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STATEMENT

The practice of architecture is not simply defined by the act of design for a client(s) but rather the education, oath, and regulations preceding the production of service(s) expected from a designer or architect. The education aspect refers to the formal knowledge base needed for making decisions for the health, safety, and welfare of the public. Without informative knowledge the basis of a profession is constantly in flux and thus relies on individual intuition over the collective knowledge base from generations past. The profession and the practice of architecture is reliant on the capabilities of an individual, or individuals, to maintain and follow the laws, regulations, ethics, standards of education, and qualifications needed for licensure and registrations, all of which are reliant on the institution to provide and instill in young architects. Above and beyond these basics that begin to define architecture, the necessity for development and progressive thought is also extremely important. The idea of manifestation as an author or designer has become difficult through the reliance of digital communication and the pressure of global anticipation. A slowdown is in demand while at the same time the demand for production is at an all time high. The continued drive for constant turnover has led to a lack of evidence for successful architecture. Furthermore, to create and design relies on the adaptability of the human condition, but at the same time the human condition is constantly in flux. In that sense, architecture is not just troubled, it is sick and the condition of this patient is critical requiring immediate attention. How do we design for this flux? Can we influence the flux to adapt to personal beliefs or an architectural community of beliefs? The answer is yes. For as many years as architecture has been considered a profession the ideas of the puppeteers have been placed into writing. A society based upon knowledge gained in communication is a society available to the ideas of gain through the interactive world dialog and collaboration across boundaries. Knowledge is an information model structured in the brain but it also lives among singular entities of manmade creations. Familiar information makes no impression because it is already in the model. It is the new and surprising that counts. Technology is good for creating the new; it is good for sparking cognition and development. It is not evil or manipulative to the loss of primal skills. It is a producer of new stimulus for further information and knowledge. To be able to talk with your fingers is the same as speaking in person or over telecommunication pathways of the past. The tools by which we communicate don’t hinder our abilities but offer a palette for which we can slingshot our abilities into the future. At the end of the journey from step-by-step collaboration to integrative technological collaboration everything will be changed and be aware: there is no undo button.

Nicholas A. McMunn

1302 W. 21st Street, #B Houston, TX 77008 303.656.7216 mcmunn.nicholas@gmail.com


OVERVIEW

Architectural design staff with 9+ years of direct practical experience dreaming up solutions to clients design problems. Poseses strong conceptual thinking and problem solving skills and utiilizes numerous mediums to generate working solutions which have helped to generate a diverse portfolio of work bridging numerous project types ranging from mixed-use, multifamily, commercial, hospitality, product development, residential landscape and higher education. Nicholas takes pride in being part of a team that strives for excellence and delivers on their promises. He finds inspiration in working with other creative professionals and aspires to continue to push the boundaries of design within his office and profession.

Project Experience: Commercial/Mixed Use Block 162 - Commercial office Tower, Denver, CO Cabela’s Corporate Campus, Sidney, NE* TMC3 Innovation Campus, Houston, TX Books-A-Million @ Houston Pavilions, Houston, TX* Griffith Observatory, Los Angeles, CA* 110 Wacker - Commercial Office Tower, Chicago, IL Education Westmont College Master Plan, Santa Barbara, CA* Barnes and Noble College Bookstores, Various Locations* Presbyterian School of Houston, Houston, TX Lone Tree College Student Union Building, Cypress, TX University of Houston Vistoria Student Union Building, Vistoria, TX

*Projects completed prior to joining Gensler

Hospitality The Post Oak Hotel, Houston, TX The TMC Hotel, Houston, TX Katy Hotel, Katy, TX The Art Hotel, Denver, CO* Besos Clothing Store, Boulder, CO* Radda Trattoria, Boulder, CO* Residential Belmar Block 13 and 14 (Trifecta Apartments), Lakewood, CO* UCLA Northwest Campus Housing Infill, University of California Los Angeles, CA*


Part 1:

Personal Work


Select Professional Works

CONTENTS

Part 2:


