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MacEngineer

The

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

VOLUME 31

NUMBER 1

MCMASTER UNIVERSITY

WINTER 2006

The evolution of engineering education See page 3


A message from the Dean Building on success and planning for the future

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s we enter 2006, the Faculty of Engineering through a consultative process has identified its new strategic advancement priorities for the next five years. It is certainly cause for celebration that we successfully completed our set of goals established earlier for which we created three new schools in the Faculty in the areas of Engineering Practice, BioMedical Engineering, and Computational Engineering and Science. With these new schools we are able to proceed with our new set of strategic priorities to build our resources so as to enable our outstanding faculty and student body to excel at teaching and learning, research and technological development.

inside this issue Engineering News...................4 Upcoming Events .................10 Alumni Profiles.................8 & 9 Hey Alumni! Have you got something to say, or any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi: Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca website: www.eng.mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer is published by the Engineering Faculty for its alumni. Distribution assistance is provided by the Alumni Office. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40063416 RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO CIRCULATION DEPTARTMENT, 1280 MAIN STREET WEST HAMILTON, ON L8S 4L7 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

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In order of priority, without question, the most critical need in Engineering is endowed faculty positions. Universities with endowed chairs are able to attract and retain the very top faculty to their institutions. High caliber professors, in turn, attract top students to a university. In addition to attracting the best and brightest, endowed chairs will enable the Faculty to build leadership in its key areas of strength and promise. These areas include Nanotechnology, Biomedical Engineering, Sustainable Energy, and Engineering Education. Our second priority is to ensure that our undergraduate engineering students learn in the best environment, in state-of-the-art laboratories with leading-edge equipment and resources. It is our intention to enhance the existing MACLAB Endowment Fund created in 1997 by our McMaster Engineering Students and supported by alumni, faculty and friends for the enhancement of undergraduate labs. The Fund now exceeds $1 M and will continue to grow as we expand its capital. The endowed fund is invested to earn income each year, and as the principal grows, so does the income available to award to laboratory refurbishment. Our third priority is to build our Graduate Scholarships so we can increase our enrolment from 600 students to 900 in the next few years. While it is true that high caliber professors attract top graduate students, competitive financial aid can also determine the quality of the graduate student body. Outstanding graduate students enable the Faculty to maintain considerable strength in both research and educational activities. Fourthly, our goal to expand the “Internationalization of the Faculty” remains strategic. In my last Dean’s Message, I mentioned how we are looking at ways to expand our programs internationally. We have embarked on a series of initiatives that will draw new international students to both our undergraduate and graduate program c

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Mo Elbestawi, Dean of Engineering

from countries such as Brazil, Mexico, India, South Korea and China. This builds on the links we currently have with numerous European and US universities. Plans are currently underway to launch a cooperative summer study abroad program in Russia in cooperation with Michigan State University. The Faculty has become increasingly involved around the world in exchange agreements, institutional collaborations and international student exchange programs. These partnerships with overseas faculty promote cutting-edge research in the fields of engineering, technology and the sciences, and help to strengthen our work at home. Our final priority is to continue to find resources to support Undergraduate Scholarships as we attract the best students with entrance awards to our Year One program, and offer in-course scholarships to retain the brightest in our engineering program. As competition increases, our level of support to attract and retain the best students is crucial. These priorities will see the Faculty move into 2006 and beyond. They will support our strategic objective of growth while improving quality and our position as one of Canada’s top engineering schools.

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A message from the Associate Dean The evolution of engineering education

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ost people are not aware of the rate at which the engineering education is evolving. For the two decades leading up to the 1990s, students at most universities had a choice of traditional engineering disciplines that included Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. Depending on the university, students might also have had the choice of other disciplines. For example, at McMaster they could have chosen Materials Engineering, Ceramic Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering or Engineering Physics, and they could combine any of these disciplines with the Management option. The 1989-90 Undergraduate Calendar lists a total of 18 programs. By contrast, the 2005-06 Undergraduate Calendar includes a choice of 33 programs. All of the traditional disciplines are still there, and these can now also be combined with the Society option. Ceramic and Metallurgical Engineering are gone, replaced by programs such as Software Engineering, Software Engineering & Game Design, and Electrical & Biomedical Engineering, or by streams (specializations) such as Nanomaterials, Water/Environmental and Photonics. In addition, all programs can be taken with or without co-op. This trend is expected to continue, with universities across North America introducing programs in response to technological development, societal need and student demand. In 2006, we will be introducing two new undergraduate programs: one in Mechatronics and the other in Engineering & Health Sciences. Mechatronics Engineering will be a fouryear program, offered through the Department of Computing and Software, leading to a B.Eng. degree. The curriculum will encompass aspects of mechanical, electronic and software systems, as well as their interaction. Students will have the option of continuing for one additional year and obtaining an M.Eng. degree in the field. The Bachelor of Engineering & Health Sciences will be a five-year program M

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series of inquiry-based courses. These courses encourage students to take responsibility for their learning and provide them with significant latitude to focus on health issues of interest to them. As seen in previous issues of The MacEngineer, the evolution of engineering education is also taking place at the postgraduate level. The School of Biomedical Engineering, the School of Computational Engineering and the School of Engineering Practice (with its M.Eng. programs in Engineering Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Engineering & Public Policy, and Engineering Design) all emphasize multidisciplinary studies and represent a sharp departure from traditional graduate education. The effect on the engineering profession will likely be profound. Many graduating engineers will have much more varied and multi-disciplinary backgrounds. We feel that this will be key to helping Canada compete on the world stage.

Dr. Peter Smith Associate Dean of Engineering

offered through the School of Biomedical Engineering and will lead to a B.Eng.H.Sc. degree. In contrast with our existing discipline-specific biomedical programs, the engineering portion of the curriculum will be broad-based. In addition, students in this new program will join those in the Bachelor of Health Sciences program in a

Peter Smith Associate Dean (Academic)

Video gaming – to a degree McMaster University has launched Canada’s first undergraduate degree program in video game design. The fouryear Software Engineering and Game Design program involves animation, real-time simulation, multimedia and everything to do with designing and implementing interactive games and data visualization. Graduates will earn a B. Eng. in software engineering, and are expected to find employment in the computer gaming, animation, data visualization and high-fidelity simulation industries, as well as other software development jobs.

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Courses are provided by both the Faculty of Engineering and the Faculty of Humanities through its Multimedia program. Engineering courses include computer architecture and graphics processors, 4D modeling for virtual reality, real-time systems and control, real-time animation, and computer game interface design. Multimedia program courses include the digital image, audio and visual digital media, animation and interactive digital culture. More information about the program can be found at http://gamer.mcmaster.ca or by e-mailing gamer@mcmaster.ca

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Engineering news McMaster engineers tackle International Development issues

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n January 2006, the McMaster Chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) is sending 31 delegates to Ottawa for a national conference on International Development. Delegates will consider the progress being made toward meeting the United Nation’s Millennium Development goal of reducing poverty by half by 2015. It seems clear that this goal may not be reached given the current level of action, and conference delegates will be asked to explore what should be done on the local and global levels, and consider the role of EWB in achieving this goal. We expect our delegates will return with inspiration, motivation and a wealth of knowledge which they can apply to their own work, and to the benefit of the rest of the Chapter and the Hamilton community. Every summer, McMaster’s EWB has sponsored two engineering students to travel to Africa to work on a development problem with a local group/organization. We are excited to announce that in 2006, the Chapter is sending Robert Borzychowski (Mech Eng & Society IV) to work on a market development project with rural farmers in Zambia, and Marka Jansen (Chemical and Bioengineering III) to work on a water and sanitation project in Ghana. This year we also plan to develop a joint project with another EWB Chapter to sponsor a long-term volunteer in a work partnership program in Zambia. The part-

nership involves having our Chapter take an active role in supporting an overseas project during its implementation and helping the project achieve its goals. These placement experiences and initiatives provide the Chapter with a strong knowledge base on the issues and challenges to International Development. We actively disseminate this knowledge in many ways. We host campus-based education workshops on a wide range of topics, staff information booths in JHE and MUSC, participate in the UN Festival day, and continue our strong High School Outreach program. This initiative introduces high school students to the issues of International Development through interactive presentations and class activities including “Water for the World” and “Food for Thought.” More recently, EWB influenced McMaster’s Engineering curriculum! Engineering students can now do a first year design project worth 25% of their final grade. The project must consider an issue relevant to International Development. One example is the project that involved shea nut processing equipment typically used in the semi-arid Sahel region of West Africa. Students had to determine how existing equipment that normally processes oil from the seeds could be used to process a quality bio-diesel fuel for use in diesel engines.

