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MacEngineer

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FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

VOLUME 30

NUMBER 1

MCMASTER UNIVERSITY

Xerox + McMaster = Innovation See page 5

WINTER 2005


A message from the Dean Moving forward

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ne of the key strategic objectives for the Faculty is to expand our graduate student enrollment to reach 20% of the total student population. Our aim therefore, is to provide more educational opportunities at the Master’s and Ph.D. levels, provide new opportunities for life-long learning, and increase the scope of our partnerships with the private sector. Our plans for the creation of three new schools – the School for Engineering Practice, the School for Biomedical Engineering and the School for Computational Engineering and Science – are well underway. All three will focus on graduate education at the Master’s and Ph.D. levels. We expect to admit the first cohort of graduate students in 2005. When fully operational, the schools will have between 150-180 new

inside this issue Engineering News...................4 Alumni Profiles .....................14 Upcoming Events .................23 Hey Alumni! Have you got something to say, or any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi: Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca website: www.eng.mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer is published by the Engineering Faculty for its alumni. Distribution assistance is provided by the Alumni Office. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40063416 RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO CIRCULATION DEPTARTMENT, 1280 MAIN STREET WEST HAMILTON, ON L8S 4L7 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

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graduate students, bringing the total graduate enrollment in the Faculty to approximately 800 students. The Faculty is also in the process of creating two new research centres in Nanoand Microsystems and in Sustainable Energy Systems. These centres will emphasize interdisciplinary research involving several Engineering departments and represent two strategic research directions for the Faculty. They will focus on expanding the current activities and implementing the research programs of the Brookhouse Institute for Materials Research (BIMR), the Centre for Electromagnetic Devices (CEM) and Nuclear Engineering. We also plan to add new resources to the area of Environmental Engineering including clean water and waste treatment. At the undergraduate level, we are offering new programs in Chemical and BioEngineering, Environmental Engineering, Computational and Nano-materials, as well as Photonics. The Faculty is also expanding its dual degree programs (5 years, combined B. Eng/M. Eng. Degrees) to include Electrical and Biomedical Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Design Engineering, Software Engineering and Game Design. Future plans will include Mechanical and Biomechanics, Mechatronics and Nanoengineering. This growth in the Faculty will necessitate a significant expansion in space. Plans for raising $8 million of private sector funding for the creation of a new 50,000 square foot Engineering building are well underway. We have reached approximately 70% of our target funding and expect to reach our goal by Spring 2005. The new Engineering building will add 25,000 sq. ft. for research and graduate education, and 12,000 sq. ft. for undergraduate laboratories. One area that is currently experiencing renewed emphasis is internationalization of the Faculty. We are expanding our collaboration and exchange agreements with universities in Europe, China and India as

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Mo Elbestawi, Dean of Engineering

well as developing new relationships in South Korea, Latin America and the Middle East. These relationships are important in providing our students with necessary experiences to support the new global economy. Clearly, the initiatives described all support the Faculty’s strategic objective of growth while improving quality and our position as one of Canada’s top Engineering Schools.

Mo Elbestawi

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A message from the Associate Dean So, how are we doing?

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ver the past decade, the Faculty of Engineering has undertaken a major expansion in terms of the number of incoming students, the number of undergraduate programs, the number of professors and staff, and the size of the physical facilities. What effect have these changes had on the quality of our programs? We are clearly busier than ever as a result of our efforts to provide students with the best possible engineering education. Our students are being offered a wider range of choices than ever before, both in terms of academic programs and of extracurricular activities, and student morale remains high. Our expansion, in fact, has allowed us to introduce new programs in emerging disciplines, such as Biomedical Engineering and Nanomaterials Engineering, and to attract many new highly talented faculty members. I would therefore argue that we have improved what we have to offer to our students. I must also admit that my opinion is not without bias. To get a more impartial opinion of how we are doing, we can review the public evaluations and rankings that have appeared recently in the press. It should be noted, however, that most evaluate universities as a whole and therefore only provide indirect insight into our own Faculty. Nevertheless, we share the same values and are guided by the same principles as McMaster University, so these evaluations are still relevant. A 2003 study from the Institute of Higher Education at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China ranked universities from around the world on their academic and research performance. The Top 100 List includes such renowned institutions as Harvard, MIT, Caltech, Berkeley, Cambridge and McMaster. McMaster University is one of only two universities in Ontario and four in Canada to have made it to the Top 100 List. Further information on the criteria and methodology used in this study can be found at http://ed.sjtu.edu.cn/ranking.htm. In October 2004, The Globe and Mail published a “Report Card on Canadian M

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eighth among the fifteen universities in the “Medical Doctoral” division in the Overall ranking and first in the Most Innovative ranking. More details are available at http://www.macleans.ca/universities. Infosource reviews R&D activities in Canada and publishes a ranking of research activity at universities. In the latest ranking, McMaster University was voted Research University of the Year after being runnerup in 2003. Further details are available at http://www.researchinfosource.com/. Also, in 2004, McMaster was ranked among the Top 10 Places to Work in International Academia by The Scientist magazine. Unlike the above reviews, the Gourman Report tries to provide an objective evaluation of Faculties of Engineering on their own merits and offers an insightful comparison between Canadian and American Faculties. Unfortunately, the latest edition available is from 1999 and does not capture many of the more recent changes that have taken place here at McMaster. In the 1999 edition, the Faculty of Engineering ranked fourth in Canada and second in Ontario. A summary of the report can be found at http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/gourman.

Dr. Peter Smith Associate Dean of Engineering

Universities” that was based on the opinions of 28,000 students. McMaster University received an A on the overall educational experience, placing first among medium sized universities. Further information can be found at http://www.globeandmail.com/reportcard. One of the most widely read comparisons of universities in Canada is published annually in November by Maclean’s magazine. In this year’s survey, McMaster placed

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University of the Year According to Research Infosource Inc., McMaster University is Research University of the Year based on its ability to attract and capitalize on its research income. The announcement was made in November when Infosource released its annual Top 50 Research Universities report. The rankings are based on total sponsored research income, faculty and graduate student research intensity, and the number of publications in leading journals. McMaster was ranked in the medical/doctoral category. For the second year in a row, McMaster placed seventh in the country in overall research income (over $218 million) and third in research intensity based on research income per full-time faculty position. The rankings are based on Statistics Canada data. Mamdouh Shoukri, vice-president of research and international affairs, notes that ranking measurements are based on both inputs and outputs, and these results demonstrate that the University is not only attracting financial support but is also producing quality research results. “The momentum our research enterprise has gained is astounding. In the last 10 years, we’ve tripled our income. But more than that, we’ve recruited and retained some of the world’s best researchers.” U

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Engineering news Alumnus donation benefits new school

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n October 2004, Stephen Elop (Comp. Eng. & Mgt. ’86) presented the Faculty of Engineering with a gift of $100,000. The donation, made jointly with his wife Nancy who is also a McMaster graduate, is

From left to right: Dean Mo Elbestawi, Nancy Elop, Stephen Elop and Dr. Peter George.

to be used specifically for the University’s new School for Engineering Practice. Currently the chief operating officer (COO) for Macromedia Inc, the company that developed the Flash program, Elop knows how important it is that students are taught the skills they need to take complex technical problems from the planning stage to the world-at-large. While he was a student in the five-year Engineering & Management program, Elop worked part-time for the Faculty. One of the successful outcomes of his employment was the preparation and presentation of a business plan for – and following through on – the University’s first campuswide ethernet installation in the John Hodgins Engineering building. This is not the first time that McMaster has benefited from Elop’s generosity. He gives freely of his time and experience to

his alma mater. In February 2004, he was the keynote speaker at an engineering alumni dinner held in Toronto, where he shared his unique experience and future insights into the Internet of the future. The McMaster University School for Engineering Practice (MSEP), the first of its kind in Canada, will ensure that future engineers will have the necessary mix of skills to recognize and develop new technologies and to take those new technologies to market in a safe, efficient and environmentally sound manner. The School will have three new research and academic centres: Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Engineering and Public Policy, and Engineering Design. These centres will emphasize interdisciplinary education and research in these areas, in partnership with the Faculties of Business and Social Sciences.

Partnership supports telemedicine research

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n December 2004, Bell University Laboratories (BUL) announced a partnership with McMaster University to do research in telemedicine. The $450,000 commitment from BUL will support the creation of an integrated systems laboratory focusing on research and education in telemedicine technology. The partnership will form part of the proposed McMaster School of BioMedical Engineering. Its mandate is to create a unique collaborative environment that will link current and emerging areas of molecular, medical and engineering research. The healthcare system uses networks in the care of patients, and for storing and accessing patient records. Bell Canada, a leader in network systems, is well-

positioned to support biomedical engineering innovations through telerobotics, teleinformatics, communications networks, telepathology and other complex technologies at its laboratories.

McMaster University welcomes the opportunity to collaborate with Bell Canada on projects that would help both parties achieve their objectives in the area of BioMedical Engineering.

The MacEngineer welcomes your comments... Send your news and views to the editor at vespi@mcmaster.ca

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From left to right: Peter George, Jean Taillon, Vice President Enterprise Sales; Brian O’Shaughnessy, Vice President of Video Networks Technology Development; and Mo Elbestawi.

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From left to right: Doug Lord, Dean Mo Elbestawi, Walter Booth, Don Black, Rafik Loufty and Dr. Peter George.

Xerox + McMaster = Innovation

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n August 2004, Xerox Canada made a $1 million gift to the University for the new McMaster Centre of Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The Centre will be the first of its kind in Ontario and will teach students how to turn inventions into successful commercial ventures. The money from the Xerox gift will be used to attract top business professionals to teach at the Centre. The program is expected to admit about 100 graduate students per session. The

first session started in January 2005. “It is our vision that the Xerox Centre for Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation will become a spawning ground for the next generation of inventors,” said Doug Lord, president and CEO of Xerox Canada, and a McMaster graduate. Lord added that 52 McMaster graduates currently work for Xerox Canada. While the company partners with many universities, “the relationship with McMaster has

been the strongest,” he said. The Centre will not only benefit graduating students, it could indirectly impact on Hamilton’s business sector. It is expected that the establishment of more innovative companies will help grow the economic development and expansion of the Hamilton area. Announcement of the gift was made at Xerox’s Mississauga, Ontario research centre which celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2004.