Part 1 Personal Work


Crossroads Copyright 2009


Light

Copyright 2015

Various Locations

Personal Work

Photography

Part 1:


Portfolio Project Copyright 2010

Disoriented in the Shadows As users of the city we seldom appreciate the services in the shadows. The dimly lit arteries to our built environment come as after thoughts to the importance of aesthetics facing our more routinely traveled paths in the city. What hasn’t been declared is the beauty located in the after thoughts, the beauty in the disoriented cluster of feed lines and waste receptacles lining our public disinterests. Too often the alleys of the inner city become landmarks for fear and avoidance. Showcased in these images are developed perspectives highlighting beauty as a rough aspect of a disoriented part of the city. From the subtle gradient in the rectilinear red tides of brick to the bleeding personality of a weathered window beauty resides within the forgotten cracks of existence; beauty is in the small things, it is in the tucked away entries and polluted fenestrations of our historical disobedience within the built environment. The potential is great and the treasures are many so the opportunity for discovery continues to grow through adaptation and ad hoc alley life.


Travels

Copyright 2015

Montral

Copyright 2016


West Elevation

South Elevation

East Elevation

North Elevation


Part 1:

Wate Diversion Metrics

Reasearch Structure BioSIP Panel Exploded Axonometric

BioSIPs

Independent Study / Research Mentor: Julee Hurdt 2009/2010

Boulder, CO

Personal Work

BioSIPs Under the expert tutelage of Julee Herdt, Senior Professor University of Colorado Boulder and the owner/founder of BioSIPs, and Kellen Schauermann, friend and senior research assistant and co-principal investigator for the CU BioSIP Project, my involvement in the construction of an experimental BioSIP building at the corner of 63rd and Arapahoe in Boulder, CO was fabricating, designing of a prototype research shed, and the assistance in researching manufacturing processes for BioSIPs. BioSIPS, which utilizes the recycling of solid waste into high-performance, environmental, structural insulated panels, offers promise for large-scale, 3D fiberboard and structural insulated panels for petroleum-alternative construction. The prototype shed will measure18x10x12, utilizes solar tracking, and is a test site for BioSIP prototype panels.


‘Vision’ - Ink Copyright 2017

‘Beauty’ - Marker Wash Sketch Copyright 2009

‘Icons’ - Digital Outline Copyright 2010

Graphics

Copyright 2017


Personal Work

Graphics and Art

Part 1:

Independent Works

Globalism I Copyright 2016

Globalism II Copyright 2016

Globalism Sculpture Copyright 2016

Graphics and Art To be able to talk with your fingers is the same as speaking in person or over telecommunication pathways of the past. The tools by which we communicate don’t hinder our abilities but offer a palette for which we can slingshot our abilities into the future. Slingshots take many forms and Art has been a way for me to communicate my entire life. Collected on this page are some recent works that allow my mind to create without the confinements of architecture and tell stories that I observe on a daily basis.


CULTURAL CONNECTIONS

Globalization is a massive effort to unify all aspects of the world for expansive collaboration on furthering the human race to proceed at ever accelerating paces. If there is no proposition for helping the underdeveloped world play catch up then the connection between all is lost and the separation and rendering of borders becomes even more intense than at the present time. It is during this point that disparity displays its gritty teeth and as a result reinforces the disconnection of culture, personality and identity. PANAMA CITY, PANAMA is a literal and figurative BRIDGE FOR CONNECTING different cultures, economies and levels of life because the region has a well known inequity status among its population, and it has continued to grow in size and economy because of a globalized market. The region harnesses the possibility for CONNECTIONS BETWEEN EXTREME DISPARITY as seen in its urban planning differences, social statuses, land use, etc.