Peek-a-boo. Obre, an orphan whose parents were killed by aids, entertains McMaster EWB volunteer Tyler Woychyshyn during his placement in rural Zambia.

As a charitable organization, Engineers Without Borders relies on funding from the school, community, businesses and organizations. To learn more about the McMaster Chapter of Engineers Without Borders, and to inquire about sponsorship, e-mail us at mac@ewb.ca or visit our website at http:// mcmaster.ewb.ca

$upport for Engineers Without Borders At its fall semi-annual general meeting, The McMaster Engineering Society voted to provide additional support to the McMaster University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB). The student club will receive $2,000 for its national conference and $6,000 to support EWB’s work across campus and

in the community. Some of the funds will also be used to support the long-term work partnership commitment the McMaster EWB Chapter is making with a Zambian community, starting this year. “The vote is the result of an increasingly globally aware community catalyzed by the global and local educa-

tion initiatives of organizations including Engineers Without Borders,” says Sura Abdul-Razzak, a member of McMaster’s EWB. “Now, more than ever before, a sense of urgency and responsibility to the development of Third World nations is manifesting itself in the world of engineering.”

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Cleanfield Energy is working with McMaster University and the Ontario Centres of Excellence on the commercial development of a new wind turbine for residential and commercial use. From left to right: Samir Ziada, Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering; Michael Stern, Cristian Stan, Alexander Trica and Tony Verrelli of Cleanfield Energy; Stephen Tullis, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering; Paula Claudino, Mechanical Engineering and Management student.

Research is blowing in the wind

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cMaster has teamed up with Cleanfield Energy Corp to help bring wind energy to individual homes and businesses. Cleanfield Energy has developed a modular Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) capable of producing reliable clean energy for residential and commercial markets. The VAWT is designed for both tower and rooftop installation. With assistance from researchers in the Faculty of Engineering, the company is testing and evaluating the turbine prior to commercial development.

Cleanfield Energy Corp.(www.clean fieldenergy.com) is the developer, manufacturer, marketer and distributor of proprietary renewable energy products. The company believes that with the rising costs of electricity and the increasing demands for power generation, the timing is right for commercial and residential wind turbines. Funding for this research project comes, in part, from the Ontario Centres of Excellence – Centre for Earth and Environmental Technologies (formerly CRESTech) and from private investors.

The 2.5kW modular Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) features three, narrow, three-metre vertical blades that rotate around a central axis. The Department of Mechanical Engineering is studying the performance of the turbine in urban wind conditions. The research is being conducted at the McMaster Manufacturing Research Institute facility in Ancaster. Field trials will be conducted at the newly established McMaster Innovation Park in Hamilton. Testing of the new VAWT is a crucial step in the product development process.

New lab will enhance MRI technologies McMaster University is establishing a new medical imaging laboratory. The state-of-the-art research lab will be part of the new School of Biomedical Engineering and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Mark Haacke, an adjunct professor with both the School of Biomedical Engineering and the Brain-Body Institute at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in Hamilton, will direct research in cardiovascular, neurological and oncological imaging at the new facility. One area of research focus will be developing MRI techniques for research

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into the human brain and conditions such as stroke, trauma, tumor identification and Alzheimer’s disease. MRI is an indispensable tool in medical research and practice; the Brain-Body Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Hamilton uses MRI technology to study interactions between the brain and nervous system, and bodily disease processes. Haacke is the founder and director of The Magnetic Resonance Imaging Institute for Biomedical Research and a professor of Radiology at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. He earned both his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees

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in physics at the University of Toronto. In 2004, he was awarded the gold medal of the ISMRM for his innovative contributions to magnetic resonance imaging in Kyoto, Japan. The medical imaging laboratory is the third of seven laboratories to be announced by the McMaster School of Biomedical Engineering. Previously, MDA Robotics announced the establishment of a Robotics Research Laboratory, and Bell University Laboratories announced the establishment of an Integrated Systems Laboratory.

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Technology education needs explored

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ver 150 business, government, community and education leaders met in November under the leadership of the Faculty of Engineering at McMaster and the Faculty of Engineering Technology at Mohawk to explore increasing the collaborative opportunities between the two institutions for providing technology education. The Community Think Tank focused on the potential of providing joint degree programs in technology and management. Participants provided insight and advice on matters related to curriculum and desired graduate knowledge. They concluded that more education programs that combine both the practical and theory are needed to allow technology employees to upgrade, and to attract more students to postsecondary education in this field. The discussion resulted in the draft of two possible collaborative programs. One is a four-year fully integrated program leading to both a Diploma in Technology and a Bachelor of Technology and Management. Entrance would be directly from high school. A second is a two-year

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he first Science in the City lecture for Fall 2005 focused on the topic of bioengineering and took place at the new McMaster Innovation Park on Longwood Road. On September 27th, bioengineer Kim Jones discussed the past successes and the future direction of this exciting and groundbreaking field. In Canada, up to 30 percent of people in need of a solid organ transplant die while waiting for an organ donation. Jones and researchers like her hope to alleviate the demand for organ donations as a result of

Chemical Engineering grad John Harling (’73) has contacted The MacEngineer with a request for assistance in helping with the recovery efforts at a wildlife refuge. The Exotic Cat Refuge and Wildlife Orphanage in Kirbyville, Texas, was devastated by Hurricane Rita which slammed into the southern United States in September. The Refuge accepts and heals/rehabilitates animals seized by the State Parks officials. To learn more about the Refuge and the damage it sustained, visit www.exoticrefuge.org. To donate, contact www.alamorx.com. John Harling can be reached at freebiej@earthlink.net.

The MacEngineer

degree program for graduates of the Mohawk College three-year Diploma in Technology. Key McMaster and Mohawk participants included Donald Green, chair of the McMaster Board of Governors, MaryLynn West-Moynes, president of Mohawk College, and Mo Elbestawi, dean of the

Faculty of Engineering at McMaster. They were joined by Bob Magee, president and CEO of Woodbridge Group and chair of the Human Resources Development Working Group established by the federal government. Magee was also the keynote speaker at the luncheon which concluded the event.

Lecture highlights directions in the bioengineering field

Can you help?