Announcing the Walter G. Booth Chair holder brings 30 years of expertise in Business executive and managing technology innovaentrepreneur Rafik Loutfy is tion. At Xerox Corporation, he the inaugural holder of the held management positions in Walter G. Booth Chair for research, development, business Engineering Entrepreneurship and strategy development, and and Innovation. The Chair is in also served as manager of the the newly established School Xerox Research Centre of for Engineering Practice, which Canada where breakthrough also includes the XEROX imaging materials, research and Centre for Engineering Entretechnology were developed. preneurship and Innovation Rafik Loutfy (CEEI). As Chair, Loutfy will Dr. Loutfy says he is very be responsible for overseeing the School’s honoured to be the first Walter G. Booth new Engineering Entrepreneurship and Chair and excited to be establishing the Innovation Master’s program. new XEROX Centre for Engineering Appointed in October 2004, Loutfy Entrepreneurship and Innovation. “My

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vision is that the school will further advance McMaster’s quality programs and research in entrepreneurship and innovation.” The Master’s program in Entrepreneurship and Innovation will provide students with the skills necessary to transform technical expertise into commercial success; the opportunity to learn methods and techniques for the effective economic exploitation of engineering ideas; and will help students learn how to turn their product or service ideas into successful new businesses. The Chair was established by mechancontinued on page 11

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First Materials Camp a huge success

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or one week during the summer of 2004, McMaster played host to a group of high school students from Canada and the United States. Materials Camp is an annual residential program for high school students, operated by ASM INTERNATIONAL, a technical society for materials. The Department of Materials Science and Engineering hosted and operated the Camp, which provided 28 students with a fun week of learning about the world of engineering materials. The major component of the week was the team project, involving seven groups of students. Project topics included: “Why did the Titanic sink?”, How can we

design a replacement for metal car bodies?” and “What is Friction?”. The students and their mentors lived in residence, so there were opportunities for activity and interaction. This year’s mentors included materials engineers from industry and academia, as well as McMaster Engineering graduate and undergraduate students. The ASM Materials Education Foundation, McMaster, the University of Toronto and Ryerson University, along with a number of industrial companies, provided funding for the camp. ASM

International says its objective in helping to run camps across the continent is to provide high school students with a better appreciation of a discipline which does not have great visibility, and possibly help influence their future career decisions. McMaster’s Materials Camp Canada 2004 was so successful it has been decided to hold one next year. Camp 2005 is scheduled for July 14th to 21st. Application forms are available at the ASM Ontario Chapter website (www.asm.on.ca). High school students must have at least one more year to graduation to qualify.

Debbie moves on Debbie Smaluck (nee Pitkin) has decided to take up a new challenge after 30 years in the Department of Civil Engineering. She recently accepted the position as Administrative CoDebbie Smaluck ordinator for the new School for Engineering Practice. Why did she stay in Civ Eng so long? “The people, both faculty and students, are so nice. The students especially were so pleasant to work with,” she says. Being connected to the Faculty of Engineering has been a terrific experience, she adds. “Engineering is such a dynamic Faculty. There is always something interesting happening.” She notes that the three Centres connected with the School for Engineering Practice will offer graduate programs in entrepreneurship & innovation, engineering & public policy, and engineering design. And she looks forward to reconnecting with engineering alumni who might return to Mac and take advantage of the new programs.

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A group of participants from the Materials Camp residential program.

Hamilton museum to the rescue

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he Iroquois Trophy is handed out annually to the top Mechanical Engineering student at graduation. The tradition began under the guidance of Dr. Jack Wade, professor, Mechanical Engineering. Recently, however, the supply of Iroquois parts has been severely diminished. Members of the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum (CWHM), located at Hamilton’s International Airport, came to the rescue by supplying the Department with genuine Orenda turbine blades, polished and set on walnut stands. In appreciation, McMaster has made a donation to the museum’s operating fund. The University and the mechanical engineering department sincerely appreciate the efforts of the Buffalo Crew and Wood Shop in the manufacture of the new trophies.

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Dr. Samir Ziada, Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, accepts the donation of “Iroquois Trophies” from Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum (CWHM) members Jim “JD” Black (ex-Orenda Flight Testing Department) and Jack Frazier (ex-Orenda Gas Turbine Experimental Fitter). N

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Research news Remote medical techniques tested

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n October, McMaster’s Mehran Anvari used the latest remote surgical technologies and techniques to conduct 10 days of experiments on mock patients in an underwater habitat. The purpose of the underwater mission, labeled NEEMO (NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations) 7, was to demonstrate and evaluate innovative remote technologies. This was the latest in a series of remote medical missions. The crew included Anvari, director of McMaster’s Centre for Minimal Access Surgery (CMAS), Craig McKinley, a CMAS surgeon, Canadian astronaut Dave Williams and two American astronauts. “Since its inception in 1999, CMAS has developed techniques to overcome some challenges faced by physicians in isolated communities,” Anvari said. “The NEEMO 7 mission allows us to test these techniques in an extreme environment.” The site, known as Aquarius, is located 19 metres below the surface of the sea, approximately 6 km off Key Largo in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Owned by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Aquarius is about 14 by 4 metres, with 11 cubic metres of living and laboratory space. In surgical simulations involving telementoring, Anvari used two-way telecommunication links to guide an untrained

surgeon. Another simulation involved telerobotics and virtual-reality technology, in which Anvari performed operations on a mock patient inside Aquarius. Because the extreme conditions underwater are similar to those of space, such missions provide astronauts and physicians with an opportunity to test state-of-the-art remote medical techniques in real-time and

real-life situations. Eventually, these medical techniques could be used in space. NEEMO 7 was a joint project involving McMaster’s Centre for Minimal Access Surgery located at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in Hamilton, the Canadian Space Agency, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Mac hosts nanotech workshop

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cMaster scientists were joined by other stakeholders from across Ontario to discuss how to address the challenging issues in nanotechnology, and how to convert those efforts into innovation. Nanotechnology is the branch of engineering that deals with individual atoms or molecules. The one-day workshop, held in November at the University, included leading researchers from academia and industry along with experts in the innovation process from the private and government sectors. Workshop organizer John Preston, director of the Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, noted that Ontario’s future economy will be strongly impacted by investments in nanoscience and nanotechnology. “By coordinating our activities, we can make those investments

much more effective in terms of delivering innovation.” At the same time, McMaster graduate students working in nanoscience and nanotechnology hosted their counterparts from across the province in a workshop that included invited talks and a poster session. The student event was sponsored by NSERC’s Nano-Innovation Platform. Mike Massa, one of the organizing students, said the event offered students from all disciplines associated with nanoscience an opportunity to come together and share ideas. McMaster researchers are at the forefront of new developments for imaging nanostructures, producing new nanomaterials, and incorporating nanotechnologies into new systems for biomedical applications.

Beacon Project – auto research initiative The cars Canadians drive in the future will not only be built here, they’ll be designed here. That’s the objective of the Beacon Project, a $2-billion automotive research and development initiative being led by GM Canada. Both McMaster and Hamilton could realize major benefits from this new project. One phase involves a huge investment into a state-of-the-art, computer-aided design centre at McMaster, which would include a centre for research into corro-

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sion resistant materials. According to plans, the company would donate $2 million to the centre, along with an additional $60 million to provide 50 workstations with appropriate hardware and software. Dean of Engineering Mo Elbestawi acknowledges the project is huge and could have significant impact for research opportunities at McMaster and spin-off jobs for Hamilton. GM spokesperson Pam McLaughlin

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says the company is convinced of the importance of developing more automotive design in Canada. The Beacon Project has the potential to increase valuable high-tech design and engineering jobs – which have not been available traditionally in Canada. Although not finalized at time of writing, discussions are on-going between GM Canada, the federal and provincial governments, McMaster and other universities and research centers.

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Engineers going beyond our borders by Tyler Woychyshyn, Stephanie Liddle and Luis Anderson.

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ngineers Without Borders (EWB), founded in 2000 to promote human development through access to technology, has grown into an influential organization dedicated to involving Canadians in actions supporting sustainable development overseas and here at home. EWB has 22 university chapters across Canada. For the past two years, McMaster’s EWB Chapter has been involved in community initiatives including the High School Outreach program, Threshold School of Building, and the Canadian Appropriate Technologies in Mine Action Competition (CATIMAC). Ten of our members are attending the National Conference in Vancouver, BC in January 2005. All these programs promote leadership, community service and volunteerism among students. Operation 21 (Op21) will send students overseas to deal with a variety of challenges confronting impoverished communities. It is our biggest project this year. The daily challenges facing these communities include water and sanitation, food processing, lack of sources of energy, and information technology. While students are expected to contribute to their respective projects during the four-month placement, the primary focus is hands-on experience and learning. By seeing first hand the types of obstacles and

Tyler Woychyshyn, Engineering Physics & Management ’06, (left) and Stephanie Liddle, Electrical and Biomedical Engineering ’08, have been chosen to work overseas this year.

problems dealt with in these communities, students gain a broader perspective. When they return to Mac, they apply this knowledge to educate, organize and motivate the local community. This year, our Chapter is sending two students overseas: Tyler Woychyshyn and Stephanie Liddle. Currently in fourth year of the Engineering Physics and Management program, Tyler became involved with EWB during his third year, and it was love at first sight. Since then he has helped coordinate different programs within our Chapter. Tyler was fortunate enough to be selected as the recipient of the Op21 placement this year to Ghana starting summer 2005. His primary goal is to absorb all that this trip

Robotics lab coming to Mac Richmond, B.C.-based MDA Space Group announced in September a $450,000 donation to help create a medical robotics laboratory at McMaster. The lab will form part of the planned $5-million School in BioMedical Engineering. The partnership between MDA and McMaster developed from the University’s desire to join the Faculties of Engineering and Health Sciences in developing new and innovative medical tools and procedures. Mag Iskander, vice-president of MDA Space Group, commented that the company is pleased to have the opportunity to partner with

a leading Canadian university that demonstrates vision. Medical robotics includes remote surgery, where the surgeon and patient may be thousands of kilometers apart, keyhole surgery in which surgeons operate from outside the body using robotic systems, and diagnostic probes which enter the body and gather medical information about the patient. Medical robotics has evolved out of the expertise and skills learned from designing and building the famed Canadarm, developed by Spar Aerospace of Brampton, Ontario. In 1999, MDA acquired Spar’s robotics division.