Part 1:

Panama City, Panama

Personal Work

ACSA Competition

The intervention on the site is to be a living monument which will accommodate galleries, libraries, parks, community gardens and plazas that are intersected by the fluid and transient spaces of the city. It is to become a connection hub for cultures and different levels of life from Old Panama City, Panama City Slums, New Panama City and Rural Panama alike. Its attempt to mend different parts of Panama City together by utilizing typically unusable space above a part of the city that has acted as a separator as much as it has a connector will create the band aid for the expanding wound of disparity plaguing the current day city. The inner city neighborhood of Casco Viejo envelopes a small region that includes historical, slum, civil, industrial, commercial and residential land uses all of which span the developmental process of decades of urban growth. Dissecting the site is a recent integration of city infrastructure in the byway connecting Balboa Av. and Av. de Los Martires which acts as both a bridge and slice in the landscape. The experiential arching created by the cultural museum and learning lab mimics the characteristics of the bridge by connecting above and below the transient force on the site for a well rounded flow between elevated connections and submerged passageways.

Graduate Advanced Studio Instructor: Michael Jenson Spring 2010

Brief The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) announced its tenth annual steel design student competition for the 2009-2010 academic year for which the design studio I was involved in at the time participated. The program, a RE-LIGARE INSTITUTE reconnecting mind and body, intended to challenge the designer to explore a variety of design issues related to the use of steel in design and construction. The program challenged the student to design a public urban center dedicated to reconnecting people with their authentic selves, others, and nature.


A West Side Entry

Lobby and Frontage Road Vantage Point A

Transverse Section A

Cantilevered Cultural Connection from Administrative Tower

Connection Point


Cultural Experience Museum Program Office Program Restroom Program Furniture Library Program Plenum Program Ground Floor

2nd and 3rd Floor

4th Floor

Educational Program Gallery Program/ Open Hall Program


Part 2 Select Professional Works


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1

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2

3

3

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5

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Gensler

Select Professional Works

Professional Work

Part 2:

110 Wacker Ground Level Plaza

Massing Concept

110 Wacker Viewing Terrace Study

Brief - 110 Wacker This confidential tower was poised to be a great addition to the famous Chicago skyline which would be comprised of a 1,700,000 SF commercial office building to replace an existing structure at 110 Wacker Dr along the South Branch of the Chicago River. The proposal would connect pedestrians to an extended riverwalk and would introduce an elevated amenities terrace to allow for unparalleled views towards Wolf Point and west over the city. As you ascend in the tower the flanking river leaves way for grand vistas over the city and a dominant presence in the Chicago skyline.


Spirit - Soul, Mood, Atmosphere, Essence, Culture, Energy, Interaction, Experience the approach and landscape

The Mind - Synergy, Understanding, Contemplation, Plan, Project, Observe, Learn, Create, Knowledge the conference center

The Body - Fullness, Core, Form, Wellness, Health, Warmth, Comfort the guest tower

Amenities Deck

Guest Drop-Off

Guest Drop-Off

Porte Cochere


Select Professional Works

Gensler

Gensler

Professional Work

Part 2:

TMC Hotel Concept Design TMC Hotel is a conceptual due diligence exercise for a hotel & conference center in the Texas Medical Center. The scope of the Project includes a 400 room 4-star luxury hotel that will serve as an extension of the TMC3 Biomedical Innovation Campus and the medical centers need for additional conference space.  The concept was derived from the surrounding context and pulled inspiration from the health of the Spirit, Mind, and Body. This project is scheduled to break ground Mid-2018.


Gensler

Gensler

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Professional Work

Part 2:

Site Plan

Entry Court

Interior Courtyard of the Helix

TMC3 Biomedical Innovation Campus TMC3 is a 30-acre district focused around life science and health care commercialization which would include research facilities for the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center; Texas A&M University; Baylor College of Medicine; and the University of Texas. Each institution would play a pivital part in the 1.5 million SF collabritive research facility that would represent the TMC’s official expansion across the bayou, linking the existing campus to research institutions further south. The plans also include a hotel (TMC Hotel), conference center, restaurant and retail spaces. Lab Building from the Piazza