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Front row from left to right: Catherine Drea, Don Green, Cheryl Jensen and Barb McKenna. Back row: Mo Elbestawi, Hans Bastel, Ken Norrie and Art Heidebrecht.

their work in the field of tissue engineering. Tissue engineering devices are manufactured artificially and include both living biological materials, such as cells, and nonliving materials. The devices range from skin and cartilage to artificial corneas and, possibly one day in the near future, to fully functioning artificial organs. Jones’ research focuses on studying the interactions between the body and the materials used in tissue engineering devices. Information from an article by Graham Jansz – SPARK writer

Get your MacEngineer by e-mail! If you would like to receive your issue by e-mail (pdf format) please contact Carm Vespi, vespi@mcmaster.ca

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A first for Canada

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n November 9th, the University officially established the School of Computational Engineering and Science – the first of its kind in Canada. The School brings together 50 faculty from engineering, science, business and health science who will work collaboratively, conducting research and teaching classes in simulation, modeling and optimization. This is an important initiative for McMaster and for Canada. Study in this area is helping to advance understanding of a wide range of issues and opportunities from pandemics and weather patterns to improving automobile safety and the design of computer chips. Computational engineering and science is an important method of scientific investigation. It utilizes mathematics, particularly the development of algorithms, and the increasing processing power of today’s computer networks to simulate, model and optimize solutions to various problems, and to design new products and services. The School will use the processing power of SHARCNET, the most powerful supercomputer in Canada, which is comprised of a “cluster of clusters” of high-performance computers linked by advanced fibre optics. Tamás Terlaky, a professor in the Department of Computing and Software and Canada Research Chair in Optimization, has been appointed Director of the School; Bradd Hart, Chair of the

Tamás Terlaky, newly appointed Director of the School of Computational Engineering and Science. M

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From left to right, back row: Tamás Terlaky, Carl Fuerst, John Kutzy, William R. Pulleyblank, Bradd Hart, Peter George, John Capone, Mo Elbestawi, and Imre Pólik. Seated in front: Margaret Wright and Barbara Keyfitz.

Department of Mathematics and Statistics, has been appointed as the School’s Associate Director. Graduate programs will be offered at the Master’s, Ph.D. and post-doctoral levels, and focus on three major research areas: Computational Physical Sciences; Computational Optimization, Design and Control; and Computational Biosciences. It is anticipated that graduates of the School will be employed by engineering design, information technology, financial, biotechnological industries, governments, and academic institutions.

As part of the official launch of the School, the University community and the general public were invited to hear two keynote speakers at a special evening lecture: Bill Pulleyblank, vice-president, Center for Business Optimization, IBM Global Services and former director of IBM’s Deep Computing Institute and the Blue Gene Project, and Margaret Wright, chair of the Department of Computer Science at New York University. They spoke on how advances in computational engineering and science are enhancing everyday lives.

The message is in the light of information can be transferred in a very small amount of time. Hranilovic’s research includes building prototype optical modems, and working on developing methods of transmitting data through many waves of light grouped together. The result of this work would be extremely fast communication – billions of bits per second. The applications for such research are far-reaching. Wireless optical communications technologies are being incorporated into satellites, probes and space stations; they could be used for communications between different components of computers; they may be most useful in metropolitan areas where radio interference is common; and they would be useful in situations where radio communication cannot be used safely such as in hospitals and airplanes.

Recent innovations in communication techniques focus on increasing speed, distance, quality and efficiency. Steve Hranilovic, an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, is leading the research in the area of wireless optical communications. Wireless communication technologies use electromagnetic (EM) waves to transmit data. Different types of EM waves – radio, microwaves, infrared light, visible light, ultraviolet light, x-rays and gamma rays – have different wavelengths and frequencies. Current wireless technologies, such as those used in laptop computers, involve transmitting data through radio waves. Radio waves have a wavelength around one tenth of a meter to one meter; however, Hranilovic is focusing on using light which has a wavelength of around 850 to 900 billionths of a meter. Because the waves Hranilovic uses are so small, many more waves reach a receiver each second. Hence, a great deal

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Adapted from an article by Graham Jansz, SPARK writer (SPARK – Students Promoting Awareness of Research Knowledge, an NSERC program).

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Alumni profiles Shawn Murray – enjoys the crash-bang of success

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e typically think of engineers as designers and builders of useful structures such as bridges or telecommunications towers. However, manufacturing engineering grad Shawn Murray (’84) takes things apart for a living. As the owner of Toronto-based Murray Demolition, he oversees a variety of demolition projects and ensures that the company’s specialized services such as the removal of hazardous waste, materials and equipment are performed efficiently and safely. “We offer an array of demolition, abatement and remediation services for industrial, government and commercial clients,” Murray explains. Murray, who has been in the business for 20 years, started the company with a management buy-out of the demolition arm of Philip Services Corp. in 2002. As President and CEO, he has grown the company four-fold into the largest demolition firm in Canada. Murray Demolition currently has 400 employees, including Mac grad Anthony Cicconi (’83, Commerce) as its Corporate Financial Officer. The MacEngineer wanted to profile Murray because his company won the contract to demolish the old Camco plant on Longwood Avenue in Hamilton. Once it is cleared of the defunct buildings, the site will become the home of the University’s new Innovation Park. Murray admits he really wanted this particular project because he feels the University’s initiative is a positive one for Hamilton. “As a Mac grad, I really wanted to make sure my company was here doing this job.” The $1.8 million teardown includes not only careful demolition of the various structures, but also the removal of hazardous waste materials such as asbestos from around piping, and PCBs and mercury from transformers and switches. As is customary in this business, Murray Demolition intends to generate income from the sale of scrap steel and metal. That is one reason that such care and precision

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Shawn Murray at the site of the old Camco plant now being demolished for the University’s new Innovation Park.

is being taken when pulling apart the structures. The brick and concrete will be crushed for use in the construction of roadbeds or as fill. Murray says most of the building materials will end up at Stelco and Dofasco, meaning that the site will be recycled totally in Hamilton. He says the former Camco project is typical of most industrial site decommissionings. “There were challenges in identifying the environmental issues, and in evaluating the types of technologies and equipment that would be needed to do the job that would be acceptable to all the authorities having jurisdiction. At the same time, you have to maintain a good relationship with the neighbourhood.” It’s sad to be demolishing a manufacturing plant, he adds. Even though the work is good for his company, “I hate it when we lose industry in Canada.”

When reminiscing about his Mac days, two events stand out especially. Frosh Week in first year was “fantastic”. But more importantly, he met Kimberly Olynyk, his future wife, during first year. They have been married 19 years, and enjoy raising and spending time with their identical twin girls. As much as it may hurt to take down old structures that were once the pride of the Canadian economy, such work is a necessary and important part of land redevelopment. Murray Demolition prides itself on having an excellent safety record in what can often be quite hazardous working situations. Recently the company made the finals for the 50 Best Managed Companies in Canada. In addition, it has recently been awarded the contract to demolish the Toronto Lakeview Generating Plant, the largest demolition contract in Canada.

2006 Veronika Czerneda Staff Award The Faculty of Engineering congratulates Dave Schick on being nominated for the 2006 Veronika Czerneda Staff Award. Dave has been with the Department of Mechanical Engineering for over 30 years, having started as a Department Technician in 1974. Currently, he is the Department’s Technical Services Coordinator (Chief Technician) with responsibility for the daily activities of technical staff, the budget for laboratory and shop upgrading and maintenance, and the smooth operation of the labs and efficient service of the shops. The Veronika Czerneda Staff Award, is presented annually in recognition of a staff member who has made an outstanding contribution. c

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Jeff Aubry – the engineering of good wine

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lthough wine has been a life-long passion for Material Sciences grad Jeff Aubry, he became a partner in one of Ontario’s newest wineries almost by accident. After graduating with a MEng and a MBA, both from McMaster (’96, ’98), Aubry found himself laid off twice in five years. This lead to some introspection and the realization that he’d rather work for himself. Aubry is now President and partner (with his father Gerald Aubry) of Coyote’s Run Estate Winery, located on 58 acres just outside the village of St. David’s in the Niagara peninsula. The property had been operating as a vineyard for over 30 years. “My role is all-encompassing,” he says with a smile. “I do the dirty work like shoveling the snow and mowing the lawn and picking the grapes. But I also do the more presidential duties like arranging financing and meeting agents and buyers. I don’t make the wine, though, and that’s a good thing!” That duty is left up to master winemaker David Sheppard, who has over 20 years experience making wines in Niagara (at Inniskillin Wines). He has had spectacular success owing to a number of factors: a focus on small batches of hand-crafted wines, and attention to quality and distinc-