has to offer and reinvest this knowledge into the community on his return. Stephanie is a second year electrical and biomedical engineering student. She is newly involved with EWB; however, this does not curb her enthusiasm. She is already involved with EWB’s CATIMAC program, working on a proposal for landmine victim assistance. She will also be attending the National Conference to learn and discuss sustainable development issues and leadership skills. Stephanie cannot wait to experience overseas development first hand, learn about different cultures, people and the development issues they face. She is hoping to motivate other people in the McMaster community to learn more about international development. Since all our overseas work is done by volunteers, EWB is able to have a high degree of impact for a very small investment. An average four month placement costs our Chapter $6,000. This is broken down into components such as travel ($2,500) and vaccinations ($500), for example. While our work is cost-effective it is still a continuous challenge to find funds. We need to raise $12,000 in order to send Tyler and Stephanie overseas. EWB is a charitable organization that works for solutions to sustainable human development in the local community or half the world away. For more information about our Chapter’s activities and how to sponsor us, you can log on to http://mac.ewb.ca or write us at mac@ewb.ca. Engineers Without Borders’Canadian Charity 89980-1815-RR0001

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Program updates New M.Eng. degree program

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he success of the Eng & Society program, now in its 13th year, has prompted the Faculty of Engineering to offer a M.Eng. in Engineering & Public Policy. Courses will cover such topics as energy and environmental systems, computer and communication technologies, and transportation planning. It’s a natural next step from the Faculty’s highly successful Engineering and Society program that explores the human side of engineering. In fact, there are already Eng & Soc graduates working in areas relating to public policy – helping to put a human face to engineering-related decisions. Emily Reisman (Civil Eng. & Society ’02) went into the program because it fit with her broad interests which included History, English, Drama, Math and Physics. “The engineering and society program seemed to be tailor made for me,” she says. Being able to spread the degree over 5 years allowed her to participate in student politics (McMaster Engineer Society and Civil Club) and the university theatre, and gave her the leeway to participate in an exchange experience. The broader education offered by the E&S program creates more interesting, flexible engineers, she believes. E&S students are challenged to ask questions and probe issues, to write and make presentations – all key skills necessary for success in today’s workplace. “Sitting around a seminar table discussing a classmate’s presentation is identical to what goes on in the real world.” Currently, Reisman is a policy advisor with the Ministry for Municipal Affairs, based in Toronto. “I work with political staff, other Ministries and stakeholders to develop policy related to building regulation.” Engineering is never purely technical, she adds. There are always external issues attached to any technical decision. “In my case, I deal with the technical issues in a policy context every day. We are constantly asking what the broader impacts are of every decision we consider.” Rita Venneri (Civil Eng. & Society ’01) took the E&S program because of its M

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Emily Reisman

sary educational background for these tasks.” Venneri is employed under the four-year Engineering Development Program (EDP) with the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) as an Engineer-in-Training, based in Toronto. Designed to introduce recent engineering graduates to the daily operations of the MTO, the program provides new employees with an opportunity to rotate through the various offices and be exposed to a broad set of skills in transportation planning, contracts, maintenance, construction, environmental, as well as government operating systems. “Being able to understand or grasp the holistic picture requires multidisciplinary knowledge,” Venneri says. She believes that engineers who have been exposed to social and policy-related issues are better able to make more informative and effective decisions. Today’s complex world expects engineers to design technical systems that provide goods and services to society in a safe, efficient and environmentally sound manner. At the Centre for Engineering & Public Policy, students will acquire an understanding of public policy and its effects on a variety of technological, social and ecological systems.

Rita Venneri

unique approach that includes core courses on the culture, history and social control of technology. It helped redefine for her the traditional role of an engineer “from one who is the mere applicator of science and mathematics to a professional who strives to understand the social, political, and environmental complexities inherent in engineering applications,” she says. Like Reisman, she also liked being able to take courses distinct from engineering. “This was an added bonus for a student like myself whose academic interests lay beyond that of the engineering program.” She too has noticed that Engineering and Society students are more adept at seeing the holistic picture. “They have the ability to better assess and identify risk, or evaluate subsequent environmental/societal issues because they have been exposed to the neces-

Keeping McMaster in the ‘know’ project in the final undergraduate year (4th year) as well as a graduate interdisciplinary project based in industry in year 5. We see tremendous value in this new combined degree, and believe that industry will benefit from the highly qualified people that graduate from the program. To be successful, we require industry support for both the work terms and the projects, and we are currently exploring opportunities to partner with industry in this initiative. For more information on the program, please contact Dr. Joe McDermid at mcdermid@mcmaster.ca.

An innovative program continues to keep McMaster at the forefront of academic ingenuity. A new 5-year Master’s program will enable students to obtain a combined B.Eng/M.Eng degree in Manufacturing. Students enrolled in Chemical, Materials or Mechanical Engineering who maintain a high GPA are eligible to participate in the program. Industrial experience is a major component of this venture; students will be required to engage in summer work terms following completion of their 3rd and 4th years of study. In addition to the work term experience, students will also be required to complete a major

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Innovative program celebrates milestone

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t the spring 2005 Convocation, the Engineering & Management program will be graduating its 30th class. A special alumni event is being planned to commemorate this milestone! Established in 1972, the program remains unique in Canada, with no other university offering such an intensely integrated program. The five-year program blends the full engineering degree requirements with all the core commerce courses needed for a B.Comm. Students can enroll in any branch of engineering and still qualify to take the business courses.

It’s been an extremely successwork through a project that ful initiative and one that sets tackles an existing problem McMaster’s Faculty of Engibeing faced by a functioning neering apart. “We are very real-world company. pleased with the program,” says “The program stretches our Ken Coley, director. “All our students, forcing them to think of graduates are enthusiastic about the wider implications of what the benefits to their careers.” they are doing,” Coley says. One of the most important He adds that the program is features is the hands-on compoattracting increasingly more Ken Coley nent. Prior to graduation, students notice from employers. Once they must take one course designed specifiknow about the program, “they are keen to cally to link both engineering and busihave our graduates.” ness theories and practices. They must

Engineering & Society program update

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design and social context”. cMaster’s Faculty of The program, now in its 13th Engineering is the first year, builds on the framework of in Canada to offer a the conventional engineering degree program that combines curriculum. To that are added a technical engineering education series of core courses that with a broader university experiexamine the complex interactions ence. The five-year Engineering between technology and society. and Society Program meets the Focused electives from need specified in a recent report by outside the Faculty add a new The Canadian Academy of Brian Baetz dimension to the engineering Engineering for “broader, less education. In addition, three courses called specialized, more integrated undergraduate Inquiry in an Engineering Context, help programs with increased emphasis on

Two new initiatives Modern engineering relies increasingly on new materials that are specifically tailored for automotive, electronics, aerospace and biotechnology applications. One of the greatest hurdles confronting technological innovation is the challenge of manufacturing materials with nano - and micro-scale structures that lead to specific functionality in the real world. Manufacturing materials with specific structure/property relationships has often had to rely on empirical, hit-or-miss approaches, which are both timeconsuming and expensive. This multi-scale challenge in materials engineering is being addressed in the University’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering with exciting new research that uses new innovations in parallel computing to conduct virtual simulations. These simulations can predict the way matter self-organizes, and how its small-scale structure and properties are determined. McMaster University is also spearheading the formation of a new Canadian Network for Computational Materials Science (CNCMS). The Network will host an annual workshop at the University that brings together researchers in engineering, science and industry to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration. Lecture topics would include modeling of electronic materials, nano- and micro-structure formation, and materials processing and fabrication. The emphasis is on bridging the often ignored gap between predictive modeling and experimental realization, the synthesis of which will ultimately lead to novel industrial materials. In 2005, the CNCMS will also support a new Canadian Summer School in Computational Materials Science at McMaster.

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students develop skills at formulating questions, carrying out research, and communicating findings. Brian Baetz, director, notes that the program set a record high enrolment of 54 students in Level II for the fall 2004 term. “We are working to maintain the hands-on learning that is central to the program’s delivery, even with the larger classes,” he says. The program is designed to develop broadly educated and resourceful engineers by emphasizing a multi-disciplinary outlook, self-directed learning, good communication skills and interaction with others. Baetz says interest in the program continues to grow because the majority of students coming into engineering have broad interests and want to have the opportunity to explore personal areas of passion in addition to taking engineering courses. Also, he adds, students are aware that the profession is looking for graduates who can think outside the box. “We now recognize that everything involved with design is inter-related and connected to human need. This program offers engineering students a heightened sensitivity to the relevance of human, environmental and social issues to what we do as engineers.” Baetz is very excited about the new MEng in Engineering and Public Policy slated to start in the fall of 2005. It will be offered part-time so that engineers who have full-time jobs can take advantage of the new program. N

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Special recognition Robert D. Loree honoured by peers

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of engineering students. He has always demonstrated great commitment to the education of future engineers. The Ontario Professional Engineers Awards recognize outstanding individuals for engineering excellence and community service. The 2004 awards program was presented by Professional Engineers Ontario and the Ontario Society of Professional Engineers. The Citizenship Award recognizes a professional engineer’s contributions to public service. Those who earn this award have given freely of their time, professional experience and engineering expertise – to the benefit of humanity.

These include Science & Engiongratulations are extendneering Fairs, Engineering Olymed to Robert D. Loree, pics, job creation programs, and P.Eng. Loree received the the Shad Valley program. He Citizenship Award at the annual created the popular multi-media Ontario Professional Engineers McMaster Engineering FIREAwards Gala on Saturday NovBALL Show that has been ember 20th. The award, presented enjoyed by 450,000 students in Toronto, recognizes his signifduring the past eight years. He is icant contributions to the promoalso the founder of the Science tion of engineering as a profession. Robert D. Loree Can! Foundation, a non-profit For more than three decades, program that encourages young people to Loree has combined his love of teaching become involved in science and technology. and engineering to initiate and promote a Loree has been a counselor, mentor, variety of programs that encourage stuconsultant and genuine friend to thousands dents to consider careers in engineering.

