSIC WORKSHOP I or experience with guitar or piano Fine Arts Credit: 0.5 Semester Course Students in Music Workshop II will create their own vocal music and/or cover the music of others. In this class, students will analyze standard song form and harmonic progressions, write melodies and lyrics, and learn to accompany themselves and others on piano or guitar. Students in this course will also complete a portfolio of original works and projects in a variety of styles and formats (mp3, video, sheet music). Choral, guitar or piano experience is required.


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MUS6561: AP MUSIC THEORY-ADV EXP I

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: Background in Music Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in AP Music Theory I will focus on the creative process by investigating the elements of music history, theory and analysis. Students will learn about music structure, form, harmony and evolution and will also utilize technology as they craft their own compositions. Competent music reading skills are a prerequisite for this course. Students planning to take the AP Music Theory exam for college credit in May should register for both AP Music Theory I and II in the same school year.

MUS6562: AP MUSIC THEORY-ADV EXP II

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: AP MUSIC THEORY-ADV EXP I Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in AP Music Theory II will expand upon the topics covered in AP Music Theory I with an increased focus on the AP exam. Additional topics will include music critique, conducting, arranging and orchestration, advanced compositional techniques, and form analysis. Students planning to take the AP exam for college credit in May should register for both AP Music Theory I and II in the same school year.

MUS7515: DIGITAL MUSIC PRODUCTION I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Digital Music Production I will create tracks, sample other sound sources and record instruments and voices as part of the music production process. In addition, students will edit music files and produce a portfolio of completed audio projects in a variety of styles and formats. No musical background is necessary.

MUS7615: DIGITAL MUSIC PRODUCTION II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Digital Music Production I Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Digital Music Production II will learn to master tracks and create music using professional grade hardware and software as a continuation of DMP I. Students will collaborate to create their own portfolios using different music technology, recording, sampling, and creation techniques. Students will also explore opportunities and pathways in careers related to music production.

FINE ARTS: THEATRE Studying Theatre provides students the opportunity to critically explore life, challenge and consider multiple perspectives, develop interpersonal skills, and explore the basic human need to express and share stories through artistic collaboration. Thus, the theatre department is committed to the exploration of this art form, considering the historical, cultural, and social implications of theatre.

THR0515: THEATRE I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Theatre I will participate in different aspects of theatre, including improvisation, voice, movement, character development, scene work and stagecraft. In addition, students will explore the elements of design and engage in collaborative groups to create original work. Students with all levels of experience are encouraged to take Theatre I. There is no theatrical experience required. Opportunities to attend professional productions and guest workshops will be offered when possible.

THR1045: THEATRE II

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: THEATRE I or comparable performing Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts experience in or outside of MHS Semester Course Students in Theatre II will study theatrical storytelling in various forms and genres. Students will practice writing, directing, designing, stagecraft, etc., and, based on their interests, create and produce a short piece to be performed for family and friends at the end of the semester. Opportunities to attend professional productions and guest workshops will be offered at least once per semester.


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FINE ARTS: THEATRE/MATH

THR1025: ACTING STUDIO

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: THEATRE I Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts Semester Course Students in Acting Studio will study the tools of acting and performance for stage and film, through improvisation, voice, movement, monologue, scene and ensemble work. Students will be able to showcase their work in a one night only performance for family and friends at the end of the semester. Opportunities to attend professional productions and guest workshops will be offered at least once per semester.

MATH Through the use of the College Preparatory Math (CPM) curriculum, the MHS math department provides all students with the opportunity to increase both their understanding of mathematical concepts and their problem solving skills. The CPM curriculum is a student-centered, problem-based program focused on generating gains in students’ long term knowledge of mathematics. Most 4-year or 2-year degrees expect students to complete at least Algebra II, with many 4-year programs looking for four years of mathematics. Note: Graphing calculators are required for all students in Algebra I, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, AP Stats and AP Calculus. Students with financial need may be eligible for assistance; please see your teacher or house social worker.

MAT0511/0512: ALGEBRA I

Grade(s): 9 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in Algebra I will develop strategies to solve problems and represent concepts in multiple ways. They will learn to represent functions, collect and analyze data and make predictions, symbolically manipulate expressions, solve simple and complex equations, inequalities and contextual word problems, analyze the slope of a line and solve a system of two linear or nonlinear equations or inequalities. The problems and collaborative investigations in this course will build the conceptual understanding of algebraic topics and an awareness of the connections between these topics.

MAT1011/1012: GEOMETRY

Grade(s): 9,10,11 Prerequisite: ALGEBRA I Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in Geometry will investigate and draw conclusions about transformations and symmetry, relationships between figures, properties of plane figures, measurements of plane figures, measurements of three-dimensional shapes, tools for analyzing and measuring shapes, investigation and proof, geometric construction, algebra, and probability. The course will be structured around problems and collaborative investigations that build spatial visualization skills, conceptual understanding of geometry topics, and an awareness of connections between different ideas. Students will investigate, conjecture, and then prove to develop their reasoning skills.

MAT1341/1342: HIGAP A (HON INT GEO/ALG II/PRE-CALC A)

Grade(s): 9,10 Prerequisite: A in ALGEBRA I and ability to work at accelerated pace. Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in HIGAP A will explore many of the key concepts of Geometry and Algebra II and their interconnectedness in a highly collaborative environment. This fast-paced course requires students to process mathematical ideas quickly and immediately apply them to new and challenging problems. Some of the key concepts addressed in this course include: transformations, modeling, geometric construction, probability, functions and multiple algebraic representations, solving linear and quadratic equations, theorem and property analysis and rewriting rational expressions. Note: Students who complete HIGAP A will be eligible to take HIGAP B next year. If a student chooses not to move on to HIGAP B, Algebra II would be the next course needed to meet the graduation requirement.

MAT1511/1512: ALGEBRA II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: GEOMETRY Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in Algebra II will expand on what they have learned in previous mathematics courses by focusing on looking at multiple representations of functions and relations and the interconnections between these ideas. Students will continue to use problem solving strategies, questioning, investigating, and explaining to analyze problems, formulate solutions and extend their knowledge by making new connections.


MATH

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MAT1611/1612: MODELING WITH FUNCTIONS AND STATISTIC

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: ALGEBRA II Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in Modeling with Functions and Statistics will solidify their high level understanding of algebraic, geometric and statistical concepts. Students will build on their knowledge from Core Connections Algebra 2 through modeling of real world phenomenon for purposes of extrapolation and analysis. Topics in this course include but are not limited to mathematical modeling through quadratic and exponential patterns, direct variation, organizing and analyzing data, procedures for collecting data, probability, making inferences from collected data and applying conclusions to larger populations through statistical analysis.