LCBO. I sell more product in the more open markets of Alberta and Manitoba than I do in Ontario stores!” Despite being in a business that seems far removed from his engineering degree, Aubry says the Mac Engineering experience has proven itself. “Engineering trained me to think analytically and logically. These skills are essential to any small businessman.” One of the fondest memories of his time spent at Mac was playing 3-pitch for the Materials team – but, admittedly, this might have something to do with the obligatory after-game visit to the Phoenix. Aubry is married to Patti Nakonechny, also a McMaster grad (MBA ’98). They are now the busy parents of two young daughters: Holly, who is two-and-a-half, and Lauren who is not yet a year old. Returning to the topic of wine, Aubry’s passion about the fruit of the vine is evident when he speaks about the product and the potential for continued success of the vintages produced at Coyote’s Run Estates. The winery grows most of its own grapes which are processed entirely on site, from crushing through to bottling. Coyote’s Run wines are known for their elegant, full-flavoured and well-balanced taste. All of the company’s wines are 100% VQA certified – meaning they are created from 100% Niagara grapes. “Good wines can never be commoditized. Each and every vintage is entirely unique.” Aubry explains that because of the very nature of the craft of wine-making, each vintage is a product of the grapes grown in a particular season on a particular piece of property, and prepared by a particular winemaker incorporating the choices that he made at various stages of the process. “Simply put, good wine is art.”

Jeff Aubry with daughter, Lauren.

tiveness. In addition, the property itself is unique. It has both the dark brown clay typical of the area, which produces a grape that is rich and earthy, and a lighter red clay that produces grapes that are fruiter and more perfumed. The combination of grapes has resulted in outstanding wines that have won seven medals in two years from the Canadian Wine Awards, including the Pinot Noir of The Year for 2005. Even these successes don’t always translate into greater visibility and acceptance. “The most challenging aspect of a small winery is operating within the anachronistic Ontario regulatory regime which is designed to service the larger, typically foreign suppliers over the domestic ones,” Aubry says. “I get scant attention from the government monopoly distributor, the

Calling all ChemEng grads! The Department of Chemical Engineering invites all alumni currently working in industry to attend the Department’s Graduate Seminar Day on Thursday April 6, 2006. The annual event offers an excellent view of current research with high-calibre presentations by graduate students, and provides a forum for discussing potential collaborative research. Seminar Day is also an opportunity for industrial participants to identify and recruit talented graduates. In addition to the presentations, graduate students will exhibit their work in a poster session, which offers further opportunity for interaction and discussion. A focal point of Seminar Day is always the keynote address, which is given by a

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distinguished graduate alumnus. This year we are honoured to have Dr. Paul Santerre, Associate Dean (Research) and Professor at the University of Toronto. Dr. Santerre has enjoyed an illustrious academic career in biomaterials while working in both the Faculties of Engineering and Dentistry. Further details may be viewed at the departmental web page: www.chemeng. mcmaster.ca. Attendance is free, but registration is required. Please register no later than March 16th to facilitate catering and venue selection. Lunch will be provided. To register or obtain further information please contact Laura Wells at wellsla2@mcmaster.ca or by calling 905525-9140, ext. 27404.

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The MacEngineer welcomes your comments... Send your news and views to the editor at vespi@mcmaster.ca

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Alumni Events Salsa Night

4th Annual Women in Engineering Experience

Wednesday Jan. 25, 2006 Time: 6:00 p.m. Location: Faculty Club, Great Hall Admission: Alumni/Friends/Faculty & Staff $12 Students $7

Saturday Feb. 18, 2006 Time: 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Location: John Hodgins Engineering Building Room A114

Agenda 5:45 p.m. Guests arrive and register 6:00 p.m. Welcome and introduction of instructors: Carlos and Laura Escalante 6:15 p.m. Dancing begins 7:15 p.m. Dance lesson concludes and farewell

YOU COULD

WIN A

ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIP

Don’t miss this great opportunity!

Mexican Buffet and Punch will be provided. Contest: Salsa your way to a beautiful prize!

Register by January 27, 2006

Register online at: www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/salsa.htm

Register online at: www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/womenexp.htm

Sharing good cheer at Scotch and Wine Tasting events

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A message from the Dean Building on success and planning for the future

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s we enter 2006, the Faculty of Engineering through a consultative process has identified its new strategic advancement priorities for the next five years. It is certainly cause for celebration that we successfully completed our set of goals established earlier for which we created three new schools in the Faculty in the areas of Engineering Practice, BioMedical Engineering, and Computational Engineering and Science. With these new schools we are able to proceed with our new set of strategic priorities to build our resources so as to enable our outstanding faculty and student body to excel at teaching and learning, research and technological development.

inside this issue Engineering News...................4 Upcoming Events .................10 Alumni Profiles.................8 & 9 Hey Alumni! Have you got something to say, or any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi: Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca website: www.eng.mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer is published by the Engineering Faculty for its alumni. Distribution assistance is provided by the Alumni Office. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40063416 RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO CIRCULATION DEPTARTMENT, 1280 MAIN STREET WEST HAMILTON, ON L8S 4L7 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

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In order of priority, without question, the most critical need in Engineering is endowed faculty positions. Universities with endowed chairs are able to attract and retain the very top faculty to their institutions. High caliber professors, in turn, attract top students to a university. In addition to attracting the best and brightest, endowed chairs will enable the Faculty to build leadership in its key areas of strength and promise. These areas include Nanotechnology, Biomedical Engineering, Sustainable Energy, and Engineering Education. Our second priority is to ensure that our undergraduate engineering students learn in the best environment, in state-of-the-art laboratories with leading-edge equipment and resources. It is our intention to enhance the existing MACLAB Endowment Fund created in 1997 by our McMaster Engineering Students and supported by alumni, faculty and friends for the enhancement of undergraduate labs. The Fund now exceeds $1 M and will continue to grow as we expand its capital. The endowed fund is invested to earn income each year, and as the principal grows, so does the income available to award to laboratory refurbishment. Our third priority is to build our Graduate Scholarships so we can increase our enrolment from 600 students to 900 in the next few years. While it is true that high caliber professors attract top graduate students, competitve financial aid can also determine the quality of the graduate student body. Outstanding graduate students enable the Faculty to maintain considerable strength in both research and educational activities. Fourthly, our goal to expand the “Internationalization of the Faculty” remains strategic. In my last Dean’s Message, I mentioned how we are looking at ways to expand our programs internationally. We have embarked on a series of initiatives that will draw new international students to both our undergraduate and graduate program c

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Mo Elbestawi, Dean of Engineering

from countries such as Brazil, Mexico, India, South Korea and China. This builds on the links we currently have with numerous European and US universities. Plans are currently underway to launch a cooperative summer study abroad program in Russia in cooperation with Michigan State University. The Faculty has become increasingly involved around the world in exchange agreements, institutional collaborations and international student exchange programs. These partnerships with overseas faculty promote cutting-edge research in the fields of engineering, technology and the sciences, and help to strengthen our work at home. Our final priority is to continue to find resources to support Undergraduate Scholarships as we attract the best students with entrance awards to our Year One program, and offer in-course scholarships to retain the brightest in our engineering program. As competition increases, our level of support to attract and retain the best students is crucial. These priorities will see the Faculty move into 2006 and beyond. They will support our strategic objective of growth while improving quality and our position as one of Canada’s top engineering schools.