Engineering Excellence Award

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ohamed A. Khattab has received the Engineering Medal for Excellence for his significant contributions in the area of railroad freight car design. The award was presented at the annual Ontario Professional Engineers Awards Gala in Toronto on November 20th. Dr. Khattab is resident consultant (director, design engineering) for National Steel Car Ltd. (NSC), the largest railroad freight car builder in Canada. He is recognized throughout North America for the design of freight cars and as an expert in steel weldment design. When Khattab arrived at NSC in 1972, he introduced his own analytical design techniques and the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to the

The Ontario Professional Engidesign process, and pushed for neers Awards recognize outstandmore computer capability. ing individuals for engineering Today, the company is recogexcellence and community service. nized as having the most sophisThe awards program is presented ticated design and stress analysis by Professional Engineers Ontario capability of any railcar manuand the Ontario Society of facturer in North America. Professional Engineers. The After 20 years with NSC, Engineering Medal for Excellence Khattab established M.K. Engineering. He is the author of nine Mohamed A. Khattab recognizes innovative applications and overall excellence in the pracpublished papers and a book, Track Train Dynamics, Fatigue Analysis of tice of engineering. Freight Cars (not yet published). He owns a number of patents in Canada and the U.S. for improvements that have made freight cars and their manufacture more efficient and cost effective.

Walter G. Booth Chair Holder continued from page 5

Peter Smith’s message

ical engineering grad Walter Booth (’62). Booth, who obtained his master’s degree in 1965, is chairman and president of Timberland Group, a group of three companies that specialize in various types of manufacturing. During his undergraduate years, he was a student leader, serving as the second McMaster Engineering Student (MES) president in 1962. He currently is a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board.

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So, where does this put us? I would suggest that, overall, we are doing very well indeed, particularly if you consider that the single university in Ontario that is routinely ranked above us is about three times our size and has been operating for a lot longer than we have. Our Faculty will continue to evolve as

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we implement the many ambitious plans that we have for the next few years. I expect that the results will continue to be scrutinized and I look forward to the verdict. Peter Smith Associate Dean (Academic)

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Fall Alumni Events provide fun & fellowshi Boys and Noise

environmentally sound tending practices. The tour was followed by an informative wine tasting and a scrumptious dinner in The Bench Bistro. This was the second year we have enjoyed a visit to one of Niagara’s wineries in the early fall. It’s becoming an Alumni tradition!

Family Day at Cameron Motorsports Karting Complex, located on Highway #6 South, was nothing short of an unqualified success! September 19th was a bright, sunny day, perfect for running the 5-lap trials and qualifying heets that kept members of the three MacEngineering teams busy all afternoon. About 30 people attended, enjoying the weather, the go-karts and the camaraderie. Check out the photos at www.eng.mcmaster.ca/eventgallery/ familyday2004/index.html.

Eng. & Society Homecoming On October 2nd, approximately 40 Engineering and Society alumni and their partners were enthusiastically welcomed home to Mac by program director Brian Baetz. In his remarks, he noted the excellent response by alumni to the program’s first homecoming event. The evening included dinner at the University Club and a silent auction. Proceeds from the auction were donated to “Society’s Challenge”, an Engineering & Society student initiative that creates connections with the global community through volunteer work.

Family Day at Cameron Motorsports.

Engineering & Society reunion.

Social Connections

For over three hours on September 23rd, a small but enthusiastic group of alumni and their guests joined faculty members and Alumni office staff for an informative – and tasty – introduction to EastDell Estates. Along with a guided walk through the vineyards, our guide explained about the age of the vines and described how soil conditions affect the grapes. EastDell Estates, located on a northerly section of Ontario’s Carolinian forest, prides itself on its

The Making Connections event was organized as an opportunity to connect 4th and 5th year engineering students with recent alumni currently working in the profession. This year, 52 alumni mentors attended, ranging from professionals, Engineers in Training, presidents who own their own companies, engineers who are now medical doctors, and others who graduated from the Faculty but no longer practise engineering. The October 12th event, held in the evening in the Marketplace at the Student Centre, attracted 125 students. They had the opportunity to speak with alumni about career options and to learn more about how to choose a career and what kind of job opportunities currently exist. Students appreciated the chance to voice concerns and get answers to questions about graduation and careers.

Alumni and guests at EastDell Estates winery.

Social connections event.

A Taste of the Niagara Grape

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ip for all… Oakville Alumni Attract Top Speaker Thirty-six Oakville, Ontario-based alumni gathered for dinner and a social time on October 21 at the Oakville Conference Centre. They enjoyed a scrumptious Italian-style dinner and following dessert, guest speaker Nick Javor (Chem.Eng. & Mgt.’80) gave a thoughtful commentary on “Diversity in Engineering”. After receiving an MBA in 1981 (also at McMaster), Javor went to work at Imperial Oil, handling design work for catalytic conversion at the Sarnia plant. He left there to join Esso, and eventually became President of its subsidiary company, Mr. Lube. It is here, he jokes, that he learned “to drink lots of coffee and dream of a career in alternative applications of high temperature oil”. Tim Hortons was the natural next career move, and he joined the company as VP of New Business Development. You have Javor to thank for the fact that you can buy a Tim Hortons coffee and donut while paying for gas at an Esso On The Run convenience store! Now Vice President for the company’s Corporate Affairs, his responsibilities include corporate communications, public relations, and government and environmental affairs. In January, 2004, he was named Vice President of the Tim Hortons Children’s Foundation which operates 6 summer camps in Canada and the United States.

MES Past Presidents’ Gala.

Kurelek ’80, Dianne (Millar) Kurelek ’81, Miranda (Weygang) Kohler ’84, Michael Lipcsik ’87, Paul Martin ’90, Ashraf Kamel ’92, Keith Taylor ’94, Janet Loebach ’96, Mets Kramer ’00, Braden Kurczak ’01, Elizabeth Clark ’02, Josh Wong ’03, and Samantha Hess ’04. Many of the Dean’s Advisory Board members attended including: Dr. Doug Barber (Chair), Bob Crow, Dr. Les McLean, Dr. Amit Monga, Dr. John Reid, Ed Whitehead, and Dr. Tamas Terlaky from the Department of Computing and Software. In addition, two past Deans were there: Dr. John Bandler and Dr. Les Shemilt. The event, billed as “Formal – black tie optional”, was an opportunity to thank the many students who served as MES President during the Society’s 43-year history, and who contributed in a unique way to the advancement of the Faculty of Engineering.

When A Sniff is Not Enough! Those who enjoyed the Scotch Tasting Event on November 30th all agree that the success of the evening was due in great measure to the knowledgeable expertise of Frances Neufeld. When everyone had assembled at the Scottish Rite building in downtown Hamilton, Ms. Neufeld led the group through a selection of 3 single malts that included a triple distilled whisky, a South African sherry casked whisky and a smoky sea-side whisky. During her talk, everyone enjoyed a dinner of traditional Christmas turkey with all the trimmings. Neufeld is a long-time student and aficionado of single malt whiskies and has journeyed to Scotland as part of her research into the popular drink. Many expressed the hope that this event will become an annual one!

Nick Javor Oakville event .

MES Past Presidents’ Gala A large group of Engineering Society Past Presidents, their partners and other invited guests gathered at the University Club on November 19th to enjoy a reception and dinner to honour MES presidents. Dean Mo Elbestawi and other University administration officials and current Department Chairs welcomed the past presidents who represented almost every year from 1959 to 2004: David Litster ’59 and Walter Booth ’60 (who are also Dean’s Advisory Board members), Ray Biggar ’63, Doug Wagstaffe ’64, Robert Wilson ’65, Doug Wilson ’68, Bruce Thomson ’73, James Nuffield ’75, Susan Sproule ’76, Ben Sproule ’78, David Mitges ’79, Andy

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Scotch-tasting event.

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Alumni profiles Tom Jenkins – one of the “100 most influential”

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om Jenkins is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Open Text, the market leader in providing Enterprise Content Management (ECM) solutions that bring together people, processes and information in global organizations. Throughout its history, Open Text has matched its tradition of innovation with a track record of financial strength and growth. Today, the company supports more than 17 million seats across 13,000 deployments in 31 countries and 12 languages worldwide. Open Text’s flagship product, Livelink® seamlessly combines collaboration with content management, helping organizations transform information into knowledge to provide the foundation for innovation, compliance and accelerated growth. Recognized as one of the “100 Most Influential People” in the world of knowledge management by KMWorld for five years in a row, Mr. Jenkins has been involved with the Internet since it emerged as a major public network in the early 1990s. As CEO of Open Text Corporation, he was instrumental in the creation of one of the first Internet search engines that was used by Netscape®, Yahoo!® and IBM®. Mr. Jenkins went on to direct the development of the first Internet-based Document Management system as well the earliest versions of Internet-based Workflow, Portals and Online Meeting software. All of these component technologies are early forerunners of current ECM technology. Mr. Jenkins has served in a variety of technical and managerial positions during his career including Design Engineer, Sales Manager, General Manager, Chief Operating Officer, President, CEO and Chairman. These positions have always been with technology intensive growth companies specializing in computer hardware and software products internationally. The Open Text Corporation has been Tom Jenkins’s passion since 1991, taking the company from it’s original roots of indexing the Oxford English Dictionary to a worldwide organization with over 2,000 employees and over

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Tom Jenkins

400 million dollars in revenues. Tom is active in developing the high tech sector in Canada and abroad and is a much

called upon speaker on high tech and business trends. He is a passionate and inspirational communicator who has seen it all in the Canadian and international mosaic of high tech companies. Tom Jenkins received an MBA in Technology Management from York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Prior to this achievement he received an M.A.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Toronto and a B.Eng. & Mgt. in Technology and Commerce from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. He is married, has three children and makes his home in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. If you would like to learn more about Tom and his world you are invited to attend the Royal York Event on January 25, 2005. Information at www.eng.mcmaster. ca/engalumni.