MAT1841/1842: HIGAP B (HON INT GEO/ALG II/PRE-CALC B)

Grade(s): 9,10,11 Prerequisite: A minimum grade of B- in HIGAP A Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in HIGAP B will process mathematical ideas quickly and apply them to new and challenging problems in a highly collaborative environment. Some of the key concepts from Algebra II and Pre-Calculus covered in this course include polynomials, complex quadratic equations, trigonometric equations and identities, geometric series, randomness and bias in surveys, statistical analysis, probability, transformations, analysis of functions and equations, limits, rates of change, vectors, and modeling using a variety of functions. Note: Students who complete HIGAP B will meet their math requirements for graduation and would be eligible to take AP Calculus or AP Statistics.

MAT2061/2062: AP STATISTICS

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: B or higher in ALGEBRA II, PRE-CALCULUS or HIGAP B Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in AP Statistics will learn to critically collect and analyze data and draw conclusions from this analysis. The course is equivalent to a one-semester college course in introductory statistics. Topics in this course include but are not limited to organizing and analyzing data, procedures for collecting data, probability and making inferences from collected data and applying conclusions to larger populations through statistical analysis. Students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May.

MAT2511/2512: PRE-CALCULUS WITH TRIGONOMETRY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: ALGEBRA II Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in Pre-Calculus will work collaboratively with classmates to explore relationships and representations of advanced topics in trigonometry and function analysis. This course emphasizes several big ideas that form a foundation for calculus and other college mathematics curricula. Key ideas in pre-calculus include transformations of functions, periodic functions and their graphs, area under a curve, inverse, exponential, and logarithmic equations and their applications, limits, properties of functions, rates of change, applications with polar, parametric and trigonometric equations and modeling using a variety of functions. This is a challenging course that prepares students for success in calculus. Note: Students not earning a grade of “C� or better in prior math courses should consult with their current math teacher regarding the course(s) they should consider following Algebra II.

MAT3561/3562: AP CALCULUS AB

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: PRE-CALCULUS WITH TRIGONOMETRY or HIGAP B Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in AP Calculus AB will build on their prior mathematical learning through the study of limits and their applications. This course is comparable to a first semester college calculus course. Students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May. For the specific requirements needed to earn credit, students should consult with their counselor, as these requirements vary by university.

MAT4061/4062: AP CALCULUS BC

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: AP CALCULUS AB Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in AP Calculus BC will further build on their prior learning with topics in calculus. This is a oneyear course comparable to a 2nd semester college calculus course. Students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May. For the specific requirements needed to earn credit, students should consult with their counselor, as these requirements vary by university.


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MATH/ PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH

MAT5071/5072: TECH COLLEGE MATH (ECAP)

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: GEOMETRY Credit: 1.0 Mathematics Year Course Students in Tech College Math will review beginning algebra topics with an emphasis on problem solving. Some of the topics include operating with real numbers, applying order of operations, applying the laws of exponents, factoring quadratic expressions, simplifying and solving linear and quadratic equations, simplifying and solving rational and radical equations, solving systems of equations and graphing linear equations. This is a dual credit Madison College course; students who successfully complete the course (grade of C or better) will earn both MHS and Madison College math credits. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through ECAP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH The Physical Education and Health Department provides opportunities for students to improve their overall fitness and wellness. Class activities are focused on physical activity, functional fitness movements, lifetime health and fitness pursuits and wellness concepts with respect to the mind-body connection. Â Students will have the opportunity to earn certification in Lifeguard and Water Safety Instruction, as well as earn college credit through UW-Oshkosh for multiple courses.

PEH0715: FOUNDATIONS OF MOVEMENT

Grade(s): 9 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in FoM will focus on the theme of overall health and well-being. Students will rotate through a combination of movement activities and sports. Students will have the opportunity to enhance their individual level of fitness and explore team and individual activities.

PEH2615: WELLNESS Grade: 10

Prerequisite: FOUNDATIONS OF MOVEMENT

Credit: 0.5 Health Semester Course Students in Wellness will develop and practice several essential health skills that are aligned with the National Health Education Standards. These skills will be taught and practiced through the lens of various dimensions of wellness and health-related topics. This class offers students the opportunity to explore and practice wellness so they may be empowered to navigate their lifelong journey of self-care and balance.

PEH1515: LIFETIME RECREATIONAL SPORTS

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: FOUNDATIONS OF MOVEMENT Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in Lifetime Recreational Sports will experience a variety of individual and group activities for lifelong recreation, fitness and wellness. A typical class will consist of 15-20 minutes of dynamic warmups followed by sports and activities that can be continued throughout a student’s lifetime. Some experiences will give students the opportunity to travel off campus during the class period. Possible Lifetime Recreation activities may include badminton, bowling, disc golf, golf, ice skating, pickleball, racquetball, water fitness ultimate Frisbee, and volleyball. Note: A course fee is required for some community activities. Students with financial need may be eligible for assistance; please see your teacher or house social worker.

PEH2015: TEAM SPORTS

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: FOUNDATIONS OF MOVEMENT Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in Team Sports will experience a variety of sports and activities which can be a potential avenue to lifetime fitness and wellness. Students will have opportunities to be team captains, managers and officials. Sports units traditionally offered include: basketball, eclipse ball, flag football, lacrosse, soccer, softball, speedball, team handball, ultimate Frisbee, volleyball, and water polo. Progression of activities will move towards tournament play for unit completion.


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PEH2511: FUNCTIONAL FITNESS I

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: FOUNDATIONS OF MOVEMENT Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in Functional Fitness I will broaden their knowledge of strength and movement training principles and incorporate them in an individualized program. Functional balance, core strength and cardiovascular fitness will be incorporated. Testing and follow-up evaluations will be emphasized. Aquatic conditioning will also be included in the training phase of the course as well as other conditioning alternatives and fitness measurements.

PEH2512: FUNCTIONAL FITNESS II

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: FUNCTIONAL FITNESS I Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in Functional Fitness II will build on the skills and knowledge gained in Functional Fitness I. They will learn advanced strength and functional movement exercises, along with expanded conditioning, speed, agility, plyometric exercises and core strength. Students will create their own personal fitness workouts based on an endurance or power approach. Aquatic conditioning as well as other unique methods of exercise will be incorporated in this class.

PEH2515: FUNCTIONAL FITNESS III

Grade(s): 12 Prerequisite: FUNCTIONAL FITNESS II Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in Functional Fitness III will build on the skills and knowledge gained in Functional Fitness I and II. They will apply advanced strength and functional movement exercises, expand conditioning, speed, agility, plyometric exercises and core strength. Students will design personalized training and fitness goals. This course is designed for students who wish to pursue possible careers or certifications in the fitness and exercise science fields.