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New Faculty Members Chemical Engineering The Department welcomes Prashant Mhaskar who joined us in September 2005 as Assistant Professor. Dr. Mhaskar received his B.Tech from Indian Institute of Technology, his MASc. from Louisiana Prashant Mhaskar State University and his Ph.D. from the University of California (Los Angeles). His research interests include process control, nonlinear Lyapunov-based and model predictive control, fault-tolerant control, and control of hybrid systems.

Civil Engineering Wael El-Dakhakhni joined the Department in October 2002 as a postdoctoral fellow in the Centre for Effective Design of Structures (CEDS). In July 2005, he became Assistant Professor in the area of Wael El-Dakhakhni structural engineering. Dr. El-Dakhakhni completed both his M.Sc. (2000) and Ph.D. (2002) at Drexel University; he obtained a B.Sc. (1996) at Ain-Shams University, Egypt. His current research focuses on structural health monitoring, behavior of masonry structures, and seismic rehabilitation of structures using Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) reinforcement. Susan Masten joined the Faculty of Engineering in July 2005 as the Director of Engineering 1. Dr. Masten received a Ph.D. from Harvard University in Environmental Studies. She joined us from the Susan Masten Michigan State University, USA, where she taught for 16 years in Civil and Environmental Engineering, and served in various administrative capacities with the Environmental Engineering Student Society, the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) design teams, and Engineers Without Borders. Professor Masten’s research involves the use of chemical

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oxidants for the remediation of soils, water, and leachates contaminated with hazardous organic chemicals. Professor Masten is also an Associate Member of the Center for Microbial Ecology. A. Ghani Razaqpur joined the Department in July 2005 as Professor and Chair in Effective Design of Structures. He is also the Director of the Centre for Effective Design of Structures. He joined us from A. Ghani Razaqpur Ottawa’s Carleton University where he taught for 22 years and served in various administrative capacities including chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research. His research focuses on the mechanics of materials and structures, including concrete reinforced with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) reinforcement, advanced finite element modeling of the mechanical behaviour and deterioration mechanisms of reinforced concrete structures, response of structures to blast and explosion and seismic behaviour of concrete arch dams. He currently serves as an associate editor of the International Journal of Cement and Concrete Composites, and of the Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering.

Electrical Engineering Sorina Dumitrescu joined the Department as an Assistant Professor in July 2005. Dr. Dumitrescu received her B.Sc. in Mathematics (1990) and her Ph.D in Mathematics/ Computer Science (1997) Sorina Dumitrescu from the University of Bucharest, Romania. She has worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Computer Science of University of Western Ontario prior to coming to McMaster as a Postdoctoral Fellow and Research Associate. Dr. Dumitrescu’s current research interests are in the broad areas of data compression and multimedia communications. More specifically, her interests

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include the design of efficient algorithms for robust multimedia transmission over unreliable networks, joint source-channel coding, multiple-description quantization, scalable codes and steganalysis

Engineering Physics The Department welcomes Qiyin Fang who joined us in November 2005 as an Assistant Professor. Dr. Fang received a Ph.D. in Biomedical Physics from East Carolina University in 2002. Most recently he has Qiyin Fang been a Research Scientist in the Minimally Invasive Surgical Technology Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre in Los Angeles. He was recently awarded a Canada Research Chair in Biophotonics. His research will focus on issues in biophotonics – a fast growing interdisciplinary field that concentrates on applying physical, chemical and engineering advances to biological and medical challenges.

Materials Sciences & Engineering The Department is delighted to welcome back Hatem Zurob, a Ph.D. graduate of 2003, who returned to MSE as a fulltime faculty member as of September 1, 2005. Hatem Zurob

Mechanical Engineering Mehran Kasra joined the Department as an Associate Professor in July 2005. Dr. Kasra holds a B.Sc. degree from Tehran Polytechnique and M.Eng. and Ph.D degrees from Ecole Polytechnique. Prior to coming to McMaster, he was an Associate Professor at the University of Tennessee. Dr. Kasra’s areas of research interest include Computational and Experimental Biomechanics (dynamics of spine, dynamics of knee joint, soft tissue and bone mechanics, design of implants and prostheses) and Tissue Engineering. N

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Departmental newsbriefs Chemical Engineering Congratulations to Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Student Club for winning the 2005 Student Chapters’ Merit Award of the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering. The selection was made recently by members of the Society. The plaque was presented during the 55th Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference in Toronto in October. Dr. Tom Marlin and Rhoda Baker attended a two-week course on Process Systems Engineering in Iguazu Falls, Argentina. Dr. Marlin taught the topic on Process Control Design, and Ms. Baker was selected as one of the 45 graduate students to attend from North and South America. The course was organized by the Pan American Advanced Studies Institute and was given financial support by the US National Science Foundation. Congratulations to Todd Hoare on winning an NSERC Innovation Challenge Award for his work on “Glucose-responsive Microgels for Self-regulating Insulin Delivery”. The Innovation Challenge Awards honour students pursuing graduate studies in the natural sciences, engineering or computer sciences who have demonstrated an entrepreneurial flair by thinking of ways to transform their original ideas into products and processes that will potentially benefit Canadians. These awards recognize and reward the power of imagination and innovation within Canada’s brightest minds. Todd is in his final year of Ph.D. studies under the supervision of Dr. Bob Pelton. Bob Pelton is to be congratulated on becoming a TAPPI (Technical Association of the American Pulp and Paper Industry) Fellow. The honorary title is bestowed upon less than one percent of TAPPI’s membership, and is given to individuals who have made extraordinary technical or service contributions to the industry and/or the Association. Don Woods has recently published a book on “Successful Trouble Shooting for Process Engineers” (ISBN 3-527-31163-7). M

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At the 55th Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference in Toronto in October, Cecilia Rodrigues presented “Troubleshooting and Monitoring of an Industrial Batch Process” co-authored by J.F. MacGregor and T. Kourti in the graduate student poster competition. The Department was well-represented at the national conference of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), held from Oct. 30 to Nov.1 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Chris Swartz provided information about Graduate Studies at McMaster at a special Graduate Fair for prospective graduate students. He also presented papers on “Interior Point Solution of Multilevel QP problems Arising in Embedded MPC Formulations” co-authored with Rhoda Baker, and “Dynamic optimization of an Integrated Multi-Unit System Under Failure Conditions” co-authored with Anthony Balthazaar. John MacGregor, Theodora Kourti, S. GarciaMunoz, D. Neogi and S. Mehta presented a paper on “Optimization of Batch Processes Using Data Driven Latent Variable Models”. Andy Hrymak, chair of the Department, completed his term as chair of the Computing and Systems Technology (CAST) division of the AIChE. Hrymak was also awarded the 2005 Excellence in Process Development Research Award by the Process Development Division of the Institute. The presentation was made at the AIChE Annual Meeting in November. The award recognizes individuals who have made significant technical contributions to the advances in industrial process development disseminated by means of welldocumented materials. Don Woods presented a workshop at the Department Heads forum on “Recruiting, Rewarding and Mentoring Faculty”. He also presented a workshop on “Assessing Teaching”.

September 2006. (Senate approval is pending.) Mechatronics Engineering focuses on the design and control of electro-mechanical devices. The program will offer a balance of mechanical, electrical and software content, with a focus on Embedded Systems Design. The Department congratulates students Wolfgang Thaller (M.Sc. Computer Science) and Shiqi Cao (Software Engineering, 3rd year) who, with the encouragement of Associate Professor Wolfram Kahl, created a computerized version of “Cops and Robbers” which was a winner in the 8th annual International Conference on Functional Programming contest.