Lab Building from the Exterior

Lab Building from the South

Lab Building from the North


View from 12th and Broadway

Porte Cochere

View from 13th and Broadway

Amenity Terrace

Rendering

Aerial Rendering


‘Fire’ Restaurant

Museum and Check-in Lobby

Davis Partnership Architects

The ART Hotel The Cultural Center in the heart of Denver anchors a rich heritage of fine art, culture and civic identity. This project is the final phase of the overall master plan for the Denver Art Museum complex. The earlier phases have included the Hamilton Building, two condominium buildings known as the Museum Residences, ground floor retail and museum spaces, a 1,000-stall public/private parking structure, and an important outdoor civic space known as Martin Plaza. This nine-story mixed-use building consists of a 165-room boutique hotel along with 50,000 sf of office space, and a retail / office / showroom space. The hotel is known as “the ART, a hotel.” The design leverages the hotel’s proximity to the Denver Art Museum by fashioning hotel public spaces as galleries where both permanent and revolving exhibits will be displayed.

‘Fire’ Restaurant Bar

Guestroom Suite

Davis Partnership Architects

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Professional Work

Part 2:

Guestroom Suite

Guestroom Suite Bathroom


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LEVEL 25 - VIP CLUB & HOTEL GUEST ROOMS

Salon

Chairman Suite

Presidential Suite

Guestroom Bathroom

PRESIDENTIAL LEVEL 22 - HOTEL FLOOR PLAN

CONCIERGE LEVEL 21 - HOTEL FLOOR PLAN

THE POST OAK HOTEL - GRAND BALLROOM

Bentley Bar

Grand Ballroom

LEVEL 20 - HOTEL FLOOR PLAN, SUITES

LEVELS 10 - 19 HOTEL FLOOR PLAN, TYPICAL South Prefunction

Junior Ballroom

Library and Prefunction RESERVED VIP PARKING

OFFICE ELEV. LOBBY

HOTEL ELEV. LOBBY

RESERVED VIP PARKING

RESERVED VIP PARKING

LIBRARY

LEVEL 3 - JR. BALLROOM, MEETING ROOMS, SPA/FITNESS, ADMIN. FUEL PUMP ROOM

OFFICE ELEV. LOBBY

GARAGE LEVEL G01

South Prefunction Entry

Meeting Room

Spa Stair at Pool

Prefunction / Bentley Showroom LEVEL 1 - RECEPTION, DINING, POOL, BALLROOM, RETAIL


Gensler

Select Professional Works

Professional Work

Part 2:

Gensler

Master Plan Aerial

East Prefunction and Bentley Showroom Entry

Hotel Approach

Hotel Approach

Guest Pool and Cabanas

The Post Oak Hotel and Conference Center The Post Oak is a mixed-use development on 9 acres that includes a 35-story hotel, a parking garage, and a two-story conference center for a site adjacent to the Landry’s Restaurant and Entertainment Company headquarters on the Loop 610 feeder road in the Galleria area. The project includes a 16,000 sf Ballroom, a total of 66,000 sf of conference and meeting space, Spa, Restaurants (both in the hotel and as two separate pad site projects on the site), Martini Lounge, Coffee Shop, 5,000 sf of Retail, 10 levels of Office totalling 140,000 sf, 272 Hotel Rooms, 18 Extended Stay Corporate Suites, and a Penthouse.


Car Dealership

East Elevation at Hotel Entry

Hotel Aerial

Tower Corner

Hotel Pool


Prefunction Hallway/ Car Dealership

Prefunction space and Car Dealership

Grand Ballroom Prefunction Space

Grand Ballroom Panorama

Prefuction Spiral Stair

Prefunction Hallway

Guestroom Bathroom


15th and California St.

Lobby - 15th and California St.

City Aerial


Gensler

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Professional Work

Part 2:

11th Floor Social Terrace

11th Floor Social Terrace

Gensler 11th Floor Amenity Space

15th and California

11th Floor Amenity Space

11th Floor Gym

11th Floor ‘Active’ Terrace

Block 162 BLOCK 162, located in the heart of Denver’s central business and entertainment district, is a vibrant mixed-use development, with a 600,000-square-foot, LEED Silver Class A office tower as its anchor. Rising 30 stories, the tower boasts panoramic views of the Front Range. With a light rail stop at 16th Street and California and the 16th Street Mall shuttle bus, public transportation is unparalleled.  Direct access to Interstate 25 from Auraria Parkway, Speer Boulevard and W. Colfax Avenue, makes for easy commuting. Block 162 is a model of modern, sustainable development.