PE 2414: SWIM FOR LIFE

Grade(s): 10, 11,12 Prerequisite: FOUNDATIONS OF MOVEMENT Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in Swim for Life will have the chance to work on improving basic swim skills, endurance and training in a self-paced learning environment. A typical class will consist of a group warm up, a student’s personal training plan and a group cool down. Students can focus upon technique instruction and analysis or, students can explore aquatics as a fitness workout. Or, students can also dedicate time to mapping out a training program for an endurance swim or a triathlon competition. Students will also work on core strength, upper and lower body strength dry-land workouts to enhance overall strength and fitness. This semester course is designed to allow students to set personal swimming & aquatics goals to ensure that they can Swim for Life. The semester’s learning targets and feedback will be based upon a student’s individual learning plan and goals to make swimming more fun and efficient. Whether or not you want to learn how to swim or how to swim more efficiently, this course is for you. Make it for you and about you as you learn to Swim for a Lifetime!

PEH3085: LIFEGUARD TRAINING (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: FOUNDATIONS OF MOVEMENT Credit: 0.5 Physical Education and American Red Cross Prerequisite Skills Semester Course Students in Lifeguard Training will gain knowledge and skills based upon the American Red Cross Lifeguard Training standards. Students who complete all class requirements (skills and written work) and are at least 15 years old at course completion will be eligible for American Red Cross Lifeguard certification, as well as First Aid/CPR and AED use for the Professional Rescuer certifications. American Red Cross certification eligibility is based upon completion and proficiency in all skills, attending all classes and receiving 80% or higher on two written tests. Students must have basic swimming proficiency to be successful in this course. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification. There is a $43.00 Certification fee involved in this course.


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PEH3515: WATER SAFETY INST

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Foundations of Movement and Credit: 0.5 Physical Education American Red Cross Pre-Requisite Skills Semester Course Students in Water Safety Instruction will follow the Learn to Swim curriculum to become a certified swim instructor. Areas of study will include Parent & Child, Pre-School Aquatics, Basic Water Rescue and Adult Swim. MCPASD 3rd and 4th graders will participate as WSI students in swim lessons. WSI candidates will gain experience planning and teaching daily swim lessons. WSI coursework, hands-on teaching experience and meeting course expectations will qualify eligible candidates age 16 or over for certification. Note: There is a $37 Certification fee involved in this course.

PEH4015: OUTDOOR PURSUITS

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Foundations of Movement Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in Outdoor Pursuits will participate in a variety of outdoor recreation activities. Possible activities include: archery, backpacking, broomball, camping, cross country skiing, cycling, hiking, ice skating, kayaking, outdoor gear, orienteering, snowshoeing, and swimming. Students will develop skills necessary to continue the course activities on their own as they pursue lifetime fitness and wellness. Students should be prepared to participate outdoors during a variety of weather conditions including rain, snow and cold. Note: A course fee is required for some community activities. Students with financial need may be eligible for assistance; please see your teacher or house social worker.

PEH4515: ROPES COURSE (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Foundations of Movement Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in Ropes Course will experience adventure education in a positive risk taking setting. The concept of ‘challenge by choice’ will be a central theme; allowing students to be in full control of their challenge course experience. The ropes course will provide team building experiences to foster personal growth as students master low and high climbing elements. Students will learn skills to ensure safe and proper spotting, climbing and belaying techniques. Strength, creativity, communication, trust and group problem solving skills along with fitness will be emphasized. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

PEH6085: FITNESS FOR LIFE (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: FOUNDATIONS OF MOVEMENT Credit: 0.5 Physical Education Semester Course Students in Fitness for Life will participate in movement based activities that will increase physical fitness levels and develop health practices that contribute to lifelong fitness. Fitness for Life will enable students to obtain the knowledge and skills necessary to develop and maintain a health enhancing level of fitness and increase physical competence, self-esteem and the motivation to pursue lifelong physical activity. Fitness for Life topics may include: components of fitness, fitness related activities/assessments, heart rate information, mindfulness, nutrition, Pilates, self-defense concepts and skills, stability ball exercises, strength training, water exercise, and yoga. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

GENERAL ELECTIVE CREDIT PEH7515: EXERCISE SCIENCE

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: FOUNDATIONS OF HEALTH Credit: 0.5 Elective Semester Course Students in Exercise Science will study kinesiology and exercise science occupations as well as research the history, future trends and careers available in the field. Students will explore careers such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, coaching, exercise science and sports medicine. Students will participate in functional movement activities, fitness assessments and physical activities as they learn to create a personal wellness and career plan. Note: A course fee is required for some community activities. Students with financial need may be eligible for assistance; please see your teacher or house social worker.


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PEH7015: LIFE SKILLS IN HIGH SCHOOL

Grades: 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Elective Credit Semester Course Students in Life Skills will focus on gaining skills to achieve overall health and well-being. Students will learn various mental health based techniques to develop and bring awareness to their own emotional and physical health. Students will gain skills in self advocacy, emotional regulation, substance use, healthy relationships, mindfulness, and aspects of various behavioral therapies. This will be an intimate class devoted to community building and mutual respect.

SCIENCE The MHS Science Department is committed to providing students with opportunities to learn new content and develop significant, transferable skills through a rigorous curriculum. Our goal is that each student will become a scientifically literate citizen, who can apply his/her critical thinking and reasoning skills to current issues, from local to global, and participate in a culture of collaboration and innovation. The MHS Science staff strongly recommend that students complete the core science sequence of Biology, Chemistry and Physics prior to graduation.

LIFE SCI0511/0512: BIOLOGY

Grade(s): 9 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Science (Life) Year Course Students in Biology will investigate and explore the biological sciences through laboratory work and collaborative problem solving. Topics of study will include cellular biology, genetics, homeostasis, evolution and ecology. Students will gain the essential background necessary for a variety of careers in biology. Students will have the option of earning a notation of ‘Honors’ on their transcript for each semester of the class.

SCI0561/0562: AP BIOLOGY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY (or concurrent enrollment in CHEMISTRY) Credit: 1.0 Science (Life) Year Course Students in AP Biology will participate in laboratory activities, develop problem solving skills and gain additional background knowledge in biology. Activities will include microbiology lab exercises, human genetics problem analysis, plant and animal observation, and dissection. AP Biology is designed to be equivalent to an introductory, college-level biology course - students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May.

SCI2015: FIELD BIOLOGY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: BIOLOGY and CHEMISTRY Credit: 0.5 Science (Life) (or concurrent enrollment in CHEMISTRY) Semester Course Students in Field Biology will learn concepts about ecology through outdoor activities and an exploration of a variety of ecosystems. Students will work with field biologists from the DNR, University of Wisconsin and conservation organizations while exploring and taking part in field research. The majority of class periods will be spent in the field (outdoors) with biologists studying topics and issues related to wildlife, forestry, grasslands and stream ecology. Active participation in field experiences will be critical as course assessments will be tied directly to field experiences.