Engineering Physics Congratulations to Jen-Shih Chang who received an Honorary Award in October from the Plasma & Laser Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences. The Department congratulates Oiyin Fang, who has been awarded a prestigious Canada Research Chair (CRC). As Canada Research Chair in Biophotonics, Dr. Fang will work on photonics-based technologies for applications in the medical field. His research will lead to real-time minimally-invasive techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases including artery plaques and brain cancers. This brings the total of CRCs at McMaster to 58. On November 14, Trish Laurie of the Engineering Physics Club organized a career night for students interested in working in the nuclear industry. Representatives from Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Babcock & Wilcox, B.C. Instruments, Bruce Power, Candesco Research Corporation, Nuclear Safety Solutions, Namet Engineering and Ontario Power Corporation were on hand to give students insights on career opportunities. A social time followed, where students were able to talk informally with the representatives and get further details on career opportunities in nuclear engineering.

Computing & Software The Department is preparing to offer a Mechatronics Engineering Program, and will accept the first students in U

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Departmental newsbriefs (continued) continued from page 13

This year’s Alumni Forum and Social will be held on Tuesday, March 28, 2006. More details will be posted on the Department’s website at http:/engphys. mcmaster.ca as they become confirmed.

Materials Science & Engineering Richard Meguerian, a final year student, won first place in the 2006 TMS Outstanding Student Paper contest – Undergraduate Division, from The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society. He will be presented with a scholarship cheque and certificate at the TMS Awards Banquet in March 2006 during the Society’s 135th Annual Meeting & Exhibition in San Antonio, Texas.

Mechanical Engineering Professor emeritus Ross Judd received unique recognition from Canadian General Electric over the summer. On August 26th, he was presented with an award at a dinner hosted by GE Canada in recognition of his pioneering contribution to the development of nuclear power in Canada. The dinner was part of a two-day CAPD Pioneer Reunion and Dinner in Peterborough, Ontario. Dr. Judd and about 300 other former scientists and developers involved in the reactor project were given a tour of AEC and each received a commemorative plaque. Dr. Gary M. Bone and his co-authors K. Gopalakrishan and K. Goldberg (University of California, Berkeley) along with M. J. Zaluzec, R. Koganti and P. Daneszczuk of the Ford Motor Company received the IEEE Transactions on Automation Science Best Paper Award for 2004. The title of the paper is “Unilateral Fixtures for Sheet-Metal Parts with Holes”. The award was presented at IEEE’s 2005 International Conference on Robotics in Barcelona, Spain. A research paper authored by graduate students Harley Chan (Mechanical Engineering) and Philip Mitchell

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(Electrical & Computer Engineering) and faculty members Dr. Allan Spence, Dr. Matthew Sklad (Mechanical Engineering) and Dr. David Capson (Electrical & Computer Engineering) received the Best Paper Award in the Manufacturing Engineering Division at the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress held November 5-11, 2005 in Orlando, Florida. The paper was entitled “Laser Digitizer/Stereo Vision Methods for Simultaneous Measurement/Analysis of Sheet Metal Forming Strain/Geometry”. Dr. Stephen Tullis and Dr. S. Ziada have been awarded a major research contract to conduct wind turbine research. The total value of the contract is $650k and is supported by Cleanfield Energy Corp. and Crestech. This development will give the Faculty of Engineering a boost in developing research and educational programs in the area of Sustainable Energy Systems. Tomasz Glawdel was awarded the 2004/05 Iroquois Trophy at a luncheon held at the University Club in August, 2005. The Iroquois Trophy is awarded annually to an undergraduate student in the graduating class who demonstrates academic excellence by attaining the highest graduating average in the Department. The trophy was presented by Dr. A. D. Spence, Undergraduate Student Advisor for the Department.

Dr. A.D. Spence presents trophy to Tomasz Glawdel.

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The 2004/05 CSME (Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineering) Medal was presented to Dr. Ian Menzies by Dr. Allan Spence and Dr. Phil Koshy at a luncheon held at the University Club in September 2005. The CSME Medal is awarded annually to a graduating student who has demonstrated both academic excellence and participation in campus societies, clubs or other activities.

Elizabeth Azhikannickal receives her award from Dr. Samir Ziada.

Elizabeth Azhikannickal was presented with an award for the Best Graduate Research Seminar for Winter 2005 by Dr. Samir Ziada, Chair of the Department. The title of Ms. Azhikannickal’s seminar was “Material and Process Models for the Forming of Oriented Polymer Tubes”. Fourth year Mechanical Engineering students Chris Evans and Sanjiv Sooriyadevan through their work in their M.E.4M06 final year project (under the supervision of Dr. Philip Koshy) helped to set a new North American record. One of the safety regulations for the recent North American Solar Car Challenge relates to the driver vacating the vehicle. The driver needs to be able to egress the car unassisted in less than 10 seconds. The students designed and built a system that led to a new solar car egress record of 2.73 seconds. The team extends special thanks to Ronny Theiss, the Technicians in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the entire Solar Car Team.

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Engineering students news When is a brick more than a brick?

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cMaster University’s Lisa Federico, a master of applied sciences student in the Department of Civil Engineering, is focusing her research on studying the implications of adding waste glass to normal clay bricks. Her work is supervised by professors Samir Chidiac and Robert Drysdale, and is being done in partnership with Brampton Brick. Federico uses the plant’s facilities for mixing and firing her prototype bricks which are then tested using the advanced facilities at McMaster’s Applied Dynamics Laboratory. She is specifically testing for strength, amount of water absorbed, and ability to withstand freeze-thaw cycles. Federico hopes that by studying the chemical components of the glass she uses, she can produce a brick that won’t require a high firing temperature and that will be more durable than the current product. The work is currently funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the McMaster University Centre for Effective Design of Structures and Materials and Manufacturing Ontario.

Adapted from an article by Graham Jansz, SPARK writer (SPARK – Students Promoting Awareness of Research Knowledge, an NSERC program).

Lisa Federico is studying the implications of adding waste glass to normal clay bricks.

Annual olympics challenge students More than 800 high school students from across Ontario joined in some friendly competition during the annual McMaster Engineering and Science Olympics held in October at McMaster University. For the first time in the history of the event, a class from Quebec attended. Students of St. George’s School in Montreal jumped in with typical enthusiasm, joining their Ontario colleagues in a variety of engineering and science-

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related competitions with the opportunity to earn tuition entrance awards. Challenges included a physics paper triathlon, photonics puzzles, the building of a mechanical transporter for golf balls, an egg drop event, and various mathematical mental gymnastics. This year, over $20,000 in McMaster entrance awards were available to be won, in addition to $7,000 in tuition awards for students selected by their teachers.

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Concentrating on the release of the vehicle for the Mechanical Transporter event.

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McMaster engineering survey shows Ontario firms looking to hire engineering graduates

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survey of organizations in Ontario employing engineers undertaken by the Faculty of Engineering found that almost 70 per cent of respondents plan to hire engineers in the coming year and that almost 80 per cent of those plan to hire engineering graduates. “This will be music to the ears of engineering students and recent graduates,” said Mo Elbestawi, dean, Faculty of Engineering, McMaster University. “The

survey confirms what we know anecdotally. Firms are counting on engineers to lead innovation and stimulate growth by developing new products, advancing product design, and finding technical solutions in a range of fields from manufacturing to computing to the environment to medicine.” Of the respondents planning to hire, 79.4 per cent plan to hire recent engineering graduates (i.e. have less than the four years work

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http://msep.mcmaster.ca msep@mcmaster.ca 905 525-9140 ext. 26566

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experience required to qualify as a P.Eng.). Ninety-six per cent of these organizations plan to hire graduates with a Bachelor's degree, 35.7 per cent with a Masters degree and 15.2 per cent with a Ph.D. “It's essential that educators, employers and the profession get the word out to students that engineering is redefining the economy and society they live in and that they can make a real difference,” said Elbestawi. “There are careers waiting for enterprising men and women in both traditional and emerging areas of engineering such as software, entertainment, the environment, mechatronics and biomedical engineering. We're introducing new programs in all these areas at McMaster.” When asked about which universities were important for recruiting engineering graduates, 91 per cent indicated McMaster Engineering. And for co-op and internship work placements, 74 per cent selected McMaster Engineering. This was well ahead of most other Ontario universities. As to the skills and qualities organizations look for when hiring a graduate, related work experience gained through such programs as co-op and internships ranked 99 per cent. This was followed by soft skills (leadership, teamwork, collaboration) at 94 per cent, specialized knowledge (93%), high marks (84%), and post-graduate education (74%). More than 79 per cent of respondents said they hired students for co-op or internship work terms. The survey was conducted by the Faculty of Engineering at McMaster University between July 21 and August 26 of this year. The purpose of the study was to better understand the engineering hiring plans of Ontario organizations, and the skills and knowledge they will require in future. Personnel and human resource managers, owners, senior executives, and engineering managers at 760 organizations in Ontario employing engineers were surveyed. The results are considered accurate plus or minus 7.5 per cent 19 out of 20 times. For more survey highlights, visit http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/survey .