Pankaj Sood – entrepreneurial engineer achieves success

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ith the introduction of Wi-Fi or wireless fidelity technology, the standard for wireless local area networks (LANs), the goal of never being out of touch with anyone – business colleagues, friends, relations or your stock broker - is truly within reach. For corporations, especially, connectivity is where it is “at”, today! Not surprisingly, a host of mobile access companies have sprung up offering a means for people to communicate with their office Intranets or the Internet – for a fee. The alternative is a community network, such as might be run by a group of small business owners within the same industry sector, for example. The first can be expensive; the second is not always as secure as business managers require. Enter Delphina Wireless, the Wi-Fi network company started in March 2004 by MacEng grad Pankaj Sood while still completing his degree. Engineering was a natural choice, says

Sood. “I have been fascinated by communications technology since I was in Grade 3, and my dad is an electrical engineer. By the time I was in Grade 10, I had made up my mind to pursue computer engineering.” Delphina actually grew out of a research course Sood took with Dr. Terry Todd on wireless networks. “I saw a potential business opportunity that was being overlooked, where revenue could be generated from advertising and sponsorships instead of by billing the clients,” he says. “The course I took with Dr. Todd was a major driving force for me in pursuing this opportunity.” Delphina Wireless designs Wi-Fi networks that are reliable and secure, and that offer free access. Hence, it is like a community network but with the security and reliability of a commercial network. In the Delphina model, a company owns the infrastructure that enables its customers to gain Intranet and Internet access. Since this service is free, no sensitive credit card

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Peter Zabrok – a passion for rock climbing

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ttention Chem Eng grads of the early 1980s. We have the scoop on Peter Zabrok. Read on … if you dare! Born in Hamilton, Zabrok attended Mac in the late 1970s and graduated in 1982. “I took Chemical Engineering and Mismanagement – I liked some of my accounting courses so much, I took them twice.” (Writer’s Disclaimer: There’s a lot of irreverence in Zabrok’s responses. Proceed with caution! Bwah-ha-ha-ha-ha!!!)

Pankaj Sood

The Barber Mill project. c

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together a lot, working together never worked,” he says. “Some people work better in a Team of One, and my dad and I could be two such people.” In fact, being a professional engineer didn’t work, either. It’s much too structured and, in hindsight, was probably the worst career choice he could have made. These days, you’ll find him (sometimes) working in the insurance industry as a selfemployed salesman for an Oakville-based company. In typically Zabrok fashion, he has few kind words for his “boss”, except to say that “he never complains when I go caving or climbing”. Which brings us to what the 45-year-old has really been doing all these years. Caving and climbing are passions that he’s pursued since university days. Zabrok started with rock climbing, later moving on to big wall solo climbing. Why? “Either you get it, or you don’t. And if you don’t, there ain’t no point tryin’ to explain it. Being a bit crazy doesn’t hurt, though.” In California’s Yosemite National Park, he has successfully tackled Reticent Wall (A5 5.8), Jolly Roger (A5 5.10) and Native Son (A4+ 5.9), and completed El Cap 26 times – including eight solo ascents - and every time via a different route. He proudly subscribes to the lazy man’s approach to climbing and in his own words, has taken [wall] climbing to “new levels of big wall leisure”. Typically, his climbing bag includes a ghetto blaster, a solar-powered shower, a bottle of Napa Valley cabernet, several cans of Guinness, and a coffee press! Still an active caver, he has helped explore and survey the Mammoth Cave System in Kentucky. Zabrok writes a column in Rock & Ice Magazine, under the moniker Dr. Piton. The good doctor offers advice on big wall climbing in exchange for assistance from novices who haul his bags to the base of routes. “Dr. Piton writes cutting-edge big wall technology which has never been published elsewhere,” Zabrok claims. “The best thing I learned in engineering? How to solve problems. I enjoy coming up with creative and inventive solutions to technical wall climbing dilemmas.” Turns out engineering proved useful after all!

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information is collected. Admittedly, this option might be more expensive to set up, but Sood and his partner, Tanesh Bhardwaj, believe the increased additional business that the client will realize quickly offsets the initial investment. The key is advertising in the form of target marketing through the Wi-Fi network. After all, the clients already belong to the business’ industry or service sector group that would benefit from announcements about specific, targeted services and products. Sood credits many people at MacEngineering with helping to get his entrepreneurial venture launched. “I still talk to Dr. Todd if I need technical advice. The staff at Engineering Career Services, especially Anne Markey, have been a tremendous help and support. David Ryan helped us get our content together, and Carm Vespi has provided me with assistance in contacting other alumni.” The company’s newest venture is an important one, both in terms of generating

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He jokingly adds that the University gave him a degree just to be rid of him, proudly noting that he graduated last in the class – both alphabetically as well as on marks – thus proving arithmetically that he did no more work than he absolutely had to. Engineering had seemed like a good idea. It could provide a useful career and Dad owned an engineering company. There were plans for him to come on board after graduating. It didn’t work out that way, though. “While we seem to enjoy fishing

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Pankaj Sood and Tanesh Bhardwaj.

substantial revenues and in prestige! Delphina Wireless will be the lead IT project manager and consultant for the Georgetown, Ontario-based Barber Mill project. A development company, Everlast Restoration Inc., will be renovating the historic Barber Mill, turning it into a commercial complex, constructing new luxury condominiums and a hotel. Delphina will be providing services such as designing and implementing the communication networks for the entire complex. This includes the surveillance system and the hotel phone system along with the corresponding billing and reservation systems, as well as a “smart” parking lot system that uses sensors to provide real time parking information. The Barber Mill project is going to be one of the most technologically advanced projects in its category, Sood notes proudly. “Victor Boutin, Everlast’s owner, has envisioned this project as a great addition to the Georgetown community and we are very happy to be a part of it!” U

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David McElhanney – drawn to western roots

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t can be said that in some strange way, David McElhanney has come “home”. But it’s not home in any family sense. He is manager of the Calgary office of McElhanney Consulting Services Ltd., part of The McElhanney Group of companies, the firm founded by his grandfather in 1910. It was sold in 1956 and is now an employeeowned private company with has no legal family connections. Since the original buyers decided to keep the name, the firm proudly boasts that it’s the oldest consulting engineering company in Western Canada. Vancouver-based McElhanney Group is an engineering consulting and land surveying company, employing over 600 staff serving clients in Canada and southern Asia. It offers civil engineering, planning, mapping and surveying services to provincial governments, municipalities and private developers.

Interestingly, this is the second time David McElhanney has been part of The McElhanney Group. After graduating from Civil Engineering in 1985, he was hired by the company and for the following 14 years, worked out of Vancouver and points further north. Although he didn’t have an “in”, his name often raised questions with colleagues and clients. “There may have been some expectation because of the name,” he admits. “However, I’ve proved myself and moved forward within the company based on my capabilities, not the name.” From 1999 to 2002, he worked for a management consulting firm specializing in performance management and leadership development in the oil and gas industry that eventually lead to his move to Calgary. He was hired once again by The McElhanney Group in 2002 to head the

Colleen Shannon – parlaying engineering skills into law

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She confesses that “I had been t’s been a long journey but thinking of law for some time, Colleen Shannon (Civil Eng. even while in engineering.” She ’81) feels right at home as a received her LLB in 1987 from lawyer. “Actually, I come from a the University of Toronto and, in long line of lawyers,” she admits. 1994, obtained an LLM from When she entered university in New York University. the late 1970s, Shannon initially While many with an engienrolled in the science program neering background are drawn to because of her love of math and science. She switched to engi- Colleen Shannon intellectual property law (IP), Shannon is very happy to have neering when she realized that her chosen commercial litigation. Currently, passion in these two areas could be she is with the Toronto firm of Borden combined and applied within civil engiLadner Gervais LLP, handling technical neering. litigation mainly in the area of environThey were wonderful years, she says of mental and construction law. In effect, she her time at McMaster. “We worked hard but is using the knowledge and skills gained had fun as well.” Because the Civ Eng from both her degrees. Clients include classes were small, the students got to know architects, engineers and contractors, and each other quite well, she remembers. she says that almost 80% of her practice Shannon was the only female to gradinvolves engineering issues. This is not to uate from civil engineering in 1981. “It was say that all her cases involve lawsuits an interesting time to be a woman in engiagainst engineers! Quite often, she has to neering!” she laughs, noting that at the time track down experts in engineering to the idea of “political correctness” had not provide professional advice or information yet been widely recognized. pertinent to a case. Following a three-year stint at Toronto“It’s a lot of fun to work in the two areas based Imperial Oil in the mechanical design that I enjoy so much.” division, she switched direction once again.

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David McElhanney

company’s new Calgary office. He and his staff are expanding the company’s engineering presence in Alberta, working on transportation and municipal infrastructure developments such has highways, resource road, sewer and water projects. David was born in Orillia but lived most of his formative years in the United States. After enrolling in university there, he decided to take some time off prior to completing his degree. He moved to British Columbia and worked for Parks Canada, and fell in love with the mountains. When it was time to buckle down and finish that degree, he selected McMaster, not in small part because the University agreed to recognize his previous credentials. He chose civil engineering because of its logical applications. “It focuses on common sense systems; it’s not as abstract as electrical or chemical engineering.” McMaster provided a good general grounding in civil engineering, he says, that has definitely been of assistance as he progressed through his career. And the Mac learning experience offered a good background for teamwork, he says. Today’s large projects require the broader knowledge base that the Mac Engineering program offers. McElhanney, who also has an MBA from the Richard Ivey School of Business (1998), is married with one son. His family also includes an Old English Sheepdog named Heathcliff. In his spare time, he enjoys a variety of sporting activities, volunteering and dabbling in investing. He has a cabin on one of the Gulf Islands of British Columbia where the family retreats at least once a year to “get away from it all”. N

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Alumni team walks to end breast cancer

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uring a September 2004 weekend, the Peach Pie Road team of Leanne Tuck, Kim Minogue and Kim Atkinson participated in “The Walk to End Breast Cancer.” The two-day, 60 km walk through the neighbourhoods of Toronto, raises money for Princess Margaret Hospital to help fund important breast cancer research, education, services and care. The team is not revealing why its name is Peach Pie Road! But the idea to participate was proposed by Tuck (Chem.’02 ) who is employed at Jordan Engineering in Jordan, Ontario. The three attended Mac together and had decided that they wanted to get involved with something in the community. Each walker is required to raise at least $2,000 to be eligible to participate. Tuck, Minogue (Chem.’02) of Burlington, Ontariobased EcoWaste Solutions and Atkinson (Eng.Phys.& Mgt. ’04) of Nuclear Safety Solutions in Toronto, were overwhelmed with the outpouring of support through corporate sponsorships and donations by family and friends. A car wash raised $400 and, after months of fundraising, the team finally had its $6,000. The women would like to claim that they underwent a strict training schedule, but have to admit they did nothing extra to prepare. They continued regular workouts coupled with a few long walks. The evening prior to the event was spent writing sponsors’ names all over the Peach Pie Road team shirts, and toasting their friendship with champagne. At 4 a.m. on September 11th, they headed to Exhibition Place to attend the emotional opening ceremonies. The crowd of walkers consisted of women and men of all ages, and many cancer survivors – some the same age as the three engineering alumni. After traveling 33 km on the first day, walkers camped at Downsview Park. Armed with Advil and Rub A-535, they enjoyed a fabulous barbecue, and listened and danced to a band under the main tent. The next day after completing the final 27 km in seven hours, the Peach Pie Road team entered Exhibition Place to cheering crowds. Emotions and excitement were high at the closing ceremonies as all the walkers poured

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The Peach Pie Road team members from left to right: Leanne Tuck, Kim Atkinson, Kim Minogue.

into Ricoh Coliseum to be greeted by family, friends and other supporters. The event was a complete success. In total, 4,565 walkers raised $14,700,000! Despite the muscle ache, blisters, and sun-

glass suntan, the experience was definitely worth it. The Peach Pie Road team can hardly wait for next year’s Walk! You can read more about the event at www.endcancer.ca.