SCI3515: INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: BIOLOGY and CHEMISTRY (or concurrent enrollment in CHEMISTRY) Credit: 0.5 Science (Life) Semester Course Students in Introduction to Biotechnology will experience an introduction to the rapidly growing field of molecular biology and its applications in areas such as agriculture and medicine. Intro to Biotechnology will provide students with skills biotechnologists and college courses use in lab settings, such as micropipetting, gel+ electrophoresis, transformation, bacterial plating, sterile technique, etc. In addition, students will discuss the social, legal and ethical issues surrounding current topics in biotechnology (stem cells, genetic testing, and genetically modified foods).


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SCI4061/4062: AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: BIOLOGY and CHEMISTRY Credit: 1.0 Science (Life/Physical) (or concurrent enrollment in CHEMISTRY) Year Course Students in AP Environmental Science will have a lab-oriented, project-based experience that examines the environment, its function and how humans impact its well-being. Topics of study will include geology, ecology, soil, agriculture and food systems, water ecology and resources, pollution, atmospheric and oceanic science, air pollution and climate change, human and wildlife populations, urban planning and energy systems. Students will have the opportunity to participate in trips to local areas of interest and may be involved in service-learning at local natural areas. Students will have the option of taking the AP Environmental Science exam for college credit in May.

SCI6675: ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: BIOLOGY and CHEMISTRY (or concurrent Credit: 0.5 Science (Life) enrollment in CHEMISTRY) Semester Course Students in Environmental Studies will participate in project-based learning that focuses on environmental sustainability through the lenses of science, social justice and responsibility. Through self-selected topics and discussions, students will better understand how current issues like biodiversity loss, climate change, energy use, waste management, agriculture and food security affect the natural world. Students will examine scientific questions related to ecological processes, biodiversity, habitat-loss and landscape modification, human populations and resource use, and how these issues are intimately connected to politics, economics, and social justice. Students will examine changing environmental attitudes in history and media as well as make connections to their own experiences in order to understand the relevance of these pressing environmental and societal concerns.

PHYSICAL SCI1011/1012: CHEMISTRY

Grade(s): 10 Prerequisite: BIOLOGY Credit: 1.0 Science (Physical) Year Course Students in Chemistry will gain an understanding of basic chemistry concepts and how they relate to current topics such as nuclear power production, ocean acidification and climate change. Content will include the relationship between matter and energy, the structures of atoms and molecules, as well as the mathematical and science practice skills needed to have a thorough understanding of chemistry. Students will have the option of earning a notation of ‘Honors’ on their transcript for each semester of the class.

SCI1061/1062: AP CHEMISTRY

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY Credit: 1.0 Science (Physical) Year Course Students in AP Chemistry will develop problem solving, laboratory and collaborative skills. Instruction will be provided via lecture, laboratory activities, discussions and small group work. AP Chemistry is designed to be equivalent to an introductory, college-level Chemistry course - students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May.

SCI1511/1512: PHYSICS

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: GEOMETRY and BIOLOGY Credit: 1.0 Science (Physical) Year Course Students in Physics will study the relationship between matter and energy. The content will provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts of physics with a balance between conceptual, graphical and mathematical material. The major topics will include the study of motion, forces, energy, space, heat, electricity, sound and light. Learning activities will include problem solving, laboratory experiments and hands-on activities.

SCI1551/1552: MATH PHYSICS

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: Completion or current enrollment in ALGEBRA II Credit: 1.0 Science (Physical) Year Course Students in Math Physics will study the physical universe focusing on the relationship between matter and energy. Math Physics will provide students with a thorough understanding of the basic concepts of physics while placing an emphasis on math application and problem solving. The major topics include mechanics (motion, forces, momentum, and energy), waves, sound, light, electricity, and thermodynamics.


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SCI1545: ADVANCED PHYSICS

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: MATH PHYSICS or PHYSICS Credit: 0.5 Science (Physical) Semester Course Students in Advanced Physics will participate in rigorous levels of critical thinking and problem solving. The topics covered will involve college level material related to engineering and physics. Units of study will include: introduction to engineering mechanics, electric circuits, special theory of relativity, the general theory of relativity, introduction to quantum mechanics and introduction to string theory.

SCI1661/1662: AP PHYSICS II

Grade(s): 12 Prerequisite: MATH PHYSICS or PHYSICS Credit: 1.0 Science (Physical) Year Course Students in AP Physics will study fluid statics and dynamics, thermodynamics with kinetic theory, PV diagrams and probability, electrostatics, electrical circuits with capacitors, magnetic fields, electromagnetism, physical and geometric optics, and quantum, atomic and nuclear physics. The focus will be on the ability to develop and apply physics knowledge to the practice of scientific inquiry and reasoning. Laboratory investigations will foster student engagement in the practice of science through experimenting, analyzing, making conjectures and arguments and solving problems in a collaborative setting. AP Physics II is designed to be equivalent to an introductory, college-level course - students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May.

SCI3015: PHYSICS OF ASTRONOMY

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of 2.0 science credits (completion Credit: 0.5 Science (Physical) or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS or MATH PHYSICS is encouraged) Semester Course Students in Physics of Astronomy will survey the basic topics and concepts of astronomy. Topics of study will include a historical perspective of astronomy, motions of the sky and constellations, stars and stellar evolution, galaxies and cosmology, the solar system and space exploration. The class will include stargazing activities at local parks.

SCI1575: FOOD SCIENCE (ES)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Career & Tech Ed Semester Course or Science (Life) Students in Food Science will engage in hands-on, experiential learning through both classroom and lab experiences. Emphasis will be placed on the relationships among food science, food preparation, and consumers’ concerns about nutritional quality as it relates to the food industry. Units of study will include food safety, food processing, preservation, sensory science, and product research/development. Learn science concepts and cooking knowledge through this exciting, hands on, engaging course.

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY (PLTW) SCI4591/4592: PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (PLTW)

Grade(s): 9,10 ,11 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Science (Life) Year Course Students in Principles of Biomed Sci will investigate the biomedical sciences through hands-on projects and problem solving opportunities. Students will prepare for a career in medicine or health care and be challenged to solve real-world problems. They will practice how to think creatively and critically to innovate in science and gain practical experience tackling challenges that biomedical professionals face in the field. Students will work through real-world situations, cases, and problems, such as solving a medical mystery case, diagnosing and treating a patient, and responding to a medical outbreak. PBS curriculum is delivered through an on-line platform and focused on independent and small group work. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for this class. Please see your instructor for additional information.


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SCI5091/5092: HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS (PLTW)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE or Credit: 1.0 Science (Life) BIOLOGY (B or better) Year Course Students in Human Body Systems will examine the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students will design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. As they explore science in action, students will build organs and tissues on a skeletal mannequin, work through engaging real world case studies, perform multiple dissections and play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries. HBS curriculum is delivered through an on-line platform. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for PLTW classes. Please see instructor for additional information.