Westmont College Winter Hall Pfeiffer Partners Inc.

Westmont College Winter Hall - Central Atrium Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2010

Westmont College Winter Hall Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Fall 2009

Westmont College Winter Hall Pfeiffer Partners Inc.


Part 2:

Select Professional Works

Pfeiffer Partners

In the short time that I was priviledged to work for Pfeiffer Partners I received several growing responsibilities and several levels of involvement on all aspects of the projects. As a first time employee in a practicing architecture office of this scale I eventually fell into a groove that I felt comfortable with and produced higher education facilities with a particular attention to detail and push for design even on a limited budget. The team that I was involved with believed in my capabilities which became apparent when I was assigned to be a project manager and construction administrator for a six building master plan located on the Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. All of the work and efforts would not have come true if it weren’t for the collaboration and dedication of the others on the design team which included Steven Hall, Phil Templeton, Karina Contreras, Brian Nichols, Gili Meerovitch, HungWei Chen, Kim Valino, Blair Wilson, Yawen Yang and Lee Karasik.

Westmont College Winter Hall - Night Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Construction Completed Summer 2010

Pfeiffer Partners Architects

Westmont College Winter Hall - Lecture Hall Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2010

Westmont College Winter Hall - Night Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Construction Completed Summer 2010

Professional Work

Pfeiffer Partners


Westmont College Observatory Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Fall 2009

Westmont College Adams Center Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2010

Westmont College Adams Center Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2010

Westmont College Adams Center - Art Gallery Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2010

Westmont College Adams Center - Art Studio Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2010

Westmont College Observatory Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Fall 2009

Westmont College Observatory Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Fall 2009


UCLA Student Housing Infill - Sproul Carnesale Complex Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2012

UCLA Student Housing Infill - Carnesale Commons Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2012

Bonus Brief - UCLA Student Housing Infill A recently completed housing infill project adds four new residence halls to the Northwest Campus at University of California, Los Angeles. Conceived in partnership with Los Angeles-based Pfeiffer Partners Architects, the design brings additional density and population to an already dense area of campus with the conviction that a concentrated living-learning environment is a positive force in fostering collaboration and interaction among students. The project began in 2001 with a master plan for the Northwest Campus that would support the university’s transformation from a commuter campus into a residential one. The plan focused on the strategic location of new buildings relative to existing structures—using courtyards, plazas, and ground floors to create new public realms and integrating the new and the old through a series of indoor-outdoor spaces. In order to respond to the needs of the highly developed campus, a building type was conceived that could bend and inflect as necessary to fit the contours of the landscape, minimizing grading while optimizing solar orientation. Borrowing massing and organization characteristics from adjacent residence halls, the new student residences mediae between existing and new geometries, creating a unified precinct. The project includes a 650-seat dining commons, a 425-seat multipurpose room, meeting rooms, a fitness center, and a grand staircase and plaza to receive students. It incorporates changes to both vehicular and pedestrian circulation, with pedestrian paths and stairs that thread their way through building portals, which serve as both entrances and common spaces that link the residence halls to one another. The completion of this work has created a new student-centered precinct and fulfilled the university’s mission to provide economical housing for undergraduate students. It is also the largest LEED Gold project at UCLA, achieved through close collaboration between the design team and university leadership. High-performance glazing, reflective roofing, increased insulation R value at the building’s exterior, and sun shading devices at the windows are some features that contributed to this rating. Site strategies included building orientation, stormwater filtration and retention, drought-resistant landscaping, and locally manufactured paving. UCLA Student Housing Infill Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2012

UCLA Student Housing Infill Pfeiffer Partners Inc. Completed Summer 2012

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