Practising what they’ve learned

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fter five years of study, a group of Engineering & Society students will put their textbook knowledge to work directly in rural Guatemala. During a one month stay in the town of El Matatazanos, the students will apply theory and practices concerning the human side of engineering to real life challenges faced by residents on a daily basis. Calling itself “Society’s Challenge”, the students spent their final two semesters working on their undergraduate thesis projects with topics specific to Guatemala, ranging from water storage and purification to urban landscaping. The objective was to study and implement solutions to specific challenges encountered by the 40,000 people living in the town. Along with its engineering initiatives, Society’s Challenge will also set up a computer room as well as finish and fully furnish another, and construct a one room addition to the school. The project began in early 2004 following a group discussion about how the students could put their unique education to work in a volunteer capacity. A student who had personal ties to the area in

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Guatemala suggested the idea as a possibility, and the planning began. Fundraising events have helped to raise some of the expected $40,000 needed to cover the cost of building materials, supplies, food and accommodations for the group, and travel costs. For more information visit www.societyschallenge.org “This is an ideal example of putting the principles of our program on the ground in a developing country,” says Brian Baetz, director of the Engineering & Society program. Sarah Lawson and Natalie Rouskov are two of the students who will be participating. “Our program is supposed to enable us to take a conscious look at how technology affects the environment,” says Lawson. “We wanted to apply our skills and knowledge to a real-life situation, and it’s snowballed since then into this huge initiative.” “We’re very excited about this opportunity to ‘do’ what we’re learning,” says Rouskov. “As our academic careers wrap up, it’s a great way to feel like we’re working toward a purpose.” T

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Departmental newsbriefs Chemical Engineering

Computer & Software Engineering

Congratulations to the Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Student Club for winning the 2004 Student Chapters’ Merit Award from the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering. The award was presented at the 54th Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering Conference in Calgary in October. Tom Marlin presented a course on Applied Optimization in Bangkok, Thailand at the invitation of Chulalongkorn University, from May 20th to June 7th . While there, he also gave a one-day seminar on Real-time Optimization to representatives from local industries. In September, the Department hosted four visitors from Finland who wanted to observe our teaching methods, especially the McMaster Problem Solving program and our use of Problem Based Learning. Our visitors were Professors Aura Loikkanen, Eeva Sundstrom, Jarmo Makela and Pekka Anvinen. All are professors of forestry and came to us from Tampere Polytechnic in Tampere, and from Karella Polytechnic in Joensuu. In October, we welcomed Professor Tricia Moore, Professor of Dental Hygiene, University of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ. She spent two weeks of her research leave observing classes and interacting with Professors Marlin, Jones, Dickson, Hrymak and Woods. In August, Professor Don Woods, together with Professor Susan Ambrose of Carnegie Mellon University and Marshall Lih of National Science Foundation, Washington, DC, presented a two-day workshop on Improving Student Learning to 90 faculty members from various engineering schools in South Korea. The workshops were given in Seoul and were patterned after the NSF Education Scholars Workshops which have been presented in the United States for the past ten years. Also in August, Professor Woods presented the Kesarwani lecture at the University of Ottawa. The topic of the workshop was “Motivating Students to Learn”.

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Congratulations to Tamas Terlaky who has been named Chair of the Optimization Society of INFORMS (International Federation of Operations Research and Management Science). The Department extends congratulations to two CAS Graduate Students who are members of the Advanced Optimization Laboratory. Zhuo Zheng won second prize for the best graduate presentation at the WindSOR/SWORD 2004 (Windsor Student Operational Research Day / South Western Ontario Operational Research Day). Oleksandr Romanko won the Canadian Operational Research Society student paper competition prize for the paper “Sensitivity Analysis in Convex Quadratic Optimization: Simultaneous Perturbation of the Objective and RightHand-Side Vectors”, co-authored by Alireza Ghaffari Hadigegh, Oleksandr Romanko and Tamas Terlaky. The Department congratulates two new Canada Research Chairs. Tom Maibaum received a Canada Research Chair in the Foundations of Software Engineering. Maibaum came to McMaster in June 2004 from Kings College, UK. His research involves making software development a more disciplined and dependable activity by proposing appropriate engineering methods of software and system specification and design. Antoine Deza received a Canada Research Chair in Combinatorial Optimization. Deza joined McMaster from Tokyo Institute of Technology in January 2004. His research involves blending theoretical and computational approaches to develop algorithms to solve large-scale combinatorial optimization problems.

Electrical & Computer Engineering Congratulations and best wishes are extended to PhD students Wessam Mesbah and Ahmed Kholiaf who were recently married. Both are ECE grad students. c

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The Department welcomes three newcomers. Tim Field was appointed Associate Professor on September 1, 2004. He will be lecturing on Information Technology. His research is focused on the use of stochastic differential equations and Ito calculus to model the scattering of electromagnetic radiation from random media. This work has provided a model for radar sea clutter which is an important military problem as well as being of interest to scientists in the areas of astronomy and optical instrumentation. Jill Wood is the new Administrative Coordinator, as of October 2004. Ms. Wood comes to us from the Department of Family Medicine where she was the Residency Program Coordinator. Frances Lima, who joined the Department on July 5th, is acting Undergraduate Assistant. She previously worked as a Special Constituency Assistant to Stan Keyes, MP. M. Jamal Deen was inducted as a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society (ECS) at its 206th Meeting in Hololulu, Hawaii in October 2004. His citation reads “in recognition of Jamal Deen important contributions in the fields of semiconductor device physics, modeling and characterization, with emphasis on low-frequency and highfrequency noise in semiconductor devices, modeling of high speed photodetectors, and development of electrical characterization techniques.” He is the fourth Canadian to be so honored by the ECS - a society for solid-state and electrochemical science and technology and one of the oldest scientific societies in North America.

Electrical Engineering & Management Congratulations to Ryan Latchman (El.Eng. & Mgmt. ’00) who is the winner of the 2004 Employee Excellence Award from Gennum Corporation. Each year Burlington-based Gennum selects a recipient for this distinction from among its 600-plus employees. Latchman was N

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presented with his award by the company’s president, Dr. Ian McWalter, at the annual Christmas lunch in early December.

Engineering Physics On November 12th, the Department hosted a one-day workshop on siliconbased photonics, the first of its kind to be held in Canada. It was organized by Andy Knights. The workshop received a great deal of attention; over 100 registrations from across Ontario and beyond were received. The emerging field of silicon photonics, which attempts to integrate electronic and photonic functionality on a single silicon chip, is gaining significant momentum. This is due to recent breakthroughs related to high-speed modulators and light emitting devices. The invited speakers included leading experts in the field such as Lorenzo Pavesi from the University of Trento, Graham Reed from the University of Surrey, Philippe Fauchet from the University of Rochester, and Richard Jones from Intel Corp.

Materials Science & Engineering Our graduate students had extraordinary success in the Poster Session at the Conference of Metallurgists held at McMaster in August. From the 28 posters submitted, McMaster posters were selected for all top 5 areas (but Mansoor Barati’s submission was withdrawn at his request because he was Chair of the Session). Congratulations to: Shane Turcott, Igor Zhitomirsky and Marek Niewczas for Electrodeposition of Iron Oxide/Polymer Nano-composite, Superparamagnetic Thin Films; Kamalesh Mandal, Diancai Guo and Gordon A. Irons for Modeling of Scrap Melting Process in EAF Steelmaking; Florent Lefevre-Schlick and David Embury for Rapid Heat Treatment of Metals by Ultra-short Laser Pulses; Jinichiro Nakano, Gary R. Purdy and Dmitri V. Malakhov for Dross Formation in Continuous Hot-dip Galvanizing Processes. Congratulations are extended to David Wilkinson, the winner of the Dofasco Award for 2004 in recognition of his outstanding contributions in materials research. His work in the mechanical M

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behaviour of metals and ceramics and in materials education were particularly noted in the citation. Earlier this year, Wilkinson was the recipient of both the Canadian Materials Physics and the CIM Distinguished Lectureship awards. The Department of Materials Science and Engineering was pleased to host a symposium, June 21-23, 2004 in honour of David Embury in the year of his 65th birthday. David Embury has had a long and illustrious career at McMaster, one that continues unabated. This three-day event featured invited lectures from many of the top materials scientists in the world, most whom have worked with David either as colleagues or as students and post-docs. The meeting not only provided a wonderful opportunity to acknowledge and celebrate David Embury’s many contributions to materials science over the past 45 years or so, but also provided a forum for an indepth discussion of some of the most pressing issues in materials science today. The Embury Symposium was followed by a two-day short course on Selecting Materials and Processes. The course was offered by Mike Ashby and Hugh Shercliff from Cambridge and Yves Brechet from Grenoble, the inventors and developers of the Cambridge Engineering Selector, the most advanced software system for materials and process selection available.

in the UK. His area of research is large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed combustion. Dr. Tullis holds a B.Sc. degree in Engineering Physics and an M.A.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Queen’s University. Dr. Tullis was employed by Hatch Associates in Toronto for several years before completing his doctoral studies, and is a licensed Professional Engineer in Ontario. Prior to accepting a position at McMaster, Ponnambalam Selvaganapathy was employed as a postdoctoral research scientist in the Nano-Bio Division of Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Dr. Selvaganapathy holds a B.Sc. degree in Chemical and Electrochemical Engineering from Madurai Kamaraj University in India, M.Sc. degrees in both Nuclear Engineering (Materials) and Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan. In September, Industrial Heating Magazine, in cooperation with the Metal Treating Institute, awarded the ninth annual 2004 Master Craftsman Award for Heat Treater of the Year to VAC AERO International, Oakville, Ontario. VAC AERO was awarded a plaque and a cash award to be used as bursary to support education in material sciences or heat treatment. VAC AERO selected the Department’s Thermal Processing Laboratory as the recipient of the bursary.