SCI5591/5592: MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS (PLTW)

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: previous or concurrent enrollment in Intro to Biotechnology or AP Biology Credit: 1.0 Science (Life) Students in Medical Interventions will investigate a variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the lives of a fictitious family. MI will serve as a “how-to” manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body as students explore how to prevent and fight infection, screen and evaluate the code in human DNA, prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students will be exposed to the wide range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. Lifestyle choices and preventive measures will be emphasized throughout the course as well as the important roles scientific thinking and engineering design play in the development of interventions of the future. MI curriculum is delivered through an on-line platform. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for PLTW classes. Please see instructor for additional information.

SCI6091/6092: BIOMEDICAL INNOVATONS (PLTW) Grade(s): 12

Prerequisite: Completion of a previous PLTW Biomedical Science Course (HBS or MI) or successful completion (B or better) of Introduction to Biotechnology or AP Biology

Credit: 1.0 Science (Life) Year Course Career Cluster: Health Science Students will apply their knowledge and skills to solve problems and answer questions related to biomedical sciences. Students will design innovative solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century as they work through progressively challenging, open-ended problems, addressing topics such as clinical medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering, and public health. They will work on an independent project and may work with a mentor or advisor from a university, hospital, physician’s office, or industry. Throughout this capstone course, students will be expected to present their work to an adult audience that may include representatives from the local business and healthcare community.

INTEGRATED ART AND SCIENCE SCI8015/ ART8015: INTEGRATED ART AND SCIENCE

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Science (Physical) Semester Course society. Students in Integrated Art and Science will explore ways in which artists and scientists make use of imagination, creativity and innovation to gain insight into the world. Students will investigate connections between art forms, materials, principles of science and the roles art and science play in society. Students will create artwork with a variety of media such as soap,ceramics, textiles, and dyes. Note: The class will meet daily for one semester; students will earn one half credit in Fine Arts and one half credit in Science. Students registering for this class MUST also register for SCI8015: Integrated Art and Science.

OFFSITE OPPORTUNITIES Please see page 8-9 for information on Youth Apprenticehip, Offsite Classes and Career Internship Opportunities.


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SOCIAL STUDIES The Middleton High School Social Studies Department hopes to instill in all of our students a commitment to civic participation in a diverse and ever-changing world. Students will learn relevant content in addition to improving their reading, writing and verbal skills. There are some intervention, ESL, and self-contained Special Education courses, but they are not listed here, as they require an IEP or school team decision for placement. or more information, please contact your child’s case manager or Coordinators Nicole Morehouse and Rebecca Poehls.

SST0611/0612: LAND, PEOPLE, AND POWER: AN ETHNIC STUDIES APPROACH to U.S. HISTORY

Grade(s): 9 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Social Studies Year Course Students in this U.S. History course will utilize their personal identity to explore the reality that ethnicity and ethnocentrism, race and racism, sex and sexism, and gender and sexual orientation have been and continue to be profoundly powerful social and cultural forces in U.S. society. The course equips students with a critical lens to see the world and their place in it by understanding systems and power at the root of U.S. society and has a goal to motivate students to actively engage in our democracy. Through this course, students are supported to discover and use their own power for the benefit of not only themselves, but also that of their community and society at large.

SST1015: CONTEMPORARY US HISTORY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in Contemporary United States History will explore U.S. history from the Cold War to the present by studying major themes/events during this time period. In addition to demonstrating conceptual knowledge of recent United States history, students will improve their skills in reading historical materials, verbal and written communication, critical thinking and historical document analysis. Students will have the option of earning a notation of ‘Honors’ on their transcript for each semester of the class.

SST1515: US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in U.S. Government and Politics will be engaged in a semester-long simulation of the legislative process. Students will develop a political identity and learn how laws are developed by investigating, writing and voting on bills. This course builds foundational knowledge regarding American government and politics through discussion of current public issues. By the end of the semester, students will have developed skills in written and verbal communication, critical thinking and will better understand their role as citizens in a democracy. Students will have the option of earning a notation of ‘Honors’ on their transcript for each semester of the class.

SST3061/3062: AP US HISTORY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 1.0 Social Studies Year Course Students in AP United States History from the pre-colonial era to the present will explore the cultural, economic, political, social and foreign policy influences that have shaped the United States. Student will develop critical thinking skills in their writing, reading, discussion and document analysis. Students with a passion for investigating and discussing the United States presidents, congressional legislation and Supreme Court rulings will find this course both challenging and engaging. This course is equivalent to an introductory, college level course. Students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May.

SST3561/3562: AP PSYCHOLOGY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 1.0 Social Studies Year Course Students in AP Psychology will investigate the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. In addition to independent textbook reading and notes, students will engage in class demonstrations, activities and small group discussions. This course includes topics such as personality, mental illness, emotions, consciousness, and the brain. This course is equivalent to an introductory, college level course. Students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May.


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SST4585: ECONOMICS (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies or Semester Course Financial Literacy Students in Economics will investigate how scarcity impacts a world of limited resources and how humans are faced with making decisions surrounding unlimited needs and wants. Students will discuss how the choices made by individuals and communities have local, national, and global economic effects. By the end of this course, students will know how to think like an economist and understand the importance of financial literacy. They will also learn about the fundamental concepts of economics, increase their skills using graphs to understand and communicate economic ideas and apply their knowledge to current economic problems. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

SST6015: LAW & JUSTICE

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in Law and Justice will explore the legal aspects of difficult issues facing our democracy. To better understand how legal issues impact society, students will investigate contemporary legal issues through case studies, mock trials, role-plays, and legal analysis. Students will also examine how modern society has been shaped by legal decisions in the past and continues to be altered by new legal decisions.

SST6615: SEMINAR: AMER SOC ISSUES TODAY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in Seminar: Amer Soc Issues Today will engage in a research and discussion based class focusing on important and often controversial issues in our society. Socratic seminars, structured academic conversations, research and small group discussions will be utilized to help students gain a better understanding of current social issues facing our diverse society as well as the challenges uniquely faced by marginalized groups. Topics of study may include current events related to homelessness and immigration in addition to institutional challenges related to health care, the justice system and education.

SST7085: INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY 101 (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in Intro to Sociology will gain an understanding of the basic concepts and foundations of sociology. Students will explore the definition of the discipline, major thinkers and theoretical paradigms, the concept of sociological imagination and the primary methods used in the field. The social institutions of family, religion, education, and government will also be an integral part of discussions in this course. Students will also explore major areas of sociological inquiry, including social interaction, socialization, crime and deviance, health, environment, organizations and social change and will discuss how social life is structured by factors such as race, class, gender and sexuality and globalization. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

SST2061/2062: AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 1.0 Social Studies Year Course Students in AP Comparative Government will investigate the fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in China, Great Britain, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia and Iran. Students will engage in significant amounts of reading and writing as well as class discussion. AP Comparative Government is equivalent to a college-level course - students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May.