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Engineering Co-op & Career Services

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eason’s Greetings and Happy New Year! McMaster University’s Engineering Co-op & Career Services (ECCS) is looking forward to the new year, and we are in the process of planning several career information/networking panels. An invitation is extended to McMaster Engineering alumni who are interested in participating on these panels. After conferring with degree-related student societies, ECCS has planned this series of discussion panels/networking events for the Winter 2006 term. Each event will focus on career opportunities related to a specific engineering field (see below for dates). The format will be a discussion-based panel. Each panellist will have the opportunity to introduce themselves and their respective employers, and then discuss career opportunities (from their perspective) associated with the degree program of topic. A “Question and Answer” session will follow the panellist introductions and perspectives. An informal “networking” event will also be held after the discussion panel – at which students may speak directly with panellists. In addition to the career development aspect of these events, we hope that that the panellists also will have the opportunity to enhance their employers’ “campus branding” – such as distributing information materials and “giveaways.” All events will begin at 5:30 p.m.

your job description to Engineering Co-op & Career Services. Your job will be posted, students will apply online and you’ll receive all applications electronically in PDF format. Tell us who you’d like to interview and we’ll make all arrangements, including hosting lunch at the University Club for your recruiters. For more information please contact ECCS at 905-525-9140 ext 22571; or e-mail your positions to engcoop@mcmaster.ca. Thank you for your support of McMaster Engineering Students.

We look forward to working with you during the upcoming year! If you are interested in participating in any of these events, or if more information is needed, please contact ECCS at 905-525-9140, ext. 22571 or at engcar@mcmaster.ca.

Co-op & Internship Positions Wanted We’re moving into the key recruitment period for student experience work terms. Whether your organization recruits students for 4 month co-op work terms over the summer or students who remain on site for 12-16 months, now’s the time to forward

Anne Markey, Manager Engineering Co-op & Career Services.

Chem Eng alumni re-connect A very successful reunion of Chemical Engineering Alumni was held on October 17th in the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. Over 50 alumni attended and reconnected with their colleagues, faculty members and Alumni Office representatives over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. Dean of the Faculty, Mo Elbestawi, was joined by Drs. Cameron Crowe, James

Dickson, Andy Hrymak, Dora Kourti, John MacGregor, Tom Marlin, Bob Pelton, Chris Swartz, John Vlachopoulos, Don Woods and Shiping Zhu. Paul Watkinson (’62) was the most senior Chem Eng grad in attendance! All the decades were represented along with recent grads from the 2005 class. It was a fun and memorable evening!

Moving? Got news to share? Fill out and fax to 905-546-5492 or e-mail info to Carm Vespi at vespi@mcmaster.ca

Wednesday, January 18, 2006: Chemical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering

Name:_______________________________________________________________________________ Grad Yr. & Dept.: _____________________________________________________________________

Tuesday, February 7, 2006: Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering

New Address: _________________________________________________________________________

Tuesday, February 28, 2006: Civil Engineering

Postal Code: __________________ E-mail:_________________________________________________

Wednesday, March 8, 2006: Mechanical Engineering

____________________________________________________________________________________

Thursday, March 16, 2006: Computer Science Software Engineering

____________________________________________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________ Fax: ________________________________________

Comments: (present occupation, recent accomplishments ie: awards, recognitions).

____________________________________________________________________________________

Any comments provided will be included in the next issue.

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Alumni Grapevine Chemical Engineering

Chemical Eng. & Society

Emery, Greg ’91: Greg and Joanna now live in Lynden, Ontario. Greg is an active member of the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers, and volunteers as their observing director and International Dark Sky Association contact. If you are interested in this hobby, contact Greg at greg.emery@mohawk college.ca .

Edl, Joe ’98: Want to share our exciting news. Catherine and I had a baby girl on July 31st, 2005. Weighing in at 6 lbs 3 oz. she may be a future MAC student!

Chemical Eng. & Mgt. Gaspari, Jerome ’01 & Janinne ’03: welcome a baby boy, born Sept. 8th and weighing 8 lbs 11 oz.

Civil Engineering Easa, Said ’76: Dr. Easa, a professor of Civil Engineering at Ryerson, has received the 2005 Arthur M. Wellington Prize from the American Society of Civil

Engineers (ASCE) for a paper entitled “Threedimensional model for stopcontrol intersection sight distance” (Journal of Transportation Engineering, Vol. 130, No. 2, 2004). The paper is co-authored with Said Essa his graduate students Essam Dabbour and Zain Ali. The research work aims to reduce traffic collisions and improve traffic safety at intersections. A plaque and certificate were presented to the authors at the ASCE Annual Convention and Exhibition in Los Angeles in October 2005. Mitchell, Melissa ’02 and Rob Ostrowercha ’02 were married in Hamilton on October 15, 2005. Rob is currently working for Planning and Engineering Initiatives doing subdivision design and contract management. Melissa is at Metropolitan Consulting, working as a water resources engineer. “We’re still

Can you help us find these lost alumni? Class of ’66 Mitsuru Aizawa, Chemical Gary Carpenter, Chemical Donald Jaffrey, Metallurgical Sunil Jha, Mechanical Suresh Kacker, Mechanical William Kucharski, Electrical Thomas Place, Metallurgical John Plewes Metallurgical Thomas Reid, Mechanical Harry Rumble, Electrical Azfar Saeed, Civil Donald Stephens, Metallurgical David Weber, Mechanical Chuan-Sung Yeh, Mechanical Alistair Young, Metallurgy

Class of ’71 Robert Ball, Chemical Maged Beshai, Electrical Winston Blair, Chemical Umesh Bonde, Mechanical Ho Chan, Civil Dung Dang, Chemical Howard Heffler, Chemical Norman Husemeyer, Mechanical Albert Klein, Chemical Stephan Lane, Chemical Michael Lovett, Chemical Alejandro Lozada, Chemical Moosa Mahomed, Mechanical Vincent McGowan, Mechanical Frederick Neil, Mechanical Richard Rynard, Mechanical Gerhard Schneider , Eng. Physics

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Allan Scott, Electrical Trevor Sutherland, Chemical

Class of ’76 Stephen Cheong, Mechanical Ian Hope, Chemical David Johnston, Mechanical Yuen Kwok, Mechanical Pak Lee, Civil Douglas Little, Chemical William McCann, Civil Nicholas Quzas, Eng. Physics John Small, Electrical Andrew Speziale, Chemical James Sullivan, Metallurgical Richard Vilim, Eng. Physics Stephen Willey, Eng. Physics Man Wong, Civil