Mechanical Engineering George Round, Professor Emeritus, has a new book: Incompressible Flow Turbomachines: Design, Selection, Applications, and Theory. Published by Elsevier Press, the book is aimed at those who study or work in mechanical engineering, manufacturing, automotive engineering, chemical engineering, or industrial engineering. Dr. Round has authored four other books. Don Metzger resigned his position at McMaster on September 30, 2004 and has accepted a research position at Atomic Energy of Canada in Mississauga. Dr. Metzger is continuing his association with McMaster as an adjunct professor, teaching courses and co-supervising graduate students. The Department welcomes two new faculty members in January 2005. Stephen Tullis recently completed his doctoral studies at Cambridge University U

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Dr. Mohamed Hamed (left) receiving the award from Mr. Jeff Pritchard, President of VAC AERO International.

Two of our undergraduate students, Julie Wood and Kelli Celeste have been awarded the undergraduate Award for Energy Conservation for a paper they wrote which was supervised by Marilyn Lightstone. The $500 cash award for each author was donated by Hamilton continued on page 23 T

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MES news

Solar car shining brightly

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ith over 50 returning team members and more than 125 new recruits, the McMaster Solar Car Project (MSCP) is once again ready for a new and exciting year. The MSCP is a student-run, non-profit organization, working strategically to design and build a high performance solar-powered vehicle. The team is committed to the development of the renewable energy used to fuel the car for racing at international competitions, as well as promoting safe and renewable energy to the community and educating the public about environmental issues. Founded in 1997 by McMaster Engineering students, the team has successfully built two solar cars to date, Fireball and Fireball II. Since its foundation, the project has had one main goal – to progress solar car technology while promoting environmentally friendly energy sources. The team has student members from a wide array of areas in engineering, as well as commerce, science, humanities, and several other faculties. The combination of all these team members’ diverse set of skills is a key component of the team’s success. The project is a valuable opportunity for all students to both learn and enjoy themselves. “This team is a great chance to apply some of what I’ve learned at school to real world design problems,” said Darryl Wallace, a senior team member. “Not only that, but I have also gained a lot of experience that can’t be taught in the classroom.”

“Progress Toward Sustainable Development” award winners from left to right: Avery Yuen, Scott Cameron, Karleen Dudeck and Tommy Hwang.

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The Solar Car Team 2005

The aforementioned experience can range from designing an aerodynamic aeroshell for the car, to securing funding and in-kind donations from generous sponsors that are essential to the team’s success. This summer, the team demonstrated their success with Fireball II, achieving the top Canadian rank and placing 5th overall during the Formula Sun Grand Prix (FSGP) – a closed circuit solar car race in Topeka, Kansas. Fireball II also competed in the American Solar Challenge in 2003, modeling high efficiency solar cells to collect power from the sun, premium power point trackers to maximize the power generated by the car’s solar array, rechargeable Lithium-ion batteries that are charged by the array, and a more efficient aerodynamic shape over the original Fireball. The Yves Landry Foundation has now recognized the MSCP for its recent successes, specifically in technological innovation and excellence. Founded in 1998, the foundation was established to encourage technological education and skills in training to minimize the Canadian industry’s skilled labour shortages over the next decade. The YLF has awarded the MSCP the “Progress Towards Sustainable Development” award for the college or university level. The academic award of $5000 is sponsored by Shell Canada, and was received by select team members at

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the Yves Landry Foundation’s 5th Annual STARS Technological Education Awards Gala on Thursday, November 18, 2004. Other guests in attendance included a former Premier of Ontario, the Honourable Bob Rae, and the current Minister of Training, Colleges, and Universities, the Honourable Mary Anne Chambers. The MSCP is now in the process of designing and building a third solar car, Phoenix, which will be lighter, faster, and ultimately more efficient than Fireball II. Once Phoenix is completed, the team plans to return to the FSGP for an even better performance, and subsequently enter the 2005 North American Solar Challenge – a solar car race from Houston, Texas to Calgary, Alberta. Phoenix will incorporate many improvements over Fireball II, including more efficient solar cells, an aluminum space-frame for increased structural stability, and a top speed of over 100km/h. The vehicle will feature over 400 Sunpower A-300 cells that will cover the surface of the car, resulting in a power output of 1000 Watts in full sunlight, and the high efficiency motor will enable the car to attain highway speeds while using the equivalent electrical power of a toaster. The motor also contains regenerative braking, which will allow the frictional energy from the brakes to be transferred continued on page 24

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Japan adventures – a report from Nicholas Leeson

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ngineering Physics grad Nicholas S. Leeson has experienced culture shock first hand during his early months as an English teacher in Japan. From customs to food to nightlife, many things are done just a bit differently there than in Canada. Leeson left for Japan in August, 2004. Jet lag was terrible, he says. That might account for his positive impression of his first Japanese breakfast: a bowl of rice, some soup, a serving of sticky beans with vegetables, two cooked eggs and two sausages. He later learned that the bean dish is known as “Natto”, and is made from fermented beans. Living in an extremely small apartment, “in the middle of Nowhere, Japan” he jokes, he currently lives in a small town of the Chiba Prefecture. It’s about an hour’s train ride outside of Tokyo. His employer provided enough furniture to completely furnish the whole apartment – a terrific boon, as apartments there are never furnished. He pays 31000 yen a month, or about $370, plus utilities, which is incredibly cheap compared to the residents of Tokyo. Leeson teaches English at four different schools – one junior high school (grades 7 to 9), and three elementary schools (grades 1-6), concentrating on vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation. One of the elementary schools had an unannounced welcome ceremony in which he had to say a few words, lead the children in some games, and then do a ‘special’ dance. He treated the assembly to some robot and a little breakdancing – much to their delight. “Essentially, I’m just a big kid here who gets to have fun with all the little kids.” As he is discovering, many things are different in Japan. The students stay in one classroom and the teachers move from class to class. After lunch, which is eaten in the classroom, the students then clean the school. Everyone must wear `indoor’ shoes, as you are not permitted to wear the shoes that you use outside. Putting a check mark next to the answer means it is wrong and all the students strangely call him Mr. Nick. Early in the term, the school took part in a sports festival. The whole school was divided into two giant teams – White and

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Leeson enjoys exploring Japanese nightspots, especially in Roppongi, a suburb of Tokyo known for its bars and dance clubs. Nightlife starts at around 11 p.m. when the trains stop, and ends around 5 a.m. when the trains start running again. And Karaoke, which is huge in Japan, is done in intimate parties among friends in private rooms of restaurants. Japanese parties don’t fizzle out or limp along lamely after people start to leave, he notes. A few “closure” words are spoken and everyone simultaneously claps their hands, once. Shopping for food is also a challenge for a person new to Japan. Nothing comes in bulk. Beer, however, is available just about everywhere – even from vending machines. “Japan takes beer to a whole new level,” he laughs. Leeson can sometimes find weekday evenings hard since his Japanese is still limited and there are only two or three people in his quiet city that he can converse with in English. Life is anything but dull however, as he finds adventures around every corner. For example, adventure found him when he ran into a cult who initiated him into their group without asking. On Halloween, armed with only a megaphone, he dressed up as Captain Canada announcing to the people of Tokyo what day it was, as “Halloween is not celebrated in Japan”. Most of his weekdays however, are spent learning a martial art formerly known as Ninjutsu, the way of

Nicholas Leeson

Red. Then the children are told how the two colours represent two ancient Samurai clans, Genji (white) and Heike (red). They fought two battles over 800 years ago and each clan claimed one victory, because they were so evenly matched! It’s a good story to relate to the children prior to competition. Being a good sport, Leeson decided to join the kids in the running events. Three of the Japanese teachers came along with their own red jumpsuits to boost the group’s spirit. They looked remarkably like the Redsuits worn by Mac Engineering students. “As it turned out, I was on Heike’s team, so that was kinda cool!” An avid dancer and all-round party type,

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Change of address card: Name:_______________________________________________________________________________ Grad Yr. & Dept.: _____________________________________________________________________ New Address: _________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________ Fax: ________________________________________ Postal Code: __________________ E-mail:_________________________________________________ Comments: (present occupation, recent accomplishments ie: awards, recognitions). ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Any comments provided will be included in the next issue.

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Alumni Grapevine MacCerEng

medics. Special thanks to husband Robert for calling 911!

Windfeld, Mary ’87: Here’s an update on us in beautiful British Columbia. Dave Buck and I are busy with three children, Alexandra 8, Matthew 5 and Thomas who is a year-andsix-months old. I am still running a refractories consulting, inspection and testing company in BC, Alberta and the United States. Keeping quite busy with all this.

MacChemEng Grabham, Norman ’74: As a footnote to a recent Grapevine posting, my assignment to Tripoli, Libya to work as a chemical engineer for Technika, was cancelled. The good news is that I have been hired by MWH, a New Zealand power utility organization. As of October 2004, I will be in Wellington, New Zealand, in the generator maintenance department. The company is huge (www.MWHglobal.com) with offices worldwide. My girlfriend Erika Lawrence and I are planning our wedding for sometime in the spring of 2005. Sieloff, Angela ’86: Mike (Chem.Eng. & Mgmt. ’85) and I have moved back to the Hamilton area. I continue to work for Dow Chemical, while Mike is still with Imperial Oil but on loan to ExxonMobil Chemical. Slama, Carol ’92: Before he’s old enough to read this, I would like to introduce my second son, Émile, born June 9th. His arrival on the living room floor was quite unexpected. Delivery was smoothly handled by a neighbour (a nurse) and assisted by four para-

Zajaczkowski, Mark ’99: Currently working for ControlChem Canada Ltd (www.controlchem.com), in the area of water treatment, as a Senior Technical Sales and Service Engineer. I work out of Montreal, and represent the whole province of Quebec and the northeastern United States. I love my job – thanks to Mac Chem Eng for helping me get there!