SST2661/2662: AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 1.0 Social Studies Year Course Students in AP Human Geography will focus on the distribution, processes and effects of humans on the planet. In-depth concepts to be covered include population, political organization, agriculture and rural land use, industrialization, economic development and urbanization. Students in this course should expect to complete a rigorous mix of reading, writing and exams. This course is equivalent to an introductory, college level course. Students will have the opportunity to earn college credit by taking the AP exam in May.


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SST4011: AREA STUDIES: EAST ASIA

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in Area Studies courses will focus on the history and development of major societies of the non-Western world. Additionally, the area studies courses will focus on modern day events including politics, culture and foreign affairs. Student interest in specific countries or regions will determine topics of study. The specific East Asian countries studied are China, Japan, North Korea, and South Korea, with an emphasis on China.

SST4012: AREA STUDIES: LATIN AMERICA

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in Area Studies courses will focus on the history and development of major societies of the non-Western world. Additionally, the area studies courses will focus on modern day events including politics, culture and foreign affairs. Student interest in specific countries or regions will determine topics of study. The specific Latin American regions studied are South and Central America, and the Caribbean.

SST5015: ISSUES IN GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in Issues in Global Development will explore the major issues of globalization, poverty, women’s rights, access to clean water and healthcare. Students will examine how these issues impact nations all across the world and how the global community is responding to these issues. Students will engage in classroom discussions, debates and projects related to these topics.

SST5515: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in International Relations will study the complexities of timely international issues and examine United States foreign policy. Students will investigate current events, global problems and their historical context and will be both excited and challenged through their regular participation in discussions, debates and simulations related to topics being studied.

SST7515: HISTORY OF WORLD RELIGIONS

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Modern World History Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Semester Course Students in History of World Religions will explore the history, beliefs, and practices of the world’s living religious traditions. Class content will include the history and essential teachings of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Secularism, along with other religions and religious practices. Student will explore religion through a religious literacy framework and will Investigate these topics through the use of readings, lectures, videos, discussions and potential speakers from the community. This course will not promote any particular faith or religion, but rather will provide students with a better understanding of the role that religion has played, and continues to play, in the world today.

MUS0515: HIP HOP EVOLUTION

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Fine Arts or Semester Course Social Studies Students in Hip Hop Evolution will be offered a chronological assessment of hip hop’s progresion as an art form from its roots to its growth as an international cultural phenomen. Students will explore the art, aesthetics, and musical styles that superseded and made the genre possible while examining various issues regarding race, class, violence, gender, politics, and society. This cross-departmental course between fine arts and social studies will allow students to deeply analyze all aspects of hip hop as an art form and make meaningful connections to contemporary social issues in America. Students will study iconic originators, albums, and innovations within the art form and within social justice movements of each era. Students will perform pivotal moments in the history of hip hop through mixing and sampling to create and find their own voice in the art form.


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SOCIAL STUDIES

MUS0711/12: THE HIP HOP COOPERATIVE Grade(s): 10,11,12 Credit: TBD

Prerequisite: Hip Hop Evolution Year Course

Students in the Hip Hop Cooperative will build a creative incubation zone that is theirs to shape. They will develop knowledge of self while building relationships with other students and faculty that spark creative collaboration through the medium and culture of Hip Hop. Students will participate in an immersive non-traditional educational experience that centers on the power of youth culture and voice. Members of the cooperative will learn about the history, evolution, and current cultural dynamics of Hip Hop through the interdisciplinary study of Fine Arts, English, Health, and Social studies. Students will demonstrate their growth through the weaponization of their academic skills and the creation of music, art, and social action while being trained using state of the art industry equipment and technology. * See addendum or course book insert for updated registration info for the 2021-2022 school year.

WORLD LANGUAGES The Middleton High School World Languages Department is committed to educating our students to be global citizens who demonstrate intercultural competence, problem-solving abilities, and communication skills to meet the challenges of an increasingly interconnected world. World Language courses are open to all students. While learning another language, students will improve their skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening while gaining new insights into their own language and culture. For those students who are college-bound, our level V and VI courses offer students the opportunity to earn college credits.

FRENCH WLA0511/0512: FRENCH I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 French Year Course Students in French I will learn about France and other French-speaking countries, the people and their language. They will learn to carry on conversations about family and friends, school, and leisure time. Students will develop reading, listening and intercultural skills through the use of authentic multimedia from various French speaking cultures. Frequent pair, small group and whole class interactions with peers are essential components to this course.

WLA1011/1012: FRENCH II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or FRENCH I Credit: 1.0 French Year Course Students in French II will continue to work on sustaining simple conversations and grow in their understanding of the French language and culture. Students will develop reading, listening, and intercultural skills through the use of authentic multimedia from various French speaking cultures. Students will engage in more self-expression through writing and conversation. Most of the class instruction will be in French. Frequent pair, small group and whole class interactions with peers are essential components to this course. A continued study of French grammar and vocabulary will be accompanied by a variety of cultural topics including fashion, home, community, food and travel.

WLA1511/1512: FRENCH III

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or FRENCH II Credit: 1.0 French Year Course Students in French III will further develop their knowledge of the French language and culture. The formal presentation of French grammar will continue with an emphasis on using both written and spoken French for communication and self-expression. Listening skills will be developed through class activities, while accuracy will be stressed in both usage and pronunciation. Students will continue to expand their study of francophone cultures and develop an appreciation for the similarities and differences between those cultures and their own.


WORLD LANGUAGES

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WLA2011/2012: FRENCH IV

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or FRENCH III Credit: 1.0 French Year Course Students in French IV will increase their fluency in French and deepen their understanding of the cultures of French-speaking countries. In addition to reviewing and fine-tuning vocabulary and structure of French, students will be introduced to a variety of topics relevant to the contemporary French-speaking world. Authentic French literary works and French film will be studied and communication skills emphasized. Students will primarily speak French and by the end of the course will be able to converse comfortably.

WLA2581/2582: FRENCH V (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or FRENCH IV Credit: 1.0 French Year Course Students in French V will improve their conversational, presentational and written communication skills through reading, class discussion, journal writing and presentations. Literature and film will serve as vehicles for a more in-depth look at the French speaking world. Review of grammar and vocabulary acquisition will be interspersed in thematic units. Class will be entirely in French, and as a result students will leave the class prepared to use their language skills in college, career and travel throughout their lifetime. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

WLA2881/2882: FRENCH VI (CAPP)

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or FRENCH V Credit: 1.0 French Year Course Students in French VI will continue to deepen their understanding of complex grammar structures, explore contemporary and classic literature and develop their conversational skills. The course curriculum is aligned to the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture themes to prepare students to take the AP French Language and Culture exam in the spring. Students will improve their individual listening, reading, writing and speaking skills throughout this course. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

GERMAN WLA3011/3012: GERMAN I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 German Year Course Students in German I will use sounds, rhythms, intonations and vocabulary to communicate in German. Topics of home, family, school, city and work will be covered throughout this course. Class activities include vocabulary and grammar exercises, dialogues, German music, internet activities and exploration of German culture.