Class of ’81

Class of ’86

Alan Arbour, Mechanical David Arnott, Civil Jacqueline Cameron, Chemical Castaneda Carbajal, Electrical Ngai Chan, Civil Ning Chan, Electrical Lucio Cinelli, Eng. Physics Surya Dumpala, Electrical Laila El Hifnawy, Civil Alaa El Zawahry, Civil Ezzat Hanafy, Civil Steven Ho, Chemical David Joyce, Eng. Physics Elizabeth Kesler, Electrical Keith Lam, Mechanical

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Eddy Ko, Electrical Rajeev Krishnamurthi, Electrical Pak Ku, Computer Gregory Lai, Electrical Amanda Lau, Eng. Physics Wing-Biu Law, Mechanical Thomas Lee, Mechanical Terry Liu, Electrical Marian Matson, Civil Martin McKeown, Eng. Physics Christopher Meadowcroft, Eng. Physics David Mitchell, Civil Foad Mojgani, Electrical Thomas Munding, Mechanical Fong Ng, Computer Cong Nguyen, Electrical Nuu Nguyen, Electrical Kiem Nguyen, Mechanical Kwang Oh, Electrical Francis Omani, Electrical Hadi Omar, Civil Cong Pham, Electrical Kiet Quach, Electrical Dante Quiroz, Electrical Edward Robb, Computer Alfred Seto, Chemical Narinder Singh, Electrical Eric Tam, Electrical Alan Thomson, Chemical Chi Tran, Chemical Ali Unal, Civil Richard Wu, Computer Kwong Yeung, Electrical Ralph Yeung, Electrical Wai Yue, Computer

Sander Lam, Electrical David Lau, Computer Mark Lemon, Ceramic Kwok Leung, Civil Michael Mcdougald, Mechanical Randell McFarlane, Chemical Lynne Morin, Eng. Physics Patrick Naraine, Electrical Soo Noh, Chemical Sunny Omorodion, Chemical Andrew Pang, Civil Shirish Patil, Civil Douglas Prowse, Electrical Zvika Shtifter, Civil Kuen Siu, Civil Yan Tam, Civil Wing Tong, Civil Stephen Topham, Eng. Physics Philip West, Electrical Sarkis Zeiter, Electrical

Terrence Atherton, Civil Chi Chong, Computer Micahel Chou, Mechanical Alain Cyr, Chemical Ronald D'Oliveira, Eng. Physics Congtru Doan, Computer Hieu Duong, Electrical Sai-Kiu Eng, Electrical Seng Fung, Civil Philip Gensey, Manufacturing Kwok Hui, Electrical Scott Iseppon, Mecahnical Joel Kao, Computer

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Alumni Grapevine (cont’d) enjoying life here in Hamilton, and would love to hear from former classmates with whom we’ve lost touch.” Contact civgirl ca@yahoo.ca .

teaching labs, and am the faculty’s technical representative for the new engineering lab building and the Beacon Automotive Centre of Excellence.

a network of trust that relies on continued recommendations. For details, contact info@ ihighlyrecommend.ca . Peters-Palfi, Jessica ’97: I am working for CH2M Hill Canada Ltd. in Toronto in the instrumentation and control system department. I have been here for about 5 years now, but am currently on maternity leave. I enjoy being home with my son (3) and daughter (10 months), and will be returning to work in January 2006 – working a 4-day week!

Electrical Eng. & Mgt. Kusmirski, Ed, ’86: Now lives in Calgary with Maryann (formerly Cooper) (Nursing ’87) and their son (4) and daughter (2). After graduation and a short stint with Maclean Hunter Communications, Ed became Employee Number 4 at Trillium Network Services – the business telecom arm of CUC Broadcasting. When Shaw Cable bought CUC and moved Ed to Calgary, he was Employee Number 2 of Shaw’s telecom business, Shaw FiberLink. Four years later, Group Telecom bought the assets of Shaw FiberLink and moved Ed back to Toronto. Later still when GT filed for CCAA court protection, the company was bought by 360networks. A couple of years after that, 360networks sold their Canadian assets to Bell Canada, which moved Ed back to Calgary, where he is currently Director, Network Operations. Aside from Maclean Hunter, Ed’s career so far has been four weddings and one funeral. Dr. Haykin never taught us this in Communications Systems 4A4!

Mechanical Engineering Electrical Engineering Nieuwenhuis, Fred ’98: Evelyn and I are pleased to announce our new addition, a son, who arrived on July 19th, 2005, weighing a healthy 7 lbs 9 oz. Pereira, Ashley ’83: still working on my PhD comprehensive defence thesis entitled “What makes an effective project leader in a remote setting is the goal – plan to apply the research of Myers Brigg’s Ashley Pereira personality module”. I work in the aerospace industry, and recently enrolled in the Honeywell Six Sigma Black Belt Leadership program. “My Black Belt certification project is around standardization & knowledge management of electrical functional circuit blocks.” Received a meritorious invention disclosure award from Honeywell International Patent Filing Office as a result of my US Govt. patent submission for a new “Intelligent” SW/System product that I designed. I invested (again) in a R580XD TaylorMade driver...golf is still a passion! Janina and the boys (Michael & Andrew) are doing fine.

Engineering Physics Gordon, Brooke ’03: I co-own a new business in Burlington called I Highly Recommend. We host Small Business seminars on how to grow your business. The first seminar was held during an evening in October at a Hamilton café, with complimentary refreshments and a special admission fee for students. I Highly Recommend operates an online directory to which companies have to be invited to join. This creates M

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Davison, Mark ’80: Currently working for TAG Holdings, LLC as the Vice President of Business Development. The position affords me the opportunity to use the broad skill set and interests I developed at Mac. After graduating, I worked at GM in Oshawa in manufacturing, then returned to school and got my MBA at Harvard Business School in Boston, graduating in 1984. Since then I have been living in Michigan, working in corporate finance, program management, marketing, sales, strategic planning, and product development for a variety of companies, then as Divisional President for a privately held manufacturing company. I met Mary Ann here in Michigan. We’ve been married 16 years and have 2 sons. We visit my family in Fort Erie, Ontario quite frequently and I fondly point out the McMaster campus and Matthews Hall where I lived for all 4 years to my wife and children as we pass up and down the escarpment on the 403 highway.

Alumni and Friends Have you moved, taken a new job, got something you would like to say, any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi at vespi@mcmaster.ca

Schuelke Leech, Beth-Anne ’94: After graduating from Mac, I joined General Motors of Canada (GMCL) in Windsor, Ontario. I transferred back to my hometown of Oshawa, Ontario, in 1995. Though I had promised myself when I left for university that I was not returning to Oshawa, I am still based here. After 9 years with GMCL, in various engineering positions (and a financial analyst one), I left GMCL in 2003 when I married a man from Boston and moved there. After 3 months, we returned to Canada so I could complete my MBA at Schulich School of Business, York University. Tim and I had a baby boy in November 2004 and happily reside in Bowmanville. I now work for the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, managing the engineering support services. I am responsible for setting up the new engineering undergraduate U

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MacEngineer

The

The MacEngineer is printed and produced by

Managing Editor: Carm Vespi, Engineering Alumni Officer Editorial Committee: Dave S. Weaver, John Preston, Terry Milson, Carm Vespi Art Direction and Design: Wordsmith Design and Advertising Contributing Writers: Administrative Coordinators, Terry Milson, Trudi Down, Carm Vespi, Judy Mair, Eugene Nakonechny

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The MacEngineer

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Put it in YOUR line of sight! 4th Annual McMaster

E ngineering Golf Tournament

Thursday, May 25, 2006 Crosswinds Golf & Country Club Milton, Ontario Check the website at: http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

MacEngineer Winter 2006  

The MacEngineer - The magazine for McMaster University's Faculty of Engineering Alumni

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