MacCivEng Byrne, Mary (Civ.Eng & Mgmt. ’93) Things are good with Dave Rogers (Mech.Eng & Mgt. ’90) and me. Second son Michael was born on Easter Monday in April 2004 and joins big brother Brian to make us a family of four. I am manager in the engineering department of Enbridge Gas Distribution in Toronto. David works as a manufacturing manager with MDS Sciex in Concord. We live in Pickering, Ontario. Gough, Jim ’80: is assisting McMaster University with the design of the new Main Street Entrance, in his capacity as a Senior Project Manager with Marshall Macklin Monaghan of Toronto. Jim started working on this project in 1997, and it’s finally coming to fruition. He is also currently serving as the President of the Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers. If you’re interested in CITE, Jim can be reached at president@cite7.org.

years as the site Chemistry Manager, I am now an Outage Executive Manager at Bruce Power in Ontario. Living life to the fullest with Patti (Psych. ’83) and our two girls, Megan and Rebecca, in Port Elgin. Ostrowercha, Rob ’02, and Mitchell, Melissa ’02, announced their engagement, with the wedding planned for October 2005. Rob is working as a construction inspector with Planning and Engineering Initiatives of Hamilton. Melissa is working in water resource engineering with Metropolitan Consulting Inc. in Burlington. Hopefully some of our former classmates will drop us a line at MMITCHELL@mpe-psi.com.

MacElectEng Barrett, Chris ’93: Chris and Heather announce the birth of Elijah Parker Barrett at home in Ottawa on Wednesday September 8th, 2004, at 10:05 p.m., weighing 8 lbs, 1 oz. – to the delight of three older sisters. Chris writes that baby Elijah “has Emma’s nose, Suzannah’s eyes and Rosalyn’s chin”. Del Riccio, Luigi (Elec.Eng. & Mgmt. ’90) I came to Italy in 1996 to do a MBA and have been working in marketing and business development ever since, both in the manufacturing sector and in Internet/ Telecommunications. Recently I have started my own consulting business to work with Canadian companies who want to develop commercial relationships in Italy and Italian companies who want to develop commercial relationships in Canada.

Little, Bill (Civ.Eng. & Mgmt. ’84) After 5

Want a good read AND a challenge? To:

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Professor Nicholson (Materials Engineering) describes his visit to China in a thriller, “Tiananmen Flight.”

Ms. Carm Vespi Managing Editor The MacEngineer Faculty of Engineering John Hodgins Building, Room A 201D McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 Tel: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 E-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer

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DID IT HAPPEN? Google Patrick Nicholson Tiananmen Flight See if you can win the PRIZE.

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MacManufEng

www.faure.ca\~phil\assorted_pictures\. My email is philippe@faure.ca.

Cook, Michelle (Polachuk) ’92: I left my previous job in May 2004 and spent the summer traveling (Italy, Hawaii, SE Asia and China!). Have returned to work with a company in Traverse City, MI at the beginning of October. I don’t do much engineering anymore. I’ve been in the energy trading business for the past 4.5 years - primarily trading natural gas futures and options and running hedging programs around natural gas assets. My new company is WPS Energy. I do enjoy receiving news from McMaster Engineering – especially now that I’m in the US!

MacEngPhy Faure, Philippe ’01: I have news! Nicholas Joseph Faure was born on Wednesday September 29, 2004, at 7:56 a.m., weighing 7 lbs., 8 oz. Pictures at

Departmental Newsbriefs continued from page 19

Utilities Corporation and was presented at a reception held on September 16th at McMaster’s University Club. Graduate student Steve Shelestynsky was awarded Best Paper for a Ph.D candidate at the Annual High Voltage Engineering and Applied Electrostatics Conference, held at the University of Toronto. His paper was titled “Active Control of Electronic Thermal Management System: EHD in Capillary Pumped Loops”. He was one of 23 presenters from various universities in Ontario, Japan and Switzerland.

mental theology, and working part-time in pastoral ministry at a local nursing home. My first book, Not by Bread Alone: Daily Reflections for Lent 2005, is published by The Liturgical Press, one of the largest religious publishers in North America (www. litpress.org). It’s available from amazon.com (www.amazon.com) for approx. $2.50. (A full description is available at http://www.litpress. org/Store/detail.cfm?ID=37324). My Web site is www3.simpatico.ca/sherri.vallee/.

MacMechEng Chan, Mike ’01: Married Wendy Chan (Elec. Eng. ’98) on August 7, 2004. “We met in 1997 while working part-time for CIS (thanks, Peter Hardwick, for scheduling us to work on the same shift!).” Currently, the happy couple is working in Singapore and can be reached at wongslw@yahoo.com and chanmkk@yahoo.ca.

Upcoming Events

Coleman, Garth (Eng. & Society’96) Married October 2004. Still living in Boston. Please note my new e-mail: scubagarth @vzavenue.net.

Monday, January 24, 2005 Tom Jenkins – Royal York, Toronto

Perrons, Robert (’95): I finished my Ph.D. at Cambridge, and am now working as Shell International Exploration & Production’s Executive Coordinator for R&D. Marrying Shannon Woodward, an Australian gal, in a few months. We’re both settling into our new lives over here in The Hague, the Netherlands. My e-mail is robert.perrons @.shell.com.

Saturday, Februray 5, 2005 Women’s Engineering Experience Monday, March 1, 2005 J.W. Hodgins Lecture with Dr. Robert Langer, MIT Friday, March 11, 2005 Engineering & Management 30th Anniversary

MacCompEng & Mgt

Friday, April 1, 2005 Kipling

Vallee, Sherri ’89: After graduation, I joined Nortel Networks (then BNR) as a software designer, and completed my MBA through part-time studies. After 5 years, I was promoted to management. I began studying theology part-time in 1998, an interest that blossomed into a desire to pursue work in theology full-time. I received a B.Th. from Ottawa’s Saint Paul University, and an MA in Liturgical Studies from St. John’s School of Theology in Collegeville, Minnesota. I’m now at Saint Paul University as a sessional lecturer, teaching liturgy and sacra-

Thursday, May 19, 2005 Applause & Accolades, Liuna Station Thursday, May 26, 2005 Engineering Alumni Golf Tournament Saturday, June 4, 2005 Engineering Alumni Weekend Class ’65, ’80 and ’85 For information and registration forms, visit our web site: www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

Engineering Alumnus Memorial Tribute by Romeo Palombella (Civil ’73)

MacEngineer

The

Syd Holtrop, P.Eng. (Civil ’73) February 16/1947 - July 1/2003: Syd Holtrop was

born in Rinsumageest, Holland and immigrated to Canada with his parents in 1953. He graduated from McMaster in 1973, persisting through adversity and numerous personal obstacles to ultimately achieve this goal. After graduation, Syd joined his brothers and father in running the family business, Holtrop Steel, based in Mount Hope, Ontario. When his father passed away, he assumed a lead role in the firm. Syd was well known in the engineering class for his big smile and warm manner, strong affiliation and kinship with the international students, his beat-up 1963 Volvo sedan, his willingness to help classmates with problem assignments, and his distinguished appearance when he showed up at formal events with his top hat and cane. I especially recall Syd’s strong sense of fair play and integrity, and loyalty to friends. He is survived by his mother Margaret, and siblings Ida, Henry, Shirley, John, and Wilma. His brothers continue to operate Holtrop Steel. We will remember him.

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The MacEngineer is printed and produced by

Managing Editor: Carm Vespi, Engineering Alumni Officer Editorial Committee: Dave S. Weaver, John Preston, Terry Milson, Carm Vespi Art Direction and Design: Wordsmith Design and Advertising Contributing Writers: Administrative Coordinators, Terry Milson, Trudi Down, The Daily News, Carm Vespi, Judy Mair

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40063416

3rd Annual McMaster

E ngineering Golf Tournament

Thursday, May 26, 2005 Crosswinds Golf & Country Club Milton, Ontario More details available soon. Check the website at: http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

Solar car

You’re invited...

Alumni 1965 Weekend 1980 1985 Saturday June 4, 2005

For more information contact: Ms. Carm Vespi Phone: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 email: vespi@mcmaster.ca www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

continued from page 20

into electrical energy for the car instead of being dissipated as heat. The team’s success will be augmented by the car’s telemetry system, which will send important information about the car’s speed, battery temperature, and power drain to a support team to improve racing strategies. This past October, Fireball II was present at several McMaster football games, garnering the attention of thousands of spectators. In addition, the team was actively involved in the McMaster Engineering and Science Olympics as well as McMaster’s Fall Preview, where hundreds of inquiring high school students had a chance to see, ask question about,

Japan adventures the Ninja. As it just so happened, he got placed in the ‘backyard’ of all the masters of Japan, and therefore the world. His stories of avoiding real swords swinging towards his neck and throwing fake ninja stars have fascinated many. If you would like to contact Nick about

and even sit in the solar car. More recently, several team members spent the day in the Student Center with Fireball II. The November 10th event was a great chance for the MSCP to show off the solar car to McMaster’s students and staff alike by answering questions, setting up a display, playing movies and slideshows, and letting several interested students and professors have their pictures taken in Fireball II. As for the immediate future, the team plans to work on Phoenix while using Fireball II for educational and promotional purposes. For more details about the McMaster Solar Car project, visit www.solarcar.mcmaster.ca.

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his adventures, his e-mail address is: leesonnicholas@yahoo.ca. Be warned however, his e-messages about life and experiences in Japan are very long and extensive! Nick will return to Canada in a year or two after his adventure is over to begin his studies as a master’s student.

“The Fireball Club” Worried about losing touch after leaving Mac Eng, a group of good friends from the 1997 and 1998 classes made a pact to reunite at least once a year. It would be like having their own annual FireBall. However, once a year proved to be too infrequent for this group of Type A organizers! Although working in different cities all over Ontario, and sometimes around the globe, Fireball Club members plan reunion weekends about 6 times a year and keep in touch daily through a group website. Proud FC members are (LtoR): Betsy (Eva) Agar, Tanya (Davis) Cochrane, Iris (Gregoriou) McDonald, Rebecca (Schinkel) Marshall, Lisa (Greb) Maurice, Janet Loebach, Michelle (Affleck) Maybee, Pamela Bhandarkar, Meredythe Brown.

MacEngineer Winter 2005  

The MacEngineer - The magazine for McMaster University's Faculty of Engineering Alumni

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