WLA3511/3512: GERMAN II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or GERMAN I Credit: 1.0 German Year Course Students in German II will continue to speak German in the classroom while adding more vocabulary and grammatical structures to their repertoire. The class will perform dialogues and skits, read short stories and create cultural projects to broaden their language skills. The geography and folklore of Germany will also be studied.

WLA4011/4012: GERMAN III

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or GERMAN II Credit: 1.0 German Year Course Students in German III will build on their abilities to read, write, speak and comprehend German. Students will increase their fluency and comprehension using their textbook, supplementary reading materials and journal activities. Authentic German literature will also be used to foster creativity and expression and expand cultural knowledge. The class will be conducted primarily in German to build the students’ confidence in speaking and understanding German more fluently.


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WORLD LANGUAGES

WLA4511/4512: GERMAN IV

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or GERMAN III Credit: 1.0 German Year Course Students in German IV will improve their proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening while studying advanced grammatical concepts. Students will do extensive reading to improve vocabulary and language proficiency. Short stories will provide a basis for students to gain further insight into German culture. Additionally, students will do frequent journaling to foster creativity and expression in the target language. Students will also improve their conversational skills through class discussions and oral presentations.

WLA5081/5082: GERMAN V (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or GERMAN IV Credit: 1.0 German Year Course Students in German V will continue to develop reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension skills through the discussion and study of contemporary and historical issues, current events, culture, history and literature from German-speaking countries. The course will review essential grammar as it applies to the material studied. Students will communicate primarily in German, both verbally and in written work. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

WLA5281/5282: GERMAN VI (CAPP)

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or GERMAN V Credit: 1.0 German Year Course Students in German VI will continue to develop reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension skills through the discussion and study of German civilization. Essential grammar will be reviewed as it applies to the material studied. Students will communicate primarily in German, both verbally and in written work. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

SPANISH WLA5511/5512: SPANISH I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: No previous Spanish study, or Credit: 1.0 Spanish recommendation of middle school instructor Year Course Students in Spanish I will begin to use spoken and written communication to express themselves in basic, everyday situations found at home, school, work and leisure time. Students will develop reading, listening and intercultural skills through the use of authentic multimedia from various Spanish speaking cultures. Frequent pair, small group and whole class interactions with peers are essential components to this course.

WLA6011/6012: SPANISH II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or SPANISH I Credit: 1.0 Spanish Year Course Students in Spanish II will continue to work on sustaining simple conversations about daily life and exploring their community. Common topics include going to a restaurant, taking a trip, my daily routine, clothes and shopping. Most of the class instruction will be in Spanish. Choice reading and free writing complement vocabulary study and learning about language structures. Students begin communicating in the past time. Cultural identity and comparison are an important part of each class. Students will develop reading, listening and intercultural skills through the use of authentic multimedia from various Spanish speaking cultures. Frequent pair, small group and whole class interactions with peers are essential components to this course.

WLA6511/6512: SPANISH III

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or SPANISH II Credit: 1.0 Spanish Year Course Students in Spanish III will extend their speaking and listening ability through the use of authentic multimedia from various Spanish speaking countries. The teacher and students will primarily communicate in Spanish. Common topics include childhood, health and wellness, home and community, and the environment. Choice reading and frequent journaling will foster creativity and expression in Spanish, as well as build vocabulary, strengthen grammatical concepts and improve reading comprehension. Frequent pair, small group, and whole class interactions with peers are essential components to this course.


WORLD LANGUAGES

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WLA7011/7012: SPANISH IV

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or SPANISH III Credit: 1.0 Spanish Year Course Students in Spanish IV will be taught in Spanish, and continue to build on the skills and knowledge taught in Spanish III. The focus in on improving and extending fluency. Students will engage in extensive reading and frequent journaling to improve their vocabulary and language proficiency and foster creativity and expression in Spanish. Authentic short stories, current events and multimedia from various Spanish countries provide a basis for students to gain further insight and understanding of Spanish and Latin American cultures. Discussion, debate, and oral presentations further improve the students’ conversational skills.

WLA7581/7582: SPANISH V (CAPP)

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or SPANISH IV Credit: 1.0 Spanish Year Course Students in Spanish V will use the grammatical and cultural background knowledge they have acquired in previous courses. The literature and film of Spain and Latin America will serve as vehicles for an indepth look into the Spanish speaking world of the past and present. Each student will improve their own individual conversational and written communication skills through extensive class discussion, readings, oral presentations and journal writing. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

WLA7881/7882: SPANISH VI (CAPP)

Grade(s): 11,12 Prerequisite: A proficiency assessment or SPANISH V Credit: 1.0 Spanish Year Course Students in Spanish VI will examine literature, film, news and other products of Spanish-speaking cultures while continuing to improve their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. This course provides an intense and high-level grammar review, deepening the students’ understanding of previously learned concepts while exposing them to the subtleties within those concepts. Note: Qualified students may receive college credit for the class through CAPP. All dual credit options are dependent upon teacher certification.

WLA7911/7912: SPANISH LANGUAGE ARTS

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Native Spanish Speaker Credit: 1.0 Spanish Year Course Students in Spanish Language Arts will focus on reading and writing in Spanish, with project-based activities and individualized grammar work. The unit themes will include identity and culture, stereotypes and prejudice and family. Spanish Language Arts is designed for students who are already bilingual (Spanish/English) and would like to work on becoming biliterate. Spanish Language Arts can be taken for two years.

MANDARIN WLA8511/8512: MANDARIN CHINESE I

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 Mandarin Year Course Students in Mandarin Chinese I will learn Mandarin in a variety of situations with ever-increasing linguistic accuracy. Students will read, write, speak and listen to become familiar with the many aspects of the language. Students will also begin to acquire knowledge and culturally appropriate interaction skills essential for basic communication and will develop uses for Mandarin within the community. Through active participation in class activities, students will develop insights into their own language and culture in addition to the Mandarin language and culture.

WLA9011/9012: MANDARIN CHINESE II

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: MANDARIN CHINESE I Credit: 1.0 Mandarin Year Course Students in Mandarin Chinese II will further develop their skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening with an emphasis on communication skills in real world situations. Students will explore and discuss culturally relevant information with the theme of “being empowered.” Active participation in class activities is a critical component to learning the language and will be expected on a daily basis.


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WORLD LANGUAGES

WLA9311/9312: MANDARIN CHINESE III

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: MANDARIN CHINESE II Credit: 1.0 Mandarin Year Course Students in Mandarin Chinese III will continue to explore real world situations in Mandarin through reading, writing, speaking and listening. Using the theme “the thinker,� students will learn about Chinese philosophies and how they connect with themselves and the world. Students will discuss culturally relevant information through texts that include moral and philosophical thought and will engage in activities surrounding these ideas.

WLA9411/9412: MANDARIN CHINESE IV

Grade(s): 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: MANDARIN CHINESE III Credit: 1.0 Mandarin Year Course Students in Mandarin Chinese IV will work to understand authentic passages on familiar issues and communicate using accurate pronunciation and intonation with more diversified sentence structures. Students will be able to read and summarize texts from Chinese modern literature or the latest authentic language materials from China, written in the form of Mandarin characters. Students will also be able to write more complex texts on related issues. In addition, movies, music, various folk art forms and ancient Chinese classics will be studied to help students further develop intercultural competence.

WLA9611/9612: MANDARIN CHINESE V

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MANDARIN CHINESE IV Credit: 1.0 Mandarin Year Course Students in Mandarin Chinese V will continue working on authentic language materials related to culture, history and current events. Students will further develop their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, as well as review essential grammar and vocabulary. Students will apply these skills to class discussions, presentations, cultural appreciations and journal writings. All reading and writing materials will be in the form of Mandarin characters. The teacher and students will speak primarily Mandarin throughout this course.

WLA9711/9712: MANDARIN CHINESE VI

Grade(s): 10,11,12 Prerequisite: MANDARIN CHINESE V Credit: 1.0 Mandarin Year Course Students in Mandarin Chinese VI will continue working on authentic language materials related to culture, history and current events. Students will further develop their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, as well as review essential grammar and vocabulary. Students will apply these skills to class discussions, presentations, cultural appreciations and journal writings. All reading and writing materials will be in the form of Mandarin characters. The teacher and students will speak primarily Mandarin throughout this course and create artworks that investigate concepts of identity, community, utility and individual expression from a multicultural perspective. Topics such as papermaking, fibers, carving, and art metals will be explored through the use of traditional and non-traditional art materials.


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ONLINE COURSES Students interested in taking online courses should consider carefully and should discuss this with their parents/ guardians and school counselor prior to registering for any online classes. Online courses can offer students a great deal of flexibility, open up options for unique courses not offered at MHS, and give students an opportunity to learn skills for success in an online learning environment. At the same time, students taking online classes have found them to be equally or more challenging than traditional courses and have learned that success in an online environment requres strong skills in self-advocacy, time management, and motivation. Please view course descriptions on the MHS registration website. BUSINESS/CTE WEN6043: Advertising and Sales Promotion WEN6023: Agriscience I WEN6024: Agriscience II WEN6003/6004: AP Computer Science WEN6023: Child Development WEN6054: Concepts of Engineering and Technology WEN6029: Cosmetology WEN6036: Culinary Arts 1a WEN6037: Culinary Arts 1b WEN6009/6010: Digital Information Technology WEN6025: Early Childhood Education WEN6033: Entrepreneurship: Starting Your Business WEN6027: Family and Consumer Science WEN6019: Family Living WEN6028: Fashion and Interior Design WEN6007/6008: Foundations of Programming WEN6011: Game Design 1a WEN6011: Game Design 1b WEN6030: Health Careers WEN6035: Hospitality and Tourism WEN6041: International Business WEN6037: Social Media: Our Connected World WEN6053: Manufacturing: Product Design and Innovation WEN6031: Medical Terminology WEN5035: Nutrition WEN6045: Real World Parenting WEN6015: Personal FinanceN WEN 6051: Sport & Entertainment Marketing HEALTH and PHY ED WEN5029: Health and Personal Wellness WEN8003: Personal Fitness WEN8009: Running WORLD LANGUAGE WEN2071/2072: French I WEN2073/2074: French II WEN2075/2076: French III WEN2077/2078: French IV WEN2097/2098: AP French WEN2041/2042: German I WEN2043/2044: German II WEN2031/2032: Chinese I WEN2033/2034: Chinese II WEN2035/2036: Chinese III WEN2001/2002: Spanish I WEN2011/2012: Spanish II WEN2021/2022: Spanish III WEN2023/2024: Spanish IV WEN2025/2026: AP Spanish FINE ARTS WEN6006: Animation WEN7011/7012: AP Art History WEN7013: Art in World Cultures WEN7031: Digital Photography I WEN7032: Digital Photography II WEN7014: Drawing WEN7021: Music Appreciation WEN7025: Theater, Cinema and Film Production SOCIAL STUDIES WEN4009: African American History WEN4021: Anthropology I WEN4022: Anthropology II WEN4037/4038: AP Human Geography WEN4035: AP Macroeconomics

WEN4033: AP Microeconomics WEN4053/4054: AP Psychology WEN4024: AP US Govt and Politics WEN4003/4004 AP US History WEN4023: Archaeology WEN4027: Criminology WEN4031: Economics WEN4044: History of the Holocaust WEN4043: Human Geography WEN4045: Law & Order: Intro to the legal studies WEN4029: National Security WEN4049: Personal Psychology I WEN4050: Personal Psychology II WEN4057: Philosophy WEN4061: Social Problems I WEN4062: Social Problems II WEN4063: Sociology I WEN4064: Sociology II WEN4075: Women’s Studies: A Personal Journey through Film WEN4011/4012: World History WEN4065: World Religions WEN4070: US Government WEN4072: US History ENGLISH WEN1051/1052: AP English Language and Comp WEN1053/1054: AP English Literature and Comp WEN1153: Creative Writing WEN1001/1002: English I WEN1021/1022: English II WEN1031/1032: English III WEN1041/1042: English IV WEN1081: Gothic Literature WEN1083/1084: Journalism WEN1075: Lord of the Rings: The Films and Their Literary Influences WEN4047: Mythology and Folklore SCIENCE WEN5000: Astronomy WEN5007/5008: AP Biology WEN5047/5048: AP Environmental Science WEN5063/5064: Anatomy & Physiology WEN5001/5002: Biology WEN5019: Biotechnology: Unlocking Nature’s Secret WEN5011/5012: Chemistry WEN5021/5022: Earth/Space Science WEN5023: Forensic Science I WEN5024: Forensic Science II WEN5055: Forestry and Natural Resources WEN5025: Great Minds in Science WEN5031/5032: Marine Science WEN5041/5042: Physics WEN5051: Veterinary Science MATH WEN3001/3002: Algebra I WEN3011/3012: Geometry WEN3021/3022: Algebra II WEN3031/3032: Pre-Calculus WEN3051/3052: Calculus WEN3061/3062: AP Calculus AB WEN3071/3072: AP Calculus BC


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Profile for mcpasd

21-22 MHS Course Offerings